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Sample records for striatal neuronal loss

  1. Increased TRPC5 glutathionylation contributes to striatal neuron loss in Huntington's disease.

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    Hong, Chansik; Seo, Hyemyung; Kwak, Misun; Jeon, Jeha; Jang, Jihoon; Jeong, Eui Man; Myeong, Jongyun; Hwang, Yu Jin; Ha, Kotdaji; Kang, Min Jueng; Lee, Kyu Pil; Yi, Eugene C; Kim, In-Gyu; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Ryu, Hoon; So, Insuk

    2015-10-01

    Aberrant glutathione or Ca(2+) homeostasis due to oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. The Ca(2+)-permeable transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channel is predominantly expressed in the brain, which is sensitive to oxidative stress. However, the role of the TRPC channel in neurodegeneration is not known. Here, we report a mechanism of TRPC5 activation by oxidants and the effect of glutathionylated TRPC5 on striatal neurons in Huntington's disease. Intracellular oxidized glutathione leads to TRPC5 activation via TRPC5 S-glutathionylation at Cys176/Cys178 residues. The oxidized glutathione-activated TRPC5-like current results in a sustained increase in cytosolic Ca(2+), activated calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and the calpain-caspase pathway, ultimately inducing striatal neuronal cell death. We observed an abnormal glutathione pool indicative of an oxidized state in the striatum of Huntington's disease transgenic (YAC128) mice. Increased levels of endogenous TRPC5 S-glutathionylation were observed in the striatum in both transgenic mice and patients with Huntington's disease. Both knockdown and inhibition of TRPC5 significantly attenuated oxidation-induced striatal neuronal cell death. Moreover, a TRPC5 blocker improved rearing behaviour in Huntington's disease transgenic mice and motor behavioural symptoms in littermate control mice by increasing striatal neuron survival. Notably, low levels of TRPC1 increased the formation of TRPC5 homotetramer, a highly Ca(2+)-permeable channel, and stimulated Ca(2+)-dependent apoptosis in Huntington's disease cells (STHdh(Q111/111)). Taken together, these novel findings indicate that increased TRPC5 S-glutathionylation by oxidative stress and decreased TRPC1 expression contribute to neuronal damage in the striatum and may underlie neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain

  2. Increased TRPC5 glutathionylation contributes to striatal neuron loss in Huntington’s disease

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    Hong, Chansik; Seo, Hyemyung; Kwak, Misun; Jeon, Jeha; Jang, Jihoon; Jeong, Eui Man; Myeong, Jongyun; Hwang, Yu Jin; Ha, Kotdaji; Kang, Min Jueng; Lee, Kyu Pil; Yi, Eugene C.; Kim, In-Gyu; Jeon, Ju-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant glutathione or Ca2+ homeostasis due to oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. The Ca2+-permeable transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channel is predominantly expressed in the brain, which is sensitive to oxidative stress. However, the role of the TRPC channel in neurodegeneration is not known. Here, we report a mechanism of TRPC5 activation by oxidants and the effect of glutathionylated TRPC5 on striatal neurons in Huntington’s disease. Intracellular oxidized glutathione leads to TRPC5 activation via TRPC5 S-glutathionylation at Cys176/Cys178 residues. The oxidized glutathione-activated TRPC5-like current results in a sustained increase in cytosolic Ca2+, activated calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and the calpain-caspase pathway, ultimately inducing striatal neuronal cell death. We observed an abnormal glutathione pool indicative of an oxidized state in the striatum of Huntington’s disease transgenic (YAC128) mice. Increased levels of endogenous TRPC5 S-glutathionylation were observed in the striatum in both transgenic mice and patients with Huntington’s disease. Both knockdown and inhibition of TRPC5 significantly attenuated oxidation-induced striatal neuronal cell death. Moreover, a TRPC5 blocker improved rearing behaviour in Huntington’s disease transgenic mice and motor behavioural symptoms in littermate control mice by increasing striatal neuron survival. Notably, low levels of TRPC1 increased the formation of TRPC5 homotetramer, a highly Ca2+-permeable channel, and stimulated Ca2+-dependent apoptosis in Huntington’s disease cells (STHdhQ111/111). Taken together, these novel findings indicate that increased TRPC5 S-glutathionylation by oxidative stress and decreased TRPC1 expression contribute to neuronal damage in the striatum and may underlie neurodegeneration in Huntington’s disease. PMID:26133660

  3. Loss of Mitochondrial Ndufs4 in Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons Mediates Progressive Motor Impairment in a Mouse Model of Leigh Syndrome

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    Byron Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Inability of mitochondria to generate energy leads to severe and often fatal myoencephalopathies. Among these, Leigh syndrome (LS is one of the most common childhood mitochondrial diseases; it is characterized by hypotonia, failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency and progressive mental and motor dysfunction, leading to early death. Basal ganglia nuclei, including the striatum, are affected in LS patients. However, neither the identity of the affected cell types in the striatum nor their contribution to the disease has been established. Here, we used a mouse model of LS lacking Ndufs4, a mitochondrial complex I subunit, to confirm that loss of complex I, but not complex II, alters respiration in the striatum. To assess the role of striatal dysfunction in the pathology, we selectively inactivated Ndufs4 in the striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs, which account for over 95% of striatal neurons. Our results show that lack of Ndufs4 in MSNs causes a non-fatal progressive motor impairment without affecting the cognitive function of mice. Furthermore, no inflammatory responses or neuronal loss were observed up to 6 months of age. Hence, complex I deficiency in MSNs contributes to the motor deficits observed in LS, but not to the neural degeneration, suggesting that other neuronal populations drive the plethora of clinical signs in LS.

  4. Dysregulation of striatal projection neurons in Parkinson's disease.

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    Beck, Goichi; Singh, Arun; Papa, Stella M

    2018-03-01

    The loss of nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) is the primary cause of motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the underlying striatal mechanisms remain unclear. In spite of abundant literature portraying structural, biochemical and plasticity changes of striatal projection neurons (SPNs), in the past there has been a data vacuum from the natural human disease and its close model in non-human primates. Recently, single-cell recordings in advanced parkinsonian primates have generated new insights into the altered function of SPNs. Currently, there are also human data that provide direct evidence of profoundly dysregulated SPN activity in PD. Here, we review primate recordings that are impacting our understanding of the striatal dysfunction after DA loss, particularly through the analysis of physiologic correlates of parkinsonian motor behaviors. In contrast to recordings in rodents, data obtained in primates and patients demonstrate similar major abnormalities of the spontaneous SPN firing in the alert parkinsonian state. Furthermore, these studies also show altered SPN responses to DA replacement in the advanced parkinsonian state. Clearly, there is yet much to learn about the striatal discharges in PD, but studies using primate models are contributing unique information to advance our understanding of pathophysiologic mechanisms.

  5. Dopamine D1-like receptors depress excitatory synaptic transmissions in striatal neurons after transient forebrain ischemia.

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    Zhang, Yuchun; Deng, Ping; Ruan, Yiwen; Xu, Zao C

    2008-08-01

    Spiny neurons in the neostriatum are highly vulnerable to ischemia. Despite an enormous body of research suggesting that dopamine is involved in ischemia-induced neuronal loss in the striatum, it remains unclear how dopamine interacts with the glutamatergic excitotoxicity that is widely accepted as a major cause of ischemic cell death. Our study was designed to investigate the effects of dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) activation on excitatory neurotransmission in postischemic striatal neurons. We used the 4-vessel occlusion ischemia model and brain slice preparations. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recording was performed on striatal neurons to measure excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Systemic administration of a D1R agonist after ischemia and hematoxylin/eosin staining were performed to evaluate the effects of D1R activation on ischemia-induced neuronal degeneration in the striatum. D1R activation depressed EPSCs in postischemic striatal neurons. The depression was attributable to inhibition of presynaptic release. An activator of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) mimicked the depressive effects of D1R activation. Bath application of a PKA inhibitor blocked the depression of EPSCs, whereas intracellular postsynaptic application of the PKA inhibitor had no effect. The D1R agonist failed to reduce EPSC amplitude in the presence of an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist. Systemic administration of a D1R agonist after ischemia significantly attenuated ischemia-induced cell death in the striatum. These results indicate that D1R activation presynaptically depresses excitatory synaptic transmission in striatal neurons after ischemia through activation of PKA and adenosine A1 receptors and thus demonstrate a novel mechanism of D1R-mediated protection against ischemia.

  6. Ciliary neurotrophic factor protects striatal neurons against excitotoxicity by enhancing glial glutamate uptake.

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    Corinne Beurrier

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is a potent neuroprotective cytokine in different animal models of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity, although its action mechanisms are still poorly characterized. We tested the hypothesis that an increased function of glial glutamate transporters (GTs could underlie CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. We show that neuronal loss induced by in vivo striatal injection of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QA was significantly reduced (by approximately 75% in CNTF-treated animals. In striatal slices, acute QA application dramatically inhibited corticostriatal field potentials (FPs, whose recovery was significantly higher in CNTF rats compared to controls (approximately 40% vs. approximately 7%, confirming an enhanced resistance to excitotoxicity. The GT inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate greatly reduced FP recovery in CNTF rats, supporting the role of GT in CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from striatal medium spiny neurons showed no alteration of basic properties of striatal glutamatergic transmission in CNTF animals, but the increased effect of a low-affinity competitive glutamate receptor antagonist (gamma-D-glutamylglycine also suggested an enhanced GT function. These data strongly support our hypothesis that CNTF is neuroprotective via an increased function of glial GTs, and further confirms the therapeutic potential of CNTF for the clinical treatment of progressive neurodegenerative diseases involving glutamate overflow.

  7. Human striatal recordings reveal abnormal discharge of projection neurons in Parkinson's disease.

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    Singh, Arun; Mewes, Klaus; Gross, Robert E; DeLong, Mahlon R; Obeso, José A; Papa, Stella M

    2016-08-23

    Circuitry models of Parkinson's disease (PD) are based on striatal dopamine loss and aberrant striatal inputs into the basal ganglia network. However, extrastriatal mechanisms have increasingly been the focus of attention, whereas the status of striatal discharges in the parkinsonian human brain remains conjectural. We now report the activity pattern of striatal projection neurons (SPNs) in patients with PD undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery, compared with patients with essential tremor (ET) and isolated dystonia (ID). The SPN activity in ET was very low (2.1 ± 0.1 Hz) and reminiscent of that found in normal animals. In contrast, SPNs in PD fired at much higher frequency (30.2 ± 1.2 Hz) and with abundant spike bursts. The difference between PD and ET was reproduced between 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated and normal nonhuman primates. The SPN activity was also increased in ID, but to a lower level compared with the hyperactivity observed in PD. These results provide direct evidence that the striatum contributes significantly altered signals to the network in patients with PD.

  8. Beyond Neuronal Activity Markers: Select Immediate Early Genes in Striatal Neuron Subtypes Functionally Mediate Psychostimulant Addiction

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    Ramesh Chandra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Immediate early genes (IEGs were traditionally used as markers of neuronal activity in striatum in response to stimuli including drugs of abuse such as psychostimulants. Early studies using these neuronal activity markers led to important insights in striatal neuron subtype responsiveness to psychostimulants. Such studies have helped identify striatum as a critical brain center for motivational, reinforcement and habitual behaviors in psychostimulant addiction. While the use of IEGs as neuronal activity markers in response to psychostimulants and other stimuli persists today, the functional role and implications of these IEGs has often been neglected. Nonetheless, there is a subset of research that investigates the functional role of IEGs in molecular, cellular and behavioral alterations by psychostimulants through striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN subtypes, the two projection neuron subtypes in striatum. This review article will address and highlight the studies that provide a functional mechanism by which IEGs mediate psychostimulant molecular, cellular and behavioral plasticity through MSN subtypes. Insight into the functional role of IEGs in striatal MSN subtypes could provide improved understanding into addiction and neuropsychiatric diseases affecting striatum, such as affective disorders and compulsive disorders characterized by dysfunctional motivation and habitual behavior.

  9. Quinolinic acid induces disrupts cytoskeletal homeostasis in striatal neurons. Protective role of astrocyte-neuron interaction.

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    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; de Lima, Bárbara Ortiz; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2015-02-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway involved in several neurological disorders. Among the several mechanisms involved in QUIN-mediated toxicity, disruption of the cytoskeleton has been demonstrated in striatally injected rats and in striatal slices. The present work searched for the actions of QUIN in primary striatal neurons. Neurons exposed to 10 µM QUIN presented hyperphosphorylated neurofilament (NF) subunits (NFL, NFM, and NFH). Hyperphosphorylation was abrogated in the presence of protein kinase A and protein kinase C inhibitors H89 (20 μM) and staurosporine (10 nM), respectively, as well as by specific antagonists to N-methyl-D-aspartate (50 µM DL-AP5) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (100 µM MPEP). Also, intra- and extracellular Ca(2+) chelators (10 µM BAPTA-AM and 1 mM EGTA, respectively) and Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (10 µM verapamil) are implicated in QUIN-mediated effects. Cells immunostained for the neuronal markers βIII-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 2 showed altered neurite/neuron ratios and neurite outgrowth. NF hyperphosphorylation and morphological alterations were totally prevented by conditioned medium from QUIN-treated astrocytes. Cocultured astrocytes and neurons interacted with one another reciprocally, protecting them against QUIN injury. Cocultured cells preserved their cytoskeletal organization and cell morphology together with unaltered activity of the phosphorylating system associated with the cytoskeleton. This article describes cytoskeletal disruption as one of the most relevant actions of QUIN toxicity in striatal neurons in culture with soluble factors secreted by astrocytes, with neuron-astrocyte interaction playing a role in neuroprotection. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Reciprocal influences of nigral cells and striatal patch neurons in dissociated co-cultures

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    Aronica, E.; Costantini, L. C.; Snyder-Keller, A.

    1996-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that the functional efficacy of nigral tissue transplants into dopamine (DA)-depleted rats is increased when embryonic striatal tissue is included (Costantini et al.: Exp Neurol 127:219-231, 1994). To examine further the influence of striatal patch neurons in this regard,

  11. TRPC1 Deletion Causes Striatal Neuronal Cell Apoptosis and Proteomic Alterations in Mice

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    Dian Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1 is widely expressed throughout the nervous system, while its biological role remains unclear. In this study, we showed that TRPC1 deletion caused striatal neuronal loss and significantly increased TUNEL-positive and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG staining in the striatum. Proteomic analysis by two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE coupled with mass spectrometry (MS revealed a total of 51 differentially expressed proteins (26 increased and 25 decreased in the stratum of TRPC1 knockout (TRPC1−/− mice compared to that of wild type (WT mice. Bioinformatics analysis showed these dysregulated proteins included: oxidative stress-related proteins, synaptic proteins, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-related proteins and apoptosis-related proteins. STRING analysis showed these differential proteins have a well-established interaction network. Based on the proteomic data, we revealed by Western-blot analysis that TRPC1 deletion caused ER stress as evidenced by the dysregulation of GRP78 and PERK activation-related signaling pathway, and elevated oxidative stress as suggested by increased 8-OHdG staining, increased NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone flavoprotein 2 (NDUV2 and decreased protein deglycase (DJ-1, two oxidative stress-related proteins. In addition, we also demonstrated that TRPC1 deletion led to significantly increased apoptosis in striatum with concurrent decrease in both 14–3–3Z and dynamin-1 (D2 dopamine (DA receptor binding, two apoptosis-related proteins. Taken together, we concluded that TRPC1 deletion might cause striatal neuronal apoptosis by disturbing multiple biological processes (i.e., ER stress, oxidative stress and apoptosis-related signaling. These data suggest that TRPC1 may be a key player in the regulation of striatal cellular survival and death.

  12. Distinct roles for direct and indirect pathway striatal neurons in reinforcement.

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    Kravitz, Alexxai V; Tye, Lynne D; Kreitzer, Anatol C

    2012-06-01

    Dopamine signaling is implicated in reinforcement learning, but the neural substrates targeted by dopamine are poorly understood. We bypassed dopamine signaling itself and tested how optogenetic activation of dopamine D1 or D2 receptor–expressing striatal projection neurons influenced reinforcement learning in mice. Stimulating D1 receptor–expressing neurons induced persistent reinforcement, whereas stimulating D2 receptor–expressing neurons induced transient punishment, indicating that activation of these circuits is sufficient to modify the probability of performing future actions.

  13. Agonist-selective effects of opioid receptor ligands on cytosolic calcium concentration in rat striatal neurons.

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    Brailoiu, G Cristina; Deliu, Elena; Hooper, Robert; Dun, Nae J; Undieh, Ashiwel S; Adler, Martin W; Benamar, Khalid; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2012-06-01

    Buprenorphine is an opioid receptor ligand whose mechanism of action is incompletely understood. Using Ca(2+) imaging, we assessed the effects of buprenorphine, β-endorphin, and morphine on cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)](i), in rat striatal neurons. Buprenorphine (0.01-1 μM) increased [Ca(2+)](i) in a dose-dependent manner in a subpopulation of rat striatal neurons. The effect of buprenorphine was largely reduced by naloxone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, but not by μ, κ, δ or NOP-selective antagonists. β-Endorphin (0.1 μM) increased [Ca(2+)](i) with a lower amplitude and slower time course than buprenorphine. Similar to buprenorphine, the effect of β-endorphin was markedly decreased by naloxone, but not by opioid-selective antagonists. Morphine (0.1-10 μM), did not affect [Ca(2+)](i) in striatal neurons. Our results suggest that buprenorphine and β-endorphin act on a distinct type/subtype of plasmalemmal opioid receptors or activate intracellular opioid-like receptor(s) in rat striatal neurons. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Diversity in Long-Term Synaptic Plasticity at Inhibitory Synapses of Striatal Spiny Neurons

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    Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E.; Mendoza, Ernesto; Hernandez, Ricardo; Aceves, Jose J.; Ibanez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, Jose

    2009-01-01

    Procedural memories and habits are posited to be stored in the basal ganglia, whose intrinsic circuitries possess important inhibitory connections arising from striatal spiny neurons. However, no information about long-term plasticity at these synapses is available. Therefore, this work describes a novel postsynaptically dependent long-term…

  15. Different correlation patterns of cholinergic and GABAergic interneurons with striatal projection neurons

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    Avital eAdler

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The striatum is populated by a single projection neuron group, the medium spiny neurons (MSNs, and several groups of interneurons. Two of the electrophysiologically well-characterized striatal interneuron groups are the tonically active neurons (TANs, which are presumably cholinergic interneurons, and the fast spiking interneurons (FSIs, presumably parvalbumin (PV expressing GABAergic interneurons. To better understand striatal processing it is thus crucial to define the functional relationship between MSNs and these interneurons in the awake and behaving animal. We used multiple electrodes and standard physiological methods to simultaneously record MSN spiking activity and the activity of TANs or FSIs from monkeys engaged in a classical conditioning paradigm. All three cell populations were highly responsive to the behavioral task. However, they displayed different average response profiles and a different degree of response synchronization (signal correlation. TANs displayed the most transient and synchronized response, MSNs the most diverse and sustained response and FSIs were in between on both parameters. We did not find evidence for direct monosynaptic connectivity between the MSNs and either the TANs or the FSIs. However, while the cross correlation histograms of TAN to MSN pairs were flat, those of FSI to MSN displayed positive asymmetrical broad peaks. The FSI-MSN correlogram profile implies that the spikes of MSNs follow those of FSIs and both are driven by a common, most likely cortical, input. Thus, the two populations of striatal interneurons are probably driven by different afferents and play complementary functional roles in the physiology of the striatal microcircuit.

  16. Populations of striatal medium spiny neurons encode vibrotactile frequency in rats: modulation by slow wave oscillations.

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    Hawking, Thomas G; Gerdjikov, Todor V

    2013-01-01

    Dorsolateral striatum (DLS) is implicated in tactile perception and receives strong projections from somatosensory cortex. However, the sensory representations encoded by striatal projection neurons are not well understood. Here we characterized the contribution of DLS to the encoding of vibrotactile information in rats by assessing striatal responses to precise frequency stimuli delivered to a single vibrissa. We applied stimuli in a frequency range (45-90 Hz) that evokes discriminable percepts and carries most of the power of vibrissa vibration elicited by a range of complex fine textures. Both medium spiny neurons and evoked potentials showed tactile responses that were modulated by slow wave oscillations. Furthermore, medium spiny neuron population responses represented stimulus frequency on par with previously reported behavioral benchmarks. Our results suggest that striatum encodes frequency information of vibrotactile stimuli which is dynamically modulated by ongoing brain state.

  17. Extrasynaptic neurotransmission in the modulation of brain function. Focus on the striatal neuronal-glial networks

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    Kjell eFuxe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Extrasynaptic neurotransmission is an important short distance form of volume transmission (VT and describes the extracellular diffusion of transmitters and modulators after synaptic spillover or extrasynaptic release in the local circuit regions binding to and activating mainly extrasynaptic neuronal and glial receptors in the neuroglial networks of the brain. Receptor-receptor interactions in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR heteromers play a major role, on dendritic spines and nerve terminals including glutamate synapses, in the integrative processes of the extrasynaptic signaling. Heteromeric complexes between GPCR and ion-channel receptors play a special role in the integration of the synaptic and extrasynaptic signals. Changes in extracellular concentrations of the classical synaptic neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA found with microdialysis is likely an expression of the activity of the neuron-astrocyte unit of the brain and can be used as an index of VT-mediated actions of these two neurotransmitters in the brain. Thus, the activity of neurons may be functionally linked to the activity of astrocytes, which may release glutamate and GABA to the extracellular space where extrasynaptic glutamate and GABA receptors do exist. Wiring transmission (WT and VT are fundamental properties of all neurons of the CNS but the balance between WT and VT varies from one nerve cell population to the other. The focus is on the striatal cellular networks, and the WT and VT and their integration via receptor heteromers are described in the GABA projection neurons, the glutamate, dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT and histamine striatal afferents, the cholinergic interneurons and different types of GABA interneurons. In addition, the role in these networks of VT signaling of the energy-dependent modulator adenosine and of endocannabinoids mainly formed in the striatal projection neurons will be underlined to understand the communication in the striatal

  18. The Fast Spiking Subpopulation of Striatal Neurons Coding for Temporal Cognition of Movements

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    Bo Shen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Timing dysfunctions occur in a number of neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, obsessive-compulsive disorder, autism and attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder. Several lines of evidence show that disrupted timing processing is involved in specific fronto-striatal abnormalities. The striatum encodes reinforcement learning and procedural motion, and consequently is required to represent temporal information precisely, which then guides actions in proper sequence. Previous studies highlighted the temporal scaling property of timing-relevant striatal neurons; however, it is still unknown how this is accomplished over short temporal latencies, such as the sub-seconds to seconds range.Methods: We designed a task with a series of timing behaviors that required rats to reproduce a fixed duration with robust action. Using chronic multichannel electrode arrays, we recorded neural activity from dorso-medial striatum in 4 rats performing the task and identified modulation response of each neuron to different events. Cell type classification was performed according to a multi-criteria clustering analysis.Results: Dorso-medial striatal neurons (n = 557 were recorded, of which 113 single units were considered as timing-relevant neurons, especially the fast-spiking subpopulation that had trial–to–trial ramping up or ramping down firing modulation during the time estimation period. Furthermore, these timing-relevant striatal neurons had to calibrate the spread of their firing pattern by rewarded experience to express the timing behavior accurately.Conclusion: Our data suggests that the dynamic activities of timing-relevant units encode information about the current duration and recent outcomes, which is needed to predict and drive the following action. These results reveal the potential mechanism of time calibration in a short temporal resolution, which may help to explain the neural basis of motor coordination

  19. FACS identifies unique cocaine-induced gene regulation in selectively activated adult striatal neurons.

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    Guez-Barber, Danielle; Fanous, Sanya; Golden, Sam A; Schrama, Regina; Koya, Eisuke; Stern, Anna L; Bossert, Jennifer M; Harvey, Brandon K; Picciotto, Marina R; Hope, Bruce T

    2011-03-16

    Numerous studies with the neural activity marker Fos indicate that cocaine activates only a small proportion of sparsely distributed striatal neurons. Until now, efficient methods were not available to assess neuroadaptations induced specifically within these activated neurons. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to purify striatal neurons activated during cocaine-induced locomotion in naive and cocaine-sensitized cfos-lacZ transgenic rats. Activated neurons were labeled with an antibody against β-galactosidase, the protein product of the lacZ gene. Cocaine induced a unique gene expression profile selectively in the small proportion of activated neurons that was not observed in the nonactivated majority of neurons. These genes included altered levels of the immediate early genes arc, fosB, and nr4a3, as well as genes involved in p38 MAPK signaling and cell-type specificity. We propose that this FACS method can be used to study molecular neuroadaptations in specific neurons encoding the behavioral effects of abused drugs and other learned behaviors.

  20. Construction of the subtracted cDNA library of striatal neurons treated with long-term morphine.

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    Bai, Bo; Liu, Hai-qing; Chen, Jing; Li, Ya-lin; Du, Hui; Lu, Hai; Yu, Peng-li

    2011-03-01

    To construct a morphine tolerance model in primarily cultured striatal neurons, and screen the differentially expressed genes in this model using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). Sbtracted cDNA libraries were constructed using SSH from normal primarily cultured striatal neurons and long-term morphine treated striatal neurons (10-5 mol/L for 72 hours). To check reliability of the cell culture model, RT-PCR was performed to detect the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) mRNA expression. The subtracted clones were prescreened by PCR. The clones containing inserted fragments from forward libraries were sequenced and submitted to GenBank for homology analysis. And the expression levels of genes of interest were confirmed by RT-PCR. Results CREB mRNA expression showed a significant increase in morphine treated striatal neurons (62.85 ± 1.98) compared with normal striatal neurons (28.43 ± 1.46, P library of striatal neurons treated with long-term morphine is constructed. Mtch1 and Akt1 might be the candidate genes for the development of morphine tolerance.

  1. A negative relationship between ventral striatal loss anticipation response and impulsivity in borderline personality disorder

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    Herbort, Maike C.; Soch, Joram; W?stenberg, Torsten; Krauel, Kerstin; Pujara, Maia; Koenigs, Michael; Gallinat, J?rgen; Walter, Henrik; Roepke, Stefan; Schott, Bj?rn H.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) frequently exhibit impulsive behavior, and self-reported impulsivity is typically higher in BPD patients when compared to healthy controls. Previous functional neuroimaging studies have suggested a link between impulsivity, the ventral striatal response to reward anticipation, and prediction errors. Here we investigated the striatal neural response to monetary gain and loss anticipation and their relationship with impulsivity in 21 female BP...

  2. Phasic Dopamine Modifies Sensory-Driven Output of Striatal Neurons through Synaptic Plasticity.

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    Wieland, Sebastian; Schindler, Sebastian; Huber, Cathrin; Köhr, Georg; Oswald, Manfred J; Kelsch, Wolfgang

    2015-07-08

    Animals are facing a complex sensory world in which only few stimuli are relevant to guide behavior. Value has to be assigned to relevant stimuli such as odors to select them over concurring information. Phasic dopamine is involved in the value assignment to stimuli in the ventral striatum. The underlying cellular mechanisms are incompletely understood. In striatal projection neurons of the ventral striatum in adult mice, we therefore examined the features and dynamics of phasic dopamine-induced synaptic plasticity and how this plasticity may modify the striatal output. Phasic dopamine is predicted to tag inputs that occur in temporal proximity. Indeed, we observed D1 receptor-dependent synaptic potentiation only when odor-like bursts and optogenetically evoked phasic dopamine release were paired within a time window of synaptic potentiation persisted after the phasic dopamine signal had ceased, but gradually reversed when odor-like bursts continued to be presented. The synaptic plasticity depended on the sensory input rate and was input specific. Importantly, synaptic plasticity amplified the firing response to a given olfactory input as the dendritic integration and the firing threshold remained unchanged during synaptic potentiation. Thus, phasic dopamine-induced synaptic plasticity can change information transfer through dynamic increases of the output of striatal projection neurons to specific sensory inputs. This plasticity may provide a neural substrate for dynamic value assignment in the striatum. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/359946-11$15.00/0.

  3. Decreased firing of striatal neurons related to licking during acquisition and overtraining of a licking task.

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    Tang, Chris C; Root, David H; Duke, Dawn C; Zhu, Yun; Teixeria, Kate; Ma, Sisi; Barker, David J; West, Mark O

    2009-11-04

    Neurons that fire in relation to licking, in the ventral part of the dorsolateral striatum (DLS), were studied during acquisition and performance of a licking task in rats for 14 sessions (2 h/d). Task learning was indicated by fewer errors of omission of licking and improved movement efficiency (i.e., shorter lick duration) over sessions. Number of licks did not change over sessions. Overtraining did not result in habit formation, as indicated by similar reductions of licking responses following devaluation by satiety in both early and late sessions. Twenty-nine lick neurons recorded and tracked over sessions exhibited a significant linear decrease in average firing rate across all neurons over sessions, correlating with concurrent declines in lick duration. Individually, most neurons (86%) exhibited decreased firing rates, while a small proportion (14%) exhibited increased firing rates, during lick movements that were matched over sessions. Reward manipulations did not alter firing patterns over sessions. Aside from the absence of habit formation, striatal processing during unconditioned movements (i.e., licking) was characterized by high activity of movement-related neurons during early performance and decreased activity of the same neurons during overtraining, similar to our previous report of head movement neurons during acquired, skilled, instrumental head movements that ultimately became habitual (Tang et al., 2007). Decreased activity in DLS neurons may reflect a common neural mechanism underlying improvement in movement efficiency with overtraining. Nonetheless, the decreased striatal firing in relation to a movement that did not become habitual demonstrates that not all DLS changes reflect habit formation.

  4. Single low doses of MPTP decrease tyrosine hydroxylase expression in the absence of overt neuron loss.

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    Alam, Gelareh; Edler, Melissa; Burchfield, Shelbie; Richardson, Jason R

    2017-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common age-related neurodegenerative disease. 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) is a prototypical neurotoxicant used in mice to mimic primary features of PD pathology including striatal dopamine depletion and dopamine neuron loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). In the literature, there are several experimental paradigms involving multiple doses of MPTP that are used to elicit dopamine neuron loss. However, a recent study reported that a single low dose caused significant loss of dopamine neurons. Here, we determined the effect of a single intraperitoneal injection of one of three doses of MPTP (0.1, 2 and 20mg/kg) on dopamine neurons, labeled by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH + ), and total neuron number (Nissl + ) in the SNc using unbiased stereological counting. Data reveal a significant loss of neurons in the SNc (TH + and Nissl + ) only in the group treated with 20mg/kg MPTP. Groups treated with lower dose of MPTP (0.1 and 2mg/kg) only showed significant loss of TH + neurons rather than TH + and Nissl + neurons. Striatal dopamine levels were decreased in the groups treated with 2 and 20mg/kg MPTP and striatal terminal markers including, TH and the dopamine transporter (DAT), were only decreased in the groups treated with 20mg/kg MPTP. These data demonstrate that lower doses of MPTP likely result in loss of TH expression rather than actual dopamine neuron loss in the SN. This finding reinforces the need to measure both total neuron number along with TH + cells in determining dopamine neuron loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Population of Indirect Pathway Striatal Projection Neurons Is Selectively Entrained to Parkinsonian Beta Oscillations.

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    Sharott, Andrew; Vinciati, Federica; Nakamura, Kouichi C; Magill, Peter J

    2017-10-11

    Classical schemes of basal ganglia organization posit that parkinsonian movement difficulties presenting after striatal dopamine depletion stem from the disproportionate firing rates of spiny projection neurons (SPNs) therein. There remains, however, a pressing need to elucidate striatal SPN firing in the context of the synchronized network oscillations that are abnormally exaggerated in cortical-basal ganglia circuits in parkinsonism. To address this, we recorded unit activities in the dorsal striatum of dopamine-intact and dopamine-depleted rats during two brain states, respectively defined by cortical slow-wave activity (SWA) and activation. Dopamine depletion escalated striatal net output but had contrasting effects on "direct pathway" SPNs (dSPNs) and "indirect pathway" SPNs (iSPNs); their firing rates became imbalanced, and they disparately engaged in network oscillations. Disturbed striatal activity dynamics relating to the slow (∼1 Hz) oscillations prevalent during SWA partly generalized to the exaggerated beta-frequency (15-30 Hz) oscillations arising during cortical activation. In both cases, SPNs exhibited higher incidences of phase-locked firing to ongoing cortical oscillations, and SPN ensembles showed higher levels of rhythmic correlated firing, after dopamine depletion. Importantly, in dopamine-depleted striatum, a widespread population of iSPNs, which often displayed excessive firing rates and aberrant phase-locked firing to cortical beta oscillations, preferentially and excessively synchronized their firing at beta frequencies. Conversely, dSPNs were neither hyperactive nor synchronized to a large extent during cortical activation. These data collectively demonstrate a cell type-selective entrainment of SPN firing to parkinsonian beta oscillations. We conclude that a population of overactive, excessively synchronized iSPNs could orchestrate these pathological rhythms in basal ganglia circuits. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic depletion of dopamine

  6. Glutamatergic Tuning of Hyperactive Striatal Projection Neurons Controls the Motor Response to Dopamine Replacement in Parkinsonian Primates.

