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Sample records for stride people acquire

  1. Technological memory aid use by people with acquired brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Jamieson, Matthew; Cullen, Breda; McGee-Lennon, Marilyn; Brewster, Stephen; Evans, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Evans, Wilson, Needham, and Brentnall (2003) investigated memory aid use by people with acquired brain injury (ABI) and found little use of technological memory aids. The present study aims to investigate use of technological and other memory aids and strategies 10 years on, and investigate what predicts use. People with ABI and self-reported memory impairments (n = 81) completed a survey containing a memory aid checklist, demographic questions and memory questionnaires. Chi-square analysis s...

  2. The importance of stride length and stride frequency in middle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... also found that the better runners have faster stride frequencies and that provincial middle distance runners use lower stride frequencies than international middle distance runners. Key Words: Biomechanics, stride length, stride frequency, maximum oxygen consumption, leg length, middle distance runners, road runners.

  3. Improvement in Body Image, Perceived Health, and Health-Related Self-Efficacy Among People With Serious Mental Illness: The STRIDE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarborough, Bobbi Jo H; Leo, Michael C; Yarborough, Micah T; Stumbo, Scott; Janoff, Shannon L; Perrin, Nancy A; Green, Carla A

    2016-03-01

    The authors examined secondary outcomes of STRIDE, a randomized controlled trial that tested a weight-loss and lifestyle intervention for individuals taking antipsychotic medications. Hierarchical linear regression was used to explore the effects of the intervention and weight change at follow-up (six, 12, and 24 months) on body image, perceived health, and health-related self-efficacy. Participants were 200 adults who were overweight and taking antipsychotic agents. Weight change × study arm interaction was associated with significant improvement in body image from baseline to six months. From baseline to 12 months, body image scores of intervention participants improved by 1.7 points more compared with scores of control participants; greater weight loss was associated with more improvement. Between baseline and 24 months, greater weight loss was associated with improvements in body image, perceived health, and health-related self-efficacy. Participation in STRIDE improved body image, and losing weight improved perceived health and health-related self-efficacy.

  4. Comparison of accelerometry stride time calculation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Michelle; Kenny, Ian C; Anderson, Ross

    2016-09-06

    Inertial sensors such as accelerometers and gyroscopes can provide a multitude of information on running gait. Running parameters such as stride time and ground contact time can all be identified within tibial accelerometry data. Within this, stride time is a popular parameter of interest, possibly due to its role in running economy. However, there are multiple methods utilised to derive stride time from tibial accelerometry data, some of which may offer complications when implemented on larger data files. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare previously utilised methods of stride time derivation to an original proposed method, utilising medio-lateral tibial acceleration data filtered at 2Hz, allowing for greater efficiency in stride time output. Tibial accelerometry data from six participants training for a half marathon were utilised. One right leg run was randomly selected for each participant, in which five consecutive running stride times were calculated. Four calculation methods were employed to derive stride time. A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) identified no significant difference in stride time between stride time calculation methods (p=1.00), whilst intra-class coefficient values (all >0.95) and coefficient of variance values (all method possibly offers a simplified technique for stride time output during running gait analysis. This method may be less influenced by "double peak" error and minor fluctuations within the data, allowing for accurate and efficient automated data output in both real time and post processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Interventions for treating acute bleeding episodes in people with acquired hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan; Zhou, Ruiqing; Duan, Xin; Long, Dan; Yang, Songtao

    2014-08-28

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). In most cases, bleeding episodes are spontaneous and severe at presentation. The optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial. To determine the efficacy of hemostatic therapies for acute bleeds in people with acquired hemophilia A; and to compare different forms of therapy for these bleeds. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 4) and MEDLINE (Ovid) (1948 to 30 April 2014). We searched the conference proceedings of the: American Society of Hematology; European Hematology Association; International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH); and the European Association for Haemophilia and Allied Disorders (EAHAD) (from 2000 to 30 April 2014). In addition to this we searched clinical trials registers. All randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials of hemostatic therapies for people with acquired hemophilia A, with no restrictions on gender, age or ethnicity. No trials matching the selection criteria were eligible for inclusion. No trials matching the selection criteria were eligible for inclusion. No randomised clinical trials of hemostatic therapies for acquired hemophilia A were found. Thus, we are not able to draw any conclusions or make any recommendations on the optimal hemostatic therapies for acquired hemophilia A based on the highest quality of evidence. GIven that carrying out randomized controlled trials in this field is a complex task, the authors suggest that, while planning randomised controlled trials in which patients can be enrolled, clinicians treating the disease continue to base their choices on alternative, lower quality sources of evidence, which hopefully, in the future, will also be appraised and incorporated in a Cochrane Review.

  6. Methodological issues in interviews involving people with communication impairments after acquired brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Eva; Paterson, Barbara L; Scott-Findlay, Shannon; Ehnfors, Margareta; Ehrenberg, Anna

    2007-12-01

    Qualitative research has made a significant contribution to the body of knowledge related to how people experience living with various chronic diseases and disabilities; however, the voices of certain vulnerable populations, particularly those with impairments that affect their ability to communicate, are commonly absent. In recent years, a few researchers have attempted to explore the most effective ways to ensure that the voices of people with communication impairments from acquired brain damages can be captured in qualitative research interviews; yet several methodological issues related to including this population in qualitative research remained unexamined. In this article, the authors draw on insights derived from their research on the experiences of adult survivors of stroke and traumatic brain injury to describe methodological issues related to sampling, informed consent, and fatigue in participant and researcher while also making some recommendations for conducting qualitative interviews with these populations.

  7. Speech and language therapists' views about AAC system acceptance by people with acquired communication disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampoulou, Eliada

    2018-04-18

    Some adults with acquired communication disorders are faced with an inability to communicate coherently through verbal speech with their communication partners. Despite the fact that a variety of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) aided systems is available to assist them in communicating, not all adults accept them. In Cyprus, there is scant research focusing on the factors that are linked to AAC system acceptance and abandonment. To address this gap, this research involves exploring the experiences of six speech and language therapists supporting adults with acquired communication disorders, who could benefit from the use of AAC systems. The main research question is: What are the factors that influence AAC system acceptance or abandonment? The method used for data collection, was semi-structured interviews and the transcripts were analyzed thematically. The findings show that a number of factors influence the acceptance of AAC systems. These include the time since onset and acceptance of disability, the person's attitude towards communication facilitators, and the perceptions about AAC systems. These findings indicate that the process of accepting an AAC system is multi-layered and these layers are interrelated. More research is warranted focusing directly on the experiences of people with acquired communication disorders and their communication partners. Implications for Rehabilitation The different myths about AAC systems need to be challenged such that awareness about their usefulness is raised. AAC specialists need to find ways to spread the message that AAC systems can actually support language, speech and communication through different dissemination avenues, such as articles in newspapers and talks through the media.

  8. Efficacy of leisure intervention groups in rehabilitation of people with an acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Elizabeth J; Veitch, Craig; Passey, Megan

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether participation in a week-long residential leisure intervention program targeting individuals with an acquired brain injury (ABI) improved the leisure satisfaction, self-esteem and quality of life (QOL) of participants. The program included leisure awareness, leisure resources, social interaction skills and leisure activity skills. Using a pre- and post-intervention design leisure satisfaction, self-esteem and QOL were assessed prior to, immediately following and at three months post program. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Participants were eight men and four women aged between 19 and 49 years who were recent clients of a rural Brain Injury Rehabilitation Service. The majority (7/12) had acquired their ABI more than two years previously, and for most (10/12) the cause was trauma. Program participants showed clinically important and statistically significant improvements in leisure satisfaction (p = 0.002), self-esteem (p = 0.03) and QOL (p = 0.02 to 0.008 for four domains of the World Health Organisation Quality of Life - Bref scale) three months post program. Adults with an ABI participating in leisure education programs can experience improvements in leisure satisfaction, self-esteem and QOL following the program. The findings suggest that active leisure intervention programs should be included in the ongoing rehabilitative care of adults with an ABI. Implications for Rehabilitation Leisure participation, leisure satisfaction and social integration can be seriously compromised following an acquired brain injury (ABI). Engagement in leisure activities has positive effects on physical and mental health and is increasingly recognised as an important determinant of quality of life (QOL) for people with ABI. Participation in a short-term intensive leisure intervention program can improve leisure satisfaction, self-esteem and QOL. Active leisure intervention programs should be included in the ongoing rehabilitation

  9. Predictive factors for the Nursing Diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Richardson Augusto Rosendo; Costa, Romanniny Hévillyn Silva; Nelson, Ana Raquel Cortês; Duarte, Fernando Hiago da Silva; Prado, Nanete Caroline da Costa; Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique Fagundes

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the predictive factors for the nursing diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. Method: a cross-sectional study, undertaken with 113 people living with AIDS. The data were collected using an interview script and physical examination. Logistic regression was used for the data analysis, considering a level of significance of 10%. Results: the predictive factors identified were: for the nursing diagnosis of knowledge deficit-inadequate following of instructions and verbalization of the problem; for the nursing diagnosis of failure to adhere - years of study, behavior indicative of failure to adhere, participation in the treatment and forgetfulness; for the nursing diagnosis of sexual dysfunction - family income, reduced frequency of sexual practice, perceived deficit in sexual desire, perceived limitations imposed by the disease and altered body function. Conclusion: the predictive factors for these nursing diagnoses involved sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, defining characteristics, and related factors, which must be taken into consideration during the assistance provided by the nurse. PMID:27384466

  10. Sexual, reproductive health needs and rights of young people with perinatally acquired HIV in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryamutuma, R; Baingana, F

    2011-06-01

    Numbers of young people with perinatally acquired HIV is growing significantly. With antiretroviral drugs, children who get infected at birth with HIV have an opportunity to graduate into adolescence and adulthood. This achievement notwithstanding, new challenges have emerged in their care and support needs. The most dynamic being, their sexual and reproductive health needs and rights (SRHR). This paper aimed at establishing the gaps at policy, program and health systems level as far as addressing sexual and reproductive health needs of young people who have lived with HIV since infancy is concerned. This paper is based on a desk review of existing literature on sexual and reproductive health needs and rights of young positives. The results indicate young positives are sexually active and are engaging in risky sexual encounters. Yet, existing policies, programs and services are inadequate in responding to their sexual and reproductive health needs and rights. Against these findings, it is important, that policies specifically targeting this subgroup are formulated and to make sure that such policies result in programs and services that are youth friendly. It is also important that integration of Sexual Reproductive Health (SRH) and HIV services is prioritized.

  11. From the wings of night: dream work with people who have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muff, J

    1996-07-01

    Nurses who work with seriously ill and dying patients are engaged in helping them live fully until they die. Most theories of death and dying deal with conscious activities only. Yet many people find relief form the fear and loneliness of life-threatening illness if given the opportunity to express their totality, meaning their unconscious as well as conscious processes. Working with the mind may not be enough. Attending to the unconscious through dream work can allow inner healing to occur, which can support that person as he or she moves into the unknown. The article describes the AIDS Dreamwork Project, the goals of which are to understand patients better and to help them better understand themselves, to help them live and die more consciously, and to discern patterns in their dreams that may be unique to people with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Six themes have been identified in the dreams collected so far: wake-up dreams; reassurance dreams; dreams of opposition, separation, or coming together; transition dreams; transformation dreams; and spiritual or archetypal dreams.

  12. Stride length: measuring its instantaneous value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campiglio, G C; Mazzeo, J R

    2007-01-01

    Human gait has been studied from different viewpoints: kinematics, dynamics, sensibility and others. Many of its characteristics still remain open to research, both for normal gait and for pathological gait. Objective measures of some of its most significant spatial/temporal parameters are important in this context. Stride length, one of these parameters, is defined as the distance between two consecutive contacts of one foot with ground. On this work we present a device designed to provide automatic measures of stride length. Its features make it particularly appropriate for the evaluation of pathological gait

  13. Developing a comprehensive framework of community integration for people with acquired brain injury: a conceptual analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Nusratnaaz M; Kersten, Paula; Siegert, Richard J; Theadom, Alice

    2018-03-06

    Despite increasing emphasis on the importance of community integration as an outcome for acquired brain injury (ABI), there is still no consensus on the definition of community integration. The aim of this study was to complete a concept analysis of community integration in people with ABI. The method of concept clarification was used to guide concept analysis of community integration based on a literature review. Articles were included if they explored community integration in people with ABI. Data extraction was performed by the initial coding of (1) the definition of community integration used in the articles, (2) attributes of community integration recognized in the articles' findings, and (3) the process of community integration. This information was synthesized to develop a model of community integration. Thirty-three articles were identified that met the inclusion criteria. The construct of community integration was found to be a non-linear process reflecting recovery over time, sequential goals, and transitions. Community integration was found to encompass six components including: independence, sense of belonging, adjustment, having a place to live, involved in a meaningful occupational activity, and being socially connected into the community. Antecedents to community integration included individual, injury-related, environmental, and societal factors. The findings of this concept analysis suggest that the concept of community integration is more diverse than previously recognized. New measures and rehabilitation plans capturing all attributes of community integration are needed in clinical practice. Implications for rehabilitation Understanding of perceptions and lived experiences of people with acquired brain injury through this analysis provides basis to ensure rehabilitation meets patients' needs. This model highlights the need for clinicians to be aware and assess the role of antecedents as well as the attributes of community integration itself to

  14. Making electronic mail accessible: perspectives of people with acquired cognitive impairments, caregivers and professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todis, B; Sohlberg, M M; Hood, D; Fickas, S

    2005-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to better understand the technology needs, barriers and strategies of individuals with acquired cognitive impairments (ACI) in order to design and modify technologies with potential for alleviating the diminished independence and social isolation common in this population. The authors hypothesized that (1) higher rates of computer use would be reported by younger, more highly educated individuals with ACI, those with less severe injuries and those with previous computer experience; (2) A low percentage of survey respondents would own their own computers; and (3) People with ACI would experience social isolation and report low frequency of connecting with important people who live far away. A total of 133 individuals with ACI, professionals and care providers completed the survey. To gain more specific information, seven focus groups were conducted with 66 individuals with ACI and 20 care providers. Finally, 10 current email users participated in structured conversations, detailing their strategies for using email. The survey revealed that 80% of subjects with ACI reported owning a computer. Age and education were not predictors of computer use, but individuals whose ACI was the result of more severe injuries were less likely to use computers. As expected, respondents reported that maintaining contact with distant loved ones is problematic. The focus groups and conversations provided more detail about the communication needs of the population and the relative advantages and disadvantages of email compared with telephone and mail. Participants also identified barriers to email use they had encountered or feared they would encounter when using email. A number of accommodations to overcome these barriers were suggested. The results of the survey, focus groups and conversations confirmed the utility of email and other technologies for people with ACI and the need to make these technologies more accessible. The results and

  15. ???The only disability I have is other people??? ??? Navigating stigma: the changing role of friendship in people with acquired physical disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, Paul James

    2013-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed Background Stigma is considered to be the main barrier to friendships in people with acquired physical disabilities. Occupational Therapy as a dynamic, client-centred process is well positioned to address stigma. Whist the process of stigmatisation in intellectual disability has been thoroughly examined in literature, there is a lack of research examining stigma associated with acquired physical disabilities, and the role it plays in the trajectory and function of frie...

  16. Participant and service provider perceptions of an outpatient rehabilitation program for people with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncet, Frédérique; Pradat-Diehl, Pascale; Lamontagne, Marie-Eve; Alifax, Anne; Fradelizi, Pascaline; Barette, Maude; Swaine, Bonnie

    2017-09-01

    A holistic, intensive and interdisciplinary rehabilitation program for people with acquired brain injury (ABI) was developed at the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, France (5 days/week for 7 weeks). This program, recently demonstrated effective, aimed to optimize the ability of people with ABI to perform activities and improve their participation by using individual and group interventions involving ecologically valid activities inside (e.g., in the gym and kitchen) and outside the hospital. However, the perception of the quality of the program by participants and service providers has not yet been reported. This study had 3 objectives: (1) report the perception of participants (adults with ABI) in terms of service quality of the program, (2) report the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT analysis) of the program as perceived by service providers, and (3) triangulate findings to draw conclusions about the program's quality and provide recommendations for quality improvement. We used a mixed-methods design with a validated questionnaire (Perception of Quality of Rehabilitation Services [PQRS-Montreal]) and interviews (structured around a SWOT analysis) involving program participants and service providers. We included 33 program participants (mean age 43.6 years) and 12 service providers (mean years with program 7.6 years). In general, study participants showed a convergence of opinion about the high quality of the program, particularly regarding the team and its participant-focused approach. Specific aspects of the program were viewed more negatively by both participants and service providers (i.e., addressing sexuality, family involvement and return to work/volunteer work/school). Participant and service provider perceptions of the rehabilitation program under study were generally positive. A reliable and valid questionnaire and interviews helped identify aspects of the program that worked well and those that could be targeted for future quality

  17. General health status measures for people with cognitive impairment: learning disability and acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemsma, R P; Forbes, C A; Glanville, J M; Eastwood, A J; Kleijnen, J

    2001-01-01

    Currently there is a wide range of health status measures that aim to assess general health status in people with cognitive impairment. However, the validity and/or applicability to this patient group are largely unknown. This has implications for the assessment of treatment outcomes and rehabilitation, for prognostic purposes, for planning services, and for determining the benefits and adverse effects of health technologies targeted at these patient groups. (1) To identify the general health status measures that have been validated in patients with cognitive impairment. (2) To assess the extent to which these measures have been validated. (3) To draw out the implications of the findings for the use of existing measures and for future primary research in this area. METHODS. Studies that assessed general health status in people with cognitive impairment due to acquired brain injury (traumatic brain injury, cerebro-vascular accident or multiple sclerosis (MS)) or learning disability (LD) were included in the review. Studies that used general health status instruments measuring only one general health dimension, and studies that only featured participants with cognitive impairment due to dementia were excluded. METHODS. A wide range of relevant databases were searched for studies on cognitive impairment, general health status measures, and validation of health status measures. A handsearch of general health status bibliographies was also conducted. Data were collected on the general health status measure used, the population characteristics, aims of the study, validity details, and conclusions. The review includes data from 71 studies, reported in 83 separate publications. In total 34 different general health status measures were described in the 83 publications, with the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) the most frequently used measures (20 and 19 studies, respectively). These studies included a total of 98 instrument validations, 52 of

  18. An Ecologically Oriented Conceptual Model of Vocational Rehabilitation of People with Acquired Midcareer Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobren, Arlene A.

    1994-01-01

    Considers vocational rehabilitation of adults who acquire disabilities during midcareer years. Literature review reveals that neither traditional theories of vocational development nor those designed specifically for rehabilitation of individuals with midcareer disabilities provide comprehensive framework for understanding this population's…

  19. [Profiles of resilience and quality of life in people with acquired disability due to traffic accidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriá Martínez, Raquel

    2015-09-01

    To identify distinct profiles of resilience in people with spinal cord injuries due to traffic accidents and to determine whether the profiles identified are related to differences in subjective well-being. The Resilience Scale (Wagnild and Young, 1993) and an adapted quality of life scale (GENCAT) were administered to 98 people with physical disabilities due to traffic accidents. Cluster analyses identified three different resilience profiles: a high-resilience group, a low-resilience group, and a group showing a predominance of high scores in self and life acceptance and social competence. The results also revealed statistically significant differences among profiles in most domains of subjective well-being. The results suggest the need to study resilience in greater depth and to design programs to enhance quality of life among people with disabilities due to traffic accidents. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Training unsupported sitting does not improve ability to sit in people with recently acquired paraplegia: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Lisa A; Ristev, Donna; Hossain, Mohammad S; Hossain, Mohammad A; Bowden, Jocelyn L; Boswell-Ruys, Claire L; Hossain, Mohammad M; Ben, Marsha

    2011-01-01

    Do people with recently acquired paraplegia benefit from a six-week motor retraining program aimed at improving their ability to sit unsupported? A randomised controlled trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding, and intention-totreat analysis. 32 people with recently acquired paraplegia and limited ability to sit unsupported. All participants undertook standard inpatient rehabilitation over a six-week period. Experimental participants received three additional 30-minute sessions per week of motor retraining directed at improving their ability to sit unsupported. The three primary outcomes were the Maximal Lean Test, Maximal Sideward Reach Test, and the Performance Item of the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). The secondary outcomes were the Satisfaction Item of the COPM, Participants' Impressions of Change, Clinicians' Impressions of Change, the T-shirt Test, and the Spinal Cord Injury Falls Concern Scale. The mean between-group differences for the Maximal Lean Test, Maximal Sideward Reach Test and the Performance Item of the COPM were -20 mm (95% CI -64 to 24), 5% arm length (95% CI -3 to 13) and 0.5 points (95% CI -0.5 to 1.5), respectively. The secondary outcomes did not differ significantly between groups. People with recently acquired paraplegia do not benefit from a six-week motor retraining program directed specifically at improving their ability to sit unsupported. Their ability to sit unsupported does, however, improve over time, suggesting that the practice of activities of daily living has important carry-over effects on unsupported sitting, rendering additional training redundant. ACTRN12608000464369. Copyright © 2011 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by .. All rights reserved.

  1. Underreporting of gestational, congenital and acquired syphilis among indigenous peoples in Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil, 2011-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiago, Zuleica da Silva; Picoli, Renata Palópoli; Graeff, Samara Vilas-Boas; Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio da; Arantes, Rui

    2017-01-01

    to describe the distribution, incidence, and underreporting of syphilis among indigenous peoples from Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. descriptive study performed with secondary data of the Information System for Notifiable Diseases (Sinan) and of the Special Indigenous Sanitary District of Mato Grosso do Sul (DSEI-MS), from 2011 to 2014; the data from both sources were compared to identify underreporting. the highest incidence rates of syphilis in pregnant women were observed in 2014 (41.1/1,000 live births) and of congenital syphilis, in 2013 (10.7/1,000 live births); the highest numbers of underreporting of cases were for syphilis in pregnant women on Sinan (45/79), of congenital syphilis at DSEI-MS (8/17) in 2014, and of acquired syphilis on Sinan in 2011 and 2013 (5/9 and 10/18, respectively). syphilis has a high incidence; underreporting hides the extent of the disease in indigenous peoples from Mato Grosso do Sul.

  2. Stride time synergy in relation to walking during dual task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Læssøe, Uffe; Madeleine, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    with a positive slope going through the mean of the strides, and bad variance with respect to a similar line with a negative slope. The general variance coefficient (CV%) was also computed. The effect of introducing a concurrent cognitive task (dual task: counting backwards in sequences of 7) was evaluated...... point of view elemental and performance variables may represent good and bad components of variability [2]. In this study we propose that the gait pattern can be seen as an on-going movement synergy in which each stride is corrected by the next stride (elemental variables) to ensure a steady gait...... (performance variable). AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate stride time synergy and to identify good and bad stride variability in relation to walking during dual task. METHODS: Thirteen healthy young participants walked along a 2x5 meter figure-of-eight track at a self-selected comfortable speed...

  3. Identification of people with acquired hemophilia in a large electronic health record database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang M

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael Wang,1 Anissa Cyhaniuk,2 David L Cooper,3 Neeraj N Iyer3 1Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, 2AC Analytic Solutions, Barrington, IL, 3Clinical Development, Medical and Regulatory Affairs, Novo Nordisk Inc., Plainsboro, NJ, USA Background: Electronic health records (EHRs can provide insights into diagnoses, treatment patterns, and clinical outcomes. Acquired hemophilia (AH is an ultrarare bleeding disorder characterized by factor VIII inhibiting autoantibodies. Aim: To identify patients with AH using an EHR database.Methods: Records were accessed from a large EHR database (Humedica between January 1, 2007 and July 31, 2013. Broad selection criteria were applied using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, clinical modification (ICD-9-CM code for intrinsic circulating anticoagulants (286.5 and all subcodes and confirmation of records 6 months before and 12 months after the first diagnosis. Additional selection criteria included mention of “bleeding” within physician notes identified via natural language processing output and a normal prothrombin time and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time.Results: Of 6,348 patients with a diagnosis code of 286.5 or any subcodes, 16 males and 15 females met the selection criteria. The most common bleeding locations reported was gastrointestinal (23%, vaginal (16%, and endocrine (13%. A wide range of comorbidities was reported. Natural language processing identified chart note mention of “hemophilia” in 3 patients (10%, “bruise” in 15 patients (48%, and “pain” in all 31 patients. No patients received a prescription for approved/recommended AH treatments. Four patient cases were reviewed to validate whether the identified cohort had AH; each patient had bleeding symptoms and a normal prothrombin time and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, although none received hemostatic treatments

  4. Virtual reality-based prospective memory training program for people with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Ben C B; Man, David W K

    2013-01-01

    Acquired brain injuries (ABI) may display cognitive impairments and lead to long-term disabilities including prospective memory (PM) failure. Prospective memory serves to remember to execute an intended action in the future. PM problems would be a challenge to an ABI patient's successful community reintegration. While retrospective memory (RM) has been extensively studied, treatment programs for prospective memory are rarely reported. The development of a treatment program for PM, which is considered timely, can be cost-effective and appropriate to the patient's environment. A 12-session virtual reality (VR)-based cognitive rehabilitation program was developed using everyday PM activities as training content. 37 subjects were recruited to participate in a pretest-posttest control experimental study to evaluate its treatment effectiveness. Results suggest that significantly better changes were seen in both VR-based and real-life PM outcome measures, related cognitive attributes such as frontal lobe functions and semantic fluency. VR-based training may be well accepted by ABI patients as encouraging improvement has been shown. Large-scale studies of a virtual reality-based prospective memory (VRPM) training program are indicated.

  5. Effects of a cognitive behavioral self-help program on depressed mood for people with acquired chronic physical impairments : A pilot randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garnefski, Nadia; Kraaij, Vivian; Schroevers, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Aim was to examine whether a new cognitive-behavioral self-help intervention program was effective in improving depressed mood in people with acquired chronic physical impairments. Methods: Participants were 32 persons with acquired chronic physical impairments and depressive symptoms,

  6. Identifying participation needs of people with acquired brain injury in the development of a collective community smart home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur, Mélanie; Pigot, Hélène; Couture, Mélanie; Bier, Nathalie; Swaine, Bonnie; Therriault, Pierre-Yves; Giroux, Sylvain

    2016-11-01

    This study explored the personalized and collective participation needs of people with acquired brain injury (ABI) living in a future shared community smart home. An action research study was conducted with 16 persons, seven with ABI, four caregivers and five rehabilitation or smart home healthcare providers. Twelve interviews and two focus groups were conducted, audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed for content. Seventy personalized and 18 collective participation needs were reported related to daily and social activities. Personalized needs concerned interpersonal relationships, general organization of activities, leisure, housing, fitness and nutrition. Collective needs related mainly to housing, general organization of activities and nutrition. Personalized and collective participation needs of people with ABI planning to live in a community smart home are diverse and concern daily as well as social activities. Implications for Rehabilitation To meet participation needs of people with ABI, the design of smart homes must consider all categories of daily and social activities. Considering personalized and collective needs allowed identifying exclusive examples of each. As some persons with ABI had difficulty identifying their needs as well as accepting their limitations and the assistance required, rehabilitation professionals must be involved in needs identification.

  7. People analytics in the era of big data changing the way you attract, acquire, develop, and retain talent

    CERN Document Server

    Isson, Jean Paul

    2016-01-01

    Apply predictive analytics throughout all stages of workforce management People Analytics in the Era of Big Data provides a blueprint for leveraging your talent pool through the use of data analytics. Written by the Global Vice President of Business Intelligence and Predictive Analytics at Monster Worldwide, this book is packed full of actionable insights to help you source, recruit, acquire, engage, retain, promote, and manage the exceptional talent your organization needs. With a unique approach that applies analytics to every stage of the hiring process and the entire workforce planning and management cycle, this informative guide provides the key perspective that brings analytics into HR in a truly useful way. You're already inundated with disparate employee data, so why not mine that data for insights that add value to your organization and strengthen your workforce? This book presents a practical framework for real-world talent analytics, backed by groundbreaking examples of workforce analytics in a...

  8. Stride length asymmetry in split-belt locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogkamer, Wouter; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Duysens, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    The number of studies utilizing a split-belt treadmill is rapidly increasing in recent years. This has led to some confusion regarding the definitions of reported gait parameters. The purpose of this paper is to clearly present the definitions of the gait parameters that are commonly used in split-belt treadmill studies. We argue that the modified version of stride length for split-belt gait, which is different from the standard definition of stride length and actually is a measure of limb excursion, should be referred to as 'limb excursion' in future studies. Furthermore, the symmetry of stride length and stride time is specifically addressed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Stride time synergy in relation to walking during dual task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Læssøe, Uffe; Madeleine, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    point of view elemental and performance variables may represent good and bad components of variability [2]. In this study we propose that the gait pattern can be seen as an on-going movement synergy in which each stride is corrected by the next stride (elemental variables) to ensure a steady gait...... (performance variable). AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate stride time synergy and to identify good and bad stride variability in relation to walking during dual task. METHODS: Thirteen healthy young participants walked along a 2x5 meter figure-of-eight track at a self-selected comfortable speed....... RESULTS: The variance coefficient (CV%) increased significantly from 1.59 to 1.90 (psynergy approach, the good/bad variance ratio during single task was: 2.53 (CI95%: 2.07-3.00). When shifting to dual task the good/bad ratio was 2.28 (CI95...

  10. Organising health care services for people with an acquired brain injury: an overview of systematic reviews and randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laver, Kate; Lannin, Natasha A; Bragge, Peter; Hunter, Peter; Holland, Anne E; Tavender, Emma; O'Connor, Denise; Khan, Fary; Teasell, Robert; Gruen, Russell

    2014-09-17

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) is the leading cause of disability worldwide yet there is little information regarding the most effective way to organise ABI health care services. The aim of this review was to identify the most up-to-date high quality evidence to answer specific questions regarding the organisation of health care services for people with an ABI. We conducted a systematic review of English papers using MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library. We included the most recently published high quality systematic reviews and any randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials, controlled before after studies or interrupted time series studies published subsequent to the systematic review. We searched for papers that evaluated pre-defined organisational interventions for adults with an ABI. Organisational interventions of interest included fee-for-service care, integrated care, integrated care pathways, continuity of care, consumer engagement in governance and quality monitoring interventions. Data extraction and appraisal of included reviews and studies was completed independently by two reviewers. A total of five systematic reviews and 21 studies were included in the review; eight of the papers (31%) included people with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) or ABI and the remaining papers (69%) included only participants with a diagnosis of stroke. We found evidence supporting the use of integrated care to improve functional outcome and reduce length of stay and evidence supporting early supported discharge teams for reducing morbidity and mortality and reducing length of stay for stroke survivors. There was little evidence to support case management or the use of integrated care pathways for people with ABI. We found evidence that a quality monitoring intervention can lead to improvements in process outcomes in acute and rehabilitation settings. We were unable to find any studies meeting our inclusion criteria regarding fee

  11. Adaptation and prosthesis effects on stride-to-stride fluctuations in amputee gait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane R Wurdeman

    Full Text Available Twenty-four individuals with transtibial amputation were recruited to a randomized, crossover design study to examine stride-to-stride fluctuations of lower limb joint flexion/extension time series using the largest Lyapunov exponent (λ. Each individual wore a "more appropriate" and a "less appropriate" prosthesis design based on the subject's previous functional classification for a three week adaptation period. Results showed decreased λ for the sound ankle compared to the prosthetic ankle (F1,23 = 13.897, p = 0.001 and a decreased λ for the "more appropriate" prosthesis (F1,23 = 4.849, p = 0.038. There was also a significant effect for the time point in the adaptation period (F2,46 = 3.164, p = 0.050. Through the adaptation period, a freezing and subsequent freeing of dynamic degrees of freedom was seen as the λ at the ankle decreased at the midpoint of the adaptation period compared to the initial prosthesis fitting (p = 0.032, but then increased at the end compared to the midpoint (p = 0.042. No differences were seen between the initial fitting and the end of the adaptation for λ (p = 0.577. It is concluded that the λ may be a feasible clinical tool for measuring prosthesis functionality and adaptation to a new prosthesis is a process through which the motor control develops mastery of redundant degrees of freedom present in the system.

  12. GAIT DYNAMICS, FRACTALS AND FALLS: FINDING MEANING IN THE STRIDE-TO-STRIDE FLUCTUATIONS OF HUMAN WALKING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2007-01-01

    Until recently, quantitative studies of walking have typically focused on properties of a typical or average stride, ignoring the stride-to-stride fluctuations and considering these fluctuations to be noise. Work over the past two decades has demonstrated, however, that the alleged noise actually conveys important information. The magnitude of the stride-to-stride fluctuations and their changes over time during a walk – gait dynamics – may be useful in understanding the physiology of gait, in quantifying age-related and pathologic alterations in the locomotor control system, and in augmenting objective measurement of mobility and functional status Indeed, alterations in gait dynamics may help to determine disease severity, medication utility, and fall risk, and to objectively document improvements in response to therapeutic interventions, above and beyond what can be gleaned from measures based on the average, typical stride. This review discusses support for the idea that gait dynamics has meaning and may be useful in providing insight into the neural control of locomtion and for enhancing functional assessment of aging, chronic disease, and their impact on mobility. PMID:17618701

  13. Gait dynamics, fractals and falls: finding meaning in the stride-to-stride fluctuations of human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2007-08-01

    Until recently, quantitative studies of walking have typically focused on properties of a typical or average stride, ignoring the stride-to-stride fluctuations and considering these fluctuations to be noise. Work over the past two decades has demonstrated, however, that the alleged noise actually conveys important information. The magnitude of the stride-to-stride fluctuations and their changes over time during a walk - gait dynamics - may be useful in understanding the physiology of gait, in quantifying age-related and pathologic alterations in the locomotor control system, and in augmenting objective measurement of mobility and functional status. Indeed, alterations in gait dynamics may help to determine disease severity, medication utility, and fall risk, and to objectively document improvements in response to therapeutic interventions, above and beyond what can be gleaned from measures based on the average, typical stride. This review discusses support for the idea that gait dynamics has meaning and may be useful in providing insight into the neural control of locomotion and for enhancing functional assessment of aging, chronic disease, and their impact on mobility.

  14. A Comparative Study of Coping Strategies and the Features of Interpersonal Relations and Life Orientations of People with Congenital and Acquired Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, E. V.; Tolkacheva, O. N.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of a comparative study of the features of the coping strategies, life orientations, and interpersonal relations of disabled people with acquired and congenital diseases of the musculoskeletal system. The authors discovered differences in interpersonal behavior in the area of control, and they revealed factors that…

  15. Precision and accuracy of the new XPrecia Stride mobile coagulometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacenza, Francesco; Galeazzi, Roberta; Cardelli, Maurizio; Moroni, Fausto; Provinciali, Mauro; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Giovagnetti, Simona; Appolloni, Stefania; Marchegiani, Francesca

    2017-08-01

    Oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) with coumarins (vitamin K antagonist) is the most used against thromboembolism. Prothrombin time (PT) International Normalized Ratio (INR) monitoring is fundamental to establish coumarins dosage and prevent bleeding complications or thrombotic events. In this contest, the method and apparatus used for providing the INR measurements are crucial. Several studies have been published regarding the precision and accuracy of mobile coagulometers with different conclusions. No studies have been published regarding the new XPrecia Stride Mobile Coagulometer (Siemens). The aim of this work is to analyze precision and accuracy of the new XPrecia Stride mobile coagulometer to provide recommendations for clinical use and quality control. A total of 163 patients (mean age=77.4years old) under Warfarin OAT for whom the INR was assessed by both the traditional cs 2100i Sysmex and the new Xprecia Stride Mobile Coagulometer were included in this pilot study. The precision of the new mobile coagulometer resulted very good (CV15% from the true value in 20% of cases). Considering the overall results obtained by the new Xprecia Stride in comparison to that ones obtained from the other commercial devices, we can conclude that the new coagulometer is enough reliable for clinical settings. However, a larger trial to confirm these data is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Strides towards substantive democracy and gender perspective in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strides towards substantive democracy and gender perspective in the 21st century of Africa. Kelvin Bribena. Abstract. The weakness of the multiparty political system in Africa will be analysed in line with accepted standards for transparency, electoral provisions, as well as the free and fair establishment, assembly and ...

  17. Extraction of stride events from gait accelerometry during treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejdić, Ervin; Lowry, Kristin A; Bellanca, Jennica; Perera, Subashan; Redfern, Mark S; Brach, Jennifer S

    Evaluating stride events can be valuable for understanding the changes in walking due to aging and neurological diseases. However, creating the time series necessary for this analysis can be cumbersome. In particular, finding heel contact and toe-off events which define the gait cycles accurately are difficult. We proposed a method to extract stride cycle events from tri-axial accelerometry signals. We validated our method via data collected from 14 healthy controls, 10 participants with Parkinson's disease and 11 participants with peripheral neuropathy. All participants walked at self-selected comfortable and reduced speeds on a computer-controlled treadmill. Gait accelerometry signals were captured via a tri-axial accelerometer positioned over the L3 segment of the lumbar spine. Motion capture data were also collected and served as the comparison method. Our analysis of the accelerometry data showed that the proposed methodology was able to accurately extract heel and toe contact events from both feet. We used t-tests, ANOVA and mixed models to summarize results and make comparisons. Mean gait cycle intervals were the same as those derived from motion capture and cycle-to-cycle variability measures were within 1.5%. Subject group differences could be identified similarly using measures with the two methods. A simple tri-axial acceleromter accompanied by a signal processing algorithm can be used to capture stride events. Clinical Impact: The proposed algorithm enables the assessment of stride events during treadmill walking, and is the first step towards the assessment of stride events using tri-axial accelerometers in real-life settings.

  18. Persistent fluctuations in stride intervals under fractal auditory stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmelat, Vivien; Torre, Kjerstin; Beek, Peter J; Daffertshofer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Stride sequences of healthy gait are characterized by persistent long-range correlations, which become anti-persistent in the presence of an isochronous metronome. The latter phenomenon is of particular interest because auditory cueing is generally considered to reduce stride variability and may hence be beneficial for stabilizing gait. Complex systems tend to match their correlation structure when synchronizing. In gait training, can one capitalize on this tendency by using a fractal metronome rather than an isochronous one? We examined whether auditory cues with fractal variations in inter-beat intervals yield similar fractal inter-stride interval variability as isochronous auditory cueing in two complementary experiments. In Experiment 1, participants walked on a treadmill while being paced by either an isochronous or a fractal metronome with different variation strengths between beats in order to test whether participants managed to synchronize with a fractal metronome and to determine the necessary amount of variability for participants to switch from anti-persistent to persistent inter-stride intervals. Participants did synchronize with the metronome despite its fractal randomness. The corresponding coefficient of variation of inter-beat intervals was fixed in Experiment 2, in which participants walked on a treadmill while being paced by non-isochronous metronomes with different scaling exponents. As expected, inter-stride intervals showed persistent correlations similar to self-paced walking only when cueing contained persistent correlations. Our results open up a new window to optimize rhythmic auditory cueing for gait stabilization by integrating fractal fluctuations in the inter-beat intervals.

  19. Professional's Perspectives on Care Management of Young People with Perinatally Acquired HIV during Transition: A Qualitative Study in Adult Care Setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enora Le Roux

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of young people with perinatally acquired HIV are surviving to adulthood. When they come of age, they leave pediatric services in which they were followed and have to be transferred to the adult health care system. Difficulties in adaptation to adult care and the numbers of young people lost to follow up after transfer to adult care have been reported. This transition phase and their retention in adult care are crucial in maintaining the clinical status of these young with HIV in adulthood. Our study aimed to explore how HIV professionals working in adult care perceive and adapt their practices to young people in transition.Qualitative interviews were conducted with 18 health and social services professionals in hospitals or patient associations in France. A thematic analysis was conducted.Adult care professionals were found to be making a distinction between these young people and their patients who were infected during adulthood. On the basis of the healthcare teams' experience, a simplified categorization of these young people into four levels can be used: those "who have everything good"; those who have some deficiencies that must be addressed; those "who have everything bad"; and those lost to follow up. Professionals interviewed highlighted the difficulties they encountered with young people in transition. Three types of problematic situations were identified: problems of acceptance of the disease; communication problems; and problems of disorientation in the new care environment.Despite the lack of specific training or national policy recommendations for the integration of young people with perinatally acquired HIV into adult services, all the adult healthcare teams interviewed tried to adapt their practice to this population. The results suggested that professional involvement during transition should depend on the characteristics of the patient, not be limited to a single transition model and that a dedicated

  20. Injection of new psychoactive substance snow blow associated with recently acquired HIV infections among homeless people who inject drugs in Dublin, Ireland, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Coralie; Igoe, Derval; Gibbons, Zorina; Hurley, Caroline; Stokes, Siobhan; McNamara, Sinead; Ennis, Orla; O'Donnell, Kate; Keenan, Eamon; De Gascun, Cillian; Lyons, Fiona; Ward, Mary; Danis, Kostas; Glynn, Ronan; Waters, Allison; Fitzgerald, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    In February 2015, an outbreak of recently acquired HIV infections among people who inject drugs (PWID) was identified in Dublin, following similar outbreaks in Greece and Romania in 2011. We compared drug and risk behaviours among 15 HIV cases and 39 controls. Injecting a synthetic cathinone, snow blow, was associated with recent HIV infection (AOR: 49; p=0.003). Prevention and control efforts are underway among PWID in Dublin, but may also be needed elsewhere in Europe.

  1. Injection of new psychoactive substance snow blow associated with recently acquired HIV infections among homeless people who inject drugs in Dublin, Ireland, 2015.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Giese, Coralie

    2015-10-08

    In February 2015, an outbreak of recently acquired HIV infections among people who inject drugs (PWID) was identified in Dublin, following similar outbreaks in Greece and Romania in 2011. We compared drug and risk behaviours among 15 HIV cases and 39 controls. Injecting a synthetic cathinone, snow blow, was associated with recent HIV infection (AOR: 49; p = 0.003). Prevention and control efforts are underway among PWID in Dublin, but may also be needed elsewhere in Europe.

  2. Caregiving of aged people, either professional job or acquiring merit in God's sight: an example of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cankurtaran Őntaş, Ozlem; Tunç, Melike

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays because of lots of reasons, lifespan is increasing and caregiving of aged people becomes more and more important. Today it is understood how the professional care of aged people is significant, instead of being carried out by volunteers. Because of this, in this study we aimed to understand the problems, and thoughts of aging of caregivers who are working in nursing homes. This study was made using the so-called qualitative research, which is one of the research designs. Including general aim, interviews with 13 caregivers with structured questions, supported by spontaneous ones. Interviews were taped and transcribed verbatim. After that, they were grouped with the same themes. Thoughts are grouped with three main themes, which are about "aging", "working life", "caregiving of aged people". Aged people are described like people who are dependent, need interest, and represent the wisdom period. Also caregiving is described like both good job and punishment. Besides, the reason of working as a caregiver, is the economic needs. The suggestions of caregivers are increasing payment, giving psychological and emotional support, and also improving physical conditions. Economic satisfaction of caregivers, giving psychological support, caregivers with aged people and improving physical conditions are important to increase the quality of professional caregiving. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Changes in timing of muscle contractions and running economy with altered stride pattern during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connick, Mark J; Li, Francois-Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Large alterations to the preferred running stride decrease running economy, and shorter strides increase leg muscle activity. However, the effect of altered strides on the timing of leg muscle activation is not known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of moderate alterations to the running stride on running economy and the timing of biceps femoris (BF), vastus lateralis (VL) and gastrocnemius (GAST) muscle contractions. The preferred stride pattern for eleven trained male runners was measured prior to a separate visit where participants ran for bouts of 5 min whilst synchronising foot contacts to a metronome signal which was tuned to (1) the preferred stride, and (2) frequencies which related to ± 8% and ± 4% of the preferred stride length. Running economy was measured at each stride pattern along with electromyography and three-dimensional kinematics to estimate onset and offset of muscle contractions for each muscle. Running economy was greatest at the preferred stride length. However, a quadratic fit to the data was optimised at a stride which was 2.9% shorter than preferred. Onset and offset of BF and VL muscle contractions occurred earlier with shorter than preferred strides. We detected no changes to the timing of muscle contractions with longer than preferred strides and no changes to GAST muscle contractions. The results suggest that runners optimise running economy with a stride length that is close to, but shorter than, the preferred stride, and that timing of BF and VL muscle contractions change with shorter than preferred strides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Public perceptions about HIV/AIDS and discriminatory attitudes toward people living with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudnia, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Negative and discriminatory attitudes towards people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) are one of the biggest experienced challenges by people suffering from HIV, and these attitudes have been regarded as a serious threat to the fundamental rights of all infected people who are affected or associated with this disease in Iran. This study aimed to determine the relationship between public perception about HIV/AIDS and discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA . The present study was conducted using a descriptive and survey design. Data were collected from 450 patients (236 male and 214 female) in Tehran and Yazd cities. The research instruments were modified HIV-related knowledge/attitude and perception questions about PLWHA, and discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA. The results showed that prevalence of discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA in the studied population was 60.0%. There was a significant negative correlation between citizens' awareness about HIV/AIDS, HIV-related attitudes, negative perception toward people with HIV/AIDS symptoms and their discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA (p AIDS explained for 23.7% of the variance of discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA. Negative public perceptions about HIV/AIDS in Iran associated with discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA and cultural beliefs in Iran tend to stigmatize and discriminate against the LWHA.

  5. Return to work in people with acquired brain injury: association with observed ability to use everyday technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson-Lund, Maria; Kottorp, Anders; Malinowsky, Camilla

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how the observed ability to use everyday technology (ET), intrapersonal capacities and environmental characteristics related to ET use contributes to the likelihood of return to work in people with ABI. The aim was also to explore whether these variables added to the likelihood of return to work to earlier defined significant variables in the group: age, perceived ADL ability and perceived ability in ET use. A cross-sectional study. The Management of Everyday Technology Assessment (META), the short version of the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (S-ETUQ) and a revised version of the ADL taxonomy were used to evaluate 74 people with ABI. Individual ability measures from all assessments were generated by Rasch analyses and used for additional statistical analysis. The univariate analyses showed that the observed ability to use ET, as well as intrapersonal capacities and environmental characteristics related to ET use were all significantly associated with returning to work. In the multivariate analyses, none of these associations remained. The explanatory precision of return to work in people with ABI increased minimally by adding the observed ability to use ET and the variables related to ET use when age, perceived ability in ET use and ADL had been taken in account.

  6. Perceived difficulty in the use of everyday technology: relationships with everyday functioning in people with acquired brain injury with a special focus on returning to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson Lund, Maria; Nygård, Louise; Kottorp, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to explore the relationships between difficulties in the use of everyday technology (ET) and the ability to perform activities of daily life (ADL) in the home and in society and in the workplace in people with acquired brain injury (ABI). The investigation comprises an explorative cross-sectional study of 74 people with ABI. The short version of the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (S-ETUQ) and a revised version of the ADL taxonomy were used to evaluate the participants. Rasch-generated person ability measures of ET use and ADL were used in correlation analyses, in group comparisons by ANOVA and in logistic regressions. Difficulty in the use of ET was significantly correlated with ADL limitations. People who worked full- or part-time had significantly higher ability to use ET than those with some type of full-time, long-term sickness compensation. The ability to use ET, ADL ability and age were significantly related to return to work. The ability to use ET is related to all areas of everyday functioning in people with ABI. Therefore, a patient's ability to use ET needs to be considered in rehabilitation strategies following an ABI to enhance the patient's performance of activities in the home and in society and to support his or her likelihood of returning to work.

  7. Functional electrical stimulation cycling does not improve mobility in people with acquired brain injury and its effects on strength are unclear: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide G de Sousa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Question: Does 4 weeks of active functional electrical stimulation (FES cycling in addition to usual care improve mobility and strength more than usual care alone in people with a sub-acute acquired brain injury caused by stroke or trauma? Design: Multi centre, randomised, controlled trial. Participants: Forty patients from three Sydney hospitals with recently acquired brain injury and a mean composite strength score in the affected lower limb of 7 (SD 5 out of 20 points. Intervention: Participants in the experimental group received an incremental, progressive, FES cycling program five times a week over a 4-week period. All participants received usual care. Outcome measures: Outcome measures were taken at baseline and at 4 weeks. Primary outcomes were mobility and strength of the knee extensors of the affected lower limb. Mobility was measured with three mobility items of the Functional Independence Measure and strength was measured with a hand-held dynamometer. Secondary outcomes were strength of the knee extensors of the unaffected lower limb, strength of key muscles of the affected lower limb and spasticity of the affected plantar flexors. Results: All but one participant completed the study. The mean between-group differences for mobility and strength of the knee extensors of the affected lower limb were –0.3/21 points (95% CI –3.2 to 2.7 and 7.5 Nm (95% CI –5.1 to 20.2, where positive values favoured the experimental group. The only secondary outcome that suggested a possible treatment effect was strength of key muscles of the affected lower limb with a mean between-group difference of 3.0/20 points (95% CI 1.3 to 4.8. Conclusion: Functional electrical stimulation cycling does not improve mobility in people with acquired brain injury and its effects on strength are unclear. Trial registration: ACTRN12612001163897. [de Sousa DG, Harvey LA, Dorsch S, Leung J, Harris W (2016 Functional electrical stimulation cycling does not improve

  8. A QEEG index of level of functional dependence for people sustaining acquired brain injury: the Seville Independence Index (SINDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Carrion, Jose; Martin-Rodriguez, Juan Francisco; Damas-Lopez, Jesus; Martin, Juan Manuel Barroso Y; Dominguez-Morales, Maria Del Rosario

    2008-01-01

    To find an easy-to-use, valid and reliable tool for evaluating the level of functional dependence of an individual with brain damage who seeks a diagnosis of his/her functional dependence in daily activities. Eighty-one patients with acquired brain injury (ABI) in post-acute phase, 40 traumatic brain injury (TBI) and 41 cerebral vascular accident (CVA), were assessed using quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) and grouped according to the FIM + FAM scale. Discriminant analysis was performed on QEEG variables to obtain a discriminant function with the best discriminative capacity between functionality groups. Discriminant analysis showed classification accuracy of 100% in the training set sample and 75% in an external cross-validation sample; 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity were reached. Coherence measures were the most numerous variables in the function. These results point out that the discriminant function may be a useful tool in objective evaluations of patients seeking a diagnosis of their level of dependence and that it could be included in current functionality assessment protocols.

  9. Internally and externally generated emotions in people with acquired brain injury: preservation of emotional experience after right hemisphere lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Riquelme, Christian E; Radovic, Darinka; Castro, Osvaldo; Turnbull, Oliver H

    2015-01-01

    The study of emotional changes after brain injury has contributed enormously to the understanding of the neural basis of emotion. However, little attention has been placed on the methods used to elicit emotional responses in people with brain damage. Of particular interest are subjects with right hemisphere [RH] cortical lesions, who have been described as presenting impairment in emotional processing. In this article, an internal and external mood induction procedure [MIP] was used to trigger positive and negative emotions, in a sample of 10 participants with RH damage, and 15 healthy controls. Emotional experience was registered by using a self-report questionnaire. As observed in previous studies, internal and external MIPs were equally effective in eliciting the target emotion, but the internal procedure generated higher levels of intensity. Remarkably, participants with RH lesions were equally able to experience both positive and negative affect. The results are discussed in relation to the role of the RH in the capacity to experience negative emotions.

