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  1. Striatonigral Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... See More About Research The NINDS supports and conducts research on disorders of the brain and nervous system such as striatonigral degeneration. This research ... Publications Definition Striatonigral ...

  2. Symptomatic laterality and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the putamen in striatonigral degeneration (SND)

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    Yanagihara, Chie; Ichikawa, Keiji; Kageyama, Yasufumi; Satou, Mutsumi; Hoshino, Masataka (Hyogo Prefectural Amagasaki Hospital (Japan))

    1994-04-01

    The relationship between sympatomatic laterality and lesions of the putamen was investigated by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in 6 patients with striatonigral degeneration (SND). According to Yahr's classification, one patient had I, III, and V each, and 3 had IV. All patients had asymmetric onset of parkinsonism. They developed variable cerebellar ataxia and/or autonomic failure. T1-weighted imaging was most superior in delineating atrophy of the putamen and laterality. The atrophy and lateral difference of the putamen were associated with progression of symptoms. Both the area and the maximum transverse diameter of the putamen were significantly decreased. Atophied putamen extended from the dorsal to the abdominal sides with symptom progression. Attention should be paid to the dorsal side of the putamen in delineating the atrophy and bilateral difference. The measurement of the maximum transverse diameter of the dorsal atrophy of the putamen was a simple, useful means for assessing the atrophy of the putamen. The diameter 7.4 mm or less of the putamen suggested the presence of atrophy. (N.K.).

  3. MRI comparative study of the progressive supranuclear palsy, striatonigral degeneration and Parkinson disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Wulin; Lou Mingwu; Wang Xiaoyi; Liao Weihua

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To provide a reliable differential diagnosis among the progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), striatonigral degeneration (SND) and Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: Conventional MRI data in clinically proved PSP (8 cases), SND (9 cases), PD (12 cases) and 12 normal controls were retrospectively analyzed. Midbrain area, pons area, pons diameter and middle cerebellar peduncles width were measured. The ratio of pons area over midbrain area (pons area / midbrain area) was calculated in all patients and normal controls. Then one way ANOVA and a Kruskal-Wallis H test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Midbrain area of the PSP group [(85.8 ± 12.0 mm 2 ] was the smallest, and there was statistically significant difference (P 2 ], PD group [(133.5 ± 10.8)mm 2 ] and the control group [(135.9 ± 7.5) mm 2 ]. There was no overlapping in the distribution of midbrain area between the PSP group (66.0-98.2 mm 2 ) and SND, PD and normal groups (116.2-142.1, 110.8-146.2 and 121.7-145.8 mm 2 ). The pons area-midbrain area ratio (P/M) of the PSP group (5.9 ± 0.8) was the largest in four groups, and there was statistically significant difference (P 2 , (18.6 ± 2.0) mm and (12.9 ± 2.4) mm] in all groups, and significant difference (P 2 , (22.7 ± 1.7) mm and (16.3 ± 1.1) mm], PD group [3.8 ± 0.3, (500.2 ± 25.8) mm 2 , (23.7 ± 1.0) mm and (16.8 ± 1.1) mm] and the control group [3.8 ± 0.3, (508.8 ± 20.6) mm 2 , (23.2 ± 1.2) mm and (16.4 ± 0.9) mm]. But the PD group and control group had no statistically significant difference in the midbrain area, pons area, pons diameter, P/M and middle cerebellar peduncles width (P > 0.05). Conclusion: MRI measurements helps in the differential diagnosis among PSP, SND and PD. (authors)

  4. Intratelencephalic corticostriatal neurons equally excite striatonigral and striatopallidal neurons and their discharge activity is selectively reduced in experimental parkinsonism

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    Ballion, B. (B.); Mallet, N. (Nicolas); Bezard, E. (E.); Lanciego, J.L. (José Luis); Gonon, F. (Francois)

    2008-01-01

    Striatonigral and striatopallidal neurons form distinct populations of striatal projection neurons. Their discharge activity is imbalanced after dopaminergic degeneration in Parkinson's disease. Striatal projection neurons receive massive cortical excitatory inputs from bilateral intratelencephalic (IT) neurons projecting to both the ipsilateral and contralateral striatum and from collateral axons of ipsilateral neurons that send their main axon through the pyramidal tract (PT). Previous anat...

  5. A dam for retrograde axonal degeneration in multiple sclerosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balk, L.J.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Steenwijk, M.D.; Daams, M.; Tewarie, P.; Killestein, J.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Polman, C.H.; Petzold, A.F.S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Trans-synaptic axonal degeneration is a mechanism by which neurodegeneration can spread from a sick to a healthy neuron in the central nervous system. This study investigated to what extent trans-synaptic axonal degeneration takes place within the visual pathway in multiple sclerosis

  6. Multiple sclerosis and anterograde axonal degeneration study by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Pardo, P.; Capdevila Cirera, A.; Sanz Marin, P.M.; Gili Planas, J.

    1993-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system that affects specifically the myelin. Its diagnosis by imaging techniques is, since the development of magnetic resonance (MR), relatively simple, and its occasional association with anterograde axonal degeneration (WD) has been reported. In both disorders, there is a lengthening of the T1 and T2 relaxation times. In the present report, 76 patients with MS with less than 4 plaques in the typical periventricular position were studied retrospectively, resulting in a rate of association with anterograde axonal degeneration of 8%. We consider that in spite of their same behavior in MR,MS and WD, with moreover represent completely different pathologies, are perfectly differential by MR. The S-E images with longer repetition and echo times in the axial and coronal planes have proved to be those most sensitive for this differentiation. Given that MS is specific pathology of then myelin, the axonal damages in delayed until several plaques adjacent to an axon affect it. We consider that this, added to the restriction of our study group (less than 4 plaques), is the cause of the pow percentage of the MS-WD association in our study. (Author)

  7. Malignant degeneration of multiple cartilaginous exostosis. Diagnostic significance of MRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, H.J.; Schmitt, R.; Moos, P.; Fellner, F.; Dvorak, O.; Rupprecht, H.; Lenz, M.

    1997-01-01

    In summary it can be said that diagnostic radiology, and particularly MRT, for evaluation of malignant degeneration of cartilaginous extoses is of high importance, also because of the difficulties posed by a biopsy for verification of malignancy. Cases of malignant cartilaginous extosis have a good prognosis at the early stages of the disease, when the extosis still is restricted to the focal region. (Orig./AJ) [de

  8. Existence and multiplicity of weak solutions for a class of degenerate nonlinear elliptic equations

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    Mihăilescu Mihai

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to study the existence and the multiplicity of non-trivial weak solutions for some degenerate nonlinear elliptic equations on the whole space . The solutions will be obtained in a subspace of the Sobolev space . The proofs rely essentially on the Mountain Pass theorem and on Ekeland's Variational principle.

  9. Existence and multiplicity of weak solutions for a class of degenerate nonlinear elliptic equations

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    Mihai Mihăilescu

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to study the existence and the multiplicity of non-trivial weak solutions for some degenerate nonlinear elliptic equations on the whole space RN. The solutions will be obtained in a subspace of the Sobolev space W1/p(RN. The proofs rely essentially on the Mountain Pass theorem and on Ekeland's Variational principle.

  10. MRI of the spinocerebellar degeneration (multiple system atrophy, Holmes type, and Menzel-Joseph type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Eiichiro; Makino, Naoki.

    1991-01-01

    We have analyzed MRI in 33 patients with several forms of spinocerebellar degeneration; 17 with multiple system atrophy, 10 with Holmes type, and 6 with Menzel-Joseph type. The MRIs were obtained using a 1.5-T GEMR System. Patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated: atrophy of the brain stem, particularly basis pontis; decreased signal intensity of the white matter of pons; atrophy of the white matter of cerebellum; atrophy and decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions; and atrophy of the cerebrum. Patients with Holmes type showed: atrophy of the cerebellum; atrophy of the vermis more than hemispheres; and nuclei of the cerebellum with no decreased intensity on T 2 -weighted sequences. Patients with Menzel-Joseph type demonstrated moderate atrophy of the brain stem and mild atrophy of the white matter of cerebellum. MRI is a useful diagnostic tool in the management of the spinocerebellar degeneration. (author)

  11. Dorsal Column Degeneration after Bortezomib Therapy in a Patient with Multiple Myeloma

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    Tatsuro Joh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We present here a case of dorsal column degeneration in a female patient with multiple myeloma following exposure to bortezomib. Two days after intravenous administration of a first course of bortezomib 1 mg/m2, the patient developed rapidly-progressive numbness, pain and muscle weakness in the bilateral upper and lower limbs. Following gancyclovir treatment of subsequent cytomegalovirus viremia, the patient went on to receive a course of EPOCH (etoposide 50 mg/m2/day on days 1–4, vincristine 0.4 mg/m2/day on days 1–4, doxorubicin 10 mg/m2/day on days 1–4, cyclophosphamide 750 mg/m2/day on day 6, and prednisolone 60 mg/m2/day on days 1–6. Shortly thereafter, the patient developed bilateral Aspergillus pneumonia. Despite treatment with appropriate antifungal agents, the patient died from respiratory failure due to bilateral diffuse alveolar damage of the lungs and without recovery of severe sensory and motor neuropathy prior to her death. Post mortem examination revealed spongy degeneration of the dorsal column from the medulla oblongata to the cervical spinal cord. Bortezomib-associated peripheral neuropathy in patients with multiple myeloma has been commonly reported but appears to resolve in a majority of these patients after dose reduction or discontinuation. We believe this to be the first report of spinal cord abnormalities in a patient with multiple myeloma treated with bortezomib. Further investigation is required to ascertain the exact mechanism of this central neurotoxic effect and to identify appropriate neuroprotective strategies.

  12. Automated detection of age-related macular degeneration in OCT images using multiple instance learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weiwei; Liu, Xiaoming; Yang, Zhou

    2017-07-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a kind of macular disease which mostly occurs in old people,and it may cause decreased vision or even lead to permanent blindness. Drusen is an important clinical indicator for AMD which can help doctor diagnose disease and decide the strategy of treatment. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is widely used in the diagnosis of ophthalmic diseases, include AMD. In this paper, we propose a classification method based on Multiple Instance Learning (MIL) to detect AMD. Drusen can exist in a few slices of OCT images, and MIL is utilized in our method. We divided the method into two phases: training phase and testing phase. We train the initial features and clustered to create a codebook, and employ the trained classifier in the test set. Experiment results show that our method achieved high accuracy and effectiveness.

  13. Cerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FARA) National Ataxia Foundation (NAF) National Multiple Sclerosis Society See all related organizations Publications Degeneración cerebelosa Order NINDS Publications Definition Cerebellar degeneration is a process in which neurons ( ...

  14. Retinal and Optic Nerve Degeneration in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Followed up for 5 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martin, Elena; Ara, Jose R; Martin, Jesus; Almarcegui, Carmen; Dolz, Isabel; Vilades, Elisa; Gil-Arribas, Laura; Fernandez, Francisco J; Polo, Vicente; Larrosa, Jose M; Pablo, Luis E; Satue, Maria

    2017-05-01

    To quantify retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) changes in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls with a 5-year follow-up and to analyze correlations between disability progression and RNFL degeneration. Observational and longitudinal study. One hundred patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 50 healthy controls. All participants underwent a complete ophthalmic and electrophysiologic exploration and were re-evaluated annually for 5 years. Visual acuity (Snellen chart), color vision (Ishihara pseudoisochromatic plates), visual field examination, optical coherence tomography (OCT), scanning laser polarimetry (SLP), and visual evoked potentials. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores, disease duration, treatments, prior optic neuritis episodes, and quality of life (QOL; based on the 54-item Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life Scale score). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed changes in all RNFL thicknesses in both groups. In the MS group, changes were detected in average thickness and in the mean deviation using the GDx-VCC nerve fiber analyzer (Laser Diagnostic Technologies, San Diego, CA) and in the P100 latency of visual evoked potentials; no changes were detected in visual acuity, color vision, or visual fields. Optical coherence tomography showed greater differences in the inferior and temporal RNFL thicknesses in both groups. In MS patients only, OCT revealed a moderate correlation between the increase in EDSS and temporal and superior RNFL thinning. Temporal RNFL thinning based on OCT results was correlated moderately with decreased QOL. Multiple sclerosis patients exhibit a progressive axonal loss in the optic nerve fiber layer. Retinal nerve fiber layer thinning based on OCT results is a useful marker for assessing MS progression and correlates with increased disability and reduced QOL. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk factors for progressive axonal degeneration of the retinal nerve fibre layer in multiple sclerosis patients.

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    Garcia-Martin, Elena; Pueyo, Victoria; Almarcegui, Carmen; Martin, Jesus; Ara, Jose R; Sancho, Eva; Pablo, Luis E; Dolz, Isabel; Fernandez, Javier

    2011-11-01

    To quantify structural and functional degeneration in the retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) over a 2-year time period, and to analyse the effect of prior optic neuritis (ON) as well as the duration and incidence of MS relapses. 166 MS patients and 120 healthy controls underwent assessment of visual acuity and colour vision, visual field examination, optical coherence tomography, scanning laser polarimetry and visual evoked potentials (VEPs). All subjects were re-evaluated after a period of 12 and 24 months. Changes in the optic nerve were detected by structural measurements but not by functional assessments. Changes registered in MS patients were greater than changes in healthy controls (p<0.05). Eyes with previous ON showed a greater reduction of parameters in the baseline evaluation, but RNFL atrophy was not significantly greater in the longitudinal study. Patients with MS relapses showed a greater reduction of RNFL thickness and VEP amplitude compared with non-relapsing cases. Patients with and without treatment showed similar measurement reduction, but the non-treated group had a significantly higher increase in Expanded Disability Status Scale (p=0.029). MS causes progressive axonal loss in the optic nerve, regardless of a history of ON. This ganglion cell atrophy occurs in all eyes but is more marked in MS eyes than in healthy eyes.

  16. Degenerate ground states and multiple bifurcations in a two-dimensional q-state quantum Potts model.

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    Dai, Yan-Wei; Cho, Sam Young; Batchelor, Murray T; Zhou, Huan-Qiang

    2014-06-01

    We numerically investigate the two-dimensional q-state quantum Potts model on the infinite square lattice by using the infinite projected entangled-pair state (iPEPS) algorithm. We show that the quantum fidelity, defined as an overlap measurement between an arbitrary reference state and the iPEPS ground state of the system, can detect q-fold degenerate ground states for the Z_{q} broken-symmetry phase. Accordingly, a multiple bifurcation of the quantum ground-state fidelity is shown to occur as the transverse magnetic field varies from the symmetry phase to the broken-symmetry phase, which means that a multiple-bifurcation point corresponds to a critical point. A (dis)continuous behavior of quantum fidelity at phase transition points characterizes a (dis)continuous phase transition. Similar to the characteristic behavior of the quantum fidelity, the magnetizations, as order parameters, obtained from the degenerate ground states exhibit multiple bifurcation at critical points. Each order parameter is also explicitly demonstrated to transform under the Z_{q} subgroup of the symmetry group of the Hamiltonian. We find that the q-state quantum Potts model on the square lattice undergoes a discontinuous (first-order) phase transition for q=3 and q=4 and a continuous phase transition for q=2 (the two-dimensional quantum transverse Ising model).

  17. MRI study of degenerative process in multiple system atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo

    1995-01-01

    The characteristic morphological changes of the brainstem and cerebellar regions of multiple system atrophy (MSA) were studied by MRI in varing subtypes, that is olivoponto cerebellar atrophy (OPCA: 23 cases), striatonigral degeneration (SND: 7 cases) and Shy-Drager's syndrome (SDS: 9 cases). OPCA was characterized by atrophy of the entire regions of the brainstem and the cerebellum. SND and SDS tended to show atrophy similar in type but lessin extent to OPCA. The common lesions in MSA were atrophy of the pontine base and cerebellum, and dilation of the fourth ventricle. Atrophy of the pontine base was more dominant in the inferior part than in the superior part, and cerebellar atrophy was more dominant in the superior part than in the inferior part, indicating that degeneration of the pontocerebellar pathway proceeds principally along fibers connecting the inferior part of the pons and the superior part of the cerebellum. Dilation of the fourth ventricle indicated atrophy of the middle cerebellar peduncle. In almost all the cases of OPCA and about a half the cases of SND and SDS, the pontine base and the middle cerebellar peduncle appeared as high signal intensity on T 2 weighted image and as low intensity on T 1 , suggesting degeneration and demyelination. In a few cases of OPCA, the dorsolateral part of the putamen were demonstrated as low signal intensity on T 2 weighted image. (author)

  18. MRI study of degenerative process in multiple system atrophy

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    Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-02-01

    The characteristic morphological changes of the brainstem and cerebellar regions of multiple system atrophy (MSA) were studied by MRI in varing subtypes, that is olivoponto cerebellar atrophy (OPCA: 23 cases), striatonigral degeneration (SND: 7 cases) and Shy-Drager`s syndrome (SDS: 9 cases). OPCA was characterized by atrophy of the entire regions of the brainstem and the cerebellum. SND and SDS tended to show atrophy similar in type but lessin extent to OPCA. The common lesions in MSA were atrophy of the pontine base and cerebellum, and dilation of the fourth ventricle. Atrophy of the pontine base was more dominant in the inferior part than in the superior part, and cerebellar atrophy was more dominant in the superior part than in the inferior part, indicating that degeneration of the pontocerebellar pathway proceeds principally along fibers connecting the inferior part of the pons and the superior part of the cerebellum. Dilation of the fourth ventricle indicated atrophy of the middle cerebellar peduncle. In almost all the cases of OPCA and about a half the cases of SND and SDS, the pontine base and the middle cerebellar peduncle appeared as high signal intensity on T{sub 2} weighted image and as low intensity on T{sub 1}, suggesting degeneration and demyelination. In a few cases of OPCA, the dorsolateral part of the putamen were demonstrated as low signal intensity on T{sub 2} weighted image. (author).

  19. Multiple sclerosis and anterograde axonal degeneration study by magnetic resonance. Asociacion de esclerosis multiple y degeneracion Walleriana estudio por resonancia magnetica

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    Martinez Pardo, P; Capdevila Cirera, A; Sanz Marin, P M; Gili Planas, J [Centro de Resonancia Magnetica de Barcelona (Spain)

    1993-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system that affects specifically the myelin. Its diagnosis by imaging techniques is, since the development of magnetic resonance (MR), relatively simple, and its occasional association with anterograde axonal degeneration (WD) has been reported. In both disorders, there is a lengthening of the T1 and T2 relaxation times. In the present report, 76 patients with MS with less than 4 plaques in the typical periventricular position were studied retrospectively, resulting in a rate of association with anterograde axonal degeneration of 8%. We consider that in spite of their same behavior in MR,MS and WD, with moreover represent completely different pathologies, are perfectly differential by MR. The S-E images with longer repetition and echo times in the axial and coronal planes have proved to be those most sensitive for this differentiation. Given that MS is specific pathology of then myelin, the axonal damages in delayed until several plaques adjacent to an axon affect it. We consider that this, added to the restriction of our study group (less than 4 plaques), is the cause of the pow percentage of the MS-WD association in our study. (Author).

  20. Coenzyme Q10 Levels Are Decreased in the Cerebellum of Multiple-System Atrophy Patients.

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    Lucia V Schottlaender

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the levels of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 in brain tissue of multiple system atrophy (MSA patients differ from those in elderly controls and in patients with other neurodegenerative diseases.Flash frozen brain tissue of a series of 20 pathologically confirmed MSA patients [9 olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA type, 6 striatonigral degeneration (SND type, and 5 mixed type] was used for this study. Elderly controls (n = 37 as well as idiopathic Parkinson's disease (n = 7, dementia with Lewy bodies (n = 20, corticobasal degeneration (n = 15 and cerebellar ataxia (n = 18 patients were used as comparison groups. CoQ10 was measured in cerebellar and frontal cortex tissue by high performance liquid chromatography.We detected a statistically significant decrease (by 3-5% in the level of CoQ10 in the cerebellum of MSA cases (P = 0.001, specifically in OPCA (P = 0.001 and mixed cases (P = 0.005, when compared to controls as well as to other neurodegenerative diseases [dementia with Lewy bodies (P<0.001, idiopathic Parkinson's disease (P<0.001, corticobasal degeneration (P<0.001, and cerebellar ataxia (P = 0.001].Our results suggest that a perturbation in the CoQ10 biosynthetic pathway is associated with the pathogenesis of MSA but the mechanism behind this finding remains to be elucidated.

  1. Clinical and MRI correlation in multiple system atrophy

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    Negoro, Kiyoshi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-05-01

    By using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we studied 11 patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA): 5 olivo-pontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), 2 Shy-Drager syndrome (SDS), and 4 striatonigral degeneration (SND). The diagnoses of OPCA, SDS and SND were clinically made. The MR images were performed on 1.5 tesla MRI unit (Siemens Asahi Medical, Magnetom H15), using a T[sub 2]-weighted spin echo (SE) sequence (TR: 2000-3000 ms, TE: 80-90 ms), a T[sub 1]-weighted SE sequence (TR: 550, TE: 15), and a proton density-weighted (PD) SE sequence (TR: 2000-3000, TE: 12-22). In the patients with OPCA, MRI revealed cerebellar and brainstem atrophy and degeneration of pontine transverse fibers more marked than in the patients with SDS and SND. T[sub 2]-weighted images showed low intensity in posterolateral putamina in one OPCA patient and all of SDS and SND patients. PD images demonstrated the abnormal slit-like high signals in posterolateral putamina in three SND. The degree of cerebellar ataxia was not well correlated with cerebellar and brainstem atrophy and degeneration of pontine transverse fibers. There was a positive correlation between the atrophy of cerebellum and brainstem and the duration of cerebellar ataxia. In most of the patients with Parkinsonism, MRI demonstrated abnormal low signals in putamina on T[sub 2]-weighted images. There were positive correlations between the abnormal low signals putamina and the duration and severity of Parkinsonism. Though abnormal low signals in lateral putamina may be seen in normal aging and other disorders on T[sub 2]-weighted images, it is useful to evaluate Parkinsonism in MSA. We believe that the abnormal slit-like high signals in posterolateral putamina in MSA may suggest loss of neurons and gliosis. (author).

  2. Macular degeneration

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    The macula is the part of the retina that distinguishes fine details at the center of the field of vision. Macular degeneration results from a partial breakdown of the insulating layer between the retina and the choroid layer of ...

  3. Optical Coherence Tomography-A New Diagnostic Tool to Evaluate Axonal Degeneration in Multiple Sclerosis: A Review

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    Nilüfer Kale

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system with a wide spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms. Multiple sclerosis lesions have a predilection for the optic nerves, periventricular white matter, brainstem, spinal cord, and cerebellum. The mechanisms responsible for multiple sclerosis are complex and heterogeneous across patients and disease stages. No specific markers exist for the definite diagnosis and prognosis of multiple sclerosis. The afferent visual pathway, which extends from the retina to the primary visual cortex including the optic nerve, is one of the most commonly affected sites in multiple sclerosis (94-99%. Pathology of affected optic nerves exhibits inflammation, demyelination, gliosis, axonal injury, and thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL. The RNFL is composed of unmyelinated axons, and measuring RNFL thickness is a viable method to monitor axonal loss reflecting disease progression. Optical coherence tomography is a noninvasive and reproducible tool in assessing the impact of multiple sclerosis on the thickness of the RNFL. Assessment of the afferent visual pathway using clinical, imaging and electrophysiological methods provides insights into the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis and may also serve a prognostic role in multiple sclerosis

  4. Quantitative MRI study of progressive cerebral atrophy in multiple system atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Matsuoka, Yukihiko; Konagaya, Yoko

    2002-01-01

    We investigated cerebral atrophy in multiple system atrophy (MSA) by quantitative analysis of MRI. The subjects were 28 patients with MSA (14 striato-nigral degeneration; SND, 14 olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy; OPCA. 106 MRI examinations were performed totally) and 85 normal persons for control. The ratios of the ventral pons to the infratentorial space in the sagittal section, the putamen, cerebrum, frontal lobe and parietal and occipital lobes to the intracranial space in the horizontal section, and the temporal lobe to the intracranial space in the coronal section were measured. In the early stage of the disease, OPCA showed significant atrophy of the ventral pons compared with SND, and conversely, SND demonstrated significantly smaller putamen than that in OPCA. According to the progression of the disease, the atrophy of these neural tissues progressed, which resulted in so significant differences between SND and OPCA. The cerebral atrophy was observed in 17 MSA patients. The atrophy of the frontal lobe was much frequent and prominent to that in the temporal lobe and parietal and occipital lobes. SND showed higher incidence of the cerebral atrophy than OPCA in the early stage of the disease. In long period follow-up cases, one case showed cerebral atrophy in earlier stage, and another case in late stage. We indicated the involvement of the cerebral hemispheres in MSA, especially the frontal lobe. (author)

  5. Quantitative MRI study of progressive cerebral atrophy in multiple system atrophy

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    Konagaya, Masaaki; Matsuoka, Yukihiko [Suzuka National Hospital, Suzuka, Mie (Japan); Konagaya, Yoko [JR Tokai General Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    We investigated cerebral atrophy in multiple system atrophy (MSA) by quantitative analysis of MRI. The subjects were 28 patients with MSA (14 striato-nigral degeneration; SND, 14 olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy; OPCA. 106 MRI examinations were performed totally) and 85 normal persons for control. The ratios of the ventral pons to the infratentorial space in the sagittal section, the putamen, cerebrum, frontal lobe and parietal and occipital lobes to the intracranial space in the horizontal section, and the temporal lobe to the intracranial space in the coronal section were measured. In the early stage of the disease, OPCA showed significant atrophy of the ventral pons compared with SND, and conversely, SND demonstrated significantly smaller putamen than that in OPCA. According to the progression of the disease, the atrophy of these neural tissues progressed, which resulted in so significant differences between SND and OPCA. The cerebral atrophy was observed in 17 MSA patients. The atrophy of the frontal lobe was much frequent and prominent to that in the temporal lobe and parietal and occipital lobes. SND showed higher incidence of the cerebral atrophy than OPCA in the early stage of the disease. In long period follow-up cases, one case showed cerebral atrophy in earlier stage, and another case in late stage. We indicated the involvement of the cerebral hemispheres in MSA, especially the frontal lobe. (author)

  6. Characteristic MRI findings in multiple system atrophy: comparison of the three subtypes

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    Naka, H.; Ohshita, T.; Murata, Y.; Imon, Y.; Mimori, Y.; Nakamura, S. [Department of Internal Medicine, Hiroshima University School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    We reviewed MRI findings in 29 patients with probable multiple system atrophy (MSA) to see whether there were common and or less common neuroradiological findings in the various clinical subtypes. We divided the patients into three clinical subtypes according to initial and predominant symptoms: 14 with olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), eight with the Shy-Drager syndrome (SDS) and seven with striatonigral degeneration (SND). The patients showed atrophy of the brain stem and cerebellum, high signal on T2-weighted images of the base of the pons and middle cerebellar peduncles, high and low signal on T2-weighted images of the putamen and atrophy of frontal and parietal lobes. The degree of atrophy of the middle cerebellar peduncle and cerebellum was greater in OPCA patients and a high-signal lateral rim to the putamen more frequent in SND. However, all findings were observed in all subtypes, and the degrees of atrophy of the putamen and pons and the frequency of high signal in the base of the pons were similar in the subtypes. We also found atrophy of the cerebral hemispheres, especially the frontal and parietal lobes, but its degree was not significantly different in the various subtypes. Our findings suggest that, although MSA can be divided clinically into three subtypes, most of the features on MRI are common and overlap in the subtypes, independently of the clinical presentation. (orig.)

  7. Clinico-MRI study of hemispheric disorder in long-term follow-up cases of multiple system atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Miwa, Shigeru; Matsuoka, Yukihiko; Konagaya, Yoko

    1998-01-01

    Twelve cases of multiple system atrophy (MSA) were studied for clinical and MRI findings of the cerebral hemispheric involvement. The subjects consisted of five olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) type and seven striatonigral degeneration (SND) type. The age at onset was 56.7±8.0 (M±SD) years, duration of illness at the first MRI study 3.2±1.1 years, duration of illness at the last study 8.1±2.2 years, and the following up duration 4.9±2.0 years. The grasping phenomenon was observed in 70% of the cases examined, snout reflex in 80%, slowness of verbal response in 88%, and decrease of spontaneous speech in 100%. Three cases finally fell into the state of mutism. Three out of ten cases were categorized as dementia by HDS-R (Hasegawa Dementia Scale-Revised) test. Besides the progression of the pontocerebellar atrophy and putaminal changes, MRI study revealed progressive frontal lobe atrophy in most cases. At six years after the onset, SND type showed significantly higher incidence of conspicuous frontal lobe atrophy and dilatation of the Sylvian fissure than OPCA type. Cerebral ventricular dilatation was common feature, and atrophy of the temporal and occipital lobes were observed in several cases. We indicated the possible involvement of the cerebral hemisphere, especially the frontal lobe, and higher nervous function in MSA. (author)

  8. Clinico-MRI study of hemispheric disorder in long-term follow-up cases of multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Miwa, Shigeru; Matsuoka, Yukihiko [Suzuka National Hospital, Mie (Japan); Konagaya, Yoko

    1998-12-01

    Twelve cases of multiple system atrophy (MSA) were studied for clinical and MRI findings of the cerebral hemispheric involvement. The subjects consisted of five olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) type and seven striatonigral degeneration (SND) type. The age at onset was 56.7{+-}8.0 (M{+-}SD) years, duration of illness at the first MRI study 3.2{+-}1.1 years, duration of illness at the last study 8.1{+-}2.2 years, and the following up duration 4.9{+-}2.0 years. The grasping phenomenon was observed in 70% of the cases examined, snout reflex in 80%, slowness of verbal response in 88%, and decrease of spontaneous speech in 100%. Three cases finally fell into the state of mutism. Three out of ten cases were categorized as dementia by HDS-R (Hasegawa Dementia Scale-Revised) test. Besides the progression of the pontocerebellar atrophy and putaminal changes, MRI study revealed progressive frontal lobe atrophy in most cases. At six years after the onset, SND type showed significantly higher incidence of conspicuous frontal lobe atrophy and dilatation of the Sylvian fissure than OPCA type. Cerebral ventricular dilatation was common feature, and atrophy of the temporal and occipital lobes were observed in several cases. We indicated the possible involvement of the cerebral hemisphere, especially the frontal lobe, and higher nervous function in MSA. (author)

  9. Fatty Acids Dietary Supplements Exert Anti-Inflammatory Action and Limit Ganglion Cell Degeneration in the Retina of the EAE Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locri, Filippo; Amato, Rosario; Marsili, Stefania; Rusciano, Dario; Bagnoli, Paola

    2018-01-01

    Optic neuritis is an acute inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the optic nerve (ON) and is an initial symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS). Optic neuritis is characterized by ON degeneration and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss that contributes to permanent visual disability and lacks a reliable treatment. Here, we used the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model of MS, a well-established model also for optic neuritis. In this model, C57BL6 mice, intraperitoneally injected with a fragment of the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), were found to develop inflammation, Müller cell gliosis, and infiltration of macrophages with increased production of oncomodulin (OCM), a calcium binding protein that acts as an atypical trophic factor for neurons enabling RGC axon regeneration. Immunolabeling of retinal whole mounts with a Brn3a antibody demonstrated drastic RGC loss. Dietary supplementation with Neuro-FAG (nFAG®), a balanced mixture of fatty acids (FAs), counteracted inflammatory and gliotic processes in the retina. In contrast, infiltration of macrophages and their production of OCM remained at elevated levels thus eventually preserving OCM trophic activity. In addition, the diet supplement with nFAG exerted a neuroprotective effect preventing MOG-induced RGC death. In conclusion, these data suggest that the balanced mixture of FAs may represent a useful form of diet supplementation to limit inflammatory events and death of RGCs associated to optic neuritis. This would occur without affecting macrophage infiltration and the release of OCM thus favoring the maintenance of OCM neuroprotective role. PMID:29517994

  10. Fatty Acids Dietary Supplements Exert Anti-Inflammatory Action and Limit Ganglion Cell Degeneration in the Retina of the EAE Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Dal Monte

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Optic neuritis is an acute inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the optic nerve (ON and is an initial symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS. Optic neuritis is characterized by ON degeneration and retinal ganglion cell (RGC loss that contributes to permanent visual disability and lacks a reliable treatment. Here, we used the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE mouse model of MS, a well-established model also for optic neuritis. In this model, C57BL6 mice, intraperitoneally injected with a fragment of the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG, were found to develop inflammation, Müller cell gliosis, and infiltration of macrophages with increased production of oncomodulin (OCM, a calcium binding protein that acts as an atypical trophic factor for neurons enabling RGC axon regeneration. Immunolabeling of retinal whole mounts with a Brn3a antibody demonstrated drastic RGC loss. Dietary supplementation with Neuro-FAG (nFAG®, a balanced mixture of fatty acids (FAs, counteracted inflammatory and gliotic processes in the retina. In contrast, infiltration of macrophages and their production of OCM remained at elevated levels thus eventually preserving OCM trophic activity. In addition, the diet supplement with nFAG exerted a neuroprotective effect preventing MOG-induced RGC death. In conclusion, these data suggest that the balanced mixture of FAs may represent a useful form of diet supplementation to limit inflammatory events and death of RGCs associated to optic neuritis. This would occur without affecting macrophage infiltration and the release of OCM thus favoring the maintenance of OCM neuroprotective role.

  11. A rapid method of accurate detection and differentiation of Newcastle disease virus pathotypes by demonstrating multiple bands in degenerate primer based nested RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desingu, P A; Singh, S D; Dhama, K; Kumar, O R Vinodh; Singh, R; Singh, R K

    2015-02-01

    A rapid and accurate method of detection and differentiation of virulent and avirulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) pathotypes was developed. The NDV detection was carried out for different domestic avian field isolates and pigeon paramyxo virus-1 (25 field isolates and 9 vaccine strains) by using APMV-I "fusion" (F) gene Class II specific external primer A and B (535bp), internal primer C and D (238bp) based reverses transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). The internal degenerative reverse primer D is specific for F gene cleavage position of virulent strain of NDV. The nested RT-PCR products of avirulent strains showed two bands (535bp and 424bp) while virulent strains showed four bands (535bp, 424bp, 349bp and 238bp) on agar gel electrophoresis. This is the first report regarding development and use of degenerate primer based nested RT-PCR for accurate detection and differentiation of NDV pathotypes by demonstrating multiple PCR band patterns. Being a rapid, simple, and economical test, the developed method could serve as a valuable alternate diagnostic tool for characterizing NDV isolates and carrying out molecular epidemiological surveillance studies for this important pathogen of poultry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aotsuka, Akiyo; Shinotoh, Hitoshi; Hirayama, Keizo [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Ikehira, Hiroo; Hashimoto, Takahiro

    1992-08-01

    We studied 18 patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) by high field strength MRI: 6 striatonigral degeneration (SND), 4 Shy-Drager syndrome (SDS), and 8 olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA). We also studied 30 Parkinson's disease (PD) and 10 age-matched controls. The diagnosis of SND, SDS, and OPCA were based on criteria after Hirayama et al (1985). Bradykinesia, rigidity, and tremor were assessed with the summed scores of the signs used as the extrapyramidal scores. The mean extrapyramidal scores were not significantly different in patients with SND, SDS, OPCA, and PD. MRI studies were performed on 1.5 tesla MRI unit, using a T[sub 2]-weighted spin echo pulse sequence (TR2500 ms/TE40 ms). The width of the pars compacta signal in all subjects was measured by the method of Duguid et al (1986). Intensity profiles were made on a straight line perpendicular to the pars compacta through the center of the red nucleus on an image of the midbrain. We measured the width of the valley at half-height between the peaks of an index of the width of the pars compacta signal. The mean widths of the pars compacta signal were: 2.8[+-]0.4 mm (SND), 2.8[+-]0.7 mm (SDS), 3.6[+-]0.6 mm (OPCA), 2.7[+-]0.3 mm (PD), and 4.3[+-]0.6 mm (control). The mean widths of the pars compacta signal in PD, SND, and SDS were significantly narrower than that in the control group (p<0.05), while the OPCA group was not significantly narrower. The results may indicate that the time course of nigral involvement is milder in OPCA than in SND and SDS. The extrapyramidal signs in OPCA may be attributed mainly to the degeneration of the putamen rather than to that of the substantia nigra. Abnormal hypointensity in the posterolateral putamen was found in only one SND patient and in two OPCA patients, even though this finding has been frequently observed in MSA. Since no PD patients exhibited this finding, it may of some value in differentiating MSA from PD. (author).

  13. Macular degeneration (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... macula in the back of the eye. The macula is important for clear central vision, allowing an individual to see fine details. There are two types of macular degeneration, dry and wet. Dry macular degeneration is more ...

  14. Motor axon excitability during Wallerian degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Alvarez, Susana; Krarup, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Axonal loss and degeneration are major factors in determining long-term outcome in patients with peripheral nerve disorders or injury. Following loss of axonal continuity, the isolated nerve stump distal to the lesion undergoes Wallerian degeneration in several phases. In the initial 'latent' phase......, action potential propagation and structural integrity of the distal segment are maintained. The aim of this study was to investigate in vivo the changes in membrane function of motor axons during the 'latent' phase of Wallerian degeneration. Multiple indices of axonal excitability of the tibial nerve...

  15. Degenerate nonlinear diffusion equations

    CERN Document Server

    Favini, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of these notes is to include in a uniform presentation style several topics related to the theory of degenerate nonlinear diffusion equations, treated in the mathematical framework of evolution equations with multivalued m-accretive operators in Hilbert spaces. The problems concern nonlinear parabolic equations involving two cases of degeneracy. More precisely, one case is due to the vanishing of the time derivative coefficient and the other is provided by the vanishing of the diffusion coefficient on subsets of positive measure of the domain. From the mathematical point of view the results presented in these notes can be considered as general results in the theory of degenerate nonlinear diffusion equations. However, this work does not seek to present an exhaustive study of degenerate diffusion equations, but rather to emphasize some rigorous and efficient techniques for approaching various problems involving degenerate nonlinear diffusion equations, such as well-posedness, periodic solutions, asympt...

  16. Iodine 123-labeled meta-iodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy in the cases of idiopathic Parkinson`s disease, multiple system atrophy, and progressive supranuclear palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshita, Mitsuhiro; Hayashi, Michiyuki; Hirai, Shunsaku [Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital (Japan)

    1997-06-01

    To investigate cardiac sympathetic function in Parkinson`s disease (PD), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy was performed in 25 patients with PD, 25 patients with MSA, 14 patients with PSP, and 20 control subjects. In planar imaging studies, the heart-to-mediastinum average count ratio (H/M) was calculated for both early and delayed images. The mean value of H/M in patients with PD was significantly lower than in those with MSA, PSP, or no disease. Regardless of disease severity or intensity of anti-parkinsonian pharmacotherapy, mean values for H/M were always low in patients with PD. The mean values of H/M in patients with MSA and PSP were significantly lower than in controls. There was no significant difference between the mean value of H/M in MSA with orthostatic hypotension (OH) and that in MSA without OH, and also there was no significant difference between the mean value of H/M in MSA with striatonigral degeneration and that in MSA with olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Although the mean value of H/M in PSP with amitriptyline treatment was significantly lower than that in PSP patients without amitriptyline treatment, there was no significant difference between the mean value of H/M in PSP patients without amitriptyline treatment and that in controls. There was no correlation between H/M and disease duration in those three akinetic-rigid disorders that we have studied here. Thus, PD may have an abnormality of cardiac sympathetic function which has not been detected by previous cardiovascular autonomic studies. Particularly in early stages, {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy may help to differentiate PD from MSA and PSP. (K.H.)

  17. Intact protein analysis of ubiquitin in cerebrospinal fluid by multiple reaction monitoring reveals differences in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeckl, Patrick; Steinacker, Petra; von Arnim, Christine A F; Straub, Sarah; Nagl, Magdalena; Feneberg, Emily; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Ludolph, Albert C; Otto, Markus

    2014-11-07

    The impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is thought to be an early event in neurodegeneration, and monitoring UPS alterations might serve as a disease biomarker. Our aim was to establish an alternate method to antibody-based assays for the selective measurement of free monoubiquitin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Free monoubiquitin was measured with liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in CSF of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Parkinson's disease (PD), primary progressive aphasia (PPA), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The LC-MS/MS method showed excellent intra- and interassay precision (4.4-7.4% and 4.9-10.3%) and accuracy (100-107% and 100-106%). CSF ubiquitin concentration was increased compared with that of controls (33.0 ± 9.7 ng/mL) in AD (47.5 ± 13.1 ng/mL, p < 0.05) and CJD patients (171.5 ± 103.5 ng/mL, p < 0.001) but not in other neurodegenerative diseases. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis of AD vs control patients revealed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.832, and the specificity and sensitivity were 75 and 75%, respectively. ROC analysis of AD and FTLD patients yielded an AUC of 0.776, and the specificity and sensitivity were 53 and 100%, respectively. In conclusion, our LC-MS/MS method may facilitate ubiquitin determination to a broader community and might help to discriminate AD, CJD, and FTLD patients.

  18. Laenderyggens degeneration og radiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP and signi...... is cyclic: exacerbations relieved by asymptomatic periods. New imaging modalities, including the combination of MR imaging and multiplanar 3-D CT scans, have broadened our awareness of possible pain-generating degenerative processes of the lumbar spine other than disc degeneration....

  19. On Degenerate Partial Differential Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Gui-Qiang G.

    2010-01-01

    Some of recent developments, including recent results, ideas, techniques, and approaches, in the study of degenerate partial differential equations are surveyed and analyzed. Several examples of nonlinear degenerate, even mixed, partial differential equations, are presented, which arise naturally in some longstanding, fundamental problems in fluid mechanics and differential geometry. The solution to these fundamental problems greatly requires a deep understanding of nonlinear degenerate parti...

  20. Laenderyggens degeneration og radiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP and signi......Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP...... and significant relationships between radiological findings and subjective symptoms have both been notoriously difficult to identify. The lack of consensus on clinical criteria and radiological definitions has hampered the undertaking of properly executed epidemiological studies. The natural history of LBP...

  1. Quantum degenerate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micheli, Fiorenza de [Centro de Estudios Cientificos, Arturo Prat 514, Valdivia (Chile); Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile); Zanelli, Jorge [Centro de Estudios Cientificos, Arturo Prat 514, Valdivia (Chile); Universidad Andres Bello, Av. Republica 440, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-10-15

    A degenerate dynamical system is characterized by a symplectic structure whose rank is not constant throughout phase space. Its phase space is divided into causally disconnected, nonoverlapping regions in each of which the rank of the symplectic matrix is constant, and there are no classical orbits connecting two different regions. Here the question of whether this classical disconnectedness survives quantization is addressed. Our conclusion is that in irreducible degenerate systems-in which the degeneracy cannot be eliminated by redefining variables in the action-the disconnectedness is maintained in the quantum theory: there is no quantum tunnelling across degeneracy surfaces. This shows that the degeneracy surfaces are boundaries separating distinct physical systems, not only classically, but in the quantum realm as well. The relevance of this feature for gravitation and Chern-Simons theories in higher dimensions cannot be overstated.

  2. Laenderyggens degeneration og radiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    and significant relationships between radiological findings and subjective symptoms have both been notoriously difficult to identify. The lack of consensus on clinical criteria and radiological definitions has hampered the undertaking of properly executed epidemiological studies. The natural history of LBP...... is cyclic: exacerbations relieved by asymptomatic periods. New imaging modalities, including the combination of MR imaging and multiplanar 3-D CT scans, have broadened our awareness of possible pain-generating degenerative processes of the lumbar spine other than disc degeneration....

  3. Degenerate band edge laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veysi, Mehdi; Othman, Mohamed A. K.; Figotin, Alexander; Capolino, Filippo

    2018-05-01

    We propose a class of lasers based on a fourth-order exceptional point of degeneracy (EPD) referred to as the degenerate band edge (DBE). EPDs have been found in parity-time-symmetric photonic structures that require loss and/or gain; here we show that the DBE is a different kind of EPD since it occurs in periodic structures that are lossless and gainless. Because of this property, a small level of gain is sufficient to induce single-frequency lasing based on a synchronous operation of four degenerate Floquet-Bloch eigenwaves. This lasing scheme constitutes a light-matter interaction mechanism that leads also to a unique scaling law of the laser threshold with the inverse of the fifth power of the laser-cavity length. The DBE laser has the lowest lasing threshold in comparison to a regular band edge laser and to a conventional laser in cavities with the same loaded quality (Q ) factor and length. In particular, even without mirror reflectors the DBE laser exhibits a lasing threshold which is an order of magnitude lower than that of a uniform cavity laser of the same length and with very high mirror reflectivity. Importantly, this novel DBE lasing regime enforces mode selectivity and coherent single-frequency operation even for pumping rates well beyond the lasing threshold, in contrast to the multifrequency nature of conventional uniform cavity lasers.

  4. Automated design of degenerate codon libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Marco A; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2005-12-01

    Degenerate codon libraries are frequently used in protein engineering and evolution studies but are often limited to targeting a small number of positions to adequately limit the search space. To mitigate this, codon degeneracy can be limited using heuristics or previous knowledge of the targeted positions. To automate design of libraries given a set of amino acid sequences, an algorithm (LibDesign) was developed that generates a set of possible degenerate codon libraries, their resulting size, and their score relative to a user-defined scoring function. A gene library of a specified size can then be constructed that is representative of the given amino acid distribution or that includes specific sequences or combinations thereof. LibDesign provides a new tool for automated design of high-quality protein libraries that more effectively harness existing sequence-structure information derived from multiple sequence alignment or computational protein design data.

  5. Intervertebral disc degeneration in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergknut, N.

    2011-01-01

    Back pain is common in both dogs and humans, and is often associated with intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. The IVDs are essential structures of the spine and degeneration can ultimately result in diseases such as IVD herniation or spinal instability. In order to design new treatments halting

  6. Intervertebral disc degeneration in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergknut, Niklas

    Back pain is common in both dogs and humans, and is often associated with intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. The IVDs are essential structures of the spine and degeneration can ultimately result in diseases such as IVD herniation or spinal instability. In order to design new treatments halting

  7. Second order degenerate elliptic equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duong Minh Duc.

    1988-08-01

    Using an improved Sobolev inequality we study a class of elliptic operators which is degenerate inside the domain and strongly degenerate near the boundary of the domain. Our results are applicable to the L 2 -boundary value problem and the mixed boundary problem. (author). 18 refs

  8. Double Degenerate Stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin-Lian, Luo; Hua, Bai; Lei, Zhao

    2008-01-01

    Regardless of the formation mechanism, an exotic object, the double degenerate star (DDS), is introduced and investigated, which is composed of baryonic matter and some unknown fermion dark matter. Different from the simple white dwarfs (WDs), there is additional gravitational force provided by the unknown fermion component inside DDSs, which may strongly affect the structure and the stability of such kind of objects. Many possible and strange observational phenomena connecting with them are concisely discussed. Similar to the normal WD, this object can also experience thermonuclear explosion as type Ia supernova explosion when DDS's mass exceeds the maximum mass that can be supported by electron degeneracy pressure. However, since the total mass of baryonic matter can be much lower than that of WD at Chandrasekhar mass limit, the peak luminosity should be much dimmer than what we expect before, which may throw a slight shadow on the standard candle of SN Ia in the research of cosmology. (general)

  9. [Lattice degeneration of the retina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭko, E V; Suetov, A A; Mal'tsev, D S

    2014-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is a clinically important type of peripheral retinal dystrophies due to its participation in the pathogenesis of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. In spite of extensive epidemiological, morphological, and clinical data, the question on causes of this particular type of retinal dystrophies currently remains debatable. Existing hypotheses on pathogenesis of retinal structural changes in lattice degeneration explain it to a certain extent. In clinical ophthalmology it is necessary to pay close attention to this kind of degenerations and distinguish between cases requiring preventive treatment and those requiring monitoring.

  10. An iterative method for selecting degenerate multiplex PCR primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souvenir, Richard; Buhler, Jeremy; Stormo, Gary; Zhang, Weixiong

    2007-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping is an important molecular genetics process, which can produce results that will be useful in the medical field. Because of inherent complexities in DNA manipulation and analysis, many different methods have been proposed for a standard assay. One of the proposed techniques for performing SNP genotyping requires amplifying regions of DNA surrounding a large number of SNP loci. To automate a portion of this particular method, it is necessary to select a set of primers for the experiment. Selecting these primers can be formulated as the Multiple Degenerate Primer Design (MDPD) problem. The Multiple, Iterative Primer Selector (MIPS) is an iterative beam-search algorithm for MDPD. Theoretical and experimental analyses show that this algorithm performs well compared with the limits of degenerate primer design. Furthermore, MIPS outperforms an existing algorithm that was designed for a related degenerate primer selection problem.

  11. Macular degeneration - age-related

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AMD occurs when the blood vessels under the macula become thin and brittle. Small yellow deposits, called drusen, form. Almost all people with macular degeneration start with the dry form. Wet AMD occurs ...

  12. Computed tomography of Wallerian degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Akira; Maeda, Fumihiko

    1986-01-01

    CT findings of wallerian degeneration of the pyramidal tract at the midbrain (atrophy of cerebral peduncle following cerebrovascular accident) were studied in 34 patients (44 CT scans) with old cerebrovascular accidents. Severe atrophy of cerebral peduncle was noted when the ipsilateral motor cortex was involved. However, when the posterior limb of the internal capsule was involved, atrophy of the ipsilateral cerebral peduncle was mild. In this series, the shortest interval between cerebrovascular accident and wallerian degeneration was 8 month. (author)

  13. What Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Age-Related Macular Degeneration Sections What Is Macular Degeneration? How is AMD ... What Does Macular Degeneration Look Like? What Is Macular Degeneration? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es la degeneración macular ...

  14. Solutions to quasilinear equations of $N$-biharmonic type with degenerate coercivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Aouaoui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article we show the existence of multiple solutions for quasilinear equations in divergence form with degenerate coercivity. Our strategy is to combine a variational method and an iterative technique to obtain the solutions.

  15. MR imaging findings of hypertrophic olivary degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Joong; Jeon, Pyung; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-01

    To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) MR images of seven patients with HOD were retrospectively reviewed. Two were women and five were men, and they were aged between 48 and 65 (mean 58) years. Imaging examinations were performed with a 1.5-T unit, and the findings were used to evaluate the size and signal intensity of olivary lesions. The time interval from hemorrhagic ictus to MR imaging was between two and 30 months. Follow-up examinations were performed in two patients. All four patients with hemorrhages involving the central tegmental tract in the pons or midbrain showed ipsilateral HOD. Among these four, bilateral HOD was seen in one patient with hemorrhage involving the bilateral central tegmental tract, and in another with tegmental hemorrhage extending to the ipsilateral superior cerebellar peduncle. One patient with cerebellar hemorrhage involving the dentate nucleus had contralateral HOD. Two patients with multiple hemorrhages involving both the pons and cerebellum showed bilateral HOD. Axial MR images showed mild enlargement of the involved olivary mucleus, with high signal intensity on both proton density and T2 weighted images. There was no apparent enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted images. MR imaging can clearly distinguish secondary olivary degeneration from underlying pathology involving the central tegmental tract in the pons or midbrain and cerebellum. These olivary abnormalities should not, however, be mistaken for primary medullary lesions.

  16. MR imaging findings of hypertrophic olivary degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Joong; Jeon, Pyung; Kim, Dong Ik

    1997-01-01

    To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) MR images of seven patients with HOD were retrospectively reviewed. Two were women and five were men, and they were aged between 48 and 65 (mean 58) years. Imaging examinations were performed with a 1.5-T unit, and the findings were used to evaluate the size and signal intensity of olivary lesions. The time interval from hemorrhagic ictus to MR imaging was between two and 30 months. Follow-up examinations were performed in two patients. All four patients with hemorrhages involving the central tegmental tract in the pons or midbrain showed ipsilateral HOD. Among these four, bilateral HOD was seen in one patient with hemorrhage involving the bilateral central tegmental tract, and in another with tegmental hemorrhage extending to the ipsilateral superior cerebellar peduncle. One patient with cerebellar hemorrhage involving the dentate nucleus had contralateral HOD. Two patients with multiple hemorrhages involving both the pons and cerebellum showed bilateral HOD. Axial MR images showed mild enlargement of the involved olivary mucleus, with high signal intensity on both proton density and T2 weighted images. There was no apparent enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted images. MR imaging can clearly distinguish secondary olivary degeneration from underlying pathology involving the central tegmental tract in the pons or midbrain and cerebellum. These olivary abnormalities should not, however, be mistaken for primary medullary lesions

  17. Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly. AMD is diagnosed based on characteristic retinal findings in individuals older than 50. Early detection and treatment are critical in increasing the likelihood of retaining good and functional vision. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Degenerated differential pair with controllable transconductance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensink, Clemens; Mensink, Clemens H.J.; Nauta, Bram

    1998-01-01

    A differential pair with input transistors and provided with a variable degeneration resistor. The degeneration resistor comprises a series arrangement of two branches of coupled resistors which are shunted in mutually corresponding points by respective control transistors whose gates are

  19. Light and inherited retinal degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Paskowitz, D M; LaVail, M M; Duncan, J L

    2006-01-01

    Light deprivation has long been considered a potential treatment for patients with inherited retinal degenerative diseases, but no therapeutic benefit has been demonstrated to date. In the few clinical studies that have addressed this issue, the underlying mutations were unknown. Our rapidly expanding knowledge of the genes and mechanisms involved in retinal degeneration have made it possible to reconsider the potential value of light restriction in specific genetic contexts. This review summ...

  20. Complement pathway biomarkers and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemenetzi, M; Lotery, A J

    2016-01-01

    In the age-related macular degeneration (AMD) ‘inflammation model', local inflammation plus complement activation contributes to the pathogenesis and progression of the disease. Multiple genetic associations have now been established correlating the risk of development or progression of AMD. Stratifying patients by their AMD genetic profile may facilitate future AMD therapeutic trials resulting in meaningful clinical trial end points with smaller sample sizes and study duration. PMID:26493033

  1. Relativistic many-body XMCD theory including core degenerate effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Takashi

    2009-11-01

    A many-body relativistic theory to analyze X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) spectra has been developed on the basis of relativistic quantum electrodynamic (QED) Keldysh Green's function approach. This theoretical framework enables us to handle relativistic many-body effects in terms of correlated nonrelativistic Green's function and relativistic correction operator Q, which naturally incorporates radiation field screening and other optical field effects in addition to electron-electron interactions. The former can describe the intensity ratio of L2/L3 which deviates from the statistical weight (branching ratio) 1/2. In addition to these effects, we consider the degenerate or nearly degenerate effects of core levels from which photoelectrons are excited. In XPS spectra, for example in Rh 3d sub level excitations, their peak shapes are quite different: This interesting behavior is explained by core-hole moving after the core excitation. We discuss similar problems in X-ray absorption spectra in particular excitation from deep 2p sub levels which are degenerate in each sub levels and nearly degenerate to each other in light elements: The hole left behind is not frozen there. We derive practical multiple scattering formulas which incorporate all those effects.

  2. Disc degeneration: current surgical options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Schizas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain attributed to lumbar disc degeneration poses a serious challenge to physicians. Surgery may be indicated in selected cases following failure of appropriate conservative treatment. For decades, the only surgical option has been spinal fusion, but its results have been inconsistent. Some prospective trials show superiority over usual conservative measures while others fail to demonstrate its advantages. In an effort to improve results of fusion and to decrease the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration, total disc replacement techniques have been introduced and studied extensively. Short-term results have shown superiority over some fusion techniques. Mid-term results however tend to show that this approach yields results equivalent to those of spinal fusion. Nucleus replacement has gained some popularity initially, but evidence on its efficacy is scarce. Dynamic stabilisation, a technique involving less rigid implants than in spinal fusion and performed without the need for bone grafting, represents another surgical option. Evidence again is lacking on its superiority over other surgical strategies and conservative measures. Insertion of interspinous devices posteriorly, aiming at redistributing loads and relieving pain, has been used as an adjunct to disc removal surgery for disc herniation. To date however, there is no clear evidence on their efficacy. Minimally invasive intradiscal thermocoagulation techniques have also been tried, but evidence of their effectiveness is questioned. Surgery using novel biological solutions may be the future of discogenic pain treatment. Collaboration between clinicians and basic scientists in this multidisciplinary field will undoubtedly shape the future of treating symptomatic disc degeneration.

  3. Lattice degeneration of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byer, N E

    1979-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is the most important of all clinically distinct entities that effect the peripheral fundus and are related to retinal detachment. The purpose of this review is to survey the extensive literature, to evaluate the many diverse opinions on this subject, and to correlate and summarize all the known facts regarding this disease entity. The disease is fully defined and described, both clinically and histologically. Some aspects of the disease are still poorly understood, and some remain controversial, especially in the area of management. For this reason, the indications for treatment are discussed under eight subsections, with a view toward providing practical guidelines for recommendations in management.