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    Singh, Arun; Jenkins, Meagan A; Burke, Kenneth J; Beck, Goichi; Jenkins, Andrew; Scimemi, Annalisa; Traynelis, Stephen F; Papa, Stella M

    2018-01-23

    Dopamine (DA) loss in Parkinson's disease (PD) alters the function of striatal projection neurons (SPNs) and causes motor deficits, but DA replacement can induce further abnormalities. A key pathological change in animal models and patients is SPN hyperactivity; however, the role of glutamate in altered DA responses remains elusive. We tested the effect of locally applied AMPAR or NMDAR antagonists on glutamatergic signaling in SPNs of parkinsonian primates. Following a reduction in basal hyperactivity by antagonists at either receptor, DA inputs induced SPN firing changes that were stable during the entire motor response, in clear contrast with the typically unstable effects. The SPN activity reduction over an extended putamenal area controlled the release of involuntary movements in the "on" state and therefore improved motor responses to DA replacement. These results demonstrate the pathophysiological role of upregulated SPN activity and support strategies to reduce striatal glutamate signaling for PD therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimal compensation for neuron loss

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    Barrett, David GT; Denève, Sophie; Machens, Christian K

    2016-01-01

    The brain has an impressive ability to withstand neural damage. Diseases that kill neurons can go unnoticed for years, and incomplete brain lesions or silencing of neurons often fail to produce any behavioral effect. How does the brain compensate for such damage, and what are the limits of this compensation? We propose that neural circuits instantly compensate for neuron loss, thereby preserving their function as much as possible. We show that this compensation can explain changes in tuning curves induced by neuron silencing across a variety of systems, including the primary visual cortex. We find that compensatory mechanisms can be implemented through the dynamics of networks with a tight balance of excitation and inhibition, without requiring synaptic plasticity. The limits of this compensatory mechanism are reached when excitation and inhibition become unbalanced, thereby demarcating a recovery boundary, where signal representation fails and where diseases may become symptomatic. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12454.001 PMID:27935480

  8. Differential effects of cocaine on histone posttranslational modifications in identified populations of striatal neurons.

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    Jordi, Emmanuelle; Heiman, Myriam; Marion-Poll, Lucile; Guermonprez, Pierre; Cheng, Shuk Kei; Nairn, Angus C; Greengard, Paul; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2013-06-04

    Drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, induce changes in gene expression and epigenetic marks including alterations in histone posttranslational modifications in striatal neurons. These changes are thought to participate in physiological memory mechanisms and to be critical for long-term behavioral alterations. However, the striatum is composed of multiple cell types, including two distinct populations of medium-sized spiny neurons, and little is known concerning the cell-type specificity of epigenetic modifications. To address this question we used bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice, which express EGFP fused to the N-terminus of the large subunit ribosomal protein L10a driven by the D1 or D2 dopamine receptor (D1R, D2R) promoter, respectively. Fluorescence in nucleoli was used to sort nuclei from D1R- or D2R-expressing neurons and to quantify by flow cytometry the cocaine-induced changes in histone acetylation and methylation specifically in these two types of nuclei. The two populations of medium-sized spiny neurons displayed different patterns of histone modifications 15 min or 24 h after a single injection of cocaine or 24 h after seven daily injections. In particular, acetylation of histone 3 on Lys 14 and of histone 4 on Lys 5 and 12, and methylation of histone 3 on Lys 9 exhibited distinct and persistent changes in the two cell types. Our data provide insights into the differential epigenetic responses to cocaine in D1R- and D2R-positive neurons and their potential regulation, which may participate in the persistent effects of cocaine in these neurons. The method described should have general utility for studying nuclear modifications in different types of neuronal or nonneuronal cell types.

  9. KV7 Channels Regulate Firing during Synaptic Integration in GABAergic Striatal Neurons

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    M. Belén Pérez-Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Striatal projection neurons (SPNs process motor and cognitive information. Their activity is affected by Parkinson’s disease, in which dopamine concentration is decreased and acetylcholine concentration is increased. Acetylcholine activates muscarinic receptors in SPNs. Its main source is the cholinergic interneuron that responds with a briefer latency than SPNs during a cortical command. Therefore, an important question is whether muscarinic G-protein coupled receptors and their signaling cascades are fast enough to intervene during synaptic responses to regulate synaptic integration and firing. One of the most known voltage dependent channels regulated by muscarinic receptors is the KV7/KCNQ channel. It is not known whether these channels regulate the integration of suprathreshold corticostriatal responses. Here, we study the impact of cholinergic muscarinic modulation on the synaptic response of SPNs by regulating KV7 channels. We found that KV7 channels regulate corticostriatal synaptic integration and that this modulation occurs in the dendritic/spines compartment. In contrast, it is negligible in the somatic compartment. This modulation occurs on sub- and suprathreshold responses and lasts during the whole duration of the responses, hundreds of milliseconds, greatly altering SPNs firing properties. This modulation affected the behavior of the striatal microcircuit.

  10. A negative relationship between ventral striatal loss anticipation response and impulsivity in borderline personality disorder.

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    Herbort, Maike C; Soch, Joram; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Krauel, Kerstin; Pujara, Maia; Koenigs, Michael; Gallinat, Jürgen; Walter, Henrik; Roepke, Stefan; Schott, Björn H

    2016-01-01

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) frequently exhibit impulsive behavior, and self-reported impulsivity is typically higher in BPD patients when compared to healthy controls. Previous functional neuroimaging studies have suggested a link between impulsivity, the ventral striatal response to reward anticipation, and prediction errors. Here we investigated the striatal neural response to monetary gain and loss anticipation and their relationship with impulsivity in 21 female BPD patients and 23 age-matched female healthy controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants performed a delayed monetary incentive task in which three categories of objects predicted a potential gain, loss, or neutral outcome. Impulsivity was assessed using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). Compared to healthy controls, BPD patients exhibited significantly reduced fMRI responses of the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens (VS/NAcc) to both reward-predicting and loss-predicting cues. BIS-11 scores showed a significant positive correlation with the VS/NAcc reward anticipation responses in healthy controls, and this correlation, while also nominally positive, failed to reach significance in BPD patients. BPD patients, on the other hand, exhibited a significantly negative correlation between ventral striatal loss anticipation responses and BIS-11 scores, whereas this correlation was significantly positive in healthy controls. Our results suggest that patients with BPD show attenuated anticipation responses in the VS/NAcc and, furthermore, that higher impulsivity in BPD patients might be related to impaired prediction of aversive outcomes.

  11. A negative relationship between ventral striatal loss anticipation response and impulsivity in borderline personality disorder

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    Maike C. Herbort

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD frequently exhibit impulsive behavior, and self-reported impulsivity is typically higher in BPD patients when compared to healthy controls. Previous functional neuroimaging studies have suggested a link between impulsivity, the ventral striatal response to reward anticipation, and prediction errors. Here we investigated the striatal neural response to monetary gain and loss anticipation and their relationship with impulsivity in 21 female BPD patients and 23 age-matched female healthy controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Participants performed a delayed monetary incentive task in which three categories of objects predicted a potential gain, loss, or neutral outcome. Impulsivity was assessed using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11. Compared to healthy controls, BPD patients exhibited significantly reduced fMRI responses of the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens (VS/NAcc to both reward-predicting and loss-predicting cues. BIS-11 scores showed a significant positive correlation with the VS/NAcc reward anticipation responses in healthy controls, and this correlation, while also nominally positive, failed to reach significance in BPD patients. BPD patients, on the other hand, exhibited a significantly negative correlation between ventral striatal loss anticipation responses and BIS-11 scores, whereas this correlation was significantly positive in healthy controls. Our results suggest that patients with BPD show attenuated anticipation responses in the VS/NAcc and, furthermore, that higher impulsivity in BPD patients might be related to impaired prediction of aversive outcomes.

  12. Reappraising striatal D1- and D2-neurons in reward and aversion.

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    Soares-Cunha, Carina; Coimbra, Barbara; Sousa, Nuno; Rodrigues, Ana J

    2016-09-01

    The striatum has been involved in complex behaviors such as motor control, learning, decision-making, reward and aversion. The striatum is mainly composed of medium spiny neurons (MSNs), typically divided into those expressing dopamine receptor D1, forming the so-called direct pathway, and those expressing D2 receptor (indirect pathway). For decades it has been proposed that these two populations exhibit opposing control over motor output, and recently, the same dichotomy has been proposed for valenced behaviors. Whereas D1-MSNs mediate reinforcement and reward, D2-MSNs have been associated with punishment and aversion. In this review we will discuss pharmacological, genetic and optogenetic studies that indicate that there is still controversy to what concerns the role of striatal D1- and D2-MSNs in this type of behaviors, highlighting the need to reconsider the early view that they mediate solely opposing aspects of valenced behaviour. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Adenosine A₂A receptors in striatal glutamatergic terminals and GABAergic neurons oppositely modulate psychostimulant action and DARPP-32 phosphorylation.

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    Hai-Ying Shen

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR are located postsynaptically in striatopallidal GABAergic neurons, antagonizing dopamine D2 receptor functions, and are also located presynaptically at corticostriatal terminals, facilitating glutamate release. To address the hypothesis that these two A2AR populations differently control the action of psychostimulants, we characterized A2AR modulation of cocaine-induced effects at the level of DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and Thr-75, c-Fos expression, and psychomotor activity using two lines of cell-type selective A2AR knockout (KO mice with selective A2AR deletion in GABAergic neurons (striatum-A2AR-KO mice, or with A2AR deletion in both striatal GABAergic neurons and projecting cortical glutamatergic neurons (forebrain-A2AR-KO mice. We demonstrated that striatum-A2AR KO mice lacked A2ARs exclusively in striatal GABAergic terminals whereas forebrain-A2AR KO mice lacked A2ARs in both striatal GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals leading to a blunted A2AR-mediated facilitation of synaptosomal glutamate release. The inactivation of A2ARs in GABAergic neurons reduced striatal DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and increased its phosphorylation at Thr-75. Conversely, the additional deletion of corticostriatal glutamatergic A2ARs produced opposite effects on DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and Thr-75. This distinct modulation of DARPP-32 phosphorylation was associated with opposite responses to cocaine-induced striatal c-Fos expression and psychomotor activity in striatum-A2AR KO (enhanced and forebrain-A2AR KO mice (reduced. Thus, A2ARs in glutamatergic corticostriatal terminals and in GABAergic striatal neurons modulate the action of psychostimulants and DARPP-32 phosphorylation in opposite ways. We conclude that A2ARs in glutamatergic terminals prominently control the action of psychostimulants and define a novel mechanism by which A2ARs fine-tune striatal activity by integrating GABAergic, dopaminergic and

  14. Emotion-induced loss aversion and striatal-amygdala coupling in low-anxious individuals.

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    Charpentier, Caroline J; De Martino, Benedetto; Sim, Alena L; Sharot, Tali; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2016-04-01

    Adapting behavior to changes in the environment is a crucial ability for survival but such adaptation varies widely across individuals. Here, we asked how humans alter their economic decision-making in response to emotional cues, and whether this is related to trait anxiety. Developing an emotional decision-making task for functional magnetic resonance imaging, in which gambling decisions were preceded by emotional and non-emotional primes, we assessed emotional influences on loss aversion, the tendency to overweigh potential monetary losses relative to gains. Our behavioral results revealed that only low-anxious individuals exhibited increased loss aversion under emotional conditions. This emotional modulation of decision-making was accompanied by a corresponding emotion-elicited increase in amygdala-striatal functional connectivity, which correlated with the behavioral effect across participants. Consistent with prior reports of 'neural loss aversion', both amygdala and ventral striatum tracked losses more strongly than gains, and amygdala loss aversion signals were exaggerated by emotion, suggesting a potential role for this structure in integrating value and emotion cues. Increased loss aversion and striatal-amygdala coupling induced by emotional cues may reflect the engagement of adaptive harm-avoidance mechanisms in low-anxious individuals, possibly promoting resilience to psychopathology. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Widespread heterogeneous neuronal loss across the cerebral cortex in Huntington's disease.

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    Nana, Alissa L; Kim, Eric H; Thu, Doris C V; Oorschot, Dorothy E; Tippett, Lynette J; Hogg, Virginia M; Synek, Beth J; Roxburgh, Richard; Waldvogel, Henry J; Faull, Richard L M

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by neuronal degeneration in the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex, and a variable symptom profile. Although progressive striatal degeneration is known to occur and is related to symptom profile, little is known about the cellular basis of symptom heterogeneity across the entire cerebral cortex. To investigate this, we have undertaken a double blind study using unbiased stereological cell counting techniques to determine the pattern of cell loss in six representative cortical regions from the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes in the brains of 14 Huntington's disease cases and 15 controls. The results clearly demonstrate a widespread loss of total neurons and pyramidal cells across all cortical regions studied, except for the primary visual cortex. Importantly, the results show that cell loss is remarkably variable both within and between Huntington's disease cases. The results also show that neuronal loss in the primary sensory and secondary visual cortices relate to Huntington's disease motor symptom profiles, and neuronal loss across the associational cortices in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes is related to both Huntington's disease motor and to mood symptom profiles. This finding considerably extends a previous study (Thu et al., Brain, 2010; 133:1094-1110) which showed that neuronal loss in the primary motor cortex was related specifically to the motor symptom profiles while neuronal loss in the anterior cingulate cortex was related specifically to mood symptom profiles. The extent of cortical cell loss in the current study was generally related to the striatal neuropathological grade, but not to CAG repeat length on the HTT gene. Overall our findings show that Huntington's disease is characterized by a heterogeneous pattern of neuronal cell loss across the entire cerebrum which varies with symptom profile.

  16. Striatal tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons are associated with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in hemiparkinsonian mice.

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    Keber, U; Klietz, M; Carlsson, T; Oertel, W H; Weihe, E; Schäfer, M K-H; Höglinger, G U; Depboylu, C

    2015-07-09

    L-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the therapeutic gold standard in Parkinson's disease. However, long-term treatment is complicated by the induction of debilitating abnormal involuntary movements termed L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LIDs). Until today the underlying mechanisms of LID pathogenesis are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to reveal new factors, which may be involved in the induction of LID. We have focused on the expression of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase-positive (TH+) neurons, which are capable of producing either L-DOPA or dopamine (DA) in target areas of ventral midbrain DAergic neurons. To address this issue, a daily L-DOPA dose was administered over the course of 15 days to mice with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesions of the medial forebrain bundle and LIDs were evaluated. Remarkably, the number of striatal TH+ neurons strongly correlated with both induction and severity of LID as well as ΔFosB expression as an established molecular marker for LID. Furthermore, dyskinetic mice showed a marked augmentation of serotonergic fiber innervation in the striatum, enabling the decarboxylation of L-DOPA to DA. Axial, limb and orolingual dyskinesias were predominantly associated with TH+ neurons in the lateral striatum, whereas medially located TH+ neurons triggered locomotive rotations. In contrast, identified accumbal and cortical TH+ cells did not contribute to the generation of LID. Thus, striatal TH+ cells and serotonergic terminals may cooperatively synthesize DA and subsequently contribute to supraphysiological synaptic DA concentrations, an accepted cause in LID pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Amphetamine and Dopamine-Induced Immediate Early Gene Expression in Striatal Neurons Depends on Postsynaptic NMDA Receptors and Calcium

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    Konradi, Christine; Leveque, Jean-Christophe; Hyman, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Amphetamine and cocaine induce the expression of both immediate early genes (IEGs) and neuropeptide genes in rat striatum. Despite the demonstrated dependence of these effects on D1 dopamine receptors, which activate the cyclic AMP pathway, there are several reports that amphetamine and cocaine-induced IEG expression can be inhibited in striatum in vivo by NMDA receptor antagonists. We find that in vivo, the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 inhibits amphetamine induction of c-fos acutely and also prevents downregulation of IEG expression with chronic amphetamine administration. Such observations raise the question of whether dopamine/glutamate interactions occur at the level of corticostriatal and mesostriatal circuitry or within striatal neurons. Therefore, we studied dissociated striatal cultures in which midbrain and cortical presynaptic inputs are removed. In these cultures, we find that dopamine- or forskolin-mediated IEG induction requires Ca2+ entry via NMDA receptors but not via L-type Ca2+ channels. Moreover, blockade of NMDA receptors diminishes the ability of dopamine to induce phosphorylation of the cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein CREB. Although these results do not rule out a role for circuit-level dopamine/glutamate interactions, they demonstrate a requirement at the cellular level for interactions between the cyclic AMP and NMDA receptor pathways in dopamine-regulated gene expression in striatal neurons. PMID:8753884

  18. Calcium dynamics predict direction of synaptic plasticity in striatal spiny projection neurons.

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    Jędrzejewska-Szmek, Joanna; Damodaran, Sriraman; Dorman, Daniel B; Blackwell, Kim T

    2017-04-01

    The striatum is a major site of learning and memory formation for sensorimotor and cognitive association. One of the mechanisms used by the brain for memory storage is synaptic plasticity - the long-lasting, activity-dependent change in synaptic strength. All forms of synaptic plasticity require an elevation in intracellular calcium, and a common hypothesis is that the amplitude and duration of calcium transients can determine the direction of synaptic plasticity. The utility of this hypothesis in the striatum is unclear in part because dopamine is required for striatal plasticity and in part because of the diversity in stimulation protocols. To test whether calcium can predict plasticity direction, we developed a calcium-based plasticity rule using a spiny projection neuron model with sophisticated calcium dynamics including calcium diffusion, buffering and pump extrusion. We utilized three spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) induction protocols, in which postsynaptic potentials are paired with precisely timed action potentials and the timing of such pairing determines whether potentiation or depression will occur. Results show that despite the variation in calcium dynamics, a single, calcium-based plasticity rule, which explicitly considers duration of calcium elevations, can explain the direction of synaptic weight change for all three STDP protocols. Additional simulations show that the plasticity rule correctly predicts the NMDA receptor dependence of long-term potentiation and the L-type channel dependence of long-term depression. By utilizing realistic calcium dynamics, the model reveals mechanisms controlling synaptic plasticity direction, and shows that the dynamics of calcium, not just calcium amplitude, are crucial for synaptic plasticity. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Striatal and Tegmental Neurons Code Critical Signals for Temporal-Difference Learning of State Value in Domestic Chicks

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    Chentao Wen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available To ensure survival, animals must update the internal representations of their environment in a trial-and-error fashion. Psychological studies of associative learning and neurophysiological analyses of dopaminergic neurons have suggested that this updating process involves the temporal-difference (TD method in the basal ganglia network. However, the way in which the component variables of the TD method are implemented at the neuronal level is unclear. To investigate the underlying neural mechanisms, we trained domestic chicks to associate color cues with food rewards. We recorded neuronal activities from the medial striatum or tegmentum in a freely behaving condition and examined how reward omission changed neuronal firing. To compare neuronal activities with the signals assumed in the TD method, we simulated the behavioral task in the form of a finite sequence composed of discrete steps of time. The three signals assumed in the simulated task were the prediction signal, the target signal for updating, and the TD-error signal. In both the medial striatum and tegmentum, the majority of recorded neurons were categorized into three types according to their fitness for three models, though these neurons tended to form a continuum spectrum without distinct differences in the firing rate. Specifically, two types of striatal neurons successfully mimicked the target signal and the prediction signal. A linear summation of these two types of striatum neurons was a good fit for the activity of one type of tegmental neurons mimicking the TD-error signal. The present study thus demonstrates that the striatum and tegmentum can convey the signals critically required for the TD method. Based on the theoretical and neurophysiological studies, together with tract-tracing data, we propose a novel model to explain how the convergence of signals represented in the striatum could lead to the computation of TD error in tegmental dopaminergic neurons.

  20. Striatal and Tegmental Neurons Code Critical Signals for Temporal-Difference Learning of State Value in Domestic Chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chentao; Ogura, Yukiko; Matsushima, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    To ensure survival, animals must update the internal representations of their environment in a trial-and-error fashion. Psychological studies of associative learning and neurophysiological analyses of dopaminergic neurons have suggested that this updating process involves the temporal-difference (TD) method in the basal ganglia network. However, the way in which the component variables of the TD method are implemented at the neuronal level is unclear. To investigate the underlying neural mechanisms, we trained domestic chicks to associate color cues with food rewards. We recorded neuronal activities from the medial striatum or tegmentum in a freely behaving condition and examined how reward omission changed neuronal firing. To compare neuronal activities with the signals assumed in the TD method, we simulated the behavioral task in the form of a finite sequence composed of discrete steps of time. The three signals assumed in the simulated task were the prediction signal, the target signal for updating, and the TD-error signal. In both the medial striatum and tegmentum, the majority of recorded neurons were categorized into three types according to their fitness for three models, though these neurons tended to form a continuum spectrum without distinct differences in the firing rate. Specifically, two types of striatal neurons successfully mimicked the target signal and the prediction signal. A linear summation of these two types of striatum neurons was a good fit for the activity of one type of tegmental neurons mimicking the TD-error signal. The present study thus demonstrates that the striatum and tegmentum can convey the signals critically required for the TD method. Based on the theoretical and neurophysiological studies, together with tract-tracing data, we propose a novel model to explain how the convergence of signals represented in the striatum could lead to the computation of TD error in tegmental dopaminergic neurons.

  1. Differences in number and distribution of striatal calbindin medium spiny neurons between a vocal-learner (Melopsittacus undulatus and a non-vocal learner bird (Colinus virginianus

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    Elena eGarcia-Calero

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Striatal projecting neurons, known as medium spiny neurons (MSNs, segregate into two compartments called matrix and striosome in the mammalian striatum. The matrix domain is characterized by the presence of calbindin immunopositive (CB+ MSNs, not observed in the striosome subdivision. The existence of a similar CB+ MSN population has recently been described in two striatal structures in male zebra finch (a vocal learner bird: the striatal capsule and the Area X, a nucleus implicated in song learning. Female zebra finches show a similar pattern of CB+ MSNs than males in the developing striatum but loose these cells in juveniles and adult stages. In the present work we analyzed the existence and allocation of CB+MSNs in the striatal domain of the vocal learner bird budgerigar (representative of psittaciformes order and the non-vocal learner bird quail (representative of galliformes order. We studied the co-localization of CB protein with FoxP1, a transcription factor expressed in vertebrate striatal MSNs. We observed CB+ MSNs in the medial striatal domain of adult male and female budgerigars, although this cell type was missing in the potentially homologous nucleus for Area X in budgerigar. In quail, we observed CB+ cells in the striatal domain at developmental and adult stages but they did not co-localize with the MSN marker FoxP1. We also described the existence of the CB+ striatal capsule in budgerigar and quail and compared these results with the CB+ striatal capsule observed in juvenile zebra finches. Together, these results point out important differences in CB+MSN distribution between two representative species of vocal learner and non-vocal learner avian orders (respectively the budgerigar and the quail, but also between close vocal learner bird families.

  2. Longitudinal study of striatal activation to reward and loss anticipation from mid-adolescence into late adolescence/early adulthood.

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    Lamm, C; Benson, B E; Guyer, A E; Perez-Edgar, K; Fox, N A; Pine, D S; Ernst, M

    2014-08-01

    Adolescent risk-taking behavior has been associated with age-related changes in striatal activation to incentives. Previous cross-sectional studies have shown both increased and decreased striatal activation to incentives for adolescents compared to adults. The monetary incentive delay (MID) task, designed to assess functional brain activation in anticipation of reward, has been used extensively to examine striatal activation in both adult and adolescent populations. The current study used this task with a longitudinal approach across mid-adolescence and late adolescence/early adulthood. Twenty-two participants (13 male) were studied using the MID task at two time-points, once in mid-adolescence (mean age=16.11; SD=1.44) and a second time in late adolescence/early adulthood (mean age=20.14; SD=.67). Results revealed greater striatal activation with increased age in high- compared to low-incentive contexts (incentive magnitude), for gain as well as for loss trials (incentive valence). Results extend cross-sectional findings and show reduced striatal engagement in adolescence compared to adulthood during preparation for action in an incentive context. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Modeling pharmacological clock and memory patterns of interval timing in a striatal beat-frequency model with realistic, noisy neurons

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    Sorinel A. Oprisan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In most species, the capability of perceiving and using the passage of time in the seconds-to-minutes range (interval timing is not only accurate but also scalar: errors in time estimation are linearly related to the estimated duration. The ubiquity of scalar timing extends over behavioral, lesion, and pharmacological manipulations. For example, in mammals, dopaminergic drugs induce an immediate, scalar change in the perceived time (clock pattern, whereas cholinergic drugs induce a gradual, scalar change in perceived time (memory pattern. How do these properties emerge from unreliable, noisy neurons firing in the milliseconds range? Neurobiological information relative to the brain circuits involved in interval timing provide support for an Striatal Beat Frequency (SBF model, in which time is coded by the coincidental activation of striatal spiny neurons by cortical neural oscillators. While biologically plausible, the impracticality of perfect oscillators, or their lack thereof, questions this mechanism in a brain with noisy neurons. We explored the computational mechanisms required for the clock and memory patterns in an SBF model with biophysically realistic and noisy Morris-Lecar neurons (SBF-ML. Under the assumption that dopaminergic drugs modulate the firing frequency of cortical oscillators, and that cholinergic drugs modulate the memory representation of the criterion time, we show that our SBF-ML model can reproduce the pharmacological clock and memory patterns observed in the literature. Numerical results also indicate that parameter variability (noise – which is ubiquitous in the form of small fluctuations in the intrinsic frequencies of neural oscillators within and between trails, and in the errors in recording/retrieving stored information related to criterion time – seems to be critical for the time-scale invariance of the clock and memory patterns.

  4. Proteostasis in striatal cells and selective neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, Julia; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Selective neuronal loss is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease (HD). Although mutant huntingtin, the protein responsible for HD, is expressed ubiquitously, a subpopulation of neurons in the striatum is the first to succumb. In this review, we examine evidence that protein quality control pathways, including the ubiquitin proteasome system, autophagy, and chaperones, are significantly altered in striatal neurons. These alterations may increase the susceptibility of striatal neurons to mutant huntingtin-mediated toxicity. This novel view of HD pathogenesis has profound therapeutic implications: protein homeostasis pathways in the striatum may be valuable targets for treating HD and other misfolded protein disorders.

  5. Dopamine D1-histamine H3 Receptor Heteromers Provide a Selective Link to MAPK Signaling in GABAergic Neurons of the Direct Striatal Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Estefanía; Hoffmann, Hanne; Gonzalez-Sepúlveda, Marta; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó, Vicent; Cortés, Antoni; Mallol, Josefa; Vignes, Michel; McCormick, Peter J.; Canela, Enric I.; Lluís, Carme; Moratalla, Rosario; Ferré, Sergi; Ortiz, Jordi; Franco, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Previously, using artificial cell systems, we identified receptor heteromers between the dopamine D1 or D2 receptors and the histamine H3 receptor. In addition, we demonstrated two biochemical characteristics of the dopamine D1 receptor-histamine H3 receptor heteromer. We have now extended this work to show the dopamine D1 receptor-histamine H3 receptor heteromer exists in the brain and serves to provide a novel link between the MAPK pathway and the GABAergic neurons in the direct striatal efferent pathway. Using the biochemical characteristics identified previously, we found that the ability of H3 receptor activation to stimulate p44 and p42 extracellular signal-regulated MAPK (ERK 1/2) phosphorylation was only observed in striatal slices of mice expressing D1 receptors but not in D1 receptor-deficient mice. On the other hand, the ability of both D1 and H3 receptor antagonists to block MAPK activation induced by either D1 or H3 receptor agonists was also found in striatal slices. Taken together, these data indicate the occurrence of D1-H3 receptor complexes in the striatum and, more importantly, that H3 receptor agonist-induced ERK 1/2 phosphorylation in striatal slices is mediated by D1-H3 receptor heteromers. Moreover, H3 receptor-mediated phospho-ERK 1/2 labeling co-distributed with D1 receptor-containing but not with D2 receptor-containing striatal neurons. These results indicate that D1-H3 receptor heteromers work as processors integrating dopamine- and histamine-related signals involved in controlling the function of striatal neurons of the direct striatal pathway. PMID:21173143

  6. The nigrostriatal pathway in the rat: A single-axon study of the relationship between dorsal and ventral tier nigral neurons and the striosome/matrix striatal compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prensa, L; Parent, A

    2001-09-15

    Axons from dorsal/ventral tiers of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), ventral tegmental area (VTA), and retrorubral field (RRF) were traced after injecting their cell body with biotinylated dextran amine. Fifty-three single axons were reconstructed from serial sagittal sections with a camera lucida, and mu-opiate receptor immunostaining served to differentiate the striosome/matrix striatal compartments. Most dorsal tier SNc axons terminate within the matrix of the dorsal striatum, but their patterns of arborization vary markedly; some axons innervate one specific matriceal area, whereas others arborize in multiple discontinuous loci. Some dorsal tier SNc axons also project to both striosomes and matrix. Other dorsal tier SNc axons, as well as VTA axons, innervate the ventral striatum and send collaterals to striosomes lying ventrally in the dorsal striatum or to the ventral sector of the subcallosal streak (SS). Ventral tier SNc axons arborize principally in striosomes, but some ramify in both compartments or in striosomes and the SS. Ventral tier neurons that form deep clusters in substantia nigra pars reticulata innervate principally the matrix and the SS. The amygdala and ventral pallidum receive secondary collaterals from striatal axons of dorsal/ventral tier neurons or RRF neurons. The subthalamic nucleus receives collaterals from striatal axons of SNc clustered neurons, whereas the globus pallidus gets collaterals from striatal axons of dorsal/ventral tier SNc neurons. These findings reveal that the nigrostriatal pathway is composed of several neuronal subsystems, each endowed with a widely distributed axonal arborization that allows them to exert a multifaceted influence on striatal and/or extrastriatal structures.

  7. Unravelling the differential functions and regulation of striatal neuron sub-populations in motor control, reward and motivational processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina eEna

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The striatum, the major input structure of the basal ganglia, is critically involved in motor control and learning of habits and skills, and is also involved in motivational and reward processes. The dorsal striatum, caudate-putamen, is primarily implicated in motor functions whereas the ventral striatum, the nucleus accumbens, is essential for motivation and drug reinforcement. Severe basal ganglia dysfunction occurs in movement disorders as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease, and in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and drug addiction. The striatum is essentially composed of GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs that are output neurons giving rise to the so-called direct and indirect pathways and are targets of the cerebral cortex and mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons. Although the involvement of striatal sub-areas in motor control and motivation has been thoroughly characterized, major issues remained concerning the specific and respective functions of the two MSNs sub-populations, D2R-striatopallidal (dopamine D2 receptor-positive and D1R-striatonigral (dopamine D1 receptor-positive neurons, as well as their specific regulation. Here, we review recent advances that gave new insight in the understanding of the differential roles of striatopallidal and striatonigral neurons in the basal ganglia circuit. We discuss innovative techniques developed in the last decade which allowed a much precise evaluation of molecular pathways implicated in motivational processes and functional roles of striatopallidal and striatonigral neurons in motor control and in the establishment of reward-associated behaviour.

  8. Striatal Transplantation of Human Dopaminergic Neurons Differentiated From Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived From Umbilical Cord Blood Using Lentiviral Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberg, Anna; Stanslowsky, Nancy; Klein, Alexander; Wesemann, Maike; Haase, Alexandra; Martin, Ulrich; Dengler, Reinhard; Grothe, Claudia; Ratzka, Andreas; Wegner, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are promising sources for regenerative therapies like the replacement of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. They offer an unlimited cell source that can be standardized and optimized to produce applicable cell populations to gain maximal functional recovery. In the present study, human cord blood-derived iPSCs (hCBiPSCs) were differentiated into dopaminergic neurons utilizing two different in vitro protocols for neural induction: (protocol I) by fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) signaling, (protocol II) by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/transforming growth factor (TGF-β) inhibition. After maturation, in vitro increased numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons (7.4% of total cells) were observed by protocol II compared to 3.5% in protocol I. Furthermore, 3 weeks after transplantation in hemiparkinsonian rats in vivo, a reduced number of undifferentiated proliferating cells was achieved with protocol II. In contrast, proliferation still occurred in protocol I-derived grafts, resulting in tumor-like growth in two out of four animals 3 weeks after transplantation. Protocol II, however, did not increase the number of TH(+) cells in the striatal grafts of hemiparkinsonian rats. In conclusion, BMP/TGF-β inhibition was more effective than FGF-2 signaling with regard to dopaminergic induction of hCBiPSCs in vitro and prevented graft overgrowth in vivo.

