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Sample records for strike-slip plate boundaries

  1. A Possible Differentially Shortened Strike-slip Plate Boundary: the Okhotsk Plate Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, D.; Egorov, V.; Mackey, K. G.; Fujita, K.

    2004-12-01

    The Okhotsk plate has been postulated based on a combination of GPS geodetic inversions (REVEL1), seimsicity, geologic and lineament data. Lying between the North American and Eurasian plates, its northwestern corner would appear to be undergoing compression in a scissors motion between the two bounding plates. Extrusion tectonics along multiple, large strike-slip faults within the Okhotsk plate itself have been suggested to allow the escape of material away from the apex of Eurasia-North America. The plate boundary between Okhotsk and North America has been suggested to be diffuse, based on widely scattered minor seismicity. However, the large, left lateral, Ulakhan fault has also been suggested as a candidate plate boundary. We present field geological and geomorphological evidence of the partitioning of deformation between the Ulakhan fault, and several parallel and oblique, linked faults. The Ulakhan fault strand appears to have a maximum displacement of 24 km based on river valley offsets and closing large pull apart basins. Some of the displacement from the Ulakhan fault appears relayed into the plate margin along oblique trending, thrust/oblique slip faults. Estimated shortening over these faults is equivalent to the amount of shortening relayed into the plate margin from the plate boundary. There may be several thrust/oblique slip faults along the Ulakhan fault, which leads to the interesting situation of a segmented, strike-slip plate boundary being actively shortened in a margin parallel direction. This may be the result of postulated extrusion of the Okhotsk plate due to North America/Eurasia convergence. Such a situation would have important consequences for the interpretation of GPS data in a plate tectonic context.

  2. Kinematics of transition from subduction to strike-slip: an example from the New Zealand plate boundary (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, L. M.; Barnes, P.; Beavan, R. J.; van Dissen, R.; Pondard, N.; Litchfield, N. J.; Lamarche, G.; Little, T. A.

    2009-12-01

    We develop a kinematic model for the transition from oblique subduction beneath the North Island to strike-slip in the South Island, New Zealand, constrained by GPS velocities and onshore and new offshore active fault slip rate and location data. To interpret these data, we simultaneously invert the kinematic data for poles of rotation of tectonic blocks (block boundaries chosen to coincide with known active faults) and the degree of interseismic coupling on faults in the region, including the Hikurangi subduction thrust. Our best-fitting kinematic models require that the northeastern corner of the South Island undergoes significant vertical axis rotation as a part of the rapidly rotating (3-4°/Myr) North Island forearc block, while the remainder of the tectonic blocks in the South Island undergo negligible vertical axis rotation relative to the Pacific Plate. This result agrees well with clockwise paleomagnetic declinations from ~4 Ma rock samples in the northeastern South Island, and suggests that paleomagnetically-observed rotation of that region is continuing today. The poles of rotation between the more rapidly rotating northeastern South Island blocks and the non-rotating South Island blocks (further south) coincide with the boundary between the rotating and non-rotating domains of the South Island. This result is consistent with structural mapping of the rotation/non-rotation boundary by Little and Roberts (1997), and suggests that the transition from the rapidly rotating forearc of the Hikurangi subduction margin to a strike-slip dominated plate boundary in the South Island is accommodated by a crustal-scale kink or hinge in the upper plate of that subduction zone. This result highlights a remarkable consistency between datasets spanning decades (GPS), thousands of years (active fault data), and millions of years (paleomagnetic data and bedrock structure) in the northeastern South Island. Although the interseismic coupling coefficients that we estimate for

  3. The Iceland Plate Boundary Zone: Propagating Rifts, Migrating Transforms, and Rift-Parallel Strike-Slip Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karson, J. A.

    2017-11-01

    Unlike most of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the North America/Eurasia plate boundary in Iceland lies above sea level where magmatic and tectonic processes can be directly investigated in subaerial exposures. Accordingly, geologic processes in Iceland have long been recognized as possible analogs for seafloor spreading in the submerged parts of the mid-ocean ridge system. Combining existing and new data from across Iceland provides an integrated view of this active, mostly subaerial plate boundary. The broad Iceland plate boundary zone includes segmented rift zones linked by transform fault zones. Rift propagation and transform fault migration away from the Iceland hotspot rearrange the plate boundary configuration resulting in widespread deformation of older crust and reactivation of spreading-related structures. Rift propagation results in block rotations that are accommodated by widespread, rift-parallel, strike-slip faulting. The geometry and kinematics of faulting in Iceland may have implications for spreading processes elsewhere on the mid-ocean ridge system where rift propagation and transform migration occur.

  4. Constraints on the rheology of the lower crust in a strike-slip plate boundary: evidence from the San Quintín xenoliths, Baja California, Mexico

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    van der Werf, Thomas; Chatzaras, Vasileios; Marcel Kriegsman, Leo; Kronenberg, Andreas; Tikoff, Basil; Drury, Martyn R.

    2017-12-01

    The rheology of lower crust and its transient behavior in active strike-slip plate boundaries remain poorly understood. To address this issue, we analyzed a suite of granulite and lherzolite xenoliths from the upper Pleistocene-Holocene San Quintín volcanic field of northern Baja California, Mexico. The San Quintín volcanic field is located 20 km east of the Baja California shear zone, which accommodates the relative movement between the Pacific plate and Baja California microplate. The development of a strong foliation in both the mafic granulites and lherzolites, suggests that a lithospheric-scale shear zone exists beneath the San Quintín volcanic field. Combining microstructural observations, geothermometry, and phase equilibria modeling, we estimated that crystal-plastic deformation took place at temperatures of 750-890 °C and pressures of 400-560 MPa, corresponding to 15-22 km depth. A hot crustal geotherm of 40 ° C km-1 is required to explain the estimated deformation conditions. Infrared spectroscopy shows that plagioclase in the mafic granulites is relatively dry. Microstructures are interpreted to show that deformation in both the uppermost lower crust and upper mantle was accommodated by a combination of dislocation creep and grain-size-sensitive creep. Recrystallized grain size paleopiezometry yields low differential stresses of 12-33 and 17 MPa for plagioclase and olivine, respectively. The lower range of stresses (12-17 MPa) in the mafic granulite and lherzolite xenoliths is interpreted to be associated with transient deformation under decreasing stress conditions, following an event of stress increase. Using flow laws for dry plagioclase, we estimated a low viscosity of 1.1-1.3×1020 Pa ṡ s for the high temperature conditions (890 °C) in the lower crust. Significantly lower viscosities in the range of 1016-1019 Pa ṡ s, were estimated using flow laws for wet plagioclase. The shallow upper mantle has a low viscosity of 5.7×1019 Pa ṡ s

  5. Transpressional segment boundaries in strike-slip fault systems offshore southern California: Implications for fluid expulsion and cold seep habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Jillian M.; Grupe, Benjamin M.; Pasulka, Alexis L.; Dawson, Katherine S.; Case, David H.; Frieder, Christina A.; Levin, Lisa A.; Driscoll, Neal W.

    2015-05-01

    The importance of tectonics and fluid flow in controlling cold seep habitats has long been appreciated at convergent margins but remains poorly understood in strike-slip systems. Here we present geophysical, geochemical, and biological data from an active methane seep offshore from Del Mar, California, in the inner California borderlands (ICB). The location of this seep appears controlled by localized transpression associated with a step in the San Diego Trough fault zone and provides an opportunity to examine the interplay between fluid expulsion and restraining step overs along strike-slip fault systems. These segment boundaries may have important controls on seep locations in the ICB and other margins characterized by strike-slip faulting (e.g., Greece, Sea of Marmara, and Caribbean). The strike-slip fault systems offshore southern California appear to have a limited distribution of seep sites compared to a wider distribution at convergent plate boundaries, which may influence seep habitat diversity and connectivity.

  6. Constraints on the rheology of the lower crust in a strike-slip plate boundary: evidence from the San Quintín xenoliths, Baja California, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. van der Werf

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The rheology of lower crust and its transient behavior in active strike-slip plate boundaries remain poorly understood. To address this issue, we analyzed a suite of granulite and lherzolite xenoliths from the upper Pleistocene–Holocene San Quintín volcanic field of northern Baja California, Mexico. The San Quintín volcanic field is located 20 km east of the Baja California shear zone, which accommodates the relative movement between the Pacific plate and Baja California microplate. The development of a strong foliation in both the mafic granulites and lherzolites, suggests that a lithospheric-scale shear zone exists beneath the San Quintín volcanic field. Combining microstructural observations, geothermometry, and phase equilibria modeling, we estimated that crystal-plastic deformation took place at temperatures of 750–890 °C and pressures of 400–560 MPa, corresponding to 15–22 km depth. A hot crustal geotherm of 40 ° C km−1 is required to explain the estimated deformation conditions. Infrared spectroscopy shows that plagioclase in the mafic granulites is relatively dry. Microstructures are interpreted to show that deformation in both the uppermost lower crust and upper mantle was accommodated by a combination of dislocation creep and grain-size-sensitive creep. Recrystallized grain size paleopiezometry yields low differential stresses of 12–33 and 17 MPa for plagioclase and olivine, respectively. The lower range of stresses (12–17 MPa in the mafic granulite and lherzolite xenoliths is interpreted to be associated with transient deformation under decreasing stress conditions, following an event of stress increase. Using flow laws for dry plagioclase, we estimated a low viscosity of 1.1–1.3×1020 Pa ⋅ s for the high temperature conditions (890 °C in the lower crust. Significantly lower viscosities in the range of 1016–1019 Pa ⋅ s, were estimated using flow laws for wet plagioclase. The

  7. The Implications of Strike-Slip Earthquake Source Properties on the Transform Boundary Development Process

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    Neely, J. S.; Huang, Y.; Furlong, K.

    2017-12-01

    Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator (STEP) faults, produced by the tearing of a subducting plate, allow us to study the development of a transform plate boundary and improve our understanding of both long-term geologic processes and short-term seismic hazards. The 280 km long San Cristobal Trough (SCT), formed by the tearing of the Australia plate as it subducts under the Pacific plate near the Solomon and Vanuatu subduction zones, shows along-strike variations in earthquake behaviors. The segment of the SCT closest to the tear rarely hosts earthquakes > Mw 6, whereas the SCT sections more than 80 - 100 km from the tear experience Mw7 earthquakes with repeated rupture along the same segments. To understand the effect of cumulative displacement on SCT seismicity, we analyze b-values, centroid-time delays and corner frequencies of the SCT earthquakes. We use the spectral ratio method based on Empirical Green's Functions (eGfs) to isolate source effects from propagation and site effects. We find high b-values along the SCT closest to the tear with values decreasing with distance before finally increasing again towards the far end of the SCT. Centroid time-delays for the Mw 7 strike-slip earthquakes increase with distance from the tear, but corner frequency estimates for a recent sequence of Mw 7 earthquakes are approximately equal, indicating a growing complexity in earthquake behavior with distance from the tear due to a displacement-driven transform boundary development process (see figure). The increasing complexity possibly stems from the earthquakes along the eastern SCT rupturing through multiple asperities resulting in multiple moment pulses. If not for the bounding Vanuatu subduction zone at the far end of the SCT, the eastern SCT section, which has experienced the most displacement, might be capable of hosting larger earthquakes. When assessing the seismic hazard of other STEP faults, cumulative fault displacement should be considered a key input in

  8. Carpathian Shear Corridor – A strike-slip boundary of an extruded crustal segment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marko, F.; Andriessen, P.A.M.; Tomek, Č.; Bezák, V.; Fojtíková, Lucia; Bošanský, M.; Piovarči, M.; Reichenwalder, P.

    703-704, APR 22 (2017), s. 119-134 ISSN 0040-1951 Grant - others:Slovak Foundation Grant(SK) VEGA 2/0188/15 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : extrusion * Neo-alpine evolution * strike-slip faulting * uplift history * Western Carpathians Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 2.693, year: 2016

  9. Strike-slip tectonics within the northernmost Philippine Sea plate in an arc-continent collisional setting

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    Gong, Wei; Jiang, Xiaodian; Guo, Yufan; Xing, Junhui; Li, Congying; Sun, Yang

    2017-09-01

    The geological processes in the northernmost Philippine Sea plate, which is bounded by the Suruga and Sagami troughs, are a typical example of an active collision zone. We attempt to illustrate the stress field through seismic estimations and geodetic analysis and propose the kinematic mode of the northernmost tip of the Philippine Sea plate. Seven events (M ≥ 4.0) are chosen for waveform inversion by the ISOLA software to distinguish the stress field. In particular, six of the chosen events, which exhibit strike-slip motion, are distributed in the eastern area, where few focal mechanisms have been reported by previous studies. According to the available focal mechanisms, strike-slip faults with similar P and T axes are widely distributed in the study area. The stress inversion suggests that the northern area is characterized by a NW-SE compression and a NE-SW extension stress regime, although some spatial differences exist. As indicated by an analysis of the geodesy, epicenters, focal mechanisms, gravity anomalies and velocity structure, the deformation in the northernmost tip is mainly accommodated by several conjugate strike-slip fault systems with steep dips that center on the Izu volcanic line. Generally, the maximum principal stress of the kinematics is derived from the collision between the Philippine Sea plate and Central Japan. Because of the different subduction angles, rates and directions of the down-going plate, diverging slab-pull forces along the Suruga and Sagami troughs may be causing the NE-NNE extension in most of the areas that are bounded by the two troughs. The extension propagates southwards along the Izu volcanic line and reaches the area adjacent to Miyake-jima.

  10. Role of the offshore Pedro Banks left-lateral strike-slip fault zone in the plate tectonic evolution of the northern Caribbean

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    Ott, B.; Mann, P.; Saunders, M.

    2013-12-01

    Previous workers, mainly mapping onland active faults on Caribbean islands, defined the northern Caribbean plate boundary zone as a 200-km-wide bounded by two active and parallel strike-slip faults: the Oriente fault along the northern edge of the Cayman trough with a GPS rate of 14 mm/yr, and and the Enriquillo-Plaintain Garden fault zone (EPGFZ) with a rate of 5-7 mm/yr. In this study we use 5,000 km of industry and academic data from the Nicaraguan Rise south and southwest of the EPGFZ in the maritime areas of Jamaica, Honduras, and Colombia to define an offshore, 700-km-long, active, left-lateral strike-slip fault in what has previously been considered the stable interior of the Caribbean plate as determined from plate-wide GPS studies. The fault was named by previous workers as the Pedro Banks fault zone because a 100-km-long segment of the fault forms an escarpment along the Pedro carbonate bank of the Nicaraguan Rise. Two fault segments of the PBFZ are defined: the 400-km-long eastern segment that exhibits large negative flower structures 10-50 km in width, with faults segments rupturing the sea floor as defined by high resolution 2D seismic data, and a 300-km-long western segment that is defined by a narrow zone of anomalous seismicity first observed by previous workers. The western end of the PBFZ terminates on a Quaternary rift structure, the San Andres rift, associated with Plio-Pleistocene volcanism and thickening trends indicating initial rifting in the Late Miocene. The southern end of the San Andreas rift terminates on the western Hess fault which also exhibits active strands consistent with left-lateral, strike-slip faults. The total length of the PBFZ-San Andres rift-Southern Hess escarpment fault is 1,200 km and traverses the entire western end of the Caribbean plate. Our interpretation is similar to previous models that have proposed the "stable" western Caribbean plate is broken by this fault whose rate of displacement is less than the threshold

  11. Strike-slip tectonics during rift linkage

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    Pagli, C.; Yun, S. H.; Ebinger, C.; Keir, D.; Wang, H.

    2017-12-01

    The kinematics of triple junction linkage and the initiation of transforms in magmatic rifts remain debated. Strain patterns from the Afar triple junction provide tests of current models of how rifts grow to link in area of incipient oceanic spreading. Here we present a combined analysis of seismicity, InSAR and GPS derived strain rate maps to reveal that the plate boundary deformation in Afar is accommodated primarily by extensional tectonics in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden rifts, and does not require large rotations about vertical axes (bookshelf faulting). Additionally, models of stress changes and seismicity induced by recent dykes in one sector of the Afar triple junction provide poor fit to the observed strike-slip earthquakes. Instead we explain these patterns as rift-perpendicular shearing at the tips of spreading rifts where extensional strains terminate against less stretched lithosphere. Our results demonstrate that rift-perpendicular strike-slip faulting between rift segments achieves plate boundary linkage during incipient seafloor spreading.

  12. Neotectonics of a subduction/strike-slip transition: the northeastern Dominican Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winslow, M.A.; McCann, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Septentrional fault system in the northeastern Dominican Republic marks the zone where the North American-Carribean plate boundary is evolving from subduction to strike-slip motion, and where terranes appear to be forming and migrating laterally in a subduction complex/forearc region. On the Island of Hispaniola, slip vectors are oblique to the strike of the Puerto Rico trench, and oblique subduction thrusts the upper plate over normal seafloor. The offshore geology and seismicity of the northern Caribbean suggest that uplift, broad crustal warping, thrusting, and strike-slip faulting (ie. collisional tectonics) should be present in the northern part of the Dominican Republic. The high topography (>1000m), high levels of seismicity, and large earthquakes support the hypothesis of contemporary deformation in Hispaniola. In this region, the subduction regime dies out toward the west, and deformation is transferred to onshore, oblique-slip faults. As this change in tectonic style has occurred in Neogene to Recent times, we are investigating the modern evolution of a plate boundary. We have already documented: (1) the presence of a strike-slip faulting in the northeastern Dominican Republic; (2) an anomalous push-up structure; and (3) a region of numerous splay faults. In conclusion, recent seismicity suggest a wide zone of deformation and variations in interplate motions near Hispaniola. This island lies at the western limit of active underthrusting and at the eastern limit of onshore faulting, i.e., at an important transition from a subduction to strike-slip regime.

  13. The morphology of strike-slip faults - Examples from the San Andreas Fault, California

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    Bilham, Roger; King, Geoffrey

    1989-01-01

    The dilatational strains associated with vertical faults embedded in a horizontal plate are examined in the framework of fault kinematics and simple displacement boundary conditions. Using boundary element methods, a sequence of examples of dilatational strain fields associated with commonly occurring strike-slip fault zone features (bends, offsets, finite rupture lengths, and nonuniform slip distributions) is derived. The combinations of these strain fields are then used to examine the Parkfield region of the San Andreas fault system in central California.

  14. Deformation at a Complex Strike-Slip Plate Boundary: Modeling the Southern California GPS Velocity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, W. R.; Murray-Moraleda, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    Because of EarthScope and related deployments, Southern California has perhaps the highest Global Positioning System (GPS) station density of any of Earth’s seismically active regions. Here we provide an updated analysis of the Southern California velocity field to illustrate both the strengths of high station density and the inherent limitations of surface geodetic measurements for quantifying earthquake-related deformation processes. Modeling GPS velocity fields in seismically active regions worldwide indicates deformation can be efficiently and usefully described as relative motions among elastic, fault-bounded crustal blocks. However, subjective choices of block geometry are unavoidable and introduce significant uncertainties in model formulation and in the resultant GPS fault slip rate estimates. To facilitate comparison between GPS and geologic results in southern California we use the SCEC Community Fault Model (CFM) and geologic slip rates tabulated in the 2008 Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF2) report as starting points for identifying the most important faults and specifying the block geometry. We then apply this geometry in an inversion of the SCEC Crustal Motion Model (CMM4) GPS velocity field to estimate block motions and intra-block fault slip rates and compare our results with previous work. In most parts of southern California—for example, north of the San Andreas Big Bend and SE of Los Angeles--our block geometry closely resembles that assumed in previous studies (McCaffrey 2005 JGR; Meade & Hager 2005 JGR; Becker et al. 2005 GJI). In these regions GPS slip rates can be reliably estimated and values for individual faults generally agree from one study to another and are also consistent with geologic estimates. However, there is no consensus on block geometry in the Transverse Ranges, Los Angeles Basin and Central Mojave Desert, where CFM faults are densely distributed, UCERF2 slip rates on several faults are comparable, and a simple block description may not be useful. It is notable that a number of documented disagreements between GPS and geologic slip rates occur on faults in these complex deforming zones (e.g. central Garlock fault, Eastern California Shear Zone, Big Bend San Andreas), in part reflecting the substantial epistemic uncertainty in GPS rate estimates for these faults. Our analysis suggests new GPS measurements and InSAR imaging that could refine slip rate estimates on a number of faults. However, in some cases GPS slip rate uncertainties are endemic and cannot be rectified by even higher station density or greater measurement precision. The difficulty arises because interseismic deformation is due to aseismic slip or localized ductile shearing on the down-dip extensions of faults that are locked (not slipping) in the seismogenic upper crust, smearing out the geodetically measured strain over a scale length of several times the locking depth of each fault (10-20 km). Where faults are closely spaced and slip at comparable rates, velocity gradients are quasi-uniform and the effects of individual faults cannot be distinguished. Better geologic slip rate constraints could ameliorate this non-uniqueness, but only under the assumption that geologic and GPS rates should agree.

  15. Active and recent strike-slip tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Amos; Boccaletti, Mario

    An international workshop cosponsored by the Department of Geology, University of Florence, Italy and the Department of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif., was held in Florence, Italy, April 18-20, 1989,on the topic of active and recent strike-slip tectonics in the continental crust. Workshop participants from Turkey, Ethiopia, Israel, Greece, and various universities in Italy, Spain, West Germany, France, the United Kingdom, Brazil, and the United States reported on a broad range of studies involving strike-slip faulting in continental crustal setting. As it turned out, much of the work reported on involved aspects of strike-slip faulting that are only poorly understood, especially crustal deformation, which is distributed over a multiplicity of faults, or even fault domains.One of the rewarding aspects of this workshop was the diversity of geographic areas and geological settings covered by the reporters. The north and east Anatolian faults, the Dead Sea transform zone, western Turkey, north and central Greece, Malta, Sicily, southern Italy, the bethic Cordillera in southern Spain, Tunisia, Tibet and southwest China, offshore Brazil, Alaska, Nevada, and California. A recurring observation reported for all those areas was mixed mode faulting, i.e., the coterminous or sequential occurrence of strike-slip and normal faulting, or strike-slip and thrust, and in many instances also strikeslip, normal and thrust faulting in a single tectonic setting.

  16. San Andreas-sized Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This mosaic of the south polar region of Jupiter's moon Europa shows the northern 290 kilometers (180 miles) of a strike-slip fault named Astypalaea Linea. The entire fault is about 810 kilometers (500 miles) long, about the size of the California portion of the San Andreas fault, which runs from the California-Mexico border north to the San Francisco Bay. In a strike-slip fault, two crustal blocks move horizontally past one another, similar to two opposing lanes of traffic. Overall motion along the fault seems to have followed a continuous narrow crack along the feature's entire length, with a path resembling steps on a staircase crossing zones that have been pulled apart. The images show that about 50 kilometers (30 miles) of displacement have taken place along the fault. The fault's opposite sides can be reconstructed like a puzzle, matching the shape of the sides and older, individual cracks and ridges broken by its movements. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The red line marks the once active central crack of the fault. The black line outlines the fault zone, including material accumulated in the regions which have been pulled apart. Bends in the fault have allowed the surface to be pulled apart. This process created openings through which warmer, softer ice from below Europa's brittle ice shell surface, or frozen water from a possible subsurface ocean, could reach the surface. This upwelling of material formed large areas of new ice within the boundaries of the original fault. A similar pulling-apart phenomenon can be observed in the geological trough surrounding California's Salton Sea, in Death Valley and the Dead Sea. In those cases, the pulled-apart regions can include upwelled materials, but may be filled mostly by sedimentary and eroded material from above. One theory is that fault motion on Europa is induced by the pull of variable daily tides generated by Jupiter's gravitational tug on Europa. Tidal tension opens the fault and

  17. Mesozoic strike-slip movement of the Dunhua-Mishan Fault Zone in NE China: A response to oceanic plate subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Zhu, Guang; Zhang, Shuai; Gu, Chengchuan; Li, Yunjian; Su, Nan; Xiao, Shiye

    2018-01-01

    The NE-striking Dunhua-Mishan Fault Zone (DMFZ) is one of two branches of the continental-scale sinistral Tan-Lu Fault Zone in NE China. The field data presented here indicate that the ca. 1000 km long DMFZ records two phases of sinistral faulting. The structures produced by these two phases of faulting include NE-SW-striking ductile shear belts and brittle faults, respectively. Mylonite-hosted microstructures and quartz c-axis fabrics suggest deformation temperatures of 450 °C-500 °C for the ductile shear belts. Combining new zircon U-Pb dates for 14 igneous rock samples analyzed during this study with the geology of this region indicates these shear belts formed during the earliest Early Cretaceous. This phase of sinistral displacement represents the initial formation of the DMFZ in response to the northward propagation of the Tan-Lu Fault Zone into NE China. A phase of Early Cretaceous rifting was followed by a second phase of sinistral faulting at 102-96 Ma, as evidenced by our new U-Pb ages for associated igneous rocks. Combining our new data with the results of previous research indicates that the DFMZ records a four-stage Cretaceous evolutionary history, where initial sinistral faulting at the beginning of the Early Cretaceous gave way to rifting during the rest of the Early Cretaceous. This was followed by a second phase of sinistral faulting at the beginning of the Late Cretaceous and a second phase of local rifting during the rest of the Late Cretaceous. The Cretaceous evolution of the DMFZ records the synchronous tectonic evolution of the NE China continent bordering the Pacific Ocean. Two phases of regional N-S compression generated the two phases of sinistral faulting within the DMFZ, whereas two-stage regional extension generated the two phases of rifting. The two compressive events were the result of the rapid low-angle subduction of the Izanagi and Pacific plates, whereas the two-stage extension was caused by the roll-back of these respective

  18. The Strike-slip Systems in Northern Venezuela Review of Neotectonic, Paleoseismological and Seismic Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audemard, F.; Schmitz, M.; Levander, A.

    2006-12-01

    The complex Caribbean-South America plate boundary zone in northern Venezuela, which extends from the Southern Caribbean Deformation Front in the north to the Guayana Shield in the south, is the result of stress transfer generated by the relative movement of 2 cm/a between both plates. The movement is active since Cretaceous time and progressively migrates from west to east, and the major movement is accommodated along a roughly 1000 km long strike-slip system in northern Venezuela, comprising the Oca-Ancon, San Sebastian and El Pilar right-lateral fault systems. Neotoectonic and paleoseismological investigations have been carried out during the last two decades, and recently have been complemented by research activities within the interdisciplinary projects BOLIVAR (Broadband Ocean-Land Investigations of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region) and GEODINOS (Recent Geodynamics of the Northern Limit of the South American Plate). By means of geological, seismicity and structural seismic investigations, the structures of the strike- slip zones are investigated from their surface expression through the crust and into the upper mantle. High velocity zones are identified at crustal levels and near surface investigations give insight to the detailed tectonic structures. Contribution from GEODINOS (FONACIT-2002000478) and BOLIVAR working groups.

  19. Major earthquakes occur regularly on an isolated plate boundary fault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Kelvin R; Cochran, Ursula A; Clark, Kate J; Biasi, Glenn P; Langridge, Robert M; Villamor, Pilar

    2012-06-29

    The scarcity of long geological records of major earthquakes, on different types of faults, makes testing hypotheses of regular versus random or clustered earthquake recurrence behavior difficult. We provide a fault-proximal major earthquake record spanning 8000 years on the strike-slip Alpine Fault in New Zealand. Cyclic stratigraphy at Hokuri Creek suggests that the fault ruptured to the surface 24 times, and event ages yield a 0.33 coefficient of variation in recurrence interval. We associate this near-regular earthquake recurrence with a geometrically simple strike-slip fault, with high slip rate, accommodating a high proportion of plate boundary motion that works in isolation from other faults. We propose that it is valid to apply time-dependent earthquake recurrence models for seismic hazard estimation to similar faults worldwide.

  20. Recent geodynamics of major strike-slip zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir G. Trifonov

    2015-09-01

    In all of the cases mentioned above, strike-slip deformation was expressed only or mainly during strong earthquakes. At other times, the rate of its accumulation was small and the dominant stress conditions led to transverse shortening, rarely resulting in local lengthening of the tectonic zone. These variations are caused by the tectonic peculiarities of these zones. The sinistral component of the deformation is related to the shift of the Arabian Plate relative to the African one, but also the transverse component is related to the continental slope and is expressed by the Coastal range shortening that exists in the El Ghab segment zone. There is not only a dextral deformation component, but also a transverse component, expressed by shortening of the Fergana and Talas ranges existing in the Talas-Fergana fault zone. In both zones, the shortening component became appreciable or dominant when the strike-slip deformation rate decreased. Similar, but more local, relationships were expressed in the epicentral area of the 2003 Altai earthquake and in the Western Palmyrides.

  1. Structural evolution of the La Trocha fault zone: Oblique collision and strike-slip basins in the Cuban Orogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Orosa, Israel; Sã Bat, Francesc; Ramos, Emilio; Rivero, LluíS.; VáZquez-Taset, Yaniel M.

    2012-10-01

    The La Trocha fault zone acted as a major left-lateral transfer zone and is bounded by the La Trocha (LTF), Zaza-Tuinicú (ZTF), Cristales (CTF) and Taguasco (TGF) faults. These faults were consistent with the clockwise rotation of convergence and shortening in central Cuba. From the Paleocene to the Early Eocene (65-48 Ma), a SSW-NNE shortening produced transtension in the LTF and transpression in the ZTF. Subsequently, during the Middle Eocene (48-37 Ma), shortening shifted to a SW-NE direction, resulting in the normal component of the LTF and transpression in the ZTF and CTF. Since the Late Eocene (37 Ma), central Cuba has been welded to the North American Plate. The post-welding deformation gave rise to transtension of the LTF and TGF. This deformation is consistent with a WSW-ENE shortening and reflects activity in the transform boundary of the Cayman Trough. Both the normal and thrust displacements of these previous faults are corroborated by structural data whereas left-lateral displacement is deduced from the concordance between oblique collision and structural features. Plate-kinematics and the structural evolution of the La Trocha fault zone indicate that the related Central Basin is a strike-slip polygenetic basin and that the formation of this system (i.e., fault zone - strike-slip basin) was a consequence of the Paleogene oblique collision between the Caribbean Volcanic Arc and the Bahamas Borderland (North American plate).

  2. Are "uncharacteristic" earthquakes spatially linked to strike-slip restraining bends?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, P.

    2011-12-01

    On the basis of a compilation of paleoseismological data from the Wasatch and San Andreas faults, Schwartz and Coppersmith (1984) proposed that both plate boundary and intraplate faults tend to generate essentially same size earthquakes having a relatively narrow range of magnitudes near the maximum. They referred to these earthquakes as "characteristic earthquakes". Their hypothesis suggests that the historical record of earthquakes documented for periods of time ranging from centuries to millennia in different parts of the world that could allow predictions of future ruptures. The characteristic earthquake model works surprisingly well for major strike-slip faults like the North Anatolian fault of Turkey and the North Tabriz strike-slip fault in Iran which both show a progressive, uni-direction pattern of rupture starting at one point and "unzippering" over a distance of hundreds of kilometers in a series of earthquakes. This regular periodicity has been attributed to systematic changes in Coulomb failure stress on individual faults or interconnected fault networks defined by distinctive changes in fault strike, or stepover faults, or by the intersection of a neighboring fault. However, studies of the San Andreas, Wasatch, and Dead Sea faults show that earthquake ruptures are not periodic and instead form clusters of events with no obvious "recurrence interval" as predicted by the characteristic earthquake model. Some of these hard-to-forecast "uncharacteristic" earthquakes initiate as blind thrust faults formed at deeper levels in the crust near the brittle-plastic transition zone as illustrated by the 1989 M 6.9 Loma Prieta earthquake of California. Such events would produce little or no surface rupture of the main fault plane so the effects of this type of earthquake would remain impossible for future paleoseismologists to discern (other than from shaking effects and the broad vertical uplift related to vertical motions on deeply buried faults). More recently

  3. Strike-slip deformation reflects complex partitioning of strain in the Nankai Accretionary Prism (SE Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Marco C.; Alves, Tiago M.; Fonseca, Paulo E.; Moore, Gregory F.

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested predominant extensional tectonics acting, at present, on the Nankai Accretionary Prism (NAP), and following a parallel direction to the convergence vector between the Philippine Sea and Amur Plates. However, a complex set of thrusts, pop-up structures, thrust anticlines and strike-slip faults is observed on seismic data in the outer wedge of the NAP, hinting at a complex strain distribution across SE Japan. Three-dimensional (3D) seismic data reveal three main families of faults: (1) NE-trending thrusts and back-thrusts; (2) NNW- to N-trending left-lateral strike-slip faults; and (3) WNW-trending to E-W right-lateral strike-slip faults. Such a fault pattern suggests that lateral slip, together with thrusting, are the two major styles of deformation operating in the outer wedge of the NAP. Both styles of deformation reflect a transpressional tectonic regime in which the maximum horizontal stress is geometrically close to the convergence vector. This work is relevant because it shows a progressive change from faults trending perpendicularly to the convergence vector, to a broader partitioning of strain in the form of thrusts and conjugate strike-slip faults. We suggest that similar families of faults exist within the inner wedge of the NAP, below the Kumano Basin, and control stress accumulation and strain accommodation in this latter region.

  4. Assemblage of strike-slip faults and tectonic extension and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    12

    and its effect on the productivity of the tight reservoirs. The study will not only guide. 95 the oil-gas ..... 5 Effect of tectonic extension and compression on coal reservoir productivity. 288. 5.1 Strike-slip compression and ..... staff of all the authors that cooperated in performing the analyses. We are also. 425 grateful to the ...

  5. Assemblage of strike-slip faults and tectonic extension and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    12

    Assemblage of strike-slip faults and tectonic. 1 extension and compression analysis: A case. 2 study of a Lower Permian commercial coal. 3 reservoir in China. 4. 5. Shuai Yina,*, Dawei Lvb, Zhonghu Wu c .... high-quality reservoirs, and tectonic action is a leading factor for oil and gas. 70 enrichment. Therefore, it is of great ...

  6. Lower Miocene coeval thrusting and strike-slip faulting in the Western Betics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasca, Gianluca; Gueydan, Frédéric; Brun, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the Africa-Europe convergence, the Mediterranean system presents a complex interaction between subduction rollback and upper subduction plate deformation since 30 Ma. The western end of the system shows an arcuate geometry across the Gibraltar arc, the Betico-Rifean belt, in which the relationship between slab dynamics and onshore tectonics is poorly constrained. The present study focuses on the Western Betics, which is characterized by two major thrusts: 1/ the Alboran Front limits the metamorphic domain (Alboran Domain) from the fold-and-thrust belts involving the Mesozoic cover of the Iberian margin (Subbetics Domain); 2/ the Alboran Internal Thrust allows the juxtaposition of a strongly attenuated lithosphere section, containing the large Ronda subcontinental mantle bodies, on top of crustal rocks. New structural data show that two major E-W strike-slip corridors controlled the deformation pattern of the Alboran Domain, in which E-W dextral strike-slip faults, N60° thrusts and N140° normal faults developed simultaneously during dextral strike-slip simple shear. The Alozaina piggy-back Basin, mainly formed by olistotromic deposits of Lower Miocene age, provides an age estimate for the continuous westward translation of the Alboran Domain, with reference to Iberia, that is accommodated mainly by an E-W lateral strike-slip ramp and a N60° frontal thrust ramp. In this context, a thrust sequence led to the piling up of thrust units in the Western Betics and to the crustal emplacement of the Ronda Peridotites bodies.

  7. The cenozoic strike-slip faults and TTHE regional crust stability of Beishan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhaojie; Zhang Zhicheng; Zhang Chen; Liu Chang; Zhang Yu; Wang Ju; Chen Weiming

    2008-01-01

    The remote sensing images and geological features of Beishan area indicate that the Altyn Tagh fault, Sanweishan-Shuangta fault, Daquan fault and Hongliuhe fault are distributed in Beishan area from south to north. The faults are all left-lateral strike-slip faults with trending of NE40-50°, displaying similar distribution pattern. The secondary branch faults are developed at the end of each main strike-slip fault with nearly east to west trending form dendritic oblique crossings at the angle of 30-50°. Because of the left-lateral slip of the branch faults, the granites or the blocks exposed within the branch faults rotate clockwisely, forming 'Domino' structures. So the structural style of Beishan area consists of the Altyn Tagh fault, Sanweishan-Shuangta fault, Daquan fault, Hongliuhe fault and their branch faults and rotational structures between different faults. Sedimentary analysis on the fault valleys in the study area and ESR chronological test of fault clay exhibit that the Sanweishan-Shuangta fault form in the late Pliocene (N2), while the Daquan fault displays formation age of l.5-1.2 Ma, and the activity age of the relevant branch faults is Late Pleistocene (400 ka). The ages become younger from the Altyn Tagh fault to the Daquan fault and strike-slip faults display NW trending extension, further revealing the lateral growth process of the strike-slip boundary at the northern margin during the Cenozoic uplift of Tibetan Plateau. The displacement amounts on several secondary faults caused by the activities of the faults are slight due to the above-mentioned structural distribution characteristics of Beishan area, which means that this area is the most stable active area with few seismic activities. We propose the main granitic bodies in Beishan area could be favorable preselected locations for China's high level radioactive waste repository. (authors)

  8. The Okhotsk Plate and the Eurasia-North America plate boundary zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, David; Mackey, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    The Eurasia-North America plate boundary zone transitions from spreading at rates of ~ 25mm/yr in the North Atlantic, to compression at rates of ~ 5mm/yr in the region of the Okhotsk plate. Because the pole of rotation between Eurasia and North America lies more or less on their mutual boundary, there is a linear change in rate along the boundary, and regions near the euler pole are subject to extremely low deformation rates. The Okhotsk - Eurasia - North America triple junction lies slightly south of the rotation pole, placing the Okhotsk plate entirely in a weakly contractional setting. Regions near the triple junction absorb 1mm/yr contraction. Further south, towards the shoreline of the Okhotsk sea, up to 5 mm/yr contraction may be absorbed within the plate. How shortening is accommodated across the boundary remains an open question. One possibility is wholesale extrusion of the entire Okhotsk plate (or possibly its northwestern corner) along two plate boundary strike slip faults (Eurasia-Okhostk and North America Okhotsk). The problem with this model is that the seismic record does not presently clearly support it, with the largest events distributed both within the plate interior and on its boundaries. This may suggest that instead, the Okhotsk plate, and particularly its north-western end, consists of a series of smaller blocks which shuffle against each other, partially accommodating extrusion, but also permitting some internal deformation and change of shape of the Okhotsk plate itself. We present analyses of the very sparse seismic record from the region, as well as geometric-kinematic, tectonic models of the possible deformation of northwest Okhotsk to try to better understand the different probabilities of how this slowly deforming plate boundary zone is behaving.

  9. Dynamics of a strike-slip fault analog model : Effects of the tectonic loading rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniven, Y.; Dominguez, S.; Soliva, R.; Cattin, R.; Peyret, M.; Chéry, J.; Romano, C.

    2013-12-01

    The average seismic cycle duration extends from hundred to a few thousands years but geodetic measurements and seismological data extend over less than one century. This short time observation scale renders difficult to constrain the role of key parameters such as fault friction and geometry, crust rheology, stress and strain rate that control the kinematics and mechanics of active faults. To solve this time scale issue, we have developed a new experimental set-up that reproduces scaled micro-earthquakes and several hundreds of seismic cycles along a strike-slip fault. The model is constituted by two polyurethane foam plates laterally in contact, lying on a basal silicone layer, which simulate the mechanical behaviour of an elastoplastic upper crust over a ductile lower crust, respectively. To simulate the boundary conditions of a strike-slip fault, a computerized motoreductor system moves the two compartments on an opposite sens at a constant low velocity (a few μm/s). The model scaling, deduces from analog material physical parameters, implies that 1 cm in the model represents 2-3 km in the nature and 1 s is equivalent to 5-15 years. Surface-horizontal strain field is quantified by sub-pixel correlation of digital camera pictures recorded every 16 μm of displacement. We record about 2000 horizontal-velocity field measurements for each experiment. The analysis of model-interseismic and coseismic surface displacements and their comparison to seismogenic natural faults demonstrate that our analog model reproduces correctly both near and far-field surface strains. To compare the experiments, we have developed several algorithms that allow studying the main spatial and temporal evolution of the physical parameters and surface deformation processes that characterise the seismic cycle (magnitudes, stress, strain, friction coefficients, interseismic locking depth, recurrence time, ...). We also performed surface-velocity field inversions to assess the spatial

  10. Structure of the la VELA Offshore Basin, Western Venezuela: AN Obliquely-Opening Rift Basin Within the South America-Caribbean Strike-Slip Plate Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, J. M.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    Bathymetric, gravity and magnetic maps show that the east-west trend of the Cretaceous Great Arc of the Caribbean in the Leeward Antilles islands is transected by an en echelon series of obliquely-sheared rift basins that show right-lateral offsets ranging from 20 to 40 km. The basins are 75-100 km in length and 20-30 km in width and are composed of sub-parallel, oblique slip normal faults that define deep, bathymetric channels that bound the larger islands of the Leeward Antilles including Aruba, Curacao and Bonaire. A single basin of similar orientation and structure, the Urumaco basin, is present to the southwest in the Gulf of Venezuela. We mapped structures and sedimentation in the La Vela rift basin using a 3D seismic data volume recorded down to 6 seconds TWT. The basin can be mapped from the Falcon coast where it is correlative with the right-lateral Adicora fault mapped onshore, and its submarine extension. To the southeast of the 3D survey area, previous workers have mapped a 70-km-wide zone of northeast-striking, oblique, right-lateral faults, some with apparent right-lateral offsets of the coastline. On seismic data, the faults vary in dip from 45 to 60 degrees and exhibit maximum vertical offsets of 600 m. The La Vela and other obliquely-opening rifts accommodate right-lateral shear with linkages to intervening, east-west-striking right-lateral faults like the Adicora. The zone of oblique rifts is restricted to the trend of the Great Arc of the Caribbean and may reflect the susceptiblity of this granitic basement to active shearing. The age of onset for the basins known from previous studies on the Leeward Antilles is early Miocene. As most of these faults occur offshore their potential to generate damaging earthquakes in the densely populated Leeward Antilles is not known.

  11. Strike-slip and extrusion tectonics of the Greater Caucasus-Kopetdagh region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, M. L.

    2012-04-01

    In the Paleogene-Early Miocene, the areas of the modern Greater Caucasus and Kopetdagh were occupied by marginal seas (parts of the Paratethys intracontinental sea) inheriting the Cretaceous back-arc basins. In the Early Miocene, a collisional compression of the seas began at the time when the Arabian plate detached from Africa to move northward. The compression proceeded in a good accordance with the Arabia movement that was manifested in a general synchroneity of the Late Alpine orogenies in the Caucasus and Kopetdagh with the rifting and spreading phases in the Aden Gulf and the Red Sea. The earliest orogeny was the Styrian one of the terminal Early Miocene. It corresponds to the initial stage of the rift opening and was mostly pronounced in the east, in Kopetdagh and East Iran, where a recent structure has been formed by the initial Middle Miocene. In the Greater Caucasus, the Styrian deformations occurred in its central part only (i.e., in front of the Arabian plate northern tip) where the main Caucasian thrusts and conjugate asymmetrical megaanticline of the Central Caucasus were formed. An essential feature of the earliest, Styrian, structure of the whole Caucasus-Kopetdagh region was a series of regional right-lateral strike-slip faults. In the Kopetdagh, the strike-slips have no submeridional but northwestern direction although they occurred in the northern continuation of the submeridional right-lateral strike-slip faults framing the Lut block. In the Caucasus, they became even sublatitudinal, in parallel with the North Anatolian fault, thus constituting a single domain with the latter. So, the right-lateral strike-slip faults of East Iran, Kopetdagh, and the Caucasus compose an extensive arc convex to the north and appeared probably as a result of the right-lateral shear caused by the known counterclockwise rotation of the Arabian lithospheric plate. The Middle Miocene was characterized by a tectonic pause both in the Red Sea-Aden rift system and in the

  12. Weak Tectono-Magmatic Relationships along an Obliquely Convergent Plate Boundary: Sumatra, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Acocella

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The tectono-magmatic relationships along obliquely convergent plate boundaries, where strain partitioning promotes strike-slip structures along the volcanic arc, are poorly known. Here it is unclear if and, in case, how the strike-slip structures control volcanic processes, distribution and size. To better define the possible tectono-magmatic relationships along strike-slip arcs, we merge available information on the case study of Sumatra (Indonesia with field structural data. The Sumatra arc (entire volcanic belt consists of 48 active volcanoes. Of these, 46% lie within 10 km from the dextral Great Sumatra Fault (GSF, which carries most horizontal displacement on the overriding plate, whereas 27% lie at >20 km from the GSF. Among the volcanoes at <10 km from GSF, 48% show a possible structural relation to the GSF, whereas only 28% show a clear structural relation, lying in pull-aparts or releasing bends; these localized areas of transtension (local extensional zone do not develop magmatic segments. There is no relation between the GSF along-strike slip rate variations and the volcanic productivity. The preferred N30°-N40°E volcano alignment and elongation are subparallel to the convergence vector or to the GSF. The structural field data, collected in the central and southern GSF, show, in addition to the dextral motions along NW-SE to N-S striking faults, also normal motions (extending WNW-ESE or NE-SW, suggesting local reactivations of the GSF. Overall, the collected data suggest a limited tectonic control on arc volcanism. The tectonic control is mostly expressed by the mean depth of the slab surface below the volcanoes (130 ± 20 km and, subordinately, local extension along the GSF. The latter, when WNW-ESE oriented (more common, may be associated with the overall tectonic convergence, as suggested by the structural data; conversely, when NE-SW oriented (less common, the extension may result from co- and post-seismic arc normal extension

  13. Mechanics of evenly spaced strike-slip faults and its implications for the formation of tiger-stripe fractures on Saturn's moon Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, An; Zuza, Andrew V.; Pappalardo, Robert T.

    2016-03-01

    We present the first mechanical analysis based on realistic rheology and boundary conditions on the formation of evenly spaced strike-slip faults. Two quantitative models employing the stress-shadow concept, widely used for explaining extensional-joint spacing, are proposed in this study: (1) an empirically based stress-rise-function model that simulates the brittle-deformation process during the formation of evenly spaced parallel strike-slip faults, and (2) an elastic plate model that relates fault spacing to the thickness of the fault-hosting elastic medium. When applying the models for the initiation and development of the tiger-stripe fractures (TSF) in the South Polar Terrain (SPT) of Enceladus, the mutually consistent solutions of the two models, as constrained by the mean spacing of the TSF at ∼35 km, requires that the brittle ice-shell thickness be ∼30 km, the elastic thickness be ∼0.7 km, and the cohesive strength of the SPT ice shell be ∼30 kPa. However, if the brittle and elastic models are decoupled and if the ice-shell cohesive strength is on the order of ∼1 MPa, the brittle ice shell would be on the order of ∼10 km.

  14. Strike-slip earthquakes in the oceanic lithosphere: Observations of exceptionally high apparent stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, George; McGarr, A.

    2002-01-01

    The radiated energies, ES, and seismic moments, M0, for 942 globally distributed earthquakes that occurred between 1987 to 1998 are examined to find the earthquakes with the highest apparent stresses (τa=μES/M0, where μ is the modulus of rigidity). The globally averaged τa for shallow earthquakes in all tectonic environments and seismic regions is 0.3 MPa. However, the subset of 49 earthquakes with the highest apparent stresses (τa greater than about 5.0 MPa) is dominated almost exclusively by strike-slip earthquakes that occur in oceanic environments. These earthquakes are all located in the depth range 7–29 km in the upper mantle of the young oceanic lithosphere. Many of these events occur near plate-boundary triple junctions where there appear to be high rates of intraplate deformation. Indeed, the small rapidly deforming Gorda Plate accounts for 10 of the 49 high-τa events. The depth distribution of τa, which shows peak values somewhat greater than 25 MPa in the depth range 20–25 km, suggests that upper bounds on this parameter are a result of the strength of the oceanic lithosphere. A recently proposed envelope for apparent stress, derived by taking 6 per cent of the strength inferred from laboratory experiments for young (less than 30 Ma) deforming oceanic lithosphere, agrees well with the upper-bound envelope of apparent stresses over the depth range 5–30 km. The corresponding depth-dependent shear strength for young oceanic lithosphere attains a peak value of about 575 MPa at a depth of 21 km and then diminishes rapidly as the depth increases. In addition to their high apparent stresses, which suggest that the strength of the young oceanic lithosphere is highest in the depth range 10–30 km, our set of high-τa earthquakes show other features that constrain the nature of the forces that cause interplate motion. First, our set of events is divided roughly equally between intraplate and transform faulting with similar depth distributions

  15. Structural Evolution of the India-Arabia Plate Boundary from Miocene to Present-Day (NW Indian Ocean) and Comparison with the Dead Sea Fault (Eastern Mediterranean Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M.; Huchon, P.; Chamot Rooke, N.; Fournier, M.; Delescluse, M.; Ben Avraham, Z.; Ten Brink, U. S.

    2014-12-01

    Arabia is bounded by the Dead Sea Transform (DST) to the west and by the Owen Fracture Zone (OFZ) to the east. These present-day major strike-slip fault systems activated during the Plio-Pleistocene, which contrasts with the age of inception of strike-slip motion, assumed to begin around 13-18 Ma for the DST and around 20 Ma at the edge of the Owen-Murray Ridge (OMR) for the India-Arabia plate boundary. This discrepancy between the age of the active strike-slip systems and the age of inception of strike-slip motion raises the question of the kinematic driver for the transition between successive generations of strike-slip faults. Using a recent mutibeam and seismic dataset crossing the OFZ and the OMR, we provide a new geodynamic framework for the Miocene to present-day structural evolution of the India-Arabia plate boundary, and highlight some similarities with the structural evolution of the DST. We first document a Late Miocene episode of uplift of the OMR uplift along the Miocene India-Arabia plate boundary. The onset of this uplift is coeval with a plate reorganization event marked by the onset of intra-plate deformation in the Central Indian Ocean. The OFZ emplaced around 3 Ma, with major pull-apart basins opening (20°N Basin, Dalrymple Trough) dated at 2.4 Ma by far-field correlation with ODP Sites. The opening of pull-apart basins is coeval with the last structural reorganization of the Makran accretionnary wedge, marked by the regional M-unconformity, and with a major intensification of the Indian monsoon. A Late Miocene episode of folding is also recognized at the Lebanon ranges prior to the onset of the present-day DST, which occurred in the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene. The similarities between the geological history of the India-Arabia plate boundary and the DST in the Late Miocene and the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene suggest that both plate boundaries recorded the same kinematic changes. Late Miocene (i.e. Tortonian) deformation is widely

  16. Strike-slip faulting in the Inner California Borderlands, offshore Southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, J. M.; Kent, G. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.; Sahakian, V. J.; Holmes, J. J.; Klotsko, S.; Kell, A. M.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    In the Inner California Borderlands (ICB), offshore of Southern California, modern dextral strike-slip faulting overprints a prominent system of basins and ridges formed during plate boundary reorganization 30-15 Ma. Geodetic data indicate faults in the ICB accommodate 6-8 mm/yr of Pacific-North American plate boundary deformation; however, the hazard posed by the ICB faults is poorly understood due to unknown fault geometry and loosely constrained slip rates. We present observations from high-resolution and reprocessed legacy 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection datasets and multibeam bathymetry to constrain the modern fault architecture and tectonic evolution of the ICB. We use a sequence stratigraphy approach to identify discrete episodes of deformation in the MCS data and present the results of our mapping in a regional fault model that distinguishes active faults from relict structures. Significant differences exist between our model of modern ICB deformation and existing models. From east to west, the major active faults are the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon, Palos Verdes, San Diego Trough, and San Clemente fault zones. Localized deformation on the continental slope along the San Mateo, San Onofre, and Carlsbad trends results from geometrical complexities in the dextral fault system. Undeformed early to mid-Pleistocene age sediments onlap and overlie deformation associated with the northern Coronado Bank fault (CBF) and the breakaway zone of the purported Oceanside Blind Thrust. Therefore, we interpret the northern CBF to be inactive, and slip rate estimates based on linkage with the Holocene active Palos Verdes fault are unwarranted. In the western ICB, the San Diego Trough fault (SDTF) and San Clemente fault have robust linear geomorphic expression, which suggests that these faults may accommodate a significant portion of modern ICB slip in a westward temporal migration of slip. The SDTF offsets young sediments between the US/Mexico border and the

  17. Onset of aseismic creep on major strike-slip faults

    KAUST Repository

    Çakir, Ziyadin

    2012-10-02

    Time series analysis of spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data, GPS measurements, and fi eld observations reveal that the central section of the Izmit (Turkey) fault that slipped with a supershear rupture velocity in the A.D. 1999, Mw7.4, Izmit earthquake began creeping aseismically following the earthquake. Rapid initial postseismic afterslip decayed logarithmically with time and appears to have reached a steady rate comparable to the preearthquake full fault-crossing rate, suggesting that it may continue for decades and possibly until late in the earthquake cycle. If confi rmed by future monitoring, these observations identify postseismic afterslip as a mechanism for initiating creep behavior along strike-slip faults. Long-term afterslip and/or creep has signifi cant implications for earthquake cycle models, recurrence intervals of large earthquakes, and accordingly, seismic hazard estimation along mature strike-slip faults, in particular for Istanbul which is believed to lie adjacent to a seismic gap along the North Anatolian fault in the Sea of Marmara. © 2012 Geological Society of America.

  18. The San Andreas Fault and a Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The mosaic on the right of the south polar region of Jupiter's moon Europa shows the northern 290 kilometers (180 miles) of a strike-slip fault named Astypalaea Linea. The entire fault is about 810 kilometers (500 miles) long, the size of the California portion of the San Andreas fault on Earth which runs from the California-Mexico border north to the San Francisco Bay. The left mosaic shows the portion of the San Andreas fault near California's san Francisco Bay that has been scaled to the same size and resolution as the Europa image. Each covers an area approximately 170 by 193 kilometers(105 by 120 miles). The red line marks the once active central crack of the Europan fault (right) and the line of the San Andreas fault (left). A strike-slip fault is one in which two crustal blocks move horizontally past one another, similar to two opposing lanes of traffic. The overall motion along the Europan fault seems to have followed a continuous narrow crack along the entire length of the feature, with a path resembling stepson a staircase crossing zones which have been pulled apart. The images show that about 50 kilometers (30 miles) of displacement have taken place along the fault. Opposite sides of the fault can be reconstructed like a puzzle, matching the shape of the sides as well as older individual cracks and ridges that had been broken by its movements. Bends in the Europan fault have allowed the surface to be pulled apart. This pulling-apart along the fault's bends created openings through which warmer, softer ice from below Europa's brittle ice shell surface, or frozen water from a possible subsurface ocean, could reach the surface. This upwelling of material formed large areas of new ice within the boundaries of the original fault. A similar pulling apart phenomenon can be observed in the geological trough surrounding California's Salton Sea, and in Death Valley and the Dead Sea. In those cases, the pulled apart regions can include upwelled materials, but may

  19. The San Andreas Fault and a Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The mosaic on the right of the south polar region of Jupiter's moon Europa shows the northern 290 kilometers (180 miles) of a strike-slip fault named Astypalaea Linea. The entire fault is about 810 kilometers (500 miles) long, the size of the California portion of the San Andreas fault on Earth which runs from the California-Mexico border north to the San Francisco Bay. The left mosaic shows the portion of the San Andreas fault near California's san Francisco Bay that has been scaled to the same size and resolution as the Europa image. Each covers an area approximately 170 by 193 kilometers(105 by 120 miles). The red line marks the once active central crack of the Europan fault (right) and the line of the San Andreas fault (left). A strike-slip fault is one in which two crustal blocks move horizontally past one another, similar to two opposing lanes of traffic. The overall motion along the Europan fault seems to have followed a continuous narrow crack along the entire length of the feature, with a path resembling stepson a staircase crossing zones which have been pulled apart. The images show that about 50 kilometers (30 miles) of displacement have taken place along the fault. Opposite sides of the fault can be reconstructed like a puzzle, matching the shape of the sides as well as older individual cracks and ridges that had been broken by its movements. Bends in the Europan fault have allowed the surface to be pulled apart. This pulling-apart along the fault's bends created openings through which warmer, softer ice from below Europa's brittle ice shell surface, or frozen water from a possible subsurface ocean, could reach the surface. This upwelling of material formed large areas of new ice within the boundaries of the original fault. A similar pulling apart phenomenon can be observed in the geological trough surrounding California's Salton Sea, and in Death Valley and the Dead Sea. In those cases, the pulled apart regions can include upwelled materials, but may

  20. Equivalent strike-slip earthquake cycles in half-space and lithosphere-asthenosphere earth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    By virtue of the images used in the dislocation solution, the deformation at the free surface produced throughout the earthquake cycle by slippage on a long strike-slip fault in an Earth model consisting of an elastic plate (lithosphere) overlying a viscoelastic half-space (asthenosphere) can be duplicated by prescribed slip on a vertical fault embedded in an elastic half-space. Inversion of 1973-1988 geodetic measurements of deformation across the segment of the San Andreas fault in the Transverse Ranges north of Los Angeles for the half-space equivalent slip distribution suggests no significant slip on the fault above 30 km and a uniform slip rate of 36 mm/yr below 30 km. One equivalent lithosphere-asthenosphere model would have a 30-km thick lithosphere and an asthenosphere relaxation time greater than 33 years, but other models are possible. -from Author

  1. Seismic link at plate boundary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    time series to determine the causality and related orientation. The resulting link orientations at the plate boundary conditions indicate that causal triggering seems to be localized along a major fault, as a stress transfer between two major faults, and parallel to the geothermal area extension. 1. Introduction. Plate boundaries ...

  2. Strike-slip fault Kinematics and mechanics at the seismic cycle time-scale : Results from new analogue model experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniven, Yannick; Dominguez, Stéphane; Soliva, Roger; Cattin, Rodolphe; Peyret, Michel; Chéry, Jean; Romano, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The average seismic cycle duration extends from hundred to a few thousands years but geodetic measurements, including trilateration, GPS, Insar and seismological data extend over less than one century. This short time observation scale renders difficult, then, to constrain the role of key parameters such as fault friction and geometry, crust rheology, stress and strain rate that control the kinematics and mechanics of active faults. To solve this time scale issue, we have developed a new experimental set-up that reproduces scaled micro-earthquakes and several hundreds of seismic cycles along a strike-slip fault. The model is constituted by two polyurethane foam plates laterally in contact, lying on a basal silicone layer, which simulate the mechanical behaviour of an elastoplastic upper crust over a ductile lower crust, respectively. To simulate the boundary conditions of a strike-slip fault, a computerized motoreductor system moves the two compartments on an opposite sens and at a constant very low velocity (a few µm/s). The model spatial and temporal scaling, deduces from analog material physical and mechanical parameters, implies that 1 cm in the model represents 2-3 km in the nature and 1 s is equivalent to 5-15 years. Surface-horizontal strain field is quantified by sub-pixel correlation of digital camera pictures recorded every 16 µm of displacement. For each experience about 2000 horizontal-velocity field measurements are recorded. The analysis of model-interseismic and coseismic surface displacements and their comparison to seismogenic natural faults demonstrate that our analog model reproduces correctly both near and far-field surface strains. To compare the experiences, we have developed several algorithms that allow studying the main spatial and temporal evolution of the physical parameters and surface deformation processes that characterise the seismic cycle (magnitudes, stress, strain, friction coefficients, interseismic locking depth, recurrence

  3. A preliminary study on surface ground deformation near shallow foundation induced by strike-slip faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Pei-Syuan; Lin, Ming-Lang

    2016-04-01

    According to investigation of recent earthquakes, ground deformation and surface rupture are used to map the influenced range of the active fault. The zones of horizontal and vertical surface displacements and different features of surface rupture are investigated in the field, for example, the Greendale Fault 2010, MW 7.1 Canterbury earthquake. The buildings near the fault rotated and displaced vertically and horizontally due to the ground deformation. Besides, the propagation of fault trace detoured them because of the higher rigidity. Consequently, it's necessary to explore the ground deformation and mechanism of the foundation induced by strike-slip faulting for the safety issue. Based on previous study from scaled analogue model of strike-slip faulting, the ground deformation is controlled by material properties, depth of soil, and boundary condition. On the condition controlled, the model shows the features of ground deformation in the field. This study presents results from shear box experiment on small-scale soft clay models subjected to strike-slip faulting and placed shallow foundations on it in a 1-g environment. The quantifiable data including sequence of surface rupture, topography and the position of foundation are recorded with increasing faulting. From the result of the experiment, first en echelon R shears appeared. The R shears rotated to a more parallel angle to the trace and cracks pulled apart along them with increasing displacements. Then the P shears crossed the basement fault in the opposite direction appears and linked R shears. Lastly the central shear was Y shears. On the other hand, the development of wider zones of rupture, higher rising surface and larger the crack area on surface developed, with deeper depth of soil. With the depth of 1 cm and half-box displacement 1.2 cm, en echelon R shears appeared and the surface above the fault trace elevated to 1.15 mm (Dv), causing a 1.16 cm-wide zone of ground-surface rupture and deformation

  4. The October 28, 2012 Mw 7.8 Haida Gwaii underthrusting earthquake and tsunami: Slip partitioning along the Queen Charlotte Fault transpressional plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Thorne; Ye, Lingling; Kanamori, Hiroo; Yamazaki, Yoshiki; Cheung, Kwok Fai; Kwong, Kevin; Koper, Keith D.

    2013-08-01

    The Pacific/North American plate boundary is undergoing predominantly right-lateral strike-slip motion along the Queen Charlotte and Fairweather transform faults. The Queen Charlotte Fault (QCF) hosted the largest historical earthquake in Canada, the 1949 MS 8.1 strike-slip earthquake, which ruptured from offshore northern Haida Gwaii several hundred kilometers northwestward. On January 5, 2013 an Mw 7.5 strike-slip faulting event occurred near the northern end of the 1949 rupture zone. Along central and southern Haida Gwaii the relative plate motion has ∼20% oblique convergence across the left-stepping plate boundary. There had been uncertainty in how the compressional component of plate motion is accommodated. The October 28, 2012 Mw 7.8 Haida Gwaii earthquake involved slightly (∼20°) oblique thrust faulting on a shallow (∼18.5°) northeast-dipping fault plane with strike (∼320°) parallel to the QCF, consistent with prior inferences of Pacific Plate underthrusting beneath Haida Gwaii. The rupture extended to shallow depth offshore of Moresby Island beneath a 25-30 km wide terrace of sediments that has accumulated in a wedge seaward of the QCF. The shallow thrusting caused seafloor uplift that generated substantial localized tsunami run-up and a modest far-field tsunami that spread across the northern Pacific, prompting a tsunami warning, beach closure, and coastal evacuation in Hawaii, although ultimately tide gauges showed less than 0.8 m of water level increase. The mainshock rupture appears to have spread with a ∼2.3 km/s rupture velocity over a length of ∼150 km, with slip averaging 3.3 m concentrated beneath the sedimentary wedge. The event was followed by a substantial aftershock sequence, in which almost all of the larger events involve distributed intraplate normal faulting extending ∼50 km oceanward from the QCF. The highly oblique slip partitioning in southern Haida Gwaii is distinctive in that the local plate boundary-parallel motion on

  5. Seismic link at plate boundary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    transfer between two major faults, and parallel to the geothermal area extension. 1. Introduction. Plate boundaries are the zones where most earth dynamics are focussed. The complexity of tectonic boundaries draws attention to them as the largest earthquakes are felt in these areas and they elicit the natural hazard of ...

  6. Late Pleistocene-Holocene Activity of the Strike-slip Xianshuihe Fault Zone, Tibetan Plateau, Inferred from Tectonic Landforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, A.; Yan, B.

    2017-12-01

    Knowledges on the activity of the strike-slip fault zones on the Tibetan Plateau have been promoted greatly by the interpretation of remote sensing images (Molnar and Tapponnier, 1975; Tapponnier and Molnar, 1977). The active strike-slip Xianshuihe-Xiaojiang Fault System (XXFS), with the geometry of an arc projecting northeastwards, plays an important role in the crustal deformation of the Tibetan Plateau caused by the continental collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates. The Xianshuihe Fault Zone (XFZ) is located in the central segment of the XXFS and extends for 370 km, with a maximum sinistral offset of 60 km since 13‒5 Ma. In this study, we investigated the tectonic landforms and slip rate along the central segment of the left-lateral strike-slip XFZ. Field investigations and analysis of ttectonic landforms show that horizontal offset has been accumulated on the topographical markers of different scales that developed since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The central segment of the XFZ is composed of three major faults: Yalahe, Selaha, and Zheduotang faults showing a right-stepping echelon pattern, that is characterized by systematical offset of drainages, alluvial fans and terrace risers with typical scissoring structures, indicating a structural feature of left-lateral strike-slip fault. Based on the offset glacial morphology and radiocarbon dating ages, we estimate the Late Pleistocene-Holocene slip rate to be 10 mm/yr for the central segment of the XFZ, which is consistent with that estimated from the GPS observations and geological evidence as reported previously. Across the central segment of the XFZ, the major Selaha and Zheduotang faults participate a slip rate of 5.8 mm/yr and 3.4 mm/yr, respectively. Detailed investigations of tectonic landforms are essential for the understanding the activity of active faults. Our findings suggest that the left-lateral slipping of the XFZ partitions the deformation of eastward extrusion and northeastward

  7. Stress rotation across the Cascadia megathrust requires a weak subduction plate boundary at seismogenic depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Duo; McGuire, Jeffrey J.; Liu, Yajing; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2018-03-01

    The Mendocino Triple Junction region is the most seismically active part of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The northward moving Pacific plate collides with the subducting Gorda plate causing intense internal deformation within it. Here we show that the stress field rotates rapidly with depth across the thrust interface from a strike-slip regime within the subducting plate, reflecting the Pacific plate collision, to a thrust regime in the overriding plate. We utilize a dense focal mechanism dataset, including observations from the Cascadia Initiative ocean bottom seismograph experiment, to constrain the stress orientations. To quantify the implications of this rotation for the strength of the plate boundary, we designed an inversion that solves for the absolute stress tensors in a three-layer model subject to assumptions about the strength of the subducting mantle. Our results indicate that the shear stress on the plate boundary fault is likely no more than about ∼50 MPa at ∼20 km depth. Regardless of the assumed mantle strength, we infer a relatively weak megathrust fault with an effective friction coefficient of ∼0 to 0.2 at seismogenic depths. Such a low value for the effective friction coefficient requires a combination of high fluid pressures and/or fault-zone minerals with low inherent friction in the region where a great earthquake is expected in Cascadia.

  8. Stress rotation across the Cascadia megathrust requires a weak subduction plate boundary at seismogenic depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Duo; McGuire, Jeffrey J.; Liu, Yajing; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2018-01-01

    The Mendocino Triple Junction region is the most seismically active part of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The northward moving Pacific plate collides with the subducting Gorda plate causing intense internal deformation within it. Here we show that the stress field rotates rapidly with depth across the thrust interface from a strike-slip regime within the subducting plate, reflecting the Pacific plate collision, to a thrust regime in the overriding plate. We utilize a dense focal mechanism dataset, including observations from the Cascadia Initiative ocean bottom seismograph experiment, to constrain the stress orientations. To quantify the implications of this rotation for the strength of the plate boundary, we designed an inversion that solves for the absolute stress tensors in a three-layer model subject to assumptions about the strength of the subducting mantle. Our results indicate that the shear stress on the plate boundary fault is likely no more than about ∼50 MPa at ∼20 km depth. Regardless of the assumed mantle strength, we infer a relatively weak megathrust fault with an effective friction coefficient of ∼0 to 0.2 at seismogenic depths. Such a low value for the effective friction coefficient requires a combination of high fluid pressures and/or fault-zone minerals with low inherent friction in the region where a great earthquake is expected in Cascadia.

  9. Far-Field Deformation Resulting from Rheologic Differences Interacting with Tectonic Stresses: An Example from the Pacific/Australian Plate Boundary in Southern New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phaedra Upton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Miocene in Southern New Zealand was dominated by strike-slip tectonics. Stratigraphic evidence from this time attests to two zones of subsidence in the south: (a a middle Cenozoic pull-apart basin and (b a regionally extensive subsiding lake complex, which developed east and distal to the developing plate boundary structure. The lake overlay a block of crust with a significantly weak mid-crustal section and we pose the question: can rheological transitions at an angle to a plate boundary produce distal subsidence and/or uplift? We use stratigraphic, structural and geophysical observations from Southern New Zealand to constrain three-dimensional numerical models for a variety of boundary conditions and rheological scenarios. We show that coincident subsidence and uplift can result from purely strike-slip boundary conditions interacting with a transition from strong to weak to strong mid-crustal rheology. The resulting pattern of vertical displacement is a function of the symmetry or asymmetry of the boundary conditions and the extent and orientation of the rheological transitions. For the Southern New Zealand case study, subsidence rates of ~0.1 mm/yr are predicted for a relative plate motion of 25 mm/yr, leading to ~500 m of subsidence over a 5 Ma time period, comparable to the thickness of preserved lacustrine sediments.

  10. Investigation of intraplate seismicity near the sites of the 2012 major strike-slip earthquakes in the eastern Indian Ocean through a passive-source OBS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Lin, J.; Yang, H.

    2017-12-01

    The 11 April 2012 Mw8.6 earthquake off the coast of Sumatra in the eastern Indian Ocean was the largest strike-slip earthquake ever recorded. The 2012 mainshock and its aftershock sequences were associated with complex slip partitioning and earthquake interactions of an oblique convergent system, in a new plate boundary zone between the Indian and Australian plates. The detail processes of the earthquake interactions and correlation with seafloor geological structure, however, are still poorly known. During March-April 2017, an array of broadband OBS (ocean bottom seismometer) were deployed, for the first time, near the epicenter region of the 2012 earthquake sequence. During post-expedition data processing, we identified 70 global earthquakes from the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) catalog that occurred during our OBS deployment period. We then picked P and S waves in the seismic records and analyzed their arrival times. We further identified and analyzed multiple local earthquakes and examined their relationship to the observed seafloor structure (fracture zones, seafloor faults, etc.) and the state of stresses in this region of the eastern Indian Ocean. The ongoing analyses of the data obtained from this unique seismic experiment are expected to provide important constraints on the large-scale intraplate deformation in this part of the eastern Indian Ocean.

  11. Models of recurrent strike-slip earthquake cycles and the state of crustal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyzenga, Gregory A.; Raefsky, Arthur; Mulligan, Stephanie G.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical models of the strike-slip earthquake cycle, assuming a viscoelastic asthenosphere coupling model, are examined. The time-dependent simulations incorporate a stress-driven fault, which leads to tectonic stress fields and earthquake recurrence histories that are mutually consistent. Single-fault simulations with constant far-field plate motion lead to a nearly periodic earthquake cycle and a distinctive spatial distribution of crustal shear stress. The predicted stress distribution includes a local minimum in stress at depths less than typical seismogenic depths. The width of this stress 'trough' depends on the magnitude of crustal stress relative to asthenospheric drag stresses. The models further predict a local near-fault stress maximum at greater depths, sustained by the cyclic transfer of strain from the elastic crust to the ductile asthenosphere. Models incorporating both low-stress and high-stress fault strength assumptions are examined, under Newtonian and non-Newtonian rheology assumptions. Model results suggest a preference for low-stress (a shear stress level of about 10 MPa) fault models, in agreement with previous estimates based on heat flow measurements and other stress indicators.

  12. Seismic link at plate boundary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... tested using the coherence of time series to determine the causality and related orientation. The resulting link orientations at the plate boundary conditions indicate that causal triggering seems to be localized along a major fault, as a stress transfer between two major faults, and parallel to the geothermal area extension.

  13. Sub-crustal earthquakes within the Australia-Pacific plate boundary zone beneath the Southern Alps, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boese, C. M.; Stern, T. A.; Townend, J.; Bourguignon, S.; Sheehan, A.; Smith, E. G. C.