  4. Age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common macular disease affecting elderly people in the Western world. It is characterised by the appearance of drusen in the macula, accompanied by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) or geographic atrophy. The disease is more common in Caucasian....... Smoking is probably also a risk factor. Preventive strategies using macular laser photocoagulation are under investigation, but their efficacy in preventing visual loss is as yet unproven. There is no treatment with proven efficacy for geographic atrophy. Optimal treatment for exudative AMD requires...

  5. Comparison of Cerebral Glucose Metabolism between Possible and Probable Multiple System Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyum-Yil Kwon

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: To investigate the relationship between presenting clinical manifestations and imaging features of multisystem neuronal dysfunction in MSA patients, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET. Methods: We studied 50 consecutive MSA patients with characteristic brain MRI findings of MSA, including 34 patients with early MSA-parkinsonian (MSA-P and 16 with early MSA-cerebellar (MSA-C. The cerebral glucose metabolism of all MSA patients was evaluated in comparison with 25 age-matched controls. 18F-FDG PET results were assessed by the Statistic Parametric Mapping (SPM analysis and the regions of interest (ROI method. Results: The mean time from disease onset to 18F-FDG PET was 25.9±13.0 months in 34 MSA-P patients and 20.1±11.1 months in 16 MSA-C patients. Glucose metabolism of the putamen showed a greater decrease in possible MSA-P than in probable MSA-P (p=0.031. Although the Unified Multiple System Atrophy Rating Scale (UMSARS score did not differ between possible MSA-P and probable MSA-P, the subscores of rigidity (p=0.04 and bradykinesia (p= 0.008 were significantly higher in possible MSA-P than in probable MSA-P. Possible MSA-C showed a greater decrease in glucose metabolism of the cerebellum than probable MSA-C (p=0.016. Conclusions: Our results may suggest that the early neuropathological pattern of possible MSA with a predilection for the striatonigral or olivopontocerebellar system differs from that of probable MSA, which has prominent involvement of the autonomic nervous system in addition to the striatonigral or olivopontocerebellar system.

  6. Fluoxetine in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (FLUOX-PMS) : study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambron, Melissa; Mostert, Jop; Haentjens, Patrick; D'Hooghe, Marie; Nagels, Guy; Willekens, Barbara; Heersema, Dorothea; Debruyne, Jan; Van Hecke, Wim; Algoed, Luc; De Klippel, Nina; Fosselle, Erwin; Laureys, Guy; Merckx, Henri; Van Wijmeersch, Bart; Vanopdenbosch, Ludo; Verhagen, Wim; Hupperts, Raymond; Hengstman, Gerald; Michiels, Veronique; Van Merhaegen-Wieleman, Annick; De Keyser, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Background: Currently available disease-modifying treatments acting by modifying the immune response are ineffective in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), which is caused by a widespread axonal degeneration. Mechanisms suspected to be involved in this widespread axonal degeneration are reduced

  7. Genetics of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela eGalimberti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD is the most frequent neurodegenerative disorder with a presenile onset. It presents with a spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from behavioural and executive impairment to language disorders and motor dysfunction. Familial aggregation is frequently reported in FTLD, and about 10% of cases have an autosomal dominant transmission. Microtubule Associated Protein Tau gene (MAPT mutations have been the first ones identified and are generally associated with early onset behavioural variant Frontotemporal Dementia (bvFTD phenotype. More recently, progranulin gene (GRN mutations were recognized in association with familial form of FTLD. In addition, other genes are linked to rare cases of familial FTLD. Lastly, a number of genetic risk factors for sporadic forms have also been identified.

  8. Frontotemporal Degeneration in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Tyler; Pascual, Juan M

    2017-07-01

    There is a predilection for the frontal and temporal lobes in certain cases of dementia in the adult, leading to the syndrome of frontotemporal dementia. However, this syndrome has seemed to elude the developing brain until now. We describe an example of apparently selective neurodegeneration of the frontal and temporal regions during development associated with some of the clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) scan features of canonical frontotemporal dementia in the adult. This patient does not have any of the common frontotemporal dementia-causing mutations or known progressive brain disorders of children. This patient illustrates that symptomatic, selective, and progressive vulnerability of the frontal and temporal lobes is not restricted to adulthood, expanding the phenotype of frontotemporal degeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Naturalness of nearly degenerate neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, J.A.; Espinosa, J.R.; Ibarra, A.; Navarro, I.

    1999-01-01

    If neutrinos are to play a relevant cosmological role, they must be essentially degenerate. We study whether radiative corrections can or cannot be responsible for the small mass splittings, in agreement with all the available experimental data. We perform an exhaustive exploration of the bimaximal mixing scenario, finding that (i) the vacuum oscillations solution to the solar neutrino problem is always excluded; (ii) if the mass matrix is produced by a see-saw mechanism, there are large regions of the parameter space consistent with the large angle MSW solution, providing a natural origin for the Δm sol 2 atm 2 hierarchy; (iii) the bimaximal structure becomes then stable under radiative corrections. We also provide analytical expressions for the mass splittings and mixing angles and present a particularly simple see-saw ansatz consistent with all observations

  10. Eigenstate Thermalization for Degenerate Observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anza, Fabio; Gogolin, Christian; Huber, Marcus

    2018-04-01

    Under unitary time evolution, expectation values of physically reasonable observables often evolve towards the predictions of equilibrium statistical mechanics. The eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH) states that this is also true already for individual energy eigenstates. Here we aim at elucidating the emergence of the ETH for observables that can realistically be measured due to their high degeneracy, such as local, extensive, or macroscopic observables. We bisect this problem into two parts, a condition on the relative overlaps and one on the relative phases between the eigenbases of the observable and Hamiltonian. We show that the relative overlaps are unbiased for highly degenerate observables and demonstrate that unless relative phases conspire to cumulative effects, this makes such observables verify the ETH. Through this we elucidate potential pathways towards proofs of thermalization.

  11. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations. PMID:22705444

  12. CERKL knockdown causes retinal degeneration in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Riera

    Full Text Available The human CERKL gene is responsible for common and severe forms of retinal dystrophies. Despite intense in vitro studies at the molecular and cellular level and in vivo analyses of the retina of murine knockout models, CERKL function remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to approach the developmental and functional features of cerkl in Danio rerio within an Evo-Devo framework. We show that gene expression increases from early developmental stages until the formation of the retina in the optic cup. Unlike the high mRNA-CERKL isoform multiplicity shown in mammals, the moderate transcriptional complexity in fish facilitates phenotypic studies derived from gene silencing. Moreover, of relevance to pathogenicity, teleost CERKL shares the two main human protein isoforms. Morpholino injection has been used to generate a cerkl knockdown zebrafish model. The morphant phenotype results in abnormal eye development with lamination defects, failure to develop photoreceptor outer segments, increased apoptosis of retinal cells and small eyes. Our data support that zebrafish Cerkl does not interfere with proliferation and neural differentiation during early developmental stages but is relevant for survival and protection of the retinal tissue. Overall, we propose that this zebrafish model is a powerful tool to unveil CERKL contribution to human retinal degeneration.

  13. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riedl L

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lina Riedl,1 Ian R Mackenzie,2 Hans Förstl,1 Alexander Kurz,1 Janine Diehl-Schmid1 1Center for Cognitive Disorders, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany; 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada Abstract: The term frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD refers to a group of progressive brain diseases, which preferentially involve the frontal and temporal lobes. Depending on the primary site of atrophy, the clinical manifestation is dominated by behavior alterations or impairment of language. The onset of symptoms usually occurs before the age of 60 years, and the mean survival from diagnosis varies between 3 and 10 years. The prevalence is estimated at 15 per 100,000 in the population aged between 45 and 65 years, which is similar to the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in this age group. There are two major clinical subtypes, behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia and primary progressive aphasia. The neuropathology underlying the clinical syndromes is also heterogeneous. A common feature is the accumulation of certain neuronal proteins. Of these, the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT, the transactive response DNA-binding protein, and the fused in sarcoma protein are most important. Approximately 10% to 30% of FTLD shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, with mutations in the genes for MAPT, progranulin (GRN, and in the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72 accounting for more than 80% of familial cases. Although significant advances have been made in recent years regarding diagnostic criteria, clinical assessment instruments, neuropsychological tests, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, and brain imaging techniques, the clinical diagnosis remains a challenge. To date, there is no specific pharmacological treatment for FTLD. Some evidence has been provided for serotonin reuptake

  14. Disk degeneration in 14 year old children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkintalo, M.; Salminen, J.J.; Paajanen, H.; Terho, P.; Kormano, M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports low back symptoms of 1,500 school children (14 years old) evaluated with a questionnaire and with a standardized clinical examination. Forty children who complained of recurrent and/or persistent low back pain and 40 matching symptomless controls were randomly chosen to undergo MR imaging of the lumbar spine. Premature disk degeneration was seen in 25.5% of asymptomatic children and in 40% of those with low back pain. The difference was statistically not significant. Disk degeneration is a surprisingly frequent MR finding in symptomless children. Premature disk degeneration may be the cause of low back pain in some children but is not always symptomatic in childhood

  15. Total absorption by degenerate critical coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, Jessica R., E-mail: jrylan@stanford.edu; Liu, Victor; Fan, Shanhui, E-mail: shanhui@stanford.edu [Ginzton Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-06-23

    We consider a mirror-symmetric resonator with two ports. We show that, when excited from a single port, complete absorption can be achieved through critical coupling to degenerate resonances with opposite symmetry. Moreover, any time two resonances with opposite symmetry are degenerate in frequency and absorption is always significantly enhanced. In contrast, when two resonances with the same symmetry are nearly degenerate, there is no absorption enhancement. We numerically demonstrate these effects using a graphene monolayer on top of a photonic crystal slab, illuminated from a single side in the near-infrared.

  16. Genetics of frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aswathy P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD is a highly heterogenous group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by atrophy of prefrontal and anterior temporal cortices. Recently, the research in the field of FTLD has gained increased attention due to the clinical, neuropathological, and genetic heterogeneity and has increased our understanding of the disease pathogenesis. FTLD is a genetically complex disorder. It has a strong genetic basis and 50% of patients show a positive family history for FTLD. Linkage studies have revealed seven chromosomal loci and a number of genes including MAPT, PGRN, VCP, and CHMB-2B are associated with the disease. Neuropathologically, FTLD is classified into tauopathies and ubiquitinopathies. The vast majority of FTLD cases are characterized by pathological accumulation of tau or TDP-43 positive inclusions, each as an outcome of mutations in MAPT or PGRN, respectively. Identification of novel proteins involved in the pathophysiology of the disease, such as progranulin and TDP-43, may prove to be excellent biomarkers of disease progression and thereby lead to the development of better therapeutic options through pharmacogenomics. However, much more dissections into the causative pathways are needed to get a full picture of the etiology. Over the past decade, advances in research on the genetics of FTLD have revealed many pathogenic mutations leading to different clinical manifestations of the disease. This review discusses the current concepts and recent advances in our understanding of the genetics of FTLD.

  17. Degeneration of biogenic superparamagnetic magnetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y-L; Pfiffner, S M; Dyar, M D; Vali, H; Konhauser, K; Cole, D R; Rondinone, A J; Phelps, T J

    2009-01-01

    Magnetite crystals precipitated as a consequence of Fe(III) reduction by Shewanella algae BrY after 265 h incubation and 5-year anaerobic storage were investigated with transmission electron microscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The magnetite crystals were typically superparamagnetic with an approximate size of 13 nm. The lattice constants of the 265 h and 5-year crystals are 8.4164A and 8.3774A, respectively. The Mössbauer spectra indicated that the 265 h magnetite had excess Fe(II) in its crystal-chemistry (Fe(3+) (1.990)Fe(2+) (1.015)O(4)) but the 5-year magnetite was Fe(II)-deficient in stoichiometry (Fe(3+) (2.388)Fe(2+) (0.419)O(4)). Such crystal-chemical changes may be indicative of the degeneration of superparamagnetic magnetite through the aqueous oxidization of Fe(II) anaerobically, and the concomitant oxidation of the organic phases (fatty acid methyl esters) that were present during the initial formation of the magnetite. The observation of a corona structure on the aged magnetite corroborates the anaerobic oxidation of Fe(II) on the outer layers of magnetite crystals. These results suggest that there may be a possible link between the enzymatic activity of the bacteria and the stability of Fe(II)-excess magnetite, which may help explain why stable nano-magnetite grains are seldom preserved in natural environments.

  18. Degeneration of Biogenic Superparamagnetic Magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dr. Yi-Liang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Pfiffner, Susan M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dyar, Dr. M Darby [Mount Holyoke College; Vali, Dr. Hojatolah [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Konhauser, Dr, Kurt [University of Alberta; Cole, David R [ORNL; Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Magnetite crystals precipitated as a consequence of Fe(III) reduction by Shewanella algae BrY after 265 hours incubation and 5-year storage were investigated with transmission electron microscopy, M ssbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The magnetite crystals were typically superparamagnetic with an approximate size of 13 nm. The lattice constants of the 265 hour and 5-year crystals are 8.4164 and 8.3774 , respectively. The M ssbauer spectra indicated that the 265 hour magnetite had excess Fe(II) in its crystal-chemistry (Fe3+1.9901Fe2+ 1.0149O4) but the 5-year magnetite was Fe(II)-deficient in stoichiometry (Fe3+2.3875Fe2+0.4188O4). Such crystal-hemical changes may be indicative of the degeneration of superparamagnetic magnetite through the aqueous oxidization of Fe(II) anaerobically, and the concomitant oxidation of the organic phases(fatty acid methyl esters) that were present during the initial formation of the magnetite. The observation of a corona structure on the aged magnetite corroborates the oxidation of Fe(II) on the outer layers of magnetite crystals. These results suggest that there may be a possible link between the enzymatic activity of the bacteria and the stability of Fe(II)-excess magnetite, which may help explain why stable nano-magnetite grains are seldom preserved in natural environments.

  19. Preparing a highly degenerate Fermi gas in an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J. R.; Huckans, J. H.; Stites, R. W.; Hazlett, E. L.; O'Hara, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a method to prepare fermionic atoms in a three-dimensional optical lattice at unprecedentedly low temperatures and uniform filling factors. The process involves adiabatic loading of degenerate atoms into multiple energy bands of an optical lattice followed by a filtering stage whereby atoms from all but the lowest band are removed. Of critical importance is the use of a nonharmonic trapping potential to provide external confinement for the atoms. For realistic experimental parameters, this procedure will produce a Fermi gas in a lattice with a reduced temperature T/T F ∼0.003 and an entropy per particle of s∼0.02 k B .

  20. Eigenvalue problems for degenerate nonlinear elliptic equations in anisotropic media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicenţiu RăDulescu

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available We study nonlinear eigenvalue problems of the type −div(a(x∇u=g(λ,x,u in ℝN, where a(x is a degenerate nonnegative weight. We establish the existence of solutions and we obtain information on qualitative properties as multiplicity and location of solutions. Our approach is based on the critical point theory in Sobolev weighted spaces combined with a Caffarelli-Kohn-Nirenberg-type inequality. A specific minimax method is developed without making use of Palais-Smale condition.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disc degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Masao; Kira, Hideaki; Fujiki, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Hinoue, Kaichi.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration with findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen autopsied (from 7 patients) and 21 surgical (from 20 patients) intervertebral discs were used as specimens for histopathological examination. In addition, 21 intervertebral discs were examined on T2-weighted images. Histopathological findings from both autopsied and surgical specimens were well correlated with MRI findings. In particular, T2-weighted images reflected increased collagen fibers and rupture within the fibrous ring accurately. However, when severely degenerated intervertebral discs and hernia protruding the posterior longitudinal ligament existed, histological findings were not concordant well with T2-weighted images. Morphological appearances of autopsy specimens, divided into four on T2-weighted images, were well consistent with histological degeneration. This morphological classification, as shown on T2-weighted images, could also be used in the evaluation of intervertebral disc degeneration. (N.K.)

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disc degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Masao (Kitakyushu City Yahata Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Kira, Hideaki; Fujiki, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Hinoue, Kaichi

    1993-02-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration with findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen autopsied (from 7 patients) and 21 surgical (from 20 patients) intervertebral discs were used as specimens for histopathological examination. In addition, 21 intervertebral discs were examined on T2-weighted images. Histopathological findings from both autopsied and surgical specimens were well correlated with MRI findings. In particular, T2-weighted images reflected increased collagen fibers and rupture within the fibrous ring accurately. However, when severely degenerated intervertebral discs and hernia protruding the posterior longitudinal ligament existed, histological findings were not concordant well with T2-weighted images. Morphological appearances of autopsy specimens, divided into four on T2-weighted images, were well consistent with histological degeneration. This morphological classification, as shown on T2-weighted images, could also be used in the evaluation of intervertebral disc degeneration. (N.K.).

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Stargardt macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... recognizing faces. In most people with Stargardt macular degeneration , a fatty yellow pigment (lipofuscin) builds up in cells underlying the macula. Over time, the abnormal accumulation of this substance ...

  4. Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and conducts a broad range of basic and clinical research on cerebellar and spinocerebellar degeneration, including work aimed at finding the cause(s) of ataxias and ways to ... Publications Definition Ataxia ...

  5. Hamiltonization of theories with degenerate coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitman, D.M.; Tyutin, I.V.

    2002-01-01

    We consider a class of Lagrangian theories where part of the coordinates does not have any time derivatives in the Lagrange function (we call such coordinates degenerate). We advocate that it is reasonable to reconsider the conventional definition of singularity based on the usual Hessian and, moreover, to simplify the conventional hamiltonization procedure. In particular, in such a procedure, it is not necessary to complete the degenerate coordinates with the corresponding conjugate momenta

  6. Hamiltonization of theories with degenerate coordinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitman, D.M. E-mail: gitman@fma.if.usp.br; Tyutin, I.V. E-mail: tyutin@lpi.ru

    2002-05-27

    We consider a class of Lagrangian theories where part of the coordinates does not have any time derivatives in the Lagrange function (we call such coordinates degenerate). We advocate that it is reasonable to reconsider the conventional definition of singularity based on the usual Hessian and, moreover, to simplify the conventional hamiltonization procedure. In particular, in such a procedure, it is not necessary to complete the degenerate coordinates with the corresponding conjugate momenta.

  7. Splitting deformations of degenerations of complex curves towards the classification of atoms of degenerations

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    The author develops a deformation theory for degenerations of complex curves; specifically, he treats deformations which induce splittings of the singular fiber of a degeneration. He constructs a deformation of the degeneration in such a way that a subdivisor is "barked" (peeled) off from the singular fiber. These "barking deformations" are related to deformations of surface singularities (in particular, cyclic quotient singularities) as well as the mapping class groups of Riemann surfaces (complex curves) via monodromies. Important applications, such as the classification of atomic degenerations, are also explained.

  8. Trichoepithelioma And Multiple Basal Cell Epithelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dey S.K

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of multiple trichoepithelioma and basal cell epithelioma is reported. Although malignant degeneration of trichoepithelioma is debated, clinical and histopathological studies, in our case, hint at that. The case is reported for its rarity.

  9. Age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Lily K; Eaton, Angie

    2013-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, and the prevalence of the disease increases exponentially with every decade after age 50 years. It is a multifactorial disease involving a complex interplay of genetic, environmental, metabolic, and functional factors. Besides smoking, hypertension, obesity, and certain dietary habits, a growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation and the immune system may play a key role in the development of the disease. AMD may progress from the early form to the intermediate form and then to the advanced form, where two subtypes exist: the nonneovascular (dry) type and the neovascular (wet) type. The results from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study have shown that for the nonneovascular type of AMD, supplementation with high-dose antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, and β-carotene) and zinc is recommended for those with the intermediate form of AMD in one or both eyes or with advanced AMD or vision loss due to AMD in one eye. As for the neovascular type of the advanced AMD, the current standard of therapy is intravitreal injections of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors. In addition, lifestyle and dietary modifications including improved physical activity, reduced daily sodium intake, and reduced intake of solid fats, added sugars, cholesterol, and refined grain foods are recommended. To date, no study has demonstrated that AMD can be cured or effectively prevented. Clearly, more research is needed to fully understand the pathophysiology as well as to develop prevention and treatment strategies for this devastating disease. © 2013 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  10. Live Imaging of Calcium Dynamics during Axon Degeneration Reveals Two Functionally Distinct Phases of Calcium Influx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Yuya; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is a key regulator of axon degeneration caused by trauma and disease, but its specific spatial and temporal dynamics in injured axons remain unclear. To clarify the function of calcium in axon degeneration, we observed calcium dynamics in single injured neurons in live zebrafish larvae and tested the temporal requirement for calcium in zebrafish neurons and cultured mouse DRG neurons. Using laser axotomy to induce Wallerian degeneration (WD) in zebrafish peripheral sensory axons, we monitored calcium dynamics from injury to fragmentation, revealing two stereotyped phases of axonal calcium influx. First, axotomy triggered a transient local calcium wave originating at the injury site. This initial calcium wave only disrupted mitochondria near the injury site and was not altered by expression of the protective WD slow (WldS) protein. Inducing multiple waves with additional axotomies did not change the kinetics of degeneration. In contrast, a second phase of calcium influx occurring minutes before fragmentation spread as a wave throughout the axon, entered mitochondria, and was abolished by WldS expression. In live zebrafish, chelating calcium after the first wave, but before the second wave, delayed the progress of fragmentation. In cultured DRG neurons, chelating calcium early in the process of WD did not alter degeneration, but chelating calcium late in WD delayed fragmentation. We propose that a terminal calcium wave is a key instructive component of the axon degeneration program. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Axon degeneration resulting from trauma or neurodegenerative disease can cause devastating deficits in neural function. Understanding the molecular and cellular events that execute axon degeneration is essential for developing treatments to address these conditions. Calcium is known to contribute to axon degeneration, but its temporal requirements in this process have been unclear. Live calcium imaging in severed zebrafish neurons and temporally controlled

  11. Indian hedgehog contributes to human cartilage endplate degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaowei; Yang, Kun; Chen, Shuai; Wang, Jiying; Du, Guoqing; Fan, Shunwu; Wei, Lei

    2015-08-01

    To determine the role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling in human cartilage endplate (CEP) degeneration. CEP-degenerated tissues from patients with Modic I or II changes (n = 9 and 45, respectively) and normal tissues from vertebral burst fracture patients (n = 17) were collected. Specimens were either cut into slices for organ culture ex vivo or digested to isolate chondrocytes for cell culture in vitro. Ihh expression and the effect of Ihh on cartilage degeneration were determined by investigating degeneration markers in this study. Ihh expression and cartilage degeneration markers significantly increased in the Modic I and II groups. The expression of cartilage degeneration markers was positively correlated with degeneration severity. Gain-of-function for Ihh promoted expression of cartilage degeneration markers in vitro, while loss-of-function for Ihh inhibited their expression both in vitro and ex vivo. These findings demonstrated that Ihh promotes CEP degeneration. Blocking Ihh pathway has potential clinical usage for attenuating CEP degeneration.

  12. Motor pathway degeneration in young ataxia telangiectasia patients: A diffusion tractography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishani Sahama

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Whole tract analysis of the corticomotor, corticospinal and somatosensory pathways in ataxia telangiectasia showed significant white matter degeneration along the entire length of motor circuits, highlighting that ataxia–telangiectasia gene mutation impacts the cerebellum and multiple other motor circuits in young patients.

  13. Role of Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress in Spaceflight-Induced Tissue Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Samantha M.; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Truong, Tiffany A.; Tahimic, Candice; Globus, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Microgravity and ionizing radiation in the spaceflight environment poses multiple challenges to homeostasis and may contribute to cellular stress. Effects may include increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA damage and repair error, cell cycle arrest, cell senescence or death. Our central hypothesis is that prolonged exposure to the spaceflight environment leads to the excess production of ROS and oxidative damage, culminating in accelerated tissue degeneration. The main goal of this project is to determine the importance of cellular redox defense for physiological adaptations and tissue degeneration in the space environment.

  14. Families and degenerations of conformal field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roggenkamp, D.

    2004-09-01

    In this work, moduli spaces of conformal field theories are investigated. In the first part, moduli spaces corresponding to current-current deformation of conformal field theories are constructed explicitly. For WZW models, they are described in detail, and sigma model realizations of the deformed WZW models are presented. The second part is devoted to the study of boundaries of moduli spaces of conformal field theories. For this purpose a notion of convergence of families of conformal field theories is introduced, which admits certain degenerated conformal field theories to occur as limits. To such a degeneration of conformal field theories, a degeneration of metric spaces together with additional geometric structures can be associated, which give rise to a geometric interpretation. Boundaries of moduli spaces of toroidal conformal field theories, orbifolds thereof and WZW models are analyzed. Furthermore, also the limit of the discrete family of Virasoro minimal models is investigated. (orig.)

  15. Intramuscular degeneration process in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Takeshi; Matsumra, Kiichiro; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Ikehira, Hiroo; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Tateno, Yukio.

    1992-01-01

    Intramuscular degeneration process of Duchenne dystrophy skeletal muscles was investigated by longitudinal skeletal muscle imaging with high-field-strength NMR-CT of 1.5 Tesla. Thigh muscles in 10 cases ranging in age from 4 to 19 years were examined by T 1 -weighted longitudinal images (TR=215∼505 ms, TE=19∼20 ms). The following results were obtained. Skeletal muscle degeneration was depicted as high signal intensity area reflecting its high fat contents. These high signal intensity areas had a longitudinally streaky appearance in parallel direction with myofibers. These findings were more prominent toward myotendon junction than muscle bellies. Skeletal muscle degeneration progressed rapidly between 7 to 10 years of age, and reached a plateau after that. (author)

  16. [Peripheral retinal degenerations--treatment recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joussen, A M; Kirchhof, B

    2004-10-01

    This report reviews the clinical appearance of degenerative diseases of the peripheral retina in relationship to the risk of developing a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. We present recommendations for preventive treatment in eyes at increased risk of developing retinal detachment. Retinal degenerations are common lesions involving the peripheral retina but most of them are clinically insignificant. Lattice degeneration, degenerative retinoschisis, cystic retinal tufts, and very rarely zonular traction tufts can result in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Therefore, these lesions have been considered for prophylactic treatment; however, adequate studies have not been performed to date. Most of the peripheral retinal degenerations may not require treatment except in rare, high-risk situations. According to current knowledge there is no higher incidence of secondary pucker or other side effects after laser coagulation. Therefore, generous laser indication is recommended if risk factors apply.

  17. ANT: Software for Generating and Evaluating Degenerate Codons for Natural and Expanded Genetic Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engqvist, Martin K M; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-08-21

    The Ambiguous Nucleotide Tool (ANT) is a desktop application that generates and evaluates degenerate codons. Degenerate codons are used to represent DNA positions that have multiple possible nucleotide alternatives. This is useful for protein engineering and directed evolution, where primers specified with degenerate codons are used as a basis for generating libraries of protein sequences. ANT is intuitive and can be used in a graphical user interface or by interacting with the code through a defined application programming interface. ANT comes with full support for nonstandard, user-defined, or expanded genetic codes (translation tables), which is important because synthetic biology is being applied to an ever widening range of natural and engineered organisms. The Python source code for ANT is freely distributed so that it may be used without restriction, modified, and incorporated in other software or custom data pipelines.

  18. Retinal Cell Degeneration in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Niwa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to provide an overview of various retinal cell degeneration models in animal induced by chemicals (N-methyl-d-aspartate- and CoCl2-induced, autoimmune (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, mechanical stress (optic nerve crush-induced, light-induced and ischemia (transient retinal ischemia-induced. The target regions, pathology and proposed mechanism of each model are described in a comparative fashion. Animal models of retinal cell degeneration provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of the disease, and will facilitate the development of novel effective therapeutic drugs to treat retinal cell damage.

  19. Kinematic control of robot with degenerate wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, L. K.; Moore, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Kinematic resolved rate equations allow an operator with visual feedback to dynamically control a robot hand. When the robot wrist is degenerate, the computed joint angle rates exceed operational limits, and unwanted hand movements can result. The generalized matrix inverse solution can also produce unwanted responses. A method is introduced to control the robot hand in the region of the degenerate robot wrist. The method uses a coordinated movement of the first and third joints of the robot wrist to locate the second wrist joint axis for movement of the robot hand in the commanded direction. The method does not entail infinite joint angle rates.

  20. Late complications following cryotherapy of lattice degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, W E; Morse, P H; Nantawan, P

    1977-10-01

    We observed 341 patients who had received cryotherapy for lattice degeneration in order to identify possible late complications. Sequelae such as retinal tears posterior to an operculum or flap tears within treated areas showed that treatment did not necessarily prevent subsequent vitreous traction. Moreover, the newly created flap tears may extend beyond the treated area and can cause retinal detachment. Even scleral buckling did not necesserily prevent further traction. Therefore, we concluded that when cryotherapy is used to treat lattice degeneration, an adequate margin of surrounding retina should be treated and the treatment should extend to the ora serrata.

  1. Genetics of lattice degeneration of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, F; Ohba, N

    1982-01-01

    First-degree relatives of proband patients with lattice degeneration of the retina revealed a significantly higher prevalence of the disease than the prevalence in the general population: the former had the disease about three times as frequently as the latter. The observed data were analyzed in terms of their accordance with recognized genetic models. The inheritance pattern did not fit well to a monogenic mode of inheritance, and it was hypothesized that a polygenic or multifactorial mode of inheritance is the most likely for lattice degeneration of the retina.

  2. CT of sarcomatous degeneration in neurofibromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, B.G.; Arger, P.H.; Dalinka, M.K.; Obringer, A.C.; Raney, B.R.; Meadows, A.T.

    1983-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis is a relatively common disorder that often involves many organ systems. One of the least understood aspects of this malady is a well documented potential for sarcomatous degeneration of neurofibromas. The inability to identify patients at risk and the lack of noninvasive screening methods for symptomatic patients often leads to late diagnosis. In six of seven subsequently proven neurofibrosarcomas, CT demonstrated low-density areas that histopathologically appeared to be due to necrosis, hemorrhage, and/or cystic degeneration. The density differences within these sarcomas were enhanced by the intravenous adminstration of iodinated contrast agents

  3. Loss of Ikbkap Causes Slow, Progressive Retinal Degeneration in a Mouse Model of Familial Dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Yumi; Ramirez, Grisela; Salcedo, Ernesto; Stabio, Maureen E; Lefcort, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is an autosomal recessive congenital neuropathy that is caused by a mutation in the gene for inhibitor of kappa B kinase complex-associated protein ( IKBKAP ). Although FD patients suffer from multiple neuropathies, a major debilitation that affects their quality of life is progressive blindness. To determine the requirement for Ikbkap in the developing and adult retina, we generated Ikbkap conditional knockout (CKO) mice using a TUBA1a promoter-Cre ( Tα1-Cre ). In the retina, Tα1-Cre expression is detected predominantly in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). At 6 months, significant loss of RGCs had occurred in the CKO retinas, with the greatest loss in the temporal retina, which is the same spatial phenotype observed in FD, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, and dominant optic atrophy. Interestingly, the melanopsin-positive RGCs were resistant to degeneration. By 9 months, signs of photoreceptor degeneration were observed, which later progressed to panretinal degeneration, including RGC and photoreceptor loss, optic nerve thinning, Müller glial activation, and disruption of layers. Taking these results together, we conclude that although Ikbkap is not required for normal development of RGCs, its loss causes a slow, progressive RGC degeneration most severely in the temporal retina, which is later followed by indirect photoreceptor loss and complete retinal disorganization. This mouse model of FD is not only useful for identifying the mechanisms mediating retinal degeneration, but also provides a model system in which to attempt to test therapeutics that may mitigate the loss of vision in FD patients.

  4. Matrix Remodeling During Intervertebral Disc Growth and Degeneration Detected by Multichromatic FAST Staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Victor Y.L.; Chan, Wilson C.W.; Hung, Siu-Chun; Cheung, Kenneth M.C.; Chan, Danny

    2009-01-01

    Various imaging techniques have been used to assess degeneration of the intervertebral disc, including many histological methods, but cartilage-oriented histological stains do not clearly show the comparatively complex structures of the disc. In addition, there is no integrated method to assess efficiently both the compartmental organization and matrix composition in disc samples. In this study, a novel histological method, termed FAST staining, has been developed to investigate disc growth and degeneration by sequential staining with fast green, Alcian blue, Safranin-O, and tartrazine to generate multichromatic histological profiles (FAST profiles). This identifies the major compartments of the vertebra-disc region, including the cartilaginous endplate and multiple zones of the annulus fibrosus, by specific FAST profile patterns. A disc degeneration model in rabbit established using a previously described puncture method showed gradual but profound alteration of the FAST profile during disc degeneration, supporting continual alteration of glycosaminoglycan. Changes of the FAST profile pattern in the nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus of the postnatal mouse spine suggested matrix remodeling activity during the growth of intervertebral discs. In summary, we developed an effective staining method capable of defining intervertebral disc compartments in detail and showing matrix remodeling events within the disc. The FAST staining method may be used to develop a histopathological grading system to evaluate disc degeneration or malformation. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:249–256, 2009) PMID:19001641

  5. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety, and considers directions for future research.

  6. Specific heats of degenerate ideal gases

    OpenAIRE

    Caruso, Francisco; Oguri, Vitor; Silveira, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    From arguments based on Heisenberg's uncertainty principle and Pauli's exclusion principle, the molar specific heats of degenerate ideal gases at low temperatures are estimated, giving rise to values consistent with the Nerst-Planck Principle (third law of Thermodynamics). The Bose-Einstein condensation phenomenon based on the behavior of specific heat of massive and non-relativistic boson gases is also presented.

  7. Ecological transition predictably associated with gene degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessinger, Carolyn A; Rausher, Mark D

    2015-02-01

    Gene degeneration or loss can significantly contribute to phenotypic diversification, but may generate genetic constraints on future evolutionary trajectories, potentially restricting phenotypic reversal. Such constraints may manifest as directional evolutionary trends when parallel phenotypic shifts consistently involve gene degeneration or loss. Here, we demonstrate that widespread parallel evolution in Penstemon from blue to red flowers predictably involves the functional inactivation and degeneration of the enzyme flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H), an anthocyanin pathway enzyme required for the production of blue floral pigments. Other types of genetic mutations do not consistently accompany this phenotypic shift. This pattern may be driven by the relatively large mutational target size of degenerative mutations to this locus and the apparent lack of associated pleiotropic effects. The consistent degeneration of F3'5'H may provide a mechanistic explanation for the observed asymmetry in the direction of flower color evolution in Penstemon: Blue to red transitions are common, but reverse transitions have not been observed. Although phenotypic shifts in this system are likely driven by natural selection, internal constraints may generate predictable genetic outcomes and may restrict future evolutionary trajectories. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Geometry of non-degenerate Susskind fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, P.

    1983-01-01

    The Dirac-Kaehler equation on the lattice is known to describe the degenerate ''flavours'' appering in Susskind's approach to lattice fermions. We study the modification that has to be made in this equation in order to lift the degeneracy and give the flavours arbitrary different masses. (orig.)

  9. Exploring Nonconvex, Crossed and Degenerate Polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Jose N.

    2004-01-01

    An exploration of nonconvex, crossed, and degenerate polygons (NCCDPs) are described with the help of examples with pedagogical tips and recommendations that are found useful when teaching the mathematical process of extending geometric patterns to NCCDPs. The study concludes that investigating such extensions with interactive geometry software…

  10. Degenerate parabolic stochastic partial differential equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    span class="emphasis">Hofmanová, Martinaspan>

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 123, č. 12 (2013), s. 4294-4336 ISSN 0304-4149 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP201/10/0752 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : kinetic solutions * degenerate stochastic parabolic equations Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.046, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/SI/hofmanova-0397241.pdf

  11. MR findings of degenerating parenchymal neurocysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yul; Chung, Eun A; Yang, Ik; Park, Hae Jung; Chung, Soo Young

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate MR imaging findings of degenerating parenchymal neurocysticercosis and to determine the characteristics which distinguish it from other brain diseases. MR imagings of 19 patients (56 lesions) of degenerating parenchymal neurocysticercosis were retrospectively evaluated, focusing on the size and location of lesions signal intensity patterns of cyst fluid and wall, the extent of the surrounding edema and features of contrast enhancement. Degenerating parenchymal neurocysticercosis was located in gray or subcortical while matter in 89.3% of 56 lesions (50/56) ; most of these (98.2%) were smaller than 2 cm in diameter. Cyst fluid signal was hyperintense relative to CSF on T1 and proton density weighted images (92.9%). A hypointense signal rim of the cyst wall was noted in the lesions on proton density (92.9%) and T2 weighted (98.2%) images, Surrounding edema was mostly mild. Peripheral rim enhancement was noted in all lesions, and this was frequently irregular and lobulated (67.9%) with a focal defect in the enhancing rim(41.1%). Findings which could be helpful in distinguishing degenerating parencymal neurocysticercosis from other brain diseases are as follows : small, superficial lesions ; hyperintense signal of the cyst fluid on T1 and proton density weighted images ; hypointense signal of the cyst wall on proton density and T2 weighted images ; relatively mild extent of surrounding edema, and peripheral rim enhancement which is frequently irregular and lobulated with a focal defect in the enhancing rim

  12. Degenerate conformal theories on higher-genus surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Two-dimensional degenerate field theories on higher-genus surfaces are investigated. Objects are built on the space of moduli, whose linear combinations are hypothetically conformal blocks in degenerate theories

  13. MR imaging of central nervous system white matter tract degeneration (Wallerian degeneration)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, M.J.; Johnson, K.A.; Davis, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration is readily demonstrated by MR imaging. Twenty-one patients with MR signal abnormalities in various central nervous system (CNS) white matter tracts were evaluated with regard to (1) nature of signal abnormality, (2) MR anatomy of the involved tract, and (3) primary pathology (e.g., infarct, tumor, hemorrhage). Most examples of wallerian degeneration result in a thin, continuous band of long T1, long T2 signal abnormality conforming to the known anatomic pathway of a CNS axonal tract. Old, large cortical infarcts have the greatest propensity to show subsequent white-matter tract degeneration. Corticospinal tract degeneration is the type most readily visualized, often seen extending completely from the cerebral cortex through the medulla

  14. Ethanol Exposure Causes Muscle Degeneration in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C. Coffey

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic myopathies are characterized by neuromusculoskeletal symptoms such as compromised movement and weakness. Although these symptoms have been attributed to neurological damage, EtOH may also target skeletal muscle. EtOH exposure during zebrafish primary muscle development or adulthood results in smaller muscle fibers. However, the effects of EtOH exposure on skeletal muscle during the growth period that follows primary muscle development are not well understood. We determined the effects of EtOH exposure on muscle during this phase of development. Strikingly, muscle fibers at this stage are acutely sensitive to EtOH treatment: EtOH induces muscle degeneration. The severity of EtOH-induced muscle damage varies but muscle becomes more refractory to EtOH as muscle develops. NF-kB induction in muscle indicates that EtOH triggers a pro-inflammatory response. EtOH-induced muscle damage is p53-independent. Uptake of Evans blue dye shows that EtOH treatment causes sarcolemmal instability before muscle fiber detachment. Dystrophin-null sapje mutant zebrafish also exhibit sarcolemmal instability. We tested whether Trichostatin A (TSA, which reduces muscle degeneration in sapje mutants, would affect EtOH-treated zebrafish. We found that TSA and EtOH are a lethal combination. EtOH does, however, exacerbate muscle degeneration in sapje mutants. EtOH also disrupts adhesion of muscle fibers to their extracellular matrix at the myotendinous junction: some detached muscle fibers retain beta-Dystroglycan indicating failure of muscle end attachments. Overexpression of Paxillin, which reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish deficient for beta-Dystroglycan, is not sufficient to rescue degeneration. Taken together, our results suggest that EtOH exposure has pleiotropic deleterious effects on skeletal muscle.

  15. Calcium channel blockers inhibit retinal degeneration in the retinal-degeneration-B mutant of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahly, I; Bar Nachum, S; Suss-Toby, E; Rom, A; Peretz, A; Kleiman, J; Byk, T; Selinger, Z; Minke, B

    1992-01-01

    Light accelerates degeneration of photoreceptor cells of the retinal degeneration B (rdgB) mutant of Drosophila. During early stages of degeneration, light stimuli evoke spikes from photoreceptors of the mutant fly; no spikes can be recorded from photoreceptors of the wild-type fly. Production of spike potentials from mutant photoreceptors was blocked by diltiazem, verapamil hydrochloride, and cadmium. Little, if any, effect of the (-)-cis isomer or (+)-cis isomer of diltiazem on the light response was seen. Further, the (+)-cis isomer was approximately 50 times more effective than the (-)-cis isomer in blocking the Ca2+ spikes, indicating that diltiazem action on the rdgB eye is mediated by means of blocking voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels, rather than by blocking the light-sensitive channels. Application of the Ca(2+)-channel blockers (+)-cis-diltiazem and verapamil hydrochloride to the eyes of rdgB flies over a 7-day period largely inhibited light-dependent degeneration of the photoreceptor cells. Pulse labeling with [32P]phosphate showed much greater incorporation into eye proteins of [32P]phosphate in rdgB flies than in wild-type flies. Retarding the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration in the mutant by Ca(2+)-channel blockers, thus, suggests that toxic increase in intracellular Ca2+ by means of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, possibly secondary to excessive phosphorylation, leads to photoreceptor degeneration in the rdgB mutant. Images PMID:1309615

  16. Degenerate r-Stirling Numbers and r-Bell Polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T.; Yao, Y.; Kim, D. S.; Jang, G.-W.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to exploit umbral calculus in order to derive some properties, recurrence relations, and identities related to the degenerate r-Stirling numbers of the second kind and the degenerate r-Bell polynomials. Especially, we will express the degenerate r-Bell polynomials as linear combinations of many well-known families of special polynomials.

  17. Atomic rate coefficients in a degenerate plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanyan, Valentin; Tallents, Greg

    2015-11-01

    The electrons in a dense, degenerate plasma follow Fermi-Dirac statistics, which deviate significantly in this regime from the usual Maxwell-Boltzmann approach used by many models. We present methods to calculate the atomic rate coefficients for the Fermi-Dirac distribution and present a comparison of the ionization fraction of carbon calculated using both models. We have found that for densities close to solid, although the discrepancy is small for LTE conditions, there is a large divergence from the ionization fraction by using classical rate coefficients in the presence of strong photoionizing radiation. We have found that using these modified rates and the degenerate heat capacity may affect the time evolution of a plasma subject to extreme ultraviolet and x-ray radiation such as produced in free electron laser irradiation of solid targets.

  18. K-causality and degenerate spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowker, H. F.; Garcia, R. S.; Surya, S.

    2000-11-01

    The causal relation K+ was introduced by Sorkin and Woolgar to extend the standard causal analysis of C2 spacetimes to those that are only C0. Most of their results also hold true in the case of metrics with degeneracies which are C0 but vanish at isolated points. In this paper we seek to examine K+ explicitly in the case of topology-changing `Morse histories' which contain degeneracies. We first demonstrate some interesting features of this relation in globally Lorentzian spacetimes. In particular, we show that K+ is robust and the Hawking and Sachs characterization of causal continuity translates into a natural condition in terms of K+. We then examine K+ in topology-changing Morse spacetimes with the degenerate points excised and then for the Morse histories in which the degenerate points are reinstated. We find further characterizations of causal continuity in these cases.

  19. Degenerate RFID Channel Modeling for Positioning Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Povalac

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the theory of channel modeling for positioning applications in UHF RFID. It explains basic parameters for channel characterization from both the narrowband and wideband point of view. More details are given about ranging and direction finding. Finally, several positioning scenarios are analyzed with developed channel models. All the described models use a degenerate channel, i.e. combined signal propagation from the transmitter to the tag and from the tag to the receiver.

  20. Degenerate odd Poisson bracket on Grassmann variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soroka, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    A linear degenerate odd Poisson bracket (antibracket) realized solely on Grassmann variables is proposed. It is revealed that this bracket has at once three Grassmann-odd nilpotent Δ-like differential operators of the first, second and third orders with respect to the Grassmann derivatives. It is shown that these Δ-like operators, together with the Grassmann-odd nilpotent Casimir function of this bracket, form a finite-dimensional Lie superalgebra

  1. Immunology of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambati, Jayakrishna; Atkinson, John P.; Gelfand, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in aged individuals. Recent advances have highlighted the essential role of immune processes in the development, progression and treatment of AMD. In this Review we discuss recent discoveries related to the immunological aspects of AMD pathogenesis. We outline the diverse immune cell types, inflammatory activators and pathways that are involved. Finally, we discuss the future of inflammation-directed therapeutics to treat AMD in the growing aged population. PMID:23702979

  2. Searching for degenerate Higgs bosons using a profile likelihood ratio method

    CERN Document Server

    Heikkilä, Jaana

    ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the Large Hadron Collider have observed a new resonance con- sistent with the standard model Higgs boson. However, it has been suggested that the observed signal could also be produced by multiple nearly mass-degenerate states that couple differently to the standard model particles. In this work, a method to discriminate between the hypothesis of a single Higgs boson and that of multiple mass-degenerate Higgs bosons was developed. Using the matrix of measured signal strengths in different production and decay modes, parametrizations for the two hypotheses were constructed as a general rank 1 matrix and the most general $5 \\times 4$ matrix, respectively. The test statistic was defined as a ratio of profile likelihoods for the two hypotheses. The method was applied to the CMS measurements. The expected test statistic distribution was estimated twice by generating pseudo-experiments according to both the standard model hypothesis and the single Higgs boson hypothesis best fitting...

  3. Degenerate pressure driven modified nucleus-acoustic waves in degenerate plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamun, A. A.

    2018-02-01

    The existence of degenerate pressure driven modified nucleus-acoustic (DPDMNA) waves propagating in a cold degenerate quantum plasma (DQP) system [containing cold inertialess degenerate electron species (DES), cold inertial non-degenerate light nucleus species (LNS), and stationary heavy nucleus species (HNS)] is predicted for the first time. The DPDMNA waves (in which the mass density of the cold LNS provides the inertia and the cold inertialess DES gives rise to the restoring force) are new since they completely disappear if the degenerate pressure of the cold DES is neglected. It is found that the phase speed (Vp) of the DPDMNA waves decreases with the rise of the charge number density of the stationary HNS for both non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic DES, and that the ultra-relativistic DES does not have any effect on Vp when β = 1, where β = Λc/Λe with Λ e = ne 0 - 1 / 3 being the average inter-electron distance in the DQP system and Λc being the constant (˜10-10 cm) for the DES. However, the ultra-relativistic DES does have quite a significant effect on Vp for β ≫ 1 and β ≪ 1, and the ultra-relativistic effect significantly enhances (reduces) Vp for β ≫ 1 (β ≪ 1). The DPDMNA waves and their dispersion properties are expected to be useful in understanding the basic features of the electrostatic perturbation mode in space and laboratory DQP systems.

  4. Fibronectin aggregation in multiple sclerosis lesions impairs remyelination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, J.M.J.; de Jonge, J.C.; Stancic, M.; Nomden, A.; van Strien, M.E.; Ma, D.; Siskova, Z.; Maier, O.; Ffrench-Constant, C.; Franklin, R.J.M.; Hoekstra, D.; Zhao, C.; Baron, W.

    2013-01-01

    Remyelination following central nervous system demyelination is essential to prevent axon degeneration. However, remyelination ultimately fails in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. This failure of remyelination is likely mediated by many factors, including changes in the

  5. Fibronectin aggregation in multiple sclerosis lesions impairs remyelination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Josephine M. J.; de Jonge, Jenny C.; Stancic, Mirjana; Nomden, Anita; van Strien, Miriam E.; Ma, Dan; Siskova, Zuzana; Maier, Olaf; Ffrench-Constant, Charles; Franklin, Robin J. M.; Hoekstra, Dick; Zhao, Chao; Baron, Wia

    Remyelination following central nervous system demyelination is essential to prevent axon degeneration. However, remyelination ultimately fails in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. This failure of remyelination is likely mediated by many factors, including changes in the

  6. Progressive Retinal Degeneration and Accumulation of Autofluorescent Lipopigments in Progranulin Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafler, Brian P.; Klein, Zoe A.; Zhou, Z. Jimmy; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Prior investigations have shown that patients with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) develop neurodegeneration characterized by vision loss, motor dysfunction, seizures, and often early death. Neuropathological analysis of patients with NCL shows accumulation of intracellular autofluorescent storage material, lipopigment, throughout neurons in the central nervous system including in the retina. A recent study of a sibling pair with adult onset NCL and retinal degeneration showed linkage to the region of the progranulin (GRN) locus and a homozygous mutation was demonstrated in GRN. In particular, the sibling pair with a mutation in GRN developed retinal degeneration and optic atrophy. This locus for this form of adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis was designated neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-11 (CLN11). Based on these clinical observations, we wished to determine whether Grn-null mice develop accumulation of autofluorescent particles and retinal degeneration. Retinas of both wild-type and Progranulin deficient mice were examined by immunostaining and autofluorescence. Accumulation of autofluorescent material was present in Progranulin deficient mice at 12 months. Degeneration of multiple classes of neurons including photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells was noted in mice at 12 and 18 months. Our data shows that Grn−/− mice develop degenerative pathology similar to features of human CLN11. PMID:25234724

  7. Human disc degeneration is associated with increased MMP 7 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maitre, C L; Freemont, A J; Hoyland, J A

    2006-01-01

    During intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, normal matrix synthesis decreases and degradation of disc matrix increases. A number of proteases that are increased during disc degeneration are thought to be involved in its pathogenesis. Matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP 7) (Matrilysin, PUMP-1) is known to cleave the major matrix molecules found within the IVD, i.e., the proteoglycan aggrecan and collagen type II. To date, however, it is not known how its expression changes with degeneration or its exact location. We investigated the localization of MMP 7 in human, histologically graded, nondegenerate, degenerated and prolapsed discs to ascertain whether MMP 7 is up-regulated during disc degeneration. Samples of human IVD tissue were fixed in neutral buffered formalin, embedded in paraffin, and sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin to score the degree of morphological degeneration. Immunohistochemistry was performed to localize MMP 7 in 41 human IVDs with varying degrees of degeneration. We found that the chondrocyte-like cells of the nucleus pulposus and inner annulus fibrosus were MMP 7 immunopositive; little immunopositivity was observed in the outer annulus. Nondegenerate discs showed few immunopositive cells. A significant increase in the proportion of MMP 7 immunopositive cells was seen in the nucleus pulposus of discs classified as showing intermediate levels of degeneration and a further increase was seen in discs with severe degeneration. Prolapsed discs showed more MMP 7 immunopositive cells compared to nondegenerated discs, but fewer than those seen in cases of severe degeneration.

  8. Dietary compound score and risk of age-related macular degeneration in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Because foods provide many nutrients, which may interact with each other to modify risk for multifactorial diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), we sought to develop a composite scoring system to summarize the combined effect of multiple dietary nutrients on AMD risk. Th...

  9. Intacs for early pellucid marginal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kymionis, George D; Aslanides, Ioannis M; Siganos, Charalambos S; Pallikaris, Ioannis G

    2004-01-01

    A 42-year-old man had Intacs (Addition Technology Inc.) implantation for early pellucid marginal degeneration (PMD). Two Intacs segments (0.45 mm thickness) were inserted uneventfully in the fashion typically used for low myopia correction (nasal-temporal). Eleven months after the procedure, the uncorrected visual acuity was 20/200, compared with counting fingers preoperatively, while the best spectacle-corrected visual acuity improved to 20/25 from 20/50. Corneal topographic pattern also improved. Although the results are encouraging, concern still exists regarding the long-term effect of this approach for the management of patients with PMD.

  10. Genome instability: Linking ageing and brain degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilai, Ari; Schumacher, Björn; Shiloh, Yosef

    2017-01-01

    Ageing is a multifactorial process affected by cumulative physiological changes resulting from stochastic processes combined with genetic factors, which together alter metabolic homeostasis. Genetic variation in maintenance of genome stability is emerging as an important determinant of ageing pace. Genome instability is also closely associated with a broad spectrum of conditions involving brain degeneration. Similarities and differences can be found between ageing-associated decline of brain functionality and the detrimental effect of genome instability on brain functionality and development. This review discusses these similarities and differences and highlights cell classes whose role in these processes might have been underestimated-glia and microglia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Degenerate stars. XII - Recognition of hot nondegenerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, J. L.

    1980-12-01

    Fifty-one newly observed degenerate stars and 14 nondegenerates include 13 faint red stars, most of which do not show any lines except DF, Gr 554. Hot subdwarfs and an X-ray source are discussed along with the problem of low-resolution spectroscopic classification of dense hot stars. The multichannel spectrum of the carbon-rich magnetic star LP 790-29 is examined by fitting the undisturbed parts of the spectrum to a black body of 7625 K by the least squares method; the Swan bands absorb 600 A of the spectrum assuming that the blocked radiation is redistributed in the observed region.

  12. Aneutronic fusion in a degenerate plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, S.; Fisch, N.J.

    2004-01-01

    In a Fermi-degenerate plasma, the electronic stopping of a slow ion is smaller than that given by the classical formula, because some transitions between the electron states are forbidden. The bremsstrahlung losses are then smaller, so that the nuclear burning of an aneutronic fuel is more efficient. Consequently, there occurs a parameter regime in which self-burning is possible. Practical obstacles in this regime that must be overcome before net energy can be realized include the compression of the fuel to an ultra dense state and the creation of a hot spot

  13. Aneutronic Fusion in a Degenerate Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, S.; Fisch, N.J.

    2004-01-01

    In a Fermi-degenerate plasma, the electronic stopping of a slow ion is smaller than that given by the classical formula, because some transitions between the electron states are forbidden. The bremsstrahlung losses are then smaller, so that the nuclear burning of an aneutronic fuel is more efficient. Consequently, there occurs a parameter regime in which self-burning is possible. Practical obstacles in this regime that must be overcome before net energy can be realized include the compression of the fuel to an ultra dense state and the creation of a hot spot

  14. MRI and MR tractography in bilateral hypertrophic olivary degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debraj Sen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic olivary degeneration is a trans-synaptic neuronal degeneration associated with hypertrophy of the inferior olivary nucleus due to a lesion in the triangle of Guillain-Mollaret. Familiarity with this entity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is essential to avoid other erroneous ominous diagnoses. We present a case of bilateral hypertrophic olivary degeneration and discuss the etiopathogenesis and MRI findings in this entity. The contributory role of MR tractography in the diagnosis is also highlighted.

  15. MRI and MR tractography in bilateral hypertrophic olivary degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Debraj; Gulati, Yoginder S; Malik, Virender; Mohimen, Aneesh; Sibi, Eranki; Reddy, Deepak Chandra

    2014-10-01

    Hypertrophic olivary degeneration is a trans-synaptic neuronal degeneration associated with hypertrophy of the inferior olivary nucleus due to a lesion in the triangle of Guillain-Mollaret. Familiarity with this entity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is essential to avoid other erroneous ominous diagnoses. We present a case of bilateral hypertrophic olivary degeneration and discuss the etiopathogenesis and MRI findings in this entity. The contributory role of MR tractography in the diagnosis is also highlighted.

  16. An Unusual Case of Extensive Lattice Degeneration and Retinal Detachment

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, David J.; Sarma, Saurabh Kumar; Basaiawmoit, Jennifer V.

    2016-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is not infrequently encountered on a dilated retinal examination and many of them do not need any intervention. We report a case of atypical lattice degeneration variant with peripheral retinal detachment. An asymptomatic 35-year-old lady with minimal refractive error was found to have extensive lattice degeneration, peripheral retinal detachment and fibrotic changes peripherally with elevation of retinal vessels on dilated retinal examination. There were al...