  9. Timing of caloric intake during weight loss differentially affects striatal dopamine transporter and thalamic serotonin transporter binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, Ruth I; Schrantee, Anouk; Adriaanse, Sofie M; Unmehopa, Unga A; Booij, Jan; Reneman, Liesbeth; Fliers, Eric; la Fleur, Susanne E; Serlie, Mireille J

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that meal timing throughout the day contributes to maintaining or regaining weight after hypocaloric diets. Although brain serotonin and dopamine are well known to be involved in regulating feeding, it is unknown whether meal timing during energy restriction affects these neurotransmitter systems. We studied the effect of a 4 wk hypocaloric diet with either 50% of daily calories consumed at breakfast (BF group) or at dinner (D group) on hypothalamic and thalamic serotonin transporter (SERT) binding and on striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) binding. The BF and D groups lost a similar amount of weight. Striatal DAT and thalamic SERT binding increased in the BF group, while decreasing in the D group after the diet (ΔDAT 0.37 ± 0.63 vs. -0.53 ± 0.77, respectively; P = 0.005; ΔSERT 0.12 ± 0.25 vs. -0.13 ± 0.26 respectively, P = 0.032). Additional voxel-based analysis showed an increase in DAT binding in the ventral striatum in the BF group and a decrease in the dorsal striatum in the D group. During weight loss, striatal DAT and thalamic SERT binding increased weight independently when 50% of daily calories were consumed at breakfast, whereas it decreased when caloric intake was highest at dinner. These findings may contribute to the earlier reported favorable effect of meal timing on weight maintenance after hypocaloric diets.-Versteeg, R. I., Schrantee, A., Adriaanse, S. M., Unmehopa, U. A., Booij, J., Reneman, L., Fliers, E., la Fleur, S. E., Serlie, M. J. Timing of caloric intake during weight loss differentially affects striatal dopamine transporter and thalamic serotonin transporter binding. © FASEB.

  10. Secretory phospholipase A2 potentiates glutamate-induced rat striatal neuronal cell death in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, M; Bruhn, T; Christensen, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) OS2 (10, 20 and 50 pmol) or OS1, (50 pmol) purified from taipan snake Oxyuranus scutellatus scutellatus venom, and the excitatory amino acid glutamate (Glu) (2.5 and 5.0 micromol) were injected into the right striatum of male Wistar rats. Injection of 10...... no tissue damage or neurological abnormality. After injection of 5.0 micromol Glu, the animals initially circled towards the side of injection, and gradually developed generalized clonic convulsions. These animals showed a well demarcated striatal infarct. When non-toxic concentrations of 20 pmol OS2 and 2.......5 micromol Glu were co-injected, a synergistic neurotoxicity was observed. Extensive histological damage occurred in the entire right hemisphere, and in several rats comprising part of the contralateral hemisphere. These animals were apathetic in the immediate hours following injection, with circling towards...

  11. Membrane properties of striatal direct and indirect pathway neurons in mouse and rat slices and their modulation by dopamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike Planert

    Full Text Available D1 and D2 receptor expressing striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs are ascribed to striatonigral ("direct" and striatopallidal ("indirect" pathways, respectively, that are believed to function antagonistically in motor control. Glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto the two types is differentially affected by Dopamine (DA, however, less is known about the effects on MSN intrinsic electrical properties. Using patch clamp recordings, we comprehensively characterized the two pathways in rats and mice, and investigated their DA modulation. We identified the direct pathway by retrograde labeling in rats, and in mice we used transgenic animals in which EGFP is expressed in D1 MSNs. MSNs were subjected to a series of current injections to pinpoint differences between the populations, and in mice also following bath application of DA. In both animal models, most electrical properties were similar, however, membrane excitability as measured by step and ramp current injections consistently differed, with direct pathway MSNs being less excitable than their counterparts. DA had opposite effects on excitability of D1 and D2 MSNs, counteracting the initial differences. Pronounced changes in AP shape were seen in D2 MSNs. In direct pathway MSNs, excitability increased across experimental conditions and parameters, and also when applying DA or the D1 agonist SKF-81297 in presence of blockers of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic receptors. Thus, DA induced changes in excitability were D1 R mediated and intrinsic to direct pathway MSNs, and not a secondary network effect of altered synaptic transmission. DAergic modulation of intrinsic properties therefore acts in a synergistic manner with previously reported effects of DA on afferent synaptic transmission and dendritic processing, supporting the antagonistic model for direct vs. indirect striatal pathway function.

  12. Differential changes in thalamic and cortical excitatory synapses onto striatal spiny projection neurons in a Huntington disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczyk, Karolina; Raymond, Lynn A

    2016-02-01

    Huntington disease (HD), a neurodegenerative disorder caused by CAG repeat expansion in the gene encoding huntingtin, predominantly affects the striatum, especially the spiny projection neurons (SPN). The striatum receives excitatory input from cortex and thalamus, and the role of the former has been well-studied in HD. Here, we report that mutated huntingtin alters function of thalamostriatal connections. We used a novel thalamostriatal (T-S) coculture and an established corticostriatal (C-S) coculture, generated from YAC128 HD and WT (FVB/NJ background strain) mice, to investigate excitatory neurotransmission onto striatal SPN. SPN in T-S coculture from WT mice showed similar mini-excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) frequency and amplitude as in C-S coculture; however, both the frequency and amplitude were significantly reduced in YAC128 T-S coculture. Further investigation in T-S coculture showed similar excitatory synapse density in WT and YAC128 SPN dendrites by immunostaining, suggesting changes in total dendritic length or probability of release as possible explanations for mEPSC frequency changes. Synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) current was similar, but extrasynaptic current, associated with cell death signaling, was enhanced in YAC128 SPN in T-S coculture. Employing optical stimulation of cortical versus thalamic afferents and recording from striatal SPN in brain slice, we found increased glutamate release probability and reduced AMPAR/NMDAR current ratios in thalamostriatal synapses, most prominently in YAC128. Enhanced extrasynaptic NMDAR current in YAC128 SPN was apparent with both cortical and thalamic stimulation. We conclude that thalamic afferents to the striatum are affected early, prior to an overt HD phenotype; however, changes in NMDAR localization in SPN are independent of the source of glutamatergic input. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Essential roles of mitochondrial depolarization in neuron loss through microglial activation and attraction toward neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Min-Kyung; Shin, Hyun-Ah; Han, Ji-Hye; Park, Dae-Wook; Rhim, Hyangshuk

    2013-04-10

    As life spans increased, neurodegenerative disorders that affect aging populations have also increased. Progressive neuronal loss in specific brain regions is the most common cause of neurodegenerative disease; however, key determinants mediating neuron loss are not fully understood. Using a model of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) loss, we found only 25% cell loss in SH-SY5Y (SH) neuronal mono-cultures, but interestingly, 85% neuronal loss occurred when neurons were co-cultured with BV2 microglia. SH neurons overexpressing uncoupling protein 2 exhibited an increase in neuron-microglia interactions, which represent an early step in microglial phagocytosis of neurons. This result indicates that ΔΨm loss in SH neurons is an important contributor to recruitment of BV2 microglia. Notably, we show that ΔΨm loss in BV2 microglia plays a crucial role in microglial activation and phagocytosis of damaged SH neurons. Thus, our study demonstrates that ΔΨm loss in both neurons and microglia is a critical determinant of neuron loss. These findings also offer new insights into neuroimmunological and bioenergetical aspects of neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Quantitative Golgi Study of Dendritic Morphology in the Mice Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons

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    Ana Hladnik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study we have provided a detailed quantitative morphological analysis of medium spiny neurons (MSNs in the mice dorsal striatum and determined the consistency of values among three groups of animals obtained in different set of experiments. Dendritic trees of 162 Golgi Cox (FD Rapid GolgiStain Kit impregnated MSNs from 15 adult C57BL/6 mice were 3-dimensionally reconstructed using Neurolucida software, and parameters of dendritic morphology have been compared among experimental groups. The parameters of length and branching pattern did not show statistically significant difference and were highly consistent among groups. The average neuronal soma surface was between 160 μm2 and 180 μm2, and the cells had 5–6 primary dendrites with close to 40 segments per neuron. Sholl analysis confirmed regular pattern of dendritic branching. The total length of dendrites was around 2100 μm with the average length of individual branching (intermediate segment around 22 μm and for the terminal segment around 100 μm. Even though each experimental group underwent the same strictly defined protocol in tissue preparation and Golgi staining, we found inconsistency in dendritic volume and soma surface. These changes could be methodologically influenced during the Golgi procedure, although without affecting the dendritic length and tree complexity. Since the neuronal activity affects the dendritic thickness, it could not be excluded that observed volume inconsistency was related with functional states of neurons prior to animal sacrifice. Comprehensive analyses of tree complexity and dendritic length provided here could serve as an additional tool for understanding morphological variability in the most numerous neuronal population of the striatum. As reference values they could provide basic ground for comparisons with the results obtained in studies that use various models of genetically modified mice in explaining different pathological conditions that

  15. Wild-type huntingtin ameliorates striatal neuronal atrophy but does not prevent other abnormalities in the YAC128 mouse model of Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leavitt Blair R

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington disease (HD is an adult onset neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin (htt protein. Htt function is essential for embryonic survival as well as normal function during the postnatal period. In addition to having roles in transcription and transport, recent evidence demonstrates that wild-type htt is neuroprotective in vivo. To determine whether treatment with wild-type htt would be beneficial in HD, we crossed the YAC128 mouse model of HD with mice that over-express wild-type htt (YAC18 mice to generate YAC128 mice that over-express wild-type htt (YAC18/128 mice. Results YAC18/128 mice were found to express mutant htt at the same level as YAC128 mice and wild-type htt at the same level as YAC18 mice. YAC18/128 mice show no significant behavioural improvement compared to YAC128 mice in the rotarod test of motor coordination or in an automated open field test. In the brain, YAC18/128 mice show no significant improvement in striatal volume, striatal neuronal numbers or striatal DARPP-32 expression compared to YAC128 mice. In contrast, striatal neuronal cross-sectional area showed significant improvement in YAC18/128 mice compared to YAC128 mice. Conclusion While the over-expression of wild-type htt results in a mild improvement in striatal neuropathology in YAC128 mice, our findings suggest that treatment with wild-type htt may not be sufficient to ameliorate the symptoms of HD in this model.

  16. Cholinergic and catecholaminergic neurons relay striatal information to the optic tectum in amphibians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin, O.; Smeets, W.J.A.J.; Munoz, M.; Sanchez-Camacho, C.; Pena, A.S.; Lopez, J.M.; Gonzalez, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the amphibians Rana perezi and Xenopus laevis, the involvement of cholinergic and catecholaminergic neurons in the relay of basal ganglia inputs to the tectum was investigated. Tract-tracing experiments, in which anterograde tracers were applied to the basal ganglia and retrograde tracers to the

  17. Neurodevelopmental disruption of cortico-striatal function caused by degeneration of habenula neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-A Lee

    2011-04-01

    suggest that neurodevelopmental deficits in the habenula and the consequent cortico-striatal dysfunctions may be involved in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of ADHD.

  18. Proteostasis in striatal cells and selective neurodegeneration in Huntington’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, Julia; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Selective neuronal loss is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington’s disease (HD). Although mutant huntingtin, the protein responsible for HD, is expressed ubiquitously, a subpopulation of neurons in the striatum is the first to succumb. In this review, we examine evidence that protein quality control pathways, including the ubiquitin proteasome system, autophagy, and chaperones, are significantly altered in striatal neurons. These alterations may increase the susceptibility of striatal neurons to mutant huntingtin-mediated toxicity. This novel view of HD pathogenesis has profound therapeutic implications: protein homeostasis pathways in the striatum may be valuable targets for treating HD and other misfolded protein disorders. PMID:25147502

  19. Serotonin 2A receptor regulation of striatal neuropeptide gene expression is selective for tachykinin, but not enkephalin neurons following dopamine depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, G J; Walker, P D

    2001-08-15

    Serotonin (5-HT) 2A receptor-mediated regulation of striatal preprotachykinin (PPT) and preproenkephalin (PPE) mRNAs was studied in adult rodents that had been subjected to near-total dopamine (DA) depletion as neonates. Two months following bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion, PPT mRNA levels decreased 59-73% across dorsal subregions of the rostral and caudal striatum while PPE transcripts increased 61-94%. Four hours after a single injection of the serotonin 2A/2C receptor agonist, (+/-)-1-(2,5-Dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI; 1 mg/kg), PPT mRNA expression was significantly increased in DA-depleted rats across all dorsal subregions of the rostral and caudal striatum as compared to 6-OHDA-treated animals alone. In the intact rat, DOI did not influence PPT mRNA levels in the rostral striatum, but did raise expression in the caudal striatum where 5-HT2A receptors are prominent. DOI did not regulate PPE mRNA levels in any striatal sub-region of the intact or DA-depleted rat. Prior administration of the 5-HT2A/2C receptor antagonist, ritanserin (1 mg/kg) or the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, ketanserin (1 mg/kg) completely blocked the DOI-induced increases in striatal PPT mRNA in both lesioned and intact animals. The ability of ketanserin to produce identical results as ritanserin suggests that 5-HT2A receptor-mediated regulation is selectively strengthened within tachykinin neurons of the rostral striatum which are suppressed by DA depletion. The selectivity suggests that 5-HT2A receptor upregulation following DA depletion is capable of regulating tachykinin biosynthesis without influencing enkephalin expression in striatal output neurons.

  20. Striatal mechanisms underlying movement, reinforcement, and punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Alexxai V; Kreitzer, Anatol C

    2012-06-01

    Direct and indirect pathway striatal neurons are known to exert opposing control over motor output. In this review, we discuss a hypothetical extension of this framework, in which direct pathway striatal neurons also mediate reinforcement and reward, and indirect pathway neurons mediate punishment and aversion.

  1. Striatal Mechanisms Underlying Movement, Reinforcement, and Punishment

    OpenAIRE

    Kravitz, Alexxai V.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.

    2012-01-01

    Direct and indirect pathway striatal neurons are known to exert opposing control over motor output. In this review, we discuss a hypothetical extension of this framework, in which direct pathway striatal neurons also mediate reinforcement and reward, and indirect pathway neurons mediate punishment and aversion.

  2. Cholesterol contributes to dopamine-neuronal loss in MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease: Involvement of mitochondrial dysfunctions and oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajib Paul

    Full Text Available Hypercholesterolemia is a known contributor to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease while its role in the occurrence of Parkinson's disease (PD is only conjecture and far from conclusive. Altered antioxidant homeostasis and mitochondrial functions are the key mechanisms in loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN region of the midbrain in PD. Hypercholesterolemia is reported to cause oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in the cortex and hippocampus regions of the brain in rodents. However, the impact of hypercholesterolemia on the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in animal models of PD remains elusive. We tested the hypothesis that hypercholesterolemia in MPTP model of PD would potentiate dopaminergic neuron loss in SN by disrupting mitochondrial functions and antioxidant homeostasis. It is evident from the present study that hypercholesterolemia in naïve animals caused dopamine neuronal loss in SN with subsequent reduction in striatal dopamine levels producing motor impairment. Moreover, in the MPTP model of PD, hypercholesterolemia exacerbated MPTP-induced reduction of striatal dopamine as well as dopaminergic neurons in SN with motor behavioral depreciation. Activity of mitochondrial complexes, mainly complex-I and III, was impaired severely in the nigrostriatal pathway of hypercholesterolemic animals treated with MPTP. Hypercholesterolemia caused oxidative stress in the nigrostriatal pathway with increased generation of hydroxyl radicals and enhanced activity of antioxidant enzymes, which were further aggravated in the hypercholesterolemic mice with Parkinsonism. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of increased vulnerability of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in PD with hypercholesterolemia.

  3. L-DOPA Oppositely Regulates Synaptic Strength and Spine Morphology in D1 and D2 Striatal Projection Neurons in Dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Luz M; Solis, Oscar; Aguado, Carolina; Lujan, Rafael; Moratalla, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine depletion in Parkinson's disease (PD) produces dendritic spine loss in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) and increases their excitability. However, the synaptic changes that occur in MSNs in PD, in particular those induced by chronic L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) treatment, are still poorly understood. We exposed BAC-transgenic D1-tomato and D2-eGFP mice to PD and dyskinesia model paradigms, enabling cell type-specific assessment of changes in synaptic physiology and morphology. The distinct fluorescence markers allowed us to identify D1 and D2 MSNs for analysis using intracellular sharp electrode recordings, electron microscopy, and 3D reconstructions with single-cell Lucifer Yellow injections. Dopamine depletion induced spine pruning in both types of MSNs, affecting mushroom and thin spines equally. Dopamine depletion also increased firing rate in both D1- and D2-MSNs, but reduced evoked-EPSP amplitude selectively in D2-MSNs. L-DOPA treatment that produced dyskinesia differentially affected synaptic properties in D1- and D2-MSNs. In D1-MSNs, spine density remained reduced but the remaining spines were enlarged, with bigger heads and larger postsynaptic densities. These morphological changes were accompanied by facilitation of action potential firing triggered by synaptic inputs. In contrast, although L-DOPA restored the number of spines in D2-MSNs, it resulted in shortened postsynaptic densities. These changes in D2-MSNs correlated with a decrease in synaptic transmission. Our findings indicate that L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia is associated with abnormal spine morphology, modified synaptic transmission, and altered EPSP-spike coupling, with distinct effects in D1- and D2-MSNs. PMID:27613437

  4. The transfection of BDNF to dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of dopamine D3 receptor agonist recovering the striatal innervation, dendritic spines and motor behavior in an aged rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F Razgado-Hernandez

    Full Text Available The progressive degeneration of the dopamine neurons of the pars compacta of substantia nigra and the consequent loss of the dopamine innervation of the striatum leads to the impairment of motor behavior in Parkinson's disease. Accordingly, an efficient therapy of the disease should protect and regenerate the dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra and the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Nigral neurons express Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF and dopamine D3 receptors, both of which protect the dopamine neurons. The chronic activation of dopamine D3 receptors by their agonists, in addition, restores, in part, the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Here we explored whether the over-expression of BDNF by dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of the activation of D3 receptors restoring nigrostriatal innervation. Twelve-month old Wistar rats were unilaterally injected with 6-hydroxydopamine into the striatum. Five months later, rats were treated with the D3 agonist 7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propy1-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT administered i.p. during 4½ months via osmotic pumps and the BDNF gene transfection into nigral cells using the neurotensin-polyplex nanovector (a non-viral transfection that selectively transfect the dopamine neurons via the high-affinity neurotensin receptor expressed by these neurons. Two months after the withdrawal of 7-OH-DPAT when rats were aged (24 months old, immunohistochemistry assays were made. The over-expression of BDNF in rats receiving the D3 agonist normalized gait and motor coordination; in addition, it eliminated the muscle rigidity produced by the loss of dopamine. The recovery of motor behavior was associated with the recovery of the nigral neurons, the dopamine innervation of the striatum and of the number of dendritic spines of the striatal neurons. Thus, the over-expression of BDNF in dopamine neurons associated with the chronic activation of the D3 receptors appears to be a promising strategy

  5. Repeated administration of D-amphetamine induces loss of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT binding to striatal dopamine transporters in rat brain: a validation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booij, Jan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: j.booij@amc.uva.nl; Bruin, Kora de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gunning, W. Boudewijn [Department of Neurology, Epilepsy Centre Kempenhaeghe, 5590 AB Heeze (Netherlands)

    2006-04-15

    In recent years, several PET and SPECT studies have shown loss of striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) binding in amphetamine (AMPH) users. However, the use of DAT SPECT tracers to detect AMPH-induced changes in DAT binding has not been validated. We therefore examined if repeated administration of D-AMPH or methamphetamine (METH) may induce loss of binding to striatal DATs in rats by using an experimental biodistribution study design and a SPECT tracer for the DAT ([{sup 123}I]FP-CIT). Methods: Groups of male rats (n=10 per group) were treated with D-AMPH (10 mg/kg body weight), METH (10 mg/kg body weight), or saline, twice a day for 5 consecutive days. Five days later, [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT was injected intravenously, and 2 h later, the rats were sacrificed and radioactivity was assayed. Results: In D-AMPH but not METH-treated rats, striatal [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT uptake was significantly lower (approximately 17%) than in the control group. Conclusion: These data show that [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT can be used to detect AMPH-induced changes in DAT binding and may validate the use of DAT radiotracers to study AMPH-induced changes in striatal DAT binding in vivo.

  6. Endotoxin induces a delayed loss of TH-IR neurons in substantia nigra and motor behavioral deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuxin; Qin, Liya; Wilson, Belinda; Wu, Xuefei; Qian, Li; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Crews, Fulton T; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2008-09-01

    We have previously reported that a single injection of endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 5mg/kg, i.p.), causes a delayed and progressive loss of TH-IR neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) in C57BL/six male mice. In this study, we determined sex differences and behavioral deficits accompanying the loss of TH-IR neurons in response to peripheral LPS injection. A single injection of LPS (5mg/kg, i.p.) failed to produce any loss of TH-IR neurons in the SN of female mice over a 12-month period. To determine if multiple-injections were required, female mice received five injections of LPS (5mg/kg, i.p.) at either weekly or monthly intervals. Behavioral motor ability and TH-IR neuronal loss were determined after the first injection of LPS. We found significant differences in both behavioral activities and neuronal loss between these two injection paradigms. Between 7 and 20 months after the first injection of LPS, progressive behavioral changes, measured by rotor-rod and open-field activities, and neuronal loss in SN were observed in monthly injected, but not in weekly injected mice. In addition, reduced rotor-rod ability in monthly injected mice were restored following treatment of l-dopa/carbidopa (30 mg/3mg/kg), i.p.). Approximately 40 and 50% loss of TH-IR neurons at 9 and 20 months, respectively, was observed after exposure to LPS, suggesting that the behavioral deficit is related to loss of dopamine function in the nigra-striatal pathway. More intense immuno-staining of alpha-synuclein and inflammatory markers were detected in brain sections exposed to LPS. In conclusion, these results show that multi-LPS monthly injections can induce a delayed and progressive loss of TH-IR neurons and motor deficits which resemble the progressive nature of Parkinson's disease. Further, the present study reveals a clear sex difference: female mice are more resistant to LPS than male mice. Repeated monthly LPS injections are required to cause both motor behavioral deficits and DA

  7. Parsing Heterogeneous Striatal Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kae Nakamura

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The striatum is an input channel of the basal ganglia and is well known to be involved in reward-based decision making and learning. At the macroscopic level, the striatum has been postulated to contain parallel functional modules, each of which includes neurons that perform similar computations to support selection of appropriate actions for different task contexts. At the single-neuron level, however, recent studies in monkeys and rodents have revealed heterogeneity in neuronal activity even within restricted modules of the striatum. Looking for generality in the complex striatal activity patterns, here we briefly survey several types of striatal activity, focusing on their usefulness for mediating behaviors. In particular, we focus on two types of behavioral tasks: reward-based tasks that use salient sensory cues and manipulate outcomes associated with the cues; and perceptual decision tasks that manipulate the quality of noisy sensory cues and associate all correct decisions with the same outcome. Guided by previous insights on the modular organization and general selection-related functions of the basal ganglia, we relate striatal activity patterns on these tasks to two types of computations: implementation of selection and evaluation. We suggest that a parsing with the selection/evaluation categories encourages a focus on the functional commonalities revealed by studies with different animal models and behavioral tasks, instead of a focus on aspects of striatal activity that may be specific to a particular task setting. We then highlight several questions in the selection-evaluation framework for future explorations.

  8. Activin A Inhibits MPTP and LPS-Induced Increases in Inflammatory Cell Populations and Loss of Dopamine Neurons in the Mouse Midbrain In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stayte, Sandy; Rentsch, Peggy; Tröscher, Anna R; Bamberger, Maximilian; Li, Kong M; Vissel, Bryce

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta region and a subsequent loss of dopamine within the striatum. A promising avenue of research has been the administration of growth factors to promote the survival of remaining midbrain neurons, although the mechanism by which they provide neuroprotection is not understood. Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily, has been shown to be a potent anti-inflammatory following acute brain injury and has been demonstrated to play a role in the neuroprotection of midbrain neurons against MPP+-induced degeneration in vitro. We hypothesized that activin A may offer similar anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in in vivo mouse models of Parkinson's disease. We found that activin A significantly attenuated the inflammatory response induced by both MPTP and intranigral administration of lipopolysaccharide in C57BL/6 mice. We found that administration of activin A promoted survival of dopaminergic and total neuron populations in the pars compacta region both 8 days and 8 weeks after MPTP-induced degeneration. Surprisingly, no corresponding protection of striatal dopamine levels was found. Furthermore, activin A failed to protect against loss of striatal dopamine transporter expression in the striatum, suggesting the neuroprotective action of activin A may be localized to the substantia nigra. Together, these results provide the first evidence that activin A exerts potent neuroprotection and anti-inflammatory effects in the MPTP and lipopolysaccharide mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

  9. Quantitative high-throughput gene expression profiling of human striatal development to screen stem cell–derived medium spiny neurons

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    Marco Straccia

    Full Text Available A systematic characterization of the spatio-temporal gene expression during human neurodevelopment is essential to understand brain function in both physiological and pathological conditions. In recent years, stem cell technology has provided an in vitro tool to recapitulate human development, permitting also the generation of human models for many diseases. The correct differentiation of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC into specific cell types should be evaluated by comparison with specific cells/tissue profiles from the equivalent adult in vivo organ. Here, we define by a quantitative high-throughput gene expression analysis the subset of specific genes of the whole ganglionic eminence (WGE and adult human striatum. Our results demonstrate that not only the number of specific genes is crucial but also their relative expression levels between brain areas. We next used these gene profiles to characterize the differentiation of hPSCs. Our findings demonstrate a temporal progression of gene expression during striatal differentiation of hPSCs from a WGE toward an adult striatum identity. Present results establish a gene expression profile to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the telencephalic hPSC-derived progenitors eventually used for transplantation and mature striatal neurons for disease modeling and drug-screening.

  10. Diverse Short-Term Dynamics of Inhibitory Synapses Converging on Striatal Projection Neurons: Differential Changes in a Rodent Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Barroso-Flores

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most neurons in the striatum are projection neurons (SPNs which make synapses with each other within distances of approximately 100 µm. About 5% of striatal neurons are GABAergic interneurons whose axons expand hundreds of microns. Short-term synaptic plasticity (STSP between fast-spiking (FS interneurons and SPNs and between SPNs has been described with electrophysiological and optogenetic techniques. It is difficult to obtain pair recordings from some classes of interneurons and due to limitations of actual techniques, no other types of STSP have been described on SPNs. Diverse STSPs may reflect differences in presynaptic release machineries. Therefore, we focused the present work on answering two questions: Are there different identifiable classes of STSP between GABAergic synapses on SPNs? And, if so, are synapses exhibiting different classes of STSP differentially affected by dopamine depletion? Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings on SPNs revealed three classes of STSPs: depressing, facilitating, and biphasic (facilitating-depressing, in response to stimulation trains at 20 Hz, in a constant ionic environment. We then used the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA rodent model of Parkinson’s disease to show that synapses with different STSPs are differentially affected by dopamine depletion. We propose a general model of STSP that fits all the dynamics found in our recordings.

  11. Age-related striatal BOLD changes without changes in behavioral loss aversion

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    Hans C Breiter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Loss aversion (LA, the idea that negative valuations have a higher psychological impact than positive ones, is considered an important variable in consumer research. The literature on aging and behavior suggests older individuals may show more LA, although it is not clear if this is an effect of aging in general (as in the continuum from age 20 and 50 years, or of the state of older age (e.g., past age 65 years. We also have not yet identified the potential biological effects of aging on the neural processing of LA. In the current study we used a cohort of subjects with a 30 year range of ages, and performed whole brain functional MRI (fMRI to examine the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens (VS/NAc response during a passive viewing of affective faces with model-based fMRI analysis incorporating behavioral data from a validated approach/avoidance task with the same stimuli. Our a priori focus on the VS/NAc was based on (1 the VS/NAc being a central region for reward/aversion processing, (2 its activation to both positive and negative stimuli, (3 its reported involvement with tracking LA. LA from approach/avoidance to affective faces showed excellent fidelity to published measures of LA. Imaging results were then compared to the behavioral measure of LA using the same affective faces. Although there was no relationship between age and LA, we observed increasing neural differential sensitivity (NDS of the VS/NAc to avoidance responses (negative valuations relative to approach responses (positive valuations with increasing age. These findings suggest that a central region for reward/aversion processing changes with age, and may require more activation to produce the same LA behavior as in younger individuals, consistent with the idea of neural efficiency observed with high IQ individuals showing less brain activation to complete the same task.

  12. Age-related striatal BOLD changes without changes in behavioral loss aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Lee, Sang; Gilman, Jodi M; Kim, Byoung Woo; Lee, Nick; Chamberlain, Laura; Livengood, Sherri L; Raman, Kalyan; Lee, Myung Joo; Kuster, Jake; Stern, Daniel B; Calder, Bobby; Mulhern, Frank J; Blood, Anne J; Breiter, Hans C

    2015-01-01

    Loss aversion (LA), the idea that negative valuations have a higher psychological impact than positive ones, is considered an important variable in consumer research. The literature on aging and behavior suggests older individuals may show more LA, although it is not clear if this is an effect of aging in general (as in the continuum from age 20 and 50 years), or of the state of older age (e.g., past age 65 years). We also have not yet identified the potential biological effects of aging on the neural processing of LA. In the current study we used a cohort of subjects with a 30 year range of ages, and performed whole brain functional MRI (fMRI) to examine the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens (VS/NAc) response during a passive viewing of affective faces with model-based fMRI analysis incorporating behavioral data from a validated approach/avoidance task with the same stimuli. Our a priori focus on the VS/NAc was based on (1) the VS/NAc being a central region for reward/aversion processing; (2) its activation to both positive and negative stimuli; (3) its reported involvement with tracking LA. LA from approach/avoidance to affective faces showed excellent fidelity to published measures of LA. Imaging results were then compared to the behavioral measure of LA using the same affective faces. Although there was no relationship between age and LA, we observed increasing neural differential sensitivity (NDS) of the VS/NAc to avoidance responses (negative valuations) relative to approach responses (positive valuations) with increasing age. These findings suggest that a central region for reward/aversion processing changes with age, and may require more activation to produce the same LA behavior as in younger individuals, consistent with the idea of neural efficiency observed with high IQ individuals showing less brain activation to complete the same task.

  13. Diabetes does not accelerate neuronal loss following nerve injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Kaare; Jakobsen, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    To determine the resistance of neuronal dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells in experimental diabetes, we studied the neuronal cell loss after severe axonal injury in streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats with unilateral transection of the L5 spinal nerve for 12 weeks. Fifty 18-week-old inbred male Wistar...... rats were randomly allocated to three study groups. In study group 1 without spinal nerve injury, STZ diabetes was induced in 9 and 10 rats were kept as nondiabetic controls. In study group 2, spinal nerve injury was performed in 10 diabetic rats and in 10 nondiabetic controls. In study group 3, six...... nondiabetic control rats at 18 weeks and five nondiabetic control rats at 30 weeks were included to determine whether DRG cell changes occur without nerve injury during the study period. In group 1, the stereologically determined number of all neuronal DRG cells was unchanged after 12 weeks of diabetes...

  14. Neonatal astrocyte damage is sufficient to trigger progressive striatal degeneration in a rat model of glutaric acidemia-I.

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    Silvia Olivera-Bravo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have investigated whether an acute metabolic damage to astrocytes during the neonatal period may critically disrupt subsequent brain development, leading to neurodevelopmental disorders. Astrocytes are vulnerable to glutaric acid (GA, a dicarboxylic acid that accumulates in millimolar concentrations in Glutaric Acidemia I (GA-I, an inherited neurometabolic childhood disease characterized by degeneration of striatal neurons. While GA induces astrocyte mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and subsequent increased proliferation, it is presently unknown whether such astrocytic dysfunction is sufficient to trigger striatal neuronal loss. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A single intracerebroventricular dose of GA was administered to rat pups at postnatal day 0 (P0 to induce an acute, transient rise of GA levels in the central nervous system (CNS. GA administration potently elicited proliferation of astrocytes expressing S100β followed by GFAP astrocytosis and nitrotyrosine staining lasting until P45. Remarkably, GA did not induce acute neuronal loss assessed by FluoroJade C and NeuN cell count. Instead, neuronal death appeared several days after GA treatment and progressively increased until P45, suggesting a delayed onset of striatal degeneration. The axonal bundles perforating the striatum were disorganized following GA administration. In cell cultures, GA did not affect survival of either striatal astrocytes or neurons, even at high concentrations. However, astrocytes activated by a short exposure to GA caused neuronal death through the production of soluble factors. Iron porphyrin antioxidants prevented GA-induced astrocyte proliferation and striatal degeneration in vivo, as well as astrocyte-mediated neuronal loss in vitro. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these results indicate that a transient metabolic insult with GA induces long lasting phenotypic changes in astrocytes that cause them to promote striatal

  15. Knockdown of GAD67 protein levels normalizes neuronal activity in a rat model of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horvath, Lazlo; van Marion, Ingrid; Taï, Khalid

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine depletion of the striatum is one of the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The loss of dopamine upregulates GAD67 expression in the striatal projection neurons and causes other changes in the activity of the basal ganglia circuit.......Dopamine depletion of the striatum is one of the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The loss of dopamine upregulates GAD67 expression in the striatal projection neurons and causes other changes in the activity of the basal ganglia circuit....

  16. Costimulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate and muscarinic neuronal receptors modulates gap junctional communication in striatal astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Rouach, N.; Tencé, M.; Glowinski, J.; Giaume, C.

    2002-01-01

    Cocultures of neurons and astrocytes from the rat striatum were used to determine whether the stimulation of neuronal receptors could affect the level of intercellular communication mediated by gap junctions in astrocytes. The costimulation of N-methyl-D-asparte (NMDA) and muscarinic receptors led to a prominent reduction of astrocyte gap junctional communication (GJC) in coculture. This treatment was not effective in astrocyte cultures, these cells being devoid of NMDA receptors. Both types ...