  10. Skill clusters of ability to manage everyday technology among people with and without cognitive impairment, dementia and acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowsky, Camilla; Fallahpour, Mandana; Lund, Maria Larsson; Nygård, Louise; Kottorp, Anders

    2018-03-01

    In order to develop supporting interventions for people demonstrating problems ET use, a detailed level of description of strengths and deficits is needed. To explore clusters of specific performance skill required when using ET, and to evaluate if and in what way such clusters are associated with age, gender, diagnosis, and types of ETs managed. A secondary analysis of 661 data records from 203 heterogeneous samples of participants using the Management of Everyday Technology Assessment (META) was used. Ward's method and a hierarchical tree cluster analysis were used to determine and define the skill clusters. Four distinct clusters of performance skill item profiles were found, across the 661 data records. These were then, based on each individuals' cluster profiles in managing ET, categorized into two groups. The two groups were associated with, diagnosis and type of ETs managed. The findings support a more dyadic person-ET approach in evaluation of ET management. The information from the skill clusters can be used to develop targeted intervention guides for occupational therapy and healthcare.

  11. Internally and externally generated emotions in people with acquired brain injury: Preservation of emotional experience after right hemisphere lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian E Salas Riquelme

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The study of emotional changes after brain injury has contributed enormously to the understanding of the neural basis of emotion. However, little attention has been placed on the methods used to elicit emotional responses in people with brain damage. Of particular interest are subjects with right hemisphere [RH] cortical lesions, who have been described as presenting impairment in emotional processing. In this article, an internal and external mood induction procedure [MIP] was used to trigger positive and negative emotions, in a sample of 10 participants with RH damage, and 15 healthy controls. Emotional experience was registered by using a self-report questionnaire. As observed in previous studies, internal and external MIPs were equally effective in eliciting the target emotion, but the internal procedure generated higher levels of intensity. Remarkably, participants with RH lesions were equally able to experience both positive and negative affect. The results are discussed in relation to the role of the RH in the capacity to experience negative emotions.

  12. Head and Tibial Acceleration as a Function of Stride Frequency and Visual Feedback during Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busa, Michael A; Lim, Jongil; van Emmerik, Richard E A; Hamill, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Individuals regulate the transmission of shock to the head during running at different stride frequencies although the consequences of this on head-gaze stability remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine if providing individuals with visual feedback of their head-gaze orientation impacts tibial and head accelerations, shock attenuation and head-gaze motion during preferred speed running at different stride frequencies. Fifteen strides from twelve recreational runners running on a treadmill at their preferred speed were collected during five stride frequencies (preferred, ±10% and ±20% of preferred) in two visual task conditions (with and without real-time visual feedback of head-gaze orientation). The main outcome measures were tibial and head peak accelerations assessed in the time and frequency domains, shock attenuation from tibia to head, and the magnitude and velocity of head-gaze motion. Decreasing stride frequency resulted in greater vertical accelerations of the tibia (pacceleration was only observed for the slowest stride frequency condition. Visual feedback resulted in reduced head acceleration magnitude (pacceleration within a wide range of stride frequencies; only at a stride frequency 20% below preferred did head acceleration increase. Furthermore, impact accelerations of the head and tibia appear to be solely a function of stride frequency as no differences were observed between feedback conditions. Increased visual task demands through head gaze feedback resulted in reductions in head accelerations in the active portion of stance and increased head-gaze stability.

  13. Efficacy of a Micro-Prompting Technology in Reducing Support Needed by People With Severe Acquired Brain Injury in Activities of Daily Living: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OʼNeill, Brian; Best, Catherine; OʼNeill, Lauren; Ramos, Sara D S; Gillespie, Alex

    2017-11-29

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an automated interactive prompting technology in supporting the morning routine of persons with acquired brain injury. The morning routine included maintaining personal hygiene and dressing. An inpatient neurorehabilitation hospital. Persons with acquired brain injury who required prompting when following their morning routine (n = 24), but were not limited by physical disability or dysphasia, took part in the study. Participants (67% with traumatic brain injury) had impairment on indices of memory and executive function. A randomized control trial evaluated the effect of an automated interactive micro-prompting device on the number of prompts by trained staff required for successful completion of the morning routine. Study-specific checklists assessed sequence performance, errors, and verbal prompts required over baseline, rehabilitation as usual, intervention, and return to baseline conditions. The intervention significantly reduced the support required to complete the task compared with usual rehabilitation. Micro-prompting technology is an effective assistive technology for cognition, which reduces support needs in people with significant cognitive impairments.

  14. Behaviors Influencing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission in the Context of Positive Prevention among People Living with HIV/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ramin Radfar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identifying factors, which influence health behaviors is critical to designing appropriate and effective preventive programs. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV transmission is highly related to people behaviors and understanding factors influencing healthy behaviors among Iranian people living with HIVs (PLHIVs/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS is very important to tailor an effective response to HIV/AIDS epidemic. Methods: This study was conducted as a qualitative study by methods of focus group discussion and in-depth interview in six provinces of Iran with 64 PLHIVs to determine factors influence engagement in positive prevention. Results: Knowledge and education, feelings of responsibility and positive prevention practices were identified as the primary domains of engagement. These domains were found to be influenced by feelings of ostracism and frustration, poverty, barriers to disclosure of HIV status, access to and utilization of drug abuse treatment services and antiretroviral therapy, adherence to treatment, age, religiousness, sex work, singleness, and incarceration. Conclusions: Designing new interventions and updating current interventions directed toward the aforementioned factors should be addressed by responsible Iranian authorities in order to have a national effective response on the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

  15. Behaviors Influencing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission in the Context of Positive Prevention among People Living with HIV/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Iran: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radfar, Seyed Ramin; Sedaghat, Abbas; Banihashemi, Arash Tehrani; Gouya, Mohammadmehdi; Rawson, Richard A

    2014-08-01

    Identifying factors, which influence health behaviors is critical to designing appropriate and effective preventive programs. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission is highly related to people behaviors and understanding factors influencing healthy behaviors among Iranian people living with HIVs (PLHIVs)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is very important to tailor an effective response to HIV/AIDS epidemic. This study was conducted as a qualitative study by methods of focus group discussion and in-depth interview in six provinces of Iran with 64 PLHIVs to determine factors influence engagement in positive prevention. Knowledge and education, feelings of responsibility and positive prevention practices were identified as the primary domains of engagement. These domains were found to be influenced by feelings of ostracism and frustration, poverty, barriers to disclosure of HIV status, access to and utilization of drug abuse treatment services and antiretroviral therapy, adherence to treatment, age, religiousness, sex work, singleness, and incarceration. Designing new interventions and updating current interventions directed toward the aforementioned factors should be addressed by responsible Iranian authorities in order to have a national effective response on the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

  16. Stride angle as a novel indicator of running economy in well-trained runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Concejero, Jordan; Tam, Nicholas; Granados, Cristina; Irazusta, Jon; Bidaurrazaga-Letona, Iraia; Zabala-Lili, Jon; Gil, Susana M

    2014-07-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between a novel biomechanical variable, the stride angle, and running economy (RE) in a homogeneous group of long-distance athletes. Twenty-five well-trained male runners completed 4-minute running stages on a treadmill at different set velocities. During the test, biomechanical variables such as stride angle, swing time, ground contact time, stride length, stride frequency, and the different sub-phases of ground contact were recorded using an optical measurement system. VO2 values at velocities below the lactate threshold were measured to calculate RE. Stride angle was negatively correlated with RE at every speed (p contact time and running performance according to the best 10-km race time (p ≤ 0.05, moderate and large effect sizes). Last, stride angle was correlated with ground contact time at every speed (p angle allows runners to minimize contact time during ground contact, whereby facilitating a better RE. Coaches and/or athletes may find stride angle a useful and easily obtainable measure to track and make alterations to running technique, because changes in stride angle may influence the energy cost of running and lead to improved performance.

  17. Investigating the correlation between paediatric stride interval persistence and gross energy expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejdić Ervin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stride interval persistence, a term used to describe the correlation structure of stride interval time series, is thought to provide insight into neuromotor control, though its exact clinical meaning has not yet been realized. Since human locomotion is shaped by energy efficient movements, it has been hypothesized that stride interval dynamics and energy expenditure may be inherently tied, both having demonstrated similar sensitivities to age, disease, and pace-constrained walking. Findings This study tested for correlations between stride interval persistence and measures of energy expenditure including mass-specific gross oxygen consumption per minute (, mass-specific gross oxygen cost per meter (VO2 and heart rate (HR. Metabolic and stride interval data were collected from 30 asymptomatic children who completed one 10-minute walking trial under each of the following conditions: (i overground walking, (ii hands-free treadmill walking, and (iii handrail-supported treadmill walking. Stride interval persistence was not significantly correlated with (p > 0.32, VO2 (p > 0.18 or HR (p > 0.56. Conclusions No simple linear dependence exists between stride interval persistence and measures of gross energy expenditure in asymptomatic children when walking overground and on a treadmill.

  18. The correlation between perceived social support and illness uncertainty in people with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosa Sajjadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Illness uncertainty is a source of a chronic and pervasive psychological stress for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS (PLWH, and largely affects their quality of life and the ability to cope with the disease. Based on the uncertainty in illness theory, the social support is one of the illness uncertainty antecedents, and influences the level of uncertainty perceived by patients. Aim: To examine uncertainty in PLWH and its correlation with social support in Iran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional correlational study was conducted with 80 PLWH presenting to AIDS Research Center, Tehran, Iran in 2013. The data collected using illness uncertainty and social support inventories were analyzed through Pearson′s correlation coefficient, Spearman′s correlation coefficient, and regression analysis. Results: The results showed a high level of illness uncertainty in PLWH and a negative significant correlation between perceived social support and illness uncertainty ( P = 0.01, r = -0.29. Conclusion: Uncertainty is a serious aspect of illness experience in Iranian PLWH. Providing adequate, structured information to patients as well as opportunities to discuss their concerns with other PLWH and receive emotional support from their health care providers may be worthwhile.

  19. The Correlation Between Perceived Social Support and Illness Uncertainty in People with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, Moosa; Rassouli, Maryam; Bahri, Narges; Mohammadipoor, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Illness uncertainty is a source of a chronic and pervasive psychological stress for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) (PLWH), and largely affects their quality of life and the ability to cope with the disease. Based on the uncertainty in illness theory, the social support is one of the illness uncertainty antecedents, and influences the level of uncertainty perceived by patients. Aim: To examine uncertainty in PLWH and its correlation with social support in Iran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional correlational study was conducted with 80 PLWH presenting to AIDS Research Center, Tehran, Iran in 2013. The data collected using illness uncertainty and social support inventories were analyzed through Pearson's correlation coefficient, Spearman's correlation coefficient, and regression analysis. Results: The results showed a high level of illness uncertainty in PLWH and a negative significant correlation between perceived social support and illness uncertainty (P = 0.01, r = -0.29). Conclusion: Uncertainty is a serious aspect of illness experience in Iranian PLWH. Providing adequate, structured information to patients as well as opportunities to discuss their concerns with other PLWH and receive emotional support from their health care providers may be worthwhile. PMID:26009679

  20. Music therapy for acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joke; Magee, Wendy L; Dileo, Cheryl; Wheeler, Barbara L; McGilloway, Emer

    2010-07-07

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) can result in impairments in motor function, language, cognition, sensory processing and emotional disturbances. This may severely reduce a survivor's quality of life. Music therapy has been used in rehabilitation to stimulate brain functions involved in movement, cognition, speech, emotions and sensory perceptions. A systematic review is needed to gauge the efficacy of music therapy as a rehabilitation intervention for people with ABI. To examine the effects of music therapy with standard care versus standard care alone or standard care combined with other therapies on gait, upper extremity function, communication, mood and emotions, social skills, pain, behavioral outcomes, activities of daily living and adverse events. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (February 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2009), MEDLINE (July 2009), EMBASE (August 2009), CINAHL (March 2010), PsycINFO (July 2009), LILACS (August 2009), AMED (August 2009) and Science Citation Index (August 2009). We handsearched music therapy journals and conference proceedings, searched dissertation and specialist music databases, trials and research registers, reference lists, and contacted experts and music therapy associations. There was no language restriction. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials that compared music therapy interventions and standard care with standard care alone or combined with other therapies for people older than 16 years of age who had acquired brain damage of a non-degenerative nature and were participating in treatment programs offered in hospital, outpatient or community settings. Two review authors independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data. We present results using mean differences (using post-test scores) as all outcomes were measured with the same scale. We included seven studies (184 participants). The results suggest that rhythmic

  1. Unfavorable Strides in Cache Memory Systems (RNR Technical Report RNR-92-015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Bailey

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available An important issue in obtaining high performance on a scientific application running on a cache-based computer system is the behavior of the cache when data are accessed at a constant stride. Others who have discussed this issue have noted an odd phenomenon in such situations: A few particular innocent-looking strides result in sharply reduced cache efficiency. In this article, this problem is analyzed, and a simple formula is presented that accurately gives the cache efficiency for various cache parameters and data strides.

  2. Select injury-related variables are affected by stride length and foot strike style during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Elizabeth R; Derrick, Timothy R

    2015-09-01

    Some frontal plane and transverse plane variables have been associated with running injury, but it is not known if they differ with foot strike style or as stride length is shortened. To identify if step width, iliotibial band strain and strain rate, positive and negative free moment, pelvic drop, hip adduction, knee internal rotation, and rearfoot eversion differ between habitual rearfoot and habitual mid-/forefoot strikers when running with both a rearfoot strike (RFS) and a mid-/forefoot strike (FFS) at 3 stride lengths. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 42 healthy runners (21 habitual rearfoot, 21 habitual mid-/forefoot) ran overground at 3.35 m/s with both a RFS and a FFS at their preferred stride lengths and 5% and 10% shorter. Variables did not differ between habitual groups. Step width was 1.5 cm narrower for FFS, widening to 0.8 cm as stride length shortened. Iliotibial band strain and strain rate did not differ between foot strikes but decreased as stride length shortened (0.3% and 1.8%/s, respectively). Pelvic drop was reduced 0.7° for FFS compared with RFS, and both pelvic drop and hip adduction decreased as stride length shortened (0.8° and 1.5°, respectively). Peak knee internal rotation was not affected by foot strike or stride length. Peak rearfoot eversion was not different between foot strikes but decreased 0.6° as stride length shortened. Peak positive free moment (normalized to body weight [BW] and height [h]) was not affected by foot strike or stride length. Peak negative free moment was -0.0038 BW·m/h greater for FFS and decreased -0.0004 BW·m/h as stride length shortened. The small decreases in most variables as stride length shortened were likely associated with the concomitant wider step width. RFS had slightly greater pelvic drop, while FFS had slightly narrower step width and greater negative free moment. Shortening one's stride length may decrease or at least not increase propensity for running injuries based on the variables

  3. Effects of changing the random number stride in Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a common practice in Monte Carlo radiation transport codes which is to start each random walk a specified number of steps up the random number sequence from the previous one. This is called the stride in the random number sequence between source particles. It is used for correlated sampling or to provide tree-structured random numbers. A new random number generator algorithm for the major Monte Carlo code MCNP has been written to allow adjustment of the random number stride. This random number generator is machine portable. The effects of varying the stride for several sample problems are examined

  4. Altered fractal dynamics of gait: reduced stride-interval correlations with aging and Huntington's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorff, J. M.; Mitchell, S. L.; Firtion, R.; Peng, C. K.; Cudkowicz, M. E.; Wei, J. Y.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    Fluctuations in the duration of the gait cycle (the stride interval) display fractal dynamics and long-range correlations in healthy young adults. We hypothesized that these stride-interval correlations would be altered by changes in neurological function associated with aging and certain disease states. To test this hypothesis, we compared the stride-interval time series of 1) healthy elderly subjects and young controls and of 2) subjects with Huntington's disease and healthy controls. Using detrended fluctuation analysis we computed alpha, a measure of the degree to which one stride interval is correlated with previous and subsequent intervals over different time scales. The scaling exponent alpha was significantly lower in elderly subjects compared with young subjects (elderly: 0.68 +/- 0.14; young: 0.87 +/- 0.15; P elderly subjects and in subjects with Huntington's disease. Abnormal alterations in the fractal properties of gait dynamics are apparently associated with changes in central nervous system control.

  5. Influence of contextual task constraints on preferred stride parameters and their variabilities during human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Lauro V; Rebula, John R; Kuo, Arthur D; Adamczyk, Peter G

    2015-10-01

    Walking is not always a free and unencumbered task. Everyday activities such as walking in pairs, in groups, or on structured walkways can limit the acceptable gait patterns, leading to motor behavior that differs from that observed in more self-selected gait. Such different contexts may lead to gait performance different than observed in typical laboratory experiments, for example, during treadmill walking. We sought to systematically measure the impact of such task constraints by comparing gait parameters and their variability during walking in different conditions over-ground, and on a treadmill. We reconstructed foot motion from foot-mounted inertial sensors, and characterized forward, lateral and angular foot placement while subjects walked over-ground in a straight hallway and on a treadmill. Over-ground walking was performed in three variations: with no constraints (self-selected, SS); while deliberately varying walking speed (self-varied, SV); and while following a toy pace car programmed to vary speed (externally-varied, EV). We expected that these conditions would exhibit a statistically similar relationship between stride length and speed, and between stride length and stride period. We also expected treadmill walking (TM) would differ in two ways: first, that variability in stride length and stride period would conform to a constant-speed constraint opposite in slope from the normal relationship; and second, that stride length would decrease, leading to combinations of stride length and speed not observed in over-ground conditions. Results showed that all over-ground conditions used similar stride length-speed relationships, and that variability in treadmill walking conformed to a constant-speed constraint line, as expected. Decreased stride length was observed in both TM and EV conditions, suggesting adaptations due to heightened awareness or to prepare for unexpected changes or problems. We also evaluated stride variability in constrained and

  6. Food Security in Households of People Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: A Cross-sectional Study in a Subdivision of Darjeeling District, West Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallabi Dasgupta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS adversely impacts food security in households of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA. Little research has focused on food insecurity among PLWHA in India. The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of and factors relating to food security in households of PLWHA in the Siliguri subdivision of Darjeeling, West Bengal, India. Methods: A cross-sectional community-based study was carried out among 173 PLWHA residing in Siliguri and registered at the Anti-retroviral Therapy Centre of North Bengal Medical College & Hospital. Data was collected at the household level with interviews of PLWHA using a food security survey instrument. We analyzed the associations using logistic regression. Results: The prevalence of household food security among the participants was 50.9% (88/173. Five years or more of schooling, higher socioeconomic class and males were found to be significantly associated with a higher likelihood of food security. A later stage of the disease and the presence of other family members with HIV/AIDS were significantly associated with a lower likelihood of food security. The major coping strategies to deal with food insecurity in the acute phase HIV infection included borrowing money (56.1%, followed by spousal support, loans from microfinance institutions, banks, or money lenders, borrowing food, or selling agricultural products. Conclusions: The present study revealed that only about half of households with PLWHA were food secure. Prior interventions relating to periods of food and economic crisis as well as strategies for sustaining food security and economic status are needed in this area.

  7. Knee Stretch Walking Method for Biped Robot: Using Toe and Heel Joints to Increase Walking Strides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takahiko; Shimmyo, Shuhei; Nakazato, Miki; Mikami, Kei; Sato, Tomoya; Sakaino, Sho; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    This paper proposes a knee stretch walking method for biped robots; the method involves the use of the toes and heel joints to increase walking strides. A knee can be stretched by switching control variables. By a knee stretch walking with heel contacts to the ground and toe takeoffs from the ground, biped robots can increase their walking stride and speed. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by simulation and experimental results.

  8. Gait variability and basal ganglia disorders: stride-to-stride variations of gait cycle timing in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorff, J. M.; Cudkowicz, M. E.; Firtion, R.; Wei, J. Y.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    The basal ganglia are thought to play an important role in regulating motor programs involved in gait and in the fluidity and sequencing of movement. We postulated that the ability to maintain a steady gait, with low stride-to-stride variability of gait cycle timing and its subphases, would be diminished with both Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). To test this hypothesis, we obtained quantitative measures of stride-to-stride variability of gait cycle timing in subjects with PD (n = 15), HD (n = 20), and disease-free controls (n = 16). All measures of gait variability were significantly increased in PD and HD. In subjects with PD and HD, gait variability measures were two and three times that observed in control subjects, respectively. The degree of gait variability correlated with disease severity. In contrast, gait speed was significantly lower in PD, but not in HD, and average gait cycle duration and the time spent in many subphases of the gait cycle were similar in control subjects, HD subjects, and PD subjects. These findings are consistent with a differential control of gait variability, speed, and average gait cycle timing that may have implications for understanding the role of the basal ganglia in locomotor control and for quantitatively assessing gait in clinical settings.

  9. HIV infection and hepatitis C virus genotype 1a are associated with phylogenetic clustering among people with recently acquired hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Sofia R; Jacka, Brendan; Bull, Rowena A; Luciani, Fabio; Matthews, Gail V; Lamoury, Francois M J; Hellard, Margaret E; Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Teutsch, Suzy; White, Bethany; Maher, Lisa; Dore, Gregory J; Lloyd, Andrew R; Grebely, Jason; Applegate, Tanya L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with phylogenetic clustering among people with recently acquired hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Participants with available sample at time of HCV detection were selected from three studies; the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C, the Hepatitis C Incidence and Transmission Study - Prison and Community. HCV RNA was extracted and Core to E2 region of HCV sequenced. Clusters were identified from maximum likelihood trees with 1000 bootstrap replicates using 90% bootstrap and 5% genetic distance threshold. Among 225 participants with available Core-E2 sequence (ATAHC, n=113; HITS-p, n=90; and HITS-c, n=22), HCV genotype prevalence was: G1a: 38% (n=86), G1b: 5% (n=12), G2a: 1% (n=2), G2b: 5% (n=11), G3a: 48% (n=109), G6a: 1% (n=2) and G6l 1% (n=3). Of participants included in phylogenetic trees, 22% of participants were in a pair/cluster (G1a-35%, 30/85, mean maximum genetic distance=0.031; G3a-11%, 12/106, mean maximum genetic distance=0.021; other genotypes-21%, 6/28, mean maximum genetic distance=0.023). Among HCV/HIV co-infected participants, 50% (18/36) were in a pair/cluster, compared to 16% (30/183) with HCV mono-infection (P=HIV co-infection [vs. HCV mono-infection; adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 4.24; 95%CI 1.91, 9.39], and HCV G1a infection (vs. other HCV genotypes; AOR 3.33, 95%CI 0.14, 0.61).HCV treatment and prevention strategies, including enhanced antiviral therapy, should be optimised. The impact of targeting of HCV treatment as prevention to populations with higher phylogenetic clustering, such as those with HIV co-infection, could be explored through mathematical modelling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Thrilled at @Bristol Kathy Sykes in conversation with Liz Whitelegg. Kathy Sykes is Senior Science Consultant at @Bristol - a new area on Bristol's Harbourside with a Science Centre Explore, a Wildlife Centre Wildscreen, with sculptures and fountains. Kathy was one of five people in 1999 to be awarded an IOP Public Awareness of Physics award. Dr Kathy Sykes What attracted you to Physics in the first place? It was really when I discovered that Physics was all about making models of the world, because then suddenly the ability to be creative became important. I liked the idea that you could have a picture of the world that might work quite well but you could always replace that with a better one. That was what made science come alive and make it seem like something that I'd really love to be involved in, rather than science as a stale body of facts that I needed to learn. I was much more interested in ideas than in facts. I think that finding out about 'models' happened around the time I was discovering quantum mechanics and how the act of observing something can actually affect the outcome. I found it incredibly exciting - especially how that changed the whole philosophy of science. I also had a fantastic teacher in physics and I owe an awful lot to him. He just swooped in at the last moment when I was considering giving it up so that made an enormous difference. After my degree I went to teach maths and physics A-level in Zimbabwe with the VSO, and it was partly wanting to share my excitement with other people about physics that made me want to go and teach abroad. When I came back and began my PhD in Physics at Bristol University, I missed teaching and thought it was important to get the public more involved in science and debates about science. My supervisor, Pete Barham, was doing lots of this himself, and he helped and encouraged me enormously. I can't thank him enough. Did you consider teaching as a career? Well I like having the carpet whipped away from

  11. Pedestrian Stride Length Estimation from IMU Measurements and ANN Based Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Xing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR can be used for continuous position estimation when satellite or other radio signals are not available, and the accuracy of the stride length measurement is important. Current stride length estimation algorithms, including linear and nonlinear models, consider a few variable factors, and some rely on high precision and high cost equipment. This paper puts forward a stride length estimation algorithm based on a back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN, using a consumer-grade inertial measurement unit (IMU; it then discusses various factors in the algorithm. The experimental results indicate that the error of the proposed algorithm in estimating the stride length is approximately 2%, which is smaller than that of the frequency and nonlinear models. Compared with the latter two models, the proposed algorithm does not need to determine individual parameters in advance if the trained neural net is effective. It can, thus, be concluded that this algorithm shows superior performance in estimating pedestrian stride length.

  12. Project Stride: An Equine-Assisted Intervention to Reduce Symptoms of Social Anxiety in Young Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Sarah V; Alfonso, Lauren A; Llabre, Maria M; Fernandez, M Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Although there is evidence supporting the use of equine-assisted activities to treat mental disorders, its efficacy in reducing signs and symptoms of social anxiety in young women has not been examined. We developed and pilot tested Project Stride, a brief, six-session intervention combining equine-assisted activities and cognitive-behavioral strategies to reduce symptoms of social anxiety. A total of 12 women, 18-29 years of age, were randomly assigned to Project Stride or a no-treatment control. Participants completed the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale at baseline, immediate-post, and 6 weeks after treatment. Project Stride was highly acceptable and feasible. Compared to control participants, those in Project Stride had significantly greater reductions in social anxiety scores from baseline to immediate-post [decrease of 24.8 points; t (9) = 3.40, P = .008)] and from baseline to follow-up [decrease of 31.8 points; t (9) = 4.12, P = .003)]. These findings support conducting a full-scale efficacy trial of Project Stride. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    ASE: Attend, Socialize, Enjoy Bob Kibble reflects on the enriching effects of the annual meeting Bob Kibble is a teacher trainer at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. I remember my first ASE meeting in Reading. Perhaps in 1978 or thereabouts. I had been teaching for a few years and thought I'd check out this local convention of science teachers. It was indeed a revelation that so many people had so much to say about teaching science. There was talk about N and F levels and the 'I level grill'. Someone had ordered something called a BBC machine (later revealed to me as the latest in hi-tech teaching). I remember it well. But it was a lonely affair for a recent recruit. People seemed to know each other and there was much friendly exchanging. However, nobody knew me and I knew nobody else. The professional revelations were accompanied by a personal isolation. A strange set of memories indeed for a new recruit, unskilled and clumsy in the social arena. Bob practising for the ASE singalong session this year. This year I went to the ASE Centenary meeting in Guildford, my sixteenth ASE annual meeting. Things have changed since the early days. Thursday started with a formal Cathedral service in celebration of 100 years of the ASE. I sat next to a lady from Oxford and behind my good friend Dave from Croydon. Things snowballed from there. I went to a workshop on the water cycle and was brought face to face with my own misconceptions about the life story of a water molecule. Got a freebie coloured bracelet as well. Thanks Margaret. A chap from Bournemouth gave me loads of ideas about how best to set up a shared lesson observation scheme as well as how to run a professional development workshop. Thanks Stuart. At a third session I joined Brenda from Cambridge and we spent an enjoyable hour discovering ways to approach the teaching of light and in particular Ibn al Haytham's revelations courtesy of a chap from Kingston. That afternoon I was invited to present a talk to

  14. Acquired Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde Nielsen, Espen; Halse, Karianne

    2013-01-01

    Acquired Techniques - a Leap into the Archive, at Aarhus School of Architecture. In collaboration with Karianne Halse, James Martin and Mika K. Friis. Following the footsteps of past travelers this is a journey into tools and techniques of the architectural process. The workshop will focus upon...

  15. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    the war Hoyle returned to Cambridge, but kept in close contact with his collaborators. Fred Hoyle was a canny and media-savvy scientist, 40 years before such things were recognized. Martin Rees said after his death '[He] also had other dimensions to his career, his inventiveness and skill as a communicator'. It is hard to realize now the impact that Hoyle's broadcasts had in post-war Britain. His programmes for the BBC on The Nature of the Universe won greater audiences than such unlikely rivals as Bertrand Russell and Tommy Handley. Even today many people recall how they were affected by listening to these broadcasts. Hoyle used one of his broadcasts to ridicule the hot explosion theory. He referred to the idea of a 'big bang as fanciful'. Unfortunately the name stuck, much to Hoyle's chagrin. In the 1950s Hoyle began a fruitful collaboration with Willy Fowler of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Hoyle was interested in the origin of the chemical elements. Hans Bethe, Charles Critchfield and Karl-Frederich von Weizsäcker had calculated in 1939 how stars could turn protons into helium nuclei by nuclear fusion. Part of the Vela supernova remmant, the debris left after the type of massive explosion in which Hoyle predicted that heavy nuclei were formed. (© Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Anglo-Australian Observatory.) Building on earlier collaboration with Ed Saltpeter, Hoyle used data supplied by Geoffrey and Margaret Burbidge and, working with Fowler, began to piece together how the elements were formed. By looking at very large stars near the end of their lives and examining their chemical composition, they noticed that the abundances of elements almost exactly corresponded to those with a low nuclear capture cross section. Hoyle argued that all of the elements in our bodies had been formed in stars that had been and gone before our solar system had even formed. In their classic paper the elements are produced by three basic methods. The

  16. Leg heating and cooling influences running stride parameters but not running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folland, J P; Rowlands, D S; Thorp, R; Walmsley, A

    2006-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of temperature on running economy (RE) and stride parameters in 10 trained male runners (VO2peak 60.8 +/- 6.8 ml . kg (-1) . min (-1)), we used water immersion as a passive temperature manipulation to contrast localised pre-heating, pre-cooling, and thermoneutral interventions prior to running. Runners completed three 10-min treadmill runs at 70 % VO2peak following 40 min of randomised leg immersion in water at 21.0 degrees C (cold), 34.6 degrees C (thermoneutral), or 41.8 degrees C (hot). Treadmill runs were separated by 7 days. External respiratory gas exchange was measured for 30 s before and throughout the exercise and stride parameters were determined from video analysis in the sagittal plane. RE was not affected by prior heating or cooling with no difference in oxygen cost or energy expenditure between the temperature interventions (average VO2 3rd-10th min of exercise: C, 41.6 +/- 3.4 ml . kg (-1) . min (-1); TN, 41.6 +/- 3.0; H, 41.8 +/- 3.5; p = 0.94). Exercise heart rate was affected by temperature (H > TN > C; p exchange and minute ventilation/oxygen consumption ratios were greater in cold compared with thermoneutral (p economy despite changes in stride parameters that might indicate restricted muscle-tendon elasticity after pre-cooling. Larger changes in stride mechanics than those produced by the current temperature intervention are required to influence running economy.

  17. Stride Leg Ground Reaction Forces Predict Throwing Velocity in Adult Recreational Baseball Pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Michael P; Borstad, John D; Oñate, James A; Chaudhari, Ajit M W

    2015-10-01

    Ground reaction forces produced during baseball pitching have a significant impact in the development of ball velocity. However, the measurement of only one leg and small sample sizes in these studies curb the understanding of ground reaction forces as they relate to pitching. This study aimed to further clarify the role ground reaction forces play in developing pitching velocity. Eighteen former competitive baseball players with previous high school or collegiate pitching experience threw 15 fastballs from a pitcher's mound instrumented to measure ground reaction forces under both the drive and stride legs. Peak ground reaction forces were recorded during each phase of the pitching cycle, between peak knee height and ball release, in the medial/lateral, anterior/posterior, and vertical directions, and the peak resultant ground reaction force. Stride leg ground reaction forces during the arm-cocking and arm-acceleration phases were strongly correlated with ball velocity (r2 = 0.45-0.61), whereas drive leg ground reaction forces showed no significant correlations. Stepwise linear regression analysis found that peak stride leg ground reaction force during the arm-cocking phase was the best predictor of ball velocity (r2 = 0.61) among drive and stride leg ground reaction forces. This study demonstrates the importance of ground reaction force development in pitching, with stride leg forces being strongly predictive of ball velocity. Further research is needed to further clarify the role of ground reaction forces in pitching and to develop training programs designed to improve upper extremity mechanics and pitching performance through effective force development.

  18. A Novel Approach to Determine Strides, Ice Contact, and Swing Phases During Ice Hockey Skating Using a Single Accelerometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetter, Bernd J; Buckeridge, Erica; von Tscharner, Vinzenz; Nigg, Sandro R; Nigg, Benno M

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a new approach for automated identification of ice hockey skating strides and a method to detect ice contact and swing phases of individual strides by quantifying vibrations in 3D acceleration data during the blade-ice interaction. The strides of a 30-m forward sprinting task, performed by 6 ice hockey players, were evaluated using a 3D accelerometer fixed to a hockey skate. Synchronized plantar pressure data were recorded as reference data. To determine the accuracy of the new method on a range of forward stride patterns for temporal skating events, estimated contact times and stride times for a sequence of 5 consecutive strides was validated. Bland-Altman limits of agreement (95%) between accelerometer and plantar pressure derived data were less than 0.019 s. Mean differences between the 2 capture methods were shown to be less than 1 ms for contact and stride time. These results demonstrate the validity of the novel approach to determine strides, ice contact, and swing phases during ice hockey skating. This technology is accurate, simple, effective, and allows for in-field ice hockey testing.

  19. Increased gait variability may not imply impaired stride-to-stride control of walking in healthy older adults: Winner: 2013 Gait and Clinical Movement Analysis Society Best Paper Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingwell, Jonathan B; Salinas, Mandy M; Cusumano, Joseph P

    2017-06-01

    Older adults exhibit increased gait variability that is associated with fall history and predicts future falls. It is not known to what extent this increased variability results from increased physiological noise versus a decreased ability to regulate walking movements. To "walk", a person must move a finite distance in finite time, making stride length (L n ) and time (T n ) the fundamental stride variables to define forward walking. Multiple age-related physiological changes increase neuromotor noise, increasing gait variability. If older adults also alter how they regulate their stride variables, this could further exacerbate that variability. We previously developed a Goal Equivalent Manifold (GEM) computational framework specifically to separate these causes of variability. Here, we apply this framework to identify how both young and high-functioning healthy older adults regulate stepping from each stride to the next. Healthy older adults exhibited increased gait variability, independent of walking speed. However, despite this, these healthy older adults also concurrently exhibited no differences (all p>0.50) from young adults either in how their stride variability was distributed relative to the GEM or in how they regulated, from stride to stride, either their basic stepping variables or deviations relative to the GEM. Using a validated computational model, we found these experimental findings were consistent with increased gait variability arising solely from increased neuromotor noise, and not from changes in stride-to-stride control. Thus, age-related increased gait variability likely precedes impaired stepping control. This suggests these changes may in turn precede increased fall risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Making Strides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    In the mad dash to complete the plethora of projects that lead up to the public launch of a campaign, it would be easy to start thinking of the kickoff as a goal in itself, but it's merely a mile marker in the marathon of a fundraising campaign that may last five to 10 years. Given that only a fraction of an institution's constituents may attend a…

  1. Stability of person ability measures in people with acquired brain injury in the use of everyday technology: the test-retest reliability of the Management of Everyday Technology Assessment (META).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowsky, Camilla; Kassberg, Ann-Charlotte; Larsson-Lund, Maria; Kottorp, Anders

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the test-retest reliability of the Management of Everyday Technology Assessment (META) in a sample of people with acquired brain injury (ABI). The META was administered twice within a two-week period to 25 people with ABI. A Rasch measurement model was used to convert the META ordinal raw scores into equal-interval linear measures of each participant's ability to manage everyday technology (ET). Test-retest reliability of the stability of the person ability measures in the META was examined by a standardized difference Z-test and an intra-class correlations analysis (ICC 1). The results showed that the paired person ability measures generated from the META were stable over the test-retest period for 22 of the 25 subjects. The ICC 1 correlation was 0.63, which indicates good overall reliability. The META demonstrated acceptable test-retest reliability in a sample of people with ABI. The results illustrate the importance of using sufficiently challenging ETs (relative to a person's abilities) to generate stable META measurements over time. Implications for Rehabilitation The findings add evidence regarding the test-retest reliability of the person ability measures generated from the observation assessment META in a sample of people with ABI. The META might support professionals in the evaluation of interventions that are designed to improve clients' performance of activities including the ability to manage ET.

  2. Stride length determination during overground running using a single foot-mounted inertial measurement unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahms, C Markus; Zhao, Yang; Gerhard, David; Barden, John M

    2018-02-10

    From a research perspective, detailed knowledge about stride length (SL) is important for coaches, clinicians and researchers because together with stride rate it determines the speed of locomotion. Moreover, individual SL vectors represent the integrated output of different biomechanical determinants and as such provide valuable insight into the control of running gait. In recent years, several studies have tried to estimate SL using body-mounted inertial measurement units (IMUs) and have reported promising results. However, many studies have used systems based on multiple sensors or have only focused on estimating SL for walking. Here we test the concurrent validity of a single foot-mounted, 9-degree of freedom IMU to estimate SL for running. We employed a running-specific, Kalman filter based zero-velocity update (ZUPT) algorithm to calculate individual SL vectors with the IMU and compared the results to SLs that were simultaneously recorded by a 6-camera 3D motion capture system. The results showed that the analytical procedures were able to successfully identify all strides that were recorded by the camera system and that excellent levels of absolute agreement (ICC(3,1) = 0.955) existed between the two methods. The findings demonstrate that individual SL vectors can be accurately estimated with a single foot-mounted IMU when running in a controlled laboratory setting. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The physical activity levels among people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome receiving high active antiretroviral therapy in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, J M; Murenzi, A

    2013-01-01

    The accessibility of high active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for local human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients is improving in Rwanda. It is well known that this therapy is associated with serious adverse effects, such as metabolic and morphologic changes. One of the recommended preventive modalities for these complications is participation in physical activity. The current study aims to determine the anthropometric profile and physical activity levels among people living with HIV and receiving HAART in Kigali, Rwanda. The study was a cross-sectional, descriptive quantitative survey. The participant's levels of physical activity participation and their association with anthropometric profiles were measured, using a structured self-administered questionnaire for 407 clients passing through the clinics. Of the participants, approximately 70% were inactive and in addition, 40% were obese and 43% overweight. Obesity was found to be strongly associated with inactivity. Lack of motivation, and time as well as fear of worsening the disease were found to be barriers to participation in physical activity.

  4. Risk factors for developing acute kidney injury in older people with diabetes and community-acquired pneumonia: a population-based UK cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anu; McDonald, Helen I; Nitsch, Dorothea; Tomlinson, Laurie; Thomas, Sara L

    2017-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is being increasingly recognised in ageing populations. There are a paucity of data about AKI risk factors among older individuals with diabetes and infections, who are at particularly high risk of AKI. The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for developing acute kidney injury (AKI) amongst older patients with diabetes and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in England, and whether the impact of underlying kidney function varied with age. This was a population-based retrospective cohort study over 7 years (01/04/2004-31/3/2011) using electronic health records from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink linked to Hospital Episode Statistics. The study population comprised individuals with diabetes aged ≥65 years with CAP. Associations between demographic, lifestyle factors, co-morbidities and medications and development of AKI within 28 days of CAP were explored in a logistic regression model. Among 3471 patients with CAP and complete covariate data, 298 patients developed subsequent AKI. In multivariable analyses, factors found to be independently associated with AKI included: male sex (adjusted odds ratio, aOR: 1.56 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20-2.04), hypertension (aOR1.36 95% CI 1.01-1.85), being prescribed either angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II-receptor-blockers (aOR: 1.59 95% CI: 1.19-2.13), or insulin (aOR: 2.27 95% CI: 1.27-4.05), presence of proteinuria (aOR 1.27 95% CI 0.98-1.63), and low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). The odds of AKI were more graded amongst older participants aged ≥80 years compared to those of younger age: for eGFR of ≤29 mL/min/1.73m 2 (vs 60 ml/min/1.73m 2 ) aOR: 5.51 95% CI 3.28-9.27 and for eGFR 30-59 mL/min/1.73m 2 1.96 95% CI 1.30-2.96, whilst any eGFR risk factors should help primary care and hospital providers identify high risk patients in need of urgent management including more intensive monitoring, and prevention of AKI

  5. Effects of socks which improved foot sensation on velocity and stride length of elderly subjects crossing obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] We developed socks which improve foot sensation and investigated their effect on the velocity and stride length of elderly women crossing obstacles. [Subjects] Ten community-dwelling, elderly women who could walk independently were recruited. [Methods] We measured velocity and stride length using the GAITRite system while the participants crossed obstacles under three conditions: barefoot, wearing ordinary socks, and wearing the socks which improve foot sensation. [Results] Velocity and stride length in bare feet and when wearing the sense-improving socks increased significantly compared to their values when wearing standard socks. Velocity and stride length did not differ between the bare foot and improved sock conditions. [Conclusion] Wearing socks helps protect the foot, but can decrease foot sensory input. Therefore, the socks which improve foot sensation were useful for preventing falls and protecting the feet of the elderly women while they crossed obstacles.

  6. Stride Segmentation during Free Walk Movements Using Multi-Dimensional Subsequence Dynamic Time Warping on Inertial Sensor Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Barth

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Changes in gait patterns provide important information about individuals’ health. To perform sensor based gait analysis, it is crucial to develop methodologies to automatically segment single strides from continuous movement sequences. In this study we developed an algorithm based on time-invariant template matching to isolate strides from inertial sensor signals. Shoe-mounted gyroscopes and accelerometers were used to record gait data from 40 elderly controls, 15 patients with Parkinson’s disease and 15 geriatric patients. Each stride was manually labeled from a straight 40 m walk test and from a video monitored free walk sequence. A multi-dimensional subsequence Dynamic Time Warping (msDTW approach was used to search for patterns matching a pre-defined stride template constructed from 25 elderly controls. F-measure of 98% (recall 98%, precision 98% for 40 m walk tests and of 97% (recall 97%, precision 97% for free walk tests were obtained for the three groups. Compared to conventional peak detection methods up to 15% F-measure improvement was shown. The msDTW proved to be robust for segmenting strides from both standardized gait tests and free walks. This approach may serve as a platform for individualized stride segmentation during activities of daily living.

  7. Are pre-existing markers of chronic kidney disease associated with short-term mortality following acute community-acquired pneumonia and sepsis? A cohort study among older people with diabetes using electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Helen I; Nitsch, Dorothea; Millett, Elizabeth R C; Sinclair, Alan; Thomas, Sara L

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to examine whether pre-existing impaired estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and proteinuria were associated with mortality following community-acquired pneumonia or sepsis among people aged ≥ 65 years with diabetes mellitus, without end-stage renal disease. Patients were followed up from onset of first community-acquired pneumonia or sepsis episode in a cohort study using large, linked electronic health databases. Follow-up was for up to 90 days, unlimited by hospital discharge. We used generalized linear models with log link, normal distribution and robust standard errors to calculate risk ratios (RRs) for all-cause 28- and 90-day mortality according to two markers of chronic kidney disease: eGFR and proteinuria. All-cause mortality among the 4743 patients with pneumonia was 29.6% after 28 days and 37.4% after 90 days. Among the 1058 patients with sepsis, all-cause 28- and 90-day mortality were 35.6 and 44.2%, respectively. eGFR sepsis (RR 1.32: 95% CI 1.07-1.64), adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic status, smoking status and co-morbidities. Neither moderately impaired eGFR nor proteinuria were associated with short-term mortality following either infection. People with pre-existing low eGFR but not on dialysis are at higher risk of death following pneumonia and sepsis. This association was not explained by existing co-morbidities. These patients need to be carefully monitored to prevent modifiable causes of death. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  8. Running-specific, periodized strength training attenuates loss of stride length during intense endurance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Lanao, Jonathan; Rhea, Matthew R; Fleck, Steven J; Lucia, Alejandro

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a running-specific, periodized strength training program (performed over the specific period [8 weeks] of a 16-week macrocycle) on endurance-trained runners' capacity to maintain stride length during running bouts at competitive speeds. Eighteen well-trained middle-distance runners completed the study (personal bests for 1500 and 5000 m of 3 minutes 57 seconds +/- 12 seconds and 15 minutes 24 seconds +/- 36 seconds). They were randomly assigned to each of the following groups (6 per group): periodized strength group, performing a periodized strength training program over the 8-week specific (intervention) period (2 sessions per week); nonperiodized strength group, performing the same strength training exercises as the periodized group over the specific period but with no week-to-week variations; and a control group, performing no strength training at all during the specific period. The percentage of loss in the stride length (cm)/speed (m.s) (SLS) ratio was measured by comparing the mean SLS during the first and third (last) group of the total repetitions, respectively, included in each of the interval training sessions performed at race speeds during the competition period that followed the specific period. Significant differences (p endurance runners during fatiguing running bouts.

  9. Effect of treadmill versus overground running on the structure of variability of stride timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Timothy R; Noakes, Timothy D; McGregor, Stephen J

    2014-04-01

    Gait timing dynamics of treadmill and overground running were compared. Nine trained runners ran treadmill and track trials at 80, 100, and 120% of preferred pace for 8 min. each. Stride time series were generated for each trial. To each series, detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), power spectral density (PSD), and multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis were applied to infer the regime of control along the randomness-regularity axis. Compared to overground running, treadmill running exhibited a higher DFA and PSD scaling exponent, as well as lower entropy at non-preferred speeds. This indicates a more ordered control for treadmill running, especially at non-preferred speeds. The results suggest that the treadmill itself brings about greater constraints and requires increased voluntary control. Thus, the quantification of treadmill running gait dynamics does not necessarily reflect movement in overground settings.

  10. Longitudinal assessment of neuropsychological and temporal/spatial gait characteristics of elderly fallers: taking it all in stride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca K MacAulay

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gait abnormalities are linked to cognitive decline and an increased fall risk within older adults. The present study addressed gaps from cross-sectional studies in the literature by longitudinally examining the interplay between temporal and spatial aspects of gait, cognitive function, age, and lower-extremity strength in elderly fallers and non-fallers. Gait characteristics, neuropsychological and physical test performance were examined at two time points spaced a year apart in cognitively intact individuals aged 60 and older (N = 416. Mixed-model repeated-measure ANCOVAs examined temporal (step time and spatial (stride length gait characteristics during a simple and cognitive-load walking task in fallers as compared to non-fallers. Fallers consistently demonstrated significant alterations in spatial, but not temporal, aspects of gait as compared to non-fallers during both walking tasks. Step time became slower as stride length shortened amongst all participants during the dual task. Shorter strides and slower step times during the dual task were both predicted by worse executive attention/processing speed performance. In summary, divided attention significantly impacts spatial aspects of gait in fallers, suggesting stride length changes may precede declines in other neuropsychological and gait characteristics, thereby selectively increasing fall risk. Our results indicate that multimodal intervention approaches that integrate physical and cognitive remediation strategies may increase the effectiveness of fall risk interventions.

  11. Analysis and Classification of Stride Patterns Associated with Children Development Using Gait Signal Dynamics Parameters and Ensemble Learning Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meihong Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Measuring stride variability and dynamics in children is useful for the quantitative study of gait maturation and neuromotor development in childhood and adolescence. In this paper, we computed the sample entropy (SampEn and average stride interval (ASI parameters to quantify the stride series of 50 gender-matched children participants in three age groups. We also normalized the SampEn and ASI values by leg length and body mass for each participant, respectively. Results show that the original and normalized SampEn values consistently decrease over the significance level of the Mann-Whitney U test (p<0.01 in children of 3–14 years old, which indicates the stride irregularity has been significantly ameliorated with the body growth. The original and normalized ASI values are also significantly changing when comparing between any two groups of young (aged 3–5 years, middle (aged 6–8 years, and elder (aged 10–14 years children. Such results suggest that healthy children may better modulate their gait cadence rhythm with the development of their musculoskeletal and neurological systems. In addition, the AdaBoost.M2 and Bagging algorithms were used to effectively distinguish the children’s gait patterns. These ensemble learning algorithms both provided excellent gait classification results in terms of overall accuracy (≥90%, recall (≥0.8, and precision (≥0.8077.

  12. Is walking a random walk? Evidence for long-range correlations in stride interval of human gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Peng, C.-K.; Ladin, Zvi; Wei, Jeanne Y.; Goldberger, Ary L.

    1995-01-01

    Complex fluctuation of unknown origin appear in the normal gait pattern. These fluctuations might be described as being (1) uncorrelated white noise, (2) short-range correlations, or (3) long-range correlations with power-law scaling. To test these possibilities, the stride interval of 10 healthy young men was measured as they walked for 9 min at their usual rate. From these time series we calculated scaling indexes by using a modified random walk analysis and power spectral analysis. Both indexes indicated the presence of long-range self-similar correlations extending over hundreds of steps; the stride interval at any time depended on the stride interval at remote previous times, and this dependence decayed in a scale-free (fractallike) power-law fashion. These scaling indexes were significantly different from those obtained after random shuffling of the original time series, indicating the importance of the sequential ordering of the stride interval. We demonstrate that conventional models of gait generation fail to reproduce the observed scaling behavior and introduce a new type of central pattern generator model that sucessfully accounts for the experimentally observed long-range correlations.

  13. Increased delivery stride length places greater loads on the ankle joint in elite male cricket fast bowlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratford, Wayne; Hicks, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect stride length has on ankle biomechanics of the leading leg with reference to the potential risk of injury in cricket fast bowlers. Ankle joint kinematic and kinetic data were collected from 51 male fast bowlers during the stance phase of the final delivery stride. The bowling cohort comprised national under-19, first class and international-level athletes. Bowlers were placed into either Short, Average or Long groups based on final stride length, allowing statistical differences to be measured. A multivariate analysis of variance with a Bonferroni post-hoc correction (α = 0.05) revealed significant differences between peak plantarflexion angles (Short-Long P = 0.005, Average and Long P = 0.04) and negative joint work (Average-Long P = 0.026). This study highlighted that during fast bowling the ankle joint of the leading leg experiences high forces under wide ranges of movement. As stride length increases, greater amounts of negative work and plantarflexion are experienced. These increases place greater loads on the ankle joint and move the foot into positions that make it more susceptible to injuries such as posterior impingement syndrome.

  14. Repeated sprint ability and stride kinematics are altered following an official match in national-level basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delextrat, A; Baliqi, F; Clarke, N

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of playing an official national-level basketball match on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and stride kinematics. Nine male starting basketball players (22.8±2.2 years old, 191.3±5.8 cm, 88±10.3 kg, 12.3±4.6% body fat) volunteered to take part. Six repetitions of maximal 4-s sprints were performed on a non-motorised treadmill, separated by 21-s of passive recovery, before and immediately after playing an official match. Fluid loss, playing time, and the frequencies of the main match activities were recorded. The peak, mean, and performance decrement for average and maximal speed, acceleration, power, vertical and horizontal forces, and stride parameters were calculated over the six sprints. Differences between pre- and post-match were assessed by student t-tests. Significant differences between pre- and post-tests were observed in mean speed (-3.3%), peak and mean horizontal forces (-4.3% and -17.4%), peak and mean vertical forces (-3.4% and -3.7%), contact time (+7.3%), stride duration (+4.6%) and stride frequency (-4.0%), (Pvertical force were significantly correlated to fluid loss and sprint, jump and shuffle frequencies (P<0.05). These results highlight that the impairment in repeated sprint ability depends on the specific activities performed, and that replacing fluid loss through sweating during a match is crucial.

  15. Validation of distal limb mounted inertial-measurement-unit sensors for stride detection in Warmblood horses at walk and trot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serra Braganca, Filipe; Bosch, S; Voskamp, J P; Marin-Perianu, M; Van der Zwaag, B J; Vernooij, J C M; van Weeren, P R; Back, W

    BACKGROUND: Inertial-measurement-unit (IMU)-sensor-based techniques are becoming more popular in horses as a tool for objective locomotor assessment. OBJECTIVES: To describe, evaluate and validate a method of stride detection and quantification at walk and trot using distal limb mounted IMU-sensors.