  17. MRI and MR tractography in bilateral hypertrophic olivary degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Debraj; Gulati, Yoginder S.; Malik, Virender; Mohimen, Aneesh; Sibi, Eranki; Reddy, Deepak Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic olivary degeneration is a trans-synaptic neuronal degeneration associated with hypertrophy of the inferior olivary nucleus due to a lesion in the triangle of Guillain-Mollaret. Familiarity with this entity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is essential to avoid other erroneous ominous diagnoses. We present a case of bilateral hypertrophic olivary degeneration and discuss the etiopathogenesis and MRI findings in this entity. The contributory role of MR tractography in the diagnosis is also highlighted

  18. Mutations in ABCR (ABCA4) in patients with Stargardt macular degeneration or cone-rod degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, C E; Rucinski, D; Rosenfeld, P J; Hirose, T; Berson, E L; Dryja, T P

    2001-09-01

    To determine the spectrum of ABCR mutations associated with Stargardt macular degeneration and cone-rod degeneration (CRD). One hundred eighteen unrelated patients with recessive Stargardt macular degeneration and eight with recessive CRD were screened for mutations in ABCR (ABCA4) by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. Variants were characterized by direct genomic sequencing. Segregation analysis was performed on the families of 20 patients in whom at least two or more likely pathogenic sequence changes were identified. The authors found 77 sequence changes likely to be pathogenic: 21 null mutations (15 novel), 55 missense changes (26 novel), and one deletion of a consensus glycosylation site (also novel). Fifty-two patients with Stargardt macular degeneration (44% of those screened) and five with CRD each had two of these sequence changes or were homozygous for one of them. Segregation analyses in the families of 19 of these patients were informative and revealed that the index cases and all available affected siblings were compound heterozygotes or homozygotes. The authors found one instance of an apparently de novo mutation, Ile824Thr, in a patient. Thirty-seven (31%) of the 118 patients with Stargardt disease and one with CRD had only one likely pathogenic sequence change. Twenty-nine patients with Stargardt disease (25%) and two with CRD had no identified sequence changes. This report of 42 novel mutations brings the growing number of identified likely pathogenic sequence changes in ABCR to approximately 250.

  19. Many-Body Green Function of Degenerate Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouder, Christian; Panati, Gianluca; Stoltz, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    A rigorous nonperturbative adiabatic approximation of the evolution operator in the many-body physics of degenerate systems is derived. This approximation is used to solve the long-standing problem of the choice of the initial states of H 0 leading to eigenstates of H 0 +V for degenerate systems. These initial states are eigenstates of P 0 VP 0 , where P 0 is the projection onto a degenerate eigenspace of H 0 . This result is used to give the proper definition of the Green function, the statistical Green function and the nonequilibrium Green function of degenerate systems. The convergence of these Green functions is established.

  20. The prognosis of retinal detachment due to lattice degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, W E; Morse, P H

    1978-09-01

    In a series of 553 consecutive retinal detachments, 29% (120) were due to lattice degeneration. Forty-five percent of these were due to atrophic holes in the lattice degeneration and 55% were due to tears caused by traction posterior to or at the end of a patch of lattice. In phakic patients, retinal detachments due to atrophic holes were most common in young myopes. Detachments due to traction tears were seen in older, less myopic patients. The incidence of massive periretinal proliferation was less (5%) in detachments due to lattice degeneration than in detachments not due to lattice degeneration (6.5%).

  1. Getting superstring amplitudes by degenerating Riemann surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matone, Marco; Volpato, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    We explicitly show how the chiral superstring amplitudes can be obtained through factorisation of the higher genus chiral measure induced by suitable degenerations of Riemann surfaces. This powerful tool also allows to derive, at any genera, consistency relations involving the amplitudes and the measure. A key point concerns the choice of the local coordinate at the node on degenerate Riemann surfaces that greatly simplifies the computations. As a first application, starting from recent ansaetze for the chiral measure up to genus five, we compute the chiral two-point function for massless Neveu-Schwarz states at genus two, three and four. For genus higher than three, these computations include some new corrections to the conjectural formulae appeared so far in the literature. After GSO projection, the two-point function vanishes at genus two and three, as expected from space-time supersymmetry arguments, but not at genus four. This suggests that the ansatz for the superstring measure should be corrected for genus higher than four.

  2. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, N.E.; Posner, J.B.; Sidtis, J.J.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Dhawan, V.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration [PCD]) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis

  3. Progranulin in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutton Michael L

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Progranulin (PGRN is a pleiotropic protein that has gained the attention of the neuroscience community with recent discoveries of mutations in the gene for PGRN that cause frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD. Pathogenic mutations in PGRN result in null alleles, and the disease is likely the result of haploinsufficiency. Little is known about the normal function of PGRN in the central nervous system apart from a role in brain development. It is expressed by microglia and neurons. In the periphery, PGRN is involved in wound repair and inflammation. High PGRN expression has been associated with more aggressive growth of various tumors. The properties of full length PGRN are distinct from those of proteolytically derived peptides, referred to as granulins (GRNs. While PGRN has trophic properties, GRNs are more akin to inflammatory mediators such as cytokines. Loss of the neurotrophic properties of PGRN may play a role in selective neuronal degeneration in FTLD, but neuroinflammation may also be important. Gene expression studies suggest that PGRN is up-regulated in a variety of neuroinflammatory conditions, and increased PGRN expression by microglia may play a pivotal role in the response to brain injury, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration.

  4. Observable consequences of partially degenerate leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Yanagida, T; Ellis, John; Raidal, Martti

    2002-01-01

    In the context of the seesaw mechanism, it is natural that the large solar and atmospheric neutrino mixing angles originate separately from large 2 by 2 mixings in the neutrino and charged-lepton sectors, respectively, and large mixing in the neutrino couplings is in turn more plausible if two of the heavy singlet neutrinos are nearly degenerate. We study the phenomenology of this scenario, calculating leptogenesis by solving numerically the set of coupled Boltzmann equations for out-of-equilibrium heavy singlet neutrino decays in the minimal supersymmetric seesaw model. The near-degenerate neutrinos may weigh < 10^8 GeV, avoiding the cosmological gravitino problem. This scenario predicts that Br(mu to e gamma) should be strongly suppressed, because of the small singlet neutrino masses, whilst Br(tau to mu gamma) may be large enough to be observable in B-factory or LHC experiments. If the light neutrino masses are hierarchical, we predict that the neutrinoless double-beta decay parameter m_{ee} is approxim...

  5. Vitreous in lattice degeneration of retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foos, R Y; Simons, K B

    1984-05-01

    A localized pocket of missing vitreous invariably overlies lattice degeneration of the retina. Subjects with lattice also have a higher rate of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, which is usually a complication of retinal tears. The latter are in turn a result of alterations in the central vitreous--that is, synchysis senilis leading to posterior vitreous detachment. In order to determine if there is either an association or a deleterious interaction between the local and central lesions of the vitreous in eyes with lattice, a comparison was made in autopsy eyes with and without lattice the degree of synchysis and rate of vitreous detachment. Results show no association between the local and central vitreous lesions, indicating that a higher rate of vitreous detachment is not the basis for the higher rate of retinal detachment in eyes with lattice. Also, there was no suggestion of deleterious interaction between the local and central vitreous lesions, either through vitreodonesis as a basis for precocious vitreous detachment, or through a greater degree of synchysis as a basis for interconnection of local and central lacunae (which could extend the localized retinal detachment in eyes with holes in lattice degeneration).

  6. Hyaline cartilage degenerates after autologous osteochondral transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibesku, C O; Szuwart, T; Kleffner, T O; Schlegel, P M; Jahn, U R; Van Aken, H; Fuchs, S

    2004-11-01

    Autologous osteochondral grafting is a well-established clinical procedure to treat focal cartilage defects in patients, although basic research on this topic remains sparse. The aim of the current study was to evaluate (1) histological changes of transplanted hyaline cartilage of osteochondral grafts and (2) the tissue that connects the transplanted cartilage with the adjacent cartilage in a sheep model. Both knee joints of four sheep were opened surgically and osteochondral grafts were harvested and simultaneously transplanted to the contralateral femoral condyle. The animals were sacrificed after three months and the received knee joints were evaluated histologically. Histological evaluation showed a complete ingrowth of the osseous part of the osteochondral grafts. A healing or ingrowth at the level of the cartilage could not be observed. Histological evaluation of the transplanted grafts according to Mankin revealed significantly more and more severe signs of degeneration than the adjacent cartilage, such as cloning of chondrocytes and irregularities of the articular surface. We found no connecting tissue between the transplanted and the adjacent cartilage and histological signs of degeneration of the transplanted hyaline cartilage. In the light of these findings, long-term results of autologous osteochondral grafts in human beings have to be followed critically.

  7. [The misery of degeneration: Buffon's materialism and the 'limitations' of his transformism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caponi, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    In "Of the degeneration of animals" (1766), Buffon espoused a kind of limited transformism. Yet twelve years later, in Epochs of Nature, he supplemented this with a materialist theory on the origin of life that left no room for this alternative: the conditions under which living beings develop could explain how the different species within each animal genus had formed through the degeneration of an originating species. But the formation of these multiple, originating varieties could only be explained by a sudden process of spontaneous generation. A limitation inherent to the very system of ideas that had taken Buffon to limited transformism the underlying theory of generation and reproduction -preempted the possibility of its radicalization.

  8. New treatment strategies for canine intervertebral disc degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) is a common problem in dogs and humans. IVD degeneration can lead to herniation of the IVD with subsequent compression of neural structures and various clinical signs, including back pain. Current treatment of IVD disease is conservative or surgical.

  9. Lattice degeneration of the retina and retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semes, L P

    1992-01-01

    Lattice retinal degeneration is considered the most significant peripheral retinal disorder potentially predisposing to retinal breaks and retinal detachment. Lattice degeneration affects the vitreous and inner retinal layers with secondary changes as deep as the retinal pigment epithelium and perhaps the choriocapillaris. Variations in clinical appearance are the rule; geographically, lattice lesions favor the vertical meridians between the equator and the ora serrata. Lattice degeneration begins early in life and has been reported in sequential generations of the same family. Along with its customary bilateral occurrence, lattice shares other characteristics of a dystrophy. The association between the vitreous and retina in lattice lesions may be responsible for the majority of lattice-induced retinal detachments. The tumultuous event of posterior vitreous separation in the presence of abnormally strong vitreoretinal adherence is the trigger for a retinal tear that, in turn, may lead to retinal detachment. Although retinal holes in young patients with lattice degeneration may play a role in the evolution of retinal detachment, the clinical course of lattice degeneration seems to be one of dormancy rather than of progressive change. This discussion outlines the pathophysiology of lattice retinal degeneration and the relationship of pathophysiology to clinical presentation. The epidemiology of lattice degeneration is summarized, as are the possible precursors to retinal detachment. A clinical characterization of the natural history of lattice degeneration is offered, and interventions for complications are described. To conclude, management strategies from a primary-care standpoint are reviewed.

  10. Prevalence of age-related macular degeneration in elderly Caucasians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erke, Maja G; Bertelsen, Geir; Peto, Tunde

    2012-01-01

    To describe the sex- and age-specific prevalence of drusen, geographic atrophy, and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD).......To describe the sex- and age-specific prevalence of drusen, geographic atrophy, and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD)....

  11. Negative electroretinograms in pericentral pigmentary retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kazuki; Kondo, Mineo; Nakamura, Makoto; Hotta, Junko; Terasaki, Hiroko; Miyake, Yozo; Hida, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    The clinical presentation and electrophysiological findings are described of three consecutive cases with pericentral pigmentary retinal degeneration. The responses to bright flashes after dark adaptation showed negative waveform shape in all cases. Rod responses were strongly reduced compared with cone responses. Cone electroretinograms elicited by long-duration stimuli showed greater loss of the on-response than the off-response. The ratio of the on-response amplitude to off-response amplitude of these patients (0.52 +/- 0.12; mean +/- SD, n = 6) was significantly smaller than that of normal subject (0.83 +/- 0.21; mean +/- SD, n = 8) (Mann-Whitney U-test, P retinal function, especially in transmission between photoreceptors and depolarizing bipolar cells.

  12. Tidal effects in twin-degenerate binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, C.G.

    1984-01-01

    The tidal velocity field is calculated for an initially non-rotating low mass white dwarf secondary in a twin-degenerate binary. These motions are used to find the tidal torque on the secondary, to first order in the orbital frequency, and an expression is derived for the synchronization time. For a lobe-filling secondary the synchronization time has a weak dependence on the mass and luminosity of the star, and for the binary G61-29 is found to be of the same order as the estimated lifetime of the system. It is emphasized, however, that tidal excitation of non-radial oscillatory modes in the secondary may significantly shorten the synchronization time. (author)

  13. A COMPUTATIONAL MODEL OF MOTOR NEURON DEGENERATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Masson, Gwendal; Przedborski, Serge; Abbott, L.F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY To explore the link between bioenergetics and motor neuron degeneration, we used a computational model in which detailed morphology and ion conductance are paired with intracellular ATP production and consumption. We found that reduced ATP availability increases the metabolic cost of a single action potential and disrupts K+/Na+ homeostasis, resulting in a chronic depolarization. The magnitude of the ATP shortage at which this ionic instability occurs depends on the morphology and intrinsic conductance characteristic of the neuron. If ATP shortage is confined to the distal part of the axon, the ensuing local ionic instability eventually spreads to the whole neuron and involves fasciculation-like spiking events. A shortage of ATP also causes a rise in intracellular calcium. Our modeling work supports the notion that mitochondrial dysfunction can account for salient features of the paralytic disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, including motor neuron hyperexcitability, fasciculation, and differential vulnerability of motor neuron subpopulations. PMID:25088365

  14. A computational model of motor neuron degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Masson, Gwendal; Przedborski, Serge; Abbott, L F

    2014-08-20

    To explore the link between bioenergetics and motor neuron degeneration, we used a computational model in which detailed morphology and ion conductance are paired with intracellular ATP production and consumption. We found that reduced ATP availability increases the metabolic cost of a single action potential and disrupts K+/Na+ homeostasis, resulting in a chronic depolarization. The magnitude of the ATP shortage at which this ionic instability occurs depends on the morphology and intrinsic conductance characteristic of the neuron. If ATP shortage is confined to the distal part of the axon, the ensuing local ionic instability eventually spreads to the whole neuron and involves fasciculation-like spiking events. A shortage of ATP also causes a rise in intracellular calcium. Our modeling work supports the notion that mitochondrial dysfunction can account for salient features of the paralytic disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, including motor neuron hyperexcitability, fasciculation, and differential vulnerability of motor neuron subpopulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Degenerate R-S perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfelder, J. O.; Certain, P. R.

    1973-01-01

    A concise, systematic procedure is given for determining the Rayleigh-Schrodinger energies and wave functions of degenerate states to arbitrarily high orders even when the degeneracies of the various states are resolved in arbitrary orders. The procedure is expressed in terms of an iterative cycle in which the energy through the (2n+1)st order is expressed in terms of the partially determined wave function through the n-th order. Both a direct and an operator derivation are given. The two approaches are equivalent and can be transcribed into each other. The direct approach deals with the wave functions (without the use of formal operators) and has the advantage that it resembles the usual treatment of nondegenerate perturbations and maintains close contact with the basic physics. In the operator approach, the wave functions are expressed in terms of infinite order operators which are determined by the successive resolution of the space of the zeroth order functions.

  16. Nearly degenerate neutrinos, supersymmetry and radiative corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, J.A.; Espinosa, J.R.; Ibarra, A.; Navarro, I.

    2000-01-01

    If neutrinos are to play a relevant cosmological role, they must be essentially degenerate with a mass matrix of the bimaximal mixing type. We study this scenario in the MSSM framework, finding that if neutrino masses are produced by a see-saw mechanism, the radiative corrections give rise to mass splittings and mixing angles that can accommodate the atmospheric and the (large angle MSW) solar neutrino oscillations. This provides a natural origin for the Δm 2 sol 2 atm hierarchy. On the other hand, the vacuum oscillation solution to the solar neutrino problem is always excluded. We discuss also in the SUSY scenario other possible effects of radiative corrections involving the new neutrino Yukawa couplings, including implications for triviality limits on the Majorana mass, the infrared fixed point value of the top Yukawa coupling, and gauge coupling and bottom-tau unification

  17. Prevention of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ian Yat Hin; Koo, Simon Chi Yan; Chan, Clement Wai Nang

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of blindness in the developed world. Although effective treatment modalities such as anti-VEGF treatment have been developed for neovascular AMD, there is still no effective treatment for geographical atrophy, and therefore the most cost-effective management of AMD is to start with prevention. This review looks at current evidence on preventive measures targeted at AMD. Modalities reviewed include (1) nutritional supplements such as the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formula, lutein and zeaxanthin, omega-3 fatty acid, and berry extracts, (2) lifestyle modifications, including smoking and body-mass-index, and (3) filtering sunlight, i.e. sunglasses and blue-blocking intraocular lenses. In summary, the only proven effective preventive measures are stopping smoking and the AREDS formula.

  18. Progression of Fatty Muscle Degeneration in Atraumatic Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert-Davies, Jonah; Teefey, Sharlene A; Steger-May, Karen; Chamberlain, Aaron M; Middleton, William; Robinson, Kathryn; Yamaguchi, Ken; Keener, Jay D

    2017-05-17

    The purpose of this prospective study was to examine the progression of fatty muscle degeneration over time in asymptomatic shoulders with degenerative rotator cuff tears. Subjects with an asymptomatic rotator cuff tear in 1 shoulder and pain due to rotator cuff disease in the contralateral shoulder were enrolled in a prospective cohort. Subjects were followed annually with shoulder ultrasonography, which evaluated tear size, location, and fatty muscle degeneration. Tears that were either full-thickness at enrollment or progressed to a full-thickness defect during follow-up were examined. A minimum follow-up of 2 years was necessary for eligibility. One hundred and fifty-six shoulders with full-thickness rotator cuff tears were potentially eligible. Seventy shoulders had measurable fatty muscle degeneration of at least 1 rotator cuff muscle at some time point. Patients with fatty muscle degeneration in the shoulder were older than those without degeneration (mean, 65.8 years [95% confidence interval (CI), 64.0 to 67.6 years] compared with 61.0 years [95% CI, 59.1 to 62.9 years]; p tears at baseline was larger in shoulders with degeneration than in shoulders that did not develop degeneration (13 and 10 mm wide, respectively, and 13 and 10 mm long; p Tears with fatty muscle degeneration were more likely to have enlarged during follow-up than were tears that never developed muscle degeneration (79% compared with 58%; odds ratio, 2.64 [95% CI, 1.29 to 5.39]; p muscle degeneration occurred more frequently in shoulders with tears that had enlarged (43%; 45 of 105) than in shoulders with tears that had not enlarged (20%; 10 of 51; p tears with enlargement and progression of muscle degeneration were more likely to extend into the anterior supraspinatus than were those without progression (53% and 17%, respectively; p tear size (p = 0.56). The median time from tear enlargement to progression of fatty muscle degeneration was 1.0 year (range, -2.0 to 6.9 years) for the

  19. Formation of Degenerate Band Gaps in Layered Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey P. Vinogradov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the review, peculiarities of spectra of one-dimensional photonic crystals made of anisotropic and/or magnetooptic materials are considered. The attention is focused on band gaps of a special type—the so called degenerate band gaps which are degenerate with respect to polarization. Mechanisms of formation and properties of these band gaps are analyzed. Peculiarities of spectra of photonic crystals that arise due to the linkage between band gaps are discussed. Particularly, it is shown that formation of a frozen mode is caused by linkage between Brillouin and degenerate band gaps. Also, existence of the optical Borrmann effect at the boundaries of degenerate band gaps and optical Tamm states at the frequencies of degenerate band gaps are analyzed.

  20. [Lattice degeneration of the peripheral retina: ultrastructural study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bec, P; Malecaze, F; Arne, J L; Mathis, A

    1985-01-01

    The ultrastructural study of a case of snail track degeneration shows the presence of lipid inclusions in both the glial and the macrophage cells in every layer of the retina, and the existence of intraretinal fibers different from collagen fibers appearing to be glial filaments similar to those found in astrocytic gliomes and to the Rosenthal fibers observed in senile nervous cells. Other features were thinning of the retina and absence of blood vessels in the retina. There are no abnormalities of the vitreo-retinal juncture. All the lesions are in agreement with those observed by Daicker [Ophthalmologica, Basel 165: 360-365, 1972; Klin. Mbl. Augenheilk. 172: 581-583, 1978] with some differences, however. They are different from those found in lattice degeneration. They show that snail track degeneration is a specific form of peripheral retinal degeneration which is quite different from lattice degeneration and must not be considered similar.

  1. Lumbar disc degeneration was not related to spine and hip bone mineral densities in Chinese: facet joint osteoarthritis may confound the association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianjiang; Lu, Xuan; Yang, Ge; Han, Yongmei; Tong, Xiang; Wang, Yue

    2017-12-01

    A sample of 512 Chinese was studied and we observed that greater disc degeneration on MRI was associated with greater spine DXA BMD. Yet, this association may be confounded by facet joint osteoarthritis. BMD may not be a risk factor for lumbar disc degeneration in Chinese. Evidence suggested that lumbar vertebral bone and intervertebral disc interact with each other in multiple ways. The current paper aims to determine the association between bone mineral density (BMD) and lumbar disc degeneration using a sample of Chinese. We studied 165 patients with back disorders and 347 general subjects from China. All subjects had lumbar spine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and dual- energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) spine BMD studies, and a subset of general subjects had additional hip BMD measurements. On T2-weighted MR images, Pfirrmann score was used to evaluate the degree of lumbar disc degeneration and facet joint osteoarthritis was assessed as none, slight-moderate, and severe. Regression analyses were used to examine the associations between lumbar and hip BMD and disc degeneration, adjusting for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), lumbar region, and facet joint osteoarthritis. Greater facet joint osteoarthritis was associated with greater spine BMD (P osteoarthritis entered the regression model, however, greater spine BMD was associated with greater facet joint osteoarthritis (P  0.05). No statistical association was observed between spine BMD and lumbar disc degeneration in patients with back disorders (P > 0.05), and between hip BMD and disc degeneration in general subjects (P > 0.05). BMD may not be a risk factor for lumbar disc degeneration in Chinese. Facet joint osteoarthritis inflates DXA spine BMD measurements and therefore, may confound the association between spine BMD and disc degeneration.

  2. Urinary incontinence and its functional anatomy in frontotemporal lobar degenerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perneczky, Robert; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Foerstl, Hans; Kurz, Alexander; Drzezga, Alexander; May, Florian

    2008-01-01

    The frontal lobes play a crucial role in micturition control. However, no reports exist on the functional role of distinct frontal brain regions in urinary incontinence (UIC) in patients with a neurodegenerative damage of the frontal lobe. The aim of the present study was therefore to explore if functional brain lesions were associated with UIC in patients suffering from frontotemporal lobar degenerations (FTLD). Forty-four patients, including eight incontinent subjects, underwent cranial positron emission tomography scanning with 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose ( 18 F-FDG PET) to assess the relative metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglc). Group comparisons of rCMRglc were conducted in SPM2 to identify brain regions where the group of incontinent patients (FTLD+UIC) had significant alterations compared with the group without UIC (FTLD-UIC). At the stringent statistical threshold of p < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons according to the family-wise error rate, the statistical analysis revealed two significant right-hemispheric hypometabolic clusters located in the premotor/anterior cingulate cortex and the putamen/claustrum/insula. No hypermetabolic regions were found. The present study is the first to provide evidence for brain functional alterations involved in the occurrence of UIC in FTLD. These results provide an important piece of evidence to the understanding of a particularly distressing autonomic nervous system symptom of dementia. (orig.)

  3. Cellular models and therapies for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Forest

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a complex neurodegenerative visual disorder that causes profound physical and psychosocial effects. Visual impairment in AMD is caused by the loss of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE cells and the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that they support. There is currently no effective treatment for the most common form of this disease (dry AMD. A new approach to treating AMD involves the transplantation of RPE cells derived from either human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells. Multiple clinical trials are being initiated using a variety of cell therapies. Although many animal models are available for AMD research, most do not recapitulate all aspects of the disease, hampering progress. However, the use of cultured RPE cells in AMD research is well established and, indeed, some of the more recently described RPE-based models show promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms of AMD and for screening drug candidates. Here, we discuss innovative cell-culture models of AMD and emerging stem-cell-based therapies for the treatment of this vision-robbing disease.

  4. Urinary incontinence and its functional anatomy in frontotemporal lobar degenerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perneczky, Robert [Technical University Munich Medical School, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Muenchen (Germany); Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Foerstl, Hans; Kurz, Alexander [Technical University Munich Medical School, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Munich (Germany); Drzezga, Alexander [Technical University Munich Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); May, Florian [Technical University Munich Medical School, Department of Urology, Munich (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    The frontal lobes play a crucial role in micturition control. However, no reports exist on the functional role of distinct frontal brain regions in urinary incontinence (UIC) in patients with a neurodegenerative damage of the frontal lobe. The aim of the present study was therefore to explore if functional brain lesions were associated with UIC in patients suffering from frontotemporal lobar degenerations (FTLD). Forty-four patients, including eight incontinent subjects, underwent cranial positron emission tomography scanning with {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG PET) to assess the relative metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglc). Group comparisons of rCMRglc were conducted in SPM2 to identify brain regions where the group of incontinent patients (FTLD+UIC) had significant alterations compared with the group without UIC (FTLD-UIC). At the stringent statistical threshold of p < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons according to the family-wise error rate, the statistical analysis revealed two significant right-hemispheric hypometabolic clusters located in the premotor/anterior cingulate cortex and the putamen/claustrum/insula. No hypermetabolic regions were found. The present study is the first to provide evidence for brain functional alterations involved in the occurrence of UIC in FTLD. These results provide an important piece of evidence to the understanding of a particularly distressing autonomic nervous system symptom of dementia. (orig.)

  5. Ultrasonographic findings of low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma of the uterus with a focus on cystic degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ga Eun; Rha, Sung Eun; Oh, Soon Nam; Lee, Ah Won; Lee, Keun Ho; Kim, Mee Ran [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The goal of this study was to perform a retrospective analysis of the ultrasonographic findings associated with low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma. Ten pathologically confirmed cases of low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma at our institution from January 2007 to April 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent a preoperative transvaginal ultrasound. Two radiologists came to a consensus regarding the location, size, margin, and echogenicity of the tumor, as well as the presence of intratumoral cystic degeneration and its extent and configuration. Low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma manifested as an intramural mass protruding into the endometrial cavity (n=6) or as a purely intramural mass (n=4). The maximal diameter of the lesion ranged from 4 to 9.1 cm (mean, 6.2 cm). The imaging features of low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma were variable: six cases involved predominantly solid masses containing cystic degeneration, one was a predominantly unilocular cystic mass, two were ill-defined infiltrative solid masses, and one was a well-defined solid mass. Among the seven cases with internal cystic degeneration, five patients showed a multiseptated cystic area or a cystic area with multiple small clusters, while a unilocular cystic area within the tumor was found in two patients. Low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma is associated with variable ultrasonographic findings with regard to the location, margin, and configuration of the lesion. Multiseptated cystic areas and multiple small areas of cystic degeneration are common.

  6. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment...

  7. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment...

  8. Pump depletion effects in thermal degenerate four-wave mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guha, S.; Chen, W.

    1987-01-01

    Characteristics such as a large magnitude of nonlinearity, fast response, broadband operation, and easy availability make absorbing liquids attractive candidates for performing phase conjugation of optical beams by degenerate four-wave mixing. The coupled-wave equations describing the interaction of four optical fields in an absorbing medium have been solved previously for the case of no pump depletion and no self-action of any of the beams. When studying phase conjugation oscillation, however, the effect of depletion of the pump beams on the phase conjugate reflectivity must be considered. Moreover, in absorbing media the self-action effects are always present. The coupled-wave equations, including the self-action terms for all four waves involved, are derived here for the first time to the authors' knowledge. For the case of small absorption, these equations are solved analytically, and the effect of pump depletion on phase conjugate reflectivity R is determined. In the absence of the pump depletion, R is proportional to tan 2 (Ql), where Ql is a dimensionless gain parameter characterizing the nonlinear medium and the input pump power. When pump depletion and self-action are included, R does not go to infinity when Ql equals odd multiples of π2. Instead R takes on values dependent on the probe ratio q 1 , which is the ratio of the input probe irradiance to the input pump irradiance. The authors find that the maximum value for R is 1q 1 . They also find that for Ql close to odd multiples of π2, the reflectivity is significantly reduced from the value obtained by ignoring pump depletion, even for probe ratios as small as one-tenth of 1%. Experimental confirmation of this theory, using an argon-ion laser as the pump and carbon tetrachloride mixed with a dye as the absorbing medium, is in progress and is reported

  9. Multiple sclerosis and other white matter diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) by computerized tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance are shown, including the examination of cerebral spinal fluid. Lymphocytic, foamy histiocytic perivascular cuffing, degenerated oligodendrocytes, and microglia proliferation with relative axonal sparing are presented. In the latter stage of the chronic MS plaque there is sclerosis with microcystic formation with complete demyelination and organization. (author)

  10. Progress toward the maintenance and repair of degenerating retinal circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vugler, Anthony A

    2010-01-01

    Retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa remain major causes of severe vision loss in humans. Clinical trials for treatment of retinal degenerations are underway and advancements in our understanding of retinal biology in health/disease have implications for novel therapies. A review of retinal biology is used to inform a discussion of current strategies to maintain/repair neural circuitry in age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and Type 2 Leber congenital amaurosis. In age-related macular degeneration/retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive loss of rods/cones results in corruption of bipolar cell circuitry, although retinal output neurons/photoreceptive melanopsin cells survive. Visual function can be stabilized/enhanced after treatment in age-related macular degeneration, but in advanced degenerations, reorganization of retinal circuitry may preclude attempts to restore cone function. In Type 2 Leber congenital amaurosis, useful vision can be restored by gene therapy where central cones survive. Remarkable progress has been made in restoring vision to rodents using light-responsive ion channels inserted into bipolar cells/retinal ganglion cells. Advances in genetic, cellular, and prosthetic therapies show varying degrees of promise for treating retinal degenerations. While functional benefits can be obtained after early therapeutic interventions, efforts should be made to minimize circuitry changes as soon as possible after rod/cone loss. Advances in retinal anatomy/physiology and genetic technologies should allow refinement of future reparative strategies.

  11. Age related macular degeneration and visual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforidis, John B; Tecce, Nicola; Dell'Omo, Roberto; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Verolino, Marco; Costagliola, Ciro

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central blindness or low vision among the elderly in industrialized countries. AMD is caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Among modifiable environmental risk factors, cigarette smoking has been associated with both the dry and wet forms of AMD and may increase the likelihood of worsening pre-existing AMD. Despite advances, the treatment of AMD has limitations and affected patients are often referred for low vision rehabilitation to help them cope with their remaining eyesight. The characteristic visual impairment for both forms of AMD is loss of central vision (central scotoma). This loss results in severe difficulties with reading that may be only partly compensated by magnifying glasses or screen-projection devices. The loss of central vision associated with the disease has a profound impact on patient quality of life. With progressive central visual loss, patients lose their ability to perform the more complex activities of daily living. Common vision aids include low vision filters, magnifiers, telescopes and electronic aids. Low vision rehabilitation (LVR) is a new subspecialty emerging from the traditional fields of ophthalmology, optometry, occupational therapy, and sociology, with an ever-increasing impact on the usual concepts of research, education, and services for visually impaired patients. Relatively few ophthalmologists practise LVR and fewer still routinely use prismatic image relocation (IR) in AMD patients. IR is a method of stabilizing oculomotor functions with the purpose of promoting better function of preferred retinal loci (PRLs). The aim of vision rehabilitation therapy consists in the achievement of techniques designed to improve PRL usage. The use of PRLs to compensate for diseased foveae has offered hope to these patients in regaining some function. However, in a recently published meta-analysis, prism spectacles were found to be unlikely to be of

  12. Localized thermonuclear runaways and volcanoes on degenerate dwarf stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shara, M.M.

    1982-10-15

    Practically all studies to date of thermonuclear runaways on degenerate dwarf stars in binary systems have considered only spherically symmetric eruptions. We emphasize that even slightly non-spherically symmetric accretion leads to transverse temperature gradients in the dwarfs' accreted envelopes. Over a rather broad range of parameter space, thermalization time scales in accreted envelopes are much longer than thermonuclear runaway time scales. Thus localized thermonuclear runaways (i.e., runaways much smaller than the host degenerate star) rather than spherically symmetric global eruptions are likely to occur on many degenerate dwarfs. Localized runaways are more likely to occur on more massive and/or hotter dwarfs.

  13. Cystic adventitial degeneration: ectopic ganglia from adjacent joint capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmann, J; Widmer, M K; Gretener, S; Do, D D; Willenberg, T; Daliri, A; Baumgartner, I

    2009-11-01

    Cystic adventitial degeneration is a rare non-atherosclerotic cause of peripheral arterial occlusive disease, mainly seen in young men without other evidence of vascular disease. Diagnosis will be established by clinical findings and by ultrasound or angiography and can be treated by excision or enucleation of the affected arterial segment or by percutaneous ultrasound-guided aspiration. However, the etiology of adventitial cysts remains unknown. We report a case of cystic adventitial degeneration showing a connection between the joint capsule and the adventitial cyst, supporting the theory that cystic adventitial degeneration may represent ectopic ganglia from adjacent joint capsules.

  14. Acquired Nonpigmented Vitreous Cyst Associated With Lattice Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Mai, Guiying; Liu, Ruyuan; Luo, Yan; Lu, Lin

    2017-10-01

    A 63-year-old male presented with a round-shaped floater and visual obscuration in the right eye. Clinical evaluation showed a nonpigmented vitreous cyst connected to a lattice degeneration by a stalk. Immunostaining of the vitreous cyst obtained from vitrectomy showed its origin of retinal neuroepithelium. The cyst was formed by continuous vitreous traction, which might tear up the disrupted retina at the area of lattice degeneration. This report added the lattice degeneration to the list of causes for the acquired vitreous cyst. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2017;48:856-858.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. [Clinical features and prognosis of retinal lattice degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X R

    1990-07-01

    110 cases (110 eyes) of retinal lattice degeneration were clinically observed and followed up for 3-8 years. Most lesions were located in the superotemporal quadrant, band-shaped, and parallel to the ora serrata. 80.9% of the lesions presented various degrees of pigmentation, 67.1% yellowish white spots, and 83.6% white lines. 32.9% of the eyes developed retinal holes. Most lattice degenerations were accompanied by vitreous degeneration and vitreoretinal traction. The disease progressed only slowly, though in a few cases it tended to expand.

  16. [Current concepts in pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicka-Trząska, Agnieszka; Karska-Basta, Izabella; Romanowska-Dixon, Bożena

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of central blindness in elderly population of the western world. The pathogenesis of this disease, likely multifactorial, is not well known, although a number of theories have been put forward, including oxidative stress, genetic interactions, hemodynamic imbalance, immune and inflammatory processes. The understanding of age-related macular degeneration pathogenesis will give rise to new approaches in prevention and treatment of the early and late stages of both atrophic and neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

  17. Lumbosacral interspinous ligament rupture associated with acute intrinsic spinal muscle degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinkins, Randy J.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate lumbosacral interspinous ligament rupture, with or without related acute intrinsic spinal muscle degeneration. This study consisted of a prospective imaging analysis of consecutive 100 MRI studies in adult patients (mean age 56 years) presenting with low back pain. Alterations from the normal in the inter- and perispinal structures of the spine and perispinal soft tissues (e.g., spinal ligaments, perispinal muscles) were sought based upon studies on young volunteers without low back pain (n=10; mean age 23 years). Compared with the group without low back pain, many index cases (n=71, 71%) demonstrated hyperintensity (i.e., sprain or frank ligamentous rupture) of the interspinous ligament(s) on T2-weighted, fat-suppressed MRI studies at one (20 of 71, 28%) or multiple (51 of 71, 72%) levels. Associated intrinsic spinal muscle (e.g., interspinalis, multifidus muscles) degeneration was observed in a minority of cases overall (n=7, 7%), but was only seen in association with cases also demonstrating interspinous ligament degeneration/rupture (7 of 71, 10%). Lumbosacral interspinous ligament sprain or frank rupture, as well as related acute-subacute autotraumatic intrinsic spinal muscle rupture/degeneration, may be overlooked by many observers if fat-suppressed, T2-weighted MRI is not acquired. These musculoligamentous alterations are on occasion the only abnormalities recognized on MRI of the lumbosacral spine and may theoretically be sources of low back morbidity that potentially may respond to specific therapy. Because this study was an observational one, based solely upon medical imaging, future research must focus upon the correlation of the relevance of these findings with an age-matched asymptomatic control group and longitudinal clinicoradiologic therapeutic trials. (orig.)

  18. A Gemini snapshot survey for double degenerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Mukremin; Brown, Warren R.; Gianninas, A.; Curd, Brandon; Bell, Keaton J.; Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2017-11-01

    We present the results from a Gemini snapshot radial-velocity survey of 44 low-mass white-dwarf candidates selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy. To find sub-hour orbital period binary systems, our time-series spectroscopy had cadences of 2-8 min over a period of 20-30 min. Through follow-up observations at Gemini and the MMT, we identify four double-degenerate binary systems with periods ranging from 53 min to 7 h. The shortest period system, SDSS J123549.88+154319.3, was recently identified as a sub-hour period detached binary by Breedt and collaborators. Here, we refine the orbital and physical parameters of this system. High-speed and time-domain survey photometry observations do not reveal eclipses or other photometric effects in any of our targets. We compare the period distribution of these four systems with the orbital period distribution of known double white dwarfs; the median period decreases from 0.64 to 0.24 d for M = 0.3-0.5 M⊙ to M < 0.3 M⊙ white dwarfs. However, we do not find a statistically significant correlation between the orbital period and white-dwarf mass.

  19. Correlations in a partially degenerate electron plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chihara, Junzo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    The density-functional theory proves that an ion-electron mixture can be treated as a one-component liquid interacting only via a pairwise interaction in the evaluation of the ion-ion radial distribution function (RDF), and provides a set of integral equations: one is an integral equation for the ion-ion RDF and another for an effective ion-ion interaction, which depends on the ion-ion RDF. This formulation gives a set of integral equation to calculate plasma structures with combined use of the electron-electron correlations in a partially degenerate electron plasma. Therefore, it is important for this purpose to determine the electron-electron correlations at a arbitrary temperature. Here, they are calculated by the quantal version of the hypernetted chain (HNC) equation. On the basis of the jellium-vacancy model, the ionic and electronic structures of rubidium are calculated for the range from liquid metal to plasma states by increasing the temperature at the fixed density using the electron-correlation results. (author)

  20. Radiation therapy: age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Carlos A Medina; Ehlers, Justis P

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe irreversible vision loss in patients over the age of 50 years in the developed world. Neovascular AMD (NVAMD) is responsible for 90% of the cases with severe visual loss. In the last decade, the treatment paradigm for NVAMD has been transformed by the advent of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Despite the excellent results of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, frequent injections remain a necessity for most patients. The burden of these frequent visits as well as the cumulative risks of indefinite intravitreal injections demand continued pursuit of more enduring therapy that provides similar functional results. Radiotherapy has been studied for two decades as a potential therapy for NVAMD. Because of its antiangiogenic properties, radiation therapy remains a promising potential adjunctive resource for the treatment of choroidal neovascularization secondary to NVAMD. This review considers the past, present and future of radiation as a treatment or combination treatment of NVAMD. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. On degenerate metrics, dark matter and unification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searight, Trevor P.

    2017-12-01

    A five-dimensional theory of relativity is presented which suggests that gravitation and electromagnetism may be unified using a degenerate metric. There are four fields (in the four-dimensional sense): a tensor field, two vector fields, and a scalar field, and they are unified with a combination of a gauge-like invariance and a reflection symmetry which means that both vector fields are photons. The gauge-like invariance implies that the fifth dimension is not directly observable; it also implies that charge is a constant of motion. The scalar field is analogous to the Brans-Dicke scalar field, and the theory tends towards the Einstein-Maxwell theory in the limit as the coupling constant tends to infinity. As there is some scope for fields to vary in the fifth dimension, it is possible for the photons to have wave behaviour in the fifth dimension. The wave behaviour has two effects: it gives mass to the photons, and it prevents them from interacting directly with normal matter. These massive photons still act as a source of gravity, however, and therefore they are candidates for dark matter.

  2. Radiotherapy in age-related macula degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gripp, Stephan; Stammen, Johannes; Petersen, Claudia; Hartmann, Axel; Willers, Reinhart; Althaus, Christoph

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To ascertain the benefit from radiotherapy in age-related macula degeneration in a single-arm longitudinal study. Methods and Materials: From 1997 to 1998, 39 patients with occult and 33 patients with classic choroidal neovascularization (CNV) were irradiated with 16 Gy. Fluorescein angiography and measurements of visual acuity were performed before and 3, 6, and 12 months after irradiation. Results: Complete follow-up data for 1 year were available from 69 patients. The mean patient age was 72 years (range 49-92). Vision decreased in 43, was stable in 18, and improved in 8 cases. The mean vision deteriorated significantly (p=0.02, Wilcoxon test), particularly within the first 3 months. Patients with occult CNV did significantly better than did those with classic CNV (p=0.03). The proportion of patients retaining vision ≥0.2 fell from 65% to 42% (p <0.01), for classic and occult CNV from 50% to 23%, and for occult CNV from 77% to 56% (p<0.02), respectively. CNV size increased in 30 patients and was stable in 38. Neither age (p=0.17) nor gender (p=0.21, chi-square test) influenced prognosis. Four patients reported transitional complaints. Conclusion: Low-dose fractionated radiotherapy with 16 Gy is well tolerated. However, vision and reading ability were not preserved in most patients

  3. Coulomb Logarithm in Nonideal and Degenerate Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, A. V.; Starostin, A. N.; Gryaznov, V. K.

    2018-03-01

    Various methods for determining the Coulomb logarithm in the kinetic theory of transport and various variants of the choice of the plasma screening constant, taking into account and disregarding the contribution of the ion component and the boundary value of the electron wavevector are considered. The correlation of ions is taken into account using the Ornstein-Zernike integral equation in the hypernetted-chain approximation. It is found that the effect of ion correlation in a nondegenerate plasma is weak, while in a degenerate plasma, this effect must be taken into account when screening is determined by the electron component alone. The calculated values of the electrical conductivity of a hydrogen plasma are compared with the values determined experimentally in the megabar pressure range. It is shown that the values of the Coulomb logarithm can indeed be smaller than unity. Special experiments are proposed for a more exact determination of the Coulomb logarithm in a magnetic field for extremely high pressures, for which electron scattering by ions prevails.

  4. Double Degenerates among DA white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragaglia, A.; Greggio, L.; Renzini, A.; D'odorico, S.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a spectroscopic survey of catalog white dwarfs in search of radial velocity variations indicative of a binary motion are reported. In a sample of 54 DA white dwarfs, one Double Degenerate (DD) system with a period of 1.15 days (the shortest period DD system yet discovered) is found. Two other excellent and two good DD candidates, and two white dwarf + red dwarf pairs were also found. If all the candidates should be confirmed, this would indicate a frequency of about 13 percent of interacting binaries in an unbiased sample of evolved stars, with a DD frequency of about 10 percent. These results suggest fairly large values for the common-envelope parameter alpha, implying that a source of energy other than orbital may be required to eject the envelope during common-envelope events. Finally, in combination with previous evidence our result implies that DDs with WD components of the DA variety are unlikely to be the precursors of Type I supernovae, but DDs with non-DA components remain very attractive candidates. 20 refs

  5. Magnonic triply-degenerate nodal points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2017-12-01

    We generalize the concept of triply-degenerate nodal points to non-collinear antiferromagnets. Here, we introduce this concept to insulating quantum antiferromagnets on the decorated honeycomb lattice, with spin-1 bosonic quasiparticle excitations known as magnons. We demonstrate the existence of magnonic surface states with constant energy contours that form pairs of magnonic arcs connecting the surface projection of the magnonic triple nodal points. The quasiparticle excitations near the triple nodal points represent three-component bosons beyond that of magnonic Dirac, Weyl, and nodal-line cases. They can be regarded as a direct reflection of the intrinsic spin carried by magnons. Furthermore, we show that the magnonic triple nodal points can split into magnonic Weyl points, as the system transits from a non-collinear spin structure to a non-coplanar one with a non-zero scalar spin chirality. Our results not only apply to insulating antiferromagnets, but also provide a platform to seek for triple nodal points in metallic antiferromagnets.

  6. Determination of source terms in a degenerate parabolic equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannarsa, P; Tort, J; Yamamoto, M

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we prove Lipschitz stability results for inverse source problems relative to parabolic equations. We use the method introduced by Imanuvilov and Yamamoto in 1998 based on Carleman estimates. What is new here is that we study a class of one-dimensional degenerate parabolic equations. In our model, the diffusion coefficient vanishes at one extreme point of the domain. Instead of the classical Carleman estimates obtained by Fursikov and Imanuvilov for non degenerate equations, we use and extend some recent Carleman estimates for degenerate equations obtained by Cannarsa, Martinez and Vancostenoble. Finally, we obtain Lipschitz stability results in inverse source problems for our class of degenerate parabolic equations both in the case of a boundary observation and in the case of a locally distributed observation

  7. The degenerate-internal-states approximation for cold collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, A.C.; Tiesinga, E.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Verhaar, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Degenerate-Internal-States approximation as well as its first-order correction are shown to provide a convenient method for calculating elastic and inelastic collision amplitudes for low temperature atomic scattering.

  8. Magnetism and magnetostriction in a degenerate rigid band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakowski, K.; Barbara, B.

    1990-09-01

    We investigate the influence of the spin-orbit coupling on the magnetic and magnetoelastic phenomena in ferromagnetic band systems. The description is within the Stoner model of a degenerate rigid band, for temperature T = O. (author). 14 refs

  9. Relativistic degenerate electron plasma in an intense magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delsante, A.E.; Frankel, N.E.

    1978-01-01

    The dielectric response function for a dense, ultra-degenerate relativistic electron plasma in an intense uniform magnetic field is presented. Dispersion relations for plasma oscillations parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field are obtained

  10. Arbitrary electron acoustic waves in degenerate dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Ata-ur; Mushtaq, A.; Qamar, A.; Neelam, S.

    2017-05-01

    A theoretical investigation is carried out of the nonlinear dynamics of electron-acoustic waves in a collisionless and unmagnetized plasma whose constituents are non-degenerate cold electrons, ultra-relativistic degenerate electrons, and stationary ions. A dispersion relation is derived for linear EAWs. An energy integral equation involving the Sagdeev potential is derived, and basic properties of the large amplitude solitary structures are investigated in such a degenerate dense plasma. It is shown that only negative large amplitude EA solitary waves can exist in such a plasma system. The present analysis may be important to understand the collective interactions in degenerate dense plasmas, occurring in dense astrophysical environments as well as in laser-solid density plasma interaction experiments.

  11. An Unusual Case of Extensive Lattice Degeneration and Retinal Detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, David J; Sarma, Saurabh Kumar; Basaiawmoit, Jennifer V

    2016-07-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is not infrequently encountered on a dilated retinal examination and many of them do not need any intervention. We report a case of atypical lattice degeneration variant with peripheral retinal detachment. An asymptomatic 35-year-old lady with minimal refractive error was found to have extensive lattice degeneration, peripheral retinal detachment and fibrotic changes peripherally with elevation of retinal vessels on dilated retinal examination. There were also areas of white without pressure, chorioretinal scarring and retinal breaks. All the changes were limited to beyond the equator but were found to span 360 degrees. She was treated with barrage laser all around to prevent extension of the retinal detachment posteriorly. She remained stable till her latest follow-up two years after the barrage laser. This case is reported for its rarity with a discussion of the probable differential diagnoses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of such findings in lattice degeneration.

  12. An imbedding theorem and its applications in degenerate elliptic equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duong Minh Duc.

    1988-06-01

    We improve the Rellich-Kondrachov theorem and apply it to study strongly degenerate and singular elliptic equations. We obtain the maximum principle, Harnacks's inequality and global regularity for solutions of those equations. (author). 11 refs

  13. The brain basis of musicophilia: evidence from frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Phillip David Fletcher; Laura eDowney; Pirada eWitoonpanich; Jason eWarren

    2013-01-01

    Musicophilia, or abnormal craving for music, is a poorly understood phenomenon that has been associated in particular with focal degeneration of the temporal lobes. Here we addressed the brain basis of musicophilia using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) on MR volumetric brain images in a retrospectively ascertained cohort of patients meeting clinical consensus criteria for frontotemporal lobar degeneration: of 37 cases ascertained, 12 had musicophilia and 25 did not exhibit the phenomenon. The s...

  14. Degenerated uterine leiomyomas mimicking malignant bilateral ovarian surface epithelial tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Yi Boem Ha; Lee, Hae Kyung; Lee, Min Hee; Choi, Seo Youn; Chung, Soo Ho [Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Uterine leiomyomas are the most common benign uterine neoplasms. Undegenerated uterine leiomyomas are easily recognizable by the typical imaging findings on radiologic studies. However, degenerated fibroids can have unusual and variable appearances. The atypical appearances due to degenerative changes may cause confusion in diagnosis of leiomyomas. In this article, we report a case of a patient with extensive cystic and myxoid degeneration of uterine leiomyoma, mimicking malignant bilateral ovarian surface epithelial tumors.

  15. Electromagnetic solitons in degenerate relativistic electron–positron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezhiani, V I; Shatashvili, N L; Tsintsadze, N L

    2015-01-01

    The existence of soliton-like electromagnetic (EM) distributions in a fully degenerate electron–positron plasma is studied applying relativistic hydrodynamic and Maxwell equations. For a circularly polarized wave it is found that the soliton solutions exist both in relativistic as well as nonrelativistic degenerate plasmas. Plasma density in the region of soliton pulse localization is reduced considerably. The possibility of plasma cavitation is also shown. (invited comment)

  16. SINGLE-DEGENERATE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE ARE PREFERENTIALLY OVERLUMINOUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, Robert; Jumper, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical progress has favored merging and helium-accreting sub-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs (WDs) in the double-degenerate and the double-detonation channels, respectively, as the most promising progenitors of normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Thus the fate of rapidly accreting Chandrasekhar mass WDs in the single-degenerate channel remains more mysterious then ever. In this paper, we clarify the nature of ignition in Chandrasekhar-mass single-degenerate SNe Ia by analytically deriving the existence of a characteristic length scale which establishes a transition from central ignitions to buoyancy-driven ignitions. Using this criterion, combined with data from three-dimensional simulations of convection and ignition, we demonstrate that the overwhelming majority of ignition events within Chandrasekhar-mass WDs in the single-degenerate channel are buoyancy-driven, and consequently lack a vigorous deflagration phase. We thus infer that single-degenerate SNe Ia are generally expected to lead to overluminous 1991T-like SNe Ia events. We establish that the rates predicted from both the population of supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs) and binary population synthesis models of the single-degenerate channel are broadly consistent with the observed rates of overluminous SNe Ia, and suggest that the population of SSSs are the dominant stellar progenitors of SNe 1991T-like events. We further demonstrate that the single-degenerate channel contribution to the normal and failed 2002cx-like rates is not likely to exceed 1% of the total SNe Ia rate. We conclude with a range of observational tests of overluminous SNe Ia which will either support or strongly constrain the single-degenerate scenario

  17. Death Receptor 6 Promotes Wallerian Degeneration in Peripheral Axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, Kanchana K; Cheng, Irene; Park, Rachel E; Karim, Mardeen S; Edamura, Kazusa; Hughes, Christopher; Spano, Anthony J; Erisir, Alev; Deppmann, Christopher D

    2017-03-20

    Axon degeneration during development is required to sculpt a functional nervous system and is also a hallmark of pathological insult, such as injury [1, 2]. Despite similar morphological characteristics, very little overlap in molecular mechanisms has been reported between pathological and developmental degeneration [3-5]. In the peripheral nervous system (PNS), developmental axon pruning relies on receptor-mediated extrinsic degeneration mechanisms to determine which axons are maintained or degenerated [5-7]. Receptors have not been implicated in Wallerian axon degeneration; instead, axon autonomous, intrinsic mechanisms are thought to be the primary driver for this type of axon disintegration [8-10]. Here we survey the role of neuronally expressed, paralogous tumor necrosis factor receptor super family (TNFRSF) members in Wallerian degeneration. We find that an orphan receptor, death receptor 6 (DR6), is required to drive axon degeneration after axotomy in sympathetic and sensory neurons cultured in microfluidic devices. We sought to validate these in vitro findings in vivo using a transected sciatic nerve model. Consistent with the in vitro findings, DR6 -/- animals displayed preserved axons up to 4 weeks after injury. In contrast to phenotypes observed in Wld s and Sarm1 -/- mice, preserved axons in DR6 -/- animals display profound myelin remodeling. This indicates that deterioration of axons and myelin after axotomy are mechanistically distinct processes. Finally, we find that JNK signaling after injury requires DR6, suggesting a link between this novel extrinsic pathway and the axon autonomous, intrinsic pathways that have become established for Wallerian degeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Natural history of seminiferous tubule degeneration in Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Wikström, Anne M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) is characterized by small, firm testis, gynaecomastia, azoospermia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Degeneration of the seminiferous tubules in 47,XXY males is a well-described phenomenon. It begins in the fetus, progresses through infancy and accelerates dramatic......Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) is characterized by small, firm testis, gynaecomastia, azoospermia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Degeneration of the seminiferous tubules in 47,XXY males is a well-described phenomenon. It begins in the fetus, progresses through infancy and accelerates...

  19. [Depression in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez, Yamile Reveiz; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a cause for disability in the elderly since it greatly affects their quality of life and increases depression likelihood. This article discusses the negative effect depression has on patients with age-related macular degeneration and summarizes the interventions available for decreasing their depression index. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Phonon emission in a degenerate semiconductor at low lattice temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midday, S.; Nag, S.; Bhattacharya, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of phonon growth in a degenerate semiconductor at low lattice temperatures have been studied for inelastic interaction of non-equilibrium electrons with the intravalley acoustic phonons. The energy of the phonon and the full form of the phonon distribution are taken into account. The results reveal significant changes in the growth characteristics compared to the same for a non-degenerate material

  1. Posterior Lattice Degeneration Characterized by Spectral Domain Optical Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Manjunath, Varsha; Taha, Mohammed; Fujimoto, James G.; Duker, Jay S.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To utilize high-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in the characterization of retinal and vitreal morphological changes overlying posterior lattice degeneration. METHODS: A cross-sectional, retrospective analysis was performed on 13 eyes of 13 nonconsecutive subjects with posterior lattice degeneration seen at the New England Eye Center, Tufts Medical Center between October 2009 and January 2010. SD-OCT images taken through the region of latti...

  2. Second level semi-degenerate fields in W{sub 3} Toda theory: matrix element and differential equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belavin, Vladimir [I.E. Tamm Department of Theoretical Physics, P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute,Leninsky Avenue 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Department of Quantum Physics, Institute for Information Transmission Problems,Bolshoy Karetny per. 19, 127994 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology,Dolgoprudnyi, 141700 Moscow region (Russian Federation); Cao, Xiangyu [LPTMS, CNRS (UMR 8626), Université Paris-Saclay,15 rue Georges Clémenceau, 91405 Orsay (France); Estienne, Benoit [LPTHE, CNRS and Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Sorbonne Universités,4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Santachiara, Raoul [LPTMS, CNRS (UMR 8626), Université Paris-Saclay,15 rue Georges Clémenceau, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2017-03-02

    In a recent study we considered W{sub 3} Toda 4-point functions that involve matrix elements of a primary field with the highest-weight in the adjoint representation of sl{sub 3}. We generalize this result by considering a semi-degenerate primary field, which has one null vector at level two. We obtain a sixth-order Fuchsian differential equation for the conformal blocks. We discuss the presence of multiplicities, the matrix elements and the fusion rules.

  3. The prevalence of sacroiliac joint degeneration in asymptomatic adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eno, Jonathan-James T; Boone, Christopher R; Bellino, Michael J; Bishop, Julius A

    2015-06-03

    Degenerative changes of the sacroiliac joint have been implicated as a cause of lower back pain in adults. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of sacroiliac joint degeneration in asymptomatic patients. Five hundred consecutive pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans, made at a tertiary-care medical center, of patients with no history of pain in the lower back or pelvic girdle were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed for degenerative changes of the sacroiliac joint. After exclusion criteria were applied, 373 CT scans (746 sacroiliac joints) were evaluated for degenerative changes. Regression analysis was used to determine the association between age and the degree of sacroiliac joint degeneration. The prevalence of sacroiliac joint degeneration was 65.1%, with substantial degeneration occurring in 30.5% of asymptomatic subjects. The prevalence steadily increased with age, with 91% of subjects in the ninth decade of life displaying degenerative changes. Radiographic evidence of sacroiliac joint degeneration is highly prevalent in the asymptomatic population and is associated with age. Caution must be exercised when attributing lower back or pelvic girdle pain to sacroiliac joint degeneration seen on imaging. Prognostic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  4. Risk of retinal detachment in patients with lattice degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, K; Ideta, H; Yonemoto, J; Tanaka, S; Hirose, A; Oka, C

    1998-01-01

    To determine the risk of retinal detachment in patients with lattice degeneration of the retina, we statistically analyzed the incidence of retinal detachment in these patients. The data of hospital patients with retinal detachment associated with lattice degeneration in Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan, in 1990 were collected. The prevalence of lattice degeneration in Kumamoto was reported to be 9.5% in 1980. Based on population data from the 1990 census, the cumulative incidence of retinal detachment associated with lattice degeneration was calculated in this study. Among 1,840,000 residents in Kumamoto, there were 110 patients with retinal detachment associated with lattice degeneration; 72 with detachment resulting from tractional tears (tears), and 38 with detachment from atrophic holes. The cumulative incidence of retinal detachment from atrophic holes was 1.5% at the age of 40 years; from tears it was 3.6% at the age of 80 years. The cumulative incidence of detachment from both atrophic holes and tears was 5.3% at the age of 80 years. The results of this study are useful for clarifying the natural course of lattice degeneration.