  17. Hippocampal neuron number loss in rats exposed to ingested sulfite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdogan, Ilgaz; Kocamaz, Erdogan; Kucukatay, Vural; Yonguc, Nilufer Goksin; Ozdemir, Mehmet Bulent; Murk, William

    2011-10-01

    Sulfite, which is continuously formed in the body during metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, is commonly used in preservatives. It has been shown that there are toxic effects of sulfite on many cellular components. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible toxic effects of sulfite on pyramidal neurons by counting cell numbers in CA1 and CA2-CA3 subdivisions of the rat hippocampus. For this purpose, male albino rats were divided into a control group and a sulfite group (25 mg/kg). Sulfite was administered to the animals via drinking water for 8 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, brains were removed and neurons were estimated in total and in a known fraction of CA1 and CA2-CA3 subdivisions of the left hippocampus by using the optical fractionator method--a stereological method. Results showed that sulfite treatment caused a significant decrease in the total number of pyramidal neurons in three subdivisions of the hippocampus (CA1 and CA2-CA3) in the sulfite group compared with the control group (p < 0.05, Mann Whitney U test). It was concluded that exogenous administration of sulfite causes loss of pyramidal neurons in CA1 and CA2-CA3 subdivisions of the rat hippocampus.

  18. Sensory neurons do not induce motor neuron loss in a human stem cell model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Andrew J; Ebert, Allison D

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder leading to paralysis and early death due to reduced SMN protein. It is unclear why there is such a profound motor neuron loss, but recent evidence from fly and mouse studies indicate that cells comprising the whole sensory-motor circuit may contribute to motor neuron dysfunction and loss. Here, we used induced pluripotent stem cells derived from SMA patients to test whether sensory neurons directly contribute to motor neuron loss. We generated sensory neurons from SMA induced pluripotent stem cells and found no difference in neuron generation or survival, although there was a reduced calcium response to depolarizing stimuli. Using co-culture of SMA induced pluripotent stem cell derived sensory neurons with control induced pluripotent stem cell derived motor neurons, we found no significant reduction in motor neuron number or glutamate transporter boutons on motor neuron cell bodies or neurites. We conclude that SMA sensory neurons do not overtly contribute to motor neuron loss in this human stem cell system.

  19. Regional Differences in Striatal Neuronal Ensemble Excitability Following Cocaine and Extinction Memory Retrieval in Fos-GFP Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziminski, Joseph J; Sieburg, Meike C; Margetts-Smith, Gabriella; Crombag, Hans S; Koya, Eisuke

    2018-03-01

    Learned associations between drugs of abuse and the drug administration environment have an important role in addiction. In rodents, exposure to a drug-associated environment elicits conditioned psychomotor activation, which may be weakened following extinction (EXT) learning. Although widespread drug-induced changes in neuronal excitability have been observed, little is known about specific changes within neuronal ensembles activated during the recall of drug-environment associations. Using a cocaine-conditioned locomotion (CL) procedure, the present study assessed the excitability of neuronal ensembles in the nucleus accumbens core and shell (NAc core and NAc shell ), and dorsal striatum (DS) following cocaine conditioning and EXT in Fos-GFP mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in activated neurons (GFP+). During conditioning, mice received repeated cocaine injections (20 mg/kg) paired with a locomotor activity chamber (Paired) or home cage (Unpaired). Seven to 13 days later, both groups were re-exposed to the activity chamber under drug-free conditions and Paired, but not Unpaired, mice exhibited CL. In a separate group of mice, CL was extinguished by repeatedly exposing mice to the activity chamber under drug-free conditions. Following the expression and EXT of CL, GFP+ neurons in the NAc core (but not NAc shell and DS) displayed greater firing capacity compared to surrounding GFP- neurons. This difference in excitability was due to a generalized decrease in GFP- excitability following CL and a selective increase in GFP+ excitability following its EXT. These results suggest a role for both widespread and ensemble-specific changes in neuronal excitability following recall of drug-environment associations.

  20. Effect of superficial radial nerve stimulation on the activity of nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons in the cat: role of cutaneous sensory input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieoullon, A.; Dusticier, N.

    1982-01-01

    The release of 3 H-dopamine (DA) continuously synthesized from 3 H-thyrosine was measured in the caudate nucleus (CN) and in the substantia nigra (SN) in both sides of the brain during electrical stimulation of the superficial radial nerve in cats lightly anaesthetized with halothane. Use of appropriate electrophysiologically controlled stimulation led to selective activation of low threshold afferent fibers whereas high stimulation activated all cutaneous afferents. Results showed that low threshold fiber activation induced a decreased dopaminergic activity in CN contralateral to nerve stimulation and a concomitant increase in dopaminergic activity on the ipsilateral side. Stimulation of group I and threshold stimulation of group II afferent fibers induced changes in the release of 3 H-DA mainly on the contralateral CN and SN and in the ipsilateral CN. High stimulation was followed by a general increase of the neurotransmitter release in the four structures. This shows that the nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons are mainly-if not exclusively-controlled by cutaneous sensory inputs. This control, non-specific when high threshold cutaneous fibers are also activated. Such activations could contribute to restablish sufficient release of DA when the dopaminergic function is impaired as in Parkinson's disease. (Author)

  1. Differential sensitivity to NaCl for inhibitors and substrates that recognize mutually exclusive binding sites on the neuronal transporter of dopamine in rat striatal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidjane Corera, A; Do-Régo, J C; Costentin, J; Bonnet, J J

    2001-03-01

    Addition of NaCl (90--290 mM) to a 10 mM Na(+) medium did not significantly modify B(max) and K(d) values for [3H]mazindol binding to the dopamine neuronal transporter (DAT) studied on rat striatal membranes at 20 degrees C. Addition of NaCl differentially affected the ability of other uptake inhibitors and substrates to block the [3H]mazindol binding. Ratios of 50% inhibiting concentrations calculated for 290 and 90 mM NaCl allowed to distinguish three groups of agents: substrates which were more potent in the presence of 290 mM NaCl (group 1; ratio mazindol, benztropine, nomifensine). However, agents from these three groups recognize mutually exclusive binding sites since in interaction studies the presence of WIN 35,428 (group 2) or mazindol (group 3) increased the 50% inhibiting concentrations of D-amphetamine (group 1) and WIN 35,428 on the [3H]mazindol binding to theoretical values expected for a competition of all of these compounds for the same binding domain on the DAT.

  2. Msh2 acts in medium-spiny striatal neurons as an enhancer of CAG instability and mutant huntingtin phenotypes in Huntington's disease knock-in mice.

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    Marina Kovalenko

    Full Text Available The CAG trinucleotide repeat mutation in the Huntington's disease gene (HTT exhibits age-dependent tissue-specific expansion that correlates with disease onset in patients, implicating somatic expansion as a disease modifier and potential therapeutic target. Somatic HTT CAG expansion is critically dependent on proteins in the mismatch repair (MMR pathway. To gain further insight into mechanisms of somatic expansion and the relationship of somatic expansion to the disease process in selectively vulnerable MSNs we have crossed HTT CAG knock-in mice (HdhQ111 with mice carrying a conditional (floxed Msh2 allele and D9-Cre transgenic mice, in which Cre recombinase is expressed specifically in MSNs within the striatum. Deletion of Msh2 in MSNs eliminated Msh2 protein in those neurons. We demonstrate that MSN-specific deletion of Msh2 was sufficient to eliminate the vast majority of striatal HTT CAG expansions in HdhQ111 mice. Furthermore, MSN-specific deletion of Msh2 modified two mutant huntingtin phenotypes: the early nuclear localization of diffusely immunostaining mutant huntingtin was slowed; and the later development of intranuclear huntingtin inclusions was dramatically inhibited. Therefore, Msh2 acts within MSNs as a genetic enhancer both of somatic HTT CAG expansions and of HTT CAG-dependent phenotypes in mice. These data suggest that the selective vulnerability of MSNs may be at least in part contributed by the propensity for somatic expansion in these neurons, and imply that intervening in the expansion process is likely to have therapeutic benefit.

  3. Sleep loss disrupts Arc expression in dentate gyrus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, James E; Kodoth, Varna; Aton, Sara J

    2018-04-07

    Sleep loss affects many aspects of cognition, and memory consolidation processes occurring in the hippocampus seem particularly vulnerable to sleep loss. The immediate-early gene Arc plays an essential role in both synaptic plasticity and memory formation, and its expression is altered by sleep. Here, using a variety of techniques, we have characterized the effects of brief (3-h) periods of sleep vs. sleep deprivation (SD) on the expression of Arc mRNA and Arc protein in the mouse hippocampus and cortex. By comparing the relative abundance of mature Arc mRNA with unspliced pre-mRNA, we see evidence that during SD, increases in Arc across the cortex, but not hippocampus, reflect de novo transcription. Arc increases in the hippocampus during SD are not accompanied by changes in pre-mRNA levels, suggesting that increases in mRNA stability, not transcription, drives this change. Using in situ hybridization (together with behavioral observation to quantify sleep amounts), we find that in the dorsal hippocampus, SD minimally affects Arc mRNA expression, and decreases the number of dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells expressing Arc. This is in contrast to neighboring cortical areas, which show large increases in neuronal Arc expression after SD. Using immunohistochemistry, we find that Arc protein expression is also differentially affected in the cortex and DG with SD - while larger numbers of cortical neurons are Arc+, fewer DG granule cells are Arc+, relative to the same regions in sleeping mice. These data suggest that with regard to expression of plasticity-regulating genes, sleep (and SD) can have differential effects in hippocampal and cortical areas. This may provide a clue regarding the susceptibility of performance on hippocampus-dependent tasks to deficits following even brief periods of sleep loss. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Serotonin agonists reduce dopamine synthesis in the striatum only when the impulse flow of nigro-striatal neurons is intact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spampinato, U; Esposito, E; Samanin, R

    1985-09-01

    The effects of 5-methoxy-N, N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) and m-chlorophenylpiperazine (CPP), two 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) agonists, on the accumulation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA] were studied in the striatum of rats treated with gamma-butyrolactone (GBL). Unlike 2 mg/kg i.p. apomorphine, neither 5 mg/kg i.p. 5-MeO-DMT nor 2.5 mg/kg i.p. CPP significantly reduced the GBL-induced increase in DOPA accumulation in the striatum. 5-MeO-DMT and CPP significantly reduced DOPA accumulation in animals that had received the aromatic amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor Ro 4-4602 but not GBL. 5-HT (10 micrograms in 0.5 microliter) injected in the substantia nigra, pars compacta, like GBL, significantly increased Ro 4-4602-induced accumulation of DOPA in the striatum. The data indicate that 5-HT agonists can reduce 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylamine (DA, dopamine) synthesis in the striatum of rats only when the impulse flow of DA neurons is intact. An indirect effect through mechanisms controlling DA synthesis in the striatum, for instance cholinergic and GABA-ergic neurons, is suggested.

  5. Western Diet Chow Consumption in Rats Induces Striatal Neuronal Activation While Reducing Dopamine Levels without Affecting Spatial Memory in the Radial Arm Maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jason C D; Ali, Saher F; Kosari, Sepideh; Woodman, Owen L; Spencer, Sarah J; Killcross, A Simon; Jenkins, Trisha A

    2017-01-01

    Rats fed high fat diets have been shown to be impaired in hippocampal-dependent behavioral tasks, such as spatial recognition in the Y-maze and reference memory in the Morris water maze (MWM). It is clear from previous studies, however, that motivation and reward factor into the memory deficits associated with obesity and high-fat diet consumption, and that the prefrontal cortex and striatum and neurotransmitter dopamine play important roles in cognitive performance. In this series of studies we extend our research to investigate the effect of a high fat diet on striatal neurochemistry and performance in the delayed spatial win-shift radial arm maze task, a paradigm highly reliant on dopamine-rich brain regions, such as the striatum after high fat diet consumption. Memory performance, neuronal activation and brain dopaminergic levels were compared in rats fed a "Western" (21% fat, 0.15% cholesterol) chow diet compared to normal diet (6% fat, 0.15% cholesterol)-fed controls. Twelve weeks of dietary manipulation produced an increase in weight in western diet-fed rats, but did not affect learning and performance in the delayed spatial win-shift radial arm maze task. Concurrently, there was an observed decrease in dopamine levels in the striatum and a reduction of dopamine turnover in the hippocampus in western diet-fed rats. In a separate cohort of rats Fos levels were measured after rats had been placed in a novel arena and allowed to explore freely. In normal rats, this exposure to a unique environment did not affect neuronal activation. In contrast, rats fed a western diet were found to have significantly increased Fos expression in the striatum, but not prefrontal cortex or hippocampus. Our study demonstrates that while western diet consumption in rats produces weight gain and brain neuronal and neurotransmitter changes, it did not affect performance in the delayed spatial win-shift paradigm in the radial arm maze. We conclude that modeling the cognitive decline

  6. The Striatal Balancing Act in Drug Addiction: Distinct Roles of Direct and Indirect Pathway Medium Spiny Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Kay eLobo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The striatum plays a key role in mediating the acute and chronic effects of addictive drugs, with drugs of abuse causing long-lasting molecular and cellular alterations in both dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens (ventral striatum. Despite the wealth of research on the biological actions of abused drugs in striatum, until recently, the distinct roles of the striatum’s two major subtypes of medium spiny neuron (MSN in drug addiction remained elusive. Recent advances in cell-type specific technologies, including fluorescent reporter mice, transgenic or knockout mice, and viral-mediated gene transfer, have advanced the field toward a more comprehensive understanding of the two MSN subtypes in the long-term actions of drugs of abuse. Here we review progress in defining the distinct molecular and functional contributions of the two MSN subtypes in mediating addiction.

  7. Dual nitrergic/cholinergic control of short-term plasticity of corticostriatal inputs to striatal projection neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Peter Blomeley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of nitric oxide and acetylcholine to modulate the short-term plasticity of corticostriatal inputs was investigated using current-clamp recordings in BAC mouse brain slices. Glutamatergic responses were evoked by stimulation of corpus callosum in D1 and D2 dopamine receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-MSNs and D2-MSN, respectively. Paired-pulse stimulation (50 ms intervals evoked depressing or facilitating responses in subgroups of both D1-MSNs and D2 MSNs. In both neuronal types, glutamatergic responses of cells that displayed paired-pulse depression were not significantly affected by the nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP; 100 µM. Conversely, in D1-MSNs and D2-MSNs that displayed paired-pulse facilitation, SNAP did not affect the first evoked response, but significantly reduced the amplitude of the second evoked EPSP, converting paired-pulse facilitation into paired-pulse depression. SNAP also strongly excited cholinergic interneurons and increased their cortical glutamatergic responses acting through a presynaptic mechanism. The effects of SNAP on glutamatergic response of D1-MSNs and D2-MSN were mediated by acetylcholine. The broad-spectrum muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (25 µM did not affect paired-pulse ratios and did not prevent the effects of SNAP. Conversely, the broad-spectrum nicotinic receptor antagonist tubocurarine (10 µM fully mimicked and occluded the effects of SNAP. We concluded that phasic acetylcholine release mediates feedforward facilitation in MSNs through activation of nicotinic receptors on glutamatergic terminals and that nitric oxide, while increasing cholinergic interneurons’ firing, functionally impairs their ability to modulate glutamatergic inputs of MSNs. These results show that nitrergic and cholinergic transmission control the short-term plasticity of glutamatergic inputs in the striatum and reveal a novel cellular mechanism underlying paired

  8. Direct Reprogramming of Spiral Ganglion Non-neuronal Cells into Neurons: Toward Ameliorating Sensorineural Hearing Loss by Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teppei Noda

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary auditory neurons (PANs play a critical role in hearing by transmitting sound information from the inner ear to the brain. Their progressive degeneration is associated with excessive noise, disease and aging. The loss of PANs leads to permanent hearing impairment since they are incapable of regenerating. Spiral ganglion non-neuronal cells (SGNNCs, comprised mainly of glia, are resident within the modiolus and continue to survive after PAN loss. These attributes make SGNNCs an excellent target for replacing damaged PANs through cellular reprogramming. We used the neurogenic pioneer transcription factor Ascl1 and the auditory neuron differentiation factor NeuroD1 to reprogram SGNNCs into induced neurons (iNs. The overexpression of both Ascl1 and NeuroD1 in vitro generated iNs at high efficiency. Transcriptome analyses revealed that iNs displayed a transcriptome profile resembling that of endogenous PANs, including expression of several key markers of neuronal identity: Tubb3, Map2, Prph, Snap25, and Prox1. Pathway analyses indicated that essential pathways in neuronal growth and maturation were activated in cells upon neuronal induction. Furthermore, iNs extended projections toward cochlear hair cells and cochlear nucleus neurons when cultured with each respective tissue. Taken together, our study demonstrates that PAN-like neurons can be generated from endogenous SGNNCs. This work suggests that gene therapy can be a viable strategy to treat sensorineural hearing loss caused by degeneration of PANs.

  9. Direct Reprogramming of Spiral Ganglion Non-neuronal Cells into Neurons: Toward Ameliorating Sensorineural Hearing Loss by Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Teppei; Meas, Steven J; Nogami, Jumpei; Amemiya, Yutaka; Uchi, Ryutaro; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Nishimura, Koji; Dabdoub, Alain

    2018-01-01

    Primary auditory neurons (PANs) play a critical role in hearing by transmitting sound information from the inner ear to the brain. Their progressive degeneration is associated with excessive noise, disease and aging. The loss of PANs leads to permanent hearing impairment since they are incapable of regenerating. Spiral ganglion non-neuronal cells (SGNNCs), comprised mainly of glia, are resident within the modiolus and continue to survive after PAN loss. These attributes make SGNNCs an excellent target for replacing damaged PANs through cellular reprogramming. We used the neurogenic pioneer transcription factor Ascl1 and the auditory neuron differentiation factor NeuroD1 to reprogram SGNNCs into induced neurons (iNs). The overexpression of both Ascl1 and NeuroD1 in vitro generated iNs at high efficiency. Transcriptome analyses revealed that iNs displayed a transcriptome profile resembling that of endogenous PANs, including expression of several key markers of neuronal identity: Tubb3, Map2, Prph, Snap25, and Prox1. Pathway analyses indicated that essential pathways in neuronal growth and maturation were activated in cells upon neuronal induction. Furthermore, iNs extended projections toward cochlear hair cells and cochlear nucleus neurons when cultured with each respective tissue. Taken together, our study demonstrates that PAN-like neurons can be generated from endogenous SGNNCs. This work suggests that gene therapy can be a viable strategy to treat sensorineural hearing loss caused by degeneration of PANs.

  10. L-type Ca2+ channel blockers promote Ca2+ accumulation when dopamine receptors are activated in striatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Molly E; Macías, Wendy; Youngs, Rachael M; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali; Dudman, Joshua T; Konradi, Christine

    2004-11-24

    Dopamine (DA) receptor-mediated signal transduction and gene expression play a central role in many brain disorders from schizophrenia to Parkinson's disease to addiction. While trying to evaluate the role of L-type Ca2+ channels in dopamine D1 receptor-mediated phosphorylation of the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), we found that activation of dopamine D1 receptors alters the properties of L-type Ca2+ channel inhibitors and turns them into facilitators of Ca2+ influx. In D1 receptor-stimulated neurons, L-type Ca2+ channel blockers promote cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation. This leads to the activation of a molecular signal transduction pathway and CREB phosphorylation. In the absence of dopamine receptor stimulation, L-type Ca2+ channel blockers inhibit CREB phosphorylation. The effect of dopamine on L-type Ca2+ channel blockers is dependent on protein kinase A (PKA), suggesting that protein phosphorylation plays a role in this phenomenon. Because of the adverse effect of activated dopamine receptors on L-type Ca2+ channel blocker action, the role of L-type Ca2+ channels in the dopamine D1 receptor signal transduction pathway cannot be assessed with pharmacological tools. However, with antisense technology, we demonstrate that L-type Ca2+ channels contribute to D1 receptor-mediated CREB phosphorylation. We conclude that the D1 receptor signal transduction pathway depends on L-type Ca2+ channels to mediate CREB phosphorylation.

  11. Inhibition of the striatal specific phosphodiesterase PDE10A ameliorates striatal and cortical pathology in R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Giampà

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease is a devastating neurodegenerative condition for which there is no therapy to slow disease progression. The particular vulnerability of striatal medium spiny neurons to Huntington's pathology is hypothesized to result from transcriptional dysregulation within the cAMP and CREB signaling cascades in these neurons. To test this hypothesis, and a potential therapeutic approach, we investigated whether inhibition of the striatal-specific cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase PDE10A would alleviate neurological deficits and brain pathology in a highly utilized model system, the R6/2 mouse.R6/2 mice were treated with the highly selective PDE10A inhibitor TP-10 from 4 weeks of age until euthanasia. TP-10 treatment significantly reduced and delayed the development of the hind paw clasping response during tail suspension, deficits in rotarod performance, and decrease in locomotor activity in an open field. Treatment prolonged time to loss of righting reflex. These effects of PDE10A inhibition on neurological function were reflected in a significant amelioration in brain pathology, including reduction in striatal and cortical cell loss, the formation of striatal neuronal intranuclear inclusions, and the degree of microglial activation that occurs in response to the mutant huntingtin-induced brain damage. Striatal and cortical levels of phosphorylated CREB and BDNF were significantly elevated.Our findings provide experimental support for targeting the cAMP and CREB signaling pathways and more broadly transcriptional dysregulation as a therapeutic approach to Huntington's disease. It is noteworthy that PDE10A inhibition in the R6/2 mice reduces striatal pathology, consistent with the localization of the enzyme in medium spiny neurons, and also cortical pathology and the formation of neuronal nuclear inclusions. These latter findings suggest that striatal pathology may be a primary driver of these secondary pathological events. More

  12. Huntington's Disease and Striatal Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel eRoze

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s Disease (HD is the most frequent neurodegenerative disease caused by an expansion of polyglutamines (CAG. The main clinical manifestations of HD are chorea, cognitive impairment and psychiatric disorders. The transmission of HD is autosomal dominant with a complete penetrance. HD has a single genetic cause, a well-defined neuropathology, and informative pre-manifest genetic testing of the disease is available. Striatal atrophy begins as early as 15 years before disease onset and continues throughout the period of manifest illness. Therefore, patients could theoretically benefit from therapy at early stages of the disease. One important characteristic of HD is the striatal vulnerability to neurodegeneration, despite similar expression of the protein in other brain areas. Aggregation of the mutated Huntingtin (HTT, impaired axonal transport, excitotoxicity, transcriptional dysregulation as well as mitochondrial dysfunction and energy deficits, are all part of the cellular events that underlie neuronal dysfunction and striatal death. Among these non-exclusive mechanisms, an alteration of striatal signaling is thought to orchestrate the downstream events involved in the cascade of striatal dysfunction.

  13. Striatal Vulnerability in Huntington’s Disease: Neuroprotection Versus Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoma Morigaki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat encoding an abnormally long polyglutamine tract (PolyQ in the huntingtin (Htt protein. In HD, striking neuropathological changes occur in the striatum, including loss of medium spiny neurons and parvalbumin-expressing interneurons accompanied by neurodegeneration of the striosome and matrix compartments, leading to progressive impairment of reasoning, walking and speaking abilities. The precise cause of striatal pathology in HD is still unknown; however, accumulating clinical and experimental evidence suggests multiple plausible pathophysiological mechanisms underlying striatal neurodegeneration in HD. Here, we review and discuss the characteristic neurodegenerative patterns observed in the striatum of HD patients and consider the role of various huntingtin-related and striatum-enriched proteins in neurotoxicity and neuroprotection.

  14. Selective loss of alpha motor neurons with sparing of gamma motor neurons and spinal cord cholinergic neurons in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powis, Rachael A; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2016-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease characterised primarily by loss of lower motor neurons from the ventral grey horn of the spinal cord and proximal muscle atrophy. Recent experiments utilising mouse models of SMA have demonstrated that not all motor neurons are equally susceptible to the disease, revealing that other populations of neurons can also be affected. Here, we have extended investigations of selective vulnerability of neuronal populations in the spinal cord of SMA mice to include comparative assessments of alpha motor neuron (α-MN) and gamma motor neuron (γ-MN) pools, as well as other populations of cholinergic neurons. Immunohistochemical analyses of late-symptomatic SMA mouse spinal cord revealed that numbers of α-MNs were significantly reduced at all levels of the spinal cord compared with controls, whereas numbers of γ-MNs remained stable. Likewise, the average size of α-MN cell somata was decreased in SMA mice with no change occurring in γ-MNs. Evaluation of other pools of spinal cord cholinergic neurons revealed that pre-ganglionic sympathetic neurons, central canal cluster interneurons, partition interneurons and preganglionic autonomic dorsal commissural nucleus neuron numbers all remained unaffected in SMA mice. Taken together, these findings indicate that α-MNs are uniquely vulnerable among cholinergic neuron populations in the SMA mouse spinal cord, with γ-MNs and other cholinergic neuronal populations being largely spared. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  15. Stress exacerbates neuron loss and microglia proliferation in a rat model of excitotoxic lower motor neuron injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puga, Denise A; Tovar, C Amy; Guan, Zhen; Gensel, John C; Lyman, Matthew S; McTigue, Dana M; Popovich, Phillip G

    2015-10-01

    All individuals experience stress and hormones (e.g., glucocorticoids/GCs) released during stressful events can affect the structure and function of neurons. These effects of stress are best characterized for brain neurons; however, the mechanisms controlling the expression and binding affinity of glucocorticoid receptors in the spinal cord are different than those in the brain. Accordingly, whether stress exerts unique effects on spinal cord neurons, especially in the context of pathology, is unknown. Using a controlled model of focal excitotoxic lower motor neuron injury in rats, we examined the effects of acute or chronic variable stress on spinal cord motor neuron survival and glial activation. New data indicate that stress exacerbates excitotoxic spinal cord motor neuron loss and associated activation of microglia. In contrast, hypertrophy and hyperplasia of astrocytes and NG2+ glia were unaffected or were modestly suppressed by stress. Although excitotoxic lesions cause significant motor neuron loss and stress exacerbates this pathology, overt functional impairment did not develop in the relevant forelimb up to one week post-lesion. These data indicate that stress is a disease-modifying factor capable of altering neuron and glial responses to pathological challenges in the spinal cord. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Progressive Loss of the Orexin Neurons Reveals Dual Effects on Wakefulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Abigail F.; Navidi, William; Tabuchi, Sawako; Terao, Akira; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Scammell, Thomas E.; Diniz Behn, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy is caused by loss of the orexin (also known as hypocretin) neurons. In addition to the orexin peptides, these neurons release additional neurotransmitters, which may produce complex effects on sleep/wake behavior. Currently, it remains unknown whether the orexin neurons promote the initiation as well as the maintenance of wakefulness, and whether the orexin neurons influence initiation or maintenance of sleep. To determine the effects of the orexin neurons on the dynamics of sleep/wake behavior, we analyzed sleep/wake architecture in a novel mouse model of acute orexin neuron loss. Methods: We used survival analysis and other statistical methods to analyze sleep/wake architecture in orexin-tTA ; TetO diphtheria toxin A mice at different stages of orexin neuron degeneration. Results: Progressive loss of the orexin neurons dramatically reduced survival of long wake bouts, but it also improved survival of brief wake bouts. In addition, with loss of the orexin neurons, mice were more likely to wake during the first 30 sec of nonrapid eye movement sleep and then less likely to return to sleep during the first 60 sec of wakefulness. Conclusions: These findings help explain the sleepiness and fragmented sleep that are characteristic of narcolepsy. Orexin neuron loss impairs survival of long wake bouts resulting in poor maintenance of wakefulness, but this neuronal loss also fragments sleep by increasing the risk of awakening at the beginning of sleep and then reducing the likelihood of quickly returning to sleep. Citation: Branch AF, Navidi W, Tabuchi S, Terao A, Yamanaka A, Scammell TE, Diniz Behn C. Progressive loss of the orexin neurons reveals dual effects on wakefulness. SLEEP 2016;39(2):369–377. PMID:26446125

  17. Progranulin deficiency promotes neuroinflammation and neuron loss following toxin-induced injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Lauren Herl; Zhang, Jiasheng; Barmada, Sami J.; Zhou, Ping; Kamiya, Sherry; Sun, Binggui; Min, Sang-Won; Gan, Li; Finkbeiner, Steven; Huang, Eric J.; Farese, Robert V.

    2012-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a widely expressed secreted protein that is linked to inflammation. In humans, PGRN haploinsufficiency is a major inherited cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), but how PGRN deficiency causes neurodegeneration is unknown. Here we show that loss of PGRN results in increased neuron loss in response to injury in the CNS. When exposed acutely to 1-methyl-4-(2′-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophine (MPTP), mice lacking PGRN (Grn–/–) showed more neuron loss and increased microgliosis compared with wild-type mice. The exacerbated neuron loss was due not to selective vulnerability of Grn–/– neurons to MPTP, but rather to an increased microglial inflammatory response. Consistent with this, conditional mutants lacking PGRN in microglia exhibited MPTP-induced phenotypes similar to Grn–/– mice. Selective depletion of PGRN from microglia in mixed cortical cultures resulted in increased death of wild-type neurons in the absence of injury. Furthermore, Grn–/– microglia treated with LPS/IFN-γ exhibited an amplified inflammatory response, and conditioned media from these microglia promoted death of cultured neurons. Our results indicate that PGRN deficiency leads to dysregulated microglial activation and thereby contributes to increased neuron loss with injury. These findings suggest that PGRN deficiency may cause increased neuron loss in other forms of CNS injury accompanied by neuroinflammation. PMID:23041626

  18. Hippocampal adaptive response following extensive neuronal loss in an inducible transgenic mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Myczek

    Full Text Available Neuronal loss is a common component of a variety of neurodegenerative disorders (including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease and brain traumas (stroke, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury. One brain region that commonly exhibits neuronal loss in several neurodegenerative disorders is the hippocampus, an area of the brain critical for the formation and retrieval of memories. Long-lasting and sometimes unrecoverable deficits caused by neuronal loss present a unique challenge for clinicians and for researchers who attempt to model these traumas in animals. Can these deficits be recovered, and if so, is the brain capable of regeneration following neuronal loss? To address this significant question, we utilized the innovative CaM/Tet-DT(A mouse model that selectively induces neuronal ablation. We found that we are able to inflict a consistent and significant lesion to the hippocampus, resulting in hippocampally-dependent behavioral deficits and a long-lasting upregulation in neurogenesis, suggesting that this process might be a critical part of hippocampal recovery. In addition, we provide novel evidence of angiogenic and vasculature changes following hippocampal neuronal loss in CaM/Tet-DTA mice. We posit that angiogenesis may be an important factor that promotes neurogenic upregulation following hippocampal neuronal loss, and both factors, angiogenesis and neurogenesis, can contribute to the adaptive response of the brain for behavioral recovery.

  19. Arctigenin protects against neuronal hearing loss by promoting neural stem cell survival and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinghua; Chen, Mo; Ding, Yan; Wang, Qin

    2017-03-01

    Neuronal hearing loss has become a prevalent health problem. This study focused on the function of arctigenin (ARC) in promoting survival and neuronal differentiation of mouse cochlear neural stem cells (NSCs), and its protection against gentamicin (GMC) induced neuronal hearing loss. Mouse cochlea was used to isolate NSCs, which were subsequently cultured in vitro. The effects of ARC on NSC survival, neurosphere formation, differentiation of NSCs, neurite outgrowth, and neural excitability in neuronal network in vitro were examined. Mechanotransduction ability demonstrated by intact cochlea, auditory brainstem response (ABR), and distortion product optoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) amplitude in mice were measured to evaluate effects of ARC on GMC-induced neuronal hearing loss. ARC increased survival, neurosphere formation, neuron differentiation of NSCs in mouse cochlear in vitro. ARC also promoted the outgrowth of neurites, as well as neural excitability of the NSC-differentiated neuron culture. Additionally, ARC rescued mechanotransduction capacity, restored the threshold shifts of ABR and DPOAE in our GMC ototoxicity murine model. This study supports the potential therapeutic role of ARC in promoting both NSCs proliferation and differentiation in vitro to functional neurons, thus supporting its protective function in the therapeutic treatment of neuropathic hearing loss in vivo. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Selected statins produce rapid spinal motor neuron loss in vitro

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    Murinson Beth B

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hmg-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins are widely used to prevent disease associated with vascular disease and hyperlipidemia. Although side effects are uncommon, clinical observations suggest statin exposure may exacerbate neuromuscular diseases, including peripheral neuropathy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Although some have postulated class-effects, prior studies of hepatocytes and myocytes indicate that the statins may exhibit differential effects. Studies of neuronal cells have been limited. Methods We examined the effects of statins on cultured neurons and Schwann cells. Cultured spinal motor neurons were grown on transwell inserts and assessed for viability using immunochemical staining for SMI-32. Cultured cortical neurons and Schwann cells were assessed using dynamic viability markers. Results 7 days of exposure to fluvastatin depleted spinal motor neurons in a dose-dependent manner with a KD of  Conclusions It is known from pharmacokinetic studies that daily treatment of young adults with fluvastatin can produce serum levels in the single micromolar range. We conclude that specific mechanisms may explain neuromuscular disease worsening with statins and further study is needed.