  16. Validation of Distal Limb Mounted Imu Sensors for Stride Detection and Locomotor Quantification in Warmblood Horses at Walk and Trot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serra Braganca, F.M.; Vernooij, J.C.M.; René van Weeren, P.; Back, Wim

    Reasons for performing study: IMU-sensor based techniques arebecoming more popular in horses as a tool for objective locomotorassessment. Using currently proposed methods only limited informationabout stride variables can be obtained for walk and trot.Objectives: To describe, evaluate and validate a

  17. Validation of distal limb mounted inertial measurement unit sensors for stride detection in Warmblood horses at walk and trot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braganca, F.M.; Bosch, S.; Voskamp, J.P.; Marin Perianu, Mihai; van der Zwaag, B.J.; Vernooij, J.C.; van Weeren, P.R.; Back, W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inertial measurement unit (IMU) sensor-based techniques are becoming more popular in horses as a tool for objective locomotor assessment. Objectives: To describe, evaluate and validate a method of stride detection and quantification at walk and trot using distal limb mounted IMU sensors.

  18. Impact of stride-coupled gaze shifts of walking blowflies on the neuronal representation of visual targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eKress

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available During locomotion animals rely heavily on visual cues gained from the environment to guide their behavior. Examples are basic behaviors like collision avoidance or the approach to a goal. The saccadic gaze strategy of flying flies, which separates translational from rotational phases of locomotion, has been suggested to facilitate the extraction of environmental information, because only image flow evoked by translational self-motion contains relevant distance information about the surrounding world. In contrast to the translational phases of flight during which gaze direction is kept largely constant, walking flies experience continuous rotational image flow that is coupled to their stride-cycle. The consequences of these self-produced image shifts for the extraction of environmental information are still unclear. To assess the impact of stride-coupled image shifts on visual information processing, we performed electrophysiological recordings from the HSE cell, a motion sensitive wide-field neuron in the blowfly visual system. This cell has been concluded to play a key role in mediating optomotor behavior, self-motion estimation and spatial information processing. We used visual stimuli that were based on the visual input experienced by walking blowflies while approaching a black vertical bar. The response of HSE to these stimuli was dominated by periodic membrane potential fluctuations evoked by stride-coupled image shifts. Nevertheless, during the approach the cell’s response contained information about the bar and its background. The response components evoked by the bar were larger than the responses to its background, especially during the last phase of the approach. However, as revealed by targeted modifications of the visual input during walking, the extraction of distance information on the basis of HSE responses is much impaired by stride-coupled retinal image shifts. Possible mechanisms that may cope with these stride

  19. Negative labeling and social exclusion of people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome in the antiretroviral therapy era: insight from attitudes and behavioral intentions of female heads of households in Zambézia Province, Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukolo, Abraham; Blevins, Meridith; Hinton, Nicole; Victor, Bart; Vaz, Lara M E; Sidat, Mohsin; Vergara, Alfredo E

    2014-01-01

    In the age of antiretroviral therapy (ART), unraveling specific aspects of stigma that impede uptake and adherence to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) services and the complex intersections among them might enhance the efficacy of stigma-reduction interventions targeted at the general public. Few studies have described community stigma in high HIV prevalence regions of Mozambique where program scale-up has been concentrated, but fear of stigma persists as a barrier to HIV service uptake. Principal components analysis of attitudinal data from 3749 female heads of households surveyed in Zambézia Province was used to examine patterns of agreement with stigmatizing attitudes and behavior toward people living with HIV. Inferences were based on comparison of factor loadings and commonality estimates. Construct validity was established through correlations with levels of knowledge about HIV transmission and consistency with the labeling theory of stigma. Two unique domains of community stigma were observed: negative labeling and devaluation (NLD, α = 0.74) and social exclusion (SoE, α = 0.73). NLD is primarily an attitudinal construct, while SoE captures behavioral intent. About one-third of the respondents scored in the upper tertile of the NLD stigma scale (scale: 0-100 stigma points) and the equivalent was 41.3% in the SoE stigma scale. Consistent with literature, NLD and SoE stigma scores were inversely correlated with HIV transmission route knowledge. In item level analysis, fear of being labeled a prostitute/immoral and of negative family affect defined the nature of stigma in this sample. Thus, despite ART scale-up and community education about HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), NLD and SoE characterized the community stigma of HIV in this setting. Follow-up studies could compare the impact of these stigma domains on HIV services uptake, in order to inform domain-focused stigma-reduction interventions.

  20. The STRIDE weight loss and lifestyle intervention for individuals taking antipsychotic medications: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Carla A; Yarborough, Bobbi Jo H; Leo, Michael C; Yarborough, Micah T; Stumbo, Scott P; Janoff, Shannon L; Perrin, Nancy A; Nichols, Greg A; Stevens, Victor J

    2015-01-01

    The STRIDE study assessed whether a lifestyle intervention, tailored for individuals with serious mental illnesses, reduced weight and diabetes risk. The authors hypothesized that the STRIDE intervention would be more effective than usual care in reducing weight and improving glucose metabolism. The study design was a multisite, parallel two-arm randomized controlled trial in community settings and an integrated health plan. Participants who met inclusion criteria were ≥18 years old, were taking antipsychotic agents for ≥30 days, and had a body mass index ≥27. Exclusions were significant cognitive impairment, pregnancy/breastfeeding, recent psychiatric hospitalization, bariatric surgery, cancer, heart attack, or stroke. The intervention emphasized moderate caloric reduction, the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet, and physical activity. Blinded staff collected data at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Participants (men, N=56; women, N=144; mean age=47.2 years [SD=10.6]) were randomly assigned to usual care (N=96) or a 6-month weekly group intervention plus six monthly maintenance sessions (N=104). A total of 181 participants (90.5%) completed 6-month assessments, and 170 (85%) completed 12-month assessments, without differential attrition. Participants attended 14.5 of 24 sessions over 6 months. Intent-to-treat analyses revealed that intervention participants lost 4.4 kg more than control participants from baseline to 6 months (95% CI=-6.96 kg to -1.78 kg) and 2.6 kg more than control participants from baseline to 12 months (95% CI=-5.14 kg to -0.07 kg). At 12 months, fasting glucose levels in the control group had increased from 106.0 mg/dL to 109.5 mg/dL and decreased in the intervention group from 106.3 mg/dL to 100.4 mg/dL. No serious adverse events were study-related; medical hospitalizations were reduced in the intervention group (6.7%) compared with the control group (18.8%). Individuals taking antipsychotic medications can lose

  1. Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE - CTN 0037: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris David W

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need for novel approaches to the treatment of stimulant abuse and dependence. Clinical data examining the use of exercise as a treatment for the abuse of nicotine, alcohol, and other substances suggest that exercise may be a beneficial treatment for stimulant abuse, with direct effects on decreased use and craving. In addition, exercise has the potential to improve other health domains that may be adversely affected by stimulant use or its treatment, such as sleep disturbance, cognitive function, mood, weight gain, quality of life, and anhedonia, since it has been shown to improve many of these domains in a number of other clinical disorders. Furthermore, neurobiological evidence provides plausible mechanisms by which exercise could positively affect treatment outcomes. The current manuscript presents the rationale, design considerations, and study design of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA Clinical Trials Network (CTN CTN-0037 Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE study. Methods/Design STRIDE is a multisite randomized clinical trial that compares exercise to health education as potential treatments for stimulant abuse or dependence. This study will evaluate individuals diagnosed with stimulant abuse or dependence who are receiving treatment in a residential setting. Three hundred and thirty eligible and interested participants who provide informed consent will be randomized to one of two treatment arms: Vigorous Intensity High Dose Exercise Augmentation (DEI or Health Education Intervention Augmentation (HEI. Both groups will receive TAU (i.e., usual care. The treatment arms are structured such that the quantity of visits is similar to allow for equivalent contact between groups. In both arms, participants will begin with supervised sessions 3 times per week during the 12-week acute phase of the study. Supervised sessions will be conducted as one-on-one (i.e., individual sessions

  2. Endüstride Su Güvenliği, Dezenfeksiyon ve Sanitasyonu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayla ÜNVER

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gelişmekte olan ülkelerde, her yıl suyla bulaşan hastalıklar yüzünden milyonlarca kişi ölmekte, milyarlarca kişi de hasta olmaktadır. Dünya nüfusunun artması sonucu, içme ve kullanma suyu ihtiyacı hızla artmıştır. Ayrıca çevre kirliliği su kaynaklarında kirlenmeye sebep olmuştur. Su endüstride en çok kullanılan hammaddelerden biridir. Su kalitesi standartları ülke yönetimleri ve uluslararası standartlarca belirlenir. Suyun saflaştırılması; istenmeyen kimyasalların, diğer materyallerin ve biyolojik kontaminantların sudan uzaklaştırılması prosesidir. Su saflaştırma, sağlıklı dağıtım sistemleri, su dezenfeksiyon prosesleri, medikal, gıda sektörü, kimyasal ve endüstriyel uygulamalar için önemli gerekliliklerdir.

  3. Effects of stride frequency and foot position at landing on braking force, hip torque, impact peak force and the metabolic cost of running in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Daniel E; Warrener, Anna G; Wang, Justin; Castillo, Eric R

    2015-11-01

    Endurance runners are often advised to use 90 strides min(-1), but how optimal is this stride frequency and why? Endurance runners are also often advised to maintain short strides and avoid landing with the feet too far in front of their hips or knees (colloquially termed 'overstriding'), but how do different kinematic strategies for varying stride length at the same stride frequency affect economy and impact peaks? Linear mixed models were used to analyze repeated measures of stride frequency, the anteroposterior position of the foot at landing, V̇O2 , lower extremity kinematics and vertical ground reaction forces in 14 runners who varied substantially in height and body mass and who were asked to run at 75, 80, 85, 90 and 95 strides min(-1) at 3.0 m s(-1). For every increase of 5 strides min(-1), maximum hip flexor moments in the sagittal plane increased by 5.8% (Pbraking forces were associated with increases in foot landing position relative to the hip (P=0.0005) but not the knee (P=0.54); increases in foot landing position relative to the knee were associated with higher magnitudes (Pbraking forces versus maximum hip flexor moments during swing. The results suggest that runners may benefit from a stride frequency of approximately 85 strides min(-1) and by landing at the end of swing phase with a relatively vertical tibia. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Beliefs and perceptions about Acquired Immunodeficieny Syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acquired Immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has assumed a disease of epidemic dimension both in Nigeria's rural and urban communities. Different people have varying knowledge and beliefs about this disease. This study was designed to assess the beliefs and perceptions of the people of Ihugh community in that ...

  5. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  6. The operational implications of donor behaviors following enrollment in STRIDE (Strategies to Reduce Iron Deficiency in blood donors).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Ritchard G; Birch, Rebecca J; Spencer, Bryan R; Wright, David J; Bialkowski, Walter; Kiss, Joseph E; Rios, Jorge; Bryant, Barbara J; Mast, Alan E

    2017-10-01

    Donor behaviors in STRIDE (Strategies to Reduce Iron Deficiency), a trial to reduce iron deficiency, were examined. Six hundred ninety-two frequent donors were randomized to receive either 19 or 38 mg iron for 60 days or an educational letter based on their predonation ferritin. Compliance with assigned pills, response to written recommendations, change in donation frequency, and future willingness to take iron supplements were examined. Donors who were randomized to receive iron pills had increased red blood cell donations and decreased hemoglobin deferrals compared with controls or with pre-STRIDE donations. Donors who were randomized to receive educational letters had fewer hemoglobin deferrals compared with controls. Of those who received a letter advising of low ferritin levels with recommendations to take iron supplements or delay future donations, 57% reported that they initiated iron supplementation, which was five times as many as those who received letters lacking a specific recommendation. The proportion reporting delayed donation was not statistically different (32% vs. 20%). Of donors who were assigned pills, 58% reported taking them "frequently," and forgetting was the primary reason for non-compliance. Approximately 80% of participants indicated that they would take iron supplements if provided by the center. Donors who were assigned iron pills had acceptable compliance, producing increased red blood cell donations and decreased low hemoglobin deferrals compared with controls or with pre-STRIDE rates. The majority of donors assigned to an educational letter took action after receiving a low ferritin result, with more donors choosing to take iron than delay donation. Providing donors with information on iron status with personalized recommendations was an effective alternative to directly providing iron supplements. © 2017 AABB.

  7. Pneumonia - children - community acquired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchopneumonia - children; Community-acquired pneumonia - children; CAP - children ... Viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia in infants and children. Ways your child can get CAP include: Bacteria and viruses living in the nose, sinuses, or mouth may spread ...

  8. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for PKD Race, Ethnicity, & Kidney Disease Renal Artery Stenosis Renal Tubular Acidosis Simple Kidney Cysts ... kidneys to develop multiple cysts. Acquired cystic kidney disease occurs in children and adults who have chronic kidney disease (CKD) — ...

  9. Acquired Neurologic Mutism

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1997-01-01

    The behavioral features of four children with acquired neurologic mutism are reported from the Department of Neurology, University Hospital Rotterdam-Dijkzigt, Rotterdam; and Department of Medical Psychology, Ziekenhuis Walcheren, Vlissingen, The Netherlands.

  10. Laboratory-acquired brucellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Knudsen, J.D.; Lebech, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9......Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  11. Laboratory-acquired brucellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Knudsen, J.D.; Lebech, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  12. "Ready to Acquire"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yetton, Philip; Henningsson, Stefan; Bjørn-Andersen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of Danisco (a global food ingredients company) as it followed a growth-by-acquisition business strategy, focusing on how a new CIO built the IT resources to ensure the IT organization was "ready to acquire." We illustrate how these IT capabilities expedited...

  13. Striding Out With Parkinson Disease: Evidence-Based Physical Therapy for Gait Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Clarissa L.; Schenkman, Margaret L.

    2010-01-01

    Although Parkinson disease (PD) is common throughout the world, the evidence for physical therapy interventions that enable long-term improvement in walking is still emerging. This article critiques the major physical therapy approaches related to gait rehabilitation in people with PD: compensatory strategies, motor skill learning, management of secondary sequelae, and education to optimize physical activity and reduce falls. The emphasis of this review is on gait specifically, although balance and falls are of direct importance to gait and are addressed in that context. Although the researchers who have provided the evidence for these approaches grounded their studies on different theoretical paradigms, each approach is argued to have a valid place in the comprehensive management of PD generally and of gait in particular. The optimal mix of interventions for each individual varies according to the stage of disease progression and the patient's preferred form of exercise, capacity for learning, and age. PMID:20022998

  14. Striding out with Parkinson disease: evidence-based physical therapy for gait disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Meg E; Martin, Clarissa L; Schenkman, Margaret L

    2010-02-01

    Although Parkinson disease (PD) is common throughout the world, the evidence for physical therapy interventions that enable long-term improvement in walking is still emerging. This article critiques the major physical therapy approaches related to gait rehabilitation in people with PD: compensatory strategies, motor skill learning, management of secondary sequelae, and education to optimize physical activity and reduce falls. The emphasis of this review is on gait specifically, although balance and falls are of direct importance to gait and are addressed in that context. Although the researchers who have provided the evidence for these approaches grounded their studies on different theoretical paradigms, each approach is argued to have a valid place in the comprehensive management of PD generally and of gait in particular. The optimal mix of interventions for each individual varies according to the stage of disease progression and the patient's preferred form of exercise, capacity for learning, and age.

  15. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACKD)? M any people with chronic kid ney disease develop ACKD, a condition in which the kidneys develop fluid-filled sacs called renal (kidney) cysts. ACKD occurs in children and adults. The cysts are more likely to ...

  16. Acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired hypertirichosis lanuginose developed rapidly in a patient with no detectable malignancy. Soft, fine, downy hair growth was noticed on the face, ears, limbs and trunk. Bilaterally symmetrical vitiliginous macules were present on the ear and preauricular region. This case is reported because of its rarity, absence of any detectable malignancy and development of vitiligo, which to our knowledge has not been reported earlier.

  17. Identification of Biomolecular Building Blocks by Recognition Tunneling: Stride towards Nanopore Sequencing of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Suman

    DNA, RNA and Protein are three pivotal biomolecules in human and other organisms, playing decisive roles in functionality, appearance, diseases development and other physiological phenomena. Hence, sequencing of these biomolecules acquires the prime interest in the scientific community. Single molecular identification of their building blocks can be done by a technique called Recognition Tunneling (RT) based on Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM). A single layer of specially designed recognition molecule is attached to the STM electrodes, which trap the targeted molecules (DNA nucleoside monophosphates, RNA nucleoside monophosphates or amino acids) inside the STM nanogap. Depending on their different binding interactions with the recognition molecules, the analyte molecules generate stochastic signal trains accommodating their "electronic fingerprints". Signal features are used to detect the molecules using a machine learning algorithm and different molecules can be identified with significantly high accuracy. This, in turn, paves the way for rapid, economical nanopore sequencing platform, overcoming the drawbacks of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques. To read DNA nucleotides with high accuracy in an STM tunnel junction a series of nitrogen-based heterocycles were designed and examined to check their capabilities to interact with naturally occurring DNA nucleotides by hydrogen bonding in the tunnel junction. These recognition molecules are Benzimidazole, Imidazole, Triazole and Pyrrole. Benzimidazole proved to be best among them showing DNA nucleotide classification accuracy close to 99%. Also, Imidazole reader can read an abasic monophosphate (AP), a product from depurination or depyrimidination that occurs 10,000 times per human cell per day. In another study, I have investigated a new universal reader, 1-(2-mercaptoethyl)pyrene (Pyrene reader) based on stacking interactions, which should be more specific to the canonical DNA nucleosides. In addition

  18. Walking training with cueing of cadence improves walking speed and stride length after stroke more than walking training alone: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Lucas R; de Oliveira, Camila Quel; Ada, Louise; Michaelsen, Stella M; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F

    2015-01-01

    After stroke, is walking training with cueing of cadence superior to walking training alone in improving walking speed, stride length, cadence and symmetry? Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised or controlled trials. Adults who have had a stroke. Walking training with cueing of cadence. Four walking outcomes were of interest: walking speed, stride length, cadence and symmetry. This review included seven trials involving 211 participants. Because one trial caused substantial statistical heterogeneity, meta-analyses were conducted with and without this trial. Walking training with cueing of cadence improved walking speed by 0.23 m/s (95% CI 0.18 to 0.27, I(2)=0%), stride length by 0.21 m (95% CI 0.14 to 0.28, I(2)=18%), cadence by 19 steps/minute (95% CI 14 to 23, I(2)=40%), and symmetry by 15% (95% CI 3 to 26, random effects) more than walking training alone. This review provides evidence that walking training with cueing of cadence improves walking speed and stride length more than walking training alone. It may also produce benefits in terms of cadence and symmetry of walking. The evidence appears strong enough to recommend the addition of 30 minutes of cueing of cadence to walking training, four times a week for 4 weeks, in order to improve walking in moderately disabled individuals with stroke. PROSPERO (CRD42013005873). Copyright © 2014 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Acquired epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Sucar Batista

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa is a group of diseases or skin disorders genetically transmitted and it is characterized by the appearance of bullae, ulcers and skin wounds. It usually appears at birth or in the first months of life. This is a case of a 72-year-old female patient who comes to the dermatology department with skin lesions of 6 months of evolution. A skin biopsy was performed, taking a sample for direct and indirect immunofluorescence. Acquired epidermolysis bullosa of unknown etiology was diagnosed. Treatment was started with low-dose colchicine to increase it later, according to the patient’s tolerance and disease progression.

  20. The acquired hyperostosis syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dihlmann, W.; Hering, L.; Bargon, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    Sterno-costo-clavicular hyperostosis (SCCH) is the most common manifestation of a syndrome, consisting of increased bone metabolism, mostly new bone formation and heterotopic ossification of fibrous tissue, which we have characterised as the acquired hyperostosis syndrome. In part I we discuss the terminology, radiological appearances, scintigraphy, clinical and laboratory findings, bacteriology, histology, nosology, complications, treatment and differential diagnosis of SCCH. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is regarded as a phaenotype of SCCH, depending on the age. CRMO occurs in children, adolescents and young adults, SCCH predominantly in middleaged and elderly adults. (orig.) [de

  1. Recommended number of strides for automatic assessment of gait symmetry and regularity in above-knee amputees by means of accelerometry and autocorrelation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tura Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symmetry and regularity of gait are essential outcomes of gait retraining programs, especially in lower-limb amputees. This study aims presenting an algorithm to automatically compute symmetry and regularity indices, and assessing the minimum number of strides for appropriate evaluation of gait symmetry and regularity through autocorrelation of acceleration signals. Methods Ten transfemoral amputees (AMP and ten control subjects (CTRL were studied. Subjects wore an accelerometer and were asked to walk for 70 m at their natural speed (twice. Reference values of step and stride regularity indices (Ad1 and Ad2 were obtained by autocorrelation analysis of the vertical and antero-posterior acceleration signals, excluding initial and final strides. The Ad1 and Ad2 coefficients were then computed at different stages by analyzing increasing portions of the signals (considering both the signals cleaned by initial and final strides, and the whole signals. At each stage, the difference between Ad1 and Ad2 values and the corresponding reference values were compared with the minimum detectable difference, MDD, of the index. If that difference was less than MDD, it was assumed that the portion of signal used in the analysis was of sufficient length to allow reliable estimation of the autocorrelation coefficient. Results All Ad1 and Ad2 indices were lower in AMP than in CTRL (P Conclusions Without the need to identify and eliminate the phases of gait initiation and termination, twenty strides can provide a reasonable amount of information to reliably estimate gait regularity in transfemoral amputees.

  2. Validation of distal limb mounted inertial measurement unit sensors for stride detection in Warmblood horses at walk and trot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragança, F M; Bosch, S; Voskamp, J P; Marin-Perianu, M; Van der Zwaag, B J; Vernooij, J C M; van Weeren, P R; Back, W

    2017-07-01

    Inertial measurement unit (IMU) sensor-based techniques are becoming more popular in horses as a tool for objective locomotor assessment. To describe, evaluate and validate a method of stride detection and quantification at walk and trot using distal limb mounted IMU sensors. Prospective validation study comparing IMU sensors and motion capture with force plate data. A total of seven Warmblood horses equipped with metacarpal/metatarsal IMU sensors and reflective markers for motion capture were hand walked and trotted over a force plate. Using four custom built algorithms hoof-on/hoof-off timing over the force plate were calculated for each trial from the IMU data. Accuracy of the computed parameters was calculated as the mean difference in milliseconds between the IMU or motion capture generated data and the data from the force plate, precision as the s.d. of these differences and percentage of error with accuracy of the calculated parameter as a percentage of the force plate stance duration. Accuracy, precision and percentage of error of the best performing IMU algorithm for stance duration at walk were 28.5, 31.6 ms and 3.7% for the forelimbs and -5.5, 20.1 ms and -0.8% for the hindlimbs, respectively. At trot the best performing algorithm achieved accuracy, precision and percentage of error of -27.6/8.8 ms/-8.4% for the forelimbs and 6.3/33.5 ms/9.1% for the hindlimbs. The described algorithms have not been assessed on different surfaces. Inertial measurement unit technology can be used to determine temporal kinematic stride variables at walk and trot justifying its use in gait and performance analysis. However, precision of the method may not be sufficient to detect all possible lameness-related changes. These data seem promising enough to warrant further research to evaluate whether this approach will be useful for appraising the majority of clinically relevant gait changes encountered in practice. © 2016 The Authors. Equine Veterinary Journal published by

  3. Learning-by-Being-Acquired

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Massimo Gaetano; Moreira, Solon; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    2016-01-01

    of new teams with both inventors of the acquiring and acquired firms-and assess the impact of this integration action in the period that immediately follows the acquisition. Drawing on social identity and self-categorization theories, we argue that R&D team reorganization increases the acquired inventors......’ use of the prior stock of technological knowledge of the acquiring firm after the acquisition. Furthermore, this effect is enhanced if the focal acquired inventor has high relative innovation ability but is weakened for acquired inventors with high ingroup collaborative strength. We construct a sample...

  4. Learning-By-Being-Acquired

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Massimo G.; Moreira, Solon; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    In this paper we study post-acquisition integration in terms of R&D team reorganization—i.e., the creation of new teams with both inventors of the acquiring and acquired firms—and assess its impact on knowledge transfer in the period that follows the acquisition. Drawing on social identity and self......-categorization theories, we argue that R&D team reorganization increases the acquired inventors’ use of the prior stock of technological knowledge of the acquiring firm after the acquisition. Furthermore, this effect is enhanced if acquired inventors have higher innovation ability relative to their acquiring peers...

  5. Observations on the State of Indigenous Human Rights in Light of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultural Survival, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Since the 1996 Peace Accords ended the Guatemalan civil war, the country has made strides to legally recognize the rights of its indigenous peoples and has criminalized racial discrimination. However, political exclusion, discrimination, and economic marginalization of indigenous peoples still regularly occur due to the lack of resources and…

  6. The Effect of the Accelerometer Operating Range on Biomechanical Parameters: Stride Length, Velocity, and Peak Tibial Acceleration during Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Mitschke

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have used accelerometers with various operating ranges (ORs when measuring biomechanical parameters. However, it is still unclear whether ORs influence the accuracy of running parameters, and whether the different stiffnesses of footwear midsoles influence this accuracy. The purpose of the present study was to systematically investigate the influence of OR on the accuracy of stride length, running velocity, and on peak tibial acceleration. Twenty-one recreational heel strike runners ran on a 15-m indoor track at self-selected running speeds in three footwear conditions (low to high midsole stiffness. Runners were equipped with an inertial measurement unit (IMU affixed to the heel cup of the right shoe and with a uniaxial accelerometer at the right tibia. Accelerometers (at the tibia and included in the IMU with a high OR of ±70 g were used as the reference and the data were cut at ±32, ±16, and at ±8 g in post-processing, before calculating parameters. The results show that the OR influenced the outcomes of all investigated parameters, which were not influenced by tested footwear conditions. The lower ORs were associated with an underestimation error for all biomechanical parameters, which increased noticeably with a decreasing OR. It can be concluded that accelerometers with a minimum OR of ±32 g should be used to avoid inaccurate measurements.

  7. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiere, H A; Niederman, M S

    1998-11-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in all age groups, especially the elderly, which is a patient population that continues to grow. Recently the spectrum and clinical picture of pneumonia has been changing as a reflection of this aging population; this requires a reassessment of and a new approach to the patient with pneumonia. Currently, pneumonia patients are classified as having either community-acquired or hospital-acquired infection rather than typical versus atypical. Patients who have CAP are categorized by age, presence of a coexisting medical illness, and the severity of the pneumonia. The rationale behind categorizing patients is to stratify them in terms of mortality risk to help determine the location of therapy (e.g., outpatient, inpatient, intensive care unit) and focus the choice of initial antimicrobial therapy. Once the decision to hospitalize a patient with pneumonia is made, the next step is to decide on an appropriate diagnostic evaluation and antibiotic therapy. Both decisions have evolved over the last several years since the publication of the American Thoracic Society's CAP guidelines. The current approach to the diagnostic work-up of pneumonia stresses a limited role of diagnostic tests and procedures. The antimicrobial regimen has now evolved into one that is empiric in nature and based on the age of the patient, the presence of coexisting medical disease, and the overall severity of the pneumonia. This process is a dynamic once because bacterial resistance to commonly used antibiotics can further complicate the course of pneumonia therapy, but the impact of resistance on outcome is less clear. Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to penicillin is a prime example of this growing problem, and adjustment to pneumonia therapy may be required. A difficult but not uncommon problem in pneumonia patients is slow recovery and delayed resolution of radiographic infiltrates. Factors that impact

  8. Pediatric acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodack, Marie I

    2010-10-01

    Although pediatric patients are sometimes included in studies about visual problems in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI), few studies deal solely with children. Unlike studies dealing with adult patients, in which mechanisms of brain injury are divided into cerebral vascular accident (CVA) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), studies on pediatric patients deal almost exclusively with traumatic brain injury, specifically caused by accidents. Here we report on the vision problems of 4 pediatric patients, ages 3 to 18 years, who were examined in the ophthalmology/optometry clinic at a children's hospital. All patients had an internally caused brain injury and after the initial insult manifested problems in at least one of the following areas: acuity, binocularity, motility (tracking or saccades), accommodation, visual fields, and visual perceptual skills. Pediatric patients can suffer from a variety of oculo-visual problems after the onset of head injury. These patients may or may not be symptomatic and can benefit from optometric intervention. Copyright © 2010 American Optometric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Intercontrole acquiring by Framatome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Framatome group, as the worldwide leader in nuclear power plant construction, has reinforced his competences in nuclear services thanks to the acquiring of the Intercontrole company, specialized in non-destructive testing in nuclear and industrial environments. After a presentation of the functioning principle and of the safety aspects of a PWR reactor, this press dossier presents in a first part the role of nuclear services and in particular of non-destructive testing in nuclear power plants (in-service inspection, regulatory aspects, testing processes). This part is illustrated with some examples of inspection performed on some components of the primary coolant loop (steam generators, reactor vessel, pressurizer, pipes, primary pumps). A second part presents the technical centres and units of Framatome in charge of performing non-destructive inspections, while a third part describes the industrial policy and strategy of the group in this domain (market of nuclear park maintenance in France, in the USA and worldwide, creation of the 'inspection and control' centre of Framatome). A last part presents the activities of the Intercontrole company and of its daughter companies with some examples of actions realized in the nuclear and natural gas domains. (J.S.)

  10. Acquiring specific interpreting competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Zidar Forte

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In postgraduate interpreter training, the main objective of the course is to help trainees develop various competences, from linguistic, textual and cultural competence, to professional and specific interpreting competence. For simultaneous interpreting (SI, the main focus is on mastering the SI technique and strategies as well as on developing and strengthening communicative skills, which is discussed and illustrated with examples in the present paper. First, a brief overview is given of all the necessary competences of a professional interpreter with greater emphasis on specific interpreting competence for SI. In the second part of the paper, various approaches are described in terms of acquiring specific skills and strategies, specifically through a range of exercises. Besides interpreting entire speeches, practical courses should also consist of targeted exercises, which help trainees develop suitable coping strategies and mechanisms (later on almost automatisms, while at the same time "force" them to reflect on their individual learning process and interpreting performance. This provides a solid base on which trained interpreters can progress and develop their skills also after joining the professional sphere.

  11. Assessing Stride Variables and Vertical Stiffness with GPS-Embedded Accelerometers: Preliminary Insights for the Monitoring of Neuromuscular Fatigue on the Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Buchheit, Andrew Gray, Jean-Benoit Morin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the ability of a GPS-imbedded accelerometer to assess stride variables and vertical stiffness (K, which are directly related to neuromuscular fatigue during field-based high-intensity runs. The ability to detect stride imbalances was also examined. A team sport player performed a series of 30-s runs on an instrumented treadmill (6 runs at 10, 17 and 24 km·h-1 with or without his right ankle taped (aimed at creating a stride imbalance, while wearing on his back a commercially-available GPS unit with an embedded 100-Hz tri-axial accelerometer. Contact (CT and flying (FT time, and K were computed from both treadmill and accelerometers (Athletic Data Innovations data. The agreement between treadmill (criterion measure and accelerometer-derived data was examined. We also compared the ability of the different systems to detect the stride imbalance. Biases were small (CT and K and moderate (FT. The typical error of the estimate was trivial (CT, small (K and moderate (FT, with nearly perfect (CT and K and large (FT correlations for treadmill vs. accelerometer. The tape induced very large increase in the right - left foot ∆ in CT, FT and K measured by the treadmill. The tape effect on CT and K ∆ measured with the accelerometers were also very large, but of lower magnitude than with the treadmill. The tape effect on accelerometer-derived ∆ FT was unclear. Present data highlight the potential of a GPS-embedded accelerometer to assess CT and K during ground running.

  12. Assessing Stride Variables and Vertical Stiffness with GPS-Embedded Accelerometers: Preliminary Insights for the Monitoring of Neuromuscular Fatigue on the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Martin; Gray, Andrew; Morin, Jean-Benoit

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the ability of a GPS-imbedded accelerometer to assess stride variables and vertical stiffness (K), which are directly related to neuromuscular fatigue during field-based high-intensity runs. The ability to detect stride imbalances was also examined. A team sport player performed a series of 30-s runs on an instrumented treadmill (6 runs at 10, 17 and 24 km·h(-1)) with or without his right ankle taped (aimed at creating a stride imbalance), while wearing on his back a commercially-available GPS unit with an embedded 100-Hz tri-axial accelerometer. Contact (CT) and flying (FT) time, and K were computed from both treadmill and accelerometers (Athletic Data Innovations) data. The agreement between treadmill (criterion measure) and accelerometer-derived data was examined. We also compared the ability of the different systems to detect the stride imbalance. Biases were small (CT and K) and moderate (FT). The typical error of the estimate was trivial (CT), small (K) and moderate (FT), with nearly perfect (CT and K) and large (FT) correlations for treadmill vs. accelerometer. The tape induced very large increase in the right - left foot ∆ in CT, FT and K measured by the treadmill. The tape effect on CT and K ∆ measured with the accelerometers were also very large, but of lower magnitude than with the treadmill. The tape effect on accelerometer-derived ∆ FT was unclear. Present data highlight the potential of a GPS-embedded accelerometer to assess CT and K during ground running. Key pointsGPS-embedded tri-axial accelerometers may be used to assess contact time and vertical stiffness during ground running.These preliminary results open new perspective for the field monitoring of neuromuscular fatigue and performance in run-based sports.

  13. Equal Justice and the Digital Revolution: Using Technology To Meet the Legal Needs of Low-Income People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Julia

    This report describes one group of nonprofit organizations that provide free civil legal assistance to qualifying low-income people. Between 1997-2001, legal services programs made significant strides in using technology to improve services. In the mid-1990s, they began using new technologies on an increasingly regular basis. However, few had…

  14. Automated stride assistance device improved the gait parameters and energy cost during walking of healthy middle-aged females but not those of young controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Risa; Matsumoto, Hiromi; Ueki, Masaru; Uehara, Kazutake; Nozawa, Nobuko; Osaki, Mari; Hagino, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of an automated stride assistance device on gait parameters and energy cost during walking performed by healthy middle-aged and young females. [Subjects and Methods] Ten middle-aged females and 10 young females were recruited as case and control participants, respectively. The participants walked for 3 minutes continuously under two different experimental conditions: with the device and without the device. Walking distance, mean walking speed, mean step length, cadence, walk ratio and the physiological cost index during the 3-minutes walk were measured. [Results] When walking with the stride assistance device, the step length and walk ratio of the middle-aged group were significantly higher than without it. Also, during walking without assistance from the device, the physiological cost index of the middle-aged group significantly increased; whereas during walking with assistance, there was no change. The intergroup comparison in the middle-aged group showed the physiological cost index was lower under the experimental condition with assistance provided, as opposed to the condition without the provision of assistance. [Conclusion] The results of this study show that the stride assistance device improved the gait parameters of the middle-aged group but not those of young controls. PMID:28174452

  15. Partial body weight support treadmill training speed influences paretic and non-paretic leg muscle activation, stride characteristics, and ratings of perceived exertion during acute stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnfield, Judith M; Buster, Thad W; Goldman, Amy J; Corbridge, Laura M; Harper-Hanigan, Kellee

    2016-06-01

    Intensive task-specific training is promoted as one approach for facilitating neural plastic brain changes and associated motor behavior gains following neurologic injury. Partial body weight support treadmill training (PBWSTT), is one task-specific approach frequently used to improve walking during the acute period of stroke recovery (training parameters and physiologic demands during this early recovery phase. To examine the impact of four walking speeds on stride characteristics, lower extremity muscle demands (both paretic and non-paretic), Borg ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and blood pressure. A prospective, repeated measures design was used. Ten inpatients post unilateral stroke participated. Following three familiarization sessions, participants engaged in PBWSTT at four predetermined speeds (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0mph) while bilateral electromyographic and stride characteristic data were recorded. RPE was evaluated immediately following each trial. Stride length, cadence, and paretic single limb support increased with faster walking speeds (p⩽0.001), while non-paretic single limb support remained nearly constant. Faster walking resulted in greater peak and mean muscle activation in the paretic medial hamstrings, vastus lateralis and medial gastrocnemius, and non-paretic medial gastrocnemius (p⩽0.001). RPE also was greatest at the fastest compared to two slowest speeds (ptraining at the slowest speeds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Most suitable mother wavelet for the analysis of fractal properties of stride interval time series via the average wavelet coefficient method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenwei; VanSwearingen, Jessie; Brach, Jennifer S; Perera, Subashan; Sejdić, Ervin

    2017-01-01

    Human gait is a complex interaction of many nonlinear systems and stride intervals exhibiting self-similarity over long time scales that can be modeled as a fractal process. The scaling exponent represents the fractal degree and can be interpreted as a "biomarker" of relative diseases. The previous study showed that the average wavelet method provides the most accurate results to estimate this scaling exponent when applied to stride interval time series. The purpose of this paper is to determine the most suitable mother wavelet for the average wavelet method. This paper presents a comparative numerical analysis of 16 mother wavelets using simulated and real fractal signals. Simulated fractal signals were generated under varying signal lengths and scaling exponents that indicate a range of physiologically conceivable fractal signals. The five candidates were chosen due to their good performance on the mean square error test for both short and long signals. Next, we comparatively analyzed these five mother wavelets for physiologically relevant stride time series lengths. Our analysis showed that the symlet 2 mother wavelet provides a low mean square error and low variance for long time intervals and relatively low errors for short signal lengths. It can be considered as the most suitable mother function without the burden of considering the signal length. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Active citizenship and acquired neurological communication difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Bennett, Amanda; Cairney, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    People with communication impairments may face barriers to civic participation, with resulting marginalisation of individuals who wish to be actively involved. The investigation aimed to explore the experience of civically engaged adults with acquired neurological communication difficulties. Six people with acquired neurological communication difficulties were interviewed. Discussion included the definition of active citizenship, their civic involvement, motivations, related barriers and facilitators. Qualitative analysis was undertaken, with data categorised, coded and examined for recurring themes. All participants were active in disability-related organisations and four undertook wider civic roles. Motivations included activity being out with the home and wanting to effect change for themselves and the populations they represented. Disability group meetings were more positive experiences than broader community activities, which were associated with fatigue and frustration, commonly resulting from communication difficulties and unmet support needs. All participants identified a need for professional and public educational about disability and communication and made recommendations on content, methods and priority groups. For these participants civic engagement had positive and negative dimensions. Speech and language therapists should promote reduction of the barriers that impede the active citizenship rights of people with communication support needs. Civic participation may be a relevant measure of outcome in communication impaired populations.

  18. How Do People Get AIDS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español How Do People Get AIDS? KidsHealth / For Teens / How Do People Get AIDS? Print en español ¿Cómo contrae alguien el SIDA? AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome , a disease that ...

  19. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koedel, Uwe; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Wijdicks, Eelco

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and subarachnoid space that can also involve the brain cortex and parenchyma. It can be acquired spontaneously in the community - community-acquired bacterial meningitis - or in the hospital as a complication of invasive procedures or head trauma

  20. Living with acquired dysarthria: the speaker's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walshe, Margaret; Miller, Nick

    2011-01-01

    To explore the speaker's experience of living with acquired chronic dysarthria. Ten people with dysarthria and progressive neurological illness and one person with dysarthria following stroke were interviewed in depth about their experience of living with dysarthria. They covered a range of ages, time post-onset and dysarthria severity levels. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using Framework Method of Analysis. Acquired dysarthria can negatively impact on speakers' lives. Findings here suggest that the experience of living with dysarthria is highly individual. There were some common perspectives. Six key themes emerged from interviews: 'dysarthria as only part of the picture', 'communication has changed', 'people treat me differently', 'dysarthria resulting in negative emotions', 'barriers to communication' and 'life is different now. The impact of co-existing physical disability and the need to consider dysarthria in context was emphasised by all participants. Findings re-emphasise the need to consider the individual experience in clinical practice. The findings provide direction for assessment and intervention in the area.

  1. Together We STRIDE: A quasi-experimental trial testing the effectiveness of a multi-level obesity intervention for Hispanic children in rural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Linda K; Rillamas-Sun, Eileen; Bishop, Sonia; Cisneros, Oralia; Holte, Sarah; Thompson, Beti

    2018-04-01

    Hispanic children are disproportionally overweight and obese compared to their non-Hispanic white counterparts in the US. Community-wide, multi-level interventions have been successful to promote healthier nutrition, increased physical activity (PA), and weight loss. Using community-based participatory approach (CBPR) that engages community members in rural Hispanic communities is a promising way to promote behavior change, and ultimately weight loss among Hispanic children. Led by a community-academic partnership, the Together We STRIDE (Strategizing Together Relevant Interventions for Diet and Exercise) aims to test the effectiveness of a community-wide, multi-level intervention to promote healthier diets, increased PA, and weight loss among Hispanic children. The Together We STRIDE is a parallel quasi-experimental trial with a goal of recruiting 900 children aged 8-12 years nested within two communities (one intervention and one comparison). Children will be recruited from their respective elementary schools. Components of the 2-year multi-level intervention include comic books (individual-level), multi-generational nutrition and PA classes (family-level), teacher-led PA breaks and media literacy education (school-level), family nights, a farmer's market and a community PA event (known as ciclovia) at the community-level. Children from the comparison community will receive two newsletters. Height and weight measures will be collected from children in both communities at three time points (baseline, 6-months, and 18-months). The Together We STRIDE study aims to promote healthier diet and increased PA to produce healthy weight among Hispanic children. The use of CBPR approach and the engagement of the community will springboard strategies for intervention' sustainability. Clinical Trials Registration Number: NCT02982759 Retrospectively registered. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acquired ichthyosis with hoffman's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathyanarayana B

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A middle aged man presented with features of acquired ichthyosis with Hoffman's syndrome. Laboratory tests support hypothyodism. Myoedema and hypertrophy of muscles were present. Patient was previously treated for Pellagra.

  3. Acquired ichthyosis with hoffman's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathyanarayana B

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A middle aged man presented with features of acquired ichthyosis with Hoffman's syndrome. Laboratory tests support hypothyodism. Myoedema and hypertrophy of muscles were present. Patient was previously treated for Pellagra.

  4. Amazing Stories: Acquiring and Avoiding Inaccurate Information from Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, David N.; Hinze, Scott R.; Slaten, Daniel G.; Horton, William S.

    2014-01-01

    Authors of fiction need not provide accurate accounts of the world, which might generate concern about the kinds of information people can acquire from narratives. Research has demonstrated that readers liberally encode and rely upon the information provided in fictional stories. To date, materials used to demonstrate these effects have largely…

  5. Socio-demographic psychosocial and clinical characteristics of participants in e-HealthyStrides©: an interactive ehealth program to improve diabetes self-management skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemu, Priscilla E; Quarshie, Alexander Q; Josiah-Willock, R; Ojutalayo, Folake O; Alema-Mensah, Ernest; Ofili, Elizabeth O

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes self-management (DSM) training helps prevent diabetic complications. eHealth approaches may improve its optimal use. The aims were to determine a) acceptability of e-HealthyStrides© (an interactive, Internet-based, patient-driven, diabetes self-management support and social networking program) among Morehouse Community Physicians' Network diabetics; b) efficacy for DSM behavior change c) success factors for use of e-HealthyStrides©. Baseline characteristics of pilot study participants are reported. Of those approached, 13.8% agreed to participate. Among participants, 96% were Black, 77% female; age 56±9.2 years; education: 44% college or higher and 15% less than 12th grade; 92.5% with home computers. Over half (51%) failed the Diabetes Knowledge Test. Nearly half (47%) were at goal A1C; 24% at goal blood pressure; 3% at goal LDL cholesterol level. Median (SD) Diabetes Empowerment Scale score = 3.93 (0.72) but managing psychosocial aspects = 3.89 (0.89) scored lower than other domains. There was low overall confidence for DSM behaviors. Assistance with healthy eating was the most frequently requested service. Requestors were more obese with worse A1C than others. Chronic care delivery scored average with high scores for counseling and problem solving but low scores for care coordination and follow up.

  6. Research staff training in a multisite randomized clinical trial: Methods and recommendations from the Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robrina; Morris, David W; Greer, Tracy L; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2014-01-01

    Descriptions of and recommendations for meeting the challenges of training research staff for multisite studies are limited despite the recognized importance of training on trial outcomes. The STRIDE (STimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise) study is a multisite randomized clinical trial that was conducted at nine addiction treatment programs across the United States within the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) and evaluated the addition of exercise to addiction treatment as usual (TAU), compared to health education added to TAU, for individuals with stimulant abuse or dependence. Research staff administered a variety of measures that required a range of interviewing, technical, and clinical skills. In order to address the absence of information on how research staff are trained for multisite clinical studies, the current manuscript describes the conceptual process of training and certifying research assistants for STRIDE. Training was conducted using a three-stage process to allow staff sufficient time for distributive learning, practice, and calibration leading up to implementation of this complex study. Training was successfully implemented with staff across nine sites. Staff demonstrated evidence of study and procedural knowledge via quizzes and skill demonstration on six measures requiring certification. Overall, while the majority of staff had little to no experience in the six measures, all research assistants demonstrated ability to correctly and reliably administer the measures throughout the study. Practical recommendations are provided for training research staff and are particularly applicable to the challenges encountered with large, multisite trials.

  7. Understanding "people" people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Timothy; Waldroop, James

    2004-06-01

    Nearly all areas of business--not just sales and human resources--call for interpersonal savvy. Relational know-how comprises a greater variety of aptitudes than many executives think. Some people can "talk a dog off a meat truck," as the saying goes. Others are great at resolving interpersonal conflicts. Some have a knack for translating high-level concepts for the masses. And others thrive when they're managing a team. Since people do their best work when it most closely matches their interests, the authors contend, managers can increase productivity by taking into account employees' relational interests and skills when making personnel choices and project assignments. After analyzing psychological tests of more than 7,000 business professionals, the authors have identified four dimensions of relational work: influence, interpersonal facilitation, relational creativity, and team leadership. This article explains each one and offers practical advice to managers--how to build a well-balanced team, for instance, and how to gauge the relational skills of potential employees during interviews. To determine whether a job candidate excels in, say, relational creativity, ask her to describe her favorite advertising campaign, slogan, or image and tell you why she finds it to be so effective. Understanding these four dimensions will help you get optimal performance from your employees, appropriately reward their work, and assist them in setting career goals. It will also help you make better choices when it comes to your own career development. To get started, try the authors' free online assessment tool, which will measure both your orientation toward relational work in general and your interest level in each of its four dimensions.

  8. Acquiring taste in home economics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbak Larsen, Christian

    Objective: To explore how home economics was taught in Denmark before the recent Danish school reform, which also revised the objectives and content of home economics, naming it Food Knowledge (Madkundskab) Methods: Participant observation was done in home economic lessons in two case schools...... appreciated by the group of boys, and others again learned to stick with their idiosyncrasies when pressured by the teacher. Conclusions: Children were acquiring taste in the home economic lessons, but not only the kind of tastes that the teacher had planned for. This leads to reflections on the very complex...... process of taste acquiring and to a call for further research into taste acquiring in complex real life contexts as home economics lessons....

  9. Functionality predictors in acquired brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas Hoyas, E; Pedrero Pérez, E J; Águila Maturana, A M; García López-Alberca, S; González Alted, C

    2015-01-01

    Most individuals who have survived an acquired brain injury present consequences affecting the sensorimotor, cognitive, affective or behavioural components. These deficits affect the proper performance of daily living activities. The aim of this study is to identify functional differences between individuals with unilateral acquired brain injury using functional independence, capacity, and performance of daily activities. Descriptive cross-sectional design with a sample of 58 people, with right-sided injury (n=14 TBI; n=15 stroke) or left-sided injury (n = 14 TBI, n = 15 stroke), right handed, and with a mean age of 47 years and time since onset of 4 ± 3.65 years. The functional assessment/functional independence measure (FIM/FAM) and the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) were used for the study. The data showed significant differences (P<.000), and a large size effect (dr=0.78) in the cross-sectional estimates, and point to fewer restrictions for patients with a lesion on their right side. The major differences were in the variables 'speaking' and 'receiving spoken messages' (ICF variables), and 'Expression', 'Writing' and 'intelligible speech' (FIM/FAM variables). In the linear regression analysis, the results showed that only 4 FIM/FAM variables, taken together, predict 44% of the ICF variance, which measures the ability of the individual, and up to 52% of the ICF, which measures the individual's performance. Gait alone predicts a 28% of the variance. It seems that individuals with acquired brain injury in the left hemisphere display important differences regarding functional and communication variables. The motor aspects are an important prognostic factor in functional rehabilitation. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Description of spatio-temporal gait parameters in elderly people and their association with history of falls: results of the population-based cross-sectional KORA-Age study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler-Kall, Kathrin; Peters, Annette; Thorand, Barbara; Grill, Eva; Autenrieth, Christine S; Horsch, Alexander; Meisinger, Christa

    2015-03-25

    In this epidemiological study we described the characteristics of spatio-temporal gait parameters among a representative, population-based sample of 890 community-dwelling people aged 65 to 90 years. In addition, we investigated the associations between certain gait parameters and a history of falls in study participants. In descriptive analyses spatio-temporal gait parameters were assessed according to history of falls, frailty, multimorbidity, gender, multiple medication use, disability status, and age group. Logistic regression models were calculated to examine the association between gait velocity and stride length with a history of falls (at least one fall in the last 12 month). Data on gait were collected on an electronic walkway on which participants walked at their usual pace. We found significant differences within gait parameters when stratifying by frailty, multimorbidity, disability and multiple medication use as well as age (cut point 75 years) and sex, with p gait parameters (velocity, cadence, time, stride duration, stride length, step width). After stratification by history of falls, only stride length showed a significant difference (p gait parameters measured during gait assessment on an electronic walkway in elderly people. Furthermore, stride length is a good indicator to differentiate fallers from non-fallers in older men from the general population.

  11. Acquired tracheo-oesophageal fistula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah C

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available Acquired tracheo-oesophageal fistula is rare. The most common causes are tuberculosis and malignancy. Here we report a patient who had come with dysphagia and aspiration pneumonia with paratracheal lymphnodes on X-ray chest and was diagnosed to have a tracheo-bronchial fistula on barium studies. Transtumoral intubation by pull-through method was carried out.

  12. Somatically acquired structural genetic differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magaard Koldby, Kristina; Nygaard, Marianne; Christensen, Kaare

    2016-01-01

    twin pairs. Furthermore, the presence of mosaic structural variants was explored. We identified four mosaic acquired uniparental disomy events on chromosome 4q and 14q in the follow-up samples from four individuals, and our study thereby supports the increasing prevalence of somatic mosaic variants...

  13. Can Tai Chi training impact fractal stride time dynamics, an index of gait health, in older adults? Cross-sectional and randomized trial studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Gow

    Full Text Available To determine if Tai Chi (TC has an impact on long-range correlations and fractal-like scaling in gait stride time dynamics, previously shown to be associated with aging, neurodegenerative disease, and fall risk.Using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA, this study evaluated the impact of TC mind-body exercise training on stride time dynamics assessed during 10 minute bouts of overground walking. A hybrid study design investigated long-term effects of TC via a cross-sectional comparison of 27 TC experts (24.5 ± 11.8 yrs experience and 60 age- and gender matched TC-naïve older adults (50-70 yrs. Shorter-term effects of TC were assessed by randomly allocating TC-naïve participants to either 6 months of TC training or to a waitlist control. The alpha (α long-range scaling coefficient derived from DFA and gait speed were evaluated as outcomes.Cross-sectional comparisons using confounder adjusted linear models suggest that TC experts exhibited significantly greater long-range scaling of gait stride time dynamics compared with TC-naïve adults. Longitudinal random-slopes with shared baseline models accounting for multiple confounders suggest that the effects of shorter-term TC training on gait dynamics were not statistically significant, but trended in the same direction as longer-term effects although effect sizes were very small. In contrast, gait speed was unaffected in both cross-sectional and longitudinal comparisons.These preliminary findings suggest that fractal-like measures of gait health may be sufficiently precise to capture the positive effects of exercise in the form of Tai Chi, thus warranting further investigation. These results motivate larger and longer-duration trials, in both healthy and health-challenged populations, to further evaluate the potential of Tai Chi to restore age-related declines in gait dynamics.The randomized trial component of this study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01340365.