  5. Posterior lattice degeneration characterized by spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, Varsha; Taha, Mohammed; Fujimoto, James G; Duker, Jay S

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to use high-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography in the characterization of retinal and vitreal morphological changes overlying posterior lattice degeneration. A cross-sectional retrospective analysis was performed on 13 eyes of 13 nonconsecutive subjects with posterior lattice degeneration seen at the New England Eye Center, Tufts Medical Center between October 2009 and January 2010. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography images taken through the region of lattice degeneration were qualitatively analyzed. Four characteristic changes of the retina and vitreous were seen in the 13 eyes with lattice degeneration: 1) anterior/posterior U-shaped vitreous traction; 2) retinal breaks; 3) focal retinal thinning; and 4) vitreous membrane formation. The morphologic appearance of vitreous traction and retinal breaks were found to be consistent with previous histologic reports. It is possible to image posterior lattice degeneration in many eyes using spectral domain optical coherence tomography and to visualize the spectrum of retinal and vitreous changes throughout the area of lattice degeneration.

  6. Differential charge-transfer cross sections for systems with energetically degenerate or near-degenerate channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, H.; Bredy, R.; Camp, H.A.; DePaola, B.D.; Awata, T.

    2004-01-01

    Resolution plays a vital role in spectroscopic studies. In the usual recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy (RIMS), Q-value resolution is relied upon to distinguish between different collision channels: The better the Q-value resolution, the better one is able to resolve energetically similar channels. Although traditional COLTRIMS greatly improves Q-value resolution by cooling the target and thus greatly reducing the initial target momentum spread, the resolution of the technique is still limited by target temperature. However, with the recent development in RIMS, namely, magneto-optical trap recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (MOTRIMS) superior recoil ion momentum resolution as well as charge transfer measurements with laser excited targets have become possible. Through MOTRIMS, methods for the measurements of target excited state fraction and kinematically complete relative charge transfer cross sections have been developed, even for some systems having energetically degenerate or nearly degenerate channels. In the present work, the systems of interest having energy degeneracies or near degeneracies are Rb + , K + , and Li + colliding with trapped Rb(5l), where l=s and p

  7. Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola ePiscopo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD includes a spectrum of disorders characterized by changes of personality and social behaviour and, often, a gradual and progressive language dysfunction. In the last years, several efforts have been fulfilled in identifying both genetic mutations and pathological proteins associated with FTLD. The molecular bases undergoing the onset and progression of the disease remain still unknown. Recent literature prompts an involvement of RNA metabolism in FTLD, particularly miRNAs. Dysregulation of miRNAs in several disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, and increasing importance of circulating miRNAs in different pathologies has suggested to implement the study of their possible application as biological markers and new therapeutic targets; moreover, miRNA-based therapy is becoming a powerful tool to deepen the function of a gene, the mechanism of a disease, and validate therapeutic targets. Regarding FTLD, different studies showed that miRNAs are playing an important role. For example, several reports have evaluated miRNA regulation of the progranulin gene suggesting that it is under their control, as described for miR-29b, miR-107 and miR-659. More recently, it has been demonstrated that TMEM106B gene, which protein is elevated in FTLD-TDP brains, is repressed by miR-132/212 cluster; this post-transcriptional mechanism increases intracellular levels of progranulin, affecting its pathways. These findings if confirmed could suggest that these microRNAs have a role as potential targets for some related-FTLD genes. In this review, we focus on the emerging roles of the miRNAs in the pathogenesis of FTLD.

  8. Risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Nano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSES: To assess the risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina using a case-control study. METHODS: Surveys were used for subjects' antioxidant intake, age/gender, race, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes (and type of treatment, smoking, sunlight exposure, red meat consumption, fish consumption, presence of age-related macular degeneration and family history of age-related macular degeneration. Main effects models for logistic regression and ordinal logistic regression were used to analyze the results. RESULTS: There were 175 cases and 175 controls with a mean age of 75.4 years and 75.5 years, respectively, of whom 236 (67.4% were female. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration, 159 (45.4% had age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 154 (44.0% in their right eyes, and 138 (39.4% in both eyes. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 47.8% had the dry type, 40.3% had the wet type, and the type was unknown for 11.9%. The comparable figures for right eyes were: 51.9%, 34.4%, and 13.7%, respectively. The main effects model was dominated by higher sunlight exposure (OR [odds ratio]: 3.3 and a family history of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 4.3. Other factors included hypertension (OR: 2.1, smoking (OR: 2.2, and being of the Mestizo race, which lowered the risk of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 0.40. Red meat/fish consumption, body mass index, and iris color did not have an effect. Higher age was associated with progression to more severe age-related macular degeneration. CONCLUSION: Sunlight exposure, family history of age-related macular degeneration, and an older age were the significant risk factors. There may be other variables, as the risk was not explained very well by the existing factors. A larger sample may produce different and better results.

  9. Structure of stable degeneration of K3 surfaces into pairs of rational elliptic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Yusuke

    2018-01-01

    F-theory/heterotic duality is formulated in the stable degeneration limit of a K3 fibration on the F-theory side. In this note, we analyze the structure of the stable degeneration limit. We discuss whether stable degeneration exists for pairs of rational elliptic surfaces. We demonstrate that, when two rational elliptic surfaces have an identical complex structure, stable degeneration always exists. We provide an equation that systematically describes the stable degeneration of a K3 surface i...

  10. Statins for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlbach, Peter; Li, Tianjing; Hatef, Elham

    2015-02-11

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive late onset disorder of the macula affecting central vision. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in people over 65 years in industrialized countries. Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and pathological evidence has shown AMD shares a number of risk factors with atherosclerosis, leading to the hypothesis that statins may exert protective effects in AMD. The objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of statins compared with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in delaying the onset and progression of AMD. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2014), PubMed (January 1946 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 5 June 2014. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared statins with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in participants who were either susceptible to or diagnosed as having early stages of AMD. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two authors independently evaluated the search results against the selection criteria, abstracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We did not perform meta-analysis due to heterogeneity in the interventions and outcomes among the included studies. Two RCTs with 144 total participants met the selection criteria

  11. Notochord Cells in Intervertebral Disc Development and Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Matthew R.; Séguin, Cheryle A.

    2016-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is a complex structure responsible for flexibility, multi-axial motion, and load transmission throughout the spine. Importantly, degeneration of the intervertebral disc is thought to be an initiating factor for back pain. Due to a lack of understanding of the pathways that govern disc degeneration, there are currently no disease-modifying treatments to delay or prevent degenerative disc disease. This review presents an overview of our current understanding of the developmental processes that regulate intervertebral disc formation, with particular emphasis on the role of the notochord and notochord-derived cells in disc homeostasis and how their loss can result in degeneration. We then describe the role of small animal models in understanding the development of the disc and their use to interrogate disc degeneration and associated pathologies. Finally, we highlight essential development pathways that are associated with disc degeneration and/or implicated in the reparative response of the tissue that might serve as targets for future therapeutic approaches. PMID:27252900

  12. Notochord Cells in Intervertebral Disc Development and Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. McCann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The intervertebral disc is a complex structure responsible for flexibility, multi-axial motion, and load transmission throughout the spine. Importantly, degeneration of the intervertebral disc is thought to be an initiating factor for back pain. Due to a lack of understanding of the pathways that govern disc degeneration, there are currently no disease-modifying treatments to delay or prevent degenerative disc disease. This review presents an overview of our current understanding of the developmental processes that regulate intervertebral disc formation, with particular emphasis on the role of the notochord and notochord-derived cells in disc homeostasis and how their loss can result in degeneration. We then describe the role of small animal models in understanding the development of the disc and their use to interrogate disc degeneration and associated pathologies. Finally, we highlight essential development pathways that are associated with disc degeneration and/or implicated in the reparative response of the tissue that might serve as targets for future therapeutic approaches.

  13. Mechanisms of Distal Axonal Degeneration in Peripheral Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Christopher R.; Höke, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of a variety of diseases and treatments, including diabetes, cancer chemotherapy, and infectious causes (HIV, hepatitis C, and Campylobacter jejuni). Despite the fundamental difference between these insults, peripheral neuropathy develops as a combination of just six primary mechanisms: altered metabolism, covalent modification, altered organelle function and reactive oxygen species formation, altered intracellular and inflammatory signaling, slowed axonal transport, and altered ion channel dynamics and expression. All of these pathways converge to lead to axon dysfunction and symptoms of neuropathy. The detailed mechanisms of axon degeneration itself have begun to be elucidated with studies of animal models with altered degeneration kinetics, including the slowed Wallerian degeneration (Wlds) and Sarmknockout animal models. These studies have shown axonal degeneration to occur througha programmed pathway of injury signaling and cytoskeletal degradation. Insights into the common disease insults that converge on the axonal degeneration pathway promise to facilitate the development of therapeutics that may be effective against other mechanisms of neurodegeneration. PMID:25617478

  14. LONGITUDINAL STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN LATE-ONSET RETINAL DEGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, Catherine; Flamendorf, Jason; Wong, Wai T; Ayyagari, Radha; Cunningham, Denise; Sieving, Paul A

    2016-12-01

    To characterize longitudinal structural changes in early stages of late-onset retinal degeneration to investigate pathogenic mechanisms. Two affected siblings, both with a S163R missense mutation in the causative gene C1QTNF5, were followed for 8+ years. Color fundus photos, fundus autofluorescence images, near-infrared reflectance fundus images, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography scans were acquired during follow-up. Both patients, aged 45 and 50 years, had good visual acuities (>20/20) in the context of prolonged dark adaptation. Baseline color fundus photography demonstrated yellow-white, punctate lesions in the temporal macula that correlated with a reticular pattern on fundus autofluorescence and near-infrared reflectance imaging. Baseline spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging revealed subretinal deposits that resemble reticular pseudodrusen described in age-related macular degeneration. During follow-up, these affected areas developed confluent thickening of the retinal pigment epithelial layer and disruption of the ellipsoid zone of photoreceptors before progressing to overt retinal pigment epithelium and outer retinal atrophy. Structural changes in early stages of late-onset retinal degeneration, revealed by multimodal imaging, resemble those of reticular pseudodrusen observed in age-related macular degeneration and other retinal diseases. Longitudinal follow-up of these lesions helps elucidate their progression to frank atrophy and may lend insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying diverse retinal degenerations.

  15. Deficiency of adaptive immunity does not interfere with Wallerian degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R Cashman

    Full Text Available Following injury, distal axons undergo the process of Wallerian degeneration, and then cell debris is cleared to create a permissive environment for axon regeneration. The innate and adaptive immune systems are believed to be critical for facilitating the clearance of myelin and axonal debris during this process. However, immunodeficient animal models are regularly used in transplantation studies investigating cell therapies to modulate the degenerative/regenerative response. Given the importance of the immune system in preparing a permissive environment for regeneration by clearing debris, animals lacking, in part or in full, a functional immune system may have an impaired ability to regenerate due to poor myelin clearance, and may, thus, be poor hosts to study modulators of regeneration and degeneration. To study this hypothesis, three different mouse models with impaired adaptive immunity were compared to wild type animals in their ability to degenerate axons and clear myelin debris one week following sciatic nerve transection. Immunofluorescent staining for axons and quantitation of axon density with nerve histomorphometry of the distal stump showed no consistent discrepancy between immunodeficient and wild type animals, suggesting axons tended to degenerate equally between the two groups. Debris clearance was assessed by macrophage density and relative myelin basic protein expression within the denervated nerve stump, and no consistent impairment of debris clearance was found. These data suggested deficiency of the adaptive immune system does not have a substantial effect on axon degeneration one week following axonal injury.

  16. Cystic degeneration of liver malignancies. Study by US and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumada, Takashi; Nakano, Satoshi; Kitamura, Kimio; Watahiki, Hajime; Takeda, Isao

    1983-03-01

    CT and US were carried out on 81 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, 20 patients with cholangiocellular carcinoma and 94 patients with metastatic liver cancer. 1) Cystic degeneration was observed in one with hepatocellular carcinoma (1.2%), one with cholangiocellular carcinoma (5.0%) and 12 with metastatic liver cancer (12.8%) by US, but this change was observed in only 5 by CT (1,0,4, respectively). Metastatic liver cancer showed the highest incidence among these tumors. 2) The characteristics of cystic degeneration of the liver tumors were thickened wall and irregularity of the inner surface of the wall. 3) Judging from macroscopic and histopathological findings, liquefactive necrosis in the tumors was shown as ''echoluent'' area. We concluded that cystic degeneration was one of the important findings in metastatic liver cancer and that careful observation by US and CT avoided the confusion with other hepatic cystic diseases.

  17. Quantization with maximally degenerate Poisson brackets: the harmonic oscillator!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutku, Yavuz

    2003-01-01

    Nambu's construction of multi-linear brackets for super-integrable systems can be thought of as degenerate Poisson brackets with a maximal set of Casimirs in their kernel. By introducing privileged coordinates in phase space these degenerate Poisson brackets are brought to the form of Heisenberg's equations. We propose a definition for constructing quantum operators for classical functions, which enables us to turn the maximally degenerate Poisson brackets into operators. They pose a set of eigenvalue problems for a new state vector. The requirement of the single-valuedness of this eigenfunction leads to quantization. The example of the harmonic oscillator is used to illustrate this general procedure for quantizing a class of maximally super-integrable systems

  18. Natural history of seminiferous tubule degeneration in Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Wikström, Anne M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) is characterized by small, firm testis, gynaecomastia, azoospermia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Degeneration of the seminiferous tubules in 47,XXY males is a well-described phenomenon. It begins in the fetus, progresses through infancy and accelerates dramatic......Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) is characterized by small, firm testis, gynaecomastia, azoospermia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Degeneration of the seminiferous tubules in 47,XXY males is a well-described phenomenon. It begins in the fetus, progresses through infancy and accelerates...... summarize current knowledge on the development of the classical endocrinological and histological features of 47,XXY males from fetus to adulthood and review the literature concerning the degeneration of the seminiferous tubules in this syndrome....

  19. Degenerate Fermi gas in a combined harmonic-lattice potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakie, P. B.; Bezett, A.; Buonsante, P.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we derive an analytic approximation to the density of states for atoms in a combined optical lattice and harmonic trap potential as used in current experiments with quantum degenerate gases. We compare this analytic density of states to numerical solutions and demonstrate its validity regime. Our work explicitly considers the role of higher bands and when they are important in quantitative analysis of this system. Applying our density of states to a degenerate Fermi gas, we consider how adiabatic loading from a harmonic trap into the combined harmonic-lattice potential affects the degeneracy temperature. Our results suggest that occupation of excited bands during loading should lead to more favorable conditions for realizing degenerate Fermi gases in optical lattices

  20. Peripheral retinal degenerations and the risk of retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Hilel

    2003-07-01

    To review the degenerative diseases of the peripheral retina in relationship with the risk to develop a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and to present recommendations for use in eyes at increased risk of developing a retinal detachment. Focused literature review and author's clinical experience. Retinal degenerations are common lesions involving the peripheral retina, and most of them are clinically insignificant. Lattice degeneration, degenerative retinoschisis, cystic retinal tufts, and, rarely, zonular traction tufts, can result in a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Therefore, these lesions have been considered for prophylactic therapy; however, adequate studies have not been performed to date. Well-designed, prospective, randomized clinical studies are necessary to determine the benefit-risk ratio of prophylactic treatment. In the meantime, the evidence available suggests that most of the peripheral retinal degenerations should not be treated except in rare, high-risk situations.

  1. Rapid glutamate receptor 2 trafficking during retinal degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yanhua

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinal degenerations, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD and retinitis pigmentosa (RP, are characterized by photoreceptor loss and anomalous remodeling of the surviving retina that corrupts visual processing and poses a barrier to late-stage therapeutic interventions in particular. However, the molecular events associated with retinal remodeling remain largely unknown. Given our prior evidence of ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR reprogramming in retinal degenerations, we hypothesized that the edited glutamate receptor 2 (GluR2 subunit and its trafficking may be modulated in retinal degenerations. Results Adult albino Balb/C mice were exposed to intense light for 24 h to induce light-induced retinal degeneration (LIRD. We found that prior to the onset of photoreceptor loss, protein levels of GluR2 and related trafficking proteins, including glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1 (GRIP1 and postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95, were rapidly increased. LIRD triggered neuritogenesis in photoreceptor survival regions, where GluR2 and its trafficking proteins were expressed in the anomalous dendrites. Immunoprecipitation analysis showed interaction between KIF3A and GRIP1 as well as PSD-95, suggesting that KIF3A may mediate transport of GluR2 and its trafficking proteins to the novel dendrites. However, in areas of photoreceptor loss, GluR2 along with its trafficking proteins nearly vanished in retracted retinal neurites. Conclusions All together, LIRD rapidly triggers GluR2 plasticity, which is a potential mechanism behind functionally phenotypic revisions of retinal neurons and neuritogenesis during retinal degenerations.

  2. [Myopia: frequency of lattice degeneration and axial length].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Sánchez, M D; Roldán Pallarés, M

    2001-05-01

    To evaluate the relationship between lattice retinal degeneration and axial length of the eye in different grades of myopia. A sample of 200 eyes from 124 myopic patients was collected by chance. The average age was 34.8 years (20-50 years) and the myopia was between 0.5 and 20 diopters (D). The eyes were grouped according to the degree of refraction defect, the mean axial length of each group (Scan A) and the frequency of lattice retinal degeneration and the relationship between these variables was studied. The possible influence of age on our results was also considered. For the statistical analysis, the SAS 6.07 program with the variance analysis for quantitative variables, and chi(2) test for qualitative variables with a 5% significance were used. A multivariable linear regression model was also adjusted. The highest frequency of lattice retinal degeneration occurred in those myopia patients having more than 15 D, and also in the group of myopia patients between 3 and 6 D, but this did not show statistical significance when compared with the other myopic groups. If the axial length is assessed, a greater frequency of lattice retinal degeneration is also found when the axial length is 25-27 mm and 29-30 mm, which correspond, respectively, to myopias between 3-10 D and more than 15 D. When the multivariable linear regression model was adjusted, the axial length showed the existence of lattice retinal degeneration (beta 0.41 mm; p=0.08) adjusted by the number of diopters (beta 0.38 mm; plattice retinal degeneration was found for myopias with axial eye length between 29-30 mm (more than 15 D), and 25-27 mm (between 3-10 D).

  3. Extended Hellmann-Feynman theorem for degenerate eigenstates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G. P.; George, Thomas F.

    2004-04-01

    In a previous paper, we reported a failure of the traditional Hellmann-Feynman theorem (HFT) for degenerate eigenstates. This has generated enormous interest among different groups. In four independent papers by Fernandez, by Balawender, Hola, and March, by Vatsya, and by Alon and Cederbaum, an elegant method to solve the problem was devised. The main idea is that one has to construct and diagonalize the force matrix for the degenerate case, and only the eigenforces are well defined. We believe this is an important extension to HFT. Using our previous example for an energy level of fivefold degeneracy, we find that those eigenforces correctly reflect the symmetry of the molecule.

  4. Global Carleman estimates for degenerate parabolic operators with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cannarsa, P; Vancostenoble, J

    2016-01-01

    Degenerate parabolic operators have received increasing attention in recent years because they are associated with both important theoretical analysis, such as stochastic diffusion processes, and interesting applications to engineering, physics, biology, and economics. This manuscript has been conceived to introduce the reader to global Carleman estimates for a class of parabolic operators which may degenerate at the boundary of the space domain, in the normal direction to the boundary. Such a kind of degeneracy is relevant to study the invariance of a domain with respect to a given stochastic diffusion flow, and appears naturally in climatology models.

  5. Design of the Advanced Virgo non-degenerate recycling cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granata, M; Barsuglia, M; Flaminio, R; Freise, A; Hild, S; Marque, J

    2010-01-01

    Advanced Virgo is the project to upgrade the interferometric gravitational wave detector Virgo, and it foresees the implementation of power and signal non-degenerate recycling cavities. Such cavities suppress the build-up of high order modes of the resonating sidebands, with some advantage for the commissioning of the detector and the build-up of the gravitational signal. Here we present the baseline design of the Advanced Virgo non-degenerate recycling cavities, giving some preliminary results of simulations about the tolerances of this design to astigmatism, mirror figure errors and thermal lensing.

  6. Transport in partially degenerate, magnetized plasmas. Pt. 1. Collision operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, S.R.; Haines, M.G.

    1997-01-01

    The quantum Boltzmann collision operator is expanded to yield a degenerate form of the Fokker-Planck collision operator. This is analyzed using Rosenbluth potentials to give a degenerate analogue of the Shkarofsky operator. The distribution function is then expanded about an equilibrium Fermi-Dirac distribution function using a tensor perturbation formulation to give a zeroth-order and a first-order collision operator. These equations are shown to satisfy the relevant conservation equations. It is shown that the distribution function relaxes to a Fermi-Dirac form through electron-electron collisions. (Author)

  7. Wallerian degeneration of the corticospinal tract in the brain stem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Akira; Onomura, Kentaro; Ohno, Masato

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of wallerian degeneration of the corticospinal tract in the brain stem was studied in 25 patients with chronic supratentorial vascular accidents. In the relatively early stages, at least three months after ictus, increased signal intensities in axial T 2 -weighted images - with or without decreased signal intensities in axial T 1 -weighted images - were observed in the brain stem ipsilaterally. In later stages, at least six months after ictus, shrinkage of the brain stem ipsilaterally - with or without decreased signal intensities - was clearly observed in axial T 1 -weighted images. MRI is therefore regarded a sensitive diagnostic modality for evaluating wallerian degeneration in the brain stem. (author)

  8. Relationship between retinal lattice degeneration and open angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mansour

    2005-01-01

    Patients with retinal disorders may develop glaucoma of both a primary and secondary type. Pigment may contribute to trabecular obstruction in some patients with open-angle glaucoma. Lattice degeneration of the retina in its typical form is a sharply demarcated, circumferentially oriented, degenerative process with significant alterations of retinal pigmentation. The association between myopia, open angle glaucoma and pigment dispersion is striking. Therefore, it could be postulated that there is significant prevalence of open angle glaucoma in patients with retinal lattice degeneration, especially in combination with myopia.

  9. Automated imaging dark adaptometer for investigating hereditary retinal degenerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Dario F. G.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Regunath, Gopalakrishnan; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    1995-05-01

    We designed and built an automated imaging dark adaptometer (AIDA) to increase accuracy, reliability, versatility and speed of dark adaptation testing in patients with hereditary retinal degenerations. AIDA increases test accuracy by imaging the ocular fundus for precise positioning of bleaching and stimulus lights. It improves test reliability by permitting continuous monitoring of patient fixation. Software control of stimulus presentation provides broad testing versatility without sacrificing speed. AIDA promises to facilitate the measurement of dark adaptation in studies of the pathophysiology of retinal degenerations and in future treatment trials of these diseases.

  10. Maximum principles for boundary-degenerate linear parabolic differential operators

    OpenAIRE

    Feehan, Paul M. N.

    2013-01-01

    We develop weak and strong maximum principles for boundary-degenerate, linear, parabolic, second-order partial differential operators, $Lu := -u_t-\\tr(aD^2u)-\\langle b, Du\\rangle + cu$, with \\emph{partial} Dirichlet boundary conditions. The coefficient, $a(t,x)$, is assumed to vanish along a non-empty open subset, $\\mydirac_0!\\sQ$, called the \\emph{degenerate boundary portion}, of the parabolic boundary, $\\mydirac!\\sQ$, of the domain $\\sQ\\subset\\RR^{d+1}$, while $a(t,x)$ may be non-zero at po...

  11. Increased Expression of CD200 on Circulating CD11b+ Monocytes in Patients with Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Amardeep; Falk, Mads K; Hviid, Thomas V F

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Dysregulation of retinal microglial activity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Microglia activity can be regulated through the membrane protein CD200 and its corresponding receptor, the CD200 receptor (CD200R). Because both...... with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and 44 age-matched controls without AMD. METHODS: The participants were aged 60 years or older, had no history of immune dysfunction or cancer, and were not receiving immune-modulating therapy. All participants were subjected to a structured interview......: Patients with neovascular AMD had a higher percentage of CD11b+CD200+ monocytes and CD200+ monocytes compared with controls. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the intergroup differences observed were independent of age. Moreover, an age-related increment in CD200 expression on monocytes...

  12. Complement receptor-3 negatively regulates the phagocytosis of degenerated myelin through tyrosine kinase Syk and cofilin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadas Smadar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intact myelin, which normally surrounds axons, breaks down in Wallerian degeneration following axonal injury and during neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Clearance of degenerated myelin by phagocytosis is essential since myelin impedes repair and exacerbates damage. CR3 (complement receptor-3 is a principal phagocytic receptor in myelin phagocytosis. We studied how tyrosine kinase Syk (spleen tyrosine kinase and cofilin control phagocytosis of degenerated myelin by CR3 in microglia and macrophages. Syk is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that CR3 recruits to convey cellular functions. Cofilin is an actin-depolymerizing protein that controls F-actin (filamentous actin remodeling (i.e., disassembly and reassembly by shifting between active unphosphorylated and inactive phosphorylated states. Results Syk was continuously activated during prolonged phagocytosis. Phagocytosis increased when Syk activity and expression were reduced, suggesting that normally Syk down regulates CR3-mediated myelin phagocytosis. Levels of inactive p-cofilin (phosphorylated cofilin decreased transiently during prolonged phagocytosis. In contrast, p-cofilin levels decreased continuously when Syk activity and expression were continuously reduced, suggesting that normally Syk advances the inactive state of cofilin. Observations also revealed inverse relationships between levels of phagocytosis and levels of inactive p-cofilin, suggesting that active unphosphorylated cofilin advances phagocytosis. Active cofilin could advance phagocytosis by promoting F-actin remodeling, which supports the production of membrane protrusions (e.g., filopodia, which, as we also revealed, are instrumental in myelin phagocytosis. Conclusions CR3 both activates and downregulates myelin phagocytosis at the same time. Activation was previously documented. We presently demonstrate that downregulation is mediated through Syk, which advances the inactive

  13. Degeneration of rapid eye movement sleep circuitry underlies rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Dillon; Peever, John

    2017-05-01

    During healthy rapid eye movement sleep, skeletal muscles are actively forced into a state of motor paralysis. However, in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder-a relatively common neurological disorder-this natural process is lost. A lack of motor paralysis (atonia) in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder allows individuals to actively move, which at times can be excessive and violent. At first glance this may sound harmless, but it is not because rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder patients frequently injure themselves or the person they sleep with. It is hypothesized that the degeneration or dysfunction of the brain stem circuits that control rapid eye movement sleep paralysis is an underlying cause of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. The link between brain stem degeneration and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder stems from the fact that rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder precedes, in the majority (∼80%) of cases, the development of synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy, which are known to initially cause degeneration in the caudal brain stem structures where rapid eye movement sleep circuits are located. Furthermore, basic science and clinical evidence demonstrate that lesions within the rapid eye movement sleep circuits can induce rapid eye movement sleep-specific motor deficits that are virtually identical to those observed in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. This review examines the evidence that rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is caused by synucleinopathic neurodegeneration of the core brain stem circuits that control healthy rapid eye movement sleep and concludes that rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is not a separate clinical entity from synucleinopathies but, rather, it is the earliest symptom of these disorders. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and

  14. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Peter X.; Stiles, Travis; Douglas, Christopher; Ho, Daisy; Fan, Wei; Du, Hongjun; Xiao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD). Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory molecules, we have

  15. Timing of autophagy and apoptosis during posterior silk gland degeneration in Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montali, Aurora; Romanelli, Davide; Cappellozza, Silvia; Grimaldi, Annalisa; de Eguileor, Magda; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2017-07-01

    Over the years, the silkworm, Bombyx mori, has been manipulated by means of chemical and genetic approaches to improve silk production both quantitatively and qualitatively. The silk is produced by the silk gland, which degenerates quickly once the larva has finished spinning the cocoon. Thus, interfering with this degeneration process could help develop new technologies aimed at ameliorating silk yield. To this end, in this work we studied the cell death processes that lead to the demise of the posterior silk gland of B. mori, directing in particular our attention to autophagy and apoptosis. We focused on this portion of the gland because it produces fibroin, the main component of the silk thread. By using multiple markers, we provide a morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization of the apoptotic and autophagic processes and define their timing in this biological setting. Our data demonstrate that the activation of both autophagy and apoptosis is preceded by a transcriptional rise in key regulatory genes. Moreover, while autophagy is maintained active for several days and progressively digests silk gland cells, apoptosis is only switched on at a very late stage of silk gland demise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sequential changes in MR imaging of human wallerian degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orita, Tetsuji; Tsurutani, Tohru; Izumihara, Akifumi; Kajiwara, Koji (Shuto General Hospital, Yamaguchi (Japan)); Matsunaga, Tokio

    1994-05-01

    MRI of wallerian degeneration of the pyramidal tract in the brainstem was repeatedly performed on the same coronal slice in 10 patients, who had infarction or hemorrhage of the basal ganglia and had the exact onset of hemiparesis. The processes of wallerian degeneration were divided into four stages by proton-density weighted images. In stage 1, the axon began to degenerate and was destroyed. It occurred during the first 0.7 month and resulted in no signal intensity abnormality. In stage 2, axon debris disappeared from degenerating tracts. Myelin structure was preserved and myelin lipid remained intact. The lipid water ratio in the tissue became large and the tissue was more hydrophobic. From 0.7 to 2.0 months, low signal intensity was observed. In stage 3, subsequent myelin lipid breakdown began and the lipid/water ratio in the tissue tended to be small. There was no abnormal signal intensity. In stage 4, lipid began to be removed from the tissue. The lipid/water ratio became smaller and the tissue became hydrophilic. Gliosis was more prominent. High signal intensity was observed. (author).

  17. Cartilage Degeneration and Alignment in Severe Varus Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Mukai, Shogo; Yabumoto, Hiromitsu; Tarumi, Eri; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between cartilage, ligament, and meniscus degeneration and radiographic alignment in severe varus knee osteoarthritis in order to understand the development of varus knee osteoarthritis. Fifty-three patients (71 knees) with primary varus knee osteoarthritis and who underwent total knee arthroplasty were selected for this study. There were 6 men and 47 women, with 40 right knees and 31 left knees studied; their mean age at operation was 73.5 years. The ligament, meniscus, degeneration of joint cartilage, and radiographic alignments were examined visually. The tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle was larger if the condition of the cartilage in the lateral femoral condyle was worse. The femorotibial angle and tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle were larger if the conditions of the lateral meniscus or the cartilage in the lateral tibial plateau were worse. Based on the results of this study, progression of varus knee osteoarthritis may occur in the following manner: medial knee osteoarthritis starts in the central portion of the medial tibial plateau, and accompanied by medial meniscal extrusion and anterior cruciate ligament rupture, cartilage degeneration expands from the anterior to the posterior in the medial tibial plateau. Bone attrition occurs in the medial tibial plateau, and the femoro-tibial angle and tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle increase. Therefore, the lateral intercondylar eminence injures the cartilage of the lateral femoral condyle in the longitudinal fissure type. Thereafter, the cartilage degeneration expands in the whole of the knee joints.

  18. Are animal models useful for studying human disc disorders / degeneration?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alini, M.; Eisenstein, S.M.; Ito, K.; Little, C.; Kettler, A.A.; Masuda, K.; Melrose, J.; Ralphs, J.; Stokes, I.; Wilke, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is an often investigated pathophysiological condition because of its implication in causing low back pain. As human material for such studies is difficult to obtain because of ethical and government regulatory restriction, animal tissue, organs and in vivo

  19. Cesare Lombroso: an anthropologist between evolution and degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarello, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Cesare Lombroso (1835-1909) was a prominent Italian medical doctor and intellectual in the second half of the nineteenth century. He became world famous for his theory that criminality, madness and genius were all sides of the same psychobiological condition: an expression of degeneration, a sort of regression along the phylogenetic scale, and an arrest at an early stage of evolution. Degeneration affected criminals especially, in particular the "born delinquent" whose development had stopped at an early stage, making them the most "atavistic" types of human being. Lombroso also advocated the theory that genius was closely linked with madness. A man of genius was a degenerate, an example of retrograde evolution in whom madness was a form of "biological compensation" for excessive intellectual development. To confirm this theory, in August 1897, Lombroso, while attending the Twelfth International Medical Congress in Moscow, decided to meet the great Russian writer Lev Tolstoy in order to directly verify, in him, his theory of degeneration in the genius. Lombroso's anthropological ideas fuelled a heated debate on the biological determinism of human behaviour.

  20. A class of degenerate stochastic differential equations with non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. In this article we consider (possibly degenerate) stochastic differential equations (SDEs) with non-Lipschitz coefficients. If the coefficients are Lipschitz, we can prove the existence of a unique strong solution (see [9]). But uniqueness fails in the case of non-Lipschitz coefficients. The literature on this topic is not ...

  1. Spectral analysis of linear relations and degenerate operator semigroups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskakov, A G; Chernyshov, K I

    2002-01-01

    Several problems of the spectral theory of linear relations in Banach spaces are considered. Linear differential inclusions in a Banach space are studied. The construction of the phase space and solutions is carried out with the help of the spectral theory of linear relations, ergodic theorems, and degenerate operator semigroups

  2. Revisiting non-degenerate parametric down-conversion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    conversion process is studied by recasting the time evolution equations for the basic op- erators in an equivalent ... We consider a model of non-degenerate parametric down-conversion process com- posed of two coupled ..... e−iωat and eiωbt have been left out in writing down the final results in ref. [4], even though these ...

  3. A study of retrograde degeneration of median nerve forearm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a disorder of the hand which results from compression of the median nerve within its fibro-osseous tunnel at the wrist. The slowing in the forearm motor conduction velocity suggests the presence of retrograde degeneration. Existing studies conflict regarding a correlation ...

  4. Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colijn, Johanna M.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H. S.; Prokofyeva, Elena; Alves, Dalila; Cachulo, Maria L.; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Merle, Bénédicte M. J.; Korb, Christina; Erke, Maja G.; Bron, Alain; Anastasopoulos, Eleftherios; Meester-Smoor, Magda A.; Segato, Tatiana; Piermarocchi, Stefano; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Topouzis, Fotis; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Bertelsen, Geir; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Fletcher, Astrid E.; Foster, Paul J.; Silva, Rufino; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Delcourt, Cécile; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Ajana, Soufiane; Arango-Gonzalez, Blanca; Arndt, Verena; Bhatia, Vaibhav; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.; Biarnés, Marc; Borrell, Anna; Bühren, Sebastian; Calado, Sofia M.; Cougnard-Grégoire, Audrey; Dammeier, Sascha; de Jong, Eiko K.; de la Cerda, Berta; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Diaz-Corrales, Francisco J.; Diether, Sigrid; Emri, Eszter; Endermann, Tanja; Ferraro, Lucia L.; Garcia, Míriam; Heesterbeek, Thomas J.; Honisch, Sabina; Bergen, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a frequent, complex disorder in elderly of European ancestry. Risk profiles and treatment options have changed considerably over the years, which may have affected disease prevalence and outcome. We determined the prevalence of early and late AMD in

  5. Degenerated human intervertebral discs contain autoantibodies against extracellular matrix proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Capossela

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Degeneration of intervertebral discs (IVDs is associated with back pain and elevated levels of inflammatory cells. It has been hypothesised that discogenic pain is a direct result of vascular and neural ingrowth along annulus fissures, which may expose the avascular nucleus pulposus (NP to the systemic circulation and induce an autoimmune reaction. In this study, we confirmed our previous observation of antibodies in human degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs cultured in vitro. We hypothesised that the presence of antibodies was due to an autoimmune reaction against specific proteins of the disc. Furthermore we identified antigens which possibly trigger an autoimmune response in degenerative disc diseases. We demonstrated that degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs contain IgG antibodies against typical extracellular proteins of the disc, particularly proteins of the NP. We identified IgGs against collagen type II and aggrecan, confirming an autoimmune reaction against the normally immune privileged NP. We also found specific IgGs against collagens types I and V, but not against collagen type III. In conclusion, this study confirmed the association between disc degeneration and autoimmunity, and may open the avenue for future studies on developing prognostic, diagnostic and therapy-monitoring markers for degenerative disc diseases.

  6. The Cerebellum and Language: Evidence from Patients with Cerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoodley, Catherine J.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and imaging studies suggest that the cerebellum is involved in language tasks, but the extent to which slowed language production in cerebellar patients contributes to their poor performance on these tasks is not clear. We explored this relationship in 18 patients with cerebellar degeneration and 16 healthy controls who completed measures…

  7. A mouse model for degeneration of the spiral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kada, Shinpei; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Ito, Juichi

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated the importance of the spiral ligament (SL) in the pathogenesis of sensorineural hearing loss. The aim of this study was to establish a mouse model for SL degeneration as the basis for the development of new strategies for SL regeneration. We injected 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), an inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, at various concentrations into the posterior semicircular canal of adult C57BL/6 mice. Saline-injected animals were used as controls. Auditory function was monitored by measurements of auditory brain stem responses (ABRs). On postoperative day 14, cochlear specimens were obtained after the measurement of the endocochlear potential (EP). Animals that were injected with 5 or 10 mM 3-NP showed a massive elevation of ABR thresholds along with extensive degeneration of the cochleae. Cochleae injected with 1 mM 3-NP exhibited selective degeneration of the SL fibrocytes but alterations in EP levels and ABR thresholds were not of sufficient magnitude to allow for testing functional recovery after therapeutic interventions. Animals injected with 3 mM 3-NP showed a reduction of around 50% in the EP along with a significant loss of SL fibrocytes, although degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons and hair cells was still present in certain regions. These findings indicate that cochleae injected with 3 mM 3-NP may be useful in investigations designed to test the feasibility of new therapeutic manipulations for functional SL regeneration.

  8. Nonlinear anisotropic elliptic equations with variable exponents and degenerate coercivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hocine Ayadi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we prove the existence and the regularity of distributional solutions for a class of nonlinear anisotropic elliptic equations with $p_i(x$ growth conditions, degenerate coercivity and $L^{m(\\cdot}$ data, with $m(\\cdot$ being small, in appropriate Lebesgue-Sobolev spaces with variable exponents. The obtained results extend some existing ones [8,10].

  9. Age-related macular degeneration in Onitsha, Nigeria | Nwosu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the incidence, pattern and ocular morbidity associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) at the Guinness Eye Center Onitsha Nigeria. Materials and Methods: The case files of all new patients aged 50 years and above seen between January 1997 and December 2004 were reviewed.

  10. Sequential changes in MR imaging of human wallerian degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orita, Tetsuji; Tsurutani, Tohru; Izumihara, Akifumi; Kajiwara, Koji; Matsunaga, Tokio.

    1994-01-01

    MRI of wallerian degeneration of the pyramidal tract in the brainstem was repeatedly performed on the same coronal slice in 10 patients, who had infarction or hemorrhage of the basal ganglia and had the exact onset of hemiparesis. The processes of wallerian degeneration were divided into four stages by proton-density weighted images. In stage 1, the axon began to degenerate and was destroyed. It occurred during the first 0.7 month and resulted in no signal intensity abnormality. In stage 2, axon debris disappeared from degenerating tracts. Myelin structure was preserved and myelin lipid remained intact. The lipid water ratio in the tissue became large and the tissue was more hydrophobic. From 0.7 to 2.0 months, low signal intensity was observed. In stage 3, subsequent myelin lipid breakdown began and the lipid/water ratio in the tissue tended to be small. There was no abnormal signal intensity. In stage 4, lipid began to be removed from the tissue. The lipid/water ratio became smaller and the tissue became hydrophilic. Gliosis was more prominent. High signal intensity was observed. (author)

  11. Twisted mass lattice QCD with non-degenerate quark masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenster, Gernot; Sudmann, Tobias

    2006-01-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics on a lattice with Wilson fermions and a chirally twisted mass term is considered in the framework of chiral perturbation theory. For two and three numbers of quark flavours, respectively, with non-degenerate quark masses the pseudoscalar meson masses and decay constants are calculated in next-to-leading order including lattice effects quadratic in the lattice spacing a

  12. Treatment of dry age-related macular degeneration with dobesilate

    OpenAIRE

    Cuevas, P; Outeiriño, L A; Angulo, J; Giménez-Gallego, G

    2012-01-01

    The authors present anatomical and functional evidences of dry age-macular degeneration improvement, after intravitreal treatment with dobesilate. Main outcomes measures were normalisation of retinal structure and function, assessed by optical coherence tomography, fundus-monitored microperimetry, electrophysiology and visual acuity. The effect might be related to the normalisation of the outer retinal architecture.

  13. Urocortin 2 treatment is protective in excitotoxic retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabadfi, K; Kiss, P; Reglodi, D; Fekete, E M; Tamas, A; Danyadi, B; Atlasz, T; Gabriel, R

    2014-03-01

    Urocortin 2 (Ucn 2) is a corticotrop releasing factor paralog peptide with many physiological functions and it has widespread distribution. There are some data on the cytoprotective effects of Ucn 2, but less is known about its neuro- and retinoprotective actions. We have previously shown that Ucn 2 is protective in ischemia-induced retinal degeneration. The aim of the present study was to examine the protective potential of Ucn 2 in monosodium-glutamate (MSG)-induced retinal degeneration by routine histology and to investigate cell-type specific effects by immunohistochemistry. Rat pups received MSG applied on postnatal days 1, 5 and 9 and Ucn 2 was injected intravitreally into one eye. Retinas were processed for histology and immunocytochemistry after 3 weeks. Immunolabeling was determined for glial fibrillary acidic protein, vesicular glutamate transporter 1, protein kinase Cα, calbindin, parvalbumin and calretinin. Retinal tissue from animals treated with MSG showed severe degeneration compared to normal retinas, but intravitreal Ucn 2 treatment resulted in a retained retinal structure both at histological and neurochemical levels: distinct inner retinal layers and rescued inner retinal cells (different types of amacrine and rod bipolar cells) could be observed. These findings support the neuroprotective function of Ucn 2 in MSG-induced retinal degeneration.

  14. Therapeutic Approaches to Histone Reprogramming in Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Andre K; Kleinman, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Recent data have revealed epigenetic derangements and subsequent chromatin remodeling as a potent biologic switch for chronic inflammation and cell survival which are important therapeutic targets in the pathogenesis of several retinal degenerations. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a major component of this system and serve as a unique control of the chromatin remodeling process. With a multitude of targeted HDAC inhibitors now available, their use in both basic science and clinical studies has widened substantially. In the field of ocular biology, there are data to suggest that HDAC inhibition may suppress neovascularization and may be a possible treatment for retinitis pigmentosa and dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the effects of these inhibitors on cell survival and chemokine expression in the chorioretinal tissues remain very unclear. Here, we review the multifaceted biology of HDAC activity and pharmacologic inhibition while offering further insight into the importance of this epigenetic pathway in retinal degenerations. Our laboratory investigations aim to open translational avenues to advance dry AMD therapeutics while exploring the role of acetylation on inflammatory gene expression in the aging and degenerating retina.

  15. Gene-diet interactions in age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a prevalent blinding disease, accounting for roughly 50% of blindness in developed nations. Very significant advances have been made in terms of discovering genetic susceptibilities to AMD as well as dietary risk factors. To date, nutritional supplementation...

  16. Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colijn, Johanna M; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Prokofyeva, Elena

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a frequent, complex disorder in elderly of European ancestry. Risk profiles and treatment options have changed considerably over the years, which may have affected disease prevalence and outcome. We determined the prevalence of early and late AMD...

  17. Ranibizumab vs. aflibercept for wet age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Shelagh M; Hedegaard, Morten; Chan, Keith

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although a reduced aflibercept (2.0 mg) injection frequency relative to the approved dosing posology is included in national treatment guidelines for wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), there is limited evidence of its comparative efficacy. The objective was to compare...

  18. Awareness, Knowledge, and Concern about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarolli, Verena R.; Laban-Baker, Allie; Hamilton, Wanda S.; Stuen, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a common eye disease causing vision loss--can be detected early through regular eye-health examinations, and measures can be taken to prevent visual decline. Getting eye examinations requires certain levels of awareness, knowledge, and concern related to AMD. However, little is known about AMD-related…

  19. Nutritional modulation of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30-50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated wi...

  20. Identification of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Using OCT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Punal M., Dr; Krishna, Nanditha; Ashwini, V.; Prathibha, H. M.

    2018-02-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration is the most leading retinal disease in the recent years. Macular degeneration occurs when the central portion of the retina, called macula deteriorates. As the deterioration occurs with the age, it is commonly referred as Age-related Macular Degeneration. This disease can be visualized by several imaging modalities such as Fundus imaging technique, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) technique and many other. Optical Coherence Tomography is the widely used technique for screening the Age-related Macular Degeneration disease, because it has an ability to detect the very minute changes in the retina. The Healthy and AMD affected OCT images are classified by extracting the Retinal Pigmented Epithelium (RPE) layer of the images using the image processing technique. The extracted layer is sampled, the no. of white pixels in each of the sample is counted and the mean value of the no. of pixels is calculated. The average mean value is calculated for both the Healthy and the AMD affected images and a threshold value is fixed and a decision rule is framed to classify the images of interest. The proposed method showed an accuracy of 75%.

  1. Propofol causes neuronal degeneration in neonatal mice and long ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Propofol causes neuronal degeneration in neonatal mice and long-term ... of 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg (treatment group) or normal saline (control) on postnatal day 7. ... PO2, glucose and lactate), among which decreased blood glucose might be ...

  2. Degree of tendon degeneration and stage of rotator cuff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Chris Hyunchul; Shin, Won Hyoung; Park, Ji Wan; Shin, Ji Sun; Kim, Ji Eun

    2017-07-01

    While tendon degeneration has been known to be an important cause of rotator cuff disease, few studies have objectively proven the association of tendon degeneration and rotator cuff disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes of tendon degeneration with respect to the stage of rotator cuff disease. A total of 48 patients were included in the study: 12 with tendinopathy, 12 with a partial-thickness tear (pRCT), 12 with a full-thickness tear (fRCT), and 12 as the control. A full-thickness supraspinatus tendon sample was harvested en bloc from the middle portion between the lateral edge and the musculotendinous junction of the tendon using a biopsy punch with a diameter of 3 mm. Harvested samples were evaluated using a semi-quantitative grading scale with 7 parameters after haematoxylin and eosin staining. There was no significant difference in age, gender, symptom duration, and Kellgren-Lawrence grade between the groups except for the global fatty degeneration index. All of the seven parameters were significantly different between the groups and could be categorized as follows: early responders (fibre structure and arrangement), gradual responder (rounding of the nuclei), after-tear responders (cellularity, vascularity, and stainability), and late responder (hyalinization). The total degeneration scores were not significantly different between the control (6.08 ± 1.16) and tendinopathy (6.67 ± 1.83) (n.s.). However, the score of pRCT group (10.42 ± 1.31) was greater than that of tendinopathy (P rotator cuff disease progresses from tendinopathy to pRCT, and then to fRCT. The degree of degeneration of tendinopathy was not different from that of normal but aged tendons, and significant tendon degeneration began from the stage of pRCT. The clinical relevance of the study is that strategies and goals of the treatment for rotator cuff disease should be specific to its stage, in order to prevent disease progression for tendinopathy and pRCT, as

  3. Gender difference in genetic association between IL1A variant and early lumbar disc degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskola, Pasi J; Kjær, Per; Sorensen, Joan S

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze the associations between specific genetic markers and early disc degeneration (DD) or early disc degeneration progression (DDP) defined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)....

  4. Three Studies Point to Same Risk Gene for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... point to same risk gene for age-related macular degeneration NIH-funded research helps unravel the biology of ... rare, but powerful risk factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common cause of vision loss in ...

  5. Familial pseudoxanthoma elasticum associated with multiple comedones

    OpenAIRE

    Maarouf, Melody; Sharon, Victoria R; Sivamani, Raja K; Prakash, Neha; Bipin, TH; Davis, Tracy; Shi, Vivian Y

    2017-01-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by atypical elastic fibers that causes connective tissue abnormalities of the skin, eyes, and heart, among other organs. The disorder is rare, with a classic presentation of yellow-orange cobblestone-like papules on flexural areas, lax skin, ocular degeneration, and moribund vasculature in multiple organs. There is wide variability in the presentation of the affected organs [1]. We present two sisters with classic...

  6. Decreased Expression of DREAM Promotes the Degeneration of Retinal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintala, Shravan; Cheng, Mei; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic mechanisms that promote the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) following the activation of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) are unclear. In this study, we have investigated the role of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM) in NMDA-mediated degeneration of the retina. NMDA, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and MK801 were injected into the vitreous humor of C57BL/6 mice. At 12, 24, and 48 hours after injection, expression of DREAM in the retina was determined by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis, and electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA). Apoptotic death of cells in the retina was determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferace dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays. Degeneration of RGCs in cross sections and in whole mount retinas was determined by using antibodies against Tuj1 and Brn3a respectively. Degeneration of amacrine cells and bipolar cells was determined by using antibodies against calretinin and protein kinase C (PKC)-alpha respectively. DREAM was expressed constitutively in RGCs, amacrine cells, bipolar cells, as well as in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). NMDA promoted a progressive decrease in DREAM levels in all three cell types over time, and at 48 h after NMDA-treatment very low DREAM levels were evident in the IPL only. DREAM expression in retinal nuclear proteins was decreased progressively after NMDA-treatment, and correlated with its decreased binding to the c-fos-DRE oligonucleotides. A decrease in DREAM expression correlated significantly with apoptotic death of RGCs, amacrine cells and bipolar cells. Treatment of eyes with NMDA antagonist MK801, restored DREAM expression to almost normal levels in the retina, and significantly decreased NMDA-mediated apoptotic death of RGCs, amacrine cells, and bipolar cells. Results presented in this study show for the first time that down-regulation of DREAM promotes the degeneration of RGCs, amacrine cells, and

  7. Survival and Functionality of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Oligodendrocytes in a Nonhuman Primate Model for Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiruvalluvan, Arun; Czepiel, Marcin; Kap, Yolanda A.; Mantingh-Otter, Ietje; Vainchtein, Ilia; Kuipers, Jeroen; Bijlard, Marjolein; Baron, Wia; Giepmans, Ben; Brueck, Wolfgang; 'T Hart, Bert A.; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2016-01-01

    : Fast remyelination by endogenous oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) is essential to prevent axonal and subsequent retrograde neuronal degeneration in demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS). In chronic lesions, however, the remyelination capacity of OPCs becomes insufficient. Cell

  8. Multiple Perspectives / Multiple Readings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Biggs

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available People experience things from their own physical point of view. What they see is usually a function of where they are and what physical attitude they adopt relative to the subject. With augmented vision (periscopes, mirrors, remote cameras, etc we are able to see things from places where we are not present. With time-shifting technologies, such as the video recorder, we can also see things from the past; a time and a place we may never have visited.In recent artistic work I have been exploring the implications of digital technology, interactivity and internet connectivity that allow people to not so much space/time-shift their visual experience of things but rather see what happens when everybody is simultaneously able to see what everybody else can see. This is extrapolated through the remote networking of sites that are actual installation spaces; where the physical movements of viewers in the space generate multiple perspectives, linked to other similar sites at remote locations or to other viewers entering the shared data-space through a web based version of the work.This text explores the processes involved in such a practice and reflects on related questions regarding the non-singularity of being and the sense of self as linked to time and place.

  9. Suppressing thyroid hormone signaling preserves cone photoreceptors in mouse models of retinal degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Hongwei; Thapa, Arjun; Morris, Lynsie; Redmond, T. Michael; Baehr, Wolfgang; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Photoreceptors degenerate in a wide array of hereditary retinal diseases and age-related macular degeneration. There is currently no treatment available for retinal degenerations. While outnumbered roughly 20:1 by rods in the human retina, it is the cones that mediate color vision and visual acuity, and their survival is critical for vision. In this communication, we investigate whether thyroid hormone (TH) signaling affects cone viability in retinal degeneration mouse models. TH signaling is...

  10. Lipids, lipid genes, and incident age-related macular degeneration: the three continent age-related macular degeneration consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Ronald; Myers, Chelsea E.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H. S.; Rochtchina, Elena; Gao, Xiaoyi; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Sivakumaran, Theru A.; Burlutsky, George; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Hofman, Albert; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Lee, Kristine E.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Wang, Jie Jin

    2014-01-01

    To describe associations of serum lipid levels and lipid pathway genes to the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meta-analysis. setting: Three population-based cohorts. population: A total of 6950 participants from the Beaver Dam Eye Study (BDES), Blue Mountains Eye Study (BMES),

  11. Medial meniscal posterior root/horn radial tears correlate with cartilage degeneration detected by T1ρ relaxation mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kenji, E-mail: Kenji-am@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Hashimoto, Sanshiro, E-mail: info@msorc.jp [Minami-Shinjuku Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Clinic, 2-16-7 Yoyogi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 151-0053 (Japan); Nakamura, Hiroshi, E-mail: nakamura@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Mori, Atsushi, E-mail: atsu@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Sato, Akiko, E-mail: akiko-sato@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Majima, Tokifumi, E-mail: tkmajima@iuhw.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, International University of Health and Welfare Hospital, 537-3 Iguchi, Nasu-shiobara, Tochigi 329-2763 (Japan); Takai, Shinro, E-mail: takai-snr@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Posterior radial tears in medial meniscus associate T1ρ values of cartilage. • Posterior radial tears relate to cartilage degeneration even in early-stage osteoarthritis. • Abnormalities in meniscus on MRI are useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis. - Abstract: Objective: This study aimed to identify factors on routine pulse sequence MRI associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Materials and methods: This study included 137 subjects with knee pain. T1ρ values were measured in the regions of interest on the surface layer of the cartilage on mid-coronal images of the femorotibial joint. Assessment of cartilage, subchondral bone, meniscus and ligaments was performed using routine pulse sequence MRI. Radiographic evaluation for osteoarthritis was also performed. Results: Multiple regression analysis revealed posterior root/horn tears to be independent factors increasing the T1ρ values of the cartilage in the medial compartment of the femorotibial joint. Even when adjusted for radiographically defined early-stage osteoarthritis, medial posterior meniscal radial tears significantly increased the T1ρ values. Conclusions: This study showed that posterior root/horn radial tears in the medial meniscus are particularly important MRI findings associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Morphological factors of the medial meniscus on MRI provide findings useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis.

  12. Medial meniscal posterior root/horn radial tears correlate with cartilage degeneration detected by T1ρ relaxation mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hashimoto, Sanshiro; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Mori, Atsushi; Sato, Akiko; Majima, Tokifumi; Takai, Shinro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Posterior radial tears in medial meniscus associate T1ρ values of cartilage. • Posterior radial tears relate to cartilage degeneration even in early-stage osteoarthritis. • Abnormalities in meniscus on MRI are useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis. - Abstract: Objective: This study aimed to identify factors on routine pulse sequence MRI associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Materials and methods: This study included 137 subjects with knee pain. T1ρ values were measured in the regions of interest on the surface layer of the cartilage on mid-coronal images of the femorotibial joint. Assessment of cartilage, subchondral bone, meniscus and ligaments was performed using routine pulse sequence MRI. Radiographic evaluation for osteoarthritis was also performed. Results: Multiple regression analysis revealed posterior root/horn tears to be independent factors increasing the T1ρ values of the cartilage in the medial compartment of the femorotibial joint. Even when adjusted for radiographically defined early-stage osteoarthritis, medial posterior meniscal radial tears significantly increased the T1ρ values. Conclusions: This study showed that posterior root/horn radial tears in the medial meniscus are particularly important MRI findings associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Morphological factors of the medial meniscus on MRI provide findings useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis

  13. Nerve fiber layer (NFL) degeneration associated with acute q-switched laser exposure in the nonhuman primate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Harry; Zuclich, Joseph A.; Stuck, Bruce E.; Gagliano, Donald A.; Lund, David J.; Glickman, Randolph D.