    2013-08-01

    Sub-crustal earthquakes have been observed sporadically for ∼40 years in the central South Island of New Zealand. We report on 20 events recorded between December 2008 and February 2012 near the Alpine Fault in the continental collision zone between the Australian and Pacific plates. A subset of 18 events at depths of 47-74 km occurs south of Mt. Cook and together with recently reported tremor locations indicates along-strike variations in deformation behaviour along the plate boundary. The sub-crustal earthquakes south of Mt. Cook increase in depth, frequency and size southwards towards the Puysegur subduction zone. Focal mechanisms could be determined for 14 earthquakes and exhibit predominantly strike-slip and reverse faulting solutions. Stress inversion analysis of the focal mechanisms yields a stress field favouring oblique-reverse faulting. We interpret the geographic and vertical distributions of these sub-crustal events in relation to a previously proposed tectonic model of a remnant passive margin that formed south of New Zealand in the Eocene and was overridden when dextral strike-slip motion initiated on the Alpine Fault. We infer that sub-crustal earthquakes occur along the leading edge of this structure, which is attached to the continental Australian crust.

  14. (Plio-)Pleistocene alluvial-lacustrine basin infill evolution in a strike-slip active zone (Northern Andes, Western-Central Cordilleras, Colombia)

    OpenAIRE

    SUTER, F.; NEUWERTH, R.; GORIN, G.; GUZMÁN, C.

    2009-01-01

    The (Plio)-Pleistocene Zarzal Formation was deposited in the Cauca Depression and Quindío-Risaralda Basin between the Western and Central Cordilleras (Northern Andes). This area is structurally located on the transcurrent Romeral Fault System (RFS). Because of the interaction between the Nazca plate and the Chocó-Panamá block (an active indenter), the RFS strike-slip component changes direction around the study zone (dextral in the south, senestral in the north). Zarzal sediments are the olde...

  15. Continent-continent collision at the Pacific/Australian plate boundary: Lithospheric deformation, mountain building, and subsequent scientific endeavors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaya, D. A.; Stern, T. A.; Davey, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    Continental collision occurs at strike-slip plate boundaries where transform motion and oblique convergence create processes of surficial mountain building and deformation within the deeper crust and lithospheric mantle. The Pacific/Australian transform plate boundary in South Island, New Zealand, is characterized by active oblique continent-continent collision with an associated Southern Alps orogen that exhibits both high exhumation rates and rapid strike-slip movement. Beginning in the 1990s, this system was the focus of a decade-long collaborative USA-New Zealand multi-disciplinary study to understand lithospheric structure and processes involved in this transpression. Funded primarily by the NSF Continental Dynamics program and the New Zealand Science Foundation, this project known as SIGHT (South Island Geophysical Transect) with its companion SAPSE (Southern Alps Passive Seismic Experiment) included the following disciplines that involved substantial field observation experiments: seismic reflection, explosion refraction, onshore-offshore wide-angle reflection/refraction, regional and teleseismic passive seismology, magnetotellurics, laboratory petrophysics, gravity, regional geological investigations, and rheological analyses. More than fifty scientists and students from both nations participated in the combined set of studies that have led to over forty-five journal publications, an AGU Monograph, and a dozen graduate theses. Primary results of the project indicate the Pacific-Australian strike-slip plate boundary (Alpine fault) is not vertical but is eastward dipping and rheologically weak based on diverse geophysical data. Most deformation is within the Pacific plate that hosts the Southern Alps orogen. High mantle seismic velocities vertically disposed beneath the orogen suggest Pacific and perhaps Australian mantle lithosphere contribute to a zone of plate-boundary-parallel distributed mantle shortening. The crustal root of the overlying Southern Alps

  16. Viscoelastic shear zone model of a strike-slip earthquake cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2001-01-01

    I examine the behavior of a two-dimensional (2-D) strike-slip fault system embedded in a 1-D elastic layer (schizosphere) overlying a uniform viscoelastic half-space (plastosphere) and within the boundaries of a finite width shear zone. The viscoelastic coupling model of Savage and Prescott [1978] considers the viscoelastic response of this system, in the absence of the shear zone boundaries, to an earthquake occurring within the upper elastic layer, steady slip beneath a prescribed depth, and the superposition of the responses of multiple earthquakes with characteristic slip occurring at regular intervals. So formulated, the viscoelastic coupling model predicts that sufficiently long after initiation of the system, (1) average fault-parallel velocity at any point is the average slip rate of that side of the fault and (2) far-field velocities equal the same constant rate. Because of the sensitivity to the mechanical properties of the schizosphere-plastosphere system (i.e., elastic layer thickness, plastosphere viscosity), this model has been used to infer such properties from measurements of interseismic velocity. Such inferences exploit the predicted behavior at a known time within the earthquake cycle. By modifying the viscoelastic coupling model to satisfy the additional constraint that the absolute velocity at prescribed shear zone boundaries is constant, I find that even though the time-averaged behavior remains the same, the spatiotemporal pattern of surface deformation (particularly its temporal variation within an earthquake cycle) is markedly different from that predicted by the conventional viscoelastic coupling model. These differences are magnified as plastosphere viscosity is reduced or as the recurrence interval of periodic earthquakes is lengthened. Application to the interseismic velocity field along the Mojave section of the San Andreas fault suggests that the region behaves mechanically like a ???600-km-wide shear zone accommodating 50 mm/yr fault

  17. Transpressional Tectonics across the N. American-Caribbean Plate Boundary: Preliminary Results of a Multichannel Seismic Survey of Lake Azuei, Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, C. K.; Cormier, M. H.; Sloan, H.; Wattrus, N. J.; Boisson, D.; Brown, B.; Guerrier, K.; King, J. W.; Knotts, P.; Momplaisir, R.; Sorlien, C. C.; Stempel, R.; Symithe, S. J.; Ulysse, S. M. J.

    2017-12-01

    On January 12, 2010, a Mw 7.0 earthquake struck Haiti, killing over 200,000 people and devastating the Capital city of Port-au-Prince and the surrounding regions. It ruptured a previously unknown blind-thrust fault that abuts the Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault (EPGF), one of two transform faults that define the North American-Caribbean plate boundary. That earthquake highlighted how transpression across this complex boundary is accommodated by slip partitioning into strike-slip and compressional structures. Because the seismic hazard is higher for a rupture on a reverse or oblique-slip fault than on a vertical strike-slip fault, the need to characterize the geometry of that fault system is clear. Lake Azuei overlies this plate boundary 60 km east of the 2010 epicenter. The lake's 23 km long axis trends NW-SE, parallel to the Haitian fold-and-thrust belt and oblique to the EPGF. This tectonic context makes it an ideal target for investigating the partitioning of plate motion between strike-slip and compressional structures. In January 2017, we acquired 222 km of multichannel seismic (MCS) profiles in the lake, largely concurrent with subbottom seismic (CHIRP) profiles. The MCS data were acquired using a high-frequency BubbleGun source and a 75 m-long, 24-channel streamer, achieving a 24 seismic fold with a penetration of 200 m below lakebed. With the goal of resolving tectonic structures in 3-D, survey lines were laid out in a grid with profiles spaced 1.2 km apart. Additional profiles were acquired at the SE end of the lake where most of the tectonic activity is presumably occurring. The co-located CHIRP and MCS profiles document the continuity of tectonic deformation between the surficial sediments and the deeper strata. Preliminary processing suggests that a SW-dipping blind thrust fault, expressed updip as a large monocline fold, may control the western edge of the lake. Gentle, young folds that protrude from the flat lakebed are also imaged with the CHIRP

  18. Right-lateral shear and rotation as the explanation for strike-slip faulting in eastern Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Philip; Molnar, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Bounds are placed here on the rate of rotation proposed by Cobbold and Davy (1988) for the major strike-slip faults in the eastern Tibetan Plateau. It is also concluded here that the image of lateral transport on such faults, known also as continental escape, extrusion, or expulsion, is an illusion, and that instead the left-lateral slip on east-striking plates in eastern Tibet is a manifestation of north-striking right-lateral simple shear. If this conclusion is correct, the east-striking left-lateral faults and the crustal blocks between them are rotating clockwise at 1-2 deg/Myr, the east-west dimension of eastern Tibet is shortening at 10-20 mm/yr, and little material is moving eastward out of India's path into Eursasia by left-lateral simple shear.

  19. High tsunami frequency as a result of combined strike-slip faulting and coastal landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbach, Matthew J.; Braudy, Nicole; Briggs, Richard W.; Cormier, Marie-Helene; Davis, Marcy B.; Diebold, John B.; Dieudonne, Nicole; Douilly, Roby; Frohlich, Cliff; Gulick, Sean P.S.; Johnson, Harold E.; Mann, Paul; McHugh, Cecilia; Ryan-Mishkin, Katherine; Prentice, Carol S.; Seeber, Leonardo; Sorlien, Christopher C.; Steckler, Michael S.; Symithe, Steeve Julien; Taylor, Frederick W.; Templeton, John

    2010-01-01

    Earthquakes on strike-slip faults can produce devastating natural hazards. However, because they consist predominantly of lateral motion, these faults are rarely associated with significant uplift or tsunami generation. And although submarine slides can generate tsunami, only a few per cent of all tsunami are believed to be triggered in this way. The 12 January Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake exhibited primarily strike-slip motion but nevertheless generated a tsunami. Here we present data from a comprehensive field survey that covered the onshore and offshore area around the epicentre to document that modest uplift together with slope failure caused tsunamigenesis. Submarine landslides caused the most severe tsunami locally. Our analysis suggests that slide-generated tsunami occur an order-of-magnitude more frequently along the Gonave microplate than global estimates predict. Uplift was generated because of the earthquake's location, where the Caribbean and Gonave microplates collide obliquely. The earthquake also caused liquefaction at several river deltas that prograde rapidly and are prone to failure. We conclude that coastal strike-slip fault systems such as the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault produce relief conducive to rapid sedimentation, erosion and slope failure, so that even modest predominantly strike-slip earthquakes can cause potentially catastrophic slide-generated tsunami - a risk that is underestimated at present.

  20. A note on 2-D lithospheric deformation due to a blind strike-slip fault

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mic deformation. Several researchers have devel- oped models of coseismic lithospheric deformation. Rybicki (1971) found a closed-form analytical solu- tion for the problem of a long vertical strike-slip fault in a two-layer model of the earth. Chinnery and Jovanovich (1972) extended the solution to a three-layer model.

  1. E–W strike slip shearing of Kinwat granitoid at South East Deccan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R D Kaplay

    2017-07-21

    Jul 21, 2017 ... cO Indian Academy of Sciences. DOI 10.1007/s12040-017-0853-8. E–W strike slip shearing of Kinwat granitoid at South East. Deccan ...... shear zone, Sutlej section-structural geology and extrusion mechanism by various combinations of simple shear, pure shear and channel flow in shifting modes; Int. J.

  2. Shell Tectonics: A Mechanical Model for Strike-slip Displacement on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose; Wurman, Gilead; Huff, Eric M.; Manga, Michael; Hurford, Terry A.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new mechanical model for producing tidally-driven strike-slip displacement along preexisting faults on Europa, which we call shell tectonics. This model differs from previous models of strike-slip on icy satellites by incorporating a Coulomb failure criterion, approximating a viscoelastic rheology, determining the slip direction based on the gradient of the tidal shear stress rather than its sign, and quantitatively determining the net offset over many orbits. This model allows us to predict the direction of net displacement along faults and determine relative accumulation rate of displacement. To test the shell tectonics model, we generate global predictions of slip direction and compare them with the observed global pattern of strike-slip displacement on Europa in which left-lateral faults dominate far north of the equator, right-lateral faults dominate in the far south, and near-equatorial regions display a mixture of both types of faults. The shell tectonics model reproduces this global pattern. Incorporating a small obliquity into calculations of tidal stresses, which are used as inputs to the shell tectonics model, can also explain regional differences in strike-slip fault populations. We also discuss implications for fault azimuths, fault depth, and Europa's tectonic history.

  3. A note on 2-D lithospheric deformation due to a blind strike-slip fault

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chinnery and Jovanovich (1972) extended the solution to a three-layer model. Savage and Prescott (1978) constructed a simple two-dimensional model of an earthquake cycle that takes place on a transform fault. Singh and Rani (1994) obtained an analytical solution for the problem of a long inclined strike- slip fault in an ...

  4. The Role of Near-Fault Relief in Creating and Maintaining Strike-Slip Landscape Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbert, S.; Duvall, A. R.; Tucker, G. E.

    2016-12-01

    Geomorphic landforms, such as shutter ridges, offset river terraces, and deflected stream channels, are often used to assess the activity and slip rates of strike-slip faults. However, in some systems, such as parts of the Marlborough Fault System (South Island, NZ), an active strike-slip fault does not leave a strong landscape signature. Here we explore the factors that dampen or enhance the landscape signature of strike-slip faulting using the Channel-Hillslope Integrated Landscape Development model (CHILD). We focus on variables affecting the length of channel offsets, which enhance the signature of strike-slip motion, and the frequency of stream captures, which eliminate offsets and reduce this signature. We model a strike-slip fault that passes through a mountain ridge, offsetting streams that drain across this fault. We use this setup to test the response of channel offset length and capture frequency to fault characteristics, such as slip rate and ratio of lateral to vertical motion, and to landscape characteristics, such as relief contrasts controlled by erodibility. Our experiments show that relief downhill of the fault, whether generated by differential uplift across the fault or by an erodibility contrast, has the strongest effect on offset length and capture frequency. This relief creates shutter ridges, which block and divert streams while being advected along a fault. Shutter ridges and the streams they divert have long been recognized as markers of strike-slip motion. Our results show specifically that the height of shutter ridges is most responsible for the degree to which they create long channel offsets by preventing stream captures. We compare these results to landscape metrics in the Marlborough Fault System, where shutter ridges are common and often lithologically controlled. We compare shutter ridge length and height to channel offset length in order to assess the influence of relief on offset channel features in a real landscape. Based on our

  5. THE ILICA BRANCH OF THE SOUTHEASTERN ESKIŞEHIR FAULT ZONE: AN ACTIVE RIGHT LATERAL STRIKE-SLIP STRUCTURE IN CENTRAL ANATOLIA, TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korhan ESAT

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Eskişehir Fault Zone is one of the prominent neotectonic structures of Turkey. It separates the west  Anatolian extensional province and the strike-slip induced northwest central Anatolian contractional area in the Anatolian Block. Its southeastern part is generally divided into three branches, namely the Ilıca, Yeniceoba, and Cihanbeyli from north to south, respectively. The right lateral strike-slip Ilıca branch (IB is an approximately 100-km-long fault and it is composed of several segments in a northwest-southeast direction. The slickensides, subsidiary fractures, cataclastic zone, fracture-controlled drainage pattern, right lateral stream deflections, deformation in the Quaternary unit observing in the seismic reflection sections, and seismicity of the region all indicate that the IB is an active right lateral strike-slip fault. The IB has also a regional tectonic importance as a boundary fault between the contractional and the extensional regions in central Anatolia considering that it is the southern limit of the contraction-related structures in the west-southwest of Ankara.

  6. Hidden Earthquake Potential in Plate Boundary Transition Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Kevin P.; Herman, Matthew; Govers, Rob

    2017-04-01

    the Pacific plate (without a triple junction). Here, the short-term, earthquake-cycle signal recorded by GPS shows a reduction in plate motion-directed displacements, which has been interpreted to reflect reduced coupling along the southernmost segment. However, this signal records both the subduction interface coupling effects related to the megathrust earthquake cycle and the shear deformation produced by the extensive right-lateral shear of the Marlborough Fault system (MFS). This superposition of deformation signals combine to mask a strongly coupled interface. The relevance of this effect is seen in the recent (November 2016) Kaikoura earthquake ,which appears to have both ruptured the megathrust interface and produced strike slip displacements on upper-plate crustal faults. These effects seen at these locations and elsewhere may cause misinterpretations of short-term deformation signals in terms of the longer term tectonic behavior of the plate boundary, missing a significant component of the earthquake potential.

  7. Evidence of displacement-driven maturation along the San Cristobal Trough transform plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, James S.; Furlong, Kevin P.

    2018-03-01

    The San Cristobal Trough (SCT), formed by the tearing of the Australia plate as it subducts under the Pacific plate near the Solomon Islands, provides an opportunity to study the transform boundary development process. Recent seismicity (2013-2016) along the 280 km long SCT, known as a Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator (STEP) fault, highlights the tearing process and ongoing development of the plate boundary. The region's earthquakes reveal two key characteristics. First, earthquakes at the western terminus of the SCT, which we interpret to indicate the Australia plate tearing, display disparate fault geometries. These events demonstrate that plate tearing is accommodated via multiple intersecting planes rather than a single through-going fault. Second, the SCT hosts sequences of Mw ∼7 strike-slip earthquakes that migrate westward through a rapid succession of events. Sequences in 1993 and 2015 both began along the eastern SCT and propagated west, but neither progression ruptured into or nucleated a large earthquake within the region near the tear. Utilizing b-value and Coulomb Failure Stress analyses, we examine these along-strike variations in the SCT's seismicity. b-Values are highest along the youngest, western end of the SCT and decrease with increasing distance from the tear. This trend may reflect increasing strain localization with increasing displacement. Coulomb Failure Stress analyses indicate that the stress conditions were conducive to continued western propagation of the 1993 and 2015 sequences suggesting that the unruptured western SCT may have fault geometries or properties that inhibit continued rupture. Our results indicate a displacement-driven fault maturation process. The multi-plane Australia plate tearing likely creates a western SCT with diffuse strain accommodated along a network of disorganized faults. After ∼90 km of cumulative displacement (∼900,000 yr of plate motion), strain localizes and faults align, allowing the SCT to host

  8. Plate boundary deformation at the latitude of the Salton Trough - northern Gulf of California (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Along the Pacific-North America plate boundary zone, the segment including the southern San Andreas fault to Salton Trough and northern Gulf of California basins has been transtensional throughout its evolution, based on Pacific-North America displacement vectors calculated from the global plate circuit (900 × 20 km at N54°W since 20 Ma; 460 × 20 km at N48°W since 11 Ma). Nevertheless, active seismicity and focal mechanisms show a broad zone of plate boundary deformation within which the inferred stress regime varies locally (Yang & Hauksson 2013 GJI), and fault patterns in some regions suggest ongoing tectonic rotation. Similar behavior is inferred to have occurred in this zone over most of its history. Crustal structure in this region is constrained by surface geology, geophysical experiments (e.g., the 2011 Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), USGS Imperial Valley 1979, PACE), and interdisciplinary marine and onland studies in Mexico (e.g., NARS-Baja, Cortes, and surveys by PEMEX). Magnetic data (e.g., EMAG-2) aids in the recognition of large-scale crustal provinces and fault boundaries in regions lacking detailed geophysical surveys. Consideration of existing constraints on crustal thickness and architecture, and fault and basin evolution suggests that to reconcile geological deformation with plate motion history, the following additional factors need to be taken into account. 1) Plate boundary displacement via interacting systems of rotating blocks, coeval with slip on steep strike slip faults, and possibly related to slip on low angle extensional faults (e.g, Axen & Fletcher 1998 IGR) may be typical prior to the onset of seafloor spreading. This fault style may have accommodated up to 150 km of plate motion in the Mexican Continental Borderland and north of the Vizcaino Peninsula, likely between 12 and 15 Ma, as well as explaining younger rotations adjacent to the Gulf of California and current deformation southwest of the Salton Sea. 2) Geophysical

  9. A note on 2-D lithospheric deformation due to a blind strike-slip fault

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Analytical solution for the problem of a surface-breaking long strike-slip fault in an elastic layer overlying an elastic half-space is well known. The purpose of this note is to obtain the corresponding solution for a blind fault. Since the solution is valid for arbitrary values of the fault-depth and the dip angle, the effects of these ...

  10. Propagation of strike-slip faults across Holocene volcano-sedimentary deposits, Pasto, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovida, Andrea; Tibaldi, Alessandro

    2005-10-01

    This study contributes to the understanding of shear failure development on the basis of macroscopic field data collected in latest Pleistocene-Holocene pyroclastic and fluvio-lacustrine deposits in the Pasto Valley, SW Colombia. Here there is a pervasive system of microfaults and joints. Right-lateral strike-slip microfaults strike N065°, whereas left-lateral strike-slip microfaults strike N120°. Three main joint sets strike N, N065° and N020° in decreasing order of frequency. Stress computation gives a horizontal σ1 trending ˜N060° and a horizontal σ3 trending ˜N150°, consistent with earthquake focal mechanisms and stress inversion of main faults. Synthetic shears dominate resulting from nucleation of older cracks. In the basement cropping out northeast of Pasto, the NE- to ENE-striking Buesaco, Aranda and Pasto Faults show evidence of latest Pleistocene-Holocene right-lateral strike-slip motions. The structures in the Pasto Valley can be interpreted as a Mode III damage zone representing the up-dip propagation of the main faults across the young volcano-sedimentary deposits.

  11. Holocene paleoearthquakes on the strike-slip Porters Pass Fault, Canterbury, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, M.; Nicol, A.; Campbell, J.; Pettinga, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    The Porters Pass Fault comprises a series of discontinuous Holocene active traces which extend for c. 40 km between the Rakaia and Waimakariri Rivers in the foothills of the Southern Alps. There have been no historical earthquakes on the Porters Pass Fault (i.e., within the last 150 yr), and the purpose of this paper is to establish the timing and magnitudes of displacements on the fault at the ground surface during Holocene paleoearthquakes. Displaced geomorphic features (e.g., relict streams, stream channels, and ridge crests), measured using either tape measure (n = 20) or surveying equipment (n = 5), range from 5.5 to 33 m right lateral strike slip and are consistent with six earthquakes characterised by slip per event of c. 5-7 m. The timing of these earthquakes is constrained by radiocarbon dates from four trenches excavated across the fault and two auger sites from within swamps produced by ponding of drainage along the fault scarp. These data indicate markedly different Holocene earthquake histories along the fault length separated by a behavioural segment boundary near Lake Coleridge. On the eastern segment at least six Holocene earthquakes were identified at 8400-9000, 5700-6700, 4500-6000, 2300-2500, 800-1100, and 500-600 yr BP, producing an average recurrence interval of c. 1500 yr. On the western segment of the fault in the Rakaia River valley, a single surface-rupturing earthquake displaced Acheron Advance glacial deposits (c.10,000-14,000 yr in age) and may represent the southward continuation of the 2300-2500 yr event identified on the eastern segment. These data suggest Holocene slip rates of 3.2-4.1 mm/yr and 0.3-0.9 mm/yr on the eastern and western sections of the fault, respectively. Displacement and timing data suggest that earthquakes ruptured the western segment of the fault in no more than one-sixth of cases and that for a sample period of 10,000 yr the recurrence intervals were not characteristic. (auth). 45 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  12. BOLIVAR: Crustal Structure Across the Caribbean-South American Plate Boundary at 70W: Results from Refraction and Reflection Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedez, M. C.; Zelt, C. A.; Magnani, M. B.; Levander, A.; Christeson, G. L.; Sawyer, D. S.

    2005-12-01

    The active-seismic component of the BOLIVAR project (Broadband Ocean and Land Investigations of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region) was completed in June 2004. Among the goals of BOLIVAR is to study the structure of the South America-Caribbean plate boundary as a site of likely continental growth by island arc accretion of the Leeward Antilles arc to the South American continent. In the west end of the Venezuelan basin the complex motion across the plate boundary is poorly understood. Other studies have concluded that the Caribbean Plate is subducting beneath the South American Plate and the Leeward Antilles arc is being accreted to older continental crust. Complicating this picture, the Maracaibo block is being displaced northward along the Bocono and Santa Marta strike-slip faults, while the Oca fault is a paleo-strand of the large right-lateral strike-slip system of the plate boundary. We present results of analyses of refraction and reflection seismic data along a 450 km long onshore-offshore profile at 70oW, extending from 10oN to 14.3oN. The refraction data include 40 Ocean Bottom Seismometer (OBS) and 348 Reftek Texan land seismometers that recorded the R/V Ewing airgun shots. The land stations also recorded two large landshots to provide reversed refraction coverage onshore. A 2-D velocity model obtained from travel time inversion of first arrivals shows that the Caribbean crust is anomalously thick, typical of oceanic plateau, ~ 15-20 km. Low velocity sediments, on the Caribbean oceanic plateau, are observed subducting beneath the South-Caribbean deformed belt over a distance of 75-100 km. We also observe low velocities associated with the Paraguana/Falcon basin extending from onshore to offshore depths of 3 km. We observe localized high compressional velocities spatially associated with the Oca fault. Similar high velocity bodies are observed on other BOLIVAR transects (see Avé Lallemant et al., this session). A migrated stack of the marine reflection

  13. Geometry and structure of the pull-apart basins developed along the western South American-Scotia plate boundary (SW Atlantic Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, F. D.; Tassone, A.; Isola, J. I.; Lodolo, E.; Menichetti, M.

    2018-04-01

    The South American-Scotia plate boundary is a left-lateral fault system which runs roughly E-W for more than 3000 km across the SW Atlantic Ocean and the Tierra del Fuego Island, reaching to the west the southern Chile Trench. Analyses of a large dataset of single- and multi-channel seismic reflection profiles acquired offshore has allowed to map the trace of the plate boundary from Tierra del Fuego to the Malvinas Trough, a tectonic depression located in the eastern part of the fault system, and to reconstruct the shape and geometry of the basins formed along the principal displacement zone of the fault system. Three main Neogene pull-apart basins that range from 70 to 100 km in length, and from 12 to 22 km in width, have been identified along this segment of the plate boundary. These basins have elongated shapes with their major axes parallel to the ENE-WSW direction of the fault zone. The sedimentary architecture and the infill geometry of the basins suggest that they represent mostly strike-slip dominated transtension basins which propagated from E to W. The basins imaged by seismic data show in some cases geometrical and structural features linked to the possible reactivation of previous wedge-top basins and inherited structures pertaining to the external front of the Magallanes fold-and-thrust compression belt, along which the South American-Scotia fault system has been superimposed. It is suggested that the sequence of the elongated basins occur symmetrically to a thorough going strike-slip fault, in a left-stepping geometrical arrangement, in a manner similar to those basins seen in other transcurrent environments.

  14. Magmatic control along a strike-slip volcanic arc: The central Aeolian arc (Italy)

    KAUST Repository

    Ruch, Joel

    2016-01-23

    The regional stress field in volcanic areas may be overprinted by that produced by magmatic activity, promoting volcanism and faulting. In particular, in strike-slip settings, the definition of the relationships between the regional stress field and magmatic activity remains elusive. To better understand these relationships, we collected stratigraphic, volcanic and structural field data along the strike-slip Central Aeolian arc (Italy): here the islands of Lipari and Vulcano separate the extensional portion of the arc (to the east) from the contractional one (to the west). We collected >500 measurements of faults, extension fractures and dikes at 40 sites. Most structures are NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE oriented, eastward dipping, and show almost pure dip-slip motion; consistent with an E-W extension direction, with minor dextral and sinistral shear. Our data highlight six eruptive periods during the last 55 ka, which allow considering both islands as a single magmatic system, in which tectonic and magmatic activity steadily migrated eastward and currently focus on a 10 km long x 2 km wide active segment. Faulting appears to mostly occur in temporal and spatial relation with magmatic events, supporting that most of the observable deformation derives from transient magmatic activity (shorter-term, days to months), rather than from steady longer-term regional tectonics (102-104 years). More in general, the Central Aeolian case shows how magmatic activity may affect the structure and evolution of volcanic arcs, overprinting any strike-slip motion with magma-induced extension at the surface.

  15. Aseismic strike-slip associated with the 2007 dike intrusion episode in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himematsu, Yuji; Furuya, Masato

    2015-08-01

    In July 2007, an earthquake swarm initiated in northern Tanzania near Lake Natron and lasted for about two months. Mt. Oldoinyo Lengai, located to the southwest of the swarm, began to erupt effusively about a month prior to the swarm, and increased its eruption intensity on September when the swarm almost ceased. Several previous studies have already reported the crustal deformation signals associated with the swarm using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). However, nearly all the published data are based on the C-band ENVISAT/ASAR images acquired only from the descending path. We use the L-band ALOS/PALSAR images acquired from both ascending and descending paths, which allow us to examine the deformation signals in more detail. In addition to the InSAR data, we employ the offset-tracking technique to detect the signals along the azimuth direction. Using InSAR and offset-tracking data, we obtain the full 3D displacement fields associated with the episode. Besides the horizontal extension and subsidence signals due to the dike intrusion as already reported, the inferred full 3D displacements further indicate that the subsiding zone was horizontally moving by ~ 48 cm toward SSW. To explain the displacements, we performed fault source modeling, assuming an elastic half space. The fault slip distribution indicates that the contribution of the strike-slip component is about 20% of total moment release. Because almost all the focal mechanisms of earthquakes during the 2007 event indicate nearly pure normal faulting, aseismic strike-slip must have been responsible for the horizontal movement of the subsiding zone. The strike-slip at the shallowest depths suggests the presence of transtensive stress, which seems to be reasonable to generate the relay zones that are widely observed in the East African Rift. We also confirmed that the stress changes due to the dike intrusion were consistent with the inferred fault slip distributions.

  16. Slip Behavior of the Queen Charlotte Plate Boundary Before and After the 2012, MW 7.8 Haida Gwaii Earthquake: Evidence From Repeating Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Tim W.; Bostock, Michael G.

    2017-11-01

    The Queen Charlotte plate boundary, near Haida Gwaii, B.C., includes the dextral, strike-slip, Queen Charlotte Fault (QCF) and the subduction interface between the downgoing Pacific and overriding North American plates. In this study, we present a comprehensive repeating earthquake catalog that represents an effective slip meter for both structures. The catalog comprises 712 individual earthquakes (0.3≤MW≤3.5) arranged into 224 repeating earthquake families on the basis of waveform similarity and source separation estimates from coda wave interferometry. We employ and extend existing relationships for repeating earthquake magnitudes and slips to provide cumulative slip histories for the QCF and subduction interface in six adjacent zones within the study area between 52.3°N and 53.8°N. We find evidence for creep on both faults; however, creep rates are significantly less than plate motion rates, which suggests partial locking of both faults. The QCF exhibits the highest degrees of locking south of 52.8°N, which indicates that the seismic hazard for a major strike-slip earthquake is highest in the southern part of the study area. The 28 October 2012, MW 7.8 Haida Gwaii thrust earthquake occurred in our study area and altered the slip dynamics of the plate boundary. The QCF is observed to undergo accelerated, right-lateral slip for 1-2 months following the earthquake. The subduction interface exhibits afterslip thrust motion that persists for the duration of the study period (i.e., 3 years and 2 months after the Haida Gwaii earthquake). Afterslip is greatest (5.7-8.4 cm/yr) on the periphery of the main rupture zone of the Haida Gwaii event.

  17. Crimea-Kopet Dagh zone of concentrated orogenic deformations as a transregional late collisional right-lateral strike-slip fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patina, I. S.; Leonov, Yu. G.; Volozh, Yu. A.; Kopp, M. L.; Antipov, M. P.

    2017-07-01

    It is shown that the Crimea, Caucasus, and Kopet Dagh fold systems make up a single whole unified by a lithospheric strike-slip fault zone of concentrated dislocations. The strike-slip fault that dissects the sedimentary cover and consolidated crust is rooted in subcrustal layers of the mantle. The notions about strike-slip dislocations in the structure of the Crimea-Kopet Dagh System are considered. Comparative analysis of structure, age, and amplitude of strike-slip fault segments is carried out. The effect of strike-slip faulting on the deep-seated and near-surface structure of the Earth's crust is considered. Based on estimation of strike-slip offsets, the paleogeography of Paleogene basins is refined; their initial contours, which have been disturbed and fragmented by slipping motion strike-slip displacement, have been reconstructed.

  18. Source study of the Jan Mayen transform fault strike-slip earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Q.; Ottemöller, L.

    2014-07-01

    Seismic source parameters of oceanic transform zone earthquakes have been relatively poorly studied. Previous studies showed that this type of earthquakes has unique characteristics such as not only the relatively common occurrence of slow events with weak seismic radiation at high frequencies but also the occurrence of some events that have high apparent stress indicating strong high frequency radiation. We studied 5 strike-slip earthquakes in the Jan Mayen fracture zone with magnitudes in the range of 5.9 centroid time delay compared to other oceanic transform fault earthquakes.

  19. Strike-slip pull-apart process and emplacement of Xiangshan uranium-producing volcanic basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Aijin; Guo Lingzhi; Shu Liangshu

    2001-01-01

    Xiangshan volcanic basin is one of the famous uranium-producing volcanic basins in China. Emplacement mechanism of Xiangshan uranium-producing volcanic basin is discussed on the basis of the latest research achievements of deep geology in Xiangshan area and the theory of continental dynamics. The study shows that volcanic activity in Xiangshan volcanic basin may be divided into two cycles, and its emplacement is controlled by strike-ship pull-apart process originated from the deep regional faults. Volcanic apparatus in the first cycle was emplaced in EW-trending structure activated by clockwise strike-slipping of NE-trending deep fault, forming the EW-trending fissure-type volcanic effusion belt. Volcanic apparatus in the second cycle was emplaced at junction points of SN-trending pull-apart structure activated by sinistral strike-slipping of NE-trending deep faults and EW-trending basement faults causing the center-type volcanic magma effusion and extrusion. Moreover, the formation mechanism of large-rich uranium deposits is discussed as well

  20. Dynamic response to strike-slip tectonic control on the deposition and evolution of the Baranof Fan, Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Maureen A. L.; Gulick, Sean P. S.; Reece, Robert S.; Barth, Ginger A.; Christeson, Gail L.; VanAvendonk, Harm J.

    2014-01-01

    The Baranof Fan is one of three large deep-sea fans in the Gulf of Alaska, and is a key component in understanding large-scale erosion and sedimentation patterns for southeast Alaska and western Canada. We integrate new and existing seismic reflection profiles to provide new constraints on the Baranof Fan area, geometry, volume, and channel development. We estimate the fan’s area and total sediment volume to be ∼323,000 km2 and ∼301,000 km3, respectively, making it among the largest deep-sea fans in the world. We show that the Baranof Fan consists of channel-levee deposits from at least three distinct aggradational channel systems: the currently active Horizon and Mukluk channels, and the waning system we call the Baranof channel. The oldest sedimentary deposits are in the northern fan, and the youngest deposits at the fan’s southern extent; in addition, the channels seem to avulse southward consistently through time. We suggest that Baranof Fan sediment is sourced from the Coast Mountains in southeastern Alaska, transported offshore most recently via fjord to glacial sea valley conduits. Because of the translation of the Pacific plate northwest past sediment sources on the North American plate along the Queen Charlotte strike-slip fault, we suggest that new channel formation, channel beheadings, and southward-migrating channel avulsions have been influenced by regional tectonics. Using a simplified tectonic reconstruction assuming a constant Pacific plate motion of 4.4 cm/yr, we estimate that Baranof Fan deposition initiated ca. 7 Ma.

  1. Large-Scale Present-Day Plate Boundary Deformations in the Eastern Hemisphere Determined from VLBI Data: Implications for Plate Tectonics and Indian Ocean Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akilan, A.; Abdul Azeez, K. K.; Schuh, H.; Yuvraaj, N.

    2015-10-01

    The dynamics of the planet Earth are manifestations of diverse plate tectonic processes which have been occurring since the Archean period of the Earth's evolution and continue to deform the plate boundaries. Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) is an efficient space geodetic method that enables precise measurement of plate motion and associated deformations. We analyze here VLBI measurements made during a period of approximately three decades at five locations on the Eastern hemisphere of the globe, which are geographically distributed over five continents (plates) around the Indian Ocean. Computed rate of change of baseline length show the deformation pattern and its rate at the boundaries between the major tectonic plates constituting the Eastern hemisphere of the Earth. The African (Nubian) and Antarctic plates are moving apart at 13.5 mm/year, which is mostly attributed to spreading of the South West Indian Ridge. Similarly, spreading of 59.0 mm/year is observed for the South East Indian Ridge that separates the Antarctic and Australian plates. Shortening at the rate of 3.9 mm/year is estimated across the subduction boundary between Africa (Nubia) and Eurasia. Similar convergence is evident between the Australian and Sunda blocks (of the Eurasian plate). The associated deformation of -54.8 mm/year seems to be chiefly accommodated along the Banda arc system, where the Australian plate is subducting under the Sunda block. VLBI sites within the Eurasian plate, Wettzell in Germany, and Seshan on the South China block, are moving apart at 3.6 mm/year. This relative motion between locations on the same plate is interpreted as a result of the deformation process along a large strike-slip fault, which is identified as the Western boundary of the South China block. Expansion of the Indian Ocean, at +91.5 m2/year, is also estimated from the rate of deformation estimated within the five baselines studied here. From the Hurst exponent values, which are indicators of

  2. An updated digital model of plate boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Peter

    2003-03-01

    A global set of present plate boundaries on the Earth is presented in digital form. Most come from sources in the literature. A few boundaries are newly interpreted from topography, volcanism, and/or seismicity, taking into account relative plate velocities from magnetic anomalies, moment tensor solutions, and/or geodesy. In addition to the 14 large plates whose motion was described by the NUVEL-1A poles (Africa, Antarctica, Arabia, Australia, Caribbean, Cocos, Eurasia, India, Juan de Fuca, Nazca, North America, Pacific, Philippine Sea, South America), model PB2002 includes 38 small plates (Okhotsk, Amur, Yangtze, Okinawa, Sunda, Burma, Molucca Sea, Banda Sea, Timor, Birds Head, Maoke, Caroline, Mariana, North Bismarck, Manus, South Bismarck, Solomon Sea, Woodlark, New Hebrides, Conway Reef, Balmoral Reef, Futuna, Niuafo'ou, Tonga, Kermadec, Rivera, Galapagos, Easter, Juan Fernandez, Panama, North Andes, Altiplano, Shetland, Scotia, Sandwich, Aegean Sea, Anatolia, Somalia), for a total of 52 plates. No attempt is made to divide the Alps-Persia-Tibet mountain belt, the Philippine Islands, the Peruvian Andes, the Sierras Pampeanas, or the California-Nevada zone of dextral transtension into plates; instead, they are designated as "orogens" in which this plate model is not expected to be accurate. The cumulative-number/area distribution for this model follows a power law for plates with areas between 0.002 and 1 steradian. Departure from this scaling at the small-plate end suggests that future work is very likely to define more very small plates within the orogens. The model is presented in four digital files: a set of plate boundary segments; a set of plate outlines; a set of outlines of the orogens; and a table of characteristics of each digitization step along plate boundaries, including estimated relative velocity vector and classification into one of 7 types (continental convergence zone, continental transform fault, continental rift, oceanic spreading ridge

  3. How seismicity impacts the evolution and branching of strike-slip faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, S.; van Dinther, Y.; Ampuero, J. P.; Herrendoerfer, R.; Gerya, T.

    2017-12-01

    Strike-slip fault systems are capable of producing large earthquakes on both their main fault and on secondary and potentially unknown faults. A recent example is the 2016 Mw 7.8 Kaikōura earthquake that resulted in surface ruptures along at least 12 major crustal faults. Strike-slip faults are surrounded by inelastic off-fault deformation zones whose displacement accounts for up to 60% of the total displacement. Secondary faults in California accommodate up to 43% of the total fault slip rate of mapped faults taken from the SCEC catalog, while unknown faults arguably accommodate up to 30% of the long-term strain. To better understand these complexities and the long-term evolution of branching fault structures, we quantify the parameters influencing branching structure with a particular focus on the role of seismicity. We incorporate the relevant dynamics of both long-term fault evolution and short-term seismogenesis using the continuum visco-elasto-plastic tools of Seismo-Thermo-Mechanical (STM) modeling approach (van Dinther et al., 2013, Herrendörfer et al., in prep). Long-term fault evolution is governed by Drucker-Prager plasticity and plastic strain weakening of cohesion, while frictional weakening and rapid slip is governed by either strongly rate-dependent (RDF) or rate-and-state friction (RSF). We use a 2D, plane view, natural scale model setup (1200 km x 1000 km), which contains the end of a dextral mature strike-slip fault on one side. Episodic slip events on this pre-existing fault patch propagate into the undamaged host rock. As faults grow they develop a fan-like plastic strain envelope, whose width keeps growing with fault length and accumulated on-fault slip. We interpret this zone as a splay-fault network, which is typically seen ahead of propagating fault tips. We analyze the evolving faults in terms of dissipated strain energy GC, accumulated slip D and fault length L. Results show that a single event is capable of producing a several hundreds

  4. Continental strike slip fault zones in geologically complex lithosphere: the North Anatolian Fault, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, David; Thompson, David; Papaleo, Elvira; Rost, Sebastian; Houseman, Gregory; Kahraman, Metin; Turkelli, Niyazi; Teoman, Ugur; Altuncu Poyraz, Selda; Gulen, Levent; Utkucu, Murat

    2016-04-01

    As part of the multi-disciplinary Faultlab project, we present new detailed images in a geologically complex region where the crust and upper mantle is bisected by a major continental strike-slip fault system. Our study region samples the north Anatolian fault zone (NAFZ) near the epicentres of two large earthquakes that occurred in 1999 at Izmit (M7.5) and Düzce (M7.2) and where estimates of present day slip rate are 20-25 mm/yr. Using recordings of teleseismic earthquakes from a rectangular seismometer array spanning the NAFZ with 66 stations at a nominal inter-station spacing of 7 km and 7 additional stations further afield, we build a detailed 3-D image of structure and anisotropy using receiver functions, tomography and shear wave splitting and illuminate major changes in the architecture and properties of the upper crust, lower crust and upper mantle, both across and along the two branches of the NAFZ, at length scales of less than 20 km. We show that the northern NAFZ branch depth extent varies from the mid-crust to the upper mantle and it is likely to be less than 10 km wide. A high velocity lower crust and a region of crustal underthrusting appear to add strength to a heterogeneous crust and play a role in dictating the variation in faulting style and postseismic deformation. Sharp changes in lithospheric mantle velocity and anisotropy are constrained as the NAFZ is crossed, whereas crustal structure and anisotropy vary considerably both parallel and perpendicular to the faulting. We use our observations to test current models of the localisation of strike-slip deformation and develop new ideas to explain how narrow fault zones develop in extremely heterogeneous lithosphere.

  5. Multiple strike slip faults sets: A case study from the Dead Sea transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron, Hagai; Nur, Amos; Eyal, Y.

    1990-01-01

    In many strike slip tectonic settings, large rotations of crust blocks about vertical axes have been inferred from paleomagnetic data. These blocks are bounded by sets of parallel faults which presumably accommodate the relative motion between the blocks as regional deformation progress. A mechanical model by Nur et al., (1986) suggests that rotations greater than phi sub c equals 25 to 45 degrees must be accommodated by more than one set of faults, with angle phi sub c between their direction; consequently the sum of the angles between sets must be roughly equal to the total tectonic material rotation. To test this model, the authors investigated the fault geometry and field relation of fault sets in the Mt. Hermon area in northern Israel, where paleomagnetic declination implies data 69 degrees plus or minus 13 degrees counter-clockwise block rotation. The statistical and field relation analysis of over 315 faults shows that the faulting is predominantly right lateral strike slip consisting of three distinct sets. The oldest set strikes 253 degrees, the second oldest set strikes 293 degrees and the youngest strikes 339 degrees. This last direction is consistent also with the current north-south direction of the maximum principle stress axis. The angle phi sub c between the first and second sets is 39 degrees and between the second and third sets 46 degrees, in good agreement with the phi sub c angle predicted from mechanical considerations. The sum of the two angles is 85 degrees, in good agreement with the 69 degrees plus or minus 13 degrees CCW paleomagnetically derived rotation. The results suggest specifically that the sequential development of multiple intersecting fault sets is responsible for the faulting in the Mt. Hermon area; and generally that the model of block rotation with multiple faults provides very good simple rules for analyzing very complex fault patterns.

  6. High-rate GPS results for the April 2012 Sumatra earthquake sequence, an unusual, complex, and very large intraplate strike-slip event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E. M.; Hermawan, I.; Lay, T.; Yue, H.; Banerjee, P.; Qiu, Q.; Macpherson, K. A.; Feng, L.; Tsang, L. L.; Lubis, A.; Tapponnier, P.; Sieh, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    The 11 April 2012 Mw 8.6 Sumatra earthquake was one of the largest strike-slip earthquakes ever recorded, and also one of the largest intraplate earthquakes. It was followed 2 hours later by another great earthquake, of Mw 8.2, in a similar location. The events occurred ~400 km from northern Sumatra, on the oceanic side of the Sunda megathrust. The event was recorded by high-rate GPS stations from our 50-station Sumatra GPS Array (SuGAr). We will present the coseismic displacements and constraints on slip obtained from this network. The location of the events is very interesting. Scientists have long been puzzled by the nature and location of the boundary between the Indian and Australian plates in the depths of the Indian Ocean. Because of the resistance provided by the collision of India with Tibet far to the north, the Indian plate is moving relatively northwards at about 1 cm/yr slower than the Australian plate; this difference in velocity causes strain between the Indian and Australian plates. These earthquakes provide important new evidence that this strain is reactivating a system of faults on the seafloor that were inherited from an older geological epoch, and bring up questions about why this deformation appears to be diffuse, rather than behaving as a proper plate boundary. The events also highlight a back-and-forth interaction between the intraplate faults and the Sunda megathrust; the 2004 megathrust event brought these earthquakes ahead in time, but these earthquakes will in turn have stressed the megathrust. Published seismological results have indicated great complexity in the rupture patterns for these events, with a cascading failure of multiple conjugate faults. Surprisingly, the majority of slip seems to have occurred on the WNW-trending, right-lateral faults, rather than the NNE-trending left-lateral faults that are prominent features of the seafloor. The seismological results also show that the ruptures are likely to have extended from the

  7. GEM Plate Boundary Simulations for the Plate Boundary Observatory: A Program for Understanding the Physics of Earthquakes on Complex Fault Networks via Observations, Theory and Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundle, J. B.; Rundle, P. B.; Klein, W.; de sa Martins, J.; Tiampo, K. F.; Donnellan, A.; Kellogg, L. H.

    The last five years have seen unprecedented growth in the amount and quality of geodetic data collected to characterize crustal deformation in earthquake-prone areas such as California and Japan. The installation of the Southern California Integrated Geodetic Network (SCIGN) and the Bay Area Regional Deformation (BARD) network are two examples. As part of the recently proposed Earthscope NSF/GEO/EAR/MRE initiative, the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) plans to place more than a thousand GPS, strainmeters, and deformation sensors along the active plate boundary of the western coast of the United States, Mexico and Canada (http://www.earthscope.org/pbo.com.html). The scientific goals of PBO include understanding how tectonic plates interact, together with an emphasis on understanding the physics of earthquakes. However, the problem of understanding the physics of earthquakes on complex fault networks through observations alone is complicated by our inability to study the problem in a manner familiar to laboratory scientists, by means of controlled, fully reproducible experiments. We have therefore been motivated to construct a numerical simulation technology that will allow us to study earthquake physics via numerical experiments. To be considered successful, the simulations must not only produce observables that are maximally similar to those seen by the PBO and other observing programs, but in addition the simulations must provide dynamical predictions that can be falsified by means of observations on the real fault networks. In general, the dynamical behavior of earthquakes on complex fault networks is a result of the interplay between the geometric structure of the fault network and the physics of the frictional sliding process. In constructing numerical simulations of a complex fault network, we will need to solve a variety of problems, including the development of analysis techniques (also called data mining), data assimilation, space-time pattern definition

  8. Hematite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry constrains intraplate strike-slip faulting on the Kuh-e-Faghan Fault, central Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzolari, Gabriele; Rossetti, Federico; Ault, Alexis K.; Lucci, Federico; Olivetti, Valerio; Nozaem, Reza

    2018-03-01

    The Kuh-e-Faghan strike-slip fault system (KFF), located to the northern edge of the Lut Block in central Iran, developed through a Neogene-Quaternary pulsed history of eastward fault propagation and fault-related exhumation. This system is a consequence of the residual stresses transmitted from the Arabia-Eurasia convergent plate boundary. Here we integrate structural and textural analysis with new and previously published apatite fission-track (AFT) and apatite (U-Th)/He (apatite He) results, chlorite thermomentry, and hematite (U-Th)/He data from hematite-coated brittle fault surfaces to constrain the timing of tectonic activity and refine patterns of late Miocene-Pliocene burial and exhumation associated with the propagation of the KFF. Twenty-nine hematite (U-Th)/He (hematite He) dates from three striated hematite coated slip surfaces from the KFF fault core and damage zone yield individual dates from 12-2 Ma. Petrographic analysis and chlorite thermometry of a polyphase, fossil fluid system in the KFF fault core document that fluid circulation and mineralization transitioned from a closed system characterized by pressure solution and calcite growth to an open system characterized by hot hydrothermal (T = 239 ± 10 °C) fluids and hematite formation. Hematite microtextures and grain size analysis reveal primary and secondary syntectonic hematite fabrics, no evidence of hematite comminution and similar hematite He closure temperatures ( 60-85 °C) in each sample. Integration of these results with thermal history modeling of AFT and apatite He data shows that KFF activity in the late Miocene is characterized by an early stage of fault nucleation, fluid circulation, hematite mineralization, and eastward propagation not associated with vertical movement that lasted from 12 to 7 Ma. Hematite He, AFT, and apatite He data track a second phase of fault system activity involving fault-related exhumation initiating at 7 Ma and continuing until present time. Our new data

  9. Fault and fracture patterns around a strike-slip influenced salt wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, G. I.; Weinberger, R.; Marco, S.; Levi, T.

    2018-01-01

    The trends of faults and fractures in overburden next to a salt diapir are generally considered to be either parallel to the salt margin to form concentric patterns, or at right angles to the salt contact to create an overall radial distribution around the diapir. However, these simple diapir-related patterns may become more complex if regional tectonics influences the siting and growth of a diapir. Using the Sedom salt wall in the Dead Sea Fault system as our case study, we examine the influence of regional strike-slip faulting on fracture patterns around a salt diapir. This type of influence is important in general as the distribution and orientation of fractures on all scales may influence permeability and hence control fluid and hydrocarbon flow. Fractures adjacent to the N-S trending salt wall contain fibrous gypsum veins and injected clastic dykes, attesting to high fluid pressures adjacent to the diapir. Next to the western flank of the salt wall, broad (∼1000 m) zones of upturn or 'drape folds' are associated with NW-SE striking conjugate extensional fractures within the overburden. Within 300 m of the salt contact, fracture patterns in map view display a progressive ∼30°-35° clockwise rotation with more NNW-SSE strikes immediately adjacent to the salt wall. While some extensional faults display growth geometries, indicating that they were syn-depositional and initiated prior to tilting of beds associated with drape folding, other fractures display increasing dips towards the salt, suggesting that they have formed during upturn of bedding near the diapir. These observations collectively suggest that many fractures developed to accommodate rotation of beds during drape folding. Extensional fractures in the overburden define a mean strike that is ∼45° anticlockwise (counter-clockwise) of the N-S trending salt wall, and are therefore consistent with sinistral transtension along the N-S trending Sedom Fault that underlies the salt wall. Our outcrop

  10. States of stress and slip partitioning in a continental scale strike-slip duplex: Tectonic and magmatic implications by means of finite element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturrieta, Pablo Cristián; Hurtado, Daniel E.; Cembrano, José; Stanton-Yonge, Ashley

    2017-09-01

    Orogenic belts at oblique convergent subduction margins accommodate deformation in several trench-parallel domains, one of which is the magmatic arc, commonly regarded as taking up the margin-parallel, strike-slip component. However, the stress state and kinematics of volcanic arcs is more complex than usually recognized, involving first- and second-order faults with distinctive slip senses and mutual interaction. These are usually organized into regional scale strike-slip duplexes, associated with both long-term and short-term heterogeneous deformation and magmatic activity. This is the case of the 1100 km-long Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System in the Southern Andes, made up of two overlapping margin-parallel master faults joined by several NE-striking second-order faults. We present a finite element model addressing the nature and spatial distribution of stress across and along the volcanic arc in the Southern Andes to understand slip partitioning and the connection between tectonics and magmatism, particularly during the interseismic phase of the subduction earthquake cycle. We correlate the dynamics of the strike-slip duplex with geological, seismic and magma transport evidence documented by previous work, showing consistency between the model and the inferred fault system behavior. Our results show that maximum principal stress orientations are heterogeneously distributed within the continental margin, ranging from 15° to 25° counter-clockwise (with respect to the convergence vector) in the master faults and 10-19° clockwise in the forearc and backarc domains. We calculate the stress tensor ellipticity, indicating simple shearing in the eastern master fault and transpressional stress in the western master fault. Subsidiary faults undergo transtensional-to-extensional stress states. The eastern master fault displays slip rates of 5 to 10 mm/yr, whereas the western and subsidiary faults show slips rates of 1 to 5 mm/yr. Our results endorse that favorably oriented

  11. Influence of fault steps on rupture termination of strike-slip earthquake faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengfang; Zhou, Bengang

    2018-03-01

    A statistical analysis was completed on the rupture data of 29 historical strike-slip earthquakes across the world. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of fault steps on the rupture termination of these events. The results show good correlations between the type and length of steps with the seismic rupture and a poor correlation between the step number and seismic rupture. For different magnitude intervals, the smallest widths of the fault steps (Lt) that can terminate the rupture propagation are variable: Lt = 3 km for Ms 6.5 6.9, Lt = 4 km for Ms 7.0 7.5, Lt = 6 km for Ms 7.5 8.0, and Lt = 8 km for Ms 8.0 8.5. The dilational fault step is easier to rupture through than the compression fault step. The smallest widths of the fault step for the rupture arrest can be used as an indicator to judge the scale of the rupture termination of seismic faults. This is helpful for research on fault segmentation, as well as estimating the magnitude of potential earthquakes, and is thus of significance for the assessment of seismic risks.

  12. Analysis of the growth of strike-slip faults using effective medium theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, A.; Berryman, J.G.

    2009-10-15

    Increases in the dimensions of strike-slip faults including fault length, thickness of fault rock and the surrounding damage zone collectively provide quantitative definition of fault growth and are commonly measured in terms of the maximum fault slip. The field observations indicate that a common mechanism for fault growth in the brittle upper crust is fault lengthening by linkage and coalescence of neighboring fault segments or strands, and fault rock-zone widening into highly fractured inner damage zone via cataclastic deformation. The most important underlying mechanical reason in both cases is prior weakening of the rocks surrounding a fault's core and between neighboring fault segments by faulting-related fractures. In this paper, using field observations together with effective medium models, we analyze the reduction in the effective elastic properties of rock in terms of density of the fault-related brittle fractures and fracture intersection angles controlled primarily by the splay angles. Fracture densities or equivalent fracture spacing values corresponding to the vanishing Young's, shear, and quasi-pure shear moduli were obtained by extrapolation from the calculated range of these parameters. The fracture densities or the equivalent spacing values obtained using this method compare well with the field data measured along scan lines across the faults in the study area. These findings should be helpful for a better understanding of the fracture density/spacing distribution around faults and the transition from discrete fracturing to cataclastic deformation associated with fault growth and the related instabilities.

  13. Source characteristics of the 2015 Mw6.5 Lefkada, Greece, strike-slip earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgar, Diego; Ganas, Athanassios; Geng, Jianghui; Liang, Cunren; Fielding, Eric J.; Kassaras, Ioannis

    2017-03-01

    We present a kinematic slip model from the inversion of 1 Hz GPS, strong motion, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data for the 2015 Mw6.5 Lefkada, Greece, earthquake. We will show that most of the slip during this event is updip of the hypocenter (10.7 km depth) with substantial slip (>0.5 m) between 5 km depth and the surface. The peak slip is 1.6 m, and the inverted rake angles show predominantly strike-slip motion. Slip concentrates mostly to the south of the hypocenter, and the source time function indicates a total duration of 17 s with peak moment rate at 6 s. We will show that a 65° dipping geometry is the most plausible due to a lack of polarity reversals in the InSAR data and good agreement with Coulomb stress modeling, aftershock locations, and regional moment tensors. We also note that there was an 20 cm peak-to-peak tsunami observed at one tide gauge station 300 km away from the earthquake. We will discuss tsunami modeling results and study the possible source of the amplitude discrepancy between the modeled and the observed data at far-field tide gauges.

  14. Ductile shear zones beneath strike-slip faults: Implications for the thermomechanics of the San Andreas fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, W.; England, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    We have carried out two-dimensional (2-D) numerical experiments on the bulk flow of a layer of fluid that is driven in a strike-slip sense by constant velocities applied at its boundaries. The fluid has the (linearized) conventional rheology assumed to apply to lower crust/upper mantle rocks. The temperature dependence of the effective viscosity of the fluid and the shear heating that accompanies deformation have been incorporated into the calculations, as has thermal conduction in an overlying crustal layer. Two end-member boundary conditions have been considered, corresponding to a strong upper crust driving a weaker ductile substrate and a strong ductile layer driving a passive, weak crust. In many cases of practical interest, shear heating is concentrated close to the axial plane of the shear zone for either boundary condition. For these cases, the resulting steady state temperature field is well approximated by a cylindrical heat source embedded in a conductive half-space at a depth corresponding to the top of the fluid layer. This approximation, along with the application of a theoretical result for one-dimensional shear zones, permits us to obtain simple analytical approximations to the thermal effects of 2-D ductile shear zones for a range of assumed rheologies and crustal geotherms, making complex numerical calculations unnecessary. Results are compared with observable effects on heat flux near the San Andreas fault using constraints on the slip distribution across the entire fault system. Ductile shearing in the lower crust or upper mantle can explain the observed increase in surface heat flux southeast of the Mendocino triple junction and match the amplitude of the regional heat flux anomaly in the California Coast Ranges. Because ductile dissipation depends only weakly on slip rate, faults moving only a few millimeters per year can be important heat sources, and the superposition of effects of localized ductile shearing on both currently active and now

  15. BOLIVAR: Crustal structure of the Caribbean-South America plate boundary between 60W and 70W from wide-angle seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelt, C. A.; Christeson, G. L.; Magnani, M. B.; Clark, S. A.; Guedez, M. C.; Bezada, M.; Levander, A.; Schmitz, M.

    2007-12-01

    We present the results from five wide-angle seismic profiles collected onshore and offshore Venezuela in 2004 as part of the Broadband Ocean Land Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region project (BOLIVAR). The study area is the diffuse plate boundary between South America (SA) and the SE Caribbean plate (CAR) covering roughly 1000 km by 500 km. Over the past 55 My the Leeward Antilles island arc that borders the CAR plate has been colliding obliquely with the SA continent resulting in a collision front that has migrated from west to east. The five wide-angle profiles sample different stages of the time-transgressive margin from west to east, each crossing the margin roughly perpendicularly. The main purpose of this presentation is to contrast and compare the crustal velocity structure along these profiles to better understand the tectonic processes that are responsible for the evolution and present-day configuration of the plate boundary. Each of the wide-angle profiles is about 500 km in length and includes both onshore and offshore shots and receivers, except the easternmost profile, which is entirely offshore. The dense wide-angle data were modeled in the same way along each profile using a two-step, layer-stripping approach: (1) the first-arrival times were tomographically inverted for a smooth velocity model, and (2) the lower crust, Moho, and uppermost mantle were determined by simultaneous inversion of the PmP refection and Pn refraction phases while keeping the upper and middle crust from the first step fixed. The five models show tremendous lateral heterogeneity, as they cross features such as normal oceanic crust, oceanic plateau crust, an accretionary wedge, active and remnant island arcs, forearc and foreland basins, a major strike-slip system, a fold and thrust belt, and the edge of cratonic continental crust. Two of the main contributions of the wide-angle models to the BOLIVAR project, and the focus of this presentation, are the Moho

  16. BOLIVAR: the Caribbean-South America plate boundary between 60W and 71W as imaged by seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, M.; Mann, P.; Clark, S. A.; Escalona, A.; Zelt, C. A.; Christeson, G. L.; Levander, A.

    2007-12-01

    We present the results of ~6000km of marine multi-channel seismic (MCS) reflection data collected offshore Venezuela as part of the Broadband Ocean Land Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region project (BOLIVAR). The imaged area spans almost 12 degrees of longitude and 5 degrees of latitude and encompasses the diffuse plate boundary between South America (SA) and the SE Caribbean plate (CAR). This plate boundary has been evolving for at least the past 55My when the volcanic island arc that borders the CAR plate started colliding obliquely with the SA continent: the collision front has migrated from west to east. BOLIVAR MCS data show that the crustal architecture of the present plate boundary is dominated by the eastward motion of the Caribbean plate with respect to SA and is characterized by a complex combination of convergent and strike-slip tectonics. To the north, the reflection data image the South Caribbean Deformed Belt (SCDB) and the structures related to the thrusting of the CAR plate under the Leeward Antilles volcanic arc region. The data show that the CAR underthrusting continues as far east as the southern edge of the Aves ridge and detailed stratigraphic dating of the Venezuela basin and trench deposits suggests that the collision began in the Paleogene. The amount of shortening along the SCDB decreases toward the east, in part due to the geometry of plate motion vectors and in part as a result of the NNE escape of the Maracaibo block in western Venezuela. South of the SCDB the MCS profiles cross the Leeward Antilles island arc and Cenozoic sedimentary basins, revealing a complex history of Paleogene-Neogene multiphase extension, compression, and tectonic inversion, as well as the influence of the tectonic activity along the right-lateral El Pilar - San Sebastian fault system. East of the Bonaire basin the MCS data image the southern end of the Aves Ridge abandoned volcanic island arc and the southwestern termination of the Grenada basin

  17. Interactions between strike-slip earthquakes and the subduction interface near the Mendocino Triple Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jianhua; McGuire, Jeffrey J.

    2018-01-01

    The interactions between the North American, Pacific, and Gorda plates at the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ) create one of the most seismically active regions in North America. The earthquakes rupture all three plate boundaries but also include considerable intraplate seismicity reflecting the strong internal deformation of the Gorda plate. Understanding the stress levels that drive these ruptures and estimating the locking state of the subduction interface are especially important topics for regional earthquake hazard assessment. However owing to the lack of offshore seismic and geodetic instruments, the rupture process of only a few large earthquakes near the MTJ have been studied in detail and the locking state of the subduction interface is not well constrained. In this paper, first, we use the second moments inversion method to study the rupture process of the January 28, 2015 Mw 5.7 earthquake on the Mendocino transform fault that was unusually well recorded by both onshore and offshore strong motion instruments. We estimate the rupture dimension to be approximately 6 km by 3 km corresponding to a stress drop of ∼4 MPa for a crack model. Next we investigate the frictional state of the subduction interface by simulating the afterslip that would be expected there as a result of the stress changes from the 2015 earthquake and a 2010 Mw 6.5 intraplate earthquake within the subducted Gorda plate. We simulate afterslip scenarios for a range of depths of the downdip end of the locked zone defined as the transition to velocity strengthening friction and calculate the corresponding surface deformation expected at onshore GPS monuments. We can rule out a very shallow downdip limit owing to the lack of a detectable signal at onshore GPS stations following the 2010 earthquake. Our simulations indicate that the locking depth on the slab surface is at least 14 km, which suggests that the next M8 earthquake rupture will likely reach the coastline and strong shaking

  18. Left-Lateral Strike-Slip Faulting in the East Alborz, NE Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, J.; Walker, R.; Jackson, J.; Bolourchi, M. J.; Eshraghi, S. A.

    2006-12-01

    The East Alborz mountains of NE Iran are actively deforming as a result of Arabia-Eurasia collision. We combine observations of the geomorphology made using high resolution satellite, topographic and field data, with historical and recent seismicity to map major active faults in this poorly studied region. Deformation on the north side of the range occurs by range-normal shortening on the Khazar thrust fault, which separates Central Iran from the South Caspian. South of the range, deformation involves both left-lateral slip on the previously undocumented Shahrud fault system, which comprises several range-bounding fault segments, and shortening on (probably minor) thrust faults. Faulting south of the range is responsible for major historical earthquakes at Damghan (856AD) and Shahrud (1890). Deformation accommodated across the East Alborz is estimated from the difference in GPS velocities north and south of the range. South of the Alborz, northward GPS velocities across Central Iran decrease eastwards and the strike of the deforming belt changes to become more sub-parallel to the direction of South Caspian- Iran relative motion. This reduces the shortening component across the East Alborz, resulting in lower elevations between 54--57°E. West of 55.5°E, the more arc-normal shortening is achieved by partitioning of deformation onto the Khazar thrust (~1 mm/yr) and the Astaneh and Firuzkuh strike-slip faults (~3 mm/yr). East of 55.5°E, the Khazar fault ends and East Alborz deformation is accommodated primarily on the left-lateral Shahrud fault system, which may slip up to 3~mm/yr. Due to the long gap in seismicity along the eastern Shahrud fault system, the city of Jajarm (15,000 pop.) is considered at high risk from future earthquakes.

  19. Earthquake Activities Along the Strike-Slip Fault System on the Thailand-Myanmar Border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santi Pailoplee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the present-day seismicity along the strike-slip fault system on the Thailand-Myanmar border. Using the earthquake catalogue the earthquake parameters representing seismic activities were evaluated in terms of the possible maximum magnitude, return period and earthquake occurrence probabilities. Three different hazardous areas could be distinguished from the obtained results. The most seismic-prone area was located along the northern segment of the fault system and can generate earthquakes of magnitude 5.0, 5.8, and 6.8 mb in the next 5, 10, and 50 years, respectively. The second most-prone area was the southern segment where earthquakes of magnitude 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0 mb might be generated every 18, 60, and 300 years, respectively. For the central segment, there was less than 30 and 10% probability that 6.0- and 7.0-mb earthquakes will be generated in the next 50 years. With regards to the significant infrastructures (dams in the vicinity, the operational Wachiralongkorn dam is situated in a low seismic hazard area with a return period of around 30 - 3000 years for a 5.0 - 7.0 mb earthquake. In contrast, the Hut Gyi, Srinakarin and Tha Thung Na dams are seismically at risk for earthquakes of mb 6.4 - 6.5 being generated in the next 50 years. Plans for a seismic-retrofit should therefore be completed and implemented while seismic monitoring in this region is indispensable.

  20. Strike-Slip Fault Patterns on Europa: Obliquity or Polar Wander?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose; Hurford, Terry A.; Manga, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Variations in diurnal tidal stress due to Europa's eccentric orbit have been considered as the driver of strike-slip motion along pre-existing faults, but obliquity and physical libration have not been taken into account. The first objective of this work is to examine the effects of obliquity on the predicted global pattern of fault slip directions based on a tidal-tectonic formation model. Our second objective is to test the hypothesis that incorporating obliquity can reconcile theory and observations without requiring polar wander, which was previously invoked to explain the mismatch found between the slip directions of 192 faults on Europa and the global pattern predicted using the eccentricity-only model. We compute predictions for individual, observed faults at their current latitude, longitude, and azimuth with four different tidal models: eccentricity only, eccentricity plus obliquity, eccentricity plus physical libration, and a combination of all three effects. We then determine whether longitude migration, presumably due to non-synchronous rotation, is indicated in observed faults by repeating the comparisons with and without obliquity, this time also allowing longitude translation. We find that a tidal model including an obliquity of 1.2?, along with longitude migration, can predict the slip directions of all observed features in the survey. However, all but four faults can be fit with only 1? of obliquity so the value we find may represent the maximum departure from a lower time-averaged obliquity value. Adding physical libration to the obliquity model improves the accuracy of predictions at the current locations of the faults, but fails to predict the slip directions of six faults and requires additional degrees of freedom. The obliquity model with longitude migration is therefore our preferred model. Although the polar wander interpretation cannot be ruled out from these results alone, the obliquity model accounts for all observations with a value

  1. Florida: A Jurassic transform plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitgord, Kim D.; Popenoe, Peter; Schouten, Hans

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic, gravity, seismic, and deep drill hole data integrated with plate tectonic reconstructions substantiate the existence of a transform plate boundary across southern Florida during the Jurassic. On the basis of this integrated suite of data the pre-Cretaceous Florida-Bahamas region can be divided into the pre-Jurassic North American plate, Jurassic marginal rift basins, and a broad Jurassic transform zone including stranded blocks of pre-Mesozoic continental crust. Major tectonic units include the Suwannee basin in northern Florida containing Paleozoic sedimentary rocks, a central Florida basement complex of Paleozoic age crystalline rock, the west Florida platform composed of stranded blocks of continental crust, the south Georgia rift containing Triassic sedimentary rocks which overlie block-faulted Suwannee basin sedimentary rocks, the Late Triassic-Jurassic age Apalachicola rift basin, and the Jurassic age south Florida, Bahamas, and Blake Plateau marginal rift basins. The major tectonic units are bounded by basement hinge zones and fracture zones (FZ). The basement hinge zone represents the block-faulted edge of the North American plate, separating Paleozoic and older crustal rocks from Jurassic rifted crust beneath the marginal basins. Fracture zones separate Mesozoic marginal sedimentary basins and include the Blake Spur FZ, Jacksonville FZ, Bahamas FZ, and Cuba FZ, bounding the Blake Plateau, Bahamas, south Florida, and southeastern Gulf of Mexico basins. The Bahamas FZ is the most important of all these features because its northwest extension coincides with the Gulf basin marginal fault zone, forming the southern edge of the North American plate during the Jurassic. The limited space between the North American and the South American/African plates requires that the Jurassic transform zone, connecting the Central Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico spreading systems, was located between the Bahamas and Cuba FZ's in the region of southern Florida. Our

  2. Role of N-S strike-slip faulting in structuring of north-eastern Tunisia; geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfaoui, Aymen; Soumaya, Abdelkader; Ben Ayed, Noureddine; Delvaux, Damien; Ghanmi, Mohamed; Kadri, Ali; Zargouni, Fouad

    2017-05-01

    Three major compressional events characterized by folding, thrusting and strike-slip faulting occurred in the Eocene, Late Miocene and Quaternary along the NE Tunisian domain between Bou Kornine-Ressas-Msella and Cap Bon Peninsula. During the Plio-Quaternary, the Grombalia and Mornag grabens show a maximum of collapse in parallelism with the NNW-SSE SHmax direction and developed as 3rd order distensives zones within a global compressional regime. Using existing tectonic and geophysical data supplemented by new fault-kinematic observations, we show that Cenozoic deformation of the Mesozoic sedimentary sequences is dominated by first order N-S faults reactivation, this sinistral wrench system is responsible for the formation of strike-slip duplexes, thrusts, folds and grabens. Following our new structural interpretation, the major faults of N-S Axis, Bou Kornine-Ressas-Messella (MRB) and Hammamet-Korbous (HK) form an N-S first order compressive relay within a left lateral strike-slip duplex. The N-S master MRB fault is dominated by contractional imbricate fans, while the parallel HK fault is characterized by a trailing of extensional imbricate fans. The Eocene and Miocene compression phases in the study area caused sinistral strike-slip reactivation of pre-existing N-S faults, reverse reactivation of NE-SW trending faults and normal-oblique reactivation of NW-SE faults, creating a NE-SW to N-S trending system of east-verging folds and overlaps. Existing seismic tomography images suggest a key role for the lithospheric subvertical tear or STEP fault (Slab Transfer Edge Propagator) evidenced below this region on the development of the MRB and the HK relay zone. The presence of extensive syntectonic Pliocene on top of this crustal scale fault may be the result of a recent lithospheric vertical kinematic of this STEP fault, due to the rollback and lateral migration of the Calabrian slab eastward.

  3. Onshore-offshore seismic reflection profiling across the southern margin of the Sea of Japan: back-arc opening, shortening and active strike-slip deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Kato, Naoko; Toda, Shigeru; Kawasaki, Shinji; Fujiwara, Akira; Tanaka, Yasuhisa; Abe, Susumu

    2017-04-01

    Pliocene to early Pleistocene along the limited fault system. The change in the direction of the motion of PHS at 1 Ma produced major change in stress regime from NS compression to EW compression in the back-arc. Following the change of stress regime, former reverse faults reactivated as strike-slip fault. Reuse of pre-existing faults are common, and crustal deformation concentrates relatively narrow zone in the back-arc failed rifts. Two-months after from our survey, Mw 6.2 Tottoriken-chubu earthquake occurred just beneath the onshore part of the seismic line. The source fault corresponds to the boundary of abrupt change in P-wave velocity, however there were no surface ruptures and distinctive geologic faults. The bottom of seismogenic layer corresponds to TWT 4.5 sec., which is almost the top horizon of reflective middle crust.