  14. Acquired brain injury services in the Republic of Ireland: experiences and perceptions of families and professionals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, Garret L

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to highlight the experiences and perceptions of rehabilitation services among families of people with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) and among professionals working in ABI rehabilitation services in Ireland.

  15. Occupationally Acquired American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Edileuza Felinto de Brito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two occupationally acquired cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL: one accidental laboratory autoinoculation by contaminated needlestick while handling an ACL lesion sample, and one acquired during field studies on bird biology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays of patient lesions were positive for Leishmania, subgenus Viannia. One isolate was obtained by culture (from patient 2 biopsy samples and characterized as Leishmania (Viannia naiffi through an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA with species-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE. Patients were successfully treated with N-methyl-glucamine. These two cases highlight the potential risks of laboratory and field work and the need to comply with strict biosafety procedures in daily routines. The swab collection method, coupled with PCR detection, has greatly improved ACL laboratory diagnosis.

  16. Universal acquired melanosis (Carbon baby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviarasan P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 3-year-old girl born with fair complexion which became darker. The color change was insidious in onset at the age of 5 months, asymptomatic and progressive involving the entire body surface. Histopathology revealed increased pigmentation of the epidermal basal layer. Universal acquired melanosis is a rare form of hypermelanosis which was synonymously referred to as "Carbon baby". This is a rare presentation with only one earlier case report.

  17. Musicality: instinct or acquired skill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Gary F

    2012-10-01

    Is the human tendency toward musicality better thought of as the product of a specific, evolved instinct or an acquired skill? Developmental and evolutionary arguments are considered, along with issues of domain-specificity. The article also considers the question of why humans might be consistently and intensely drawn to music if musicality is not in fact the product of a specifically evolved instinct. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  18. [Acquired disorders of color vision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascu, Lidia; Balaş, Mihaela

    2002-01-01

    This article is a general view of acquired disorders of color vision. The revision of the best known methods and of the etiopathogenic classification is not very important in ophthalmology but on the other hand, the detection of the blue defect advertise and associated ocular pathology. There is a major interest in serious diseases as multiple sclerosis, AIDS, diabetes melitus, when the first ocular sign can be a defect in the color vision.

  19. Complement's participation in acquired immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2002-01-01

    in which antigen is seen, be it alone or in association with natural or induced antibodies and/or C3-complement fragments. The aim of this review is to describe the present status of our understanding of complement's participation in acquired immunity and the regulation of autoimmune responses........ It is now clear that complement serves as a regulator of several B cell functions, including specific antibody production, antigen uptake, processing and presentation, and shaping of the B cell repertoire. Of key importance, in this respect, is the role played by the B cell-signaling triad consisting...

  20. Acquired Duodenal Obstruction in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Hung Chien

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic intramural hematoma of the duodenum is a rare cause of acquired duodenal obstruction in children, and a high degree of suspicion is therefore required to make an early and accurate diagnosis. We report a 6-year-old boy whose epigastrium was impacted by the handlebar of his bicycle during a traffic accident. The boy then experienced epigastralgia. Six days later, progressive bilious vomiting suggestive of gastrointestinal obstruction was noted. Imaging studies revealed a large hematoma extending from the fourth portion of the duodenum to the jejunum. Conservative methods of treatment failed to manage his condition. He underwent laparoscopic surgery to evacuate the hematoma. We also report a case of duodenal obstruction in a previously healthy 2-year-old girl who presented for the first time with acute symptoms of proximal intestinal obstruction. Contrast examinations showed apparent barium retention over the stomach and proximal duodenum. She underwent surgery due to persistent obstruction, and a mushroom-like foreign body was detected embedded in the orifice of the windsock duodenal web. After duodenoduodenostomy and removal of the bezoar, she had a smooth recovery and tolerated feeding well. We conclude that blunt abdominal trauma and incomplete duodenal obstruction, such as that caused by duodenal web, should be considered as possible causes of acquired proximal gastrointestinal obstruction in previously healthy children, despite their rarity.

  1. WAYS OF ACQUIRING FLYING PHOBIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Bettina; Vriends, Noortje; Margraf, Jürgen; Stieglitz, Rolf-Dieter

    2016-02-01

    The few studies that have explored how flying phobia is acquired have produced contradictory results. We hypothesized that classical conditioning plays a role in acquiring flying phobia and investigated if vicarious (model) learning, informational learning through media, and experiencing stressful life events at the time of onset of phobia also play a role. Thirty patients with flying phobia and thirty healthy controls matched on age, sex, and education were interviewed with the Mini-DIPS, the short German version of the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule (DSM-IV diagnostic criteria) and the Fear-of-Flying History Interview. Fifty Percent of patients with flying phobia and 53% of healthy controls reported frightening events in the air. There was no significant difference between the two samples. Thus there were not more classical conditioning events for patients with flying phobia. There also was no significant difference between the two samples for vicarious (model) learning: 37% of flying phobia patients and 23% of healthy controls felt influenced by model learning. The influence of informational learning through media was significantly higher for the clinical sample (70%) than for the control group (37%). Patients with flying phobia experienced significantly more stressful life events in the period of their frightening flight experience (60%) than healthy controls (19%). Frightening experiences while flying are quite common, but not everybody develops a flying phobia. Stressful life events and other factors might enhance conditionability. Informational learning through negative media reports probably reinforces the development of flying phobia. Clinical implications are discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. People's Education (for People's Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thokozani Mathebula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The central feature of Athenian citizens' rights, that is, people's participation in government, is also enshrined in the South African Constitution. This article argues for the Athenian style of participatory democracy as a viable model of participation in governing South African schools. The author claims that 'people's education', which had its origins in the principles of the Freedom Charter¹ - was diluted during the negotiationsfor South Africa's new democratic government. As a result, the political and educational ideal of 'people's education for 'people's power' has given way to democratic elitism in post-apartheid South African schools.

  3. The effects of isometric trunk exercises and dynamic trunk exercises on gait in elderly people

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Nyeon-Jun; Kim, Ji-Sung; Wang, Joong-San; Park, Joo-Hyun; Choi, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of dynamic trunk exercises and isometric trunk exercises on gait in elderly people. [Subjects] This study randomly allocated 20 elderly people to an isometric trunk exercise group (n=10) and a dynamic trunk exercise group (n=10). The exercises were performed for 30 minutes three times a week for 12 weeks. Gait speed, stride length, cadence, and step width were measured at a normal pace using GAITRite. All groups were evaluated before and af...

  4. The influence of physical activity on body image in people with and without acquired mobility disability [Vliv pohybové aktivity na subjektivní vnímání těla u osob se získaným tělesným postižením a bez něj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziya Koruç

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Body image in people with physical disability is important, but it has received little attention in the research literature. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to determine whether differences exist between adolescents with acquired mobility disability (AMD and those without AMD regarding body image, and whether physical activity influences these differences. METHODS: Fifty-eight adolescents, aged 16 to 18 years, participated in this study. Half the participants had some form of AMD while the other half were healthy. Body image was evaluated with the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ before and after 6 weeks of playing darts. A two-way ANOVA was used to analyse the results. RESULTS: At the end of the study, the healthy adolescents scored significantly higher than the AMD group on the subscales of fitness perception, orientation and overall health perception. No interaction was found between disability and exercise on any subscales of the MBSRQ. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study demonstrate that people with AMD evaluate their health and fitness levels as being lower than healthy adolescents and that they are less concerned with fitness as compared with healthy adolescents. Six weeks of playing darts as a physical activity had no effect on improving the self-perceptions of the AMD group.[VÝCHODISKA: Subjektivní vnímání těla u lidí s tělesným postižením je důležitý aspekt, v odborné literatuře mu však nebylo věnováno příliš pozornosti. CÍLE: Cílem studie bylo stanovit, zda se vyskytují rozdíly mezi adolescenty se získaným tělesným postižením (AMD a adolescenty bez AMD, co se týče subjektivního vnímání těla, a zda tyto rozdíly ovlivňuje pohybová aktivita. METODIKA: Této studie se zúčastnilo padesát osm adolescentů ve věku mezi 16 a 18 lety. Polovina účastníků měla některou z forem AMD, zatímco druhá polovina byla zdravá. Subjektivní vnímání t

  5. Pseudomona pseudomallei community acquired pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severiche, Diego

    1998-01-01

    This is the first published case report en Colombia about pseudomona pseudomallei community acquired pneumonia. This uncommon pathogen is from the epidemiological standpoint a very important one and medical community should be aware to look after it in those patients where no other etiological pathogen is recovered. A brief summary about epidemiology is showed, emphasizing those regions where it can be found. Likewise, comments about the differential diagnosis are important since it should be considered in those patients where tuberculosis is suspected. This is particularly representative for countries with high tuberculosis rates. Furthermore, a microbiological review is shown, emphasizing on isolation techniques, descriptions about therapeutics and other regarding treatment issues according international standards. Finally; a description about the clinical picture, laboratory findings, treatment and evolution of the case reported are shown for discussion

  6. Acquired Functional Asplenia in Sarcoidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Richard W.; McDaniel, Willie R.; Armstrong, Earl M.; Young, Roscoe C.; Higginbotham-Ford, Edith A.

    1985-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a recently identified cause of functional asplenia that can be diagnosed by radionuclide imaging. A 31-year-old woman with a five-year history of histologically compatible sarcoidosis was found to have nonvisualization of the spleen on technetium 99m sulfur colloid (radiopharmaceutical) liver-spleen scan. This scintigraphic finding was accompanied by poikilocytosis and Howell-Jolly bodies in the peripheral blood smear. A subsequent gallium 67 citrate scan reflected an abnormal increase in concentration of activity in the spleen, suggesting an active inflammatory process. Based upon this constellation of findings, it was concluded that acquired functional asplenia is the result of reticuloendothelial cell replacement via infiltration of the spleen by epithelioid cell granulomas of active sarcoidosis. This case also illustrates the reversibility of functional asplenia of sarcoidosis following adrenocorticosteroid therapy. Functional asplenia in sarcoidosis is now found to have a recognizable radionuclide imaging pattern. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:3908697

  7. And the Winner is - Acquired

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henkel, Joachim; Rønde, Thomas; Wagner, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    New entrants to a market tend to be superior to incumbents in originating radical innovations. We provide a new explanation for this phenomenon, based on markets for technology. It applies in industries where successful entrepreneurial firms, or their technologies, are acquired by incumbents...... that then commercialize the innovation. To this end we analyze an innovation game between one incumbent and a large number of entrants. In the first stage, firms compete to develop innovations of high quality. They do so by choosing, at equal cost, the success probability of their R&D approach, where a lower probability...... the incumbent performs the least radical project. Entrants pick pairwise different projects; the bigger the number of entrants, the more radical the most radical project. Generally, entrants tend to choose more radical R&D approaches and generate the highest value innovation in case of success. We illustrate...

  8. Drug abuse and acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Y

    1998-12-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a modern plague. The first sign of the disease was the appearance of Pneumocystis carinii and Kaposi's sarcoma among young homosexual patients. The virus transmission is from an infected individual to a susceptible host through blood-related, sexual, and perinatal routes. Exchange of body fluid occurs when sharing syringes, drugs, and drug paraphernalia. Although the largest number of people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is in subSaharan Africa, the most rapid growth of HIV infection during the 1990s was seen in South-East Asia. Asia showed a steep increase from 1992. Given the experiences in Thailand, India and China, a similar spread of AIDS in other parts of Asia is possible. The risk behaviors that enable the spread of HIV are present in all Pacific Asian countries. Risk behaviors are considered to be the injection of illicit drugs, male patronage of prostitutes, high rates of sexually transmitted diseases, and low condom use.

  9. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costerus, Joost M; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Bijlsma, Merijn W; van de Beek, Diederik

    2017-02-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency and is associated with a high disease burden. We reviewed recent progress in the management of patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis. The worldwide burden of disease of bacterial meningitis remains high, despite the decreasing incidence following introduction of routine vaccination campaigns. Delay in diagnosis and treatment remain major concerns in the management of acute bacterial meningitis. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases guidelines strive for a door-to-antibiotic-time less than 1 h. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has emerged as an important diagnostic tool to identify the causative organism. Point-of-care tests using fast multiplex PCR have been developed, but additional value has not been proven. Although anecdotal observations advocate pressure-based management, a randomized controlled trial will need to be performed first to determine efficacy and safety of such an aggressive treatment approach. Adjunctive dexamethasone remains the only adjunctive therapy with proven efficacy. The incidence of bacterial meningitis has been decreasing after the implementation of effective vaccines. Treatment should be administered as soon as possible and time to treatment should not exceed 1 h.

  10. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. 210.8-06 Section 210.8-06 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Statements of Smaller Reporting Companies § 210.8-06 Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. If...

  11. Executive functions are associated with gait and balance in community-living elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Iersel, Marianne B; Kessels, Roy P C; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Verbeek, André L M; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M

    2008-12-01

    Cognition influences gait and balance in elderly people. Executive functions seem to play a key role in this mechanism. Previous studies used only a single test to probe executive functions, and outcome measures were restricted to gait variables. We extend this prior work by examining the association between two different executive functions and measures of both gait and balance, with and without two different cognitive dual tasks. This is a cross-sectional study with randomly selected community-living elderly people. Executive functions were tested with the Trail Making Test Parts A and B and the Stroop Color Word Test; memory with Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) subtests. Patients walked without and with two dual tasks (subtracting serial sevens and animal naming). Main outcomes focused on gait (velocity, stride length, and stride time variability), measured on an electronic walkway, and balance, measured as trunk movements during walking. Associations were assessed with multiple regression models. One hundred elderly people, with a mean age 80.6 years (range 75-93 years) participated. Both dual tasks decreased gait velocity and increased variability and trunk sway. Executive functions were associated with only stride length variability and mediolateral trunk sway during performance of animal naming as the dual task. Memory was not associated with the gait and balance variables. In community-living elderly people, executive functions are associated with gait and balance impairment during a challenging dual-task condition that also depends on executive integrity. Next steps will be to explore the value of executive functions in defining fall-risk profiles and in fall-prevention interventions for frail patients.

  12. Clinicopathological associations of acquired erythroblastopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunes, Gursel; Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Yasar, Hatime Arzu; Eliacik, Eylem; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Demiroglu, Haluk; Sayinalp, Nilgun; Aksu, Salih; Etgul, Sezgin; Aslan, Tuncay; Goker, Hakan; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Acquired erythroblastopenia (AE) is a rare clinical situation. It is characterized by the reduction of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow together with the low reticulocyte counts in the peripheral blood. Main secondary causes of AE are drugs, Parvovirus B19 and other infectious reasons, lymphoid and myeloid neoplasia, autoimmune diseases, thymoma and pregnancy. The aim of this study is to assess the frequencies and clinical associations of AE via analyzing 12340 bone marrow samples in a retrospective manner. Bone marrow aspirations which were obtained from patients who applied to Hacettepe University Hematology Clinic between 2002 and 2013, were analyzed retrospectively. Thirty four erythroblastopenia cases were found. Patients ranged in age from 16 to 80 years with a median of 38 years. Fifteen patients were men (44%) and nineteen were women (56%). In these patients, detected causes of erythroblastopenia were MDS, idiopathic pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), parvovirus infection, post chemotherapy aplasia, plasma proliferative diseases, copper deficiency due to secondary amyloidosis, fever of unknown origin, hemophagocytic syndrome, enteric fever and legionella pneumonia. We found that between those reasons the most common causes of erythroblastopenia are MDS (17.7%) and idiopathic PRCA (17.7%). As a result, erythroblastopenia in the bone marrow may be an early sign of MDS. In those AE cases possibility of being MDS must be kept in mind as it can be mistaken for PRCA. To conclude, in adults MDS without excess blast is one of the most common causes of erythroblastopenia in clinical practice and in case of erythroblastopenia the presence of MDS should be investigated.

  13. Terrible People

    OpenAIRE

    Chaney, JoAnn

    2014-01-01

    Terrible People is a psychological thriller following several different characters as they hunt for a serial killer. The main protagonist, Samantha Peterson, is a former newspaper reporter who knows that to redeem herself and get back into writing, she must get to the bottom of this new string of murders.

  14. Emergence of community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection: the experience of a French hospital and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Ogielska

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: CDI can cause community-acquired diarrhoea, and CA-CDI may be more severe than HCA-CDI. Prospective studies of CDI involving people from the general community without risk factors are required to confirm this observation.

  15. And the Winner is – Acquired

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henkel, Joachim; Rønde, Thomas; Wagner, Marcus

    value in case of success—that is, a more radical innovation. In the second stage, successful entrants bid to be acquired by the incumbent. We assume that entrants cannot survive on their own, so being acquired amounts to a ‘prize’ in a contest. We identify an equilibrium in which the incumbent chooses...

  16. Acquired Inventors’ Productivity after Horizontal Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Massimo G.; Moreira, Solon; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    Effective integration of the R&D functions of the acquired and acquiring firms is essential for knowledge recombination after acquisition. However, prior research suggests that the post-acquisition integration process often damages the inventive labor force. We argue that an examination of the mu...

  17. Young people and sexual health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klouda, T

    1996-01-01

    Prevention and control of the sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) requires attention to the characteristics of the sexual interactions between people that determine whether or not sex can be protected. These interactions are influenced by a diversity of factors, including gender inequalities, societal norms, power, socioeconomic status, knowledge, and personality. The poor, the marginalized, the young, and many women are at a disadvantage in protecting themselves from sexual exploitation and sexually transmitted diseases. Programs that seek to instill self-confidence and sexual negotiation skills in individuals overlook the pervasive influence of cultural norms. The focus of AIDS prevention programs must shift from the empowerment of individuals to community-wide considerations of sexual health. Finally, any program that seeks to encourage young people to redefine social norms governing their sexual relationships must also reach out to the adults (from parents to community leaders) who wield power over these young people.

  18. Music interventions for acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Wendy L; Clark, Imogen; Tamplin, Jeanette; Bradt, Joke

    2017-01-20

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) can result in impairments in motor function, language, cognition, and sensory processing, and in emotional disturbances, which can severely reduce a survivor's quality of life. Music interventions have been used in rehabilitation to stimulate brain functions involved in movement, cognition, speech, emotions, and sensory perceptions. An update of the systematic review published in 2010 was needed to gauge the efficacy of music interventions in rehabilitation for people with ABI. To assess the effects of music interventions for functional outcomes in people with ABI. We expanded the criteria of our existing review to: 1) examine the efficacy of music interventions in addressing recovery in people with ABI including gait, upper extremity function, communication, mood and emotions, cognitive functioning, social skills, pain, behavioural outcomes, activities of daily living, and adverse events; 2) compare the efficacy of music interventions and standard care with a) standard care alone, b) standard care and placebo treatments, or c) standard care and other therapies; 3) compare the efficacy of different types of music interventions (music therapy delivered by trained music therapists versus music interventions delivered by other professionals). We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (January 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2015, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1946 to June 2015), Embase (1980 to June 2015), CINAHL (1982 to June 2015), PsycINFO (1806 to June 2015), LILACS (1982 to January 2016), and AMED (1985 to June 2015). We handsearched music therapy journals and conference proceedings, searched dissertation and specialist music databases, trials and research registers, reference lists, and contacted relevant experts and music therapy associations to identify unpublished research. We imposed no language restriction. We performed the original search in 2009. We included all randomised controlled trials

  19. Lapses in measures recommended for preventing hospital-acquired infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, P N; Milind, K

    2001-03-01

    This study was carried out in a rural tertiary care referral hospital in central India, to ascertain lapses made by people caring for neonates in measures recommended for preventing hospital-acquired infections. Unobtrusive observation of the healthcare personnel (doctors, nurses, mothers and hospital attendants) during care of the newborn was undertaken. Lapse in handwashing by healthcare personnel was observed around 41% of the time, although mothers practiced their instructions meticulously. Lapses in methods of hand drying were seen around 7-8% of the time, in those who did wash their hands. Gloves were not used around 21% of the time, when they should have been; and of those using gloves, they were unsterile in around 22% cases. At delivery babies were received unhygienically on approximately 67% of occasions observed. Lapses during cord care ranged from 14.2% to 28.6% and during resuscitation from 16.6% to 60% of occasions. An uncleaned stethoscope was used 75% of the time. The practice of putting a finger in the baby's mouth was observed on 18 occasions. Considerable lapses by all, in every measure recommended for the prevention of hospital-acquired infections were observed. It is concluded that nothing other than an individual's commitment is likely to be successful in preventing hospital-acquired infections. Copyright 2001 The Hospital Infection Society.

  20. The effects of isometric trunk exercises and dynamic trunk exercises on gait in elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nyeon-Jun; Kim, Ji-Sung; Wang, Joong-San; Park, Joo-Hyun; Choi, Jung-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of dynamic trunk exercises and isometric trunk exercises on gait in elderly people. [Subjects] This study randomly allocated 20 elderly people to an isometric trunk exercise group (n=10) and a dynamic trunk exercise group (n=10). The exercises were performed for 30 minutes three times a week for 12 weeks. Gait speed, stride length, cadence, and step width were measured at a normal pace using GAITRite. All groups were evaluated before and after 12 weeks. [Results] The isometric exercise group showed a significant change in gait velocity, cadence, and left and right step lengths. The dynamic trunk exercise group showed a significant change in gait velocity, cadence, left and right step lengths, left and right step times, and left and right stride lengths. Moreover, a comparison of the exercise effect between the two groups showed a significant difference in gait velocity. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that isometric trunk exercises and dynamic trunk exercises have a positive effect on gait function in elderly people. In particular, isometric trunk exercises are recommended to promote gait velocity.

  1. Verizon acquired Vodafone: Analysis of market reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Pal Netra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent big tickets in telecom industry include Microsoft acquiring part of Nokia for US$ 7.2 billion, Verizon buying 45% stake in Vodafone for US$130 billion, Google acquiring Motorola for 12.5 billion, and Lenovo acquiring Motorola mobility from Google for US$ 3 billion. These buyouts are analyzed and commented by experts of the industry. This research paper is an attempt to analyze and collate their views with respect to Verizon and Vodafone deal. The analysis includes reasons for buyout, size of the deal, general comments in the media, what is in the deal for Verizon and Vodafone, impact on the eco-system, etc.

  2. Origins and consequences of technology acquirement by independent-living seniors: towards an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, S T M; Luijkx, K G; Vrijhoef, H J M; Nieboer, M E; Aarts, S; van der Voort, C S; Rijnaard, M D; Wouters, E J M

    2017-08-22

    Living independently can be challenging for seniors. Technologies are expected to help older adults age in place, yet little empirical research is available on how seniors develop a need for technologies, how they acquire these technologies, and how these subsequently affect their lives. Aging is complex, dynamic and personal. But how does this translate to seniors' adoption and acceptance of technology? To better understand origins and consequences of technology acquirement by independent-living seniors, an explorative longitudinal qualitative field study was set up. Home visits were made to 33 community-dwelling seniors living in the Netherlands, on three occasions (2012-2014). Semi-structured interviews were conducted on the timeline of acquirements, and people and factors involved in acquirements. Additionally, participants were interviewed on experiences in using technologies since acquirement. Thematic analysis was employed to analyze interview transcripts, using a realist approach to better understand the contexts, mechanisms and outcomes of technology acquirements. Findings were accumulated in a new conceptual model: The Cycle of Technology Acquirement by Independent-Living Seniors (C-TAILS), which provides an integrative perspective on why and how technologies are acquired, and why these may or may not prove to be appropriate and effective, considering an independent-living senior's needs and circumstances at a given point in time. We found that externally driven and purely desire-driven acquirements led to a higher risk of suboptimal use and low levels of need satisfaction. Technology acquirement by independent-living seniors may be best characterized as a heterogeneous process with many different origins, pathways and consequences. Furthermore, technologies that are acquired in ways that are not congruent with seniors' personal needs and circumstances run a higher risk of proving to be ineffective or inappropriate. Yet, these needs and circumstances are

  3. Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In October 2014, CMS began reducing Medicare payments for subsection (d) hospitals that rank in the worst performing quartile with respect to hospital-acquired...

  4. Acquiring New Competencies Through Continuing Library ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , specify core competencies to be acquired by all practicing librarians, that the Nigerian Library Association must take the issue of library continuing education seriously to enable librarians to retain their jobs and global job mobility and that ...

  5. Enhancing Medicares Hospital Acquired Conditions Policy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The current Medicare policy of non-payment to hospitals for Hospital Acquired Conditions (HAC) seeks to avoid payment for preventable complications identified within...

  6. Acquired pure red cell aplasia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata R Dafale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired Pure Red Cell Aplasia (PRCA is a rare occurrence in children.This is a case of an eight year old girl child who developed acquired PRCA secondary to long term intake of sodium Valproate. This case is reported to review the causes of PRCA in children and to reconsider the use of drugs of longer duration in children and adults.

  7. Severity assessment criteria recommended by the British Thoracic Society (BTS) for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and older patients. Should SOAR (systolic blood pressure, oxygenation, age and respiratory rate) criteria be used in older people? A compilation study of two prospective cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Phyo K; Kamath, Ajay V; Vowler, Sarah L; Maisey, David N; Harrison, Brian D W

    2006-05-01

    To assess the usefulness of the British Thoracic Society guidelines for severity assessment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in predicting mortality and to explore alternative criteria which could be more useful in older patients. Compilation study of two prospective observational cohorts. A University hospital in Norfolk, UK with a catchment population of 568,000. Subjects were 195 patients (median age = 77 years) who were included in two prospective studies of CAP. All-cause mortality occurring within the 6 week follow-up. sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for study outcome using CURB and CURB-65 were assessed in 189 patients, and CRB-65 in 192 patients out of a total of 195 patients. Our results were comparable with the original study by Lim et al. Although CURB-65 and CRB-65 included age criteria, in effect they did not materially improve the specificity in predicting high-risk patients in both studies. We found that oxygenation measured by ventilation perfusion mismatch (PaO2:FiO2) was the best predictor of outcome in this slightly older cohort [odds ratio (OR) = 0.99 (0.98-0.99), P = 0.0001]. We derived a new set of criteria; SOAR (systolic blood pressure, oxygenation, age and respiratory rate) based on our findings. Their sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 81.0% (58.1-94.6), 59.3% (49.6-68.4), 27.0% (16.6-39.7) and 94.4% (86.2-98.4), respectively, confirming their comparability with existing criteria. Our Study confirms the usefulness of currently recommended severity rules for CAP in this older cohort. SOAR criteria may be useful as alternative criteria for a better identification of severe CAP in advanced age where both raised urea level above 7 mmol/l and confusion are common.

  8. Thinking Allowed: Use of Egocentric Speech after Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Sian A.; Skidmore, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the use of thinking aloud made by young people who have sustained a severe acquired brain injury (ABI). The phenomenon is compared with the concepts of egocentric speech and inner speech before the form of thinking aloud by pupils with ABI is examined. It is suggested that by using thinking aloud, this group of pupils is able…

  9. The Personal Touch: A Guide to Acquiring Power within a College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simplicio, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    There are two main avenues for acquiring power. The first is rooted in the job position. Being the boss means people have to listen to what you say, or pay the consequences. Unfortunately, becoming the boss can take years of hard work. There is also no guarantee that such hard work will be rewarded with promotions and career advancements. In…

  10. Evaluation of a Computer-Based Revision Prompting Intervention for Undergraduate Writers with Acquired Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Alexander K.

    2017-01-01

    People with acquired brain injury (ABI) present with impairments in working memory and executive functions, and these cognitive deficits contribute to difficulty self-regulating the production of expository writing. Cognitive processes involved in carrying out complex writing tasks include planning, generating text, and reviewing or revising text…

  11. The role of disability self-concept in adaptation to congenital or acquired disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Kathleen R

    2014-02-01

    Current theories of adaptation to disability do not address differences in adaptation to congenital or acquired disability. Although people with congenital disabilities are generally assumed to be better adapted than people with acquired disabilities, few studies have tested this, and even fewer have attempted to explain the mechanisms behind these differences. This study tested the proposition that whether a disability is congenital or acquired plays an important role in the development of the disability self-concept (consisting of disability identity and disability self-efficacy), which in turn, affects satisfaction with life. It was predicted that disability self-concept would be better developed among people with congenital, compared with acquired disabilities, predicting greater satisfaction with life in those with acquired conditions. 226 participants with congenital and acquired mobility disabilities completed a cross-sectional online questionnaire measuring satisfaction with life, self-esteem, disability identity, disability self-efficacy, and demographic information. Self-esteem, disability identity, disability self-efficacy, and income were significant predictors of satisfaction with life. Congenital onset predicted higher satisfaction with life; disability identity and disability self-efficacy, but not self-esteem, partially mediated the relationship. Findings highlight the distinction between adaptation to congenital versus acquired disability and the importance of disability self-concept, which are underresearched constructs. Results suggest that rather than attempting to "normalize" individuals with disabilities, health care professionals should foster their disability self-concept. Possible ways to improve disability self-concept are discussed, such as involvement in the disability community and disability pride. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Patient Perspectives on Acquiring Spectacles: A Cambodian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormsby, Gail Melva; Grant-Skiba, Dawn; Naidoo, Kovin; Keeffe, Jill E

    2016-01-01

    To assess the perspectives of patients who acquired spectacles from an eye unit/vision center in Cambodia. A sample (n = 62) of patients was selected across 4 provinces: Prey Veng, Siem Reap, Battambang, and Takeo. The Patient Spectacle Satisfaction Survey covering demographic and semistructured questions regarding patient satisfaction, style, and costs incurred was used to collect data. Information was transcribed and translated into English and analyzed by thematic coding using NVivo. Although there were more women seeking eye health care treatment, there was no significant age difference. Patient satisfaction levels were high although the patients had to pay for transportation, registration, and the glasses themselves. A total of 60 patients (96.7%) stated they would recommend the refractive service center to others. Despite a high level of awareness of eye disease such as cataract, only 2 in 10 people could accurately identify cataract as a major cause of poor vision or blindness. Most of the people (52%) blamed bad vision or blindness on dust or other foreign objects getting into the eye, old age (31%), or poor hygiene (16%). Most people will pay eye care costs once barriers to seeking treatment have been broken via education and encouragement. Satisfaction of wearing spectacles was associated with improved vision; style, color, and fit of the spectacles; and protection from sunlight and dust. The proximity of and easy access to health facilities influenced patient desire to seek treatment.

  13. The effects of balance training and ankle training on the gait of elderly people who have fallen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Nyeon-Jun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of balance training and muscle training around the ankle joints on the gait of elderly people who have experienced a fall. [Subjects] Twenty-six elderly people with a risk of falling and a Berg Balance Scale score of 37 to 50 points who had experienced a fall in the last year were randomly and equally assigned to either a balance training group or an ankle training group. The balance training group received training on a hard floor, training while maintaining balance on a cushion ball in a standing position, and training while maintaining balance on an unstable platform in a standing position; the ankle training group received training to strengthen the muscles around the ankle joints and conducted stretch exercise for the muscles around the ankle joints. [Results] There were significant changes in gait velocity, step length, and stride length in the balance training group after the intervention; there were significant changes in gait velocity, cadence, step time, cycle time, step length, and stride length in the ankle training group after the intervention. In a between-group comparison, the gait velocity of the balance training group showed a significant improvement compared with the ankle training group. [Conclusion] Both balance training and ankle joint training are effective in enhancing the gait ability of elderly people with a risk of falling; in particular, balance training is effective in improving the gait velocity of elderly people who have experienced a fall compared with ankle joint training.

  14. Nivel de conocimiento sobre el Síndrome de Inmunodeficiencia Adquirida en un grupo de adultos mayores Knowledge about the Acquired Inmunodeficiency Syndrome among a group of elderly people Nível de Conhecimento de um grupo de idosos em relação à Síndrome da Imunodeficiência Adquirida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FREITAS MEDEIROS HILDA MARIA

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo se centró en verificar el nivel de conocimiento de un grupo de adultos mayores con respecto al Síndrome de Inmunodeficiencia Adquirida (VIH/SIDA, para ello se utilizó el método de investigación cuantitativa-exploratoria. Los datos se recolectaron entre marzo y junio de 2008 a través de un cuestionario semiestructurado compuesto por preguntas abiertas y cerradas, aplicado a 23 adultos mayores, miembros del Grupo de la Tercera Edad Mexe Coração del municipio de Santa Maria, RS, Brasil. El rango etario de los participantes varió desde 58 a 96 años. El análisis de los datos revela la existencia de vacíos en el conocimiento de los adultos mayores sobre el concepto VIH/SIDA, grupos de riesgo, formas de transmisión, vulnerabilidad y otros factores que contribuyen al aumento de esta enfermedad durante este rango etario.This study aimed to verify the level of knowledge of agroup of elderly in relation to Acquired Inmunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS. The method used was an exploratory quantitative research. Data were collected in 2008 between March and June, through a semistructured questionnaire with open and closed questions, applied in 23 elderly, members of the Group of Elderly Mexe Coração in Santa Maria, RS, Brazil. The ages of participants ranged from 58 to 96 years. Data analysis revealed the existence of gaps in knowledge of the elderly about the concept of HIV/AIDS, risk groups, ways of transmission and vulnerability and other factors that contribute to the rise of the disease in this age group.Este trabalho teve por objetivo verificar o nível de conhecimento de um grupo de idosos em relação ao Síndromeda Imunodeficiência Adquirida (HIV/AIDS. O método utilizado foi uma pesquisa quantitativo-exploratória. Os dados foram coletados entre março e junho de 2008 por meio de um questionário semi-estruturado com questões abertas e fechadas, aplicado a 23 idosos, integrantes do Grupo de Terceira

  15. Nível de Conhecimento de um grupo de idosos em relação à Síndrome da Imunodeficiência Adquirida Nivel de conocimiento sobre el Síndrome de Inmunodeficiencia Adquirida en un grupo de adultos mayores Knowledge about the Acquired Inmunodeficiency Syndrome among a group of elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARTHA H TEIXEIRA DE SOUZA

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo verificar o nível de conhecimento de um grupo de idosos em relação ao Síndromeda Imunodeficiência Adquirida (HIV/AIDS. O método utilizado foi uma pesquisa quantitativo-exploratória. Os dados foram coletados entre março e junho de 2008 por meio de um question ário semi-estruturado com questões abertas e fechadas, aplicado a 23 idosos, integrantes do Grupo de Terceira Idade Mexe Coração do município de Santa Maria, RS, Brasil. A faixa et ária dos participantes variou de 58 a 96 anos. A an álise dos dados revela a existência de lacunas no conhecimento dos idosos em relação conceito de HIV/AIDS, grupos de risco, formas de transmissão, vulnerabilidade e outros fatores que contribuem para a ascensão da doença nesta faixa et ária.El objetivo de este trabajo se centró en verificar el nivel de conocimiento de un grupo de adultos mayores con respecto al Síndrome de Inmunodeficiencia Adquirida (VIH/SIDA, para ello se utilizó el método de investigación cuantitativa-exploratoria. Los datos se recolectaron entre marzo y junio de 2008 a través de un cuestionario semiestructurado compuesto por preguntas abiertas y cerradas, aplicado a 23 adultos mayores, miembros del Grupo de la Tercera Edad Mexe Coração del municipio de Santa Maria, RS, Brasil. El rango etario de los participantes varió desde 58 a 96 años. El an álisis de los datos revela la existencia de vacíos en el conocimiento de los adultos mayores sobre el concepto VIH/SIDA, grupos de riesgo, formas de transmisión, vulnerabilidad y otros factores que contribuyen al aumento de esta enfermedad durante este rango etario.This study aimed to verify the level of knowledge of agroup of elderly in relation to Acquired Inmunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS. The method used was an exploratory quantitative research. Data were collected in 2008 between March and June, through a semistructured questionnaire with open and closed questions, applied in 23

  16. Acquired Inventors’ Productivity after Horizontal Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Massimo G.; Moreira, Solon; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    of the multifaceted nature of the integration process further enhances our understanding of which conditions will be more or less detrimental for corporate inventors. We focus on R&D teams which are the immediate organizational context in which inventors operate and drawing on insights from learning theory...... and evolutionary economics we posit and find that the reorganization of R&D teams after acquisition harms acquired inventors? innovative performance. Though, the implementation of other integration decisions can mitigate or aggravate this negative effect.......Effective integration of the R&D functions of the acquired and acquiring firms is essential for knowledge recombination after acquisition. However, prior research suggests that the post-acquisition integration process often damages the inventive labor force. We argue that an examination...

  17. In vivo mechanisms of acquired thymic tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, W; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Sayegh, M H

    1997-01-01

    expansion of transferred CD4+ TCR transgenic cells in tolerant mice in vivo. There was an increase in clonotype-positive T cells in the thymus after immunization, confirming that activated T cells circulate through the thymus. Furthermore, thymectomy after intrathymic injection abrogates the effect...... of acquired thymic tolerance and restores antigen-dependent clonal expansion in vivo. We conclude that intrathymic injection of antigen induces Th1 cell unresponsiveness and prevents the peripheral expansion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells in vivo. This is the first demonstration that in acquired thymic...

  18. 17 CFR 210.8-04 - Financial statements of businesses acquired or to be acquired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Article 8 Financial Statements of Smaller Reporting Companies § 210.8-04 Financial statements of... financial statements of the business acquired or to be acquired and the smaller reporting company's most...) of this section and the pro forma financial information required by § 210.8-05, the determination of...

  19. Interviewing Children with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Anne-Marie; Linden, Mark; Alderdice, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    Research into the lives of children with acquired brain injury (ABI) often neglects to incorporate children as participants, preferring to obtain the opinions of the adult carer (e.g. McKinlay et al., 2002). There has been a concerted attempt to move away from this position by those working in children's research with current etiquette…

  20. Acquired dysfibrinogenemia secondary to multiple myeloma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotlín, R.; Sobotková, A.; Riedel, Tomáš; Salaj, P.; Suttnar, J.; Reicheltová, Z.; Májek, P.; Khaznadar, T.; Dyr, J. E.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 2 (2008), s. 75-81 ISSN 0001-5792 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : acquired dysfibrinogenemia * amorphous clot * fibrinogen Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.191, year: 2008

  1. Neutrophil Segmentation Index Anomaly in Acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neutrophil lobe count was conducted on the blood films of 262 patients with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Virus (AIDS) and 204 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) antibody-negative apparently healthy controls. The count for each group was evaluated for neutrophil segmentation index by standard method.

  2. Beliefs and perceptions about Acquired Immunodeficieny Syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This should include town cry, health talk at their worship centres and local gatherings. The electronic and print media are not the best based on their peculiarities. Keywords: Beliefs; Perceptions; Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology Vol. 8 (1) 2007: pp. 40-48 ...

  3. How Did Light Acquire a Velocity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauginie, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    We discuss how light acquired a velocity through history, from the ancient Greeks to the early modern era. Combining abstract debates, models of light, practical needs, planned research and chance, this history illustrates several key points that should be brought out in science education.

  4. Perceptions and knowledge about the acquired immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using an anonymous questionnaire to obtain baseline data on sexual behaviour and knowledge of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) among students in university residences, the following information was obtained: Knowledge of AIDS was found to be high, although misconceptions regarding transmission ...

  5. Some Characteristics of Patients with Community Acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a dearth of studies relating the information from the history of patients with community-acquired pneumonia to the mortality of the disease. The relationship between age, sex, occupation, marital status, smoking history, alcohol use, concomitant COPD / bronchial asthma, source of referral and the mortality of patients ...

  6. Radiological pulmonary manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchiori, Edson; Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de; Ossa, Alfonso Jaramillo

    1999-01-01

    In this article are reviewed the principal radiologic manifestations of inflammatory and tumoral diseases the compromise the lungs of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In the group of inflammatory diseases the radiologic aspects of pneumocystosis, cytomegalovirus disease, cryptococcosis, tuberculosis and bacterial pneumonias are emphasized. In the neoplasic diseases' group the aspects of lymphoma and Kaposi's sarcoma are specially presented. (author)

  7. Perceptions and knowledge about the acquired immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-02-02

    Feb 2, 1991 ... The acquired immunodeficiency sydrome (AIDS) is becoming a major health care priority and a threat to all South Africans. Since the diagnosis of the first case of AIDS in South Africa in March 19821 over 430 cases have been reported to 21 June. 1990 (information courtesy the AIDS Advisory Group). At.

  8. Immunomodulation in community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmelts, H.H.F.

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common disease with considerable morbidity and mortality, despite effective antibiotic treatment. In this thesis, we showed that the major causative microorganisms in CAP trigger distinct inflammatory response profiles in the host. While an inflammatory

  9. People With Chronic Neck Pain Walk With a Stiffer Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falla, Deborah; Gizzi, Leonardo; Parsa, Hesam; Dieterich, Angela; Petzke, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, case-control design. Objective To evaluate spine kinematics and gait characteristics in people with nonspecific chronic neck pain. Background People with chronic neck pain present with a number of sensorimotor and biomechanical alterations, yet little is known about the influence of neck pain on gait and motions of the spine during gait. Methods People with chronic nonspecific neck pain and age- and sex-matched asymptomatic controls walked on a treadmill at 3 different speeds (self-selected, 3 km/h, and 5 km/h), either with their head in a neutral position or rotated 30°. Tridimensional motion capture was employed to quantify body kinematics. Neck and trunk rotations were derived from the difference between the transverse plane component of the head and thorax and thorax and pelvis angles to provide an indication of neck and trunk rotation during gait. Results Overall, the patient group showed shorter stride length compared to the control group (Pneck pain showed smaller trunk rotations (Pneck pain walk with reduced trunk rotation, especially when challenged by walking with their head positioned in rotation. Reduced rotation of the trunk during gait may have long-term consequences on spinal health. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(4):268-277. Epub 3 Feb 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.6768.

  10. How the Recession Affects the Expectations of Potential Acquirers of Real Estate Right in Deciding to Purchase Property?

    OpenAIRE

    Grum, Bojan; Grum, Darja Kobal

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to identify factors which are critical to potential acquirers of real estate right in deciding to purchase property. We analysed whether the recession is negatively associated with these expectations. The results of 1306 participant show that people generally expressed higher expectations in year 2009 than then in year 2011, as specially reflected by younger participants. Further analyses of the impact of statistically significant differences of potential acquirers of real e...

  11. Acquired preferences for piquant foods by chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozin, P; Kennel, K

    1983-06-01

    Humans frequently develop likings for innately unpalatable substances, while this occurs very rarely in non-humans. In this study, we establish a preference for crackers seasoned with chili pepper in two domesticated chimpanzees. Chimps were offered a series of increasingly piquant crackers by their caretaker, and gradually came to prefer these crackers to unseasoned crackers. The preferences were stable over months, and generalized to a different piquant cracker. Available evidence suggests that these are acquired likes rather than preferences maintained because of positive consequences that follow ingestion. We note that all existing instances of acquired likings for innately aversive foods in animals (including some informal results from dogs presented in this paper) involve animals with a close personal relationship with humans, suggesting an important role for social-affective factors in the reversal of innate aversions.

  12. Acquired portosystemic collaterals: anatomy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Andrea Farias de Melo; Mota Junior, Americo; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Portosystemic shunts are enlarged vessels that form collateral pathological pathways between the splanchnic circulation and the systemic circulation. Although their causes are multifactorial, portosystemic shunts all have one mechanism in common - increased portal venous pressure, which diverts the blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Congenital and acquired collateral pathways have both been described in the literature. The aim of this pictorial essay was to discuss the distinct anatomic and imaging features of portosystemic shunts, as well as to provide a robust method of differentiating between acquired portosystemic shunts and similar pathologies, through the use of illustrations and schematic drawings. Imaging of portosystemic shunts provides subclinical markers of increased portal venous pressure. Therefore, radiologists play a crucial role in the identification of portosystemic shunts. Early detection of portosystemic shunts can allow ample time to perform endovascular shunt operations, which can relieve portal hypertension and prevent acute or chronic complications in at-risk patient populations. (author)

  13. Acquired portosystemic collaterals: anatomy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Andrea Farias de Melo; Mota Junior, Americo, E-mail: andreafariasm@gmail.com [Instituto de Medicina Integral Professor Fernando Figueira de Pernambuco (IMIP), Recife, PE (Brazil); Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete [Universidade de Fortaleza (UNIFOR), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-07-15

    Portosystemic shunts are enlarged vessels that form collateral pathological pathways between the splanchnic circulation and the systemic circulation. Although their causes are multifactorial, portosystemic shunts all have one mechanism in common - increased portal venous pressure, which diverts the blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Congenital and acquired collateral pathways have both been described in the literature. The aim of this pictorial essay was to discuss the distinct anatomic and imaging features of portosystemic shunts, as well as to provide a robust method of differentiating between acquired portosystemic shunts and similar pathologies, through the use of illustrations and schematic drawings. Imaging of portosystemic shunts provides subclinical markers of increased portal venous pressure. Therefore, radiologists play a crucial role in the identification of portosystemic shunts. Early detection of portosystemic shunts can allow ample time to perform endovascular shunt operations, which can relieve portal hypertension and prevent acute or chronic complications in at-risk patient populations. (author)

  14. Postpartum Acquired Hemophilia. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Antonia Cabezas Poblet

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Periparturient hemorrhages are the leading cause of extremely serious maternal morbidity and maternal death in Cuba and the world. Acquired Hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder characterized by the presence of antibodies against circulating factor VIII (FVIII. We present the case of a 36 years old pregnant woman with term pregnancy and vaginal delivery that suffers from hemorrhagic manifestations in the immediate postpartum secondary to raffia hematoma, requiring blood transfusion. Then she presents a bruise in the right upper limb secondary to stroke that requires surgical repair. The postpartum torpid evolution characterized by sustained bleeding raffia and the surgically treated arm, makes us suspect of the presence of a blood disorder. We observed a decrease in the FVIII factor, which involves the diagnosis of acquired hemophilia and requires treatment with recombinant VIIa factor (FVIIar concentrate and cyclophosphamide. Posterior evolution was favorable. The patient was discharged without sequelae.

  15. Healthy Pets and People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people to get sick from diseases shared between animals and people (also known as zoonotic diseases or zoonoses). CDC ... valuable source of information on diseases shared between animals and people. Keep Your Pet Healthy Whether you have a ...

  16. Phylogenetically Acquired Representations and Evolutionary Algorithms.

    OpenAIRE

    Wozniak , Adrianna

    2006-01-01

    First, we explain why Genetic Algorithms (GAs), inspired by the Modern Synthesis, do not accurately model biological evolution, being rather an artificial version of artificial, rather than natural selection. Being focused on optimisation, we propose two improvements of GAs, with the aim to successfully generate adapted, desired behaviour. The first one concerns phylogenetic grounding of meaning, a way to avoid the Symbol Grounding Problem. We give a definition of Phylogenetically Acquired Re...

  17. Intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms in enterococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeck, Brian L.; Rice, Louis B.

    2012-01-01

    Enterococci have the potential for resistance to virtually all clinically useful antibiotics. Their emergence as important nosocomial pathogens has coincided with increased expression of antimicrobial resistance by members of the genus. The mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci may be intrinsic to the species or acquired through mutation of intrinsic genes or horizontal exchange of genetic material encoding resistance determinants. This paper reviews the antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis and discusses treatment options. PMID:23076243

  18. Acquired flat foot deformity: postoperative imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmick, Simon; Chhabra, Avneesh; Grujic, Leslie; Linklater, James M

    2012-07-01

    Flat foot (pes planus) is a progressive and disabling pathology that is treated initially with conservative measures and often followed by a variety of surgeries. This article briefly reviews the pathology in acquired flat foot deformity, the classification of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, discusses surgical techniques for the management of adult flat foot deformity, and reviews potential complications and their relevant imaging appearances. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Acquired Credit Unions: Drivers of Takeover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Raymond Sant

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study acquired credit unions and analyze their financial performance up to six years prior to merger, on a quarterly basis. The primary focus is on balance sheet (asset liability management and profitability variables (return on assets. We find that acquired credit unions during the period 2008 (third quarter to 2014 (first quarter experienced negative return on assets for several quarters prior to their takeover. This was the result of a declining loan portfolio and increasing charge offs. In spite of decreasing lending activity, such credit unions continued to increase their deposits, i.e., adding to their cost base. Due to declining loans, their net interest margin as a proportion of deposits was also in decline. We argue that this is an indicator of poor management ability. Furthermore, our analysis finds that operating expenses were increasing over time, something that has been documented in previous literature also for smaller credit unions and is attributable to lack of economies of scale. The average asset size of the acquired credit unions in our sample is about $22 million just before acquisition. We attribute our findings to poor business strategy followed by such credit unions. We also conclude that signs of trouble are evident up to two years before merger on average and regulatory policy may have to become more proactive to manage the consolidation challenge faced by the credit union industry in general.

  20. MRI of fetal acquired brain lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, Daniela; Brugger, Peter C.; Kasprian, Gregor; Witzani, Linde; Helmer, Hanns; Dietrich, Wolfgang; Eppel, Wolfgang; Langer, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Acquired fetal brain damage is suspected in cases of destruction of previously normally formed tissue, the primary cause of which is hypoxia. Fetal brain damage may occur as a consequence of acute or chronic maternal diseases, with acute diseases causing impairment of oxygen delivery to the fetal brain, and chronic diseases interfering with normal, placental development. Infections, metabolic diseases, feto-fetal transfusion syndrome, toxic agents, mechanical traumatic events, iatrogenic accidents, and space-occupying lesions may also qualify as pathologic conditions that initiate intrauterine brain damage. MR manifestations of acute fetal brain injury (such as hemorrhage or acute ischemic lesions) can easily be recognized, as they are hardly different from postnatal lesions. The availability of diffusion-weighted sequences enhances the sensitivity in recognizing acute ischemic lesions. Recent hemorrhages are usually readily depicted on T2 (*) sequences, where they display hypointense signals. Chronic fetal brain injury may be characterized by nonspecific changes that must be attributable to the presence of an acquired cerebral pathology. The workup in suspected acquired fetal brain injury also includes the assessment of extra-CNS organs that may be affected by an underlying pathology. Finally, the placenta, as the organ that mediates oxygen delivery from the maternal circulation to the fetus, must be examined on MR images

  1. Interventions for eye movement disorders due to acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Fiona J; Hanna, Kerry; Evans, Jennifer R; Noonan, Carmel P; Garcia-Finana, Marta; Dodridge, Caroline S; Howard, Claire; Jarvis, Kathryn A; MacDiarmid, Sonia L; Maan, Tallat; North, Lorraine; Rodgers, Helen

    2018-03-05

    extracted data. We used standard methods expected by Cochrane. We employed the GRADE approach to interpret findings and assess the quality of the evidence. We found five RCTs (116 participants) that were eligible for inclusion. These trials included conditions of acquired nystagmus, sixth cranial nerve palsy and traumatic brain injury-induced ocular motility defects. We did not identify any relevant studies of restitutive interventions.We identified one UK-based trial of a substitutive intervention, in which botulinum toxin was compared with observation in 47 people with acute sixth nerve palsy. At four months after entry into the trial, people given botulinum toxin were more likely to make a full recovery (reduction in angle of deviation within 10 prism dioptres), compared with observation (risk ratio 1.19, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.48; low-certainty evidence). These same participants also achieved binocular single vision. In the injection group only, there were 2 cases of transient ptosis out of 22 participants (9%), and 4 participants out of 22 (18%) with transient vertical deviation; a total complication rate of 24% per injection and 27% per participant. All adverse events recovered. We judged the certainty of evidence as low, downgrading for risk of bias and imprecision. It was not possible to mask investigators or participants to allocation, and the follow-up between groups varied.We identified one USA-based cross-over trial of a compensatory intervention. Oculomotor rehabilitation was compared with sham training in 12 people with mild traumatic brain injury, at least one year after the injury. We judged the evidence from this study to be very low-certainty. The study was small, data for the sham training group were not fully reported, and it was unclear if a cross-over study design was appropriate as this is an intervention with potential to have a permanent effect.We identified three cross-over studies of pharmacological interventions for acquired nystagmus, which took place

  2. Community acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in a young athlete man: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahdar, Hossein Ali; Kazemian, Hossein; Bimanand, Lida; Zahedani, Shahram Shahraki; Feyisa, Seifu Gizaw; Taki, Elahe; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Karami-Zarandi, Morteza

    2018-04-10

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is commonly known as nosocomial infection agent but rarely previously healthy peoples infected by P. aeruginosa. Here we report community acquired pneumonia in a 27 years old athleteman. 15 published P. aeruginosa CAP case reports are reviewed.1 53.3% of patients was female and 46.67% was male. The mean age was 44 years old (SD: ±13.54). In 8 report it is mentioned that the patient was smoker. Fatality rate was 46.6% and death rate was not significantly different between selected antibiotic regimen, sex and smoking in patient's outcome. Chest strike can be a risk factor for P. aeruginosa CAP in athlete people. Our reported patient treated by ciprofloxacin 400 mg per day and healed without any Secondary complication. Fast and timelymanner diagnosis and treatment is critical in Community acquired P. aeruginosapneumonia outcome. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Robotic and Sensor Technologies for Mobility in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteridis, Lazaros; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Sancarlo, Daniele; Giuliani, Francesco; Ricciardi, Francesco; Cavallo, Filippo; Greco, Antonio; Trochidis, Ilias; Gkiokas, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    Maintaining independent mobility is fundamental to independent living and to the quality of life of older people. Robotic and sensor technologies may offer a lot of potential and can make a significant difference in the lives of older people and to their primary caregivers. The aim of this study was to provide a presentation of the methods that are used up till now for analysis and evaluation of human mobility utilizing sensor technologies and to give the state of the art in robotic platforms for supporting older people with mobility limitations. The literature was reviewed and systematic reviews of cohort studies and other authoritative reports were identified. The selection criteria included (1) patients with age ≥60 years; (2) patients with unstable gait, with or without recurrent falls; (3) patients with slow movements, short strides, and little trunk movement; (4) sensor technologies that are currently used for mobility evaluation; and (5) robotic technologies that can serve as a supporting companion for older people with mobility limitations. One hundred eighty-one studies published up until February 2017 were identified, of which 36 were included. Two categories of research were identified from the review regarding the robot and sensor technologies: (1) sensor technologies for mobility analysis and (2) robots for supporting older people with mobility limitations. Potential for robotic and sensor technologies can be taken advantage of for evaluation and support at home for elder persons with mobility limitations in an automated way without the need of the physical presence of any medical personnel, reducing the stress of caregivers.