    1995-01-01

    We have evaluated acute laser retinal exposure in non-human primates using a Rodenstock scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) equipped with spectral imaging laser sources at 488, 514, 633, and 780 nm. Confocal spectral imaging at each laser wavelength allowed evaluation of the image plane from deep within the retinal vascular layer to the more superficial nerve fiber layer in the presence and absence of the short wavelength absorption of the macular pigment. SLO angiography included both fluorescein and indocyanine green procedures to assess the extent of damage to the sensory retina, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and the choroidal vasculature. All laser exposures in this experiment were from a Q-switched Neodymium laser source at an exposure level sufficient to produce vitreous hemorrhage. Confocal imaging of the nerve fiber layer revealed discrete optic nerve sector defects between the lesion site and the macula (retrograde degeneration) as well as between the lesion site and the optic disk (Wallerian degeneration). In multiple hemorrhagic exposures, lesions placed progressively distant from the macula or overlapping the macula formed bridging scars visible at deep retinal levels. Angiography revealed blood flow disturbance at the retina as well as at the choroidal vascular level. These data suggest that acute parafoveal laser retinal injury can involve both direct full thickness damage to the sensory and non-sensory retina and remote nerve fiber degeneration. Such injury has serious functional implications for both central and peripheral visual function.

  14. Genetic and functional dissection of HTRA1 and LOC387715 in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenglin Yang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A common haplotype on 10q26 influences the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD and encompasses two genes, LOC387715 and HTRA1. Recent data have suggested that loss of LOC387715, mediated by an insertion/deletion (in/del that destabilizes its message, is causally related with the disorder. Here we show that loss of LOC387715 is insufficient to explain AMD susceptibility, since a nonsense mutation (R38X in this gene that leads to loss of its message resides in a protective haplotype. At the same time, the common disease haplotype tagged by the in/del and rs11200638 has an effect on the transcriptional upregulation of the adjacent gene, HTRA1. These data implicate increased HTRA1 expression in the pathogenesis of AMD and highlight the importance of exploring multiple functional consequences of alleles in haplotypes that confer susceptibility to complex traits.

  15. Quantitative degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy: Probes for molecular species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrow, R.; Rakestraw, D.; Paul, P.; Lucht, R.; Danehy, P.; Friedman-Hill, E.; Germann, G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Resonant degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) is currently the subject of intensive investigation as a sensitive diagnostic tool for molecular species. DFWM has the advantage of generating a coherent (beam-like) signal which results in null-background detection and provides excellent immunity to background-light interference. Since multiple one-photon resonances are involved in the signal generation process, the DFWM technique can allow sensitive detection of molecules via electronic, vibrational or rotational transitions. These properties combine to make DFWM a widely applicable diagnostic technique for the probing of molecular species. The authors are conducting fundamental and applied investigations of DFWM for quantitative measurements of trace species in reacting gases. During the past year, efforts have been focussed in two areas: (1) understanding the effects of collisional processes on the DFWM signal generation process, and (2) exploring the applicability of infrared DFWM to detect polyatomic molecules via rovibrational transitions.

  16. Glial loss of the metallo β-lactamase domain containing protein, SWIP-10, induces age- and glutamate-signaling dependent, dopamine neuron degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea L Gibson

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Across phylogeny, glutamate (Glu signaling plays a critical role in regulating neural excitability, thus supporting many complex behaviors. Perturbed synaptic and extrasynaptic Glu homeostasis in the human brain has been implicated in multiple neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease, where theories suggest that excitotoxic insults may accelerate a naturally occurring process of dopamine (DA neuron degeneration. In C. elegans, mutation of the glial expressed gene, swip-10, results in Glu-dependent DA neuron hyperexcitation that leads to elevated DA release, triggering DA signaling-dependent motor paralysis. Here, we demonstrate that swip-10 mutations induce premature and progressive DA neuron degeneration, with light and electron microscopy studies demonstrating the presence of dystrophic dendritic processes, as well as shrunken and/or missing cell soma. As with paralysis, DA neuron degeneration in swip-10 mutants is rescued by glial-specific, but not DA neuron-specific expression of wildtype swip-10, consistent with a cell non-autonomous mechanism. Genetic studies implicate the vesicular Glu transporter VGLU-3 and the cystine/Glu exchanger homolog AAT-1 as potential sources of Glu signaling supporting DA neuron degeneration. Degeneration can be significantly suppressed by mutations in the Ca2+ permeable Glu receptors, nmr-2 and glr-1, in genes that support intracellular Ca2+ signaling and Ca2+-dependent proteolysis, as well as genes involved in apoptotic cell death. Our studies suggest that Glu stimulation of nematode DA neurons in early larval stages, without the protective actions of SWIP-10, contributes to insults that ultimately drive DA neuron degeneration. The swip-10 model may provide an efficient platform for the identification of molecular mechanisms that enhance risk for Parkinson's disease and/or the identification of agents that can limit neurodegenerative disease progression.

  17. Multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indwelling catheter Osteoporosis or thinning of the bones Pressure sores Side effects of medicines used to treat the ... Daily bowel care program Multiple sclerosis - discharge Preventing pressure ulcers Swallowing problems Images Multiple sclerosis MRI of the ...

  18. Cerebral blood flow SPECT scanning in cortico-basal degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slawek, J.; Walczak, A.; Krupa-Olchawa, J.; Lass, P.; Dubaniewicz, M.

    1999-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease accounts for ca. 75% of all cases of Parkinsonism. Corticobasal degeneration is a relatively rare example of the so-called ''Parkinson-plus'' syndrome. The authors present the case of a 56-year-old woman with rigidity and atypical tremor of upper extremity followed by gait apraxia, dysarthria, bilateral pyramidal signs and myoclonus. There was no improvement after treatment with L-dopa. The disease has progressed, but the patient is still alive. On the basis of clinical data a diagnosis of corticobasal degeneration has been established. Cerebral blood flow SPECT scanning revealed diffuse hypoperfusion of left frontal lobe, antero-inferior part of the left temporal lobe and left basal ganglia. The case illustrates the usefulness of brain SPECT in atypical forma of Parkinson's disease. (author)

  19. C1,1 regularity for degenerate elliptic obstacle problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalopoulos, Panagiota; Feehan, Paul M. N.

    2016-03-01

    The Heston stochastic volatility process is a degenerate diffusion process where the degeneracy in the diffusion coefficient is proportional to the square root of the distance to the boundary of the half-plane. The generator of this process with killing, called the elliptic Heston operator, is a second-order, degenerate-elliptic partial differential operator, where the degeneracy in the operator symbol is proportional to the distance to the boundary of the half-plane. In mathematical finance, solutions to the obstacle problem for the elliptic Heston operator correspond to value functions for perpetual American-style options on the underlying asset. With the aid of weighted Sobolev spaces and weighted Hölder spaces, we establish the optimal C 1 , 1 regularity (up to the boundary of the half-plane) for solutions to obstacle problems for the elliptic Heston operator when the obstacle functions are sufficiently smooth.

  20. Accreting neutron stars, black holes, and degenerate dwarf stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, D

    1980-02-08

    During the past 8 years, extended temporal and broadband spectroscopic studies carried out by x-ray astronomical satellites have led to the identification of specific compact x-ray sources as accreting neutron stars, black holes, and degenerate dwarf stars in close binary systems. Such sources provide a unique opportunity to study matter under extreme conditions not accessible in the terrestrial laboratory. Quantitative theoretical models have been developed which demonstrate that detailed studies of these sources will lead to a greatly increased understanding of dense and superdense hadron matter, hadron superfluidity, high-temperature plasma in superstrong magnetic fields, and physical processes in strong gravitational fields. Through a combination of theory and observation such studies will make possible the determination of the mass, radius, magnetic field, and structure of neutron stars and degenerate dwarf stars and the identification of further candidate black holes, and will contribute appreciably to our understanding of the physics of accretion by compact astronomical objects.

  1. Sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome in western Canada: 93 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, Marina L; Lucyshyn, Danica; Bauer, Bianca S; Grahn, Bruce H; Sandmeyer, Lynne S

    2017-11-01

    This study reviewed clinical data from dogs diagnosed with sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) in western Canada. Medical records from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine from 2002 to 2016 showed that 93 cases of SARDS were diagnosed based on presentation for sudden blindness and a bilaterally extinguished electroretinogram. The most common pure breeds were the miniature schnauzer, dachshund, and pug. The mean age at diagnosis was 8.1 years and males and females were equally affected. Most of the dogs were presented with normal non-chromatic, but abnormal chromatic pupillary light reflexes. The incidence of retinal degeneration as detected via ophthalmoscopy increased over time after SARDS diagnosis. Polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, weight gain, elevated liver enzyme values, isosthenuria, and proteinuria were common clinical and laboratory findings. Chromatic pupillary light reflex testing may be more valuable than non-chromatic pupillary light testing in detecting pupil response abnormalities in dogs with SARDS, although electroretinography remains the definitive diagnostic test.

  2. Iron in hereditary retinal degeneration: PIXE microanalysis Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeant, C.; Gouget, B.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M.; Yefimova, M.; Courtois, Y.; Jeanny, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Several types of hereditary retinal degeneration with progressive alteration of photoreceptors exist in men and animals. Recent immunohistochemical results have shown strong degradation of transferrin, the protein responsible for iron transport, in retinas of rats with hereditary retinal degeneration. Freeze-dried thin sections of rat retinas from different stages of the disease, and respective coeval control sections, have been analyzed using nuclear microprobe. In this first part of the study, the rat retinas at post-natal stages of 35 and 45 days have been analyzed. The sample preparation and the post-irradiation staining to determine precisely the retinal layers involved are described. Preliminary results of element distributions (K, Ca, Fe) in the rat retina layers are discussed. A very high content of calcium in the choriocapillaris of dystrophic rat retinas was observed. Preliminary results on iron distribution in the rat retina layers are presented

  3. On the Behavior of Eisenstein Series Through Elliptic Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbin, D.; Pippich, A.-M. V.

    2009-12-01

    Let Γ be a Fuchsian group of the first kind acting on the hyperbolic upper half plane {mathbb{H}}, and let {M = Γbackslash mathbb{H}} be the associated finite volume hyperbolic Riemann surface. If γ is a primitive parabolic, hyperbolic, resp. elliptic element of Γ, there is an associated parabolic, hyperbolic, resp. elliptic Eisenstein series. In this article, we study the limiting behavior of these Eisenstein series on an elliptically degenerating family of finite volume hyperbolic Riemann surfaces. In particular, we prove the following result. The elliptic Eisenstein series associated to a degenerating elliptic element converges up to a factor to the parabolic Eisenstein series associated to the parabolic element which fixes the newly developed cusp on the limit surface.

  4. Calculation of degenerated Eigenmodes with modified power method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Peng; Lee, Hyun Suk; Lee, Deok Jung [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The modified power method has been studied by many researchers to calculate the higher Eigenmodes and accelerate the convergence of the fundamental mode. Its application to multidimensional problems may be unstable due to degenerated or near-degenerated Eigenmodes. Complex Eigenmode solutions are occasionally encountered in such cases, and the shapes of the corresponding eigenvectors may change during the simulation. These issues must be addressed for the successful implementation of the modified power method. Complex components are examined and an approximation method to eliminate the usage of the complex numbers is provided. A technique to fix the eigenvector shapes is also provided. The performance of the methods for dealing with those aforementioned problems is demonstrated with two dimensional one group and three dimensional one group homogeneous diffusion problems.

  5. Nonlinear electromagnetic waves in a degenerate electron-positron plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Labany, S.K., E-mail: skellabany@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta (Egypt); El-Taibany, W.F., E-mail: eltaibany@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Science for Girls in Abha, King Khalid University, Abha (Saudi Arabia); El-Samahy, A.E.; Hafez, A.M.; Atteya, A., E-mail: ahmedsamahy@yahoo.com, E-mail: am.hafez@sci.alex.edu.eg, E-mail: ahmed_ateya2002@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt)

    2015-08-15

    Using the reductive perturbation technique (RPT), the nonlinear propagation of magnetosonic solitary waves in an ultracold, degenerate (extremely dense) electron-positron (EP) plasma (containing ultracold, degenerate electron, and positron fluids) is investigated. The set of basic equations is reduced to a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for the lowest-order perturbed magnetic field and to a KdV type equation for the higher-order perturbed magnetic field. The solutions of these evolution equations are obtained. For better accuracy and searching on new features, the new solutions are analyzed numerically based on compact objects (white dwarf) parameters. It is found that including the higher-order corrections results as a reduction (increment) of the fast (slow) electromagnetic wave amplitude but the wave width is increased in both cases. The ranges where the RPT can describe adequately the total magnetic field including different conditions are discussed. (author)

  6. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan) Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Hasuo, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Uchida, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Matsumoto, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Tsukamoto, Y. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Ohno, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Masuda, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1993-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of seven patients with olivary degeneration caused by cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhages were reviewed. In four patients with cerebellar haemorrhage, old haematomas were identified as being located in the dentate nucleus; the contralateral inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense on proton-density- and T2-weighted images. In two patients with pontine haemorrhages, the old haematomas were in the tegmentum and the ipsilateral inferior olivary nuclei, which were hyperintense. In one case of midbrain haemorrhage, the inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense bilaterally. The briefest interval from the ictus to MRI was 2 months. Hypertrophic olivary nuclei were observed only at least 4 months after the ictus. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage should not be confused with ischaemic, neoplastic, or other primary pathological conditions of the medulla. (orig.)

  7. A Case of Corticobasal Degeneration Studied with Positron Emission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nagasawa

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available We measured cerebral blood flow, oxygen metabolism, glucose utilization, and dopamine metabolism in the brain of a patient with corticobasal degeneration using positron emission tomography (PET. The clinical picture is distinctive, comprising features referable to both cortical and basal ganglionic dysfunction. Brain imagings of glucose and dopamine metabolism can demonstrate greater abnormalities in the cerebral cortex and in the striatum contralateral to the more affected side than those of blood flow and oxygen metabolism. This unique combination study measuring both cerebral glucose utilization and dopamine metabolism in the nigrostriatal system can provide efficient information about the dysfunctions which are correlated with individual clinical symptoms, and this study is essential to diagnosis of corticobasal degeneration.

  8. Sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome in western Canada: 93 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, Marina L.; Lucyshyn, Danica; Bauer, Bianca S.; Grahn, Bruce H.; Sandmeyer, Lynne S.

    2017-01-01

    This study reviewed clinical data from dogs diagnosed with sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) in western Canada. Medical records from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine from 2002 to 2016 showed that 93 cases of SARDS were diagnosed based on presentation for sudden blindness and a bilaterally extinguished electroretinogram. The most common pure breeds were the miniature schnauzer, dachshund, and pug. The mean age at diagnosis was 8.1 years and males and females were equally affected. Most of the dogs were presented with normal non-chromatic, but abnormal chromatic pupillary light reflexes. The incidence of retinal degeneration as detected via ophthalmoscopy increased over time after SARDS diagnosis. Polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, weight gain, elevated liver enzyme values, isosthenuria, and proteinuria were common clinical and laboratory findings. Chromatic pupillary light reflex testing may be more valuable than non-chromatic pupillary light testing in detecting pupil response abnormalities in dogs with SARDS, although electroretinography remains the definitive diagnostic test. PMID:29089658

  9. Follistatin Alleviates Synovitis and Articular Cartilage Degeneration Induced by Carrageenan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yamada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Activins are proinflammatory cytokines which belong to the TGFβ superfamily. Follistatin is an extracellular decoy receptor for activins. Since both activins and follistatin are expressed in articular cartilage, we hypothesized that activin-follistatin signaling participates in the process of joint inflammation and cartilage degeneration. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of follistatin in a carrageenan-induced mouse arthritis model. Synovitis induced by intra-articular injection of carrageenan was significantly alleviated by preinjection with follistatin. Macrophage infiltration into the synovial membrane was significantly reduced in the presence of follistatin. In addition, follistatin inhibited proteoglycan erosion induced by carrageenan in articular cartilage. These data indicate that activin-follistatin signaling is involved in joint inflammation and cartilage homeostasis. Our data suggest that follistatin can be a new therapeutic target for inflammation-induced articular cartilage degeneration.

  10. Identifying Initial Condition in Degenerate Parabolic Equation with Singular Potential

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    K. Atifi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid algorithm and regularization method are proposed, for the first time, to solve the one-dimensional degenerate inverse heat conduction problem to estimate the initial temperature distribution from point measurements. The evolution of the heat is given by a degenerate parabolic equation with singular potential. This problem can be formulated in a least-squares framework, an iterative procedure which minimizes the difference between the given measurements and the value at sensor locations of a reconstructed field. The mathematical model leads to a nonconvex minimization problem. To solve it, we prove the existence of at least one solution of problem and we propose two approaches: the first is based on a Tikhonov regularization, while the second approach is based on a hybrid genetic algorithm (married genetic with descent method type gradient. Some numerical experiments are given.

  11. Lattice degeneration of the retina and the pigment dispersion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weseley, P; Liebmann, J; Walsh, J B; Ritch, R

    1992-11-15

    Retinal detachment occurs more frequently in patients with pigment dispersion syndrome. We evaluated the incidence of peripheral retinal abnormalities known to predispose to rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in a consecutive series of 60 patients with pigment dispersion syndrome with or without glaucoma. Lattice degeneration was present in at least one eye of 12 patients (20%). Seven patients had bilateral lesions. Full-thickness retinal breaks were found in seven patients (11.7%) and two patients (3.3%) had asymptomatic rhegmatogenous retinal detachments that required scleral buckle procedures. The incidence of lattice degeneration and full-thickness retinal breaks appears to be increased in this group of patients, and may be responsible for the increased risk of rhegmatogenous detachment.

  12. Helicoid peripapillary chorioretinal degeneration complicated by choroidal neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafylla, Magdalini; Panos, Georgios D; Dardabounis, Doukas; Nanos, Panagiotis; Konstantinidis, Aristeidis

    2016-02-15

    Helicoid peripapillary chorioretinal degeneration (HPCD) is a hereditary disease of the fundus that is characterized by atrophic chorioretinal areas that appear early in life and expand gradually from the optic disc towards the macula and the periphery. We describe the case of an elderly man with a known diagnosis of HPCD who developed choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV) in both eyes during the course of the disease. The patient was treated with intravitreal injection of ranibizumab, to which he had excellent response. The CNV subsided with 2 injections in the right eye and 1 in the left. Two years after the initial diagnosis of CNV in the right eye, visual acuity was 5/10 OD and 9/10 OS. Helicoid peripapillary chorioretinal degeneration is rarely complicated by CNV as the fundus lacks the trigger factors that would sustain this process. Although rare, HPCD complicated by CNV can be seen bilaterally, but responds well to few ranibizumab injections.

  13. Radiation treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Tomoko; Mandai, Michiko; Honjo, Megumi; Matsuda, Naoko; Miyamoto, Hideki; Takahashi, Masayo; Ogura, Yuichiro; Sasai, Keisuke [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    Fifteen eyes of age-related macular degeneration were treated by low-dose radiation. All the affected eyes had subfoveal neovascular membrane. Seventeen nontreated eyes with similar macular lesion served as control. Radiation was performed using photon beam at 6MV. Each eye received daily dose of 2 Gy for 5 consecutive days. When evaluated 9 to 12 months after treatment, the size of neovascular membrane had decreased in 47% of treated eyes and 7% of control eyes. The visual acuity improved by 2 lines or more in 13% of treated eyes and in none of control eyes. When the initial neovascular membrane was less than 1.5 disc diameter in size, the visual acuity had improved or remained stationary in 90% of treated eyes and in 36% of control eyes. The findings show the potential beneficial effect of radiation for age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  14. Neuronal degeneration in autonomic nervous system of Dystonia musculorum mice

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    Liu Kang-Jen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dystonia musculorum (dt is an autosomal recessive hereditary neuropathy with a characteristic uncoordinated movement and is caused by a defect in the bullous pemphigoid antigen 1 (BPAG1 gene. The neural isoform of BPAG1 is expressed in various neurons, including those in the central and peripheral nerve systems of mice. However, most previous studies on neuronal degeneration in BPAG1-deficient mice focused on peripheral sensory neurons and only limited investigation of the autonomic system has been conducted. Methods In this study, patterns of nerve innervation in cutaneous and iridial tissues were examined using general neuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 via immunohistochemistry. To perform quantitative analysis of the autonomic neuronal number, neurons within the lumbar sympathetic and parasympathetic ciliary ganglia were calculated. In addition, autonomic neurons were cultured from embryonic dt/dt mutants to elucidate degenerative patterns in vitro. Distribution patterns of neuronal intermediate filaments in cultured autonomic neurons were thoroughly studied under immunocytochemistry and conventional electron microscopy. Results Our immunohistochemistry results indicate that peripheral sensory nerves and autonomic innervation of sweat glands and irises dominated degeneration in dt/dt mice. Quantitative results confirmed that the number of neurons was significantly decreased in the lumbar sympathetic ganglia as well as in the parasympathetic ciliary ganglia of dt/dt mice compared with those of wild-type mice. We also observed that the neuronal intermediate filaments were aggregated abnormally in cultured autonomic neurons from dt/dt embryos. Conclusions These results suggest that a deficiency in the cytoskeletal linker BPAG1 is responsible for dominant sensory nerve degeneration and severe autonomic degeneration in dt/dt mice. Additionally, abnormally aggregated neuronal intermediate filaments may participate in

  15. Axon degeneration: make the Schwann cell great again

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    Keit Men Wong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Axonal degeneration is a pivotal feature of many neurodegenerative conditions and substantially accounts for neurological morbidity. A widely used experimental model to study the mechanisms of axonal degeneration is Wallerian degeneration (WD, which occurs after acute axonal injury. In the peripheral nervous system (PNS, WD is characterized by swift dismantling and clearance of injured axons with their myelin sheaths. This is a prerequisite for successful axonal regeneration. In the central nervous system (CNS, WD is much slower, which significantly contributes to failed axonal regeneration. Although it is well-documented that Schwann cells (SCs have a critical role in the regenerative potential of the PNS, to date we have only scarce knowledge as to how SCs 'sense' axonal injury and immediately respond to it. In this regard, it remains unknown as to whether SCs play the role of a passive bystander or an active director during the execution of the highly orchestrated disintegration program of axons. Older reports, together with more recent studies, suggest that SCs mount dynamic injury responses minutes after axonal injury, long before axonal breakdown occurs. The swift SC response to axonal injury could play either a pro-degenerative role, or alternatively a supportive role, to the integrity of distressed axons that have not yet committed to degenerate. Indeed, supporting the latter concept, recent findings in a chronic PNS neurodegeneration model indicate that deactivation of a key molecule promoting SC injury responses exacerbates axonal loss. If this holds true in a broader spectrum of conditions, it may provide the grounds for the development of new glia-centric therapeutic approaches to counteract axonal loss.

  16. Ultrafast Degenerate Transient Lens Spectroscopy in Semiconductor Nanosctructures

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    Leontyev A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the non-resonant excitation and probing of the nonlinear refractive index change in bulk semiconductors and semiconductor quantum dots through degenerate transient lens spectroscopy. The signal oscillates at the center laser field frequency, and the envelope of the former in quantum dots is distinctly different from the one in bulk sample. We discuss the applicability of this technique for polarization state probing in semiconductor media with femtosecond temporal resolution.

  17. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Corticobasal Degeneration: Pathophysiology and Treatment Options

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, Ruth; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Lees, Andrew J.; Morris, Huw R.

    2016-01-01

    Opinion statement There are currently no disease-modifying treatments for progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) or corticobasal degeneration (CBD), and no approved pharmacological or therapeutic treatments that are effective in controlling their symptoms. The use of most pharmacological treatment options are based on experience in other disorders or from non-randomized historical controls, case series, or expert opinion. Levodopa may provide some improvement in symptoms of Parkinsonism (specif...

  18. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Corticobasal Degeneration: Pathophysiology and Treatment Options

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, R.; Rohrer, J. D.; Lees, A. J.; Morris, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    There are currently no disease-modifying treatments for progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) or corticobasal degeneration (CBD), and no approved pharmacological or therapeutic treatments that are effective in controlling their symptoms. The use of most pharmacological treatment options are based on experience in other disorders or from non-randomized historical controls, case series, or expert opinion. Levodopa may provide some improvement in symptoms of Parkinsonism (specifically bradykinesi...

  19. Processing emotion from abstract art in frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Miriam H.; Carton, Amelia M.; Hardy, Christopher J.; Golden, Hannah L.; Clark, Camilla N.; Fletcher, Phillip D.; Jaisin, Kankamol; Marshall, Charles R.; Henley, Susie M.D.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract art may signal emotions independently of a biological or social carrier: it might therefore constitute a test case for defining brain mechanisms of generic emotion decoding and the impact of disease states on those mechanisms. This is potentially of particular relevance to diseases in the frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) spectrum. These diseases are often led by emotional impairment despite retained or enhanced artistic interest in at least some patients. However, the process...

  20. Stopping power of degenerate electron liquid at metallic densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shigenori; Ichimaru, Setsuo

    1985-01-01

    We calculate the stopping power of the degenerate electron liquid at metallic densities in the dielectric formalism. The strong Coulomb-coupling effects beyond the random-phase approximation are taken into account through the static and dynamic local-field corrections. It is shown that those strong-coupling and dynamic effects act to enhance the stopping power substantially in the low-velocity regime, leading to an improved agreement with experimental data. (author)

  1. Prolonged Prevention of Retinal Degeneration with Retinylamine Loaded Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Puntel, Anthony; Maeda, Akiko; Golczak, Marcin; Gao, Song-Qi; Yu, Guanping; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration impairs the vision of millions in all age groups worldwide. Increasing evidence suggests that the etiology of many retinal degenerative diseases is associated with impairment in biochemical reactions involved in the visual cycle, a metabolic pathway responsible for regeneration of the visual chromophore (11-cis-retinal). Inefficient clearance of toxic retinoid metabolites, especially all-trans-retinal, is considered responsible for photoreceptor cytotoxicity. Primary amin...

  2. Ignition Regime for Fusion in a Degenerate Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, S.; Fisch, N.J.

    2005-01-01

    We identify relevant parameter regimes in which aneutronic fuels can undergo fusion ignition in hot-ion degenerate plasma. Because of relativistic effects and partial degeneracy, the self-sustained burning regime is considerably larger than previously calculated. Inverse bremsstrahlung plays a major role in containing the reactor energy. We solve the radiation transfer equation and obtain the contribution to the heat conductivity from inverse bremsstrahlung

  3. Optimal Control for the Degenerate Elliptic Logistic Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, M.; Montero, J.A.; Suarez, A.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the optimal control of harvesting the diffusive degenerate elliptic logistic equation. Under certain assumptions, we prove the existence and uniqueness of an optimal control. Moreover, the optimality system and a characterization of the optimal control are also derived. The sub-supersolution method, the singular eigenvalue problem and differentiability with respect to the positive cone are the techniques used to obtain our results

  4. Nonlinear degenerate cross-diffusion systems with nonlocal interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Di Francesco, M.; Esposito, A.; Fagioli, S.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate a class of systems of partial differential equations with nonlinear cross-diffusion and nonlocal interactions, which are of interest in several contexts in social sciences, finance, biology, and real world applications. Assuming a uniform "coerciveness" assumption on the diffusion part, which allows to consider a large class of systems with degenerate cross-diffusion (i.e. of porous medium type) and relaxes sets of assumptions previously considered in the literature, we prove g...

  5. Bone scintigraphy in hereditary multiple exostoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, D.A.; Levin, E.J.

    1978-01-01

    Two adult patients with multiple hereditary exostoses, a skeletal disorder with recognized malignant potential, each demonstrated increased /sup 99m/Tc diphosphonate uptake in an exostosis in which renewed growth had begun. None of the other multiple exostoses in either patient showed abnormal uptake. Histologic study of the lesions demonstrated chondrosarcoma in one case and benign osteochondroma in the second. Although bone scintigraphy nonspecifically identifies bone growth rather than malignant degeneration, it is more useful than radiographic bone survey in the periodic surveillance of adult patients with this disorder

  6. Humor and laughter in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, B; Propson, B; Göricke, S; Jacobi, H; Wild, B; Timmann, D

    2012-06-01

    Humor is a complex behavior which includes cognitive, affective and motor responses. Based on observations of affective changes in patients with cerebellar lesions, the cerebellum may support cerebral and brainstem areas involved in understanding and appreciation of humorous stimuli and expression of laughter. The aim of the present study was to examine if humor appreciation, perception of humorous stimuli, and the succeeding facial reaction differ between patients with cerebellar degeneration and healthy controls. Twenty-three adults with pure cerebellar degeneration were compared with 23 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy control subjects. No significant difference in humor appreciation and perception of humorous stimuli could be found between groups using the 3 Witz-Dimensionen Test, a validated test asking for funniness and aversiveness of jokes and cartoons. Furthermore, while observing jokes, humorous cartoons, and video sketches, facial expressions of subjects were videotaped and afterwards analysed using the Facial Action Coding System. Using depression as a covariate, the number, and to a lesser degree, the duration of facial expressions during laughter were reduced in cerebellar patients compared to healthy controls. In sum, appreciation of humor appears to be largely preserved in patients with chronic cerebellar degeneration. Cerebellar circuits may contribute to the expression of laughter. Findings add to the literature that non-motor disorders in patients with chronic cerebellar disease are generally mild, but do not exclude that more marked disorders may show up in acute cerebellar disease and/or in more specific tests of humor appreciation.

  7. Digoxin-induced retinal degeneration depends on rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfried, Britta; Samardzija, Marijana; Barben, Maya; Schori, Christian; Klee, Katrin; Storti, Federica; Grimm, Christian

    2017-03-16

    Na,K-ATPases are energy consuming ion pumps that are required for maintaining ion homeostasis in most cells. In the retina, Na,K-ATPases are especially important to sustain the dark current in photoreceptor cells needed for rapid hyperpolarization of rods and cones in light. Cardiac glycosides like digoxin inhibit the activity of Na,K-ATPases by targeting their catalytic alpha subunits. This leads to a disturbed ion balance, which can affect cellular function and survival. Here we show that the treatment of wild-type mice with digoxin leads to severe retinal degeneration and loss of vision. Digoxin induced cell death specifically in photoreceptor cells with no or only minor effects in other retinal cell types. Photoreceptor-specific cytotoxicity depended on the presence of bleachable rhodopsin. Photoreceptors of Rpe65 knockouts, which have no measurable rhodopsin and photoreceptors of Rpe65 R91W mice that have treatment. Similarly, cones in the all-cone retina of Nrl knockout mice were also not affected. Digoxin induced expression of several genes involved in stress signaling and inflammation. It also activated proteins such as ERK1/2, AKT, STAT1, STAT3 and CASP1 during a period of up to 10 days after treatment. Activation of signaling genes and proteins, as well as the dependency on bleachable rhodopsin resembles mechanisms of light-induced photoreceptor degeneration. Digoxin-mediated photoreceptor cell death may thus be used as an inducible model system to study molecular mechanisms of retinal degeneration.

  8. MULTIPLE OBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Bosov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The development of complicated techniques of production and management processes, information systems, computer science, applied objects of systems theory and others requires improvement of mathematical methods, new approaches for researches of application systems. And the variety and diversity of subject systems makes necessary the development of a model that generalizes the classical sets and their development – sets of sets. Multiple objects unlike sets are constructed by multiple structures and represented by the structure and content. The aim of the work is the analysis of multiple structures, generating multiple objects, the further development of operations on these objects in application systems. Methodology. To achieve the objectives of the researches, the structure of multiple objects represents as constructive trio, consisting of media, signatures and axiomatic. Multiple object is determined by the structure and content, as well as represented by hybrid superposition, composed of sets, multi-sets, ordered sets (lists and heterogeneous sets (sequences, corteges. Findings. In this paper we study the properties and characteristics of the components of hybrid multiple objects of complex systems, proposed assessments of their complexity, shown the rules of internal and external operations on objects of implementation. We introduce the relation of arbitrary order over multiple objects, we define the description of functions and display on objects of multiple structures. Originality.In this paper we consider the development of multiple structures, generating multiple objects.Practical value. The transition from the abstract to the subject of multiple structures requires the transformation of the system and multiple objects. Transformation involves three successive stages: specification (binding to the domain, interpretation (multiple sites and particularization (goals. The proposed describe systems approach based on hybrid sets

  9. Loss of Arf4 causes severe degeneration of the exocrine pancreas but not cystic kidney disease or retinal degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian N Pearring

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Arf4 is proposed to be a critical regulator of membrane protein trafficking in early secretory pathway. More recently, Arf4 was also implicated in regulating ciliary trafficking, however, this has not been comprehensively tested in vivo. To directly address Arf4's role in ciliary transport, we deleted Arf4 specifically in either rod photoreceptor cells, kidney, or globally during the early postnatal period. Arf4 deletion in photoreceptors did not cause protein mislocalization or retinal degeneration, as expected if Arf4 played a role in protein transport to the ciliary outer segment. Likewise, Arf4 deletion in kidney did not cause cystic disease, as expected if Arf4 were involved in general ciliary trafficking. In contrast, global Arf4 deletion in the early postnatal period resulted in growth restriction, severe pancreatic degeneration and early death. These findings are consistent with Arf4 playing a critical role in endomembrane trafficking, particularly in the pancreas, but not in ciliary function.

  10. Comparison of model Hartree-Fock type calculation schemes involving various non-degenerate and quasi-degenerate intrinsic Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusa, A.

    1983-03-01

    Different Hamiltonians and their corresponding rotationally degenerate intrinsic counterparts are employed in the study of 18 O nucleus under the normal Hartree-Fock, as well as under six other Hartree-Fock type variational calculation schemes. The results are compared and then assessed in the light of their closeness or otherwise to the full 1s-0d basis shell model calculations for this nucleus. The use of these schemes for other shells is also considered. (author)

  11. Prescreening whole exome sequencing results from patients with retinal degeneration for variants in genes associated with retinal degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryant L

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Laura Bryant,1 Olga Lozynska,1 Albert M Maguire,1–3 Tomas S Aleman,1–3 Jean Bennett1–3 1Center for Advanced Retinal and Ocular Therapeutics (CAROT, FM Kirby Center for Molecular Ophthalmology, Scheie Eye Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Ophthalmology, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Scheie Eye Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Background: Accurate clinical diagnosis and prognosis of retinal degeneration can be aided by the identification of the disease-causing genetic variant. It can confirm the clinical diagnosis as well as inform the clinician of the risk for potential involvement of other organs such as kidneys. It also aids in genetic counseling for affected individuals who want to have a child. Finally, knowledge of disease-causing variants informs laboratory investigators involved in translational research. With the advent of next-generation sequencing, identifying pathogenic mutations is becoming easier, especially the identification of novel pathogenic variants.Methods: We used whole exome sequencing on a cohort of 69 patients with various forms of retinal degeneration and in whom screens for previously identified disease-causing variants had been inconclusive. All potential pathogenic variants were verified by Sanger sequencing and, when possible, segregation analysis of immediate relatives. Potential variants were identified by using a semi-masked approach in which rare variants in candidate genes were identified without knowledge of the clinical diagnosis (beyond “retinal degeneration” or inheritance pattern. After the initial list of genes was prioritized, genetic diagnosis and inheritance pattern were taken into account.Results: We identified the likely pathogenic variants in 64% of the subjects. Seven percent had a single

  12. NADPH Oxidase Contributes to Photoreceptor Degeneration in Constitutively Active RAC1 Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongman; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Zeng, Yong; Marangoni, Dario; Bush, Ronald A.; Wu, Zhijian; Sieving, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The active form of small GTPase RAC1 is required for activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX), which in turn generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in nonphagocytic cells. We explored whether NOX-induced oxidative stress contributes to rod degeneration in retinas expressing constitutively active (CA) RAC1. Methods Transgenic (Tg)–CA-RAC1 mice were given apocynin (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), a NOX inhibitor, or vehicle daily for up to 13 weeks. Superoxide production and oxidative damage were assessed by dihydroethidium staining and by protein carbonyls and malondialdehyde levels, respectively. Outer nuclear layer (ONL) cells were counted and electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes measured in Tg-CA-RAC1 mice. Outer nuclear layer cells were counted in wild-type (WT) mice after transfer of CA-Rac1 gene by subretinal injection of AAV8-pOpsin-CA Rac1-GFP. Results Transgenic-CA-RAC1 retinas had significantly fewer photoreceptor cells and more apoptotic ONL cells than WT controls from postnatal week (Pw) 3 to Pw13. Superoxide accumulation and protein and lipid oxidation were increased in Tg-CA-RAC1 retinas and were reduced in mice treated with apocynin. Apocynin reduced the loss of photoreceptors and increased the rod ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes when compared with vehicle-injected transgenic controls. Photoreceptor loss was also observed in regions of adult WT retina transduced with AAV8-pOpsin-CA Rac1-GFP but not in neighboring regions that were not transduced or in AAV8-pOpsin-GFP–transduced retinas. Conclusions Constitutively active RAC1 promotes photoreceptor cell death by oxidative damage that occurs, at least partially, through NOX-induced ROS. Reactive oxygen species are likely involved in multiple forms of retinal degenerations, and our results support investigating RAC1 inhibition as a therapeutic approach that targets this disease pathway. PMID:27233035

  13. Novel Animal Model of Crumbs-Dependent Progressive Retinal Degeneration That Targets Specific Cone Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jinling; Nagashima, Mikiko; Guo, Chuanyu; Raymond, Pamela A; Wei, Xiangyun

    2018-01-01

    Human Crb1 is implicated in some forms of retinal degeneration, suggesting a role in photoreceptor maintenance. Multiple Crumbs (Crb) polarity genes are expressed in vertebrate retina, although their functional roles are not well understood. To gain further insight into Crb and photoreceptor maintenance, we compared retinal cell densities between wild-type and Tg(RH2-2:Crb2b-sfEX/RH2-2:GFP)pt108b transgenic zebrafish, in which the extracellular domain of Crb2b-short form (Crb2b-sfEX) is expressed in the retina as a secreted protein, which disrupts the planar organization of RGB cones (red, green, and blue) by interfering with Crb2a/2b-based cone-cone adhesion. We used standard morphometric techniques to assess age-related changes in retinal cell densities in adult zebrafish (3 to 27 months old), and to assess effects of the Crb2b-sfEX transgene on retinal structure and photoreceptor densities. Linear cell densities were measured in all retinal layers in radial sections with JB4-Feulgen histology. Planar (surface) densities of cones were determined in retinal flat-mounts. Cell counts from wild-type and pt108b transgenic fish were compared with both a "photoreceptor maintenance index" and statistical analysis of cell counts. Age-related changes in retinal cell linear densities and cone photoreceptor planar densities in wild-type adult zebrafish provided a baseline for analysis. Expression of Crb2b-sfEX caused progressive and selective degeneration of RGB cones, but had no effect on ultraviolet-sensitive (UV) cones, and increased numbers of rod photoreceptors. These differential responses of RGB cones, UV cones, and rods to sustained exposure to Crb2b-sfEX suggest that Crb-based photoreceptor maintenance mechanisms are highly selective.

  14. Valproic acid prevents retinal degeneration in a murine model of normal tension glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Atsuko; Guo, Xiaoli; Noro, Takahiko; Harada, Chikako; Tanaka, Kohichi; Namekata, Kazuhiko; Harada, Takayuki

    2015-02-19

    Valproic acid (VPA) is widely used for treatment of epilepsy, mood disorders, migraines and neuropathic pain. It exerts its therapeutic benefits through modulation of multiple mechanisms including regulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate neurotransmissions, activation of pro-survival protein kinases and inhibition of histone deacetylase. The evidence for neuroprotective properties associated with VPA is emerging. Herein, we investigated the therapeutic potential of VPA in a mouse model of normal tension glaucoma (NTG). Mice with glutamate/aspartate transporter gene deletion (GLAST KO mice) demonstrate progressive retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss and optic nerve degeneration without elevated intraocular pressure, and exhibit glaucomatous pathology including glutamate neurotoxicity and oxidative stress in the retina. VPA (300mg/kg) or vehicle (PBS) was administered via intraperitoneal injection in GLAST KO mice daily for 2 weeks from the age of 3 weeks, which coincides with the onset of glaucomatous retinal degeneration. Following completion of the treatment period, the vehicle-treated GLAST KO mouse retina showed significant RGC death. Meanwhile, VPA treatment prevented RGC death and thinning of the inner retinal layer in GLAST KO mice. In addition, in vivo electrophysiological analyses demonstrated that visual impairment observed in vehicle-treated GLAST KO mice was ameliorated with VPA treatment, clearly establishing that VPA beneficially affects both histological and functional aspects of the glaucomatous retina. We found that VPA reduces oxidative stress induced in the GLAST KO retina and stimulates the cell survival signalling pathway associated with extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK). This is the first study to report the neuroprotective effects of VPA in an animal model of NTG. Our findings raise intriguing possibilities that the widely prescribed drug VPA may be a novel candidate for treatment of glaucoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  15. Multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunwald, I.Q.; Kuehn, A.L.; Backens, M.; Papanagiotou, P.; Shariat, K.; Kostopoulos, P.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common chronic inflammatory disease of myelin with interspersed lesions in the white matter of the central nervous system. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in the diagnosis and monitoring of white matter diseases. This article focuses on key findings in multiple sclerosis as detected by MRI. (orig.) [de

  16. Ex vivo quantitative multiparametric MRI mapping of human meniscus degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebelung, Sven; Kuhl, Christiane; Truhn, Daniel; Tingart, Markus; Jahr, Holger; Pufe, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of T1, T1ρ, T2, T2*, and UTE-T2* (ultrashort-echo time-enhanced T2*) mapping in the refined graduation of human meniscus degeneration with histology serving as standard-of-reference. This IRB-approved intra-individual comparative ex vivo study was performed on 24 lateral meniscus body samples obtained from 24 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Samples were assessed on a 3.0-T MRI scanner using inversion-recovery (T1), spin-lock multi-gradient-echo (T1ρ), multi-spin-echo (T2) and multi-gradient-echo (T2* and UTE-T2*) sequences to determine relaxation times of quantitative MRI (qMRI) parameters. Relaxation times were calculated on the respective maps, averaged to the entire meniscus and to its zones. Histologically, samples were analyzed on a four-point score according to Williams (0-III). QMRI results and Williams (sub)scores were correlated using Spearman's ρ, while Williams grade-dependent differences were assessed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. Sensitivities and specificities in the detection of intact (Williams grade [WG]-0) and severely degenerate meniscus (WG-II-III) were calculated. Except for T2*, significant increases in qMRI parameters with increasing Williams grades were observed. T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* exhibited high sensitivity and variable specificity rates. Significant marked-to-strong correlations were observed for these parameters with each other, with histological WGs and the subscores tissue integrity and cellularity. QMRI mapping holds promise in the objective evaluation of human meniscus. Although sufficient discriminatory power of T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* was only demonstrated for the histological extremes, these data may aid in the future MRI-based parameterization and quantification of human meniscus degeneration. (orig.)

  17. Analysis of meniscal degeneration and meniscal gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norton James H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Menisci play a vital role in load transmission, shock absorption and joint stability. There is increasing evidence suggesting that OA menisci may not merely be bystanders in the disease process of OA. This study sought: 1 to determine the prevalence of meniscal degeneration in OA patients, and 2 to examine gene expression in OA meniscal cells compared to normal meniscal cells. Methods Studies were approved by our human subjects Institutional Review Board. Menisci and articular cartilage were collected during joint replacement surgery for OA patients and lower limb amputation surgery for osteosarcoma patients (normal control specimens, and graded. Meniscal cells were prepared from these meniscal tissues and expanded in monolayer culture. Differential gene expression in OA meniscal cells and normal meniscal cells was examined using Affymetrix microarray and real time RT-PCR. Results The grades of meniscal degeneration correlated with the grades of articular cartilage degeneration (r = 0.672; P HLA-DPA1, integrin, beta 2 (ITGB2, ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1, ankylosis, progressive homolog (ANKH and fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7, were expressed at significantly higher levels in OA meniscal cells compared to normal meniscal cells. Importantly, many of the genes that have been shown to be differentially expressed in other OA cell types/tissues, including ADAM metallopeptidase with thrombospondin type 1 motif 5 (ADAMTS5 and prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES, were found to be expressed at significantly higher levels in OA meniscal cells. This consistency suggests that many of the genes detected in our study are disease-specific. Conclusion Our findings suggest that OA is a whole joint disease. Meniscal cells may play an active role in the development of OA. Investigation of the gene expression profiles of OA meniscal cells may reveal new therapeutic targets for OA therapy and also may uncover novel

  18. Taurine Provides Neuroprotection against Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froger, Nicolas; Cadetti, Lucia; Lorach, Henri; Martins, Joao; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Dubus, Elisabeth; Degardin, Julie; Pain, Dorothée; Forster, Valérie; Chicaud, Laurent; Ivkovic, Ivana; Simonutti, Manuel; Fouquet, Stéphane; Jammoul, Firas; Léveillard, Thierry; Benosman, Ryad; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was incriminated in the retinal toxicity of an antiepileptic drug. We demonstrate here that taurine can improve RGC survival in culture or in different animal models of RGC degeneration. Taurine effect on RGC survival was assessed in vitro on primary pure RCG cultures under serum-deprivation conditions, and on NMDA-treated retinal explants from adult rats. In vivo, taurine was administered through the drinking water in two glaucomatous animal models (DBA/2J mice and rats with vein occlusion) and in a model of Retinitis pigmentosa with secondary RGC degeneration (P23H rats). After a 6-day incubation, 1 mM taurine significantly enhanced RGCs survival (+68%), whereas control RGCs were cultured in a taurine-free medium, containing all natural amino-acids. This effect was found to rely on taurine-uptake by RGCs. Furthermore taurine (1 mM) partly prevented NMDA-induced RGC excitotoxicity. Finally, taurine supplementation increased RGC densities both in DBA/2J mice, in rats with vein occlusion and in P23H rats by contrast to controls drinking taurine-free water. This study indicates that enriched taurine nutrition can directly promote RGC survival through RGC intracellular pathways. It provides evidence that taurine can positively interfere with retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23115615

  19. Ex vivo quantitative multiparametric MRI mapping of human meniscus degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebelung, Sven; Kuhl, Christiane; Truhn, Daniel [Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Tingart, Markus; Jahr, Holger [Aachen University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Aachen (Germany); Pufe, Thomas [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Aachen (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of T1, T1ρ, T2, T2*, and UTE-T2* (ultrashort-echo time-enhanced T2*) mapping in the refined graduation of human meniscus degeneration with histology serving as standard-of-reference. This IRB-approved intra-individual comparative ex vivo study was performed on 24 lateral meniscus body samples obtained from 24 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Samples were assessed on a 3.0-T MRI scanner using inversion-recovery (T1), spin-lock multi-gradient-echo (T1ρ), multi-spin-echo (T2) and multi-gradient-echo (T2* and UTE-T2*) sequences to determine relaxation times of quantitative MRI (qMRI) parameters. Relaxation times were calculated on the respective maps, averaged to the entire meniscus and to its zones. Histologically, samples were analyzed on a four-point score according to Williams (0-III). QMRI results and Williams (sub)scores were correlated using Spearman's ρ, while Williams grade-dependent differences were assessed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. Sensitivities and specificities in the detection of intact (Williams grade [WG]-0) and severely degenerate meniscus (WG-II-III) were calculated. Except for T2*, significant increases in qMRI parameters with increasing Williams grades were observed. T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* exhibited high sensitivity and variable specificity rates. Significant marked-to-strong correlations were observed for these parameters with each other, with histological WGs and the subscores tissue integrity and cellularity. QMRI mapping holds promise in the objective evaluation of human meniscus. Although sufficient discriminatory power of T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* was only demonstrated for the histological extremes, these data may aid in the future MRI-based parameterization and quantification of human meniscus degeneration. (orig.)

  20. Centralization of extruded medial meniscus delays cartilage degeneration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Kawabata, Kenichi; Koga, Hideyuki; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Saito, Ryusuke; Udo, Mio; Yanagisawa, Katsuaki; Ohara, Toshiyuki; Mochizuki, Tomoyuki; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2017-05-01

    Meniscus extrusion often observed in knee osteoarthritis has a strong correlation with the progression of cartilage degeneration and symptom in the patients. We recently reported a novel procedure "arthroscopic centralization" in which the capsule was sutured to the edge of the tibial plateau to reduce meniscus extrusion in the human knee. However, there is no animal model to study the efficacy of this procedure. The purposes of this study were [1] to establish a model of centralization for the extruded medial meniscus in a rat model; and [2] to investigate the chondroprotective effect of this procedure. Medial meniscus extrusion was induced by the release of the anterior synovial capsule and the transection of the meniscotibial ligament. Centralization was performed by the pulled-out suture technique. Alternatively, control rats had only the medial meniscus extrusion surgery. Medial meniscus extrusion was evaluated by micro-CT and macroscopic findings. Cartilage degeneration of the medial tibial plateau was evaluated macroscopically and histologically. By micro-CT analysis, the medial meniscus extrusion was significantly improved in the centralization group in comparison to the extrusion group throughout the study. Both macroscopically and histologically, the cartilage lesion of the medial tibial plateau was prevented in the centralization group but was apparent in the control group. We developed medial meniscus extrusion in a rat model, and centralization of the extruded medial meniscus by the pull-out suture technique improved the medial meniscus extrusion and delayed cartilage degeneration, though the effect was limited. Centralization is a promising treatment to prevent the progression of osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ex vivo quantitative multiparametric MRI mapping of human meniscus degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebelung, Sven; Tingart, Markus; Pufe, Thomas; Kuhl, Christiane; Jahr, Holger; Truhn, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of T1, T1ρ, T2, T2*, and UTE-T2* (ultrashort-echo time-enhanced T2*) mapping in the refined graduation of human meniscus degeneration with histology serving as standard-of-reference. This IRB-approved intra-individual comparative ex vivo study was performed on 24 lateral meniscus body samples obtained from 24 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Samples were assessed on a 3.0-T MRI scanner using inversion-recovery (T1), spin-lock multi-gradient-echo (T1ρ), multi-spin-echo (T2) and multi-gradient-echo (T2* and UTE-T2*) sequences to determine relaxation times of quantitative MRI (qMRI) parameters. Relaxation times were calculated on the respective maps, averaged to the entire meniscus and to its zones. Histologically, samples were analyzed on a four-point score according to Williams (0-III). QMRI results and Williams (sub)scores were correlated using Spearman's ρ, while Williams grade-dependent differences were assessed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. Sensitivities and specificities in the detection of intact (Williams grade [WG]-0) and severely degenerate meniscus (WG-II-III) were calculated. Except for T2*, significant increases in qMRI parameters with increasing Williams grades were observed. T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* exhibited high sensitivity and variable specificity rates. Significant marked-to-strong correlations were observed for these parameters with each other, with histological WGs and the subscores tissue integrity and cellularity. QMRI mapping holds promise in the objective evaluation of human meniscus. Although sufficient discriminatory power of T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* was only demonstrated for the histological extremes, these data may aid in the future MRI-based parameterization and quantification of human meniscus degeneration.

  2. Magnetization transfer and spin lock MR imaging of patellar cartilage degeneration at 0.1 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskinen, S.K.; Ylae-Outinen, H.; Komu, M.E.S.; Aho, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate magnetization transfer (MT) parameters and rotating frame relaxation time T1ρ in patellar cartilage at different levels of degeneration. Material and Methods: Thirty cadaveric patellae were examined at 0.1 T using the time-dependent saturation-transfer MT technique and the spin lock (SL) technique. In an SL experiment, nuclear spins are locked with a radiofrequency (RF) field, and the locked nuclear magnetization relaxes along the magnetic component of the locking RF field. The specimens were divided into three groups according to the level of cartilage degeneration. MT parameters and T1ρ were measured. Results: The MT effect was greater in degenerated cartilage than in normal cartilage. T1ρ was longer in advanced cartilage degeneration than in intermediate cartilage degeneration. Conculsion: The results suggest that more studies are needed to fully establish the value of SL imaging in cartilage degeneration. (orig.)

  3. Intervertebral disc (IVD): Structure, degeneration, repair and regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whatley, Benjamin R.; Wen Xuejun, E-mail: xjwen@clemson.edu

    2012-02-01

    Low back pain affects a large portion of the population, resulting in high care costs for therapy and treatment. One primary cause of low back pain is the degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) resulting in the compression of the spinal nerves and adjacent vertebrae. Exact causes of degeneration are unknown, but it is thought that natural aging, and both biological and genetic factors may play a significant role in the degenerative process. Conventional methods to alleviate low back pain include spinal fusion and artificial disc replacement. Traditional treatments through spinal fusion may eliminate pain yet do not restore disc function and lead to further degeneration of adjacent levels by altering disc biomechanics and natural kinematics. Recently, artificial IVD replacements have started to gain interest, with two IVD implants currently approved in the United States. Although these implants facilitate the preservation of motions and disc space height, they are unable to sustain compressive forces due to their lack of elasticity. In addition, the implants may produce wear debris that can cause osteolysis and other deleterious effects. As an alternative to these conventional approaches, tissue engineered IVD constructs offer the advantage of biointegration while preserving the essential attributes of natural motion and disc space restoration. There is a great need for the development of tissue engineered scaffolds that simulate the natural 3D morphology and microenvironment of the targeted tissue. Scaffolds should facilitate biological transport to satisfy nutrition and waste removal requirements within the IVD. The discrete tissue architectures of the nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) have posed great challenges to IVD tissue engineering. Current attempts have not been able to satisfy the biological functions and/or mechanical properties of native tissue. Therefore, these current scaffolds are far from satisfactory. This review highlights the

  4. Hydrodynamics in a Degenerate, Strongly Attractive Fermi Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John E.; Kinast, Joseph; Hemmer, Staci; Turlapov, Andrey; O'Hara, Ken; Gehm, Mike; Granade, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    In summary, we use all-optical methods with evaporative cooling near a Feshbach resonance to produce a strongly interacting degenerate Fermi gas. We observe hydrodynamic behavior in the expansion dynamics. At low temperatures, collisions may not explain the expansion dynamics. We observe hydrodynamics in the trapped gas. Our observations include collisionally-damped excitation spectra at high temperature which were not discussed above. In addition, we observe weakly damped breathing modes at low temperature. The observed temperature dependence of the damping time and hydrodynamic frequency are not consistent with collisional dynamics nor with collisionless mean field interactions. These observations constitute the first evidence for superfluid hydrodynamics in a Fermi gas.

  5. Theory of fidelity measure in degenerate four-wave mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochove, E.J.

    1983-01-01

    Phase-conjugate beam fidelity is studied in degenerate four-wave mixing with spatially varying pump beams. The analysis includes the effects of probe depletion, diffracting non-linear phase variation focussing, and finally that of losses. Relatively simple algebraic expressions are found for the phase conjugate reflectivity for the cases of collinear and near-collinear beam gemetries. It is found that by focussing the probe beam into the mixing medium, the fraction of energy in the phase conjugate beam which was transferred to other modes, may typically be reduced by one order of magnitude. (Author) [pt

  6. Genetics and molecular pathology of Stargardt-like macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasireddy, Vidyullatha; Wong, Paul; Ayyagari, Radha

    2010-05-01

    Stargardt-like macular degeneration (STGD3) is an early onset, autosomal dominant macular degeneration. STGD3 is characterized by a progressive pathology, the loss of central vision, atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium, and accumulation of lipofuscin, clinical features that are also characteristic of age-related macular degeneration. The onset of clinical symptoms in STGD3, however, is typically observed within the second or third decade of life (i.e., starting in the teenage years). The clinical profile at any given age among STGD3 patients can be variable suggesting that, although STGD3 is a single gene defect, other genetic or environmental factors may play a role in moderating the final disease phenotype. Genetic studies localized the STGD3 disease locus to a small region on the short arm of human chromosome 6, and application of a positional candidate gene approach identified protein truncating mutations in the elongation of very long chain fatty acids-4 gene (ELOVL4) in patients with this disease. The ELOVL4 gene encodes a protein homologous to the ELO group of proteins that participate in fatty acid elongation in yeast. Pathogenic mutations found in the ELOVL4 gene result in altered trafficking of the protein and behave with a dominant negative effect. Mice carrying an Elovl4 mutation developed photoreceptor degeneration and depletion of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA). ELOVL4 protein participates in the synthesis of fatty acids with chain length longer than 26 carbons. Studies on ELOVL4 indicate that VLCFA may be necessary for normal function of the retina, and the defective protein trafficking and/or altered VLCFA elongation underlies the pathology associated with STGD3. Determining the role of VLCFA in the retina and discerning the implications of abnormal trafficking of mutant ELOVL4 and depleted VLCFA content in the pathology of STGD3 will provide valuable insight in understanding the retinal structure, function, and pathology underlying STGD3

  7. Harnack's Inequality for Degenerate and Singular Parabolic Equations

    CERN Document Server

    DiBenedetto, Emmanuele; Vespri, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Degenerate and singular parabolic equations have been the subject of extensive research for the last 25 years. Despite important achievements, the issue of the Harnack inequality for non-negative solutions to these equations, both of p-Laplacian and porous medium type, while raised by several authors, has remained basically open. Recently considerable progress has been made on this issue, to the point that, except for the singular sub-critical range, both for the p-laplacian and the porous medium equations, the theory is reasonably complete. It seemed therefore timely to trace a comprehensive

  8. Degenerate quantum codes and the quantum Hamming bound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarvepalli, Pradeep; Klappenecker, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The parameters of a nondegenerate quantum code must obey the Hamming bound. An important open problem in quantum coding theory is whether the parameters of a degenerate quantum code can violate this bound for nondegenerate quantum codes. In this article we show that Calderbank-Shor-Steane (CSS) codes, over a prime power alphabet q≥5, cannot beat the quantum Hamming bound. We prove a quantum version of the Griesmer bound for the CSS codes, which allows us to strengthen the Rains' bound that an [[n,k,d

  9. Phase transition in the non-degenerate Hubbard Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaves, C.M.; Lederer, P.; Gomes, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    Phase transition in the isotropic non-degenerate Hubbard Hamiltonian within the renormalization group techniques, using the epsilon = 4 - d expansion to first order in epsilon, is studied. The functional obtained from the Hubbard Hamiltonian displays full rotation symmetry and describes two coupled fields: a vector spin field, with n components and a non-soft scalar charge field. The possibility of tricritical behavior then emerges. The effects of simple constraints imposed on the charge field is considered. The relevance of the coupling between the fields in producing Fisher renormalization of the critical exponents is discussed. The possible singularities introduced in the charge-charge correlation function by the coupling are also discussed

  10. Progressive neuronal degeneration of childhood with liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, B.E.; Boyd, S.G.; Egger, J.; Harding, B.N.