  4. The Quest for the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary West of the Strait of Gibraltar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitellini, N.

    2009-04-01

    A new swath bathymetry compilation of the Gulf of Cadiz Area and SW Iberia is presented. The new map is the result of a collaborative research performed after year 2000 by teams from 7 European countries and 14 research institutions. This new dataset allow for the first time to present and to discuss the missing link in the plate boundary between Eurasia and Africa in the Central Atlantic. A set of almost linear and sub parallel dextral strike-slip faults, the SWIM Faults (SWIM is the acronym of the ESF EuroMargins project "Earthquake and Tsunami hazards of active faults at the South West Iberian Margin: deep structure, high-resolution imaging and paleoseismic signature") was mapped using a the new swath bathymetry compilation available in the area. The SWIM Faults form a narrow band of deformation over a length of 600 km coincident with a small circle centred on the pole of rotation of Africa with respect to Eurasia, This narrow band of deformation connects the Gloria Fault to the Rif-Tell Fault Zone, two segments of the plate boundary between Africa and Eurasia. In addition, the SWIM faults cuts across the Gulf of Cadiz, in the Atlantic Ocean, where the 1755 Great Lisbon earthquake, M~8.5-8.7, and tsunami were generated, providing a new insights on its source location. SWIM Team: E. Gràcia (2), L. Matias (3), P. Terrinha (4), M.A. Abreu (5), G. DeAlteriis(6), J.P. Henriet (7), J.J. Dañobeitia (2), D.G. Masson (8), T. Mulder (9), R. Ramella (10), L. Somoza (11) and S. Diez (2) (2) Unitat de Tecnologia Marina (CSIC), Centre Mediterrani d'Investigacions Marines i Ambientals, Barcelona, Spain (3) Centro Geofísica da Universidade de Lisboa (CGUL, IDL), Lisboa, Portugal (4) National Institute for Engineering, Technology and Innovation (INETI, LATTEX), Departamento de Geologia Marinha, Amadora, Portugal (5) Estrutura de Missão para a Extensão da Plataforma Continental, Lisboa, Portugal (6) Geomare Sud IAMC, CNR, Napoli, Italy (7) Renard Centre of Marine Geology

  5. The Arabia-India plate boundary unveiled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, M.; Chamot-Rooke, N. R.; Rodriguez, M.; Petit, C.; Huchon, P.; Beslier, M.; Hazard, B.

    2009-12-01

    Since the advent of Plate Tectonics, tectonic plate boundaries were explored on land as at sea for search of active faults where the destructive energy of earthquakes is released. Yet, some plate boundaries, less active or considered as less dangerous to humankind, escaped general attention and remained unknown to a large extent. Among them, the boundary between two major tectonic plates: Arabia and India. The Arabia-India motion is currently accommodated along the Owen Fracture Zone (OFZ) in the NW Indian Ocean, which connects the spreading centers of the Sheba and Carlsberg ridge system to the Makran subduction zone. We recently surveyed this fracture zone onboard the R/V Beautemps-Beaupré (Owen Cruise, March 2009) using a high-resolution deep-water multibeam echo-sounder. Bathymetric data reveal a spectacular submarine fault system running over a distance of 800 km between the Arabia-India-Somalia triple junction to the south and the Dalrymple Trough to the north. The morphology of the active faults is well preserved on the seafloor where fault scarps can be followed over hundreds of kilometres. The surficial trace of the faults is not obscured by the sediments of the aggrading deep-sea fan of the Indus River. The fault system is segmented in five main segments connected by pull apart basins. The length of the individual, apparently uninterrupted, segments is between 100 km and 220 km. The largest pull-apart basin at the latitude 20°N (20°N-Basin) corresponds to a right step-over of about 12 km between two fault segments. The 20°N-Basin is bounded by a normal fault scarp with a throw of 450-500 m. Numerous minor normal faults cutting the floor of the basin attest to recent activity. The 20°N-Basin is directly supplied in turbidity-current deposits by an active channel of the Indus fan. The preservation of tectonic features indicates that the dip-slip motion has exceeded the rate of burial by sediments. Some compressional structures are also deduced from

  6. Crustal Structure of the Caribbean-South American Diffuse Plate Boundary: Subduction Zone Migration and Polarity Reversal Along BOLIVAR Profile 64W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S. A.; Levander, A.; Magnani, M.; Zelt, C. A.; Sawyer, D. S.; Ave Lallemant, H. G.

    2005-12-01

    The BOLIVAR (Broadband Ocean-Land Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region) project is an NSF funded, collaborative seismic experiment in the southeast Caribbean region. The purpose of the project is to understand the diffuse plate boundary created by the oblique collision between the Caribbean and South American plates. Profile 64W of the BOLIVAR experiment, a 450 km-long, N-S transect onshore and offshore Venezuela located at ~64°W longitude, images the deep crustal structures formed by this collision. The active source components of profile 64W include 300 km of MCS reflection data, 33 coincident OBSs, and 344 land seismic stations which recorded 7500 offshore airgun shots and 2 explosive land shots. Results from the reflection and refraction seismic data along 64W show complex crustal structure across the entire span of the diffuse plate boundary. The onshore portion of 64W crosses the fold and thrust belt of the Serrania del Interior, which formed at ~16 Ma by collision of the Caribbean forearc with the northern South American passive margin. Underlying the Serrania del Interior is a south-vergent, remnant Lesser Antillean subduction zone. As this Lesser Antilles subduction impinged on continental crust, it caused a polarity reversal and jump offshore to the north. Convergence was initially localized in the closure and inversion of the Grenada Basin. However, subduction could not develop because of the ~20-km-thick crust of the Aves Ridge; instead, north-vergent subduction initiated further to the north, where ~12-km-thick Caribbean oceanic crust of the Venezuela Basin began to subduct beneath the Aves Ridge in the Pliocene (~4 Ma) and appears to continue subducting today. Between the remnant subduction zone and the modern one, the El Pilar and Coche dextral strike-slip faults accommodate most of the transform motion of the plate boundary. From the Serrania del Interior to the Aves Ridge, ~260 km of accreted orogenic float comprises the diffuse

  7. COMPARISON OF COSEISMIC IONOSPHERIC DISTURBANCE WAVEFORMS REVISITED: STRIKE-SLIP, NORMAL, AND REVERSE FAULT EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhamad Nur Cahyadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Using Total Electron Content (TEC measurements with Global Positioning System we studied ionospheric responses to three large earthquakes with difference focal mechanism that occurred in the Sumatra Andaman 26 December 2004, North off Sumatra 11 April 2012, and North Japan 7 December 2012. These earthquakes have different focal mechanisms, i.e. high-angle reverse, strike-slip, and normal faulting, respectively. TEC responses to the Sumatra Andaman 2004 and north Japan 2012 events initiated with positive changes. On the other hand, the initial TEC changes in the Sumatra 2012 earthquake showed both positive and negative polarities depending on the azimuth around the focal area. Such a variety may reflect differences in coseismic vertical crustal displacements, which are dominated by uplift and subsidence in the Sumatra 2012 event. This phenomena has same characteristic with 1994 Kuril Arch earthquake. There are three different propagation velocity in the Sumatra 2012 earthquake, within the first 300 km until 430 km, the CID propagation velocity was ~3 km/s, which is equal to the secod sound speed at the height of the ionospheric F-layer. Starting from 380 km until 750 km out from the epicenter, the disturbance seems to divide into two separate perturbations, with each propagating at a different velocity, about 1 km/s for the one and about 0.4 m/s for the other. The apparent velocity in the Sumatra Andaman 2004 and Japan 2012 propagated ~ 1 km/s and ~ 0.3 km/s, consistent with the sound speed at the ionospheric F layer height and internal gravity wave respectively. Resonant oscillation of TEC with a frequency of ~ 3.7 mHZ and ~4.4 mHz have been found in the Sumatra 2012 and Sumatra Andaman 2004 events. Those earthquakes, which occurred during a period of quiet geomagnetic activity, also showed clear preseismic TEC anomalies similar to those before the 2011 Tohoku-Oki and 2007 Bengkulu earthquake.   The positive anomalies started 30-60 minutes

  8. Structural setting and kinematics of Nubian fault system, SE Western Desert, Egypt: An example of multi-reactivated intraplate strike-slip faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakran, Shawky; Said, Said Mohamed

    2018-02-01

    Detailed surface geological mapping and subsurface seismic interpretation have been integrated to unravel the structural style and kinematic history of the Nubian Fault System (NFS). The NFS consists of several E-W Principal Deformation Zones (PDZs) (e.g. Kalabsha fault). Each PDZ is defined by spectacular E-W, WNW and ENE dextral strike-slip faults, NNE sinistral strike-slip faults, NE to ENE folds, and NNW normal faults. Each fault zone has typical self-similar strike-slip architecture comprising multi-scale fault segments. Several multi-scale uplifts and basins were developed at the step-over zones between parallel strike-slip fault segments as a result of local extension or contraction. The NNE faults consist of right-stepping sinistral strike-slip fault segments (e.g. Sin El Kiddab fault). The NNE sinistral faults extend for long distances ranging from 30 to 100 kms and cut one or two E-W PDZs. Two nearly perpendicular strike-slip tectonic regimes are recognized in the NFS; an inactive E-W Late Cretaceous - Early Cenozoic dextral transpression and an active NNE sinistral shear.

  9. Analog modeling of strike-slip surface ruptures: Implications for Greendale Fault (New Zealand) mechanics and paleoseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasnett, P.; Quigley, M.; Cruden, A. R.; Boutelier, D. A.; Villamor, P.

    2013-12-01

    Analog modeling of strike-slip faulting provides insight into the development and behavior of surface ruptures with progressive slip, with relevance for understanding how coseismic displacements from fault ruptures are recorded in paleoseismic trenches. Patterns of surface deformation were investigated in analogue experiments using cohesive and non-cohesive granular materials above a vertical, planar, strike-slip basement fault. Surface deformation during the experiments was monitored by 3D PIV (Particle Imaging Velocimetry) and 2D time-lapse photography. Analysis of the experiments focused on fault zone morphology and development, as well as comparisons between the models and surface deformation observed along the Greendale Fault that resulted from the 2010 Darfield earthquake, New Zealand. Complex surface rupture patterns with similar characteristics to the Greendale Fault (en echelon fractures, Riedel shears, pop-up structures, etc.) were generated by a simple fault plane of uniform dip, slip, and frictional properties. The main controls on surface rupture morphology were found to be the properties and thickness of the overburden, the nature of the material surface, and the overall displacement of the underlying fault. Mapping the evolution of fracture patterns with progressive shear strain reveals that Riedel shears, striking 0-30° from the underlying basement fault, are more frequently reactivated during multiple displacement (earthquake) cycles, and are thus most likely to provide reliable paleoseismic records. This information will assist in the identification of suitable locations for paleoseismic trenches and in the interpretation of trench records from the Greendale Fault and other active, strike-slip faults in analogous geologic settings. The results also highlight the tendency of trenching studies of faults of this type to underestimate the number of and displacements on previous ruptures, which potentially leads to an underestimate of the magnitude

  10. The Mechanics, Geometry and Distribution of Strike Slip Faults in a Fold and Thrust Belt, County Clare, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenna, F. A.; Aydin, A.

    2010-12-01

    Fundamental structures such as opening mode joints and veins, and closing mode pressure solution seams (PSSs) can form dense orthogonal arrays in collisional deformation belts and play important roles in the initiation and development of larger scale faults. We describe the deformation processes and the evolution of fault architecture using systematic documentation of field observations from arrays of strike-slip faults in the Carboniferous Ross Sandstone. This unit is exposed on the Loop Head Peninsula, County Clare, Ireland and was subject to compressive stresses associated with the Variscan orogeny at the end of the Carboniferous producing broad regional east-west trending folds and also tight low-amplitude folds cored by thrust faults. Near these faults, orthogonal sets of PSSs and joints/veins form contemporaneous arrays with pressure solution seams that are sub-parallel to the thrust fault traces and fold axes. A stress or material rotation during the Variscan Orogeny (or perhaps a major second stage of deformation either in late phase of the orogeny or post-orogeny) has lead to left-lateral shear of the PSSs evidenced by pressure solution splays and pull-aparts between their sheared segments, and right-lateral shear on the joints/veins evidenced by splay fractures. The splays of the sheared joints are in the same orientation of the joints in the pull-aparts of the sheared PSSs with which they merge. This indicates that the shearing of the joints/veins and the PSSs was likely to have occurred simultaneously under the same remote loading conditions. With increased shear, extensive splay fractures and pull-apart networks form weak damage zones through which strike-slip faults systems develop with slip of up to 2km. As a higher proportion of the shear is resolved on the joint system than that of the PSS system, the more prominent strike-slip faults are sub-parallel to or slightly inclined to the pre-existing joint/vein set and have a right-lateral sense of slip

  11. Three-dimensional shuffling of horses in a strike-slip duplex: an example from the Lambertville sill, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laney, Stephen E.; Gates, Alexander E.

    1996-06-01

    Detailed analysis of a dextral strike-slip duplex within the relatively isotropic rocks of the Lambertville sill, New Jersey indicates that horses have experienced vertical, horizontal and oblique movements resulting from extrusional shuffling within a restraining bend. This is the first documentation of the three-dimensional movement of horses within a strike-slip duplex. Deformation within the duplex shows a complex system of early synthetic fractures and reverse faults followed by antithetic fractures which dissect previously continuous slab-shaped horses into diamond-shaped lenses. Most faults are oblique slip. Antithetic fault movements and clockwise rigid rotation of horses dominate the south half of the duplex and synthetic movements and counterclockwise rotations dominate the north half. Slickenline plunges on curved horse-bounding fault surfaces within the duplex range from nearly horizontal to 40° resulting in both lateral movements (middle) to normal movements (tails) on a single horse. Curved slickensides commonly have opposite senses of movement on either side of individual horses indicating relative emergence or submergence. Such a geometry could also result from a group of horses moving in the same oblique direction but at different rates. These complex extrusional-type movements were observed in both cross-sectional and plan views. The net result of the movements is a contraction or flattening of the duplex normal to the bounding faults. The horses shifted to accommodate this flattening as overall displacement was transferred between the bounding faults along curved internal faults.

  12. Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) Measurements of the North American Plate Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, T.; King, R.; McClusky, S.; Murray, M.; Santillan, M.; Melbourne, T.; Anderson, G.

    2006-12-01

    The first GPS site in the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) component of the National Science Foundation's Earthscope project was installed in January 2004. As of September 2006, 411 PBO GPS sites have been installed with 50 of these sites located on or near active volcanoes around the plate boundary. In addition to these new sites, 209 pre-existing GPS sites are incorporated into the PBO data analysis through the NSF PBO Nucleus Project. Also 37 IGS and NGS CORS sites are included to tie the PBO data analyses into the Stable North America Reference Frame (SNARF). The GPS phase data from all these sites are analyzed by PBO analysis centers (ACs) at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMT) and at Central Washington University (CWU). The results from the two ACs, which use different GPS data processing programs, are combined into PBO GPS products by the Analysis Center Coordinator (ACC) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Three levels of analysis are performed on the data: a "rapid" analysis available with a 1-day latency; a "final" analysis that uses IGS final orbit products and is available with a 6-13 day latency; and a "supplemental" analysis that runs with 12-week latency and adds to the final analysis data from sites with late data retrieval. Results from these analyses in the form of velocity estimates, time series, and Solution Independent Exchange Format (SINEX) files that contain position and full covariance information are all available from http://pboweb.unavco.org/?pageid=88. The median root-mean-square (RMS) scatter of the daily estimates in the SNARF reference frame from the final analysis is 1.2 mm horizontal position and 3.8 mm in vertical position. We discuss the results being obtained from the PBO analyses and the progress toward defining the elements and behavior of the North American plate boundary with PBO.

  13. Plate Boundary Observatory GPS Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, T. A.; King, R.; McClusky, S.; Murray, M.; Santillan, M.; Melbourne, T.; Anderson, G.

    2005-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory GPS data analysis centers (ACs) at the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL) and Central Washington University (CWU), and the analysis center coordinator (ACC) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology began establishing the GPS processing centers on April 1, 2005. The PBO GPS data analyses will be operational on October 1, 2005, with the regular delivery of daily SINEX solution files with full covariance and time series files designed for ease of analysis and plotting. The initial results for the PBO analyses will start with data from January 1, 2004 and contain position time series for 209 PBO Nucleus stations, 17 IGS reference frame stations, 9 CORS stations (to bridge Alaska to the continental United States), and all PBO stations as they come on line. The first PBO site was ready on January 11, 2004. The PBO ACs routinely generate rapid orbit analyses (1-day latency), primarily to check data quality, and initial final orbit analyses with 6-13 day latency. The timing of the generation of these products is based on the availability of the International GNSS Service rapid and final orbit products. Currently, between 280 and 300 stations are included in these rapid analyses and typically 310-315 stations are in the final analyses. The initial testing of the analysis procedures shows median north and east daily root-mean-square (rms) scatters of 1.0-1.3 mm for horizontal positions for a network encompassing North America and Central Pacific. The median height rms scatter is 5 mm. This talk will show results and products being generated by the PBO ACs and ACC, and compare the results between the GIPSY (CWU) and GAMIT (BSL) processing.

  14. Alaskan crustal thickness variations from P receiver functions provide insight into both inherited and active plate boundary structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. S.; O'Driscoll, L.; Porritt, R.; Roeske, S.

    2017-12-01

    The geologic mosaic of terranes, adjacent multi-phase plate boundary in the south, rapid lateral topographic variations, and heterogeneous distribution of strain throughout Alaska all suggest strong heterogeneity of crustal architecture. We present the first wide-scale model of crustal thickness based on broadband seismic data across the region that is primarily constrained where seismic instrumentation has been deployed - dense coverage in the south-central region and more sparse coverage in the northern, western, and arctic regions from EarthScope Transportable Array (TA) stations. P receiver functions (PRF) were calculated for 2070 events at 465 stations, which yielded a final 22,886 total RFs. The resulting 3D CCP stacked model and individual receiver functions at remote stations reproduce many of the Moho depth variations previously modeled by both more concentrated studies using receiver functions and tomographic imaging. However, these new results provide more detailed images of the entire state that illustrate the active and inherited crustal structures that have persisted throughout the tectonic history in the region. The continental growth by accretion and strike-slip displacement of oceanic and pericratonic terranes is documented in discrete changes in crustal thicknesses that are observed across the terranes of the northern Cordillera in Alaska and there are distinct changes across major, active and inactive faults. Analysis of P receiver functions provides the first detailed look at the crust and upper mantle structures across Alaska. These images show variability that reflects inherited thickness from Mesozoic convergent and extension events, which in some regions is being extensively modified by ongoing convergence and collision, particularly along the active southern margin. The 4D interpretation of the Alaskan crust and Moho structure will continue to evolve as the full USArray Transportable Array is deployed and geologic studies are combined with

  15. Plate Coupling and Strain Partitioning in the Northeastern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaker, D.; Calais, E.; Jansma, P.; Mattioli, G.

    2006-12-01

    Major strike-slip faults commonly found on the margin of overriding plates in oblique subduction zone settings facilitate the partitioning of strain into trench-parallel and trench-normal tectonics. Their development has been proposed to be controlled by factors such as convergence obliquity, basal tractions, magnitude of slab-pull force, or strength of interplate coupling. In the northeastern Caribbean, the direction of GPS velocities and earthquake slip vectors suggests low coupling along the Puerto Rico and Lesser Antilles trenches, but strong coupling to the west along the Hispaniola margin, while the convergence obliquity remains constant. Coincidentally, large strike-slip faults in the overriding plate only develop in Hispaniola, which is also the locus of the largest historical subduction earthquakes in the Caribbean (M8.0, 1946-53 sequence). We investigate interplate coupling at the Caribbean-North American plate boundary using a model that allows for block rotations and elastic strain accumulation on partially coupled faults. Model parameters (block rotations and coupling on interplate faults) are derived from an inversion of earthquake slip vectors and new GPS data covering Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the Lesser Antilles. We find that intraplate coupling is high in the western half of the domain, coincident with the development of large and fast-slipping strike-slip faults in the upper plate that partition the Carribean/North America plate motion, but low in its eastern half, along the Puerto Rico and Lesser Antilles subductions, that show little to no strain partitioning. This suggests that strain partitioning occur only if interplate coupling is large enough to effectively transfer shear stresses to the overriding plate.

  16. Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO): A large Geodetic Network on the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, T. A.; King, R. W.; McClusky, S. C.; Santillan, V. M.; Melbourne, T. I.; Murray, M. H.; Anderson, G. J.

    2007-05-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory is being installed along the Pacific-North America plate boundary and when complete will add 875 new GPS sites and incorporate 209 existing GPS sites into the network. The GPS phase data from all these sites and an additional 40 sites to tie to the North America plate are analyzed by PBO analysis centers (ACs) at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMT) and at Central Washington University (CWU). The results from the two ACs, which use different GPS data processing programs, are combined into PBO GPS products by the Analysis Center Coordinator (ACC) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Three levels of analysis are performed on the data: a "rapid" analysis available with a 1-day latency; a "final" analysis that uses IGS final orbit products and is available with a 6-13 day latency; and a "supplemental" analysis that runs with 12-week latency and adds to the final analysis data from sites with late data retrieval. Results from these analyses in the form of velocity estimates, time series, and Solution Independent Exchange Format (SINEX) files that contain position and full covariance information are all available from http:pboweb.unavco.org/gps_data. The median root-mean-square (RMS) scatter of the daily estimates from currently about 800 stations in a North America fixed reference frame from the final analysis is 1.3 mm horizontal position and 4.0 mm in vertical position. We discuss the results being obtained from the PBO analyses and the methods used to process the GPS data from this network.

  17. Late-orogenic extension and strike-slip deformation in the Neogene of southeastern Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijninger, B.M.L.

    2006-01-01

    The Betic Cordillera of southern Spain form the western end of the Alpine orogen, which during the Neogene was affected by large-scale late-orogenic extension. Extension, however, occurred within a setting of continuous slow convergence of the African and European plates. During the Neogene,

  18. A PHYSICAL MODEL OF THE EFFECT OF A SHALLOW WEAK LAYER ON STRONG GROUND MOTION FOR STRIKE-SLIP RUPTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JAMES N. BRUNE AND ABDOLRASOOL ANOOSHEHPOOR

    1998-02-23

    We report results of foam-rubber modeling of the effect of a shallow weak layer on ground motion from strike-slip ruptures. Computer modeling of strong ground motion from strike-slip earthquakes has involved somewhat arbitrary assumptions about the nature of slip along the shallow part of the fault (e.g., fixing the slip to be zero along the upper 2 kilometers of the fault plane) in order to match certain strong motion accelerograms. Most modeling studies of earthquake strong ground motion have used what is termed kinematic dislocation modeling. In kinematic modeling the time function for slip on the fault is prescribed, and the response of the layered medium is calculated. Unfortunately, there is no guarantee that the model and the prescribed slip are physically reasonable unless the true nature of the medium and its motions are known ahead of time. There is good reason to believe that in many cases faults are weak along the upper few kilometers of the fault zone and may not be able to maintain high levels of shear strain required for high dynamic energy release during earthquakes. Physical models of faulting, as distinct from numerical or mathematical models, are guaranteed to obey static and dynamic mechanical laws. Foam-rubber modeling studies have been reported in a number of publications. The object of this paper is to present results of physical modeling using a shallow weak layer, in order to verify the physical basis for assuming a long rise time and a reduced high frequency pulse for the slip on the shallow part of faults. It appears a 2-kilometer deep, weak zone along strike-slip faults could indeed reduce the high frequency energy radiated from shallow slip, and that this effect can best be represented by superimposing a small amplitude, short rise-time pulse at the onset of a much longer rise-time slip. A weak zone was modeled by inserting weak plastic layers of a few inches in thickness into the foam rubber model. For the 15 cm weak zone the average

  19. A nonlinear least-squares inverse analysis of strike-slip faulting with application to the San Andreas fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Charles A.; Richardson, Randall M.

    1988-01-01

    A nonlinear weighted least-squares analysis was performed for a synthetic elastic layer over a viscoelastic half-space model of strike-slip faulting. Also, an inversion of strain rate data was attempted for the locked portions of the San Andreas fault in California. Based on an eigenvector analysis of synthetic data, it is found that the only parameter which can be resolved is the average shear modulus of the elastic layer and viscoelastic half-space. The other parameters were obtained by performing a suite of inversions for the fault. The inversions on data from the northern San Andreas resulted in predicted parameter ranges similar to those produced by inversions on data from the whole fault.

  20. Stress near geometrically complex strike-slip faults - Application to the San Andreas fault at Cajon Pass, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucier, Francois; Humphreys, Eugene; Weldon, Ray, II

    1992-01-01

    A model is presented to rationalize the state of stress near a geometrically complex major strike-slip fault. Slip on such a fault creates residual stresses that, with the occurrence of several slip events, can dominate the stress field near the fault. The model is applied to the San Andreas fault near Cajon Pass. The results are consistent with the geological features, seismicity, the existence of left-lateral stress on the Cleghorn fault, and the in situ stress orientation in the scientific well, found to be sinistral when resolved on a plane parallel to the San Andreas fault. It is suggested that the creation of residual stresses caused by slip on a wiggle San Andreas fault is the dominating process there.

  1. Analogue Modeling of Oblique Convergent Strike-Slip Faulting and Application to The Seram Island, Eastern Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benyamin Sapiie

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.v1i3.189Sandbox experiment is one of the types of analogue modeling in geological sciences in which the main purpose is simulating deformation style and structural evolution of the sedimentary basin.  Sandbox modeling is one of the effective ways in conducting physically modeling and evaluates complex deformation of sedimentary rocks. The main purpose of this paper is to evaluate structural geometry and deformation history of oblique convergent deformation using of integrated technique of analogue sandbox modeling applying to deformation of Seram Fold-Thrust-Belt (SFTB in the Seram Island, Eastern Indonesia. Oblique convergent strike-slip deformation has notoriously generated area with structural complex geometry and pattern resulted from role of various local parameters that control stress distributions. Therefore, a special technique is needed for understanding and solving such problem in particular to relate 3D fault geometry and its evolution. The result of four case (Case 1 to 4 modeling setting indicated that two of modeling variables clearly affected in our sandbox modeling results; these are lithological variation (mainly stratigraphy of Seram Island and pre-existing basement fault geometry (basement configuration. Lithological variation was mainly affected in the total number of faults development.  On the other hand, pre-existing basement fault geometry was highly influenced in the end results particularly fault style and pattern as demonstrated in Case 4 modeling.  In addition, this study concluded that deformation in the Seram Island is clearly best described using oblique convergent strike-slip (transpression stress system.

  2. Vibration Analysis of Annular Sector Plates under Different Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyan Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical framework is developed for the vibration analysis of annular sector plates with general elastic restraints along each edge of plates. Regardless of boundary conditions, the displacement solution is invariably expressed as a new form of trigonometric expansion with accelerated convergence. The expansion coefficients are treated as the generalized coordinates and determined using the Rayleigh-Ritz technique. This work allows a capability of modeling annular sector plates under a variety of boundary conditions and changing the boundary conditions as easily as modifying the material properties or dimensions of the plates. Of equal importance, the proposed approach is universally applicable to annular sector plates of any inclusion angles up to 2π. The reliability and accuracy of the current method are adequately validated through numerical examples.

  3. Introduction to Plate Boundaries and Natural Hazards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarte, João C.; Schellart, Wouter P.

    2016-01-01

    A great variety of natural hazards occur on Earth, including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis, landslides, floods, fires, tornadoes, hurricanes, and avalanches. The most destructive of these hazards, earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanic eruptions, are mostly associated with tectonic plate

  4. Analogue modelling of strike-slip fault propagation across a rheological/morphological crustal anisotropy: implications for the morphotectonic evolution of the Gloria Fault - Tore Madeira Rise area in NE Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás, Ricardo; Rosas, Filipe M.; Duarte, João C.; Terrinha, Pedro; Kullberg, Maria C.; Almeida, Jaime; Barata, Frederico; Carvalho, Bruno; Almeida, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    The Gloria Fault (GF) marks the E-W dextral transcurrent plate boundary between Eurasia and Africa in NE Atlantic, displaying complying high magnitude (historical and instrumental) seismic activity (e.g. M=7.1 in 1939 and M=8.4 in 1941, Bufforn et al., 1988), and cutting across a NNE-SSW 1000 km long bathymetric ridge: the so called Tore-Madeira Rise - TMR (rising in average 3km above the abyssal plain). The precise origin and tectono-magmatic evolution of the TMR is still not fully understood, although reported wide-angle refraction data points to a rheological configuration comprising an isostatically compensated thickened oceanic crust, possibly formed during a period of high accretion in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Pierce and Barton, 1991). Widespread evidence for volcanic activity has also been recognized, spanning from late Cretaceous to Present (Geldmacher et al. 2006, Merle et al. 2009), noticeably with the most recent volcanism (~500 Ky) occurring as tectonically aligned volcanic plugs, distributed along the E-W tectonic trend of the GF-related structures. To better understand the complex interference at play in this key area between the tectonic structures (essentially determined by the Gloria Fault system), the present and past magmatic activity and the resulting seafloor morphology, a series of dynamically scaled analogue modelling experiments have been conceived and carried out. The main focus of this experimental work was to decipher the potential influence of a rheological vs. morphological anisotropy (accounting for the TMR) on the lateral propagation of a major right-lateral strike-slip fault (representing the GF). The preliminary comparison of the obtained experimental results with the natural morphotectonic pattern in the study area reveals, not only a strong tectonic control of the ongoing volcanism, manifested by the observed preferred directions of aligned volcanic plugs, but also a so far unsuspected deflection/distributed pattern of several

  5. A Comparison of Geodetic and Geologic Rates Prior to Large Strike-Slip Earthquakes: A Diversity of Earthquake-Cycle Behaviors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, James F.; Meade, Brendan J.

    2017-12-01

    Comparison of preevent geodetic and geologic rates in three large-magnitude (Mw = 7.6-7.9) strike-slip earthquakes reveals a wide range of behaviors. Specifically, geodetic rates of 26-28 mm/yr for the North Anatolian fault along the 1999 MW = 7.6 Izmit rupture are ˜40% faster than Holocene geologic rates. In contrast, geodetic rates of ˜6-8 mm/yr along the Denali fault prior to the 2002 MW = 7.9 Denali earthquake are only approximately half as fast as the latest Pleistocene-Holocene geologic rate of ˜12 mm/yr. In the third example where a sufficiently long pre-earthquake geodetic time series exists, the geodetic and geologic rates along the 2001 MW = 7.8 Kokoxili rupture on the Kunlun fault are approximately equal at ˜11 mm/yr. These results are not readily explicable with extant earthquake-cycle modeling, suggesting that they may instead be due to some combination of regional kinematic fault interactions, temporal variations in the strength of lithospheric-scale shear zones, and/or variations in local relative plate motion rate. Whatever the exact causes of these variable behaviors, these observations indicate that either the ratio of geodetic to geologic rates before an earthquake may not be diagnostic of the time to the next earthquake, as predicted by many rheologically based geodynamic models of earthquake-cycle behavior, or different behaviors characterize different fault systems in a manner that is not yet understood or predictable.

  6. From 2012 HAITI-SIS Survey: thick-skin versus thin-skin tectonics partitioned along offshore strike-slip Faults-Haïti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellouz, N.; Leroy, S. D.; Momplaisir, R.; Mercier de Lepinay, B.

    2013-12-01

    The characterization of the deformation along large strike-slip fault-systems like transpressive boundaries between N. Caribbean/N America is a challenging topic, which requires a multi-scale approach. Thanks to Haiti-sis new data, the precise description of the fault segmentation pattern, the sedimentogical distribution, the uplift/subsidence rates, the along-fault and intra-basin fluids circulations, allows to actualize the evolution of the deformation history up to present-day . All the co-seismic surface to near-surface events, have to be also identified in order to integrate geophysical solutions for the earthquake, within the present-day geological and structural pattern. These two approaches, ranging from geological to instantaneous time-scales have been used during multi-tools Haiti-Sis oceanographic survey, allowing to document and image these different aspects at a large scale. The complex strike-slip North Caribbean boundary registered significative stress partitioning. Oblique convergence is expressed by along-strike evolution; from rifted segments (Cayman Through) to transpressive ones (Haiti, Dominican Rep.), to subduction (Porto Rico). In the Haiti-Sis survey, we acquired new offshore data surrounding the active fault areas, in the Gonâve Bay, the Jamaica Channel and along Southern Peninsula. Mapping the sea-floor, and HR seismic acquisition were our main objectives, in order to characterize the fault and fold architecture, with a new delineation of active segments. Offshore piston cores, have been used as representative of the modern basin sedimentation, and to document the catastrophic events (earthquakes, massive flood or sudden destabilization of the platform ) represented by turbiditic or mass-flow sequences, with the objective to track the time recurrence of seismic events by dating some of these catastrophic sediment deposition. At surface, the other markers of the fault activity are linked with along-fault permeability and fluid circulation

  7. Structural evidence for strike-slip deformation in the Izmir-Balikesir transfer zone and consequences for late Cenozoic evolution of western Anatolia (Turkey)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uzel, B.; Sözbilir, H.; Özkaymak, T.; Kaymakci, N.; Langereis, C.G.

    2013-01-01

    The Izmir-Balikesir transfer zone (IBTZ) is a recently recognized strike-slip dominated shear zone that accommodates the differential deformation between the Cycladic and Menderes core complexes within the Aegean Extensional System. Here, we present new structural and kinematic data obtained from

  8. Characteristics of the Late Quaternary right-lateral strike-slip movement of Bolokenu-Aqikekuduk fault in northern Tianshan Mountains, NW China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shen

    2011-10-01

    A typical strain partitioning style in the compression area has developed between the intermontane Bo-A fault and the piedmont thrust structures of Northern Tianshan Mountains, under the effect of oblique compression, as indicated by the piedmont thrust structure and the strike-slip fault in the mountains.

  9. Generation of plate tectonics with two-phase grain-damage and pinning: Source-sink model and toroidal flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2013-03-01

    The grain-damage and pinning mechanism of Bercovici and Ricard (2012) for lithospheric shear-localization is employed in two-dimensional flow calculations to test its ability to generate toroidal (strike-slip) motion and influence plate evolution. This mechanism posits that damage to the interface between phases in a polycrystalline material like peridotite (composed primarily of olivine and pyroxene) increases the number of small Zener pinning surfaces, which then constrain mineral grains to ever smaller sizes, regardless of creep mechanism. This effect allows a self-softening feedback in which damage and grain-reduction can co-exist with a grain-size dependent diffusion creep rheology; moreover, grain growth and weak-zone healing are greatly impeded by Zener pinning thereby leading to long-lived relic weak zones. The fluid dynamical calculations employ source-sink driven flow as a proxy for convective poloidal flow (upwelling/downwelling and divergent/convergent motion), and the coupling of this flow with non-linear rheological mechanisms excites toroidal or strike-slip motion. The numerical experiments show that pure dislocation-creep rheology, and grain-damage without Zener pinning (as occurs in a single-phase assemblages) permit only weak localization and toroidal flow; however, the full grain-damage with pinning readily allows focussed localization and intense, plate-like toroidal motion and strike-slip deformation. Rapid plate motion changes are also tested with abrupt rotations of the source-sink field after a plate-like configuration is developed; the post-rotation flow and material property fields retain memory of the original configuration for extensive periods, leading to suboptimally aligned plate boundaries (e.g., strike-slip margins non-parallel to plate motion), oblique subduction, and highly localized, weak and long lived acute plate-boundary junctions such as at what is observed at the Aleutian-Kurile intersection. The grain-damage and pinning

  10. Boundary element solutions for plates on elastic foundations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puttonen, J.; Varpasuo, P.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of the boundary element method to plate bending problems are quite sparse. The usual approach has been to treat same specific problems or types of problems. However, many practically important problems have been left without consideration. Plates on elastic foundations is one of these practically important areas and, moreover, it seems to be especially suitable to be treated with boundary element method. The analysis presented in this paper is based on the Kirchhoff plate bending theory and a fundamental singular solution is a displacement field caused by a unit lateral load acting at a point of an infinite plate resting on a linearly elastic foundation, which can be either of Winkler or Pasternak types or an elastic half space or, more generally, a foundation for which an axisymmetric external stress will result in an axisymmetric state of deformation. The derived integral equations base on the so-called direct formulation of the boundary element method. The two solution equations are formulated in terms of displacement rotation, moment and resultant boundary shear in every boundary nodal point. From these four unknown variables in every boundary node at least two has to be prescribed. The considered boundary conditions are free, simply supported and rotationally restrained edges. The developed computer code was designed to include the singular solutions for plates on Winkler, Pasternak and elastic half space foundations. These solutions were plotted and compared with each other and with available solutions in literature. The developed method has the advantage that the treatment of plates with finite dimensions and varying boundary conditions will be greatly facilitated. The analytic solution for these types of problems are rare and, moreover, the evaluating of numerical results from these solutions is a cumbersome task. (orig.)

  11. A Physical Analog Model of Strike-Slip Faulting for Model-Based Inquiry in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curren, I. S.; Glesener, G.

    2013-12-01

    Geoscience educators often use qualitative physical analog models to demonstrate natural processes; while these are effective teaching tools, they often neglect the fundamental scientific practices that make up the core of scientific work. Physical analog models with dynamic properties that can be manipulated and measured quantitatively in real-time, on the other hand, can give students the opportunity to explore, observe and empirically test their own ideas and hypotheses about the relevant target concepts within a classroom setting. Providing classroom content for inquiry, such as a hands-on physical analog model, which fosters students' production and refinement of their mental models in participatory and discursive activities have been argued by many education researchers to help students build a deeper understanding of science and scientific reasoning. We present a physical analog model that was originally developed by UCLA's Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory (MEDL) for the purpose of engaging students in the study of elastic rebound on a strike-slip fault; it was later modified to accommodate research of complex tectonic processes associated with strike-slip faulting, which are currently debated by scientists in both the geology and geophysics disciplines. During experimentation, it became clear that this new design could be used as a relevant resource for inquiry from which students would be able to make and discuss real-time empirical measurements and observations to help them infer causal accounts of theoretical and/or unobservable dynamic processes within the Earth's crust. In our poster session, we will: 1) demonstrate the physical analog model; 2) describe various real-time data collection tools, as well as quantitative methods students can use to process their data; and 3) describe the surficial, structural and relational similarities between the physical analog model and the target concepts intended for students to explore in the

  12. Slip rate and slip magnitudes of past earthquakes along the Bogd left-lateral strike-slip fault (Mongolia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Carol S.; Rizza, M.; Ritz, J.F.; Baucher, R.; Vassallo, R.; Mahan, S.

    2011-01-01

    We carried out morphotectonic studies along the left-lateral strike-slip Bogd Fault, the principal structure involved in the Gobi-Altay earthquake of 1957 December 4 (published magnitudes range from 7.8 to 8.3). The Bogd Fault is 260 km long and can be subdivided into five main geometric segments, based on variation in strike direction. West to East these segments are, respectively: the West Ih Bogd (WIB), The North Ih Bogd (NIB), the West Ih Bogd (WIB), the West Baga Bogd (WBB) and the East Baga Bogd (EBB) segments. Morphological analysis of offset streams, ridges and alluvial fans—particularly well preserved in the arid environment of the Gobi region—allows evaluation of late Quaternary slip rates along the different faults segments. In this paper, we measure slip rates over the past 200 ka at four sites distributed across the three western segments of the Bogd Fault. Our results show that the left-lateral slip rate is∼1 mm yr–1 along the WIB and EIB segments and∼0.5 mm yr–1 along the NIB segment. These variations are consistent with the restraining bend geometry of the Bogd Fault. Our study also provides additional estimates of the horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake along the western part of the Bogd rupture, complementing previously published studies. We show that the mean horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake decreases progressively from 5.2 m in the west to 2.0 m in the east, reflecting the progressive change of kinematic style from pure left-lateral strike-slip faulting to left-lateral-reverse faulting. Along the three western segments, we measure cumulative displacements that are multiples of the 1957 coseismic offset, which may be consistent with a characteristic slip. Moreover, using these data, we re-estimate the moment magnitude of the Gobi-Altay earthquake at Mw 7.78–7.95. Combining our slip rate estimates and the slip distribution per event we also determined a mean recurrence interval of∼2500

  13. Modeling the evolution of the lower crust with laboratory derived rheological laws under an intraplate strike slip fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Sagiya, T.

    2015-12-01

    The earth's crust can be divided into the brittle upper crust and the ductile lower crust based on the deformation mechanism. Observations shows heterogeneities in the lower crust are associated with fault zones. One of the candidate mechanisms of strain concentration is shear heating in the lower crust, which is considered by theoretical studies for interplate faults [e.g. Thatcher & England 1998, Takeuchi & Fialko 2012]. On the other hand, almost no studies has been done for intraplate faults, which are generally much immature than interplate faults and characterized by their finite lengths and slow displacement rates. To understand the structural characteristics in the lower crust and its temporal evolution in a geological time scale, we conduct a 2-D numerical experiment on the intraplate strike slip fault. The lower crust is modeled as a 20km thick viscous layer overlain by rigid upper crust that has a steady relative motion across a vertical strike slip fault. Strain rate in the lower crust is assumed to be a sum of dislocation creep and diffusion creep components, each of which flows the experimental flow laws. The geothermal gradient is assumed to be 25K/km. We have tested different total velocity on the model. For intraplate fault, the total velocity is less than 1mm/yr, and for comparison, we use 30mm/yr for interplate faults. Results show that at a low slip rate condition, dislocation creep dominates in the shear zone near the intraplate fault's deeper extension while diffusion creep dominates outside the shear zone. This result is different from the case of interplate faults, where dislocation creep dominates the whole region. Because of the power law effect of dislocation creep, the effective viscosity in the shear zone under intraplate faults is much higher than that under the interplate fault, therefore, shear zone under intraplate faults will have a much higher viscosity and lower shear stress than the intraplate fault. Viscosity contract between

  14. Inelastic off-fault response and three-dimensional dynamics of earthquake rupture on a strike-slip fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, D.J.; Ma, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Large dynamic stress off the fault incurs an inelastic response and energy loss, which contributes to the fracture energy, limiting the rupture and slip velocity. Using an explicit finite element method, we model three-dimensional dynamic ruptures on a vertical strike-slip fault in a homogeneous half-space. The material is subjected to a pressure-dependent Drucker-Prager yield criterion. Initial stresses in the medium increase linearly with depth. Our simulations show that the inelastic response is confined narrowly to the fault at depth. There the inelastic strain is induced by large dynamic stresses associated with the rupture front that overcome the effect of the high confining pressure. The inelastic zone increases in size as it nears the surface. For material with low cohesion (~5 MPa) the inelastic zone broadens dramatically near the surface, forming a "flowerlike" structure. The near-surface inelastic strain occurs in both the extensional and the compressional regimes of the fault, induced by seismic waves ahead of the rupture front under a low confining pressure. When cohesion is large (~10 MPa), the inelastic strain is significantly reduced near the surface and confined mostly to depth. Cohesion, however, affects the inelastic zone at depth less significantly. The induced shear microcracks show diverse orientations near the surface, owing to the low confining pressure, but exhibit mostly horizontal slip at depth. The inferred rupture-induced anisotropy at depth has the fast wave direction along the direction of the maximum compressive stress.

  15. Vibration modes of a single plate with general boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phamová L.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with free flexural vibration modes and natural frequencies of a thin plate with general boundary conditions — a simply supported plate connected to its surroundings with torsional springs. Vibration modes were derived on the basis of the Rajalingham, Bhat and Xistris approach. This approach was originally used for a clamped thin plate, so its adaptation was needed. The plate vibration function was usually expressed as a single partial differential equation. This partial differential equation was transformed into two ordinary differential equations that can be solved in the simpler way. Theoretical background of the computations is briefly described. Vibration modes of the supported plate with torsional springs are presented graphically and numerically for three different values of stiffness of torsional springs.

  16. Slip events propagating along a ductile mid-crustal strike-slip shear zone (Malpica-Lamego line, Variscan Orogen, NW Iberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llana-Fúnez, Sergio; de Paola, Nicola; Pozzi, Giacomo; Lopez-Sanchez, Marco Antonio

    2017-04-01

    The current level of erosion in NW Iberian peninsula exposes Variscan mid-crustal depths, where widespread deformation during orogenesis produced dominantly ductile structures. It constitutes an adequate window for the observation of structures close to the brittle-plastic transition in the continental crust. The shear zone object of this work is the Malpica-Lamego line (MLL), a major Variscan structure formed in the late stages of the Variscan collision. The MLL is a mostly strike-slip major structure that offsets laterally by several kilometres the assembly of allochthonous complexes, that contain a sub-horizontal suture zone, which are the remnants of the plate duplication during the Variscan convergence. The shear zone is exposed along the northern coast of Galicia (NW Spain). It is characterized by phyllonites and quartz-mylonites in a zone which is tens of meters in thickness. Within the phyllonites, a few seams of cataclastic rocks have been found in bands along the main fabric. Their cohesive character, the parallelism between the different bands, the fact that host rocks maintain mineral assemblage and that no cross-cutting relations in the field were identified, are considered indicative of these brittle structures forming coetaneously with the ductile shearing producing the phyllonites. Samples from the phyllonites, also from quartz-mylonites, were prepared and powdered to characterize friction properties in a rotary shear apparatus at high, seismic velocities (m/s). Preliminary experiments run at room temperature and effective normal stresses between 10 to 25 MPa, show that friction coefficients µ are relatively high and a limited drop in friction coefficient occurs after 10-20 cm of slip, with µ decreasing from 0.7 to 0.5. Fracturing seems coetaneous with dominant ductile shearing within the shear zone, however, given the frictional properties of the phyllonites, it is unlikely that brittle deformation nucleates within these fault rocks. Instead, it

  17. Active tectonic deformation of the western Indian plate boundary: A case study from the Chaman Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crupa, Wanda E.; Khan, Shuhab D.; Huang, Jingqiu; Khan, Abdul S.; Kasi, Aimal

    2017-10-01

    Collision of the Eurasian and Indian plates has resulted in two spatially offset subduction zones, the Makran subduction zone to the south and the Himalayan convergent margin to the north. These zones are linked by a system of left-lateral strike-slip faults known as the Chaman Fault System, ∼1200 km, which spans along western Pakistan. Although this is one of the greatest strike-slip faults, yet temporal and spatial variation in displacement has not been adequately defined along this fault system. This study conducted geomorphic and geodetic investigations along the Chaman Fault in a search for evidence of spatial variations in motion. Four study areas were selected over the span of the Chaman Fault: (1) Tarnak-Rud area over the Tarnak-Rud valley, (2) Spinatizha area over the Spinatizha Mountain Range, (3) Nushki area over the Nushki basin, and (4) Kharan area over the northern tip of the Central Makran Mountains. Remote sensing data allowed for in depth mapping of different components and faults within the Kohjak group. Wind and water gap pairs along with offset rivers were identified using high-resolution imagery and digital-elevation models to show displacement for the four study areas. The mountain-front-sinuosity ratio, valley height-to-width-ratio, and the stream-length-gradient index were calculated and used to determine the relative tectonic activity of each area. These geomorphic indices suggest that the Kharan area is the most active and the Tarnak-Rud area is the least active. GPS data were processed into a stable Indian plate reference frame and analyzed. Fault parallel velocity versus fault normal distance yielded a ∼8-10 mm/yr displacement rate along the Chaman Fault just north of the Spinatizha area. InSAR data were also integrated to assess displacement rates along the fault system. Geodetic data support that ultra-slow earthquakes similar to those that strike along other major strike-slip faults, such as the San Andreas Fault System, are

  18. Plate boundary deformation in North Iceland during 1992–2009 revealed by InSAR time-series analysis and GPS

    KAUST Repository

    Metzger, Sabrina

    2014-08-20

    In North Iceland, extensional plate motion is accommodated by the Northern Volcanic Zone, a set of en-echelon volcanic systems, and the Tjörnes Fracture Zone, a transform offset in the mid-Atlantic Ridge consisting of two parallel transform lineaments. The southern lineament, the Húsavík–Flatey fault, is a 100 km-long right-lateral strike slip fault that has not ruptured for more than 140 years and poses a significant seismic hazard to Húsavík, a fishing town located by the fault, and to other coastal communities. We present results of InSAR time-series analysis data spanning almost two decades (1992–2009) that show extensional and interseismic deformation within the Northern Volcanic Zone and the on-shore part of the Tjörnes Fracture Zone. The results also exhibit transient inflation at Theistareykir volcano, deflation at Krafla central volcano and a broad uplift north of Krafla. The current plate extension is not uniform across the Northern Volcanic Zone, but concentrated at the western fissures of the Theistareykir volcanic system and the outermost fissures of the Krafla fissure swarm. We combine a back-slip plate boundary model with a set of point pressure sources representing volcanic changes to describe the current extensional plate boundary deformation and update the previous estimations of the locking depth and slip rate of the Húsavík–Flatey fault that were based on GPS data alone. Using different combinations of input data, we find that the Húsavík–Flatey fault has a locking depth of 6–10 km and, with a slip rate of 6–9 mm/yr, is accommodating about a third of the full transform motion. We furthermore show that while the InSAR data provide important constraints on the volcanic deformation within the NVZ, they do not significantly improve the model parameter estimation for the HFF, as the dense GPS network appears to better capture the deformation across the fault.

  19. Discovering the plates boundaries in the Mediterranean sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    During the 8th class the students learn geology. We analyze the earth's layers, the earthquakes, the volcanoes and other natural phenomena like subduction and orogeny. We start with a global study but our goal is to focus on the crust to discover the plates boundaries, particularly the boundary between Eurasian and African Plate in the Mediterranean sea. It's very simple for the students to discover all the information using the Internet or the science book, but I want to make with them an exploration of earth science with the help of the natural phenomena we studied during the year. We connect with Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia ( http://www.ingv.it/en/ ) where we can find a map with the earthquakes happened in the last years in Italy and in the Mediterranean sea and the list of the main volcanoes. In this way we can draw a map of the mediterranean plates and we can talk about the past and the future of the Mediterranean sea, Europe and Africa based on our maps and on the Alps orogeny. Using youtube we can have a confirm of our hypothesis about the future of the Mediterranean sea (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGcDed4xVD4 ). A good observation for the students is given by the fact that we live in Europe but actually we stay on the African plate. The boundary is 5 km north of our school and we can go and visit the place where it is possible to see the different height of the two plates.

  20. Global plate boundary evolution and kinematics since the late Paleozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kara J.; Maloney, Kayla T.; Zahirovic, Sabin; Williams, Simon E.; Seton, Maria; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2016-11-01

    Many aspects of deep-time Earth System models, including mantle convection, paleoclimatology, paleobiogeography and the deep Earth carbon cycle, require high-resolution plate motion models that include the evolution of the mosaic of plate boundaries through time. We present the first continuous late Paleozoic to present-day global plate model with evolving plate boundaries, building on and extending two previously published models for the late Paleozoic (410-250 Ma) and Mesozoic-Cenozoic (230-0 Ma). We ensure continuity during the 250-230 Ma transition period between the two models, update the absolute reference frame of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic model and add a new Paleozoic reconstruction for the Baltica-derived Alexander Terrane, now accreted to western North America. This 410-0 Ma open access model provides a framework for deep-time whole Earth modelling and acts as a base for future extensions and refinement. We analyse the model in terms of the number of plates, predicted plate size distribution, plate and continental root mean square (RMS) speeds, plate velocities and trench migration through time. Overall model trends share many similarities to those for recent times, which we use as a first order benchmark against which to compare the model and identify targets for future model refinement. Except for during the period 260-160 Ma, the number of plates (16-46) and ratio of "large" plates (≥ 107.5 km2) to smaller plates ( 2.7-6.6) are fairly similar to present-day values (46 and 6.6, respectively), with lower values occurring during late Paleozoic assembly and growth of Pangea. This temporal pattern may also reflect difficulties in reconstructing small, now subducted oceanic plates further back in time, as well as whether a supercontinent is assembling or breaking up. During the 260-160 Ma timeframe the model reaches a minima in the number of plates, in contrast to what we would expect during initial Pangea breakup and thus highlighting the need for refinement

  1. Discovering Plate Boundaries, a data rich classroom exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, D. S.; Henning, A. T.; Shipp, S.

    2002-12-01

    I have developed an exercise called "Discovering Plate Boundaries" that is getting increasing use in the Houston area, via teacher workshop sessions I give, and nationally through my web page and teacher workshops lead by colleagues. The exercise is based on 5 world maps containing earthquake, volcano, topography, satellite gravity, and seafloor age data. The novel aspect of the exercise is the "jigsaw" manner in which student groups access the maps and use them to discover, classify, and describe plate boundary types. The exercise is based only on observation and description, which makes it useful at a wide variety of levels; I have used it successfully in 5th grade classes, 8th grade classes, as well as in high school and earth science classes at Rice University. The exercise is based on a set of wall maps that are not consumed during the exercise. The consumables are inexpensive: two 11x17 in. B&W copies per student and some colored pencils. Because the exercise is not based on student access to the web, it is not dependent on classroom technology equipment. The exercise takes three 50 minute class periods to complete and involves the students in making presentations to one another in small groups as well as to the whole class. The students come away from the exercise with knowledge of the key features of each type of plate boundary and a sense of why each looks/acts the way it does.

  2. Discovering Plate Boundaries, A Data-Rich Inquiry-Based Classroom Exercise for Teaching Plate Tectonic Boundary Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, D. S.

    2005-12-01

    Discovering Plate Boundaries is a classroom exercise based on 4 world maps containing earthquake, volcano, topography, and seafloor age data. A novel aspect of the exercise is the jigsaw manner in which student groups access the maps and use them to discover, classify, and describe plate boundary types. The exercise is based only on observation and description, which makes it useful at a wide variety of levels. We have used it successfully with middle school, high school, and college major and non-major earth science classes, as well as with pre-service and in-service teachers. The exercise takes three to four 50 minute class periods to complete and involves the students making presentations to one another in small groups and to the whole class. The students come away from the exercise with knowledge of the key features of each type of plate boundary and a sense of why each looks the way it does. While the materials are accessible on the web (http://terra.rice.edu/plateboundary/ and through http://www.dlese.org ), the actual exercise is not based on student access to the Web and is not dependent on classroom technology equipment.

  3. A New Class of Plate Boundary and Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, H.; Lin, J.; Schouten, H.; Michael, P.; Snow, J.; Jokat, W.

    2003-04-01

    While it has long been considered that there are only three types of boundary that enclose the earth's tectonic plates, a new class of plate boundary, amagmatic accretionary ridge segments, has recently been recognized as well as a new class of ocean ridge: ultra-slow spreading. This is the direct consequence of the successful investigations of the very-slow spreading Southwest Indian and Arctic Ridge systems promoted by InterRidge. Amagmatic accretionary ridge segments are a new class of accretionary plate boundary distinct from magmatic accretionary ridge segments. Amagmatic accretionary segments are marked by deep troughs often floored by mantle peridotite, with only thin or scattered basalt flows. They represent plate failure originating near the base of the plate following the zone of lithospheric necking unlike magmatic accretionary segments, where the plate fails from the top. Unlike stable transforms and magmatic accretionary segments, amagmatic accretionary segments may assume any angle to the spreading direction and replace both orthogonal segments and transform faults over large sections of ocean ridge. Magmatic and amagmatic accretionary segments can stably coexist, one connected to the other for many millions of years, or may displace one another as mantle thermal structure, composition, ridge geometry or spreading rate change. Ultra-slow spreading ridges are a new class of ridge that form where the effective spreading rate for mantle upwelling falls below ~12 mm/yr. The ESR is the orthogonal component of the spreading rate measured perpendicular to the ridge trend. Magmas erupted along ultra-slow spreading ridges may be alkaline and/or isotopically and incompatible trace element enriched compared to typical MORB. Ultra-slow spreading ridges consist of linked magmatic and amagmatic accretionary segments and are as mechanically, morphologically and petrologically distinct from slow-spreading ridges, as slow-spreading ridges are from fast. The Southwest

  4. Deformation of the Northwestern Okhotsk Plate: How is it happening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, D.; Fujita, K.; Mackey, K.

    2009-09-01

    The Eurasia (EU) - North America (NA) plate boundary zone across Northeast Asia still presents many open questions within the plate tectonic paradigm. Constraining the geometry and number of plates or microplates present in the plate boundary zone is especially difficult because of the location of the EU-NA euler pole close to or even upon the EU-NA boundary. One of the major challenges remains the geometry of the Okhotsk plate (OK). whose northwestern portion terminates on the EU-OK-NA triple junction and is thus caught and compressed between converging EU and NA. We suggest that this leads to a coherent and understandable large scale deformation pattern of mostly northwest-southeast trending strike-slip faults which split Northwest OK into several extruding slivers. When the fault geometry is analysed together with space geodetic and focal mechanism data it suggests a central block which is extruding faster bordered east and west by progressively slower extruding blocks until the OK plate boundary faults are encountered. Taking into account elastic loading from both the intra-OK faults and the OK-Pacific (PA) boundary reconciles geodetic motions with geologic slip rates on at least the OK-NA boundary which corresponds to the Ulakhan fault.

  5. The role of post-collisional strike-slip tectonics in the geological evolution of the late Neoproterozoic volcano-sedimentary Guaratubinha Basin, southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barão, Leonardo M.; Trzaskos, Barbara; Vesely, Fernando F.; de Castro, Luís Gustavo; Ferreira, Francisco J. F.; Vasconcellos, Eleonora M. G.; Barbosa, Tiago C.

    2017-12-01

    The Guaratubinha Basin is a late Neoproterozoic volcano-sedimentary basin included in the transitional-stage basins of the South American Platform. The aim of this study is to investigate its tectonic evolution through a detailed structural analysis based on remote sensing and field data. The structural and aerogeophysics data indicate that at least three major deformational events affected the basin. Event E1 caused the activation of the two main basin-bounding fault zones, the Guaratubinha Master Fault and the Guaricana Shear Zone. These structures, oriented N20-45E, are associated with well-defined right-lateral to oblique vertical faults, conjugate normal faults and vertical flow structures. Progressive transtensional deformation along the two main fault systems was the main mechanism for basin formation and the deposition of thick coarse-grained deposits close to basin-borders. The continuous opening of the basin provided intense intermediate and acid magmatism as well as deposition of volcaniclastic sediments. Event E2 characterizes generalized compression, recorded as minor thrust faults with tectonic transport toward the northwest and left-lateral activation of the NNE-SSW Palmital Shear Zone. Event E3 is related to the Mesozoic tectonism associated with the South Atlantic opening, which generated diabase dykes and predominantly right-lateral strike-slip faults oriented N10-50W. Its rhomboidal geometry with long axis parallel to major Precambrian shear zones, the main presence of high-angle, strike-slip or oblique faults, the asymmetric distribution of geological units and field evidence for concomitant Neoproterozoic magmatism and strike-slip movements are consistent with pull-apart basins reported in the literature.

  6. Seismic Velocity and Elastic Properties of Plate Boundary Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppson, Tamara N.

    The elastic properties of fault zone rock at depth play a key role in rupture nucleation, propagation, and the magnitude of fault slip. Materials that lie within major plate boundary fault zones often have very different material properties than standard crustal rock values. In order to understand the mechanics of faulting at plate boundaries, we need to both measure these properties and understand how they govern the behavior of different types of faults. Mature fault zones tend to be identified in large-scale geophysical field studies as zones with low seismic velocity and/or electrical resistivity. These anomalous properties are related to two important mechanisms: (1) mechanical or diagenetic alteration of the rock materials and/or (2) pore fluid pressure and stress effects. However, in remotely-sensed and large-length-scale data it is difficult to determine which of these mechanisms are affecting the measured properties. The objective of this dissertation research is to characterize the seismic velocity and elastic properties of fault zone rocks at a range of scales, with a focus on understanding why the fault zone properties are different from those of the surrounding rock and the potential effects on earthquake rupture and fault slip. To do this I performed ultrasonic velocity experiments under elevated pressure conditions on drill core and outcrops samples from three plate boundary fault zones: the San Andreas Fault, California, USA; the Alpine Fault, South Island, New Zealand; and the Japan Trench megathrust, Japan. Additionally, I compared laboratory measurements to sonic log and large-scale seismic data to examine the scale-dependence of the measured properties. The results of this study provide the most comprehensive characterization of the seismic velocities and elastic properties of fault zone rocks currently available. My work shows that fault zone rocks at mature plate boundary faults tend to be significantly more compliant than surrounding crustal

  7. The late Quaternary slip history of the North Anatolian Fault, Turkey: Implications for the spatial and temporal behaviour of large strike-slip fault belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabcı, Cengiz; Akyüz, H. Serdar; Sançar, Taylan; Güneç Kıyak, Nafiye

    2015-04-01

    The study of the spatial and temporal behaviour of active faults by estimating the geologic and geodetic slip rates is critical not only for assessing the seismic potential of these tectonic structures, but also for understanding their geodynamics. Geodetic data can provide detailed spatial coverage but represent a short time interval of a single earthquake cycle, while geologic rates are derived as average values for multiple events at spatially limited sites. In the complex tectonic setting of the eastern Mediterranean, the westward extrusion of the Anatolian scholle is mainly accommodated by two major tectonic structures, the North Anatolian (NASZ) and the East Anatolian (EASZ) shear zones, respectively forming the northern and eastern boundaries. The rate of deformation all along the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is spatially well documented mainly by GPS and InSAR based geodetic studies during the last two decades. Furthermore, the number of the morphochronology-based geologic slip rate studies significantly increased, covering the different sections of this large strike slip fault for various time intervals. In this study, we do not only compile all previous geologic slip rate estimates, but we also present data for three new and two revised sites from central to the most eastern parts of the NAF in order to understand the spatial and temporal behaviour of this important fault system. The integrated dataset of geologic studies were classified into two groups to represent the central to eastern sections (Model I) and the western part (Model II). The geographical diversion between two models is about at the 31° E longitude, where the NAF bifurcates into two branches from this point toward west into the Marmara Region. To test any secular variation in fault's slip history, we used the Monte Carlo approach of Gold and Cowgill (2011). After the removal of rates, which do not account the near fault deformation or the existing parallel/sub-parallel faults, the Model

  8. A recent Mw 4.3 earthquake proving activity of a shallow strike-slip fault in the northern part of the Western Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Ebraheem, Mohamed O.; Zahradník, Jiří

    2018-03-01

    The Mw 4.3 earthquake of September 2015 is the first felt earthquake since 1900 A.D in the northern part of the Western Desert, Egypt, south of the El-Alamein City. The available waveform data observed at epicentral distances 52-391 km was collected and carefully evaluated. Nine broad-band stations were selected to invert full waveforms for the centroid position (horizontal and vertical) and for the focal mechanism solution. The first-arrival travel times, polarities and low-frequency full waveforms (0.03-0.08 Hz) are consistently explained in this paper as caused by a shallow source of the strike-slip mechanism. This finding indicates causal relation of this earthquake to the W-E trending South El-Alamein fault, which developed in Late Cretaceous as dextral strike slip fault. Recent activity of this fault, proven by the studied rare earthquake, is of fundamental importance for future seismic hazard evaluations, underlined by proximity (∼65 km) of the source zone to the first nuclear power plant planned site in Egypt. Safe exploration and possible future exploitation of hydrocarbon reserves, reported around El-Alamein fault in the last decade, cannot be made without considering the seismic potential of this fault.

  9. The Arctic Plate Boundary: Seismotectonics at Ultra-slow Spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engen, $; Eldholm, O.; Bungum, H.

    2002-12-01

    Earthquakes reveal the dynamics of the Arctic midocean ridge (MOR) system between the Knipovich Ridge and the Laptev Sea continental margin, where the Eurasian and North American plates separate by 1.5-0.5 cm/a. By assessing location errors and network detectabilities we have evaluated and quality sorted earthquake reports north of 72°N from 1955-99. Sorting the earthquakes by number of recording stations has yielded a catalog dominated by post-1995 events, with epicenter location errors of ~15 km and Ms 4.4 completeness threshold. Hence, the catalog is suitable for studying spatial and temporal earthquake patterns, including the regional segmentation of the Arctic plate boundary. From integration of seismicity with available focal mechanism solutions, bathymetry and potential field data we suggest at least nine transform faults and four structural plate boundary provinces: The Spitsbergen Transform System characterized by distinct, short ridge and transform segments, the West Gakkel Ridge with an accentuated topography and high magnetic amplitudes, the East Gakkel Ridge with more subdued topography and geophysical character, and the continental Laptev Sea Rift System. The ocean-continent transition at the Laptev Sea continental margin is less than 60 km wide and encompasses a sheared margin segment with 150-200 km offset. Landward there are two distinct seismicity trends in a migrating rift system. In the oceanic domain the earthquakes occur in interplate swarms, of which a 209-event swarm on the East Gakkel Ridge in 1999 is the largest recorded. There are no significant seismicity gaps, thus magmatic accretion episodes occur along the entire ultra-slow spreading MOR system. The earthquake magnitude-frequency relationships in each structural province show that source-area stress is highest in the Spitsbergen Transform System and decreases with spreading rate along the Gakkel Ridge.

  10. The Magmatic Component of the Plate Boundary Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencin, D.; Jackson, M.; Lisowski, M.; Feaux, K.; Andersen, G.; Bohnenstiehl, K.; Hodgkinson, K.; Coyle, B.; Friesen, B.; Pauk, B.; Walls, C.; Meertens, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) component of the NSF-funded Earthscope program has a significant complement of instruments devoted to the study of magmatic systems. There are ten target areas: Akutan, Unimak, Augustine, Mt St Helens, Long Valley, Yellowstone, Lake Tahoe, Medicine Lake, Mt Lassen, and Mt Shasta that include 22 borehole strainmeters, 22 borehole seismometers, 26 borehole tiltmeters and 110 continuous GPS stations all returning data in near real-time. In conjunction with the existing instrumentation operated by the USGS Volcanic Hazards Programs Volcano Observatories, this represents a significant array of tools for exploring various volcanic processes. In the first four years of the project, PBO has captured two volcanic events (Mt St Helens and Augustine) far exceeding the anticipation of capturing one event in the first 15 years of the project. This presentation gives an overview and status of the program, the various targets, instrumentation and results.

  11. The 2015 M7.2 Sarez, Central Pamir, Earthquake And The Importance Of Strike-Slip Faulting In The Pamir Interior: Insights From Geodesy And Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Sabrina; Schurr, Bernd; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Schöne, Tilo; Kufner, Sofia-Katerina; Zhang, Yong; Sudhaus, Henriette

    2017-04-01

    The Pamir mountain range, located in the Northwest of the India-Asia collision zone, accommodates approximately one third of the northward advance of the Indian continent at this longitude (i. e. ˜34 mm/yr) mostly by shortening at its northern thrust system. Geodetic and seismic data sets reveal here a narrow zone of high deformation and M7+ earthquakes of mostly thrust type with some dextral strike-slip faulting observed, too. The Pamir interior shows sinistral strike-slip and normal faulting indicating north-south compression and east-west extension. In this tectonic setting the two largest instrumentally recorded earthquakes, the M7+ 1911 and 2015 earthquake events in the central Pamir occurred with left-lateral shear along a NE-SW rupture plane. We present the co-seismic deformation field of the 2015 earthquake observed by radar satellite interferometry (InSAR), SAR amplitude pixel offsets and high-rate Global Positioning System (GPS). The InSAR and pixel offset results suggest a 50+ km long rupture with sinistral fault offsets at the surface of more than 2 m on a yet unmapped fault trace of the Sarez Karakul Fault System (SKFS). A distributed slip model with a data-driven slip patch resolution yields a sub-vertical fault plane with a strike of N39.5 degrees and a rupture area of ˜80 x 40 km with a maximum slip of 2 m in the upper 10 km of the crust near the surface rupture. Field observations collected some nine months after the earthquake confirm the rupture mechanism, surface trace location and fault offset measurements as constrained by geodetic data. Diffuse deformation was observed across a 1-2 km wide zone, hosting primary fractures sub-parallel to the rupture strike with offsets of 2 m and secondary, en echelon fractures including Riedel shears and hybrid fractures often related to gravitational mass movements. The 1911 and 2015 earthquakes demonstrate the importance of sinistral strike-slip faulting on the SKFS, contributing both to shear between the

  12. Rupture model of the 2015 M7.2 Sarez, Central Pamir, earthquake and the importance of strike-slip faulting in the Pamir interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, S.; Schurr, B.; Schoene, T.; Zhang, Y.; Sudhaus, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Pamir mountain range, located in the Northwest of the India-Asia collision zone, accommodates approximately one third of the northward advance of the Indian continent at this longitude (i.e. 34 mm/yr) mostly by shortening at its northern thrust system. Geodetic and seismic data sets reveal here a narrow zone of high deformation and M7+ earthquakes of mostly thrust type with some dextral strike-slip faulting observed, too. The Pamir interior shows sinistral strike-slip and normal faulting indicating north-south compression and east-west extension. In this tectonic setting the two largest instrumentally recorded earthquakes, the M7+ 1911 and 2015 earthquake events in the central Pamir occurred with left-lateral shear along a NE-SW rupture plane. We present the co-seismic deformation field of the 2015 earthquake observed by Radar satellite interferometry (InSAR), SAR amplitude offsets and high-rate Global Positioning System (GPS). The InSAR and offset results reveal that the earthquake created a 50 km long surface rupture with maximum left-lateral offsets of more than two meters on a yet unmapped fault trace of the Sarez Karakul Fault System (SKFS). We further derive a distributed slip-model including a thorough model parameter uncertainty study. Using a two-step approach to first find the optimal rupture geometry and then invert for slip on discrete patches, we show that a data-driven patch resolution produces yields a better representation of the near-surface slip and an increased slip precision than a uniform patch approach without increasing the number of parameters and thus calculation time. Our best-fit model yields a sub-vertical fault plane with a strike of N39.5 degrees and a rupture area of 80 x 40 km2 with a maximum slip of 2 meters in the upper 10 km of the crust near the surface rupture. The 1911 and 2015 earthquakes demonstrate the importance of sinistral strike-slip faulting on the SKFS, contributing both to shear between the western and eastern

  13. Evaluating slab-plate coupling in the Indo-Australian plate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandiford, Mike; Coblentz, David; Schellart, Wouter Pieter

    Distributed seismicity in the central Indian Ocean affords a unique opportunity to evaluate the extent of slab-plate coupling in the Indo-Australian plate. The mix of reverse-fault and strike-slip mechanisms in this region, with northwest-southeast to north-south maximum horizontal stress, SHmax,

  14. The last interglacial period at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and an estimate of late Quaternary tectonic uplift rate in a strike-slip regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweig, E. S.; Muhs, D. R.; Simmons, K. R.; Halley, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Guantanamo Bay, Cuba is an area dominated by a strike-slip tectonic regime and is therefore expected to have very low Quaternary uplift rates. We tested this hypothesis by study of an unusually well preserved emergent reef terrace around the bay. Up to 12 m of unaltered, growth-position reef corals are exposed at about 40 sections examined around ˜40 km of coastline. Maximum reef elevations in the protected, inner part of the bay are ˜11-12 m, whereas outer-coast shoreline angles of wave-cut benches are as high as ˜14 m. Fifty uranium-series analyses of unrecrystallized corals from six localities yield ages ranging from ˜134 ka to ˜115 ka, when adjusted for small biases due to slightly elevated initial 234U/238U values. Thus, ages of corals correlate this reef to the peak of the last interglacial period, marine isotope stage (MIS) 5.5. Previously, we dated the Key Largo Limestone to the same high-sea stand in the tectonically stable Florida Keys. Estimates of paleo-sea level during MIS 5.5 in the Florida Keys are ~6.6 to 8.3 m above present. Assuming a similar paleo-sea level in Cuba, this yields a long-term tectonic uplift rate of 0.04-0.06 m/ka over the past ~120 ka. This estimate supports the hypothesis that the tectonic uplift rate should be low in this strike-slip regime. Nevertheless, on the southeast coast of Cuba, east of our study area, we have observed flights of multiple marine terraces, suggesting either (1) a higher uplift rate or (2) an unusually well-preserved record of pre-MIS 5.5 terraces not observed at Guantanamo Bay.