  4. A designated centre for people with disabilities operated by Acquired Brain Injury Ireland, Louth

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-08-01

    As a mechanisms-based classification of pain \\'peripheral neuropathic pain\\' (PNP) refers to pain arising from a primary lesion or dysfunction in the peripheral nervous system. Symptoms and signs associated with an assumed dominance of PNP in patients attending for physiotherapy have not been extensively studied. The purpose of this study was to identify symptoms and signs associated with a clinical classification of PNP in patients with low back (± leg) pain. Using a cross-sectional, between-subjects design; four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (± leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol. Patients\\' pain was assigned a mechanisms-based classification based on experienced clinical judgement. Clinicians then completed a clinical criteria checklist specifying the presence or absence of various clinical criteria. A binary logistic regression analysis with Bayesian model averaging identified a cluster of two symptoms and one sign predictive of PNP, including: \\'Pain referred in a dermatomal or cutaneous distribution\\

  5. A designated centre for people with disabilities, operated by Acquired Brain Injury Ireland, Offaly

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennessy, Robin J

    2010-09-01

    Any developmental relationship between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia engenders continuing debate. As the brain and face emerge in embryological intimacy, brain dysmorphogenesis is accompanied by facial dysmorphogenesis. 3D laser surface imaging was used to capture the facial surface of 13 male and 14 female patients with bipolar disorder in comparison with 61 male and 75 female control subjects and with 37 male and 32 female patients with schizophrenia. Surface images were analysed using geometric morphometrics and 3D visualisations to identify domains of facial shape that distinguish bipolar patients from controls and bipolar patients from those with schizophrenia. Both male and female bipolar patients evidenced significant facial dysmorphology: common to male and female patients was overall facial widening, increased width of nose, narrowing of mouth and upward displacement of the chin; dysmorphology differed between male and female patients for nose length, lip thickness and tragion height. There were few morphological differences in comparison with schizophrenia patients. That dysmorphology of the frontonasal prominences and related facial regions in bipolar disorder is more similar to than different from that found in schizophrenia indicates some common dysmorphogenesis. Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia might reflect similar insult(s) acting over slightly differing time-frames or slightly differing insult(s) acting over a similar time-frame.

  6. A designated centre for people with disabilities operated by Acquired Brain Injury Ireland, Cork

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dardis, Christopher

    2015-12-21

    Epidural anesthesia is the most commonly used method of pain relief during labor in the USA. It is not classically associated with alterations in level of alertness. Coma during the procedure is rare, with a reported incidence of 0.1-0.3%.

  7. [Acquired ichthyosis and haematological malignancies: five cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrady, R; Baybay, H; Khammar, Z; Lahlou, M; Lamchachti, L; Gallouj, S; El Hatimi, A; Mernissi, F-Z; Bono, W

    2012-01-01

    Acquired ichthyosis is a rare condition that can reveal an unsuspected haematological malignancy, thus allowing early diagnosis and management. If ichthyosis regresses under treatment for the haematological disorder, its recurrence reflects a turning point in the course of the disease and implies worsening of the prognosis. The patients were examined at a joint dermatology/haematology consultation. The diagnosis of ichthyosis was based on clinical examination alone with no patients undergoing skin biopsy. Our series included three men and two women aged 38 to 65 years consulting for a variety of reasons including asthenia, anaemia and adenopathy. Ichthyosis occurred 2 to 9 months after the initial symptoms of the blood disease. Lesions consisted of diffuse brown scales. The disease was associated with lymphadenopathy and biological inflammatory syndrome. Two patients were presenting non-Hodgkin lymphoma, one had Hodgkin's disease, one had chronic myeloid leukaemia in progression and one had an undifferentiated lymphomatous process. Treatment was based on chemotherapy and emollients. The ichthyosis progressed in step with the underlying malignancy in all cases, with regression being complete in three cases, partial in one case and absent in one case. In rare cases, acquired ichthyosis reveals systemic disease, and may be of infectious, endocrine or drug origin; it may also be idiopathic. However, it is most often a paraneoplastic syndrome with cutaneous expression encountered during haematological malignancies. Because of the variety of causative blood dyscrasias, ichthyosis cannot be used to guide their diagnosis, although it remains a reliable monitoring tool. Acquired ichthyosis should prompt the clinician to search for a neoplastic condition, primarily a haematological disorder, guided by other associated signs, given that in our study, skin lesions generally appear to precede signs of the blood disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Sigmoid plate dehiscence: Congenital or acquired condition?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhaohui, E-mail: lzhtrhos@163.com [Capital Medical University, Beijing Tongren Hospital, No 1 Dong Jiao Min Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Li, Jing, E-mail: lijingxbh@yahoo.com.cn [Capital Medical University, Beijing Tongren Hospital, No 1 Dong Jiao Min Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhao, Pengfei, E-mail: zhaopengf05@163.com [Capital Medical University, Beijing Friendship Hospital, No 95 Yongan Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050 (China); Lv, Han, E-mail: chrislvhan@126.com [Capital Medical University, Beijing Friendship Hospital, No 95 Yongan Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050 (China); Dong, Cheng, E-mail: derc007@sina.com [Capital Medical University, Beijing Friendship Hospital, No 95 Yongan Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050 (China); Liu, Wenjuan, E-mail: wenjuanliu@163.com [Jining No. 1 People' s Hospital, No. 6 Health Street, Jining 272100 (China); Wang, Zhenchang, E-mail: cjr.wzhch@vip.163.com [Capital Medical University, Beijing Friendship Hospital, No 95 Yongan Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • CT with multiplanar reformations can accurately display the sigmoid platet dehiscence. • The prevalence of sigmoid plate dehiscence was no significant difference among different age groups. • The size of sigmoid plate bony defects were not statistically different among different age groups. • The sigmoid plate dehiscence is more commonly a congenital than an acquired condition. - Abstract: Background and purpose: The imaging features of sigmoid plate dehiscence-induced pulsatile tinnitus have been presented. The origin of the sigmoid plate dehiscence, however, remains unclear. Our aim was to assess the prevalence and extent of sigmoid plate dehiscence on computed tomography (CT) images in multiple age groups to determine whether this condition is more likely to be congenital or acquired. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed contrast-enhanced CT images of sigmoid plates of temporal bones in 504 patients. Each temporal bone was characterized as normal or dehiscent. Patients were then subcategorized into four age groups, and the prevalence and extent of dehiscent sigmoid plates in each group were calculated and compared. Results: Overall, 80 patients had sigmoid plate dehiscence, nine of whom had it bilaterally. In successively older age groups, the prevalences of sigmoid plate dehiscence were 18.9%, 20.1%, 14.5%, and 12.7%, respectively. Respective average anteroposterior bony defect diameters were 3.7 ± 1.7, 3.0 ± 1.3, 3.1 ± 1.5, and 3.0 ± 1.1 mm. Respective average vertical bony defect diameters were 3.6 ± 2.3, 2.6 ± 1.2, 3.2 ± 1.5, and 3.0 ± 1.7 mm. The prevalence and extent of sigmoid plate dehiscence were not statistically different among the four age groups. Conclusions: The similar radiologic prevalence and extent of dehiscent sigmoid plates among the age groups suggest that the dehiscence is more commonly a congenital than an acquired condition.

  9. Sigmoid plate dehiscence: Congenital or acquired condition?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhaohui; Li, Jing; Zhao, Pengfei; Lv, Han; Dong, Cheng; Liu, Wenjuan; Wang, Zhenchang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CT with multiplanar reformations can accurately display the sigmoid platet dehiscence. • The prevalence of sigmoid plate dehiscence was no significant difference among different age groups. • The size of sigmoid plate bony defects were not statistically different among different age groups. • The sigmoid plate dehiscence is more commonly a congenital than an acquired condition. - Abstract: Background and purpose: The imaging features of sigmoid plate dehiscence-induced pulsatile tinnitus have been presented. The origin of the sigmoid plate dehiscence, however, remains unclear. Our aim was to assess the prevalence and extent of sigmoid plate dehiscence on computed tomography (CT) images in multiple age groups to determine whether this condition is more likely to be congenital or acquired. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed contrast-enhanced CT images of sigmoid plates of temporal bones in 504 patients. Each temporal bone was characterized as normal or dehiscent. Patients were then subcategorized into four age groups, and the prevalence and extent of dehiscent sigmoid plates in each group were calculated and compared. Results: Overall, 80 patients had sigmoid plate dehiscence, nine of whom had it bilaterally. In successively older age groups, the prevalences of sigmoid plate dehiscence were 18.9%, 20.1%, 14.5%, and 12.7%, respectively. Respective average anteroposterior bony defect diameters were 3.7 ± 1.7, 3.0 ± 1.3, 3.1 ± 1.5, and 3.0 ± 1.1 mm. Respective average vertical bony defect diameters were 3.6 ± 2.3, 2.6 ± 1.2, 3.2 ± 1.5, and 3.0 ± 1.7 mm. The prevalence and extent of sigmoid plate dehiscence were not statistically different among the four age groups. Conclusions: The similar radiologic prevalence and extent of dehiscent sigmoid plates among the age groups suggest that the dehiscence is more commonly a congenital than an acquired condition

  10. Clinicopathological correlation of acquired hypopigmentary disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisha B Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired hypopigmentary disorders comprise a significant group of disorders that affect Indians and Asians. The pigment disturbance in darker skin individuals can be very distressing to the patient and the family. These disorders cover a wide array of pathologies including infections, autoimmune processes, lymphoproliferative disorders, and sclerosing diseases. Histological diagnosis is particularly important because treatments for these diseases are varied and specific. This review will focus on histopathological diagnosis based on clinicopathological correlation for commonly encountered disorders such as leprosy, vitiligo, lichen sclerosus, pityriasis alba (PA, and pityriasis versicolor (PV. Atypical or uncommon clinical presentation of classic diseases such as hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF and hypopigmented sarcoidosis are also included.

  11. Acanthamoeba endophthalmitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffler, K F; Eckhardt, T J; Reboli, A C; Stieritz, D

    1996-10-01

    To report the findings of Acanthamoeba endophthalmitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A 35-year-old man with AIDS and Acanthamoeba infection of the skin and lungs was treated for a granulomatous uveitis in the left eye. The left eye developed mutton-fat keratic precipitates, iris granulomas, cataract, hypotony, and choroidal infiltrates. Aqueous and vitreous specimens were positive for Acanthamoeba cysts. Topical and systemic antiamebic medications decreased the inflammation but failed to control the infection. Acanthamoeba infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of uveitis in patients with AIDS.

  12. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome manifested as disseminated cryptococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittard, G; Seger, D

    1985-01-01

    A 32-year-old male homosexual presented to the emergency department (ED) with the clinical picture of a nonspecific illness. While in the ED, he experienced a first-time seizure. Computed tomography (CT) showed an enhancing mass lesion. Antibacterial therapy was started and continued until a second lumbar puncture (LP), 36 hours after admission, showed distinct yeast forms. Subsequent institution of appropriate therapy did not prevent the patient's death. The cause of death was disseminated cryptococcosis secondary to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

  13. Origins of species: acquired genomes and individuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, L.

    1993-01-01

    Entire genomes with their accompanying protein synthetic systems are transferred throughout the biosphere primarily as bacteria and protists which become symbionts as they irreversibly integrate into pre-existing organisms to form more complex individuals. Individualization is stabilized by simultaneous transmission of once-separate heterologous genetic systems. The origin of new species is hypothesized to correlate with the acquisition, integration and subsequent inheritance of such acquired microbial genomes. These processes were recognized by Mereschkovsky ("Symbiogenesis" in Russian, 1909) and by Wallin ("Symbionticism", see p. 181, this issue).

  14. Clinicopathological correlation of acquired hypopigmentary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anisha B; Kubba, Raj; Kubba, Asha

    2013-01-01

    Acquired hypopigmentary disorders comprise a significant group of disorders that affect Indians and Asians. The pigment disturbance in darker skin individuals can be very distressing to the patient and the family. These disorders cover a wide array of pathologies including infections, autoimmune processes, lymphoproliferative disorders, and sclerosing diseases. Histological diagnosis is particularly important because treatments for these diseases are varied and specific. This review will focus on histopathological diagnosis based on clinicopathological correlation for commonly encountered disorders such as leprosy, vitiligo, lichen sclerosus, pityriasis alba (PA), and pityriasis versicolor (PV). Atypical or uncommon clinical presentation of classic diseases such as hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF) and hypopigmented sarcoidosis are also included.

  15. Cerebral involvement in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestin, G.P.; Juergens, R.; Steinbrich, W.; Diederich, N.; Koeln Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is usually due to opportunistic infections; these frequently offer a difficult differential diagnostic problem. Imaging methods play an important part in the elucidation of symptoms. CT and MR findings were analysed in 13 patients with AIDS and neurological symptoms. Some infections of the central nervous system (encephalitis of unknown aetiology, cytomegalic encephalitis, meningitis) may show cerebral atrophy or even no morphological changes. Toxoplasmosis and PML are the most common opportunistic infections typical changes on CT and MR may lead to diagnosis. MR offers advantages compared with CT in its higher sensitivity for the demonstration even of small lesions. (orig.) [de

  16. Psychological issues in acquired facial trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Sousa Avinash

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The face is a vital component of one′s personality and body image. There are a vast number of variables that influence recovery and rehabilitation from acquired facial trauma many of which are psychological in nature. The present paper presents the various psychological issues one comes across in facial trauma patients. These may range from body image issues to post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms accompanied by anxiety and depression. Issues related to facial and body image affecting social life and general quality of life are vital and the plastic surgeon should be aware of such issues and competent to deal with them in patients and families.

  17. Acquired apraxia of speech: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knollman-Porter, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Apraxia of speech (AOS) is an acquired adult neurogenic communication disorder that often occurs following stroke. The purpose of this article is to review current research studies addressing the diagnostic and therapeutic management of AOS. Traditional definitions and characteristics are compared with current features that assist in the differential diagnosis of AOS. Prognostic indicators are reviewed in addition to how neuroplasticity may impact treatment in chronic AOS. Treatment techniques discussed include the articulatory kinematic approach (AKA), use of augmentative/alternative communication devices, intersystemic facilitation/reorganization, and constraint-induced therapy. Finally, the need to address functional communication through support groups, outside the therapeutic environment, is discussed.

  18. Prevention of hospital-acquired hyponatraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunøe, Mathilde; Overgaard-Steensen, C

    2015-01-01

    . In the hospitalised patient, non-osmotic antidiuretic hormone secretion is frequent and results in a reduced renal electrolyte-free water clearance (EFWC). This condition puts the patient at risk of hyponatraemia upon infusion of fluids that are hypotonic such as 5% glucose, Darrow-glucose, NaKglucose and 0.45% Na...... like Ringer-acetate/Ringer-lactate can increase the intracranial pressure dramatically. Consequently, 0.9 % NaCl is recommended as first-line fluid for such patients. CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence of hospital-acquired hyponatraemia may be reduced by prescribing fluids, type and amount, with the same...

  19. [Iris heterochromia in acquired Horner's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beynat, J; Soichot, P; Bidot, S; Dugas, B; Creuzot-Garcher, C; Bron, A

    2007-09-01

    Horner's syndrome (HS) is related to an interruption of the oculosympathetic nerve pathway. The classic clinical findings associated with this condition are ptosis, miosis, and enophthalmos. Heterochromia is typically described in congenital HS, but it is an uncommon finding in acquired HS. We report a case of post-traumatic HS associated with heterochromia. A literature review indicates that this type of heterochromia may be related to a reduction in the number of iris melanocytes. This mechanism may be the same in the physiological iris color modifications in adulthood.

  20. Acquired CNS lesions in fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reith, W.; Pogledic, I.

    2013-01-01

    Acquired central nervous system (CNS) lesions are often subtle; therefore, the prenatal diagnosis of these lesions is extremely important. The fetal ultrasound examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are two important imaging methods that give an insight into these types lesions. The method of choice during pregnancy is still fetal ultrasound; however, fetal MRI is important when there are certain pathologies, e.g. periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) or malformations of the vein of Galen. In this manner clinicians can plan further therapy after childbirth in advance (e.g. cerebral angiography or embolization). (orig.) [de

  1. Treatment of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young R; Houngue, Coovi; Hall, Ronald G

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is the sixth leading cause of death in the USA. Adherence to the 2007 Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society community-acquired pneumonia guidelines has been associated with improved clinical outcomes. However, choice between guideline-recommended treatments is at the discretion of the prescribing clinician. This review is intended to discuss the characteristics of these treatment options including dosing frequency, dose adjustment for renal/hepatic dysfunction, serious/common adverse events, drug interactions, lung penetration, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target and effect of obesity to help guide antimicrobial selection. An increasing portion of patients are receiving expanded empiric coverage for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as recommended by the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Diseases Society of America for healthcare-associated pneumonia. However, this expanded coverage may not be achieving the desired improvements in clinical outcomes. We expect this increasingly diverse spectrum of patients with pneumonia to eventually result in the merger of these two guidelines to include all patients with pneumonia.

  2. Asian elephants acquire inaccessible food by blowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Kaori; Irie, Naoko; Hiraiwa-Hasegawa, Mariko; Kutsukake, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Many animals acquire otherwise inaccessible food with the aid of sticks and occasionally water. As an exception, some reports suggest that elephants manipulate breathing through their trunks to acquire inaccessible food. Here, we report on two female Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in Kamine Zoo, Japan, who regularly blew to drive food within their reach. We experimentally investigated this behaviour by placing foods in inaccessible places. The elephants blew the food until it came within accessible range. Once the food was within range, the elephants were increasingly less likely to blow as the distance to the food became shorter. One subject manipulated her blowing duration based on food distance: longer when the food was distant. These results suggest that the elephants used their breath to achieve goals: that is, they used it not only to retrieve the food but also to fine-tune the food position for easy grasping. We also observed individual differences in the elephants' aptitude for this technique, which altered the efficiency of food acquisition. Thus, we added a new example of spontaneous behaviour for achieving a goal in animals. The use of breath to drive food is probably unique to elephants, with their dexterous trunks and familiarity with manipulating the act of blowing, which is commonly employed for self-comfort and acoustic communication.

  3. [Acquired hemophilia A after an early abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wullen, B; Mühlhöfer, A; Luz, H; Zoller, W G

    2002-05-17

    A 30-year-old woman was referred to our clinic because she had developed recurrent spontaneous hematomas of both calves within the last 2 months. 6 months earlier the patient had developed an ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome after ovarian stimulation treatment and intrauterine insemination. Shortly afterwards a missed abortion (8 (th) week) had been diagnosed. A curettage was carried out. Routine coagulation tests confirmed a prolongation of aPTT to 90 s and a lupus anticoagulant. A high-titre factor VIII inhibitor (56 Bethesda units) was identified. Given these facts an acquired post-partum hemophilia was diagnosed. The patient was treated with prednisolone and immunoglobulins. The aPTT shortened to normal values. The factor VIII inhibitor and lupus anticoagulant disappeared. There were no further hematomas. The simultaneous occurrence of antibodies in an altered immune state such as pregnancy is well known. In our case, acquired factor VIII inhibitor was found after an early abortion. Treatment with steroids and immunoglobulines led to the disappearance of factor VIII inhibitor and lupus anticoagulant.

  4. Software for Acquiring Image Data for PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Cheung, H. M.; Kressler, Brian

    2003-01-01

    PIV Acquisition (PIVACQ) is a computer program for acquisition of data for particle-image velocimetry (PIV). In the PIV system for which PIVACQ was developed, small particles entrained in a flow are illuminated with a sheet of light from a pulsed laser. The illuminated region is monitored by a charge-coupled-device camera that operates in conjunction with a data-acquisition system that includes a frame grabber and a counter-timer board, both installed in a single computer. The camera operates in "frame-straddle" mode where a pair of images can be obtained closely spaced in time (on the order of microseconds). The frame grabber acquires image data from the camera and stores the data in the computer memory. The counter/timer board triggers the camera and synchronizes the pulsing of the laser with acquisition of data from the camera. PIVPROC coordinates all of these functions and provides a graphical user interface, through which the user can control the PIV data-acquisition system. PIVACQ enables the user to acquire a sequence of single-exposure images, display the images, process the images, and then save the images to the computer hard drive. PIVACQ works in conjunction with the PIVPROC program which processes the images of particles into the velocity field in the illuminated plane.

  5. "Elderly Deafblindness." Proceedings of the European Conference of Deafblind International's Acquired Deafblindness Network (3rd, Marcelli di Numana, Italy, October 2-7, 1998).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deafblind International, London (England).

    This text includes all of the plenary presentations from the 3rd European Conference of Deafblind International's Acquired Deafblindness Network. This international conference was the first to focus specifically on older people with dual sensory impairment. Presentations addressed the awareness of the needs of older people with deafblind or dual…

  6. Synesthetic colors for Japanese late acquired graphemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Michiko; Yokosawa, Kazuhiko

    2012-06-01

    Determinants of synesthetic color choice for the Japanese logographic script, Kanji, were studied. The study investigated how synesthetic colors for Kanji characters, which are usually acquired later in life than other types of graphemes in Japanese language (phonetic characters called Hiragana and Katakana, and Arabic digits), are influenced by linguistic properties such as phonology, orthography, and meaning. Of central interest was a hypothesized generalization process from synesthetic colors for graphemes, learned prior to acquisition of Kanji, to Kanji characters learned later. Results revealed that color choices for Kanji characters depend on meaning and phonological information. Some results suggested that colors are generalized from Hiragana characters and Arabic digits to Kanji characters via phonology and meaning, respectively. Little influence of orthographic information was observed. The findings and approach of this study contributes to a clarification of the mechanism underlying grapheme-color synesthesia, especially in terms of its relationship to normal language processing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dendritic ion channelopathy in acquired epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolos, Nicholas P.; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ion channel dysfunction or “channelopathy” is a proven cause of epilepsy in the relatively uncommon genetic epilepsies with Mendelian inheritance. But numerous examples of acquired channelopathy in experimental animal models of epilepsy following brain injury have also been demonstrated. Our understanding of channelopathy has grown due to advances in electrophysiology techniques that have allowed the study of ion channels in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons in cortex and hippocampus. The apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons comprise the vast majority of neuronal surface membrane area, and thus the majority of the neuronal ion channel population. Investigation of dendritic ion channels has demonstrated remarkable plasticity in ion channel localization and biophysical properties in epilepsy, many of which produce hyperexcitability and may contribute to the development and maintenance of the epileptic state. Here we review recent advances in dendritic physiology and cell biology, and their relevance to epilepsy. PMID:23216577

  8. Monitoring Agitated Behavior After acquired Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aadal, Lena; Mortensen, Jesper; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbaek

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the onset, duration, intensity, and nursing shift variation of agitated behavior in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI) at a rehabilitation hospital. Design: Prospective descriptive study. Methods: A total of 11 patients with agitated behavior were included. Agitated...... behavior was registered with the Agitated Behavior Scale (ABS). The nurse or therapist allocated the individual patient assessed ABS during each shift. Intensity of agitated behavior was tested using exact test. A within-subject shift effect was analyzed with repeated-measure ANOVA. Findings: The onset...... of agitated behavior was at a median of 14 (1–28) days from admission. Seven patients remained agitated beyond 3 weeks from onset. Severe intensity of agitation was observed in 86 of 453 nursing shifts. Differences in agitated behavior between day, evening, and night shifts were found, F(2.20) = 7.90, p...

  9. Contemporary Management of Adult Acquired Buried Penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, M S; Gallegos, M A; Santucci, R A

    2018-04-06

    In 2014, The World Health Organization reported that 1.9 billion adults, 39% of the population, were overweight or obese [1]. Unlike most complications of obesity, adult acquired buried penis is an uncomfortable topic which may be overlooked. Patients are often encouraged to lose weight, but this is futile. Simple weight loss will not cure buried penis, as it is a multifactorial condition caused by a combination of: a) overhanging escutcheon from overweight, b) lichen sclerosus, which often contracts and destroys the penile shaft skin, and c) loss of normal penile shaft attachments to the penile skin. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Time dysperception perspective for acquired brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica ePiras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Distortions of time perception are presented by a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we survey timing abilities in clinical populations with acquired brain injuries in key cerebral areas recently implicated in human studies of timing. We purposely analyzed the complex relationship between cognitive and contextual factors involved in time estimation, as to characterize the correlation between timed and other cognitive behaviors in each group. We assume that interval timing is a solid construct to study cognitive dysfunctions following brain injury, as timing performance is a sensitive metric of information processing, while temporal cognition has the potential of influencing a wide range of cognitive processes. Moreover, temporal performance is a sensitive assay of damage to the underlying neural substrate after a brain insult. Further research in neurological and psychiatric patients will definitively answer the question of whether time distortions are manifestations of cognitive and behavioral symptoms of brain damage and definitively clarify their mechanisms.

  11. Stereotypic movement disorder after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Cynthia M; Kennedy, Richard E; Hoye, Wayne; Yablon, Stuart A

    2002-05-01

    Stereotypic movement disorder (SMD) consists of repetitive, non-functional motor behaviour that interferes with daily living or causes injury to the person. It is most often described in patients with mental retardation. However, recent evidence indicates that this condition is common among otherwise normal individuals. This case study describes a patient with new-onset SMD occurring after subdural haematoma and brain injury. SMD has rarely been reported after acquired brain injury, and none have documented successful treatment. The current psychiatric literature regarding neurochemistry, neuroanatomy, and treatment of SMD are reviewed with particular application to one patient. Treatment options include serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, opioid antagonists and dopamine antagonists. SMD has been under-appreciated in intellectually normal individuals, and may also be unrecognized after brain injury. Further investigation is needed in this area, which may benefit other individuals with SMD as well.

  12. The acquired hyperostosis syndrome. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dihlmann, W.; Hering, L.; Bargon, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    In the second part of this publication, we describe some additional findings in cases of sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis (SCCH). These include focal hyperostosis of the spine, in the pelvis and in the extremities and psoriatric skin lesions and severe forms of acne (acne conglobata, acne fulminans). An analysis of our 13 patients and of the relevant literature indicates that the hyperostosis is due to increased bone metabolism and heterotopic ossification of fibrous tissue and that these are the pathogenic bases of the changes in the axial skeleton, the pelvis and the bones of the extremities. We have suggested a scheme which would categorise the syndrom into complete, incomplete and possibly acquired forms. (orig./GDG) [de

  13. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, H W; Hardy, A M; Morgan, W M; Darrow, W W

    1985-11-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a major health problem for gay men in the United States. About three fourths of all reported cases have occurred in this population, and the number is projected to double in the next year. In Manhattan and San Francisco, AIDS is now the leading cause of premature mortality in men aged 25 to 44 years who have never married. In a sample of a cohort of gay men enrolled in a San Francisco clinic, 2.7% of the men had the syndrome and 26% had related conditions in 1984. Antibody to human T-lymphotropic virus, type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus was found in sera from 67% of the men, including 58% of asymptomatic men. Behavioral factors associated with an increased risk of AIDS include large numbers of sexual partners, receptive anal intercourse, and "fisting." The adoption of safer lifestyles is currently the basis of attempts to control the syndrome in gay men.

  14. Factors Associated with Student Nurses' Intent to Provide Physical and Psychosocial Care to Persons with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Frank L.

    1996-01-01

    Responses from 125 of 290 nursing undergraduates indicated their attitudes ranged from most to least positive regarding people with AIDS acquired through blood transfusion, heterosexual activity, homosexual activity, and needle sharing. Homophobia, fear of AIDS, and perceived susceptibility were inversely related with intention to care for AIDS…

  15. Meeting the Needs of Persons with Acquired Brain Injury in the Republic of Ireland: A Contextual Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeneffe, Charles Edmund; Fullerton, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article examines how the Republic of Ireland conceptualizes disability, specifically acquired brain injury (ABI); how it meets the needs of people with ABI; and its similarities and difference with the U.S. system of ABI professional care, policy, and services. The article provides ideas for improvements and innovations toward ABI…

  16. The Basic Nature of Ethical Problems Experienced by Persons with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: Implications for Nursing Ethics Education and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Miriam E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-five persons with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) described and validated 100 ethical problems that are experienced by people with AIDS from 3 levels of ethical inquiry: descriptive ethics, normative ethics, and metaethics. Findings suggest strategies for improving nursing ethics education. (JOW)

  17. Caregiver wellbeing: an examination of the coping-appraisel process of caring for individuals with an acquired brain injury

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-12-09

    Objective: Previous literature has demonstrated empirical support for a stress process model of caregiving (Chronister & Chan, 2006). This study examined whether a coping–appraisal stress model helps in our understanding of the experience of caregiving for people with an acquired brain injury.\\r\

  18. Hospital-acquired pneumonia in critically ill children: Incidence, risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mervat Gamal Eldin Mansour

    2012-02-21

    acquired infection in critically ill patients. National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) system reported that. HAP accounts for as much as 31% of all nosocomial infections acquired in medical intensive care units. (ICU).

  19. Mortality predictors in community-acquired pneumonia | Tanimowo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acquired pneumonia to themedicalwards of Ladoke Akintola University ofTeaching Hospital between Jan. 2003 andDec. 2005. The case notes of 65 patients admitted for community-acquired pneumoniawere studiedwith respect to their admission ...

  20. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannella, Hernán A; Luna, Carlos M

    2016-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region. Poverty, socioeconomic factors, and malnutrition influence the incidence and outcome of CAP in LAC. In LAC, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent microorganism responsible for CAP, (incidence: 24-78%); the incidence of atypical microorganisms is similar to other regions of the world. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a growing problem in the LAC region, with the Caribbean being the second most affected area worldwide after Sub-Saharan Africa. Pneumococcal pneumonia remains the most common cause of CAP in HIV-infected patients, but Pneumocystis jirovecii and tuberculosis (TB) are also common in this population. The heterogeneity of the health care systems and social inequity between different countries in LAC, and even between different settings inside the same country, is a difficult issue. TB, including multidrug-resistant TB, is several times more common in South American and Central American countries compared with North America. Furthermore, hantaviruses circulating in the Americas (new world hantaviruses) generate a severe respiratory disease called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, with an associated mortality as high as 50%. More than 30 hantaviruses have been reported in the Western Hemisphere, with more frequent cases registered in the southern cone (Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Brazil). Respiratory viruses (particularly influenza) remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the elderly. Low rates of vaccination (against influenza as well as pneumococcus) may heighten the risk of these infections in low- and middle-income countries. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Does Acquired Hypothyroidism Affect the Hearing Functions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Arduç

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: It is well known that congenital hypothyroidism can cause hearing loss. However, conflicting results were found in studies investigating hearing functions in acquired hypothyroidism. Therefore, we evaluated the audiometric findings in patients with acquired hypothyroidism. Material and Method: The study included 58 patients with hypothyroidism and age- and gender-matched 34 healthy controls. Twenty eight (48.27% patients had subclinical hypothyroidism, and 30 (51.73% had obvious hypothyroidism. All subjects had a normal otoscopic examination and tympanometry. Pure tone audiometry at 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, 6000, and 8000 Hertz (Hz was performed in both groups. Blood pressure measurements and the levels of plasma electrolytes, lipids and vitamin B12 were available in all subjects. Results: Hypothyroidism group and control group were similar with respect to systolic and diastolic blood pressures and plasma glucose, lipid, vitamin B12, calcium, sodium, potassium, and chloride levels. Significantly higher audiometric thresholds (dB at 250 (10 (0-45 vs. 5 (0-15, p<0.001 and 500 Hz (10 (0-40 vs. 10 (-5-15, p=0.003 were recorded in hypothyroid patients compared to that in healthy controls. Hearing thresholds at 250 and 500 Hz correlated positively with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, and negatively with free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine. Subclinical hypothyroid patients had a higher hearing threshold at 250 Hz than healthy controls (p=0.001. Discussion: Our study demonstrated that hearing ability decreases in hypothyroidism, even in subclinical hypothyroidism. The changes in TSH and thyroid hormone levels seem to be directly related to the hearing loss in this population of patients.

  2. Immunosuppression for acquired hemophilia A : results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, Peter; Baudo, Francesco; Knoebl, Paul; Levesque, Herve; Nemes, Laszlo; Pellegrini, Fabio; Marco, Pascual; Tengborn, Lilian; Huth-Kuehne, Angela; Aspoeck, Gerold; Heistinger, Max; Knobl, Paul; Makipernaa, Anne; Andre, Helene; Aouba, A; Bellucci, Sylvia; Beurrier, Philippe; Borg, Jeanne Yvonne; Darnige, Luc; Devignes, Jean; dOiron, Roseline; Gautier, Philippe; Gay, Valerie; Girault, Stephane; Gruel, Yves; Guerin, Viviane; Hezard, Nathalie; Khellaf, Mehdi; Koenig, Martial; Levesque, Herve; Lifermann, Francois; Marlu, Raphael; Ninet, J.; Peynet, Jocelyne; Quemeneur, Thomas; Rothschild, Chantal; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Sigaud, Marianne; Trouillier, Sebastien; Voisin, Sophie; Giebl, Andreas; Holstein, Katharina; Huth-Kuhne, Angela; Loreth, Ralph M.; Steigerwald, Udo; Tiede, Andreas; Theodossiades, George; Nemes, Laszlo; Radvanyi, Gaspar; Schlammadinger, Agota; Barillari, Giovanni; Pasca, Samantha; Baudo, Francesco; Caimi, T.; Contino, L.; D'Angelo, Armando; Crippa, Luciano; Fattorini, Annalisa; Di Minno, Giovanni; Cerbone, Anna Maria; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; D'inca, Marco; Falanga, Anna; Maggioni, Anna; Lerede, Teresa; Franchini, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; De Paoli, Lorenzo; Gamba, Gabriella; Ghirardi, Raffaele; Girotto, Mauro; Tasca, Delios; Grandone, Elvira; Tiscia, Giovanni; Imberti, Davide; Iorio, Alfonso; Landolfi, Raffaele; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Novarese, Linda; Mariani, Guglielmo; Lapecorella, Mario; Marietta, Marco; Pedrazzi, Paola; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Santoro, Cristina; Morfini, Massimo; Linari, Silvia; Moratelli, Stefano; Paolini, Rossella; Piseddu, Gavino; Poggio, Renzo; Pogliani, Enrico; Carpenedo, Monica; Remiddi, Chiara; Santagostino, Elena; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Santoro, Rita; Papaleo, Giuseppina; Schinco, Piercarla; Borchiellini, Alessandra; Valeri, Federica; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Siragusa, Sergio; Sottilotta, Gianluca; Squizzato, Alessandro; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Sartori, Roberto; Tagliaferri, Anna Rita; Di Perna, Caterina; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Testa, Sophie; Paoletti, Oriana; Toschi, Vincenzo; Zanon, Ezio; Brandolin, Barbara; Hamulyak, Karly; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta; Leebeek, Frank W.G.; Marten, Nijziel; Novakova, Irena; Schutgens, Roger; van der Linden, P.W.G; van Esser, Joost; van der Meer, J.; Ypma, Paula; Campos, Manuel; Aguilar, Carlos; Altisent, Carmen; Bermejo, Nuria; Del Campo, Raquel; Ferreiro Arguelles, M.; Gonzalez Boullosa, Rosario; Gutierrez Pimentel, Maria Jose; Jimenez-Yuste, Victor [No Value; Jose-Felix, Lucia; Marco, Pascual; Mingot, Maria Eva; Perez Garrido, Rosario; Perez Gonzale, Noelia z; Prieto Garcia, Manuel; Rodriguez-Huerta, Ana Maria; Maranon, HGUG [No Value; Sedano, Carmen; Tolosa Munoz, Alexandra; Baghaei, Fariba; Tengborn, Lilian; Boehlen, Francoise; Korte, Wolfgang; Chowdary, Pratima; Collins, Peter; Evans, Gillian; Pavord, Suzanne; Rangarajan, Savita; Wilde, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an autoimmune disease caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Patients are at risk of severe and fatal hemorrhage until the inhibitor is eradicated, and guidelines recommend immunosuppression as soon as the diagnosis has been made. The optimal immunosuppressive

  3. Management of bleeding in acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia (EACH2) Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter; Huth-Kühne, Angela; Lévesque, Hervé; Marco, Pascual; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Tengborn, Lilian; Knoebl, Paul; Aspoeck, Gerold; Heistinger, Max; Knöbl, Paul; Makipernaa, Anne; André, Hélène; Aouba, Achille; Bellucci, Sylvia; Beurrier, Philippe; Borg, Jeanne Yvonne; Darnige, Luc; Devignes, Jean; d'Oiron, Roseline; Gautier, Philippe; Gay, Valérie; Girault, Stéphane; Gruel, Yves; Guerin, Viviane; Hézard, Nathalie; Khellaf, Mehdi; Koenig, Martial; Lifermann, François; Marlu, Raphael; Ninet, Jacques; Peynet, Jocelyne; Quéméneur, Thomas; Rothschild, Chantal; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Sigaud, Marianne; Trouillier, Sébastien; Voisin, Sophie; Giebl, Andreas; Holstein, Katharina; Loreth, Ralph M.; Steigerwald, Udo; Tiede, Andreas; Theodossiades, George; Radvanyi, Gaspar; Schlammadinger, Agota; Barillari, Giovanni; Pasca, Samantha; Caimi, Teresa; Contino, Laura; D'Angelo Armando, Crippa Luciano; Fattorini, Annalisa; Di Minno, Giovanni; Cerbone, Anna Maria; Di Minno, Dario; D'incà, Marco; Falanga, Anna; Maggioni, Anna; Lerede, Teresa; Franchini, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; de Paoli, Lorenzo; Gamba, Gabriella; Ghirardi, Raffaele; Girotto, Mauro; Tasca, Delios; Grandone, Elvira; Tiscia, Giovanni; Imberti, Davide; Iorio, Alfonso; Landolfi, Raffaele; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Novarese, Linda; Mariani, Guglielmo; Lapecorella, Mario; Marietta, Marco; Pedrazzi, Paola; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Santoro, Cristina; Morfini, Massimo; Linari, Silvia; Moratelli, Stefano; Paolini, Rossella; Piseddu, Gavino; Poggio, Renzo; Pogliani, Enrico; Carpenedo, Monica; Remiddi, Chiara; Santagostino, Elena; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Santoro, Rita; Papaleo, Giuseppina; Schinco, Piercarla; Borchiellini, Alessandra; Valeri, Federica; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Siragusa, Sergio; Sottilotta, Gianluca; Squizzato, Alessandro; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Sartori, Roberto; Tagliaferri, Anna Rita; Di Perna, Caterina; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Testa, Sophie; Paoletti, Oriana; Toschi, Vincenzo; Zanon, Ezio; Brandolin, Barbara; Hamulyák, Karly; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta; Leebeek, Frank W. G.; Marten, Nijziel; Novakova, Irena; Schutgens, Roger; van der Linden, P. W. G.; van Esser, Joost; van der Meer, J.; Ypma, Paula; Campos, Manuel; Aguilar, Carlos; Altisent, Carmen; Bermejo, Nuria; del Campo, Raquel; Ferreiro Argüelles, María; González Boullosa, Rosario; Gutiérrez Pimentel, María José; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Jose-Felix, Lucia; Mingot, Maria Eva; Perez Garrido, Rosario; Perez Gonzale, Noelia Z.; Prieto Garcia, Manuel; Rodriguez-Huerta, Ana María; Sedano, Carmen; Tolosa Munoz, Alexandra; Baghaei, Fariba; Boehlen, Françoise; Korte, Wolfgang; Chowdary, Pratima; Evans, Gillian; Pavord, Suzanne; Rangarajan, Savita; Wilde, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation FVIII. Bleeding episodes at presentation are spontaneous and severe in most cases. Optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial, and available data are from observational and retrospective studies only. The

  4. Immunosuppression for acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, Peter; Baudo, Francesco; Knoebl, Paul; Lévesque, Hervé; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Marco, Pascual; Tengborn, Lilian; Huth-Kühne, Angela; Aspoeck, Gerold; Heistinger, Max; Knöbl, Paul; Makipernaa, Anne; André, Hélène; Aouba, Achille; Bellucci, Sylvia; Beurrier, Philippe; Borg, Jeanne Yvonne; Darnige, Luc; Devignes, Jean; d'Oiron, Roseline; Gautier, Philippe; Gay, Valérie; Girault, Stéphane; Gruel, Yves; Guerin, Viviane; Hézard, Nathalie; Khellaf, Mehdi; Koenig, Martial; Lifermann, François; Marlu, Raphael; Ninet, Jacques; Peynet, Jocelyne; Quéméneur, Thomas; Rothschild, Chantal; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Sigaud, Marianne; Trouillier, Sébastien; Voisin, Sophie; Giebl, Andreas; Holstein, Katharina; Loreth, Ralph M.; Steigerwald, Udo; Tiede, Andreas; Theodossiades, George; Radvanyi, Gaspar; Schlammadinger, Agota; Barillari, Giovanni; Pasca, Samantha; Caimi, Teresa; Contino, Laura; D'Angelo Armando, Crippa Luciano; Fattorini, Annalisa; Di Minno, Giovanni; Cerbone, Anna Maria; Di Minno, Dario; D'incà, Marco; Falanga, Anna; Maggioni, Anna; Lerede, Teresa; Franchini, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; de Paoli, Lorenzo; Gamba, Gabriella; Ghirardi, Raffaele; Girotto, Mauro; Tasca, Delios; Grandone, Elvira; Tiscia, Giovanni; Imberti, Davide; Iorio, Alfonso; Landolfi, Raffaele; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Novarese, Linda; Mariani, Guglielmo; Lapecorella, Mario; Marietta, Marco; Pedrazzi, Paola; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Santoro, Cristina; Morfini, Massimo; Linari, Silvia; Moratelli, Stefano; Paolini, Rossella; Piseddu, Gavino; Poggio, Renzo; Pogliani, Enrico; Carpenedo, Monica; Remiddi, Chiara; Santagostino, Elena; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Santoro, Rita; Papaleo, Giuseppina; Schinco, Piercarla; Borchiellini, Alessandra; Valeri, Federica; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Siragusa, Sergio; Sottilotta, Gianluca; Squizzato, Alessandro; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Sartori, Roberto; Tagliaferri, Anna Rita; Di Perna, Caterina; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Testa, Sophie; Paoletti, Oriana; Toschi, Vincenzo; Zanon, Ezio; Brandolin, Barbara; Hamulyák, Karly; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta; Leebeek, Frank W. G.; Marten, Nijziel; Novakova, Irena; Schutgens, Roger; van der Linden, P. W. G.; van Esser, Joost; van der Meer, J.; Ypma, Paula; Campos, Manuel; Aguilar, Carlos; Altisent, Carmen; Bermejo, Nuria; del Campo, Raquel; Ferreiro Argüelles, María; González Boullosa, Rosario; Gutiérrez Pimentel, María José; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Jose-Felix, Lucia; Mingot, Maria Eva; Perez Garrido, Rosario; Perez Gonzale, Noelia Z.; Prieto Garcia, Manuel; Rodriguez-Huerta, Ana María; Sedano, Carmen; Tolosa Munoz, Alexandra; Baghaei, Fariba; Boehlen, Françoise; Korte, Wolfgang; Chowdary, Pratima; Evans, Gillian; Pavord, Suzanne; Rangarajan, Savita; Wilde, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an autoimmune disease caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Patients are at risk of severe and fatal hemorrhage until the inhibitor is eradicated, and guidelines recommend immunosuppression as soon as the diagnosis has been made. The optimal immunosuppressive

  5. 7 CFR 1779.90 - Disposition of acquired property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Disposition of acquired property. (a) General. When the lender acquires title to the collateral and the final... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disposition of acquired property. 1779.90 Section... develop a plan to fully protect the collateral, and the lender must dispose of the collateral without...

  6. 19 CFR 148.33 - Articles acquired abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... combined with the duty in determining which rates are highest. (c) Gifts. An article acquired abroad by a... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Articles acquired abroad. 148.33 Section 148.33... Articles acquired abroad. (a) Exemption. Each returning resident is entitled to bring in free of duty and...

  7. Preschoolers Acquire General Knowledge by Sharing in Pretense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Shelbie L.; Friedman, Ori

    2012-01-01

    Children acquire general knowledge about many kinds of things, but there are few known means by which this knowledge is acquired. In this article, it is proposed that children acquire generic knowledge by sharing in pretend play. In Experiment 1, twenty-two 3- to 4-year-olds watched pretense in which a puppet represented a "nerp" (an unfamiliar…

  8. Ebishushani: people poses places

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrea Stultiens

    2014-01-01

    Ebifananyi II – People Poses Places Andrea Stultiens People Poses Places is the second part of Ebifananyi, a book series that visualises historical Ugandan photo collections. In People Poses Places we delve into the archive of the photographer Musa Katuramu. In the mid 1930s, teacher and carpenter

  9. Learning to echolocate in sighted people: A correlational study on attention, working memory and spatial abilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekkel, M.R.; Lier, R.J. van; Steenbergen, B.

    2017-01-01

    Echolocation can be beneficial for the orientation and mobility of visually impaired people. Research has shown considerable individual differences for acquiring this skill. However, individual characteristics that affect the learning of echolocation are largely unknown. In the present study, we

  10. Examining Courtesy Stigma in Siblings of People with Down Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Fulk, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether siblings of people with Down syndrome face courtesy stigma, a stigma acquired as a result of an association with a person from a stigmatized group. The central hypothesis was that the majority of people who have a sibling with Down syndrome face courtesy stigma during both adolescence and adulthood. The data supports this hypothesis, showing that 76% of respondents reported courtesy stigma as adolescents and 62% reported courtesy stigma as ad...

  11. Magnetic Oculomotor Prosthetics for Acquired Nystagmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachev, Parashkev; Rose, Geoff E; Verity, David H; Manohar, Sanjay G; MacKenzie, Kelly; Adams, Gill; Theodorou, Maria; Pankhurst, Quentin A; Kennard, Christopher

    2017-10-01

    Acquired nystagmus, a highly symptomatic consequence of damage to the substrates of oculomotor control, often is resistant to pharmacotherapy. Although heterogeneous in its neural cause, its expression is unified at the effector-the eye muscles themselves-where physical damping of the oscillation offers an alternative approach. Because direct surgical fixation would immobilize the globe, action at a distance is required to damp the oscillation at the point of fixation, allowing unhindered gaze shifts at other times. Implementing this idea magnetically, herein we describe the successful implantation of a novel magnetic oculomotor prosthesis in a patient. Case report of a pilot, experimental intervention. A 49-year-old man with longstanding, medication-resistant, upbeat nystagmus resulting from a paraneoplastic syndrome caused by stage 2A, grade I, nodular sclerosing Hodgkin's lymphoma. We designed a 2-part, titanium-encased, rare-earth magnet oculomotor prosthesis, powered to damp nystagmus without interfering with the larger forces involved in saccades. Its damping effects were confirmed when applied externally. We proceeded to implant the device in the patient, comparing visual functions and high-resolution oculography before and after implantation and monitoring the patient for more than 4 years after surgery. We recorded Snellen visual acuity before and after intervention, as well as the amplitude, drift velocity, frequency, and intensity of the nystagmus in each eye. The patient reported a clinically significant improvement of 1 line of Snellen acuity (from 6/9 bilaterally to 6/6 on the left and 6/5-2 on the right), reflecting an objectively measured reduction in the amplitude, drift velocity, frequency, and intensity of the nystagmus. These improvements were maintained throughout a follow-up of 4 years and enabled him to return to paid employment. This work opens a new field of implantable therapeutic devices-oculomotor prosthetics-designed to modify eye

  12. Community-acquired pneumonia; Ambulant erworbene Pneumonien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poetter-Lang, S.; Herold, C.J. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Wien (Austria)

    2017-01-15

    The diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often not possible based only on the clinical symptoms and biochemical parameters. For every patient with the suspicion of CAP, a chest radiograph in two planes should be carried out. Additionally, a risk stratification for the decision between outpatient therapy or hospitalization is recommended. Based on the evaluation of the different radiological patterns as well as their extent and distribution, a rough allocation to so-called pathogen groups as well as a differentiation between viral and bacterial infections are possible; however, because different pathogens cause different patterns an accurate correlation is not feasible by relying purely on imaging. The radiological findings serve as proof or exclusion of pneumonia and can also be used to evaluate the extent of the disease (e.g. monolobular, multilobular, unilateral or bilateral). In cases of prolonged disease, suspicion of complications (e.g. pleural effusion or empyema, necrotizing pneumonia or abscess) or comorbid conditions (e.g. underlying pulmonary or mediastinal diseases) computed tomography is an important diagnostic tool in addition to chest radiography. Ultrasound is often used to diagnose pleural processes (e.g. parapneumonic effusion or pleural empyema). (orig.) [German] Anhand der klinischen Symptome und laborchemischen Befundkonstellation alleine ist es oft nicht moeglich, die Diagnose einer ambulant erworbenen Pneumonie (''community-acquired pneumonia'', CAP) zu stellen. Bei jedem Patienten mit Verdacht auf CAP sollte eine Roentgenthoraxaufnahme in 2 Ebenen angefertigt werden. Weiter muss eine Risikostratifizierung im Sinne der Entscheidung ambulante Therapie vs. Hospitalisierung erfolgen. Anhand der Analyse radiologischer Muster sowie deren Verteilung und Ausdehnung koennen eine grobe Zuordnung zu sogenannten Erregergruppen sowie eine Differenzierung zwischen viralen und bakteriellen Infektionen gelingen. Da

  13. Acquired ventricular septal defect due to infective endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi E Durden

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired intracardiac left-to-right shunts are rare occurrences. Chest trauma and myocardial infection are well-known causes of acquired ventricular septal defect (VSD. There have been several case reports describing left ventricle to right atrium shunt after infective endocarditis (IE. We present here a patient found to have an acquired VSD secondary to IE of the aortic and tricuspid valves in the setting of a known bicuspid aortic valve. This is the first case reported of acquired VSD in a pediatric patient in the setting of IE along with literature review of acquired left-to-right shunts.