    1987-01-01

    The clinical, electrophysiological and neuroradiological features of thirteen patients suffering from progressive neuronal degeneration of childhood with liver failure are presented. The disease commonly presents very early in life with progressive mental retardation, followed by intractable epilepsy, and should be suspected clinically especially if there is a family history of similar disorder in a sibling. On computed tomography there are low density regions, particularly in the occipital and posterior temporal lobes, involving both cortex and white matter, combined with or followed by progressive atrophy. Typical EEG findings may be confirmatory. (orig.)

  11. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Advances in Management and Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Yonekawa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in older populations in industrialized nations. AMD is a late-onset deterioration of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium in the central retina caused by various environmental and genetic factors. Great strides in our understanding of AMD pathogenesis have been made in the past several decades, which have translated into revolutionary therapeutic agents in recent years. In this review, we describe the clinical and pathologic features of AMD and present an overview of current diagnosis and treatment strategies.

  12. Figure ground discrimination in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thi Ha Chau; Guyader, Nathalie; Guerin, Anne; Despretz, Pascal; Boucart, Muriel

    2011-03-01

    To investigate impairment in discriminating a figure from its background and to study its relation to visual acuity and lesion size in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Seventeen patients with neovascular AMD and visual acuity Figure/ground segregation is impaired in patients with AMD. A white space surrounding an object is sufficient to improve the object's detection and to facilitate figure/ground segregation. These results may have practical applications to the rehabilitation of the environment in patients with AMD.

  13. Optomechanical entanglement via non-degenerate parametric interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Rizwan; Qamar, Shahid

    2017-01-01

    We present a scheme for the optomechanical entanglement between a micro-mechanical mirror and the field inside a bimodal cavity system using a non-degenerate optical parametric amplifier (NOPA). Our results show that the introduction of NOPA makes the entanglement stronger or more robust against the mean number of average thermal phonons and cavity decay. Interestingly, macroscopic entanglement depends upon the choice of the phase associated with classical field driving NOPA. We also consider the effects of input laser power on optomechanical entanglement. (paper)

  14. Age related macular degeneration - modern diagnostic and therapeutic preventive approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gogelová, Blanka

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disease associated with aging that gradually destroys sharp, central vision. Central vision is needed for seeing objects clearly and for common daily tasks such as reading and driving. AMD affects the macula, the part of the eye that alows seeing of fine details. AMD occurs in two form: dry and wet. In dry AMD, the light sensitive cells in the macula slowly break down. As fewer cells in the macula are able to function, people will see details less c...

  15. New developments in age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndon da Cruz

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO estimates that over 3 million people (9% of global blindness are blinded by age-related macular degeneration (AMD. AMD affects people over the age of 55. There are two main types of AMD, dry and wet. In dry AMD, patients slowly lose vision through progressive atrophy of the macular tissue. Wet, or exudative, AMD, is associated with new blood vessels called subretinal neovascular membranes (or SRNVM and affected patients lose vision more rapidly due to fluid leakage and haemorrhage at the macula.

  16. Boson mapping in systems with non-degenerate shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Hitoshi; Arima, Akito

    1988-01-01

    A new boson mapping, which has some aspects similar to the OAI mapping and can be applied also to a non-degenerate system, is presented in order to give a microscopic foundation of the interacting boson model. Numerical calculations of the E2 operator in a two-j system show that this mapping gives a good approximation for the seniority-changing part, and that it stays at least within the accuracy of the OAI mapping, even for the seniority-conserving part. (orig.)

  17. Degeneration in dysplastic hips. A computer tomography study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Rømer, Lone; Søballe, Kjeld

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hip dysplasia is considered pre-osteoarthritic, causing degeneration in young individuals. OBJECTIVE: To determine the pattern of degenerative change in moderate to severely dysplastic hips in young patients. DESIGN AND PATIENTS: One hundred and ninety-three consecutively......-referred younger patients with hip pain believed to be caused by hip dysplasia constituted the study cohort. The average age was 35.5 years (range, 15-61 years). They were examined by close-cut transverse pelvic and knee computed tomography and antero-posterior radiographs (CT). We identified 197 hips...

  18. Uterine malignant degeneration after low-dose endometrial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikkanen, V.; Salmi, T.; Groenroos, M.

    1980-01-01

    The effectiveness of low-dose intrauterine irradiation for benign diseases and its possible carcinogenic effect on the uterus was studied in 190 patients who were treated during the years 1952-1974. The indications for irradiation were premenopausal functional bleeding, leukemia, hemophilia, fibroids, endometriosis or other benign reason. Radiation was also performed on patients with severe neurologic diseases that contraindicated surgery and on some mentally retarded patients whose restlessness and epileptic seizures were aggravated premenstrually and during menstruation. The mean follow-up period was 15 years. Uterine bleeding recurred in 21 percent of the patients. No cases of uterine malignant degeneration were found. (author)

  19. Optomechanical entanglement via non-degenerate parametric interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rizwan; Qamar, Shahid

    2017-10-01

    We present a scheme for the optomechanical entanglement between a micro-mechanical mirror and the field inside a bimodal cavity system using a non-degenerate optical parametric amplifier (NOPA). Our results show that the introduction of NOPA makes the entanglement stronger or more robust against the mean number of average thermal phonons and cavity decay. Interestingly, macroscopic entanglement depends upon the choice of the phase associated with classical field driving NOPA. We also consider the effects of input laser power on optomechanical entanglement.

  20. Age-related macular degeneration: epidemiology and optimal treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common macular disease affecting elderly people in the Western world. It is characterised by the appearance of drusen in the macula, accompanied by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) or geographic atrophy. The disease is more common in Caucasian....... Smoking is probably also a risk factor. Preventive strategies using macular laser photocoagulation are under investigation, but their efficacy in preventing visual loss is as yet unproven. There is no treatment with proven efficacy for geographic atrophy. Optimal treatment for exudative AMD requires...

  1. Research status of conbercept treating age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Yan He

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration(AMDis one of the major reasons of blindness among the elderly in the developed countries. As AMD patients are increasing year by year, AMD has become one of the important topics of ophthalmic research to prevent blindness. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood, but many studies have shown that vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGFplays an important role in the pathogenesis. With the development and application of anti-VEGF drugs, there are a variety of drugs applied to the disease. This article introduces conbercept for the treatment of AMD.

  2. Brain metabolic correlates of dopaminergic degeneration in de novo idiopathic Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berti, Valentina; Polito, Cristina; Vanzi, Eleonora; Cristofaro, Maria Teresa de; Pellicano, Giannantonio; Mungai, Francesco; Formiconi, Andreas Robert; Pupi, Alberto; Ramat, Silvia; Marini, Paolo; Sorbi, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reciprocal relationships between motor impairment, dopaminergic dysfunction, and cerebral metabolism (rCMRglc) in de novo Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Twenty-six de novo untreated PD patients were scanned with 123 I-FP-CIT SPECT and 18 F-FDG PET. The dopaminergic impairment was measured with putaminal 123 I-FP-CIT binding potential (BP), estimated with two different techniques: an iterative reconstruction algorithm (BP OSEM ) and the least-squares (LS) method (BP LS ). Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) multiple regression analyses were performed to determine the specific brain regions in which UPDRS III scores and putaminal BP values correlated with rCMRglc. The SPM results showed a negative correlation between UPDRS III and rCMRglc in premotor cortex, and a positive correlation between BP OSEM and rCMRglc in premotor and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, not surviving at multiple comparison correction. Instead, there was a positive significant correlation between putaminal BP LS and rCMRglc in premotor, dorsolateral prefrontal, anterior prefrontal, and orbitofrontal cortex (p LS is an efficient parameter for exploring the correlations between PD severity and rCMRglc cortical changes. The correlation between dopaminergic degeneration and rCMRglc in several prefrontal regions likely represents the cortical functional correlate of the dysfunction in the motor basal ganglia-cortical circuit in PD. This finding suggests focusing on the metabolic course of these areas to follow PD progression and to analyze treatment effects. (orig.)

  3. The relationship between vascular endothelial dysfunction and treatment frequency in neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda-Consolvo, Tomoko; Hayashi, Atsushi; Ozaki, Mayumi; Nakamura, Tomoko; Yagou, Takaaki; Abe, Shinya

    2017-07-01

    To assess the correlation between endothelial dysfunction and frequency of antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). We examined 64 consecutive patients with nAMD who were evaluated for endothelial function by use of peripheral arterial tonometry (EndoPAT 2000; Itamar Medical, Caesarea, Israel) at Toyama University Hospital from January 2015. We tallied the number of anti-VEGF treatments between January 2014 and December 2015 and determined the correlation between the number of anti-VEGF injections and endothelial function expressed as the reactive hyperemia index (RHI). Multiple regression analysis was also performed to identify the independent predictors of a larger number of injections. The mean number of anti-VEGF injections was 8.2 ± 3.3. The mean lnRHI was 0.47 ± 0.17. The lnRHI correlated with the number of anti-VEGF injections (r = -0.56; P = 0.030). The multiple regression analysis revealed that endothelial function, neovascular subtypes, and treatment regimens were associated with the number of injections. Endothelial dysfunction may affect the efficacy of anti-VEGF therapy. Neovascular subtypes may also predict a larger number of injections.

  4. The effects of wallerian degeneration of the optic radiations demonstrated by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoiardo, M.; Grisoli, M.; Forester, M.; D' Incerti, L.; Farina, L. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Ist. Nazionale Neurologico C. Besta, Milan (Italy)); Pareyson, D. (Dept. of Neurology, Ist. Nazionale Neurologico C. Besta, Milan (Italy))

    1992-08-01

    The effects of wallerian degeneration can be demonstrated by MRI as abnormal signal along the course of the degenerate fibres; they have previously been reported in the corticospinal tract. We report two cases of wallerian degeneration of the right optic radiations due to lesions of the right lateral geniculate body. The anatomy and the MRI visibility of the normal optic radiations are briefly discussed. (orig.).

  5. The effects of wallerian degeneration of the optic radiations demonstrated by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoiardo, M.; Grisoli, M.; Forester, M.; D'Incerti, L.; Farina, L.; Pareyson, D.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of wallerian degeneration can be demonstrated by MRI as abnormal signal along the course of the degenerate fibres; they have previously been reported in the corticospinal tract. We report two cases of wallerian degeneration of the right optic radiations due to lesions of the right lateral geniculate body. The anatomy and the MRI visibility of the normal optic radiations are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  6. Multiple homicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, A R

    1989-09-01

    A study of multiple homicides or multiple deaths involving a solitary incident of violence by another individual was performed on the case files of the Office of the Medical Examiner of Metropolitan Dade County in Miami, Florida, during 1983-1987. A total of 107 multiple homicides were studied: 88 double, 17 triple, one quadruple, and one quintuple. The 236 victims were analyzed regarding age, race, sex, cause of death, toxicologic data, perpetrator, locale of the incident, and reason for the incident. This article compares this type of slaying with other types of homicide including those perpetrated by serial killers. Suggestions for future research in this field are offered.

  7. Aag-initiated base excision repair drives alkylation-induced retinal degeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meira, Lisiane B; Moroski-Erkul, Catherine A; Green, Stephanie L; Calvo, Jennifer A; Bronson, Roderick T; Shah, Dharini; Samson, Leona D

    2009-01-20

    Vision loss affects >3 million Americans and many more people worldwide. Although predisposing genes have been identified their link to known environmental factors is unclear. In wild-type animals DNA alkylating agents induce photoreceptor apoptosis and severe retinal degeneration. Alkylation-induced retinal degeneration is totally suppressed in the absence of the DNA repair protein alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (Aag) in both differentiating and postmitotic retinas. Moreover, transgenic expression of Aag activity restores the alkylation sensitivity of photoreceptors in Aag null animals. Aag heterozygotes display an intermediate level of retinal degeneration, demonstrating haploinsufficiency and underscoring that Aag expression confers a dominant retinal degeneration phenotype.

  8. Subretinally transplanted embryonic stem cells rescue photoreceptor cells from degeneration in the RCS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraermeyer, U; Thumann, G; Luther, T; Kociok, N; Armhold, S; Kruttwig, K; Andressen, C; Addicks, K; Bartz-Schmidt, K U

    2001-01-01

    The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat is an animal model for retinal degeneration such as the age-related macular degeneration. The RCS rat undergoes a progressive retinal degeneration during the early postnatal period. A potential treatment to prevent this retinal degeneration is the transplantation into the subretinal space of cells that would replace functions of the degenerating retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells or may form neurotrophic factors. In this study we have investigated the potential of subretinally transplanted embryonic stem cells to prevent the genetically determined photoreceptor cell degeneration in the RCS rat. Embryonic stem cells from the inner cell mass of the mouse blastocyst were allowed to differentiate to neural precursor cells in vitro and were then transplanted into the subretinal space of 20-day-old RCS rats. Transplanted and sham-operated rats were sacrificed 2 months following cell transplantation. The eyes were enucleated and photoreceptor degeneration was quantified by analyzing and determining the thickness of the outer nuclear layer by light and electron microscopy. In the eyes transplanted with embryonic cells up to 8 rows of photoreceptor cell nuclei were observed, whereas in nontreated control eyes the outer nuclear layer had degenerated completely. Transplantation of embryonic stem cells appears to delay photoreceptor cell degeneration in RCS rats.

  9. Some Remarks on Space-Time Decompositions, and Degenerate Metrics, in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar

    Space-time decomposition of the Hilbert-Palatini action, written in a form which admits degenerate metrics, is considered. Simple numerology shows why D = 3 and 4 are singled out as admitting a simple phase space. The canonical structure of the degenerate sector turns out to be awkward. However, the real degenerate metrics obtained as solutions are the same as those that occur in Ashtekar's formulation of complex general relativity. An exact solution of Ashtekar's equations, with degenerate metric, shows that the manifestly four-dimensional form of the action, and its 3 + 1 form, are not quite equivalent.

  10. MR imaging of patellar cartilage degeneration at 0.02 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskinen, S.K.; Komu, M.; Aho, H.J.; Kormano, M.; Turku University Hospital

    1991-01-01

    MR imaging with a 0.02 T resistive magnet was used to establish the correlation between the histologic grading of patellar cartilage degeneration and fat water separation images or T1- and T2-relaxation times. We examined 23 cadaveric patellae. There was a positive correlation between histologically graded cartilage degeneration and T1-relaxation time. Patellar cartilage was well differentiated from surrounding structures on chemical shift water proton images, and an evaluation of cartilage degeneration was possible. No correlation was found between cartilage degeneration damage and T2-relaxation time. Chemical shift imaging at 0.02 T is easy to perform and gives further information of cartilage disorders. (orig.)

  11. Relationship of Tear Size and Location to Fatty Degeneration of the Rotator Cuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. Mike; Dahiya, Nirvikar; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Keener, Jay D.; Galatz, Leesa M.; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Background: Fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles may have detrimental effects on both anatomical and functional outcomes following shoulder surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between tear geometry and muscle fatty degeneration in shoulders with a deficient rotator cuff. Methods: Ultrasonograms of both shoulders of 262 patients were reviewed to assess the type of rotator cuff tear and fatty degeneration in the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles. The 251 shoulders with a full-thickness tear underwent further evaluation for tear size and location. The relationship of tear size and location to fatty degeneration of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles was investigated with use of statistical comparisons and regression models. Results: Fatty degeneration was found almost exclusively in shoulders with a full-thickness rotator cuff tear. Of the 251 shoulders with a full-thickness tear, eighty-seven (34.7%) had fatty degeneration in either the supraspinatus or infraspinatus, or both. Eighty-two (32.7%) of the 251 full-thickness tears had a distance of 0 mm between the biceps tendon and anterior margin of the tear. Ninety percent of the full-thickness tears with fatty degeneration in both muscles had a distance of 0 mm posterior from the biceps, whereas only 9% of those without fatty degeneration had a distance of 0 mm. Tears with fatty degeneration had significantly greater width and length than those without fatty degeneration (p Tears with fatty degeneration had a significantly shorter distance posterior from the biceps than those without fatty degeneration (p tear width and length were found to be the most important predictors for infraspinatus fatty degeneration. Conclusions: Fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles is closely associated with tear size and location. The finding of this study suggests that the integrity of the anterior supraspinatus tendon is important to the development of fatty

  12. Three dimensional electrostatic solitary waves in a dense magnetoplasma with relativistically degenerate electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ata-ur-Rahman,; Qamar, A. [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Masood, W. [National Centre for Physics, QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); COMSATS, Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Eliasson, B. [Physics Department, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, small but finite amplitude electrostatic solitary waves in a relativistic degenerate magnetoplasma, consisting of relativistically degenerate electrons and non-degenerate cold ions, are investigated. The Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived employing the reductive perturbation technique and its solitary wave solution is analyzed. It is shown that only compressive electrostatic solitary structures can propagate in such a degenerate plasma system. The effects of plasma number density, ion cyclotron frequency, and direction cosines on the profiles of ion acoustic solitary waves are investigated and discussed at length. The relevance of the present investigation vis-a-vis pulsating white dwarfs is also pointed out.

  13. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of degeneration of cervical intervertebral discs and facet joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walraevens, Joris; Liu, Baoge; Meersschaert, Joke; Demaerel, Philippe; Delye, Hans; Depreitere, Bart; Vander Sloten, Jos; Goffin, Jan

    2009-03-01

    Degeneration of intervertebral discs and facet joints is one of the most frequently encountered spinal disorders. In order to describe and quantify degeneration and evaluate a possible relationship between degeneration and biomechanical parameters, e.g., the intervertebral range of motion and intradiscal pressure, a scoring system for degeneration is mandatory. However, few scoring systems for the assessment of degeneration of the cervical spine exist. Therefore, two separate objective scoring systems to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the degree of cervical intervertebral disc and facet joint degeneration were developed and validated. The scoring system for cervical disc degeneration consists of three variables which are individually scored on neutral lateral radiographs: "height loss" (0-4 points), "anterior osteophytes" (0-3 points) and "endplate sclerosis" (0-2 points). The scoring system for facet joint degeneration consists of four variables which are individually scored on neutral computed tomography scans: "hypertrophy" (0-2 points), "osteophytes" (0-1 point), "irregularity" on the articular surface (0-1 point) and "joint space narrowing" (0-1 point). Each variable contributes with varying importance to the overall degeneration score (max 9 points for the scoring system of cervical disc degeneration and max 5 points for facet joint degeneration). Degeneration of 20 discs and facet joints of 20 patients was blindly assessed by four raters: two neurosurgeons (one senior and one junior) and two radiologists (one senior and one junior), firstly based on first subjective impression and secondly using the scoring systems. Measurement errors and inter- and intra-rater agreement were determined. The measurement error of the scoring system for cervical disc degeneration was 11.1 versus 17.9% of the subjective impression results. This scoring system showed excellent intra-rater agreement (ICC = 0.86, 0.75-0.93) and excellent inter-rater agreement (ICC = 0

  14. The brain basis of musicophilia: evidence from frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip David Fletcher

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Musicophilia, or abnormal craving for music, is a poorly understood phenomenon that has been associated in particular with focal degeneration of the temporal lobes. Here we addressed the brain basis of musicophilia using voxel-based morphometry (VBM on MR volumetric brain images in a retrospectively ascertained cohort of patients meeting clinical consensus criteria for frontotemporal lobar degeneration: of 37 cases ascertained, 12 had musicophilia and 25 did not exhibit the phenomenon. The syndrome of semantic dementia was relatively over-represented among the musicophilic subgroup. A VBM analysis revealed significantly increased regional grey matter volume in left posterior hippocampus in the musicophilic subgroup relative to the non-musicophilic group (p<0.05 corrected for regional comparisons; at a relaxed significance threshold (P<0.001 uncorrected across the brain volume musicophilia was associated with additional relative sparing of regional grey matter in other temporal lobe and prefrontal areas and atrophy of grey matter in posterior parietal and orbitofrontal areas. The present findings suggest a candidate brain substrate for musicophilia as a signature of distributed network damage that may reflect a shift of hedonic processing toward more abstract (non-social stimuli, with some specificity for particular neurodegenerative pathologies.

  15. Exploring the nearly degenerate stop region with sbottom decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Haipeng [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E. California Blvd, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States); Gu, Jiayin [Center for Future High Energy Physics, Institute of High Energy Physics,19B YuquanLu, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); DESY,Notkestraße 85, Hamburg, D-22607 (Germany); Wang, Lian-Tao [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago,5640 S Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL, 60637 (United States); Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago,5640 S Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL, 60637 (United States)

    2017-04-13

    A light stop with mass almost degenerate with the lightest neutralino has important connections with both naturalness and dark matter relic abundance. This region is also very hard to probe at colliders. In this paper, we demonstrate the potential of searching for such stop particles at the LHC from sbottom decays, focusing on two channels with final states 2ℓ+E{sub T}{sup miss} and 1b1ℓ+E{sub T}{sup miss}. We found that, if the lightest sbottom has mass around or below 1 TeV and has a significant branching ratio to decay to stop and W (b̃→t̃ W), a stop almost degenerate with neutralino can be excluded up to about 500–600 GeV at the 13 TeV LHC with 300 fb{sup −1} data. The searches we propose are complementary to other SUSY searches at the LHC and could have the best sensitivity to the stop-bino coannihilation region. Since they involve final states which have already been used in LHC searches, a reinterpretation of the search results already has sensitivity. Further optimization could deliver the full potential of these channels.

  16. Exploring the nearly degenerate stop region with sbottom decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Haipeng [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States). Walter Burke Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Gu, Jiayin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Wang, Lian-Tao [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.; Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Kavli Inst. for Cosmological Physics

    2016-11-15

    A light stop with mass almost degenerate with the lightest neutralino has important connections with both naturalness and dark matter relic abundance. This region is also very hard to probe at colliders. In this paper, we demonstrate the potential of searching for such stop particles at the LHC from sbottom decays, focusing on two channels with final states 2l+E{sup miss}{sub T} and 1b1l+E{sup miss}{sub T}. We found that, if the lightest sbottom has mass around or below 1 TeV and has a significant branching ratio to decay to stop and W (b→tW), a stop almost degenerate with neutralino can be excluded up to about 500-600 GeV at the 13 TeV LHC with 300 fb{sup -1} data. The searches we propose are complementary to other SUSY searches at the LHC and could have the best sensitivity to the stop-bino coannihilation region. Since they involve final states which have already been used in LHC searches, a reinterpretation of the search results already has sensitivity. Further optimization could deliver the full potential of these channels.

  17. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in the Aged, Trauma or Degeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs) are generally regarded to be a traumatic lesion. It was regarded as a stroke in 17th century, an inflammatory disease in 19th century. From 20th century, it became a traumatic lesion. CSH frequently occur after a trauma, however, it cannot occur when there is no enough subdural space even after a severe head injury. CSH may occur without trauma, when there is sufficient subdural space. The author tried to investigate trends in the causation of CSH. By a review of literature, the author suggested a different view on the causation of CSH. CSH usually originated from either a subdural hygroma or an acute subdural hematoma. Development of CSH starts from the separation of the dural border cell (DBC) layer, which induces proliferation of DBCs with production of neomembrane. Capillaries will follow along the neomembrane. Hemorrhage would occur into the subdural fluid either by tearing of bridge veins or repeated microhemorrhage from the neomembrane. That is the mechanism of hematoma enlargement. Trauma or bleeding tendency may precipitate development of CSH, however, it cannot lead CSH, if there is no sufficient subdural space. The key determinant for development of CSH is a sufficient subdural space, in other words, brain atrophy. The most common and universal cause of brain atrophy is the aging. Modifying Virchow's description, CSH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by degeneration of the brain. Now, it is reasonable that degeneration of brain might play pivotal role in development of CSH in the aged persons.

  18. Association between intervertebral disc degeneration and the Oswestry Disability Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middendorp, Marcus; Vogl, Thomas J; Kollias, Konstantinos; Kafchitsas, Konstantinos; Khan, M Fawad; Maataoui, Adel

    2017-01-01

    Low back pain and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) are common findings. Valid data on correlation between clinical pain scores and grades of IDD are not available. To investigate the correlation of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) at lumbar levels L4/5 and L5/S1 and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). The lumbar discs L4/5 and L5/S1 of 591 patients were evaluated according to the 5-point (Grade I to Grade V) grading system as published by Pfirrmann et al. Functional status was assessed using the Oswestry Disability Index. Spearman's coefficient of rank correlation was used for statistical analysis (p disability (ODI score between 21 and 40%). There was a weak, but statistically significant positive correlation between IDD and ODI for both evaluated lumbar levels. Increased lumbar IDD in MRI goes along with an increased ODI. Thus, MRI is a strong indicator of a patient's clinical appearance. However, low back pain cannot be explained by imaging alone. Clinical correlation is imperative for an adequate diagnostic advance in patients with low back pain.

  19. Quasi-degenerate perturbation theory using matrix product states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Sandeep; Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Alavi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we generalize the recently proposed matrix product state perturbation theory (MPSPT) for calculating energies of excited states using quasi-degenerate (QD) perturbation theory. Our formulation uses the Kirtman-Certain-Hirschfelder canonical Van Vleck perturbation theory, which gives Hermitian effective Hamiltonians at each order, and also allows one to make use of Wigner’s 2n + 1 rule. Further, our formulation satisfies Granovsky’s requirement of model space invariance which is important for obtaining smooth potential energy curves. Thus, when we use MPSPT with the Dyall Hamiltonian, we obtain a model space invariant version of quasi-degenerate n-electron valence state perturbation theory (NEVPT), a property that the usual formulation of QD-NEVPT2 based on a multipartitioning technique lacked. We use our method on the benchmark problems of bond breaking of LiF which shows ionic to covalent curve crossing and the twist around the double bond of ethylene where significant valence-Rydberg mixing occurs in the excited states. In accordance with our previous work, we find that multi-reference linearized coupled cluster theory is more accurate than other multi-reference theories of similar cost

  20. Quasi-degenerate perturbation theory using matrix product states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Sandeep, E-mail: sanshar@gmail.com; Jeanmairet, Guillaume [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstraße 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Alavi, Ali, E-mail: a.alavi@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstraße 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-21

    In this work, we generalize the recently proposed matrix product state perturbation theory (MPSPT) for calculating energies of excited states using quasi-degenerate (QD) perturbation theory. Our formulation uses the Kirtman-Certain-Hirschfelder canonical Van Vleck perturbation theory, which gives Hermitian effective Hamiltonians at each order, and also allows one to make use of Wigner’s 2n + 1 rule. Further, our formulation satisfies Granovsky’s requirement of model space invariance which is important for obtaining smooth potential energy curves. Thus, when we use MPSPT with the Dyall Hamiltonian, we obtain a model space invariant version of quasi-degenerate n-electron valence state perturbation theory (NEVPT), a property that the usual formulation of QD-NEVPT2 based on a multipartitioning technique lacked. We use our method on the benchmark problems of bond breaking of LiF which shows ionic to covalent curve crossing and the twist around the double bond of ethylene where significant valence-Rydberg mixing occurs in the excited states. In accordance with our previous work, we find that multi-reference linearized coupled cluster theory is more accurate than other multi-reference theories of similar cost.

  1. Quasi-degenerate perturbation theory using matrix product states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sandeep; Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Alavi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we generalize the recently proposed matrix product state perturbation theory (MPSPT) for calculating energies of excited states using quasi-degenerate (QD) perturbation theory. Our formulation uses the Kirtman-Certain-Hirschfelder canonical Van Vleck perturbation theory, which gives Hermitian effective Hamiltonians at each order, and also allows one to make use of Wigner's 2n + 1 rule. Further, our formulation satisfies Granovsky's requirement of model space invariance which is important for obtaining smooth potential energy curves. Thus, when we use MPSPT with the Dyall Hamiltonian, we obtain a model space invariant version of quasi-degenerate n-electron valence state perturbation theory (NEVPT), a property that the usual formulation of QD-NEVPT2 based on a multipartitioning technique lacked. We use our method on the benchmark problems of bond breaking of LiF which shows ionic to covalent curve crossing and the twist around the double bond of ethylene where significant valence-Rydberg mixing occurs in the excited states. In accordance with our previous work, we find that multi-reference linearized coupled cluster theory is more accurate than other multi-reference theories of similar cost.

  2. Encounters between degenerate stars and extrasolar comet clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineault, S.; Poisson, E.

    1989-01-01

    Under the assumption that the presence of comet clouds around otherwise normal stars is a common occurrence in the Galaxy, the observational consequences of random penetration encounters between the general Galactic population of degenerate stars and these comet clouds is considered. The only case considered is where the compact stars is a single star. For this scenario, encounters involving neutron stars (NSs) result in impact rates 1000-10,000 times slower than in the model of Tremaine and Zytkow (1986). The rate for white dwarfs (WDs) is larger than the one for NSs by a factor of about 30 times the ratio of the degenerate star number densities. The mean impact rate is significantly increased if the number of comets in a cloud is nearly independent of the mass of the central star. It is concluded that some of the observed gamma-ray bursts may be caused by accretion of comets onto NSs and that this scenario, but with a WD as the accretor, probably contributes to the optical flash background rate. 38 refs

  3. Present and future treatment possibilities in macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, E.; Wegner, A.; Pfeiler, T.; Mertz, M.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To discuss present and future treatment possibilities in different types of choroidal neovascularisation. Methods: Presented are angiographic- and OCT-findings in patients with macular degeneration of different origin. Choroidal neovascularisations, which are not likely to respond positively to established procedures like thermal laser coagulation or photodynamic therapy will be discussed. Results and conclusions: Present study-guidelines and new methods of pharmacological intervention are analysed in different patterns of macular degeneration. Conventional laser coagulation in the treatment of classic, extrafoveal CNV and photodynamic therapy of predominantly classic subfoveal CNV still represent a gold standard. There are new recommendations, loosening the tight criteria of the TAP and VIP-guidelines, which cover, for instance, wider visual acuity ranges and the treatment of juxtafoveally located choroidal neovascularisations. Positive findings in literature confirm the role of PDT in pathologic myopia and other non-AMD CNV. Studies about surgical procedures, like macula- or RPE-translocation after surgical removal or thermal laser destruction of the CNV are in progress and are expected to show promising results. Phase II/III studies will soon point out the effect of anti-VEGF agents. The application of intravitreal (triamcinolone) or peribulbar (anecortave acetat) steroids could be useful. The combination with surgical or laser techniques could bring further benefit to the patient.

  4. Value-based medicine and interventions for macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Melissa M; Brown, Gary C; Brown, Heidi

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this article is to review the patient value conferred by interventions for neovascular macular degeneration. Value-based medicine is the practice of medicine based upon the patient value (improvement in quality of life and length of life) conferred by an intervention. For ophthalmologic interventions, in which length-of-life is generally unaffected, the value gain is equivalent to the improvement in quality of life. Photodynamic therapy delivers a value gain (improvement in quality of life) of 8.1% for the average person with classic subfoveal choroidal neovascularization, while laser photocoagulation for the same entity confers a 4.4% improvement in quality of life. Preliminary data suggest the value gain for the treatment of occult/minimally classic choroidal neovascularization with ranibizumab is greater than 15%. The average value gain for statins for the treatment of hyperlipidemia is 3.9%, while that for the use of biphosphonates for the treatment of osteoporosis is 1.1% and that for drugs to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia is 1-2%. Interventions, especially ranibizumab therapy, for neovascular macular degeneration appear to deliver an extraordinary degree of value compared with many other interventions across healthcare.

  5. Testing the single degenerate channel for supernova Ia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Steven

    2014-10-01

    The progenitors of supernova Ia are close binaries containing white dwarfs. Of crucial importance to the evolution of these systems is how much material the white dwarf can stably accrete and hence grow in mass. This occurs during a short-lived intense phase of mass transfer known as the super soft source (SSS) phase. The short duration of this phase and large extinction to soft X-rays means that only a handful are known in our Galaxy. Far more can be learned from the underlying SSS progenitor population of close white dwarf plus FGK type binaries. Unfortunately, these systems are hard to find since the main-sequence stars completely outshine the white dwarfs at optical wavelengths. Because of this, there are currently no known close white dwarf binaries with F, G or early K type companions, making it impossible to determine the contribution of the single degenerate channel towards supernova Ia. Using the GALEX and RAVE surveys we have now identified the first large sample of FGK stars with UV excesses, a fraction of which are these illusive, close systems. Following an intense ground based spectroscopic investigation of these systems, we have identified 5 definite close binaries, with periods of less than a few days. Here we apply for COS spectroscopic observations to measure the mass and temperature of the white dwarfs in order to determine the future evolution of these systems. This will provide a crucial test for the single degenerate channel towards supernova Ia.

  6. Correlation between T2 relaxation time and intervertebral disk degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takashima, Hiroyuki; Takebayashi, Tsuneo; Yoshimoto, Mitsunori; Terashima, Yoshinori; Tsuda, Hajime; Ida, Kazunori; Yamashita, Toshihiko [Sapporo Medical University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    Magnetic resonance T2 mapping allows for the quantification of water and proteoglycan content within tissues and can be used to detect early cartilage abnormalities as well as to track the response to therapy. The goal of the present study was to use T2 mapping to quantify intervertebral disk water content according to the Pfirrmann classification. This study involved 60 subjects who underwent lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (a total of 300 lumbar disks). The degree of disk degeneration was assessed in the midsagittal section on T2-weighted images according to the Pfirrmann classification (grades I to V). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed among grades to determine the cut-off values. In the nucleus pulposus, T2 values tended to decrease with increasing grade, and there was a significant difference in T2 values between each grade from grades I to IV. However, there was no significant difference in T2 values in the anterior or posterior annulus fibrosus. T2 values according to disk degeneration level classification were as follows: grade I (>116.8 ms), grade II (92.7-116.7 ms), grade III (72.1-92.6 ms), grade IV (<72.0 ms). T2 values decreased with increasing Pfirrmann classification grade in the nucleus pulposus, likely reflecting a decrease in proteoglycan and water content. Thus, T2 value-based measurements of intervertebral disk water content may be useful for future clinical research on degenerative disk diseases. (orig.)

  7. Molecular pharmacodynamics of emixustat in protection against retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianye; Kiser, Philip D; Badiee, Mohsen; Palczewska, Grazyna; Dong, Zhiqian; Golczak, Marcin; Tochtrop, Gregory P; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-07-01

    Emixustat is a visual cycle modulator that has entered clinical trials as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This molecule has been proposed to inhibit the visual cycle isomerase RPE65, thereby slowing regeneration of 11-cis-retinal and reducing production of retinaldehyde condensation byproducts that may be involved in AMD pathology. Previously, we reported that all-trans-retinal (atRAL) is directly cytotoxic and that certain primary amine compounds that transiently sequester atRAL via Schiff base formation ameliorate retinal degeneration. Here, we have shown that emixustat stereoselectively inhibits RPE65 by direct active site binding. However, we detected the presence of emixustat-atRAL Schiff base conjugates, indicating that emixustat also acts as a retinal scavenger, which may contribute to its therapeutic effects. Using agents that lack either RPE65 inhibitory activity or the capacity to sequester atRAL, we assessed the relative importance of these 2 modes of action in protection against retinal phototoxicity in mice. The atRAL sequestrant QEA-B-001-NH2 conferred protection against phototoxicity without inhibiting RPE65, whereas an emixustat derivative incapable of atRAL sequestration was minimally protective, despite direct inhibition of RPE65. These data indicate that atRAL sequestration is an essential mechanism underlying the protective effects of emixustat and related compounds against retinal phototoxicity. Moreover, atRAL sequestration should be considered in the design of next-generation visual cycle modulators.

  8. Radiation therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Petrarca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Robert Petrarca, Timothy L JacksonDepartment of Ophthalmology, King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UKAbstract: Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF therapies represent the standard of care for most patients presenting with neovascular (wet age-related macular degeneration (neovascular AMD. Anti-VEGF drugs require repeated injections and impose a considerable burden of care, and not all patients respond. Radiation targets the proliferating cells that cause neovascular AMD, including fibroblastic, inflammatory, and endothelial cells. Two new neovascular AMD radiation treatments are being investigated: epimacular brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery. Epimacular brachytherapy uses beta radiation, delivered to the lesion via a pars plana vitrectomy. Stereotactic radiosurgery uses low voltage X-rays in overlapping beams, directed onto the lesion. Feasibility data for epimacular brachytherapy show a greatly reduced need for anti-VEGF therapy, with a mean vision gain of 8.9 ETDRS letters at 12 months. Pivotal trials are underway (MERLOT, CABERNET. Preliminary stereotactic radiosurgery data suggest a mean vision gain of 8 to 10 ETDRS letters at 12 months. A large randomized sham controlled stereotactic radiosurgery feasibility study is underway (CLH002, with pivotal trials to follow. While it is too early to conclude on the safety and efficacy of epimacular brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, preliminary results are positive, and these suggest that radiation offers a more durable therapeutic effect than intraocular injections.Keywords: wet age-related macular degeneration, neovascular, radiation therapy, epimacular brachytherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, anti-VEGF

  9. Large Polyglutamine Repeats Cause Muscle Degeneration in SCA17 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Huang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In polyglutamine (polyQ diseases, large polyQ repeats cause juvenile cases with different symptoms than those of adult-onset patients, who carry smaller expanded polyQ repeats. The mechanisms behind the differential pathology mediated by different polyQ repeat lengths remain unknown. By studying knockin mouse models of spinal cerebellar ataxia-17 (SCA17, we found that a large polyQ (105 glutamines in the TATA-box-binding protein (TBP preferentially causes muscle degeneration and reduces the expression of muscle-specific genes. Direct expression of TBP with different polyQ repeats in mouse muscle revealed that muscle degeneration is mediated only by the large polyQ repeats. Different polyQ repeats differentially alter TBP’s interaction with neuronal and muscle-specific transcription factors. As a result, the large polyQ repeat decreases the association of MyoD with TBP and DNA promoters. Our findings suggest that specific alterations in protein interactions by large polyQ repeats may account for the unique pathology in juvenile polyQ diseases.

  10. Large Polyglutamine Repeats Cause Muscle Degeneration in SCA17 Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shanshan; Yang, Su; Guo, Jifeng; Yan, Sen; Gaertig, Marta A.; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases, large polyQ repeats cause juvenile cases with different symptoms than adult-onset patients, who carry smaller expanded polyQ repeats. The mechanisms behind the differential pathology mediated by different polyQ repeat lengths remain unknown. By studying knock-in mouse models of spinal cerebellar ataxia-17 (SCA17), we found that a large polyQ (105 glutamines) in the TATA box-binding protein (TBP) preferentially causes muscle degeneration and reduces the expression of muscle-specific genes. Direct expression of TBP with different polyQ repeats in mouse muscle revealed that muscle degeneration is mediated only by the large polyQ repeats. Different polyQ repeats differentially alter TBP’s interaction with neuronal and muscle-specific transcription factors. As a result, the large polyQ repeat decreases the association of MyoD with TBP and DNA promoters. Our findings suggest that specific alterations in protein interactions by large polyQ repeats may account for the unique pathology in juvenile polyQ diseases. PMID:26387956

  11. Radiation therapy for age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagi, Chikako; Mori, Hideo; Akuta, Keizou [Otsu Red Cross Hospital, Shiga (Japan); Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    1998-04-01

    We evaluated the effect of low-dose radiation on age-related macular degeneration in 8 affected eyes. Radiation was applied using photons at 4 MV. Each eye received 10 fractions of 2 Gy per day over 2 weeks. At 6 months after treatment, funduscopic or angiographic findings had either improved or remained unchanged in all the eyes. The visual acuity improved by 2 lines or more in 2 eyes (25%), remained unchanged in 5 eyes (63%) and deteriorated in 1 eye (13%). At the last examination, fundus findings had improved in 2 eyes (25%), remained unchanged in 1 eye (13%) and deteriorated in 5 eyes (63%). The visual acuity had improved or unchanged in 2 eyes each (25%) and deteriorated in 4 eyes (50%). There has been no negative side effects of radiation. Above findings show that low-dose radiation is potentially beneficial for subfoveal or juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularizations in age-related macular degeneration on a short term basis. (author)

  12. Bose-Einstein condensate & degenerate Fermi cored dark matter halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, W.-J.; Nelson, L. A.

    2018-06-01

    There has been considerable interest in the last several years in support of the idea that galaxies and clusters could have highly condensed cores of dark matter (DM) within their central regions. In particular, it has been suggested that dark matter could form Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) or degenerate Fermi cores. We examine these possibilities under the assumption that the core consists of highly condensed DM (either bosons or fermions) that is embedded in a diffuse envelope (e.g., isothermal sphere). The novelty of our approach is that we invoke composite polytropes to model spherical collisionless structures in a way that is physically intuitive and can be generalized to include other equations of state (EOSs). Our model is very amenable to the analysis of BEC cores (composed of ultra-light bosons) that have been proposed to resolve small-scale CDM anomalies. We show that the analysis can readily be applied to bosons with or without small repulsive self-interactions. With respect to degenerate Fermi cores, we confirm that fermionic particle masses between 1—1000 keV are not excluded by the observations. Finally, we note that this approach can be extended to include a wide range of EOSs in addition to multi-component collisionless systems.

  13. Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the myelin sheath, the material that surrounds and protects your nerve cells. This damage slows down ...

  14. Multiple myeloma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Conor D

    2012-02-01

    Advances in the imaging and treatment of multiple myeloma have occurred over the past decade. This article summarises the current status and highlights how an understanding of both is necessary for optimum management.

  15. Multiple mononeuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with multiple mononeuropathy are prone to new nerve injuries at pressure points such as the knees and elbows. They should avoid putting pressure on these areas, for example, by not leaning on the elbows, crossing the knees, ...

  16. Relationship between facet tropism and facet joint degeneration in the sub-axial cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Rong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facet tropism is the angular asymmetry between the left and right facet joint orientation. Although debatable, facet tropism was suggested to be associated with disc degeneration, facet degeneration and degenerative spondylolisthesis in the lumbar spine. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between facet tropism and facet degeneration in the sub-axial cervical spine. Methods A total of 200 patients with cervical spondylosis were retrospectively analyzed. Facet degeneration was categorized into 4 grade: grade I, normal; grade II, degenerative changes including joint space narrowing, cyst formation, small osteophytes (3 mm without fusion of the joint; grade IV, bony fusion of the facet joints. Facet orientations and facet tropisms with respect to the transverse, sagittal and coronal plane were calculated from the reconstructed cervical spine, which was based on the axial CT scan images. The paired facet joints were then categorized into three types: symmetric, moderated tropism and severe tropism. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to evaluate the relationship between any demographic and anatomical factor and facet degeneration. Results The mean age of enrolled patients was 46.23 years old (ranging from 30 to 64 years old. There were 114 males and 86 females. The degrees of facet degeneration varied according to cervical levels and ages. Degenerated facet joints were most common at C2-C3 level and more common in patients above 50 years old. The facet orientations were also different from level to level. By univariate analysis, genders, ages, cervical levels, facet orientations and facet tropisms were all significantly different between the normal facets and degenerated facets. However, results from multivariate logistic regression suggested only age and facet tropism with respect to the sagittal plane were related to facet degeneration. Conclusion Facet degeneration were more common at

  17. Biomarkers of neuropathic pain in skin nerve degeneration neuropathy: contact heat-evoked potentials as a physiological signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Wei; Wang, Yi-Chia; Hsieh, Paul-Chen; Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Chu, Chih-Pang; Feng, Fang-Ping; Lin, Yea-Huey; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang; Chao, Chi-Chao

    2017-03-01

    Contact heat-evoked potentials (CHEPs) have become an established method of assessing small-fiber sensory nerves; however, their potential as a physiological signature of neuropathic pain symptoms has not been fully explored. To investigate the diagnostic efficacy in examining small-fiber sensory nerve degeneration, the relationship with skin innervations, and clinical correlates with sensory symptoms, we recruited 188 patients (115 men) with length-dependent sensory symptoms and reduced intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) density at the distal leg to perform CHEP, quantitative sensory testing, and nerve conduction study. Fifty-seven age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled for comparison of CHEP and skin innervation. Among patients with neuropathy, 144 patients had neuropathic pain and 64 cases had evoked pain. Compared with quantitative sensory testing and nerve conduction study parameters, CHEP amplitudes showed the highest sensitivity for diagnosing small-fiber sensory nerve degeneration and exhibited the strongest correlation with IENF density in multiple linear regression. Contact heat-evoked potential amplitudes were strongly correlated with the degree of skin innervation in both patients with neuropathy and controls, and the slope of the regression line between CHEP amplitude and IENF density was higher in patients with neuropathy than in controls. Patients with evoked pain had higher CHEP amplitude than those without evoked pain, independent of IENF density. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that CHEP had better performance in diagnosing small-fiber sensory nerve degeneration than thermal thresholds. Furthermore, CHEPs showed superior classification accuracy with respect to evoked pain. In conclusion, CHEP is a sensitive tool to evaluate pathophysiology of small-fiber sensory nerve and serves as a physiological signature of neuropathic pain symptoms.

  18. [Multiple meningiomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, L-M; François, P

    2016-06-01

    Multiple meningiomas (MMs) or meningiomatosis are defined by the presence of at least 2 lesions that appear simultaneously or not, at different intracranial locations, without the association of neurofibromatosis. They present 1-9 % of meningiomas with a female predominance. The occurrence of multiple meningiomas is not clear. There are 2 main hypotheses for their development, one that supports the independent evolution of these tumors and the other, completely opposite, that suggests the propagation of tumor cells of a unique clone transformation, through cerebrospinal fluid. NF2 gene mutation is an important intrinsic risk factor in the etiology of multiple meningiomas and some exogenous risk factors have been suspected but only ionizing radiation exposure has been proven. These tumors can grow anywhere in the skull but they are more frequently observed in supratentorial locations. Their histologic types are similar to unique meningiomas of psammomatous, fibroblastic, meningothelial or transitional type and in most cases are benign tumors. The prognosis of these tumors is eventually good and does not differ from the unique tumors except for the cases of radiation-induced multiple meningiomas, in the context of NF2 or when diagnosed in children where the outcome is less favorable. Each meningioma lesion should be dealt with individually and their multiple character should not justify their resection at all costs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Brain metabolic correlates of dopaminergic degeneration in de novo idiopathic Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, Valentina; Polito, Cristina; Vanzi, Eleonora; Cristofaro, Maria Teresa de; Pellicano, Giannantonio; Mungai, Francesco; Formiconi, Andreas Robert; Pupi, Alberto [University of Florence, Department of Clinical Pathophysiology, Florence (Italy); Ramat, Silvia; Marini, Paolo; Sorbi, Sandro [University of Florence, Department of Psychiatric and Neurological Sciences, Florence (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reciprocal relationships between motor impairment, dopaminergic dysfunction, and cerebral metabolism (rCMRglc) in de novo Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Twenty-six de novo untreated PD patients were scanned with {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET. The dopaminergic impairment was measured with putaminal {sup 123}I-FP-CIT binding potential (BP), estimated with two different techniques: an iterative reconstruction algorithm (BP{sub OSEM}) and the least-squares (LS) method (BP{sub LS}). Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) multiple regression analyses were performed to determine the specific brain regions in which UPDRS III scores and putaminal BP values correlated with rCMRglc. The SPM results showed a negative correlation between UPDRS III and rCMRglc in premotor cortex, and a positive correlation between BP{sub OSEM} and rCMRglc in premotor and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, not surviving at multiple comparison correction. Instead, there was a positive significant correlation between putaminal BP{sub LS} and rCMRglc in premotor, dorsolateral prefrontal, anterior prefrontal, and orbitofrontal cortex (p < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparison). Putaminal BP{sub LS} is an efficient parameter for exploring the correlations between PD severity and rCMRglc cortical changes. The correlation between dopaminergic degeneration and rCMRglc in several prefrontal regions likely represents the cortical functional correlate of the dysfunction in the motor basal ganglia-cortical circuit in PD. This finding suggests focusing on the metabolic course of these areas to follow PD progression and to analyze treatment effects. (orig.)

  20. Radiation therapy for macular degeneration: technical considerations and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, Luther W.; Freire, Jorge E.; Longton, Wallace A.; Miyamoto, Curtis T.; Augsburger, James J.; Brown, Gary C.; Micaily, Bizhan; Sagerman, Robert H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to assess the toxicity and possible benefits from the administration of low-dose external-beam irradiation for Age-Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD). The premise of the treatment is that radiation induces regression and/or promotes inactivation of the subretinal neo-vasculature, resulting in reabsorption of fluid and blood thus reducing the risk for further leakage or bleeding, as well as subretinal fibrosis. Clinically, the beneficial effect could be translated into stabilization of visual acuity and prevention of progression of the wet type of ARMD with the possibility for some visual improvement. Methods and Materials: Allegheny University Hospitals, Hahnemann, Department of Radiation Oncology, treated 278 patients prospectively beginning in January 1995 with low-dose irradiation for wet-type macular degeneration. Two hundred forty-nine patients were treated with a total dose of 14.40 Gy in eight fractions of 1.80 Gy over 10-13 elapsed days, and 27 patients with 20 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction over 12-15 days. The first two patients were treated to a total dose of 10.00 Gy in five fractions of 2.00 Gy. Patients were evaluated at 2-3 weeks and 2-3 months. A percentage (36.7%) of the patients had previously received laser treatments in the study eye, 21.9% once, 5% twice, 9.7% three or more. Subjective visual acuity and toxicity data was collected on all patients. Results: At 2-3 weeks after treatment 195 patients (70%) retained their visual acuity without change, 68 patients (24.5%) stated they had improved vision, and 15 patients (4.8%) stated their vision continued to decrease. Two to 3 months after treatment, 183 patients (65.8%) had no change in their vision. 75 patients (27%) patients had an improvement in their vision, and 20 patients (7.2%) had a decrease in visual acuity. Transient acute reactions occurred in 14 of the 278 patients treated. Conclusion: Our observations in this group of 278 patients support the conclusion

  1. External radiotherapy in macular degeneration: technique and preliminary subjective response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Jorge; Longton, Wallace A.; Miyamoto, Curtis T.; Brady, Luther W.; Augsburger, James; Brown, Gary; Micaily, Bizhan; Unda, Ricardo

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study attempted to assess the toxicity and possible preliminary benefits from the administration of low-dose external beam irradiation for age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). The premise of the treatment is that radiation induces regression and/or promotes inactivation of the subretinal neovasculature which would result in reabsorption of fluid and blood. This would reduce the risk for further leakage or bleeding, as well as subretinal fibrosis. Consequently, the beneficial effect could be translated into stabilization of visual acuity and prevention of progression of the wet ARMD with the possibility for slight improvement. Methods and Materials: Allegheny University Department of Radiation Oncology treated 41 patients prospectively from January through October 1995 with low-dose irradiation for wet-type macular degeneration. A total of 39 patients were treated with a total dose of 14.4 Gy in eight fractions of 1.8 Gy/fraction over 10-13 elapsed days. The first two patients were treated with a total dose of 10 Gy in fivefractions of 2 Gy. Patients were evaluated at 2-3 weeks and 2-3 months. Some of the patients (36.7%) had laser treatments in the study eye: 21.9% (9) once, 5% (2) twice, 9.7% (4) thrice or more. Subjective visual acuity and toxicity data were collected on all patients. Results: At 2-3 weeks after treatment 29 patients (70%) retained their visual acuity without change, 10 (24.5%) stated they had improved vision, and 2 (4.8%) stated their vision continued to decrease. At 2-3 months after treatment, 27 patients (65.8%) had no change in their vision, 11 (27%) had an improvement in their vision, and 3 (7.2%) had a decrease in visual acuity. Six patients of 41 in the treated group had acute transient side effects. Conclusion: Our observations in this group of 41 patients support the conclusion that many patients will have improved or stable vision after treatment with low-dose irradiation for age-related wet-type macular degeneration

  2. Familial pseudoxanthoma elasticum associated with multiple comedones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarouf, Melody; Sharon, Victoria R; Sivamani, Raja K; Prakash, Neha; Bipin, T H; Davis, Tracy; Shi, Vivian Y

    2017-09-15

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by atypical elastic fibers that causes connective tissue abnormalities of the skin, eyes, and heart, among other organs. The disorder is rare, with a classic presentation of yellow-orange cobblestone-like papules on flexural areas, lax skin, ocular degeneration, and moribund vasculature in multiple organs. There is wide variability in the presentation of the affected organs [1]. We present two sisters with classic cutaneous findings of PXE with the additional unusual findings of numerous open comedones on the neck. To our knowledge, this is the first report of numerous open comedones in familial PXE.

  3. Multiple sclerosis: current immunological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Cuevas-García

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is the most common inflammatory, chronic and degenerative condition of the central nervous system, and represents the first cause of disability in young adults. In Mexico, 11 to 20 out of every 100 000 people suffer from this disease. The causes of multiple sclerosis remain unknown, but several theories have been proposed on its origin: the interaction of environmental factors, viral infectious factors and genetic and immune susceptibility of each individual patient, which induce an autoimmune response and promote neuronal/axonal degeneration. In this review, the immune reaction main components and neurodegeneration present in multiple sclerosis are analyzed, as well as the inflammatory cascade associated with demyelination. Available treatments’ main purpose is to modulate aspects related to the adaptive immune response (B and T cells. The therapeutic challenge will be antigen-specific immune-tolerance induction, for example, with the use of tolerance protocols with peptides or DNA or nanoparticles vaccines. Future therapies should aim to control innate components (microglia, macrophages, astrocytes and to promote remyelination. To optimize the treatment, a combined therapeutic approach targeting the control of inflammatory and neurodegenerative components of the disease and monitoring of biomarkers will be necessary.

  4. Basic dynamics at a multiple resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraz-Mello, S.; Yokoyama, T.

    The problem of multiple resonance is dealt with as it occurs in Celestial Mechanics and in non-linear Mechanics. In perturbation theory small divisors occur as a consequence of the fact that the flows in the phase space of the real system and the flows in the phase space of the so-called undisturbed system are not homeomorphic at all. Whatever the perturbation technique we adopt, the first step is to correct the topology of the undisturbed flows. It is shown that at a multiple resonance we are led to dynamical systems that are generally non-integrable. The basic representatives of these systems are the n-pendulums theta sup(:) sub(k) = σ sub(j)A sub(jk) sin theta sub(j). Multiple resonances are classified as syndetic or asyndetic following the eigenvalues of a quadratic form. Some degenerate cases are also presented. (Author) [pt

  5. Effect of intervertebral disk degeneration on spinal stenosis during magnetic resonance imaging with axial loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Tae-Joon; Lee, Sang-Ho; Choi, Gun; Ahn, Yong; Liu, Wei-Chiang; Kim, Ho-Jin; Lee, Ho-Yeon

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with axial loading can simulate the physiological standing state and disclose spinal stenosis undetected or underestimated in the conventional position. Intervertebral disk degeneration may be an important factor in spinal stenosis. This study investigated whether intervertebral disk degeneration increases spinal stenosis during axial loading. MR imaging with and without axial loading was obtained in 51 patients with neurogenic intermittent claudication and/or sciatica and reviewed retrospectively. The grade of disk degeneration was rated in four disk spaces from L2-3 to L5-S1. The dural sac cross-sectional area (DCSA) was measured on MR images taken in both conventional and axial loading positions, and the change in the DCSA was calculated. The effect of disk degeneration on the DCSA was statistically analyzed. Significant decreases in the DCSA occurred with grade 4 disk degeneration (mean±standard deviation, 20.1±14.1 mm 2 ), followed by grade 3 (18.3±15.1 mm 2 ) and grade 2 (8.9±13.1 mm 2 ). DCSA decreased considerably with increased severity of disk degeneration with axial loading, except for grade 5 disk degeneration. More accurate diagnosis of stenosis can be achieved using MR imaging with axial loading, especially if grade 2 to 4 disk degeneration is present. (author)

  6. HUMAN CAPSULE EPITHELIAL-CELL DEGENERATION A LM, SEM AND TEM INVESTIGATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JONGEBLOED, WL; KALICHARAN, D; WORST, JGF

    1993-01-01

    The degeneration of the capsule epithelium of cataractous lenses has been studied with LM, SEM on TEM with emphases on TEM. The observed degeneration of the epithelial cells can be described as follows: The cell nucleus becomes picnotic and desintegrates as result of change of the chromatin.