  15. The 2015 Mw7.2 Sarez Strike-Slip Earthquake in the Pamir Interior: Response to the Underthrusting of India's Western Promontory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Sabrina; Schurr, Bernd; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Sudhaus, Henriette; Kufner, Sofia-Katerina; Schöne, Tilo; Zhang, Yong; Perry, Mason; Bendick, Rebecca

    2017-11-01

    The Pamir orogen, Central Asia, is the result of the ongoing northward advance of the Indian continent causing shortening inside Asia. Geodetic and seismic data place the most intense deformation along the northern rim of the Pamir, but the recent 7 December 2015, Mw7.2 Sarez earthquake occurred in the Pamir's interior. We present a distributed slip model of this earthquake using coseismic geodetic data and postseismic field observations. The earthquake ruptured an ˜80 km long, subvertical, sinistral fault consisting of three right-stepping segments from the surface to ˜30 km depth with a maximum slip of three meters in the upper 10 km of the crust. The coseismic slip model agrees well with en échelon secondary surface breaks that are partly influenced by liquefaction-induced mass movements. These structures reveal up to 2 m of sinistral offset along the northern, low-offset segment of modeled rupture. The 2015 event initiated close to the presumed epicenter of the 1911 Mw˜7.3 Lake Sarez earthquake, which had a similar strike-slip mechanism. These earthquakes highlight the importance of NE trending sinistral faults in the active tectonics of the Pamir. Strike-slip deformation accommodates shear between the rapidly northward moving eastern Pamir and the Tajik basin in the west and is part of the westward (lateral) extrusion of thickened Pamir plateau crust into the Tajik basin. The Sarez-Karakul fault system and the two large Sarez earthquakes likely are crustal expressions of the underthrusting of the northwestern leading edge of the Indian mantle lithosphere beneath the Pamir.

  16. Paleoearthquakes on the Anninghe and Zemuhe fault along the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau and implications for fault rupture behavior at fault bends on strike-slip faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Ran, Yongkang; Chen, Lichun; Li, Yanbao

    2017-11-01

    Fault bends can serve as fault segment boundaries and are used in seismic hazard assessment. Recent studies addressing whether rupture propagation would be arrested at such structural complexities have commonly focused on computational modeling. However, multi-cycle paleoseismic rupture observations through fault bends have seldom been reported. In this study, we used trenching and radiocarbon dating to reveal paleoseismic rupture histories on the southern segment of the Anninghe fault (ANHF) along the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau to explore multi-cycle surface rupture behavior at an extensional fault bend (with an angle of about 30°) at Xichang between the ANHF and Zemuhe fault (ZMHF). Specifically, nine trenches were opened in a fault depression at Maoheshan site and five paleoseismic events were identified. These have been named E1 through E5 respectively corresponding to events at 1400-935 BCE, 420-875 CE, 830-1360 CE, 1295-1715 CE, and 1790 CE-Present. After comparison with the historical records of earthquakes around Xichang and previous paleoseismic results, we suggest that the five seismic events are constrained at: 1365 BCE-935 BCE, 814 CE, 950 CE- 1145 CE, 1536 CE and 1850 CE, respectively. The average recurrence interval of earthquakes along the southern segment of the ANHF is about 700-800 yr. Furthermore, the evidence indicates that surface-faulting events along the southern segment of the ANHF appear to be unevenly spaced in time. Moreover, based on comparisons of seismic events along the ANHF and ZMHF, we find that two fault segments simultaneous ruptured during the 814 CE and 1850 CE earthquakes, event E3 and the 1536 CE earthquake ruptured the ANHF but not rupture the ZMHF. We suggest that the Xichang fault bend is not a persistent fault boundary, indicating that extensional fault bends with an angle of about 30° may not effectively terminate seismic ruptures on strike-slip faults.

  17. Congested subduction in New Zealand driving plate boundary reogranisation and accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, D.; Betts, P. G.; Moresi, L. N.; Ailleres, L.

    2017-12-01

    Oblique dextral convergence along the Australia-Pacific plate boundary in the SW Pacific is characterised by large scale changes in the lithospheric composition of the convergent plates. Unimpeded subduction along the Tonga-Kermadec Trench transitions to subduction that is congested by the Hikurangi Plateau along the Hikurangi Trench and then to micro-continent collision along the Alpine Fault. The Marlborough Fault Zone is located at the edge of the Campbell Micro-continent, providing the structural link between the congested Hikurangi Trench and Alpine Fault. The Marlborough Fault Zone displays a 120 km step-wise migration of the plate boundary since the mid-Miocene, resulting in 700,000 km3 of crust accreting from the Pacific to the Australian Plate. To understand how congested subduction along the Pacific-Australia Plate Boundary influences plate boundary re-organisation and accretion in the Marlborough Fault Zone, we present 3D numerical models to understand the influence of lithospheric heterogeneity on the evolution of plate boundary geometry and deformation. We compare this with present day plate boundary deformation characterised by GPS and earthquake focal mechanisms. Paleo-stress analysis from striation data shows a clockwise P-axis rotation from 66° to 118° since the Mid-Miocene, indicating plate boundary rotations of at least 52°. This rotation is driven by collision of the Hikurangi Plateau with the Hikurangi Trench during the indentation of the Campbell micro-continent. The rotation of plate boundary acts to minimise the width of the colliding Hikurangi Plateau, and allows the plate boundary to unlock southward. We interpret the indentation of the Campbell micro-continent and southward unlocking of the Hikurangi Megathrust to drive the southward migration of the plate boundary in the Marlborough Fault Zone, and in doing so have identified a previously undescribed mechanism of accretion, which we term "Subduction propagation accretion".

  18. Distributed Active Folding across the Northern Caribbean Plate Boundary Derived from the Combined Analysis of Srtm Topography and Seismic Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, M.; Seeber, L.; Sorlien, C. C.; Steckler, M. S.; Gulick, S. P.; McHugh, C. M.; Hornbach, M.

    2011-12-01

    Sinistral transpression across the northern Caribbean plate boundary is partitioned across Hispaniola between two subparallel transforms that accommodate strike-slip motion, and a wide swath of intervening NW-trending folds. These folds correspond to mountain chains continuous with offshore anticlinal ridges. The mapping of onshore flights of marine terraces exposed across these folds, combined with the dating of fossil corals, have constrained uplift rates for their emerged portions [Mann et al., 1995]. Slope maps produced from recently released SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) data with a resolution of ~30 m highlight the full 3D geometry of the deformed marine terraces across these folds. Offshore multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) profiles collected in 1982 by GSI / Western Geophysical constrain the broader geometry of the submerged anticline limbs. This combined dataset is used to investigate the deformation history of four folds whose emerged limbs are only moderately disrupted by mass wasting. One of the exposed structures (St Marc peninsula) displays both fold limbs, with the highest uplift predictably centered on the axial trace of the fold. Two others display terraces that remain planar and are progressively tilted away from the presumed anticline crests, indicating in each case that only one of the fold limbs is exposed above sea level and that it is subsiding relative to the crest. Lastly, the west end of Gonave Island, the WNW-trending island located between the north and south peninsulas of Haiti, displays nearly horizontal terraces. While prior investigation of the lowest ~125 ka terrace indicates that it has not uplifted since it was formed [Mann et al., 1995], nearshore MCS data reveal a ~350 m-deep horizontal erosional surface that truncates folded reflectors. This suggests that the submerged portion of the Gonave anticline crest is subsiding. Furthermore, progressive tilting of the seismic reflectors on the fold limbs requires that

  19. The Collapse and Spreading of Sundaland (SE Asia); evolution and Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pubellier, Manuel; Morley, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    By the end of Mesozoic times Sundaland (the continental core of SE Asia) was an elevated area composed of granite and metamorphic basement on the rims; which suffered collapse and incipient extension, whereas the central part was stable. Most of the basins opened inside evolved since the Late Cretaceous in a manner that may be correlated to the conditions of the subduction in the Sunda Trench. The Sundaland promontory was surrounded by a large subduction zone, except in the north and was a free boundary in the Early Cenozoic. Starting from the Palaeogene, fractures initiated during the India Eurasia collision, and rifting began along large faults (mostly N-S and NNW-SSE strike-slip). The basins remained in a continental fluvio-lacustrine or shallow marine environment for a long time and some are marked by extremely stretched crust (Phu Khanh, Natuna, N. Makassar) or even reached the ocean floor spreading stage (Celebes, Flores). Western Sundaland was a combination of basin opening and strike-slip transpressional deformation. The configuration suggests a free boundary particularly to the east (trench pull associated with the Proto-South China Sea subduction; Java-Sulawesi trench subduction rollback). In the Early Miocene, Australian blocks reached the Sunda subduction zone and imposed local shortening in the south and southeast, whereas the western part was free from compression after the Indian continent had moved away to the north. This suggests an important coupling of the Sunda Plate with the Indo-Australian Plate both to SE and NW, possibly further west rollback had ceased in the Java-Sumatra subduction zone, and compressional stress was being transferred northwards across the plate boundary. The internal compression is expressed to the south by shortening which is transmitted as far as the Malay basin. In the Late Miocene, most of the Sunda Plate was under compression, except the tectonically isolated Andaman Sea and the Damar basins. In the Pliocene

  20. Focal Mechanisms at the convergent plate boundary in Southern Aegean, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshou, Alexandra; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Drakatos, George; Evangelidis, Christos; Karakostas, Vasilios; Vallianatos, Filippos; Makropoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-05-01

    Greece is characterized by high seismicity, mainly due to the collision between the European and the African lithospheric plates and the dextral strike slip motion along the North Anatolia Fault zone and North Aegean Trough. The subduction of the Eastern Mediterranean oceanic plate along the Hellenic Arc under the Aegean microplate along with the accompanied roll back of the descending slab is considered the main tectonic feature of the region (Papazachos and Comninakis 1971; Makropoulos and Burton 1984; Papazachos et al. 2000a, b). The divergent motion between the Aegean block and mainland Europe is indicated by an extension zone in the northern Aegean, with Crete and Aegean diverging from mainland Europe at a rate of about 3.5 cm yr-1 with Africa moving northward relative to Europe at a rate of about 1 cm yr-1 (Dewey et al., 1989; Papazachos et al., 1998; Mc-Clusky et al., 2000; Reilinger et al., 2006). In this tectonically complicated area diverge types of deformation are manifested, in addition to the dominant subduction processes. Aiming to shed more light in the seismotectonic properties and faulting seismological data from the Hellenic Unified Seismological Network (HUSN) were selected and analyzed for determining focal mechanisms using the method of moment tensor inversion, additional to the ones being available from the routine moment tensor solutions and several publications. Thus, 31 new fault plane solutions for events with magnitude M>4.0, are presented in this study, by using the software of Ammon (Randall et al., 1995). For this scope the data from at least 4 stations were used with an adequate azimuthal coverage and with an epicentral distance not more than 350 km. The preparation of the data includes the deconvolution of instruments response, then the velocity was integrated to displacement and finally the horizontal components were rotated to radial and transverse. Following, the signal was inverted using the reflectivity method of Kennett (1983

  1. Dike-induced contraction along oceanic and continental divergent plate boundaries

    KAUST Repository

    Trippanera, D.

    2014-10-28

    The axis of divergent plate boundaries shows extension fractures and normal faults at the surface. Here we present evidence of contraction along the axis of the oceanic ridge of Iceland and the continental Main Ethiopian Rift. Contraction is found at the base of the tilted hanging wall of dilational normal faults, balancing part of their extension. Our experiments suggest that these structures result from dike emplacement. Multiple dike injection induces subsidence above and uplift to the sides of the dikes; the transition in between is accommodated by reverse faults and subsequent peripheral inward dipping normal faults. Our results suggest that contraction is a direct product of magma emplacement along divergent plate boundaries, at various scales, marking a precise evolutionary stage and initiating part of the extensional structures (extension fractures and normal faults). Key Points Contraction along divergent plate boundaries results from dike emplacementContraction generates extensional structures along divergent plate boundariesSurface deformation along divergent plate boundaries may be magma induced

  2. An EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M.; Anderson, G.; Blume, F.; Walls, C.; Coyle, B.; Feaux, K.; Friesen, B.; Phillips, D.; Hafner, K.; Johnson, W.; Mencin, D.; Pauk, B.; Dittmann, T.

    2007-12-01

    UNAVCO is building and operating the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project to understand the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the North American continent. When complete in October 2008, the 875 GPS, 103 strain and seismic, and 28 tiltmeters stations will comprise the largest integrated geodetic and seismic network in United States and the second largest in the world. Data from the PBO network will facilitate research into plate boundary deformation with unprecedented scope and detail. As of 1 September 2007, UNAVCO had completed 680 PBO GPS stations and had upgraded 89% of the planned PBO Nucleus stations. Highlights of the past year's work include the expansion of the Alaska subnetwork to 95 continuously-operating stations, including coverage of Akutan and Augustine volcanoes and reconnaissance for future installations on Unimak Island; the installation of nine new stations on Mt. St. Helens; and the arrival of 33 permits for station installations on BLM land in Nevada. The Augustine network provided critical data on magmatic and volcanic processes associated with the 2005-2006 volcanic crisis, and has expanded to a total of 11 stations. Please visit http://pboweb.unavco.org/?pageid=3 for further information on PBO GPS network construction activities. As of September 2007, 41 PBO borehole stations had been installed and three laser strainmeter stations were operating, with a total of 60 borehole stations and 4 laser strainmeters expected by October 2007. In response to direction from the EarthScope community, UNAVCO installed a dense network of six stations along the San Jacinto Fault near Anza, California; installed three of four planned borehole strainmeter stations on Mt. St. Helens; and has densified coverage of the Parkfield area. Please visit http://pboweb.unavco.org/?pageid=8 for more information on PBO strainmeter network construction progress. The combined PBO/Nucleus GPS network provides 350 GB of raw standard

  3. Palaeopermeability anisotropies of a strike-slip fault damage zone: 3D Insights of quantitative fluid flow from µCT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomila, R.; Arancibia, G.; Nehler, M.; Bracke, R.; Morata, D.

    2017-12-01

    Fault zones and their related structural permeability are a key aspect in the migration of fluids through the continental crust. Therefore, the estimation of the hydraulic properties (palaeopermeability conditions; k) and the spatial distribution of the fracture mesh within the damage zone (DZ) are critical in the assessment of fault zones behavior for fluids. The study of the real spatial distribution of the veinlets of the fracture mesh (3D), feasible with the use of µCT analyses, is a first order factor to unravel both, the real structural permeability conditions of a fault-zone, and the validation of previous (and classical) estimations made in 2D analyses in thin-sections. This work shows the results of a fault-related fracture mesh and its 3D spatial distribution in the damage-zone of the Jorgillo Fault (JF), an ancient subvertical left-lateral strike-slip fault exposed in the Atacama Fault System in northern Chile. The JF is a ca. 20 km long NNW-striking strike-slip fault with sinistral displacement of ca. 4 km. The methodology consisted of drilling 5 mm vertically oriented plugs at several locations within the JF damage zone. Each specimen was scanned with an X-Ray µCT scanner, to assess the fracture mesh, with a voxel resolution of ca. 4.5 µm in the 3D reconstructed data. Tensor permeability modeling, using Lattice-Boltzmann Method, through the segmented microfracture mesh show GMkmin (geometric mean values) of 2.1x10-12 and 9.8x10-13 m2, and GMkmax of 6.4x10-12 and 2.1x10-12 m2. A high degree of anisotropy of the DZ permeability tensor both sides of the JF (eastern and western side, respectively) is observed, where the k values in the kmax plane are 2.4 and 1.9 times higher than the kmin direction at the time of fracture sealing. This style of anisotropy is consistent with the obtained for bedded sandstones supporting the idea that damage zones have an analogous effect - but vertically orientated - on bulk permeability (in low porosity rocks) as

  4. Recurring extensional and strike-slip tectonics after the Neoproterozoic collisional events in the southern Mantiqueira province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato P. Almeida

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In Eastern South America, a series of fault-bounded sedimentary basins that crop out from Southern Uruguay to Southeastern Brazil were formed after the main collisional deformation of the Brasiliano Orogeny and record the tectonic events that affected the region from the Middle Ediacaran onwards. We address the problem of discerning the basin-forming tectonics from the later deformational events through paleostress analysis of more than 600 fault-slip data, mainly from the Camaquã Basin (Southern Brazil, sorted by stratigraphic level and cross-cutting relationships of superposed striations, and integrated with available stratigraphic and geochronological data. Our results show that the Camaquã Basin was formed by at least two distinct extensional events, and that rapid paleostress changes took place in the region a few tens of million years after the major collision (c.a. 630 Ma, probably due to the interplay between local active extensional tectonics and the distal effects of the continued amalgamation of plates and terranes at the margins of the still-forming Gondwana Plate. Preliminary paleostress data from the Castro Basin and published data from the Itajaí Basin suggest that these events had a regional nature.No Leste da América do Sul, um conjunto de bacias sedimentares que afloram do sul do Uruguai ao sudeste do Brasil formou-se após os eventos colisionais da Orogenia Brasiliana, registrando os eventos tectônicos que afetaram a região a partir do Mesoediacarano. O problema da distinção entre a tectônica formadora das bacias e os eventos deformacionais posteriores é aqui abordado através da análise de paleotensões de mais de 600 dados de falhas com estrias, obtidos principalmente na Bacia Camaquã (Sul do Brasil, que foram classificados por nível estratigráfico e relações de corte entre estrias sobrepostas, e intergrados a dados estratigráficos e geocronológicos disponíveis. Nossos resultados revelam que a Bacia Camaqu

  5. The geometry of the active strike-slip El Tigre Fault, Precordillera of San Juan, Central-Western Argentina: integrating resistivity surveys with structural and geomorphological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzito, Sabrina Y.; Cortés, José M.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Terrizzano, Carla M.

    2013-07-01

    The geometry and related geomorphological features of the right-lateral strike-slip El Tigre Fault, one of the main morphostructural discontinuities in the Central-Western Precordillera of Argentina, were investigated. Achievements of this survey include: recognition of structural and geometrical discontinuities along the fault trace, identification and classification of landforms associated with local transpressional and transtensional sectors, observation of significant changes in the fault strike and detection of right and left bends of different wavelength. In the Central Segment of the El Tigre Fault, 2D electrical resistivity tomography surveys were carried out across the fault zone. The resistivity imaging permitted to infer the orientation of the main fault surface, the presence of blind fault branches along the fault zone, tectonic tilting of the Quaternary sedimentary cover, subsurface structure of pressure ridges and depth to the water table. Based on this information, it is possible to characterize the El Tigre Fault also as an important hydro-geological barrier. Our survey shows that the main fault surface changes along different segments from a high-angle to a subvertical setting whilst the vertical-slip component is either reverse or normal, depending on the local transpressive or transtensive regime induced by major bends along the trace. These local variations are expressed as sections of a few kilometres in length with relatively homogeneous behaviour and frequently separated by oblique or transversal structures.

  6. Cenozoic structural inversion from transtension to transpression in Yingxiong Range, western Qaidam Basin: New insights into strike-slip superimposition controlled by Altyn Tagh and Eastern Kunlun Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiang; Zhang, Daowei; Jolivet, Marc; Yu, Xiangjiang; Du, Wei; Liu, Runchao; Guo, Zhaojie

    2018-01-01

    A Cenozoic structural inversion event from transtension to transpression involving salt tectonics has been uncovered in the Yingxiong Range, the western Qaidam Basin. Seismic reflection data show that there are two common structural styles in the Yingxiong Range: (1) the positive flower structure; (2) the thrust-controlled fold at shallow depth and the positive inverted flower structure at deep levels, which are separated by a salt layer in the upper Xiaganchaigou Formation. The Yingxiong Range experienced a first stage of transtension in the Eocene, induced by the Altyn Tagh Fault, and a second stage of transpression from the early Miocene to present, jointly controlled by the Altyn Tagh and Eastern Kunlun Faults. The Eocene transtension produced numerous NW-striking right-stepping en-échelon transtensional normal faults or fractures in the Yingxiong Range. At the same time, evaporites and mudstone were deposited in the vicinity of these faults. In the early Miocene, the Eocene transtensional normal faults were reactivated in a reverse sense, and the thrust-controlled folds at shallow depth started to form simultaneously. With transpression enhanced in the late Cenozoic, positive flower structures directly formed in places without evaporites. The Cenozoic transtension to transpression inversion of the Yingxiong Range is the result of strike-slip superimposition controlled by the Altyn Tagh and Eastern Kunlun Faults in time and space.

  7. Sound radiation from strip plates with longitudinal stiffeners using waveguide finite and boundary element methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.; Ryue, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the vibration characteristics and sound radiation of strip plates with finite width and infinite length are investigated numerically in order to analyze the vibration and sound radiation of structures consisting of many stiffened and double-layered plates. The waveguide finite element approach, which is effective for waveguide structures, is applied as a numerical scheme. The sound power and radiation efficiencies for an unstiffened plate are calculated numerically via coupling boundary elements to the WFEs. Longitudinal stiffeners and additional upper plates are included in the plate model to investigate the effect of stiffeners and an upper plate on sound power and radiation efficiency. In this study, it is found that the stiffeners contribute differently to plate vibration and sound radiation, and that the radiation efficiencies of the stiffened and double plates are larger than those of the unstiffened plate due to the presence of the stiffeners.

  8. Overview on the Plate Boundaries Along the Western Mexican Pacific Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.; Bandy, W. L.; Michaud, F.; Ortega Ramírez, J.

    2013-05-01

    The cinematic of the Pacific, Rivera and Cocos oceanic plates have a significant impact on the subduction process and seismic cycles occurring along the western Mexican Pacific margin of the North American and Caribbean plates. Sections of Pacific (PAC), Rivera (RIV), Cocos (COC), North American (NAM) and Caribbean (CAB) plate boundaries along the western margin of Mexico are not well constrained. From north to south: the transform-rift system at Gulf of California has been generally considered as part of PAC-NAM plate boundary. However results of the FAMEX cruise at 2002 evidenced that Tosco-Abreojos Fault System along the western margin of Baja California Peninsula is active. Should this tectonic structure be considered as a plate boundary? At the RIV plate northern corner (including Mazatlan Basin), the scatter seismicity recorded between Tamayo FZ and the Marias Islands restricts the characterization of the plate boundary between the RIV and NAM plates. Some authors have proposed that Tamayo FZ and Marias I. Escarpment are the RIV-NAM plate boundary. Recently other authors have called that RIV-NAM boundary is a geomorphology lineament that runs from a Rivera Rise transform at 23N to the northern end of Marias I. Escarpment. Even so this concept is not sustained with seismic activity. Further this thought would imply that the oceanic lithosphere of Mazatlan Basin would form part of NAM plate. Other thoughts are either that there is a diffuse RIV-NAM plate boundary to the north of the Maria Archipelago, or Middle America Subduction Zone is gradually extending northward of the Maria Is. While the plate boundary at SE corner of the RIV plate is neither well defined morphologically nor seismically constraint, offshore Colima Coast. Some authors have proposed that this zone is a diffuse plate boundary between RIV and COC plates, result of a NE-SW shear plate motion. Other authors have proposed that the RIV-COC boundary extends E-W from the El Gordo Graben (EGG) at

  9. Pleistocene slip rates on the Boconó fault along the North Andean Block plate boundary, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pousse-Beltran, Lea; Vassallo, Riccardo; Audemard, Franck; Jouanne, François; Carcaillet, Julien; Pathier, Erwan; Volat, Matthieu

    2017-07-01

    The Boconó fault is a strike-slip fault lying between the North Andean Block and the South American plate which has triggered at least five Mw > 7 historical earthquakes in Venezuela. The North Andean Block is currently moving toward NNE with respect to a stable South American plate. This relative displacement at 12 mm yr-1 in Venezuela (within the Maracaibo Block) was measured by geodesy, but until now the distribution and rates of Quaternary deformation have remained partially unclear. We used two alluvial fans offset by the Boconó fault (Yaracuy Valley) to quantify slip rates, by combining 10Be cosmogenic dating with measurements of tectonic displacements on high-resolution satellite images (Pleiades). Based upon a fan dated at >79 ka and offset by 1350-1580 m and a second fan dated at 120-273 ka and offset by 1236-1500 m, we obtained two Pleistocene rates of 5.0-11.2 and <20.0 mm yr-1, consistent with the regional geodesy. This indicates that the Boconó fault in the Yaracuy Valley accommodates 40 to 100% of the deformation between the South American plate and the Maracaibo Block. As no aseismic deformation was shown by interferometric synthetic aperture radar analysis, we assume that the fault is locked since the 1812 event. This implies that there is a slip deficit in the Yaracuy Valley since the last earthquake ranging from 1 to 4 m, corresponding to a Mw 7-7.6 earthquake. This magnitude is comparable to the 1812 earthquake and to other historical events along the Boconó fault.

  10. The simulation of Lamb waves in a cracked plate using the scaled boundary finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravenkamp, Hauke; Prager, Jens; Saputra, Albert A; Song, Chongmin

    2012-09-01

    The scaled boundary finite element method is applied to the simulation of Lamb waves for ultrasonic testing applications. With this method, the general elastodynamic problem is solved, while only the boundary of the domain under consideration has to be discretized. The reflection of the fundamental Lamb wave modes from cracks of different geometry in a steel plate is modeled. A test problem is compared with commercial finite element software, showing the efficiency and convergence of the scaled boundary finite element method. A special formulation of this method is utilized to calculate dispersion relations for plate structures. For the discretization of the boundary, higher-order elements are employed to improve the efficiency of the simulations. The simplicity of mesh generation of a cracked plate for a scaled boundary finite element analysis is illustrated.

  11. Structural acoustic control of plates with variable boundary conditions: design methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprofera, Joseph D; Cabell, Randolph H; Gibbs, Gary P; Clark, Robert L

    2007-07-01

    A method for optimizing a structural acoustic control system subject to variations in plate boundary conditions is provided. The assumed modes method is used to build a plate model with varying levels of rotational boundary stiffness to simulate the dynamics of a plate with uncertain edge conditions. A transducer placement scoring process, involving Hankel singular values, is combined with a genetic optimization routine to find spatial locations robust to boundary condition variation. Predicted frequency response characteristics are examined, and theoretically optimized results are discussed in relation to the range of boundary conditions investigated. Modeled results indicate that it is possible to minimize the impact of uncertain boundary conditions in active structural acoustic control by optimizing the placement of transducers with respect to those uncertainties.

  12. Implications of the diffuse deformation of the Indian Ocean lithosphere for slip partitioning of oblique plate convergence in Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, K. E.; Feng, L.; Hill, E. M.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Sieh, K.

    2017-01-01

    Oblique plate convergence between Indian Ocean lithosphere and continental crust of the Sunda plate is distributed between subduction on the Sunda megathrust and upper plate strike-slip faulting on the Sumatran Fault Zone, in a classic example of slip partitioning. Over the last decade, a destructive series of great earthquakes has brought renewed attention to the mechanical properties of these faults and the intervening fore-arc crustal block. While observations of fore-arc deformation over the earthquake cycle indicate that the fore-arc crust is fundamentally elastic, the spatial pattern of slip vector azimuths for earthquakes sourced by rupture of the Sunda megathrust is strongly inconsistent with relative motion of two rigid plates. Permanent and distributed deformation therefore occurs in either the downgoing lithospheric slab or the overriding fore-arc crust. Previous studies have inferred from geodetic velocities and geological slip rates of the Sumatran Fault that the fore-arc crust is undergoing rapid trench-parallel stretching. Using new geological slip rates for the Sumatran Fault and an updated decadal GPS velocity field of Sumatra and the fore-arc islands, we instead show that permanent deformation within the fore-arc sliver is minor and that the Sumatran Fault is a plate boundary strike-slip fault. The kinematic data are best explained by diffuse deformation within the oceanic lithosphere of the Wharton Basin, which accommodates convergence between the Indian and Australian plates and has recently produced several large earthquakes well offshore of Sumatra. The slip partitioning system in Sumatra is fundamentally linked with the mechanical properties of the subducting oceanic lithosphere.

  13. Influence of fault trend, fault bends, and fault convergence on shallow structure, geomorphology, and hazards, Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Watt, J. T.; Hartwell, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    We mapped a ~94-km-long portion of the right-lateral Hosgri Fault Zone from Point Sal to Piedras Blancas in offshore central California using high-resolution seismic reflection profiles, marine magnetic data, and multibeam bathymetry. The database includes 121 seismic profiles across the fault zone and is perhaps the most comprehensive reported survey of the shallow structure of an active strike-slip fault. These data document the location, length, and near-surface continuity of multiple fault strands, highlight fault-zone heterogeneity, and demonstrate the importance of fault trend, fault bends, and fault convergences in the development of shallow structure and tectonic geomorphology. The Hosgri Fault Zone is continuous through the study area passing through a broad arc in which fault trend changes from about 338° to 328° from south to north. The southern ~40 km of the fault zone in this area is more extensional, resulting in accommodation space that is filled by deltaic sediments of the Santa Maria River. The central ~24 km of the fault zone is characterized by oblique convergence of the Hosgri Fault Zone with the more northwest-trending Los Osos and Shoreline Faults. Convergence between these faults has resulted in the formation of local restraining and releasing fault bends, transpressive uplifts, and transtensional basins of varying size and morphology. We present a hypothesis that links development of a paired fault bend to indenting and bulging of the Hosgri Fault by a strong crustal block translated to the northwest along the Shoreline Fault. Two diverging Hosgri Fault strands bounding a central uplifted block characterize the northern ~30 km of the Hosgri Fault in this area. The eastern Hosgri strand passes through releasing and restraining bends; the releasing bend is the primary control on development of an elongate, asymmetric, "Lazy Z" sedimentary basin. The western strand of the Hosgri Fault Zone passes through a significant restraining bend and

  14. Relationships between along-fault heterogeneous normal stress and fault slip patterns during the seismic cycle: Insights from a strike-slip fault laboratory model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniven, Yannick; Dominguez, Stéphane; Soliva, Roger; Peyret, Michel; Cattin, Rodolphe; Maerten, Frantz

    2017-12-01

    We use a strike-slip fault analog model to study experimentally the role played by along-fault non-uniform and asymmetric applied normal stress on both coseismic slip and long-term fault behavior. Our model is based on a visco-elasto-plastic multi-layered rheology that allows to produce several hundreds of scaled analog microquakes and associated seismic cycles. Uniform or heterogeneous applied normal stress along the fault plane is imposed and maintained constant during the whole experiment durations. Our results suggest that coseismic slip patterns are strongly controlled by spatial normal stress variations and subsequent accumulated shear stress along fault strike. Major microquakes occur preferentially in zones of major shear stress asperities. Coseismic slip distributions exhibit a pattern similar to the along-fault applied normal stress distribution. The occurrence of isolated low to moderate microquakes where residual stresses persist around secondary stress asperities, indicates that stress conditions along the fault also control the whole variability of fault slip events. Moreover, when fault slip stability conditions are modulated by normal stress distribution, our experiments suggest that the along-fault stress heterogeneity influences the seismic cycle regularity and, consequently, long-term fault slip behavior. Uniform applied normal stress favors irregular seismic cycles and the occurrence of earthquakes clustering, whereas non-uniform normal stress with a single high amplitude stress asperity generates strong characteristic microquake events with stable return periods. Together our results strengthen the assumption that coseismic slip distribution and earthquake variability along an active fault may provide relevant information on long term tectonic stress and could thus improve seismic hazard assessment.

  15. Reconstructing the magnitude and timing of late Pleistocene and Holocene strike-slip events within the Marlborough Fault Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ed; Dolan, James; Van Dissen, Russ; Langridge, Rob; Zinke, Rob; Hatem, Alex; McGuire, Chris; Brown, Nathan

    2017-04-01

    In most instances, information about the timing of pre-historic earthquake events comes from palaeoseismic trenches located within sediments that were deposited gradually and are close to the fault. Earthquake events are recognised by disturbed stratigraphy, and the timing provided by radiocarbon dating of organic materials that constrain the youngest disturbances for each event. In contrast, fault slip rates are typically derived from the dating of geomorphic features that are offset by one or more slip events. In this latter case, it is often hard to locate suitable organic material for dating these features which often comprise fluvial terraces or channels, and a variety of alternative chronological approaches has been taken including the use of terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCNs; 10Be, 36Cl), U-series dating of carbonate overgrowths on pebbles, and/or luminescence dating of sediments. Using luminescence dating based on single grains of K-feldspar and a post-IR IRSL (Infra-Red Stimulated Luminescence) measurement protocol, we have been able to control the age of several offset terrace units from a number of major strike slip faults of the Marlborough Fault Zone, New Zealand. In the past, arguments concerning the selection of which geomorphic terrace feature to date have been presented, and typically a single age estimate, or small number of dates were used to constrain the derived slip rate. In the Marlborough region, we have sampled several locations characterised by multiple fluvial terraces dating from the late Glacial period (c. 16,000 years ago) through the Holocene. By using a high sampling density involving multiple age estimates within each terrace, dating each one of the terraces, and applying a Bayesian statistical approach to constrain the age of deposition and incision events, we are able to approach a situation where we can derive slip-per-event data and event timing from the same dataset. This can overcome problems of relating observed slip

  16. Seismically-triggered soft-sediment deformation structures close to a major strike-slip fault system in the Eastern Alps (Hirlatz cave, Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Martina Lan; Grasemann, Bernhard; Plan, Lukas; Gier, Susanne; Schöpfer, Martin P. J.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate episodic soft-sediment deformation structures cross-cut by normal faults preserved in unlithified finely laminated calcite rich sediments in the Hirlatz cave in the Northern Calcareous Alps (Austria). These sediments comprise varve-like alternations of brighter carbonate/quartz rich layers, and darker clay mineral rich layers. The deformed sediments contain abundant millimeter to centimeter-scale soft-sediment structures (load casts, ball-and-pillow structures), sheet slumps (thrust faults and folds), erosive channels filled with slides and chaotic slumps. After deposition and soft-sediment deformation normal faults developed within the entire sedimentary succession, an event that probably correlates with an offset of c. 10 cm of the passage wall above the outcrop. Our major conclusions are: (i) The sediments have a glacial origin and were deposited in the Hirlatz cave under phreatic fluvio-lacustrine conditions. The deposition and the soft-sediment deformation occurred most likely during the last glaciation (i.e. around 25 ka ago); (ii) The liquefaction and formation of the soft-sediment structures in water-saturated stratified layers was triggered by episodic seismic events; (iii) The internally deformed sediments were later displaced by normal faults; (iv) A possible source for the seismic events is the active sinistral Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazeller-Puchberger (SEMP) strike-slip fault which is located about 10 km south of the outcrop and plays a major role in accommodating the extrusion of the Eastern Alps towards the Pannonian Basin. To our knowledge, the described structures are the first report of liquefaction and seismically induced soft-sediment deformations in Quaternary sediments in the Eastern Alps.

  17. Heat conduction in a plate-type fuel element with time-dependent boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faya, A.J.G.; Maiorino, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    A method for the solution of boundary-value problems with variable boundary conditions is applied to solve a heat conduction problem in a plate-type fuel element with time dependent film coefficient. The numerical results show the feasibility of the method in the solution of this class of problems. (Author) [pt

  18. 3D deformation in strike-slip systems: Analogue modelling and numerical restoration Deformación 3D en sistemas de rumbo: modelación analógica y restauración numérica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel González

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Regional and local strike-slip systems in Chile are complex and pose interesting questions, such as the interaction between strike-slip and reverse faults, how they evolve, and the relationship between shortening, rotation and uplift. Within this context, we developed a new analytical method based on analogue and numerical modelling applied to 3D, pure and transtensional-transpressional strike-slip systems. Analogue modelling results indicate that in restraining stepovers of strike-slip fault systems, where antiformal pop-up structures are usually formed, pre-existent basement structures with a high angle to the main strike-slip fault will generate a higher rotation of blocks. However, when these structures are oriented at a high angle with respect to the main stress convergence vector, the rotation will be less and therefore a higher tendency to uplift will be produced. These results were applied to NW- and SE-striking basement faults oblique to N-S mega-thrust faults in central Chile (32°-35°S, for which we propose a simultaneous development based on the analogue model results. Moreover, we propose that strike-slip movement occurred on thrust faults in central Chile. Furthermore, we performed a numerical restoration of an analogue experiment which modeled a pure strike-slip system, and concluded that the restoration is very sensitive to shortening data as well as to rotational data. These results are extremely important for future numerical and regional analysis of strike-slip systems.Los sistemas de rumbo regionales y locales en Chile son complejos y plantean interesantes preguntas, tales como la interacción entre fallas de rumbo y fallas inversas, cómo evolucionan ellas, y la relación entre acortamiento, rotación y alzamiento. En este contexto, desarrollamos un nuevo método analítico basado en modelamiento analógico y numérico de sistemas de rumbo de cizalle puro y sistemas transpresionales-trantensionales en 3D. Los resultados del

  19. Seismic attribute detection of faults and fluid pathways within an active strike-slip shear zone: New insights from high-resolution 3D P-Cable™ seismic data along the Hosgri Fault, offshore California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluesner, Jared W.; Brothers, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Poststack data conditioning and neural-network seismic attribute workflows are used to detect and visualize faulting and fluid migration pathways within a 13.7 km2 13.7 km2 3D P-Cable™ seismic volume located along the Hosgri Fault Zone offshore central California. The high-resolution 3D volume used in this study was collected in 2012 as part of Pacific Gas and Electric’s Central California Seismic Imaging Project. Three-dimensional seismic reflection data were acquired using a triple-plate boomer source (1.75 kJ) and a short-offset, 14-streamer, P-Cable system. The high-resolution seismic data were processed into a prestack time-migrated 3D volume and publically released in 2014. Postprocessing, we employed dip-steering (dip and azimuth) and structural filtering to enhance laterally continuous events and remove random noise and acquisition artifacts. In addition, the structural filtering was used to enhance laterally continuous edges, such as faults. Following data conditioning, neural-network based meta-attribute workflows were used to detect and visualize faults and probable fluid-migration pathways within the 3D seismic volume. The workflow used in this study clearly illustrates the utility of advanced attribute analysis applied to high-resolution 3D P-Cable data. For example, results from the fault attribute workflow reveal a network of splayed and convergent fault strands within an approximately 1.3 km wide shear zone that is characterized by distinctive sections of transpressional and transtensional dominance. Neural-network chimney attribute calculations indicate that fluids are concentrated along discrete faults in the transtensional zones, but appear to be more broadly distributed amongst fault bounded anticlines and structurally controlled traps in the transpressional zones. These results provide high-resolution, 3D constraints on the relationships between strike-slip fault mechanics, substrate deformation, and fluid migration along an active

  20. Vortices in the Prandtl boundary layer induced by irregularities on a plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, V. G.; Gaydukov, R. K.

    2015-04-01

    A fluid flow along a plate with small irregularities on the surface is considered for large Reynolds numbers. The boundary layer has a double-deck structure, i.e., both a thin boundary layer and the classical Prandtl boundary layer are present. It is proved that the solution of the boundary-value problem thus obtained exists and is unique in the Prandtl boundary layer, and the stability of the solution is investigated at large times. The results of numerical modeling are given. Supported by the Basic Research Program of the National Research University "Higher School of Economics."

  1. New method for solving the bending problem of rectangular plates with mixed boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xin Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method is used to solve the rectangular plate bending problem with mixed boundary conditions. The method overcomes the complicated derivation of the classical solution by Fourth-order differential problem into integrating question. Under uniform loading rectangular plate bending problem with one side fixed the opposite side half simply supported half fixed the other two sides free rectangular plate, one side simply supported the opposite side half simply supported half fixed the other two sides free rectangular plate is systematically solved. According to the actual boundary conditions of the rectangular plate, the corresponding characteristic equation can easily be set up. It is presented deflection curve equation and the numerical calculation. By compared the results of the equation to the finite element program, we are able to demonstrate the correctness of the method. So the method not only has certain theoretical value, but also can be directly applied to engineering practice.

  2. Recent crustal movement and great earthquakes in Qinghai-Tibet sub-plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Liangqian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Crustal movement and incremental-movement data observed repeatedly at GPS stations during 1999–2009 were analyzed to study the effect of two earthquakes of Ms8.1 and Ms8.0 that occurred in 2001 and 2008, respectively, in Qinghai-Tibet sub-plate and its eastern margin. The result revealed certain anomalous pre-earthquake deformation and some large co-seismic changes. Prior to the 2008 Wenchuan Ms8.0 earthquake, the seismogenic Kunlunshan fault zone became a geographic boundary between different regional movements. At the time of the earthquake, there was an average cross-fault crustal shortening of −1.04 m and an average right-lateral strike slip of 0.76 m along the ruptured segment, as well as a strain-energy release of −62. 66 × 10.7.

  3. Flat Plate Boundary Layer Stimulation Using Trip Wires and Hama Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguero, Charles; Henoch, Charles; Hrubes, James; Fredette, Albert; Roberts, Raymond; Huyer, Stephen

    2017-11-01

    Water tunnel experiments on a flat plate at zero angle of attack were performed to investigate the effect of single roughness elements, i.e., trip wires and Hama strips, on the transition to turbulence. Boundary layer trips are traditionally used in scale model testing to force a boundary layer to transition from laminar to turbulent flow at a single location to aid in scaling of flow characteristics. Several investigations of trip wire effects exist in the literature, but there is a dearth of information regarding the influence of Hama strips on the flat plate boundary layer. The intent of this investigation is to better understand the effects of boundary layer trips, particularly Hama strips, and to investigate the pressure-induced drag of both styles of boundary layer trips. Untripped and tripped boundary layers along a flat plate at a range of flow speeds were characterized with multiple diagnostic measurements in the NUWC/Newport 12-inch water tunnel. A wide range of Hama strip and wire trip thicknesses were used. Measurements included dye flow visualization, direct skin friction and parasitic drag force, boundary layer profiles using LDV, wall shear stress fluctuations using hot film anemometry, and streamwise pressure gradients. Test results will be compared to the CFD and boundary layer model results as well as the existing body of work. Conclusions, resulting in guidance for application of Hama strips in model scale experiments and non-dimensional predictions of pressure drag will be presented.

  4. Three-Dimensional Vibration Analysis of Rectangular Thick Plates on Pasternak Foundation with Arbitrary Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first known vibration characteristic of rectangular thick plates on Pasternak foundation with arbitrary boundary conditions on the basis of the three-dimensional elasticity theory. The arbitrary boundary conditions are obtained by laying out three types of linear springs on all edges. The modified Fourier series are chosen as the basis functions of the admissible function of the thick plates to eliminate all the relevant discontinuities of the displacements and their derivatives at the edges. The exact solution is obtained based on the Rayleigh–Ritz procedure by the energy functions of the thick plate. The excellent accuracy and reliability of current solutions are demonstrated by numerical examples and comparisons with the results available in the literature. In addition, the influence of the foundation coefficients as well as the boundary restraint parameters is also analyzed, which can serve as the benchmark data for the future research technique.

  5. Geological and Structural evolution of the Eurasia Africa plate boundary in the Gulf of Cadiz Central Eastern Atlantic Sea.

    OpenAIRE

    D’Oriano, Filippo

    2010-01-01

    Iberia Africa plate boundary, cross, roughly W-E, connecting the eastern Atlantic Ocean from Azores triple junction to the Continental margin of Morocco. Relative movement between the two plate change along the boundary, from transtensive near the Azores archipelago, through trascurrent movement in the middle at the Gloria Fracture Zone, to transpressive in the Gulf of Cadiz area. This study presents the results of geophysical and geological analysis on the plate boundary area offshore Gibral...

  6. Origin of oroclines in Paleozoic Australia: the role of inherited plate boundary irregularities and trench retreat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, G.; Shaanan, U.; Hoy, D.; Abdullah, R.

    2015-12-01

    Paleozoic Australia is made of a series of orogenic belts that include the Delamerian, Lachlan and New England orogens, as well as the poorly defined Thomson Orogen. The origin of these belts has been attributed to subduction and accretionary processes along the ~N-S-striking (present coordinates) plate boundary of Gondwana. However, recent studies show that orogenic segments are strongly contorted, thus raising questions about the geodynamic origin of eastern Australia and Paleozoic plate tectonics in general. Results from the New England Orogen revealed that oroclinal bending has occurred simultaneously with basin formation and trench retreat. Geochronological provenance studies of detrital zircon show that these basins were situated in a back-arc position, indicating that back-arc extension may have played a crucial role in oroclinal bending. In addition, geochronological data of detrital zircon show that terranes that were once considered to be exotic were actually derived from local sources. The collective geological evidence suggests that deformation and oroclinal bending were driven by subduction-related processes possibly acting on inherited irregularities in the orientation of the plate boundary. The irregular geometries were further accentuated by trench migration (retreat and advance) that led to subduction segmentation, oroclinal bending, and alternating episodes of contraction and (back-arc) extension. In search of inherited plate boundary irregularities in Paleozoic Australia, we have studied the ~E-W boundary between the Lachlan and Thomson orogens. This lithospheric-scale boundary may reflect the original geometry of the plate boundary, which might have accommodated hundreds of km of dextral offset. This boundary may be part a much larger orogenic curvature, hitherto not recognised, and the development of which may have played a fundamental role in the formation of the smaller-scale oroclines in the Lachlan and New England orogens.

  7. Seismic Imaging of the Cascadia Plate Boundary with Four Source Array Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, W. F.; Holbrook, W.; Kent, G.; Keranen, K. M.; Trehu, A. M.; Johnson, H. P.; Everson, E. D.

    2012-12-01

    Imaging the plate boundary in the Cascadia region has great importance for understanding seismic hazards in the coastal margin of the Pacific Northwest. The Cascadia margin is a potential earthquake and tsunami threat to the many millions who live in the area, yet the location and shape of the subducting oceanic plate boundary remains poorly understood. This is due in large part to the plate boundary being relatively aseismic and difficult to constrain through passive-source seismic methods. In July 2012, the COAST project acquired 15 seismic transects of the Cascadia margin intended to image the plate boundary. Four of the seismic transects were acquired over the same location with different source arrays: 36 air guns towed at 9m depth, 18 air guns towed at 9m depth, 36 air guns towed at 15m depth, and 18 air guns towed at 15m depth. These changes were chosen to represent possible configurations for 2D and 3D seismic data acquisitions with emphasis on identifying deep Earth features lying below complicated folding sediments of the accretionary wedge. Thirty-six air guns represents the full volume of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth source used when collecting 2D seismic data, while eighteen represents the half volume that would typically be fired for a 3D survey. Nine meters and fifteen meters are common source depths but have very different outputs in the frequency domain due to the "ghost notch" created by acoustic reflection off the sea surface. Here we present four identically processed, pre-stack depth migrated images of the Cascadia plate boundary and an analysis of the benefits and drawbacks of each seismic acquisition parameter set. While expressions of the plate boundary exist in all data acquired, preliminary results indicate that a deeper tow depth, and its lower frequency source output, captures more continuous representations of the plate boundary. However, a more shallow tow depth increases the resolution of the overlying sediments and the plate boundary

  8. Experimental validation of the sound transmission of rectangular baffled plates with general elastic boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Dayi; Mak, Cheuk Ming

    2011-06-01

    Several prediction methods have recently been developed for systematically studying the effects of general boundary conditions on the sound transmission loss (STL) of plate-like structures. But corresponding experimental validation studies remain scarce owing to the difficulty of obtaining accurate boundary conditions for practical structures. This paper presents a convincing experiment conducted on a baffled plate system to validate the STL prediction model in a previous paper by Yu et al. [Noise Control Eng. J. 58(2), 187-200, 2010]. A method is proposed to determine the boundary conditions of this system, and experimental STL compares well with the predictions based on the identified boundary condition. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  9. Irregular plate boundary controls on Foreland Basin sedimentation (Miocene, Kahramanmaraş Foreland Basin, SE Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gül, Murat; Gürbüz, Kemal; Cronin, Bryan T.

    2015-11-01

    The northern movement of the Arabian Plate led to the development of a compressional regime in the south-eastern part of Turkey after the Late Cretaceous. The collision of the Arabian Plate with the Anatolide-Taurides Platform and subsequent development of the Kahramanmaraş Foreland Basin at the beginning of the Miocene evolved as a result of this movement. An irregular plate geometry or promontory of the Arabian Plate caused partitioning of the plate margin (precollision-collision-postcollision). This irregular plate boundary was delimited by western and northern boundary faults and an interior basin fault. The NW-oriented small wedge top basins on the overlying Anatolide-Taurides Platform obliquely cut through the foredeep basin. The region (across the wedge top basin) on the irregular promontory of the underlying Arabian Plate contains different sedimentation depocentres. Small fining-upward submarine fan deposits (including pebbly channel deposits and coarsening-upward lobe sequences) are located at the centre of the irregular part of the plate (in the Tanır region) and overlie planktic foraminifera-bearing claystones. These submarine fan sediments pass outboard into distal interbedded turbidite claystones and siltstones in a downdip direction (S-SE). The boundary fault intersection of the promontory led to the development of a submarine slope environment with irregular sea-floor topography in the Fırnız area (4-5 km south-east of the Tanır region). The slump deposits, sandy debrites, and fine-grained thin-bedded turbidites filled this region. Structural alignments and seismicity associated with the plate margin were the main controlling factors on the geometry of the depocentre, sediment quantity, sediment input, sedimentary facies, local sea level changes, and post-sedimentary deformation in the Kahramanmaraş Foreland Basin.

  10. Lithospheric deformation in the Africa-Iberia plate boundary: Improved neotectonic modeling testing a basal-driven Alboran plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neres, M.; Carafa, M. M. C.; Fernandes, R. M. S.; Matias, L.; Duarte, J. C.; Barba, S.; Terrinha, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present an improved neotectonic numerical model of the complex NW Africa-SW Eurasia plate boundary segment that runs from west to east along the Gloria Fault up to the northern Algerian margin. We model the surface velocity field and the ongoing lithospheric deformation using the most recent version of the thin-shell code SHELLS and updated lithospheric model and fault map of the region. To check the presence versus the absence of an independently driven Alboran domain, we develop two alternative plate models: one does not include an Alboran plate; another includes it and determines the basal shear tractions necessary to drive it with known velocities. We also compare two alternative sets of Africa-Eurasia velocity boundary conditions, corresponding to geodetic and geological-scale averages of plate motion. Finally, we perform an extensive parametric study of fault friction coefficient, trench resistance, and velocities imposed in Alboran nodes. The final run comprises 5240 experiments, each scored to geodetic velocities (estimated for 250 stations and here provided), stress direction data, and seismic strain rates. The model with the least discrepancy to the data includes the Alboran plate driven by a basal WSW directed shear traction, slightly oblique to the westward direction of Alboran motion. We provide estimates of long-term strain rates and slip rates for the modeled faults, which can be useful for further hazard studies. Our results support that a mechanism additional to the Africa-Eurasia convergence is required to drive the Alboran domain, which can be related to subduction processes occurring within the mantle.

  11. Historical and modern seismotectonics of the Indian plate with an emphasis on its western boundary with the Eurasian plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeliga, W. M.

    The western edge of the Indian plate is a transform plate boundary similar to the San Andreas Fault in that it lies mostly on land, has a similar expected slip rate, accommodates restraining bends, and contains segments that may slip aseismically by surface creep. Tectonic models of the western edge of India must also account for the absence of significant seismic moment release in the past century along the Chaman Fault, the transform boundary between Asia and India. I discuss modern and historical data from India and Pakistan that provide new constraints on deformation within this 100--250 km wide plate boundary. Geological and plate-closure estimates suggest sinistral slip of 19--35 mm/yr since the Oligocene across the Chaman Fault system. Analysis of space-based geodetic data suggests a prevalence of shallow locking depths and an upper limit of approximately 19.5 mm/yr of sinistral motion across the Chaman Fault System south of Afghanistan. In the past century, the region between the Chaman Fault System and the Indus Plain near Quetta, Pakistan, has experienced numerous earthquakes with a larger total moment release than an equivalent length of the Himalaya in the same period, comparable to a single Mw 8:0. Of this moment release, 90% has occurred more than 70 km east of the Chaman fault. In this region, GPS data have captured slip partitioning across the plate boundary suggesting that long-term sinistral slip is shared between the Chaman and Ghazaband fault systems. Additionally, a combination of GPS and InSAR analysis of a pair of Mw 6:4 earthquakes NE of Quetta in 2008 suggests that they occurred on a parallel pair of sinistral faults, rather than the dextral mechanism suggested by their NW-SE trending fault planes. I find that "bookshelf faulting" occurs in a zone NE of Quetta that includes several previous instrumental and historical earthquakes. This geodetic view of deformation in Pakistan differs from that derived from the instrumental seismic record

  12. What drives microplate motion and deformation in the northeastern Caribbean plate boundary region?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Benthem, S.A.C.; Govers, R.; Wortel, R.

    2014-01-01

    The north Caribbean plate boundary zone is a broad deformation zone with several fault systems and tectonic blocks that move with different velocities. The indentation by the Bahamas Platform (the “Bahamas Collision”) is generally invoked as a cause of this fragmentation. We propose that a second

  13. Cocos Ridge Collision as a Driver for Plate Boundary Deformation in the Western Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Femina, P. C.; Govers, R. M.; Geirsson, H.; Kobayashi, D.

    2011-12-01

    The subduction and collision of bathymetric highs can result in geodynamic changes along convergent plate boundaries, including intense upper plate deformation, increases in mechanical coupling and seismicity, migration and or cessation of volcanism and formation of forearc terranes. But how extensive can the deformation associated with these features be and what are the implications for the long-term formation and evolution of plate boundary zones? Plate boundary evolution and upper plate deformation in southern Central America associated with Cocos Ridge collision is well studied and indicates, 1) migration of the volcanic arc toward the backarc northwest of and cessation of volcanism directly inboard the ridge, 2) uplift of the Cordillera de Talamanca inboard the ridge, 3) shortening across the forearc Fila Costena fold and thrust belt, and 4) outer forearc uplift above and flanking the ridge. Recent geodynamical modeling of Cocos Ridge collision, combined with the results of kinematic block models for the Central American margin, suggests the ridge drives northwest-directed forearc motion from central Costa Rica northwest to the Cocos - Caribbean (Central American forearc block) - North America triple junction, greatly increasing the spatial scale of deformation. Upperplate deformation of the Central American margin to the southeast of the Cocos Ridge in Panama was not investigated in these models. We investigate the dynamics of Cocos Ridge collision along the entire Central American margin and the implications on plate boundary evolution with a new geodynamic model of ridge collision. Our model results are compared to a new GPS derived horizontal velocity field for Central America and preliminary results indicate that the Cocos Ridge drives the Panamanian isthmus into northern South America (i.e., the North Andes block).

  14. A Natural Model of Active Transpressional Tectonics the en Échelon Structures of the Oriente Deep, Along the Northern Caribbean Transcurrent Plate Boundary (Southern Cuban Margin Un modèle naturel de tectonique transpressive active Les structures en échelon de la fosse de l'Oriente le long de la limite de plaques décrochante Nord-Caraïbe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calais E.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A seabearn and seismic reflection structural study of the Oriente Deep, located along the northern Caribbean transcurrent plate boundary, allows us to image in three dimensions active transpressional structures (cruise SEA-CARIB II, R/V Jean Charcot. These structures are folds and reverse faults. The folds display an en échelon arrangement and are set within three E-W trending alignments. The folds appear with an axis trending 30° to 40° to the shear direction. Their axes have undergone a rotation which gives them in plan a sigmoidal Zshape. The reverse faults formed after the folds and are located at the bases of the anticlines. The folding occurs outside the main strike-slip fault, above inactive burried faults affecting the basement of the Oriente Deep. The Oriente Deep is a exceptional natural model for the study of active transpressional deformation along a major strike-slip fault. La campagne océanographique SEACARIB II du N/O Jean Charcot a permis l'étude structurale du bassin de l'Oriente, situé le long de la limite de plaques décrochante nord caraïbe au sud de Cuba. Cette étude, par Seabeam et sismique réflexion, y a révélé des structures transpressives actives (plis et failles inverses et a permis de les illustrer en trois dimensions. Au sein de ce bassin, les plis sont disposés en échelon en trois alignements E-W. La direction de l'axe des plis naissant fait un angle de 30° à 40° avec la direction du décrochement principal. Les axes des plis subissent ensuite une rotation qui leur donne, en carte, une forme sigmoïdale en Z . Des failles inverses se forment après les plis à la base des anticlinaux. Le plissement est localisé en avant du décrochement principal, au-dessus de failles inactives enfouies affectant le substratum du bassin de l'Oriente. Le bassin de l'Oriente est un modèle naturel exceptionnel pour l'étude de déformations transpressives actives le long d'un décrochement actif majeur.

  15. Abrupt plate acceleration through oblique rifting: Geodynamic aspects of Gulf of California evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Gulf of California formed by oblique divergence across the Pacific-North America plate boundary. This presentation combines numerical forward modeling and plate tectonic reconstructions in order to address 2 important aspects of rift dynamics: (1) Plate motions during continental rifting are decisively controlled by the non-linear decay of rift strength. This conclusion is based on a recent plate-kinematic analysis of post-Pangea rift systems (Central Atlantic, South Atlantic, Iberia/Newfoundland, Australia/Antarctica, North Atlantic, South China Sea). In all cases, continental rifting starts with a slow phase followed by an abrupt acceleration within a few My introducing a fast rift phase. Numerical forward modeling with force boundary conditions shows that the two-phase velocity behavior and the rapid speed-up during rifting are intrinsic features of continental rupture that can be robustly inferred for different crust and mantle rheologies. (2) Rift strength depends on the obliquity of the rift system: the force required to maintain a given rift velocity can be computed from simple analytical and more realistic numerical models alike, and both modeling approaches demonstrate that less force is required to perpetuate oblique extension. The reason is that plastic yielding requires a smaller plate boundary force when extension is oblique to the rift trend. Comparing strike slip and pure extension end-member scenarios, it can be shown that about 50% less force is required to deform the lithosphere under strike-slip. This result implies that rift systems involving significant obliquity are mechanically preferred. These two aspects shed new light on the underlying geodynamic causes of Gulf of California rift history. Continental extension is thought to have started in Late Eocene/Oligocene times as part of the southern Basin and Range Province and evolved in a protracted history at low extension rate (≤15 mm/yr). However, with a direction change in Baja

  16. Late Cretaceous to mid Eocene plate boundaries in the southwest Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kara J.; Dietmar Müller, R.; Whittaker, Joanne; Flament, Nicolas; Seton, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The late Cretaceous to mid Eocene history of the southwest and southernmost Pacific has been subject to starkly contrasting interpretations, ranging from relative tectonic quiescence with the Lord Howe Rise (LHR) being part of the Pacific plate to a dynamic subduction setting. In the first scenario the Tasman Sea would have formed as a consequence of divergence between the Pacific and Australian plates, whereas in the second scenario it would have formed as a marginal basin associated with subduction. The first scenario is supported by a number of arguments, including a lack of evidence for deformation and tectonic activity in New Zealand during this period and a geodynamic modelling inference, namely that the bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor chain can be better reproduced if the LHR is part of the Pacific plate. The second scenario is supported by regional plate kinematic models reconciling a variety of observations including back-arc basin formation and destruction through time and the history of arc-continent collisions. The primary problem with the first scenario is the use of a plate circuit that leaves relative motion between East and West Antarctica unconstrained, leading to an improbable history of periodic compression and extension. The main problem with the alternative scenario is a lack of sampled late Cretaceous volcanic arc rocks east of the LHR. We analysed available geological and geophysical data to constrain the locations of and movements along the plate boundaries in the southwest and southern Pacific from the late Cretaceous to mid Eocene, and assessed how Pacific plate motion is best quantified during this period. Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that a plate boundary separated the Pacific plate from the LHR. The distribution of lower mantle slab material that is imaged by seismic tomography beneath New Zealand is best explained if subduction occurred to the east of the LHR during the entire late Cretaceous to mid Eocene period. Rocks

  17. In-plane vibration analysis of annular plates with arbitrary boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xianjie; Shi, Dongyan; Qin, Zhengrong; Wang, Qingshan

    2014-01-01

    In comparison with the out-of-plane vibrations of annular plates, far less attention has been paid to the in-plane vibrations which may also play a vital important role in affecting the sound radiation from and power flows in a built-up structure. In this investigation, a generalized Fourier series method is proposed for the in-plane vibration analysis of annular plates with arbitrary boundary conditions along each of its edges. Regardless of the boundary conditions, the in-plane displacement fields are invariantly expressed as a new form of trigonometric series expansions with a drastically improved convergence as compared with the conventional Fourier series. All the unknown expansion coefficients are treated as the generalized coordinates and determined using the Rayleigh-Ritz technique. Unlike most of the existing studies, the presented method can be readily and universally applied to a wide spectrum of in-plane vibration problems involving different boundary conditions, varying material, and geometric properties with no need of modifying the basic functions or adapting solution procedures. Several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and reliability of the current solution for predicting the in-plane vibration characteristics of annular plates subjected to different boundary conditions.

  18. In-Plane Vibration Analysis of Annular Plates with Arbitrary Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianjie Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In comparison with the out-of-plane vibrations of annular plates, far less attention has been paid to the in-plane vibrations which may also play a vital important role in affecting the sound radiation from and power flows in a built-up structure. In this investigation, a generalized Fourier series method is proposed for the in-plane vibration analysis of annular plates with arbitrary boundary conditions along each of its edges. Regardless of the boundary conditions, the in-plane displacement fields are invariantly expressed as a new form of trigonometric series expansions with a drastically improved convergence as compared with the conventional Fourier series. All the unknown expansion coefficients are treated as the generalized coordinates and determined using the Rayleigh-Ritz technique. Unlike most of the existing studies, the presented method can be readily and universally applied to a wide spectrum of in-plane vibration problems involving different boundary conditions, varying material, and geometric properties with no need of modifying the basic functions or adapting solution procedures. Several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and reliability of the current solution for predicting the in-plane vibration characteristics of annular plates subjected to different boundary conditions.

  19. Structural vibration a uniform accurate solution for laminated beams, plates and shells with general boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Guoyong; Su, Zhu

    2015-01-01

    This book develops a uniform accurate method which is capable of dealing with vibrations of laminated beams, plates and shells with arbitrary boundary conditions including classical boundaries, elastic supports and their combinations. It also provides numerous solutions for various configurations including various boundary conditions, laminated schemes, geometry and material parameters, which fill certain gaps in this area of reach and may serve as benchmark solutions for the readers. For each case, corresponding fundamental equations in the framework of classical and shear deformation theory are developed. Following the fundamental equations, numerous free vibration results are presented for various configurations including different boundary conditions, laminated sequences and geometry and material properties. The proposed method and corresponding formulations can be readily extended to static analysis.

  20. Catalyzed combustion in a flat plate boundary layer. I. Experimental measurements and comparison with numerical calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robben, R.; Schefer, R.; Agrawal, V.; Namer, I.

    1977-09-01

    A classic fluid mechanics boundary layer problem, flow over a sharp leading edge flat plate, was used to study the effect of a heated surface on combustion in lean hydrogen-air mixtures. The velocity and density profiles of the boundary layer have been measured with laser Doppler velocimetry and Rayleigh scattering, respectively. Preliminary measurements on a silicon dioxide ''non-catalytic'' surface indicate neither boundary layer nor surface combustion for wall temperatures up to 1250/sup 0/K. Measurements on a platinum catalytic surface indicate that, at a surface temperature of 1000/sup 0/K, not only is there significant surface combustion but that homogeneous combustion in the boundary layer is induced by active species generated at the catalytic surface.

  1. MHD free convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid past a flat vertical plate with Newtonian heating boundary condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammed J; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, Ahmed I

    2012-01-01

    Steady two dimensional MHD laminar free convective boundary layer flows of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid over a solid stationary vertical plate in a quiescent fluid taking into account the Newtonian heating boundary condition is investigated numerically. A magnetic field can be used to control the motion of an electrically conducting fluid in micro/nano scale systems used for transportation of fluid. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and then using linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The effects of different controlling parameters, namely, Lewis number, Prandtl number, buoyancy ratio, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, magnetic field and Newtonian heating on the flow and heat transfer are investigated. The numerical results for the dimensionless axial velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction as well as the reduced Nusselt and Sherwood number have been presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the rate of heat and mass transfer increase as Newtonian heating parameter increases. The dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions increase with the increase of Newtonian heating parameter. The results of the reduced heat transfer rate is compared for convective heating boundary condition and found an excellent agreement.

  2. MHD free convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid past a flat vertical plate with Newtonian heating boundary condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed J Uddin

    Full Text Available Steady two dimensional MHD laminar free convective boundary layer flows of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid over a solid stationary vertical plate in a quiescent fluid taking into account the Newtonian heating boundary condition is investigated numerically. A magnetic field can be used to control the motion of an electrically conducting fluid in micro/nano scale systems used for transportation of fluid. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and then using linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The effects of different controlling parameters, namely, Lewis number, Prandtl number, buoyancy ratio, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, magnetic field and Newtonian heating on the flow and heat transfer are investigated. The numerical results for the dimensionless axial velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction as well as the reduced Nusselt and Sherwood number have been presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the rate of heat and mass transfer increase as Newtonian heating parameter increases. The dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions increase with the increase of Newtonian heating parameter. The results of the reduced heat transfer rate is compared for convective heating boundary condition and found an excellent agreement.

  3. Numerical analysis of viscoelastic boundary layers : the case of plate withdrawal in a Maxwellian fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghy, K.; Sharifi, M.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of a fluid's elasticity on the characteristics of its boundary layer was investigated in this work. A viscoelastic fluid of Maxwellian type was selected for this purpose and the flow induced in this fluid by a plate withdrawing at a constant velocity was studied. Conventional boundary layer assumptions were invoked to reduce the equations of motion to a simple form incorporating an elastic term in addition to the familiar inertial, viscous and pressure terms. It was shown that for elastic effects to be of an importance in a boundary layer, the fluid's relaxation time should be of an order much larger than its kinematic viscosity. By introducing a stream function, the governing equation was transformed into a nonlinear ODE with x-coordinate still appearing in the equation demonstrating that no similarity solution existed for this flow. The resulting equation was then solved numerically for Deborah numbers as large as 1.0. The results showed a marked formation of boundary layer adjacent to a moving wall for a Maxwellian fluid. The boundary layer thickness and the wall shear stress were found to scale with fluid's elasticity - both decreasing the higher the fluid's elasticity. It is thus anticipated that in free coating processes, the force required to impart a constant velocity to a withdrawing belt or plate would be lower if fluid's elasticity is significant. (author)

  4. MHD Natural Convection with Convective Surface Boundary Condition over a Flat Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad M. Rashidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We apply the one parameter continuous group method to investigate similarity solutions of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD heat and mass transfer flow of a steady viscous incompressible fluid over a flat plate. By using the one parameter group method, similarity transformations and corresponding similarity representations are presented. A convective boundary condition is applied instead of the usual boundary conditions of constant surface temperature or constant heat flux. In addition it is assumed that viscosity, thermal conductivity, and concentration diffusivity vary linearly. Our study indicates that a similarity solution is possible if the convective heat transfer related to the hot fluid on the lower surface of the plate is directly proportional to (x--1/2 where x- is the distance from the leading edge of the solid surface. Numerical solutions of the ordinary differential equations are obtained by the Keller Box method for different values of the controlling parameters associated with the problem.

  5. Gradual unlocking of plate boundary controlled initiation of the 2014 Iquique earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, Bernd; Asch, Günter; Hainzl, Sebastian; Bedford, Jonathan; Hoechner, Andreas; Palo, Mauro; Wang, Rongjiang; Moreno, Marcos; Bartsch, Mitja; Zhang, Yong; Oncken, Onno; Tilmann, Frederik; Dahm, Torsten; Victor, Pia; Barrientos, Sergio; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre

    2014-08-21

    On 1 April 2014, Northern Chile was struck by a magnitude 8.1 earthquake following a protracted series of foreshocks. The Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile monitored the entire sequence of events, providing unprecedented resolution of the build-up to the main event and its rupture evolution. Here we show that the Iquique earthquake broke a central fraction of the so-called northern Chile seismic gap, the last major segment of the South American plate boundary that had not ruptured in the past century. Since July 2013 three seismic clusters, each lasting a few weeks, hit this part of the plate boundary with earthquakes of increasing peak magnitudes. Starting with the second cluster, geodetic observations show surface displacements that can be associated with slip on the plate interface. These seismic clusters and their slip transients occupied a part of the plate interface that was transitional between a fully locked and a creeping portion. Leading up to this earthquake, the b value of the foreshocks gradually decreased during the years before the earthquake, reversing its trend a few days before the Iquique earthquake. The mainshock finally nucleated at the northern end of the foreshock area, which skirted a locked patch, and ruptured mainly downdip towards higher locking. Peak slip was attained immediately downdip of the foreshock region and at the margin of the locked patch. We conclude that gradual weakening of the central part of the seismic gap accentuated by the foreshock activity in a zone of intermediate seismic coupling was instrumental in causing final failure, distinguishing the Iquique earthquake from most great earthquakes. Finally, only one-third of the gap was broken and the remaining locked segments now pose a significant, increased seismic hazard with the potential to host an earthquake with a magnitude of >8.5.

  6. Discrete quintic spline for boundary value problem in plate deflation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Patricia J. Y.

    2017-07-01

    We propose a numerical scheme for a fourth-order boundary value problem arising from plate deflation theory. The scheme involves a discrete quintic spline, and it is of order 4 if a parameter takes a specific value, else it is of order 2. We also present a well known numerical example to illustrate the efficiency of our method as well as to compare with other numerical methods proposed in the literature.

  7. Seismo-electromagnetic phenomena in the western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. G. Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a work that aims to monitor seismo-electromagnetic phenomena in the Western Part of the Eurasia-Nubia Plate Boundary. This region has a significant tectonic activity combined with relatively low electromagnetic noise levels, rendering high quality seismo-electromagnetic measurements possible. An overview of the seismicity of this region is presented and the research plan is discussed accordingly.

  8. Examples of the Re-number effect on the transitional flat plate boundary layers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Antoš, Pavel; Jonáš, Pavel; Procházka, Pavel P.; Uruba, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2014), s. 605-606 ISSN 1617-7061. [Annual Meeting of the International Association of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics /85./. Erlangen, 10.03.2014-14.03.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/12/1271 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : transition * flat plate * boundary layer Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pamm.201410290

  9. A great earthquake rupture across a rapidly evolving three-plate boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Kevin P; Lay, Thorne; Ammon, Charles J

    2009-04-10

    On 1 April 2007 a great, tsunamigenic earthquake (moment magnitude 8.1) ruptured the Solomon Islands subduction zone at the triple junction where the Australia and Solomon Sea-Woodlark Basin plates simultaneously underthrust the Pacific plate with different slip directions. The associated abrupt change in slip direction during the great earthquake drove convergent anelastic deformation of the upper Pacific plate, which generated localized uplift in the forearc above the subducting Simbo fault, potentially amplifying local tsunami amplitude. Elastic deformation during the seismic cycle appears to be primarily accommodated by the overriding Pacific forearc. This earthquake demonstrates the seismogenic potential of extremely young subducting oceanic lithosphere, the ability of ruptures to traverse substantial geologic boundaries, and the consequences of complex coseismic slip for uplift and tsunamigenesis.

  10. Free Vibration Of Functionally Graded Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Composite Annular Sector Plate With General Boundary Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Fuzhen; Li, Haichao; Du, Yuan; Shan, Yanhe; Ji, Fang

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, an efficient and unified approach for free vibration analysis of the moderately thick functionally graded carbon nanotube reinforced composite annular sector plate with general boundary supports is presented by using the Ritz method and the first-order shear deformation theory. For the distribution of the carbon nanotubes in thickness direction, it may be uniform or functionally graded. Properties of the composite media are based on a refined rule of the mixture approach which contains the efficiency parameters. A modified Fourier series is chosen as the basic function of the admissible function to eliminate all the relevant discontinuities of the displacements and their derivatives at the edges. To establish the general boundary supports of the annular sector plate, the artificial spring boundary technique is implemented at all edges. The desired solutions are obtained through the Ritz-variational energy method. Some numerical examples are considered to check the accuracy, convergence and reliability of the present method. In addition, the parameter studies of the functionally graded carbon nanotube reinforced composite annular sector plate are carried out as well.