  14. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and its ocular complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Narsing

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus infection is the first major pandemic of the 20th century. At present, almost 10 million people are known to be infected with this virus, and it is estimated that by the year 2000, approximately 40 million people will be infected. Transmission of this deadly infection is predominantly by sexual contact. Individuals infected with this virus pass through several predictable stages with progressive decrease in circulating CD4+ T cells. During the advanced stage, these patients develop various opportunistic infections or malignancies, or both. It is this advanced stage that was first recognized as AIDS, which has a 100% mortality rate. The opportunistic organisms that can involve the eye in patients with AIDS include cytomegalovirus, herpes zoster, Toxoplasma gondii, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare, Pneumocystis carinii, Histoplasma capsulatum, Candida, and others. Intraocular lesions from these agents often represent disseminated infections. Visual morbidity occurs secondary to retinitis due to cytomegalovirus, herpes zoster, or Toxoplasma gondii. Anti-viral agents such as ganciclovir or foscarnet are effective against cytomegalovirus infection. The role of the ophthalmologist in the diagnosis and management of AIDS is becoming increasingly important. Not only does the eye reflect systemic disease, but ocular involvement may often precede systemic manifestations. In the AIDS patient, the ophthalmologist thus has an opportunity to make not only a slight-saving, but also life-saving diagnosis of disseminated opportunistic infections.

  15. Biomarkers in Community-Acquired Pneumonia Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voskresenska Natalja

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents information on pneumonia (P patients with features of oxidative stress (OS. Identifying features of OS in patients with P is of interest not only for diagnosis, but also for monitoring of treatment efficiency. We recruited 73 patients with community-acquired P (CAP, previously healthy adults, both males and females with mean age of 68.0 ± 15.2, hospitalised, and 61 healthy control patients matched for age. For quantitative evaluation of lipid peroxidation in CAP patients, the levels of aldehydic lipid peroxidation products like malondialdehyde (MDA and 4- hydroxynon-2-enal (HNE were quantified. Furthermore, concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH and several antioxidant enzymes and selenium in plasma were determined. In CAP patients, decreased levels of GSH and plasma selenium were observed. Plasma levels of MDA, and HNE did significantly differ between patient and control groups. We also noted reduced activity of antioxidant enzymes, namely, glutation peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Low antioxidant enzymes activity was associated with a more severe CAP pattern. Both GSH and antioxidant enzymes may serve as markers for inflammation-related OS in CAP patients, and measurement of these biomarkers may be a valid indentifier for its management.

  16. Free Radicals Mediate Systemic Acquired Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic acquired resistance (SAR is a form of resistance that protects plants against a broad spectrum of secondary infections. However, exploiting SAR for the protection of agriculturally important plants warrants a thorough investigation of the mutual interrelationships among the various signals that mediate SAR. Here, we show that nitric oxide (NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS serve as inducers of SAR in a concentration-dependent manner. Thus, genetic mutations that either inhibit NO/ROS production or increase NO accumulation (e.g., a mutation in S-nitrosoglutathione reductase [GSNOR] abrogate SAR. Different ROS function additively to generate the fatty-acid-derived azelaic acid (AzA, which in turn induces production of the SAR inducer glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P. Notably, this NO/ROS→AzA→G3P-induced signaling functions in parallel with salicylic acid-derived signaling. We propose that the parallel operation of NO/ROS and SA pathways facilitates coordinated regulation in order to ensure optimal induction of SAR.

  17. Identification of acquired antimicrobial resistance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zankari, Ea; Hasman, Henrik; Cosentino, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    ObjectivesIdentification of antimicrobial resistance genes is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms and the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available in routine diagnostic laborato......ObjectivesIdentification of antimicrobial resistance genes is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms and the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available in routine diagnostic...... laboratories and is anticipated to substitute traditional methods for resistance gene identification. Thus, the current challenge is to extract the relevant information from the large amount of generated data.MethodsWe developed a web-based method, ResFinder that uses BLAST for identification of acquired...... antimicrobial resistance genes in whole-genome data. As input, the method can use both pre-assembled, complete or partial genomes, and short sequence reads from four different sequencing platforms. The method was evaluated on 1862 GenBank files containing 1411 different resistance genes, as well as on 23 de...

  18. Peptidomic analysis of human acquired enamel pellicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitorino, Rui; Calheiros-Lobo, Maria João; Williams, Jason; Ferrer-Correia, António J; Tomer, Kenneth B; Duarte, José A; Domingues, Pedro M; Amado, Francisco M L

    2007-11-01

    Human acquired enamel pellicle is the result of a selective interaction of salivary proteins and peptides with the tooth surface. In the present work, the characterization of the peptides as well as the type of interactions established with the enamel surface was performed. Peptides from in vivo bovine enamel implants in the human oral cavity were sequentially extracted using guanidine and trifluoroacetic acid solutions and the fractions obtained were analysed by LC-MS and LC-MS/MS. Based on the LC-MS data, six phosphorylated peptides were identified in an intact form, strongly adsorbed to the enamel surface. Data from the LC-MS/MS analyses allowed us to identified 30 fragment peptides non-covalently bonded to enamel [basic proline-rich proteins, histatins (1 and 3) and acidic proline-rich protein classes]. The tandem mass spectrometry experiments showed the existence of a pattern of amide bond cleavage for the different identified peptide classes suggesting a selective proteolytic activity. For histatins, a predominance of cleavage at Arg, Lys and His residues was observed, while for basic proline-rich proteins, cleavage at Arg and Pro residues prevailed. In the case of acidic proline-rich proteins, a clearly predominance of cleavage of the Gln-Gly amide bond was evident. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Ocular Manifestations of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Shin; Sun, Hae Jung; Kim, Tae Hyong; Kang, Kui Dong; Lee, Sung Jin

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the patterns and risk factors of the ocular manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and their correlation with CD4+ count in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). This retrospective study examined 127 AIDS patients who presented to Soonchunhyang University Hospital. Data were collected from patient interviews, clinical examinations, and laboratory investigations. Ophthalmologic examinations included the best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, anterior segment and adnexal examination, and dilated fundus examination. Of the 127 patients with AIDS, 118 were on HAART and 9 were not. The mean CD4+ count was 266.7 ± 209.1 cells/µL. There were ocular manifestations in 61 patients (48.0%). The incidence of anterior segment manifestations was higher than posterior segment manifestations at 28.3% and 19.7%, respectively. The mean CD4+ count was significantly (p AIDS. In this study, anterior segment and external ocular manifestations occurred more frequently than posterior segment manifestations. Also, the mean CD4+ count was significantly lower in patients with posterior segment ocular manifestations versus anterior segment ocular manifestations. We found that CD4+ count and age >35 years were independent risk factors for developing ocular manifestations.

  20. Hyperthyroidism caused by acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J-J; Zhou, J-J; Yuan, X-L; Li, C-Y; Sheng, H; Su, B; Sheng, C-J; Qu, S; Li, H

    2014-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is an immune deficiency disease. The etiology of hyperthyroidism, which can also be immune-related, is usually divided into six classical categories, including hypophyseal, hypothalamic, thyroid, neoplastic, autoimmune and inflammatory hyperthyroidism. Hyperthyroidism is a rare complication of highly active antimicrobial therapy (HAART) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Hyperthyroidism caused directly by AIDS has not been previously reported. A 29-year-old man who complained of dyspnea and asthenia for 1 month, recurrent fever for more than 20 days, and breathlessness for 1 week was admitted to our hospital. The thyroid function test showed that the level of free thyroxine (FT4) was higher than normal and that the level of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was below normal. He was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. Additional investigations revealed a low serum albumin level and chest infection, along with diffuse lung fibrosis. Within 1 month, he experienced significant weight loss, no hand tremors, intolerance of heat, and perspiration proneness. We recommended an HIV examination; subsequently, AIDS was diagnosed based on the laboratory parameters. This is the first reported case of hyperthyroidism caused by AIDS. AIDS may cause hyperthyroidism by immunization regulation with complex, atypical, and easily ignored symptoms. Although hyperthyroidism is rare in patients with AIDS, clinicians should be aware of this potential interaction and should carefully monitor thyroid function in HIV-positive patients.

  1. Acquiring Synaesthesia: Insights from Training Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eRothen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Synaesthesia denotes a condition of remarkable individual differences in experience characterized by specific additional experiences in response to normal sensory input. Synaesthesia seems to (i run in families which suggests a genetic component, (ii is associated with marked structural and functional neural differences, and (iii is usually reported to exist from early childhood. Hence, synaesthesia is generally regarded as a congenital phenomenon. However, most synaesthetic experiences are triggered by cultural artefacts (e.g., letters, musical sounds. Evidence exists to suggest that synaesthetic experiences are triggered by the conceptual representation of their inducer stimuli. Cases were identified for which the specific synaesthetic associations are related to prior experiences and large scale studies show that grapheme-colour associations in synaesthesia are not completely random. Hence, a learning component is inherently involved in the development of specific synaesthetic associations. Researchers have hypothesized that associative learning is the critical mechanism. Recently, it has become of scientific and public interest if synaesthetic experiences may be acquired by the means of associative training procedures and whether the gains of these trainings are associated with similar cognitive benefits as genuine synaesthetic experiences. In order to shed light on these issues and inform synaesthesia researchers and the general interested public alike, we provide a comprehensive literature review on developmental aspects of synaesthesia and specific training procedures in non-synaesthetes. Under the light of a clear working definition of synaesthesia, we come to the conclusion that synaesthesia can potentially be learned by the appropriate training.

  2. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Mentoring - The knowledge acquired for future ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Zupančič

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mentoring is a tool which enables the transfer of knowledge: it is receiving more and more attention in work environments. Mentoring offers new knowledge and competences, new job opportunities to job seekers on the one hand, and reduces labour market imbalances in the demand and supply of professions on the other. Mentoring includes various forms of activities, connects younger and older employees, those experienced and the first job seekers. In the times of economic crisis, mentoring can enable a smoother transition of youth from education/training into the labour market, and might contribute to lower unemployment rates for young people. By respecting the responsibilities of all partners involved, Slovenia could develop its own system of knowledge transfer on the basis of the experiences of the successful countries which have already implemented mentoring schemes. This could help Slovenia broaden its existing stock of knowledge and experiences and improve its performance in the labour market.

  4. Speech perception and reading: two parallel modes of understanding language and implications for acquiring literacy naturally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, Dominic W

    2012-01-01

    I review 2 seminal research reports published in this journal during its second decade more than a century ago. Given psychology's subdisciplines, they would not normally be reviewed together because one involves reading and the other speech perception. The small amount of interaction between these domains might have limited research and theoretical progress. In fact, the 2 early research reports revealed common processes involved in these 2 forms of language processing. Their illustration of the role of Wundt's apperceptive process in reading and speech perception anticipated descriptions of contemporary theories of pattern recognition, such as the fuzzy logical model of perception. Based on the commonalities between reading and listening, one can question why they have been viewed so differently. It is commonly believed that learning to read requires formal instruction and schooling, whereas spoken language is acquired from birth onward through natural interactions with people who talk. Most researchers and educators believe that spoken language is acquired naturally from birth onward and even prenatally. Learning to read, on the other hand, is not possible until the child has acquired spoken language, reaches school age, and receives formal instruction. If an appropriate form of written text is made available early in a child's life, however, the current hypothesis is that reading will also be learned inductively and emerge naturally, with no significant negative consequences. If this proposal is true, it should soon be possible to create an interactive system, Technology Assisted Reading Acquisition, to allow children to acquire literacy naturally.

  5. PROGNOSTIC IMPACT OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED AND HOSPITAL-ACQUIRED HYPONATREMIA IN PATIENTS WITH DECOMPENSATED HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Shchekochikhin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare prognostic impact of community-acquired and hospital-acquired hyponatremia in hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure Material and methods. Data of 120 patients with decompensated heart failure were analyzed. Hyponatremia was defined as serum sodium concentration of 135 mmol/l or less. Several outcomes were analyzed: mortality, transfer to intensive care unit (ICU, resistance to loop diuretics and worsening renal function.Results. 13.0% of patients had community-acquired hyponatremia, 9.6% - hospital-acquired hyponatremia. Community-acquired hyponatremia was associated with increased mortality [odds ratio (OR=7.8], admission to ICU (OR=19.1 and resistance to loop diuretics (OR=4.8. Hospital-acquired hyponatremia was associated with worsening renal function (OR=12.4.Conclusion. Both, community-acquired and hospital hyponatremia have negative impact in hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure.

  6. PROGNOSTIC IMPACT OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED AND HOSPITAL-ACQUIRED HYPONATREMIA IN PATIENTS WITH DECOMPENSATED HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Shchekochikhin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare prognostic impact of community-acquired and hospital-acquired hyponatremia in hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure Material and methods. Data of 120 patients with decompensated heart failure were analyzed. Hyponatremia was defined as serum sodium concentration of 135 mmol/l or less. Several outcomes were analyzed: mortality, transfer to intensive care unit (ICU, resistance to loop diuretics and worsening renal function.Results. 13.0% of patients had community-acquired hyponatremia, 9.6% - hospital-acquired hyponatremia. Community-acquired hyponatremia was associated with increased mortality [odds ratio (OR=7.8], admission to ICU (OR=19.1 and resistance to loop diuretics (OR=4.8. Hospital-acquired hyponatremia was associated with worsening renal function (OR=12.4.Conclusion. Both, community-acquired and hospital hyponatremia have negative impact in hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure.

  7. Translational genomics of acquired laryngotracheal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis, Mursalin M; Zhao, Zhigen; Khurana, Jasvir; Krynetskiy, Evgeny; Soliman, Ahmed M S

    2014-05-01

    Acquired laryngotracheal stenosis (ALTS) results from abnormal mucosal wound healing after laryngeal and/or tracheal injury. Patients with ALTS often present late after significant reduction of the airway lumen and onset of symptoms. Motivated by the need for earlier detection of affected patients, we sought to investigate genetic markers for ALTS that would identify susceptible patients. Pilot Case-Control Study. Seventy-six patients were recruited, 40 patients with ALTS and 36 control patients with airway injury but without ALTS. DNA was isolated from whole blood and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens from patients. Custom primers were designed and the TaqMan assay employing allele-specific polymerase chain reaction was used to interrogate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): rs2569190, rs1799750, and rs1800469 located in candidate genes CD14, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), respectively. A logistic regression model was used to examine the association of candidate gene polymorphisms with the presence or absence of ALTS. All 76 patients were successfully genotyped at the three loci of interest by optimizing the genotyping protocol. MMP-1 SNP rs1799750 was most significantly associated with development of ALTS (P = 0.005). Identification of SNPs associated with development of ALTS will provide new experimental targets to study wound healing in human subjects. The association found in the current study between ALTS and SNP rs1799750 is being validated in a larger population examining an expanded set of relevant SNPs. Identifying patients with genetic susceptibility to ALTS and poor wound healing in the upper airway will be useful for management of patients after upper-airway injury. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. How to acquire customers on the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D L; Novak, T P

    2000-01-01

    Most retailers on the Web spend more to acquire customers than they will ever get back in revenue from them. Many think that sky-high spending on marketing is necessary to stake out their share of Internet space. But is it really? How do retailers know how much to pay? Consider CDnow, which has developed a multifaceted customer-acquisition strategy that reflects a clear understanding of the economics of an on-line business. At the heart of its strategy is affiliate marketing, a concept the company pioneered. Under its BuyWeb program, anyone can put a link to CDnow on his or her Web site, and if a customer uses that link to arrive at CDnow and make a purchase, the referring site owner gets a percentage of the sale. CDnow pays no money if no sale is made, which makes the marketing program completely efficient. But CDnow didn't stop there. Being a Web store, it had complete data on the number of visitors to its site and what they bought, which it used to work out the lifetime value of an average customer. CDnow used that figure to determine how much to wager on the expensive and risky world of traditional advertising to reach a wider audience that wasn't already on-line. CDnow's experience, still a work in progress, contradicts John Wanamaker's oft-quoted lament: "I know half the money I spend on advertising is wasted, but I can never find out which half." As the CDnow example demonstrates, there is a way to find out which half really works.

  9. Organizing homeless people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    People who are homeless belong to some of the most vulnerable, dispersed and disorganized groups in welfare societies. Yet in 2001, a national interest organization of homeless people was formed for the first time in Denmark. This article identifies the processes that facilitated the formation...... been homeless. The analysis may thus serve as a case of inspiration for activists and professionals who want to improve homeless people's opportunities for participation in other national settings....

  10. Allopurinol in the treatment of acquired reactive perforating collagenosis*

    OpenAIRE

    Tilz, Hemma; Becker, Jürgen Christian; Legat, Franz; Schettini, Antonio Pedro Mendes; Inzinger, Martin; Massone, Cesare

    2013-01-01

    Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis is a perforating dermatosis usually associated with different systemic diseases, mainly diabetes mellitus and/or chronic renal insufficiency. Different therapies have been tried but treatment is not standardized yet and remains a challenge. In the last few years, allopurinol has been reported as a good therapeutic option for acquired reactive perforating collagenosis. We describe the case of a 73-year-old man affected by acquired reactive perforating...

  11. Neural basis of acquired amusia and its recovery after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Sihvonen, A.J.; Ripollés, P.; Leo, V.; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Soinila, S.; Särkämö, T.

    2016-01-01

    Although acquired amusia is a relatively common disorder after stroke, its precise neuroanatomical basis is still unknown. To evaluate which brain regions form the neural substrate for acquired amusia and its recovery, we performed a voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) and morphometry (VBM) study with 77 human stroke subjects. Structural MRIs were acquired at acute and 6 month poststroke stages. Amusia and aphasia were behaviorally assessed at acute and 3 month poststroke stages using t...

  12. Strides in Preservation of Malawi's Natural Stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamanga, Tamara; Chisenga, Chikondi; Katonda, Vincent

    2017-04-01

    The geology of Malawi is broadly grouped into four main lithological units that is the Basement Complex, the Karoo Super group, Tertiary to Quaternary sedimentary deposits and the Chilwa Alkaline province. The basement complex rocks cover much of the country and range in age from late Precambrian to early Paleozoic. They have been affected by three major phases of deformation and metamorphism that is the Irumide, Ubendian and The Pan-African. These rocks comprise gneisses, granulites and schists with associated mafic, ultramafic, syenites and granite rocks. The Karoo System sedimentary rocks range in age from Permian to lower Jurassic and are mainly restricted to two areas in the extreme North and extreme Alkaline Province - late Jurassic to Cretaceous in age, preceded by upper Karoo Dolerite dyke swarms and basaltic lavas, have been intruded into the Basement Complex gneisses of southern Malawi. Malawi is endowed with different types of natural stone deposits most of which remain unexploited and explored. Over twenty quarry operators supply quarry stone for road and building construction in Malawi. Hundreds of artisanal workers continue to supply aggregate stones within and on the outskirts of urban areas. Ornamental stones and granitic dimension stones are also quarried, but in insignificant volumes. In Northern Malawi, there are several granite deposits including the Nyika, which is the largest single outcrop occupying approximately 260.5 km2 , Mtwalo Amazonite an opaque to translucent bluish -green variety of microcline feldspar that occurs in alkali granites and pegmatite, the Ilomba granite (sodalite) occurring in small areas within biotite; apatite, plagioclase and calcite. In the Center, there are the Dzalanyama granites, and the Sani granites. In the South, there are the Mangochi granites. Dolerite and gabbroic rocks spread across the country, treading as black granites. Malawi is also endowed with many deposits of marble. A variety of other igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks are also used as dimension stones. Discovery and preservation of more natural stone deposits through research is essential in the country .Natural stone preservation has not only the potential to generate significant direct and indirect economic benefits for Malawi but also to preserve its heritage .

  13. Personalized medicine: Striding from genes to medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sunita R

    2010-10-01

    Personalized medicine has the potential of revolutionizing patient care. This treatment modality prescribes therapies specific to individual patients based on pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic information. The mapping of the human genome has been an important milestone in understanding the interindividual differences in response to therapy. These differences are attributed to genotypic differences, with consequent phenotypic expression. It is important to note that targeted therapies should ideally be accompanied by a diagnostic marker. However, most efforts are being directed toward developing both these separately; the former by pharmaceutical companies and the later by diagnostic companies. Further, this companion strategy will be successful only when the biomarkers assayed are differentiated on a value-based approach rather than a cost-based approach, especially in countries that reimburse disease management costs. The advantages of using personalized therapies are manifold: targeted patient population; avoidance of drug-related toxicities and optimization of costs in nonresponder patients; reduction in drug development costs, and fewer patients to be tested in clinical trials. The success of personalized therapy in future will depend on a better understanding of pharmacogenomics and the extension of these scientific advances to all countries.

  14. Personalized medicine: Striding from genes to medicines

    OpenAIRE

    Sunita R Nair

    2010-01-01

    Personalized medicine has the potential of revolutionizing patient care. This treatment modality prescribes therapies specific to individual patients based on pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic information. The mapping of the human genome has been an important milestone in understanding the interindividual differences in response to therapy. These differences are attributed to genotypic differences, with consequent phenotypic expression. It is important to note that targeted therapies should...

  15. The psychological challenges of identity reconstruction following an acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Chalotte; Krogh, Lærke

    2015-01-01

    interviewed (semi- structured interviews) twice: while hospitalized and one year post-injury. Discourse analysis, drawing on the concepts of positioning and agency, was applied in order to investigate developmental processes in self-narratives over time. The analysis reveals that one of the key patterns......An acquired brain injury (ABI) has a huge impact on a person’s life and identity. However, identity research in connection with ABI is still sparse. The present study investigates how people with ABI reconstruct their identity in the first year post-injury. Forty-three Danish adults were...

  16. Trust is other people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luckner, Naemi; Werner, Katharina; Subasi, Özge

    , the Internet is often experienced as a place of anonymity, and people are scared of the ’figurative creep’ lurking behind every dark corner. This view on online environments can be a reason for potential sharers not to use sharing platforms. To explore how people view such issues, we conducted an open...

  17. Managing & Developing People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain, Gill, Ed.

    This book presents ideas about and approaches to human resource management (HRM) in British further education (FE) colleges. Introductory material includes author biographies and a preface (Brain) on human resource issues in FE. "Investors in People" (Chambers) considers how working toward recognition as an Investor in People (a British…

  18. People & Tropical Rain Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NatureScope, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Discusses ways people who live in rain forests make a living and some of the products that enrich our lives. Provides activities covering forest people, tropical treats, jungle in the pantry, treetop explorers, and three copyable pages to accompany activities. (Author/RT)

  19. People and oaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul F. Starrs

    2015-01-01

    While technical knowledge of oaks, acorns, habitat, wildlife, and woodland environments is evolving and a sought-after field of study, there are profound linkages, at once humanistic and artistic, where it comes to people and oaks. Looking at six distinct facets of humans and oak woodlands, this essay suggests that the bonds of people to place can be mediated by the...

  20. We, the People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruening, William H.

    The meaning of the Constitution is reflected in its preamble, which lists the reasons for framing the Constitution; but, in turn, the rights of the people are either not mentioned or relegated to some tangential concern. The first three articles of the Constitution reveal that "we the people" is determined by the states as well as the crucial…

  1. Older people. Courtesy entitles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calnan, Michael; Woolhead, Gillian; Dieppe, Paul

    2003-02-20

    A study of 72 people, with an average age of 72, showed that dignity--and lack of it--were key issues in their estimation of care. Concerns about lack of dignity centred on lack of privacy, mixed sex wards, forms of address and loss of independence. The study suggested that older people do not complain about care for fear of retaliation.

  2. Young People's Conversations about Environmental and Sustainability Issues in Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Erik; Öhman, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Young people's conversations about environmental and sustainability issues in social media and their educational implications are under-researched. Understanding young people's meaning-making in social media and the experiences they acquire could help teachers to stage pluralistic and participatory approaches to classroom discussions about the…

  3. The case of Geely acquiring Volvo Car : A study on low brand equity acquiring high brand equity

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Xiaoshu; Shi, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Much previous research has studied high brand equity acquiring high brand equity or high brand equity acquiring low brand equity. However, very little research has been conducted to understand how that low brand equity acquiring high brand equity changes the low brand equity especially in China. This paper is on the case of Geely Group acquiring Volvo Car which was a typical acquisition of a high brand equity company by a low brand equity company. The aim of the paper is to verify whether thi...

  4. Effects of 2 Years of Exercise on Gait Impairment in People With Parkinson Disease: The PRET-PD Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Miriam R; Prodoehl, Janey; Robichaud, Julie A; David, Fabian J; Poon, Cynthia; Goelz, Lisa C; Vaillancourt, David E; Kohrt, Wendy M; Comella, Cynthia L; Corcos, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a secondary analysis from the Progressive Resistance Exercise Training in Parkinson Disease (PRET-PD) trial investigating the effects of progressive resistance exercise (PRE) and a Parkinson disease (PD)-specific multimodal exercise program, modified Fitness Counts (mFC), on spatial, temporal, and stability-related gait impairments in people with PD. Forty-eight people with PD were randomized to participate in PRE or mFC 2 times a week for 24 months; 38 completed the study. Gait velocity, stride length, cadence, and double-support time were measured under 4 walking conditions (off-/on-medication, comfortable/fast speed). Ankle strength was also measured off- and on-medication. Twenty-four healthy controls provided comparison data at one time point. At 24 months, there were no significant differences between exercise groups. Both groups improved fast gait velocity off-medication, cadence in all conditions, and plantarflexion strength off-/on-medication. Both groups with PD had more gait measures that approximated the healthy controls at 24 months than at baseline. Plantarflexion strength was significantly associated with gait velocity and stride length in people with PD at baseline and 24 months, but changes in strength were not associated with changes in gait. Twenty-four months of PRE and mFC were associated with improved off-medication fast gait velocity and improved cadence in all conditions, which is important because temporal gait measures can be resistant to medications. Spatial and stability-related measures were resistant to long-term improvements, but did not decline over 24 months. Strength gains did not appear to transfer to gait.Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A161).

  5. Borrowing and Loan Words: The Lemmatizing of Newly Acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rbr

    or foreign acquisition. English, for instance, is spoken in many countries on all five continents and is, therefore, able to acquire vocabulary from many lan- guages worldwide. This is coupled with the readiness and the ability of the language to acquire new terminology through borrowing, instead of following the puristic ...

  6. 33 CFR 211.27 - Method of acquiring Federal jurisdiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... jurisdiction. 211.27 Section 211.27 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... PROJECTS Federal Jurisdiction over Real Estate § 211.27 Method of acquiring Federal jurisdiction. Jurisdiction is acquired in accordance with the laws of the various States. ...

  7. Acquiring Knowledge of Derived Nominals and Derived Adjectives in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinellie, Sally A.; Kneile, Lynn A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This research investigated children's ability to acquire semantic and syntactic knowledge of derived nominals and derived adjectives in the context of short passages. The study also investigated the relation of morphological awareness and the ability to acquire knowledge of derived words in context. Method: A total of 106 children in…

  8. 7 CFR 3575.90 - Disposition of acquired property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... property. (a) General. When the lender acquires title to the collateral and the final loss claim is not... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disposition of acquired property. 3575.90 Section... protect the collateral, and the lender must dispose of the collateral without delay. (b) Re-title...

  9. Community- versus healthcare-acquired bloodstream infections at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enterobacteriaceae and non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli were predominant among healthcare-acquired pathogens (39.2% and 28.5%, respectively), while Enterobacteriaceae and Gram-positive organisms were the most common among community-acquired pathogens (39.2% and 54.3%, respectively). The majority ...

  10. Nosocomial and Community Acquired Infections in Korle Bu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Nosocomial or hospital acquired infection has been recognized as a serious public health problem in the last twenty years. In most hospitals in Africa-South of the Sahara, although the types of community acquired infections are known, neither the magnitude, nor the common types of nosocomial infections ...

  11. A rare case of acquired lymphangioma circumscriptum of the penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adikari, S; Philippidou, M; Samuel, M

    2017-02-01

    Acquired lymphangioma circumscriptum is a rare occurrence on the penis. We report a case of a 47-year-old man who presented with a single lesion of acquired lymphangioma circumscriptum on the penis resembling genital warts. We report the case to increase awareness of this rare condition which may mimic sexually transmitted infections such as genital warts.

  12. The motivational needs of primary health care nurses to acquire ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted within the theoretical framework of McClelland's Acquired Motivation Theory which consists of three basic needs, e the need for achievement, the need for power, and the need for affiliation. One of the research questions posed was “What are the motivational needs of PHC nurses to acquire power ...

  13. The challenge of retaining customers acquired with free trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Datta, H.; Foubert, B.; van Heerde, H.J.

    Many service firms acquire customers by offering free-trial promotions. A crucial challenge is to retain customers acquired with these free trials. To address this challenge, firms need to understand how free-trial customers differ from regular customers in terms of their decision making to retain

  14. Severe community-acquired pneumonia : what's in a name?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterheert, JJ; Bonten, MJM; Hak, E; Schneider, MME; Hoepelman, AIM

    Purpose of review Formerly, patients with community-acquired pneumonia admitted to an intensive care unit were considered as having the severe form of the disease. Recently, guidelines have distinguished severe and non-severe community-acquired pneumonia based on clinical definitions. In this

  15. Community-acquired soft-tissue pyogenic abscesses in Mulago ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Clinical practice, for a long time, has dwelt on study and management of pyogenic abscesses without distinction between nosocomial and community-acquired types. This study aimed at identifying the bacteria isolated from community-acquired acute subcutaneous and soft tissue pyogenic abscesses.

  16. 33 CFR 211.2 - Authority to acquire real estate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authority to acquire real estate..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REAL ESTATE ACTIVITIES OF THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS IN CONNECTION WITH CIVIL WORKS PROJECTS Real Estate; General § 211.2 Authority to acquire real estate. (a) Congressional authority...

  17. Clinical aspects of acquired aphasia and dysarthria in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. van Dongen (Hugo)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractFor the last decade, it has been a common clinical belief that the prognosis of acquired childhood aphasia is good. However, our own clinical experiences were rather conflicting on this point. As a consequence, we re-examined all the children (15) with an acquired aphasia who in a

  18. Significance of acquired diverticular disease of the vermiform appendix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallenbach, Klaus; Hjorth, Sofie Vetli; Engel, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of acquired diverticulum of the appendix (DA), including incipient forms and its possible significance as a marker of local/regional neoplasms.......To assess the prevalence of acquired diverticulum of the appendix (DA), including incipient forms and its possible significance as a marker of local/regional neoplasms....

  19. Gait variability and motor control in people with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkjaer, Tine; Raffalt, Peter C; Dalsgaard, Helle; Simonsen, Erik B; Petersen, Nicolas C; Bliddal, Henning; Henriksen, Marius

    2015-10-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease that impairs walking ability and function. We compared the temporal gait variability and motor control in people with knee OA with healthy controls. The purpose was to test the hypothesis that the temporal gait variability would reflect a more stereotypic pattern in people with knee OA compared with healthy age-matched subjects. To assess the gait variability the temporal structure of the ankle and knee joint kinematics was quantified by the largest Lyapunov exponent and the stride time fluctuations were quantified by sample entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis. The motor control was assessed by the soleus (SO) Hoffmann (H)-reflex modulation and muscle co-activation during walking. The results showed no statistically significant mean group differences in any of the gait variability measures or muscle co-activation levels. The SO H-reflex amplitude was significantly higher in the knee OA group around heel strike when compared with the controls. The mean group difference in the H-reflex in the initial part of the stance phase (control-knee OA) was -6.6% Mmax (95% CI: -10.4 to -2.7, p=0.041). The present OA group reported relatively small impact of their disease. These results suggest that the OA group in general sustained a normal gait pattern with natural variability but with suggestions of facilitated SO H-reflex in the swing to stance phase transition. We speculate that the difference in SO H-reflex modulation reflects that the OA group increased the excitability of the soleus stretch reflex as a preparatory mechanism to avoid sudden collapse of the knee joint which is not uncommon in knee OA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. PATHOGENETIC MECHANISMS OF CHRONIC ACQUIRED TOXOPLASMOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotsyna S.S.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular protozoan that infects approximately one-third of the world’s population. Infection in human generally occurs through consuming food or drink contaminated with oocysts and tissue cysts from undercooked meat. Although latent infection with Toxoplasma gondii is among the most prevalent of human infections, it has been generally assumed that, except for congenital transmission, it is asymptomatic. Different conditions such as, number of parasite, virulence of the organism, genetic background, sex, and immunological status seem to affect the course of infection The demonstration that Toxoplasma infections can alter behavior, reproductive function in patients has led to a reconsideration of this assumption. During chronic acquired toxoplasmosis (САT identified the regularities of changes in the ratio of the immune system and the basal levels of sex hormones available informative methods, which made it possible to evaluate the severity of the flow chart and predict treatment outcome without resorting to complex research methods. Found that the host-parasite relationships and clinical manifestations of chronic toxoplasmosis depend largely on protective and adaptive responses and compensatory abilities of the human body. Material & methods. 112 patients attended in the 6 Department of Kharkiv Regional Infectious Diseases Hospital №22 (Department of Medical Parasitology and Tropical Diseases of Kharkiv Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, in Kharkiv, Ukraine were enrolled in the study. Forty four patients (39,3±4,6% were male and sixty eight (60,7±4,6% were female. The age of the patients was 18 till 72 years. Results & discussion. All of 112 CAT patients had subjective clinical symptoms in various combinations: increased fatigue 99,1 ± 0,9%, headache and tiredness 95,5 ± 1,9%, pain in the liver 88,4 ± 3,1%, bitter taste in the mouth 93,8 ± 2,2%, muscle pain 81,3 ± 3,7% and joint pain

  1. Myelofibrosis and acquired hemophilia A: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Marie; Comio, Emilie; Gay, Valerie; Baroudi, Noureddine; Meyer, Pascal; Chuniaud-Louche, Christine; Hacini, Maya; Pica, Gian Matteo

    2016-05-07

    Myelofibrosis and acquired hemophilia A is a rare association. To the best of our knowledge only one case of myelofibrosis and acquired hemophilia A has been previously described. A 66-year-old Caucasian man diagnosed with myelofibrosis evolving in acute myeloid leukemia was referred to us for postoperative bleeding. Hemostatic studies showed prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, decreased factor VIII coagulation, and a high factor VIII inhibitor titer; these findings led to a diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A for which he was treated with methylprednisolone and recombinant activated factor VII on admission. Due to a lack of response he was subsequently treated with rituximab combined with activated prothrombin complex concentrates. Furthermore, he received azacytidine to treat the underlying hematological malignancies. Immunosuppressive rituximab therapy resolved acquired hemophilia A with marked efficacy. Rapid and accurate diagnosis, effective hemostatic therapy, and timely treatment for underlying disease are important in the management of acquired hemophilia A secondary to hematological malignancy.

  2. Undiagnosed Diabetes Mellitus in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is an important risk factor for community-acquired pneumonia, whereas the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and prediabetes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia is largely unknown. We aimed to determine the prevalence of prediabetes, undiagnosed...... diabetes mellitus, and risk factors associated with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus in a large European community-acquired pneumonia cohort. Methods: This was a multicenter prospective cohort study of hospitals and private practices in Germany and Austria encompassing 1961 adults with community......-acquired pneumonia included in the German Community-Acquired Pneumonia Competence Network (CAPNETZ) study between 2007 and 2014. The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and prediabetes was estimated based on hemoglobin A1c measurements. Logistic regression was used to assess risk factors for undiagnosed...

  3. Disparities -- Healthy People 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... requires valuing everyone equally with focused and ongoing societal efforts to address avoidable inequalities, historical and contemporary ... Site Map Accessibility Privacy Policy Disclaimers Freedom of Information Act Healthy People 2010 Archive Nondiscrimination Notice Web ...

  4. OFDA People-Trak

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — People-Trak HRIS is a workforce management tool. It will provide tracking and management tools for recruiting, training, contact info, performance, travel monitoring...

  5. Rural People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical facility. Interpreted more broadly, it is a philosophy which promotes the idea that people with disabilities ... way lower costs and improve efficiency. The Rural Policy Research Institute's 2015 document Care Coordination in Rural ...

  6. Meet the Noodle People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananen, Mary King

    1995-01-01

    Presents a hands-on activity for children to build and take home a basic model of the human skeletal system. Describes how to make "noodle people" from ordinary materials including pasta, pipe cleaners, straws, and margarine tub lids. (NB)

  7. Perception of using group buying sites to acquire tourist services cou-pons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Mendes Filho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Technologies brought new forms of business as in the case of group buying sites, which are basically a way to sell on the Internet that allows consumers to buy goods and services at lower prices. This study analyzed the travelers’ perception of the use of group buying sites to acquire tourist services coupons. The research presents a quantitative-exploratory approach using the Technology Acceptance Model to investigate the use of group buying sites to acquire tourist services coupons during a trip. They were collected 60 valid questionnaires with students from a public university in northeastern of Brazil. It was used a data collection survey type, with a non-probabilistic convenience sample. Since this is a pilot study with a small sample, the results were verified by the structural equation modeling (SEM, using the technique Partial Least Squares (PLS. From the analysis, it was found that most people who responded to the questionnaires are using group buying sites to acquire tourist services coupons. However, according to the results, the group buying sites may not be easy tools to help in decision making in purchasing tourism services.

  8. Policing Transgender People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby Miles-Johnson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Police policy documents often articulate strategies and approaches that police organizations want to implement in their efforts to break down barriers with minority groups. However, most police policy documents are written for police audiences and not for members of the public. Police policy documents serve as a reflection of the aspirations of the agency and not necessarily the practice of the officers. Differential policing has been a salient experience for members of transgender communities because, as individuals who express gender in ways that deviate from the norm, they have experienced numerous documented cases of police mismanaged practice. In Australia, achieving police reform in the area of policing of diverse community groups has been difficult as new initiatives implemented to educate police officers about diverse groups such as transgender communities are scarce. My study sought to analyze a police policy document to assess how one police agency’s policy aspires to shape police contact/experiences with transgender people and how this document might shape intergroup identity differences between transgender people and the police. It is argued that the policy document will negatively affect police perceptions of transgender people and may enhance adverse perceptions of intergroup difference between police and transgender people. I also argue that using this document to achieve police reform in the area of policing of transgender people will be problematic as the policy document lacks substantial procedural guidelines regarding interaction with transgender people and may not favorably constrain discretionary police power.

  9. Rethinking responsibility in offenders with acquired paedophilia: punishment or treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Frédéric; Focquaert, Farah

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the current neurobiological literature on the aetiology of developmental and acquired paedophilia and examines what the consequences could be in terms of responsibility and treatment for the latter. Addressing the question of responsibility and punishment of offenders with acquired paedophilia from a neurobiological perspective is controversial. Consequently it is essential to avoid hasty conclusions based strictly on neurobiological abnormality justifications. This study establishes a distinction between developmental and acquired paedophilia. The article investigates whether offenders who fulfil the diagnosis of acquired paedophilia should be held fully responsible, particularly in cases where the offender's conduct appears to result from volitionally controlled behaviour that is seemingly incompatible with a neurological cause. Moreover, the article explores how responsibility can be compromised when offenders with acquired paedophilia have (partially) preserved moral knowledge despite their sexual disorder. The article then examines the option of offering mandatory treatment as an alternative to imprisonment for offenders with acquired paedophilia. Furthermore, the article addresses the ethical issues related to offering any form of quasi-coercive treatment as a condition of release. This study concludes that decisions to fully or partially excuse an individual who fulfil the diagnosis of acquired paedophilia should take all relevant information into account, both neurobiological and other environmental evidence, and should proceed on a careful case by case analysis before sentencing or offering treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Acquired dysarthria in conversation: methods of resolving understandability problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Steven; Wilkinson, Ray

    2011-01-01

    People with acquired progressive dysarthria typically experience increased problems with intelligibility in everyday conversation as their disease progresses. Such problems are likely to impact on both the person with dysarthria and those with whom they interact. If this is the case then we may ask questions not just about the nature of these problems but how it is that such problems are dealt with by participants when they occur. To investigate ways through which problems resulting from dysarthria in everyday conversation are resolved by participants. Further, to examine some of the features of repair resolution, particularly where understanding of self-repair attempts themselves prove difficult. Video data of natural conversation from two dyads were selected for this paper. One dyad features a 58 year-old man with multiple sclerosis and moderate intelligibility problems, the other a 79 year-old woman with motor neurone disease with mild to moderate intelligibility problems. Both elected to be recorded in conversation with their spouses. The dyads were video-recorded at home with no researcher present. Using the methods of Conversation Analysis (CA) a collection of sequences was identified and transcribed. The sequences were analysed with reference to how the participants resolve problems in the understanding of dysarthric speech. It is shown how some problems resulting from dysarthria in conversation can be resolved relatively quickly, particularly where a specific element of a prior turn is highlighted by the recipient as problematic. In other instances, the recipient's understanding problem may be more global. These result in longer repair sequences in which problematic elements are addressed individually. Such a resolution method is ultimately successful but may also be characterised by additional understanding problems. These findings draw attention to an important distinction between intelligibility and understandability. It is concluded that problems

  11. Quantitative gait analysis under dual-task in older people with mild cognitive impairment: a reliability study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutmanis Iris

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reliability of quantitative gait assessment while dual-tasking (walking while doing a secondary task such as talking in people with cognitive impairment is unknown. Dual-tasking gait assessment is becoming highly important for mobility research with older adults since better reflects their performance in the basic activities of daily living. Our purpose was to establish the test-retest reliability of assessing quantitative gait variables using an electronic walkway in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI under single and dual-task conditions. Methods The gait performance of 11 elderly individuals with MCI was evaluated using an electronic walkway (GAITRite® System in two sessions, one week apart. Six gait parameters (gait velocity, step length, stride length, step time, stride time, and double support time were assessed under two conditions: single-task (sG: usual walking and dual-task (dG: counting backwards from 100 while walking. Test-retest reliability was determined using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC. Gait variability was measured using coefficient of variation (CoV. Results Eleven participants (average age = 76.6 years, SD = 7.3 were assessed. They were high functioning (Clinical Dementia Rating Score = 0.5 with a mean Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE score of 28 (SD = 1.56, and a mean Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA score of 22.8 (SD = 1.23. Under dual-task conditions, mean gait velocity (GV decreased significantly (sGV = 119.11 ± 20.20 cm/s; dGV = 110.88 ± 19.76 cm/s; p = 0.005. Additionally, under dual-task conditions, higher gait variability was found on stride time, step time, and double support time. Test-retest reliability was high (ICC>0.85 for the six parameters evaluated under both conditions. Conclusion In older people with MCI, variability of time-related gait parameters increased with dual-tasking suggesting cognitive control of gait performance. Assessment of quantitative gait

  12. Animals: Disease Risks for People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Disease Risks for People at Dog Social Events People attending dog social events can be at risk ... which are diseases that spread from animals to people. Some of these diseases can be spread directly ...

  13. An extra X does not prevent acquired hemophilia - Pregnancy-associated acquired hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barg, Assaf A; Livnat, Tami; Kenet, Gili

    2017-03-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a severe bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies against clotting factor VIII (FVIII). With an estimated annual incidence of 1.3 to 1.5 per million, AHA is a rare disease. An extremely rare form of AHA has been described among women in the peripartum period, and may present with peripartum hemorrhage. Notably, although hemorrhagic symptoms commonly present 1-4 months around delivery, they may occur up to 1 year after parturition. When caring for a mother with AHA it is important to note that Factor VIII inhibitor may be transferred via the placenta from the mother to the fetus. Hence the newborn may also be affected. It is important to increase the awareness of Gynecologists for clinical symptoms and laboratory signs of AHA in order to avoid delayed diagnosis. Treatment may involve use of bypass agents to control hemorrhage, despite the risk of thrombosis, while immunomodulation (with increasing role for Rituximab) may be required to eradicate the inhibiting antibodies. Our review will evaluate the epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment of peripartum AHA, focusing upon mother and infant care. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Immunosuppression for acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Peter; Baudo, Francesco; Knoebl, Paul; Lévesque, Hervé; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Marco, Pascual; Tengborn, Lilian; Huth-Kühne, Angela

    2012-07-05

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an autoimmune disease caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Patients are at risk of severe and fatal hemorrhage until the inhibitor is eradicated, and guidelines recommend immunosuppression as soon as the diagnosis has been made. The optimal immunosuppressive regimen is unclear; therefore, data from 331 patients entered into the prospective EACH2 registry were analyzed. Steroids combined with cyclophosphamide resulted in more stable complete remission (70%), defined as inhibitor undetectable, factor VIII more than 70 IU/dL and immunosuppression stopped, than steroids alone (48%) or rituximab-based regimens (59%). Propensity score-matched analysis controlling for age, sex, factor VIII level, inhibitor titer, and underlying etiology confirmed that stable remission was more likely with steroids and cyclophosphamide than steroids alone (odds ratio = 3.25; 95% CI, 1.51-6.96; P < .003). The median time to complete remission was approximately 5 weeks for steroids with or without cyclophosphamide; rituximab-based regimens required approximately twice as long. Immunoglobulin administration did not improve outcome. Second-line therapy was successful in approximately 60% of cases that failed first-line therapy. Outcome was not affected by the choice of first-line therapy. The likelihood of achieving stable remission was not affected by underlying etiology but was influenced by the presenting inhibitor titer and FVIII level.

  15. Management of bleeding in acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia (EACH2) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter; Huth-Kühne, Angela; Lévesque, Hervé; Marco, Pascual; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Tengborn, Lilian; Knoebl, Paul

    2012-07-05

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation FVIII. Bleeding episodes at presentation are spontaneous and severe in most cases. Optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial, and available data are from observational and retrospective studies only. The EACH2 registry, a multicenter, pan-European, Web-based database, reports current patient management. The aim was to assess the control of first bleeding episodes treated with a bypassing agent (rFVIIa or aPCC), FVIII, or DDAVP among 501 registered patients. Of 482 patients with one or more bleeding episodes, 144 (30%) received no treatment for bleeding; 31 were treated with symptomatic therapy only. Among 307 patients treated with a first-line hemostatic agent, 174 (56.7%) received rFVIIa, 63 (20.5%) aPCC, 56 (18.2%) FVIII, and 14 (4.6%) DDAVP. Bleeding was controlled in 269 of 338 (79.6%) patients treated with a first-line hemostatic agent or ancillary therapy alone. Propensity score matching was applied to allow unbiased comparison between treatment groups. Bleeding control was significantly higher in patients treated with bypassing agents versus FVIII/DDAVP (93.3% vs 68.3%; P = .003). Bleeding control was similar between rFVIIa and aPCC (93.0%; P = 1). Thrombotic events were reported in 3.6% of treated patients with a similar incidence between rFVIIa (2.9%) and aPCC (4.8%).

  16. Ceftobiprole medocaril in the treatment of hospital-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheeren, Thomas W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Ceftobiprole medocaril is a fifth-generation cephalosporin approved in Europe as single-agent therapy for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), excluding ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). It is rapidly converted to the active metabolite ceftobiprole following intravenous administration.

  17. Co-morbidities in children hospitalized for community acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -morbidities in children admitted for community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in ... It is recommended that the presence of comorbidity be actively looked for in children hospitalized for pneumonia, so as to effect holistic treatment, and improve the ...

  18. Structural characterization and lipid composition of acquired cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Svane-Knudsen, Viggo; Sørensen, Jens A

    2012-01-01

    noninvasive structural and lipid compositional study of acquired cholesteatoma and control human skin using multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-related techniques and high-performance thin-layer chromatography. RESULTS: The structural arrangement of the cholesteatoma is morphologically invariant...

  19. Analysis of clinical manifestations of symptomatic acquired jejunoileal diverticular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chia-Yuan; Chang, Wen-Hsiung; Lin, Shee-Chan; Chu, Cheng-Hsin; Wang, Tsang-En; Shih, Shou-Chuan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze systematically our experience over 22 years with symptomatic acquired diverticular disease of the jejunum and ileum, exploring the clinical manifestations and diagnosis of this rare but life-threatening disease.

  20. The Impact of Hospital-Acquired Conditions on Medicare..

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in The Impact of Hospital-Acquired Conditions on Medicare Program Payments, published in Volume 4, Issue 4 of the Medicare and...

  1. Acquired colour vision deficiency in patients receiving digoxin maintenance therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrenson, J G; Kelly, C; Lawrenson, A L; Birch, J

    2002-01-01

    Background/aims: Disturbances of colour vision are a frequently reported sign of digoxin toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of acquired colour vision deficiency in elderly hospitalised patients receiving maintenance digoxin therapy.

  2. Examination of the Accuracy of Coding Hospital-Acquired...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A new study, Examination of the Accuracy of Coding Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcer Stages, published in Volume 4, Issue 1 of the Medicare and Medicaid Research...

  3. Evaluation of Spectrodirectional Alfalfa Canopy Data Acquired During Daisex'99

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strub, G.; Schaepman, M.E.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Itten, K.I.

    2003-01-01

    Field goniometer measurements are a tool to generate a priori bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) knowledge for correction and validation of directional reflectance data acquired by air- and spaceborne sensors. This study analyzes the diurnal hemispherical.-directional reflectance

  4. Acquired alopecia, mental retardation, short stature, microcephaly, and optic atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekam, R. C.; Renckens-Wennen, E. G.

    1990-01-01

    We report on a female patient who had acquired total alopecia, short stature, microcephaly, optic atrophy, severe myopia, and mental retardation. A survey of published reports failed to show an identical patient, despite various similar cases

  5. Acquired ichthyosis in a child with autoimmune thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzelli, Valeria; Larizza, Daniela; Muzio, Francesca; Fornara, Luisa; Calcaterra, Valeria; Vassallo, Camilla; Scaglia, Francesca; Borroni, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    Acquired ichthyosis is a rare cutaneous disorder characterized by dry, rough skin with prominent scaling, that involves symmetrically the trunk and limbs and especially on the extensor surfaces. It appears most commonly in adults in association with malignant, autoimmune, metabolic, endocrine, and infectious diseases. We describe a child with acquired ichthyosis in whom an autoimmune hypothyroidism was detected; furthermore, replacement therapy with L-thyroxine resulted in complete remission of ichthyosis.

  6. Prognostic value of lactate clearance in severe community acquired pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Kamel Abd Elaziz; Ahmed, Dief Abd Elgalil

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Severe community acquired pneumonia (SCAP) occurs in approximately 18–36% of all CAP and the mortality rate could be as high as 67% in patients with SCAP. Several studies have described a correlation between baseline lactate concentration and mortality of ICU patients. Aim of the work: To follow lactate clearance after admission for 24 h which could be an indicator of outcome in severe community acquired pneumonia. Patients and methods: Forty-six consecutively admitted adu...

  7. A methodology for acquiring qualitative knowledge for probabilistic graphical models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærulff, Uffe Bro; Madsen, Anders L.