  7. Increased MMP-2 activity during intervertebral disc degeneration is correlated to MMP-14 levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutges, J. P. H. J.; Kummer, J. A.; Oner, F. C.; Verbout, A. J.; Roestenburg, H. J. A.; Dhert, W. J. A.; Creemers, L. B.

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is associated with the increased expression of several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), in particular MMP-2. However, little is known about the actual activity of MMP-2 in healthy and degenerated discs, or what mechanisms are involved in its activation. A

  8. Genetic association of apolipoprotein E with age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kliffen (Mike); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); M. Cruts (Marc); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); P.T.V.M. de Jong (Paulus); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); C. van Broeckhoven (Christine); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractAge-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common geriatric eye disorder leading to blindness and is characterized by degeneration of the neuroepithelium in the macular area of the eye. Apolipoprotein E (apoE), the major apolipoprotein of the CNS and an

  9. Oxygen-induced retinopathy in mice with retinal photoreceptor cell degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Zuo-Ming

    2014-04-25

    It is reported that retinal neovascularization seems to rarely co-exist with retinitis pigmentosa in patients and in some mouse models; however, it is not widely acknowledged as a universal phenomenon in all strains of all animal species. We aimed to further explore this phenomenon with an oxygen-induced retinopathy model in mice with retinal photoreceptor cell degeneration. Oxygen-induced retinopathy of colored and albino mice with rapid retinal degeneration were compared to homologous wild-type mice. The retinas were analyzed using high-molecular-weight FITC-dextran stained flat-mount preparation, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained cross-sections, an immunohistochemical test for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) distribution and Western blotting for VEGF expression after exposure to hyperoxia between postnatal days 17 (P17) and 21. Leakage and areas of non-perfusion of the retinal blood vessels were alleviated in the retinal degeneration mice. The number of preretinal vascular endothelial cell nuclei in the retinal degeneration mice was smaller than that in the homologous wild-type mice after exposure to hyperoxia (Poxygen-induced retinopathy was positively correlated with the VEGF expression level. However, the VEGF expression level was lower in the retinal degeneration mice. Proliferative retinopathy occurred in mice with rapid retinal degeneration, but retinal photoreceptor cell degeneration could partially restrain the retinal neovascularization in this rapid retinal degeneration mouse model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Matrix units and Schur elements for the degenerate cyclotomic Hecke algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Deke

    2011-01-01

    The paper uses the cellular basis of the (semi-simple) degenerate cyclotomic Hecke algebras to investigate these algebras exhaustively. As a consequence, we describe explicitly the "Young's seminormal form" and a orthogonal bases for Specht modules and determine explicitly the closed formula for the natural bilinear form on Specht modules and Schur elements for the degenerate cyclotomic Hekce algebras.

  11. Frequency of lattice degeneration and retinal breaks in the fellow eye in retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzen, S E

    1988-04-01

    The fellow eye of 100 consecutively admitted cases of retinal detachment was studied with three-mirror examination for the presence of lattice degeneration and retinal breaks. Lattice degeneration was found in 18% and retinal breaks in 20% of fellow eyes.

  12. Subfoveal fibrosis in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration treated with intravitreal ranibizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Sara Brandi; Lund-Andersen, Henrik; Sander, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    To assess baseline and follow-up characteristics of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesions in age-related macular degeneration in relation to the development of subfoveal subretinal fibrosis.......To assess baseline and follow-up characteristics of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesions in age-related macular degeneration in relation to the development of subfoveal subretinal fibrosis....

  13. Verteporfin plus ranibizumab for choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of same-day verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) and intravitreal ranibizumab combination treatment versus ranibizumab monotherapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration.......To compare the efficacy and safety of same-day verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) and intravitreal ranibizumab combination treatment versus ranibizumab monotherapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration....

  14. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, Egon; Stenager, E N; Knudsen, Lone

    1994-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 117 randomly selected patients (52 men, 65 women) with definite multiple sclerosis, it was found that 76 percent were married or cohabitant, 8 percent divorced. Social contacts remained unchanged for 70 percent, but outgoing social contacts were reduced for 45 percent......, need for structural changes in home and need for pension became greater with increasing physical handicap. No significant differences between gender were found. It is concluded that patients and relatives are under increased social strain, when multiple sclerosis progresses to a moderate handicap...

  15. Mixed Estimates for Degenerate Multilinear Operators Associated to Simplexes

    OpenAIRE

    Kesler, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We prove that the degenerate trilinear operator $C_3^{-1,1,1}$ given by the formula \\begin{eqnarray*} C_3^{-1,1,1}(f_1, f_2, f_3)(x)=\\int_{x_1 < x_2 < x_3} \\hat{f_1}(x_1) \\hat{f_2}(x_2) \\hat{f_3}(x_3) e^{2\\pi i x (-x_1 + x_2 + x_3)} dx_1dx_2 dx_3 \\end{eqnarray*} satisfies the new estimates \\begin{eqnarray*} ||C_3^{-1,1,1}(f_1, f_2, f_3)||_{\\frac{1}{\\frac{1}{p_1}+\\frac{1}{p_2}+\\frac{1}{p_3}}} \\lesssim_{p_1, p_2, p_3} ||\\hat{f}_1||_{p^\\prime_1} ||f_2||_{p_2}||f_3||_{p_3} \\end{eqnarray*} for all...

  16. A case of subacute combined degeneration: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, K.; Shrier, D.A.; Tanaka, H.; Numaguchi, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The specific spinal cord lesion caused by vitamin B12 deficiency is known as subacute combined degeneration (SCD). Neuropathological studies of SCD show lesions mainly in the posterior and lateral columns, involving the cortico-spinal and spino-cerebellar tracts. We report a case of SCD in a 19-year-old man who presented with 4 weeks history of gradually progressing tingling in both hands. MRI of the cervical spine demonstrated symmetrical areas of T2 signal abnormality involving the dorsal columns of the cervical cord from the C2 through C5 levels associated with spinal cord expansion. He was treated with vitamin B12 supplements and experienced gradual improvement in his clinical symptoms. Repeat MRI of the cervical spine after 2 months revealed slight decrease in the area of abnormal signal. (orig.)

  17. Radiative neutrino mass model with degenerate right-handed neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwase, Shoichi; Suematsu, Daijiro

    2016-01-01

    The radiative neutrino mass model can relate neutrino masses and dark matter at a TeV scale. If we apply this model to thermal leptogenesis, we need to consider resonant leptogenesis at that scale. It requires both finely degenerate masses for the right-handed neutrinos and a tiny neutrino Yukawa coupling. We propose an extension of the model with a U(1) gauge symmetry, in which these conditions are shown to be simultaneously realized through a TeV scale symmetry breaking. Moreover, this extension can bring about a small quartic scalar coupling between the Higgs doublet scalar and an inert doublet scalar which characterizes the radiative neutrino mass generation. It also is the origin of the Z 2 symmetry which guarantees the stability of dark matter. Several assumptions which are independently supposed in the original model are closely connected through this extension. (orig.)

  18. Approximation of entropy solutions to degenerate nonlinear parabolic equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Eduardo; Colombeau, Mathilde; Panov, Evgeny Yu

    2017-12-01

    We approximate the unique entropy solutions to general multidimensional degenerate parabolic equations with BV continuous flux and continuous nondecreasing diffusion function (including scalar conservation laws with BV continuous flux) in the periodic case. The approximation procedure reduces, by means of specific formulas, a system of PDEs to a family of systems of the same number of ODEs in the Banach space L^∞, whose solutions constitute a weak asymptotic solution of the original system of PDEs. We establish well posedness, monotonicity and L^1-stability. We prove that the sequence of approximate solutions is strongly L^1-precompact and that it converges to an entropy solution of the original equation in the sense of Carrillo. This result contributes to justify the use of this original method for the Cauchy problem to standard multidimensional systems of fluid dynamics for which a uniqueness result is lacking.

  19. The standard and degenerate primordial nucleosynthesis versus recent experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, S.; Mangano, G.; Miele, G.; Pisanti, O.

    2000-01-01

    We report the results on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) based on an updated code, with accuracy of the order of 0.1% on He4 abundance, compared with the predictions of other recent similar analysis. We discuss the compatibility of the theoretical results, for vanishing neutrino chemical potentials, with the observational data. Bounds on the number of relativistic neutrinos and baryon abundance are obtained by a likelihood analysis. We also analyze the effect of large neutrino chemical potentials on primordial nucleosynthesis, motivated by the recent results on the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation spectrum. The BBN exclusion plots for electron neutrino chemical potential and the effective number of relativistic neutrinos are reported. We find that the standard BBN seems to be only marginally in agreement with the recent BOOMERANG and MAXIMA-1 results, while the agreement is much better for degenerate BBN scenarios for large effective number of neutrinos, N ν ∼ 10. (author)

  20. Vitamin D and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Garcia Layana

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the relationship between vitamin D and health has received growing attention from the scientific and medical communities. Vitamin D deficiencies have been repeatedly associated with various acute and chronic diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Its active metabolite, 1α,25-dihydoxy vitamin D, acts as a modulator of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and cumulative data from experimental and observational studies suggest that relatively a lower vitamin D status could be a potential risk factor for the development of early and/or late AMD. Herein, we made a narrative review of the mechanisms linking a potential role of vitamin D with the current concepts of AMD pathophysiology.

  1. Perilesional edema in radiation necrosis reflects axonal degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Torres, Carlos J; Yuan, Liya; Schmidt, Robert E; Rich, Keith M; Ackerman, Joseph JH; Garbow, Joel R

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we characterized a Gamma Knife® radiation necrosis mouse model with various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols to identify biomarkers useful in differentiation from tumors. Though the irradiation was focal to one hemisphere, a contralateral injury was observed that appeared to be localized in the white matter only. Interestingly, this injury was identifiable in T2-weighted images, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) maps, but not on post-contrast T1-weighted images. This observation of edema independent of vascular changes is akin to the perilesional edema seen in clinical radiation necrosis. The pathology underlying the observed white-matter MRI changes was explored by performing immunohistochemistry for healthy axons and myelin. The presence of both healthy axons and myelin was reduced in the contralateral white-matter lesion. Based on our immunohistochemical findings, the contralateral white-matter injury is most likely due to axonal degeneration

  2. Extended Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory for degenerate Bose systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tommasini, Paolo; Passos, E J V de; Pires, M O C; Piza, A F R de Toledo

    2005-01-01

    An extension of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) theory of degenerate Bose systems in which the coupling between one and two quasi-particles is taken into account is developed. The excitation operators are written as linear combinations of one and two HFB quasi-particles. Excitation energies and quasi-particle amplitudes are given by generalized Bogoliubov equations. The excitation spectrum has two branches. The first one is a discrete branch which is gapless and has a phonon character at large wavelength and, contrarily to HFB, is always stable. This branch is detached from a second, continuum branch whose threshold, at fixed total momentum, coincides with the two quasi-particle threshold of the HFB theory. The gap between the two branches at P = 0 is twice the HFB gap, which thus provides for the relevant energy scale. Numerical results for a specific case are given

  3. Imaging geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, Arno P; Fleckenstein, Monika; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Brinkmann, Christian K; Holz, Frank G

    2011-01-01

    Advances in retinal imaging technology have largely contributed to the understanding of the natural history, prognostic markers and disease mechanisms of geographic atrophy (GA) due to age-related macular degeneration. There is still no therapy available to halt or slow the disease process. In order to evaluate potential therapeutic effects in interventional trials, there is a need for precise quantification of the GA progression rate. Fundus autofluorescence imaging allows for accurate identification and segmentation of atrophic areas and currently represents the gold standard for evaluating progressive GA enlargement. By means of high-resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, distinct microstructural alterations related to GA can be visualized. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Regeneration of peripheral nerve fibres following Haloxon-induced degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Veronica de Souza

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Delayed neurotoxicity has been associated with organophosphorus poisoning for years. In order to study such condition in sheep, 11 animals were given either one or two high doses of Haloxon. Exposed sheep were observed daily and between 16 and 25 days after administration neurological signs as incoordination and ataxia were detected in six of them. Biopsies of tibial and laryngeal nerves were performed as soon as neurotoxicity was diagnosed, and after death fragments of selected nerves were collected together with CNS tissues for light and electron microscopy and teased fiber studies. Laryngeal, tibial and sciatic nerves showed the most pronouced changes, consisting chiefly of wallerian degeneration that was seen either as a single fiber or as a complete fascicle feature. Exams performed after death clearly showed regenerating fascicles with axonal sprouts growing within a Schwann cell old basal lamina, and some thinly myelinated axonal sprouts.

  5. Transcriptome changes in age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitmore S Scott

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a debilitating, common cause of visual impairment. While the last decade has seen great progress in understanding the pathophysiology of AMD, the molecular changes that occur in eyes with AMD are still poorly understood. In the current issue of Genome Medicine, Newman and colleagues present the first systematic transcriptional profile analysis of AMD-affected tissues, providing a comprehensive set of expression data for different regions (macula versus periphery, tissues (retina versus retinal pigment epithelium (RPE/choroid, and disease state (control versus early or advanced AMD. Their findings will serve as a foundation for additional systems-level research into the pathogenesis of this blinding disease. Please see related article: http://genomemedicine.com/content/4/2/16

  6. Vitamin D and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layana, Alfredo Garcia; Minnella, Angelo Maria; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Aslam, Tariq; Holz, Frank G; Leys, Anita; Silva, Rufino; Delcourt, Cécile; Souied, Eric; Seddon, Johanna M

    2017-10-13

    In recent years, the relationship between vitamin D and health has received growing attention from the scientific and medical communities. Vitamin D deficiencies have been repeatedly associated with various acute and chronic diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Its active metabolite, 1α,25-dihydoxy vitamin D, acts as a modulator of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and cumulative data from experimental and observational studies suggest that relatively a lower vitamin D status could be a potential risk factor for the development of early and/or late AMD. Herein, we made a narrative review of the mechanisms linking a potential role of vitamin D with the current concepts of AMD pathophysiology.

  7. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Insights into Inflammatory Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Cascella

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects approximately 8.7% of elderly people worldwide (>55 years old. AMD is characterized by a multifactorial aetiology that involves several genetic and environmental risk factors (genes, ageing, smoking, family history, dietary habits, oxidative stress, and hypertension. In particular, ageing and cigarette smoking (including oxidative compounds and reactive oxygen species have been shown to significantly increase susceptibility to the disease. Furthermore, different genes (CFH, CFI, C2, C3, IL-6, IL-8, and ARMS2 that play a crucial role in the inflammatory pathway have been associated with AMD risk. Several genetic and molecular studies have indicated the participation of inflammatory molecules (cytokines and chemokines, immune cells (macrophages, and complement proteins in the development and progression of the disease. Taking into consideration the genetic and molecular background, this review highlights the genetic role of inflammatory genes involved in AMD pathogenesis and progression.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic spin waves in degenerate electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mushtaq, A. [TPPD, PINSTECH Nilore, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); National Center for Physics, Shahdrah Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Maroof, R.; Ahmad, Zulfiaqr [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, 25000 Peshawar (Pakistan); Qamar, A. [National Center for Physics, Shahdrah Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, 25000 Peshawar (Pakistan)

    2012-05-15

    Low frequency magnetosonic waves are studied in magnetized degenerate electron-positron-ion plasmas with spin effects. Using the fluid equations of magnetoplasma with quantum corrections due to the Bohm potential, temperature degeneracy, and spin magnetization energy, a generalized dispersion relation for oblique magnetosonic waves is derived. Spin effects are incorporated via spin force and macroscopic spin magnetization current. For three different values of angle {theta}, the generalized dispersion relation is reduced to three different relations under the low frequency magnetohydrodynamic assumptions. It is found that the effect of quantum corrections in the presence of positron concentration significantly modifies the dispersive properties of these modes. The importance of the work relevant to compact astrophysical bodies is pointed out.

  9. Hot Topics in Pharmacogenetics of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Brantley, Milam A; Kovach, Jaclyn L; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of irreversible visual loss and is primarily treated with nutritional supplementation as well as with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents for certain patients with neovascular disease. AMD is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. In addition, treatment outcomes from nutritional supplementation and anti-VEGF agents vary considerably. Therefore, it is reasonable to suspect that there may be pharmacogenetic influences on these treatments. Many series have reported individual associations with variants in complement factor H (CFH), age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2), and other loci. However, at this time there are no validated associations. With respect to AMD, pharmacogenetics remains an intriguing area of research but is not helpful for routine clinical management. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Degenerated-Inverse-Matrix-Based Channel Estimation for OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Yoshida

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses time-domain channel estimation for pilot-symbol-aided orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM systems. By using a cyclic sinc-function matrix uniquely determined by Nc transmitted subcarriers, the performance of our proposed scheme approaches perfect channel state information (CSI, within a maximum of 0.4 dB degradation, regardless of the delay spread of the channel, Doppler frequency, and subcarrier modulation. Furthermore, reducing the matrix size by splitting the dispersive channel impulse response into clusters means that the degenerated inverse matrix estimator (DIME is feasible for broadband, high-quality OFDM transmission systems. In addition to theoretical analysis on normalized mean squared error (NMSE performance of DIME, computer simulations over realistic nonsample spaced channels also showed that the DIME is robust for intersymbol interference (ISI channels and fast time-invariant channels where a minimum mean squared error (MMSE estimator does not work well.

  11. Kinetic theory of thermotransport of polar semiconductors: Degenerate limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel-Huerta, A. [Facultad de Ciencias de la Computacion Benemerita, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, 14 Sur y San Claudio C.U., Puebla 72570 (Mexico); Rodriguez-Meza, M.A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico D.F. 11801 (Mexico)

    2005-08-01

    We develop a kinetic theory approach from the semiclassical Boltzmann transport equation for the thermotransport of electrons in degenerate polar semiconductors. The method of moments applied to the Boltzmann equation gives us a set of hydrodynamical equations which are closed up to thirteen relevant variables, including energy density, the stress tensor and the heat flux in the description. The closure of the balance equations is achieved by evaluating the higher order momenta, as well as the production terms, through a non equilibrium distribution function coming from the maximum entropy principle. We assume that electronoptical polar phonon interaction is the leading scattering process in order to obtain analytical expressions for both, the characteristic relaxation times and the usual thermoelectric coefficients. We also show that in this case the Onsager symmetry relationship is not satisfied. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Risk Factors and Biomarkers of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Nathan G.; Singh, Malkit K.; ElShelmani, Hanan; Mansergh, Fiona C.; Wride, Michael A.; Padilla, Maximilian; Keegan, David; Hogg, Ruth E.; Ambati, Balamurali K.

    2016-01-01

    A biomarker can be a substance or structure measured in body parts, fluids or products that can affect or predict disease incidence. As age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, much research and effort has been invested in the identification of different biomarkers to predict disease incidence, identify at risk individuals, elucidate causative pathophysiological etiologies, guide screening, monitoring and treatment parameters, and predict disease outcomes. To date, a host of genetic, environmental, proteomic, and cellular targets have been identified as both risk factors and potential biomarkers for AMD. Despite this, their use has been confined to research settings and has not yet crossed into the clinical arena. A greater understanding of these factors and their use as potential biomarkers for AMD can guide future research and clinical practice. This article will discuss known risk factors and novel, potential biomarkers of AMD in addition to their application in both academic and clinical settings. PMID:27156982

  13. Radiation Therapy for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishan, Amar U. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Modjtahedi, Bobeck S.; Morse, Lawrence S. [Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, California (United States); Lee, Percy, E-mail: percylee@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-03-01

    In the enormity of the public health burden imposed by age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), much effort has been directed toward identifying effective and efficient treatments. Currently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections have demonstrated considerably efficacy in treating neovascular ARMD, but patients require frequent treatment to fully benefit. Here, we review the rationale and evidence for radiation therapy of ARMD. The results of early photon external beam radiation therapy are included to provide a framework for the sequential discussion of evidence for the usage of stereotactic radiation therapy, proton therapy, and brachytherapy. The evidence suggests that these 3 modern modalities can provide a dose-dependent benefit in the treatment of ARMD. Most importantly, preliminary data suggest that all 3 can be used in conjunction with anti-VEGF therapeutics, thereby reducing the frequency of anti-VEGF injections required to maintain visual acuity.

  14. Nutritional supplements in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidl, Doreen; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause of blindness in the Western World. While with new therapies that are directed towards vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potentially efficient treatment option for the wet form of the disease has been introduced, a therapeutic regimen for dry AMD is still lacking. There is evidence from several studies that oral intake of supplements is beneficial in preventing progression of the disease. Several formulations of micronutrients are currently available. The present review focuses on the role of supplements in the treatment and prevention of AMD and sums up the current knowledge about the most frequently used micronutrients. In addition, regulatory issues are discussed, and future directions for the role of supplementation in AMD are highlighted. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Pseudo-periodic maps and degeneration of Riemann surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The first part of the book studies pseudo-periodic maps of a closed surface of genus greater than or equal to two. This class of homeomorphisms was originally introduced by J. Nielsen in 1944 as an extension of periodic maps. In this book, the conjugacy classes of the (chiral) pseudo-periodic mapping classes are completely classified, and Nielsen’s incomplete classification is corrected. The second part applies the results of the first part to the topology of degeneration of Riemann surfaces. It is shown that the set of topological types of all the singular fibers appearing in one-parameter holomorphic families of Riemann surfaces is in a bijective correspondence with the set of conjugacy classes of the pseudo-periodic maps of negative twists. The correspondence is given by the topological monodromy.

  16. The Rate of Vitamin A Dimerization in Lipofuscinogenesis, Fundus Autofluorescence, Retinal Senescence and Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Ilyas; Saad, Leonide

    2016-01-01

    One of the earliest events preceding several forms of retinal degeneration is the formation and accumulation of vitamin A dimers in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and underlying Bruch's membrane (BM). Such degenerations include Stargardt disease, Best disease, forms of retinitis pigmentosa, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Since their discovery in the 1990's, dimers of vitamin A, have been postulated as chemical triggers driving retinal senescence and degeneration. There is evidence to suggest that the rate at which vitamin A dimerizes and the eye's response to the dimerization products may dictate the retina's lifespan. Here, we present outstanding questions, finding the answers to which may help to elucidate the role of vitamin A dimerization in retinal degeneration.

  17. PATTERNS OF FUNDUS AUTOFLUORESCENCE DEFECTS IN NEOVASCULAR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION SUBTYPES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkok, Ahmet; Sigford, Douglas K; Tezel, Tongalp H

    2016-11-01

    To test define characteristic fundus autofluorescence patterns of different exudative age-related macular degeneration subtypes. Cross-sectional study. Fifty-two patients with choroidal neovascularization because of three different neovascular age-related macular degeneration subtypes were included in the study. Macular and peripheral fundus autofluorescence patterns of study subjects were compared in a masked fashion. Fundus autofluorescence patterns of all three neovascular age-related macular degeneration subtypes revealed similar patterns. However, peripapillary hypo-autofluorescence was more common among patients with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (88.2%) compared with patients with retinal angiomatous proliferation (12.5%) and patients without retinal angiomatous proliferation and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (21.1%) (P autofluorescence defects in neovascular age-related macular degeneration maybe suggestive of polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy as a variant of neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

  18. Muscle hypertrophy induced by myostatin inhibition accelerates degeneration in dysferlinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Sil; Lehar, Adam; Sebald, Suzanne; Liu, Min; Swaggart, Kayleigh A; Talbot, C Conover; Pytel, Peter; Barton, Elisabeth R; McNally, Elizabeth M; Lee, Se-Jin

    2015-10-15

    Myostatin is a secreted signaling molecule that normally acts to limit muscle growth. As a result, there is extensive effort directed at developing drugs capable of targeting myostatin to treat patients with muscle loss. One potential concern with this therapeutic approach in patients with muscle degenerative diseases like muscular dystrophy is that inducing hypertrophy may increase stress on dystrophic fibers, thereby accelerating disease progression. To investigate this possibility, we examined the effect of blocking the myostatin pathway in dysferlin-deficient (Dysf(-/-)) mice, in which membrane repair is compromised, either by transgenic expression of follistatin in skeletal muscle or by systemic administration of the soluble form of the activin type IIB receptor (ACVR2B/Fc). Here, we show that myostatin inhibition by follistatin transgene expression in Dysf(-/-) mice results in early improvement in histopathology but ultimately exacerbates muscle degeneration; this effect was not observed in dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mice, suggesting that accelerated degeneration induced by follistatin transgene expression is specific to mice lacking dysferlin. Dysf(-/-) mice injected with ACVR2B/Fc showed significant increases in muscle mass and amelioration of fibrotic changes normally seen in 8-month-old Dysf(-/-) mice. Despite these potentially beneficial effects, ACVR2B/Fc treatment caused increases in serum CK levels in some Dysf(-/-) mice, indicating possible muscle damage induced by hypertrophy. These findings suggest that depending on the disease context, inducing muscle hypertrophy by myostatin blockade may have detrimental effects, which need to be weighed against the potential gains in muscle growth and decreased fibrosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. New Perspective on Parkinsonism in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Kyung Park

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia (FTD is the second most common type of presenile dementia. Three clinical prototypes have been defined; behavioral variant FTD, semantic dementia, and progressive nonfluent aphasia. Progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and motor neuron disease may possess clinical and pathological characteristics that overlap with FTD, and it is possible that they may all belong to the same clinicopathological spectrum. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD is a clinicopathological syndrome that encompasses a heterogenous group of neurodegenerative disorders. Owing to the advancement in the field of molecular genetics, diagnostic imaging, and pathology, FTLD has been the focus of great interest. Nevertheless, parkinsonism in FTLD has received relatively less attention. Parkinsonism is found in approximately 20–30% of patients in FTLD. Furthermore, parkinsonism can be seen in all FTLD subtypes, and some patients with familial and sporadic FTLD can present with prominent parkinsonism. Therefore, there is a need to understand parkinsonism in FTLD in order to obtain a better understanding of the disease. With regard to the clinical characteristics, the akinetic rigid type of parkinsonism has predominantly been described. Parkinsonism is frequently observed in familial FTD, more specifically, in FTD with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17q (FTDP-17. The genes associated with parkinsonism are microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT, progranulin (GRN or PGRN, and chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72 repeat expansion. The neural substrate of parkinsonism remains to be unveiled. Dopamine transporter (DAT imaging revealed decreased uptake of DAT, and imaging findings indicated atrophic changes of the basal ganglia. Parkinsonism can be an important feature in FTLD and, therefore, increased attention is needed on the subject.

  20. Renin angiotensin system and gender differences in dopaminergic degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Perez Ana I

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are sex differences in dopaminergic degeneration. Men are approximately two times as likely as premenopausal women of the same age to develop Parkinson's disease (PD. It has been shown that the local renin angiotensin system (RAS plays a prominent role in sex differences in the development of chronic renal and cardiovascular diseases, and there is a local RAS in the substantia nigra and dopaminergic cell loss is enhanced by angiotensin via type 1 (AT1 receptors. Results In the present study, we observed that intrastriatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine induced a marked loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of male rats, which was significantly higher than the loss induced in ovariectomized female rats given estrogen implants (i.e. rats with estrogen. However, the loss of dopaminergic neurons was significantly lower in male rats treated with the AT1 antagonist candesartan, and similar to that observed in female rats with estrogen. The involvement of the RAS in gender differences in dopaminergic degeneration was confirmed with AT1a-null mice lesioned with the dopaminergic neurotoxin MPTP. Significantly higher expression of AT1 receptors, angiotensin converting enzyme activity, and NADPH-oxidase complex activity, and much lower levels of AT2 receptors were observed in male rats than in female rats with estrogen. Conclusions The results suggest that brain RAS plays a major role in the increased risk of developing PD in men, and that manipulation of brain RAS may be an efficient approach for neuroprotective treatment of PD in men, without the feminizing effects of estrogen.

  1. Tear film proteome in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiarczyk, Mateusz; Kaarniranta, Kai; Winiarczyk, Stanisław; Adaszek, Łukasz; Winiarczyk, Dagmara; Mackiewicz, Jerzy

    2018-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the main reason for blindness in elderly people in the developed countries. Current screening protocols have limitations in detecting the early signs of retinal degeneration. Therefore, it would be desirable to find novel biomarkers for early detection of AMD. Development of novel biomarkers would help in the prevention, diagnostics, and treatment of AMD. Proteomic analysis of tear film has shown promise in this research area. If an optimal set of biomarkers could be obtained from accessible body fluids, it would represent a reliable way to monitor disease progression and response to novel therapies. Tear films were collected on Schirmer strips from a total of 22 patients (8 with wet AMD, 6 with dry AMD, and 8 control individuals). 2D electrophoresis was used to separate tear film proteins prior to their identification with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight spectrometer (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and matching with functional databases. A total of 342 proteins were identified. Most of them were previously described in various proteomic studies concerning AMD. Shootin-1, histatin-3, fidgetin-like protein 1, SRC kinase signaling inhibitor, Graves disease carrier protein, actin cytoplasmic 1, prolactin-inducible protein 1, and protein S100-A7A were upregulated in the tear film samples isolated from AMD patients and were not previously linked with this disease in any proteomic analysis. The upregulated proteins supplement our current knowledge of AMD pathogenesis, providing evidence that certain specific proteins are expressed into the tear film in AMD. As far we are aware, this is the first study to have undertaken a comprehensive in-depth analysis of the human tear film proteome in AMD patients.

  2. Genetic susceptibility of intervertebral disc degeneration among young Finnish adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelempisioti Anthi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disc degeneration (DD is a common condition that progresses with aging. Although the events leading to DD are not well understood, a significant genetic influence has been found. This study was undertaken to assess the association between relevant candidate gene polymorphisms and moderate DD in a well-defined and characterized cohort of young adults. Focusing on young age can be valuable in determining genetic predisposition to DD. Methods We investigated the associations of existing candidate genes for DD among 538 young adults with a mean age of 19 belonging to the 1986 Northern Finland Birth Cohort. Nineteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in 16 genes were genotyped. We evaluated lumbar DD using the modified Pfirrmann classification and a 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner for imaging. Results Of the 538 individuals studied, 46% had no degeneration, while 54% had DD and 51% of these had moderate DD. The risk of DD was significantly higher in subjects with an allele G of IL6 SNPs rs1800795 (OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.07-1.96 and rs1800797 (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.02-1.85 in the additive inheritance model. The role of IL6 was further supported by the haplotype analysis, which resulted in an association between the GGG haplotype (SNPs rs1800797, rs1800796 and rs1800795 and DD with an OR of 1.51 (95% CI 1.11-2.04. In addition, we observed an association between DD and two other polymorphisms, SKT rs16924573 (OR 0.27 95% CI 0.07-0.96 and CILP rs2073711 in women (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.07-3.89. Conclusion Our results indicate that IL6, SKT and CILP are involved in the etiology of DD among young adults.

  3. Age-related macular degeneration: prevention and treatment. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease. Age, light exposure, smoking, melanin levels and low-antioxidant diet are contributed to AMD development and progression. Cardiovascular disorders are of considerable importance as well. In macula, photoreceptor outer segments that are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA, particularly, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, are susceptible to free radicals damage. High blood flow velocity and oxygen partial pressure as well as direct sunlight exposure induce oxidative processes. The source of free radicals in photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is an extensive mitochondrial metabolism, photoreceptor outer segments phagocytosis, lipofuscin phototoxic activity and hemoglobin or protoporphyrin precursors photosensitization. Oxidative stress is considered as an universal component of cell depth in necrosis, apoptosis and toxic damage. Antioxidant protective system consists of enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase and non-enzymatic factors (ascorbic acid, alpha tocopherol, retinol, carotenoids. Specific antioxidant food supplement containing ascorbic acid (500 mg, vitamin E (400 IU and beta carotene (15 mg coupled with zinc (80 mg of zinc oxide and copper (2 mg of copper oxide results in 25 % decrease in late-stage AMD development rate. Amongst the agents that can protect retina from oxidative stress and AMD development, carotenoids are of special importance. Lutein and zeaxanthin containing in retina and lens screen blue light from central area of the retina. They also absorb blue light and inhibit free radicals generation thus preventing polyunsaturated FA light destruction. Association between lutein and zeaxanthin intake and late-stage AMD risk was revealed. Amongst the most important factors which deficiency favors macular degeneration are omega-3 FAs, i.e., DHA. DHA is the key component of visual pigment rhodopsin transformation. It

  4. Age-related macular degeneration: prevention and treatment. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease. Age, light exposure, smoking, melanin levels and low-antioxidant diet are contributed to AMD development and progression. Cardiovascular disorders are of considerable importance as well. In macula, photoreceptor outer segments that are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA, particularly, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, are susceptible to free radicals damage. High blood flow velocity and oxygen partial pressure as well as direct sunlight exposure induce oxidative processes. The source of free radicals in photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is an extensive mitochondrial metabolism, photoreceptor outer segments phagocytosis, lipofuscin phototoxic activity and hemoglobin or protoporphyrin precursors photosensitization. Oxidative stress is considered as an universal component of cell depth in necrosis, apoptosis and toxic damage. Antioxidant protective system consists of enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase and non-enzymatic factors (ascorbic acid, alpha tocopherol, retinol, carotenoids. Specific antioxidant food supplement containing ascorbic acid (500 mg, vitamin E (400 IU and beta carotene (15 mg coupled with zinc (80 mg of zinc oxide and copper (2 mg of copper oxide results in 25 % decrease in late-stage AMD development rate. Amongst the agents that can protect retina from oxidative stress and AMD development, carotenoids are of special importance. Lutein and zeaxanthin containing in retina and lens screen blue light from central area of the retina. They also absorb blue light and inhibit free radicals generation thus preventing polyunsaturated FA light destruction. Association between lutein and zeaxanthin intake and late-stage AMD risk was revealed. Amongst the most important factors which deficiency favors macular degeneration are omega-3 FAs, i.e., DHA. DHA is the key component of visual pigment rhodopsin transformation. It

  5. [Development of specific and degenerated primers to CesA genes encoding flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) cellulose synthase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grushetskaia, Z E; Lemesh, V A; Khotyleva, L V

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose synthase catalytic subunit genes, CesA, have been discovered in several higher plant species, and it has been shown that the CesA gene family has multiple members. HVR2 fragment of these genes determine the class specificity of the CESA protein and its participation in the primary or secondary cell wall synthesis. The aim of this study was development of specific and degenerated primers to flax CesA gene fragments leading to obtaining the class specific HVR2 region of the gene. Two pairs of specific primers to the certain fragments of CesA-1 and CesA-6 genes and one pair of degenerated primers to HVR2 region of all flax CesA genes were developed basing on comparison of six CesA EST sequences of flax and full cDNA sequences of Arabidopsis, poplar, maize and cotton plants, obtained from GenBank. After amplification of flax cDNA, the bands of expected size were detected (201 and 300 b.p. for the CesA-1 and CesA-6, and 600 b.p. for the HVR2 region of CesA respectively). The developed markers can be used for cloning and sequencing of flax CesA genes, identifying their number in flax genome, tissue and stage specificity.

  6. Multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Jeong Ick; Ha, Choon Ho; Choi, Karp Shik

    1994-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant plasma cell tumor that is thought to originate proliferation of a single clone of abnormal plasma cell resulting production of a whole monoclonal paraprotein. The authors experienced a case of multiple myeloma with severe mandibular osteolytic lesions in 46-year-old female. As a result of careful analysis of clinical, radiological, histopathological features, and laboratory findings, we diagnosed it as multiple myeloma, and the following results were obtained. 1. Main clinical symptoms were intermittent dull pain on the mandibular body area, abnormal sensation of lip and pain due to the fracture on the right clavicle. 2. Laboratory findings revealed M-spike, reversed serum albumin-globulin ratio, markedly elevated ESR and hypercalcemia. 3. Radiographically, multiple osteolytic punched-out radiolucencies were evident on the skull, zygoma, jaw bones, ribs, clavicle and upper extremities. Enlarged liver and increased uptakes on the lesional sites in RN scan were also observed. 4. Histopathologically, markedly hypercellular marrow with sheets of plasmoblasts and megakaryocytes were also observed.

  7. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Jensen, K

    1988-01-01

    Forty-two (12%) of a total of 366 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) had psychiatric admissions. Of these, 34 (81%) had their first psychiatric admission in conjunction with or after the onset of MS. Classification by psychiatric diagnosis showed that there was a significant positive correlation...

  8. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Knudsen, L; Jensen, K

    1991-01-01

    In a cross-sectional investigation of 116 patients with multiple sclerosis, the social and sparetime activities of the patient were assessed by both patient and his/her family. The assessments were correlated to physical disability which showed that particularly those who were moderately disabled...

  9. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Jensen, K

    1990-01-01

    An investigation on the correlation between ability to read TV subtitles and the duration of visual evoked potential (VEP) latency in 14 patients with definite multiple sclerosis (MS), indicated that VEP latency in patients unable to read the TV subtitles was significantly delayed in comparison...

  10. Multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Knudsen, L; Jensen, K

    1994-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 94 patients (42 males, 52 females) with definite multiple sclerosis (MS) in the age range 25-55 years, the correlation of neuropsychological tests with the ability to read TV-subtitles and with the use of sedatives is examined. A logistic regression analysis reveals...

  11. Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on multiple sclerosis is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  12. Parenting Multiples

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... when your babies do. Though it can be hard to let go of the thousand other things you need to do, remember that your well-being is key to your ability to take care of your babies. What Problems Can Happen? It may be hard to tell multiple babies apart when they first ...

  13. Degeneration and height of cervical discs classified from MRI compared with precise height measurements from radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolstad, Frode [National Centre of Spinal Disorders, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, University Hospital of Trondheim, 7006 Trondheim (Norway)]. E-mail: frode.kolstad@medisin.ntnu.no; Myhr, Gunnar [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Trondheim, 7006 Trondheim (Norway); Kvistad, Kjell Arne [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Trondheim, 7006 Trondheim (Norway); Nygaard, Oystein P. [National Centre of Spinal Disorders, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, University Hospital of Trondheim, 7006 Trondheim (Norway); Leivseth, Gunnar [Department of Neuromedicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, University Hospital of Trondheim, 7006 Trondheim (Norway)

    2005-09-01

    Study design: Descriptive study comparing MRI classifications with measurements from radiographs. Objectives: 1.Define the relationship between MRI classified cervical disc degeneration and objectively measured disc height. 2.Assess the level of inter- and intra-observer errors using MRI in defining cervical disc degeneration. Summary of background data: Cervical spine degeneration has been defined radiologically by loss of disc height, decreased disc and bone marrow signal intensity and disc protrusion/herniation on MRI. The intra- and inter-observer error using MRI in defining cervical degeneration influences data interpretation. Few previous studies have addressed this source of error. The relation and time sequence between cervical disc degeneration classified by MRI and cervical disc height decrease measured from radiographs is unclear. Methods: The MRI classification of degeneration was based on nucleus signal, prolaps identification and bone marrow signal. Two neuro-radiologists evaluated the MR-images independently in a blinded fashion. The radiographic disc height measurements were done by a new computer-assisted method compensating for image distortion and permitting comparison with normal level-, age- and gender-appropriate disc height. Results/conclusions: 1.Progressing disc degeneration classified from MRI is on average significantly associated with a decrease of disc height as measured from radiographs. Within each MRI defined category of degeneration measured disc heights, however, scatter in a wide range. 2.The inter-observer agreement between two neuro-radiologists in both defining degeneration and disc height by MRI was only moderate. Studies addressing questions related to cervical disc degeneration should take this into consideration.

  14. Degeneration and height of cervical discs classified from MRI compared with precise height measurements from radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolstad, Frode; Myhr, Gunnar; Kvistad, Kjell Arne; Nygaard, Oystein P.; Leivseth, Gunnar

    2005-01-01

    Study design: Descriptive study comparing MRI classifications with measurements from radiographs. Objectives: 1.Define the relationship between MRI classified cervical disc degeneration and objectively measured disc height. 2.Assess the level of inter- and intra-observer errors using MRI in defining cervical disc degeneration. Summary of background data: Cervical spine degeneration has been defined radiologically by loss of disc height, decreased disc and bone marrow signal intensity and disc protrusion/herniation on MRI. The intra- and inter-observer error using MRI in defining cervical degeneration influences data interpretation. Few previous studies have addressed this source of error. The relation and time sequence between cervical disc degeneration classified by MRI and cervical disc height decrease measured from radiographs is unclear. Methods: The MRI classification of degeneration was based on nucleus signal, prolaps identification and bone marrow signal. Two neuro-radiologists evaluated the MR-images independently in a blinded fashion. The radiographic disc height measurements were done by a new computer-assisted method compensating for image distortion and permitting comparison with normal level-, age- and gender-appropriate disc height. Results/conclusions: 1.Progressing disc degeneration classified from MRI is on average significantly associated with a decrease of disc height as measured from radiographs. Within each MRI defined category of degeneration measured disc heights, however, scatter in a wide range. 2.The inter-observer agreement between two neuro-radiologists in both defining degeneration and disc height by MRI was only moderate. Studies addressing questions related to cervical disc degeneration should take this into consideration

  15. Loss of Binocular Vision in Monocularly Blind Patients Causes Selective Degeneration of the Superior Lateral Occipital Cortices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Doety D; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE. Chronic ocular pathology, such as glaucoma and macular degeneration, is associated with neuroanatomic changes in the visual pathways. It is a challenge to determine the mechanism responsible for these changes. This could be functional deprivation or transsynaptic degeneration. Acquired

  16. Spondylolisthesis adjacent to a cervical disc arthroplasty does not increase the risk of adjacent level degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieser, David Christopher; Cawley, Derek Thomas; Roscop, Cecile; Mazas, Simon; Coudert, Pierre; Boissiere, Louis; Obeid, Ibrahim; Vital, Jean-Marc; Pointillart, Vincent; Gille, Olivier

    2018-03-31

    To understand whether a spondylolisthesis in the sub-axial spine cranial to a cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) construes a risk of adjacent level disease (ALD). A retrospective review of 164 patients with a minimum 5-year follow-up of a cervical disc arthroplasty was performed. Multi-level surgeries, including hybrid procedures, were included. Multiple implant types were included. The two inter-vertebral discs (IVD) cranial of the CDA were monitored for evidence of radiologic degeneration using the Kettler criteria. The rate of ALD in CDA found in this series was 17.8%, with most affecting the immediately adjacent IVD (27.4 and 7.6%, respectively p = 0.000). Pre-operative mild spondylolisthesis adjacent to a planned CDA was not found to be a risk factor for ALD within 5 years. Those with a degenerative spondylolisthesis are at higher risk of ALD (33%) than those with a non-degenerative cause for their spondylolisthesis (11%). Post-operative CDA alignment, ROM or induced spondylolisthesis do not affect the rate of ALD in those with an adjacent spondylolisthesis. Patients with ALD experience significantly worse 5-year pain and functional outcomes than those unaffected by ALD. A pre-operatively identified mild spondylolisthesis in the sub-axial spine cranially adjacent to a planned CDA is not a risk factor for ALD within 5 years. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.

  17. Retinal pigment epithelial detachments and tears, and progressive retinal degeneration in light chain deposition disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberg, Leigh H; Heckenlively, John R; Leys, Anita M

    2013-05-01

    Light-chain deposition disease (LCDD) is a rare condition characterised by deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains (LCs) in tissues, resulting in varying degrees of organ dysfunction. This study reports the characteristic clinical ocular findings seen in advanced LCDD upon development of ocular fundus changes. This is the first report to describe this entity in vivo in a series of patients. A case series of ocular fundus changes in three patients with kidney biopsy-proven LCDD. All patients underwent best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) exam, perimetry, colour fundus photography and fluorescein angiography; two patients underwent indocyanine green angiography, optical coherence tomography, ultrasound and electroretinography; and one patient underwent fundus autofluorescence. Three patients, 53-60 years old at initial presentation, were studied. All three presented with night blindness, poor dark adaptation, metamorphopsia and visual loss. Examination revealed serous and serohaemorrhagic detachments, multiple retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) tears, diffuse RPE degeneration and progressive fibrotic changes. Neither choroidal neovascularisation nor other vascular abnormalities were present. Final best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) ranged from 20/40 to 20/300. Progressive LC deposition in the fundus seems to damage RPE pump function with flow disturbance between choroid and retina. This pathogenesis can explain the evolution to RPE detachments and subsequent rips and progressive retinal malfunction.

  18. Gravitational black-holes-hedgehogs and two degenerate vacua of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidharth, B. G.; Das, C. R.; Laperashvili, L. V.; Nielsen, H. B.

    In the present paper, assuming the Multiple Point Principle (MPP) as a new law of Nature, we considered the existence of the two degenerate vacua of the Universe: the first Electroweak (EW) vacuum at v1 ≈ 246GeV — “true vacuum”, and the second Planck scale “false vacuum” at v2 ˜ 1018 GeV. In these vacua, we investigated different topological defects. The main aim of this paper is an investigation of the black-hole-hedgehogs configurations as defects of the false vacuum. In the framework of the f(R) gravity, described by the Gravi-Weak unification model, we considered a black-hole solution, which corresponds to a “hedgehog” — global monopole, that has been “swallowed” by the black-hole with mass core MBH ˜ 1018GeV and radius δ ˜ 10‑21GeV‑1. Considering the results of the hedgehog lattice theory in the framework of the SU(2) Yang-Mills gauge-invariant theory with hedgehogs in the Wilson loops, we have used the critical value of temperature for the hedgehogs confinement phase (Tc ˜ 1018GeV). This result gave us the possibility to conclude that the SM shows a new physics with contributions of the SU(2)-triplet Higgs bosons at the scale ˜10TeV. Theory predicts the stability of the EW-vacuum and the accuracy of the MPP.

  19. Optical imaging through turbid media with a degenerate four wave mixing correlation time gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sappey, A.D.

    1994-01-01

    A novel method for detection of ballistic light and rejection of unwanted diffusive light to image structures inside highly scattering media is demonstrated. Degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM) of a doubled YAG laser in Rhodamine 6G is used to provide an ultrafast correlation time gate to discriminate against light that has undergone multiple scattering and therefore lost memory of the structures inside the scattering medium. We present preliminary results that determine the nature of the DFWM grating, confirm the coherence time of the laser, prove the phase-conjugate nature of the signal beam, and determine the dependence of the signal (reflectivity) on dye concentration and laser intensity. Finally, we have obtained images of a test cross-hair pattern through highly turbid suspensions of whole milk in water that are opaque to the naked eye. These imaging experiments demonstrate the utility of DFWM for imaging through turbid media. Based on our results, the use of DFWM as an ultrafast time gate for the detection of ballistic light in optical mammography appears to hold great promise for improving the current state of the art

  20. Synthesis and structural characterization of carboxyethylpyrrole-modified proteins: mediators of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Liang; Gu, Xiaorong; Hong, Li; Laird, James; Jaffe, Keeve; Choi, Jaewoo; Crabb, John; Salomon, Robert G

    2009-11-01

    Protein modifications in which the epsilon-amino group of lysyl residues is incorporated into a 2-(omega-carboxyethyl)pyrrole (CEP) are mediators of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). They promote both angiogenesis into the retina ('wet AMD') and geographic retinal atrophy ('dry AMD'). Blood levels of CEPs are biomarkers for clinical prognosis of the disease. To enable mechanistic studies of their role in promoting AMD, for example, through the activation of B- and T-cells, interaction with receptors, or binding with complement proteins, we developed an efficient synthesis of CEP derivatives, that is especially effective for proteins. The structures of tryptic peptides derived from CEP-modified proteins were also determined. A key finding is that 4,7-dioxoheptanoic acid 9-fluorenylmethyl ester reacts with primary amines to provide 9-fluorenylmethyl esters of CEP-modified proteins that can be deprotected in situ with 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene without causing protein denaturation. The introduction of multiple CEP-modifications with a wide variety of CEP:protein ratios is readily achieved using this strategy.

  1. The Age-Related Eye Disease 2 Study: Micronutrients in the Treatment of Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorusupudi, Aruna; Nelson, Kelly; Bernstein, Paul S

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of vision loss in the elderly. With an increasingly aged population worldwide, the need for the prevention of AMD is rising. Multiple studies investigating AMD with the use of animal models and cell culture have identified oxidative stress-related retinal damage as an important contributing factor. In general, diet is an excellent source of the antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals necessary for healthy living; moreover, the general public is often receptive to recommendations made by physicians and health care workers regarding diet and supplements as a means of empowering themselves to avoid common and worrisome ailments such as AMD, which has made epidemiologists and clinicians enthusiastic about dietary intervention studies. A wide variety of nutrients, such as minerals, vitamins, ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids, and various carotenoids, have been associated with reducing the risk of AMD. Initial results from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) indicated that supplementation with antioxidants (β-carotene and vitamins C and E) and zinc was associated with a reduced risk of AMD progression. The AREDS2 follow-up study, designed to improve upon the earlier formulation, tested the addition of lutein, zeaxanthin, and ω-3 fatty acids. In this review, we examine the science behind the nutritional factors included in these interventional studies and the reasons for considering their inclusion to lower the rate of AMD progression. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. The Age-Related Eye Disease 2 Study: Micronutrients in the Treatment of Macular Degeneration123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorusupudi, Aruna; Nelson, Kelly; Bernstein, Paul S

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of vision loss in the elderly. With an increasingly aged population worldwide, the need for the prevention of AMD is rising. Multiple studies investigating AMD with the use of animal models and cell culture have identified oxidative stress–related retinal damage as an important contributing factor. In general, diet is an excellent source of the antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals necessary for healthy living; moreover, the general public is often receptive to recommendations made by physicians and health care workers regarding diet and supplements as a means of empowering themselves to avoid common and worrisome ailments such as AMD, which has made epidemiologists and clinicians enthusiastic about dietary intervention studies. A wide variety of nutrients, such as minerals, vitamins, ω-3 (n–3) fatty acids, and various carotenoids, have been associated with reducing the risk of AMD. Initial results from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) indicated that supplementation with antioxidants (β-carotene and vitamins C and E) and zinc was associated with a reduced risk of AMD progression. The AREDS2 follow-up study, designed to improve upon the earlier formulation, tested the addition of lutein, zeaxanthin, and ω-3 fatty acids. In this review, we examine the science behind the nutritional factors included in these interventional studies and the reasons for considering their inclusion to lower the rate of AMD progression. PMID:28096126

  3. Screening UBQLN-2 in French frontotemporal lobar degeneration and frontotemporal lobar degeneration-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattante, Serena; Le Ber, Isabelle; Camuzat, Agnès; Pariente, Jérémie; Brice, Alexis; Kabashi, Edor

    2013-08-01

    The ubiquilin-2 gene (UBQLN-2) is the only amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-related gene mapping on the X chromosome. Mutations in the PXX domain of UBQLN-2 have been first described in ALS patients with a mutational frequency of 2.6% in familial ALS cases with no evidence of male-to-male transmission. Different populations have been further tested with mutations largely distributed in the gene and lower frequency of positive cases. To determine the genetic contribution of UBQLN-2 in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and FTLD-ALS, we screened a cohort of 136 French patients, identifying a missense variant (c.1006A>G; p.T336A) in 1 FTLD patient whose biological relevance to disease is questionable. We conclude that UBQLN-2 mutations related to ALS/FTLD are extremely rare in French FTLD and FTLD-ALS patients and should not be analyzed systematically. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Correlation functions with fusion-channel multiplicity in W3 Toda field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belavin, Vladimir; Estienne, Benoit; Foda, Omar; Santachiara, Raoul

    2016-01-01

    Current studies of W N Toda field theory focus on correlation functions such that the W N highest-weight representations in the fusion channels are multiplicity-free. In this work, we study W 3 Toda 4-point functions with multiplicity in the fusion channel. The conformal blocks of these 4-point functions involve matrix elements of a fully-degenerate primary field with a highest-weight in the adjoint representation of sl 3 , and a fully-degenerate primary field with a highest-weight in the fundamental representation of sl 3 . We show that, when the fusion rules do not involve multiplicities, the matrix elements of the fully-degenerate adjoint field, between two arbitrary descendant states, can be computed explicitly, on equal footing with the matrix elements of the semi-degenerate fundamental field. Using null-state conditions, we obtain a fourth-order Fuchsian differential equation for the conformal blocks. Using Okubo theory, we show that, due to the presence of multiplicities, this differential equation belongs to a class of Fuchsian equations that is different from those that have appeared so far in W N theories. We solve this equation, compute its monodromy group, and construct the monodromy-invariant correlation functions. This computation shows in detail how the ambiguities that are caused by the presence of multiplicities are fixed by requiring monodromy-invariance.

  5. Correlation functions with fusion-channel multiplicity in W{sub 3} Toda field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belavin, Vladimir [I.E. Tamm Department of Theoretical Physics, P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute,Leninsky Avenue 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Department of Quantum Physics, Institute for Information Transmission Problems,Bolshoy Karetny per. 19, 127994 Moscow (Russian Federation); Estienne, Benoit [LPTHE, CNRS and Université Pierre et Marie Curie,Sorbonne Universités, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Foda, Omar [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne,Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Santachiara, Raoul [LPTMS, CNRS (UMR 8626), Université Paris-Saclay,15 rue Georges Clémenceau, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2016-06-22

    Current studies of W{sub N} Toda field theory focus on correlation functions such that the W{sub N} highest-weight representations in the fusion channels are multiplicity-free. In this work, we study W{sub 3} Toda 4-point functions with multiplicity in the fusion channel. The conformal blocks of these 4-point functions involve matrix elements of a fully-degenerate primary field with a highest-weight in the adjoint representation of sl{sub 3}, and a fully-degenerate primary field with a highest-weight in the fundamental representation of sl{sub 3}. We show that, when the fusion rules do not involve multiplicities, the matrix elements of the fully-degenerate adjoint field, between two arbitrary descendant states, can be computed explicitly, on equal footing with the matrix elements of the semi-degenerate fundamental field. Using null-state conditions, we obtain a fourth-order Fuchsian differential equation for the conformal blocks. Using Okubo theory, we show that, due to the presence of multiplicities, this differential equation belongs to a class of Fuchsian equations that is different from those that have appeared so far in W{sub N} theories. We solve this equation, compute its monodromy group, and construct the monodromy-invariant correlation functions. This computation shows in detail how the ambiguities that are caused by the presence of multiplicities are fixed by requiring monodromy-invariance.