  11. A formal derivation for the Blasius similarity solution for flat-plate boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hao

    2015-11-01

    The Blasius solution is a classical solution for a laminar boundary layer attached to a semi-infinite flat plate. The key of the solution strategy is to reduce the boundary layer equations, which are PDEs, to a set of ODEs, using a similarity variable transform. Conceptually, the similarity suggests that the velocity profile in each transverse cross-section appears ``self-similar''. In many classical text books and typical classroom lectures on fluid mechanics, the existence of the similarity solution is argued heuristically. The similarity variable is defined a priori so as to collapse the PDEs. It appears somewhat mystical that the PDEs can be perfectly reduced via such an approach. Here we present a rigorous derivation for the existence of a similarity solution, which naturally arises from the fact that there is no apparent streamwise length scale for a semi-infinite plate. Conversely, a similarity solution cannot exist if the plate size is finite. This derivation can be useful in fluids education, in topics including similarity, scaling arguments, and boundary layer theory.

  12. Tectonics Timor-style: Episodic, early-stage orogenesis at a young collision plate margin and implications for orogenic and petroleum fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keep, Myra; Haig, David; Benincasa, Aaron

    2017-04-01

    Timor Island, in the Outer Banda Arc, preserves the orogenic product of an arc-continent collision between the Australian Plate and the Banda Arc that commenced after 9.8 Ma GTS2004 but emerged above sea level only 3.1 Ma ago. The orogenic pile includes large tracts of material from the Australian margin, including the Permian to Middle Jurassic Gondwana Megasequence and the Late Jurassic to early Late Miocene Australian-Margin Megasequence, as well as stratigraphic sequences indicating a Gondwanan terrane with an oceanic affinity. In addition, material from the Banda Arc side of the plate margin, referred to as the Banda Terrane, occurs throughout the island and includes both seaf!oor metamorphosed igneous material and cover sediments. We document four distinct stages to this young orogeny, based largely on detailed and robust stratigraphic and biostratigraphic analyses. An early shortening, between 9.8 Ma and 5.5 Ma reflects the early collision. However, somewhat unexpectedly we found that this early collision was followed by a period of tectonic quiescence, 5.5 Ma to 4.5 Ma, during which time pelagic sedimentation occurred across much of Timor, reflecting locking of the subduction zone. Since 4.5 Ma deformation has been manifest as late, high-angle strike slip faults that dominate the topography and dismember the early-formed thrust sheets, and a more recent phase of broad doming causing uplift relate to the rapid rise of the island. Early deformation, manifest as south- to southeasterly directed thrust nappes, is now preserved in only a handful of locations. Oil and gas seeps and hot springs that occur across East Timor reflect control by underlying structural zones parallel to the strike of the island. These linear zones parallel plate-boundary scale strike-slip faults that exhume the Australian-derived (oldest) rocks on Timor. Recent strike-slip deformation, manifest as linear tectonic melange zones parallel to major, late, high-angle faults controls the

  13. Static analysis for magneto-electro-elastic plates based on the scaled boundary finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengchong; Liu, Jun; Lin, Gao

    2017-04-01

    The scaled boundary finite element method (SBFEM) and the precise integration algorithm (PIA) are utilized to analyze the extended displacement field in clamped or simple-supported magneto-electro-elastic plates produced by external transverse loadings. There are no limitation on boundary conditions and types of external forces. Only the in-plane dimensions are divided into 2D elements. By introducing a set of scaled boundary local coordinates, 3D governing partial differential equations are converted into the second order ordinary differential matrix equation. By means of the internal nodal force, a first order ordinary differential equation is obtained and its general solution is a matrix exponential. The PIA is introduced to calculate the matrix exponential and any desired accuracy can be obtained. Finally, several numerical examples are provided to validate the versatility of the proposed technique.

  14. Streamwise counter-rotating vortices generated by triangular leading edge pattern in flat plate boundary layer

    KAUST Repository

    Hasheminejad, S. M.

    2016-01-05

    A series of flow visualizations were conducted to qualitatively study the development of streamwise counter-rotating vortices over a flat plate induced by triangular patterns at the leading edge of a flat plate. The experiments were carried out for a Reynolds number based on the pattern wavelength (λ) of 3080. The results depict the onset, development and breakdown of the vortical structures within the flat plate boundary layer. Moreover, the effect of one spanwise array of holes with diameter of 0.2λ (=3 mm) was examined. This investigation was done on two different flat plates with holes placed at the location x/λ = 2 downstream of the troughs and peaks. The presence of holes after troughs does not show any significant effect on the vortical structures. However, the plate with holes after peaks noticeably delays the vortex breakdown. In this case, the “mushroom-like” vortices move away from the wall and propagate downstream with stable vortical structures. The vortex growth is halted further downstream but start to tilt aside.

  15. Asymmetric Vibration of Polar Orthotropic Annular Circular Plates of Quadratically Varying Thickness with Same Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bhardwaj

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, asymmetric vibration of polar orthotropic annular circular plates of quadratically varying thickness resting on Winkler elastic foundation is studied by using boundary characteristic orthonormal polynomials in Rayleigh-Ritz method. Convergence of the results is tested and comparison is made with results already available in the existing literature. Numerical results for the first ten frequencies for various values of parameters describing width of annular plate, thickness profile, material orthotropy and foundation constant for all three possible combinations of clamped, simply supported and free edge conditions are shown and discussed. It is found that (a higher elastic property in circumferential direction leads to higher stiffness against lateral vibration; (b Lateral vibration characteristics of F-Fplates is more sensitive towards parametric changes in material orthotropy and foundation stiffness than C-C and S-Splates; (c Effect of quadratical thickness variation on fundamental frequency is more significant in cases of C-C and S-S plates than that of F-Fplates. Thickness profile which is convex relative to plate center-line tends to result in higher stiffness of annular plates against lateral vibration than the one which is concave and (d Fundamental mode of vibration of C-C and S-Splates is axisymmetrical while that of F-Fplates is asymmetrical.

  16. How diking affects the longer-term structure and evolution of divergent plate boundaries

    KAUST Repository

    Trippanera, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    Recurrent diking episodes along divergent plate boundaries, as at Dabbahu (2005, Afar) or at Bardarbunga (2014, Iceland) , highlight the possibility to have m-wide opening in a short time (days to weeks). This suggests a prominent role of magma enhancing transient plate separations. However, the role of diking on a longer term (> 102 years) and its influence on the structure and the evolution of a divergent plate boundary is still poorly investigated. Here we use field surveys along the oceanic Icelandic and continental Ethiopian plate boundaries, along five eruptive fissures and four rift segments. Field observations have also been integrated with analogue and numerical models of dike emplacement to better understand the effect of dike emplacement at depth and at the surface. Our results show that the dike-fed eruptive fissures are systematically associated with graben structures formed by inward dipping normal faults having throws up to 10 m and commonly propagating downward. Moreover, rift segments (i.e. mature rift zones), despite any asymmetry and repetition, are characterized by the same features as the eruptive fissures, the only difference lying in the larger size (higher fault throws, up to 40 m, and wider deformation zones). Analogue and numerical models of dike intrusion confirm that all the structural features observed along the rift segments may be dike-induced; these features include downward propagating normal faults bordering graben structures, contraction at the base of the hanging walls of the faults and upward propagating faults. Simple calculations based on the deeper structure of the eroded rift segments in eastern and western Iceland also suggest that all the fault slip in the active rift segments may result from diking. These results suggest that the overall deformation pattern of eruptive fissures and rift segments may be explained only by dike emplacement. In a magmatic rift, the regional tectonic stress may rarely be high enough to be

  17. Transition due to streamwise streaks in a supersonic flat plate boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-12-01

    Transition induced by stationary streaks undergoing transient growth in a supersonic flat plate boundary layer flow is studied using numerical computations. While the possibility of strong transient growth of small-amplitude stationary perturbations in supersonic boundary layer flows has been demonstrated in previous works, its relation to laminar-turbulent transition cannot be established within the framework of linear disturbances. Therefore, this paper investigates the nonlinear evolution of initially linear optimal disturbances that evolve into finite amplitude streaks in the downstream region, and then studies the modal instability of those streaks as a likely cause for the onset of bypass transition. The nonmodal evolution of linearly optimal stationary perturbations in a supersonic, Mach 3 flat plate boundary layer is computed via the nonlinear plane-marching parabolized stability equations (PSE) for stationary perturbations, or equivalently, the perturbation form of parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. To assess the effect of the nonlinear finite-amplitude streaks on transition, the linear form of plane-marching PSE is used to investigate the instability of the boundary layer flow modified by the spanwise periodic streaks. The onset of transition is estimated using an N -factor criterion based on modal amplification of the secondary instabilities of the streaks. In the absence of transient growth disturbances, first mode instabilities in a Mach 3, zero pressure gradient boundary layer reach N =10 at Rex≈107 . However, secondary instability modes of the stationary streaks undergoing transient growth are able to achieve the same N -factor at Rex<2 ×106 when the initial streak amplitude is sufficiently large. In contrast to the streak instabilities in incompressible flows, subharmonic instability modes with twice the fundamental spanwise wavelength of the streaks are found to have higher amplification ratios than the streak instabilities at fundamental

  18. Plate boundary deformation and man-made subsidence around geothermal fields on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland

    KAUST Repository

    Keiding, Marie

    2010-07-01

    We present Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data from 1992-1999 and 2003-2008 as well as GPS data from 2000-2009 for the active plate boundary on the Reykjanes Peninsula, southwest Iceland. The geodetic data reveal deformation mainly due to plate spreading, anthropogenic subsidence caused by geothermal fluid extraction and, possibly, increasing pressure in a geothermal system. Subsidence of around 10. cm is observed during the first 2. years of production at the Reykjanes geothermal power plant, which started operating in May 2006. We model the surface subsidence around the new power plant using point and ellipsoidal pressure sources in an elastic halfspace. Short-lived swarms of micro-earthquakes as well as aseismic fault movement are observed near the geothermal field following the start of production, possibly triggered by the stresses induced by geothermal fluid extraction. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Active faulting and transpression tectonics along the plate boundary in North Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Meghraoui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a synthesis of the active tectonics of the northern Atlas Mountains, and suggest a kinematic model of transpression and block rotation that illustrates the mechanics of this section of the Africa–Eurasia plate boundary. Neotectonic structures and significant shallow seismicity (with Mw >5.0 indicate that coeval E-W-trending, right-lateral faulting and NE-SW, thrust-related folding result from oblique convergence at the plate boundary, which forms a transpressional system. The strain distribution obtained from fault–fold structures and P axes of focal mechanism solutions, and the geodetic (NUVEL-1 and GPS convergence show that the shortening and convergence directions are not coaxial. The transpressional strain is partitioned along the strike and the quantitative description of the displacement field yields a compression-to-transcurrence ratio varying from 33% near Gibraltar, to 50% along the Tunisian Atlas. Shortening directions oriented NNE and NNW for the Pliocene and Quaternary, respectively, and the S shape of the Quaternary anticline axes, are in agreement with the 2.24˚/Myr to 3.9˚/Myr modeled clockwise rotation of the small tectonic blocks and with the paleomagnetic data. The convergence between Africa and Eurasia is absorbed along the Atlas Mountains at the upper crustal level, by means of thrusting above decollement systems, which are controlled by subdued transcurrent faults. The Tell Atlas of northwest Algeria, which has experienced numerous large earthquakes with respect to the other regions, is interpreted as a restraining bend that localizes the strain distribution along the plate boundary.

  20. Architectural Blueprint for Plate Boundary Observatories based on interoperable Data Management Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschke, D. I.; Häner, R.; Schurr, B.; Oncken, O.; Wächter, J.

    2014-12-01

    Interoperable data management platforms play an increasing role in the advancement of knowledge and technology in many scientific disciplines. Through high quality services they support the establishment of efficient and innovative research environments. Well-designed research environments can facilitate the sustainable utilization, exchange, and re-use of scientific data and functionality by using standardized community models. Together with innovative 3D/4D visualization, these concepts provide added value in improving scientific knowledge-gain, even across the boundaries of disciplines. A project benefiting from the added value is the Integrated Plate boundary Observatory in Chile (IPOC). IPOC is a European-South American network to study earthquakes and deformation at the Chilean continental margin and to monitor the plate boundary system for capturing an anticipated great earthquake in a seismic gap. In contrast to conventional observatories that monitor individual signals only, IPOC captures a large range of different processes through various observation methods (e.g., seismographs, GPS, magneto-telluric sensors, creep-meter, accelerometer, InSAR). For IPOC a conceptual design has been devised that comprises an architectural blueprint for a data management platform based on common and standardized data models, protocols, and encodings as well as on an exclusive use of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) including visualization components. Following the principles of event-driven service-oriented architectures, the design enables novel processes by sharing and re-using functionality and information on the basis of innovative data mining and data fusion technologies. This platform can help to improve the understanding of the physical processes underlying plate deformations as well as the natural hazards induced by them. Through the use of standards, this blueprint can not only be facilitated for other plate observing systems (e.g., the European Plate

  1. Analysis of Blasius Equation for Flat-Plate Flow with Infinite Boundary Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miansari, M. O.; Miansari, M. E.; Barari, Amin

    2010-01-01

    This paper applies the homotopy perturbation method (HPM) to determine the well-known Blasius equation with infinite boundary value for Flat-plate Flow. We study here the possibility of reducing the momentum and continuity equations to ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformation...... and write the nonlinear differential equation in the state space format, and then solve the initial value problem instead of boundary value problem. The significance of linear part is a key factor in convergence. A first seen linear part may lead to an unstable solution, therefore an extra term is added...... to the linear part and deduced from the nonlinear section. The results reveal that HPM is very effective, convenient, and quite accurate to both linear and nonlinear problems. It is predicted that HPM can be widely applied in engineering. Some plots and numerical results are presented to show the reliability...

  2. Boundary Layer Flow and Heat Transfer of FMWCNT/Water Nanofluids over a Flat Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Safaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the heat transfer and flow of water/FMWCNT (functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube nanofluids over a flat plate was investigated using a finite volume method. Simulations were performed for velocity ranging from 0.17 mm/s to 1.7 mm/s under laminar regime and nanotube concentrations up to 0.2%. The 2-D governing equations were solved using an in-house FORTRAN code. For a specific free stream velocity, the presented results showed that increasing the weight percentage of nanotubes increased the Nusselt number. However, an increase in the solid weight percentage had a negligible effect on the wall shear stress. The results also indicated that increasing the free stream velocity for all cases leads to thinner boundary layer thickness, while increasing the FMWCNT concentration causes an increase in the boundary layer thickness.

  3. Skin friction drag reduction on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer using synthetic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Randy; Boom, Pieter D.; Hanson, Ronald E.; Lavoie, Philippe; Zingg, David W.

    2017-11-01

    In these studies, we investigate the effect of mild synthetic jet actuation on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer with the goal of interacting with the large scales in the log region of the boundary layer and manipulating the overall skin friction. Results will be presented from both large eddy simulations (LES) and wind tunnel experiments. In the experiments, a large parameter space of synthetic jet frequency and amplitude was studied with hot film sensors at select locations behind a pair of synthetic jets to identify the parameters that produce the greatest changes in the skin friction. The LES simulations were performed for a selected set of parameters and provide a more complete evaluation of the interaction between the boundary layer and synthetic jets. Five boundary layer thicknesses downstream, the skin friction between the actuators is generally found to increase, while regions of reduced skin friction persist downstream of the actuators. This pattern is reversed for forcing at low frequency. Overall, the spanwise-averaged skin friction is increased by the forcing, except when forcing at high frequency and low amplitude, for which a net skin friction reduction persists downstream. The physical interpretation of these results will be discussed. The financial support of Airbus is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. The ultra low frequency electromagnetic radiation observed in the topside ionosphere above boundaries of tectonic plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Athanasiou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present results of a comparison between ultra low frequency (ULF electromagnetic (EM radiation, recorded by an electric field instrument onboard the satellite detection of electromagnetic emissions transmitted from earthquake regions in the topside ionosphere, and the seismicity of regions with high and low seismic activity. In particular, we evaluated the energy variations of the ULF Ezelectric field component during a period of four years (2006-2009, in order to examine the possible relation of ULF EM radiation with seismogenic regions located in Central America, Indonesia, the Eastern Mediterranean Basin and Greece. As a tool for evaluating the ULF Ez energy variations we used singular spectrum analysis techniques. The results of our analysis clearly show a significant increase of the ULF EM energy emitted from regions of highest seismic activity at the boundaries tectonic plates. Furthermore, we found that higher electromagnetic radiation was detected in a region above the northern- western Greek Arc (R1 than above the adjacent region including Athens and its urban area. We interpret these results of the present study as suggesting that: i the seismogenic regions at the boundary of tectonic plates radiate ULF EM emissions observed by satellites in the topside ionosphere; and ii that this EM radiation is not only related with the occurrence time of great (M≥5 earthquakes, but it is often present in intermediate times and it appears as a quasi-permanent phenomenon.

  5. Origin of methane-rich natural gas at the West Pacific convergent plate boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Yuji; Kinoshita, Naoya; Kagoshima, Takanori; Takahata, Naoto; Sakata, Susumu; Toki, Tomohiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Waseda, Amane; Lan, Tefang; Wen, Hsinyi; Chen, Ai-Ti; Lee, Hsiaofen; Yang, Tsanyao F; Zheng, Guodong; Tomonaga, Yama; Roulleau, Emilie; Pinti, Daniele L

    2017-11-15

    Methane emission from the geosphere is generally characterized by a radiocarbon-free signature and might preserve information on the deep carbon cycle on Earth. Here we report a clear relationship between the origin of methane-rich natural gases and the geodynamic setting of the West Pacific convergent plate boundary. Natural gases in the frontal arc basin (South Kanto gas fields, Northeast Japan) show a typical microbial signature with light carbon isotopes, high CH 4 /C 2 H 6 and CH 4 / 3 He ratios. In the Akita-Niigata region - which corresponds to the slope stretching from the volcanic-arc to the back-arc -a thermogenic signature characterize the gases, with prevalence of heavy carbon isotopes, low CH 4 /C 2 H 6 and CH 4 / 3 He ratios. Natural gases from mud volcanoes in South Taiwan at the collision zone show heavy carbon isotopes, middle CH 4 /C 2 H 6 ratios and low CH 4 / 3 He ratios. On the other hand, those from the Tokara Islands situated on the volcanic front of Southwest Japan show the heaviest carbon isotopes, middle CH 4 /C 2 H 6 ratios and the lowest CH 4 / 3 He ratios. The observed geochemical signatures of natural gases are clearly explained by a mixing of microbial, thermogenic and abiotic methane. An increasing contribution of abiotic methane towards more tectonically active regions of the plate boundary is suggested.

  6. Catalyzed combustion in a flat plate boundary layer. II. Numerical calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefer, R.; Robben, F.

    1977-09-01

    A computer program has been developed to solve the boundary layer equations for laminar flow over a heated plate with H/sub 2//air combustion. The objectives are to investigate the importance of homogeneous as opposed to catalytic surface reactions during the combustion process, and to determine the roles of heat and mass transfer and their effect on combustion. Results are presented for combustion of H/sub 2//air at an equivalence ratio of 0.1 for flow over a noncatalytic plate at a surface temperature of 1100/sup 0/K. A detailed mechanism involving 8 chemical species and 13 reactions has been used to describe the kinetics. The reactions leading to the initiation of combustion and the effect of the large diffusivity of hydrogen are discussed. The boundary conditions for catalytic surface and a simplified model to account for catalytic wall reaction are formulated. Results are presented for combustion over a catalytic surface and compared with the non-catalytic case.

  7. Numerical investigation of a spatially developing turbulent natural convection boundary layer along a vertical heated plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Keisuke; Hattori, Yasuo; Suto, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A large-eddy simulation of a spatially developing natural convection boundary layer is conducted. • First- and second-order moments of the heat and momentum showed a reasonable agreement with past experiments. • Coherent structure of turbulent vortex inherent in this boundary layer is discussed. - Abstract: Large-eddy simulation (LES) on a spatially developing natural convection boundary layer along a vertical heated plate was conducted. The heat transfer rate, friction velocity, mean velocity and temperature, and second-order turbulent properties both in the wall-normal and the stream-wise direction showed reasonable agreement with the findings of past experiments. The spectrum of velocity and temperature fluctuation showed a -2/3-power decay slope and -2-power decay slope respectively. Quadrant analysis revealed the inclination on Q1 and Q3 in the Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux, changing their contribution along the distance from the plate surface. Following the convention, we defined the threshold region where the stream-wise mean velocity takes local maximum, the inner layer which is closer to the plate than the threshold region, the outer layer which is farther to the plate than the threshold region. The space correlation of stream-wise velocity tilted the head toward the wall in the propagating direction in the outer layer; on the other hand, the correlated motion had little inclination in the threshold region. The time history of the second invariant of gradient tensor Q revealed that the vortex strength oscillates both in the inner and the outer layers in between the laminar and the transition region. In the turbulent region, the vortex was often dominant in the outer layer. Instantaneous three-dimensional visualization of Q revealed the existence of high-speed fluid parcels associated with arch-shape vortices. These results were considered as an intrinsic structure in the outer layer, which is symmetrical to the structure of

  8. Crustal structure of the Eurasia-Africa plate boundary across the Gloria Fault, North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Luis; Hübscher, Christian; Terrinha, Pedro; Matias, Luis; Afilhado, Alexandra; Lüdmann, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    The oceanic crustal and uppermost lithospheric mantle structure across the Gloria Fault (GF) transcurrent plate boundary between Africa and Eurasia in the Northeast Atlantic is investigated based on seismic reflection, seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection data. This experiment used 18 ocean bottom stations along an N-S 150 km long traverse together with acquisition of a multichannel seismic reflection profile. Modeling of P and S seismic waves and gravimetric anomalies allowed estimation of P- and S-wave velocities, density, Poisson's ratio and discussion of a compositional model. A five-layer model is proposed in which layers 1-3 correspond to normal sediments through typical oceanic crust layers 2 and 3. Layer 5 yielded mantle velocities above 7.9 km s-1. Layer 4 with 4 km of thickness has Vp velocities between 7.1 and 7.4 km s-1 and is clearly separated from typical oceanic crust and mantle layers. Comparison with natural analogues and published lab measurements suggest that layer 4 can be a mix of lithologies that comply with the estimated P and S velocities and computed Poisson's ratio and densities, such as, olivine cumulates, peridotite, gabbro and hydrated mantle. We favour the tectonic process that produces secondary porosity from which results serpentinization due to sea water circulation in fractures. Structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the reflection profile shows that Neogene to recent tectonic deformation on this segment of the plate boundary concentrated on the southern side of the GF, that is, the Africa plate.

  9. The effect of energy accumulation and boundary slip on laminar flow between rotating plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenpeng; Zeng, Liangcai; Chen, Keying; Jin, Xiaohong; Wu, Shiqian

    2018-02-01

    The poor operating conditions of fluid lubrication equipment during the start-up process are due to the resistance of the high-viscosity lubricating liquid. Moreover, the excessive reduction in fluid viscosity due to the elevated temperature resulting from power consumption during prolonged operation is not conducive to the generation of dynamic pressure. In this study, we examine the effect of energy accumulation and boundary slip on the laminar flow of a liquid between a pair of rotating plates. The experiments are conducted using a rotary rheometer, with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as the thermal insulation material and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as the slip drag reduction material, and a three-dimensional simulation model is established. This model is derived by combining the energy equation including the slip length and the heat conduction equation. Thus, the temperature changes over time are predicted by this model, and the model accuracy is verified by experiments. The results reveal the following points: 1) boundary slips function as a drag reduction mechanism for short-time continuous operation; 2) under prolonged operation, the slip reduces the extent of the oil viscosity decrease and clear control of the elevated temperature by the boundary slip is observed.

  10. Boundary integral equation methods and numerical solutions thin plates on an elastic foundation

    CERN Document Server

    Constanda, Christian; Hamill, William

    2016-01-01

    This book presents and explains a general, efficient, and elegant method for solving the Dirichlet, Neumann, and Robin boundary value problems for the extensional deformation of a thin plate on an elastic foundation. The solutions of these problems are obtained both analytically—by means of direct and indirect boundary integral equation methods (BIEMs)—and numerically, through the application of a boundary element technique. The text discusses the methodology for constructing a BIEM, deriving all the attending mathematical properties with full rigor. The model investigated in the book can serve as a template for the study of any linear elliptic two-dimensional problem with constant coefficients. The representation of the solution in terms of single-layer and double-layer potentials is pivotal in the development of a BIEM, which, in turn, forms the basis for the second part of the book, where approximate solutions are computed with a high degree of accuracy. The book is intended for graduate students and r...

  11. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary beneath the South Island of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Junlin; Fischer, Karen M.; Savage, Martha K.

    2018-02-01

    Lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) properties beneath the South Island of New Zealand have been imaged by Sp receiver function common-conversion point stacking. In this transpressional boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates, dextral offset on the Alpine fault and convergence have occurred for the past 20 My, with the Alpine fault now bounded by Australian plate subduction to the south and Pacific plate subduction to the north. Using data from onland seismometers, especially the 29 broadband stations of the New Zealand permanent seismic network (GeoNet), we obtained 24,971 individual receiver functions by extended-time multi-taper deconvolution, and mapped them to three-dimensional space using a Fresnel zone approximation. Pervasive strong positive Sp phases are observed in the LAB depth range indicated by surface wave tomography. These phases are interpreted as conversions from a velocity decrease across the LAB. In the central South Island, the LAB is observed to be deeper and broader to the northwest of the Alpine fault. The deeper LAB to the northwest of the Alpine fault is consistent with models in which oceanic lithosphere attached to the Australian plate was partially subducted, or models in which the Pacific lithosphere has been underthrust northwest past the Alpine fault. Further north, a zone of thin lithosphere with a strong and vertically localized LAB velocity gradient occurs to the northwest of the fault, juxtaposed against a region of anomalously weak LAB conversions to the southeast of the fault. This structure could be explained by lithospheric blocks with contrasting LAB properties that meet beneath the Alpine fault, or by the effects of Pacific plate subduction. The observed variations in LAB properties indicate strong modification of the LAB by the interplay of convergence and strike-slip deformation along and across this transpressional plate boundary.

  12. EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Data in the College Classroom (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Olds, S. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) is the geodetic component of the EarthScope project, designed to study the 3-D strain field across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American tectonics plates in the western United States. All PBO data are freely available to scientific and educational communities and have been incorporated into a variety of activities for college and university classrooms. UNAVCO Education and Outreach program staff have worked closely with faculty users, scientific researchers, and facility staff to create materials that are scientifically and technically accurate as well as useful to the classroom user. Availability of processed GPS data is not new to the geoscience community. However, PBO data staff have worked with education staff to deliver data that are readily accessible to educators. The UNAVCO Data for Educators webpage, incorporating an embedded Google Map with PBO GPS locations and providing current GPS time series plots and downloadable data, extends and updates the datasets available to our community. Google Earth allows the visualization GPS data with other types of datasets, e.g. LiDAR, while maintaining the self-contained and easy-to-use interface of UNAVCO’s Jules Verne Voyager map tools, which have multiple sets of geological and geophysical data. Curricular materials provide scaffolds for using EarthScope data in a variety of forms for different learning goals. Simple visualization of earthquake epicenters and locations of volcanoes can be used with velocity vectors to make simple deductions of plate boundary behaviors. Readily available time series plots provide opportunities for additional science skills, and there are web and paper-based support materials for downloading data, manipulating tables, and using plotting programs for processed GPS data. Scientists have provided contextual materials to explore the importance of these data in interpreting the structure and dynamics of the Earth. These data

  13. Vertical-axis rotations and deformation along the active strike-slip El Tigre Fault (Precordillera of San Juan, Argentina) assessed through palaeomagnetism and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzito, Sabrina Y.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Cortés, José M.; Terrizzano, Carla M.

    2017-03-01

    Palaeomagnetic data from poorly consolidated to non-consolidated late Cenozoic sediments along the central segment of the active El Tigre Fault (Central-Western Precordillera of the San Juan Province, Argentina) demonstrate broad cumulative deformation up to 450 m from the fault trace and reveal clockwise and anticlockwise vertical-axis rotations of variable magnitude. This deformation has affected in different amounts Miocene to late Pleistocene samples and indicates a complex kinematic pattern. Several inherited linear structures in the shear zone that are oblique to the El Tigre Fault may have acted as block boundary faults. Displacement along these faults may have resulted in a complex pattern of rotations. The maximum magnitude of rotation is a function of the age of the sediments sampled, with largest values corresponding to middle Miocene-lower Pliocene deposits and minimum values obtained from late Pleistocene deposits. The kinematic study is complemented by low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data to show that the local strain regime suggests a N-S stretching direction, subparallel to the strike of the main fault.

  14. Subcrustal earthquakes in the plate boundary zone of New Zealand's South Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boese, C. M.; Stern, T. A.; Townend, J.; Sheehan, A. F.; Molnar, P. H.; Collins, J. A.; Karalliyadda, S.; Bourguignon, S.; Bannister, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Sporadic, intermediate-depth earthquakes have been observed for ~40 years in the vicinity of the Alpine Fault, a 460 km-long transpressive fault forming the western boundary of the Southern Alps. The Alpine Fault represents the plate boundary between the Australian and Pacific Plates in New Zealand and links two subduction zones of opposite polarity in the North and South. Several earthquakes at depths of 59-85 km have been recorded by the Southern Alps Microearthquake Borehole Array (SAMBA) since its deployment in November 2008. Due to large numbers of impulsive phase arrivals, focal mechanisms were obtained for these events during routine processing. In 2009 and early 2010, several additional temporary seismometer networks were operating in the central Southern Alps (Alpine Fault Array ALFA, Deep Fault Drilling Project 2010 DFDP10) and the offshore region west of the South Island (Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa MOANA). To gain more insight about the cause and mechanism of these deep events, a comprehensive analysis has been performed incorporating data from all available instruments. Accurate hypocentres of 22 earthquakes (ML<4) and focal mechanisms of at least 14 events have been obtained. The focal mechanisms reveal that reverse faulting predominates at depth in the continental collision zone between the Pacific and Australian Plates. The intermediate-depth events occur below the Moho discontinuity, which has been mapped in detail using wide-angle reflection/refraction data obtained during the South Island Geophysical Transect (SIGHT) project in 1995/96. Although the cause for these subcrustal earthquakes is not yet clear, they have previously been interpreted to result from intra-continental subduction (Reyners 1987), high shear-strain gradients due to depressed geotherms and viscous deformation of mantle lithosphere (Kohler and Eberhart-Phillips 2003). On the basis of the locations and mechanisms obtained using SAMBA, we have argued that

  15. The 2014 Mw6.9 Gokceada and 2017 Mw6.3 Lesvos Earthquakes in the Northern Aegean Sea: The Transition from Right-Lateral Strike-Slip Faulting on the North Anatolian Fault to Extension in the Central Aegean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, S.; Konca, A. O.; Dogan, U.; Floyd, M.; Karabulut, H.; Ergintav, S.; Ganas, A.; Paradisis, D.; King, R. W.; Reilinger, R. E.

    2017-12-01

    The 2014 Mw6.9 Gokceada (strike-slip) and 2017 Mw6.3 Lesvos (normal) earthquakes represent two of the set of faults that accommodate the transition from right-lateral strike-slip faulting on the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) to normal faulting along the Gulf of Corinth. The Gokceada earthquake was a purely strike-slip event on the western extension of the NAF where it enters the northern Aegean Sea. The Lesvos earthquake, located roughly 200 km south of Gokceada, occurred on a WNW-ESE-striking normal fault. Both earthquakes respond to the same regional stress field, as indicated by their sub-parallel seismic tension axis and far-field coseismic GPS displacements. Interpretation of GPS-derived velocities, active faults, crustal seismicity, and earthquake focal mechanisms in the northern Aegean indicates that this pattern of complementary faulting, involving WNW-ESE-striking normal faults (e.g. Lesvos earthquake) and SW-NE-striking strike-slip faults (e.g. Gokceada earthquake), persists across the full extent of the northern Aegean Sea. The combination of these two "families" of faults, combined with some systems of conjugate left-lateral strike-slip faults, complement one another and culminate in the purely extensional rift structures that form the large Gulfs of Evvia and Corinth. In addition to being consistent with seismic and geodetic observations, these fault geometries explain the increasing velocity of the southern Aegean and Peloponnese regions towards the Hellenic subduction zone. Alignment of geodetic extension and seismic tension axes with motion of the southern Aegean towards the Hellenic subduction zone suggests a direct association of Aegean extension with subduction, possibly by trench retreat, as has been suggested by prior investigators.

  16. Seismicity and Seismic Hazard along the Western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Fontiela, João; Ferrão, Celia; Borges, José Fernando; Caldeira, Bento; Dib, Assia; Ousadou, Farida

    2016-04-01

    The seismic phenomenon is the most damaging natural hazard known in the Mediterranean area. The western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary extends from the Azores to the Mediterranean region. The oceanic part of the plate boundary is well delimited from the Azores Islands, along the Azores-Gibraltar fault to approximately 12°W (west of the Strait of Gibraltar). From 12°W to 3.5°E, including the Iberia-Nubia region and extending to the western part of Algeria, the boundary is more diffuse and forms a wider area of deformation. The boundary between the Iberia and Nubia plates is the most complex part of the margin. This region corresponds to the transition from an oceanic boundary to a continental boundary, where Iberia and Nubia collide. Although most earthquakes along this plate boundary are shallow and generally have magnitudes less than 5.5, there have been several high-magnitude events. Many devastating earthquakes, some of them tsunami-triggering, inflicted heavy loss and considerable economic damage to the region. From 1920 to present, three earthquakes with magnitudes of about 8.0 (Mw 8.2, 25 November 1941; Ms 8.0, 25 February 1969; and Mw 7.9, 26 May 1975) occurred in the oceanic region, and four earthquakes with magnitudes of about 7.0 (Mw 7.1, 8 May 1939, Santa Maria Island and Mw 7.1, January 1980, Terceira and Graciosa Islands, both in the Azores; Ms 7.1, 20 May 1931, Azores-Gibraltar fracture zone; and Mw 7.3, 10 October 1980, El Asnam, Algeria) occurred along the western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary. In general, large earthquakes (M ≥7) occur within the oceanic region, with the exception of the El Asnam (Algeria) earthquakes. Some of these events caused extensive damage. The 1755 Lisbon earthquake (˜Mw 9) on the Portugal Atlantic margin, about 200 km W-SW of Cape St. Vincent, was followed by a tsunami and fires that caused the near-total destruction of Lisbon and adjacent areas. Estimates of the death toll in Lisbon alone (~70

  17. Forced convection boundary layer MHD flow of nanofluid over a permeable stretching plate with viscous dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibi Matin Meisam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Forced convection boundary layer magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD flow of a nanofluid over a permeable stretching plate is studied in this paper. The effects of suction-injection and viscous dissi1pation are taken into account. The nanofluid model includes Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects. The governing momentum, energy and nanofluid solid volume fraction equations are solved numerically using an implicit finite difference scheme known as Keller-box method and the results are compared with available numerical data. The results for the dimensionless velocity, dimensionless temperature, dimensionless nanofluid solid volume fraction, reduced Nusselt and reduced Sherwood numbers are presented illustrating the effects of magnetic parameter, suction-injection parameter, Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis parameter, Prandtl number, Eckert number and Lewis number.

  18. Development of the Plate Boundary Observatory GPS Low Latency Salton Trough Radio Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, C.; Miller, S.; Wilson, B.; Lawrence, S.; Arnitz, E.

    2008-05-01

    UNAVCO is developing a 20 GPS station low latency radio network that spans the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults in the region of highest strain in southern California and the narrowest part of the North America-Pacific plate boundary. The Salton Trough Radio Network (STRN) is instrumented with Ethernet bridge Intuicom EB6+ (900 MHz) radios to transmit a high rate low latency data stream from each permanent GPS site for the purpose of the following: 1) telemeter 15 second data (1 MB/day/station) to the Plate Boundary Observatory archive, 2) accommodate the timely download of 1 and 5 sample per second data following large earthquakes (4 MB/hour/station), and 3) test the UStream of 1Hz BINEX and RTCM data. Three of four phases have been completed. Office radio testing yielded transfer rates of 30-50 KB/s with subsecond latency while streaming 1 Hz data. Latency climbed to ~1.8 seconds while simultaneously streaming 1 Hz and downloading hourly 1 and 5 sample per second data files. Field testing demonstrated rates on the order of 30 KB/s. At present the radios are installed and have transfer rates of 10-40 KB/s between sites that span 10-32 km. The final phase will be the installation of the main telemetry relay where master radios will be connected to a high speed ISP near the town of Brawley. The high-rate low latency UStream data will be available to researchers who are developing prototype earthquake early warning systems in Southern California. A goal of the STRN is to make the data available rapidly enough for GPS-derived coseismic and dynamic displacements to be integrated into early warning system earthquake models. The improved earthquake models will better assist emergency response. UStream data will also aid surveyors who wish to use PBO GPS stations as permanent, high-quality base stations in real-time kinematic surveys.

  19. Interaction between central volcanoes and regional tectonics along divergent plate boundaries: Askja, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippanera, Daniele; Ruch, Joël; Acocella, Valerio; Thordarson, Thor; Urbani, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    Activity within magmatic divergent plate boundaries (MDPB) focuses along both regional fissure swarms and central volcanoes. An ideal place to investigate their mutual relationship is the Askja central volcano in Iceland. Askja consists of three nested calderas (namely Kollur, Askja and Öskjuvatn) located within a hyaloclastite massif along the NNE-SSW trending Icelandic MDPB. We performed an extensive field-based structural analysis supported by a remote sensing study of tectonic and volcanic features of Askja's calderas and of the eastern flank of the hyaloclastite massif. In the massif, volcano-tectonic structures trend N 10° E to N 40° E, but they vary around the Askja caldera being both parallel to the caldera rim and cross-cutting on the Western side. Structural trends around the Öskjuvatn caldera are typically rim parallel. Volcanic vents and dikes are preferentially distributed along the caldera ring faults; however, they follow the NNE-SSW regional structures when located outside the calderas. Our results highlight that the Askja volcano displays a balanced amount of regional (fissure-swarm related) and local (shallow-magma-chamber related) tectonic structures along with a mutual interaction among these. This is different from Krafla volcano (to the north of Askja) dominated by regional structures and Grímsvötn (to the South) dominated by local structures. Therefore, Askja represents an intermediate tectono-magmatic setting for volcanoes located in a slow divergent plate boundary. This is also likely in accordance with a northward increase in the spreading rate along the Icelandic MDPB.

  20. Interaction between central volcanoes and regional tectonics along divergent plate boundaries: Askja, Iceland

    KAUST Repository

    Trippanera, Daniele

    2017-12-04

    Activity within magmatic divergent plate boundaries (MDPB) focuses along both regional fissure swarms and central volcanoes. An ideal place to investigate their mutual relationship is the Askja central volcano in Iceland. Askja consists of three nested calderas (namely Kollur, Askja and Öskjuvatn) located within a hyaloclastite massif along the NNE-SSW trending Icelandic MDPB. We performed an extensive field-based structural analysis supported by a remote sensing study of tectonic and volcanic features of Askja’s calderas and of the eastern flank of the hyaloclastite massif. In the massif, volcano-tectonic structures trend N 10° E to N 40° E, but they vary around the Askja caldera being both parallel to the caldera rim and cross-cutting on the Western side. Structural trends around the Öskjuvatn caldera are typically rim parallel. Volcanic vents and dikes are preferentially distributed along the caldera ring faults; however, they follow the NNE-SSW regional structures when located outside the calderas. Our results highlight that the Askja volcano displays a balanced amount of regional (fissure-swarm related) and local (shallow-magma-chamber related) tectonic structures along with a mutual interaction among these. This is different from Krafla volcano (to the north of Askja) dominated by regional structures and Grímsvötn (to the South) dominated by local structures. Therefore, Askja represents an intermediate tectono-magmatic setting for volcanoes located in a slow divergent plate boundary. This is also likely in accordance with a northward increase in the spreading rate along the Icelandic MDPB.

  1. Logistical Support for the Installation of the Plate Boundary Observatory GPS and Borehole Strainmeter Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnik, C.; Austin, K.; Coyle, B.; Dittmann, T.; Feaux, K.; Friesen, B.; Johnson, W.; Mencin, D.; Pauk, B.; Walls, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, is designed to study the three- dimensional strain field resulting from deformation across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates in the western United States. To meet these goals, UNAVCO will install 880 continuous GPS stations, 103 borehole strainmeter stations, 28 tiltmeters, and five laser strainmeters by October 2008. Such a broad network presents significant logisitical challenges, including moving supplies, equipment, and personnel around 6 million square kilometers, and this requires accurate tracking and careful planning. The PBO logistics chain includes the PBO headquarters at UNAVCO in Boulder, Colorado and five regional offices in the continental United States and Alaska, served by dozens of suppliers spread across the globe. These offices are responsible for building and maintaining sites in their region. Most equipment and supplies first arrive in Boulder, where they are tagged and entered into a UNAVCO-wide equipment database, assembled and quality checked as necessary, and sent on to the appropriate regional office. Larger items which are costly to store and ship from Boulder, such as batteries or long sections of stainless steel pipe and bar required for monuments, are shipped directly from the supplier to each region as needed. These supplies and equipment are also tracked through the ordering, delivery, installation, and maintenance cycle via Earned Value Management techniques which allow us to meet NSF and other Federal procurement rules. Early prototypes and assembly configurations aid the development of material and supply budgets. A thorough understanding of Federal procurement rules at project start up is critical as the project moves forward.

  2. The final year of GPS Installations in the Alaska Region of the Plate Boundary Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, B.; Pauk, B.; Enders, M.; Bierma, R.; Gasparich, S.; Marzulla, A.; Feaux, K.

    2008-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) is the geodetic component of the National Science Foundation funded Earthscope Project. The final PBO GPS network will comprise 1100 continuously operating GPS stations installed throughout the Western US and Alaska. The Alaska region is an important area of study because of the major crustal deformation and high volcanic activity associated with the subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the North American Plate. The PBO network will provide data to help better understand these earth processes. In the fifth and final year of the PBO installation phase, we built 31 GPS Stations and installed 8 tilt meters in Alaska. These installs completed the PBO network in Alaska which comprises 135 GPS stations and 12 tilt meters. We also completed maintenance visits to GPS stations installed during earlier years of the five year project. In the 2008 field season we faced some of our most difficult logistical challenges with installations in remote areas, islands and volcanoes. Highlights include boat-based helicopter supported installs in the Shumagin Islands on Chernabura, Nagai and Popof; and 13 GPS stations and 8 tiltmeters installed on Unimak Island to monitor Westdahl and Shishaldin volcanoes. The Unimak installations were completed in a four week period and were carried out in cooperation with scientists from the Alaska Volcano Observatory. We also installed the remaining stations monitoring the Denali fault and integrated the Denali earthquake response stations built by University of Alaska Fairbanks into the PBO network. Now that the installations are completed, the PBO network will be operated and maintained by UNAVCO engineers for the next 10 years. Data from all of the PBO stations are available from the UNAVCO archive.

  3. The tsunami-like sea level disturbance in Crotone harbor, Italy, after the Mw6.5 strike-slip earthquake of 17 November 2015 in Lefkada Isl., Ionian Sea, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, Tatyana; Annunziato, Alessandro; Charalampakis, Marinos; Romano, Fabrizio; Volpe, Manuela; Tonini, Roberto; Gerardinger, Andrea; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos A.

    2016-04-01

    On 17 November 2015 an Mw6.5 earthquake ruptured offshore Lefkada Isl. in Ionian Sea, Greece, causing two human victims, minor damage and several ground failures including coastal landslides. Fault plane solutions released by CMT/Harvard, NOA and other institutes have indicated that the faulting style was strike-slip right-lateral, which is quite typical for the area, as for example, the Mw6.3 event that occurred on August 14, 2003, in exactly the same fault zone. In spite of the very low tsunami potential commonly associated to this faulting mechanism, a tsunami-like sea level change was recorded after the earthquake by one tide-gauge in the Crotone harbor, Italy. Preliminary tsunami numerical simulations were performed to reproduce the observed signal. The spectral analysis of the synthetic mareograms close to the entrance of the harbor shows the presence of some peaks that could justify the relation between the natural port resonance and the observed wave amplification. Of particular interest is the coupling between the tsunami energy and the natural modes of basin oscillation enhancing tsunami wave amplitude in harbors through resonance, as shown in some historical events in the Mediterranean Sea and elsewhere. This research is a contribution to the EU-FP7 tsunami research project ASTARTE (Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe), grant agreement no: 603839, 2013-10-30.

  4. Excitation of tsunami by a pure strike-slip earthquake. ; Izu Oshima kinkai earthquake tsunami on Feb. 20, 1990. Yokozure danso jishin ni yoru tsunami no reiki. ; 1990 nen 2 gatsu 20 nichi Izu Oshima kinkai jishin tsunami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K. (Nippon Dental University, Tokyo (Japan). Niigata Junior College); Okada, M. (Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1993-06-24

    A numerical experiment was performed to reproduce the tsunami from the Izu-Oshima Kinkai Earthquake which occurred on February 20, 1990, using a tsunami excited by a pure strike-slip fault. An existence of a vertical fault with a length of 15 km and a width of 12 km was hypothesized in the south-north direction on the ocean bottom around the focal region. Then, a tsunami was assumed to have been excited when the fault was given a side-slip movement to create discrepancies of 1 m in the fault. Water level change for one hour after onset of the tsunami was calculated in one-second interval in each unit square with a side length of 1 km over an ocean area of 200 km from east to west and 150 km from north to south centering on the wave source. The results obtained from the calculation were harmonious with tsunami waveforms observed at five stations in the subject region and their spectral analytic results. Reproduced were the two predominant frequencies commonly observed at more than two stations, and difference in predominant cycles that appear according to azimuths of the observation points to the epicenter. These facts endorse the reasonability of the above hypothesis. 9 refs., 11 figs.

  5. Refining plate reconstructions of the North Atlantic and Ellesmerian domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Grace E.; Abdelmalak, Mansour M.; Buiter, Susanne; Piepjohn, Karsten; Jones, Morgan; Torsvik, Trond; Faleide, Jan Inge; Gaina, Carmen

    2017-04-01

    Located at the intersection of major tectonic plates, the North Atlantic and western Arctic domains have experienced both widespread and localized deformation since the Paleozoic. In conventional tectonic reconstructions, the plates of Greenland, Eurasia and North America are assumed to be rigid. However, prior to the onset of seafloor spreading, rifting lithosphere experiences significant thinning that is usually not accounted for. This leads to significant (in excess of 300 km in places) over- and under-laps between conjugate continent-ocean boundaries, an incomplete history of basin evolution, and loose correlations between climatic, volcanic, oceanographic and, geologic events. Furthermore, a handful of alternative regional reconstructions now exist, which predict different timings, rates and locations of relative motion and associated deformation. Assumptions of reference crustal thicknesses and the nature of lower crustal bodies, as well as the location of basin hinge lines have to-date not yet been incorporated into a consistent regional kinematic model. Notably, the alternative models predict varying episodes of compression or quiescence, not just orthogonal or oblique rifting. Here, we present new temporal and spatial-dependent results related to (1) the dominant rifting episodes across the North Atlantic (Carboniferous, Late Permian, Late Jurassic-Early Cenozoic and Late Cretaceous-Paleogene), and (2) restoration of compression and strike-slip motion between northern Greenland, Ellesmere Island (North America) and Spitsbergen (Eurasia) related to the Eurekan Orogeny. We achieve this by integrating a series of conjugate seismic profiles, calculated stretching factors, dated volcanic events, structural mapping and mass-balanced restorations into a global plate motion model via GPlates software. We also test alternative models of rift velocities (as kinematic boundary conditions) with 2-D lithosphere and mantle numerical models, and explore the importance of

  6. Boundary Layer of Photon Absorption Applied to Heterogeneous Photocatalytic Solar Flat Plate Reactor Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor L. Otálvaro-Marín

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study provides information to design heterogeneous photocatalytic solar reactors with flat plate geometry used in treatment of effluents and conversion of biomass to hydrogen. The concept of boundary layer of photon absorption taking into account the efficient absorption of radiant energy was introduced; this concept can be understood as the reactor thickness measured from the irradiated surface where 99% of total energy is absorbed. Its thickness and the volumetric rate of photons absorption (VRPA were used as design parameters to determine (i reactor thickness, (ii maximum absorbed radiant energy, and (iii the optimal catalyst concentration. Six different commercial brands of titanium dioxide were studied: Evonik-Degussa P-25, Aldrich, Merck, Hombikat, Fluka, and Fisher. The local volumetric rate of photon absorption (LVRPA inside the reactor was described using six-flux absorption-scattering model (SFM applied to solar radiation. The radiation field and the boundary layer thickness of photon absorption were simulated with absorption and dispersion effects of catalysts in water at different catalyst loadings. The relationship between catalyst loading and reactor thickness that maximizes the absorption of radiant energy was obtained for each catalyst by apparent optical thickness. The optimum concentration of photocatalyst Degussa P-25 was 0.2 g/l in 0.86 cm of thickness, and for photocatalyst Aldrich it was 0.3 g/l in 0.80 cm of thickness.

  7. An analytical solution for a multilayered magneto-electro-elastic circular plate under simply supported lateral boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, R; Han, Q; Pan, E

    2010-01-01

    We derive, in this paper, the analytical solution for a three-dimensional transversely isotropic axisymmetric multilayered magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) circular plate under simply supported boundary conditions. The state space vector, the finite Hankel transform and propagating matrix methods are utilized together to obtain the full-field solutions for the MEE plate made of piezoelectric (PE) and piezomagnetic (PM) layers. Numerical examples for three-layered and five-layered PE/PM composites with different stacking sequences and under different loading conditions are presented and discussed. These results can serve as benchmark solutions for future numerical analyses of layered MEE plates

  8. Crustal and upper mantle investigations of the Caribbean-South American plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezada, Maximiliano J.

    The evolution of the Caribbean --- South America plate boundary has been a matter of vigorous debate for decades and many questions remain unresolved. In this work, and in the framework of the BOLIVAR project, we shed light on some aspects of the present state and the tectonic history of the margin by using different types of geophysical data sets and techniques. An analysis of controlled-source traveltime data collected along a boundary-normal profile at ˜65°W was used to build a 2D P-wave velocity model. The model shows that the Caribbean Large Igenous Province is present offshore eastern Venezuela and confirms the uniformity of the velocity structure along the Leeward Antilles volcanic belt. In contrast with neighboring profiles, at this longitude we see no change in velocity structure or crustal thickness across the San Sebastian - El Pilar fault system. A 2D gravity modeling methodology that uses seismically derived initial density models was developed as part of this research. The application of this new method to four of the BOLIVAR boundary-normal profiles suggests that the uppermost mantle is denser under the South American continental crust and the island arc terranes than under the Caribbean oceanic crust. Crustal rocks of the island arc and extended island arc terranes of the Leeward Antilles have a relatively low density, given their P-wave velocity. This may be caused by low iron content, relative to average magmatic arc rocks. Finally, an analysis of teleseismic traveltimes with frequency-dependent kernels produced a 3D P-wave velocity perturbation model. The model shows the structure of the mantle lithosphere under the study area and clearly images the subduction of the Atlantic slab and associated partial removal of the lower lithosphere under northern South America. We also image the subduction of a section of the Caribbean plate under South America with an east-southeast direction. Both the Atlantic and Caribbean subducting slabs penetrate the

  9. Cenozoic Plate tectonic history of the northern Venezuela-Trinidad Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlich, Robert N.; Barrett, S. F.

    1990-02-01

    Geological and geophysical data, coupled with recent plate tectonic reconstructions, suggest that the Cenozoic geologic history of the northern Venezuela-Trinidad area has been dominated by strike-slip displacement of discrete crustal blocks. Allochthonous terranes within the area include metavolcanic rocks of the Cretaceous Villa de Cura Group and metamorphic rocks of the Precambrian to Cretaceous Cordillera de la Costa. A relatively competent crustal block (Margarita Block) is defined by an outline around the metamorphic basement of Margarita Island, the Araya/Paria peninsula, the Northern Range of Trinidad, and Tobago Island. Reconstruction of the Margarita Block to its original position requires at least partial closure of the Falcon Basin, closure of the Bonaire and Cariaco basins, and restoration of about 50 km of motion on both the Oca and Bocono faults. Post middle Eocene eastward translation of the Caribbean plate caused eastward motion of the Margarita Block. A minor change in relative plate motion during the late Oligocene or early Miocene produced a right step in the Moron fault, forming the Cariaco pull-apart basin and El Pilar fault zone. Maximum offset on El Pilar fault is estimated to be no more than 125 km, though displacement along the entire fault zone may have been greater. Transpressional stresses between the Caribbean plate and northern South America caused folding of the Serrania del Interior of Venezuela and the Central Range of Trinidad. Eastward migration of transpressional stresses at the southeastern corner of the Caribbean-South American plate boundary is being accommodated by formation of oblique thrusts, transpressive anticlines, and downwarping of the crust. Bouguer gravity data suggest that Jurassic-aged Atlantic oceanic crust is being depressed as the Caribbean plate expands into the Demerara Plateau area. This study suggests that the faults and transtensional/transpressional/compressional structures identified in this study are

  10. Identifying Fault Connections of the Southern Pacific-North American Plate Boundary Using Triggered Slip and Crustal Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, A.; Grant Ludwig, L.; Rundle, J. B.; Parker, J. W.; Granat, R.; Heflin, M. B.; Pierce, M. E.; Wang, J.; Gunson, M.; Lyzenga, G. A.

    2017-12-01

    The 2010 M7.2 El Mayor - Cucapah earthquake caused extensive triggering of slip on faults proximal to the Salton Trough in southern California. Triggered slip and postseismic motions that have continued for over five years following the earthquake highlight connections between the El Mayor - Cucapah rupture and the network of faults that branch out along the southern Pacific - North American Plate Boundary. Coseismic triggering follows a network of conjugate faults from the northern end of the rupture to the Coachella segment of the southernmost San Andreas fault. Larger aftershocks and postseismic motions favor connections to the San Jacinto and Elsinore faults further west. The 2012 Brawley Swarm can be considered part of the branching on the Imperial Valley or east side of the plate boundary. Cluster analysis of long-term GPS velocities using Lloyds Algorithm, identifies bifurcation of the Pacific - North American plate boundary; The San Jacinto fault joins with the southern San Andreas fault, and the Salton Trough and Coachella segment of the San Andreas fault join with the Eastern California Shear Zone. The clustering analysis does not identify throughgoing deformation connecting the Coachella segment of the San Andreas fault with the rest of the San Andreas fault system through the San Gorgonio Pass. This observation is consistent with triggered slip from both the 1992 Landers and 2010 El Mayor - Cucapah earthquakes that follows the plate boundary bifurcation and with paleoseismic evidence of smaller earthquakes in the San Gorgonio Pass.

  11. Lithospheric Evolution of the Pacific-North American Plate Boundary Considered in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasi, G. P.

    2006-12-01

    Tomographic imaging indicates that the heterogeneity observed in the crust of westernmost North America is underlain by mantle structures of a similar scale and heterogeneity. When likely scaling relationships are used to interpret mantle velocity images, it becomes clear that much of the boundary is explained by mantle lithospheric processes and the crustal evolution is just the surficial expression of strength beneath the surface. The Sierra Nevada block provides something of a Rosetta stone for this interpretation. We note first that Sierra Nevada terrain is not distinguished at the surface from faulted and even shattered batholithic rocks in southern California. It does differ in the upper mantle, because the Sierra Nevada is underlain by a high- velocity root along almost its entire strike. Where that root is missing, roughly south of the White Wolf fault, and east of the Kern Canyon fault, the surface rocks are deforming. The origin of the strong upper mantle component is self-evident near 39.5N latitude, where the contact between the subducting Gorda Slab and the Sierran mantle root can be imaged directly. The upper plate structure dates to latest Mesozoic through Laramide times, with the pattern apparently reinforced on the west to some extent during post-Laramide subduction. Since the genesis of batholithic rocks and the subsequent Laramide history are similar south of the Sierran block, we extrapolate that a similar mantle root would have been present also. This assumption is confirmed with two lines of evidence. First, the mechanical evolution of southern and central California blocks seems to require it. Second, the volumes of the "drips" beneath the Transverse Ranges and southern Sierras exceed reasonable bounds for material scavenged from the mantle lithosphere unless it had distinct initial conditions. The local sources of mantle lithospheric material that could have delaminated around the southern Sierran drip are volumetrically insufficient by a

  12. Analysis of and results from the GPS component of the Plate Boundary Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, T.; King, R. W.; Floyd, M. A.; Murray, M. H.; Melbourne, T. I.; Santillan, V. M.; Mattioli, G. S.; Phillips, D. A.; Puskas, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    The first GPS station installed by the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) component of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Earthscope program was installed and started operation in January 2004. Since then over 1100 new GPS stations have been installed and combined with over 300 pre-existing GPS stations to form PBO. Analysis of the data from this network is performed daily, with one-day latency, using rapid orbit products from the International GNSS Service (IGS) and weekly, with ~2 week latency, using the final IGS product. A supplemental analysis is also preformed with 12-week latency to add to the final solution data from sites that were not available when the first finals were run. The median weighted root-mean-square (WRMS) scatters of the position results from the combined analyses of these data performed by two different GPS analysis programs, GAMIT at New Mexico Tech and GIPSY at Central Washington University and combined with GLOBK at MIT, are less than 1 mm in North and East (NE) and 3 mm for vertical (U) over monthly durations. The WRMS scatters of the position residuals about linear trends, with offsets for earthquakes and antenna changes removed, from all results processed thus far, ~8 years of data for longest running sites, are ~1.5 mm NE and 4.5 mm U. The top 10% of sites have short period scatters (month duration) of 0.5 mm NE and 1.9 mm U, while the long-term scatters increase to 0.8 mm in NE and 3.3 mm U. The largest RMS sites are generally in volcanic areas and/or affected by snow and ice on the antennas. All of the data from PBO and from an additional 600 GPS sites are being re-processed with data back to 1996 being included in the reprocessing. In this paper, we will present results from this re-processing in terms of secular rates across the Pacific/North America plate boundary and non-secular signals arising from earthquakes (co- and post-seismic deformation) and other natural and human-induced processes.

  13. Global crustal movement and tectonic plate boundary deformation constrained by the ITRF2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Ze

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the newly released International Terrestrial Reference Frame(ITRF2008 by the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS, a new global plate model ITRF2008 plate for the major plates is established. This ITRF2008-derived model is analyzed in comparison with NNR-NUVEL1A model, which is mainly based on geological and geophysical data. The Eurasia and Pacific plates display obvious differences in terms of the velocity fields derived from the two plate motion models. Plate acceleration is also introduced to characterize the differences of the two velocity fields which obtained from ITRF2008 -plate and NNR-NUVEL1A models for major individual plates. The results show that the Africa, South America and Eurasia plates are undergoing acceleration, while the North America and Australia plates are in the state of deceleration motion.

  14. UNAVCO Plate Boundary Observatory 2007 Student Field Assistant Program in the Alaska Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzulla, A.; Gasparich, S.; Pauk, B.; Feaux, K.; Jackson, M.

    2007-12-01

    The UNAVCO, Inc. Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) Student Field Assistant Program strives to engage students in further study and careers in the Earth Sciences. Student Field Assistants from a variety of educational backgrounds ranging from high school graduates to master's level students spend a three to five month field season working in tandem with UNAVCO regional Field Engineers. The students work closely with senior staff to reconnaissance, install, and maintain a network of 875 permanent Global Positioning System (GPS) stations in one of the five PBO regions covering the western United States, including Alaska. Practical skills, such as power tool use, drilling, welding, firearms training, and proper field safety procedures, are taught and expected of the students. Installation and maintenance of new and existing GPS stations composes the bulk of the student's responsibilities and duties. When not in the field, students prepare gear and arrange logistics for site installations and maintenance as well as enter metadata and complete installation reports from recently constructed sites. An understanding of the operations of the GPS receivers and the scientific benefit of the network allows for an appreciation and great attention to detail during installation of the sites. Student assistance in the Alaska region during 2007 PBO AK field season was critical to the successful installation of 36 new GPS stations throughout Alaska. Significant benchmarks of the field season included installing six logistically difficult stations in Prince William Sounds, completing the Denali Fault GPS network, four new tiltmeters on Akutan Volcano, completing all installs on the Seward Peninsula as well as several new GPS stations throughout the western interior of the state. Alaska is a prominent area for much movement and deformation as the Pacific Plate subducts beneath the North American Plate resulting in an area of high volcanic activity and heightened crustal deformation. The

  15. The International Plate Boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC) in the northern Chile seismic gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, B.; Asch, A.; Sodoudi, F.; Manzanares, A.; Ritter, O.; Klotz, J.; Chong-Diaz, G.; Barrientos, S.; Villotte, J.-P.; Oncken, O.

    2009-04-01

    Fast convergence between the oceanic Nazca and the continental South American plate is accommodated by recurrent rupture of large segments of the two plates' interface. The resulting earthquakes are among the largest and, for their sizes, most frequent on Earth. Along the Chilean and southern Peruvian margin, all segments have ruptured at least once in the past 150 years for which there exist historic and/or instrumental records. The one segment that is most mature for re-rupture stretches for more than 500 km along the northernmost Chilean coast between roughly -23° and -18° latitude. It last broke in 1877 in a magnitude ~8.8 earthquake, triggering a major Tsunami. From the historical record, it has been known to have a recurrence cycle of approximately 110 years. The adjoining segments to the north and south broke rather recently in 1995 and 2001 in M>8 earthquakes and an M 7.7 earthquake encroached the southern part of the gap in 2007. The IPOC project intends to investigate this segment of the Nazca-South American plate boundary, on which a strong to devastating earthquake is expected to occur within the next years, by monitoring at a variety of time-scales deformation, seismicity, and magnetotelluric fields in the subduction zone at the closing stages of the interseismic cycle before and possibly during occurrence of a big earthquake. For that purpose, installation of long-term observatories in Northern Chile started in 2006 in a close cooperation of the Universidad de Chile (Santiago, Chile), the Universidad Catolica del Norte (Antofagasta, Chile), the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (Paris, France), and the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ, Potsdam, Germany). Currently we are operating 14 modern seismological stations equipped with STS-2 broadband seismometers and accelerometers (EPI sensor). At least two more stations will be installed in the near future. To cope with the high resolution and dynamic of the sensors and data acquisition

  16. New Insights into Old Events: Improving Estimates of the Spatial Heterogeneity and Distribution of Co-Seismic Slip with Depth for Several Large Magnitude Strike-Slip Earthquakes using Geodetic Observations of the Near-Field Deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliner, C. W. D.; Burgmann, R.; Wang, T.

    2016-12-01

    Finite-fault inversions of geodetic data to estimate co-seismic slip at depth, provide important information for faulting mechanics, understanding the behavior of the rupture process and constraints for dynamic rupture simulations. However, incorporating measurement of the near-field surface deformation has typically been difficult, due to decorrelation of the InSAR phase caused by complex ground deformation, and the difficulty of measuring diffuse, `off-fault' deformation in geologic field surveys. Such a lack of near-field data has been found to artificially generate deficits of shallow slip, by (a) overestimating slip at larger depths (3-8 km) by up to 30% [Xu et al. 2016], and (b) limiting the size of near-surface patches, with coarser meshes found to underestimate shallow slip [Huang et al. 2015], in turn distorting the spatial variation of slip across the rupture plane. Here we will present new results of kinematic slip inversions for the 1999 Mw 7.1 Hector Mine, 1999 Mw 7.6 Izmit and 2015 Mw 7.2 Tajikistan earthquakes using GPS data, SAR interferograms with refined phase unwrapping using SNAPHU, new SAR azimuth offsets, and optical image correlation results that can provide important near-field constraints of surface motion. Improved slip distributions for these large strike-slip earthquakes, which span a range of structural maturities, will allow us to assess whether more mature, `smoother' faults exhibit smoother slip distributions as predicted by quasi-static [Dieterich and Smith, 2009] and dynamic numerical rupture simulations [Dunham et al. 2011], and whether deficits of shallow slip are robust features. Understanding whether ruptures exhibit a deficit of shallow slip, and how the spatial heterogeneity of slip may vary between different fault systems holds significance for understanding how strain is released throughout the seismic cycle, generating realistic synthetic simulations of earthquake ruptures and the expected amount of ground shaking.

  17. The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory: Bringing Low Latency Data From Unimak Island, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaux, K.; Mencin, D.; Jackson, M.; Gallaher, W.; Pauk, B.; Smith, S.

    2008-05-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, will complete the installation of a fourteen station GPS network on Unimak Island, Alaska in August, 2008. The primary data communications goal of the project is to design and implement a robust data communications network capable of downloading 15-sec daily GPS files and streaming 1 Hz GPS data, via Ustream, from Unimak Island to three data relay points in the Aleutian chain. As part of the permitting agreement with the landowner, PBO will co-locate the GPS stations with existing USGS seismic stations. The technical challenges involved in optimizing the data communications network for both the GPS data and the seismic data will be presented. From Unimak island, there will be three separate data telemetry paths: 1) West through a radio repeater on Akutan volcano to a VSAT in Akutan village, 2) East through a radio repeater to a T1 connection in Cold Bay, AK, 3) South through a radio repeater to a VSAT at an existing PBO GPS station in King Cove, AK. The difficulties involved in the project include complex network geometries with multiple radio repeaters, long distance RF transmission over water, hardware bandwidth limitations, power limitations, space limitations, as well as working in bear country on an incredibly remote and active volcano.

  18. Is the Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone an ancient plate boundary of Baltica?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Stanislaw; Mikolajczak, Mateusz; Krzywiec, Piotr; Malinowski, Michal; Buffenmyer, Vinton; Lewandowski, Marek

    2015-12-01

    The Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone (TTZ) is generally regarded as a fossil plate boundary in Europe that extends 2000 km from the Baltic Sea to the Black Sea. We used an integrated approach merging potential fields and seismic data to explore crustal architecture across the TTZ in central Poland. The aim of the study was to test whether the TTZ coincides with an early Paleozoic (Caledonian) suture formed through the closure of the Tornquist Ocean along the SW Baltica margin. The suture is presumed to separate the East European Craton (EEC) from the Paleozoic terranes of Western Europe. Two seismic reflection lines from the PolandSPAN™ experiment were used to image the deep structure at the SW margin of the EEC. Lines PL-5300 and PL-5400 run NE-SW in central and northern Poland, respectively. The seismic interpretation down to top of basement was integrated with 2-D gravity and magnetic modeling to highlight the structure of the deep crust. Both the gravity and magnetic models show a suture that welds together two blocks at the base of crust. However, top of basement above the suture dips uniformly to the SW and is overlain by undisturbed lower Paleozoic and younger sediments. By implication, the suture must have developed in the Precambrian and both crustal blocks amalgamated belong to the EEC. Consequently, the Caledonian suture, formed by the closure of the Tornquist Ocean between Avalonia and Baltica, must be located farther southwest beneath thick upper Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments.

  19. Tidal calibration of Plate Boundary Observatory borehole strainmeters: Roles of vertical and shear coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeloffs, Evelyn

    2010-01-01

    A multicomponent borehole strainmeter directly measures changes in the diameter of its cylindrical housing at several azimuths. To transform these measurements to formation strains requires a calibration matrix, which must be estimated by analyzing the installed strainmeter's response to known strains. Typically, theoretical calculations of Earth tidal strains serve as the known strains. This paper carries out such an analysis for 12 Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) borehole strainmeters, postulating that each of the strainmeters' four gauges responds ("couples") to all three horizontal components of the formation strain tensor, as well as to vertical strain. Orientation corrections are also estimated. The fourth extensometer in each PBO strainmeter provides redundant information used to reduce the chance that coupling coefficients could be misleadingly fit to inappropriate theoretical tides. Satisfactory fits between observed and theoretically calculated tides were obtained for three PBO strainmeters in California, where the calculated tides are corroborated by other instrumentation, as well as for six strainmeters in Oregon and Washington, where no other instruments have ever recorded Earth tidal strain. Several strainmeters have unexpectedly large coupling coefficients for vertical strain, which increases the strainmeter's response to atmospheric pressure. Vertical coupling diminishes, or even changes the sign of, the apparent response to areal strain caused by Earth tides or deep Earth processes because near the free surface, vertical strains are opposite in sign to areal strain. Vertical coupling does not impair the shear strain response, however. PBO borehole strainmeters can provide calibrated shear strain time series of transient strain associated with tectonic or magmatic processes.

  20. Contrasting styles of (U)HP rock exhumation along the Cenozoic Adria-Europe plate boundary (Western Alps, Calabria, Corsica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malusà, Marco G.; Faccenna, Claudio; Baldwin, Suzanne L.; Fitzgerald, Paul G.; Rossetti, Federico; Balestrieri, Maria Laura; Danišík, Martin; Ellero, Alessandro; Ottria, Giuseppe; Piromallo, Claudia

    2015-06-01

    Since the first discovery of ultrahigh pressure (UHP) rocks 30 years ago in the Western Alps, the mechanisms for exhumation of (U)HP terranes worldwide are still debated. In the western Mediterranean, the presently accepted model of synconvergent exhumation (e.g., the channel-flow model) is in conflict with parts of the geologic record. We synthesize regional geologic data and present alternative exhumation mechanisms that consider the role of divergence within subduction zones. These mechanisms, i.e., (i) the motion of the upper plate away from the trench and (ii) the rollback of the lower plate, are discussed in detail with particular reference to the Cenozoic Adria-Europe plate boundary, and along three different transects (Western Alps, Calabria-Sardinia, and Corsica-Northern Apennines). In the Western Alps, (U)HP rocks were exhumed from the greatest depth at the rear of the accretionary wedge during motion of the upper plate away from the trench. Exhumation was extremely fast, and associated with very low geothermal gradients. In Calabria, HP rocks were exhumed from shallower depths and at lower rates during rollback of the Adriatic plate, with repeated exhumation pulses progressively younging toward the foreland. Both mechanisms were active to create boundary divergence along the Corsica-Northern Apennines transect, where European southeastward subduction was progressively replaced along strike by Adriatic northwestward subduction. The tectonic scenario depicted for the Western Alps trench during Eocene exhumation of (U)HP rocks correlates well with present-day eastern Papua New Guinea, which is presented as a modern analog of the Paleogene Adria-Europe plate boundary.

  1. Study of Boundary Layer Convective Heat Transfer with Low Pressure Gradient Over a Flat Plate Via He's Homotopy Perturbation Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathizadeh, M.; Aroujalian, A.

    2012-01-01

    The boundary layer convective heat transfer equations with low pressure gradient over a flat plate are solved using Homotopy Perturbation Method, which is one of the semi-exact methods. The nonlinear equations of momentum and energy solved simultaneously via Homotopy Perturbation Method are in good agreement with results obtained from numerical methods. Using this method, a general equation in terms of Pr number and pressure gradient (λ) is derived which can be used to investigate velocity and temperature profiles in the boundary layer.

  2. Halfway There: An EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M.; Anderson, G.; Blume, F.; Coyle, B.; Feaux, K.; Friesen, B.; Hafner, K.; Hasting, M.; Johnson, W.; Mencin, D.; Pauk, B.; Phillips, D.; Walls, C.; Prescott, W.