  1. Loss of aPKCλ in differentiated neurons disrupts the polarity complex but does not induce obvious neuronal loss or disorientation in mouse brains.

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    Tomoyuki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available Cell polarity plays a critical role in neuronal differentiation during development of the central nervous system (CNS. Recent studies have established the significance of atypical protein kinase C (aPKC and its interacting partners, which include PAR-3, PAR-6 and Lgl, in regulating cell polarization during neuronal differentiation. However, their roles in neuronal maintenance after CNS development remain unclear. Here we performed conditional deletion of aPKCλ, a major aPKC isoform in the brain, in differentiated neurons of mice by camk2a-cre or synapsinI-cre mediated gene targeting. We found significant reduction of aPKCλ and total aPKCs in the adult mouse brains. The aPKCλ deletion also reduced PAR-6β, possibly by its destabilization, whereas expression of other related proteins such as PAR-3 and Lgl-1 was unaffected. Biochemical analyses suggested that a significant fraction of aPKCλ formed a protein complex with PAR-6β and Lgl-1 in the brain lysates, which was disrupted by the aPKCλ deletion. Notably, the aPKCλ deletion mice did not show apparent cell loss/degeneration in the brain. In addition, neuronal orientation/distribution seemed to be unaffected. Thus, despite the polarity complex disruption, neuronal deletion of aPKCλ does not induce obvious cell loss or disorientation in mouse brains after cell differentiation.

  2. Lateral Hypothalamic Neurotensin Neurons Orchestrate Dual Weight Loss Behaviors via Distinct Mechanisms

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    Hillary L. Woodworth

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The central mechanism by which neurotensin (Nts potentiates weight loss has remained elusive. We leveraged chemogenetics to reveal that Nts-expressing neurons of the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA promote weight loss in mice by increasing volitional activity and restraining food intake. Intriguingly, these dual weight loss behaviors are mediated by distinct signaling pathways: Nts action via NtsR1 is essential for the anorectic effect of the LHA Nts circuit, but not for regulation of locomotor or drinking behavior. Furthermore, although LHA Nts neurons cannot reduce intake of freely available obesogenic foods, they effectively restrain motivated feeding in hungry, weight-restricted animals. LHA Nts neurons are thus vital mediators of central Nts action, particularly in the face of negative energy balance. Enhanced action via LHA Nts neurons may, therefore, be useful to suppress the increased appetitive drive that occurs after lifestyle-mediated weight loss and, hence, to prevent weight regain.

  3. Neocortical Neuronal Loss in Patients with Multiple System Atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvesen, Lisette; Winge, Kristian; Brudek, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    To determine the extent of neocortical involvement in multiple system atrophy (MSA), we used design-based stereological methods to estimate the total numbers of neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia in the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital cortex of brains from 11 patients...... with MSA and 11 age- and gender-matched control subjects. The stereological data were supported by cell marker expression analyses in tissue samples from the prefrontal cortex. We found significantly fewer neurons in the frontal and parietal cortex of MSA brains compared with control brains. Significantly...

  4. Astrocyte Depletion Impairs Redox Homeostasis and Triggers Neuronal Loss in the Adult CNS

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    Bettina Schreiner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the importance of reactive astrocytes during CNS pathology is well established, the function of astroglia in adult CNS homeostasis is less well understood. With the use of conditional, astrocyte-restricted protein synthesis termination, we found that selective paralysis of GFAP+ astrocytes in vivo led to rapid neuronal cell loss and severe motor deficits. This occurred while structural astroglial support still persisted and in the absence of any major microvascular damage. Whereas loss of astrocyte function did lead to microglial activation, this had no impact on the neuronal loss and clinical decline. Neuronal injury was caused by oxidative stress resulting from the reduced redox scavenging capability of dysfunctional astrocytes and could be prevented by the in vivo treatment with scavengers of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS. Our results suggest that the subpopulation of GFAP+ astrocytes maintain neuronal health by controlling redox homeostasis in the adult CNS.

  5. Effects of neuronal loss in the dynamic model of neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, B-G; Choi, J; Choi, M Y

    2008-01-01

    We study the phase transitions and dynamic behavior of the dynamic model of neural networks, with an emphasis on the effects of neuronal loss due to external stress. In the absence of loss the overall results obtained numerically are found to agree excellently with the theoretical ones. When the external stress is turned on, some neurons may deteriorate and die; such loss of neurons, in general, weakens the memory in the system. As the loss increases beyond a critical value, the order parameter measuring the strength of memory decreases to zero either continuously or discontinuously, namely, the system loses its memory via a second- or a first-order transition, depending on the ratio of the refractory period to the duration of action potential

  6. Mechanism for Prenatal LPS-Induced DA Neuron Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    to the skull with the aid of screws and dental cement . The tubing was threaded subcutaneously to the nape of the neck and then connected to a mini-pump...adult rat brain: the effects of 6-hydroxydop- amine lesions in adult brain. Dev. Brain Res. 97, 297–303. 6-Hydroxydopamine-induced alterations in...L. Neuronal uptake processes for amines and amino acids. Adv. Biochem. Psychopharmacol. 2:109– 62. McNaught, K. S.; Perl, D. P.; Brownell, A. L

  7. Restricted loss of olivocochlear but not vestibular efferent neurons in the senescent gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus

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    Susanne eRadtke-Schuller

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Degeneration of hearing and vertigo are symptoms of age-related auditory and vestibular disorders reflecting multifactorial changes in the peripheral and central nervous system whose interplay remains largely unknown. Originating bilaterally in the brain stem, vestibular and auditory efferent cholinergic projections exert feedback control on the peripheral sensory organs, and modulate sensory processing. We studied age-related changes in the auditory and vestibular efferent systems by evaluating number of cholinergic efferent neurons in young adult and aged gerbils, and in cholinergic trigeminal neurons serving as a control for efferents not related to the inner ear. We observed a significant loss of olivocochlear neurons in aged compared to young adult animals, whereas the overall number of lateral superior olive cells was not reduced in aging. Although the loss of lateral and medial olivocochlear neurons was uniform and equal on both sides of the brain, there were frequency-related differences within the lateral olivocochlear neurons, where the decline was larger in the medial limb of the superior olivary nucleus (high frequency representation than in the lateral limb (middle-to-low frequency representation. In contrast, neither the number of vestibular efferent neurons, nor the population of motor trigeminal neurons were significantly reduced in the aged animals. These observations suggest differential effects of aging on the respective cholinergic efferent brainstem systems.

  8. Ultrafine carbon particles promote rotenone-induced dopamine neuronal loss through activating microglial NADPH oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yinxi; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Huifeng; Wang, Yixin; Wei, Ling; Liu, Yutong; Liao, Jieying; Gao, Hui-Ming; Zhou, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Background: Atmospheric ultrafine particles (UFPs) and pesticide rotenone were considered as potential environmental risk factors for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, whether and how UFPs alone and in combination with rotenone affect the pathogenesis of PD remains largely unknown. Methods: Ultrafine carbon black (ufCB, a surrogate of UFPs) and rotenone were used individually or in combination to determine their roles in chronic dopaminergic (DA) loss in neuron-glia, and neuron-enriched, mix-glia cultures. Immunochemistry using antibody against tyrosine hydroxylase was performed to detect DA neuronal loss. Measurement of extracellular superoxide and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were performed to examine activation of NADPH oxidase. Genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase and MAC-1 receptor in microglia were employed to examine their role in DA neuronal loss triggered by ufCB and rotenone. Results: In rodent midbrain neuron-glia cultures, ufCB and rotenone alone caused neuronal death in a dose-dependent manner. In particularly, ufCB at doses of 50 and 100 μg/cm 2 induced significant loss of DA neurons. More importantly, nontoxic doses of ufCB (10 μg/cm 2 ) and rotenone (2 nM) induced synergistic toxicity to DA neurons. Microglial activation was essential in this process. Furthermore, superoxide production from microglial NADPH oxidase was critical in ufCB/rotenone-induced neurotoxicity. Studies in mix-glia cultures showed that ufCB treatment activated microglial NADPH oxidase to induce superoxide production. Firstly, ufCB enhanced the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (gp91 phox , p47 phox and p40 phox ); secondly, ufCB was recognized by microglial surface MAC-1 receptor and consequently promoted rotenone-induced p47 phox and p67 phox translocation assembling active NADPH oxidase. Conclusion: ufCB and rotenone worked in synergy to activate NADPH oxidase in microglia, leading to oxidative damage to DA neurons. Our

  9. Murine CMV-induced hearing loss is associated with inner ear inflammation and loss of spiral ganglia neurons.

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    Russell D Bradford

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV occurs in 0.5-1% of live births and approximately 10% of infected infants develop hearing loss. The mechanism(s of hearing loss remain unknown. We developed a murine model of CMV induced hearing loss in which murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection of newborn mice leads to hematogenous spread of virus to the inner ear, induction of inflammatory responses, and hearing loss. Characteristics of the hearing loss described in infants with congenital HCMV infection were observed including, delayed onset, progressive hearing loss, and unilateral hearing loss in this model and, these characteristics were viral inoculum dependent. Viral antigens were present in the inner ear as were CD(3+ mononuclear cells in the spiral ganglion and stria vascularis. Spiral ganglion neuron density was decreased after infection, thus providing a mechanism for hearing loss. The lack of significant inner ear histopathology and persistence of inflammation in cochlea of mice with hearing loss raised the possibility that inflammation was a major component of the mechanism(s of hearing loss in MCMV infected mice.

  10. Striatal cholinergic interneuron regulation and circuit effects

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    Sean Austin Lim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The striatum plays a central role in motor control and motor learning. Appropriate responses to environmental stimuli, including pursuit of reward or avoidance of aversive experience all require functional striatal circuits. These pathways integrate synaptic inputs from limbic and cortical regions including sensory, motor and motivational information to ultimately connect intention to action. Although many neurotransmitters participate in striatal circuitry, one critically important player is acetylcholine (ACh. Relative to other brain areas, the striatum contains exceptionally high levels of ACh, the enzymes that catalyze its synthesis and breakdown, as well as both nicotinic and muscarinic receptor types that mediate its postsynaptic effects. The principal source of striatal ACh is the cholinergic interneuron (ChI, which comprises only about 1-2% of all striatal cells yet sends dense arbors of projections throughout the striatum. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the factors affecting the excitability of these neurons through acute effects and long term changes in their synaptic inputs. In addition, we discuss the physiological effects of ACh in the striatum, and how changes in ACh levels may contribute to disease states during striatal dysfunction.

  11. Huntington’s Disease and Striatal Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roze, Emmanuel; Cahill, Emma; Martin, Elodie; Bonnet, Cecilia; Vanhoutte, Peter; Betuing, Sandrine; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2011-01-01

    Huntington’s Disease (HD) is the most frequent neurodegenerative disease caused by an expansion of polyglutamines (CAG). The main clinical manifestations of HD are chorea, cognitive impairment, and psychiatric disorders. The transmission of HD is autosomal dominant with a complete penetrance. HD has a single genetic cause, a well-defined neuropathology, and informative pre-manifest genetic testing of the disease is available. Striatal atrophy begins as early as 15 years before disease onset and continues throughout the period of manifest illness. Therefore, patients could theoretically benefit from therapy at early stages of the disease. One important characteristic of HD is the striatal vulnerability to neurodegeneration, despite similar expression of the protein in other brain areas. Aggregation of the mutated Huntingtin (HTT), impaired axonal transport, excitotoxicity, transcriptional dysregulation as well as mitochondrial dysfunction, and energy deficits, are all part of the cellular events that underlie neuronal dysfunction and striatal death. Among these non-exclusive mechanisms, an alteration of striatal signaling is thought to orchestrate the downstream events involved in the cascade of striatal dysfunction. PMID:22007160

  12. Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss and Dopamine-Dependent Locomotor Defects in Fbxo7-Deficient Zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Zhao (Tianna); H. Zondervan-van der Linde (Herma); E.A.W.F.M. Severijnen (Lies-Anne); B.A. Oostra (Ben); R. Willemsen (Rob); V. Bonifati (Vincenzo)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractRecessive mutations in the F-box only protein 7 gene (FBXO7) cause PARK15, a Mendelian form of early-onset, levodopa-responsive parkinsonism with severe loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. However, the function of the protein encoded by FBXO7, and the pathogenesis of PARK15

  13. The bioenergetic status relates to dopamine neuron loss in familial PD with PINK1 mutations.

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    Rüediger Hilker

    Full Text Available Mutations in the PINK1 gene cause autosomal recessive familial Parkinson's disease (PD. The gene encodes a mitochondrial protein kinase that plays an important role in maintaining mitochondrial function and integrity. However, the pathophysiological link between mutation-related bioenergetic deficits and the degenerative process in dopaminergic neurons remains to be elucidated. We performed phosphorous ((31P and proton ((1H 3-T magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI in 11 members of a German family with hereditary PD due to PINK1 mutations (PARK6 compared to 23 age-matched controls. All family members had prior 18-Fluorodopa (FDOPA positron emission tomography (PET. The striatal FDOPA uptake was correlated with quantified metabolic brain mapping in MRSI. At group level, the heterozygous PINK1 mutation carriers did not show any MRSI abnormalities relative to controls. In contrast, homozygous individuals with manifest PD had putaminal GPC, PCr, HEP and β-ATP levels well above the 2SD range of controls. Across all subjects, the FDOPA K(i values correlated positively with MI (r = 0.879, p<0.001 and inversely with β-ATP (r = -0.784, p = 0.008 and GPC concentrations (r = -0.651, p = 0.030 in the putamen. Our combined imaging data suggest that the dopaminergic deficit in this family with PD due to PINK1 mutations relates to osmolyte dysregulation, while the delivery of high energy phosphates was preserved. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that PINK1 mutations result in reduced neuronal survival, most likely due to impaired cellular stress resistance.

  14. Corresponding decrease in neuronal markers signals progressive parvalbumin neuron loss in MAM schizophrenia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Kathryn M; Grace, Anthony A

    2014-10-01

    Alteration in normal hippocampal (HPC) function attributed to reduced parvalbumin (PV) expression has been consistently reported in schizophrenia patients and in animal models of schizophrenia. However, it is unclear whether there is an overall loss of interneurons as opposed to a reduction in activity-dependent PV content. Co-expression of PV and the constitutively expressed substance P (SP)-receptor protein has been utilized in other models to ascertain the degree of cell survival, as opposed to reduction in activity-dependent PV content, in the HPC. The present study measured the co-expression of PV and SP-receptors in the dentate and dorsal and ventral CA3 subregions of the HPC in the methylazoymethanol acetate (MAM) rat neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. In addition, these changes were compared at the post-natal day 27 (PND27) and post-natal day 240 (PND > 240) time points. Brains from PND27 and PND > 240 MAM (n = 8) and saline (SAL, n = 8) treated offspring were immunohistochemically processed for the co-expression of PV and SP-receptors. The dorsal dentate, dorsal CA3 and ventral CA3 subregions of PND27 and PND > 240 MAM rats demonstrated significant reductions in PV but not SP-receptor expression, signifying a loss of PV-content. In contrast, in the ventral dentate the co-expression of PV and SP-receptors was significantly reduced only in PND > 240 MAM animals, suggesting a reduction in cell number. While MAM-induced reduction of PV content occurs in CA3 of dorsal and ventral HPC, the most substantial loss of interneuron number is localized to the ventral dentate of PND > 240 animals. The disparate loss of PV in HPC subregions likely impacts intra-HPC network activity in MAM rats.

  15. Icariin Reduces Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss and Microglia-Mediated Inflammation in Vivo and in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Qing Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases characterized with a gradual loss of midbrain substantia nigra (SN dopamine (DA neurons. An excessive evidence demonstrated that microglia-mediated inflammation might be involved in the pathogenesis of PD. Thus, inhibition of neuroinflammation might possess a promising potential for PD treatment. Icariin (ICA, a single active component extracted from the Herba Epimedii, presents amounts of pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammation, anti-oxidant, and anti-aging. Recent studies show ICA produced neuroprotection against brain dysfunction. However, the mechanisms underlying ICA-exerted neuroprotection are fully illuminated. In the present study, two different neurotoxins of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA and lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced rat midbrain DA neuronal damage were applied to investigate the neuroprotective effects of ICA. In addition, primary rat midbrain neuron-glia co-cultures were performed to explore the mechanisms underlying ICA-mediated DA neuroprotection. In vitro data showed that ICA protected DA neurons from LPS/6-OHDA-induced DA neuronal damage and inhibited microglia activation and pro-inflammatory factors production via the suppression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB pathway activation. In animal results, ICA significantly reduced microglia activation and significantly attenuated LPS/6-OHDA-induced DA neuronal loss and subsequent animal behavior changes. Together, ICA could protect DA neurons against LPS- and 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity both in vivo and in vitro. These actions might be closely associated with the inhibition of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation.

  16. Age-related neuronal loss in the rat brain starts at the end of adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morterá, Priscilla; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2012-01-01

    Aging-related changes in the brain have been mostly studied through the comparison of young adult and very old animals. However, aging must be considered a lifelong process of cumulative changes that ultimately become evident at old age. To determine when this process of decline begins, we studied how the cellular composition of the rat brain changes from infancy to adolescence, early adulthood, and old age. Using the isotropic fractionator to determine total numbers of neuronal and non-neuronal cells in different brain areas, we find that a major increase in number of neurons occurs during adolescence, between 1 and 2–3 months of age, followed by a significant trend of widespread and progressive neuronal loss that begins as early as 3 months of age, when neuronal numbers are maximal in all structures, until decreases in numbers of neurons become evident at 12 or 22 months of age. Our findings indicate that age-related decline in the brain begins as soon as the end of adolescence, a novel finding has important clinical and social implications for public health and welfare. PMID:23112765

  17. Intratympanic steroid prevents long-term spiral ganglion neuron loss in experimental meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Brandt, C.T.; Lund, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Hypothesis: Intratympanic steroid treatment prevents hearing loss and cochlear damage in a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis. Background: Sensorineural hearing loss is a long-term complication of meningitis affecting up to a third of survivors. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the bacterial species...... treatment prevents long-term spiral ganglion neuron loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. This finding is clinically relevant in relation to postmeningitic hearing rehabilitation by cochlear implantation. However, the drug instillation in the middle ear induced local fibrosis and a concurrent low...

  18. Intratelencephalic corticostriatal neurons equally excite striatonigral and striatopallidal neurons and their discharge activity is selectively reduced in experimental parkinsonism

    OpenAIRE

    Ballion, B. (B.); Mallet, N. (Nicolas); Bezard, E. (E.); Lanciego, J.L. (José Luis); Gonon, F. (Francois)

    2008-01-01

    Striatonigral and striatopallidal neurons form distinct populations of striatal projection neurons. Their discharge activity is imbalanced after dopaminergic degeneration in Parkinson's disease. Striatal projection neurons receive massive cortical excitatory inputs from bilateral intratelencephalic (IT) neurons projecting to both the ipsilateral and contralateral striatum and from collateral axons of ipsilateral neurons that send their main axon through the pyramidal tract (PT). Previous anat...

  19. A neuronal activation correlate in striatum and prefrontal cortex of prolonged cocaine intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Ping; de Munck, Jan C; Limpens, Jules H W; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Voorn, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    Maladaptive changes in the involvement of striatal and frontal cortical regions in drug use are thought to underlie the progression to habitual drug use and loss of cognitive control over drug intake that occur with accumulating drug experience. The present experiments focus on changes in neuronal

  20. Transcriptional profiling of striatal neurons in response to single or concurrent activation of dopamine D2, adenosine A(2A) and metabotropic glutamate type 5 receptors: focus on beta-synuclein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Laia; Selga, Elisabet; García-Martínez, Juan Manuel; Amaral, Olavo B; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Alberch, Jordi; Canela, Enric I; Franco, Rafael; Noé, Véronique; Lluís, Carme; Ciudad, Carlos J; Ciruela, Francisco

    2012-10-25

    G protein-coupled receptor oligomerization is a concept which is changing the understanding of classical pharmacology. Both, oligomerization and functional interaction between adenosine A(2A,) dopamine D(2) and metabotropic glutamate type 5 receptors have been demonstrated in the striatum. However, the transcriptional consequences of receptors co-activation are still unexplored. We aim here to determine the changes in gene expression of striatal primary cultured neurons upon isolated or simultaneous receptor activation. Interestingly, we found that 95 genes of the total analyzed (15,866 transcripts and variants) changed their expression in response to simultaneous stimulation of all three receptors. Among these genes, we focused on the β-synuclein (β-Syn) gene (SCNB). Quantitative PCR verified the magnitude and direction of change in expression of SCNB. Since β-Syn belongs to the homologous synuclein family and may be considered a natural regulator of α-synuclein (α-Syn), it has been proposed that β-Syn might act protectively against α-Syn neuropathology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Loss of autophagy in dopaminergic neurons causes Lewy pathology and motor dysfunction in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shigeto; Uchihara, Toshiki; Fukuda, Takahiro; Noda, Sachiko; Kondo, Hiromi; Saiki, Shinji; Komatsu, Masaaki; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Tanaka, Keiji; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2018-02-12

    Inactivation of constitutive autophagy results in the formation of cytoplasmic inclusions in neurons, but the relationship between impaired autophagy and Lewy bodies (LBs) as well as the in vivo process of formation remains unknown. Synuclein, a component of LBs, is the defining characteristic of Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we characterize dopamine (DA) neuron-specific autophagy-deficient mice and provide in vivo evidence for LB formation. Synuclein deposition is preceded by p62 and resulted in the formation of inclusions containing synuclein and p62. The number and size of these inclusions were gradually increased in neurites rather than soma with aging. These inclusions may facilitate peripheral failures. As a result, DA neuron loss and motor dysfunction including the hindlimb defect were observed in 120-week-old mice. P62 aggregates derived from an autophagic defect might serve as "seeds" and can potentially be cause of LB formation.

  2. Apparent opposite effects of tetrabenazine and reserpine on the toxic effects of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium or 6-hydroxydopamine on nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleren, Carine; Naudin, Bertrand; Costentin, Jean

    2003-11-07

    It is well documented that VMAT2 protects nigrostriatal DA neurons against MPP(+) by sequestering it inside vesicles away from its mitochondrial site of neurotoxic action. However, the implication of the VMAT2 in the mechanism of action exerted by 6-OHDA has received little attention. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether the vesicular sequestration of 6-OHDA would protect dopaminergic neurons from its toxicity similarly to what is observed with MPP(+). We injected mice with 6-OHDA 90 min after TBZ treatment. Since, unexpectedly, TBZ pretreatment prevented 6-OHDA neurotoxicity, we performed a similar experience replacing 6-OHDA with MPP(+) in order to check our experimental protocol. TBZ pretreatment similarly prevented MPP(+) neurotoxicity. This discrepancy with what is commonly describe in the literature, led us to use reserpine. Indeed, the long lasting VMAT2 inhibition induced by reserpine allowed us to inject neurotoxins while mice no longer presented hypothermia. Contrary to TBZ pretreatment, reserpine pretreatment potentiated both 6-OHDA and MPP(+) toxicity on dopaminergic neurons. Hypothermia elicited by TBZ appeared to be responsible, at least in part, for the neuroprotective effect observed. To verify this hypothesis, we investigated the influence of hypothermia on the toxic activity of both neurotoxins. A hypothermia similar to that induced by TBZ was obtained by a forced swimming test of putting mice into cool water (23 degrees C). The hypothermia prevented both 6-OHDA and MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity. We finally reported that VMAT2 inhibition potentiates both MPP(+) and 6-OHDA neurotoxicity.

  3. Dopaminergic neuronal loss and dopamine-dependent locomotor defects in Fbxo7-deficient zebrafish.

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    Tianna Zhao

    Full Text Available Recessive mutations in the F-box only protein 7 gene (FBXO7 cause PARK15, a mendelian form of early-onset, levodopa-responsive parkinsonism with severe loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. However, the function of the protein encoded by FBXO7, and the pathogenesis of PARK15 remain unknown. No animal models of this disease exist. Here, we report the generation of a vertebrate model of PARK15 in zebrafish. We first show that the zebrafish Fbxo7 homolog protein (zFbxo7 is expressed abundantly in the normal zebrafish brain. Next, we used two zFbxo7-specific morpholinos (targeting protein translation and mRNA splicing, respectively, to knock down the zFbxo7 expression. The injection of either of these zFbxo7-specific morpholinos in the fish embryos induced a marked decrease in the zFbxo7 protein expression, and a range of developmental defects. Furthermore, whole-mount in situ mRNA hybridization showed abnormal patterning and significant decrease in the number of diencephalic tyrosine hydroxylase-expressing neurons, corresponding to the human nigrostriatal or ventral tegmental dopaminergic neurons. Of note, the number of the dopamine transporter-expressing neurons was much more severely depleted, suggesting dopaminergic dysfunctions earlier and larger than those due to neuronal loss. Last, the zFbxo7 morphants displayed severe locomotor disturbances (bradykinesia, which were dramatically improved by the dopaminergic agonist apomorphine. The severity of these morphological and behavioral abnormalities correlated with the severity of zFbxo7 protein deficiency. Moreover, the effects of the co-injection of zFbxo7- and p53-specific morpholinos were similar to those obtained with zFbxo7-specific morpholinos alone, supporting further the contention that the observed phenotypes were specifically due to the knock down of zFbxo7. In conclusion, this novel vertebrate model reproduces pathologic and behavioral hallmarks of human parkinsonism (dopaminergic

  4. Intratympanic steroid prevents long-term spiral ganglion neuron loss in experimental meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Brandt, C.T.; Lund, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Hypothesis: Intratympanic steroid treatment prevents hearing loss and cochlear damage in a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis. Background: Sensorineural hearing loss is a long-term complication of meningitis affecting up to a third of survivors. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the bacterial species...... most often associated with a hearing loss. Methods: Rats were randomly assigned to 3 treatment groups: a group treated with intratympanic betamethasone and 2 control groups treated with either intratympanic or systemic saline. Treatment was initiated 21 hours after infection and repeated once a day...... treatment prevents long-term spiral ganglion neuron loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. This finding is clinically relevant in relation to postmeningitic hearing rehabilitation by cochlear implantation. However, the drug instillation in the middle ear induced local fibrosis and a concurrent low...

  5. Bcl-2 over-expression fails to prevent age-related loss of calretinin positive neurons in the mouse dentate gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Mingbo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive performance declines with increasing age. Possible cellular mechanisms underlying this age-related functional decline remain incompletely understood. Early studies attributed this functional decline to age-related neuronal loss. Subsequent studies using unbiased stereological techniques found little or no neuronal loss during aging. However, studies using specific cellular markers found age-related loss of specific neuronal types. To test whether there is age-related loss of specific neuronal populations in the hippocampus, and subsequently, whether over-expression of the B-cell lymphoma protein-2 (Bcl-2 in these neurons could delay possible age-related neuronal loss, we examined calretinin (CR positive neurons in the mouse dentate gyrus during aging. Result In normal mice, there was an age-related loss of CR positive cells in the dentate gyrus. At the same region, there was no significant decrease of total numbers of neurons, which suggested that age-related loss of CR positive cells was due to the decrease of CR expression in these cells instead of cell death. In the transgenic mouse line over-expressing Bcl-2 in neurons, there was an age-related loss of CR positive cells. Interestingly, there was also an age-related neuronal loss in this transgenic mouse line. Conclusion These data suggest an age-related loss of CR positive neurons but not total neuronal loss in normal mice and this age-related neuronal change is not prevented by Bcl-2 over-expression.

  6. Loss of neuron-astroglial interaction rapidly induces protective CNTF expression after stroke in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seong Su; Keasey, Matthew P.; Cai, Jun; Hagg, Theo

    2012-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a potent neural cytokine with very low expression in the CNS, predominantly by astrocytes. CNTF increases rapidly and greatly following traumatic or ischemic injury. Understanding the underlying mechanisms would help to design pharmacological treatments to increase endogenous CNTF levels for neuroprotection. Here, we show that astroglial CNTF expression in the adult mouse striatum is increased two-fold within 1 hour and increases up to >30 fold over two weeks following a focal stroke caused by a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Selective neuronal loss caused by intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid resulted in a comparable increase. Co-cultured neurons reduced CNTF expression in astrocytes which was prevented by light trypsinization. RGD blocking peptides induced CNTF expression which was dependent on transcription. Astroglial CNTF expression was not affected by diffusible neuronal molecules or by neurotransmitters. The transient ischemia does not seem to directly increase CNTF, as intrastriatal injection of an ischemic solution or exposure of naive mice or cultured cells to severe hypoxia had minimal effects. Inflammatory mechanisms were probably also not involved, as intrastriatal injection of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFNγ, IL6) in naive mice had no or small effects, and anti-inflammatory treatments did not diminish the increase in CNTF after MCAO. CNTF−/− mice had more extensive tissue loss and similar astrocyte activation after MCAO than their wildtype littermates. These data suggest that contact-mediated integrin signaling between neurons and astrocytes normally represses CNTF expression and that neuronal dysfunction causes a rapid protective response by the CNS. PMID:22764235

  7. What is the optimal duration of middle-cerebral artery occlusion consistently resulting in isolated cortical selective neuronal loss in the spontaneously hypertensive rat?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail eEjaz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objectives: Selective neuronal loss (SNL in the reperfused penumbra may impact clinical recovery and is thus important to investigate. Brief proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo results in predominantly striatal SNL, yet cortical damage is more relevant given its behavioral implications and that thrombolytic therapy mainly rescues the cortex. Distal temporary MCAo (tMCAo does target the cortex, but the optimal occlusion duration that results in isolated SNL has not been determined. In the present study we assessed different distal tMCAo durations looking for consistently pure SNL.Methods: Microclip distal tMCAo (md-tMCAo was performed in ~6-month old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs. We previously reported that 45min md-tMCAo in SHRs results in pan-necrosis in the majority of subjects. Accordingly, three shorter MCAo durations were investigated here in decremental succession, namely 30, 22 and 15mins (n=3, 3 and 7 subjects, respectively. Recanalization was confirmed by MR angiography just prior to brain collection at 28 days and T2-weighted MRI was obtained for characterization of ischemic lesions. NeuN, OX42 and GFAP immunohistochemistry appraised changes in neurons, microglia and astrocytes, respectively. Ischemic lesions were categorized into three main types: 1 pan-necrosis; 2 partial infarction; and 3 SNL. Results: Pan-necrosis or partial infarction was present in all 30min and 22min subjects, but not in the 15min group (p < 0.001, in which isolated cortical SNL was consistently present. MRI revealed characteristic hyperintense abnormalities in all rats with pan-necrosis or partial infarction, but no change in any 15min subject. Conclusions: We found that 15min distal MCAo consistently resulted in pure cortical SNL, whereas durations equal or longer than 22min consistently resulted in infarcts. This model may be of use to study the pathophysiology of cortical SNL and its prevention by appropriate

  8. VEGF receptor antagonist Cyclo-VEGI reduces inflammatory reactivity and vascular leakiness and is neuroprotective against acute excitotoxic striatal insult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLarnon James G

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excitotoxic brain insult is associated with extensive neuronal damage but could also cause inflammatory reactivity and vascular remodeling. The effects of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF inhibitor, Cyclo-VEGI on expression of VEGF, microgliosis and astrogliosis, blood-brain barrier (BBB integrity and neuronal viability have been studied following intra-striatal injection of the excitotoxin, quinolinic acid (QUIN. The purpose of this study was to examine VEGF-dependent inflammatory responses in excitotoxin-injected brain and their dependence on pharmacological antagonism of VEGF receptors. Methods Single and double immunofluorescence staining of cellular (microglia, astrocyte, neuron responses and dye and protein infiltration of blood-brain barrier have been applied in the absence, and presence, of pharmacological modulation using a VEGF receptor antagonist, Cyclo-VEGI. Dunn-Bonferroni statistical analysis was used to measure for significance between animal groups. Results Detailed analysis, at a single time point of 1 d post-QUIN injection, showed excitotoxin-injected striatum to exhibit marked increases in microgliosis (ED1 marker, astrogliosis (GFAP marker and VEGF expression, compared with PBS injection. Single and double immunostaining demonstrated significant effects of Cyclo-VEGI treatment of QUIN-injected striatum to inhibit microgliosis (by 38%, ED1/VEGF (by 42% and VEGF striatal immunoreactivity (by 43%; astrogliosis and GFAP/VEGF were not significantly altered with Cyclo-VEGI treatment. Leakiness of BBB was indicated by infiltration of Evans blue dye and plasma protein fibrinogen into QUIN-injected striatum with barrier permeability restored by 62% (Evans blue permeability and 49% (fibrinogen permeability with Cyclo-VEGI application. QUIN-induced toxicity was demonstrated with loss of striatal neurons (NeuN marker and increased neuronal damage (Fluoro-Jade marker with significant neuroprotection

  9. Selective alterations of neurons and circuits related to early memory loss in Alzheimer's disease

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    María eLlorens-Martín

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A progressive loss of episodic memory is a well-known clinical symptom that characterizes Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The beginning of this loss of memory has been associated with the very early, pathological accumulation of tau and neuronal degeneration observed in the entorhinal cortex (EC. Tau-related pathology is thought to then spread progressively to the hippocampal formation and other brain areas as the disease progresses. The major cortical afferent source of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus is the EC through the perforant pathway. At least two main circuits participate in the connection between EC and the hippocampus; one originating in layer II and the other in layer III of the EC giving rise to the classical trisynaptic (ECII→dentate gyrus→CA3→CA1 and monosynaptic (ECIII→CA1 circuits. Thus, the study of the early pathological changes in these circuits is of great interest. In this review, we will discuss mainly the alterations of the granule cell neurons of the dentate gyrus and the atrophy of CA1 pyramidal neurons that occur in AD in relation to the possible differential alterations of these two main circuits.