    2004-01-01

    We present a practical and general methodology that simplifies the task of acquiring and formulating qualitative knowledge for constructing probabilistic graphical models (PGMs). The methodology efficiently captures and communicates expert knowledge, and has significantly eased the model developm......We present a practical and general methodology that simplifies the task of acquiring and formulating qualitative knowledge for constructing probabilistic graphical models (PGMs). The methodology efficiently captures and communicates expert knowledge, and has significantly eased the model...

  8. Communicative Language Teaching enable students to acquire communicative competence

    OpenAIRE

    J.R.Nirmala; E.sugantha Ezhil Mary

    2011-01-01

    English is the language of international affairs, cultures and economic systems. It is a language of wider communication. The main aim of the learners is to acquire the target language but it can be acquired easily only if the language is made use of in our daily affairs. In order to achieve that target communicative language teaching, it focuses on the language competency of the target language .Knowledge of the structure of the language is equally important in order to learn the language.

  9. Auto antibody mediated acquired haemophilia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdul Aziz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibody mediated acquired haomophilia is a rare disease. Hereditary haemophilia usually presents with traumatic or spontaneous bleeding in a young male with positive family history in maternal side.In this case study we described an elderly male patient presenting with short history of recurrent ecchymosis with no similar history in the past and no family history of similar illness. He ultimately turned out to be a case of acquired haemophilia due to SLE.

  10. Pulmonary infiltrates during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjeldsøe-Nielsen, Hans; Gjeraa, Kirsten; Berthelsen, Birgitte G

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to describe the frequency of pulmonary infiltrates on chest X-ray (CXR) during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia at a single centre in Denmark.......The primary aim of this study was to describe the frequency of pulmonary infiltrates on chest X-ray (CXR) during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia at a single centre in Denmark....

  11. Daily-Life Gait Quality as Predictor of Falls in Older People: A 1-Year Prospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley S van Schooten

    Full Text Available Falls can have devastating consequences for older people. We determined the relationship between the likelihood of fall incidents and daily-life behavior. We used wearable sensors to assess habitual physical activity and daily-life gait quality (in terms of e.g. stability, variability, smoothness and symmetry, and determined their predictive ability for time-to-first-and-second-falls. 319 older people wore a trunk accelerometer (Dynaport MoveMonitor, McRoberts during one week. Participants further completed questionnaires and performed grip strength and trail making tests to identify risk factors for falls. Their prospective fall incidence was followed up for six to twelve months. We determined interrelations between commonly used gait characteristics to gain insight in their interpretation and determined their association with time-to-falls. For all data -including questionnaires and tests- we determined the corresponding principal components and studied their predictive ability for falls. We showed that gait characteristics of walking speed, stride length, stride frequency, intensity, variability, smoothness, symmetry and complexity were often moderately to highly correlated (r > 0.4. We further showed that these characteristics were predictive of falls. Principal components dominated by history of falls, alcohol consumption, gait quality and muscle strength proved predictive for time-to-fall. The cross-validated prediction models had adequate to high accuracy (time dependent AUC of 0.66-0.72 for time-to-first-fall and 0.69-0.76 for -second-fall. Daily-life gait quality obtained from a single accelerometer on the trunk is predictive for falls. These findings confirm that ambulant measurements of daily behavior contribute substantially to the identification of elderly at (high risk of falling.

  12. Daily-Life Gait Quality as Predictor of Falls in Older People: A 1-Year Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schooten, Kimberley S.; Pijnappels, Mirjam; Rispens, Sietse M.; Elders, Petra J. M.; Lips, Paul; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Beek, Peter J.; van Dieën, Jaap H.

    2016-01-01

    Falls can have devastating consequences for older people. We determined the relationship between the likelihood of fall incidents and daily-life behavior. We used wearable sensors to assess habitual physical activity and daily-life gait quality (in terms of e.g. stability, variability, smoothness and symmetry), and determined their predictive ability for time-to-first-and-second-falls. 319 older people wore a trunk accelerometer (Dynaport MoveMonitor, McRoberts) during one week. Participants further completed questionnaires and performed grip strength and trail making tests to identify risk factors for falls. Their prospective fall incidence was followed up for six to twelve months. We determined interrelations between commonly used gait characteristics to gain insight in their interpretation and determined their association with time-to-falls. For all data -including questionnaires and tests- we determined the corresponding principal components and studied their predictive ability for falls. We showed that gait characteristics of walking speed, stride length, stride frequency, intensity, variability, smoothness, symmetry and complexity were often moderately to highly correlated (r > 0.4). We further showed that these characteristics were predictive of falls. Principal components dominated by history of falls, alcohol consumption, gait quality and muscle strength proved predictive for time-to-fall. The cross-validated prediction models had adequate to high accuracy (time dependent AUC of 0.66–0.72 for time-to-first-fall and 0.69–0.76 for -second-fall). Daily-life gait quality obtained from a single accelerometer on the trunk is predictive for falls. These findings confirm that ambulant measurements of daily behavior contribute substantially to the identification of elderly at (high) risk of falling. PMID:27389583

  13. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness in the burn population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Davies, Menna; Lye, George; Evans, Janine; Combellack, Tom; Dickson, William; Nguyen, Dai Q

    2016-05-01

    Intensive care unit-acquired weakness is an evolving problem in the burn population. As patients are surviving injuries that previously would have been fatal, the focus of treatment is shifting from survival to long-term outcome. The rehabilitation of burn patients can be challenging; however, a certain subgroup of patients have worse outcomes than others. These patients may suffer from intensive care unit-acquired weakness, and their treatment, physiotherapy and expectations need to be adjusted accordingly. This study investigates the condition of intensive care unit-acquired weakness in our burn centre. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all the admissions to our burn centre between 2008 and 2012 and identified 22 patients who suffered from intensive care unit-acquired weakness. These patients were significantly younger with significantly larger burns than those without intensive care unit-acquired weakness. The known risk factors for intensive care unit-acquired weakness are commonplace in the burn population. The recovery of these patients is significantly affected by their weakness. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Uninhabited Combat Aerial Vehicles: Airpower by the People, For the People, But Not With the People

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clark, Richard

    2000-01-01

    .... Clark's Uninhabited Combat Aerial Vehicles: Airpower by the People, For the People, But Not With the People, draws on that long history to gauge what the future may hold for uninhabited combat aerial vehicles (UCAV). The United States (US...

  15. The Acquirement of Technical Nursing Skills by New Graduates : The Process of Acquirement of Skills Considering Graduates' Voluntarity

    OpenAIRE

    稲垣, 美紀; 土居, 洋子; 西上, あゆみ; Inagaki, Miki; Doi, Yoko; Nishigami, Ayumi

    2003-01-01

    The first research have performed the technical nursing skills (29 skills) by new graduates (30 students) . The purpose of this study was to continue to clarify the acquirement of technical nursing skills, which new graduates learned in clinical nursing skills seminars add to the previous 29 skills, their attitude toward seminars and practical trainings, how their attitude effected the acquirement of technical nursing skills and the new graduates' demands of the seminar and practical training...

  16. Rehabilitation and older people.

    OpenAIRE

    Young, J.

    1996-01-01

    Rehabilitation is concerned with lessening the impact of disabling conditions. These are particularly common in older people and considerable health gain can be achieved by successful rehabilitation. Hospital doctors and general practitioners should be aware of the core principles of rehabilitation, be able to recognise rehabilitation need in their patients, and have sufficient knowledge of their local rehabilitation services to trigger the referral process.

  17. HIV among Transgender People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Transgender People Format: Select One PDF [268K] ...

  18. The peopling of Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Vania; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Sanchez, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    The peopling of Greenland has a complex history shaped by population migrations, isolation and genetic drift. The Greenlanders present a genetic heritage with components of European and Inuit groups; previous studies using uniparentally inherited markers in Greenlanders have reported evidence of ...

  19. Esperanto and Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Ilona

    1978-01-01

    Research has indicated that the elderly retain the ability to learn, and specifically to learn new languages. Furthermore, the increasingly greater proportion of old people in the population demands that their need for continued intellectual stimulation be met. In the absence of explicit motives for learning an ethnic language, Esperanto is a good…

  20. Plants and people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn Lynch

    2012-01-01

    Salal! Salmonberries! Sword ferns! The Northwest is home to a great number of native plant species that humans have used for centuries. Sadly, many local children are unaware of the history and culture connecting people and plants. Yet, from the beginning of time, plants have provided us food, medicine, and material for clothing, shelter, transportation, decoration,...

  1. Drugs and Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug abuse is a serious public health problem. It affects almost every community and family in some way. Drug abuse in children and teenagers may pose a ... of young people may be more susceptible to drug abuse and addiction than adult brains. Abused drugs ...

  2. People who use

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. People who use. Three companies are employing the technologies in India. One company is in the advanced stages in being able to commercialize the products in Malaysia shortly. Some new collaborations are being built.

  3. Cities Feeding People

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Above all, UA more generally emerges as the efforts, replicated on a massive scale, of space-starved urbanizing people of developing nations to obtain the very basic, without which there can be no sustainable city, economy, or government: reliable and sufficient supplies of good-quality food affordable by the majority of ...

  4. Global and regional trends in the nutritional status of young people: a critical and neglected age group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akseer, Nadia; Al-Gashm, Sara; Mehta, Seema; Mokdad, Ali; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2017-04-01

    Adolescence and emerging adulthood form a critical time period for the achievement of optimal health and nutrition across all stages of the life course. We undertook a review of published literature and global data repositories for information on nutrition levels, trends, and patterns among young people aged 10-24 years from January 1, 2016 to September 20, 2016. We describe patterns for both males and females at the global level and for geographic regions for the period covering 1990-2015. The results of this study paint a less than ideal picture of current young people's nutrition, suggesting dual burdens of underweight and high body-mass index in many countries and variable improvements in micronutrient deficiencies across geographical regions. Poor diet diversity and lack of nutrient-dense food, high risk for metabolic syndrome, and sedentary lifestyles also characterize this population. The need for objective, comparable, and high-quality data is also recognized for further study in this area. As the global community works toward supporting and scaling up health gains in the sustainable development goal era, realizing the critical role of young people is essential. Investing in young people's nutrition is critical to making strides in improving the overall health and well-being of all populations. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Response actions to difficulties in using everyday technology after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson Lund, Maria; Lövgren Engström, Ann-Louice; Lexell, Jan

    2012-03-01

    People with acquired brain injury (ABI) have difficulties using everyday technology (ET) in daily tasks at home and in society. To support them in managing the demands imposed by using ET, knowledge is needed concerning their response actions to the difficulties. The aim of this study was to explore and describe what characterizes response actions to difficulties using ET, their conditions, and how they influence the experiences of tasks in daily life among people with ABI. Interviews and observations were undertaken with 13 persons with an ABI. Data were analysed qualitatively using the constant comparative method. The participants' response actions were categorized as (i) deliberate and organized planning, (ii) random and inflexible repeating (iii), re-evaluating tasks, (iv) explaining difficulties related to others, and (iv) proving and protecting capability. Certain conditions were decisive for the different response actions to be applied and also for their effectiveness in enabling engagement in tasks in daily life. Each participant used several types of response actions and the same action could be applied in several situations. To support people with an ABI to manage the demands imposed by using ET, it is important to identify the uniqueness of each client and his or her response actions to difficulties using ET and thereafter adjust the interventions accordingly.

  6. Preference for People and Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampold, Bruce E.; Mondin, Gregory W.; Ahn, Hyun-nie

    1999-01-01

    Investigates preference of Social (S) and Investigative (I) people for performing S and I tasks with S or I people or alone. Upper-division undergraduates in S majors (n=38) or I majors (n=15) were utilized in study. S participants preferred working with S people. I participants most preferred to perform I tasks with I people and least preferred…

  7. Atypical pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubairi, Ali Bin Sarwar; Zafar, Afia; Salahuddin, Nawal; Haque, Ahmed Suleman; Waheed, Shahan; Khan, Javaid Ahmed

    2012-07-01

    To determine the frequency of community-acquired respiratory pathogens with special focus on atypical organisms in patients presenting to a tertiary care facility with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The descriptive study on adult patients was conducted from February 2007 to March 2008 at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. It comprised 124 consenting patients of age 16 and above who presentd with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia. The diagnostic modalities used were based on significant changes in antibody titer or persisting high antibody titers in the case of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chalmydia pneumoniae infections, or bacterial antigen in urine, in the case of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 infection. Pyogenic bacteria were identified on the results of respiratory secretions or blood cultures. Continuous data and categorical variables were worked out using SPSS version 15. Among the 124 patients enrolled, an etiologic agent was identified in 44 (35.4%) patients. The most common organism was Mycoplasma pneumoniae (n = 21, 17%), followed by Chlamydia pneumoniae (n = 15, 12%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 9, 7%), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 2, 1.6%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 2, 1.6%) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 1, 0.8%). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common organism isolated from blood cultures. No cases of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 were identified. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chalmydia pneumoniae are significant etiologic agents for community-acquired pneumonia occurring in Karachi. Local treatment guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia should include therapy directed specifically at these agents.

  8. Mucocutaneous manifestations of acquired hypoparathyroidism: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somenath Sarkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoparathyroidism is a disorder of calcium and phosphorus metabolism due to decreased secretion of parathyroid hormone. Hypoparathyroidism can be hereditary and acquired. Acquired hypoparathyroidism usually occurs following neck surgery (thyroid surgery or parathyroid surgery. Along with systemic manifestations, hypoparathyroidism produces some skin manifestations. Lack of study regarding mucocutaneous manifestations of acquired hypoparathyroidism prompted us to undertake this study. To evaluate the mucocutaneous manifestations of acquired hypoparathyroidism. An observational study done in a tertiary care hospital of Kolkata by comprehensive history taking, through clinical examination and relevant laboratory investigations. Twenty-one patients were included in the study. The commonest form of acquired hypoparathyroidism was neck surgery (thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy operation. Mucocutaneous manifestations were present in 76.19% of patients. The most frequent mucocutaneous manifestation was found in the hairs like the loss of axillary hair (61.9%, loss of pubic hair (52.38%, coarsening of body hair (47.62%, and alopecia areata (9.52%. The nail changes noted were brittle and ridged nail, followed by onycholysis, onychosezia, and onychomedesis. The most common skin features were xerotic skin in 11 patients (52.38%, followed by pellagra-like skin pigmentation, pustular psoriasis and acne form eruption, bullous impetigo, etc. Mucosa was normal in all the cases excepting the one which showed oral candidiasis.

  9. Connectionist neuropsychology: uncovering ultimate causes of acquired dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollams, Anna M

    2014-01-01

    Acquired dyslexia offers a unique window on to the nature of the cognitive and neural architecture supporting skilled reading. This paper provides an integrative overview of recent empirical and computational work on acquired dyslexia within the context of the primary systems framework as implemented in connectionist neuropsychological models. This view proposes that damage to general visual, phonological or semantic processing abilities are the root causes of different forms of acquired dyslexia. Recent case-series behavioural evidence concerning pure alexia, phonological dyslexia and surface dyslexia that supports this perspective is presented. Lesion simulations of these findings within connectionist models of reading demonstrate the viability of this approach. The commitment of such models to learnt representations allows them to capture key aspects of performance in each type of acquired dyslexia, particularly the associated non-reading deficits, the role of relearning and the influence of individual differences in the premorbid state of the reading system. Identification of these factors not only advances our understanding of acquired dyslexia and the mechanisms of normal reading but they are also relevant to the complex interactions underpinning developmental reading disorders.

  10. Stuttering Following Acquired Brain Damage: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Kristine; Helm-Estabrooks, Nancy; Klein, Reva

    2010-09-01

    Communication problems resulting from acquired brain damage are most frequently manifested as motor speech disorders such as dysarthria, syndromes of aphasia, and impairments of pragmatics. A much less common phenomenon is the onset of stuttering in adults who sustain a stroke, traumatic brain injury, or other neurologic events. When stuttering occurs in association with neuropathology, precise characterization and explanation of observed behaviors is often difficult. Among the clinical challenges presented by acquired stuttering are the problem of distinguishing this form of dysfluency from those associated with dysarthria and aphasia, and identifying the neuropathological condition(s) and brain lesion site(s) giving rise to this speech disorder. Another challenge to the precise characterization of acquired stuttering is the fact that some cases of acquired stuttering apparently have a psychological or neuropsychiatric genesis rather than a neuropathological one. In this paper we provide a review of the literature pertaining to the complicated phenomenon of acquired stuttering in adults and draw some tentative explanatory conclusions regarding this disorder.

  11. The elderly people of post-Soviet Ukraine: medical, social, and economic challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsitz, Lewis A

    2005-12-01

    Over the past 14 years, since Ukraine became an independent nation, the country has made major strides toward achieving political and economic reforms, exemplified by the recent populist uprising for fair and free elections. Despite these successes, many challenges still lie ahead, particularly in the area of health care for older people. The average life expectancy in Ukraine is only 67 years, and those who achieve old age often live in poverty. Women are expected to retire from their professions at age 55 and men at 60. Pensions are so low that retirees are often forced to take laborious jobs on the streets. Because of deficiencies in medical education, deteriorating hospital facilities, a lack of modern medications and supplies, and inadequate physician payment mechanisms that breed corruption, many elderly people mistrust the medical system and often turn to folk medicines and Eastern medical practices to treat their illnesses. By understanding the expectations and former medical practices of elderly patients who have emigrated from Ukraine, Western physicians will be better able to meet their emotional and medical needs.

  12. Elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia: optimal treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiem, Ulrich; Heppner, Hans-Jürgen; Pientka, Ludger

    2011-07-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common infectious disease that still causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Elderly people are frequently affected, and several issues related to care of this condition in the elderly have to be considered. This article reviews current recommendations of guidelines with a special focus on aspects of the care of elderly patients with CAP. The most common pathogen in CAP is still Streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by other pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Legionella species. Antimicrobial resistance is an increasing problem, especially with regard to macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae and fluoroquinolone-resistant strains. With regard to β-lactam antibacterials, resistance by H. influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis is important, as is the emergence of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The main management decisions should be guided by the severity of disease, which can be assessed by validated clinical risk scores such as CURB-65, a tool for measuring the severity of pneumonia based on assessment of confusion, serum urea, respiratory rate and blood pressure in patients aged ≥65 years. For the treatment of low-risk pneumonia, an aminopenicillin such as amoxicillin with or without a β-lactamase inhibitor is frequently recommended. Monotherapy with macrolides is also possible, although macrolide resistance is of concern. When predisposing factors for special pathogens are present, a β-lactam antibacterial combined with a β-lactamase inhibitor, or the combination of a β-lactam antibacterial, a β-lactamase inhibitor and a macrolide, may be warranted. If possible, patients who have undergone previous antibacterial therapy should receive drug classes not previously used. For hospitalized patients with non-severe pneumonia, a common recommendation is empirical antibacterial therapy with an aminopenicillin in combination with a β-lactamase inhibitor, or

  13. Ocular components before and after acquired, nonaccommodative esotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frane, S L; Sholtz, R I; Lin, W K; Mutti, D O

    2000-12-01

    Acquired nonaccommodative esotropia describes the sudden onset of a constant, comitant strabismus of idiopathic origin in children >6 months of age. We present a case of acquired nonaccommodative esotropia at 20 months of age in a subject participating in the Berkeley Infant Biometry Study, a longitudinal study of emmetropization and ocular component development in infants between 3 months and 3 years of age. Ocular components for this child were normal before the onset of strabismus (within 2 SD's of the mean for orthotropic study participants) for refractive error, corneal power, lens radii, lens power, and ocular axial dimensions. Refractive error postsurgically was significantly more hyperopic and crystalline lens power lower than average at +2.38 D and 37.2 D, respectively. The lack of abnormal ocular parameters is consistent with the idiopathic etiology of acute onset esotropia. This case suggests that ocular component values may not be useful for assessing the risk of acquired nonaccommodative esotropia.

  14. Diagnosis and Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Karymdzhanov

    2016-02-01

    The initial antibiotic therapy of community-acquired pneumonia is carried out empirically. In the treatment of severe community-acquired pneumonia in children from 2 months to 5 years, the drug of choice is amoxicillin orally. Macrolides are the drugs of choice for children aged 5 to 16 years. In severe pneumonia, drugs of choice are amoxicillin clavulanate, 2nd–4th generation cephalosporins. In general, the duration of antibiotic therapy in the community-acquired pneumonia caused by typical bacteria is 7–10 days, by atypical bacteria — 10–14 days. In the real clinical practice, the errors associated with the choice of drug, route of administration, dosage, regimen of application, length of treatment are frequent during antibacterial therapy.

  15. REVIEW OF A CASE OF CHILD WITH ACQUIRED APHASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana FILIPOVA

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Achieved children speech disabilities are manifested at certain level of development of speech from the age of 3 to 12 years. The speech disabilities with children from the age of one to three years have developmental and acquired characteristics. It is well-known when and why the disabilities occurr at acquired aphasia or disphasia.The child with acquired aphasia or disphasia has early brain impairements and a relative improvement happens with adequate treatment and prompt rehabilitation treatment. It is more obvious with children than with adults.This fast and complete rehabilitation happens due to the plastic character of child’s brain and the possibilities for intro-hemisphere and inter-hemisphere reorganization of speech functions in childhood.

  16. Tuberculosis and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome in South Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, M.V.; Genro, C.H.; Santos Silveira, R. de C. dos

    1989-01-01

    Tuberculosis and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome in South Brazil. The authors studied the incidence of tuberculosis in South Brazilian patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome from January 1985 to June 1988. During this period, tuberculosis occurred in 10.3% of acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients. The socioeconomic conditions and the incidence of disease in the population were not confirmed as a potential risk for tuberculosis infection. Chest radiographs revealed pulmonary infiltrates in six patients, hilar and/or mediastinal adenopathy in three, and pleural effusion in two. The two remaining patients had pulmonary consolidation associated with other features. None of these patients presented pulmonary cavitation or radiographic findings of typical reactivation of pulmonary tuberculosis. (author) [pt

  17. Rehabilitation of discourse impairments after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindri, Gigiane; Pagliarin, Karina Carlesso; Casarin, Fabíola Schwengber; Branco, Laura Damiani; Ferré, Perrine; Joanette, Yves; Fonseca, Rochele Paz

    2014-01-01

    Language impairments in patients with acquired brain injury can have a negative impact on social life as well as on other cognitive domains. Discourse impairments are among the most commonly reported communication deficits among patients with acquired brain damage. Despite advances in the development of diagnostic tools for detecting such impairments, few studies have investigated interventions to rehabilitate patients presenting with these conditions. The aim of this study was to present a systematic review of the methods used in the rehabilitation of discourse following acquired brain injury. The PubMed database was searched for articles using the following keywords: "rehabilitation", "neurological injury", "communication" and "discursive abilities". A total of 162 abstracts were found, but only seven of these met criteria for inclusion in the review. Four studies involved samples of individuals with aphasia whereas three studies recruited samples of individuals with traumatic brain injury. All but one article found that patient performance improved following participation in a discourse rehabilitation program.

  18. People and renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenvald, Avo

    2002-01-01

    The use of renewable energy is tightly connected to solving social problems in Estonia by creating more new jobs. It is essential that Estonia should increase the use of biofuels. One of the biofuels, firewood, has been used already for centuries. For wider use of renewable energy in Estonia, it is not enough to rely only on enterprices. Rather, before any serious progress can take place, the state should create the appropriate legal environment. Due to its many social and environmental aspects, renewable energy is more important to the state than a sole enterprice. Unfortunately, Estonian government has been delaying its duties. Estonia has two resources that should be taken advantage of, fertile spare land and people still used to the country life. The country people would get work by growing different energy crops on the spare land. (author)

  19. Parasites, Plants, and People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marion; Moore, Tony

    2016-06-01

    Anthelminthic resistance is acknowledged worldwide and is a major problem in Aotearoa New Zealand, thus alternative parasite management strategies are imperative. One Health is an initiative linking animal, human, and environmental health. Parasites, plants, and people illustrate the possibilities of providing diverse diets for stock thereby lowering parasite burdens, improving the cultural wellbeing of a local community, and protecting the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Multinational Exploration of Acquired R&D Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Jens

    2004-01-01

    R&D. This paper establishes the connection between amultinational corporation that follows a capability-motivated acquisition strategy and theR&D role new subsidiaries should play in order for the acquired resources to be utilizedcorporation-wide. Statistical findings reveal the need to follow......This paper presents the results of a survey of 54 Danish multinational corporations that haveacquired activities abroad. The role of the acquired R&D units was the focus of the survey,particularly with respect to the schism between basic and applied R&D, and the schismbetween autonomous and network...

  1. Acquired pathology of the pediatric spine and spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palasis, Susan; Hayes, Laura L. [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology at Scottish Rite, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Pediatric spine pathology poses a diagnostic challenge for radiologists. Acquired spine pathology often yields nonspecific signs and symptoms in children, especially in the younger age groups, and diagnostic delay can carry significant morbidity. This review is focused on some of the more common diagnostic dilemmas we face when attempting to evaluate and diagnose acquired pediatric spine anomalies in daily practice. An understanding of some of the key differentiating features of these disease processes in conjunction with pertinent history, physical exam, and advanced imaging techniques can indicate the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  2. Acquired pathology of the pediatric spine and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palasis, Susan; Hayes, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric spine pathology poses a diagnostic challenge for radiologists. Acquired spine pathology often yields nonspecific signs and symptoms in children, especially in the younger age groups, and diagnostic delay can carry significant morbidity. This review is focused on some of the more common diagnostic dilemmas we face when attempting to evaluate and diagnose acquired pediatric spine anomalies in daily practice. An understanding of some of the key differentiating features of these disease processes in conjunction with pertinent history, physical exam, and advanced imaging techniques can indicate the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  3. Spirituality in elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia San Martín Petersen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality may be understood as a group of feelings, beliefs and actions that suppose a search for the transcendent, sacred or divine. As representations about an ultimate power, they contribute to the sense and purpose in life and orient peoples behavior, relationships, and ways to feel and think about reality and about themselves. Since either in the growing old process and in the evaluation of life that occurs when approaching to death it may emerge conflicts, confusion and suffering, people beliefs about what is beyond death, or the answers to the questions about what for and why of life, become determinants in elders well-being. Furthermore, considering that life expectancy has significantly increased, and that the ways of growing old are changing as well as what being old means, and this process advantages and disadvantages or problems, in it ́s different contexts, it ́s necessary to think old age over again, as well as the policies that affect the quality of life of this group of people. Therefore, every professional who assist elderly, specially mental health professionals, must consider the spiritual referents of the individual in order to give the best assistance in whatever problems may appear in the growing old process. 

  4. Technology for helping people

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    The first THE Port hackathon problem-solving workshop was held at CERN from 31 October to 2 November in the framework of the 60th anniversary celebrations. The aim of the event was to develop technological projects that can help to solve the day-to-day needs of people living in areas of the planet that experience conflicts or natural disasters.   Collage of shots from THE Port hackathon. Credit: THE Port association The event was dedicated to humanitarian and social topics inspired by members of non-governmental organisations‬. “There is plenty of room for technology to help in humanitarian fields. That’s why we came up with the idea of bringing people together to work on these topics,” explains Ines Knäpper, Project Manager of THE Port hackathon. “We started six months ago setting up THE Port association.* The success of the event was only possible because of the joint effort of a team of roughly twenty people. They were inspired by the aim...

  5. Genomic view on the peopling of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamang, Rakesh; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2012-10-01

    India is known for its vast human diversity, consisting of more than four and a half thousand anthropologically well-defined populations. Each population differs in terms of language, culture, physical features and, most importantly, genetic architecture. The size of populations varies from a few hundred to millions. Based on the social structure, Indians are classified into various caste, tribe and religious groups. These social classifications are very rigid and have remained undisturbed by emerging urbanisation and cultural changes. The variable social customs, strict endogamy marriage practices, long-term isolation and evolutionary forces have added immensely to the diversification of the Indian populations. These factors have also led to these populations acquiring a set of Indian-specific genetic variations responsible for various diseases in India. Interestingly, most of these variations are absent outside the Indian subcontinent. Thus, this review is focused on the peopling of India, the caste system, marriage practice and the resulting health and forensic implications.

  6. Everyday memory self-assessed by adult patients with acquired brain damage and their significant others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Erik; Wik, Karin; Ostling, Ann-Katrine; Johansson, Magnus; Andersson, Gerhard

    2006-06-01

    Self-assessment of everyday memory dysfunction was examined in a sample of 48 patients with acquired brain injury. A modified version of the Everyday Memory Questionnaire (EMQ20) was used as an interview. Patients were compared to 30 persons without brain injury. EMQ20 was completed by significant others (SOs) to both patients and controls. Patients reported a higher frequency of memory problems (days per week) and more distress due to memory deficits compared to controls. A high degree of consistency was found between patient and SO ratings on these measures. No difference was found on the total usage of memory aids, but patients asked other people more for a reminder and used loose notes less than controls. Implications for rehabilitation and future research are discussed.

  7. [Impact of acquired brain injury towards the community integration: employment outcome, disability and dependence two years after injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Lario, P; Ojeda, N; Tirapu-Ustarroz, J; Pena, J

    2016-06-16

    To analyze the impact of acquired brain injury towards the community integration (professional career, disability, and dependence) in a sample of people affected by vascular, traumatic and tumor etiology acquired brain damage, over a two year time period after the original injury, and also to examine what sociodemographic variables, premorbid and injury related clinical data can predict the level of the person's integration into the community. 106 adults sample suffering from acquired brain injury who were attended by the Neuropsychology and Neuropsychiatry Department at Hospital of Navarra (Spain) affected by memory deficit as their main sequel. Differences among groups have been analyzed by using t by Student, chi squared and U by Mann-Whitney tests. 19% and 29% of the participants who were actively working before the injury got back their previous status within one and two years time respectively. 45% of the total sample were recognized disabled and 17% dependant. No relationship between sociodemographic and clinical variables and functional parameters observed were found. Acquired brain damage presents a high intensity impact on affected person's life trajectory. Nevertheless, in Spain, its consequences at sociolaboral adjustment over the the two years following the damage through functional parameters analyzed with official governmental means over a vascular, traumatic and tumor etiology sample had never been studied before.

  8. Small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLVs) break the species barrier to acquire new host range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minardi da Cruz, Juliano Cezar; Singh, Dinesh Kumar; Lamara, Ali; Chebloune, Yahia

    2013-07-23

    Zoonotic events of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) from non-human primates to humans have generated the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), one of the most devastating infectious disease of the last century with more than 30 million people dead and about 40.3 million people currently infected worldwide. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 and HIV-2), the two major viruses that cause AIDS in humans are retroviruses of the lentivirus genus. The genus includes arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) and Maedi-Visna virus (MVV), and a heterogeneous group of viruses known as small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLVs), affecting goat and sheep. Lentivirus genome integrates into the host DNA, causing persistent infection associated with a remarkable diversity during viral replication. Direct evidence of mixed infections with these two closely related SRLVs was found in both sheep and goats. The evidence of a genetic continuum with caprine and ovine field isolates demonstrates the absence of an efficient species barrier preventing cross-species transmission. In dual-infected animals, persistent infections with both CAEV and MVV have been described, and viral chimeras have been detected. This not only complicates animal trade between countries but favors the risk that highly pathogenic variants may emerge as has already been observed in the past in Iceland and, more recently, in outbreaks with virulent strains in Spain. SRLVs affecting wildlife have already been identified, demonstrating the existence of emergent viruses adapted to new hosts. Viruses adapted to wildlife ruminants may acquire novel biopathological properties which may endanger not only the new host species but also domestic ruminants and humans. SRLVs infecting sheep and goats follow a genomic evolution similar to that observed in HIV or in other lentiviruses. Lentivirus genetic diversity and host factors leading to the establishment of naturally occurring virulent versus avirulent infections, in addition to

  9. Small Ruminant Lentiviruses (SRLVs Break the Species Barrier to Acquire New Host Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Cezar Minardi da Cruz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Zoonotic events of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV from non-human primates to humans have generated the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, one of the most devastating infectious disease of the last century with more than 30 million people dead and about 40.3 million people currently infected worldwide. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 and HIV-2, the two major viruses that cause AIDS in humans are retroviruses of the lentivirus genus. The genus includes arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV and Maedi-Visna virus (MVV, and a heterogeneous group of viruses known as small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLVs, affecting goat and sheep. Lentivirus genome integrates into the host DNA, causing persistent infection associated with a remarkable diversity during viral replication. Direct evidence of mixed infections with these two closely related SRLVs was found in both sheep and goats. The evidence of a genetic continuum with caprine and ovine field isolates demonstrates the absence of an efficient species barrier preventing cross-species transmission. In dual-infected animals, persistent infections with both CAEV and MVV have been described, and viral chimeras have been detected. This not only complicates animal trade between countries but favors the risk that highly pathogenic variants may emerge as has already been observed in the past in Iceland and, more recently, in outbreaks with virulent strains in Spain. SRLVs affecting wildlife have already been identified, demonstrating the existence of emergent viruses adapted to new hosts. Viruses adapted to wildlife ruminants may acquire novel biopathological properties which may endanger not only the new host species but also domestic ruminants and humans. SRLVs infecting sheep and goats follow a genomic evolution similar to that observed in HIV or in other lentiviruses. Lentivirus genetic diversity and host factors leading to the establishment of naturally occurring virulent versus avirulent infections

  10. Perinatally acquired HIV infection in adolescents from sub-Saharan Africa: a review of emerging challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenthal, Elizabeth D; Bakeera-Kitaka, Sabrina; Marukutira, Tafireyi; Chapman, Jennifer; Goldrath, Kathryn; Ferrand, Rashida A

    2014-07-01

    Worldwide, more than three million children are infected with HIV, 90% of whom live in sub-Saharan Africa. As the HIV epidemic matures and antiretroviral treatment is scaled up, children with HIV are reaching adolescence in large numbers. The growing population of adolescents with perinatally acquired HIV infection living within this region presents not only unprecedented challenges but also opportunities to learn about the pathogenesis of HIV infection. In this Review, we discuss the changing epidemiology of paediatric HIV and the particular features of HIV infection in adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. Longstanding HIV infection acquired when the immune system is not developed results in distinctive chronic clinical complications that cause severe morbidity. As well as dealing with chronic illness, HIV-infected adolescents have to confront psychosocial issues, maintain adherence to drugs, and learn to negotiate sexual relationships, while undergoing rapid physical and psychological development. Context-specific strategies for early identification of HIV infection in children and prompt linkage to care need to be developed. Clinical HIV care should integrate age-appropriate sexual and reproductive health and psychological, educational, and social services. Health-care workers will need to be trained to recognise and manage the needs of these young people so that the increasing numbers of children surviving to adolescence can access quality care beyond specialist services at low-level health-care facilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Study of Emotionalism in Patients Undergoing Rehabilitation following Severe Acquired Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna McGrath

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the phenomenon of emotionalism in a sample of brain injured patients of mixed aetiology, with a view to identifying issues relevant to clinical management, and possible causal factors. 82 subjects with severe acquired brain injury undergoing rehabilitation participated in a structured interview in which they were asked to report the presence/absence of emotionalism and degree of distress associated with it. Their overt crying behaviour was also observed and recorded. Independent variables that predicted crying during the interview were identified using a multiple logistic regression procedure. Prevalence rates of emotionalism-tearfulness were high in this sample (52% self-report, 36–41% Emotionalism-laughter was much less common (13% Emotionalism-tearfulness was usually accompanied by negative affect, occurred in response to identifiable precipitants, and was often controllable. It was associated with major personal distress in about half the subjects who reported it. Independent variables which predicted crying behaviour were female gender and focal damage to the right cerebral hemisphere. It is concluded that an increased readiness to cry is common in people with severe acquired brain injury of mixed aetiology. The behaviour is meaningful, though not always distressing. The intensity of the behaviour is variable, and it may be most appropriate to regard emotionalism as a dimension rather than a syndrome. Implications for clinical management are discussed.

  12. Toxicity of oral radiotherapy in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.S.; Fried, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    Although radiotherapy is a standard form of management of head and neck tumors, treatment of the oral cavity in patients who have the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome has produced unacceptable toxicity. Five such patients are described as a warning of enhanced toxicity of oral radiotherapy in this patient population

  13. 33 CFR 211.26 - Functions in acquiring Federal jurisdiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... jurisdiction. 211.26 Section 211.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... PROJECTS Federal Jurisdiction over Real Estate § 211.26 Functions in acquiring Federal jurisdiction. (a) The Division Engineer. Upon determination that Federal jurisdiction is desired over a Civil Works...

  14. A Corpus-Based Comparative Study of "Learn" and "Acquire"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bei

    2016-01-01

    As an important yet intricate linguistic feature in English language, synonymy poses a great challenge for second language learners. Using the 100 million-word British National Corpus (BNC) as data and the software Sketch Engine (SkE) as an analyzing tool, this article compares the usage of "learn" and "acquire" used in natural…

  15. Barriers to acquiring English reading and writing skills by Zulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reflects on an investigation into the barriers that hinder Zulu-speaking. English second language (L2) learners in the Foundation Phase from acquiring reading and writing skills. These barriers are categorised as contextual, language, school and intrinsic learner factors. A questionnaire based on these categories ...

  16. Childhood acquired heart disease in Nigeria: an echocardiographic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Introduction: Acquired heart diseases (AHD) are not uncommon in children. The current multi-center study aims to provide a more representative data of AHD in Nigeria. Methods: Over 42 months, children referred for echocardiographic evaluation who had confirmed AHD in three centers in. Nigeria were recruited.

  17. A case of acquired Gitelman syndrome presenting as hypokalemic paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a young female patient who presented with weakness of upper and lower limbs. On evaluation, she had hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, metabolic alkalosis and hypocalciuria. Anti-Ro (SSA antibody was positive. She had an acquired Gitelman syndrome due to primary Sjögren′s syndrome (SS. SS presenting with features of Gitelman syndrome is very rare.

  18. Latex allergy in an infant with acquired hydrocephalus | Ehiozw ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report the case of a 3 month old male infant with acquired hydrocephalus undergoing ventriculo-peritoneal shunt insertion who developed wheals and suffered a respiratory arrest following contact with latex gloves. The need for anaesthetists to effectively diagnose and properly manage this rare clinical entity is ...

  19. 'Atypical' bacteria are a common cause of community-acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To assess the proportion of cases of community· acquired pneumonia caused by 'atypical' bacteria, inclUding the recently discovered Chlamydia pneumoniae, and to compare the clinical, radiographic and laboratory features of patients with and without 'atypical' bacteria. Methods. A prospective serological ...

  20. Characteristics of Individuals with Congenital and Acquired Deaf-Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, Dawn M.; Hirdes, John P.; Stolee, Paul; Strong, J. Graham; Poss, Jeff; Tjam, Erin Y.; Bowman, Lindsay; Ashworth, Melody

    2009-01-01

    Using a standardized assessment instrument, the authors compared 182 adults with congenital deaf-blindness and those with acquired deaf-blindness. They found that those with congenital deaf-blindness were more likely to have impairments in cognition, activities of daily living, and social interactions and were less likely to use speech for…

  1. 26 CFR 1.9002-6 - Acquiring corporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-6 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES General Actuarial Valuations § 1.9002-6 Acquiring corporation. Section 5(d) of the... corporation by another corporation in a distribution or transfer described in section 381(a) of the Code the...

  2. Staphylococcus aureus strategies to evade the host acquired immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Oliver; Medina, Eva

    2017-09-15

    Staphylococcus aureus poses a significant public-health problem. Infection caused by S. aureus can manifest as acute or long-lasting persistent diseases that are often refractory to antibiotic and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To develop more effective strategies for preventing or treating these infections, it is crucial to understand why the immune response is incapable to eradicate the bacterium. When S. aureus first infect the host, there is a robust activation of the host innate immune responses. Generally, S. aureus can survive this initial interaction due to the expression of a wide array of virulence factors that interfere with the host innate immune defenses. After this initial interaction the acquired immune response is the arm of the host defenses that will try to clear the pathogen. However, S. aureus is capable of maintaining infection in the host even in the presence of a robust antigen-specific immune response. Thus, understanding the mechanisms underlying the ability of S. aureus to escape immune surveillance by the acquired immune response will help uncover potentially important targets for the development of immune-based adjunctive therapies and more efficient vaccines. There are several lines of evidence that lead us to believe that S. aureus can directly or indirectly disable the acquired immune response. This review will discuss the different immune evasion strategies used by S. aureus to modulate the different components of the acquired immune defenses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Idiopathic Acquired Hemophilia A with Undetectable Factor VIII Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas B. Abt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We present the case of a 73-year-old female, with no family or personal history of a bleeding disorder, who had a classic presentation for acquired hemophilia A. Factor VIII activity was low but detectable and a factor VIII inhibitor was undetectable. Methods. The patient’s plasma was comprehensively studied to determine the cause of the acquired coagulopathy. Using the Nijmegen modification of the Bethesda assay, no factor VIII autoantibody was measureable despite varying the incubation time from 1 to 3 hours. Results. The aPTT was prolonged at 46.8 seconds, which did not correct in the 4 : 1 mix but did with 1 : 1 mix. Using a one stage factor VIII activity assay, the FVIII activity was 16% and chromogenic FVIII activity was also 16%. The patient was treated with recombinant FVII and transfusion, significantly reducing bleeding. Long-term therapy was initiated with cyclophosphamide and prednisone with normalization of FVIII activity. Conclusions. Physicians can be presented with the challenging clinical picture of an acquired factor VIII inhibitor without a detectable inhibitor by the Bethesda assay. Standard therapy for an acquired hemophilia A should be considered.

  4. Guiding therapy and adjunctive treatment in community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoorenberg, S.M.C.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Despite the availability of effective antibiotics and vaccines, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains the cause of significant morbidity and mortality worldwide.A major problem is that in absence of full spectrum rapid microbiology diagnostics, the antibiotic treatment at start is

  5. community acquired pneumonia or βhcg - Producing lung tumor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    She developed signs suggestive of βhCG-producing lung tumor with metastasis to the brain and succumbed to the illness before she could be referred for further evaluations and management. Key Words: Community acquired pneumonia, βhCG-producing lung tumor, Paraneoplastic Syndrome, Oculomotor Nerve Palsy.

  6. Use of biocidal surfaces for reduction of healthcare acquired infections

    CERN Document Server

    Borkow, Gadi

    2014-01-01

    A "must read" by all infection control officers determined to protect their patients from infections The Book reviews and discusses "out of the box" measures to fight Healthcare Acquired Infections (HAI) The Book describes how using self-sterilizing surfaces can fight HAI, including those caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens.

  7. Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Development of an autoimmune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaller, M.; Studt, J.-D.; Voorberg, J.; Kremer Hovinga, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    The von Willebrand factor (VWF)-cleaving metalloprotease, ADAMTS13 (adisintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 motifs-13) is the only known target of the dysregulated immune response in acquired TTP. Autoantibodies to ADAMTS13 either neutralize its activity or accelerate its

  8. Purpura fulminans due to acquired protein C deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devdeep Mukherjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpura fulminans (PF may be the presenting symptom in a patient with protein C (PC deficiency. It is a hematological emergency and presents with extensive areas of hemorrhagic necrosis of the skin. PC deficiency is usually genetically inherited. However, we report a 1 year and 4 months boy, who presented with acquired PC deficiency possibly of postinfectious etiology and developed PF.

  9. Treatment of pharyngocutaneous fistula acquired from incisions and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of pharyngocutaneous fistula acquired from incisions and drainage of deep neck space abscess in a patient with occult third branchial anomaly. ... We did surgical exploration to excise and close the fistula but only succeeded at the second attempt. Conclusion: We conclude that branchial apparatus anomaly ...

  10. An unusual ocular presentation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunachalam Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old male who presented with bilateral keratomalacia and on subsequent evaluation was found to be human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive is being reported. A MEDLINE search of the literature did not reveal any report of keratomalacia as the initial presenting feature of HIV/ acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

  11. 30 CFR 879.14 - Management of acquired land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Management of acquired land. 879.14 Section 879.14 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION ACQUISITION, MANAGEMENT, AND DISPOSITION OF LANDS AND WATER § 879.14...

  12. Solithromycin for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viasus, Diego; Ramos, Oscar; Ramos, Leidy; Simonetti, Antonella F; Carratalà, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is a major public health problem worldwide. In recent years, there has been an increase in the frequency of resistance to the antimicrobials such as β-lactams or macrolides which have habitually been used against the causative pathogens. Solithromycin, a next-generation macrolide, is the first fluoroketolide with activity against most of the frequently isolated bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia, including typical and atypical bacteria as well as macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. Areas covered: A detailed assessment of the literature relating to the antimicrobial activity, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, efficacy, tolerability and safety of solithromycin for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia Expert commentary: Recent randomized controlled phase II/III trials have demonstrated the equivalent efficacy of oral and intravenous solithromycin compared with fluoroquinolones in patients with lower mild-to-moderate respiratory infections, and have shown that systemic adverse events are comparable between solithromycin and alternative treatments. However, studies of larger populations which are able to identify infrequent adverse events are now needed to confirm these findings. On balance, current data supports solithromycin as a promising therapy for empirical treatment in adults with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile of community-acquired urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M.S. Barry

    2017-04-28

    Apr 28, 2017 ... Antimicrobial susceptibility profile of community-acquired urinary tract infection in adults: A seven months prospective cross-sectional study in Dakar Town, Senegal. M.S. Barrya,d,∗. , B.A. Diallob, D. Kantéc, I.S. Diallod a Medical Affairs Department, Sanofi West Africa, Senegal b Department of Gynecology, ...

  14. Etiology and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of community-acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community-acquired urinary tract infections occur in individuals not admitted in hospital prior to development of the symptoms of the infection. It occurs mostly in women and caused by Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of urinary tract infection among individuals residing within Jos ...

  15. School Reentry for Children with Acquired Central Nervous Systems Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Joan; Porter, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Onset of acquired central nervous system (CNS) injury during the normal developmental process of childhood can have impact on cognitive, behavioral, and motor function. This alteration of function often necessitates special education programming, modifications, and accommodations in the education setting for successful school reentry. Special…

  16. Learning through Business Games: Acquiring Competences within Virtual Realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortmuller, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The didactic function of business games is often seen only in the development of sociocommunicative competences and general problem-solving strategies. An equally important aspect of business games lies in the acquirement of technical and problem-oriented knowledge, which is the focus of this article. Moreover, this knowledge dimension is further…

  17. Incidence of pulmonary mycoses in patients with acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fungal infections are common complications ofAIDS and pulmonary complications remain a major cause of both morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Such complications can also result in life threatening meningitis and discomforting if not debilitating thrush. The impact of the Acquired Immunodeficiency ...

  18. Hemorrhagic abscess in a patient with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casado-Naranjo, I.; Lopez-Trigo, J.; Ferrandiz, A.; Cervello, A.; Navarro, V.

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis is frequent among patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The common computed tomography appearance of this complication is multiple low density area with ring enhancement. We describe a very rare picture of cerebral toxoplasmosis, this is multiple hemorrhagic toxoplasmic abscess. (orig.)

  19. Hydrocephalus in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soemirien Kasanmoentalib, E.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the occurrence, treatment, and outcome of hydrocephalus complicating community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults. Methods: Case series from a prospective nationwide cohort study from Dutch hospitals from 2006 to 2009. Results: Hydrocephalus was diagnosed in 26 of 577

  20. Childhood acquired heart diseases in Jos, north central Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The patterns of childhood acquired heart diseases (AHD) vary in different parts of the world and may evolve over time. We aimed to compare the pattern of childhood AHD in our institution to the historical and contemporary patterns in other parts of the country, and to highlight possible regional differences and ...

  1. Antibiotic Treatment Strategies for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Douwe F.; Van Werkhoven, Cornelis H.; Van Elden, Leontine J R; Thijsen, Steven F T; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Boersma, Wim G.; Compaijen, Clara J.; Van Der Wall, Eva; Prins, Jan M.; Oosterheert, Jan J.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The choice of empirical antibiotic treatment for patients with clinically suspected community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) who are admitted to non-intensive care unit (ICU) hospital wards is complicated by the limited availability of evidence. We compared strategies of empirical treatment

  2. Community-acquired Streptococcus viridans pneumonia in a healthy child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Fang-Yih; Wang, Chih-Chien; Chang, Yaw-Wen; Chen, Shyi-Jou

    2012-04-01

    Streptococcus viridans is usually considered to be nonpathogenic in healthy patients. Some strains become penicillin-resistant and cause life-threatening infections in immuno-compromised patients. We report an immunocompetent boy who had community-acquired S. viridans pneumonia that was resistant to penicillin. Clinicians should note local patterns of virulence and antibiotic resistance in S. viridans and adjust treatment strategies accordingly.

  3. Cutaneous myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis acquired in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veraldi, S; Francia, C; Persico, M C; La Vela, V

    2009-12-01

    The authors describe a case of cutaneous myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis in a 23-year-old Italian woman who contracted the infestation during a tour in Jamaica. The infestation was located on the back and was characterized clinically by a single inflammatory nodule. To our knowledge, this is the first case of cutaneous myiasis due to Dermatobia hominis acquired in Jamaica.

  4. Epidemiology of bacteria colonization and ICU-acquired infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Health care associated infection (HCAI) or Hospital acquired infection is associated with significant morbidity, mortality and cost. The incidence is about 6% and disproportionately higher in critically ill patients who may have been immune-compromised with many invasive procedures already performed.

  5. Aetiology and outcome of severe community-acquired pneumonia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine the aetiological agents and outcome of severe community-acquired pneumonia (SCAP) in children admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at Kalafong Hospital, Pretoria. Patients and methods. An audit was done after a protocol was implemented to identify the aetiological agents in ...

  6. Management Outcome in Patients with Acquired Gynaetresia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: In marriage, great importance is placed on a satisfactory sexual life and child bearing. Whereas companionship is the primary purpose of marriage in many western societies, here in Nigeria procreation is the central issue in marriage. Acquired gynaetresia is commonly associated with infertility in tropical Africa.

  7. Do learning skills acquired in the university access programme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article I critically evaluate whether or not learning skills acquired in the university access programme enhance participation in academic practice. University access programmes have been developed with a view to preparing and empowering underprepared students who did not meet the university criteria. The article ...

  8. Pattern of Community Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia in Kano, North ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study was to determine the clinical pattern of bacterial community acquired pneumonia amongst patients admitted into medical wards in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano. The study was a descriptive prospective study incorporating consecutive adult patients aged fifteen years and above admitted ...

  9. Prevalence of Hospital Acquired Infections in The Intensive Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hospital acquired infections (HAIs) are defined as infections which develop 48 hours after hospital admission or within 48 hours after being discharged. This study investigates the prevalence rate of HAIs and the risk factors involved in Ilorin Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected from 50 ...

  10. Dermatologia comparativa: fibroqueratoma digital adquirido Comparative dermatology: acquired digital fibrokeratoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rheingantz da Cunha Filho

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Demonstra-se quadro característico de fibroqueratoma digital adquirido em trabalhadora rural de 42 anos de idade, que se compara a corno de rinoceronte.It is presented a case of a 42 year-old white female farmer with the classical feature of acquired digital fibrokeratoma, which is compared to rhinoceros horn.

  11. Thrombocytopenia in intensive care unit: is it related to acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the most common infections in mechanically ventilated patients in the intensive care unit is acquired pneumonia, which has a considerable mortality and morbidity. Low platelet count is considered one of the most common laboratory abnormal finding in ICU, and in this study we are trying to correlate it with ICU ...

  12. Tsukamurella infection: a rare cause of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Yatin B; Goswami, Raktima; Bhanot, Nitin; Mehta, Zankhana; Simonelli, Paul

    2011-06-01

    A 79-year-old Asian man was admitted with community-acquired pneumonia. Antimycobacterial therapy was initiated when sputum smears revealed acid fast bacilli. The patient was, however, diagnosed to have pneumonia secondary to Tsukamurella spp. This is an exceedingly rare cause of pneumonia, especially in immunocompetent individuals. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment strategies of Tsukamurella pneumonia are discussed with a literature review.