    2006-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, is designed to study the three-dimensional strain field resulting from deformation across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates in the western United States. To meet these goals, UNAVCO will install 852 continuous GPS stations, 103 borehole strainmeter stations, 28 tiltmeters, and five laser strainmeters by October 2008, acquire radar imagery and geochronology as well as manage data for 209 previously existing continuous GPS stations through the PBO Nucleus project. As of September 2006, UNAVCO had completed half the PBO GPS stations, with 426 installed and data returned from 400 stations, and 60% of the PBO Nucleus stations have been upgraded. Highlights of the past year's work include the expansion of the Alaska subnetwork to nearly 70 continuously-operating stations, including coverage of Akutan and Augustine volcanoes and reconnaissance for future installations on Unimak Island; the installation of nine new stations on Mt. St. Helens; and the arrival of 33 permits for station installations on BLM land in Nevada. The Augustine network provided critical data on magmatic and volcanic processes associated with the 2005-2006 volcanic crisis, and is now being expanded to a total of 11 stations. Please visit http://pboweb.unavco.org/?pageid=3 for further information on PBO GPS network construction activities. UNAVCO is also installing and operating the largest borehole seismic/strainmeter network in North America, as well as tiltmeters and laser strainmeters. As of September 2006, 19 PBO borehole stations had been installed and two laser strainmeter stations were operating, with a total of 28 borehole stations and 3 laser strainmeters expected by the end of 2006. In response to direction from the EarthScope community, UNAVCO has installed a dense network of six stations along the San Jacinto Fault near Anza, California. During the fall of 2006, the first

  3. The Future of the Plate Boundary Observatory in the GAGE Facility and beyond 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, G. S.; Bendick, R. O.; Foster, J. H.; Freymueller, J. T.; La Femina, P. C.; Miller, M. M.; Rowan, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and Earthscope (GAGE) Facility, which operates the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), builds on UNAVCO's strong record of facilitating research and education in the geosciences and geodesy-related engineering fields. Precise positions and velocities for the PBO's ~1100 continuous GPS stations and other PBO data products are used to address a wide range of scientific and technical issues across North America. A large US and international community of scientists, surveyors, and civil engineers access PBO data streams, software, and other on-line resources daily. In a global society that is increasingly technology-dependent, consistently risk-averse, and often natural resource-limited, communities require geodetic research, education, and infrastructure to make informed decisions about living on a dynamic planet. The western U.S. and Alaska, where over 95% of the PBO sensor assets are located, have recorded significant geophysical events like earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunami. UNAVCO community science provides first-order constraints on geophysical processes to support hazards mapping and zoning, and form the basis for earthquake and tsunami early warning applications currently under development. The future of PBO was discussed at a NSF-sponsored three-day workshop held in September 2014 in Breckenridge, CO. Over 40 invited participants and community members, including representatives from interested stakeholder groups, UNAVCO staff, and members of the PBO Working Group and Geodetic Infrastructure Advisory Committee participated in workshop, which included retrospective and prospective plenary presentations and breakout sessions focusing on specific scientific themes. We will present some of the findings of that workshop in order to continue a dialogue about policies and resources for long-term earth observing networks. How PBO fits into the recently released U.S. National Plan for Civil Earth Observations will also be

  4. Fault and graben growth along active magmatic divergent plate boundaries in Iceland and Ethiopia

    KAUST Repository

    Trippanera, D.

    2015-10-08

    Recent studies highlight the importance of annual-scale dike-induced rifting episodes in developing normal faults and graben along the active axis of magmatic divergent plate boundaries (MDPB). However, the longer-term (102-105 years) role of diking on the cumulative surface deformation and evolution of MDPB is not yet well understood. To better understand the longer-term normal faults and graben along the axis of MDPB, we analyze fissure swarms in Iceland and Ethiopia. We first focus on the simplest case of immature fissure swarms, with single dike-fed eruptive fissures; these consist of a <1 km wide graben bordered by normal faults with displacement up to a few meters, consistent with theoretical models and geodetic data. A similar structural pattern is found, with asymmetric and multiple graben, within wider mature fissure swarms, formed by several dike-fed eruptive fissures. We then consider the lateral termination of normal faults along these graben, to detect their upward or downward propagation. Most faults terminate as open fractures on flat surface, suggesting downward fault propagation; this is consistent with recent experiments showing dike-induced normal faults propagating downward from the surface. However, some normal faults also terminate as open fractures on monoclines, which resemble fault propagation folds; this suggests upward propagation of reactivated buried faults, promoted by diking. These results suggest that fault growth and graben development, as well as the longer-term evolution of the axis of MDPB, may be explained only through dike emplacement and that any amagmatic faulting is not necessary.

  5. Geodetic constraints on areal changes in the Pacific-North America plate boundary zone: What controls Basin and Range extension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreemer, Corné; Hammond, William C.

    2007-10-01

    Using ˜1500 geodetic velocities we model the present-day spatial patterns of areal changes inside the Pacific-North America plate boundary zone. From this model we show that between the central Gulf of California and the Queen Charlotte Islands there is no significant net change in surface area. This zero net areal-change result allows us to relate regions of areal growth to areas of equivalent contraction elsewhere within the plate boundary zone. We find that areal growth of the Basin and Range province (BRP) and its eastern margin (˜5.2 ± 0.1 × 103 m2/yr) is balanced by areal reduction near northwestern California between 38°N and 42°N. The San Andreas fault system south of 38°N and the plate boundary zone north of ˜42°N (including the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridge systems) each have no significant net areal change. Our results suggest a kinematic relationship between extension in the BRP and contraction near the northern California Coast Ranges and Klamath Mountains. From these observations we propose that, although BRP extension may be caused by internal forces, the southernmost Cascadia subduction zone provides a “window of escape” that acts as a stress guide to BRP extension as well as northwestward Sierra Nevada motion. Such a dynamic model is consistent with independent findings that (1) the least principal horizontal stress orientations in the BRP are toward northern California, (2) extension directions in the BRP have changed orientation to track the northward migration of the Mendocino triple junction, and (3) the southernmost Cascadia subduction zone is a relatively weak plate boundary.

  6. Dynamic Stress Concentration at the Boundary of an Incision at the Plate Under the Action of Weak Shock Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulich Olena

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the novel technique for analysis of dynamic stress state of multi-connected infinite plates under the action of weak shock waves. For solution of the problem it uses the integral and discrete Fourier transforms. Calculation of transformed dynamic stresses at the incisions of plates is held using the boundary-integral equation method and the theory of complex variable functions. The numerical implementation of the developed algorithm is based on the method of mechanical quadratures and collocation technique. For calculation of originals of the dynamic stresses it uses modified discrete Fourier transform. The algorithm is effective in the analysis of the dynamic stress state of defective plates.

  7. SIMILARITY SOLUTION FOR NATURAL CONVECTION FROM A MOVING VERTICAL PLATE WITH INTERNAL HEAT GENERATION AND A CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwole Daniel Makinde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Steady laminar natural convection flow over a semi-infinite moving vertical plate in the presence of internal heat generation and a convective surface boundary condition is examined in this paper. It is assumed that the left surface of the plate is in contact with a hot fluid while the cold fluid on the right surface of the plate contains a heat source that decays exponentially with the classical similarity variable. The governing non-linear partial differential equations have been transformed by a similarity transformation into a system of ordinary differential equations, which are solved numerically by applying shooting iteration technique together with fourth order Runge-Kutta integration scheme. The effects of physical parameters on the dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles are depicted graphically and analyzed in detail. Finally, numerical values of physical quantities, such as the local skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are presented in tabular form.

  8. Abbot Ice Shelf, the Amundsen Sea Continental Margin and the Southern Boundary of the Bellingshausen Plate Seaward of West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, J. R.; Tinto, K. J.; Bell, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Abbot Ice Shelf extends 450 km along the coast of West Antarctica between 103°W and 89°W and straddles the boundary between the Bellingshausen Sea continental margin, which overlies a former subduction zone, and Amundsen Sea rifted continental margin. Inversion of NASA Operation IceBridge airborne gravity data for sub-ice bathymetry shows that the western part of the ice shelf, as well as Cosgrove Ice Shelf to the south, are underlain by a series of east-west trending rift basins. The eastern boundary of the rifted terrain coincides with the eastern boundary of rifting between Antarctica and Zealandia and the rifts formed during the early stages of this rifting. Extension in these rifts is minor as rifting quickly jumped north of Thurston Island. The southern boundary of the Cosgrove Rift is aligned with the southern boundary of a sedimentary basin under the Amundsen Embayment continental shelf to the west, also formed by Antarctica-Zealandia rifting. The shelf basin has an extension factor, β, of 1.5 - 1.7 with 80 -100 km of extension occurring in an area now ~250 km wide. Following this extension early in the rifting process, rifting centered to the north of the present shelf edge and proceeded to continental rupture. Since then, the Amundsen Embayment continental shelf has been tectonically quiescent and has primarily been shaped though subsidence, sedimentation and the passage of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet back and forth across it. The former Bellingshausen Plate was located seaward of the Amundsen Sea margin prior to its incorporation into the Antarctic Plate at ~62 Ma. During the latter part of its existence, Bellingshausen plate motion had a clockwise rotational component relative to Antarctica producing convergence between the Bellingshausen and Antarctic plates east of 102°W. Seismic reflection and gravity data show that this convergence is expressed by an area of intensely deformed sediments beneath the continental slope from 102°W to 95°W and

  9. Evolving seismogenic plate boundary megathrust and mega-splay faults in subduction zone (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, G.; Hamahashi, M.; Fukuchi, R.; Yamaguchi, A.; Kameda, J.; Kitamura, Y.; Hashimoto, Y.; Hamada, Y.; Saito, S.; Kawasaki, R.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the fault mechanism and its relationship to the sesimo-tsunamigenesis is a key of the scientific targets of subduction zone and therefore NantroSEIZE project of IODP and future new drilling project of International Ocean Discovery Program keeps focusing on that. Mega-splay fault branched from plate boundary megathrust in subduction zone is located around the border between outer and inner wedges and is considered to cause great earthquake and tsunami such as 1960 Alaska earthquake, 1944 and 1946 Nankai-Tonankai earthquakes, and 2004 Sumatra earthquakes. Seismic reflection studies for the mega-splay fault in 2D and 3D in the Nankai forearc present the reflector with negative or positive polarities with various amplitudes and suggest complicated petrophysical properties and condition of the fault and its surroundings. The Nankai mega-splay fault at a depth of ~5km is going to be drilled and cored by NantroSEIZE experiments and is expected for great progress of understanding of the fault mechanics. Before drilling the really targeted seismogenic fault, we are conducting many exercises of geophysical and geological observations. The core-log-seismic integrated exercise for the exhumed mega-splay fault by drilling was operated for the Nobeoka thrust in the Shimanto Belt, Kyushu, Japan. The Nobeoka thrust was once buried in the depth >~10km and suffered maximum temperature >~300 dgree C. As the core recovery is ~99%, perfect correlation between the core and logging data is possible. Thickness of the fault zone is >200 m with a ~50 cm thick central fault core dividing the phyllitic hanging wall and the footwall of broken-melange like cataclasite. A-few-meter-thick discrete damage zones with fault cores are recognized by difference in physical properties and visual deformation textures at several horizons in the fault zone. Host rocks for those damaged zones are completely lithified cataclasites with abundant mineral veins, which record the older and deeper

  10. The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Alaska Region: Highlights from the 2012 Summer Field Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, M.; Bierma, R. M.; Boyce, E. S.; Willoughby, H.; Fend, M.; Feaux, K.

    2012-12-01

    UNAVCO has now completed its fourth year of operation and maintenance of the 138 continuous GPS stations, 12 tiltmeters and 31 data communications relays that comprise the Alaska region of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). The successful operation of the autonomous GPS and tiltmeter network in Alaska continues to be a challenge, because of logistics, weather, and other difficulties related to working in Alaska. PBO engineers continue to work on network enhancements to make the stations more robust, while improving overall data quality and station uptime to better serve the EarthScope science community. In the summer of 2012, PBO engineers completed maintenance activities in Alaska, which resulted in a 95% operational status for the Alaska network within PBO. PBO engineers completed a total of 87 maintenance visits in the summer of FY2012, including 62 routine maintenance and 25 unscheduled maintenance visits to GPS and data communications stations. We present a number of highlights and accomplishments from the PBO 2012 summer field season in Alaska, for example the deployment of a newly designed methanol fuel cell at AV35, a critical station that serves as the main repeater for the real time network on Unimak Island. In addition, PBO engineers also completed the installation of three Inmarsat BGAN terminals for data telemetry following successful testing at AC60 Shemya. Lastly, PBO engineers completed scheduled battery replacements at most of the PBO stations on Unimak Island, in collaboration with the USGS/Alaska Volcano Observatory. In addition to routine maintenance and planned station improvements to sites in Alaska, numerous critical repairs were made at stations on Unimak Island and elsewhere to ensure that the PBO network continues to function well and continues to meet the requirements stipulated by the NSF. We also present some of the station failures unique to Alaska, which we encountered during the course of the 2012 field season, as well

  11. Real Time Data From the Plate Boundary Observatory Continuous GPS Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M.; Borsa, A.; Feaux, K.; Walls, C.; Mencin, D.

    2009-05-01

    EarthScope's Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) runs a network of 1,100 continuous GPS stations in North America and has the potential to be a major provider of real-time GPS data for scientific research, hazard monitoring and survey control. PBO is planning to implement real time data flow for its three volcanic subnetworks (at Mt. Saint Helens and Alaksa's Akutan and Unimak Islands) to maximize the return of scientifically important data to detect the onset of eruptive activity. GPS sites with collocated instruments for meteorological measurement are also targeted for both GPS and met data streaming in the near future. On a larger scale, the USGS and a handful of academic institutions are doing research on integrating GPS into earthquake early warning (EEW) networks. The implementation of GPS-based EEW will involve real time streaming from GPS sites on major faults and in areas of high seismic hazard, and PBO is partnering with the USGS to help develop the first implementation of this early warning capability. Finally, planning is underway to develop open statewide real time networks to serve surveying communities and the general public, and PBO is positioned to be a key data provider for these efforts. PBO has been operating a pilot program to provide real-time GPS streams to the public from 75+ stations from the Salton Sea to Alaska. PBO's streaming data is provided exclusively via the NTrip protocol, from servers located at UNAVCO headquarters in Boulder, CO. The formats supported are BINEX and RTCM 2.3 at 1 second sampling, with RTCM 3.0 to be added in the near future. Access to PBO data streams is currently unrestricted and users are free to rebroadcast these streams provided they do not charge for these services. Our experience with this program indicates that we are technically capable of streaming low-latency, real time GPS data from most of our network using existing telemetry, although PBO's IT infrastructure would have to be upgraded to support an

  12. 2011 Operations and Maintenance Activities in the East Region of UNAVCO's Plate Boundary Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, T.; Feaux, K.; Kasmer, D.; Jenkins, F.; Mencin, D.

    2011-12-01

    2011 marked Year 3 of Operations and Maintenance of the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). In the East Region of PBO, it was a year characterized by several major projects as well as scheduled ongoing maintenance activities. The most significant major project was a USGS/ARRA funded communications upgrade in Yellowstone National Park. This upgrade consisted of bringing 8 existing PBO stations within the Yellowstone volcanic region to near real-time communications. This work will be completed on time and in collaboration with the National Park Service. The upgrade promises to provide much faster latency for invaluable data being recorded for one of the most geodetically critical regions of the current PBO network. Another significant ongoing project in the East Region has been supporting the community that continues to use PBO data. In particular, support of Kristine Larson (Univ of CO) both in installing webcams at PBO sites for monitoring snow depth as well as supporting vegetative surveys at current PBO sites. Similarly, the East Region responded promptly to the community with requests for data quality issues that are station hardware related, including replacing GPS antennae and receivers. With regards to ongoing operations and maintenance projects, reasons for site visits in 2011 were dominated by two significant situations: battery replacement and CDMA modem swaps. 83 site visits were required as part of the Operations and Maintenance strategic battery plan of 5 year battery replacements. This proved to be a considerable challenge due to the scale and geography of the scheduled replacements- the sites were spread throughout the entire network, east to west and north to south. 20 station visits were required due to a Verizon upgrade of the older Alltel network purchased by Verizon. These stations are predominantly in the Rocky Mountain region, but often times had limited access to due weather. Overall, despite record snowfalls throughout the west, state of health

  13. The Plate Boundary Observatory Borehole Strainmeter Program: Overview of Data Analysis and Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, K.; Anderson, G.; Hasting, M.; Hoyt, B.; Jackson, M.; Lee, E.; Matykiewicz, J.; Mencin, D.; Persson, E.; Smith, S.; Torrez, D.; Wright, J.

    2006-12-01

    The PBO borehole strainmeter network is now the largest in the US with 19 strainmeters installed along the Western US Plate Boundary: 14 in the Pacific North West and 5 in Anza, Southern California. With five drilling crews operating though October 2006 the network should grow to 28 strainmeters by December 2006. The areas include Parkfield and Mt St. Helens, PBO's first strainmeter installation in a volcanic region. PBO strainmeter sites are multi-instrumented. Seismic, pore pressure, atmospheric pressure, rainfall and temperature data are measured at almost all sites. Tiltmeters will also be installed at some sites. The strainmeters record at 20-sps, 1-sps and 10-minute interval and are downloaded hourly. The 1-sps data are sent to the NCEDC and IRIS DMC within a few minutes of being retrieved from the strainmeter. The data are archived in SEED format and can be viewed and analyzed with any SEED handling software. PBO's Borehole Strainmeter Analysis Center (BSMAC) in Socorro, NM, produces processed strain data every 10 to 14 days. The data are stored in XML format giving the user the option to use PBO edits or to work with unedited data. The XML file contains time series corrections for the atmospheric pressure, the Earth tides and borehole effects. Every 3 months the data are reviewed and the borehole trends and tidal signal are re- estimated to form the best possible processed data set. PBO reviewed the quality of the data collected by the first 8 strainmeters in a workshop in January 2006. The group discussed coring, examined the borehole trends, tidal signal, and a PSD analysis of data from each strainmeter. A second workshop, focusing on data analysis and in-situ calibration, will take place in October 2006. The UNAVCO strainmeter web page (http://pboweb.unavco.org) provides links to the raw and processed data and is a source for information on data formats, links to software and instrument documentation. An XML log file for each strainmeter provides a

  14. Stress intensity factors and weight functions for the edge cracked plate calculated by the boundary collocation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fett, T.

    1990-09-01

    The determination of stress intensity factors for cracks exposed to arbitrary stress distribution according to the weight function method calls for knowledge of the crack opening displacements and stress intensity factor for a reference load case. The determination of these variables by means of the Boundary Collocation Method (BCM) is discussed by the example of the drawn plate with an edge crack. After derivation of the formulas for evaluation the influence is studied of the relative crack depth and the plate length on the stress intensity factor, and the results are compared with data from the literature. The crack opening displacement field is determined from the stress function established by the Boundary Collocation Method and the fracture mechanical weight function is calculated from it. The results are compared with an analytical weight function obtained on the basis of approximative crack opening displacement fields. A formula is indicated for the weight function which covers the total range from a/W=0 to a/W=1. This formula is the result of BCM computations made up to a/W=0.8 for a relative plate length of a/H > 1.5 and applies to the limit case a/W=1 known from the analysis. Finally the Boundary Collocation Method is used to calculate the mode II stress intensity factors for shear loaded plates with an edge crack. The results of the computations are compared with solutions proposed in the literature. For the edge crack loaded with constant shear stresses, which act on the crack surfaces, a numerical formula is given of the geometric function. Values applicable to the weight function are determined from the crack opening displacements. (orig.) [de

  15. Punctuated Neogene tectonics and stratigraphy of the African-Iberian plate-boundary zone: concurrent development of Betic-Rif basins (southern Spain, northern Morocco)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sissingh, W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper integrates the sequence stratigraphic and tectonic data related to the Neogene geodynamic and palaeogeographic development of the African-Iberian plate boundary zone between Spain and Morocco. Though the dating of individual tectonostratigraphic sequences and their delimiting sequence

  16. Study on the general characteristics of the sound radiation of a rectangular plate with different boundary edge conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Ji Woo

    2010-01-01

    Sound radiation is the most important phenomenon when a structure vibrates, which is strongly dependent on boundary conditions and its shape such as aspect ratio. This paper deals with general aspects of sound radiation from this viewpoint. A particular guided and pinned condition being taken into account here, is that the cross-modal terms can average out for all possible point excitation locations. Then, the average radiation efficiency based on the modal radiation efficiency and corresponding radiation power can numerically be obtained. It is shown that the radiation power of the guided plate is governed by the piston mode as well as the critical frequency. Unlike the pinned plate, no clear corner and edge mode regions below the critical frequency may be found for the guided case. Meanwhile, if the plate damping increases the similar tendency that the radiation efficiency increases below the critical frequency is found, as the vibrational level decreases. For the strip with a large aspect ratio, the radiation power is maximised at frequencies where the wavelength is an integer times the short edge length. This can be seen for both the guided and the pinned boundary conditions

  17. Large-eddy simulation of separation and reattachment of a flat plate turbulent boundary layer

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, W.

    2015-11-11

    © 2015 Cambridge University Press. We present large-eddy simulations (LES) of separation and reattachment of a flat-plate turbulent boundary-layer flow. Instead of resolving the near wall region, we develop a two-dimensional virtual wall model which can calculate the time- and space-dependent skin-friction vector field at the wall, at the resolved scale. By combining the virtual-wall model with the stretched-vortex subgrid-scale (SGS) model, we construct a self-consistent framework for the LES of separating and reattaching turbulent wall-bounded flows at large Reynolds numbers. The present LES methodology is applied to two different experimental flows designed to produce separation/reattachment of a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer at medium Reynolds number Reθ based on the momentum boundary-layer thickness θ. Comparison with data from the first case at demonstrates the present capability for accurate calculation of the variation, with the streamwise co-ordinate up to separation, of the skin friction coefficient, Reθ, the boundary-layer shape factor and a non-dimensional pressure-gradient parameter. Additionally the main large-scale features of the separation bubble, including the mean streamwise velocity profiles, show good agreement with experiment. At the larger Reθ = 11000 of the second case, the LES provides good postdiction of the measured skin-friction variation along the whole streamwise extent of the experiment, consisting of a very strong adverse pressure gradient leading to separation within the separation bubble itself, and in the recovering or reattachment region of strongly-favourable pressure gradient. Overall, the present two-dimensional wall model used in LES appears to be capable of capturing the quantitative features of a separation-reattachment turbulent boundary-layer flow at low to moderately large Reynolds numbers.

  18. Pyrolysis and Boundary Layer Combustion of a Non-Charring Solid Plate Under Forced Flow

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ananth, Ramagopal

    2003-01-01

    Solutions of Navier-Stokes (NS) equations were obtained for burning rate Nu and temperature distributions for a flat PMMA plate using an iterative method to impose steady-state, pyrolysis kinetics at the surface...

  19. PLATE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Joyce; Hjulmand, Lise-Lotte

    2008-01-01

    ’s level of English is sufficient for the increasing number of courses offered in English each semester. This paper addresses these concerns and describes a pilot project initiated in 2003 at CBS to gauge the overall English language proficiency of those teaching content courses in English. Through...... the Project in Language Assessment for Teaching in English (PLATE) language professionals from CBS’s Language Center observe teachers and provide feedback using evaluation criteria from the Common European Framework for Reference (CEFR) supplemented by some additional criteria which take the LSP nature...... of academic teaching and lecturing into account....

  20. Locating seismicity on the Arctic plate boundary using multiple-event techniques and empirical signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, S. J.; Harris, D. B.; Dahl-Jensen, T.; Kværna, T.; Larsen, T. B.; Paulsen, B.; Voss, P. H.

    2017-12-01

    The oceanic boundary separating the Eurasian and North American plates between 70° and 84° north hosts large earthquakes which are well recorded teleseismically, and many more seismic events at far lower magnitudes that are well recorded only at regional distances. Existing seismic bulletins have considerable spread and bias resulting from limited station coverage and deficiencies in the velocity models applied. This is particularly acute for the lower magnitude events which may only be constrained by a small number of Pn and Sn arrivals. Over the past two decades there has been a significant improvement in the seismic network in the Arctic: a difficult region to instrument due to the harsh climate, a sparsity of accessible sites (particularly at significant distances from the sea), and the expense and difficult logistics of deploying and maintaining stations. New deployments and upgrades to stations on Greenland, Svalbard, Jan Mayen, Hopen, and Bjørnøya have resulted in a sparse but stable regional seismic network which results in events down to magnitudes below 3 generating high-quality Pn and Sn signals on multiple stations. A catalogue of several hundred events in the region since 1998 has been generated using many new phase readings on stations on both sides of the spreading ridge in addition to teleseismic P phases. A Bayesian multiple event relocation has resulted in a significant reduction in the spread of hypocentre estimates for both large and small events. Whereas single event location algorithms minimize vectors of time residuals on an event-by-event basis, the Bayesloc program finds a joint probability distribution of origins, hypocentres, and corrections to traveltime predictions for large numbers of events. The solutions obtained favour those event hypotheses resulting in time residuals which are most consistent over a given source region. The relocations have been performed with different 1-D velocity models applicable to the Arctic region and

  1. EarthScope: Cyberinfrastructure to access Plate Boundary Observatory data products and services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meertens, C. M.; Mattioli, G. S.; Miller, M.; Boler, F. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Mencin, D.; Phillips, D. A.; Snett, L.

    2013-12-01

    The wealth of data from geodetic observing systems, especially the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), presents major data management challenges. The challenges are driven by ingenious new uses of Global Positioning System (GPS) data, demands for higher-rate, lower latency data, the need for continued access and long term preservation of archival data, the expansion of data users into other science, engineering and commercial arenas, and the growth of enhanced products that expand the utility of the data. To meet these challenges, UNAVCO has established a comprehensive suite of data services encompassing sensor network data operations, data product generation (through the activities of partners at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Central Washington University, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, and the University of California, San Diego - UCSD), data management, access and archiving, and advanced cyberinfrastructure. PBO sensor systems include 1,100 continuously operating GPS stations, 79 borehole geophysical sites (with a combination of strainmeters, tiltmeters, seismometers, pore pressure gauges, and meteorological sensors), and 6 long baseline strainmeters. Imaging data acquired for EarthScope include large volumes of satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and airborne LiDAR data. Core data products such as daily GPS position time series and derived crustal motion velocities have been augmented with real-time data streams and positions calculated every second from 367 PBO stations. Higher rate (5 Hz) data files are available for applications such as GPS seismology. Efforts are underway with UCSD to integrate GPS and accelerometers at a subset of PBO sites to increase the reliability and capability of the observations. These observations have utility for research and hazards mitigation. Ingenious methods of GPS data analysis, developed by the University of Colorado and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, measure snow depth

  2. Plate Boundary Observatory Infrastructure and Data Products in Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Barbour, K.; Lee, E.

    2005-12-01

    As one of three major components of NSF's EarthScope program, the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) encourages the integration of research and education. Informing various communities about the current work of PBO and the scientific discoveries related to the use of this instrumentation has contributed to the success of PBO during the first two years of the EarthScope project. UNAVCO(PBO), IRIS (USArray), and the EarthScope project office work together to integrate Education and Outreach (E&O) opportunities into a program that is greater than the sum of its parts and yet maintains the identity of each organization. Building and maintaining the PBO website, documenting and archiving activities of PBO, providing short courses for professional development of scientists using EarthScope data, and developing higher level data products with an appropriate educational framework are a few of the activities that provide both challenges and opportunities. The internet, particularly the World Wide Web, has become the primary tool for disseminating information to various audiences. The primary goals of the PBO website are to provide current information on the progress of GPS and Strainmeter facility construction; to provide access to different levels of data products; and to facilitate networking with and among scientists. Challenges for the PBO website include publishing current stories on installation projects while coordinating with field engineers on a regular basis; providing near to real time updates and maintaining quality assurance processes; and defining personnel requirements for a maintaining a dynamic website. Currently, archived photographs, web diaries, and numerous web highlights document PBO's success and provide a visual record of PBO's accomplishments and behind-the-scene activities over the last two years. The community charged PBO with increasing the number of scientists using its data. UNAVCO does this by providing short courses for professional development

  3. Coupled effects of director orientations and boundary conditions on light induced bending of monodomain nematic liquid crystalline polymer plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Yue; Ding, Shurong; Huo, Yongzhong; Xu, Changwei

    2012-01-01

    A photo-chromic liquid crystal polymers (LCPs) is a smart material for large light-activated variation or bending to transfer luminous energy into mechanical energy. We study the light induced behavior by modeling planar and homeotropic nematic network polymer plates. We effectively illustrate some reported experimental outcomes and theoretically predict some possible bending patterns. This paper constructs an understanding between the bending behaviors and interactions among the alignments, aspect ratios and boundary conditions, etc. Our work provides information on optimizing light induced bending in the process of micro-opto-mechanical system (MOMS) design. (paper)

  4. Structure of the tsunamigenic plate boundary and low-frequency earthquakes in the southern Ryukyu Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Ryuta; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Kodaira, Shuichi; Kaiho, Yuka; Nakanishi, Ayako; Fujie, Gou; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Ishihara, Yasushi; Miura, Seiichi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that even weakly coupled subduction zones may cause large interplate earthquakes leading to destructive tsunamis. The Ryukyu Trench is one of the best fields to study this phenomenon, since various slow earthquakes and tsunamis have occurred; yet the fault structure and seismic activity there are poorly constrained. Here we present seismological evidence from marine observation for megathrust faults and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs). On the basis of passive observation we find LFEs occur at 15–18 km depths along the plate interface and their distribution seems to bridge the gap between the shallow tsunamigenic zone and the deep slow slip region. This suggests that the southern Ryukyu Trench is dominated by slow earthquakes at any depths and lacks a typical locked zone. The plate interface is overlaid by a low-velocity wedge and is accompanied by polarity reversals of seismic reflections, indicating fluids exist at various depths along the plate interface. PMID:27447546

  5. Exact solution of two-dimensional MHD boundary layer flow over a semi-infinite flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudenatti, Ramesh B.; Kirsur, Shreenivas R.; Achala, L. N.; Bujurke, N. M.

    2013-05-01

    In the present paper, an exact solution for the two-dimensional boundary layer viscous flow over a semi-infinite flat plate in the presence of magnetic field is given. Generalized similarity transformations are used to convert the governing boundary layer equations into a third order nonlinear differential equation which is the famous MHD Falkner-Skan equation. This equation contains three flow parameters: the stream-wise pressure gradient (β), the magnetic parameter (M), and the boundary stretch parameter (λ). Closed-form analytical solution is obtained for β=-1 and M=0 in terms of error and exponential functions which is modified to obtain an exact solution for general values of β and M. We also obtain asymptotic analyses of the MHD Falkner-Skan equation in the limit of large η and λ. The results obtained are compared with the direct numerical solution of the full boundary layer equation, and found that results are remarkably in good agreement between the solutions. The derived quantities such as velocity profiles and skin friction coefficient are presented. The physical significance of the flow parameters are also discussed in detail.

  6. Late Mesozoic- Cenozoic plate boundaries in the North Atlantic – Arctic: Quantitative reconstructions using Hellinger criterion in GPlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaina, Carmen; Watson, Robin; Cirbus, Juraj

    2015-04-01

    uncertainties are combined with a regional model and used to infer the plate boundaries during the formation of Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay. Challenges for establishing the continuation of these plate boundaries the Arctic domain are also discussed. References Chang, T. (1988), Estimating the relative rotation of two tectonic plates from boundary crossings, J. Am. Stat. Assoc., 83, 1178-1183. Hellinger, S. J. (1981), The uncertainties of finite rotations in plate tectonics, J Geophys Res, 86, 9312-9318. Hanna, M.S and T. Chang (1990), On graphically representing the confidence region for an unknown rotation in three dimensions. Computers & Geosciences 16 (2), 163-194. Royer, J. Y., and T. Chang (1991), Evidence for Relative Motions between the Indian and Australian Plates during the Last 20 My from Plate Tectonic Reconstructions - Implications for the Deformation of the Indo-Australian Plate, J Geophys Res, 96(B7), 11779-11802.

  7. Analytical Solution of Forced-Convective Boundary-Layer Flow over a Flat Plate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirgolbabaei, H.; Barari, Amin; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2010-01-01

    In this letter, the problem of forced convection heat transfer over a horizontal flat plate is investigated by employing the Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM). The series solution of the nonlinear differential equations governing on the problem is developed. Comparison between results obtained...

  8. Using GPS, tide gauge and altimetry data to constrain subduction parameters at the Vanuatu plate boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballu, V.; Bouin, M.; Baillard, C.; Calmant, S.; Pelletier, B.; Crawford, W. C.; Kanas, T.; Garaebiti, E.

    2012-12-01

    The Vanuatu subduction zone, Southwest Pacific, combines several features that makes it a particularly useful place to study seismic cycles. The convergence rate is high - approximately 12 cm/yr - and the seismic cycle relatively short. Measurements of interseismic motions are helped by relatively high vertical rates, the close proximity of some islands to the plate interface and the existence of very shallow seamounts on either side of the plate interface. The Vanuatu archipelago is part of the Pacific Ring of Fire: the Australian plate subducts eastward beneath the North Fiji basin, on the western border of the Pacific Plate. High topographic features on the diving plate may contribute to locking of the plates, which can play a major role in the genesis of destructive earthquakes. GPS network points were installed in the early 1990s and the geodesy network has been densified through the years, enabling us to map interseismic horizontal and vertical deformation rates throughout the archipelago. More recently, 8 continuous GPS stations were installed, along with 3 continuous seafloor pressure gauges very near to the plate interface. We show results from GPS data collected from 1996 to 2011, that we re-processed and combined into the ITRF2008 reference frame, and altimetry and seafloor pressure data from 1999 to 2010. The GPS results show that vertical deformation rates vary both across and along the archipelago. We believe that these variations result from variable distance to the plate limit and variable locking parameters. In some areas, subsidence rates are close to one centimeter per year. In the Torres islands (at the northern end of the archipelago) where villagers face recurrent coastal flooding, we showed that this flooding is due more to ground motion than to rise in the absolute sea level, even though the sea-level rise rates are locally high and the islands uplift over the long term. In the Central area of Vanuatu, we augmented the on-land network with

  9. Effects of processing optimisation on microstructure, texture, grain boundary and mechanical properties of Fe–17Cr ferritic stainless steel thick plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jian, E-mail: jh595@uowmail.edu.au [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Li, Huijun; Zhu, Zhixiong [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Jiang, Laizhu; Xu, Haigang; Ma, Li [Baoshan Iron and Steel Co., Ltd., Shanghai 200431 (China)

    2014-10-20

    The relationships between microstructure, texture, grain boundary and tensile strength, Charpy impact toughness of (Nb+Ti+V) stabilised Fe–17Cr ferritic stainless steel thick plates were investigated by means of optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, tensile and Charpy impact testing. The results show that for Fe–17Cr ferritic stainless steel thick plate, the addition of warm rolling procedure leads to refinement of grain size, modification of texture, and then optimisation of grain boundary, including grain boundary character distribution and grain boundary connectivity. Meanwhile, the mechanical testing results indicate that optimal transformation that warm rolling procedure brings to Fe–17Cr ferritic steel thick plate is beneficial to its mechanical properties.

  10. Crustal deformation evidences for viscous coupling and fragmented lithosphere at the Nubia-Iberia plate boundary (Western Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palano, Mimmo; González, Pablo J.; Fernández, José

    2016-04-01

    A spatially dense crustal velocity field, based on up to 15 years of GNSS observations at more than 380 sites and extensively covering the Iberian Peninsula and Northern Africa, allow us to provide new insights into two main tectonic processes currently occurring in this area. We detected a slow large-scale clockwise rotation of the Iberian Peninsula with respect to a local pole located closely to the northwestern sector of the Pyrenean mountain range (Palano et al., 2015). Although this crustal deformation pattern could suggest a rigid rotating lithosphere block, this model would predict significant shortening along the Western (off-shore Lisbon) and North Iberian margin which cannot totally ruled out but currently is not clearly observed. Conversely, we favour the interpretation that this pattern reflects the quasi-continuous straining of the ductile lithosphere in some sectors of South and Western Iberia in response to viscous coupling of the NW Nubia and Iberian plate boundary in the Gulf of Cádiz. Furthermore, the western Mediterranean basin appears fragmented into independent crustal tectonic blocks, which delimited by inherited lithospheric shear structures and trapped within the Nubia-Eurasia collision, are currently accommodating most of the plate convergence rate. Among these blocks, an (oceanic-like western) Algerian one is currently transferring a significant fraction of the Nubia-Eurasia convergence rate into the Eastern Betics (SE Iberia) and likely causing the eastward motion of the Baleares Promontory. Most of the observed crustal ground deformation can be attributed to processes driven by spatially variable lithospheric plate forces imposed along the Nubia-Eurasia convergence boundary. Nevertheless, the observed deformation field infers a very low convergence rates as observed also at the eastern side of the western Mediterranean, along the Calabro Peloritan Arc, by space geodesy (e.g. Palano, 2015). References Palano M. (2015). On the present

  11. Marginal inherited structures impact on the oblique convergent N American Plate/ Central Caribbean plate-boundary in the Northern Caribbean. The tectonic evolution since Miocene times based on Haiti data acquired onshore and offshore since 2012- a step toward an ADP Drilling Proposal (Haiti-DRILL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellouz, N.; Hamon, Y.; Deschamps, R.; Battani, A.; Wessels, R.; Boisson, D.; Prepetit, C.; Momplaisir, R.

    2017-12-01

    Since Early Paleogene times, the North Caribbean plate is colliding obliquely with the south continental part of the old N. American Margins, which is represented by various segments from West to East, inherited from Jurassic times. Location, amount of displacement, rotation and the structural deformation of these margin segments, resulting from the dislocation of the continental N American margin, are not clearly yet established. At present, the plate limits are marked either by two left lateral faults west and inside Haiti (OSF in the North and EPGF in the South), oblique collision front (further west in Cuba), oblique subducted segments (to the East, Porto-Rico). From our recent works operated both offshore (Haiti-SIS and Haiti-BGF surveys 2012-2015) and onshore (field campaigns 2013-2017) in Haitian zone, the position of the present-day and paleo major limits have been redefined. These paleolimits have been reconstructed up to early Miocene times, based on: restoration of regional structural cross-sections, sedimentology and on paleoenvironement studies. In a preliminary way, we analyzed the complexity of the tectonic heritage with possible nature, heterogeneity of the crustal fragments and associated margins close to Haiti (age, structure, environment, location of the dislocated blocks through times) which profoundly impact the partitioning of the deformation along this complex transformed margin. The change in the structure wavelength, decollement level variations are primary constraints in the restoration of the main units and do impose a deep connection along specific segments either related to strike-slip or to splay faults. The asymmetry on the repartition of the fault activity tend to prove that the past motion related to "EPGF transfer zone" is mainly partitioned in Haiti to the North of the present-day EPGF position. At present, these results are still coherent with the distribution of the aftershoks registered after 2010, and with the present

  12. Boundary integral equation methods in eigenvalue problems of elastodynamics and thin plates

    CERN Document Server

    Kitahara, M

    1985-01-01

    The boundary integral equation (BIE) method has been used more and more in the last 20 years for solving various engineering problems. It has important advantages over other techniques for numerical treatment of a wide class of boundary value problems and is now regarded as an indispensable tool for potential problems, electromagnetism problems, heat transfer, fluid flow, elastostatics, stress concentration and fracture problems, geomechanical problems, and steady-state and transient electrodynamics.In this book, the author gives a complete, thorough and detailed survey of the method. It pro

  13. Experiments of dike-induced deformation: Insights on the long-term evolution of divergent plate boundaries

    KAUST Repository

    Trippanera, D.

    2015-10-22

    The shallow transport of magma occurs through dikes causing surface deformation. Our understanding of the effects of diking at the surface is limited, especially on the long term, for repeated intrusive episodes. We use analogue models to study the upper crustal deformation induced by dikes. We insert metal plates within cohesive sand with three setups: in setup A, the intrusion rises upward with constant thickness and in setups B and C, the intrusion thickens at a fixed depth, with final rectangular (setup B) or triangular (setup C) shape in section. Setup A creates a doming delimited by reverse faults, with secondary apical graben, without close correspondence in nature. In setups B and C, a depression flanked by two uplifted areas is bordered by inward dipping normal faults propagating downward and, for deeper intrusions in setup B, also by inner faults, reverse at the surface; this deformation is similar to what is observed in nature, suggesting a consistent physical behavior. Dikes in nature initially propagate developing a mode I fracture at the tip, subsequently thickened by magma intrusion, without any host rock translation in the propagation direction (as in setup A). The deformation pattern in setups B and C depends on the intrusion depth and thickness, consistently to what is observed along divergent plate boundaries. The early deformation in setups B and C is similar to that from a single rifting episode (i.e., Lakagigar, Iceland, and Dabbahu, Afar), whereas the late stages resemble the structure of mature rifts (i.e., Krafla, Iceland), confirming diking as a major process in shaping divergent plate boundaries.

  14. Vp and Vs velocity models from the Eurasia-Africa plate boundary across the Gloria Fault, North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Luis; Hübscher, Christian; Terrinha, Pedro; Matias, Luis; Afilhado, Alexandra; Lüdmann, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The oceanic crustal and uppermost lithospheric mantle structure across the Gloria Fault transcurrent plate boundary between Africa and Eurasia in the Northeast Atlantic is investigated based on seismic reflection, seismic refraction and wide angle reflection data. This experiment used 18 ocean bottom stations along a N-S 150 km long traverse together with coincident acquisition of a multichannel seismic reflection profile. Structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the reflection profile shows that Neogene to recent tectonic deformation on this segment of the plate boundary concentrated on the southern side of the Gloria Fault, i.e. the Africa plate. Modeling of P and S seismic waves and gravimetric anomalies allowed estimation of velocities, density, Poisson's ratio and proposal of a compositional model. A five layer model is proposed in which layers 1 to 3 correspond to normal sediments and typical oceanic crust layers 2 and 3, respectively. Layer 5 yielded mantle velocities above 7.9 km/s. Layer 4 with 4 km of thickness has Vp velocities between 7.1 and 7.4 km/s. Layer 4 velocities can be found at the base of the lower crust and at the uppermost hydrated lithospheric mantle as reported from various authors from other parts of the Earth. Enrichment in olivine at the base of the lower crust, as a result of underplating, could explain Layer 4 velocities; however, there are no morphologic evidences associated to plume activity. On the other hand, morphologic, geologic and seismicity generated along the Gloria Fault (M>7-8.4) indicates that the Gloria Fault has accumulated ductile and brittle deformation from the upper mantle through the surface. It is here argued that pathways for fluid migration through seismic pumping mechanisms have provided the conditions for partial serpentinization of the peridotite mantle rocks, which probably make up the bulk of Layer 4. Publication supported by FCT- project UID/GEO/50019/2013 - Instituto Dom Luiz

  15. "Discovering Plate Boundaries in Data-Rich Environments": Supporting Pre-service Teachers involvement in Unique Practices of Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, A. S.; Moore, J.

    2012-12-01

    plate tectonics using key scientific practices. As a result of the educational activities developed in this project, we will try help teachers to overcome their challenges and develop the pedagogical skills that novice teachers need to use to teach plate tectonics by focusing on key scientific practices with the help of previously-developed educational resources. Learning about the processes that occur at plate boundaries will help future teachers (and their students) understand natural disasters such as earthquakes and volcanoes. Furthermore, the study will have a significant, and broader, impact by 'teaching the teachers' and empowering novice teachers to overcome the challenges of reading maps and using argumentation in science classrooms.

  16. Hydromagnetic natural convection flow between vertical parallel plates with time-periodic boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adesanya, S.O.; Oluwadare, E.O.; Falade, J.A.; Makinde, O.D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the free convective flow of magnetohydrodynamic fluid through a channel with time periodic boundary condition is investigated by taking the effects of Joule dissipation into consideration. Based on simplifying assumptions, the coupled governing equations are reduced to a set of nonlinear boundary valued problem. Approximate solutions are obtained by using semi-analytical Adomian decomposition method. The effect of pertinent parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature distribution, Nusselt number and skin friction are presented graphically and discussed. The result of the computation shows that an increase in the magnetic field intensity has significant influence on the fluid flow. - Highlights: • The influence of magnetic field on the free convective fluid flow is considered. • The coupled equations are solved by using Adomian decomposition method. • The Adomian series solution agreed with previously obtained result. • Magnetic field decreases the velocity maximum but enhances temperature field

  17. A theoretical study on the overlap region in a flat plate turbulent boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, Michio

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the wall-law defect-law overlap region in a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer. By taking account of the non-parallel flow effect, a system of differential equations is derived, which describes the velocity profile for the overlap layer and the velocity and length scales for the outer layer. Two kinds of solutions are obtained for the velocity profile in combination with corresponding solutions for the outer layer scales. One is of log-law type and the other is of power-law type. These are possible solutions that represent the necessary condition for the existence of the overlap layer. In the light of the present solutions, recent experimental data for a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer are examined. It is found that the observed velocity data follow the log-law solution for momentum thickness Reynolds numbers R θ above 20 000.

  18. Paleoseismic and Geomorphic Evidence for Quaternary Fault Slip on the Central Range Fault, South American-Caribbean Plate Boundary, Trinidad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, C. S.; Weber, J.; Crosby, C. J.

    2001-12-01

    The island of Trinidad is located along the transform plate boundary between the South American and Caribbean plates. GPS measurements show that relative motion along this boundary is nearly E-W right-lateral shear (Weber et al., 2001). Analysis and comparison of historic triangulation and GPS data suggest that a significant fraction (14+/-3 mm/yr) of the total plate-boundary motion (about 20 mm/yr) is being accommodated across the Central Range Fault in central Trinidad. Our new paleoseismic studies demonstrate that Quaternary surface rupture has occurred on this previously unrecognized, historically aseismic, active fault. Geomorphic evidence of Quaternary faulting along the Central Range Fault includes linear drainages, aligned topographic saddles and troughs, offset ridges, right-laterally deflected streams, and linear scarps. We mapped these features using 1:20,000 scale aerial photographs and field reconnaissance along a 25-km-long section between Pointe-a-Pierre on the west coast and Navet Dam. Geomorphic features near Manzanilla Bay on the east coast suggest that the Central Range Fault continues across the island as a Quaternary feature for another 25 km to the northeast. Marine geophysical surveys suggest this fault continues offshore to the west (Warm Springs fault), and steps to the north across the Gulf of Paria pull-apart basin to the El Pilar Fault. The extent of the fault offshore to the east is unknown. We exposed a 6-m-wide shear zone within Pliocene(?) material in a trench cut into a fluvial terrace, south of Samlalsingh Road near Bonne Aventure. The overlying Quaternary fluvial gravel is faulted and folded across the shear zone, and Quaternary fluvial deposits are faulted against the shear zone on the north side. A second excavation across a prominent scarp near Tabaquite, 12 km northeast of Samlalsingh Road, exposed a colluvial wedge and overlying unfaulted sediments. We interpret the colluvial wedge to represent deposits shed off the scarp in

  19. Repeating Deep Very Low Frequency Earthquakes: An Evidence of Transition Zone between Brittle and Ductile Zone along Plate Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.; Arai, R.

    2017-12-01

    Recently slow or low frequency seismic and geodetic events are focused under recognition of important role in tectonic process. The most western region of Ryukyu trench, Yaeyama Islands, is very active area of these type events. It has semiannual-like slow slip (Heki et.al., 2008; Nishimura et.al.,2014) and very frequent shallow very low frequency earthquakes near trench zone (Ando et.al.,2012; Nakamura et.al.,2014). Arai et.al.(2016) identified clear reverse phase discontinuity along plate boundary by air-gun survey, suggesting existence of low velocity layer including fluid. The subducting fluid layer is considered to control slip characteristics. On the other hand, deep low frequency earthquake and tremor observed at south-western Honshu and Shikoku of Japan are not identified well due to lack of high-quality seismic network. A broadband seismic station(ISG/PS) of Pacific21 network is operating in last 20 years that locates on occurrence potential area of low frequency earthquake. We tried to review continuous broadband record, searching low frequency earthquakes. In pilot survey, we found three very low frequency seismic events which are dominant in less than 0.1Hz component and are not listed in earthquake catalogue. Source locates about 50km depth and at transition area between slow slip event and active area of general earthquake along plate boundary. To detect small and/or hidden very low frequency earthquake, we applied matched filter analysis to continuous three components waveform data using pre-reviewed seismogram as template signal. 12 events with high correlation are picked up in last 10 years. Most events have very similar waveform, which means characteristics of repeating deep very low frequency earthquake. The event history of very low frequency earthquake is not related with one of slow slip event in this region. In Yaeyama region, low frequency earthquake, general earthquake and slow slip event occur dividing in space and have apparent

  20. Crustal movements at a divergent plate boundary: interplay between volcano deformation, geothermal processes, and plate spreading in the Northern Volcanic Zone, Iceland since 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Vincent; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Ofeigsson, Benedikt G.; Sturkell, Erik; Islam, Tariqul

    2014-05-01

    Iceland is a subaerial part of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, where the divergent plate boundary between the North-American and Eurasian Plates can be studied. The Northern Volcanic Zone (NVZ) of Iceland, comprised of several volcanic systems, is particularly well suited to study interplay between volcanoes, geothermal areas and plate spreading, as the zone is relatively simple and accommodates the full spreading of the plates (18.6 mm/yr in a direction of 105 degrees according to NUVEL-1A predictions). The most recent volcanic activity in the area was the Krafla rifting episode (1975-1984). In 2007-2008 two intrusive events were detected: one in Upptypingar and the other in Þeistareykir. Extensive crustal deformation studies have been carried out in the NVZ; we report the results of recent GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) studies focusing on Krafla, Þeistareykir and Askja volcanic systems in the NVZ. An extensive GPS survey was undertaken in 2013, with over 135 stations occupied. This data was evaluated in conjunction with data acquired since 2008, to generate a velocity field spanning this entire time period. In addition to an existing continuous GPS (cGPS) station, three cGPS stations were installed in the area in 2011-2012. The 2008-2013 GPS velocities were compared to earlier GPS results, and complementary analysis of InSAR images was undertaken. Earlier studies have shown that the Krafla caldera underwent uplift during 1984-1989, followed by subsidence. Since 1995, the maximum subsidence in Krafla has shifted from directly above the shallow magma chamber towards an array of boreholes (geothermal exploitation) in Leirbotnar. Similar subsidence has been observed around another array of boreholes in Bjarnaflag, 7 km further south. The most significant signal on the velocities calculated from campaign GPS data over the 5 year period, is plate spreading with an E-W velocity of about 12 mm/yr over a 30 km wide area. However it also shows an

  1. A high-brightness light guide plate with high precise double-sided microstructures fabricated using the fixed boundary hot embossing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Cheng-Huan; Yang, Sen-Yeu

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, microstructures have been widely applied in many key optical elements and bio-elements. The effective and efficient fabrication of optical elements and bio-elements with superior performance has become an essential challenge. This requires very accurate shape replication of microstructures. The plate-to-plate hot embossing process is the most likely method of mass production for the replication of double-sided micro/nano structures with high precision and quality. However, the traditional uniform heating hot embossing process as the free boundary of open die forging leads to variation. In this research, three techniques are implemented; the conventional uniform heating technique, the non-uniform pressure compensating technique and the fixed boundary hot embossing technique. The temperature distribution of the hot-plates of the fixed boundary hot embossing technique are designed to keep the temperature in the center part higher than the outer part on the surface of the substrates. This phenomenon changes free boundary in conventional uniform heating into fixed boundary. The results demonstrate the potential of the fixed boundary hot embossing technique for the fabrication of large-area high brightness LGPs with double-sided microstructures. The results are also helpful for enhancing the performance of optical elements and bio-elements fabricated using the fixed boundary hot embossing technique. (paper)

  2. Development of Streamwise Counter-Rotating Vortices in Flat Plate Boundary Layer Pre-set by Leading Edge Patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Hasheminejad, S.M.

    2017-04-03

    Development of streamwise counter-rotating vortices induced by leading edge patterns with different pattern shape is investigated using hot-wire anemometry in the boundary layer of a flat plate. A triangular, sinusoidal and notched patterns with the same pattern wavelength λ of 15mm and the same pattern amplitude A of 7.5mm were examined for free-stream velocity of 3m/s. The results show a good agreement with earlier studies. The inflection point on the velocity profile downstream of the trough of the patterns at the beginning of the vortex formation indicates that the vortices non-linearly propagate downstream. An additional vortex structure was also observed between the troughs of the notched pattern.

  3. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a moving vertical flat plate in an external fluid flow with viscous dissipation effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norfifah Bachok

    Full Text Available The steady boundary layer flow of a viscous and incompressible fluid over a moving vertical flat plate in an external moving fluid with viscous dissipation is theoretically investigated. Using appropriate similarity variables, the governing system of partial differential equations is transformed into a system of ordinary (similarity differential equations, which is then solved numerically using a Maple software. Results for the skin friction or shear stress coefficient, local Nusselt number, velocity and temperature profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. It is found that the set of the similarity equations has unique solutions, dual solutions or no solutions, depending on the values of the mixed convection parameter, the velocity ratio parameter and the Eckert number. The Eckert number significantly affects the surface shear stress as well as the heat transfer rate at the surface.

  4. Fracture analysis of one-dimensional hexagonal quasicrystals: Researches of a finite dimension rectangular plate by boundary collocation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiaxing, Cheng; Dongfa, Sheng [Southwest Forestry University, Yunnan (China)

    2017-05-15

    As an important supplement and development to crystallography, the applications about quasicrystal materials have played a core role in many fields, such as manufacturing and the space industry. Due to the sensitivity of quasicrystals to defects, the research on the fracture problem of quasicrystals has attracted a great deal of attention. We present a boundary collocation method to research fracture problems for a finite dimension rectangular one-dimensional hexagonal quasicrystal plate. Because mode I and mode II problems for one- dimensional hexagonal quasicrystals are like that for the classical elastic materials, only the anti-plane problem is discussed in this paper. The correctness of the present numerical method is verified through a comparison of the present results and the existing results. And then, the size effects on stress field, stress intensity factor and energy release rate are discussed in detail. The obtained results can provide valuable references for the fracture behavior of quasicrystals.

  5. Widespread remagnetizations and a new view of Neogene tectonic rotations within the Australia-Pacific plate boundary zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Christopher J.; Roberts, Andrew P.

    2008-03-01

    Large, clockwise, vertical axis tectonic rotations of the Hikurangi margin, East Coast, New Zealand, have been inferred over both geological and contemporary timescales, from paleomagnetic and geodetic data, respectively. Previous interpretations of paleomagnetic data have laterally divided the margin into independently rotating domains; this is not a feature of the short-term velocity field, and it is also difficult to reconcile with the large-scale boundary forces driving the rotation. New paleomagnetic results, rigorously constrained by field tests, demonstrate that late diagenetic growth of the iron sulfide greigite has remagnetized up to 65% of sampled localities on the Hikurangi margin. When these remagnetizations are accounted for, similar rates, magnitudes, and timings of tectonic rotation can be inferred for the entire Hikurangi margin south of the Raukumara Peninsula in the last 7-10 Ma. Numerous large (50-80°) declination anomalies from magnetizations acquired in the late Miocene require much greater rates of rotation (8-14° Ma-1) than the presently observed rate of 3-4° Ma-1, which is only likely to be characteristic of the tectonic regime established since 1-2 Ma. These new results are consistent with both long- and short-term deformation on the Hikurangi margin being driven by realignment of the subducting Pacific plate, with collision of the Hikurangi Plateau in the late Miocene potentially being key to both the initiation of tectonic rotations and the widespread remagnetization of Neogene sediments. However, accommodating faster, more coherent rotation of the Hikurangi margin in Neogene reconstructions of the New Zealand plate boundary region, particularly in the late Miocene, remains a challenge.

  6. Hydrodynamic and hydroelastic analyses of a plate excited by the turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappi, E.; Magionesi, F.; de Rosa, S.; Franco, F.

    2009-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the characterisation of wall-pressure fluctuations for surface ships is of great interest not only for military applications but also for civil marine vehicles. A ship model towed in a towing tank is used to perform pressure and structural measurements at high Reynolds numbers. This facility provides ideal flow conditions because background turbulence and noise are almost absent. Free surface effects are naturally included in the analysis, although in the particular section chosen for the present study do not have significant consequences on pressure spectra. Scaling laws for the power spectral density are identified providing the possibility to estimate pressure spectra for different flow conditions and in particular for full-scale applications. The range of validity of some theoretical models for the cross-spectral density representation is analysed by direct comparison with experimental data of wall-pressure fluctuations measured in streamwise and spanwise direction. In a second phase, an indirect validation is performed by comparing the measured vibrational response of an elastic plate inserted in the catamaran hull with that obtained numerically using, as a forcing function, the modelled pressure load. In general, marine structures are able to accept energy mainly from the sub-convective components of the pressure field because the typical bending wavenumber values are usually lower than the convective one; thus, a model that gives an accurate description of the phenomenon at low wavenumbers is needed. In this work, it is shown that the use of the Chase model for the description of the pressure field provides a satisfactory agreement between the numerical and the experimental response of the hull plate. These experimental data, although acquired at model scale, represent a significant test case also for the real ship problem.

  7. Discovering Plate Boundaries in Data-integrated Environments: Preservice Teachers' Conceptualization and Implementation of Scientific Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezen-Barrie, Asli; Moore, Joel; Roig, Cara E.

    2015-08-01

    Drawn from the norms and rules of their fields, scientists use variety of practices, such as asking questions and arguing based on evidence, to engage in research that will contribute to our understanding of Earth and beyond. In this study, we explore how preservice teachers' learn to teach scientific practices while teaching plate tectonic theory. In particular, our aim is to observe which scientific practices preservice teachers use while teaching an earth science unit, how do they integrate these practices into their lessons, and what challenges do they face during their first time teaching of an earth science content area integrated with scientific practices. The study is designed as a qualitative, exploratory case study of seven preservice teachers while they were learning to teach plate tectonic theory to a group of middle school students. The data were driven from the video records and artifacts of the preservice teachers' learning and teaching processes as well as written reflections on the teaching. Intertextual discourse analysis was used to understand what scientific practices preservice teachers choose to integrate into their teaching experience. Our results showed that preservice teachers chose to focus on four aspects of scientific practices: (1) employing historical understanding of how the theory emerged, (2) encouraging the use of evidence to build up a theory, (3) observation and interpretation of data maps, and (4) collaborative practices in making up the theory. For each of these practices, we also looked at the common challenges faced by preservice teachers by using constant comparative analysis. We observed the practices that preservice teachers decided to use and the challenges they faced, which were determined by what might have come as in their personal history as learners. Therefore, in order to strengthen preservice teachers' background, college courses should be arranged to teach important scientific ideas through scientific practices

  8. Deformations along the Caribbean - South American Plate Boundary From Nine Years Repeated GPS Observations in the CASA Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, H.; Kaniuth, K.; Stuber, K.; Tremel, H.; Hernandez, J. N.; Hoyer, M.

    2002-05-01

    The first GPS observations along the Caribbean - South American plate boundary were carried out within the Central and South American Geodynamics Project (CASA UNO) in 1988. The precision of the results was quite poor due to the imperfect operation of the GPS system at that time. Since 1993 regular re-measurements of more than 20 stations in the eastern part of the network along the Bocono - El Pilar fault system in Venezuela have been performed. The paper presents the continuous deformations derived from the 1993, 1996, 1999 and 2002 complete network observations and some additional partial measurements. The long-term deformations in the order of one to two centimeters per year are now significantly confirmed and may be interpreted in the context of regional plate tectonics and geodynamics. The co-seismic displacements during the Cariaco (Sucre) 1997 earthquake are analyzed separately using detailed GPS observations in 1997. They are discussed as well as the local post-seismic deformations from 1997 to 2002.

  9. Numerical Investigation of Wall Cooling and Suction Effects on Supersonic Flat-Plate Boundary Layer Transition Using Large Eddy Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suozhu Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Reducing friction resistance and aerodynamic heating has important engineering significance to improve the performances of super/hypersonic aircraft, so the purpose of transition control and turbulent drag reduction becomes one of the cutting edges in turbulence research. In order to investigate the influences of wall cooling and suction on the transition process and fully developed turbulence, the large eddy simulation of spatially evolving supersonic boundary layer transition over a flat-plate with freestream Mach number 4.5 at different wall temperature and suction intensity is performed in the present work. It is found that the wall cooling and suction are capable of changing the mean velocity profile within the boundary layer and improving the stability of the flow field, thus delaying the onset of the spatial transition process. The transition control will become more effective as the wall temperature decreases, while there is an optimal wall suction intensity under the given conditions. Moreover, the development of large-scale coherent structures can be suppressed effectively via wall cooling, but wall suction has no influence.

  10. MHD boundary layer slip flow and radiative nonlinear heat transfer over a flat plate with variable fluid properties and thermophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Parida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work considers the two-dimensional steady MHD boundary layer flow of heat and mass transfer over a flat plate with partial slip at the surface subjected to the convective heat flux. The particular attraction lies in searching the effects of variable viscosity and variable thermal diffusivity on the behavior of the flow. In addition, non-linear thermal radiation effects and thermophoresis are taken into account. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations for the flow, heat and mass transfer are transformed into a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using similarity variable, which are solved numerically by applying Runge–Kutta fourth–fifth order integration scheme in association with quasilinear shooting technique. The novel results for the dimensionless velocity, temperature, concentration and ambient Prandtl number within the boundary layer are displayed graphically for various parameters that characterize the flow. The local skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are shown graphically. The numerical results obtained for the particular case are fairly in good agreement with the result of Rahman [6].

  11. A sharp cadherin-6 gene expression boundary in the developing mouse cortical plate demarcates the future functional areal border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terakawa, Youhei W; Inoue, Yukiko U; Asami, Junko; Hoshino, Mikio; Inoue, Takayoshi

    2013-10-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex can be tangentially subdivided into tens of functional areas with distinct cyto-architectures and neural circuitries; however, it remains elusive how these areal borders are genetically elaborated during development. Here we establish original bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mouse lines that specifically recapitulate cadherin-6 (Cdh6) mRNA expression profiles in the layer IV of the somatosensory cortex and by detailing their cortical development, we show that a sharp Cdh6 gene expression boundary is formed at a mediolateral coordinate along the cortical layer IV as early as the postnatal day 5 (P5). By further applying mouse genetics that allows rigid cell fate tracing with CreERT2 expression, it is demonstrated that the Cdh6 gene expression boundary set at around P4 eventually demarcates the areal border between the somatosensory barrel and limb field at P20. In the P6 cortical cell pellet culture system, neurons with Cdh6 expression preferentially form aggregates in a manner dependent on Ca(2+) and electroporation-based Cdh6 overexpression limited to the postnatal stages perturbs area-specific cell organization in the barrel field. These results suggest that Cdh6 expression in the nascent cortical plate may serve solidification of the protomap for cortical functional areas.

  12. IDENTIFYING DEFECT SIZE IN TWO DIMENSIONAL PLATES BASED ON BOUNDARY MEASUREMENTS USING REDUCED MODEL AND GENETIC ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRAHIM BENAISSA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available ­In this study the proper orthogonal decomposition method is utilised as a model reduction technique in crack size estimation in a cracked plate under traction problem. The idea is to create a reduced model based on the results issued from finite element method, thus the crack size parameter is directly related to the boundary displacement obtained from the boundary nodes considered as sensor points. The inverse investigation is run using a genetic algorithm to minimization the error function expressed as the difference between data caused by the crack proposed by genetic algorithm in every individual and the one measured at the actual crack identity. The reduced model is validated by comparing the estimated structural response with the corresponding results from the finite element model. The effectiveness of the approach related to the used number of sensors is presented. Finally the stability of the method against uncertainty is tested by introducing different levels of white noise to the reference data.

  13. High-velocity basal sediment package atop oceanic crust, offshore Cascadia: Impacts on plate boundary processes and fluid migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, D. E.; Keranen, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    Differences in fluid pressure and mechanical properties at megathrust boundaries in subduction zones have been proposed to create varying seismogenic behavior. In Cascadia, where large ruptures are possible but little seismicity occurs presently, new seismic transects across the deformation front (COAST cruise; Holbrook et al., 2012) image an unusually high-wavespeed sedimentary unit directly overlying oceanic crust. Wavespeed increases before sediments reach the deformation front, and the well-laminated unit, consistently of 1 km thickness, can be traced for 50 km beneath the accretionary prism before imaging quality declines. Wavespeed is modeled via iterative prestack time migration (PSTM) imaging and increases from 3.5 km/sec on the seaward end of the profile to >5.0 km/s near the deformation front. Landward of the deformation front, wavespeed is low along seaward-dipping thrust faults in the Quaternary accretionary prism, indicative of rapid dewatering along faults. The observed wavespeed of 5.5 km/sec just above subducting crust is consistent with porosity consolidation, cementation, and diagenesis as the sediments encounter the deformation front. Beneath the sediment, the compressional wavespeed of uppermost oceanic crust is 3-4 km/sec, likely reduced by alteration and/or fluids, lowest within a propagator wake. The propagator wake intersects the plate boundary at an oblique angle and changes the degree of hydration of the oceanic plate as it subducts within our area. Fluid flow out of oceanic crust is likely impeded by the low-porosity basal sediment package except along the focused thrust faults. Decollements are present at the top of oceanic basement, at the top of the high-wavespeed basal unit, and within sedimentary strata at higher levels; the decollement at the top of oceanic crust is active at the toe of the deformation front. The basal sedimentary unit appears to be mechanically strong, similar to observations from offshore Sumatra, where strongly

  14. Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briestenský Miloš

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The EU-TecNet monitoring network uses customized three-dimensional extensometers to record transient deformations across individual faults. This paper presents the first results from two newly established monitoring points in the Balkan Mountains in Bulgaria. The data from Saeva Dupka, recorded across an EEN-WWS striking fault, show sinistral strike-slip along the fault and subsidence of the southern block. Much of the subsidence occurred around the time of the distal MW = 5.6 Pernik Earthquake. An important transient deformation event, which began in autumn 2012, was reflected by significant compression and following extension, across the monitored fault. The data from Bacho Kiro, recorded across a NE–SW striking fault, show sinistral strike-slip along the fault and subsidence of the north-western block. The same important deformation event was reflected by changes in the strike-slip, dip-slip, and horizontal opening/closing trends. These results have been compared to data from other monitoring points in the Western Carpathians, External Dinarides, and Tian Shan. Many of the sites show evidence of simultaneous displacement anomalies and this observation is interpreted as a reflection of the plate-wide propagation of a tectonic pressure pulse towards the end of 2012.

  15. The Lithosphere-asthenosphere Boundary beneath the South Island of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, J.; Fischer, K. M.; Savage, M. K.

    2017-12-01

    LAB properties indicate strong modification of the LAB by the interplay of convergence and strike-slip deformation along and across this transpressional plate boundary.

  16. Rheological responses to plate boundary deformation at the Eastern Volcanic Zone in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariqul Islam, Md.; Sturkell, Erik

    2017-10-01

    Located on the mid-Atlantic ridge, Iceland allows for direct measurement of crustal deformation. Global Positioning System (GPS) data from the Eastern Volcanic Zone (EVZ), Iceland, and crustal deformation of the rift near its southern end at 64°N show a spreading rate of 13.8 ± 1.8 mm yr- 1. About 90% of the deformation occurs in an 80 to 90-km wide zone. To understand how the rheology of the lithosphere influences rifting, we applied a thermo-mechanical stretching model that includes thermal states in Iceland using temperature- and stress-dependent wet and dry olivine rheology. We attempt to reproduce the thermal structure of a rift by defining 700 °C from 5- to 15-km depth at the rift axis that leads to variation in rheological structure, and to estimate the layer (from surface to a depth of 700 °C) where the elastic deformation of the lithosphere is the greatest. At a fixed spreading rate, the deformation field is controlled by the sub-surface thermal state. The vertical subsidence rate at the ridge axis increases almost linearly as the half-velocity increases. The best fitted model suggests a thermal gradient of 54 °C km- 1 at depth below where 700 °C occurs at the ridge axis. The models have little sensitivity to the wet or dry olivine rheology. Estimated viscosity is 1 × 1019 Pa s at 20-km depth at the ridge axis and 1 × 1018 Pa s up to 100-km depth in the model. The spreading rate influences the tangential (non-linearity) shape of the deformation field, and a change in spreading rate affects the deformation field the most. After spreading velocity, the model's second most sensitive parameter is the location of the 700 °C at the rift axis. The thermomechanical model confirms that the rheological responses at the central part of the rift zone in the EVZ, Iceland caused of plate spreading is nonlinear, comparable with surface deformation observed by GPS measurement.

  17. Deformation of plate boundaries associated with subduction of continental margins: insights from 3D thermo-mechanical laboratory experiments (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutelier, D. A.; Cruden, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    -dimensional. Three-dimensional, non-cylindrical thermomechanical laboratory experiments of arc-continent collision investigate the impact of the flexural strength of the orogen and along-strike coupling of the neighboring segments of the plate boundary in the cases of diachronous collisions because of obliquity of the subducting passive margin or obliquity of the convergence in the subduction zone. The experiments reveal that deformation is continuous along-strike, but also fundamentally three-dimensional. Progressive along-strike structural variations arise because coupling between neighboring segments induces either advanced or delayed failure of the arc lithosphere and passive margin. The modeling results suggest that orogenic belts should experience deeper subduction of continental crust and hence higher-pressure metamorphism where the two plates first collided than elsewhere along the plate boundary where collision subsequently propagated. Furthermore, during the initial stage of collision the accretionary wedge is partially subducted, which leads to lubrication of the interplate zone and a reduction of shear traction. Therefore, a large convergence obliquity angle does not produce a migrating fore-arc sliver. Rather, the pressure force generated by subduction of the buoyant continental crust causes fore-arc motion. It follows that convergence obliquity during collision does not yield trench-parallel deformation of the fore arc and its influence on the collision process is limited.

  18. Frequency response of rectangular plates with free-edge openings and carlings subjected to point excitation force and enforced displacement at boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Seung Cho

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a numerical procedure for the natural vibration analysis of plates with openings and carlings based on the assumed mode method is extended to assess their forced response. Firstly, natural response of plates with openings and carlings is calculated from the eigenvalue equation derived by using Lagrange's equation of motion. Secondly, the mode superposition method is applied to determine frequency response. Mindlin theory is adopted for plate modelling and the effect of openings is taken into account by subtracting their potential and kinetic energies from the corresponding plate energies. Natural and frequency response of plates with openings and carlings subjected to point excitation force and enforced acceleration at boundaries, respectively, is analysed by using developed in-house code. For the validation of the developed method and the code, extensive numerical results, related to plates with different opening shape, carlings and boundary conditions, are compared with numerical data from the relevant literature and with finite element solutions obtained by general finite element tool.

  19. Velocity- and slip-dependent weakening on the Tohoku plate boundary fault: shallow coseismic slip facilitated by foreshock afterslip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Y.; Ikari, M.; Ujiie, K.; Kopf, A.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding of role of slow earthquakes as they relate to the occurrence of both megathrust earthquakes and tsunami earthquakes is necessary to mitigate these disasters in the near future. Laboratory shearing experiments is one of important approach to evaluate these relationships. Here, we use powdered gouge samples from JFAST (IODP Expedition 343) Hole C0019E, core sample 17R-1, which is the plate boundary fault zone in the Japan Trench subduction zone. In this region, both large coseismic slip during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake as well as discrete slow slip events (SSE) have occurred. Experiments were conducted in a single-direct shear apparatus under normal stress of 16 MPa, with total shear displacements of up to 16 mm. We evaluate both the velocity- and slip-dependence of friction by extracting the velocity-dependent friction parameters a, b, and Dc, and measuring the rate of change in friction coefficient with shear displacement as the slip-dependence of friction. We report that in friction experiments using the Tohoku fault zone samples, an increase in sliding velocity exceeding that of earthquake afterslip can induce a change from steady-state frictional strength or slip hardening friction to slip-weakening frictional behavior. Our results show that the slip weakening is observed when the slip velocity exceeds 1 x 10-6 m/s during our experiments, while steady-state frictional strength or slip hardening is observed below 1x10-6 m/s. In the Japan Trench region, two slow events were observed at the downdip edge of the mainshock coseismic slip zone (< 30 m) were observed. These are an episodic SSE with a slip velocity of 0.1 x 10-6, and afterslip after the largest foreshock with a slip velocity of 2 x 10-6 m/s. This suggests that the afterslip may have facilitated the large coseismic slip during the mainshock on the plate boundary fault of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake.