  10. Astrocyte-produced miR-146a as a mediator of motor neuron loss in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sison, Samantha L; Patitucci, Teresa N; Seminary, Emily R; Villalon, Eric; Lorson, Christian L; Ebert, Allison D

    2017-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the leading genetic cause of infant mortality, is caused by the loss of the survival motor neuron-1 (SMN1) gene, which leads to motor neuron loss, muscle atrophy, respiratory distress, and death. Motor neurons exhibit the most profound loss, but the mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis are not fully understood. Recent evidence suggests that motor neuron extrinsic influences, such as those arising from astrocytes, contribute to motor neuron malfunction and loss. Here we investigated both loss-of-function and toxic gain-of-function astrocyte mechanisms that could play a role in SMA pathology. We had previously found that glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is reduced in SMA astrocytes. However, reduced GDNF expression does not play a major role in SMA pathology as viral-mediated GDNF re-expression did not improve astrocyte function or motor neuron loss. In contrast, we found that SMA astrocytes increased microRNA (miR) production and secretion compared to control astrocytes, suggesting potential toxic gain-of-function properties. Specifically, we found that miR-146a was significantly upregulated in SMA induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived astrocytes and SMNΔ7 mouse spinal cord. Moreover, increased miR-146a was sufficient to induce motor neuron loss in vitro, whereas miR-146a inhibition prevented SMA astrocyte-induced motor neuron loss. Together, these data indicate that altered astrocyte production of miR-146a may be a contributing factor in astrocyte-mediated SMA pathology. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Differential regulation of the phosphorylation of Trimethyl-lysine27 histone H3 at serine 28 in distinct populations of striatal projection neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Södersten, Erik; Spigolon, Giada; Hu, Xiaochen; Hellysaz, Arash; Falconi, Anastasia; Gomes, Ana-Luisa; Broberger, Christian; Hansen, Klaus; Fisone, Gilberto

    2016-08-01

    Phosphorylation of histone H3 (H3) on serine 28 (S28) at genomic regions marked by trimethylation of lysine 27 (H3K27me3) often correlates with increased expression of genes normally repressed by Polycomb group proteins (PcG). We show that amphetamine, an addictive psychostimulant, and haloperidol, a typical antipsychotic drug, increase the phosphorylation of H3 at S28 and that this effect occurs in the context of H3K27me3. The increases in H3K27me3S28p occur in distinct populations of projection neurons located in the striatum, the major component of the basal ganglia. Genetic inactivation of the protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor, dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32), reduces the phosphorylation of H3K27me3S28 produced by amphetamine and haloperidol. In contrast, knockout of the mitogen- and stress activated kinase 1 (MSK1), which is implicated in the phosphorylation of histone H3, decreases the effect of amphetamine, but not that of haloperidol. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis shows that amphetamine and haloperidol increase the phosphorylation of H3K27me3S28 at the promoter regions of Atf3, Npas4 and Lipg, three genes repressed by PcG. These results identify H3K27me3S28p as a potential mediator of the effects exerted by amphetamine and haloperidol, and suggest that these drugs may act by re-activating PcG repressed target genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Eliminating microglia in Alzheimer’s mice prevents neuronal loss without modulating amyloid-β pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Elizabeth E.; Lee, Rafael J.; Najafi, Allison R.; Rice, Rachel A.; Elmore, Monica R. P.; Blurton-Jones, Mathew; West, Brian L.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to amyloid-β plaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle deposition, neuroinflammation is considered a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease pathology. Inflammation in Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of reactive astrocytes and activated microglia surrounding amyloid plaques, implicating their role in disease pathogenesis. Microglia in the healthy adult mouse depend on colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) signalling for survival, and pharmacological inhibition of this receptor results in rapid elimination of nearly all of the microglia in the central nervous system. In this study, we set out to determine if chronically activated microglia in the Alzheimer's disease brain are also dependent on CSF1R signalling, and if so, how these cells contribute to disease pathogenesis. Ten-month-old 5xfAD mice were treated with a selective CSF1R inhibitor for 1 month, resulting in the elimination of ∼80% of microglia. Chronic microglial elimination does not alter amyloid-β levels or plaque load; however, it does rescue dendritic spine loss and prevent neuronal loss in 5xfAD mice, as well as reduce overall neuroinflammation. Importantly, behavioural testing revealed improvements in contextual memory. Collectively, these results demonstrate that microglia contribute to neuronal loss, as well as memory impairments in 5xfAD mice, but do not mediate or protect from amyloid pathology. PMID:26921617

  13. Dendrobium alkaloids prevent Aβ25–35-induced neuronal and synaptic loss via promoting neurotrophic factors expression in mice

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    Jing Nie

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Neuronal and synaptic loss is the most important risk factor for cognitive impairment. Inhibiting neuronal apoptosis and preventing synaptic loss are promising therapeutic approaches for Alzheimer’s disease (AD. In this study, we investigate the protective effects of Dendrobium alkaloids (DNLA, a Chinese medicinal herb extract, on β-amyloid peptide segment 25–35 (Aβ25-35-induced neuron and synaptic loss in mice. Method Aβ25–35(10 µg was injected into the bilateral ventricles of male mice followed by an oral administration of DNLA (40 mg/kg for 19 days. The Morris water maze was used for evaluating the ability of spatial learning and memory function of mice. The morphological changes were examined via H&E staining and Nissl staining. TUNEL staining was used to check the neuronal apoptosis. The ultrastructure changes of neurons were observed under electron microscope. Western blot was used to evaluate the protein expression levels of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the hippocampus and cortex. Results DNLA significantly attenuated Aβ25–35-induced spatial learning and memory impairments in mice. DNLA prevented Aβ25–35-induced neuronal loss in the hippocampus and cortex, increased the number of Nissl bodies, improved the ultrastructural injury of neurons and increased the number of synapses in neurons. Furthermore, DNLA increased the protein expression of neurotrophic factors BDNF, CNTF and GDNF in the hippocampus and cortex. Conclusions DNLA can prevent neuronal apoptosis and synaptic loss. This effect is mediated at least in part via increasing the expression of BDNF, GDNF and CNTF in the hippocampus and cortex; improving Aβ-induced spatial learning and memory impairment in mice.

  14. Anti-Epileptic Drugs Delay Age-Related Loss of Spiral Ganglion Neurons via T-type Calcium Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Debin; Gao, Xia; Perez, Philip; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Chen, Chien-Chang; Campbell, Kevin P.; Hood, Aizhen Yang; Bao, Jianxin

    2011-01-01

    Loss of spiral ganglion neurons is a major cause of age-related hearing loss (presbycusis). Despite being the third most prevalent condition afflicting elderly persons, there are no known medications to prevent presbycusis. Because calcium signaling has long been implicated in age-related neuronal death, we investigated T-type calcium channels. This family is comprised of three members (Cav3.1, Cav3.2, and Cav3.3), based on their respective main pore-forming alpha subunits: α1G, α1H, and α1I. In the present study, we report a significant delay of age-related loss of cochlear function and preservation of spiral ganglion neurons in α1H null and heterozygous mice, clearly demonstrating an important role for Cav3.2 in age-related neuronal loss. Furthermore, we show that anticonvulsant drugs from a family of T-type calcium channel blockers can significantly preserve spiral ganglion neurons during aging. To our knowledge, this is the first report of drugs capable of diminishing age-related loss of spiral ganglion neurons. PMID:21640179

  15. Neuronal erythropoietin overexpression protects mice against age-related hearing loss (presbycusis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge Naldi, Arianne; Belfrage, Celina; Jain, Neha; Wei, Eric T; Canto Martorell, Belén; Gassmann, Max; Vogel, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    So far, typical causes of presbycusis such as degeneration of hair cells and/or primary auditory (spiral ganglion) neurons cannot be treated. Because erythropoietin's (Epo) neuroprotective potential has been shown previously, we determined hearing thresholds of juvenile and aged mice overexpressing Epo in neuronal tissues. Behavioral audiometry revealed in contrast to 5 months of age, that 11-month-old Epo-transgenic mice had up to 35 dB lower hearing thresholds between 1.4 and 32 kHz, and at the highest frequencies (50-80 kHz), thresholds could be obtained in aged Epo-transgenic only but not anymore in old C57BL6 control mice. Click-evoked auditory brainstem response showed similar results. Numbers of spiral ganglion neurons in aged C57BL6 but not Epo-transgenic mice were dramatically reduced mainly in the basal turn, the location of high frequencies. In addition, there was a tendency to better preservation of inner and outer hair cells in Epo-transgenic mice. Hence, Epo's known neuroprotective action effectively suppresses the loss of spiral ganglion cells and probably also hair cells and, thus, development of presbycusis in mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Diurnal fluctuation in the number of hypocretin/orexin and histamine producing: Implication for understanding and treating neuronal loss.

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    Ronald McGregor

    Full Text Available The loss of specific neuronal phenotypes, as determined by immunohistochemistry, has become a powerful tool for identifying the nature and cause of neurological diseases. Here we show that the number of neurons identified and quantified using this method misses a substantial percentage of extant neurons in a phenotype specific manner. In mice, 24% more hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt neurons are seen in the night compared to the day, and an additional 17% are seen after inhibiting microtubule polymerization with colchicine. We see no such difference between the number of MCH (melanin concentrating hormone neurons in dark, light or colchicine conditions, despite MCH and Hcrt both being hypothalamic peptide transmitters. Although the size of Hcrt neurons did not differ between light and dark, the size of MCH neurons was increased by 15% in the light phase. The number of neurons containing histidine decarboxylase (HDC, the histamine synthesizing enzyme, was 34% greater in the dark than in the light, but, like Hcrt, cell size did not differ. We did not find a significant difference in the number or the size of neurons expressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT, the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, in the horizontal diagonal band (HBD during the dark and light conditions. As expected, colchicine treatment did not increase the number of these neurons. Understanding the function and dynamics of transmitter production within "non-visible" phenotypically defined cells has fundamental implications for our understanding of brain plasticity.

  17. Diurnal fluctuation in the number of hypocretin/orexin and histamine producing: Implication for understanding and treating neuronal loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Ronald; Shan, Ling; Wu, Ming-Fung; Siegel, Jerome M

    2017-01-01

    The loss of specific neuronal phenotypes, as determined by immunohistochemistry, has become a powerful tool for identifying the nature and cause of neurological diseases. Here we show that the number of neurons identified and quantified using this method misses a substantial percentage of extant neurons in a phenotype specific manner. In mice, 24% more hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt) neurons are seen in the night compared to the day, and an additional 17% are seen after inhibiting microtubule polymerization with colchicine. We see no such difference between the number of MCH (melanin concentrating hormone) neurons in dark, light or colchicine conditions, despite MCH and Hcrt both being hypothalamic peptide transmitters. Although the size of Hcrt neurons did not differ between light and dark, the size of MCH neurons was increased by 15% in the light phase. The number of neurons containing histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the histamine synthesizing enzyme, was 34% greater in the dark than in the light, but, like Hcrt, cell size did not differ. We did not find a significant difference in the number or the size of neurons expressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, in the horizontal diagonal band (HBD) during the dark and light conditions. As expected, colchicine treatment did not increase the number of these neurons. Understanding the function and dynamics of transmitter production within "non-visible" phenotypically defined cells has fundamental implications for our understanding of brain plasticity.

  18. Intermittent hypoxia can aggravate motor neuronal loss and cognitive dysfunction in ALS mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Min Kim

    Full Text Available Patients with ALS may be exposed to variable degrees of chronic intermittent hypoxia. However, all previous experimental studies on the effects of hypoxia in ALS have only used a sustained hypoxia model and it is possible that chronic intermittent hypoxia exerts effects via a different molecular mechanism from that of sustained hypoxia. No study has yet shown that hypoxia (either chronic intermittent or sustained can affect the loss of motor neurons or cognitive function in an in vivo model of ALS.To evaluate the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia on motor and cognitive function in ALS mice.Sixteen ALS mice and 16 wild-type mice were divided into 2 groups and subjected to either chronic intermittent hypoxia or normoxia for 2 weeks. The effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia on ALS mice were evaluated using the rotarod, Y-maze, and wire-hanging tests. In addition, numbers of motor neurons in the ventral horn of the spinal cord were counted and western blot analyses were performed for markers of oxidative stress and inflammatory pathway activation.Compared to ALS mice kept in normoxic conditions, ALS mice that experienced chronic intermittent hypoxia had poorer motor learning on the rotarod test, poorer spatial memory on the Y-maze test, shorter wire hanging time, and fewer motor neurons in the ventral spinal cord. Compared to ALS-normoxic and wild-type mice, ALS mice that experienced chronic intermittent hypoxia had higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation.Chronic intermittent hypoxia can aggravate motor neuronal death, neuromuscular weakness, and probably cognitive dysfunction in ALS mice. The generation of oxidative stress with activation of inflammatory pathways may be associated with this mechanism. Our study will provide insight into the association of hypoxia with disease progression, and in turn, the rationale for an early non-invasive ventilation treatment in patients with ALS.

  19. MRI and neuropathological validations of the involvement of air pollutants in cortical selective neuronal loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejaz, Sohail; Anwar, Khaleeq; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2014-03-01

    Vehicles are a major source of air pollution, especially particulate matter (PM) pollution, throughout the world and auto-rickshaws are considered main contributors to this air pollution. PM, in addition to causing respiratory and cardiovascular disorders, has potential to gain access to the brain and could induce neuroinflammation leading to different neurological disorders. Therefore, in the current project, MRI and immunohistochemistry techniques were adopted to ascertain the neurotoxic potential of the chronic exposure to different PM generated by two-stroke auto-rickshaws (TSA), four-stroke auto-rickshaws (FSA), and aluminum sulfate (AS) solution in rats. The results highlighted that all treated groups followed a pattern of dose-dependent increase in pure cortical neuronal loss, selective neuronal loss (SNL), nuclear pyknosis, karyolysis, and karyorrhexis. Mild to moderate areas of penumbra were also observed with increase in the population of activated microglia and astrocytes, while no alteration in the intensities of T2W MRI signals was perceived in any group. When comparing the findings, TSA possess more neurotoxic potential than FSA and AS, which could be associated with increased concentration of certain elements in TSA emissions. The study concludes that chronic exposure to PM from TSA, FSA, and AS solutions produces diverse neuropathies in the brain, which may lead to different life-threatening neurological disorders like stroke, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's disorders. Government and environmental agencies should take serious notice of this alarming situation, and immediate steps should be implemented to improve the standards of PM emissions from auto-rickshaws.

  20. Loss of spatacsin function alters lysosomal lipid clearance leading to upper and lower motor neuron degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchu, Julien; Boutry, Maxime; Sourd, Laura; Depp, Marine; Leone, Céline; Corriger, Alexandrine; Vallucci, Maeva; Esteves, Typhaine; Matusiak, Raphaël; Dumont, Magali; Muriel, Marie-Paule; Santorelli, Filippo M; Brice, Alexis; El Hachimi, Khalid Hamid; Stevanin, Giovanni; Darios, Frédéric

    2017-06-01

    Mutations in SPG11 account for the most common form of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), characterized by a gait disorder associated with various brain alterations. Mutations in the same gene are also responsible for rare forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease and progressive juvenile-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To elucidate the physiopathological mechanisms underlying these human pathologies, we disrupted the Spg11 gene in mice by inserting stop codons in exon 32, mimicking the most frequent mutations found in patients. The Spg11 knockout mouse developed early-onset motor impairment and cognitive deficits. These behavioral deficits were associated with progressive brain atrophy with the loss of neurons in the primary motor cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus, as well as with accumulation of dystrophic axons in the corticospinal tract. Spinal motor neurons also degenerated and this was accompanied by fragmentation of neuromuscular junctions and muscle atrophy. This new Spg11 knockout mouse therefore recapitulates the full range of symptoms associated with SPG11 mutations observed in HSP, ALS and CMT patients. Examination of the cellular alterations observed in this model suggests that the loss of spatacsin leads to the accumulation of lipids in lysosomes by perturbing their clearance from these organelles. Altogether, our results link lysosomal dysfunction and lipid metabolism to neurodegeneration and pinpoint a critical role of spatacsin in lipid turnover. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Early microgliosis precedes neuronal loss and behavioural impairment in mice with a frontotemporal dementia-causing CHMP2B mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clayton, Emma L.; Mancuso, Renzo; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup

    2017-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD)-causing mutations in the CHMP2B gene lead to the generation of mutant C-terminally truncated CHMP2B. We report that transgenic mice expressing endogenous levels of mutant CHMP2B developed late-onset brain volume loss associated with frank neuronal loss and FTD-like c...

  2. Ultrastructural development of Rohon-Beard neurons: loss of intramitochondrial granules parallels loss of calcium action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamborghini, J E; Revenaugh, M; Spitzer, N C

    1979-02-15

    , decrease in parallel with the loss of the Ca++ component of the inward current of the action potential in Rohon-Beard neurons.

  3. Neuroglial plasticity at striatal glutamatergic synapses in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa M Villalba

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Striatal dopamine denervation is the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Another major pathological change described in animal models and PD patients is a significant reduction in the density of dendritic spines on medium spiny striatal projection neurons. Simultaneously, the ultrastructural features of the neuronal synaptic elements at the remaining corticostriatal and thalamostriatal glutamatergic axo-spinous synapses undergo complex ultrastructural remodeling consistent with increased synaptic activity (Villalba et al., 2011. The concept of tripartite synapses (TS was introduced a decade ago, according to which astrocytes process and exchange information with neuronal synaptic elements at glutamatergic synapses (Araque et al., 1999a. Although there has been compelling evidence that astrocytes are integral functional elements of tripartite glutamatergic synaptic complexes in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, their exact functional role, degree of plasticity and preponderance in other CNS regions remain poorly understood. In this review, we discuss our recent findings showing that neuronal elements at cortical and thalamic glutamatergic synapses undergo significant plastic changes in the striatum of MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys. We also present new ultrastructural data that demonstrate a significant expansion of the astrocytic coverage of striatal TS synapses in the parkinsonian state, providing further evidence for ultrastructural compensatory changes that affect both neuronal and glial elements at TS. Together with our limited understanding of the mechanisms by which astrocytes respond to changes in neuronal activity and extracellular transmitter homeostasis, the role of both neuronal and glial components of excitatory synapses must be considered, if one hopes to take advantage of glia-neuronal communication knowledge to better understand the pathophysiology of striatal processing in parkinsonism, and develop new PD

  4. Conditional Deletion of PDK1 in the Forebrain Causes Neuron Loss and Increased Apoptosis during Cortical Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congyu Xu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Decreased expression but increased activity of PDK1 has been observed in neurodegenerative disease. To study in vivo function of PDK1 in neuron survival during cortical development, we generate forebrain-specific PDK1 conditional knockout (cKO mice. We demonstrate that PDK1 cKO mice display striking neuron loss and increased apoptosis. We report that PDK1 cKO mice exhibit deficits on several behavioral tasks. Moreover, PDK1 cKO mice show decreased activities for Akt and mTOR. These results highlight an essential role of endogenous PDK1 in the maintenance of neuronal survival during cortical development.

  5. [Protective effect of valsartan or/and ligustrazine on hippocampal neuronal loss in rats with vascular dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Da-lian; Deng, Sha; Zhang, Zhuo; Zhou, Miao; Li, Hua

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of Valsartan and Ligustrazine on hippocampal neuronal loss and the ability of learning and memory of rats with vascular dementia. Vascular dementia was induced in rats by blocking bilateral carotid artery repeatedly and intraperitoneal injection of sodium nitroprusside. The vacuity learning and memory of the rats were measured with Morris water maze. The plasma AVP and ANGII were determined by radio-immunity methods. The activities of SOD, GSH-Px and MDA in hippocampal tissues were detected by chemistry colorimetry. The hippocampal neuronal loss was observe with light microscope. Both valsartan and ligustrazine shortened escape latency (P drugs alone in all of the indicators except for plasma AVP. Valsartan or/and Ligustrazine have protective effect on hippocampal neuronal loss in rats with vascular dementia, possibly through inhibiting RAS activation and free radical formation induced by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion.

  6. The effects of bilateral vestibular loss on hippocampal volume, neuronal number and cell proliferation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen eZheng

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in humans have shown that bilateral loss of vestibular function is associated with a significant bilateral atrophy of the hippocampus, which correlated with the patients’ spatial memory deficits. More recently, patients who had recovered from unilateral vestibular neuritis have been reported to exhibit a significant atrophy of the left posterior hippocampus. Therefore, we investigated whether bilateral vestibular deafferentation (BVD would result in a decrease in neuronal number or volume in the rat hippocampus, using stereological methods. At 16 months post-BVD, we found no significant differences in hippocampal neuronal number or volume compared to sham controls, despite the fact that these animals exhibited severe spatial memory deficits. By contrast, using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU as a marker of cell proliferation, we found that the number of BrdU-labelled cells significantly increased in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus between 48 h and 1 week following BVD. Although a substantial proportion of these cells survived for up to 1 month, the survival rate was significantly lower in BVD animals when compared with that in sham animals. These results suggest a dissociation between the effects of BVD on spatial memory and hippocampal structure in rats and humans, which cannot be explained by an injury-induced increase in cell proliferation.

  7. Temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis: hippocampal neuronal loss as a predictor of surgical outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaclara Prada Jardim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze retrospectively a series of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS, and the association of patterns of hippocampal sclerosis with clinical data and surgical prognosis. METHOD: Sixty-six patients with medically refractory TLE with unilateral MTS after anterior temporal lobectomy were included. Quantitative neuropathological evaluation was performed on NeuN-stained hippocampal sections. Patient's clinical data and surgical outcome were reviewed. RESULTS: Occurrence of initial precipitating insult (IPI, as well as better postoperative seizure control (i.e. Engel class 1, were associated with classical and severe patterns of hippocampal sclerosis (MTS type 1a and 1b, respectively. CONCLUSION: Quantitative evaluation of hippocampal neuronal loss patterns predicts surgical outcome in patients with TLE-MTS.

  8. Temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis: hippocampal neuronal loss as a predictor of surgical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Neves, Rafael Scarpa da Costa; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Lancellotti, Carmen Lucia Penteado; Marinho, Murilo Martinez; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2012-05-01

    To analyze retrospectively a series of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), and the association of patterns of hippocampal sclerosis with clinical data and surgical prognosis. Sixty-six patients with medically refractory TLE with unilateral MTS after anterior temporal lobectomy were included. Quantitative neuropathological evaluation was performed on NeuN-stained hippocampal sections. Patient's clinical data and surgical outcome were reviewed. Occurrence of initial precipitating insult (IPI), as well as better postoperative seizure control (i.e. Engel class 1), were associated with classical and severe patterns of hippocampal sclerosis (MTS type 1a and 1b, respectively). Quantitative evaluation of hippocampal neuronal loss patterns predicts surgical outcome in patients with TLE-MTS.

  9. Loss of functional neuronal nicotinic receptors in dorsal root ganglion neurons in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Gilles R; Kohlhaas, Kathy L; Rueter, Lynne E; Surowy, Carol S; Meyer, Michael D; Briggs, Clark A

    2005-03-07

    Recent evidence has suggested that the anti-allodynic effect of neuronal acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists may have a peripheral component [L.E. Rueter, K.L. Kohlhaas, P. Curzon, C.S. Surowy, M.D. Meyer, Peripheral and central sites of action for A-85380 in the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain, Pain 103 (2003) 269-276]. In further studies of the peripheral anti-allodynic mechanisms of nAChR agonists, we investigated the function of nAChRs in acutely isolated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from allodynic [L5-L6 spinal nerve ligation (SNL)] and naive adult rats. Following determination of cell diameter and membrane capacitance, responses to rapid applications of nAChR agonists were recorded under whole cell patch clamp. nAChR inward currents were observed in approximately 60% of naive neurons, across small, medium, and large diameter cells. Evoked nAChR currents could be clustered into three broad classes: fast transient, biphasic, and slow desensitizing currents, consistent with multiple subtypes of nAChR expressed in DRG [J.R. Genzen, W. Van Cleve, D.S. McGehee, Dorsal root ganglion neurons express multiple nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes, J. Neurophysiol. 86 (2001) 1773-1782]. In contrast, in neurons from allodynic animals, the occurrence and amplitude of responses to nAChR agonists were significantly reduced. Reduced responsiveness to nAChR agonists covered the range of DRG neuron sizes. The decrease in the responsiveness to nAChR agonists was not seen in neighboring uninjured L4 neurons. The significant decrease in the number of cells with nAChR agonist responses, compounded with the significant decrease in response amplitude, indicates that there is a marked down regulation of functional nAChRs in DRG somata associated with SNL.

  10. GABAergic Neuron-Specific Loss of Ube3a Causes Angelman Syndrome-Like EEG Abnormalities and Enhances Seizure Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Matthew C; Wallace, Michael L; Sidorov, Michael S; Burette, Alain C; Gu, Bin; van Woerden, Geeske M; King, Ian F; Han, Ji Eun; Zylka, Mark J; Elgersma, Ype; Weinberg, Richard J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2016-04-06

    Loss of maternal UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with severe epilepsy. We previously implicated GABAergic deficits onto layer (L) 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the pathogenesis of neocortical hyperexcitability, and perhaps epilepsy, in AS model mice. Here we investigate consequences of selective Ube3a loss from either GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, focusing on the development of hyperexcitability within L2/3 neocortex and in broader circuit and behavioral contexts. We find that GABAergic Ube3a loss causes AS-like increases in neocortical EEG delta power, enhances seizure susceptibility, and leads to presynaptic accumulation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs)-all without decreasing GABAergic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Conversely, glutamatergic Ube3a loss fails to yield EEG abnormalities, seizures, or associated CCV phenotypes, despite impairing tonic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. These results substantiate GABAergic Ube3a loss as the principal cause of circuit hyperexcitability in AS mice, lending insight into ictogenic mechanisms in AS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. GABAergic neuron-specific loss of Ube3a causes Angelman syndrome-like EEG abnormalities and enhances seizure susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Matthew C.; Wallace, Michael L.; Sidorov, Michael S.; Burette, Alain C.; Gu, Bin; van Woerden, Geeske M.; King, Ian F.; Han, Ji Eun; Zylka, Mark J.; Elgersma, Ype; Weinberg, Richard J.; Philpot, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss of maternal UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with severe epilepsy. We previously implicated GABAergic deficits onto layer (L) 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the pathogenesis of neocortical hyperexcitability, and perhaps epilepsy, in AS model mice. Here we investigate consequences of selective Ube3a loss from either GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, focusing on the development of hyperexcitability within L2/3 neocortex and in broader circuit and behavioral contexts. We find that GABAergic Ube3a loss causes AS-like increases in neocortical EEG delta power, enhances seizure susceptibility, and leads to presynaptic accumulation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) – all without decreasing GABAergic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Conversely, glutamatergic Ube3a loss fails to yield EEG abnormalities, seizures, or associated CCV phenotypes, despite impairing tonic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. These results substantiate GABAergic Ube3a loss as the principal cause of circuit hyperexcitability in AS mice, lending insight into ictogenic mechanisms in AS. PMID:27021170

  12. Re-emergence of striatal cholinergic interneurons in movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Antonio; Bernardi, Giorgio; Ding, Jun; Surmeier, D James

    2007-10-01

    Twenty years ago, striatal cholinergic neurons were central figures in models of basal ganglia function. But since then, they have receded in importance. Recent studies are likely to lead to their re-emergence in our thinking. Cholinergic interneurons have been implicated as key players in the induction of synaptic plasticity and motor learning, as well as in motor dysfunction. In Parkinson's disease and dystonia, diminished striatal dopaminergic signalling leads to increased release of acetylcholine by interneurons, distorting network function and inducing structural changes that undoubtedly contribute to the symptoms. By contrast, in Huntington's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy, there is a fall in striatal cholinergic markers. This review gives an overview of these recent experimental and clinical studies, placing them within the context of the pathogenesis of movement disorders.

  13. Dync1h1 Mutation Causes Proprioceptive Sensory Neuron Loss and Impaired Retrograde Axonal Transport of Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Yi; Xu, Huan; Fu, Yuan; Qian, Ting; Bo, Deng; Lu, Yan-Xin; Xiong, Yi; Wan, Jun; Zhang, Xiang; Dong, Qiang; Chen, Xiang-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Sprawling (Swl) is a radiation-induced mutation which has been identified to have a nine base pair deletion in dynein heavy chain 1 (DYNC1H1: encoded by a single gene Dync1h1). This study is to investigate the phenotype and the underlying mechanism of the Dync1h1 mutant. To display the phenotype of Swl mutant mice, we examined the embryos of homozygous (Swl/Swl) and heterozygous (Swl/+) mice and their postnatal dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of surviving Swl/+ mice. The Swl/+ mice could survive for a normal life span, while Swl/Swl could only survive till embryonic (E) 8.5 days. Excessive apoptosis of Swl/+ DRG neurons was revealed during E11.5-E15.5 days, and the peak rate was at E13.5 days. In vitro study of mutated DRG neurons showed impaired retrograde transport of dynein-driven nerve growth factor (NGF). Mitochondria, another dynein-driven cargo, demonstrated much slower retrograde transport velocity in Swl/+ neurons than in wild-type (WT) neurons. Nevertheless, the Swl, Loa, and Cra mutations did not affect homodimerization of DYNC1H1. The Swl/Swl mutation of Dync1h1 gene led to embryonic mal-development and lethality, whereas the Swl/+ DRG neurons demonstrated deficient retrograde transport in dynein-driven cargos and excessive apoptosis during mid- to late-developmental stages. The underlying mechanism of the mutation may not be due to impaired homodimerization of DYNC1H1. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Intracellular accumulation of amyloid-beta - a predictor for synaptic dysfunction and neuron loss in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Bayer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite of long-standing evidence that beta-amyloid (Aβ peptides have detrimental effects on synaptic function, the relationship between Aβ, synaptic and neuron loss is largely unclear. During the last years there is growing evidence that early intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ peptides is one of the key events leading to synaptic and neuronal dysfunction. Many studies have been carried out using transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD which have been proven to be valuable model system in modern AD research. The present review discusses the impact of intraneuronal Aβ accumulation on synaptic impairment and neuron loss and provides an overview of currently available AD mouse models showing these pathological alterations.

  15. Treatment with a GLP-1R agonist over four weeks promotes weight loss-moderated changes in frontal-striatal brain structures in individuals with mood disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansur, Rodrigo B; Zugman, Andre; Ahmed, Juhie

    2017-01-01

    /volumetric parameters in adults with a mood disorder. This is the secondary analysis of a 4-week, pilot, proof-of-concept, open-label study. Participants (N=19) exhibiting impairments in executive function with either major depressive disorder (MDD) or bipolar disorder (BD) were recruited. Liraglutide 1.8mg...... with changes in body mass index (BMI), indicating the weight loss was associated with volume increase in most regions (e.g. r=-0.561, p=0.042 in the left superior frontal area). After adjusting for intracranial volume, age, gender, and BMI, we observed significant changes from baseline to endpoint in multiple...