  6. Multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadashima, Hiromichi; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Imai, Terukuni; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Matsumoto, Sadayuki; Yamamoto, Toru; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Maya, Kiyomi

    1986-01-01

    Eleven patients with a definite diagnosis of multiple sclerosis were examined in terms of correlations between the clinical features and the results of cranial computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: In 5 of the 11 patients, both CT and MRI demonstrated lesions consistent with a finding of multiple sclerosis. In 3 patients, only MRI demonstrated lesions. In the remaining 3 patients, neither CT nor MRI revealed any lesion in the brain. All 5 patients who showed abnormal findings on both CT and MRI had clinical signs either of cerebral or brainstem - cerebellar lesions. On the other hand, two of the 3 patients with normal CT and MRI findings had optic-nerve and spinal-cord signs. Therefore, our results suggested relatively good correlations between the clinical features, CT, and MRI. MRI revealed cerebral lesions in two of the four patients with clinical signs of only optic-nerve and spinal-cord lesions. MRI demonstrated sclerotic lesions in 3 of the 6 patients whose plaques were not detected by CT. In conclusion, MRI proved to be more helpful in the demonstration of lesions attributable to chronic multiple sclerosis. (author)

  7. Focal Thalamic Degeneration from Ethanol and Thiamine Deficiency is Associated with Neuroimmune Gene Induction, Microglial Activation, and Lack of Monocarboxylic Acid Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Liya; Crews, Fulton T

    2014-01-01

    Background Wernicke's encephalopathy-Korsakoff syndrome (WE-KS) is common in alcoholics, caused by thiamine deficiency (TD; vitamin B1) and associated with lesions to the thalamus (THAL). Although TD alone can cause WE, the high incidence in alcoholism suggests that TD and ethanol (EtOH) interact. Methods Mice in control, TD, or EtOH groups alone or combined were studied after 5 or 10 days of treatment. THAL and entorhinal cortex (ENT) histochemistry and mRNA were assessed. Results Combined EtOH-TD treatment for 5 days (EtOH-TD5) showed activated microglia, proinflammatory gene induction and THAL neurodegeneration that was greater than that found with TD alone (TD5), whereas 10 days resulted in marked THAL degeneration and microglial-neuroimmune activation in both groups. In contrast, 10 days of TD did not cause ENT degeneration. Interestingly, in ENT, TD10 activated microglia and astrocytes more than EtOH-TD10. In THAL, multiple astrocytic markers were lost consistent with glial cell loss. TD blocks glucose metabolism more than acetate. Acetate derived from hepatic EtOH metabolism is transported by monocarboxylic acid transporters (MCT) into both neurons and astrocytes that use acetyl-CoA synthetase (AcCoAS) to generate cellular energy from acetate. MCT and AcCoAS expression in THAL is lower than ENT prompting the hypothesis that focal THAL degeneration is related to insufficient MCT and AcCoAS in THAL. To test this hypothesis, we administered glycerin triacetate (GTA) to increase blood acetate and found it protected the THAL from TD-induced degeneration. Conclusions Our findings suggest that EtOH potentiates TD-induced THAL degeneration through neuroimmune gene induction. The findings support the hypothesis that TD deficiency inhibits global glucose metabolism and that a reduced ability to process acetate for cellular energy results in THAL focal degeneration in alcoholics contributing to the high incidence of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in alcoholism. PMID

  8. MRI histogram analysis enables objective and continuous classification of intervertebral disc degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldenberg, Christian; Hebelka, Hanna; Brisby, Helena; Lagerstrand, Kerstin Magdalena

    2018-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best diagnostic imaging method for low back pain. However, the technique is currently not utilized in its full capacity, often failing to depict painful intervertebral discs (IVDs), potentially due to the rough degeneration classification system used clinically today. MR image histograms, which reflect the IVD heterogeneity, may offer sensitive imaging biomarkers for IVD degeneration classification. This study investigates the feasibility of using histogram analysis as means of objective and continuous grading of IVD degeneration. Forty-nine IVDs in ten low back pain patients (six males, 25-69 years) were examined with MRI (T2-weighted images and T2-maps). Each IVD was semi-automatically segmented on three mid-sagittal slices. Histogram features of the IVD were extracted from the defined regions of interest and correlated to Pfirrmann grade. Both T2-weighted images and T2-maps displayed similar histogram features. Histograms of well-hydrated IVDs displayed two separate peaks, representing annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus. Degenerated IVDs displayed decreased peak separation, where the separation was shown to correlate strongly with Pfirrmann grade (P histogram appearances. Histogram features correlated well with IVD degeneration, suggesting that IVD histogram analysis is a suitable tool for objective and continuous IVD degeneration classification. As histogram analysis revealed IVD heterogeneity, it may be a clinical tool for characterization of regional IVD degeneration effects. To elucidate the usefulness of histogram analysis in patient management, IVD histogram features between asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals needs to be compared.

  9. Menopause is associated with articular cartilage degeneration: a clinical study of knee joint in 860 women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Chao; Xiang, Guangheng; Weng, Qiaoyou; Chen, Zhaojie; Chen, Deheng; Wang, Qingqing; Zhang, Di; Zhou, Bin; He, Dengwei; Chen, Hongliang

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between menopause and severity of knee joint cartilage degeneration using a magnetic resonance imaging-based six-level grading system, with six cartilage surfaces, the medial and lateral femoral condyle, the femoral trochlea, the medial and lateral tibia plateau, and the patella. The study cohort comprised 860 healthy women (age 36-83 y), and 5,160 cartilage surfaces were analyzed. Age, weight, height, age at natural menopause, and years since menopause (YSM) were obtained. Cartilage degeneration was assessed using a magnetic resonance imaging-based six-level grading system. After removing the age, height, and weight effects, postmenopausal women had more severe cartilage degeneration than pre- and perimenopausal women (P  0.05). No significant difference was observed in lateral tibia plateau and lateral femoral condyle in postmenopausal women. Menopause is associated with cartilage degeneration of knee joint. After menopause, cartilage showed progressive severe degeneration that occurred in the first 25 YSM, suggesting estrogen deficiency might be a risk factor of cartilage degeneration of the knee joint. Further studies are needed to investigate whether age or menopause plays a more important role in the progression of cartilage degeneration in the knee joint.

  10. Relationship between full-thickness macular hole and retinal break/lattice degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinglin; Li, Yonghao; Zhao, Xiujuan; Cai, Yu; Yu, Xiling; Lu, Lin

    2015-12-01

    The purpose is to investigate the relationship between full-thickness macular hole (MH) and retinal break (RB) and/or lattice degeneration. Patients diagnosed as full-thickness MH and referred to Dr. Lin Lu from January 2009 to December 2013 were evaluated. All patients underwent general ophthalmologic examinations, fundus examination and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The RB and/or lattice degeneration were recorded. Totally 183 eyes of 167 patients were included. The sex ratio of men to women was 1:2.88. A total of 17 eyes were pseudophakic and 166 eyes were phakic. RB and/or lattice degeneration were found in 62 eyes (33.88%). The prevalence of RB and/or lattice degeneration was similar between men and women (P = 0.344 > 0.05). There was no statistical difference between the pseudophakic eyes and phakic eyes (P = 0.138 > 0.05). All of the RB and/or lattice degeneration were located near or anterior to the equator. The inferior quadrants and the vertical meridian were affected more often than the superior quadrants and the horizontal meridian. We identified a high incidence of RB/lattice degeneration in cases of full-thickness MH. Carefully examination of the peripheral retina and prophylactic treatment of RB and/or lattice degeneration are critical.

  11. Association of HTRA1 rs11200638 with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in Brazilian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lana, Tamires Prates; da Silva Costa, Sueli Matilde; Ananina, Galina; Hirata, Fábio Endo; Rim, Priscila Hae Hyun; Medina, Flávio MacCord; de Vasconcellos, José Paulo Cabral; de Melo, Mônica Barbosa

    2018-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a multifactorial disease that can lead to vision impairment in older individuals. Although the etiology of age-related macular degeneration remains unknown, risk factors include age, ethnicity, smoking, hypertension, obesity, and genetic factors. Two main loci have been identified through genome-wide association studies, on chromosomes 1 and 10. Among the variants located at the 10q26 region, rs11200638, located at the HTRA1 gene promoter, has been associated with age-related macular degeneration in several populations and is considered the main polymorphism. We conducted a replication case-control study to analyze the frequency and participation of rs11200638 in the etiology of age-related macular degeneration in a sample of patients and controls from the State of São Paulo, Brazil, through polymerase chain reaction and enzymatic digestion. The frequency of the A allele was 57.60% in patients with age-related macular degeneration and 36.45% in controls (p value age-related macular degeneration group compared to the control group (p = 1.21 e-07 and 0.0357, respectively). No statistically significant results were observed after stratification in dry versus wet types or advanced versus non-advanced forms. To our knowledge, this is the first time the association between rs11200638 and overall age-related macular degeneration has been reported in South America.

  12. De-MetaST-BLAST: a tool for the validation of degenerate primer sets and data mining of publicly available metagenomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Gulvik

    Full Text Available Development and use of primer sets to amplify nucleic acid sequences of interest is fundamental to studies spanning many life science disciplines. As such, the validation of primer sets is essential. Several computer programs have been created to aid in the initial selection of primer sequences that may or may not require multiple nucleotide combinations (i.e., degeneracies. Conversely, validation of primer specificity has remained largely unchanged for several decades, and there are currently few available programs that allows for an evaluation of primers containing degenerate nucleotide bases. To alleviate this gap, we developed the program De-MetaST that performs an in silico amplification using user defined nucleotide sequence dataset(s and primer sequences that may contain degenerate bases. The program returns an output file that contains the in silico amplicons. When De-MetaST is paired with NCBI's BLAST (De-MetaST-BLAST, the program also returns the top 10 nr NCBI database hits for each recovered in silico amplicon. While the original motivation for development of this search tool was degenerate primer validation using the wealth of nucleotide sequences available in environmental metagenome and metatranscriptome databases, this search tool has potential utility in many data mining applications.

  13. Molecular imaging of serotonin degeneration in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gwenn S; Barrett, Frederick S; Joo, Jin Hui; Nassery, Najlla; Savonenko, Alena; Sodums, Devin J; Marano, Christopher M; Munro, Cynthia A; Brandt, Jason; Kraut, Michael A; Zhou, Yun; Wong, Dean F; Workman, Clifford I

    2017-09-01

    Neuropathological and neuroimaging studies have consistently demonstrated degeneration of monoamine systems, especially the serotonin system, in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. The evidence for degeneration of the serotonin system in mild cognitive impairment is limited. Thus, the goal of the present study was to measure the serotonin transporter in vivo in mild cognitive impairment and healthy controls. The serotonin transporter is a selective marker of serotonin terminals and of the integrity of serotonin projections to cortical, subcortical and limbic regions and is found in high concentrations in the serotonergic cell bodies of origin of these projections (raphe nuclei). Twenty-eight participants with mild cognitive impairment (age 66.6±6.9, 16 males) and 28 healthy, cognitively normal, demographically matched controls (age 66.2±7.1, 15 males) underwent magnetic resonance imaging for measurement of grey matter volumes and high-resolution positron emission tomography with well-established radiotracers for the serotonin transporter and regional cerebral blood flow. Beta-amyloid imaging was performed to evaluate, in combination with the neuropsychological testing, the likelihood of subsequent cognitive decline in the participants with mild cognitive impairment. The following hypotheses were tested: 1) the serotonin transporter would be lower in mild cognitive impairment compared to controls in cortical and limbic regions, 2) in mild cognitive impairment relative to controls, the serotonin transporter would be lower to a greater extent and observed in a more widespread pattern than lower grey matter volumes or lower regional cerebral blood flow and 3) lower cortical and limbic serotonin transporters would be correlated with greater deficits in auditory-verbal and visual-spatial memory in mild cognitive impairment, not in controls. Reduced serotonin transporter availability was observed in mild cognitive impairment compared to controls in cortical and limbic

  14. Axonal degeneration stimulates the formation of NG2+ cells and oligodendrocytes in the mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helle Hvilsted; Ladeby, Rune; Drøjdahl, Nina

    2006-01-01

    the response of the NG2+ cells to the different components of demyelinating pathology, we investigated the response of adult NG2+ cells to axonal degeneration in the absence of primary myelin or oligodendrocyte pathology. Axonal degeneration was induced in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult mice...... by transection of the entorhino-dentate perforant path projection. The acutely induced degeneration of axons and terminals resulted in a prompt response of NG2+ cells, consisting of morphological transformation, cellular proliferation, and upregulation of NG2 expression days 2-3 after surgery. This was followed...

  15. Spin-dependent Hall effect in degenerate semiconductors: a theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrish Miah, M

    2008-01-01

    The spin-dependent Hall (SDH) effect in degenerate semiconductors is investigated theoretically. Starting from a two-component drift-diffusion equation, an expression for SDH voltage (V SDH ) is derived, and drift and diffusive contributions to V SDH are studied. For the possible enhancement of the diffusive part, degenerate and nondegenerate cases are examined. We find that due to an increase in the diffusion coefficient V SDH increases in a degenerate semiconductor, consistent with the experimental observations. The expression for V SDH is reduced in three limiting cases, namely diffusive, drift-diffusion crossover and drift, and is analysed. The results agree with those obtained in recent theoretical investigations.

  16. MR imaging in the evaluation of macular degeneration and intraocular tumorlike conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mafee, M.F.; Peyman, G.A.; Cohen, S.B.; Capek, V.

    1987-01-01

    The MR characteristics of malignant uveal melanoma and choroidal hematoma have been described. This paper reports on MR imaging and CT examinations of patients who had macular degeneration, retinal and subretinal masses (hematoma, dense scar), choroidal metastases, choroidal nevus, and choroidal leiomyoma. Several diagnostically helpful MR findings were noted. Posterior hyaloid detachment with associated retinal detachment and subretinal hematoma in patients with macular degeneration demonstrated by MR imaging. Associated liquefaction of the vitreous in our patients with macular degeneration was seen as hyperintensity of the involved vitreous. Hematomas, metastases, and nevi may be confused with uveal melanoma. Choroidal leiomyoma had characteristic high signal intensity in both T1- and T2-weighted images

  17. Mode conversion and its utilization of degenerating surface wave modes on a plasma column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, S.; Akao, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Both mode conversion at degenerating points of dispersion relations for surface wave modes on a discharge plasma column and the methods for their detection and utilization are presented. Mode conversions at three degenerating points become observable by using a surface wave resonator when an azimuthal inhomogeneity of plasma is produced by a static magnetic field of about 1 G applied perpendicular to the column axis. Two of the three detected degenerating points can be utilized for an easy and exact determination of the electron density and its distribution in the discharge tube

  18. Multiple inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Theory of Inflation, namely, that at some point the entropy content of the universe was greatly increased, has much promise. It may solve the puzzles of homogeneity and the creation of structure. However, no particle physics model has yet been found that can successfully drive inflation. The difficulty in satisfying the constraint that the isotropy of the microwave background places on the effective potential of prospective models is immense. In this work we have codified the requirements of such models in a most general form. We have carefully calculated the amounts of inflation the various problems of the Standard Model need for their solution. We have derived a completely model independent upper bond on the inflationary Hubble parameter. We have developed a general notation with which to probe the possibilities of Multiple Inflation. We have shown that only in very unlikely circumstances will any evidence of an earlier inflation, survive the de Sitter period of its successor. In particular, it is demonstrated that it is most unlikely that two bouts of inflation will yield high amplitudes of density perturbations on small scales and low amplitudes on large. We conclude that, while multiple inflation will be of great theoretical interest, it is unlikely to have any observational impact

  19. Imaging Polarimetry in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Masahiro; Yamanari, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Takuya; Elsner, Ann E.; Makita, Shuichi; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the birefringence properties of eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To compare the information from two techniques—scanning laser polarimetry (GDx) and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT)—and investigate how they complement each other. METHODS The authors prospectively examined the eyes of two healthy subjects and 13 patients with exudative AMD. Using scanning laser polarimetry, they computed phase-retardation maps, average reflectance images, and depolarized light images. To obtain polarimetry information with improved axial resolution, they developed a fiber-based, polarization-sensitive, spectral-domain OCT system and measured the phase retardation associated with birefringence in the same eyes. RESULTS Both GDx and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography detected abnormal birefringence at the locus of exudative lesions. Polarization-sensitive, spectral-domain OCT showed that in the old lesions with fibrosis, phase-retardation values were significantly larger than in the new lesions (P = 0.020). Increased scattered light and altered polarization scramble were associated with portions of the lesions. CONCLUSIONS GDx and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain OCT are complementary in probing birefringence properties in exudative AMD. Polarimetry findings in exudative AMD emphasized different features and were related to the progression of the disease, potentially providing a noninvasive tool for microstructure in exudative AMD. PMID:18515594

  20. Light non-degenerate squarks at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahbubani, Rakhi

    2012-12-01

    Experimental bounds on squarks of the first two generations assume their masses to be eightfold degenerate, and consequently constrain them to be heavier than ∝1.4 TeV when the gluino is lighter than 2.5 TeV. The assumption of squark-mass universality is neither a direct consequence of Minimal Flavor Violation (MFV), which allows for splittings within squark generations, nor a prediction of supersymmetric alignment models, which allow for splittings between generations. We reinterpret a recent CMS multijet plus missing energy search allowing for deviations from U(2) universality, and find significantly weakened squark bounds: a 400 GeV second-generation squark singlet is allowed, even with exclusive decays to a massless neutralino; and in an MFV scenario, the down-type squark singlets can be as light as 600 GeV provided the up-type singlets are pushed up to 1.8 TeV, for a 1.5 TeV gluino and decoupled doublet squarks.

  1. Degeneration of pyramidal tract of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Tatsuhito; Harada, Noboru; Gotoh, Yasunobu; Imataka, Kiyoharu; Kinuta, Yuji; Okumura, Teizo; Niijima, Kyo; Taki, Waro; Kikuchi, Haruhiko.

    1988-01-01

    MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) examinaion was performed on cases of hemiplegia and hemiparesis. These included seven cases of intracerebral hemorrhage, four cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage, one case of cerebral infarct, and two cases of head trauma. The pyramidal tract in the brain stem was studied in five patients with complete hemiplegia and in nine with incomplete hemiparesis. The scanner of the MRI was a resistive type operating at a field of 0.2 Tesla. The inversion recovery (IR) and saturation recovery (SR) techniques were utilized. The pyramidal tract at the level of the midbrain and the pons was recognized as a low intensity area on the T 1 image (IR 1500/43) in the cases of complete hemiplegia. However, it was recognized as a high intensity area on the SR image (SR 1000/60) and the T 2 image (SR 2000/100). No abnormal signal intensity was found in the cases of incomplete hemiparesis. A low intensity area on the T 1 image and a high intensity area on the T 2 image were recognized in the ventral portion of the midbrain and the pons on the affected side. These findings indicate a degeneration of the pyramidal tract at the level of the brain stem in patients with complete hemiplegia. (author)

  2. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism in frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.M.; Cho, S.S.; Lee, K.-H.; Choi, Y.; Choe, Y.S.; Kim, B.-T.; Kim, S.E.; Kwon, J.C.; Na, D.L.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is the third most common cause of dementia, following Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body disease. Four prototypic neuro behavioral syndromes can be produced by FTLD: frontotemporal dementia (FTD), frontotemporal dementia with motor neuron disease (MND), semantic dementia (SD), and progressive aphasia (PA). We investigated patterns of metabolic impairment in patients with FTLD presented with four different clinical syndromes. Methods: We analyzed glucose metabolic patterns on FDG PET images obtained from 34 patients with a clinical diagnosis of FTLD (19 FTD, 6 MND, 6 SD, and 3 PA, according to a consensus criteria for clinical syndromes associated with FTLD) and 7 age-matched healthy controls using SPM99. Results: Patients with FTD had metabolic deficit in the left frontal cortex and bilateral anterior temporal cortex. Hypometabolism in the bilateral pre-motor area was shown in patients with MND. Patients with SD had metabolic deficit in the left posterior temporal cortex including Wernicke's area, while hypometabolism in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus including Broca's area and left angular gyrus was seen in patients with PA. These metabolic patterns were well correlated with clinical and neuropsychological features of FTLD syndromes. Conclusion: These data provide a biochemical basis of clinical classification of FTLD. FDG PET may help evaluate and classify patients with FTLD

  3. Epidemiological Survey of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration in Tottori Prefecture, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Wada-Isoe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD in Japan is unknown. An epidemiological survey study of FTLD was undertaken in Tottori Prefecture, a district in the western region of Japan. Methods: Hospitals in Tottori Prefecture were surveyed by a two-step questionnaire in 2010, and the prevalence of FTLD per 100,000 inhabitants was calculated using the actual number of patients and inhabitants in Tottori Prefecture on the prevalence day of October 1, 2010. Results: In this survey, 66 patients were diagnosed with FTLD. The subtypes of FTLD were as follows: 62 cases of frontotemporal dementia (FTD, 3 cases of progressive nonfluent aphasia, and 1 case of semantic dementia. Among the FTD cases, 5 cases were FTD with motor neuron disease and 1 case was FTD with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17. The prevalence of FTD in the total population of Tottori Prefecture was 11.2 per 100,000 inhabitants. Based on these results, the prevalence of FTLD in Japan in 2008 was estimated to be 9.5 per 100,000 individuals. Conclusions: Our epidemiological survey results suggest that there are at least 12,000 FTLD patients in Japan, indicating that FTLD is not a rare disease.

  4. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Parmeggiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease.

  5. Neuroanatomical profiles of personality change in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Colin J; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Omar, Rohani; Rossor, Martin N; Warren, Jason D

    2011-05-01

    The neurobiological basis of personality is poorly understood. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) frequently presents with complex behavioural changes, and therefore potentially provides a disease model in which to investigate brain substrates of personality. To assess neuroanatomical correlates of personality change in a cohort of individuals with FTLD using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Thirty consecutive individuals fulfilling consensus criteria for FTLD were assessed. Each participant's carer completed a Big Five Inventory (BFI) questionnaire on five key personality traits; for each trait, a change score was derived based on current compared with estimated premorbid characteristics. All participants underwent volumetric brain magnetic resonance imaging. A VBM analysis was implemented regressing change score for each trait against regional grey matter volume across the FTLD group. The FTLD group showed a significant decline in extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness and openness and an increase in neuroticism. Change in particular personality traits was associated with overlapping profiles of grey matter loss in more anterior cortical areas and relative preservation of grey matter in more posterior areas; the most robust neuroanatomical correlate was identified for reduced conscientiousness in the region of the posterior superior temporal gyrus. Quantitative measures of personality change in FTLD can be correlated with changes in regional grey matter. The neuroanatomical profiles for particular personality traits overlap brain circuits previously implicated in aspects of social cognition and suggest that dysfunction at the level of distributed cortical networks underpins personality change in FTLD.

  6. Branchial arch anomalies: Recurrence, malignant degeneration and operative complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mufarrej, Faisal; Stoddard, David; Bite, Uldis

    2017-06-01

    Branchial arch anomalies (BAA) represent one of the commonest pediatric neck masses, but large case series are lacking with none specifically examining risk of recurrence, surgical complications, and malignancy. Retrospective study of patients with BAA at Mayo Clinic from 1/1/1976-7/29/2011. Features studied include age, gender, location, BAA type, symptoms, recurrence, preoperative management, extent of surgery, pathology as well as presence of tracts. Associations with tracts, operative complications, and recurrence were evaluated. 421 subjects underwent BAA excision during the study period at our institution. Subjects with tracts were symptomatic earlier. Four cases (mean age 60.3 years) of malignancy were identified. Among the 358 (non-remenant) BAA patients with no previous excision, 3.6% recurred at a mean of 47.1 months following surgery. Patients who underwent incision and drainage prior to BAA excision were 3.4 times more likely to recur. 2% experienced complications. Age, BAA type, preoperative imaging and extent of surgery did not affect recurrence or complication rates. Patients with history of preoperative incision and drainage should be followed closely for recurrence the first four years. Early BAA excision is not associated with higher complication rate. Extent of resection should be determined by gross margins of BAA. Malignant degeneration was not seen in children. Malignancies have been seen in older patients (over 45 years) diagnosed with BAA, and a thorough work-up is important for correct diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Repeated adjacent-segment degeneration after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Shinya; Oda, Takenori; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Maeno, Takafumi; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important sequelae affecting long-term results is adjacent-segment degeneration (ASD) after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Although several reports have described the incidence rate, there have been no reports of repeated ASD. The purpose of this report was to describe 1 case of repeated ASD after PLIF. A 62-year-old woman with L-4 degenerative spondylolisthesis underwent PLIF at L4-5. At the second operation, L3-4 PLIF was performed for L-3 degenerative spondylolisthesis 6 years after the primary operation. At the third operation, L2-3 PLIF was performed for L-2 degenerative spondylolisthesis 1.5 years after the primary operation. Vertebral collapse of L-1 was detected 1 year after the third operation, and the collapse had progressed. At the fourth operation, 3 years after the third operation, vertebral column resection of L-1 and replacement of titanium mesh cages with pedicle screw fixation between T-4 and L-5 was performed. Although the patient's symptoms resolved after each operation, the time between surgeries shortened. The sacral slope decreased gradually although each PLIF achieved local lordosis at the fused segment.

  8. Gene therapy for inherited retinal and optic nerve degenerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Nicholas A; Morral, Nuria; Ciulla, Thomas A; Bracha, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The eye is a target for investigational gene therapy due to the monogenic nature of many inherited retinal and optic nerve degenerations (IRD), its accessibility, tight blood-ocular barrier, the ability to non-invasively monitor for functional and anatomic outcomes, as well as its relative immune privileged state.Vectors currently used in IRD clinical trials include adeno-associated virus (AAV), small single-stranded DNA viruses, and lentivirus, RNA viruses of the retrovirus family. Both can transduce non-dividing cells, but AAV are non-integrating, while lentivirus integrate into the host cell genome, and have a larger transgene capacity. Areas covered: This review covers Leber's congenital amaurosis, choroideremia, retinitis pigmentosa, Usher syndrome, Stargardt disease, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, Achromatopsia, and X-linked retinoschisis. Expert opinion: Despite great potential, gene therapy for IRD raises many questions, including the potential for less invasive intravitreal versus subretinal delivery, efficacy, safety, and longevity of response, as well as acceptance of novel study endpoints by regulatory bodies, patients, clinicians, and payers. Also, ultimate adoption of gene therapy for IRD will require widespread genetic screening to identify and diagnose patients based on genotype instead of phenotype.

  9. Stem cells in clinical trials for treatment of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Henry

    2016-01-01

    After decades of basic science research involving the testing of regenerative strategies in animal models of retinal degenerative diseases, a number of clinical trials are now underway, with additional trials set to begin shortly. These efforts will evaluate the safety and preliminary efficacy of cell-based products in the eyes of patients with a number of retinal conditions, notably including age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa and Stargardt's disease. This review considers the scientific work and early trials with fetal cells and tissues that set the stage for the current clinical investigatory work, as well the trials themselves, specifically those either now completed, underway or close to initiation. The cells of interest include retinal pigment epithelial cells derived from embryonic stem or induced pluripotent stem cells, undifferentiated neural or retinal progenitors or cells from the vascular/bone marrow compartment or umbilical cord tissue. Degenerative diseases of the retina represent a popular target for emerging cell-based therapeutics and initial data from early stage clinical trials suggest that short-term safety objectives can be met in at least some cases. The question of efficacy will require additional time and testing to be adequately resolved.

  10. Autoimmune neurological syndromes associated limbic encephalitis and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayas, Zeynep Özözen; Kotan, Dilcan; Aras, Yeşim Güzey

    2016-10-06

    Autoimmune neurological syndrome is a group of disorders caused by cancer affecting nervous system by different immunological mechanisms. In this study, we aim to study the clinical symptoms, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings, autoantibody tests, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs and treatment outcome of patients with autoimmune syndromes. In this study, 7 patients (4 male, 3 female) diagnosed with autoimmune neurological syndrome were retrospectively examined. Five of patients were diagnosed with limbic encephalitis, two of them were paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Confusion and seizure were the most seen symptoms. Two patients had psychiatric disturbances (28,5%) followed by seizure. Headache was seen in 2 patients (% 28,5), disartria in 1 patient (% 14,2), and gait disorder in 2 patients (28,5%). The duration of symptoms was 46 (3-150) days on average. CSF abnormalities were detected in 2 patients. CT and MRI of the brain was available in all patients. Five patients had involvement of mesiotemporal region, two patients had diffuse cerebellar atrophy. One of patients had anti-GABAR B1 positivity. Tumors were detected in 2 patients while investigation for paraneoplasia screening. Remission is only possible with the detection and treatment of the malignancy. Early diagnosis and treatment are of paramount importance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Detecting superlight dark matter with Fermi-degenerate materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochberg, Yonit [Theory Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,Berkeley, CA 94709 (United States); Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94709 (United States); Pyle, Matt [Physics Department, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94709 (United States); Zhao, Yue [Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, University of Michigan,Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Zurek, Kathryn M. [Theory Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,Berkeley, CA 94709 (United States); Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94709 (United States)

    2016-08-08

    We examine in greater detail the recent proposal of using superconductors for detecting dark matter as light as the warm dark matter limit of O(keV). Detection of such light dark matter is possible if the entire kinetic energy of the dark matter is extracted in the scattering, and if the experiment is sensitive to O(meV) energy depositions. This is the case for Fermi-degenerate materials in which the Fermi velocity exceeds the dark matter velocity dispersion in the Milky Way of ∼10{sup −3}. We focus on a concrete experimental proposal using a superconducting target with a transition edge sensor in order to detect the small energy deposits from the dark matter scatterings. Considering a wide variety of constraints, from dark matter self-interactions to the cosmic microwave background, we show that models consistent with cosmological/astrophysical and terrestrial constraints are observable with such detectors. A wider range of viable models with dark matter mass below an MeV is available if dark matter or mediator properties (such as couplings or masses) differ at BBN epoch or in stellar interiors from those in superconductors. We also show that metal targets pay a strong in-medium suppression for kinetically mixed mediators; this suppression is alleviated with insulating targets.

  12. Light non-degenerate squarks at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahbubani, Rakhi [CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Div.; Papucci, Michele; Ruderman, Joshua T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA (United States). Theoretical Physics Group; California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Perez, Gilad [CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Div.; Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Particle Physics and Astrophysics; Weiler, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Experimental bounds on squarks of the first two generations assume their masses to be eightfold degenerate, and consequently constrain them to be heavier than {proportional_to}1.4 TeV when the gluino is lighter than 2.5 TeV. The assumption of squark-mass universality is neither a direct consequence of Minimal Flavor Violation (MFV), which allows for splittings within squark generations, nor a prediction of supersymmetric alignment models, which allow for splittings between generations. We reinterpret a recent CMS multijet plus missing energy search allowing for deviations from U(2) universality, and find significantly weakened squark bounds: a 400 GeV second-generation squark singlet is allowed, even with exclusive decays to a massless neutralino; and in an MFV scenario, the down-type squark singlets can be as light as 600 GeV provided the up-type singlets are pushed up to 1.8 TeV, for a 1.5 TeV gluino and decoupled doublet squarks.

  13. Mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament: Management and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Pandey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mucoid degeneration (MD is a rare pathological affection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL. Mucinous material within the substance of ACL produces pain and limited motion in the knee. This series describes the clinicoradiological presentation of patients with mucoid ACL, partial arthroscopic debridement of ACL and outcomes. Materials and Methods: During a period of 3 years, 11 patients were included based upon the clinical suspicion, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings, arthroscopic features and histopathologic confirmation of MD of ACL. Result: Six patients were male and five were female with median age of 40 years (range 21-59 years. All patients complained of knee pain with median duration of 5 months (range 1-24 months. All patients had painful deep flexion with 63.6% (N = 7 reporting trivial trauma before the onset of symptoms. MRI revealed MD of ACL in all with associated cyst in three patients. Partial debridement of ACL was done in ten and complete in one patient. None of them required notchplasty. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis in all of them. At the mean followup of 13.81 months (range 6-28 months, all patients regained complete flexion and none complained of instability. Conclusion: Prior knowledge of condition with high index of suspicion and careful interpretation of MRI can establish the diagnosis preoperatively. It responds well to partial debridement of ACL and mucinous material without development of instability.

  14. Degenerate four-wave mixing with the phase diffusion field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.H.; Chen, CE.; Elliott, D.S.; Cooper, J.; Smith, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    We report measurements of the effect of laser fluctuations on a strong-field degenerate four-wave mixing interaction, carried out in a nearly Doppler-free, two-level system using a single laser with statistically well-defined phase fluctuations. The counterpropagating pump beams and the probe beam, each split from this phase-noise-modulated source, were fully correlated. The nonlinear medium was an optically-pumped diffuse beam of atomic sodium. By time-delaying the probe with respect to the pump beams, the composite field becomes non-Markovian. Four-wave mixing results in the generation of a phase-conjugate beam anti-parallel to the probe beam. With the laser field spectrum nearly Lorentzian in shape, and with a field linewidth greater (and, for comparison, much narrower) than the natural linewidth of the sodium, we measured the intensity of the phase-conjugate beam as the pump and probe beams were tuned through the D2 resonance, as a function of intensity of die pump beam (up to intensities several times the saturation intensity), and for varying delay between the pump and probe fields. This experiment provides a cleaner measurement of this interaction than any previously available

  15. Temporomandibular joint fibrocartilage degeneration from unilateral dental splints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sarah E; Lowe, Jesse R; Tudares, Mauro A; Gold, Michael S; Almarza, Alejandro J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which altered loading in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), as might be associated with a malocclusion, drives degeneration of articulating surfaces in the TMJ. We therefore sought to quantify the effects of altered joint loading on the mechanical properties and biochemical content and distribution of TMJ fibrocartilage in the rabbit. Altered TMJ loading was induced with a 1mm splint placed unilaterally over the maxillary and mandibular molars for 6 weeks. At that time, TMJ fibrocartilage was assessed by compression testing, biochemical content (collagen, glycosaminoglycan (GAG), DNA) and distribution (histology), for both the TMJ disc and the condylar fibrocartilage. There were no changes in the TMJ disc for any of the parameters tested. The condylar fibrocartilage from the splinted animals was significantly stiffer and the DNA content was significantly lower than that in control animals. There was significant remodeling in the condylar fibrocartilage layers as manifested by a change in GAG and collagen II distribution and a loss of defined cell layers. A connection between the compressive properties of TMJ condylar fibrocartilage after 6 weeks of splinting and the changes in histology was observed. These results suggest a change in joint loading leads to condylar damage, which may contribute to pain associated with at least some forms of TMJ disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Target 5000: Target Capture Sequencing for Inherited Retinal Degenerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Dockery

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available There are an estimated 5000 people in Ireland who currently have an inherited retinal degeneration (IRD. It is the goal of this study, through genetic diagnosis, to better enable these 5000 individuals to obtain a clearer understanding of their condition and improved access to potentially applicable therapies. Here we show the current findings of a target capture next-generation sequencing study of over 750 patients from over 520 pedigrees currently situated in Ireland. We also demonstrate how processes can be implemented to retrospectively analyse patient datasets for the detection of structural variants in previously obtained sequencing reads. Pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations were detected in 68% of pedigrees tested. We report nearly 30 novel mutations including three large structural variants. The population statistics related to our findings are presented by condition and credited to their respective candidate gene mutations. Rediagnosis rates of clinical phenotypes after genotyping are discussed. Possible causes of failure to detect a candidate mutation are evaluated. Future elements of this project, with a specific emphasis on structural variants and non-coding pathogenic variants, are expected to increase detection rates further and thereby produce an even more comprehensive representation of the genetic landscape of IRDs in Ireland.

  17. Use of antidementia drugs in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pousa, Secundino; Calvó-Perxas, Laia; Lejarreta, Saioa; Cullell, Marta; Meléndez, Rosa; Hernández, Erélido; Bisbe, Josep; Perkal, Héctor; Manzano, Anna; Roig, Anna Maria; Turró-Garriga, Oriol; Vilalta-Franch, Joan; Garre-Olmo, Josep

    2012-06-01

    Clinical evidence indicates that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) are not efficacious to treat frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). The British Association for Psychopharmacology recommends avoiding the use of AChEI and memantine in patients with FTLD. Cross-sectional design using 1092 cases with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 64 cases with FTLD registered by the Registry of Dementias of Girona. Bivariate analyses were performed, and binary logistic regressions were used to detect variables associated with antidementia drugs consumption. The AChEIs were consumed by 57.6% and 42.2% of the patients with AD and FTLD, respectively. Memantine was used by 17.2% and 10.9% of patients with AD and FTLD, respectively. Binary logistic regressions yielded no associations with antidementia drugs consumption. There is a discrepancy regarding clinical practice and the recommendations based upon clinical evidence. The increased central nervous system drug use detected in FTLD requires multicentric studies aiming at finding the best means to treat these patients.

  18. Radiation therapy for age-related macular degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Ayako; Honda, Kaoru; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of low-dose radiation on choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Since Chakravarthy reported the benefits from administration of low-dose external-beam irradiation for CNV, many studies have demonstrated that irradiation could have a beneficial treatment effect, whereas several reports have not. In our hospital, 12 eyes with AMD received 10 Gy of 4 MV photons and the other 9 eyes received 20 Gy. Another 4 eyes were untreated as control. After 6 months of treatment, visual acuity was maintained in 11 eyes, improved in 5 eyes, and deteriorated in 5 eyes of treated patients. In control group, visual acuity was maintained in 1 eye and deteriorated in 3 eyes. The size of CNV regressed in 10 eyes, remained stationary in 2 eyes and progressed in 2 eyes of treated patients, while in control group CNV regressed in 2 eyes and remained stationary in 1 eye. After 12 months some CNV progressed. Although the present result seems to be better than those in previous reports, whether or not the treatment is beneficial has to be awaited. (author)

  19. Langmuir instability in partially spin polarized bounded degenerate plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Z.; Jamil, M.; Murtaza, G.

    2018-04-01

    Some new features of waves inside the cylindrical waveguide on employing the separated spin evolution quantum hydrodynamic model are evoked. Primarily, the instability of Langmuir wave due to the electron beam in a partially spin polarized degenerate plasma considering a nano-cylindrical geometry is discussed. Besides, the evolution of a new spin-dependent wave (spin electron acoustic wave) due to electron spin polarization effects in the real wave spectrum is elaborated. Analyzing the growth rate, it is found that in the absence of Bohm potential, the electron spin effects or exchange interaction reduce the growth rate as well as k-domain but the inclusion of Bohm potential increases both the growth rate and k-domain. Further, we investigate the geometry effects expressed by R and pon and find that they have opposite effects on the growth rate and k-domain of the instability. Additionally, how the other parameters like electron beam density or streaming speed of beam electrons influence the growth rate is also investigated. This study may find its applications for the signal analysis in solid state devices at nanoscales.

  20. Light crystals for ultracold quantum degenerate bosonic gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimondo, E.

    2009-01-01

    Full text follows. The experimental realization of quantum degenerate states in ultracold atomic gases has opened the possibility to realize few body systems isolated from external perturbations and at temperatures close to absolute zero. Under these conditions counterintuitive phenomena characteristic of the quantum mechanical evolution may be assessed experimentally. Matter quantum-mechanical waves inside periodic potentials investigated in solid-state physics, where electrons propagate within a crystal lattice. Interfering laser beams create a light-induced spatial periodic potential for ultracold atoms called an 'optical lattice'. Atoms hopping between the lattice periodic potential minima emulate the motion of electrons in a crystal. The creation of one-, two-, and three-dimensional periodic structures in which atoms can be trapped and accelerated, with the possibility of switching or modulating the lattice at will, gives a great flexibility. In addition atomic physicists can tune the lattice's geometry, the rate of hopping, and the push and pull between atoms within the light crystals. So they hope to map the various behaviors of solid-state models. On the basis of the research work performed at Pisa, several processes of quantum mechanics evolution within a spatial periodic potential and associated to the solid-state physics will be presented

  1. Terrien's marginal degeneration accompanied by latticed stromal opacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yibing; Jia, Hui

    2014-05-01

    We report a case of Terrien's marginal degeneration (TMD) with a unilaterally typical narrow band of peripheral corneal stroma thinning, accompanied by the presence of an unusual network of opacities diffusing throughout the anterior stroma layers. A 43-year-old woman presented with superior nasal peripheral corneal thinning and an unusual network of polygonal stromal opacities in the anterior corneal stroma of the right eye. Latticed corneal changes were unusually extensive and distributed diffusely in the stroma. No abnormalities were found in the corneal epithelium and in the basal epithelial cells. No noticeable changes were found in the left eye. Because of a progressively worse ocular irritation of the right eye, a diagnosis of TMD was made for this patient. This case of TMD accompanied by keratopathy was unusual. The branching stromal lattice pattern of the corneal opacities was difficult to distinguish from lattice corneal dystrophy. In this case, the polygonal stromal opacities were located in the anterior corneal stroma and therefore were distinguished from a similar manifestation in posterior crocodile shagreen.

  2. Terrien’s Marginal Degeneration Accompanied by Latticed Stromal Opacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yibing; Jia, Hui

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose We report a case of Terrien’s marginal degeneration (TMD) with a unilaterally typical narrow band of peripheral corneal stroma thinning, accompanied by the presence of an unusual network of opacities diffusing throughout the anterior stroma layers. Case Report A 43-year-old woman presented with superior nasal peripheral corneal thinning and an unusual network of polygonal stromal opacities in the anterior corneal stroma of the right eye. Latticed corneal changes were unusually extensive and distributed diffusely in the stroma. No abnormalities were found in the corneal epithelium and in the basal epithelial cells. No noticeable changes were found in the left eye. Because of a progressively worse ocular irritation of the right eye, a diagnosis of TMD was made for this patient. Conclusions This case of TMD accompanied by keratopathy was unusual. The branching stromal lattice pattern of the corneal opacities was difficult to distinguish from lattice corneal dystrophy. In this case, the polygonal stromal opacities were located in the anterior corneal stroma and therefore were distinguished from a similar manifestation in posterior crocodile shagreen. PMID:24681833

  3. Nuclei in neutrino-degenerate dense matter, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogasawara, Ryusuke; Sato, Katsuhiko

    1982-01-01

    The properties of nuclei in cold dense matter with strongly degenerate neutrinos are investigated with the aid of an extended Thomas-Fermi model of nuclei. The following results are obtained. 1) The proton number of nucleus increases with the increasing density of the matter and it becomes very huge compared with that of the cold catalyzed matter due to the decrease of the Coulomb energy caused by the effect of the lattice-Coulomb energy. 2) The matter densities at the neutron-drip points, where the chemical potentials of neutrons equal zero are obtained as a function of the number of leptons per nucleon Y sub(L), and it is found that nuclei coalesce before neutron drip when Y sub(L) is greater than about 0.4 for the case b.c.c. lattice. 3) Along the neutron-drip points, an infinite network of linked nuclei may be formed at the matter density rho sub(P) asymptotically equals 9 x 10 13 g cm - 3 , and the bubble-phase appears at the matter density rho sub(B) asymptotically equals 1.1 x 10 14 g cm - 3 . When the matter density becomes higher than rho sub(H) asymptotically equals 1.7 x 10 14 g cm - 3 , the bubbles melt into a homogeneous matter. (author)

  4. Permanent magnetic lattices for ultracold atoms and quantum degenerate gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanbari, Saeed; Kieu, Tien D; Sidorov, Andrei; Hannaford, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We propose the use of periodic arrays of permanent magnetic films for producing magnetic lattices of microtraps for confining, manipulating and controlling small clouds of ultracold atoms and quantum degenerate gases. Using analytical expressions and numerical calculations we show that periodic arrays of magnetic films can produce one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) magnetic lattices with non-zero potential minima, allowing ultracold atoms to be trapped without losses due to spin flips. In particular, we show that two crossed layers of periodic arrays of parallel rectangular magnets plus bias fields, or a single layer of periodic arrays of square-shaped magnets with three different thicknesses plus bias fields, can produce 2D magnetic lattices of microtraps having non-zero potential minima and controllable trap depth. For arrays with micron-scale periodicity, the magnetic microtraps can have very large trap depths (∼0.5 mK for the realistic parameters chosen for the 2D lattice) and very tight confinement

  5. Quantum degenerate atomic gases in controlled optical lattice potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemelke, Nathan D.

    2007-12-01

    Since the achievement of Bose Einstein condensation in cold atomic gases, mean-field treatments of the condensed phase have provided an excellent description for the static and dynamic properties observed in experiments. Recent experimental efforts have focused on studying deviations from mean-field behavior. I will describe work on two experiments which introduce controlled single particle degeneracies with time-dependent optical potentials, aiming to induce correlated motion and nontrivial statistics in the gas. In the first experiment, an optical lattice with locally rotating site potentials is produced to investigate fractional quantum Hall effects (FQHE) in rotating Bose gases. Here, the necessary gauge potential is provided by the rotating reference frame of the gas, which, in direct analogy to the electronic system, organizes single particle states into degenerate Landau levels. At low temperatures the repulsive interaction provided by elastic scattering is expected to produce ground states with structure nearly identical to those in the FQHE. I will discuss how these effects are made experimentally feasible by working at small particle numbers in the tight trapping potentials of an optical lattice, and present first results on the use of photoassociation to probe correlation in this system. In the second experiment, a vibrated optical lattice potential alters the single-particle dispersion underlying a condensed Bose gas and offers tailored phase-matching for nonlinear atom optical processes. I will demonstrate how this leads to parametric instability in the condensed gas, and draw analogy to an optical parametric oscillator operating above threshold.

  6. Dopamine induces soluble α-synuclein oligomers and nigrostriatal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Danielle E; Tsika, Elpida; Mazzulli, Joseph R; Gould, Neal S; Kim, Hanna; Daniels, Malcolm J; Doshi, Shachee; Gupta, Preetika; Grossman, Jennifer L; Tan, Victor X; Kalb, Robert G; Caldwell, Kim A; Caldwell, Guy A; Wolfe, John H; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2017-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is defined by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the formation of Lewy body inclusions containing aggregated α-synuclein. Efforts to explain dopamine neuron vulnerability are hindered by the lack of dopaminergic cell death in α-synuclein transgenic mice. To address this, we manipulated both dopamine levels and α-synuclein expression. Nigrally targeted expression of mutant tyrosine hydroxylase with enhanced catalytic activity increased dopamine levels without damaging neurons in non-transgenic mice. In contrast, raising dopamine levels in mice expressing human A53T mutant α-synuclein induced progressive nigrostriatal degeneration and reduced locomotion. Dopamine elevation in A53T mice increased levels of potentially toxic α-synuclein oligomers, resulting in conformationally and functionally modified species. Moreover, in genetically tractable Caenorhabditis elegans models, expression of α-synuclein mutated at the site of interaction with dopamine prevented dopamine-induced toxicity. These data suggest that a unique mechanism links two cardinal features of PD: dopaminergic cell death and α-synuclein aggregation.

  7. Conical refraction in a degenerated two-crystal cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peet, V

    2016-01-01

    When a collimated light beam is passed consequently along the optic axes of two identical biaxial crystals, the conical refraction produces in the focal image plane a specific light pattern consisting of a ring and a central spot. The ring is formed due to the additive action of two crystals, while the spot results from the reversed conical refraction in such a degenerated cascade arrangement. The relative intensity of these two components depends on the azimuth angle between the orientations of the crystals about the beam axis. It is shown that this dependence arises due to the interference of pairs of waves produced by conical refraction in two crystals. If a part of these waves is blocked by polarization selection of beam components, the dependence of the light pattern on the azimuth angle vanishes. In this case, the outgoing light profile consists of a ring and a central spot with fixed intensities so that the total beam power is divided equally between these two components. Depending on the applied polarization, the central spot appears either as a restored input beam or a charge-two optical vortex. The results of numerical simulations of the effect are in a very good agreement with the experimental observations. (paper)

  8. Ferromagnetic resonance features of degenerate GdN semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidyasagar, Reddithota, E-mail: dr.vidyasagar1979@gmail.com [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Kita, Takashi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Sakurai, Takahiro; Shimokawa, Tokuro [Centre for Support to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Ohta, Hitoshi [Molecular Photoscience Research Center and Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Using X-band Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) Spectroscopy, we demonstrate the microscopic ferromagnetic resonance features of degenerated GdN semiconductor. The FMR spectrum suggests a single resonance mode below 10 K; interestingly, this particular structure is found to exhibit a peculiar magnetic resonance (PMR) on the top of the uniform FMR while temperature increases from 12–36 K. The low-field PMR mode attributed to the differently magnetized part of the film with an easy in-plane axis. The narrow-field gap between PMR and uniform FMR suggests the strong coupling owning to the differently magnetized part with easy in-plane axis and the magnetized part with an out-of-plane axis. The saturation magnetization, cubic magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and uniaxial anisotropy of GdN epitaxial film have been evaluated by the angular-dependence FMR. - Highlights: • Observation of peculiar magnetic resonance (PMR) on the top of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). • Newly evolving PMR manifests differently magnetized part of the film with an easy in-plane axis. • Narrow gap between PMR and FMR owing to the strong interaction between two spin–wave resonances. • Uniaxial anisotropy increases with GdN thickness decreases.

  9. Clinical Characteristics and Current Therapies for Inherited Retinal Degenerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahel, José-Alain; Marazova, Katia; Audo, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal degenerations (IRDs) encompass a large group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases that affect approximately 1 in 3000 people (>2 million people worldwide) (Bessant DA, Ali RR, Bhattacharya SS. 2001. Molecular genetics and prospects for therapy of the inherited retinal dystrophies. Curr Opin Genet Dev 11: 307–316.). IRDs may be inherited as Mendelian traits or through mitochondrial DNA, and may affect the entire retina (e.g., rod–cone dystrophy, also known as retinitis pigmentosa, cone dystrophy, cone–rod dystrophy, choroideremia, Usher syndrome, and Bardet-Bidel syndrome) or be restricted to the macula (e.g., Stargardt disease, Best disease, and Sorsby fundus dystrophy), ultimately leading to blindness. IRDs are a major cause of severe vision loss, with profound impact on patients and society. Although IRDs remain untreatable today, significant progress toward therapeutic strategies for IRDs has marked the past two decades. This progress has been based on better understanding of the pathophysiological pathways of these diseases and on technological advances. PMID:25324231

  10. Many-body theory of effective mass in degenerate semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, G. S.; Shadangi, S. K.

    2018-03-01

    We derive the many-body theory of the effective mass in the effective mass representation (EMR). In the EMR, we need to solve the equation of motion of an electron in the presence of electron-electron interactions, where the wavefunction is expanded over a complete set of Luttinger-Kohn wavefunctions. We use the Luttinger-Ward thermodynamic potential and the Green’s function perturbation to derive an expression for the band effective mass by taking into account the electron-electron interactions. Both quasi-particle and the correlation contributions are considered. We show that had we considered only the quasi-particle contribution, we would have missed important cancellations. Thus the correlated motion of electrons has important effects in the renormalization of the effective mass. Considering the exchange self-energy in the band model, we derive a tractable expression for the band effective mass. We apply the theory to n-type degenerate semiconductors, PbTe and SnTe, and analyze the impact of the theory on the anisotropic effective mass of the conduction bands in these systems.

  11. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Romano, Mario R.; Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; Incorvaia, Carlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Perri, Paolo; De Palma, Paolo; De Nadai, Katia; Sebastiani, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease. PMID:23209345

  12. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune privileged tissue due to its unique anatomical and physiological properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergo low levels of activation (para-inflammation). In many cases, this para-inflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), this para-inflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal para-inflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors and old age. Dysregulated para-inflammation (chronic inflammation) in AMD damages the blood retina barrier (BRB), resulting in the breach of retinal immune privilege leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in AMD, and explores the difference between beneficial para-inflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of AMD. PMID:26292978

  13. Ocular Surface Temperature in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sodi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320. The ocular surface temperature (OST of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272. OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P>0.05. Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD.

  14. Automatic age-related macular degeneration detection and staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Grinsven, Mark J. J. P.; Lechanteur, Yara T. E.; van de Ven, Johannes P. H.; van Ginneken, Bram; Theelen, Thomas; Sánchez, Clara I.

    2013-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disorder of the central part of the retina, which mainly affects older people and leads to permanent loss of vision in advanced stages of the disease. AMD grading of non-advanced AMD patients allows risk assessment for the development of advanced AMD and enables timely treatment of patients, to prevent vision loss. AMD grading is currently performed manually on color fundus images, which is time consuming and expensive. In this paper, we propose a supervised classification method to distinguish patients at high risk to develop advanced AMD from low risk patients and provide an exact AMD stage determination. The method is based on the analysis of the number and size of drusen on color fundus images, as drusen are the early characteristics of AMD. An automatic drusen detection algorithm is used to detect all drusen. A weighted histogram of the detected drusen is constructed to summarize the drusen extension and size and fed into a random forest classifier in order to separate low risk from high risk patients and to allow exact AMD stage determination. Experiments showed that the proposed method achieved similar performance as human observers in distinguishing low risk from high risk AMD patients, obtaining areas under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve of 0.929 and 0.934. A weighted kappa agreement of 0.641 and 0.622 versus two observers were obtained for AMD stage evaluation. Our method allows for quick and reliable AMD staging at low costs.

  15. Radiation therapy for age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Ayako; Honda, Kaoru; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-11-01

    We evaluated the effects of low-dose radiation on choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Since Chakravarthy reported the benefits from administration of low-dose external-beam irradiation for CNV, many studies have demonstrated that irradiation could have a beneficial treatment effect, whereas several reports have not. In our hospital, 12 eyes with AMD received 10 Gy of 4 MV photons and the other 9 eyes received 20 Gy. Another 4 eyes were untreated as control. After 6 months of treatment, visual acuity was maintained in 11 eyes, improved in 5 eyes, and deteriorated in 5 eyes of treated patients. In control group, visual acuity was maintained in 1 eye and deteriorated in 3 eyes. The size of CNV regressed in 10 eyes, remained stationary in 2 eyes and progressed in 2 eyes of treated patients, while in control group CNV regressed in 2 eyes and remained stationary in 1 eye. After 12 months some CNV progressed. Although the present result seems to be better than those in previous reports, whether or not the treatment is beneficial has to be awaited. (author)

  16. Recent developments in age-related macular degeneration: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zamil, Waseem M; Yassin, Sanaa A

    2017-01-01

    Background Visual impairment in elderly people is a considerable health problem that significantly affects quality of life of millions worldwide. The magnitude of this issue is becoming more evident with an aging population and an increasing number of older individuals. Objective The objective of this article was to review the clinical and pathological aspects of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diagnostic tools, and therapeutic modalities presently available or underway for both atrophic and wet forms of the disease. Methods An online review of the PubMed database was performed, searching for the key words. The search was limited to articles published since 1980 to date. Results Several risk factors have been linked to AMD, such as age (>60 years), lifestyle (smoking and diet), and family history. Although the pathogenesis of AMD remains unclear, genetic factors have been implicated in the condition. Treatment for atrophic AMD is mainly close observation, coupled with nutritional supplements such as zinc and antioxidants, whereas treatment of wet AMD is based on targeting choroidal neovascular membranes. Conclusion Identification of modifiable risk factors would improve the possibilities of preventing the progression of AMD. The role of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents has transformed the therapeutic approach of the potentially blinding disease “wet AMD” into a more favorable outcome. PMID:28860733

  17. Experimental study on fulminant angitis with fibrinoid-like degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H; Morisada, M

    1985-01-01

    Administration of high doses of Na2EDTA or feeding animals a low calcium diet leads to angiolytic changes of the mesenteric arteries as reported in previous papers. Slight inflammatory reactions in the arterial wall including leucocytic infiltration and exudation could be demonstrated. The reason is thought to be the lack of morphological changes of the endothelium. As far as the endothelium was concerned a lift up phenomenon of the endothelial cells and the formation of subendothelial vacuoles was observed, but no endothelial gap formation or desquamation. Administration of Na2EDTA resulted in rapid removal of calcium ions from living animals, but injurious effects on the morphology of the cells did not occur except of changes of the cellular shape, both of endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Without any morpho-functional alterations of the endothelial lining cells, severe exudation and leucocytic trapping could not be induced. The morphological changes of the vascular wall following the above procedures are said to be angiolytic and not angitic. In this experiment, dysproteinemia was provoked in Na2EDTA treated animals by repeated administration of bovine serum albumin (BSA). As a result, angitis-like lesions with severe exudation, similar to those of fibrinoid degeneration and leucocytic reaction against it, were demonstrated. These facts showed that angitis is not merely due to exogenous factors and hostal predisposition.

  18. Multiple scattering in electron fluid and energy loss in multi-ionic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, C., E-mail: claude.deutsch@u-psud.fr [LPGP, UParis-Sud, 91405-Orsay (France); Tahir, N.A. [GSI, 1Planck Str., 64291-Darmstadt (Germany); Barriga-Carrasco, M. [ETSII, UCastilla-la-Mancha, 13071 Ciudad-Real (Spain); Ceban, V. [LPGP, UParis-Sud, 91405-Orsay (France); Fromy, P. [CRI, UParis-Sud, 91405-Orsay (France); Gilles, D. [CEA/Saclay/DSM/IRFU/SAP, 91191-Gif-s-Yvette (France); Leger, D. [Laboratoire Monthouy, UValenciennes-Hainaut Cambresis (France); Maynard, G. [LPGP, UParis-Sud, 91405-Orsay (France); Tashev, B. [Department of Physics, KazNu, Tole Bi82, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Volpe, L. [Department of Physics, UMilano-Bicocca, Milano 20126 (Italy)

    2014-01-01

    Extensions of the standard stopping model (SSM) for ion projectiles interacting with dense targets of timely concern for ICF and WDM are reviewed. They include multiple scattering on partially degenerate electrons, low velocity ion slowing down in demixing H–He mixtures within Jovian planets core or multiionic target such as Kapton.

  19. Relaxation height in energy landscapes : an application to multiple metastable states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cirillo, E.N.M.; Nardi, F.R.

    2012-01-01

    The study of systems with multiple (not necessarily degenerate) metastable states presents subtle difficulties from the mathematical point of view related to the variational problem that has to be solved in these cases. We introduce the notion of relaxation height in a general energy landscape and

  20. Multiple scattering in electron fluid and energy loss in multi-ionic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, C.; Tahir, N.A.; Barriga-Carrasco, M.; Ceban, V.; Fromy, P.; Gilles, D.; Leger, D.; Maynard, G.; Tashev, B.; Volpe, L.

    2014-01-01

    Extensions of the standard stopping model (SSM) for ion projectiles interacting with dense targets of timely concern for ICF and WDM are reviewed. They include multiple scattering on partially degenerate electrons, low velocity ion slowing down in demixing H–He mixtures within Jovian planets core or multiionic target such as Kapton