  20. Observing active deformation of volcanoes in North America: Geodetic data from the Plate Boundary Observatory and associated networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puskas, C. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Mattioli, G. S.; Meertens, C. M.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Enders, M.; Feaux, K.; Mencin, D.; Baker, S.; Lisowski, M.; Smith, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), operated by UNAVCO, records deformation of the geologically diverse North America western plate boundary, with subnetworks of instruments concentrated at selected active and potentially active volcanoes. These sensors record deformation and earthquakes and allow monitoring agencies and researchers to analyze changes in ground motion and seismicity. The intraplate volcanoes at Yellowstone and Long Valley are characterized by uplift/subsidence cycles, high seismicity, and hydrothermal activity but there have been no historic eruptions at either volcano. PBO maintains dense GPS networks of 20-25 stations at each of these volcanoes, with an additional 5 boreholes at Yellowstone containing tensor strainmeters, short-period seismometers, and borehole tiltmeters. Subduction zone volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc have had multiple historic eruptions, and PBO maintains equipment at Augustine (8 GPS), Akutan (8 GPS, 4 tiltmeters), and Unimak Island (14 GPS, 8 tiltmeters). The Unimak stations are at the active Westdahl and Shishaldin edifices and the nearby, inactive Isanotski volcano. In the Cascade Arc, PBO maintains networks at Mount St. Helens (15 GPS, 4 borehole strainmeters and seismometers, 8 borehole tiltmeters), Shasta (7 GPS, 1 borehole strainmeter and seismometer), and Lassen Peak (8 GPS). Data from many of these stations in the Pacific Northwest and California are also provided as realtime streams of raw and processed data. Real-time GPS data, along with high-rate GPS data, will be an important new resource for detecting and studying future rapid volcanic deformation events and earthquakes. UNAVCO works closely with the USGS Volcano Hazards Program, archiving data from USGS GPS stations in Alaska, Cascadia, and Long Valley. The PBO and USGS networks combined provide more comprehensive coverage than PBO alone, particularly of the Cascade Arc, where the USGS maintains a multiple instruments near each volcano. Ground

  1. Progressive migration of slab break-off along the southern Tyrrhenian plate boundary: Constraints for the present day kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarabba, Claudio; Palano, Mimmo

    2017-04-01

    The Ionian subduction in the central Mediterranean, just 200 km wide, is one of the narrowest in the world. Its evolution has involved a progressive disruption of the subducting slab, contemporaneous to the retreat and step-wise opening of back-arc basins. In this study, we analyse velocity anomalies of the upper mantle, together with the most comprehensive set of earthquake locations and kinematic indicators available for Italy, to reconstruct the geodynamics and tectonic evolution of the Ionian subduction system. Along the Sicilian boundary, we identify an eastward migration of the slab edge with detachment of the Ionian oceanic lithosphere. We hypothesize that the progressive detachment of the slab took place along lithospheric transform faults of the Neo-Tethys Ocean. Among the main active kinematic elements of the Ionian accretionary wedge, we suggest that a ∼400-km-long and highly segmented shear zone formed by the Aeolian-Tindari-Letojanni fault system and the Ionian fault represents the surface expression of such a lithospheric tearing. The present day convergence between the Eurasian and African plates is accommodated both at the frontal thrust of the flexed Hyblean margin in southern Sicily and offshore along the Tyrrhenian Sea. Lithospheric bending favors the wedging of the mantle underneath northern Sicily, while magmatic fluids are channeled along slab tears.

  2. Large plates and small blocks: The Variscan orogeny in the Bohemian Massif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Uwe; Romer, Rolf L.

    2017-04-01

    juxtaposition of different crustal levels along steeply inclined shear zones finally accounts for the distribution of low-strain and high-strain domains. The model works with NE-SW oriented plate convergence. Perpendicular NW-SE shortening coeval with dextral strike slip tectonics reflects escape tectonics during the late Variscan transpression. The abundance of pre-orogenic microcontinental blocks within a collisional orogen does not provide evidence for independent lithospheric microplates.

  3. An analysis of the relaxation of laminar boundary layer on a flat plate after passage of an interface with application to expansion-tube flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    The relaxation of the accelerating-gas boundary layer to the test-gas boundary layer over a flat plate in an expansion tube is analyzed. Several combinations of test gas and acceleration gas are considered. The problem is treated in two conically similar limits: (1) when the time lag between the arrival of the shock and the interface at the leading edge of the plate is very large, and (2) when this lag is negligible. The time-dependent laminar-boundary-layer equations of a binary mixture of perfect gases are taken as the flow-governing equations. This coupled set of differential equations, written in terms of the Lam-Crocco variables, has been solved by a line-relaxation finite-difference techniques. The results presented include the Stanton number and the local skin-friction coefficient as functions of shock Mach number and the nondimensional distance-time variable. The results indicate that more than 95 percent of the test-gas boundary layer exists over a length, measured from the leading edge of the plate, equal to about three-tenths of the distance traversed by the interface in the free stream.

  4. Heterogeneous distribution of pelagic sediments incoming the Japan Trench possibly controlling slip propagation on shallow plate boundary fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, A.; Nakamura, Y.; Fukuchi, R.; Kurano, H.; Ikehara, K.; Kanamatsu, T.; Arai, K.; Usami, K.; Ashi, J.

    2017-12-01

    Catastrophic tsunami of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake was triggered by large coseismic slip reached to the Japan Trench axis (e.g. Fujiwara et al., 2011, Science; Kodaira et al., 2012, Nature Geoscience). Results of the IODP Expedition 343 (JFAST) suggest that small friction of smectite-rich pelagic clay caused slip propagation on shallow plate boundary fault (Ujiie et al., 2013, Science; Kameda et al., 2015, Geology; Moore et al., 2015, Geosphere). On the other hand, JAMSTEC high-resolution seismic profiles show that incoming sediments have large heterogeneities in thicknesses, and two areas of extremely thin sediments on the Pacific Plate (thickness less than 100 m) were found at around 39°N (Nakamura et al., AGU 2017, this session). To reconcile whether the smectite-rich pelagic clay even exists in these areas, we sampled surface sediments during the R/V Shinsei Maru KS-15-3 cruise. Seven piston cores were retrieved from seaward trench slope, horst, graben, and graben edge. Core lithologies are mainly diatomaceous ooze/clay including tephra layers, not resemble to pelagic clays discovered in JFAST. Ages of tephra layers were estimated by correlating mineral assemblages and refractive indices of volcanic glasses to Japanese widespread tephras. Averaged sedimentation rates of seaward trench slope, horst, graben, and graben edge are estimated to be 25-30, 6.5-20, 45, 0.9 cm/kyr, respectively. These sedimentation rates imply that sediments on seaward trench slope and horst have been deposited in the last 160-500 kyr, suggesting that entire pelagic sediments, including smectite-rich pelagic clay, have been removed by some reasons in the last 0.5 million years. Possible reason for such modification of sediment is near-trench igneous activity known as petit-spot volcanism (Hirano et al., 2006, Science). The lack of smectite-rich pelagic clay near 39°N of the Japan Trench is consistent with results of tsunami inversions proposing shallow large coseismic slip propagated

  5. Incorporating Cutting Edge Scientific Results from the Margins-Geoprisms Program into the Undergraduate Curriculum, Rupturing Continental Lithosphere Part II: Introducing Euler Poles Using Baja-North America Relative Plate Motion Across the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, J. P.; Bennett, S. E. K.; Cashman, S. M.; Dorsey, R. J.; Goodliffe, A. M.; Lamb, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-MARGINS Program funded a decade of research on continental margin processes. The NSF-GeoPRISMS Mini-lesson Project, funded by NSF-TUES, is designed to integrate the significant findings from the MARGINS program into open-source college-level curriculum. The Gulf of California (GOC) served as the focus site for the Rupturing Continental Lithosphere (RCL) initiative, which addressed several scientific questions: What forces drive rift initiation, localization, propagation and evolution? How does deformation vary in time and space, and why? How does crust evolve, physically and chemically, as rifting proceeds to sea-floor spreading? What is the role of sedimentation and magmatism in continental extension? We developed two weeks of curriculum, including lectures, labs, and in-class activities that can be used as a whole or individually. This component of the curriculum introduces students to the Euler pole description of relative plate motion (RPM) by examining the tectonic interactions of the Baja California microplate and North American plate. The plate boundary varies in rift obliquity along strike, from highly oblique and strike-slip dominated in the south to slightly less oblique and with a larger extensional component in the north. This Google Earth-based exercise provides students with a visualization of RPM using small circle contours of the local direction and magnitude of Baja-North America movement on a spherical Earth. Students use RPM to calculate the fault slip rates on transform, normal, and oblique-slip faults and examine how the varying faulting styles combine to accommodate RPM. MARGINS results are integrated via comparison of rift obliquity with the structural style of rift-related faults around the GOC. We find this exercise to fit naturally into courses about plate tectonics, geophysics, and especially structural geology, given the similarity between Euler pole rotations and stereonet-based rotations of structural data.

  6. Evolution of the Mariana Convergent Plate Margin System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Patricia

    1996-02-01

    volcano chains extending from the base of the fault westward into the back arc basin. The western boundary is the West Mariana Ridge, the western portion of the volcanic arc active prior to formation of the Mariana Trough. The trough evolved in a two-stage extension process of rifting and subsequent seafloor spreading. The back arc basin varies along strike from rifted arc lithosphere with scattered volcanoes but no real spreading center in the north to a complex mid-ocean-type spreading center south of 20°N. The change from initial rifting to true seafloor spreading is also evident across the Mariana Trough from rifted topography near the West Mariana Ridge to spreading ridges in the central to eastern basin south of 20°N. This morphologic change indicates an early stage of extension with basin-and-range-type topography predominant and volcanism restricted to fissure eruptions along fault block boundaries. The spreading ridges and abyssal hill morphology evolved later as new lithosphere was generated at elongate volcanic ridges located in the center of rift valleys. The center of extension intersects the active volcanic front differently at either end of the Mariana Trough. In the north, extension is by rifting of arc lithosphere where it intersects the arc. In the south a major strike-slip fault extends from the trench axis across the forearc, through the volcanic arc, and into the back arc basin. Arc magmas apparently leak along this fault zone into the forearc and the back arc spreading center. The complexity of interrelated tectonism and magmatism in this convergent margin is daunting, but studies of arc systems such as this provide the best hope of interpreting many of the exposed terranes accreted to continents. Comparison of subaerial terranes with recent studies of intraoceanic convergent margins will add to our understanding of plate interactions and of the evolution of the volcanic arcs and extensional back arc basins generated within such environments.

  7. Modelling and visualizing distributed compressional plate deformation using GPlates2.0: The Arctic Eurekan Orogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gion, Austin; Williams, Simon; Müller, Dietmar

    2017-04-01

    Present-day distributed plate deformation is being mapped and simulated in great detail, largely based on satellite observations. In contrast, the modelling of and data assimilation into deforming plate models for the geological past is still in its infancy. The recently released GPLates2.0 (www.gplates.org) software provides a framework for building plate models including diffuse deformation. Here we present an application example for the Eurekan orogeny, a Paleogene tectonic event driven by sea floor spreading in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay, resulting in compression between NW Greenland and the Canadian Arctic. The complexity of the region has prompted the development of countless tectonic models over the last 100 years. Our new tectonic model incorporates a variety of geological field and geophysical observations to model rigid and diffuse plate deformation in this region. Compression driven by Greenland's northward motion contemporaneous with sea floor spreading in the Labrador Sea, shortens Ellesmere Island in a "fan" like pattern, creating a series of thrust faults. Our model incorporates two phases of tectonic events during the orogeny from 63-35 Ma. Phase one from 63 to 55 Ma incorporates 85 km of Paleocene extension between Ellesmere Island and Devon Island with extension of 20 km between Axel Heiberg Island and Ellesmere Island and 85 km of left-lateral strike-slip along the Nares Strait/Judge Daly Fault System, matching a range of 50-100 km indicated by the offset of marker beds, facies contacts, and platform margins between the conjugate Greenland and Ellesmere Island margins. Phase two from 55 to 35 Ma captures 30 km of east-west shortening and 200 km of north-south shortening from Ellesmere Island to the Canadian Arctic Island margins. Our model extends the boundaries of the Eurekan Orogeny northward, considering its effect on the Lomonosov Ridge, Morris Jessup Rise, and the Yermak Plateau , favouring a model in which the Lomonosov Ridge moves

  8. The Iberian Plate: myth or reality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canerot, J.

    2016-10-01

    The plate tectonics theory generally leads us to consider that Iberia was an independent plate separated from Europe by the North Pyrenean Fault (NPF). The NPF has been commonly interpreted as a transform fault associated with a huge counterclockwise transverse and rotational movement that allowed the opening of the Bay of Biscay and the relative eastward motion of Iberia during the Mesozoic. According to some interpretations, this movement may have generated an interplate gap several hundreds of km wide, which led to the creation of an oceanic crust during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. However, field studies recently carried out in the Pyrenees do not support these interpretations. The North Pyrenean Fault (NPF) of Tertiary age is observed in the central and eastern Pyrenees, where pioneering researchers defined it as separating the North Pyrenean Zone from the Axial Zone.However, this fault cannot be identified in the western part of the range to the west of the Ossau valley. Consequently, the geodynamic evolution of Iberia has always been dependent on Europe, especially during the failed oceanic rifting in the Mid-Cretaceous. Indeed, during this period, a central zone of crustal thinning occupied by turbiditic basins separated the European from the Iberian continental crust, with a very localized mantle exhumation found only in the Mauleon basin. Therefore, far from being an interplate range, the Pyrenees can neither be considered as an intraplate unit. We can define this orogenic belt as resulting from the Tertiary tectonic inversion of a Mid-Cretaceous rift system. According to this new interpretation, Iberia would not have been an isolated plate but represented an unstable, outlying part of Europe. Rather than displaying the features of a rigid lithospheric unit with well-defined boundaries, Iberia grouped together different crustal blocks undergoing specific movements at particular times. During the Mesozoic, normal, reverse or strike-slip

  9. Vibration characteristics of functionally graded carbon nanotube reinforced composite rectangular plates on Pasternak foundation with arbitrary boundary conditions and internal line supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Rui; Wang, Qingshan; Tang, Jinyuan; Shuai, Cijun; Liang, Qian

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents the first known vibration characteristics of moderately thick functionally graded carbon nanotube reinforced composite rectangular plates on Pasternak foundation with arbitrary boundary conditions and internal line supports on the basis of the firstorder shear deformation theory. Different distributions of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) along the thickness are considered. Uniform and other three kinds of functionally graded distributions of carbon nanotubes along the thickness direction of plates are studied. The solutions carried out using an enhanced Ritz method mainly include the following three points: Firstly, create the Lagrange energy function by the energy principle; Secondly, as the main innovation point, the modified Fourier series are chosen as the basic functions of the admissible functions of the plates to eliminate all the relevant discontinuities of the displacements and their derivatives at the edges; Lastly, solve the natural frequencies as well as the associated mode shapes by means of the Ritz-variational energy method. In this study, the influences of the volume fraction of CNTs, distribution type of CNTs, boundary restrain parameters, location of the internal line supports, foundation coefficients on the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the FG-CNT reinforced composite rectangular plates are presented.

  10. Effect of flange and stiffener rigidity on the boundary conditions and shear buckling stress of plate girders

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Azzawi, Zaid; Stratford, Timothy; Rotter, John; Bisby, Luke

    2015-01-01

    The two essential functions of the web plate in a plate girder are to maintain a relative distance between the top and bottom flanges and to resist shear stresses. In most practical ranges of plate girder bridge spans, the shear stresses are relatively low compared to bending stresses in the flanges induced by flexure. As a result, the web plate is typically much thinner than the flanges. The web panel is therefore prone to buckling at comparatively low shear forces. To enhance the web’s buck...

  11. New insights into North America-Pacific Plate boundary deformation from Lake Tahoe, Salton Sea and southern Baja California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Daniel Stephen

    Five studies along the Pacific-North America (PA-NA) plate boundary offer new insights into continental margin processes, the development of the PA-NA tectonic margin and regional earthquake hazards. This research is based on the collection and analysis of several new marine geophysical and geological datasets. Two studies used seismic CHIRP surveys and sediment coring in Fallen Leaf Lake (FLL) and Lake Tahoe to constrain tectonic and geomorphic processes in the lakes, but also the slip-rate and earthquake history along the West Tahoe-Dollar Point Fault. CHIRP profiles image vertically offset and folded strata that record deformation associated with the most recent event (MRE). Radiocarbon dating of organic material extracted from piston cores constrain the age of the MRE to be between 4.1--4.5 k.y. B.P. Offset of Tioga aged glacial deposits yield a slip rate of 0.4--0.8 mm/yr. An ancillary study in FLL determined that submerged, in situ pine trees that date to between 900-1250 AD are related to a medieval megadrought in the Lake Tahoe Basin. The timing and severity of this event match medieval megadroughts observed in the western United States and in Europe. CHIRP profiles acquired in the Salton Sea, California provide new insights into the processes that control pull-apart basin development and earthquake hazards along the southernmost San Andreas Fault. Differential subsidence (>10 mm/yr) in the southern sea suggests the existence of northwest-dipping basin-bounding faults near the southern shoreline. In contrast to previous models, the rapid subsidence and fault architecture observed in the southern part of the sea are consistent with experimental models for pull-apart basins. Geophysical surveys imaged more than 15 ˜N15°E oriented faults, some of which have produced up to 10 events in the last 2-3 kyr. Potentially 2 of the last 5 events on the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF) were synchronous with rupture on offshore faults, but it appears that ruptures on

  12. Using EarthScope Construction of the Plate Boundary Observatory to Provide Locally Based Experiential Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M.; Eriksson, S.; Barbour, K.; Venator, S.; Mencin, D.; Prescott, W.

    2006-12-01

    EarthScope is an NSF-funded, national science initiative to explore the structure and evolution of the North American continent and to understand the physical processes controlling earthquakes and volcanoes. This large-scale experiment provides locally based opportunities for education and outreach which engage students at various levels and the public. UNAVCO is responsible for the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) component of EarthScope. PBO includes the installation and operations and maintenance of large networks of Global Positioning Satellite (GPS), strainmeter, seismometer, and tiltmeter instruments and the acquisition of satellite radar imagery, all of which will be used to measure and map the smallest movements across faults, the magma movement inside active volcanoes and the very wide areas of deformation associated with plate tectonic motion. UNAVCO, through its own education and outreach activities and in collaboration with the EarthScope E&O Program, uses the PBO construction activities to increase the understanding and public appreciation of geodynamics, earth deformation processes, and their relevance to society. These include programs for public outreach via various media, events associated with local installations, a program to employ students in the construction of PBO, and development of curricular materials by use in local schools associated with the EarthScope geographic areas of focus. PBO provides information to the media to serve the needs of various groups and localities, including interpretive centers at national parks and forests, such as Mt. St. Helens. UNAVCO staff contributed to a television special with the Spanish language network Univision Aquí y Ahora program focused on the San Andreas Fault and volcanoes in Alaska. PBO participated in an Education Day at the Pathfinder Ranch Science and Outdoor Education School in Mountain Center, California. Pathfinder Ranch hosts two of the eight EarthScope borehole strainmeters in the Anza

  13. On plate tectonics and the geologic evolution of southwestern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Peter L.

    1991-07-01

    so that the East Pacific Rise in this immediate area became nearly perpendicular to the trench and perpendicular to the vector of motion of the Pacific plate relative to North America. Formation of the SMO batholith was followed between 24 and 20 Ma by a major increase in the rate of subduction of the Guadalupe plate, a fragment of the former Farallon plate, and by increasing mylonitization, extension, and uplift in the metamorphic core complexes that extend northwestward through southern Arizona from the northern end of the SMO batholith. The plate margin underwent another major change between 12.5 and 10 Ma when subduction again stopped, strike slip faulting became dominant along the coast, the Basin and Range Province opened, and numerous tectonostratigraphic terranes in southern California underwent large rotations. By 3 Ma a large, new terrane had been severed from North America immediately west of the SMO batholith as the Gulf of California opened. These observations can be explained by a model for the weakening and ultimate falling apart of the uppermost part of the subducted oceanic plate in the 20-30 m.y. after the end of rapid subduction. As the plate falls apart, not only is compressional stress relieved, but significant backslip along the old subduction zone is also possible, perhaps bringing blueschists rapidly upward from 20- to 30-km depths.

  14. MHD Heat and Mass Transfer of Chemical Reaction Fluid Flow over a Moving Vertical Plate in Presence of Heat Source with Convective Surface Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Rout

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate the influence of chemical reaction and the combined effects of internal heat generation and a convective boundary condition on the laminar boundary layer MHD heat and mass transfer flow over a moving vertical flat plate. The lower surface of the plate is in contact with a hot fluid while the stream of cold fluid flows over the upper surface with heat source and chemical reaction. The basic equations governing the flow, heat transfer, and concentration are reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations by using appropriate transformation for variables and solved numerically by Runge-Kutta fourth-order integration scheme in association with shooting method. The effects of physical parameters on the velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are illustrated graphically. A table recording the values of skin friction, heat transfer, and mass transfer at the plate is also presented. The discussion focuses on the physical interpretation of the results as well as their comparison with previous studies which shows good agreement as a special case of the problem.

  15. Cretaceous to Cenozoic sequential kinematics in the forearc-arc transition: effects of changing oblique plate convergence and the San Andreas system with implications for the La Paz fault (southern Baja California, Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Frank; Pérez Venzor, José Antonio; Pérez Espinoza, Jesus Efraín; Rochin, Joel Hirales

    2010-01-01

    We studied metasediments and mylonitic arc granitoids from the forearc-arc transition of southern Baja California, Mexico. Thin section analyses and field evidence show that metamorphism of the forearc-arc transition is of the high T/P active margin type. The heat was provided by Cretaceous arc intrusions. Field observations and thin section analyses, including the time/temperature deformation path, demonstrate that the study area was first affected by dextral, ductile shearing followed by ductile, sinistral, possibly transpressive strike-slip parallel to the magmatic arc during the Cretaceous. Both intervals are related to changing oblique plate convergence and, thus, identified as trench-linked strike-slip effects. The geometric relationship between arc-dipping foliation, stretching lineation and shear sense indicates that the arc may have been pressed onto the rocks of the study area during sinistral shearing. The sinistral interval lasted up until regional cooling (Early Cenozoic?). Because the La Paz fault is closely associated with the forearc-arc transition, it must have the same Cretaceous to Early Cenozoic kinematic history. The northern segment of the La Paz fault is a modern, brittle, strike-slip fault interpreted as a dextral synthetic fault of the San Andreas system which opened the Gulf of California (Mar de Cortés/Golfo de California). We found no evidence for Miocene Basin and Range extension.

  16. A comparison of GPS solutions for strain and SKS fast directions: Implications for modes of shear in the mantle of a plate boundary zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlie, N.; Stern, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    The strain rate and vertical velocity fields for New Zealand are computed using GPS data from GEONET (NZ) collected during the past decade. Two domains for shear in the mantle are inferred by comparing the principal shortening direction with the fast direction of shear wave splitting. Beneath the central- southern part of the South Island the strains are low and its unclear if irrotational strain is taking place or if the splitting here is dominated by anisotropy in the asthenosphere. In contrast, data for the central and northern South Island suggest simple shear is dominant and distributed over a zone 200 km wide. An analysis of the major strike-slip faults confirms that the strike of the major South Island fault systems makes a 60±15 deg. angle with the shortening direction. A map of the vertical component of GEONET GPS velocities shows regions of surface uplift >5mm/y in both the central South and North Islands. While the pattern of uplift in central South Island is consistent with known geology, the rate of uplift in the central North Island is an order of magnitude higher than the geological rate estimated on a my timescale.

  17. 16 Years, 16 Cruises, 1.6 Billion Soundings: a Compilation of High-Resolution Multibeam Bathymetry of the Active Plate Boundary Along the Chilean Continental Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrebe, W.; Flueh, E. R.; Hasert, M.; Behrmann, J. H.; Voelker, D.; Geersen, J.; Ranero, C. R.; Diaz-Naveas, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Chile, a country stranding the active plate boundary between the South-American and the Nazca Plate is afflicted by recurrent earthquakes and hazardous volcanic eruptions. The strongest earthquake ever recorded occurred here, and volcanic hazards are frequent. Consequently, this area has been studied by geoscientists for many years to improve the understanding of subduction zone processes. Swath bathymetry mapping of the ocean floor has proven to bear a large potential for the interpretation of subduction-related processes, such as tectonic deformation of the marine forearc, release and migration of fluids as well as earthquake-triggered mass wasting. Multibeam bathymetry data of 16 major cruises of German, British, and Chilean research vessels recorded between 1995 and December 2010, in total more than 10,000 data files comprising about 1.6 billion soundings, have now been carefully reprocessed, compiled and merged into a unifying set of high-resolution bathymetric maps of the Chilean continental margin from latitude 40°S to 20°S. The imprint of subsurface processes on the surface morphology is well displayed in the case of the Chilean continental margin. The 3,500 km long Chilean convergent margin is not uniform, as various segments with different tectonic characteristics can be distinguished. Major factors that control margin morphology and thus the style of subduction are (1) relief and structure of the incoming oceanic plate, (2) supply of trench sediment, (3) turbidite transport within the trench, and (4) the input of terrigeneous sediments down the continental slope. A major segment boundary occurs at latitude 32°-33° S where the hotspot-related volcanic chain of Juan Fernandez is presently subducting. South of the area of ridge subduction the trench is filled with turbidites, and accretionary ridges develop across the base of the slope along most of the segment, whereas north of this boundary the turbiditic infill is reduced and subduction erosion is

  18. Segmentation along the Queen Charlotte Fault: The long-lived influence of plate-motion rotation and Explorer Ridge fracture zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, N. C.; Walton, M. A. L.; Brothers, D. S.; Haeussler, P. J.; Ten Brink, U. S.; Conrad, J. E.; Kluesner, J.; Andrews, B. D.

    2017-12-01

    The Queen Charlotte Fault (QCF) generally tracks the flow line for Pacific/North America (Pa/NA) relative motion since 20 Ma, indicating that the plate boundary localized along an optimally oriented small circle geometry. Rotation in Pa/NA motion at 10—12 Ma caused the QCF south of 53 N to be oblique to plate motion by 10—20. This oblique convergence appears to be accommodated in part by underthrusting of the Pacific Plate beneath Haida Gwaii and in part by slip on faults west of the QCF. On the west side of the QCF, a series of ridges and small basins oriented subparallel to either the QCF or relative plate motion form a 40-km-wide terrace. New high-resolution seismic reflection data image the seaward edge of the ridges as a vertical contact between horizontal or sometimes downwarped deep-sea sediments and west-vergent anticlinal structures within the ridges, supporting earlier interpretations that these ridges have accommodated some component of oblique motion. We argue that the ridges originated as step overs from fracture zones on Explorer Ridge, analogous to the current fault geometry at the southernmost end of the QCF. There, the Revere-Dellwood Fracture Zone (RDFZ) overlaps the QCF for 120 km and connects to the QCF via a more-optimally oriented extensional right step. 3.9—6.4 Mw strike-slip earthquakes along the RDFZ and a lack of contractional seafloor morphologies along the QCF south of the RDFZ-QCF right step suggest that the step over and reactivation along the RDFZ accommodates a majority of plate motion in this region. Kinematic reconstruction of ridges from 54—56 N indicates that they also originated in a similar location, potentially as right steps from either the RDFZ or Sovanco Fracture Zone. Similarly, the RDFZ flow path is coincident with a truncation of seafloor magnetic anomalies and the outer edge of the ridge-bounded terrace, which both parallel the QCF since at least the onset of Explorer Ridge spreading at 8 Ma. The RDFZ-QCF right

  19. Combined of magnetic field and thermophoresis particle deposition in free convection boundary layer from a vertical flat plate embedded in a porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakier Yousof Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Deals with heat and mass transfer by steady laminar boundary layer flow of Newtonian, viscous fluid over a vertical flat plate embedded in a fluid-saturated porous medium in the presence of thermophoretic and magnetic field. The resulting similarity equation are solved by finite difference marching technique. The nature of variation of particle concentration profile and magnetic field with respect to buoyancy force, Fw, and Prandtl number is found to be similar. Comparisons with previous published work are performed and the results are found to be in excellent agreement. .

  20. Strike slip faulting inferred from offsetting of drainages: Lower ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (a) Geological map of a part of lower Narmada valley showing disposition of active faults and structures (Agarwal. 1986). Red dotted box represents the area of figure 1(b). (b) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the part of Narmada valley showing various tectonic geomorphic features like fault scarp, palaeobank, linear valley ...

  1. Strike slip faulting inferred from offsetting of drainages: Lower ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The evolution of fault scarps, deformed rivers, marine terraces and the morphology of the moun- tain fronts have been studied for understanding neotectonic evolution of an area (Morisawa and. Hack 1985; Merritts and Hesterberg 1994; Keller and Printer 1996). Tricart (1974) discussed long- term effects of faulting and ...

  2. Strike slip faulting inferred from offsetting of drainages: Lower ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The detailed analysis of landforms,drainages and geology of the area between the rivers Amaravati and Karjan was carried out in order to understand the tectonic history of the lower Narmada basin. Movement along the various faults in the area was studied on the basis of the drainage offsetting. Horizontal offsetting of ...

  3. True subduction vs. underthrusting of the Caribbean plate beneath Hispaniola, northern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanes Estrada, P.; Ten Brink, U. S.; Granja Bruna, J.; Carbó-Gorosabel, A.; Flores, C. H.; Villasenor, A.; Pazos, A.; Martin Davila, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    to strike-slip/collision regimes that takes places in the northeastern Caribbean. Vertical cross-sections from p-wave global tomography Hispaniola do not show a northward-dipping fast velocity layer suggesting that the Caribbean plate's interior does not subduct in the upper mantle under the Muertos margin. The Eastern Greater Antilles arc is therefore likely a crustal-scale bivergent (or "doubly vergent") thrust wedge formed during unidirectional subduction. Other examples of island arcs in which a crustal-scale thrust belt develops in the back-arc region with a vergence opposite to that of the accretionary prism, include Banda, Vanuatu and Panama.

  4. Significado tectónico y migración de fluidos hidrotermales en una red de fallas y vetas de un Dúplex de rumbo: un ejemplo del Sistema de Falla de Atacama Tectonic significance and hydrothermal fluid migration within a strike-slip duplex fault-vein network: an example from the Atacama Fault System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Olivares

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available El Dúplex Caleta Coloso es una estructura de rumbo desarrollada durante la deformación frágil del Sistema de Falla de Atacama (SFA en el Cretácico Temprano. En su interior hay un sistema de vetas hidrotermales que documentan la naturaleza de la relación entre el transporte de fluidos y el desarrollo del dúplex. El sistema de vetas de orientación dominante NW se localiza en la roca de caja, adyacentes a las zonas de falla. Según su mineralogía dominante hay vetas de clorita, epidota-cuarzo y calcita-limonita, y según las relaciones de corte o su estructura interna, se definieron vetas tempranas (clorita, intermedias (epidota-cuarzo y tardías (calcita-limonitas. Algunas vetas muestran cristales perpendiculares u oblicuos a sus paredes (vetas de extensión y de extensión oblicua o fibras minerales orientadas paralelas a las estrías de las fallas (vetas-fallas. Estas últimas tienen indicadores cinemáticos compatibles con las fallas, evidenciando que fueron sincinemáticas con el desarrollo del dúplex. Según su microestructura, ellas se habrían formado en fracturas abiertas llenas de fluidos, bajo condiciones de presión inferior a la hidrostática, lo cual indicaría que la precipitación mineral ocurrió por caídas abruptas de la presión en una corteza somera (The Caleta Coloso Duplex is a brittle strike-slip structure developed along the Atacama Fault System during the Early Cretaceous. A hydrothermal vein system existing within the duplex documents the nature of the link between fluid transport and progressive structural development. The dominantly NW-striking vein system occurs near or at the damage zone of the duplex fault zones. Veins can be classified according to their composition and crosscutting relationships into early chlorite veins, intermediate epidotic-quartz veins and late calcite-limonite veins. Some of them exhibit minerals with their long axes oriented orthogonally or obliquely with respect to the vein walls

  5. Influence of boundary conditions on the response of multilayered plates with cohesive interfaces and delaminations using a homogenized approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Massabò

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Stress and displacement fields in multilayered composites with interfacial imperfections, such as imperfect bonding of the layers or delaminations, or where the plies are separated by thin interlayers allowing relative motion, have large variations in the thickness, with characteristic zigzag patterns and jumps at the layer interfaces. These effects are well captured by a model recently formulated by the author for multilayered plates with imperfect interfaces and affine interfacial traction laws (Massabò & Campi, Meccanica, 2014, in press; Compos Struct, 2014, 116, 311-324. The model defines a homogenized displacement field, which satisfies interfacial continuity, and uses a variational technique to derive equilibrium equations depending on only six generalized displacement functions, for any arbitrary numbers of layers and interfaces. The model accurately predicts stresses and displacements in simply supported, highly anisotropic, thick plates with continuous, sliding interfaces. In this paper the model is applied to wide plates with clamped edges and some inconsistencies, which have been noted in the literature for models based on similar approaches and have limited their utilization, are explained. A generalized transverse shear force is introduced as the gross stress resultant which is directly related to the bending moment in the equilibrium equations of multilayered structures with imperfect interfaces and substitutes for the shear force of single-layer theory. An application to a delaminated wide plate highlights the potential and limitations of the proposed model for the solution of fracture mechanics problems.

  6. The Ionian and Alfeo-Etna fault zones : New segments of an evolving plate boundary in the central Mediterranean Sea?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polonia, A.; Torelli, L.; Artoni, A.; Carlini, M.; Faccenna, C.; Ferranti, L.; Gasperini, L.; Govers, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/108173836; Klaeschen, D.; Monaco, C.; Neri, G.; Nijholt, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413306674; Orecchio, B.; Wortel, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068439202

    2016-01-01

    The Calabrian Arc is a narrow subduction-rollback system resulting from Africa/Eurasia plate convergence. While crustal shortening is taken up in the accretionary wedge, transtensive deformation accounts for margin segmentation along transverse lithospheric faults. One of these structures is the

  7. Upper mantle deformation in the western US determined from seismic anisotropy; 2: Western North American plate boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozalaybey, S.; Savage, M.K. (Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Seismological Lab.); Silver, P.G. (Carnegie Inst., Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-04-01

    The western margin of the North American plate includes subduction, transform faulting and a migrating triple junction. The authors have measured polarization azimuths ([phi]) and delay-times ([delta]t) of split shear waves. Stations located close to the northern end of the San Andreas fault, near the San Francisco Bay area yielded well-constrained but azimuthally varying splitting parameters. These can be explained by a model consisting of two anisotropic layers: an upper layer with fast direction parallel to the strike of the San Andreas fault and a lower layer with E-W fast direction. Both layers have average delay-times of 1[+-]0.3 s. The authors have found that an east-west fast feature is also present beneath stations in the Sierra-Nevada, the Mojave Desert and the Los Angeles area. These latter measurements do not require more than one layer. The E-W fast layer diminishes near the southern edge of the Gorda plate. The authors interpret their measurements as caused by single or double layers of homogeneously, transversely anisotropic material with horizontal symmetry axes due to strain-induced preferred orientation of olivine in the upper mantle. They suggest that the fault-parallel fast layer is the result of finite strain associated with the transform plate motion between the North American and Pacific plates. The deeper layer with E-W fast direction can not be associated with known surface tectonic features. One possible mechanisms for this E-W fast feature is that it may be related to the passage of the trailing edge of the Farallon plate as the slab migrated northward beneath central California. The shear associated with the different motion between the slab and the asthenosphere may cause mineral alignment leading to shear-wave splitting.

  8. Evolution of the Adria-Europe plate boundary in the northern Dinarides: From continent-continent collision to back-arc extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustaszewski, Kamil; Kounov, Alexandre; Schmid, Stefan M.; Schaltegger, Urs; Krenn, Erwin; Frank, Wolfgang; Fügenschuh, Bernhard

    2010-12-01

    The Sava Zone of the northern Dinarides is part of the Cenozoic Adria-Europe plate boundary. Here Late Cretaceous subduction of remnants of Meliata-Vardar oceanic lithosphere led to the formation of a suture, across which upper plate European-derived units of Tisza-Dacia were juxtaposed with Adria-derived units of the Dinarides. Late Cretaceous siliciclastic sediments, deposited on the Adriatic plate, were incorporated into an accretionary wedge that evolved during the initial stages of continent-continent collision. Structurally deeper parts of the exposed accretionary wedge underwent amphibolite-grade metamorphism. Grt-Pl-Ms-Bt thermobarometry and multiphase equilibria indicate temperatures between 550°C and 630°C and pressures between 5 and 7 kbar for this event. Peak metamorphic conditions were reached at around 65 Ma. Relatively slow cooling from peak metamorphic conditions throughout most of the Paleogene was possibly induced by hanging wall erosion in conjunction with southwest directed propagation of thrusting in the Dinarides. Accelerated cooling took place in Miocene times, when the Sava Zone underwent substantial extension that led to the exhumation of the metamorphosed units along a low-angle detachment. Footwall exhumation started under greenschist facies conditions and was associated with top-to-the-north tectonic transport, indicating exhumation from below European plate units. Extension postdates the emplacement of a 27 Ma old granitoid that underwent solid-state deformation under greenschist facies conditions. The 40Ar/39Ar sericite and zircon and apatite fission track ages from the footwall allow bracketing this extensional unroofing between 25 and 14 Ma. This extension is hence linked to Miocene rift-related subsidence in the Pannonian basin, which represents a back-arc basin formed due to subduction rollback in the Carpathians.

  9. Changes in Student Knowledge and Views of Geohazards, Societal Risks, and Monitoring at Active Plate Boundaries Using a Data-Rich Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkin, P. A.; Goodell, L. P.; Teasdale, R.

    2015-12-01

    The "Living on the Edge: Building Resilient Societies on Active Plate Margins" curriculum consists of six data-rich activities, each intended for a 50-minute class, in which students assess risk at active plate boundaries due to earthquakes and volcanoes. Developed as part of the InTeGrate NSF STEP Center the peer-reviewed, publically available materials (http://serc.carleton.edu/104296) have been used at several institutions in diverse classroom settings including small laboratory sections, large lecture courses, medium-sized upper division courses and professional development programs for middle and high school teachers. Pre- and post-instruction surveys measured content knowledge and geoscience literacy, self-efficacy in using geologic data to assess hazards and risk, and attitudes towards the value of monitoring plate margins. The activities have overall positive effects on knowledge of geohazard concepts. Views about the value of scientific practice also became more positive: 74% of students indicated they "agree" or "strongly agree" that monitoring geologic activity has value to them personally (even if they don't live on an active plate margin) and 94% indicated that such monitoring is valuable to society. Most became more confident in evaluating geologic hazard and risk (>60% of students self-described increased confidence by one or more Likert levels). Student knowledge of both the types and limits of data in forecasting geological hazards and their effects also improved. However, attitudes toward sustainability and geoscience careers did not change. Learning and attitudinal improvements are true for all classroom types, but the degree of change varies with class size and the amount of time spent on activities. Learning data and instructor feedback suggest that interactive classroom activities that use real-world data to address societally relevant issues increase student learning and enhance students' ability to synthesize scientific information.

  10. Physical analysis and second-order modelling of an unsteady turbulent flow - The oscillating boundary layer on a flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha Minh, H.; Viegas, J. R.; Rubesin, M. W.; Spalart, P.; Vandromme, D. D.

    1989-01-01

    The turbulent boundary layer under a freestream whose velocity varies sinusoidally in time around a zero mean is computed using two second order turbulence closure models. The time or phase dependent behavior of the Reynolds stresses are analyzed and results are compared to those of a previous SPALART-BALDWIN direct simulation. Comparisons show that the second order modeling is quite satisfactory for almost all phase angles, except in the relaminarization period where the computations lead to a relatively high wall shear stress.

  11. Comparison of Different Analytic Solutions to Axisymmetric Squeezing Fluid Flow between Two Infinite Parallel Plates with Slip Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Khan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate squeezing flow between two large parallel plates by transforming the basic governing equations of the first grade fluid to an ordinary nonlinear differential equation using the stream functions ur(r,z,t=(1/r(∂ψ/∂z and uz(r,z,t=−(1/r(∂ψ/∂r and a transformation ψ(r,z=r2F(z. The velocity profiles are investigated through various analytical techniques like Adomian decomposition method, new iterative method, homotopy perturbation, optimal homotopy asymptotic method, and differential transform method.

  12. Cenozoic deep-water sedimentary basin formation at the Australia-Pacific plate boundary, southern New Caledonia Trough and Taranaki Basin, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, J. R.; Sutherland, R.; Stern, T. A.

    2010-12-01

    Investigation of four petroleum exploration wells and seismic-reflection interpretation reveal >2 km of tectonic subsidence related to Cretaceous rift structures, and 2-3km of Cenozoic subsidence with little faulting of the upper crust. Comparisons to thermal cooling models require stretching factors that are incompatible with the continental foundations of the basin. In addition, up to 50 % of the subsidence signal occurred in the Mid-Cenozoic, hundreds of kilometres from potential contemporary plate boundaries. Thus, upper crustal faulting, thermal relaxation or flexure cannot explain the 300-500 km wide and 2000 km long sedimentary basin system. We suggest that not all deep-water basins are the evolved products of processes that form shallow-water sedimentary basins, but instead they may be influenced by different processes such as convection in the asthenospheric mantle, instabilities in the mantle lithosphere and/or detachment fault zones that inevitably lead to deeper water.

  13. Some Exact Solutions of Boundary Layer Flows along a Vertical Plate with Buoyancy Forces Combined with Lorentz Forces under Uniform Suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asterios Pantokratoras

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Exact analytical solutions of boundary layer flows along a vertical porous plate with uniform suction are derived and presented in this paper. The solutions concern the Blasius, Sakiadis, and Blasius-Sakiadis flows with buoyancy forces combined with either MHD Lorentz or EMHD Lorentz forces. In addition, some exact solutions are presented specifically for water in the temperature range of 0∘C≤≤8∘C, where water density is nearly parabolic. Except for their use as benchmarking means for testing the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, the presented exact solutions with EMHD forces have use in flow separation control in aeronautics and hydronautics, whereas the MHD results have applications in process metallurgy and fusion technology. These analytical solutions are valid for flows with strong suction.

  14. Heat Transfer Analysis for Stationary Boundary Layer Slip Flow of a Power-Law Fluid in a Darcy Porous Medium with Plate Suction/Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Asim; Ali, Yasir; Aziz, Taha; Siddique, J I

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the slip effects on the boundary layer flow and heat transfer characteristics of a power-law fluid past a porous flat plate embedded in the Darcy type porous medium. The nonlinear coupled system of partial differential equations governing the flow and heat transfer of a power-law fluid is transformed into a system of nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations by applying a suitable similarity transformation. The resulting system of ordinary differential equations is solved numerically using Matlab bvp4c solver. Numerical results are presented in the form of graphs and the effects of the power-law index, velocity and thermal slip parameters, permeability parameter, suction/injection parameter on the velocity and temperature profiles are examined.

  15. Deformed Neogene basins, active faulting and topography in Westland: Distributed crustal mobility west of the Alpine Fault transpressive plate boundary (South Island, New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisetti, Francesca; Sibson, Richard H.; Hamling, Ian

    2016-12-01

    Tectonic activity in the South Island of New Zealand is dominated by the Alpine Fault component of the Australia-Pacific plate boundary. West of the Alpine Fault deformation is recorded by Paleogene-Neogene basins coeval with the evolution of the right-lateral/transpressive plate margin. Initial tectonic setting was controlled by N-S normal faults developed during Late Cretaceous and Eocene-early Miocene rifting. Following inception of the Alpine Fault (c. 25 Ma) reverse reactivation of the normal faults controlled tectonic segmentation that became apparent in the cover sequences at c. 22 Ma. Based on restored transects tied to stratigraphic sections, seismic lines and wells, we reconstruct the vertical mobility of the Top Basement Unconformity west of Alpine Fault. From c. 37-35 Ma to 22 Ma subsidence was controlled by extensional faulting. After 22 Ma the region was affected by differential subsidence, resulting from eastward crustal flexure towards the Alpine Fault boundary and/or components of transtension. Transition from subsidence to uplift started at c. 17 Ma within a belt of basement pop-ups, separated by subsiding basins localised in the common footwall of oppositely-dipping reverse faults. From 17 to 7-3 Ma reverse fault reactivation and uplift migrated to the WSW. Persistent reverse reactivation of the inherited faults in the present stress field is reflected by the close match between tectonic block segmentation and topography filtered at a wavelength of 25 km, i.e. at a scale comparable to crustal thickness in the region. However, topography filtered at wavelength of 75 km shows marked contrasts between the elevated Tasman Ranges region relative to regions to the south. Variations in thickness and rigidity of the Australian lithosphere possibly control N-S longitudinal changes, consistent with our estimates of increase in linear shortening from the Tasman Ranges to the regions located west of the Alpine Fault bend.

  16. Focusing of relative plate motion at a continental transform fault: Cenozoic dextral displacement >700 km on New Zealand's Alpine Fault, reversing >225 km of Late Cretaceous sinistral motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Simon; Mortimer, Nick; Smith, Euan; Turner, Gillian

    2016-03-01

    The widely accepted ˜450 km Cenozoic dextral strike-slip displacement on New Zealand's Alpine Fault is large for continental strike-slip faults, but it is still less than 60% of the Cenozoic relative plate motion between the Australian and Pacific plates through Zealandia, with the remaining motion assumed to be taken up by rotation and displacement on other faults in a zone up to 300 km wide. We show here that the 450 km total displacement across the Alpine Fault is an artifact of assumptions about the geometry of New Zealand's basement terranes in the Eocene, and the actual Cenozoic dextral displacement across the active trace is greater than 665 km, with more than 700 km (and 94%) of the relative plate motion in the last 25 Ma at an average rate in excess of 28 mm/yr. It reverses more than 225 km (and Zealandia in the Late Cretaceous, when Zealandia lay on the margin of Gondwana, providing a direct constraint on the kinematics of extension between East and West Antarctica at this time.

  17. Abbot Ice Shelf, structure of the Amundsen Sea continental margin and the southern boundary of the Bellingshausen Plate seaward of West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, James R.; Tinto, Kirsty J.; Bell, Robin E.

    2015-05-01

    Inversion of NASA Operation IceBridge airborne gravity over the Abbot Ice Shelf in West Antarctica for subice bathymetry defines an extensional terrain made up of east-west trending rift basins formed during the early stages of Antarctica/Zealandia rifting. Extension is minor, as rifting jumped north of Thurston Island early in the rifting process. The Amundsen Sea Embayment continental shelf west of the rifted terrain is underlain by a deeper, more extensive sedimentary basin also formed during rifting between Antarctica and Zealandia. A well-defined boundary zone separates the mildly extended Abbot extensional terrain from the deeper Amundsen Embayment shelf basin. The shelf basin has an extension factor, β, of 1.5-1.7 with 80-100 km of extension occurring across an area now 250 km wide. Following this extension, rifting centered north of the present shelf edge and proceeded to continental rupture. Since then, the Amundsen Embayment continental shelf appears to have been tectonically quiescent and shaped by subsidence, sedimentation, and the advance and retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The Bellingshausen Plate was located seaward of the Amundsen Sea margin prior to incorporation into the Antarctic Plate at about 62 Ma. During the latter part of its independent existence, Bellingshausen plate motion had a clockwise rotational component relative to Antarctica producing convergence across the north-south trending Bellingshausen Gravity Anomaly structure at 94°W and compressive deformation on the continental slope between 94°W and 102°W. Farther west, the relative motion was extensional along an east-west trending zone occupied by the Marie Byrd Seamounts. The copyright line for this article was changed on 5 JUN 2015 after original online publication.

  18. Deep-rooted “thick skinned” model for the High Atlas Mountains (Morocco. Implications for the seismic Eurasia-Africa plate boundary region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiraud, M.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous crustal models of the High Atlas suppose the existence of a mid-crustal detachment where all the surface thrusts merged and below which the lower crust was continuous. However, both seismic refraction data and gravity modeling detected a jump in crustal thickness between the High Atlas and the northern plains. Here we show that this rapid and vertical jump in the depth of Moho discontinuity suggests that a thrust fault may penetrate the lower crust and offset the Moho (deep-rooted “thick skinned” model. The distribution of Neogene and Quaternary volcanisms along and at the northern part of the High Atlas lineament can be related to the beginning of a partial continental subduction of the West African plate to the north underneath Moroccan microplate. Allowing from the complex problem of the plate boundary in the western zone of the Mediterranean, we propose to interpret the South-Atlasic fault zone as the actual northwestern boundary of the stable part of the African plate rather than the Azores-Gibraltar fault currently used.Los modelos geodinámicos existentes sobre la estructura profunda del alto Atlas suponen la existencia de un despegue medio-cortical donde convergen los cabalgamientos superficiales y bajo el cual la corteza inferior es continua. Los datos de sísmica de refracción y gravimetría, sin embargo, indican la existencia de una discontinuidad en el grosor de la corteza (profundidad del Moho bajo el Alto Atlas. En este artículo ponemos de manifiesto que este salto rápido en la profundidad del Moho puede ser causado por un cabalgamiento que penetra la corteza inferior, desplazando la base de la misma ("deeprooted thick skinned model". La distribución del volcanismo Neógeno y Cuaternario a lo largo de y al norte de la alineación del Alto Atlas pueden estar relacionados con el comienzo de una subducción continental parcial de la placa Africana occidental hacia el norte, bajo la microplaca marroquí. La expresi

  19. Researchers investigate submarine faults north of Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindlay, N.; Mann, P.; Dolan, J.

    A 23-day marine geophysical expedition in the summer of 1996 revealed a previously unidentified strike-slip fault zone within 60-100 km of the densely populated northern coast of Puerto Rico. The purpose of the expedition, which was held aboard the U.S. research vessel Maurice Ewing, was to map the northeastern portion of the North America Caribbean plate boundary.The 3000-km-long North America-Caribbean plate boundary stretches from Guatemala to the Lesser Antilles arc. The dominantly left-lateral strike-slip boundary accommodates slow (1-2.6 cm/yr) eastward motion of the Caribbean plate relative to North America. Distributed interplate motion in the region generates large earthquakes (Figure 1, inset). In 1976, an M 7.5 left-lateral, strike-slip earthquake in Guatemala killed approximately 23,000 people and left a quarter of the nation's population homeless.

  20. The Terceira Rift as hyper-slow, hotspot-dominated oblique spreading axis: A comparison with other slow-spreading plate boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, P. R.; Jung, W. Y.

    2004-01-01

    We suggest the 550 km long Terceira Rift (TR, Azores Plateau) is the world's slowest-spreading (hyper-slow, 4 mm/a plate separation; 2.3-3.8 mm/a perpendicular to oblique axial segments) organized accreting plate boundary. In its slightly sinuous (ca. 300 km radius of curvature) axial trace, its oblique spreading angles (ca. 40°-65°), and in frequency and first motions of earthquakes, the TR resembles better-known 'ultra-' or 'super-' slow spreading ridges (e.g. Gakkel and Southwest Indian ridges). Interpreted simply as volcanically 'unfilled' rift valley segments, the inter-island basins (e.g. the 3200 m deep Hirondelle Basin) are slightly wider (30-60 km), but not significantly deeper (1000-2200 m) than the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) median valley (20-28 mm/a; 10°N-53°N). However, along-axis segmentation wavelengths (ca. 100 km) are double those along the central MAR, but make TR comparable to the 'ultra-slow' (15-16 mm/a) Southwest Indian and Gakkel (7-13 mm/a) ridges. If this segmentation wavelength reflects Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, the viscosity contrast between the overlying axial lithosphere and the partial melt zones is about an order of magnitude greater at ca. 4-16 mm/a than at 20-30 mm/a. The TR differs dramatically from ultra-slow ridges only in the large amplitude of along-strike topography (2000-4000 m; 4200 m total variation) owing perhaps to a copious melt flux from the Azores 'hotspot', combined with a spreading-rate-determined greater axial flexural strength and plate thickness, and slower export of volcanics from the rift axis. The probable TR youth (ca. 1 Ma?, requiring less than 4 km new oceanic crust) suggests lack of steady-state spreading conditions, which may explain the published gravity evidence against TR spreading. Absolute plate motions support the creation of the Azores Plateau by successive NE jumps of the rift axis to maintain its position over a fixed 'hotspot'.

  1. Influence of temperature dependent physical properties on heat transfer in the laminar boundary layer of a parallel affluxed flat plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehle, F.; Brandt, F.

    1982-08-23

    The influence of temperature dependent properties on the heat transfer is not jet satisfying claryfied. Measurements of heat transfer contain more or less great faults, and it is practically not possible to investigate the influence of the temperature dependence for particular physical properties separately. Therefore, the only possibility is to examine this problem numerically. Hereby it is important to use methods which don't require too much computing time in order to study a great number of parameters. In the following article such a numerical method for the calculation of a laminar boundary layer will be introduced. By this method it is also possible to consider the dissipation. Already, the form of the differential equations, which are to be solved, shows, that the influence of a variable property fluid has to be considered separately, because it is not possible to combine all physical properties with the Pr-number. The results of the parameter studies will be discussed and will be compared with the well-known correction terms.

  2. New methods to cope with temperature elevations in heated segments of flat plates cooled by boundary layer flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajmohammadi Mohammad R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents two reliable methods to cope with the rising temperature in an array of heated segments with a known overall heat load and exposed to forced convective boundary layer flow. Minimization of the hot spots (peak temperatures in the array of heated segments constitutes the primary goal that sets the platform to develop the methods. The two proposed methods consist of: 1 Designing an array of unequal heaters so that each heater has a different size and generates heat at different rates, and 2 Distancing the unequal heaters from each other using an insulated spacing. Multi-scale design based on constructal theory is applied to estimate the optimal insulated spacing, heaters size and heat generation rates, such that the minimum hot spots temperature is achieved when subject to space constraint and fixed overall heat load. It is demonstrated that the two methods can considerably reduce the hot spot temperatures and consequently, both can be utilized with confidence in industry to achieve optimized heat transfer.

  3. The Cottage Grove fault system (Illinois Basin): Late Paleozoic transpression along a Precambrian crustal boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchek, A.B.; McBride, J.H.; Nelson, W.J.; Leetaru, H.E.

    2004-01-01

    The Cottage Grove fault system in southern Illinois has long been interpreted as an intracratonic dextral strike-slip fault system. We investigated its structural geometry and kinematics in detail using (1) outcrop data, (2) extensive exposures in underground coal mines, (3) abundant borehole data, and (4) a network of industry seismic reflection profiles, including data reprocessed by us. Structural contour mapping delineates distinct monoclines, broad anticlines, and synclines that express Paleozoic-age deformation associated with strike slip along the fault system. As shown on seismic reflection profiles, prominent near-vertical faults that cut the entire Paleozoic section and basement-cover contact branch upward into outward-splaying, high-angle reverse faults. The master fault, sinuous along strike, is characterized along its length by an elongate anticline, ???3 km wide, that parallels the southern side of the master fault. These features signify that the overall kinematic regime was transpressional. Due to the absence of suitable piercing points, the amount of slip cannot be measured, but is constrained at less than 300 m near the ground surface. The Cottage Grove fault system apparently follows a Precambrian terrane boundary, as suggested by magnetic intensity data, the distribution of ultramafic igneous intrusions, and patterns of earthquake activity. The fault system was primarily active during the Alleghanian orogeny of Late Pennsylvanian and Early Permian time, when ultramatic igneous magma intruded along en echelon tensional fractures. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  4. Vibration of plates

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraverty, Snehashish

    2008-01-01

    Plates are integral parts of most engineering structures and their vibration analysis is required for safe design. This work provides a comprehensive introduction to vibration theory and analysis of two-dimensional plates. It offers information on vibration problems along with a discussion of various plate geometries and boundary conditions.

  5. Effects of crystal preferred orientation on upper-mantle flow near plate boundaries: rheologic feedbacks and seismic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, D. K.; Boyce, D. E.; Castelnau, O.; Dawson, P. R.; Laske, G.

    2017-09-01

    Insight into upper-mantle processes can be gained by linking flow-induced mineral alignment to regional deformation and seismic anisotropy patterns. Through a series of linked micro-macro scale numerical experiments, we explore the rheologic effects of crystal preferred orientation (CPO) and evaluate the magnitude of possible impacts on the pattern of flow and associated seismic signals for mantle that includes a cooling, thickening young oceanic lithosphere. The CPO and associated anisotropic rheology, computed by a micromechanical polycrystal model, are coupled with a large scale flow model (Eulerian Finite Element method) via a local viscosity tensor field, which quantifies the stress:strain rate response of a textured polycrystal. CPO is computed along streamlines throughout the model space and the corresponding viscosity tensor field at each element defines the local properties for the next iteration of the flow field. Stable flow and CPO distributions were obtained after several iterations for the two dislocation glide cases tested: linear and nonlinear stress:strain rate polycrystal behaviour. The textured olivine polycrystals are found to have anisotropic viscosity tensors in a significant portion of the model space. This directional dependence in strength impacts the pattern of upper-mantle flow. For background asthenosphere viscosity of ∼1020 Pa s and a rigid lithosphere, the modification of the corner flow pattern is not drastic but the change could have geologic implications. Feedback in the development of CPO occurs, particularly in the region immediately below the base of the lithosphere. Stronger fabric is predicted below the flanks of a spreading centre for fully coupled, power-law polycrystals than was determined using prior linear, intermediate coupling polycrystal models. The predicted SKS splitting is modestly different (∼0.5 s) between the intermediate and fully coupled cases for oceanic plates less than 20 Myr old. The magnitude of

  6. Slip-dependent weakening on shallow plate boundary fault in the Japan subduction zone: shallow coseismic slip facilitated by foreshock afterslip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoshi; Ikari, Matt; Ujiie, Kohtaro; Kopf, Achim

    2017-04-01

    Understanding of role of slow earthquakes as they relate to the occurrence of both megathrust earthquakes and tsunami earthquakes is necessary to mitigate these disasters in the near future. Laboratory shearing experiments is one of important approach to evaluate these relationships. Here, we use powdered gouge samples from JFAST (IODP Expedition 343) Hole C0019E, core sample 17R-1, which is the plate boundary fault zone in the Japan Trench subduction zone. In this region, both large coseismic slip during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake as well as discrete slow slip events (SSE) have occurred. Experiments were conducted in a single-direct shear apparatus under normal stress of 16 MPa, with total shear displacements of up to 16 mm. We evaluate the slip-dependence of friction by extracting the velocity-dependent friction parameters a, b, and Dc , and also measure the rate of change in friction coefficient with shear displacement as the slip-dependence of friction. We report that in friction experiments using the Tohoku fault zone samples, an increase in sliding velocity exceeding that of earthquake afterslip can induce a change from steady-state frictional strength or slip hardening friction to slip-weakening frictional behavior. Our results show that the slip weakening is observed when the slip velocity exceeds 3.7 × 10-6 m/s during our experiments, while steady-state frictional strength or slip hardening is observed below 1 × 10-6 m/s. In the Japan Trench region, two slow events prior to the mainshock were observed in the mainshock area with a coseismic slip exceeding 30 m . One event is an episodic SSE with a slip velocity of 0.1 × 10-6 , and the other is afterslip after the largest Tohoku earthquake foreshock with a slip velocity exceeding 2 × 10-6 m/s. Our experiments show that slip-weakening friction should be expected at the afterslip rate, suggesting that the afterslip may have facilitated the large coseismic slip during the mainshock on the plate boundary

  7. Morphology and sedimentation in Caribbean montane streams" examples from Jamaica and Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Ahmad; F.N. Scatena; A Gupta

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a summary description of the morphology, sedimentation, and behaviour of the montane streams of eastern Jamaica and eastern Puerto Rico. The area is located within a 200 km wide seismically active zone of Neogene left-lateral strike-slip deformation which defines the plate boundary between the Caribbean and North American Plates. Tropical storms,...

  8. Prediction of an internal boundary layer on a flat plate after a step change in roughness using a near-wall RANS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Minghan; Meng, Fanxiao; Bergstrom, Donald J.

    2017-11-01

    An in-house computational fluid dynamics code was used to simulate turbulent flow over a flat plate with a step change in roughness, exhibiting a smooth-rough-smooth configuration. An internal boundary layer (IBL) is formed at the transition from the smooth to rough (SR) and then the rough to smooth (RS) surfaces. For an IBL the flow far above the surface has experienced a wall shear stress that is different from the local value. Within a Reynolds-Averaged-Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation, the two-layer k- ɛ model of Durbin et al. (2001) was implemented to analyze the response of the flow to the change in surface condition. The numerical results are compared to experimental data, including some in-house measurements and the seminal work of Antonia and Luxton (1971,72). This problem captures some aspects of roughness in industrial and environmental applications, such as corrosion and the earth's surface heterogeneity, where the roughness is often encountered as discrete distributions. It illustrates the challenge of incorporating roughness models in RANS that are capable of responding to complex surface roughness profiles.

  9. Archean greenstone-tonalite duality: Thermochemical mantle convection models or plate tectonics in the early Earth global dynamics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrich, Robert; Polat, Ali

    2006-03-01

    were intruded by voluminous norites from the Neoarchean through Proterozoic; norites are accounted for by melting of subduction metasomatized Archean continental lithospheric mantle (CLM). Deep CLM defines Archean cratons; it extends to ˜ 350 km, includes the diamond facies, and xenoliths signify a composition of the buoyant, refractory, residue of plume melting, a natural consequence of imbricated plateau-arc crust. Voluminous tonalites of Archean greenstone-granitoid terranes show a secular trend of increasing Mg#, Cr, Ni consistent with slab melts hybridizing with thicker mantle wedge as subduction angle steepens. Strike-slip faults of 1000 km scale; diachronous accretion of distinct tectonostratigraphic terranes; and broad Cordilleran-type orogens featuring multiple sutures, and oceanward migration of arcs, in the Archean Superior and Yilgarn cratons, are in common with the Altaid and Phanerozoic Cordilleran orogens. There is increasing geological evidence of the supercontinent cycle operating back to ˜ 2.7 Ga: Kenorland or Ur ˜ 2.7-2.4 Ga; Columbia ˜ 1.6-1.4 Ga; Rodinia ˜ 1100-750 Ma; and Pangea ˜ 230 Ma. High-resolution seismic reflection profiling of Archean terranes reveals a prevalence of low angle structures, and evidence for paleo-subduction zones. Collectively, the geological-geochemical-seismic records endorse the operation of plate tectonics since the early Archean.

  10. Role of the Tectonic inheritance on multi-phased rifting of the Sperchios Basin (Greece), north-western boundary of the Aegean Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanier, Frank; Ferriere, Jacky; Averbuch, Olivier; Gaullier, Virginie; Graveleau, Fabien

    2017-04-01

    The Aegean plate is characterized by active extension, mainly occurring during the Pliocene to the Quaternary. This extensional deformation is considered as the upper plate response to the rollback of the northward subducting African slab. In Central Greece, it has led to the formation of large rifted basins, such as the Corinth Rift or the Sperchios basin. Both are experiencing active tectonics, as seismicity and morphotectonic analysis demonstrate. In this study, we focus on the East-West Sperchios basin, which has developed obliquely across a major NW-SE thrust zone separating the internal and external zones of the Hellenides mountain range. This range has developed since the late Jurassic, with the obduction of the Maliac Ocean, up to the Eocene times, with the collision of the External Zones. The Frontal Thrust of the internal Hellenides constitutes a major discontinuity within the crust, which may have influenced the development of the Sperchios basin. Our field investigations indicate that the southern boundary of the Sperchios rifted basin shows several large E-W to NW-SE normal faults that accommodate km-scale offsets. Our fault plane analysis showed a variety of fault orientations, all with dip-slip slicken-slides. It suggests at least two major episodes of extension, starting with a NE-SW direction in the Pliocene and then followed by a N-S direction. The latter is still active today and confirmed by geodetic studies and by earthquakes focal mechanisms. The early NE-SW episode of extension (mainly Pliocene in age) is expressed in the field by low-angle normal faults, dipping 20 to 30° northeastward, more or less parallel to the Frontal thrust of the Internal Hellenides. These low-angle normal faults are separating the platform limestones of the external zones from the upper tectonic units of the internal zones. We suggest that these low-angle normal faults are corresponding to the earlier stage of rifting and that they are rooted in the major thrust

  11. Late Quaternary uplift along the North America-Caribbean plate boundary: Evidence from the sea level record of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Schweig, Eugene S.; Simmons, Kathleen R.; Halley, Robert B.

    2017-12-01

    The tectonic setting of the North America-Caribbean plate boundary has been studied intensively, but some aspects are still poorly understood, particularly along the Oriente fault zone. Guantanamo Bay, southern Cuba, is considered to be on a coastline that is under a transpressive tectonic regime along this zone, and is hypothesized to have a low uplift rate. We tested this by studying emergent reef terrace deposits around the bay. Reef elevations in the protected, inner part of the bay are ∼11-12 m and outer-coast, wave-cut benches are as high as ∼14 m. Uranium-series analyses of corals yield ages ranging from ∼133 ka to ∼119 ka, correlating this reef to the peak of the last interglacial period, marine isotope stage (MIS) 5.5. Assuming a span of possible paleo-sea levels at the time of the last interglacial period yields long-term tectonic uplift rates of 0.02-0.11 m/ka, supporting the hypothesis that the tectonic uplift rate is low. Nevertheless, on the eastern and southern coasts of Cuba, east and west of Guantanamo Bay, there are flights of multiple marine terraces, at higher elevations, that could record a higher rate of uplift, implying that Guantanamo Bay may be anomalous. Southern Cuba is considered to have experienced a measurable but modest effect from glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) processes. Thus, with a low uplift rate, Guantanamo Bay should show no evidence of emergent marine terraces dating to the ∼100 ka (MIS 5.3) or ∼80 ka (MIS 5.1) sea stands and results of the present study support this.

  12. Structural and Tectonic Map Along the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary in Northern Gulf of California, Sonora Desert and Valle de Mexicali, Mexico, from Seismic Reflection Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Escobar, M.; Suarez-Vidal, F.; Mendoza-Borunda, R.; Martin Barajas, A.; Pacheco-Romero, M.; Arregui-Estrada, S.; Gallardo-Mata, C.; Sanchez-Garcia, C.; Chanes-Martinez, J.

    2012-12-01

    Between 1978 and 1983, Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) carried on an intense exploration program in the northern Gulf of California, the Sonora Desert and the southern part of the Mexicali Valley. This program was supported by a seismic reflection field operation. The collected seismic data was 2D, with travel time of 6 s recording, in 48 channels, and the source energy was: dynamite, vibroseis and air guns. Since 2007 to present time, the existing seismic data has been re-processing and ire-interpreting as part of a collaboration project between the PEMEX's Subdirección de Exploración (PEMEX) and CICESE. The study area is located along a large portion of the Pacific-North America plate boundary in the northern Gulf of California and the Southern part of the Salton Trough tectonic province (Mexicali Valley). We present the result of the processes reflection seismic lines. Many of the previous reported known faults were identify along with the first time described located within the study region. We identified regions with different degree of tectonic activity. In structural map it can see the location of many of these known active faults and their associated seismic activity, as well as other structures with no associated seismicity. Where some faults are mist placed they were deleted or relocated based on new information. We included historical seismicity for the region. We present six reflection lines that cross the aftershocks zone of the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake of April 4, 2010 (Mw7.2). The epicenter of this earthquake and most of the aftershocks are located in a region where pervious to this earthquake no major earthquakes are been reported. A major result of this study is to demonstrate that there are many buried faults that increase the seismic hazard.

  13. Late Quaternary uplift along the North America-Caribbean plate boundary: Evidence from the sea level record of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel; Schweig, Eugene S.; Simmons, Kathleen; Halley, Robert B.

    2017-01-01

    The tectonic setting of the North America-Caribbean plate boundary has been studied intensively, but some aspects are still poorly understood, particularly along the Oriente fault zone. Guantanamo Bay, southern Cuba, is considered to be on a coastline that is under a transpressive tectonic regime along this zone, and is hypothesized to have a low uplift rate. We tested this by studying emergent reef terrace deposits around the bay. Reef elevations in the protected, inner part of the bay are ∼11–12 m and outer-coast, wave-cut benches are as high as ∼14 m. Uranium-series analyses of corals yield ages ranging from ∼133 ka to ∼119 ka, correlating this reef to the peak of the last interglacial period, marine isotope stage (MIS) 5.5. Assuming a span of possible paleo-sea levels at the time of the last interglacial period yields long-term tectonic uplift rates of 0.02–0.11 m/ka, supporting the hypothesis that the tectonic uplift rate is low. Nevertheless, on the eastern and southern coasts of Cuba, east and west of Guantanamo Bay, there are flights of multiple marine terraces, at higher elevations, that could record a higher rate of uplift, implying that Guantanamo Bay may be anomalous. Southern Cuba is considered to have experienced a measurable but modest effect from glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) processes. Thus, with a low uplift rate, Guantanamo Bay should show no evidence of emergent marine terraces dating to the ∼100 ka (MIS 5.3) or ∼80 ka (MIS 5.1) sea stands and results of the present study support this.

  14. Life and death of the resurrection plate: Evidence for its existence and subduction in the northeastern Pacific in Paleocene-Eocene time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeussler, P.J.; Bradley, D.C.; Wells, R.E.; Miller, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Range just after 50 Ma, related to slab-window magmatism, (5) birth of the Queen Charlotte transform margin at ca. 50 Ma, (6) extensional exhumation of high-grade metamorphic terranes and development of core complexes in British Columbia, Idaho, and Washington, and extensional collapse of the Cordilleran foreland fold-and-thrust belt in Alberta, Montana, and Idaho after 50 Ma related to initiation of the transform margin, (7) enigmatic 53-45 Ma magmatism associated with extension from Montana to the Yukon Territory as related to slab breakup and the formation of a slab window, (8) right-lateral margin-parallel strike-slip faulting in southern and western Alaska during Late Cretaceous and Paleocene time, which cannot be explained by Farallon convergence vectors, and (9) simultaneous changes in Pacific-Farallon and Pacific-Kula plate motions concurrent with demise of the Kula-Resurrection Ridge.

  15. EarthScope's Plate Boundary Observatory in Alaska: Building on Existing Infrastructure to Provide a Platform for Integrated Research and Hazard-monitoring Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, E. S.; Bierma, R. M.; Willoughby, H.; Feaux, K.; Mattioli, G. S.; Enders, M.; Busby, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    EarthScope's geodetic component in Alaska, the UNAVCO-operated Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) network, includes 139 continuous GPS sites and 41 supporting telemetry relays. These are spread across a vast area, from northern AK to the Aleutians. Forty-five of these stations were installed or have been upgraded in cooperation with various partner agencies and currently provide data collection and transmission for more than one group. Leveraging existing infrastructure normally has multiple benefits, such as easier permitting requirements and costs savings through reduced overall construction and maintenance expenses. At some sites, PBO-AK power and communications systems have additional capacity beyond that which is needed for reliable acquisition of GPS data. Where permits allow, such stations could serve as platforms for additional instrumentation or real-time observing needs. With the expansion of the Transportable Array (TA) into Alaska, there is increased interest to leverage existing EarthScope resources for station co-location and telemetry integration. Because of the complexity and difficulty of long-term O&M at PBO sites, however, actual integration of GPS and seismic equipment must be considered on a case-by-case basis. UNAVCO currently operates two integrated GPS/seismic stations in collaboration with the Alaska Earthquake Center, and three with the Alaska Volcano Observatory. By the end of 2014, PBO and TA plan to install another four integrated and/or co-located geodetic and seismic systems. While three of these are designed around existing PBO stations, one will be a completely new TA installation, providing PBO with an opportunity to expand geodetic data collection in Alaska within the limited operations and maintenance phase of the project. We will present some of the design considerations, outcomes, and lessons learned from past and ongoing projects to integrate seismometers and other instrumentation at PBO-Alaska stations. Developing the PBO

  16. Bending and stretching of plates

    CERN Document Server

    Mansfield, E H; Hemp, W S

    1964-01-01

    The Bending and Stretching of Plates deals with elastic plate theory, particularly on small- and large-deflexion theory. Small-deflexion theory concerns derivation of basic equations, rectangular plates, plates of various shapes, plates whose boundaries are amenable to conformal transformation, plates with variable rigidity, and approximate methods. Large-deflexion theory includes general equations and some exact solutions, approximate methods in large-deflexion theory, asymptotic large-deflexion theories for very thin plates. Asymptotic theories covers membrane theory, tension field theory, a

  17. Microstructural and seismic properties of the upper mantle underneath a rifted continental terrane (Baja California): An example of sub-crustal mechanical asthenosphere?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasse, L.N.; Vissers, R.L.M.; Paulssen, H.; Basu, A.R.; Drury, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    The Gulf of California rift is a young and active plate boundary that links the San Andreas strike-slip fault system in California to the oceanic spreading system of the East Pacific Rise. The xenolith bearing lavas of the San Quintin volcanic area provide lower crust and upper mantle samples from

  18. Plate-kinematic reconstructions of the North Atlantic and Arctic: Late Jurassic to Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, David B.; Lottes, Ann L.