  16. Sustained striatal ciliary neurotrophic factor expression negatively affects behavior and gene expression in normal and R6/1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denovan-Wright, Eileen M; Attis, Marissa; Rodriguez-Lebron, Edgardo; Mandel, Ronald J

    2008-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an elongation of CAG repeats in the HD gene, which encodes a mutant copy of huntingtin with an expanded polyglutatmine repeat. Individuals who are affected by the disease suffer from motor, cognitive, and emotional impairments. Levels of certain striatal-enriched mRNAs decrease in both HD patients and transgenic HD mice prior to the development of motor symptoms and neuronal cell death. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been shown to protect neurons against chemically induced toxic insults in vitro and in vivo. To test the hypothesis that CNTF might protect neurons from the negative effects of the mutant huntingtin protein in vivo, CNTF was continuously expressed following transduction of the striatum by recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAV2). Wild-type and R6/1 HD transgenic (R6/1) mice that received bilateral or unilateral intrastriatal injections of rAAV2-CNTF experienced weight loss. The CNTF-treated R6/1 HD transgenic mice experienced motor impairments at an earlier age than expected compared with age-matched control R6/1 HD transgenic animals. CNTF also caused abnormal behavior in WT mice. In addition to behavioral impairments, in situ hybridization showed that, in both WT and R6/1 mice, CNTF expression caused a significant decrease in the levels of striatal-enriched transcripts. Overall, continuous expression of striatal CNTF at the dose mediated by the expression cassette used in this study was detrimental to HD and wild-type mice. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Spinal muscular atrophy: Selective motor neuron loss and global defect in the assembly of ribonucleoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Christine E; Kolb, Stephen J

    2018-02-17

    Spinal muscular atrophy is caused by deletions or mutations in the SMN1 gene that result in reduced expression of the SMN protein. The SMN protein is an essential molecular chaperone that is required for the biogenesis of multiple ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes including spliceosomal small nuclear RNPs (snRNPs). Reductions in SMN expression result in a reduced abundance of snRNPs and to downstream RNA splicing alterations. SMN is also present in axons and dendrites and appears to have important roles in the formation of neuronal mRNA-protein complexes during development or neuronal repair. Thus, SMA is an exemplar, selective motor neuron disorder that is caused by defects in fundamental RNA processing events. A detailed molecular understanding of how motor neurons fail, and why other neurons do not, in SMA will yield important principals about motor neuron maintenance and neuronal specificity in neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Frizzled3 controls axonal polarity and intermediate target entry during striatal pathway development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morello, Francesca; Prasad, Asheeta A.; Rehberg, Kati; Baptista Vieira de Sá, Renata; Antón-Bolaños, Noelia; Leyva-Diaz, Eduardo; Adolfs, Youri; Tissir, Fadel; López-Bendito, Guillermina; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    The striatum is a large brain nucleus with an important role in the control of movement and emotions.Mediumspiny neurons (MSNs) are striatal output neurons forming prominent descending axon tracts that target different brain nuclei. However, how MSN axon tracts in the forebrain develop remains

  19. Therapeutic strategies to address neuronal nitric oxide synthase deficiency and the loss of nitric oxide bioavailability in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpani, Cara A; Hayes, Alan; Rybalka, Emma

    2017-05-25

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is a rare and fatal neuromuscular disease in which the absence of dystrophin from the muscle membrane induces a secondary loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and the muscles capacity for endogenous nitric oxide synthesis. Since nitric oxide is a potent regulator of skeletal muscle metabolism, mass, function and regeneration, the loss of nitric oxide bioavailability is likely a key contributor to the chronic pathological wasting evident in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. As such, various therapeutic interventions to re-establish either the neuronal nitric oxide synthase protein deficit or the consequential loss of nitric oxide synthesis and bioavailability have been investigated in both animal models of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and in human clinical trials. Notably, the efficacy of these interventions are varied and not always translatable from animal model to human patients, highlighting a complex interplay of factors which determine the downstream modulatory effects of nitric oxide. We review these studies herein.

  20. Cortico-Striatal Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity After Activation of Subcortical Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Jan M.; Redgrave, Peter; Reynolds, John N. J.

    2010-01-01

    Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is modulated by dopamine in vitro. The present study investigated STDP in vivo using alternative procedures for modulating dopaminergic inputs. Postsynaptic potentials (PSP) were evoked in intracellularly recorded spiny neurons by electrical stimulation of the contralateral motor cortex. PSPs often consisted of up to three distinct components, likely representing distinct cortico-striatal pathways. After baseline recording, bicucullin...

  1. Opposite Effects of Stimulant and Antipsychotic Drugs on Striatal Fast-Spiking Interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Wiltschko, Alexander B; Pettibone, Jeffrey R; Berke, Joshua D

    2010-01-01

    Psychomotor stimulants and typical antipsychotic drugs have powerful but opposite effects on mood and behavior, largely through alterations in striatal dopamine signaling. Exactly how these drug actions lead to behavioral change is not well understood, as previous electrophysiological studies have found highly heterogeneous changes in striatal neuron firing. In this study, we examined whether part of this heterogeneity reflects the mixture of distinct cell types present in the striatum, by di...

  2. Differential effects of delayed aging on phenotype and striatal pathology in a murine model of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallaksen-Greene, Sara J; Sadagurski, Marianna; Zeng, Li; Mauch, Roseanne; Perkins, Matthew; Banduseela, Varuna C; Lieberman, Andrew P; Miller, Richard A; Paulson, Henry L; Albin, Roger L

    2014-11-19

    The common neurodegenerative syndromes exhibit age-related incidence, and many Mendelian neurodegenerative diseases exhibit age-related penetrance. Mutations slowing aging retard age related pathologies. To assess whether delayed aging retards the effects of a mutant allele causing a Huntington's disease (HD)-like syndrome, we generated compound mutant mice, placing a dominant HD knock-in polyglutamine allele onto the slow-aging Snell dwarf genotype. The Snell genotype did not affect mutant huntingtin protein expression. Bigenic and control mice were evaluated prospectively from 10 to 100 weeks of age. Adult HD knock-in allele mice lost weight progressively with weight loss blunted significantly in male bigenic HD knock-in/Snell dwarf mice. Impaired balance beam performance developed significantly more slowly in bigenic HD knock-in/Snell dwarf mice. Striatal dopamine receptor expression was diminished significantly and similarly in all HD-like mice, regardless of the Snell genotype. Striatal neuronal intranuclear inclusion burden was similar between HD knock-in mice with and without the Snell genotype, whereas nigral neuropil aggregates were diminished in bigenic HD knock-in/Snell dwarf mice. Compared with control mice, Snell dwarf mice exhibited differences in regional benzodiazepine and cannabinoid receptor binding site expression. These results indicate that delaying aging delayed behavioral decline with little effect on the development of striatal pathology in this model of HD but may have altered synaptic pathology. These results indicate that mutations prolonging lifespan in mice delay onset of significant phenotypic features of this model and also demonstrate dissociation between striatal pathology and a commonly used behavioral measure of disease burden in HD models. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3415658-11$15.00/0.

  3. New neurons in the adult brain : The role of sleep and consequences of sleep loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, Peter; Mistiberger, Ralph E.; Jacobs, Barry L.; Heller, H. Craig; McGinty, Dennis; Mistlberger, Ralph E.

    2009-01-01

    Research over the last few decades has firmly established that new neurons are generated in selected areas of the adult mammalian brain, particularly the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. The function of adult-born neurons is still a

  4. Functional Rescue of Dopaminergic Neuron Loss in Parkinson's Disease Mice After Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarche-Xifro, Wassim; di Vicino, Umberto; Muñoz-Martin, Maria Isabel; Bortolozzi, Analía; Bové, Jordi; Vila, Miquel; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder, which is due to the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and for which no definitive cure is currently available. Cellular functions in mouse and human tissues can be restored after fusion of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells with a variety of somatic cells. Here, after transplantation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in the SNpc of two different mouse models of Parkinson's disease, we significantly ameliorated the dopaminergic neuron loss and function. We show fusion of transplanted HSPCs with neurons and with glial cells in the ventral midbrain of Parkinson's disease mice. Interestingly, the hybrids can undergo reprogramming in vivo and survived up to 4weeks after transplantation, while acquiring features of mature astroglia. These newly generated astroglia produced Wnt1 and were essential for functional rescue of the dopaminergic neurons. Our data suggest that glial-derived hybrids produced upon fusion of transplanted HSPCs in the SNpc can rescue the Parkinson's disease phenotype via a niche-mediated effect, and can be exploited as an efficient cell-therapy approach. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. X-linked spinal muscular atrophy in mice caused by autonomous loss of ATP7A in the motor neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, Victoria L; Dale, Jeffery M; Garcia, Michael L; Weisman, Gary A; Lee, Jaekwon; Gitlin, Jonathan D; Petris, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    ATP7A is a copper-transporting P-type ATPase that is essential for cellular copper homeostasis. Loss-of-function mutations in the ATP7A gene result in Menkes disease, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder resulting in seizures, hypotonia and failure to thrive, due to systemic copper deficiency. Most recently, rare missense mutations in ATP7A that do not impact systemic copper homeostasis have been shown to cause X-linked spinal muscular atrophy type 3 (SMAX3), a distal hereditary motor neuropathy. An understanding of the mechanistic and pathophysiological basis of SMAX3 is currently lacking, in part because the disease-causing mutations have been shown to confer both loss- and gain-of-function properties to ATP7A, and because there is currently no animal model of the disease. In this study, the Atp7a gene was specifically deleted in the motor neurons of mice, resulting in a degenerative phenotype consistent with the clinical features in affected patients with SMAX3, including the progressive deterioration of gait, age-dependent muscle atrophy, denervation of neuromuscular junctions and a loss of motor neuron cell bodies. Taken together, these data reveal autonomous requirements for ATP7A that reveal essential roles for copper in the maintenance and function of the motor neuron, and suggest that SMAX3 is caused by a loss of ATP7A function that specifically impacts the spinal motor neuron. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. TDP-43 Loss-of-Function Causes Neuronal Loss Due to Defective Steroid Receptor-Mediated Gene Program Switching in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Vanden Broeck

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available TDP-43 proteinopathy is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and related neurodegenerative disorders. Whether TDP-43 neurotoxicity is caused by a novel toxic gain-of-function mechanism of the aggregates or by a loss of its normal function is unknown. We increased and decreased expression of TDP-43 (dTDP-43 in Drosophila. Although upregulation of dTDP-43 induced neuronal ubiquitin and dTDP-43-positive inclusions, both up- and downregulated dTDP-43 resulted in selective apoptosis of bursicon neurons and highly similar transcriptome alterations at the pupal-adult transition. Gene network analysis and genetic validation showed that both up- and downregulated dTDP-43 directly and dramatically increased the expression of the neuronal microtubule-associated protein Map205, resulting in cytoplasmic accumulations of the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR and a failure to switch EcR-dependent gene programs from a pupal to adult pattern. We propose that dTDP-43 neurotoxicity is caused by a loss of its normal function.

  7. Trehalose rescues glial cell dysfunction in striatal cultures from HD R6/1 mice at early postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucho, Juan; Gómez, Ana; Muñoz, María Paz; de Yébenes, Justo García; Mena, María Ángeles; Casarejos, María José

    2016-07-01

    The pathological hallmark of Huntington disease (HD) is the intracellular aggregation of mutant huntingtin (mHTT) in striatal neurons and glia associated with the selective loss of striatal medium-sized spiny neurons. Up to the present, the role of glia in HD is poorly understood and has been classically considered secondary to neuronal disorder. Trehalose is a disaccharide known to possess many pharmacological properties, acting as an antioxidant, a chemical chaperone, and an inducer of autophagy. In this study, we analyzed at an early postnatal development stage the abnormalities observed in striatal glial cell cultures of postnatal R6/1 mice (HD glia), under baseline and stressing conditions and the protective effects of trehalose. Our data demonstrate that glial HD alterations already occur at early stages of postnatal development. After 20 postnatal days in vitro, striatal HD glia cultures showed more reactive astrocytes with increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) but with less replication capacity, less A2B5(+) glial progenitors and more microglia than wild-type (WT) cultures. HD glia had lower levels of intracellular glutathione (GSH) and was more susceptible to H2O2 and epoxomicin insults. The amount of expressed GDNF and secreted mature-BDNF by HD astrocytes were much lower than by WT astrocytes. In addition, HD glial cultures showed a deregulation of the major proteolytic systems, the ubiquitin-proteasomal system (UPS), and the autophagic pathway. This produces a defective protein quality control, indicated by the elevated levels of ubiquitination and p62 protein. Interestingly, we show that trehalose, through its capacity to induce autophagy, inhibited p62/SQSTM1 accumulation and facilitated the degradation of cytoplasmic aggregates from mHTT and α-synuclein proteins. Trehalose also reduced microglia activation and reversed the disrupted cytoskeleton of astrocytes accompanied with an increase in the replication capacity. In

  8. Measurement of striatal dopamine metabolism with 6-[18F]-fluoro-L-dopa and PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwabara, Y.; Otsuka, M.; Ichiya, Y.; Yoshikai, T.; Fukumura, T.; Masuda, K.; Kato, M.; Taniwaki, T.

    1992-01-01

    Striatal dopamine metabolism was studied with 6-[ 18 F]-fluoro-L-dopa ( 18 F-DOPA) and PET. The subjects were normal controls, and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), parkinsonism, multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD) and other cerebral disorders. Cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRGlc) was also measured in these patients. Striatal dopamine metabolism was evaluated by the relative striatal uptake of 18 F-DOPA referring cerebellum (S/C ratio). In normal controls, the S/C ratio was 2.82 ± 0.32 (n = 6, mean ± SD) at 120 min after injection of 18 F-DOPA. The S/C ratio was low in patients with PD, parkinsonism, MSA and PSP compared to the normal controls and thus coincident with the symptoms of parkinsonism due to decrease in striatal dopamine concentration. The decrease in the striatal CMRGlc was also observed in patients with parkinsonism and PSP, and it was preserved in patients with PD, thus representing that more neurons were damaged in patients with parkinsonism and PSP than in patients with PD. A patient with AD having symptoms of parkinsonism also showed a decrease in S/C ratio. In a patient with HD, the striatal CMRGlc sharply decreased, but the S/C ratio was normal. The measurements of striatal dopamine and glucose metabolism with PET may be useful for studying the pathophysiological mechanism in patients with cerebral disorders. (author)

  9. Selective loss of bi-directional synaptic plasticity in the direct and indirect striatal output pathways accompanies generation of parkinsonism and l-DOPA induced dyskinesia in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Sherri L; Chen, Betty; Lo, Charlotte; Gertler, Tracey S; Warre, Ruth; Surmeier, James D; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Nash, Joanne E

    2014-11-01

    Parkinsonian symptoms arise due to over-activity of the indirect striatal output pathway, and under-activity of the direct striatal output pathway. l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) is caused when the opposite circuitry problems are established, with the indirect pathway becoming underactive, and the direct pathway becoming over-active. Here, we define synaptic plasticity abnormalities in these pathways associated with parkinsonism, symptomatic benefits of l-DOPA, and LID. We applied spike-timing dependent plasticity protocols to cortico-striatal synapses in slices from 6-OHDA-lesioned mouse models of parkinsonism and LID, generated in BAC transgenic mice with eGFP targeting the direct or indirect output pathways, with and without l-DOPA present. In naïve mice, bidirectional synaptic plasticity, i.e. LTP and LTD, was induced, resulting in an EPSP amplitude change of approximately 50% in each direction in both striatal output pathways, as shown previously. In parkinsonism and dyskinesia, both pathways exhibited unidirectional plasticity, irrespective of stimulation paradigm. In parkinsonian animals, the indirect pathway only exhibited LTP (LTP protocol: 143.5±14.6%; LTD protocol 177.7±22.3% of baseline), whereas the direct pathway only showed LTD (LTP protocol: 74.3±4.0% and LTD protocol: 63.3±8.7%). A symptomatic dose of l-DOPA restored bidirectional plasticity on both pathways to levels comparable to naïve animals (Indirect pathway: LTP protocol: 124.4±22.0% and LTD protocol: 52.1±18.5% of baseline. Direct pathway: LTP protocol: 140.7±7.3% and LTD protocol: 58.4±6.0% of baseline). In dyskinesia, in the presence of l-DOPA, the indirect pathway exhibited only LTD (LTP protocol: 68.9±21.3% and LTD protocol 52.0±14.2% of baseline), whereas in the direct pathway, only LTP could be induced (LTP protocol: 156.6±13.2% and LTD protocol 166.7±15.8% of baseline). We conclude that normal motor control requires bidirectional plasticity of both striatal outputs

  10. Pathological changes in hippocampal neuronal circuits underlie age-associated neurodegeneration and memory loss: positive clue toward SAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthi, P; Premkumar, P; Priyanka, R; Jayachandran, K S; Anusuyadevi, M

    2015-08-20

    Among vertebrates hippocampus forms the major component of the brain in consolidating information from short-term memory to long-term memory. Aging is considered as the major risk factor for memory impairment in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (SAD) like pathology. Present study thus aims at investigating whether age-specific degeneration of neuronal-circuits in hippocampal formation (neural-layout of Subiculum-hippocampus proper-dentate gyrus (DG)-entorhinal cortex (EC)) results in cognitive impairment. Furthermore, the neuroprotective effect of Resveratrol (RSV) was attempted to study in the formation of hippocampal neuronal-circuits. Radial-Arm-Maze was conducted to evaluate hippocampal-dependent spatial and learning memory in control and experimental rats. Nissl staining of frontal cortex (FC), subiculum, hippocampal-proper (CA1→CA2→CA3→CA4), DG, amygdala, cerebellum, thalamus, hypothalamus, layers of temporal and parietal lobe of the neocortex were examined for pathological changes in young and aged wistar rats, with and without RSV. Hippocampal trisynaptic circuit (EC layerII→DG→CA3→CA1) forming new memory and monosynaptic circuit (EC→CA1) that strengthen old memories were found disturbed in aged rats. Loss of Granular neuron observed in DG and polymorphic cells of CA4 can lead to decreased mossy fibers disturbing neural-transmission (CA4→CA3) in perforant pathway. Further, intensity of nissl granules (stratum lacunosum moleculare (SLM)-SR-SO) of CA3 pyramidal neurons was decreased, disturbing the communication in schaffer collaterals (CA3-CA1) during aging. We also noticed disarranged neuronal cell layer in Subiculum (presubiculum (PrS)-parasubiculum (PaS)), interfering output from hippocampus to prefrontal cortex (PFC), EC, hypothalamus, and amygdala that may result in interruption of thought processes. We conclude from our observations that poor memory performance of aged rats as evidenced through radial arm maze (RAM) analysis was due to the

  11. Brainstem neurons survive the identical ischemic stress that kills higher neurons: insight to the persistent vegetative state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Devin Brisson

    Full Text Available Global ischemia caused by heart attack, pulmonary failure, near-drowning or traumatic brain injury often damages the higher brain but not the brainstem, leading to a 'persistent vegetative state' where the patient is awake but not aware. Approximately 30,000 U.S. patients are held captive in this condition but not a single research study has addressed how the lower brain is preferentially protected in these people. In the higher brain, ischemia elicits a profound anoxic depolarization (AD causing neuronal dysfunction and vasoconstriction within minutes. Might brainstem nuclei generate less damaging AD and so be more resilient? Here we compared resistance to acute injury induced from simulated ischemia by 'higher' hippocampal and striatal neurons versus brainstem neurons in live slices from rat and mouse. Light transmittance (LT imaging in response to 10 minutes of oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD revealed immediate and acutely damaging AD propagating through gray matter of neocortex, hippocampus, striatum, thalamus and cerebellar cortex. In adjacent brainstem nuclei, OGD-evoked AD caused little tissue injury. Whole-cell patch recordings from hippocampal and striatal neurons under OGD revealed sudden membrane potential loss that did not recover. In contrast brainstem neurons from locus ceruleus and mesencephalic nucleus as well as from sensory and motor nuclei only slowly depolarized and then repolarized post-OGD. Two-photon microscopy confirmed non-recoverable swelling and dendritic beading of hippocampal neurons during OGD, while mesencephalic neurons in midbrain appeared uninjured. All of the above responses were mimicked by bath exposure to 100 µM ouabain which inhibits the Na+/K+ pump or to 1-10 nM palytoxin which converts the pump into an open cationic channel. Therefore during ischemia the Na+/K+ pump of higher neurons fails quickly and extensively compared to naturally resilient hypothalamic and brainstem neurons. The selective survival

  12. Developmental alterations in motor coordination and medium spiny neuron markers in mice lacking pgc-1α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth K Lucas

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence implicates the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α in the pathophysiology of Huntington Disease (HD. Adult PGC-1α (-/- mice exhibit striatal neurodegeneration, and reductions in the expression of PGC-1α have been observed in striatum and muscle of HD patients as well as in animal models of the disease. However, it is unknown whether decreased expression of PGC-1α alone is sufficient to lead to the motor phenotype and striatal pathology characteristic of HD. For the first time, we show that young PGC-1α (-/- mice exhibit severe rotarod deficits, decreased rearing behavior, and increased occurrence of tremor in addition to the previously described hindlimb clasping. Motor impairment and striatal vacuolation are apparent in PGC-1α (-/- mice by four weeks of age and do not improve or decline by twelve weeks of age. The behavioral and pathological phenotype of PGC-1α (-/- mice can be completely recapitulated by conditional nervous system deletion of PGC-1α, indicating that peripheral effects are not responsible for the observed abnormalities. Evaluation of the transcriptional profile of PGC-1α (-/- striatal neuron populations and comparison to striatal neuron profiles of R6/2 HD mice revealed that PGC-1α deficiency alone is not sufficient to cause the transcriptional changes observed in this HD mouse model. In contrast to R6/2 HD mice, PGC-1α (-/- mice show increases in the expression of medium spiny neuron (MSN markers with age, suggesting that the observed behavioral and structural abnormalities are not primarily due to MSN loss, the defining pathological feature of HD. These results indicate that PGC-1α is required for the proper development of motor circuitry and transcriptional homeostasis in MSNs and that developmental disruption of PGC-1α leads to long-term alterations in motor functioning.

  13. No loss of hippocampal hilar somatostatinergic neurons after repeated electroconvulsive shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalby, Nils Ole; Tønder, N; Wolby, D P

    1996-01-01

    Electrically induced seizures with anesthesia and muscle relaxation (ECT) is commonly used in the therapy of psychotic depression in humans. Unmodified electroshock (ECS) is used as a model for epilepsy in the rat. In several seizure models of epilepsy, in particular the dentate hilar somatostatin...... was estimated using the optical disector technique. The mean number of hilar SSergic neurons in the ECS-treated rats was 12,785, compared to 12,392 in the control rats. The total number of hilar SSergic neurons in ECS-treated versus control rats was not significantly different (Student's t test; t value = .35...

  14. Neuronal loss, demyelination and volume change in the multiple sclerosis neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carassiti, D; Altmann, D R; Petrova, N

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Indices of brain volume [grey matter, white matter (WM), lesions] are being used as outcomes in clinical trials of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the relationship between cortical volume, the number of neocortical neurons estimated using stereology and demyelination....... Grey and WM demyelination was outlined on myelin basic protein immunostained sections, and expressed as percentages of cortex and WM respectively. RESULTS: In MS, the mean number of neurons was 14.9 ± 1.9 billion vs. 24.4 ± 2.4 billion in controls (P

  15. Acupuncture ameliorates cognitive impairment and hippocampus neuronal loss in experimental vascular dementia through Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Rui; Shi, Guang-Xia; Yang, Jing-Wen; Yan, Chao-Qun; Lin, Li-Ting; Du, Si-Qi; Zhu, Wen; He, Tian; Zeng, Xiang-Hong; Xu, Qian; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Emerging evidence suggests acupuncture could exert neuroprotection in the vascular dementia via anti-oxidative effects. However, the involvement of Nrf2, a master regulator of antioxidant defense, in acupuncture-induced neuroprotection in vascular dementia remains undetermined. The goal of our study was to investigate the contribution of Nrf2 in acupuncture and its effects on vascular dementia. Morris water maze and Nissl staining were used to assess the effect of acupuncture on cognitive function and hippocampal neurodegeneration in experimental vascular dementia. The distribution of Nrf2 in neurons in hippocampus, the protein expression of Nrf2 in both cytosol and nucleus, and the protein and mRNA levels of its downstream target genes NQO1 and HO-1 were detected by double immunofluorescent staining, Western blotting and realtime PCR analysis respectively. Cognitive function and microglia activation were measured in both wild-type and Nrf2 gene knockout mice after acupuncture treatment. We found that acupuncture could remarkably reverse the cognitive deficits, neuron cell loss, reactive oxygen species production, and decreased cerebral blood flow. It was notable that acupuncture enhanced nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in neurons and up-regulate the protein and mRNA levels of Nrf2 and its target genes HO-1 and NQO1. Moreover, acupuncture could significantly down-regulated the over-activation of microglia after common carotid artery occlusion surgery. However, the reversed cognitive deficits, neuron cell loss and microglia activation by acupuncture were abolished in Nrf2 gene knockout mice. In conclusion, these findings provide evidence that the neuroprotection of acupuncture in models of vascular dementia was via the Nrf2 activation and Nrf2-dependent microglia activation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Histological studies of neuroprotective effects of Curcuma longa Linn. on neuronal loss induced by dexamethasone treatment in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issuriya, Acharaporn; Kumarnsit, Ekkasit; Wattanapiromsakul, Chatchai; Vongvatcharanon, Uraporn

    2014-10-01

    Long term exposure to dexamethasone (Dx) is associated with brain damage especially in the hippocampus via the oxidative stress pathway. Previously, an ethanolic extract from Curcuma longa Linn. (CL) containing the curcumin constituent has been reported to produce antioxidant effects. However, its neuroprotective property on brain histology has remained unexplored. This study has examined the effects of a CL extract on the densities of cresyl violet positive neurons and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactive (GFAP-ir) astrocytes in the hippocampus of Dx treated male rats. It showed that 21 days of Dx treatment (0.5mg/kg, i.p. once daily) significantly reduced the densities of cresyl violet positive neurons in the sub-areas CA1, CA3 and the dentate gyrus, but not in the CA2 area. However, CL pretreatment (100mg/kg, p.o.) was found to significantly restore neuronal densities in the CA1 and dentate gyrus. In addition, Dx treatment also significantly decreased the densities of the GFAP-ir astrocytes in the sub-areas CA1, CA3 and the dentate gyrus. However, CL pretreatment (100mg/kg, p.o.) failed to protect the loss of astrocytes in these sub-areas. These findings confirm the neuroprotective effects of the CL extract and indicate that the cause of astrocyte loss might be partially reduced by a non-oxidative mechanism. Moreover, the detection of neuronal and glial densities was suitable method to study brain damage and the effects of treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Altered biometal homeostasis is associated with CLN6 mRNA loss in mouse neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja M. Kanninen

    2013-05-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, the most common fatal childhood neurodegenerative illnesses, share many features with more prevalent neurodegenerative diseases. Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses are caused by mutations in CLN genes. CLN6 encodes a transmembrane endoplasmic reticulum protein with no known function. We characterized the behavioural phenotype of spontaneous mutant mice modeling CLN6 disease, and demonstrate progressive motor and visual decline and reduced lifespan in these mice, consistent with symptoms observed in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis patients. Alterations to biometal homeostasis are known to play a critical role in pathology in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and motor neuron diseases. We have previously shown accumulation of the biometals, zinc, copper, manganese and cobalt, in CLN6 Merino and South Hampshire sheep at the age of symptom onset. Here we determine the physiological and disease-associated expression of CLN6, demonstrating regional CLN6 transcript loss, and concurrent accumulation of the same biometals in the CNS and the heart of presymptomatic CLN6 mice. Furthermore, increased expression of the ER/Golgi-localized cation transporter protein, Zip7, was detected in cerebellar Purkinje cells and whole brain fractions. Purkinje cells not only control motor function, an early symptomatic change in the CLN6 mice, but also display prominent neuropathological changes in mouse models and patients with different forms of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. Whole brain fractionation analysis revealed biometal accumulation in fractions expressing markers for ER, Golgi, endosomes and lysosomes of CLN6 brains. These data are consistent with a link between CLN6 expression and biometal homeostasis in CLN6 disease, and provide further support for altered cation transporter regulation as a key factor in neurodegeneration.

  18. Forebrain mineralocorticoid receptor overexpression enhances memory, reduces anxiety and attenuates neuronal loss in cerebral ischaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, Maggie; Horsburgh, Karen; Bae, Sung-Eun; Carter, Roderick N.; Stenvers, Dirk J.; Fowler, Jill H.; Yau, Joyce L.; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.; Holmes, Megan C.; Kenyon, Christopher J.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Macleod, Malcolm R.

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a high-affinity receptor for glucocorticoids, is highly expressed in the hippocampus where it underpins cognitive, behavioural and neuroendocrine regulation. Increased neuronal MR expression occurs early in the response to cellular injury in vivo and in

  19. Age-related hearing loss: prevention of threshold declines, cell loss and apoptosis in spiral ganglion neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Frisina, Robert D.; Ding, Bo; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Walton, Joseph P.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) -presbycusis - is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease and number one communication disorder of our aged population; and affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Its prevalence is close to that of cardiovascular disease and arthritis, and can be a precursor to dementia. The auditory perceptual dysfunction is well understood, but knowledge of the biological bases of ARHL is still somewhat lacking. Surprisingly, there are no FDA-approved drugs fo...

  20. Age-related neuronal loss in the rat brain starts at the end of adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Priscilla eMorterá; Priscilla eMorterá; Suzana eHerculano-Houzel; Suzana eHerculano-Houzel

    2012-01-01

    Aging-related changes in the brain have been mostly studied through the comparison of young adult and very old animals. However, aging must be considered a lifelong process of cumulative changes that ultimately become evident at old age. To determine when this process of decline begins, we studied how the cellular composition of the rat brain changes from infancy to adolescence, early adulthood, and old age. Using the isotropic fractionator to determine total numbers of neuronal and non-neuro...

  1. Hyperthermia aggravates status epilepticus-induced epileptogenesis and neuronal loss in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suchomelová, L.; Lopes-Meraz, M. L.; Niquet, J.; Kubová, Hana; Wasterlain, C. G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 305, Oct 1 (2015), s. 209-224 ISSN 0306-4522 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0971; GA MŠk(CZ) ME08045; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : neuronal injury * temperature * immature brain * lithium /pilocarpine model * EEG monitoring Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.231, year: 2015

  2. Hippocampal neuronal loss, decreased GFAP immunoreactivity and cognitive impairment following experimental intoxication of rats with aluminum citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ademir F Junior; Aguiar, Maria Socorro S; Carvalho, Odemir S Junior; Santana, Luana de Nazaré S; Franco, Edna C S; Lima, Rafael Rodrigues; Siqueira, Natalino Valente M de; Feio, Romulo Augusto; Faro, Lilian Rosana F; Gomes-Leal, Walace

    2013-01-23

    Aluminum (Al) is a neurotoxic agent with deleterious actions on cognitive processes. Nevertheless, few studies have investigated the neuropathological effects underlying the Al-induced cognitive impairment. We have explored the effects of acute Al citrate intoxication on both hippocampal morphology and mnemonic processes in rodents. Adult male Wistar rats were intoxicated with a daily dose of Al citrate (320 mg/kg) during 4 days by gavage. Animals were perfused at 8 (G2), 17 (G3) and 31 days (G4) after intoxication. Control animals were treated with sodium citrate (G1). Animals were submitted to behavioral tests of open field and elevated T-maze. Immunohistochemistry was performed to label neurons (anti-NeuN) and astrocytes (anti-GFAP) in both CA1 and CA3 hippocampal regions. There was an increase in the locomotor activity in open field test for G2 in comparison to control group and other groups (ANOVA-Bonferroni, P<0.05). The elevated T-maze avoidance latency (AL) was higher in all intoxicated groups compared to control (P<0.05) in avoidance 1. These values remained elevated in avoidance 2 (P<0.05), but abruptly decreased in G2 and G3, but not in G1 and G4 animals in avoidance 3 (P<0.05). There were no significant differences for 1 and 2 escape latencies. There were intense neuronal loss and a progressive decrease in GFAP immunoreactivity in the hippocampus of intoxicated animals. The results suggest that Al citrate treatment induces deficits on learning and memory concomitant with neuronal loss and astrocyte impairment in the hippocampus of intoxicated rats. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. De Novo Mutations in PDE10A Cause Childhood-Onset Chorea with Bilateral Striatal Lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mencacci, N.E.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Nakashima, K.; R'Bibo, L.; Lynch, D.S.; Balint, B.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Adams, M.E.; Wiethoff, S.; Suzuki, K.; Davies, C.H.; Ng, J.; Meyer, E.; Veneziano, L.; Giunti, P.; Hughes, D.; Raymond, F.L.; Carecchio, M.; Zorzi, G.; Nardocci, N.; Barzaghi, C.; Garavaglia, B.; Salpietro, V.; Hardy, J.; Pittman, A.M.; Houlden, H.; Kurian, M.A.; Kimura, H.; Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Wood, N.W.; Bhatia, K.P.

    2016-01-01

    Chorea is a hyperkinetic movement disorder resulting from dysfunction of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs), which form the main output projections from the basal ganglia. Here, we used whole-exome sequencing to unravel the underlying genetic cause in three unrelated individuals with a very

  4. Age-related hearing loss: prevention of threshold declines, cell loss and apoptosis in spiral ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisina, Robert D; Ding, Bo; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Walton, Joseph P

    2016-09-23

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) -presbycusis - is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease and number one communication disorder of our aged population; and affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Its prevalence is close to that of cardiovascular disease and arthritis, and can be a precursor to dementia. The auditory perceptual dysfunction is well understood, but knowledge of the biological bases of ARHL is still somewhat lacking. Surprisingly, there are no FDA-approved drugs for treatment. Based on our previous studies of human subjects, where we discovered relations between serum aldosterone levels and the severity of ARHL, we treated middle age mice with aldosterone, which normally declines with age in all mammals. We found that hearing thresholds and suprathreshold responses significantly improved in the aldosterone-treated mice compared to the non-treatment group. In terms of cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this therapeutic effect, additional experiments revealed that spiral ganglion cell survival was significantly improved, mineralocorticoid receptors were upregulated via post-translational protein modifications, and age-related intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were blocked by the aldosterone therapy. Taken together, these novel findings pave the way for translational drug development towards the first medication to prevent the progression of ARHL.

  5. Age-related hearing loss: prevention of threshold declines, cell loss and apoptosis in spiral ganglion neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoxia; Walton, Joseph P.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) -presbycusis - is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease and number one communication disorder of our aged population; and affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Its prevalence is close to that of cardiovascular disease and arthritis, and can be a precursor to dementia. The auditory perceptual dysfunction is well understood, but knowledge of the biological bases of ARHL is still somewhat lacking. Surprisingly, there are no FDA-approved drugs for treatment. Based on our previous studies of human subjects, where we discovered relations between serum aldosterone levels and the severity of ARHL, we treated middle age mice with aldosterone, which normally declines with age in all mammals. We found that hearing thresholds and suprathreshold responses significantly improved in the aldosterone-treated mice compared to the non-treatment group. In terms of cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this therapeutic effect, additional experiments revealed that spiral ganglion cell survival was significantly improved, mineralocorticoid receptors were upregulated via post-translational protein modifications, and age-related intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were blocked by the aldosterone therapy. Taken together, these novel findings pave the way for translational drug development towards the first medication to prevent the progression of ARHL. PMID:27667674

  6. Serial imaging of bilateral striatal necrosis associated with acidaemia in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamei, S.; Takasu, T.; Mori, N.; Yoshihashi, K.; Shikata, E.