  13. Causes of Mortality in ICU-Acquired Weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wagenberg, Linda; Witteveen, Esther; Wieske, Luuk; Horn, Janneke

    2017-01-01

    Intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICU-AW) is a common complication of critical illness and is associated with increased mortality, longer mechanical ventilation and longer hospital stay. Little is known about the causes of mortality in patients with ICU-AW. In this study, we aimed to give an

  14. The motivational needs of primary health care nurses to acquire ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Karien Jooste

    development. This could lead them to feel unmotivated to deliver quality nursing care. It was unclear what the motiva- tional needs of PHC nurses were in the workplace at mine clinic settings. One of the questions posed was: “What are the motivational needs of PHC nurses to acquire power in the workplace at mine clinic ...

  15. Community-acquired pneumonia - a clinical approach to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The implementation of CAP guidelines can decrease patient mortality and limit antibiotic resistance. The South African Thoracic Society (SATS) has revised its guidelines for the management of CAP in adults. This article ...

  16. Bacterial Isolates andAntibiotic Sensitivity in Community Acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of the studywas to determine bacterial causes of community acquired pneumonia and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern amongst patients admitted intomedicalwards inAminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria Methods: The study incorporated patients aged fifteen years and above admitted into ...

  17. The impact of blood glucose on community-acquired pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk; Andersen, Stine Bang

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia is common in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and is a predictor of severe outcomes. Data are scarce regarding whether this association is affected by diabetes mellitus (DM) and also regarding its importance for severe outcomes in hospital. We determined the impact...

  18. Community-acquired Pneumonia in Hospitalized Urban Young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of a comprehensive hospital-based study of acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) in under-five urban Nigerian children, we sought to identify the possible clinical and investigative correlates of lobar versus bronchopneumonia, and the possible determinants of mortality in community-acquired pneumonia. Over a ...

  19. Childhood acquired heart disease in Nigeria: an echocardiographic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Acquired heart diseases (AHD) are not uncommon in children. The current multi-center study aims to provide a more representative data of AHD in Nigeria. Methods: Over 42 months, children referred for echocardiographic evaluation who had confirmed AHD in three centers in Nigeria were recruited. The data ...

  20. Features of Acquired Immunity in Malaria Endemic Areas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of Acquired Immunity in Malaria Endemic Areas. Adults (>15 years) do not suffer from the disease. Concomitant presence of low levels of P. falciparum in immune persons. This immunity is lost within 6-12 months if a person moves out of endemic area. Antibodies mediate protection for the asexual stages of P. falciparum.

  1. Economic Evaluation of Crop Farms Acquired for Crude Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Economic Evaluation of Crop Farms Acquired for Crude Oil Production Activities in Rivers State of Nigeria. ... of economic loss due to crude oil production activities was $165,287.10 out of which pipelines laying accounted for $43,741.25, flow stations ($36,387.92), oil well sites ($31,334.67), gas flaring sites ($10,485.63).

  2. Acquired Dysarthria in Conversation: Identifying Sources of Understandability Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Steven; Wilkinson, Ray

    2009-01-01

    Background: Acquired progressive dysarthria is traditionally assessed, rated, and researched using measures of speech perception and intelligibility. The focus is commonly on the individual with dysarthria and how speech deviates from a normative range. A complementary approach is to consider the features and consequences of dysarthric speech as…

  3. Management of Acquired Atresia of the External Auditory Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajin, Münir Demir; Yılmaz, Taner; Günaydın, Rıza Önder; Kuşçu, Oğuz; Sözen, Tevfik; Jafarov, Shamkal

    2015-08-01

    The aim was to evaluate surgical techniques and their relationship to postoperative success rate and hearing outcomes in acquired atresia of the external auditory canal. In this article, 24 patients with acquired atresia of the external auditory canal were retrospectively evaluated regarding their canal status, hearing, and postoperative success. Acquired stenosis occurs more commonly in males with a male: female ratio of 2-3:1; it seems to be a disorder affecting young adults. Previous ear surgery (13 patients, 54.2%) and external ear trauma (11 patients, 45.8%) were the main etiological factors of acquired ear canal stenosis. Mastoidectomy (12/13) and traffic accidents (8/11) comprise the majority of these etiological factors. Endaural incision is performed in 79.2% and postauricular incision for 20.8% of cases during the operation. As types of surgical approach, transcanal (70.8%), transmastoid (20.8%), and combined (8.4%) approaches are chosen. The atretic plate is generally located at the bony-cartilaginous junction (37.5%) and in the cartilaginous canal (33.3%); the bony canal is involved in a few cases only. Preserved healthy canal skin, split- or full-thickness skin grafts, or pre- or postauricular skin flaps are used to line the ear canal, but preserved healthy canal skin is preferred. The results of surgery are generally satisfactory, and complications are few if surgical principles are followed.

  4. The sensitivity status of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community acquired Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from various infectious sites in two private laboratories in Kano-city, Nigeria. A total of 247 (11%) Staphylococcu aureus isolates were recovered from all infectious sites except cerebro-spinal fluid. The least Staphylococcus aureus isolates were found in urine ...

  5. Spoken Persuasive Discourse Abilities of Adolescents with Acquired Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Catherine; Kirk, Cecilia; Powell, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the performance of adolescents with acquired brain injury (ABI) during a spoken persuasive discourse task. Persuasive discourse is frequently used in social and academic settings and is of importance in the study of adolescent language. Method: Participants included 8 adolescents with ABI and 8 peers…

  6. On the difficulties of acquiring mathematical experience: Case rural education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booss-Bavnbek, Bernhelm

    2014-01-01

    Based on a variety of philosophical approaches and my own work for decades in pure and applied mathematics teaching and research, I explain my view upon the basic difficulties of acquiring the “Mathematical Experience” (in the sense of P.J. Davis and R. Hersh 1981) and submit a list of claims how...

  7. People's Education (for People's Power) — a promise unfulfilled ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a result, the political and educational ideal of 'people's education for 'people's power' has given way to democratic elitism in post-apartheid South African schools. Keywords: democracy; education; elitism; Freedom Charter; participation; people's education; Representative Councils of Learners; School Governing Bodies ...

  8. Stigma models: Testing hypotheses of how images of Nevada are acquired and values are attached to them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins-Smith, H.C. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This report analyzes data from surveys on the effects that images associated with nuclear power and waste (i.e., nuclear images) have on people`s preference to vacation in Nevada. The analysis was stimulated by a model of imagery and stigma which assumes that information about a potentially hazardous facility generates signals that elicit negative images about the place in which it is located. Individuals give these images negative values (valences) that lessen their desire to vacation, relocate, or retire in that place. The model has been used to argue that the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository could elicit images of nuclear waste that would stigmatize Nevada and thus impose substantial economic losses there. This report proposes a revised model that assumes that the acquisition and valuation of images depend on individuals` ideological and cultural predispositions and that the ways in which new images will affect their preferences and behavior partly depend on these predispositions. The report tests these hypotheses: (1) individuals with distinct cultural and ideological predispositions have different propensities for acquiring nuclear images, (2) these people attach different valences to these images, (3) the variations in these valences are important, and (4) the valences of the different categories of images within an individual`s image sets for a place correlate very well. The analysis largely confirms these hypotheses, indicating that the stigma model should be revised to (1) consider the relevant ideological and cultural predispositions of the people who will potentially acquire and attach value to the image, (2) specify the kinds of images that previously attracted people to the host state, and (3) consider interactions between the old and potential new images of the place. 37 refs., 18 figs., 17 tabs.

  9. Charles Dickens' old people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, D C; Charles, L A

    Charles Dickens, rare among authors of any period, presented a host of elderly and old characters in his novels and stories. More than 120 such characters were identified, distributed among four levels of involvement (protagonist to minor role) and six categories of behavior (warm and sympathetic to villainous and threatening). The two-thirds male, one-third female characters tended to be concentrated at the minor, rather than major, levels of involvement in plots, but they represented a great range of behavior. Dickens' old people were fully engaged in life and society and were not age-stereotyped.

  10. Research with Arctic peoples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, H Sally; Bjerregaard, Peter; Chan, Hing Man

    2006-01-01

    entitled "Research with Arctic Peoples: Unique Research Opportunities in Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep Disorders". The meeting was international in scope with investigators from Greenland, Iceland and Russia, as well as Canada and the United States. Multiple health agencies from Canada and the United States...... sent representatives. Also attending were representatives from the International Union for Circumpolar Health (IUCH) and the National Indian Health Board. The working group developed a set of ten recommendations related to research opportunities in heart, lung, blood and sleep disorders; obstacles...

  11. Territories, Peoples, Sovereignty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabino Cassese

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nation States have three defining characteristics: government of a territory, rapport with a group of people and ownership of a sovereign power. All three of these characteristics are undergoing changes. Several developments involve a redefinition of the “State” and produce numerous contradictions, which can only be solved if we consider the historicity of both the phenomenal essence and the conceptual essence of the State. We need to rethink and reconceptualise the State within the context of the new tendencies and transformations delineated by globalisation.

  12. Interdisciplinarity and humanization in the intensive care unit: the physical therapist in service to people with disabilities physical acquired

    OpenAIRE

    Renata dos Santos Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Este trabalho procurou descrever e analisar como o atendimento interdisciplinar/humanizado à pessoa com deficiência física adquirida vem sendo percebido pelo profissional fisioterapeuta pós-graduando atuante no ambiente de UTI, levando em consideração a experiência pessoal do fisioterapeuta e as informações adquiridas no decorrer de sua formação acadêmica. Participaram da pesquisa vinte fisioterapeutas pós-graduandos matriculados em curso de especialização de fisioterapia em terapia intensiva...

  13. Investigation of perceived stigma among people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome in Henan Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The level of perceived HIV stigma and discrimination among PLWHA in Henan Province is moderate and was affected by the level of education and route of infection. Special intervention should be established to address this problem.

  14. The U.K. Pushes the Boundaries of Bionics: Researchers and Engineers Are Making Great Strides Toward Advanced Prosthetics' Ultimate Goal-Mimicking the Functionality of a Real Limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Using state-of-the-art technology, athletes at the Paralympic Games achieve great feats of physical prowess, but for most people using assistive and rehabilitative technologies (ART), even simple tasks can present huge challenges. Many do not make full use of the technology available to them because it is unreliable, uncomfortable, and nonintuitive, so researchers are pushing the envelope to create practical solutions that function like real limbs.

  15. Dual task interference on postural sway, postural transitions and gait in people with Parkinson's disease and freezing of gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Fortaleza, Ana Claudia; Mancini, Martina; Carlson-Kuhta, Patty; King, Laurie A; Nutt, John G; Chagas, Eliane Ferrari; Freitas, Ismael Forte; Horak, Fay B

    2017-07-01

    Freezing of gait (FoG) is associated with less automatic gait and more impaired cognition, balance and postural transitions compared to people with PD who do not have FoG. However, it is unknown whether dual-task cost during postural sway, postural transitions (such as gait initiation and turning), and gait are more in subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD) who have freezing of gait (FoG+) compared to those who do not have FoG (FoG-). Here, we hypothesized that the effects of a cognitive dual task on postural sway, postural transitions and gait would be larger in FoG+ than FoG-. Thirty FoG- and 24 FoG+ performed an Instrumented Stand and Walk test in OFF medication state, with and without a secondary cognitive task (serial subtraction by 3s). Measures of postural sway, gait initiation, turning, and walking were extracted using body-worn inertial sensors. FoG+ showed significantly larger dual task cost than FoG- for several gait metrics, but not during postural sway or postural transitions. During walking, FoG+ exhibited a larger dual task cost than FoG- resulting in shorter stride length and slower stride velocity. During standing, FoG+ showed a larger postural sway compared to FoG- and during gait initiation, FoG+, but not FoG-, showed a longer first step duration during the dual-task condition compared to single-task condition (interaction effect, p=0.04). During turning, both groups showed a slower turn peak speed in the dual-task condition compared to single task condition. These findings partly support our hypothesis that dual task cost on walking is greater in FoG+ than FoG-. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Objective Gait and Balance Impairments Relate to Balance Confidence and Perceived Mobility in People With Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtze, Carolin; Nutt, John G; Carlson-Kuhta, Patricia; Mancini, Martina; Horak, Fay B

    2016-11-01

    Body-worn, inertial sensors can provide many objective measures of balance and gait. However, the objective measures that best reflect patient perception of mobility disability and clinician assessment of Parkinson disease (PD) are unknown. The purposes of this study were: (1) to determine which objective measures of balance and gait are most related to patient perception of mobility disability and disease severity in people with PD and (2) to examine the effect of levodopa therapy on these correlates. This was an experimental correlation study. One hundred four people with idiopathic PD performed 3 trials of the Instrumented Stand and Walk Test (ISAW) in the "on" and "off" medication states. The ISAW consists of quiet standing (30 seconds), gait initiation, straight walking (7 m), and turning (180°), yielding 34 objective measures of mobility from body-worn inertial sensors. Patient perception of mobility disability was assessed with the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale and the mobility subscale of the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39). Disease severity was assessed with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, part III (motor UPDRS). Spearman correlations were used to relate objective measures of mobility to patient perception and disease severity. Turning speed, gait speed, and stride length were most highly correlated to severity of disease and patient perception of mobility disability. The objective measures of mobility in the off-medication state were more indicative of patient perception of mobility disability and balance confidence compared with on-medication state measures. Causation is an inherent problem of correlation studies. Physical therapists should evaluate mobility in people with PD in the off-medication state because the off-medication state is more related to disease severity and patient perception of mobility disability than the on-medication state mobility. Assessment and treatment of mobility in people with PD

  17. Acquiring Second Language Vocabulary through Reading: A Replication of the Clockwork Orange Study Using Second Language Acquirers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Michael; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Adult second language acquirers were asked to read the first two chapters of "A Clockwork Orange," a novel containing a number of slang words of Russian origin. Subsequent testing revealed modest but significant incidental acquisition of nadsat words. (Author/VWL)

  18. Demographic and clinical data in acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoebl, P.; Marco, P.; Baudo, F.; Collins, P.; Huth-Kühne, A.; Nemes, L.; Pellegrini, F.; Tengborn, L.; Lévesque, H.; Aspoeck, Gerold; Heistinger, Max; Knöbl, Paul; Makipernaa, Anne; André, Hélène; Aouba, Achille; Bellucci, Sylvia; Beurrier, Philippe; Borg, Jeanne Yvonne; Darnige, Luc; Devignes, Jean; d'Oiron, Roseline; Gautier, Philippe; Gay, Valérie; Girault, Stéphane; Gruel, Yves; Guerin, Viviane; Hézard, Nathalie; Khellaf, Mehdi; Koenig, Martial; Lévesque, Hervé; Lifermann, François; Marlu, Raphael; Peynet, Jocelyne; Quéméneur, Thomas; Rothschild, Chantal; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Sigaud, Marianne; Trouillier, Sébastien; Voisin, Sophie; Giebl, Andreas; Holstein, Katharina; Huth-Kühne, Angela; Loreth, Ralph M.; Steigerwald, Udo; Tiede, Andreas; Theodossiades, George; Nemes, László; Radvanyi, Gaspar; Schlammadinger, Agota; Barillari, Giovanni; Pasca, Samantha; Baudo, Francesco; Caimi, Teresa; Contino, Laura; Di Minno, Giovanni; Cerbone, Anna Maria; Di Minno, Dario; D'incà, Marco; Falanga, Anna; Maggioni, Anna; Lerede, Teresa; Franchini, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; de Paoli, Lorenzo; Gamba, Gabriella; Ghirardi, Raffaele; Girotto, Mauro; Tasca, Delios; Grandone, Elvira; Tiscia, Giovanni; Imberti, Davide; Iorio, Alfonso; Landolfi, Raffaele; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Novarese, Linda; Mariani, Guglielmo; Lapecorella, Mario; Marietta, Marco; Pedrazzi, Paola; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Santoro, Cristina; Morfini, Massimo; Linari, Silvia; Moratelli, Stefano; Paolini, Rossella; Piseddu, Gavino; Poggio, Renzo; Pogliani, Enrico; Carpenedo, Monica; Remiddi, Chiara; Santagostino, Elena; Santoro, Rita; Papaleo, Giuseppina; Schinco, Piercarla; Borchiellini, Alessandra; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Siragusa, Sergio; Sottilotta, Gianluca; Squizzato, Alessandro; Sartori, Roberto; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Tagliaferri, Anna Rita; Di Perna, Caterina; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Testa, Sophie; Paoletti, Oriana; Toschi, Vincenzo; Zanon, Ezio; Brandolini, Barbara; Hamulyák, Karly; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta; Leebeek, Frank W. G.; Marten, Nijziel; Novakova, Irena; Schutgens, Roger; van der Linden, P. W. G.; van Esser, Joost; van der Meer, J.; Ypma, Paula; Campos, Manuel; Aguilar, Carlos; Altisent, Carmen; Bermejo, Nuria; del Campo, Raquel; Ferreiro Argüelles, María; González Boullosa, Rosario; Gutiérrez Pimentel, María José; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Jose-Felix, Lucia; Pascual, Marco; Mingot, Maria Eva; Perez Garrido, Rosario; Perez Gonzale, Noelia z; Prieto Garcia, Manuel; Rodriguez-Huerta, Ana María; Sedano, Carmen; Tolosa Munoz, Alexandra; Baghaei, Fariba; Tengborn, Lilian; Boehlen, Françoise; Korte, Wolfgang; Chowdary, Pratima; Collins, Peter; Evans, Gillian; Pavord, Suzanne; Rangarajan, Savita; Wilde, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII and characterized by spontaneous hemorrhage in patients with no previous family or personal history of bleeding. Although data on several AHA cohorts have been collected,

  19. Shielding: people and shelter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krissdottir, M.; Simon, J.

    1977-01-01

    Housing is something that protects and defends. This book explores the ways in which humans have sought to defend themselves against physical dangers and to protect themselves against the imagined evils of the natural world by means of the shelters built. The book examines briefly the shelters built in ancient times, and shows how several basic types recurred in different ages and at different times. Following this there is a brief survey of the kinds of shelters built by the native peoples of Canada, depending on their environment--climate, the natural materials on hand--and the culture and life-style of each people. The next chapter explores the psychology of human beings, and how shelters should satisfy not only physical needs but psychological needs as well--the need for companionship and yet for privacy, space for children to play and community centers for adults to meet. The second half of the book looks at the dilemmas of housing today, and at various attempts around the world and in Canada to solve the problems--garden cities in England, the famous community of Tapiola in Finland, the technological innovations of Disneyland, new housing suburbs in Canada. There is a discussion of the problems of urban renewal, of overcoming the high cost of home-ownership--condominiums, cooperatives, owner-built homes, and the disadvantages of trailers--and of overcoming the energy crisis by building ecological houses.

  20. Peopling Global Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Biehl

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The field of Global Health brings together a vastly diverse array of actors working to address pressing health issues worldwide with unprecedented financial and technological resources and informed by various agendas. While Global Health initiatives are booming and displacing earlier framings of the field (such as tropical medicine or international health, critical analyses of the social, political, and economic processes associated with this expanding field — an “open source anarchy” on the ground — are still few and far between. In this essay, we contend that, among the powerful players of Global Health, the supposed beneficiaries of interventions are generally lost from view and appear as having little to say or nothing to contribute. We make the case for a more comprehensive and people-centered approach and demonstrate the crucial role of ethnography as an empirical lantern in Global Health. By shifting the emphasis from diseases to people and environments, and from trickle-down access to equality, we have the opportunity to set a humane agenda that both realistically confronts challenges and expands our vision of the future of global communities.

  1. The effects of prolonged wear of textured shoe insoles on gait, foot sensation and proprioception in people with multiple sclerosis: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Anna L; Dixon, John; Rome, Keith; Brauer, Sandra G; Williams, Katrina; Kerr, Graham

    2016-04-21

    Many people with multiple sclerosis experience problems with walking, which can make daily activities difficult and often leads to falls. Foot sensation plays an important role in keeping the body balanced whilst walking; however, people with multiple sclerosis often have poor sensation on the soles of their feet. Wearing a specially designed shoe insole, which enhances plantar sensory information, could help people with multiple sclerosis to walk better. This study will explore whether long-term wear of a textured insole can improve walking in people with multiple sclerosis. A prospective randomised controlled trial with two parallel groups will be conducted aiming to recruit 176 people with multiple sclerosis living in the community (Brisbane, Australia). Adults with a clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, Disease Steps score 1-4, who are ambulant over 100 m and who meet specific inclusion criteria will be recruited. Participants will be randomised to a smooth control insole (n = 88) or textured insole (n = 88) group. The allocated insole will be worn for 12-weeks within participants' own footwear, with self-report wear diaries and falls calendars being completed over this period. Blinded assessors will conduct two baseline assessments and one post-intervention assessment. Gait tasks will be completed barefoot, wearing standardised footwear only, and wearing standardised footwear with smooth and textured insoles. The primary outcome measure will be mediolateral base of support when walking over even and uneven surfaces. Secondary measures include spatiotemporal gait parameters (stride length, stride time variability, double-limb support time, velocity), gait kinematics (hip, knee, and ankle joint angles, toe clearance, trunk inclination, arm swing, mediolateral pelvis/head displacement), foot sensation (light touch-pressure, vibration, two-point discrimination) and proprioception (ankle joint position sense). Group allocation will be concealed and

  2. Posttraumatic growth following acquired brain injury: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Louise Kinsella

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The idea that acquired brain injury (ABI caused by stroke, haemorrhage, infection or traumatic insult to the brain can result in posttraumatic growth (PTG for individuals is increasingly attracting psychological attention. However PTG also attracts controversy as a result of ambiguous empirical findings. The extent that demographic variables, injury factors, subjective beliefs, and psychological health are associated with PTG following ABI is not clear. Consequently, this systematic review and meta-analysis explores the correlates of variables within these four broad areas and PTG. From a total of 744 published studies addressing PTG in people with ABI, eight studies met inclusion criteria for detailed examination. Meta-analysis of these studies indicated that growth was related to employment, longer education, subjective beliefs about change post-injury, relationship status, older age, longer time since injury, and lower levels of depression. Results from homogeneity analyses indicated significant inter-study heterogeneity across variables. There is general support for the idea that people with ABI can experience growth, and that various demographics, injury-related variables, subjective beliefs and psychological health are related to growth. The contribution of social integration and the forming of new identities post-ABI to the experience of PTG is explored. These meta-analytic findings are however constrained by methodological limitations prevalent in the literature. Clinical and research implications are discussed with specific reference to community and collective factors that enable PTG.

  3. Microsoft Acquired Nokia in Unipolar Operating System Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Netra Pal Singh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent big tickets include Microsoft acquiring part of Nokia for US$ 7.2 billion, Verizon buy 45% stake in Vodafone for US$130 billion, Google acquiring Motorola for 12.5 billion. These buyouts are analyzed and commented by experts of the industry. This research paper attempted to collate their view in the context of Microsoft and Nokia deal on six parameters. These parameters are (i reasons for the downfall of the Nokia market share, (ii general comments of the experts, (iii similarities / dissimilarities of past and business models of the smartphone business, (iv reasons for Microsoft to buy out Nokia, (vi impact of buyout on Microsoft, Nokia, consumers and markets.

  4. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated with blood-product transfusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jett, J.R.; Kuritsky, J.N.; Katzmann, J.A.; Homburger, H.A.

    1983-11-01

    A 53-year-old white man had fever, malaise, and dyspnea on exertion. His chest roentgenogram was normal, but pulmonary function tests showed impaired diffusion capacity and a gallium scan showed marked uptake in the lungs. Results of an open-lung biopsy documented Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Immunologic test results were consistent with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The patient denied having homosexual contact or using intravenous drugs. Twenty-nine months before the diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia was made, the patient had had 16 transfusions of whole blood, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma during coronary artery bypass surgery at another medical center. This patient is not a member of any currently recognized high-risk group and is believed to have contracted the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from blood and blood-product transfusions.

  5. Тhe features of severe community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avramenko I.V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on data from a prospective analysis for the year of observation, the article presents information about the features of severe community acquired pneumonia in patients who were hospitalized at the department of pulmonology (or therapy, as well as department of the intensive care from three teaching hospitals in Dnepropetrovsk, namely "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №6», "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №2», "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №16», which are the clinical ones of "Dnepropetrovsk Medical Academy of the Ministry of Health Ukraine". Dependence of the severity of the condition shown on duration of illness before admission, features of season character of disease. The effect of breathing exercises on the course of the disease. The results can be the basis for a more personal approach to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic programs for patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia.

  6. Acquired factor VIII inhibitor syndrome: A rare cause of hematuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuvel Seral Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old woman presented with gross hematuria for 1 month. Clinical examinations, laboratory investigations, ultrasound and contrast computed tomography were normal, except anemia. Cystoscopy revealed bloody efflux from the right side. Retrograde pyelogram showed filling defect in the renal pelvis and biopsy was inconclusive. Renal angiogram was normal. She developed ecchymosis on the right thigh and arm with elevated activated partial thromboplastin time. The partial thromboplastin time correction study and Bethesda study confirmed the presence of acquired factor VIII inhibitor (acquired hemophilia. With flexible ureterorenoscopy, the mass in the renal pelvis was removed and its histopathology revealed clotted blood. The patient was subsequently managed with steroids and Factor eight inhibitor bypass activity.

  7. Visual online control processes are acquired during observational practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Spencer J; Elliott, Digby; Bennett, Simon J

    2013-07-01

    This experiment examined whether visual online control processes are coded during observational practice. Participants physically practised an aiming sequence while yoked participants either observed (observational practice) or did nothing (control). Two target sizes were used to vary the importance of visual online control processes. Constant error and variable error indicated that participants acquired the timing constraints through physical practice and observational practice. Kinematic data confirmed that the physical practice and observational practice groups executed similar movement control. Physical practice did result in a performance advantage, but only under large target conditions. These findings indicate that visual online control processes can be effectively acquired through observational practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Community-acquired pneumonia: 2012 history, mythology, and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donowitz, Gerald R

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonia remains one of the major disease entities practicing physicians must manage. It is a leading cause of infection-related morbidity and mortality in all age groups, and a leading cause of death in those older than 65 years of age. Despite its frequency and importance, clinical questions have remained in the therapy of community-acquired pneumonia including when to start antibiotics, when to stop them, who to treat, and what agents to use. Answers to these questions have involved historical practice, mythology, and science-sometimes good science, and sometimes better science. How clinical decisions are made for patients with community-acquired pneumonia serves as an illustrative model for other problem areas of medicine and allows for insight as to how clinical decisions have been made and clinical practice established.

  9. Acquired haemophilia: Epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingot-Castellano, Maria Eva; Núñez, Ramiro; Rodríguez-Martorell, Francisco Javier

    2017-04-07

    The development of circulating autoantibodies able to inhibit some coagulation proteins induces severe or even life-threatening bleeding. This disorder is called acquired haemophilia. This is a rare disease, although its impact may be underestimated because of the lack of records, the lack of knowledge by many specialists, the complexity of the laboratory diagnosis and, finally, because of the fulminant clinical presentation that often precludes diagnosis. Several studies established that mortality ranges between 9 and 33%. Not only haematologists but all physicians should be trained to follow the right steps to diagnose these patients as soon as possible in order to reduce such mortality rates. This review approaches the basic concepts dealing with the diagnosis and management of these patients and intends to assist physicians in identifying patients under suspicion of acquired haemophilia to correctly manage them and refer them to the appropriate Haemostasis Unit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated with blood-product transfusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jett, J.R.; Kuritsky, J.N.; Katzmann, J.A.; Homburger, H.A.

    1983-01-01

    A 53-year-old white man had fever, malaise, and dyspnea on exertion. His chest roentgenogram was normal, but pulmonary function tests showed impaired diffusion capacity and a gallium scan showed marked uptake in the lungs. Results of an open-lung biopsy documented Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Immunologic test results were consistent with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The patient denied having homosexual contact or using intravenous drugs. Twenty-nine months before the diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia was made, the patient had had 16 transfusions of whole blood, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma during coronary artery bypass surgery at another medical center. This patient is not a member of any currently recognized high-risk group and is believed to have contracted the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from blood and blood-product transfusions

  11. Acquired heterochromia with horner syndrome in two adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesenhouse, M C; Palay, D A; Newman, N J; To, K; Albert, D M

    1992-12-01

    Heterochromia iridis, asymmetry of iris pigmentation, has been well described with congenital Horner syndrome. Acquired heterochromia associated with lesions in the ocular sympathetic pathways in adulthood, however, is rare. Two cases are reported in which sympathectomy in adults resulted in ipsilateral Horner syndrome with heterochromia. In each case, pharmacologic testing with cocaine and hydroxyamphetamine was performed. In both cases, sympathectomy occurred at the level of the second order neuron, but hydroxyamphetamine testing suggested at least partial third order neuron involvement. Acquired heterochromia can occur in adults. The partial response to hydroxyamphetamine in the two cases presented may reflect trans-synaptic degeneration of the postganglionic neuron. A reduction in trophic influences on iris melanocytes may have contributed to the observed heterochromia.

  12. Training Pseudoword Reading in Acquired Dyslexia: A Phonological Complexity Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Ellyn A.; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Individuals with acquired phonological dyslexia experience difficulty associating written letters with corresponding sounds, especially in pseudowords. Previous studies have shown that reading can be improved in these individuals by training letter-sound correspondence, practicing phonological skills, or using combined approaches. However, generalization to untrained items is typically limited. Aims We investigated whether principles of phonological complexity can be applied to training letter-sound correspondence reading in acquired phonological dyslexia to improve generalization to untrained words. Based on previous work in other linguistic domains, we hypothesized that training phonologically “more complex” material (i.e., consonant clusters with small sonority differences) would result in generalization to phonologically “less complex” material (i.e., consonant clusters with larger sonority differences), but this generalization pattern would not be demonstrated when training the “less complex” material. Methods & Procedures We used a single-participant, multiple baseline design across participants and behaviors to examine phonological complexity as a training variable in five individuals. Based on participants' error data from a previous experiment, a “more complex” onset and a “less complex” onset were selected for training for each participant. Training order assignment was pseudo-randomized and counterbalanced across participants. Three participants were trained in the “more complex” condition and two in the “less complex” condition while tracking oral reading accuracy of both onsets. Outcomes & Results As predicted, participants trained in the “more complex” condition demonstrated improved pseudoword reading of the trained cluster and generalization to pseudowords with the untrained, “simple” onset, but not vice versa. Conclusions These findings suggest phonological complexity can be used to improve

  13. Cerebral computed tomography in men with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, B.; Boesen, F.; Gerstoft, J.; Nielsen, J.O.; Praestholm, J.

    Cerebral CT scannings were performed in 19 homosexual men with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Nearly half of them (9 patients) had cortical atrophy. Three patients with toxoplasmosis had cerebral pathology, in two of them with ring enhancement while the third had an ill-defined nonspecific lesion with slight heterogeneous enhancement without ring formation. Two patients with multifocal leucoencephalopathy and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, respectively, presented non-enhancing, low attenuating lesions at CT.

  14. Neural Alterations in Acquired Age-Related Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Mudar, Raksha A.; Husain, Fatima T.

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic health conditions in older adults. Growing evidence suggests that hearing loss is associated with reduced cognitive functioning and incident dementia. In this mini-review, we briefly examine literature on anatomical and functional alterations in the brains of adults with acquired age-associated hearing loss, which may underlie the cognitive consequences observed in this population, focusing on studies that have used structural and functional m...

  15. Corticosteroids for all adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ger Rijkers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticosteroid therapy as adjunctive treatment in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a promising but controversial subject. The potentially beneficial effect of corticosteroids is based on the ability of steroids to dampen an excessive inflammatory response that often occurs in patients with CAP. This excessive inflammatory response can cause damage to the lungs and other organs, and is associated with poor outcome.

  16. Cutaneous malignant melanoma arising in an acquired naevus of Ota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Clare R S; Acland, Katharine; Khooshabeh, Ramona

    2009-11-01

    Naevus of Ota is a dermal melanocytosis most commonly found in black or Asian skin and is usually a benign malformation, but with a low risk of melanoma. We describe a 32-year-old Caucasian man with an acquired naevus of Ota with subtle pigmentation, in which a melanocytic papule developed. The lesion, deceptively, had no clinically suspicious features, but investigation revealed an aggressive cutaneous malignant melanoma, extensive orbital ring melanocytosis and metastatic brain and subsequent liver disease.

  17. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 negatively regulates systemic acquired resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, M.; Brodersen, P.; Naested, H.

    2000-01-01

    Transposon inactivation of Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 produced the mpk4 mutant exhibiting constitutive systemic acquired resistance (SAR) including elevated salicylic acid (SA) revels, increased resistance to virulent pathogens, and constitutive pathogenesis-related gene expression shown by Northern...... of NPR1. PDF1.2 and THI2.1 gene induction by jasmonate was blocked in mpk4 expressing NahG, suggesting that MPK4 is required for jasmonic acid-responsive gene expression....

  18. Community Acquired Pneumonia Associated Fatal Secondary Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Arun Agarwal; Mudit Agarwal

    2018-01-01

    The burden of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) requiring hospitalization among adults is substantial and is a leading infectious cause of hospitalization and death. Severe CAP may rarely get complicated with secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). The term hemophagocytosis refers to the pathologic finding of activated macrophages engulfing erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, or their precursor cells in the bone marrow, liver, or lymph nodes; this being characteristic for hemoph...

  19. Cerebral computed tomography in men with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, B.; Boesen, F.; Gerstoft, J.; Nielsen, J.O.; Praestholm, J.; Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen; Hvidovre Hospital; Hvidovre Hospital; Hvidovre Hospital

    1986-01-01

    Cerebral CT scannings were performed in 19 homosexual men with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Nearly half of them (9 patients) had cortical atrophy. Three patients with toxoplasmosis had cerebral pathology, in two of them with ring enhancement while the third had an ill-defined nonspecific lesion with slight heterogeneous enhancement without ring formation. Two patients with multifocal leucoencephalopathy and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, respectively, presented non-enhancing, low attenuating lesions at CT. (orig.)

  20. An unusual cause of community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaimie Mittal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of fatal community-acquired pneumonia (CAP due to Acinetobacter baumannii, which is rarely reported in the northeastern United States. Previously reported cases originate from tropical and subtropical climates, and infection tends to have an aggressive course with a poor outcome. Appropriate antimicrobial therapy is crucial; however, the associated systemic inflammatory response may overwhelm host defenses, especially in patients with certain co-morbidities.

  1. Acquired Cytoresistance in the Setting of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Zager, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Pre-existent renal insufficiency is a widely accepted risk factor for superimposed renal damage (e.g., due to ischemia or nephrotoxic drug administration). However, both experimental renal injury and surgical ablation of renal mass in rodents confer protection against superimposed renal insults (the so-called “acquired cytoresistance” state). This study addressed whether baseline renal function is associated with either increased or decreased susceptibility to renal...

  2. Multinational Exploration of Acquired R&D Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Jens

    2004-01-01

    R&D. This paper establishes the connection between amultinational corporation that follows a capability-motivated acquisition strategy and theR&D role new subsidiaries should play in order for the acquired resources to be utilizedcorporation-wide. Statistical findings reveal the need to follow...... a combination of basic andnetwork-oriented R&D activities when focusing on capability development.Keywords: Acquisition; Research and Development (R&D), Basic R&D, Applied R&D,Autonomy, Network, Capabilities....

  3. Differential Protein Expression in Congenital and Acquired Cholesteatomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Ho Shin

    Full Text Available Congenital cholesteatomas are epithelial lesions that present as an epithelial pearl behind an intact eardrum. Congenital and acquired cholesteatomas progress quite differently from each other and progress patterns can provide clues about the unique origin and pathogenesis of the abnormality. However, the exact pathogenic mechanisms by which cholesteatomas develop remain unknown. In this study, key proteins that directly affect cholesteatoma pathogenesis are investigated with proteomics and immunohistochemistry. Congenital cholesteatoma matrices and retroauricular skin were harvested during surgery in 4 patients diagnosed with a congenital cholesteatoma. Tissue was also harvested from the retraction pocket in an additional 2 patients during middle ear surgery. We performed 2-dimensional (2D electrophoresis to detect and analyze spots that are expressed only in congenital cholesteatoma and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS to separate proteins by molecular weight. Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. The image analysis of 2D electrophoresis showed that 4 congenital cholesteatoma samples had very similar protein expression patterns and that 127 spots were exclusively expressed in congenital cholesteatomas. Of these 127 spots, 10 major spots revealed the presence of titin, forkhead transcription activator homolog (FKH 5-3, plectin 1, keratin 10, and leucine zipper protein 5 by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that FKH 5-3 and titin were expressed in congenital cholesteatoma matrices, but not in acquired cholesteatomas. Our study shows that protein expression patterns are completely different in congenital cholesteatomas, acquired cholesteatomas, and skin. Moreover, non-epithelial proteins, including FKH 5-3 and titin, were unexpectedly expressed in congenital cholesteatoma tissue. Our data indicates that congenital cholesteatoma origins

  4. Strongyloidiasis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Kenji; Kogure, Hitoshi; Kaneko, Shingo; Kato, Yasuyuki; Akao, Nobuaki

    2004-06-01

    Rhabditiform larvae, transforming larvae from rhabditiform to filariform, and eggs of Strongyloides stercoralis were identified in the sputum of a Thai woman with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and stool microscopy also showed a heavy load of rhabditiform larvae of S. stercoralis. She was treated with 12 mg ivermectin once a day for 2 days for the strongyloidiasis, with good therapeutic results being obtained. Strongyloidiasis may be a curable disease through the use of an appropriate therapy, even in a patient with AIDS.

  5. Rehabilitation of discourse impairments after acquired brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gigiane Gindri

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Language impairments in patients with acquired brain injury can have a negative impact on social life as well as on other cognitive domains. Discourse impairments are among the most commonly reported communication deficits among patients with acquired brain damage. Despite advances in the development of diagnostic tools for detecting such impairments, few studies have investigated interventions to rehabilitate patients presenting with these conditions. Objective: The aim of this study was to present a systematic review of the methods used in the rehabilitation of discourse following acquired brain injury. Methods: The PubMed database was searched for articles using the following keywords: "rehabilitation", "neurological injury", "communication" and "discursive abilities". Results: A total of 162 abstracts were found, but only seven of these met criteria for inclusion in the review. Four studies involved samples of individuals with aphasia whereas three studies recruited samples of individuals with traumatic brain injury. Conclusion: All but one article found that patient performance improved following participation in a discourse rehabilitation program.

  6. [Community-acquired pneumonia: risk focus and family functionality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo-Sánchez, David López; Sabag-Ruiz, Enrique; Díaz-Verduzco, Manuel de Jesús; Monzón-Vega, Mario Alonso

    2006-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is one of the five most prevalent causes of death worldwide; in Mexico, it accounts for more than 10% of the hospital admissions. To identify the risk factors and the kind of family functionality associated to community-acquired pneumonia among adult patients. With the prior authorization of the research and bioethics committees, a study of cases and controls took place, where both groups were asked about the following variables: alcohol consumption or active smoking, conditions of house and family functionality, anti-flu and anti-pneumococcal vaccination, disablement, and chronic pulmonary disease, among others. It was found that the significant variables were active smoking, disablement, pulmonary emphysema, chronic bronchitis, overcrowding at home, and alcohol consumption; and with a protective effect for this disease: a functional family and anti-pneumococcal vaccination. There are risk factors that predispose the development of community-acquired pneumonia, and that allow us to make a population profile in which some preventive strategy could diminish the frequency and lethality of this disease.

  7. Extrapulmonary cryptococcosis in children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggiadro, R J; Kline, M W; Hughes, W T

    1991-09-01

    There is a paucity of published information available on extrapulmonary cryptococcosis (EC) in children infected with human immunodeficiency virus, the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We surveyed investigators in pediatric acquired immunodeficiency syndrome around the country regarding their experience with EC. Investigators from 33 (87%) of 38 institutions responded and information on 13 patients from 11 institutions was analyzed. EC was the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome indicator disease in 9 (69%) of 13 patients. Median age was 8 years with a range of 2 to 17 years. Human immunodeficiency virus risk factors were transfusion (5 patients), hemophilia (4 patients) and perinatal exposure (4 patients). Meningitis, seen in 62% of patients, was the most common clinical manifestation. Although 2 patients with fulminant disease died before therapy was started, 10 (91%) of 11 had a clinical response to amphotericin B with or without flucytosine. Our study indicates a spectrum of EC in pediatric human immunodeficiency virus infection ranging from fulminant, fatal fungemia to chronic meningitis and fever of unknown origin. Cryptococcosis was generally not the cause of death in patients who initially responded to amphotericin B therapy. Optimal antifungal therapy, including the role of fluconazole, warrants further study.

  8. Acquired intolerance to organic solvents and results of vestibular testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyntelberg, F.; Vesterhauge, S.; Fog, P.; Isager, H.; Zillstorff, K.

    1986-01-01

    Among 160 consecutive patients referred to the Clinic of Occupational Medicine, Rigshospitalet, for symptoms connected with exposure to organic solvents, 20 exhibited symptoms of acquired intolerance to minor amounts of organic solvents. Later, an additional 30 consecutive patients with symptoms of acquired intolerance were included, yielding a total of 43 men and 7 women. The characteristics of the clinical syndrome described are complaints of dizziness, nausea, and weakness after exposure to minimal solvent vapor concentrations. After having tolerated long-term occupational exposure to moderate or high air concentrations of various organic solvents, the patients became intolerant within a short period of time. Since dizziness was a frequent complaint, we tried to obtain a measure of the patients' complaints using vestibular tests. As a diagnostic test the combined vestibular tests had a sensitivity of 0.55 and a specificity of 0.87. No differences between patients with and without intolerance could be detected by the vestibular tests used. We conclude that acquired intolerance to organic solvents is a new but characteristic and easily recognizable syndrome, often with severe consequences for the patient's working ability.

  9. Sepsis syndromes: understanding the role of innate and acquired immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberholzer, A; Oberholzer, C; Moldawer, L L

    2001-08-01

    An intact innate and acquired immune response are essential for defeating systemic microbial infections. Recognition molecules, inflammatory cells, and the cytokines they produce are the principal means for host tissues to recognize invading microbes and to initiate intercellular communication between the innate and acquired immune systems. However, activation of host innate immunity may also occur in the absence of microbial recognition, through expression of internal "danger" signals produced by tissue ischemia and necrosis. When activation of the innate immune system is severe enough, the host response itself can propel the patient into a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), or even multiple system organ failure (MSOF) and shock. Although most patients survive the initial SIRS insult, these patients remain at increased risk of developing secondary or opportunistic infections because of the frequent onset of a compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS). The initial activation of the innate immune response often leads to macrophage deactivation, T-cell anergy, and the rapid apoptotic loss of lymphoid tissues, which all contribute to the development of this CARS syndrome and its associated morbidity and mortality. Initial efforts to treat the septic patient with anticytokine therapies directed at the SIRS response have been disappointing, and therapeutic efforts to modify the immune response during sepsis syndromes will require a more thorough understanding of the innate and acquired immune responses and the increased apoptosis in the lymphoid tissue.

  10. Clinical Characteristics of Community-Acquired Viridans Streptococcal Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sun Ha; Choi, Keum-Ju; Lim, Jae-Kwang; Seo, Hyewon; Yoo, Seung-Soo; Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Shin-Yup; Kim, Chang-Ho; Park, Jae-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Viridans streptococci (VS) are a large group of streptococcal bacteria that are causative agents of community-acquired respiratory tract infection. However, data regarding their clinical characteristics are limited. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the clinical and radiologic features of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with or without parapneumonic effusion caused by VS. Methods Of 455 consecutive CAP patients with or without parapneumonic effusion, VS were isolated from the blood or pleural fluid in 27 (VS group, 5.9%) patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified as a single etiologic agent in 70 (control group) patients. We compared various clinical parameters between the VS group and the control group. Results In univariate analysis, the VS group was characterized by more frequent complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema and bed-ridden status, lower incidences of productive cough, elevated procalcitonin (>0.5 ng/mL), lower age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index score, and more frequent ground glass opacity (GGO) or consolidation on computed tomography (CT) scans. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema, productive cough, bed-ridden status, and GGO or consolidation on CT scans were independent predictors of community-acquired respiratory tract infection caused by VS. Conclusion CAP caused by VS commonly presents as complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema. It is characterized by less frequent productive cough, more frequent bed-ridden status, and less common CT pulmonary parenchymal lesions. However, its treatment outcome and clinical course are similar to those of pneumococcal pneumonia. PMID:26175772

  11. The Dynamics of Naturally Acquired Immunity to Plasmodium falciparum Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkevych, Mykola; Petravic, Janka; Chelimo, Kiprotich; Kazura, James W.; Moormann, Ann M.; Davenport, Miles P.

    2012-01-01

    Severe malaria occurs predominantly in young children and immunity to clinical disease is associated with cumulative exposure in holoendemic settings. The relative contribution of immunity against various stages of the parasite life cycle that results in controlling infection and limiting disease is not well understood. Here we analyse the dynamics of Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection after treatment in a cohort of 197 healthy study participants of different ages in order to model naturally acquired immunity. We find that both delayed time-to-infection and reductions in asymptomatic parasitaemias in older age groups can be explained by immunity that reduces the growth of blood stage as opposed to liver stage parasites. We found that this mechanism would require at least two components – a rapidly acting strain-specific component, as well as a slowly acquired cross-reactive or general immunity to all strains. Analysis and modelling of malaria infection dynamics and naturally acquired immunity with age provides important insights into what mechanisms of immune control may be harnessed by malaria vaccine strategists. PMID:23093922

  12. The Stage Life: Promoting the Inclusion of Young People through Participatory Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickley, Theodore; Crosbie, Brian; Hui, Ada

    2012-01-01

    The Stage Life was a participatory arts programme for people attending a day services provision in Nottinghamshire. The uniqueness of this programme was that it was provided in a local disused cinema acquired by the local authority for community-based activities amongst disadvantaged groups. The Stage Life aimed to build the community arts…

  13. Stigma models: Testing hypotheses of how images of Nevada are acquired and values are attached to them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins-Smith, H.C.

    1994-12-01

    This report analyzes data from surveys on the effects that images associated with nuclear power and waste (i.e., nuclear images) have on people's preference to vacation in Nevada. The analysis was stimulated by a model of imagery and stigma which assumes that information about a potentially hazardous facility generates signals that elicit negative images about the place in which it is located. Individuals give these images negative values (valences) that lessen their desire to vacation, relocate, or retire in that place. The model has been used to argue that the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository could elicit images of nuclear waste that would stigmatize Nevada and thus impose substantial economic losses there. This report proposes a revised model that assumes that the acquisition and valuation of images depend on individuals' ideological and cultural predispositions and that the ways in which new images will affect their preferences and behavior partly depend on these predispositions. The report tests these hypotheses: (1) individuals with distinct cultural and ideological predispositions have different propensities for acquiring nuclear images, (2) these people attach different valences to these images, (3) the variations in these valences are important, and (4) the valences of the different categories of images within an individual's image sets for a place correlate very well. The analysis largely confirms these hypotheses, indicating that the stigma model should be revised to (1) consider the relevant ideological and cultural predispositions of the people who will potentially acquire and attach value to the image, (2) specify the kinds of images that previously attracted people to the host state, and (3) consider interactions between the old and potential new images of the place. 37 refs., 18 figs., 17 tabs

  14. Community-acquired pneumonia in older patients: does age influence systemic cytokine levels in community-acquired pneumonia?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Emer

    2009-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of death in the elderly. The age-related increase in comorbid illnesses plays a part but the effect of aging on the immune response may be equally important. We aimed to evaluate patients with CAP for evidence of a muted response to infection in elderly patients admitted to hospital compared with a younger patient group.

  15. Effects of Postprandial Blood Pressure on Gait Parameters in Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Shailaja; Visvanathan, Renuka; Piscitelli, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Postprandial hypotension (PPH), a fall in systolic blood pressure (SBP) within 2 h of a meal, may detrimentally affect gait parameters and increase the falls risk in older people. We aimed to determine the effects of postprandial SBP on heart rate (HR), gait speed, and stride length, double-support time and swing time variability in older subjects with and without PPH. Twenty-nine subjects were studied on three days: glucose (“G”), water and walk (“WW”), glucose and walk (“GW”). Subjects consumed a glucose drink on “G” and “GW” and water on “WW”. The “G” day determined which subjects had PPH. On “WW” and “GW” gait was analyzed. Sixteen subjects demonstrated PPH. In this group, there were significant changes in gait speed (p = 0.040) on “WW” and double-support time variability (p = 0.027) on “GW”. The area under the curve for the change in gait parameters from baseline was not significant on any study day. Among subjects without PPH, SBP increased on “WW” (p gait parameters remained unchanged on all study days. These findings suggest that by changing gait parameters, PPH may contribute to an increased falls risk in the older person with PPH. PMID:27089361

  16. Exploring Outcome Measures for Exercise Intervention in People with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. King

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is widely believed that exercise improves mobility in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD. However, it is difficult to determine whether a specific type of exercise is the most effective. The purpose of this study was to determine which outcome measures were sensitive to exercise intervention and to explore the effects of two different exercise programs for improving mobility in patients with PD. Methods. Participants were randomized into either the Agility Boot Camp (ABC or treadmill training; 4x/week for 4 weeks. Outcome measures were grouped by the International Classification of Function/Disability (ICF. To determine the responsiveness to exercise, we calculated the standardized response means. t-tests were used to compare the relative benefits of each exercise program. Results. Four of five variables at the structure/function level changed after exercise: turn duration (P=0.03, stride velocity (P=0.001, peak arm speed (P=0.001, and horizontal trunk ROM during gait (P=0.02. Most measures improved similarly for both interventions. The only variable that detected a difference between groups was postural sway in ABC group (F=4.95; P=0.03. Conclusion. Outcome measures at ICF body structure/function level were most effective at detecting change after exercise and revealing differences in improvement between interventions.

  17. Delirium in elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Sharon K; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Saczynski, Jane S

    2014-03-08

    Delirium is an acute disorder of attention and cognition in elderly people (ie, those aged 65 years or older) that is common, serious, costly, under-recognised, and often fatal. A formal cognitive assessment and history of acute onset of symptoms are necessary for diagnosis. In view of the complex multifactorial causes of delirium, multicomponent non-pharmacological risk factor approaches are the most effective strategy for prevention. No convincing evidence shows that pharmacological prevention or treatment is effective. Drug reduction for sedation and analgesia and non-pharmacological approaches are recommended. Delirium offers opportunities to elucidate brain pathophysiology--it serves both as a marker of brain vulnerability with decreased reserve and as a potential mechanism for permanent cognitive damage. As a potent indicator of patients' safety, delirium provides a target for system-wide process improvements. Public health priorities include improvements in coding, reimbursement from insurers, and research funding, and widespread education for clinicians and the public about the importance of delirium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Young people in adult education

    OpenAIRE

    Albert Mrgole

    1997-01-01

    The increasing number of young people participating in adult education programmes has, in the recent years, raised the question of transfer from regular education system to labour market where a large proportion of young people remain socially marginalized and isolated. Young people in adult education are a special target group; in order to plan educational programmes properly, we need to be familiar with their specific characteristics. The article, on the level of a statistical data outline ...

  19. Healthy Places for Healthy People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Describes the Healthy Places for Healthy People technical assistance program that helps communities create walkable, healthy, economically vibrant places by engaging with local health care facility partners

  20. Education Game to Blind People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidya Oktorina Kusuma Sakti

    2015-11-01

    Now there are blind people who have their formal and informal education. Even though they cannot see, they can take benefit from another sense, like sense of hearing, palpability, smell, and taste. Their senses can be a modal to study. Developer games have their build game in audio to blind people too. Their game is variation between audio games and online games, so games can be used for blind people as an education tools. In this paper, there will be an explanation about how to facilitate blind people to study with paper