    1988-12-01

    Numerous reconstructions of the North Atlantic have been proposed based on fitting of magnetic anomalies transform-fracture-zone systems, continent-ocean boundaries, and/or bathymetry of previously adjacent segments of lithosphere. Some of the reconstructions have been used interpret the tectonic evolution of the Arctic, but none have used constraints from the geology of the Arctic to test the viability of the proposed reconstructions. The evolution of the circum-North Atlantic region is dominated by the relative motion history of North America and Eurasia, and by smaller plates, including Greenland, Rockall, Hatton-Edoras, Svalbard, Jan Mayen. Lomonosov and North Slope-Chukotka. Seafloor spreading began between North America and Eurasia in the Middle Albian, approximately 110 m.y. ago. Post-110 m.y. relative motions between North America and Eurasia are limited by the unconformable overlap of the essentially undeformed Aptian (?)-Albian and younger Okhotsk-Chukotsk volcanic-plutonic belt across the South Anyuy suture linking the North Slope-Chukotka block to Eurasia, and by the absence of post-Early Cretaceous motion between the North Slope-Chukotka block and North America. This constraint is supported by the geology of the circum-Arctic shelf which is characterized by extensional and strike-slip basins, but lacks any evidence of Middle Mesozoic and younger structures associated with contractional deformation. Published reconstructions of the North Atlantic predict between 500 and 1400 km of E-W shortening of North America to Eurasia during the interval 110-56 Ma. This is clearly incompatible with the geology of the Arctic, and suggests that all of these reconstructions are incorrect and therefore analyses dependent on these reconstructions, such as the evolution of the Tethyan domain, global paleomagnetic inversions, and paleo-oceanic and paleoclimatological reconstructions must also have significant errors. We present a revised set of plate reconstructions of

  19. Similarity Solution for Combined Free-Forced Convection Past a Vertical Porous Plate in a Porous Medium with a Convective Surface Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garg P.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the mathematical implications of the two dimensional viscous steady laminar combined free-forced convective flow of an incompressible fluid over a semi infinite fixed vertical porous plate embedded in a porous medium. It is assumed that the left surface of the plate is heated by convection from a hot fluid which is at a temperature higher than the temperature of the fluid on the right surface of the vertical plate. To achieve numerical consistency for the problem under consideration, the governing non linear partial differential equations are first transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations using a similarity variable and then solved numerically under conditions admitting similarity solutions. The effects of the physical parameters of both the incompressible fluid and the vertical plate on the dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles are studied and analysed and the results are depicted both graphically and in a tabular form. Finally, algebraic expressions and the numerical values are obtained for the local skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number.

  20. Source parameters of the Bay of Bengal earthquake of 21 May 2014 and related seismotectonics of 85°E and 90°E ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Rajesh; Prajapati, Sanjay Kumar; Srivastava, Hari Narain

    2018-01-01

    Source parameters of the Bay of Bengal earthquake of 21 May 2014 have been studied using full waveform inversion. Its source mechanism thus determined the orientation of the strike slip faulting as NW-SE/NE-SW. The occurrence of past earthquakes along the NE-SW nodal plane suggested its preference as the main fault which could result from the transmission of stresses from the Indian plate boundary. High stress drop of this earthquake (216 bar) is attributed to its location in the intraplate region, strike slip faulting and focus in the colder upper mantle. Comparison of the stress drop of deeper focus Hindukush earthquakes with that of the Bay of Bengal earthquake showed a smaller felt radius due to fractured lithosphere in the Himalayas vis-a-vis more efficient propagation of seismic waves in the peninsular region from the source region of this recent earthquake. The seismological evidence presented for the 85°E and 90°E ridges shows the predominance of strike slip faulting with thrusting on both the ridges. Integrating their source mechanism with that of the May 2014 earthquake, it could be inferred that the Bay of Bengal region (excluding Andaman Sumatra subduction zone) is characterised predominantly by strike slip faulting in the region north of latitude 20°N and strike slip with thrusting in the remaining portion.

  1. Deformation of the Northwestern Okhotsk Plate: How is it happening?

    OpenAIRE

    Hindle, D.; Fujita, K.; Mackey, K.

    2009-01-01

    The Eurasia (EU) – North America (NA) plate boundary zone across Northeast Asia still presents many open questions within the plate tectonic paradigm. Constraining the geometry and number of plates or microplates present in the plate boundary zone is especially difficult because of the location of the EU-NA euler pole close to or even upon the EU-NA boundary. One of the major challenges remains the geometry of the Okhotsk plate (OK). whose northwestern portion terminates on ...

  2. Validation of three-dimensional incompressible spatial direct numerical simulation code: A comparison with linear stability and parabolic stability equation theories for boundary-layer transition on a flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Streett, Craig L.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    1992-01-01

    Spatially evolving instabilities in a boundary layer on a flat plate are computed by direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. In a truncated physical domain, a nonstaggered mesh is used for the grid. A Chebyshev-collocation method is used normal to the wall; finite difference and compact difference methods are used in the streamwise direction; and a Fourier series is used in the spanwise direction. For time stepping, implicit Crank-Nicolson and explicit Runge-Kutta schemes are used to the time-splitting method. The influence-matrix technique is used to solve the pressure equation. At the outflow boundary, the buffer-domain technique is used to prevent convective wave reflection or upstream propagation of information from the boundary. Results of the DNS are compared with those from both linear stability theory (LST) and parabolized stability equation (PSE) theory. Computed disturbance amplitudes and phases are in very good agreement with those of LST (for small inflow disturbance amplitudes). A measure of the sensitivity of the inflow condition is demonstrated with both LST and PSE theory used to approximate inflows. Although the DNS numerics are very different than those of PSE theory, the results are in good agreement. A small discrepancy in the results that does occur is likely a result of the variation in PSE boundary condition treatment in the far field. Finally, a small-amplitude wave triad is forced at the inflow, and simulation results are compared with those of LST. Again, very good agreement is found between DNS and LST results for the 3-D simulations, the implication being that the disturbance amplitudes are sufficiently small that nonlinear interactions are negligible.

  3. A unified analysis of kinetic models for the problem of thermal creep based on the boundary conditions of Cercignani-Lampis for heterogeneous plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Cinara Ewerling da; Knackfuss, Rosenei Felippe

    2013-01-01

    In this work is presented a series of numerical results and graphical comparisons of the physical quantities of interest such as: the velocity profile and the heat on profile. This formulation is developed for the problem of Thermal Creep, where the gas is moving between two parallel plates with different chemical constitutions (heterogeneous plates) due to a temperature gradient. The flow of a rarefied gas, is investigated with special attention to the gas-surface interaction, modeled by the Cercignani-Lampis kernel, that unlike Maxwell's scattering kernel, is defined in terms of two accommodation coefficients (normal and tangential) to represent the physical properties of the gas. The kinetic theory for rarefied gas dynamics, derived from the linearized Boltzmann equation, is developed in an unified approach, to the BGK model, S model, GJ model and MRS model. In the search for solutions to solve the problem of Thermal Creep with kernel of the Cercignani-Lampis, we used a analytical version of the discrete ordinates method (ADO) based on an arbitrary quadrature scheme, under which is determined a problem of eigenvalues and their respective separation constants. Numerical results are developed by the computer program FORTRAN. (author)

  4. Thermophoresis on boundary layer heat and mass transfer flow of Walters-B fluid past a radiate plate with heat sink/source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasu, B.; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy; Murthy, P. V. S. N.

    2017-05-01

    The Walters-B liquid model is employed to simulate medical creams and other rheological liquids encountered in biotechnology and chemical engineering. This rheological model introduces supplementary terms into the momentum conservation equation. The combined effects of thermal radiation and heat sink/source on transient free convective, laminar flow and mass transfer in a viscoelastic fluid past a vertical plate are presented by taking thermophoresis effect into account. The transformed conservation equations are solved using a stable, robust finite difference method. A parametric study illustrating the influence of viscoelasticity parameter ( Γ), thermophoretic parameter ( τ), thermal radiation parameter ( F), heat sink/source ( ϕ), Prandtl number ( Pr), Schmidt number ( Sc), thermal Grashof number ( Gr), solutal Grashof number ( Gm), temperature and concentration profiles as well as local skin-friction, Nusselt and Sherwood number is conducted. The results of this parametric study are shown graphically and inform of table. The study has applications in polymer materials processing.

  5. Geomorphic analysis of transient landscapes in the Sierra Madre de Chiapas and Maya Mountains (northern Central America): implications for the North American-Caribbean-Cocos plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, L.; Gloaguen, R.

    2016-01-01

    We use a geomorphic approach in order to unravel the recent evolution of the diffuse triple junction between the North American, Caribbean, and Cocos plates in northern Central America. We intend to characterize and understand the complex tectonic setting that produced an intricate pattern of landscapes using tectonic geomorphology, as well as available geological and geophysical data. We classify regions with specific relief characteristics and highlight uplifted relict landscapes in northern Central America. We also analyze the drainage network from the Sierra Madre de Chiapas and Maya Mountains in order to extract information about potential vertical displacements. Our results suggest that most of the landscapes of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas and Maya Mountains are in a transient stage. Topographic profiles and morphometric maps highlight elevated relict surfaces that are characterized by a low-amplitude relief. The river longitudinal profiles display upper reaches witnessing these relict landscapes. Lower reaches adjust to new base-level conditions and are characterized by multiple knickpoints. These results backed by published GPS and seismotectonic data allow us to refine and extend existing geodynamic models of the triple junction. Relict landscapes are delimited by faults and thus result from a tectonic control. The topography of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas evolved as the result of (1) the inland migration of deformation related to the coupling between the Chiapas Massif and the Cocos forearc sliver and (2) the compression along the northern tip of the Central American volcanic arc. Although most of the shortening between the Cocos forearc sliver and the North American Plate is accommodated within the Sierra de Chiapas and Sierra de los Cuchumatanes, a small part may be still transmitted to the Maya Mountains and the Belize margin through a "rigid" Petén Basin.

  6. Geomorphic analysis of transient landscapes from the Sierra Madre de Chiapas and Maya Mountains (northern Central America): implications for the North American-Caribbean-Cocos plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, L.; Gloaguen, R.

    2015-09-01

    We use a geomorphic approach in order to unravel the recent evolution of the diffuse triple junction between the North American, Caribbean, and Cocos plates in northern Central America. The complex tectonic setting produced an intricate pattern of landscapes that we try to systemize using remote sensing tectonic geomorphology and available geological and geophysical data. We classify regions with specific relief characteristics and highlight uplifted relict landscapes in northern Central America. We also analyze the drainage network from the Sierra Madre de Chiapas and Maya Mountains in order to extract information about potential vertical displacements. Our results suggest that most of the landscapes of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas and Maya Mountains are in transient stage. Topographic profiles and morphometric maps highlight elevated relict surfaces that are characterized by a low amplitude relief. The river longitudinal profiles display upper reaches witnessing these relict landscapes while lower segments characterized by multiple knickpoints, that adjust to new base-level conditions. These results backed by published GPS and seismotectonic data allow us to refine and extend existing geodynamic models of the triple junction. Relict landscapes are delimited by faults and thus result from a tectonic control. The topography of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas evolved as the result of (1) the inland migration of deformation related to the coupling between the Chiapas Massif and the Cocos fore-arc sliver, and (2) the compression along the northern tip of the Central America Volcanic Arc. Although most of the shortening between the Cocos fore-arc sliver and the North American plate is accommodated within the Sierra de Chiapas and Sierra de los Cuchumatanes, a small part may be still transmitted to the Maya Mountains and the Belize margin through a "rigid" Petén basin.

  7. The solution of the laminar-boundary-layer equation for the flat plate for velocity and temperature fields for variable physical properties and for the diffusion field at high concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, H

    1950-01-01

    In connection with Pohlhausen's solution for the temperature field on the flat plate, a series of formulas were indicated by means of which the velocity and temperature field for variable physical characteristics can be computed by an integral equation and an iteration method based on it. With it, the following cases were solved: On the assumption that the viscosity simply varies with the temperature while the other fluid properties remain constant, the velocity and temperature field on the heated and cooled plate, respectively, was computed at the Prandtl numbers 12.5 and 100 (viscous fluids). A closer study of these two cases resulted in general relations: The calculations for a gas of Pr number 0.7 (air) were conducted on the assumption that all fluid properties vary with the temperature, and the velocities are low enough for the heat of friction to be discounted. The result was a thickening of the boundary layers, but no appreciable modification in shearing stress or heat-transfer coefficient.

  8. Plate boundary deformation of the Pacific plate. Two case studies. (1) Crustal structure of the northwestern Vizcaino block and Gorda escarpment, offshore northern California, and implications for postsubduction deformation of a paleoaccretionary margin. (2) A focused look at the Alpine fault, New Zealand: Seismicity, focal mechanisms and stress observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Beate

    Two examples of Pacific rim plate boundary deformation are presented. In the first part of the thesis crustal models are derived for the northwestern part of the Vizcaino block in California using marine seismic and gravity data collected by the Mendocino Triple Junction Seismic Experiment. A northwest-southeast trending kink in the Moho is imaged and interpreted to have formed under compression by reactivation of preexisting thrust faults in the paleoaccretionary prism at the seaward margin of the Vizcaino block. The study suggests that the deformation resulted from mainly north-south compression between the Pacific-Juan de Fuca plates across the Mendocino transform fault and predates late Pliocene Pacific-North America plate convergence. In the second part, 195 earthquakes recorded during the duration of the Southern Alps Passive Seismic Experiment (SAPSE) are analysed. Precise earthquake locations and focal mechanisms provide unprecedented detail of the seismotectonics in the central South Island. The short term (6 month) SAPSE seismicity is compared with long term (8 years) seismicity recorded by the New Zealand National Seismic network and the Lake Pukaki network. The seismicity rate of the Alpine fault is low, but comparable to locked sections of the San Andreas fault, with large earthquakes expected. Changes of the depth of the seismogenic zone, generally uniform at about 10--12 km, occur only localised over distances smaller than 30 km, suggesting that thermal perturbations must be of similar scale. This implies that the thermal effects of the uplift of the Southern Alps do not change the seismogenic depth significantly and are not in accordance with most of the present thermal models. Both the Hope and Porters Pass fault zones are seismically active and deformation is accommodated near the fault zones and in the adjacent crust. North of Mt Cook, a triangular shaped region along the Alpine fault is characterised by absence of earthquakes. We interpret this

  9. Geodetic constraints on slip partitioning at a convergent plate boundary: Reconciling long-term structural deformation with earthquake cycle observations in West Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulali, A.; McClusky, S.; Susilo, S.; Leonard, Y.; Cummins, P. R.; Tregoning, P.; Meilano, I.; Efendi, J.; Wijanarto, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    Slip partitioning models have been used extensively to describe the broad zones of deformation in oblique convergence zones. Traditionally these models have exploited course spatial and temporal constraints from geomorphology, seismology and geodesy. However, the development of high resolution geodetic measurements in the recent years have allowed the imaging of multiple transient processes occurring during the seismic cycle ranging from post-seismic relaxation to slow slip events, which raise questions about our ability to understand the long-term patterns of relative motion in actively convergent deforming regions. Here we present the example of West Java, where continuous GPS observations show a time-dependent change in the linear rate of surface motion, which we interpret as an ongoing long-term post-seismic deformation following the 2006 Mw 7.8 Java earthquake. We use a combination of a regional tectonic block model and a viscoelastic relaxation model to consider the post-seismic transient and we propose a kinematic model of convergence of the Australian Plate and the Sunda Block, involving a slip partitioning between the Java Trench and a left-lateral structure extending E-W along Java, with most of the normal component is occurring onto the subduction Thrust and a much smaller parallel motion accommodated along the Barabis ( 5± 0.2 mm/yr) and Kendeng (˜ 0.8 ± 0.3 mm/yr) Thrusts. Our findings correlate with observations from historical seismicity and highlight a new potential seismic hazard in Java Island.

  10. Numerical analysis of the flow separation and adverse pressure gradient in laminar boundary layer over a flat plate due to a rotating cylinder in the vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afroz, Farhana; Sharif, Muhammad A. R.

    2018-04-01

    Generation of adverse pressure gradient (APG) in the boundary layer over a plane wall using a rotating cylinder close to the wall has been numerically investigated for a range of the freestream Reynolds number (50 ≤ Re ≤ 400), the cylinder rotation rate (0 ≤ α ≤ 2), and the cylinder to wall gap (0.125 ≤ G/D ≤ 2). Various combinations of these flow parameters have been considered and the transient flow is computed using the ANSYS Fluent CFD code. The magnitude of the APG has been quantified. The influence of the freestream Reynolds number on the dynamics of flow separation and cylinder wake has been examined. Reynolds number has strong effect on bubble size properties and APG magnitude. Drag and lift force coefficient on the cylinder are also computed which are found to be strong function of the Reynolds number. Higher Reynolds number results in complex laminar separation bubble on the wall. A parametric demarcation map showing the threshold combinations of the flow parameters for transition from steady to periodic unsteady flow is generated.

  11. Cold plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marroquin, Christopher M.; O' Connell, Kevin M.; Schultz, Mark D.; Tian, Shurong

    2018-02-13

    A cold plate, an electronic assembly including a cold plate, and a method for forming a cold plate are provided. The cold plate includes an interface plate and an opposing plate that form a plenum. The cold plate includes a plurality of active areas arranged for alignment over respective heat generating portions of an electronic assembly, and non-active areas between the active areas. A cooling fluid flows through the plenum. The plenum, at the non-active areas, has a reduced width and/or reduced height relative to the plenum at the active areas. The reduced width and/or height of the plenum, and exterior dimensions of cold plate, at the non-active areas allow the non-active areas to flex to accommodate surface variations of the electronics assembly. The reduced width and/or height non-active areas can be specifically shaped to fit between physical features of the electronics assembly.

  12. Plating laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seamster, A.G.; Weitkamp, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    The lead plating of the prototype resonator has been conducted entirely in the plating laboratory at SUNY Stony Brook. Because of the considerable cost and inconvenience in transporting personnel and materials to and from Stony Brook, it is clearly impractical to plate all the resonators there. Furthermore, the high-beta resonator cannot be accommodated at Stony Brook without modifying the set up there. Consequently the authors are constructing a plating lab in-house

  13. Turkish earthquakes reveal dynamics of fracturing along a major strike-slip fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çemen, Ibrahim; Gökten, Ergun; Varol, Baki; Kiliç, Recep; Özaksoy, Volkan; Erkmen, Cenk; Pinar, Ali

    During the last 5 months of 1999, northwestern Turkey experienced two major earthquakes along the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). The first earthquake struck the country at 3:01 A.M. local time on August 17, and caused extensive damage in the towns of Yalova, Gölcük, Izmit, Adapazari, and Düzce (Figure 1). The second earthquake occurred at 6:57 P.M. local time on November 12 and caused damage mostly in Düzce and Kaynasli.The 7.4-Mw main shock of the August 17 Izmit earthquake was centered at 40.702°N, 29.987°E and originated at a depth of 17 km. The center was about 11 km southeast of Izmit, a major industrial town (Figure 1). The earthquake was a devastating natural disaster that claimed close to 20,000 lives and left more than 100,000 people homeless.

  14. E-W strike slip shearing of Kinwat Granitoid at South East Deccan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    53

    detail/photo evidences nor any attitude data were presented. Tectonically active-, moderately active- and inactive basins have elongation ratios 0.75 ..... various types of interaction between coexisting felsic and mafic magmas. Earth and. Environmental Science Trans. Royal Soc. Edin. 83 145-153.

  15. E–W strike slip shearing of Kinwat granitoid at South East Deccan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R D Kaplay

    2017-07-21

    Jul 21, 2017 ... Roy S and Rao R U M 1999 Geothermal investigations in the. 1993 Latur earthquake area, Deccan Volcanic Province,. India; Tectonophys. 306 237–252. Sangode S J, Mesharm D C, Kulkarni Y R, Gudadhe. S S, Malpe D B and Herlekar M A 2013 Neotectonic response of the Godavari and Kaddam Rivers ...

  16. Pseudodynamic Source Characterization for Strike-Slip Faulting Including Stress Heterogeneity and Super-Shear Ruptures

    KAUST Repository

    Mena, B.

    2012-08-08

    Reliable ground‐motion prediction for future earthquakes depends on the ability to simulate realistic earthquake source models. Though dynamic rupture calculations have recently become more popular, they are still computationally demanding. An alternative is to invoke the framework of pseudodynamic (PD) source characterizations that use simple relationships between kinematic and dynamic source parameters to build physically self‐consistent kinematic models. Based on the PD approach of Guatteri et al. (2004), we propose new relationships for PD models for moderate‐to‐large strike‐slip earthquakes that include local supershear rupture speed due to stress heterogeneities. We conduct dynamic rupture simulations using stochastic initial stress distributions to generate a suite of source models in the magnitude Mw 6–8. This set of models shows that local supershear rupture speed prevails for all earthquake sizes, and that the local rise‐time distribution is not controlled by the overall fault geometry, but rather by local stress changes on the faults. Based on these findings, we derive a new set of relations for the proposed PD source characterization that accounts for earthquake size, buried and surface ruptures, and includes local rise‐time variations and supershear rupture speed. By applying the proposed PD source characterization to several well‐recorded past earthquakes, we verify that significant improvements in fitting synthetic ground motion to observed ones is achieved when comparing our new approach with the model of Guatteri et al. (2004). The proposed PD methodology can be implemented into ground‐motion simulation tools for more physically reliable prediction of shaking in future earthquakes.

  17. E–W strike slip shearing of Kinwat granitoid at South East Deccan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    School of Earth Sciences, S.R.T.M. University, Nanded, Maharashtra 431 606, India. Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400 076, India. Nanded Education Society's Science College, Nanded, Maharashtra 431 606, India. Dnyanopasak College, Parbhani ...

  18. Cretaceous plate interaction during the formation of the Colombian plateau, Northandean margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammer, Andreas; Piraquive, Alejandro; Díaz, Sebastián

    2015-04-01

    The Cretaceous subduction cycle at the Northandean margin ends with an accretionary event that welds the plateau rocks of the present Western Cordillera to the continental margin. A suture between plateau and rock associations of the continental margin is well exposed at the western border of the Central Cordillera, but overprinted by intense block tectonics. Analyzed in detail, its evolution tracks an increased coupling between lower and upper plate, as may be accounted for by the following stages: 1) The Cretaceous plateau suite records at its onset passive margin conditions, as it encroaches on the continental margin and accounts for an extensional event that triggered the emplacement of ultramafic and mafic igneous rock suites along major faults. 2) An early subduction stage of a still moderate plate coupling is documented by the formation of a magmatic arc in an extensional setting that may have been prompted by slab retreat. Convergence direction was oblique, as attested the transfer of strike-slip displacements to the forearc region. 3) A phase of strong plate interaction entailed the delamination of narrow crustal flakes and their entrainment to depths below the petrologic Moho, as evidenced by their present association to serpentinites in a setting that bears characteristics of a subduction channel. 4) During the final collisional stage deformation is transferred to the lower plate, where the stacking of imbricate sheets, combined with their erosional unloading, led to the formation of an antiformal bulge that fed a foreland basin. - The life time of this Cretaceous subduction cycle was strictly synchronous to the construction of the Colombian plateau. With the final collisional stage magmatic activity vanished. This coincidence incites to explore a relationship between plume activity and subduction.

  19. Casimir densities for parallel plate in the domain wall background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setare, M R

    2003-01-01

    The Casimir forces on two parallel plates in the conformally flat domain wall background due to a conformally coupled massless scalar field satisfying mixed boundary conditions on the plates are investigated. In the general case of mixed boundary conditions, formulae are derived for the vacuum expectation values of the energy-momentum tensor and vacuum forces acting on the boundaries

  20. Development of boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.

    1980-01-01

    Boundary layers develop along the blade surfaces on both the pressure and the suction side in a non-stationary flow field. This is due to the fact that there is a strongly fluctuating flow on the downstream blade row, especially as a result of the wakes of the upstream blade row. The author investigates the formation of boundary layers under non-stationary flow conditions and tries to establish a model describing the non-stationary boundary layer. For this purpose, plate boundary layers are measured, at constant flow rates but different interferent frequency and variable pressure gradients. By introducing the sample technique, measurements of the non-stationary boundary layer become possible, and the flow rate fluctuation can be divided in its components, i.e. stochastic turbulence and periodical fluctuation. (GL) [de

  1. Decadal GPS Time Series and Velocity Fields Spanning the North American Continent and Beyond: New Data Products, Cyberinfrastructure and Case Studies from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) and Other Regional Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D. A.; Herring, T.; Melbourne, T. I.; Murray, M. H.; Szeliga, W. M.; Floyd, M.; Puskas, C. M.; King, R. W.; Boler, F. M.; Meertens, C. M.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope (GAGE) Facility, operated by UNAVCO, provides a diverse suite of geodetic data, derived products and cyberinfrastructure services to support community Earth science research and education. GPS data and products including decadal station position time series and velocities are provided for 2000+ continuous GPS stations from the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) and other networks distributed throughout the high Arctic, North America, and Caribbean regions. The position time series contain a multitude of signals in addition to the secular motions, including coseismic and postseismic displacements, interseismic strain accumulation, and transient signals associated with hydrologic and other processes. We present our latest velocity field solutions, new time series offset estimate products, and new time series examples associated with various phenomena. Position time series, and the signals they contain, are inherently dependent upon analysis parameters such as network scaling and reference frame realization. The estimation of scale changes for example, a common practice, has large impacts on vertical motion estimates. GAGE/PBO velocities and time series are currently provided in IGS (IGb08) and North America (NAM08, IGb08 rotated to a fixed North America Plate) reference frames. We are reprocessing all data (1996 to present) as part of the transition from IGb08 to IGS14 that began in 2017. New NAM14 and IGS14 data products are discussed. GAGE/PBO GPS data products are currently generated using onsite computing clusters. As part of an NSF funded EarthCube Building Blocks project called "Deploying MultiFacility Cyberinfrastructure in Commercial and Private Cloud-based Systems (GeoSciCloud)", we are investigating performance, cost, and efficiency differences between local computing resources and cloud based resources. Test environments include a commercial cloud provider (Amazon/AWS), NSF cloud-like infrastructures within

  2. MACMA: a Virtual Lab for Plate Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigne, C.; Combes, M.; Tisseau, C.

    2013-12-01

    MACMA (Multi-Agent Convective MAntle) is a tool developed to simulate evolutive plate tectonics and mantle convection in a 2-D cylindrical geometry (Combes et al., 2012). The model relies mainly on a force balance to compute the velocity of each plate, and on empirical rules to determine how plate boundaries move and evolve. It includes first-order features of plate tectonics: (a) all plates on Earth do not have the same size, (b) subduction zones are asymmetric, (c) plates driven by subducting slabs and upper plates do not exhibit the same velocities, and (d) plate boundaries are mobile, can collide, merge and disappear, and new plate boundaries can be created. The MACMA interface was designed to be user-friendly and a simple use of the simulator can be achieved without any prerequisite knowledge in fluid dynamics, mantle rheology, nor in numerical methods. As a preliminary study, the simulator was used by a few students from bachelor's degree to master's degree levels. An initial configuration for plate tectonics has to be created before starting a simulation: the number and types of plate boundaries (ridge, subduction, passive margins) has to be defined and seafloor ages must be given. A simple but interesting exercise consists in letting students build such an initial configuration: they must analyze a map of tectonic plates, choose a 2-D section and examine carefully a map of seafloor ages. Students mentioned that the exercise made them realize that the 3-D spherical structure of plate tectonics does not translate directly in a simple 2-D section, as opposed to what is usually shown in books. Physical parameters: e.g. mantle viscosity, number of layers to consider in the mantle (upper and lower mantle, possible asthenosphere), initial time and mantle temperature, have to be chosen, and students can use this virtual lab to see how different scenarios emerge when parameters are varied. Very importantly, the direct visualization of the mobility of plate

  3. Strain resolving method of composite plane plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion FUIOREA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the extension of isotropic plates problem to the case of composite plates. In order to perform it, the Kirchhoff-Love hypotheses were “softened” by some additional ones. Considering the constitutive laws for composite materials the stress functions were eliminated by using Cauchy equations. As a result a partial derivative equation in displacements was obtained. Finally the boundary condition formulation was extended for the case of complex composite plates.

  4. Seismic tomographic constraints on plate-tectonic reconstructions of Nazca subduction under South America since late Cretaceous (˜80 Ma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. W.; Wu, J.; Suppe, J.

    2017-12-01

    Global seismic tomography has provided new and increasingly higher resolution constraints on subducted lithospheric remnants in terms of their position, depth, and volumes. In this study we aim to link tomographic slab anomalies in the mantle under South America to Andean geology using methods to unfold (i.e. structurally restore) slabs back to earth surface and input them to globally consistent plate reconstructions (Wu et al., 2016). The Andean margin of South America has long been interpreted as a classic example of a continuous subduction system since early Jurassic or later. However, significant gaps in Andean plate tectonic reconstructions exist due to missing or incomplete geology from extensive Nazca-South America plate convergence (i.e. >5000 km since 80 Ma). We mapped and unfolded the Nazca slab from global seismic tomography to produce a quantitative plate reconstruction of the Andes back to the late Cretaceous 80 Ma. Our plate model predicts the latest phase of Nazca subduction began in the late Cretaceous subduction after a 100 to 80 Ma plate reorganization, which is supported by Andean geology that indicates a margin-wide compressional event at the mid-late Cretaceous (Tunik et al., 2010). Our Andean plate tectonic reconstructions predict the Andean margin experienced periods of strike-slip/transtensional and even divergent plate tectonics between 80 to 55 Ma. This prediction is roughly consistent with the arc magmatism from northern Chile between 20 to 36°S that resumed at 80 Ma after a magmatic gap. Our model indicates the Andean margin only became fully convergent after 55 Ma. We provide additional constraints on pre-subduction Nazca plate paleogeography by extracting P-wave velocity perturbations within our mapped slab surfaces following Wu et al. (2016). We identified localized slow anomalies within our mapped Nazca slab that apparently show the size and position of the subducted Nazca ridge, Carnegie ridge and the hypothesized Inca plateau

  5. Plate interior polyphase fault systems and sedimentary basin evolution: A case study of the East Gobi Basin and East Gobi Fault Zone, southeastern Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heumann, Matthew J.; Johnson, Cari L.; Webb, Laura E.

    2018-01-01

    Structural interpretation of 2-D seismic reflection data and subsurface-outcrop correlations reveal six distinct phases of deformation recorded in the Paleozoic basement rocks and Mesozoic-Cenozoic basin fill of the East Gobi Basin (EGB), southeastern Mongolia. These phases include arc accretion and arc-continent collision in late Paleozoic time, Late Triassic sinistral shear-zone development, Early Jurassic fold and thrust belt style shortening, Middle Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous extension and rift basin development, middle Cretaceous shortening with basin inversion and regional unconformity development, and Late Cretaceous-Oligocene thermal subsidence with renewed Paleogene left-lateral strike slip faulting across the fault zone. The five post-amalgamation deformation phases are localized along the East Gobi Fault Zone, suggesting that preexisting structures and boundary conditions exert fundamental controls on the long term evolution of intracontinental basins such as the EGB. Subsurface geophysical data and outcrop correlations demonstrate that the main subbasins of the EGB contain major differences in basement metamorphic and structural fabrics, basin fill patterns, and distinct Mesozoic-Cenozoic fault generations. Potential causes related to far-field boundary conditions and other driving factors are suggested for each of the major deformation phases.

  6. Indonesian Landforms and Plate Tectonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Th. Verstappen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v5i3.103The horizontal configuration and vertical dimension of the landforms occurring in the tectonically unstable parts of Indonesia were resulted in the first place from plate tectonics. Most of them date from the Quaternary and endogenous forces are ongoing. Three major plates – the northward moving Indo-Australian Plate, the south-eastward moving SE-Asian Plate and the westward moving Pacific Plate - meet at a plate triple-junction situated in the south of New Guinea’s Bird’s Head. The narrow North-Moluccan plate is interposed between the Asia and Pacific. It tapers out northward in the Philippine Mobile Belt and is gradually disappearing. The greatest relief amplitudes occur near the plate boundaries: deep ocean trenches are associated with subduction zones and mountain ranges with collision belts. The landforms of the more stable areas of the plates date back to a more remote past and, where emerged, have a more subdued relief that is in the first place related to the resistance of the rocks to humid tropical weathering Rising mountain ranges and emerging island arcs are subjected to rapid humid-tropical river erosions and mass movements. The erosion products accumulate in adjacent sedimentary basins where their increasing weight causes subsidence by gravity and isostatic compensations. Living and raised coral reefs, volcanoes, and fault scarps are important geomorphic indicators of active plate tectonics. Compartmental faults may strongly affect island arcs stretching perpendicular to the plate movement. This is the case on Java. Transcurrent faults and related pull-apart basins are a leading factor where plates meet at an angle, such as on Sumatra. The most complicated situation exists near the triple-junction and in the Moluccas. Modern research methods, such as GPS measurements of plate movements and absolute dating of volcanic outbursts and raised coral reefs are important tools. The mega-landforms resulting

  7. Natural convection flow between moving boundaries | Chepkwony ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The laminar steady natural convection flow of viscous, incompressible fluid between two moving vertical plates is considered. It is assumed that the plates are moving in opposite direction with equal velocity. The two-point boundary value problem governing the flow is characterized by a non-dimensional parameter K. It is ...

  8. Levy Solution for Buckling Analysis of Functionally Graded Rectangular Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Meisam; Saidi, Ali Reza; Jomehzadeh, Emad

    2010-04-01

    In this article, an analytical method for buckling analysis of thin functionally graded (FG) rectangular plates is presented. It is assumed that the material properties of the plate vary through the thickness of the plate as a power function. Based on the classical plate theory (Kirchhoff theory), the governing equations are obtained for functionally graded rectangular plates using the principle of minimum total potential energy. The resulting equations are decoupled and solved for rectangular plate with different loading conditions. It is assumed that the plate is simply supported along two opposite edges and has arbitrary boundary conditions along the other edges. The critical buckling loads are presented for a rectangular plate with different boundary conditions, various powers of FGM and some aspect ratios.

  9. The baffle influence on sound radiation characteristics of a plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic radiation characteristics of the baffle plates and unbaffle plates are calculated and compared by single-layer potential and double-layer potential. Based on the boundary integral equation, the sound pressure integral equation of the baffle and the baffle are deduced respectively. According to the boundary compatibility condition, the sound pressure and the vibration velocity of the plates are obtained. Further, the dynamic equation of the structure is substituted into the vibration equation in the form of the baffle plate and the baffle plate. The sound pressure difference and the displacement of a plate surface are in the form of the vibration mode superposition and the acoustic radiation impedance of the double integral form is obtained, which determines vibration mode coefficient and sound radiation parameters. The effect of the baffle on the acoustic radiation characteristics of the thin plate is analyzed by comparing the acoustic radiation parameters with the simple and simple rectangular plate in water.

  10. Mathematical methods for elastic plates

    CERN Document Server

    Constanda, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models of deformation of elastic plates are used by applied mathematicians and engineers in connection with a wide range of practical applications, from microchip production to the construction of skyscrapers and aircraft. This book employs two important analytic techniques to solve the fundamental boundary value problems for the theory of plates with transverse shear deformation, which offers a more complete picture of the physical process of bending than Kirchhoff’s classical one.   The first method transfers the ellipticity of the governing system to the boundary, leading to singular integral equations on the contour of the domain. These equations, established on the basis of the properties of suitable layer potentials, are then solved in spaces of smooth (Hölder continuous and Hölder continuously differentiable) functions.   The second technique rewrites the differential system in terms of complex variables and fully integrates it, expressing the solution as a combination of complex ana...

  11. Plate kinematics in the Cantabrian domain of the Pyrenean orogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tavani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Cantabrian domain represents the western portion of the Pyrenean orogen, in the area where the Iberian continental lithosphere was subducted toward the north underneath the transitional to oceanic lithosphere of the Bay of Biscay. There, the about 100 km of orogenic convergence have been mostly accommodated in the northern portion of the orogen (i.e. the retro wedge developed in the Bay of Biscay abyssal plain, while only crustal-scale folding with limited internal deformation occurred in the Cantabrian southern wedge (pro-wedge. Integrated meso- and macrostructural analyses and a reappraisal of available information from the transitional area between the Pyrenean and Cantabrian domains are presented in this work, allowing to set geometric and kinematic constraints on the entire Meso-Cenozoic history of the northern portion of the Iberian Plate, including subduction initiation and evolution in the western portion of the Pyrenean orogen.

    The structural record of the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous deformation stage, which was associated with rifting and seafloor spreading in the Bay of Biscay, indicates a ridge perpendicular (NNE-SSW oriented extension, with no evidence of relevant strike-slip components during rifting. A Cenozoic NNW-SSE oriented shortening stage followed, related to the limited (about 100 km north-directed subduction of the Iberian continental lithosphere underneath the transitional to oceanic lithosphere of the Bay of Biscay. Subduction led to the formation of the poorly-developed Cantabrian pro-wedge, which is laterally juxtaposed to the well-developed Pyrenean pro-wedge to the east. During this convergence stage, the structural framework in the Cantabrian pro-wedge, and particularly along its transition with the Pyrenean wedge to the east, was severely complicated by the reactivation of Paleozoic and Mesozoic inherited structures.

    Data presented in this work fully support the development of the

  12. Analysis of hydraulic instability of ANS involute fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartory, W.K.

    1991-11-01

    Curved shell equations for the involute Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) fuel plates are coupled to two-dimensional hydraulic channel flow equations that include fluid friction. A complete set of fluid and plate boundary conditions is applied at the entrance and exit and along the sides of the plate and the channel. The coupled system is linearized and solved to assess the hydraulic instability of the plates

  13. The effect of plate-scale rheology and plate interactions on intraplate seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Byung-Dal; Capitanio, Fabio A.

    2017-11-01

    We use finite element modeling to investigate on the stress loading-unloading cycles and earthquakes occurrence in the plate interiors, resulting from the interactions of tectonic plates along their boundary. We model a visco-elasto-plastic plate embedding a single or multiple faults, while the tectonic stress is applied along the plate boundary by an external loading visco-elastic plate, reproducing the tectonic setting of two interacting lithospheres. Because the two plates deform viscously, the timescale of stress accumulation and release on the faults is self-consistently determined, from the boundary to the interiors, and seismic recurrence is an emerging feature. This approach overcomes the constraints on recurrence period imposed by stress (stress-drop) and velocity boundary conditions, while here it is unconstrained. We illustrate emerging macroscopic characteristics of this system, showing that the seismic recurrence period τ becomes shorter as Γ and Θ decreases, where Γ =ηI /ηL, the viscosity ratio of the viscosities of the internal fault-embedded to external loading plates, respectively, and Θ =σY /σL the stress ratio of the elastic limit of the fault to far-field loading stress. When the system embeds multiple, randomly distributed faults, stress transfer results in recurrence period deviations, however the time-averaged recurrence period of each fault show the same dependence on Γ and Θ, illustrating a characteristic collective behavior. The control of these parameters prevails even when initial pre-stress was randomly assigned in terms of the spatial arrangement and orientation on the internal plate, mimicking local fluctuations. Our study shows the relevance of macroscopic rheological properties of tectonic plates on the earthquake occurrence in plate interiors, as opposed to local factors, proposing a viable model for the seismic behavior of continent interiors in the context of large-scale, long-term deformation of interacting tectonic

  14. Plate flexure and volcanism: Late Cenozoic tectonics of the Tabar-Lihir-Tanga-Feni alkalic province, New Ireland Basin, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, I. D.

    2016-05-01

    Late Cenozoic Tabar-Lihir-Tanga-Feni (TLTF) alkaline volcanism, New Ireland Basin, PNG, is associated with extensional cracks along the crests of flexed ridges developed on the New Ireland Microplate (New name). The tectonic alignment of the TLTF volcanic arc is essentially perpendicular to the flexed ridges, suggesting that fractures parallel to the direction of maximum horizontal compression facilitated the rapid ascent of alkaline magmas from the mantle region, perhaps 60-70 km depth. The mainly Pliocene to Pleistocene volcanoes were localized at the intersection of ridge-parallel Kabang structures and arc-parallel Niffin structures, suggesting that the Kabang-Niffin structural intersections underlying each of the TLTF island groups provided a well developed, clustered network of open conduits which tapped the mantle source region. Periodic post-Miocene locking and unlocking along the strike-slip Kilinailau Fault (New name) are thought to have functioned as a valve, turning on (Pliocene) and then turning off (Pleistocene) volcanic activity, respectively. Partial locking of the Kilinailau Fault during the Pliocene resulted in the accumulation of intraplate stresses within the New Ireland Microplate, and caused plate flexure and ridge development, plate-cracking along ridge crests and the development of arc-parallel regional fractures parallel to the direction of maximum compression. Unlocking of the Kilinailau Fault in the Pleistocene resulted in the release of intraplate stresses in the New Ireland Microplate and a cessation of volcanic activity across most of the TLTF arc. The style and scale of plate flexure and cracking, accompanied by within-plate alkaline volcanism from equally spaced ridge-top eruptive centers confined to a narrow, linear volcanic arc are unknown from any other tectonic province.

  15. Negotiating boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Ballegaard, Stinne Aaløkke

    2010-01-01

    to maintain the order of the home when managing disease and adopting new healthcare technology. In our analysis we relate this boundary work to two continuums of visibility-invisibility and integration-segmentation in disease management. We explore five factors that affect the boundary work: objects......To move treatment successfully from the hospital to that of technology assisted self-care at home, it is vital in the design of such technologies to understand the setting in which the health IT should be used. Based on qualitative studies we find that people engage in elaborate boundary work......, activities, places, character of disease, and collaboration. Furthermore, the processes are explored of how boundary objects move between social worlds pushing and shaping boundaries. From this we discuss design implications for future healthcare technologies for the home....

  16. Boundary Spanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    The paper explores how locals span boundaries between corporate and local levels. The aim is to better comprehend potentialities and challenges when MNCs draws on locals’ culture specific knowledge. The study is based on an in-depth, interpretive case study of boundary spanning by local actors...... in the period of post-acquisition when their organization is being integrated into the acquiring MNC. The paper contributes to the literature on boundary spanning in three ways: First, by illustrating that boundary spanning is performed by numerous organizational actors in a variety of positions in MNCs......, inclusively by locals in subsidiaries. Second, by showing that boundary spanning is ‘situated’ in the sense that its result depends on the kind of knowledge to be transmitted and the attitude of the receivers. A third contribution is methodological. The study illustrates that combining bottom-up grounded...

  17. Is There Really A North American Plate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krill, A.

    2011-12-01

    Lithospheric plates are typically identified from earthquake epicenters and evidence such as GPS movements. But no evidence indicates a plate boundary between the North American and South American Plates. Some plate maps show them separated by a transform boundary, but it is only a fracture zone. Other maps show an "undefined plate boundary" or put no boundary between these two plates (check Google images). Early plate maps showed a single large American Plate, quite narrow east of the Caribbean Plate (Le Pichon 1968, Morgan 1968). The North and South American Plates became established by the leading textbook Earth (Press & Siever 1974). On their map, from a Scientific American article by John Dewey (1972), these new plates were separated by an "uncertain plate boundary." The reasons for postulating a North American Plate were probably more psychological than geological. Each of the other continents of the world had its own plate, and North American geologists naturally wanted theirs. Similarly, European geographers used to view Europe as its own continent. A single large plate should again be hypothesized. But the term American Plate would now be ambiguous ("Which plate, North or South?") Perhaps future textbook authors could call it the "Two-American Plate." Textbook authors ultimately decide such global-tectonic matters. I became aware of textbook authors' opinions and influence from my research into the history of Alfred Wegener's continental drift (see Fixists vs. Mobilists by Krill 2011). Leading textbook author Charles Schuchert realized that continental drift would abolish his cherished paleogeographic models of large east-west continents (Eria, Gondwana) and small oceans (Poseiden, Nereis). He and his junior coauthors conspired to keep drift evidence out of their textbooks, from the 1934-editions until the 1969-editions (Physical Geology by Longwell et al. 1969, Historical Geology by Dunbar & Waage 1969). Their textbooks ruled in America. Textbooks

  18. Seismicity of the Earth 1900–2010 Australia plate and vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Harley M.; Herman, Matthew; Tarr, Arthur C.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Dart, Richard L.; Rhea, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This map shows details of the Australia plate and vicinity not presented in Tarr and others (2010). The boundary of the Australia plate includes all fundamental plate boundary components: mid-ocean ridges, subduction zones, arc-continent collisions, and large-offset transform faults. Along the southern edge of the plate the mid-ocean ridge separates the Australia and Antarctica plates and its behavior is straightforward. In contrast, the other boundary segments that ring the Australia plate represent some of the most seismically active elements of the global plate boundary system, and some of the most rapidly evolving plate interactions. As a result, there are some very complex structures which host many large and great earthquakes

  19. Boundary Spanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    The paper explores how locals span boundaries between corporate and local levels. The aim is to better comprehend potentialities and challenges when MNCs draws on locals’ culture specific knowledge. The study is based on an in-depth, interpretive case study of boundary spanning by local actors in...... approach with pattern matching is a way to shed light on the tacit local knowledge that organizational actors cannot articulate and that an exclusively inductive research is not likely to unveil....

  20. Paleomagnetic evidence for vertical-axis rotations of crustal blocks in the Woodlark Rift, SE Papua New Guinea: Miocene to present-day kinematics in one of the world's most rapidly extending plate boundary zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Elizabeth A.; Little, Timothy A.; Turner, Gillian M.; Wallace, Laura M.; Ellis, Susan

    2015-07-01

    The continental Woodlark Rift, in SE Papua New Guinea lies west of a propagating oceanic spreading center in the Woodlark Basin and is currently one of few places on Earth where active continental breakup is thought to be occurring. Here north-south extension is localized on a few major normal faults. We determined characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) components from demagnetization profiles of >300 individual specimens. From these, 157 components contribute to paleomagnetic directions for six formations. We compare Early Miocene (˜20 Ma) to Late Pliocene (3.0 ± 0.5) ChRM mean directions, at four localities, with contemporaneous expected field directions corresponding to the Australian Plate. Time-varying finite rotations from Cape Vogel Peninsula (28-12°) suggest anticlockwise rotation had begun by ˜15 Ma. This rotation may have been accompanied by rifting, ˜7 Ma earlier than previously inferred. Furthermore, that early extension may have occurred south of the present rift, and that deformation later migrated north of the Peninsula. Pliocene vertical-axis rotations are consistent with GPS-determined plate motions, suggesting that contemporary rift kinematics were established by ˜3 Ma. Finite anticlockwise rotation (10.1 ± 7.6°) in the Amphlett Islands is accordant with seafloor spreading in the Woodlark Basin, suggesting this locality has seen the full Woodlark plate motion since 3 Ma. Clockwise rotation of the Goodenough Bay Block (-6.5 ± 11.2°) since the Late Miocene has accomplished transfer of deformation between major extensional corridors, and an especially rapid local rotation (-16.3 ± 9.5°) in NW Normanby Island may suggest an incipient dextral transfer fault.

  1. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pacific Islanders American Indian/Alaska Native Programs Older Adults Family Link Diabetes EXPO Upcoming Diabetes EXPOs EXPO ... Plate! Click on the plate sections below to add your food choices. Reset Plate Share Create Your ...

  2. Active tectonics, fault patterns, and stress field of Deception Island: A response to oblique convergence between the Pacific and Antarctic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestro, A.; Somoza, L.; Rey, J.; Martínez-Frías, J.; López-Martínez, J.

    2007-02-01

    Palaeostress results derived from brittle mesoscopic structures on Deception Island (Bransfield Trough, Western Antarctica) show a recent stress field characterized by an extensional regime, with local compressional stress states. The maximum horizontal stress ( σy) shows NW-SE and NNE-SSW to NE-SW orientations and horizontal extension ( σ3) in NE-SW and WNW-ESE to NW-SE directions. Alignments of mesofractures show a maximum of NNE-SSW orientation and several relative maxima striking N030-050E, N060-080E, N110-120E, and N160-170E. Subaerial and submarine macrofaults of Deception Island show six main systems controlling the morphology of the island: N-S, NNE-SSW, NE-SW, ENE-WSW to E-W, WNW-ESE, and NNW-SSE. Geochemical patterns related to submarine hydrothermally influenced fault and fissure pathways also share the same trends. The orientation of these fault systems is compared to Riedel shear fractures. Following this model, we propose two evolutionary stages from geometrical relationships between the location and orientation of joints and faults. These stages imply a counter-clockwise rotation of Deception Island, which may be linked to a regional left-lateral strike-slip. In addition, the simple shear zone could be a response to oblique convergence between the Antarctic and Pacific plates. This stress direction is consistent with the present-day movements between the Antarctic, Scotia, and Pacific plates. Nevertheless, present basalt-andesitic volcanism and deep earthquake focal mechanisms may indicate rollback of the former Phoenix subducted slab, which is presently amalgamated with the Pacific plate. We postulate that both mechanisms could occur simultaneously.

  3. Delamination, upper plate extension, and plate margin complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kosuke; Gerya, Taras; Willett, Sean

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the syn- and post-subduction margin evolution with respect to extension, lithospheric removal, and magmatic and topographic consequences by employing 3D geodynamic models. In all experiments, regions of extended partial melting are overlain by up to 3 km high plateaus. There is complex geometric entanglement between upper mantle, partially molten rocks, and lithosphere, which is thermally eroded, over hundreds of kilometers across the plate contact. A complex lithosphere-asthenosphere-boundary features elongated anomalies at scales of few tens to hundred kilometers. First-order, synthetic seismic anomaly patterns, based on thermodynamic velocities which are tabulated for model p,T conditions, are accordingly complex. Passive margin geometry variations in the lower plate effect consistent and inherited differences in dynamic evolution. Promontories along the margin tend to trigger three stages of evolution: 1) a magmatic arc; 2) a lower plate, eduction-like exhumation of buried continental crust in domal patterns of few tens of km wavelength; and subsequently, 3) the formation of extended zones on the upper plate which lack a lithospheric mantle, undergo partial extension, and feature lower crustal melting. Slab break-off is consistently favoured in locations where the lower plate margin is relatively recessed. Concerning the classical removal mechanisms, transitions and co-evolution between delamination, convective thinning, and upper-plate extension are gradual and these modes are not mutually exclusive. Almost complete mixed-mode removal and extension can be compared to the Aegean. Slab window formation by margin geometry variation produces characteristic uplift patterns that are comparable to the Apennines, where higher uplift rates could be a consequence of incipient necking of the slab below central Calabria.

  4. Blurring Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Nielsen, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    of welfare functions into EU law both from an internal market law and a constitutional law perspective. The main problem areas covered by the Blurring Boundaries project were studied in sub-projects on: 1) Internal market law and welfare services; 2) Fundamental rights and non-discrimination law aspects......; and 3) Services of general interest. In the Blurring Boundaries project, three aspects of the European Social Model have been particularly highlighted: the constitutionalisation of the European Social Model, its multi-level legal character, and the clash between market access justice at EU level...... and distributive justice at national level....

  5. Attractors for stochastic strongly damped plate equations with additive noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Ma

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the asymptotic behavior of stochastic plate equations with homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions. We show the existence of an attractor for the random dynamical system associated with the equation.

  6. Offset of latest pleistocene shoreface reveals slip rate on the Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Dartnell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Hosgri fault is the southern part of the regional Hosgri–San Gregorio dextral strike‐slip fault system, which extends primarily in the offshore for about 400 km in central California. Between Morro Bay and San Simeon, high‐resolution multibeam bathymetry reveals that the eastern strand of the Hosgri fault is crossed by an ∼265  m wide slope interpreted as the shoreface of a latest Pleistocene sand spit. This sand spit crossed an embayment and connected a western fault‐bounded bedrock peninsula and an eastern bedrock highland, a paleogeography resembling modern coastal geomorphology along the San Andreas fault. Detailed analysis of the relict shoreface with slope profiles and slope maps indicates a lateral slip rate of 2.6±0.9  mm/yr, considered a minimum rate for the Hosgri given the presence of an active western strand. This slip rate indicates that the Hosgri system takes up the largest share of the strike‐slip fault budget and is the most active strike‐slip fault west of the San Andreas fault in central California. This result further demonstrates the value and potential of high‐resolution bathymetry in characterization of active offshore faults.

  7. A new multilayered visco-elasto-plastic experimental model to study strike-slip fault seismic cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caniven, Y.; Dominguez, S.; Soliva, R.; Cattin, R.; Peyret, M.; Marchandon, M.; Romano, C.; Strak, V.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, technological advances in satellite imagery measurements as well as the development of dense geodetic and seismologic networks allow for a detailed analysis of surface deformation associated with active fault seismic cycle. However, the study of earthquake dynamics faces several limiting

  8. Fault slip and earthquake recurrence along strike-slip faults — Contributions of high-resolution geomorphic data

    KAUST Repository

    Zielke, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Understanding earthquake (EQ) recurrence relies on information about the timing and size of past EQ ruptures along a given fault. Knowledge of a fault\\'s rupture history provides valuable information on its potential future behavior, enabling seismic hazard estimates and loss mitigation. Stratigraphic and geomorphic evidence of faulting is used to constrain the recurrence of surface rupturing EQs. Analysis of the latter data sets culminated during the mid-1980s in the formulation of now classical EQ recurrence models, now routinely used to assess seismic hazard. Within the last decade, Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) surveying technology and other high-resolution data sets became increasingly available to tectono-geomorphic studies, promising to contribute to better-informed models of EQ recurrence and slip-accumulation patterns. After reviewing motivation and background, we outline requirements to successfully reconstruct a fault\\'s offset accumulation pattern from geomorphic evidence. We address sources of uncertainty affecting offset measurement and advocate approaches to minimize them. A number of recent studies focus on single-EQ slip distributions and along-fault slip accumulation patterns. We put them in context with paleoseismic studies along the respective faults by comparing coefficients of variation CV for EQ inter-event time and slip-per-event and find that a) single-event offsets vary over a wide range of length-scales and the sources for offset variability differ with length-scale, b) at fault-segment length-scales, single-event offsets are essentially constant, c) along-fault offset accumulation as resolved in the geomorphic record is dominated by essentially same-size, large offset increments, and d) there is generally no one-to-one correlation between the offset accumulation pattern constrained in the geomorphic record and EQ occurrence as identified in the stratigraphic record, revealing the higher resolution and preservation potential of the latter. While slip accumulation along a fault segment may be dominated by repetition of large, nearly constant offset increments, timing of surface-rupture is less regular. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Plate tectonic evolution of the Mediterranean-Middle East region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gealey, W. K.

    1988-12-01

    single plate until a rifting event that started during the Late Jurassic. The Balkan Mountains are interpreted to represent an Alpine inversion of this Mesozoic rift system that extended west from the Black Sea Basin. (4) The Eastern Carpathian microcontinental sliver is concluded as continuing southward as the Serbo-Macedonian Massif that separates Rhodope from the Vardar Zone rather than as Rhodope itself. (5) The Scutari-Pec Lineament is considered as representing a major discontinuity between the Apulia-Pannonian plate and adjacent Greece and Turkey. Ophiolites to the northwest of this lineament originated in a single oceanic area, the Vardar Zone. Ophiolites to the southeast of this lineament evolved from two oceanic areas, those of interior Greece and northern Anatolia and the associated Ankara melange relating to the Vardar Zone, the former north arm of Tethys. and the Pindos-southern Anatolia-Zagros-Oman Ophiolites relating to a former south arm of Mesozoic Tethys. (6) Based on the history of development of various elements of the Alpine system, there is a strong suggestion that important dextral movement took place along a major strike-slip fault system reaching from the Middle East to the Central Alps between Late Cretaceous and Middle Eocene times. Sestini (1984).

  10. Three Dimensional Stress Fields in Cracked Plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    Elliptic Boundary Value Problaes, Princeton: D. Van Nostrand, 1965. 2. Bonlo. T., Nuovo risoluzione di un problems fondamentale della teoria dellelasticita...precisely the eigenfunctions used by Folias. N r .4’ I! Notation. A system of Cartesian coordinates (x,y,z) is used. The plate occupies the region

  11. Buckling analysis of rectangular composite plates with rectangular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Int. J. Mech. Sci. 44: 1925–1945. Nemeth M P 1997 Buckling behavior of long symmetrically laminated plates subjected to shear and linearly varying edge loads. NASA TP-3659. Panda S K and Ramachandra L S 2010 Buckling of rectangular plates with various boundary conditions loaded by non-uniform inplane loads.

  12. Thermoelastic waves without energy dissipation in an elastic plate to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The linear theory of thermoelasticity without energy dissipation for isotropic and homogeneous materials is employed to study waves in an elastic plate. The waves are assumed to arise out of a ramp-type stress on the plate's boundary which is maintained at constant temperature. Laplace transforms are used to solve the ...

  13. Direct Method of Analysis of an Isotropic Rectangular Plate Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The shape function of fourth order for the plate under uniformly distributed load for various boundary conditions were formulated using the characteristic orthogonal polynomials (COP), which is also known as product of orthogonal strips of the plate along the two axes. Analyses of results obtained were compared with exact ...

  14. An Alternative Estimate of the Motion of the Capricorn Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris, S. G.; Gordon, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    Diffuse plate boundaries cover ~15% of Earth's surface and can exceed 1000 km in across-strike width. Deforming oceanic lithosphere in the equatorial Indian Ocean accommodates the motion between the India and Capricorn plates and serves as their mutual diffuse plate boundary. This deforming lithosphere lies between the Central Indian Ridge to the west and the Sumatra trench to the east; the plates diverge to the west of ≈74°E and converge to the east of it. Many data have shown that the pole of rotation between the India and Capricorn plates lies within this diffuse plate boundary [1,2]. Surprisingly, however, the recently estimated angular velocity in the MORVEL global set of angular velocities [3] places this pole of rotation north of prior poles by several degrees, and north of the diffuse plate boundary. The motion between the India and Capricorn plates can only be estimated indirectly by differencing the motion of the India plate relative to the Somalia plate, on the one hand, and the motion of the Capricorn plate relative to Somalia plate, on the other. While the MORVEL India-Somalia angular velocity is similar to prior estimates, the MORVEL Capricorn-Somalia pole of rotation lies northwest of its predecessors. The difference is not caused by new transform azimuth data incorporated into MORVEL or by the new application of a correction to spreading rates for outward displacement. Instead the difference appears to be caused by a few anomalous spreading rates near the northern end of the Capricorn-Somalia plate boundary along the Central Indian Ridge. Rejecting these data leads to consistency with prior results. Implications for the motion of the Capricorn plate relative to Australia will be discussed. [1] DeMets, C., R. G. Gordon, and J.-Y. Royer, 2005. Motion between the Indian, Capricorn, and Somalian plates since 20 Ma: implications for the timing and magnitude of distributed deformation in the equatorial Indian ocean, Geophys. J. Int., 161, 445-468. [2

  15. On a consistent finite-strain plate theory of growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiong; Steigmann, David; Wang, Fan-Fan; Dai, Hui-Hui

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a consistent finite-strain plate theory for growth-induced large deformations is developed. The three-dimensional (3D) governing system of the plate model is formulated through the variational approach, which is composed of the mechanical equilibrium equation and the constraint equation of incompressibility. Then, series expansions of the unknown functions in terms of the thickness variable are adopted. By using the 3D equilibrium equations and the surface boundary conditions, recursion relations for the expansion coefficients are successfully established. As a result, a 2D vector plate equation with three unknowns is obtained and the associated edge boundary conditions are proposed. It can be verified that the plate equation ensures the required asymptotic order for all the terms in the variations of the total energy functional. The weak formulation of the plate equation has also been derived for future numerical calculations. As applications of the plate theory, two examples regarding the growth-induced deformations and instabilities in thin hyperelastic plates are studied. Some analytical results are obtained in these examples, which can be used to describe the large deformations and reveal the bifurcation properties of the thin plates. Furthermore, the results obtained from the current plate theory are compared with those obtained from the classical Föppl-von Kármán plate theory, from which the efficiencies and advantages of the current plate theory can be demonstrated.

  16. Numerical solution of acoustic scattering by finite perforated elastic plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalieri, A V G; Wolf, W R; Jaworski, J W

    2016-04-01

    We present a numerical method to compute the acoustic field scattered by finite perforated elastic plates. A boundary element method is developed to solve the Helmholtz equation subjected to boundary conditions related to the plate vibration. These boundary conditions are recast in terms of the vibration modes of the plate and its porosity, which enables a direct solution procedure. A parametric study is performed for a two-dimensional problem whereby a cantilevered perforated elastic plate scatters sound from a point quadrupole near the free edge. Both elasticity and porosity tend to diminish the scattered sound, in agreement with previous work considering semi-infinite plates. Finite elastic plates are shown to reduce acoustic scattering when excited at high Helmholtz numbers k 0 based on the plate length. However, at low k 0 , finite elastic plates produce only modest reductions or, in cases related to structural resonance, an increase to the scattered sound level relative to the rigid case. Porosity, on the other hand, is shown to be more effective in reducing the radiated sound for low k 0 . The combined beneficial effects of elasticity and porosity are shown to be effective in reducing the scattered sound for a broader range of k 0 for perforated elastic plates.

  17. Thermo-mechanical buckling analysis of FGM plate using generalized plate theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kanishk; Kumar, Dinesh; Gite, Anil

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the thermo-mechanical buckling behavior of simply-supported FGM plate under the framework of generalized plate theory (GPT), which includes classical plate theory (CPT), first order shear deformation theory (FSDT) and higher order shear deformation theory (HSDT) as special cases. The governing equations for FGM plate under thermal and mechanical loading conditions are derived from the principle of virtual displacements and Navier-type solution is assumed for simply supported boundary condition. The efficiency and applicability of presented methodology is illustrated by considering various examples of thermal and mechanical buckling of FGM plates. The closed form solutions in the form of critical thermal and mechanical buckling loads, predicted by CPT, FSDT and HSDT are compared for different side-to-thickness of FGM plate. Subsequently, the effect of material gradation profile on critical buckling parameters is examined by evaluating the buckling response for a range of power law indexes. The effect of geometrical parameters on mechanical buckling of FGM plate under uni-axial and bi-axial loading conditions are also illustrated by calculating the critical load for various values of slenderness ratios. Furthermore a comparative analysis of critical thermal buckling loads of FGM plate for different temperature profiles is also presented. It is identified that all plate theories predicted approximately same critical buckling loads and critical buckling temperatures for thin FGM plate, however for thick FGM plates, CPT overestimates the critical buckling parameters. Moreover the critical buckling loads and critical buckling temperatures of FGM plate are found to be significantly lower than the corresponding homogenous isotropic ceramic plate (n=0).

  18. Plate interactions control middle late Miocene, proto-Gulf and Basin and Range extension in the southern Basin and Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Christopher D.; Aranda-Gomez, J. Jorge

    2000-03-01

    Middle-late Miocene (proto-Gulf; ˜12-6 Ma) extension around the Gulf of California (Gulf Extensional Province) is commonly interpreted as resulting from partitioning of oblique Pacific-North American plate motion into strike-slip displacement along the margin and east-northeast extension perpendicular to the margin within the North American plate. We propose that this mechanism also applies to kinematically similar, predominantly east-northeast extension that occurred at the same time throughout the southern Basin and Range province, from southern Arizona and New Mexico to the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. New field and 40Ar/ 39Ar data in Sinaloa and Durango confirm that this episode of extension occurred on the mainland side of the Gulf and in the Basin and Range east of the Sierra Madre Occidental, which is generally considered the eastern margin of the Gulf Extensional Province. Published data indicate the middle-late Miocene episode also occurred across the northern and southern ends of the Sierra Madre where the Gulf Extensional Province connects with the Basin and Range: (1) from central Sonora into southern Arizona and New Mexico, and (2) from Nayarit into central Mexico north of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. This episode appears to have affected an area that continues to the eastern edge of the Basin and Range province in Texas and San Luis Potosi. Recognition that this episode of extension affected the entire southern Basin and Range resolves the discrepancy between the amount of extension calculated based on plate reconstructions and that based on field data within the Gulf Extensional Province alone. Published plate reconstructions require 160 to 110 km of east-northeast extension between ˜12 and 6 Ma. If taken up solely within the Gulf Extensional Province, this would have generated 66 to 78% extension, which is much greater than observed. Spread across the entire southern Basin and Range it requires only ˜20% total extension, which is more

  19. Buckling Response of Thick Functionally Graded Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOUAZZA MOKHTAR

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the buckling of a functionally graded plate is studied by using first order shear deformation theory (FSDT. The material properties of the plate are assumed to be graded continuously in the direction of thickness. The variation of the material properties follows a simple power-law distribution in terms of the volume fractions of constituents. The von Karman strains are used to construct the equilibrium equations of the plates subjected to two types of thermal loading, linear temperature rise and gradient through the thickness are considered. The governing equations are reduced to linear differential equation with boundary conditions yielding a simple solution procedure. In addition, the effects of temperature field, volume fraction distributions, and system geometric parameters are investigated. The results are compared with the results of the no shear deformation theory (classic plate theory, CPT.

  20. Within plate seismicity analysis in the segment between the high Cordillera and the Precordillera of northern Mendoza (Southern Central Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Olivar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Crustal seismicity in northwestern Mendoza Province in Argentina, corresponding to the transition zone between the Chilean-Pampean flat subduction zone (26.5–33.5°S and the Southern Central Andes normal subduction zone to the south, is studied in order to i identify its relationship with the mapped structure, ii determine deformational mechanisms and iii constrain the geometry of the fold and thrust belt in the lower crust. Through this, we aim to determine which are the structures that contribute to Andean construction, east of the Frontal Cordillera in Argentina and at the western Principal Cordillera in Chile. Data from a temporary local seismic network are reprocessed in order to achieve a precise location of hypocenters and, whenever possible, to build focal mechanisms. Results are interpreted and compared with previous seismic studies and structural models. Analyzed seismicity is grouped around the eastern front of Frontal Cordillera, with hypocenters mainly at depths of 25–40 km. Contrastingly, earthquakes in the Principal Cordillera to the west are located at the axial Andean sector and Chilean slope, with depths shallower than 15 km. Obtained focal mechanisms indicate mainly strike-slip displacements, left lateral at Frontal Cordillera and right lateral at Principal Cordillera. Based on these observations, new possible structural models are proposed, where seismogenic sources could be either associated with inherited basement structures from the Cuyania-Chilenia suture; or correspond to deep-blind thrusts linked with a deeper-than-previously-assumed decollement that could be shared between Frontal Cordillera and western Precordillera. This deeper decollement would coincide in turn with the one determined from receiver function analysis for the eastern Sierras Pampeanas in previous works, potentially implying a common decollement all through the fold and thrust belt configuration. Apart from this, a new interpretation of

  1. Numerical modeling of intraplate seismicity with a deformable loading plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, B. D.; Capitanio, F. A.

    2017-12-01

    We use finite element modeling to investigate on the stress loading-unloading cycles and earthquakes occurrence in the plate interiors, resulting from the interactions of tectonic plates along their boundary. We model a visco-elasto-plastic plate embedding a single or multiple faults, while the tectonic stress is applied along the plate boundary by an external loading visco-elastic plate, reproducing the tectonic setting of two interacting lithospheres. Because the two plates deform viscously, the timescale of stress accumulation and release on the faults is self-consistently determined, from the boundary to the interiors, and seismic recurrence is an emerging feature. This approach overcomes the constraints on recurrence period imposed by stress (stress-drop) and velocity boundary conditions, while here it is unconstrained. We illustrate emerging macroscopic characteristics of this system, showing that the seismic recurrence period τ becomes shorter as Γ and Θ decreases, where Γ = ηI/ηL the viscosity ratio of the viscosities of the internal fault-embedded to external loading plates, respectively, and Θ = σY/σL the stress ratio of the elastic limit of the fault to far-field loading stress. When the system embeds multiple, randomly distributed faults, stress transfer results in recurrence period deviations, however the time-averaged recurrence period of each fault show the same dependence on Γ and Θ, illustrating a characteristic collective behavior. The control of these parameters prevails even when initial pre-stress was randomly assigned in terms of the spatial arrangement and orientation on the internal plate, mimicking local fluctuations. Our study shows the relevance of macroscopic rheological properties of tectonic plates on the earthquake occurrence in plate interiors, as opposed to local factors, proposing a viable model for the seismic behavior of continent interiors in the context of large-scale, long-term deformation of interacting tectonic

  2. On the vibrations of a simply supported square plate on a weakly nonlinear elastic foundation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarubinskaya, M.A.; Van Horssen, W.T.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper an initial-boundary value problem for a weakly nonlinear plate equation with a quadratic nonlinearity will be studied. This initial-boundary value problem can be regarded as a simple model describing free oscillations of a simply supported square plate on an elastic foundation. It is

  3. Bleeding boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian Møller; Petersen, Michael Nebeling

    2018-01-01

    Hook-up apps such as Grindr and Scruff have become important sites for the negotiation of sex between men, in that they shape the ways intimacy cultures are practised and become visible (Mowlabocus, 2010; Race, 2014; Duguay et al., 2016). While such apps enable different intimacy cultures......, they also come paired with anxieties. In the epigraph the interview participant James1 expresses concerns about the how the hook-up app Scruff might restructure the boundaries of privacy and make him vulnerable to exposure. Such technological ambivalence is central to domestication theory, which focuses...

  4. Breaking Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . As a fundamental human experience, liminality transmits cultural practices, codes, rituals, and meanings in-between aggregate structures and uncertain outcomes. As a methodological tool it is well placed to overcome disciplinary boundaries, which often direct attention to specific structures or sectors of society....... Its capacity to provide explanatory accounts of seemingly unstructured situations provides an opportunity to link experience-based and culture-oriented approaches not only to contemporary problems but also to undertake comparisons across historical periods. From a perspective of liminality...

  5. Boundary issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alan R.; Porder, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    What is our point of no return? Caesar proclaimed 'the die is cast' while crossing the Rubicon, but rarely does modern society find so visible a threshold in our continued degradation of ecosystems and the services they provide. Humans have always used their surroundings to make a living— sometimes successfully, sometimes not (Diamond 2005)—and we intuitively know that there are boundaries to our exploitation. But defining these boundaries has been a challenge since Malthus first prophesied that nature would limit the human population (Malthus 1798). In 2009, Rockström and colleagues tried to quantify what the 6.8 billion (and counting) of us could continue to get away with, and what we couldn't (Rockström et al 2009). In selecting ten 'planetary boundaries', the authors contend that a sustainable human enterprise requires treating a number of environmental thresholds as points of no return. They suggest we breach these Rubicons at our own peril, and that we've already crossed three: biodiversity loss, atmospheric CO2, and disruption of the global nitrogen (N) cycle. As they clearly hoped, the very act of setting targets has provoked scientific inquiry about their accuracy, and about the value of hard targets in the first place (Schlesinger 2009). Such debate is a good thing. Despite recent emphasis on the science of human-ecosystem interactions, understanding of our planetary boundaries is still in its infancy, and controversy can speed scientific progress (Engelhardt and Caplan 1987). A few weeks ago in this journal, Carpenter and Bennett (2011) took aim at one of the more controversial boundaries in the Rockström analysis: that for human alteration of the global phosphorus (P) cycle. Rockström's group chose riverine P export as the key indicator, suggesting that humans should not exceed a value that could trigger widespread marine anoxic events—and asserting that we have not yet crossed this threshold. There are defensible reasons for a marine

  6. Space-dependent core/reflector boundary conditions generated by the boundary element method for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, M.; Brebbia, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the boundary element method used to genera