    1996-01-01

    Bilateral striatal necrosis in acute encephalopathy has been reported in a small number of adults with methanol or cyanide intoxication, hypoxic encephalopathy or haemolytic-uraemic syndrome. Acute encephalopathy with bilateral striatal necrosis has been reported in infants and children. However, the pathogenesis of the necrosis remains unclear. This is the first report of serial imaging from the very early yo chronic stage in two acute encephalopathic adults with bilateral striatal necrosis. A clinicoradiological study is presented for clarification of the pathological process and pathogenesis. Striatal lesions were not detected in the very early stages, but only thereafter. Serial studies suggested that the lesions were caused by delayed neuronal death. These patients had severe lactic acidosis, near the limit for survival. There hav ebeen few reports of adults with acute encephalopathy and bilateral striatal necrosis in whom arterial pH was described; all these exhibited marked acidosis. The common pathophysiological condition among these encephalopathies with bilateral striatal necrosis could be lactic acidosis elicited by impairnment of ATP generation through the Krebs cycle. The striatum might represent one of the target areas of Krebs-cycle blockade. (orig.)

  7. No neuronal loss, but alterations of the GDNF system in asymptomatic diverticulosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrenschee, Martina; Wedel, Thilo; Lange, Christina; Hohmeier, Ines; Cossais, François; Ebsen, Michael; Vogel, Ilka; Böttner, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor known to promote the survival and maintenance of neurons not only in the developing but also in the adult enteric nervous system. As diverticular disease (DD) is associated with reduced myenteric neurons, alterations of the GDNF system were studied in asymptomatic diverticulosis (diverticulosis) and DD. Morphometric analysis for quantifying myenteric ganglia and neurons were assessed in colonic full-thickness sections of patients with diverticulosis and controls. Samples of tunica muscularis (TM) and laser-microdissected myenteric ganglia from patients with diverticulosis, DD and controls were analyzed for mRNA expression levels of GDNF, GFRA1, and RET by RT-qPCR. Myenteric protein expression of both receptors was quantified by fluorescence-immunohistochemistry of patients with diverticulosis, DD, and controls. Although no myenteric morphometric alterations were found in patients with diverticulosis, GDNF, GFRA1 and RET mRNA expression was down-regulated in the TM of patients with diverticulosis as well as DD. Furthermore GFRA1 and RET myenteric plexus mRNA expression of patients with diverticulosis and DD was down-regulated, whereas GDNF remained unaltered. Myenteric immunoreactivity of the receptors GFRα1 and RET was decreased in both asymptomatic diverticulosis and DD patients. Our data provide evidence for an impaired GDNF system at gene and protein level not only in DD but also during early stages of diverticula formation. Thus, the results strengthen the idea of a disturbed GDNF-responsiveness as contributive factor for a primary enteric neuropathy involved in the pathogenesis and disturbed intestinal motility observed in DD.

  8. Malfunctioning DNA damage response (DDR) leads to the degeneration of nigro-striatal pathway in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Michal; Galron, Ronit; Frenkel, Dan; Mandelbaum, Gil; Shiloh, Yosef; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Barzilai, Ari

    2012-03-01

    Pronounced neuropathology is a feature of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) and Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), which are both genomic instability syndromes. The Nbs1 protein, which is defective in NBS, is a component of the Mre11/RAD50/NBS1 (MRN) complex. This complex plays a major role in the early phase of the cellular response to double strand breaks (DSBs) in the DNA. Among others, MRN is required for timely activation of the protein kinase ATM (A-T mutated), which is disrupted in patients with A-T. Earlier reports show that Atm-deficient mice exhibit severe degeneration of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive dopaminergic nigro-striatal neurons and their terminals in the striatum. This cell loss is accompanied by a large reduction in immunoreactivity for the dopamine transporter protein (DAT) in the striatum. To test whether Nbs1 inactivation also affects the integrity of the nigro-striatal pathway, we examined this pathway in a murine model with conditional inactivation of the Nbs1 gene in central nervous system (Nbs1-CNS-Δ). We report that this model has a reduction in TH-positive cells in the substantia nigra. This phenomenon was seen at very early age, while Atm-/- mice showed a progressive age-dependent reduction. Furthermore, we observed an age-dependent increase in the level of TH in the striatum of Atm-/- and Nbs1-CNS-Δ mice. In addition to the altered expression of TH, we also found a reduction of DAT in the striatum of both Atm-/- and Nbs1-CNS-Δ mice at 60 days of age. Finally, microglial recruitment and alterations in the levels of various neurotrophic factors were also observed. These results indicate that malfunctioning DNA damage response severely affects the integrity of the nigro-striatal pathway and suggest a new neurodegenerative pathway in Parkinsonian syndromes.

  9. Decreased neuron loss and memory dysfunction in pilocarpine-treated rats pre-exposed to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Val-da Silva, Raquel Araujo; Peixoto-Santos, José Eduardo; Scandiuzzi, Renata Caldo; Balista, Priscila Alves; Bassi, Mirian; Glass, Mogens Lesner; Romcy-Pereira, Rodrigo Neves; Galvis-Alonso, Orfa Yineth; Leite, João Pereira

    2016-09-22

    Preconditioning can induce a cascade of cellular events leading to neuroprotection against subsequent brain insults. In this study, we investigated the chronic effects of hypoxic preconditioning on spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS), neuronal death, and spatial memory performance in rats subjected to pilocarpine (Pilo)-induced status epilepticus (SE). Rats underwent a short hypoxic episode (7% O2+93% N2; 30min on two consecutive days) preceding a 4-h SE (HSE group). Control groups were rats submitted to SE only (SE), rats subjected to hypoxia only (H) or normoxia-saline (C). Animals were monitored for the occurrence of SRS, and spatial memory performance was evaluated in the radial-arm maze. Hippocampal sections were analyzed for cell death and mossy fiber sprouting at 1 or 60days after SE. Compared to SE group, HSE had increased SE latency, reduced number of rats with SRS, reduced mossy fiber sprouting at 60days, and reduced cell death in the hilus and the CA3 region 1 and 60days after SE. Additionally, HSE rats had better spatial memory performance than SE rats. Our findings indicated that short hypoxic preconditioning preceding SE promotes long-lasting protective effects on neuron survival and spatial memory. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Striatal disorders dissociate mechanisms of enhanced and impaired response selection — Evidence from cognitive neurophysiology and computational modelling

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    Christian Beste

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paradoxically enhanced cognitive processes in neurological disorders provide vital clues to understanding neural function. However, what determines whether the neurological damage is impairing or enhancing is unclear. Here we use the performance of patients with two disorders of the striatum to dissociate mechanisms underlying cognitive enhancement and impairment resulting from damage to the same system. In a two-choice decision task, Huntington's disease patients were faster and less error prone than controls, yet a patient with the rare condition of benign hereditary chorea (BHC was both slower and more error prone. EEG recordings confirmed significant differences in neural processing between the groups. Analysis of a computational model revealed that the common loss of connectivity between striatal neurons in BHC and Huntington's disease impairs response selection, but the increased sensitivity of NMDA receptors in Huntington's disease potentially enhances response selection. Crucially the model shows that there is a critical threshold for increased sensitivity: below that threshold, impaired response selection results. Our data and model thus predict that specific striatal malfunctions can contribute to either impaired or enhanced selection, and provide clues to solving the paradox of how Huntington's disease can lead to both impaired and enhanced cognitive processes.

  11. Association Between Peripheral Inflammation and DATSCAN Data of the Striatal Nuclei in Different Motor Subtypes of Parkinson Disease

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    Hossein Sanjari Moghaddam

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The interplay between peripheral and central inflammation has a significant role in dopaminergic neural death in nigrostriatal pathway, although no direct assessment of inflammation has been performed in relation to dopaminergic neuronal loss in striatal nuclei. In this study, the correlation of neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR as a marker of peripheral inflammation to striatal binding ratios (SBRs of DAT SPECT images in bilateral caudate and putamen nuclei was calculated in 388 drug-naïve early PD patients [288 tremor dominant (TD, 73 postural instability and gait difficulty (PIGD, and 27 indeterminate] and 148 controls. NLR was significantly higher in PD patients than in age- and sex-matched healthy controls, and showed a negative correlation to SBR in bilateral putamen and ipsilateral caudate in all PD subjects. Among our three subgroups, only TD patients showed remarkable results. A positive association between NLR and motor severity was observed in TD subgroup. Besides, NLR could negatively predict the SBR in ipsilateral and contralateral putamen and caudate nuclei in tremulous phenotype. Nonetheless, we found no significant association between NLR and other clinical and imaging findings in PIGD and indeterminate subgroups, supporting the presence of distinct underlying pathologic mechanisms between tremor and non-tremor predominant PD at early stages of the disease.

  12. Transient and steady-state selection in the striatal microcircuit

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    Adam eTomkins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the basal ganglia have been widely studied and implicated in signal processing and action selection, little information is known about the active role the striatal microcircuit plays in action selection in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loops. To address this knowledge gap we use a large scale three dimensional spiking model of the striatum, combined with a rate coded model of the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loop, to asses the computational role the striatum plays in action selection. We identify a robust transient phenomena generated by the striatal microcircuit, which temporarily enhances the difference between two competing cortical inputs. We show that this transient is sufficient to modulate decision making in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuit. We also find that the transient selection originates from a novel adaptation effect in single striatal projection neurons, which is amenable to experimental testing. Finally, we compared transient selection with models implementing classical steady-state selection. We challenged both forms of model to account for recent reports of paradoxically enhanced response selection in Huntington's Disease patients. We found that steady-state selection was uniformly impaired under all simulated Huntington's conditions, but transient selection was enhanced given a sufficient Huntington's-like increase in NMDA receptor sensitivity. Thus our models provide an intriguing hypothesis for the mechanisms underlying the paradoxical cognitive improvements in manifest Huntington's patients.

  13. Activation of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway: A potential response to long-term neuronal loss in the hippocampus after sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-nan Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of sepsis may suffer chronic cognitive impairment as a long-term sequela. However, the precise mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction after sepsis are not well understood. We employed the cecal ligation-and-puncture-induced septic mouse model. We observed elevated phosphorylation of Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and p70S6K on days 14 and 60, progressive neuronal loss in the cornu ammonis 1 region, and abnormal neuronal morphology in the hippocampus in the sepsis mouse model. These findings indicate that changes in neuronal morphology and number in the hippocampus after sepsis were associated with strong activation of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, and may reflect a “self-rescuing” feedback response to neuronal loss after sepsis.

  14. No dramatic age-related loss of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons in Bcl-2 over-expression mice or Bax null mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohlemiller Kevin K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Age-related decline of neuronal function is associated with age-related structural changes. In the central nervous system, age-related decline of cognitive performance is thought to be caused by synaptic loss instead of neuronal loss. However, in the cochlea, age-related loss of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs is consistently observed in a variety of species, including humans. Since age-related loss of these cells is a major contributing factor to presbycusis, it is important to study possible molecular mechanisms underlying this age-related cell death. Previous studies suggested that apoptotic pathways were involved in age-related loss of hair cells and SGNs. In the present study, we examined the role of Bcl-2 gene in age-related hearing loss. In one transgenic mouse line over-expressing human Bcl-2, there were no significant differences between transgenic mice and wild type littermate controls in their hearing thresholds during aging. Histological analysis of the hair cells and SGNs showed no significant conservation of these cells in transgenic animals compared to the wild type controls during aging. These data suggest that Bcl-2 overexpression has no significant effect on age-related loss of hair cells and SGNs. We also found no delay of age-related hearing loss in mice lacking Bax gene. These findings suggest that age-related hearing loss is not through an apoptotic pathway involving key members of Bcl-2 family.

  15. Rosiglitazone attenuates inflammation and CA3 neuronal loss following traumatic brain injury in rats

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    Liu, Hao; Rose, Marie E. [Geriatric Research Educational and Clinical Center, V.A. Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA (United States); Department of Neurology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (United States); Culver, Sherman; Ma, Xiecheng; Dixon, C. Edward [Geriatric Research Educational and Clinical Center, V.A. Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15216 (United States); Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15216 (United States); Graham, Steven H., E-mail: Steven.Graham@va.gov [Geriatric Research Educational and Clinical Center, V.A. Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA (United States); Department of Neurology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Rosiglitazone, a potent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonist, has been shown to confer neuroprotective effects in stroke and spinal cord injury, but its role in the traumatic brain injury (TBI) is still controversial. Using a controlled cortical impact model in rats, the current study was designed to determine the effects of rosiglitazone treatment (6 mg/kg at 5 min, 6 h and 24 h post injury) upon inflammation and histological outcome at 21 d after TBI. In addition, the effects of rosiglitazone upon inflammatory cytokine transcription, vestibulomotor behavior and spatial memory function were determined at earlier time points (24 h, 1–5 d, 14–20 d post injury, respectively). Compared with the vehicle-treated group, rosiglitazone treatment suppressed production of TNFα at 24 h after TBI, attenuated activation of microglia/macrophages and increased survival of CA3 neurons but had no effect on lesion volume at 21 d after TBI. Rosiglitazone-treated animals had improved performance on beam balance testing, but there was no difference in spatial memory function as determined by Morris water maze. In summary, this study indicates that rosiglitazone treatment in the first 24 h after TBI has limited anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in rat traumatic injury. Further study using an alternative dosage paradigm and more sensitive behavioral testing may be warranted. - Highlights: • Effects of rosiglitazone after CCI were evaluated using a rat TBI model. • Rosiglitazone suppressed production of TNFα at 24 h after CCI. • Rosiglitazone inhibited microglial activation at 21 d after CCI. • Rosiglitazone increased survival of CA3 neurons at 21 d after CCI. • Rosiglitazone-treated animals had improved performance in beam balance testing.

  16. Rosiglitazone attenuates inflammation and CA3 neuronal loss following traumatic brain injury in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hao; Rose, Marie E.; Culver, Sherman; Ma, Xiecheng; Dixon, C. Edward; Graham, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    Rosiglitazone, a potent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonist, has been shown to confer neuroprotective effects in stroke and spinal cord injury, but its role in the traumatic brain injury (TBI) is still controversial. Using a controlled cortical impact model in rats, the current study was designed to determine the effects of rosiglitazone treatment (6 mg/kg at 5 min, 6 h and 24 h post injury) upon inflammation and histological outcome at 21 d after TBI. In addition, the effects of rosiglitazone upon inflammatory cytokine transcription, vestibulomotor behavior and spatial memory function were determined at earlier time points (24 h, 1–5 d, 14–20 d post injury, respectively). Compared with the vehicle-treated group, rosiglitazone treatment suppressed production of TNFα at 24 h after TBI, attenuated activation of microglia/macrophages and increased survival of CA3 neurons but had no effect on lesion volume at 21 d after TBI. Rosiglitazone-treated animals had improved performance on beam balance testing, but there was no difference in spatial memory function as determined by Morris water maze. In summary, this study indicates that rosiglitazone treatment in the first 24 h after TBI has limited anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in rat traumatic injury. Further study using an alternative dosage paradigm and more sensitive behavioral testing may be warranted. - Highlights: • Effects of rosiglitazone after CCI were evaluated using a rat TBI model. • Rosiglitazone suppressed production of TNFα at 24 h after CCI. • Rosiglitazone inhibited microglial activation at 21 d after CCI. • Rosiglitazone increased survival of CA3 neurons at 21 d after CCI. • Rosiglitazone-treated animals had improved performance in beam balance testing.

  17. Motor tics evoked by striatal disinhibition in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfeld, Maya; Yael, Dorin; Belelovsky, Katya; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2013-01-01

    Motor tics are sudden, brief, repetitive movements that constitute the main symptom of Tourette syndrome (TS). Multiple lines of evidence suggest the involvement of the cortico-basal ganglia system, and in particular the basal ganglia input structure—the striatum in tic formation. The striatum receives somatotopically organized cortical projections and contains an internal GABAergic network of interneurons and projection neurons' collaterals. Disruption of local striatal GABAergic connectivity has been associated with TS and was found to induce abnormal movements in model animals. We have previously described the behavioral and neurophysiological characteristics of motor tics induced in monkeys by local striatal microinjections of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline. In the current study we explored the abnormal movements induced by a similar manipulation in freely moving rats. We targeted microinjections to different parts of the dorsal striatum, and examined the effects of this manipulation on the induced tic properties, such as latency, duration, and somatic localization. Tics induced by striatal disinhibition in monkeys and rats shared multiple properties: tics began within several minutes after microinjection, were expressed solely in the contralateral side, and waxed and waned around a mean inter-tic interval of 1–4 s. A clear somatotopic organization was observed only in rats, where injections to the anterior or posterior striatum led to tics in the forelimb or hindlimb areas, respectively. These results suggest that striatal disinhibition in the rat may be used to model motor tics such as observed in TS. Establishing this reliable and accessible animal model could facilitate the study of the neural mechanisms underlying motor tics, and the testing of potential therapies for tic disorders. PMID:24065893

  18. Motor tics evoked by striatal disinhibition in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya eBronfeld

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Motor tics are sudden, brief, repetitive movements that constitute the main symptom of Tourette syndrome (TS. Multiple lines of evidence suggest the involvement of the cortico-basal ganglia system, and in particular the basal ganglia input structure – the striatum in tic formation. The striatum receives somatotopically organized cortical projections and contains an internal GABAergic network of interneurons and projection neurons collaterals. Disruption of local striatal GABAergic connectivity has been associated with TS and was found to induce abnormal movements in model animals. We have previously described the behavioral and neurophysiological characteristics of motor tics induced in monkeys by local striatal microinjections of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline. In the current study we explored the abnormal movements induced by a similar manipulation in freely moving rats. We targeted microinjections to different parts of the dorsal striatum, and examined the effects of this manipulation on the induced tic properties, such as latency, duration and somatic localization. Tics induced by striatal disinhibition in monkeys and rats shared multiple properties: tics began within several minutes after microinjection, were expressed solely in the contralateral side, and waxed and waned around a mean inter-tic interval of 1-4 s. A clear somatotopic organization was observed only in rats, where injections to the anterior or posterior striatum led to tics in the forelimb or hindlimb areas, respectively. These results suggest that striatal disinhibition in the rat may be used to model motor tics such as observed in TS. Establishing this reliable and accessible animal model could facilitate the study of the neural mechanisms underlying motor tics, and the testing of potential therapies for tic disorders.

  19. Restoration of Motor Defects Caused by Loss ofDrosophilaTDP-43 by Expression of the Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel,Cacophony, in Central Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembke, Kayly M; Scudder, Charles; Morton, David B

    2017-09-27

    Defects in the RNA-binding protein, TDP-43, are known to cause a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar dementia. A variety of experimental systems have shown that neurons are sensitive to TDP-43 expression levels, yet the specific functional defects resulting from TDP-43 dysregulation have not been well described. Using the Drosophila TDP-43 ortholog TBPH, we previously showed that TBPH-null animals display locomotion defects as third instar larvae. Furthermore, loss of TBPH caused a reduction in cacophony , a Type II voltage-gated calcium channel, expression and that genetically restoring cacophony in motor neurons in TBPH mutant animals was sufficient to rescue the locomotion defects. In the present study, we examined the relative contributions of neuromuscular junction physiology and the motor program to the locomotion defects and identified subsets of neurons that require cacophony expression to rescue the defects. At the neuromuscular junction, we showed mEPP amplitudes and frequency require TBPH. Cacophony expression in motor neurons rescued mEPP frequency but not mEPP amplitude. We also showed that TBPH mutants displayed reduced motor neuron bursting and coordination during crawling and restoring cacophony selectively in two pairs of cells located in the brain, the AVM001b/2b neurons, also rescued the locomotion and motor defects, but not the defects in neuromuscular junction physiology. These results suggest that the behavioral defects associated with loss of TBPH throughout the nervous system can be associated with defects in a small number of genes in a limited number of central neurons, rather than peripheral defects. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT TDP-43 dysfunction is a common feature in neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal lobar dementia, and Alzheimer's disease. Loss- and gain-of-function models have shown that neurons are sensitive to TDP-43

  20. Loss of lrrk2 impairs dopamine catabolism, cell proliferation, and neuronal regeneration in the zebrafish brain

    OpenAIRE

    Suzzi, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene are a major cause of Parkinson’s disease (PD), which is why modelling PD by replicating effects in animal models attracts great interest. However, the exact mechanisms of pathogenesis are still unclear. While a gain-of-function hypothesis generally receives consensus, there is evidence supporting an alternative loss-of-function explanation. Yet, neither overexpression of the human wild-type LRRK2 protein or its pathogenic variants, no...

  1. Netrin-1 rescues neuron loss by attenuating secondary apoptosis in ipsilateral thalamic nucleus following focal cerebral infarction in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, S-J; Gong, Q; Chen, X-R; Ye, L-X; Ding, Q; Zeng, J-S; Yu, J

    2013-02-12

    Neurological deficit following cerebral infarction correlates with not only primary injury, but also secondary neuronal apoptosis in remote loci connected to the infarction. Netrin-1 is crucial for axonal guidance by interacting with its receptors, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) and uncoordinated gene 5H (UNC5H). DCC and UNC5H are also dependence receptors inducing cell apoptosis when unbound by netrin-1. The present study is to investigate the role of netrin-1 and its receptors in ipsilateral ventroposterior thalamic nucleus (VPN) injury secondary to stroke in hypertensive rats. Renovascular hypertensive Sprague-Dawley rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of netrin-1 (600 ng/d for 7 days) or vehicle (IgG/Fc) was given 24h after MCAO. Neurological function was evaluated by postural reflex 8 and 14 days after MCAO. Then, immunoreactivity was determined in the ipsilateral VPN for NeuN, glial fibrillary acidic protein, netrin-1 and its receptors (DCC and UNC5H2), apoptosis was detected with Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and the expressions of caspase-3, netrin-1, DCC, and UNC5H2 were quantified by western blot analysis. MCAO resulted in the impaired postural reflex after 8 and 14 days, with decreased NeuN marked neurons and increased TUNEL-positive cells, as well as an up-regulation in the levels of cleaved caspase-3 and UNC5H2 protein in the ipsilateral VPN, without significant change in DCC or netrin-1 expression. By exogenous netrin-1 infusion, the number of neurons was increased in the ipsilateral VPN, and both TUNEL-positive cell number and caspase-3 protein level were reduced, while UNC5H2 expression remained unaffected, simultaneously, the impairment of postural reflex was improved. Taken together, the present study indicates that exogenous netrin-1 could rescue neuron loss by attenuating secondary apoptosis in the

  2. Centrality of striatal cholinergic transmission in basal ganglia function

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    Paola eBonsi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Work over the past two decades revealed a previously unexpected role for striatal cholinergic interneurons in the context of basal ganglia function. The recognition that these interneurons are essential in synaptic plasticity and motor learning represents a significant step ahead in deciphering how the striatum processes cortical inputs, and why pathological circumstances cause motor dysfunction.Loss of the reciprocal modulation between dopaminergic inputs and the intrinsic cholinergic innervation within the striatum appears to be the trigger for pathophysiological changes occurring in basal ganglia disorders. Accordingly, there is now compelling evidence showing profound changes in cholinergic markers in these disorders, in particular Parkinson’s disease and dystonia.Based on converging experimental and clinical evidence, we provide an overview of the role of striatal cholinergic transmission in physiological and pathological conditions, in the context of the pathogenesis of movement disorders.

  3. Sensory defects in Necdin deficient mice result from a loss of sensory neurons correlated within an increase of developmental programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Pierre-Alain

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human NECDIN gene is involved in a neurodevelopmental disorder, Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS. Previously we reported a mouse Necdin knock-out model with similar defects to PWS patients. Despite the putative roles attributed to Necdin, mainly from in vitro studies, its in vivo function remains unclear. In this study, we investigate sensory-motor behaviour in Necdin deficient mice. We reveal cellular defects and analyse their cause. Results We report sensory differences in Necdin deficient mice compared to wild type animals. These differences led us to investigate sensory neuron development in Necdin deficient mouse embryos. First, we describe the expression pattern of Necdin in developing DRGs and report a reduction of one-third in specified sensory neurons in dorsal roots ganglia and show that this neuronal loss is achieved by E13.5, when DRGs sensory neurons are specified. In parallel, we observed an increase of 41% in neuronal apoptosis during the wave of naturally occurring cell death at E12.5. Since it is assumed that Necdin is a P75NTR interactor, we looked at the P75NTR-expressing cell population in Necdin knock-out embryos. Unexpectedly, Necdin loss of function has no effect on p75NTR expressing neurons suggesting no direct genetic interaction between Necdin and P75NTR in this context. Although we exclude a role of Necdin in axonal outgrowth from spinal sensory neurons in early developmental stages; such a role could occur later in neuronal differentiation. Finally we also exclude an anti-proliferative role of Necdin in developing sensory neurons. Conclusion Overall, our data show clearly that, in early development of the nervous system, Necdin is an anti-apoptotic or survival factor.

  4. Focal neuronal loss, reversible subcortical focal T2 hypointensity in seizures with a nonketotic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state

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    Raghavendra, S.; Ashalatha, R.; Thomas, Sanjeev V. [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Neurology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India); Kesavadas, C. [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Trivandrum (India)

    2007-04-15

    Neuroimaging in seizures associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia (NKH) is considered normal. We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities in four patients with NKH and seizures. We prospectively evaluated clinical and radiological abnormalities in four patients with NKH during the period March 2004 to December 2005. All patients presented with seizures, either simple or complex partial seizures or epilepsia partialis continua. Two of them had transient hemianopia. MRI showed subcortical T2 hypointensity in the occipital white matter and in or around the central sulcus (two patients each), T2 hyperintensity of the overlying cortex (two patients), focal overlying cortical enhancement (three patients) and bilateral striatal hyperintensity (one patient). Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) performed in three patients showed restricted diffusion. The ictal semiology and electroencephalographic (EEG) findings correlated with the MRI abnormalities. On clinical recovery, the subcortical T2 hypointensity and striatal hyperintensity reversed in all patients. The initial cortical change evolved to FLAIR hyperintensity suggestive of focal cortical gliosis. The radiological differential diagnosis considered initially included encephalitis, malignancy and hemorrhagic infarct rendering a diagnostic dilemma. We identified subcortical T2 hypointensity rather than hyperintensity as a characteristic feature of seizures associated with NKH. Only very few similar reports exist in literature. Reversible bilateral striatal T2 hyperintensity in NKH has not been reported to the best of our knowledge. (orig.)

  5. Focal neuronal loss, reversible subcortical focal T2 hypointensity in seizures with a nonketotic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra, S; Ashalatha, R; Thomas, Sanjeev V; Kesavadas, C

    2007-04-01

    Neuroimaging in seizures associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia (NKH) is considered normal. We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities in four patients with NKH and seizures. We prospectively evaluated clinical and radiological abnormalities in four patients with NKH during the period March 2004 to December 2005. All patients presented with seizures, either simple or complex partial seizures or epilepsia partialis continua. Two of them had transient hemianopia. MRI showed subcortical T2 hypointensity in the occipital white matter and in or around the central sulcus (two patients each), T2 hyperintensity of the overlying cortex (two patients), focal overlying cortical enhancement (three patients) and bilateral striatal hyperintensity (one patient). Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) performed in three patients showed restricted diffusion. The ictal semiology and electroencephalographic (EEG) findings correlated with the MRI abnormalities. On clinical recovery, the subcortical T2 hypointensity and striatal hyperintensity reversed in all patients. The initial cortical change evolved to FLAIR hyperintensity suggestive of focal cortical gliosis. The radiological differential diagnosis considered initially included encephalitis, malignancy and hemorrhagic infarct rendering a diagnostic dilemma. We identified subcortical T2 hypointensity rather than hyperintensity as a characteristic feature of seizures associated with NKH. Only very few similar reports exist in literature. Reversible bilateral striatal T2 hyperintensity in NKH has not been reported to the best of our knowledge.

  6. Loss of GCN5 leads to increased neuronal apoptosis by upregulating E2F1- and Egr-1-dependent BH3-only protein Bim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanna; Ma, Shanshan; Xia, Yong; Lu, Yangpeng; Xiao, Shiyin; Cao, Yali; Zhuang, Sidian; Tan, Xiangpeng; Fu, Qiang; Xie, Longchang; Li, Zhiming; Yuan, Zhongmin

    2017-01-26

    Cellular acetylation homeostasis is a kinetic balance precisely controlled by histone acetyl-transferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities. The loss of the counterbalancing function of basal HAT activity alters the precious HAT:HDAC balance towards enhanced histone deacetylation, resulting in a loss of acetylation homeostasis, which is closely associated with neuronal apoptosis. However, the critical HAT member whose activity loss contributes to neuronal apoptosis remains to be identified. In this study, we found that inactivation of GCN5 by either pharmacological inhibitors, such as CPTH2 and MB-3, or by inactivation with siRNAs leads to a typical apoptosis in cultured cerebellar granule neurons. Mechanistically, the BH3-only protein Bim is transcriptionally upregulated by activated Egr-1 and E2F1 and mediates apoptosis following GCN5 inhibition. Furthermore, in the activity withdrawal- or glutamate-evoked neuronal apoptosis models, GCN5 loses its activity, in contrast to Bim induction. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of GCN5 suppresses Bim induction and apoptosis. Interestingly, the loss of GCN5 activity and the induction of Egr-1, E2F1 and Bim are involved in the early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) in rats. HDAC inhibition not only significantly rescues Bim expression and apoptosis induced by either potassium deprivation or GCN5 inactivation but also ameliorates these events and EBI in SAH rats. Taken together, our results highlight a new mechanism by which the loss of GCN5 activity promotes neuronal apoptosis through the transcriptional upregulation of Bim, which is probably a critical event in triggering neuronal death when cellular acetylation homeostasis is impaired.

  7. Application of multispectral imaging detects areas with neuronal myelin loss, without tissue labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazgiouraki, Eleftheria; Papadakis, Vassilis M; Efstathopoulos, Paschalis; Lazaridis, Iakovos; Charalampopoulos, Ioannis; Fotakis, Costas; Gravanis, Achille

    2016-04-01

    The application of multispectral imaging to discriminate myelinated and demyelinated areas of neural tissue is herein presented. The method is applied through a custom-made, multispectral imaging monochromator, coupled to a commercially available microscope. In the present work, a series of spinal cord sections were analysed derived from mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an experimental model widely used to study multiple sclerosis (MS). The multispectral microscope allows imaging of local areas with loss of myelin without the need of tissue labelling. Imaging with the aforementioned method and system is compared in a parallel way with conventional methods (wide-field and confocal fluorescence microscopies). The diagnostic sensitivity of our method is 90.4% relative to the 'gold standard' method of immunofluorescence microscopy. The presented method offers a new platform for the possible future development of an in vivo, real-time, non-invasive, rapid imaging diagnostic tool of spinal cord myelin loss-derived pathologies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Application of the Physical Disector Principle for Quantification of Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss in a Rat 6-Hydroxydopamine Nigral Lesion Model of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrine Fabricius

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Stereological analysis is the optimal tool for quantitative assessment of brain morphological and cellular changes induced by neurotoxic lesions or treatment interventions. Stereological methods based on random sampling techniques yield unbiased estimates of particle counts within a defined volume, thereby providing a true quantitative estimate of the target cell population. Neurodegenerative diseases involve loss of specific neuron types, such as the midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase-positive dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease and in animal models of nigrostriatal degeneration. Therefore, we applied an established automated physical disector principle in a fractionator design for efficient stereological quantitative analysis of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-positive dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta of hemiparkinsonian rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA lesions. We obtained reliable estimates of dopamine neuron numbers, and established the relationship between behavioral asymmetry and dopamine neuron loss on the lesioned side. In conclusion, the automated physical disector principle provided a useful and efficient tool for unbiased estimation of TH-positive neurons in rat midbrain, and should prove valuable for investigating neuroprotective strategies in 6-OHDA model of parkinsonism, while generalizing to other immunohistochemically-defined cell populations.

  9. Decreased spontaneous eye blink rates in chronic cannabis users: evidence for striatal cannabinoid-dopamine interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael A Kowal

    Full Text Available Chronic cannabis use has been shown to block long-term depression of GABA-glutamate synapses in the striatum, which is likely to reduce the extent to which endogenous cannabinoids modulate GABA- and glutamate-related neuronal activity. The current study aimed at investigating the effect of this process on striatal dopamine levels by studying the spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR, a clinical marker of dopamine level in the striatum. 25 adult regular cannabis users and 25 non-user controls matched for age, gender, race, and IQ were compared. Results show a significant reduction in EBR in chronic users as compared to non-users, suggesting an indirect detrimental effect of chronic cannabis use on striatal dopaminergic functioning. Additionally, EBR correlated negatively with years of cannabis exposure, monthly peak cannabis consumption, and lifetime cannabis consumption, pointing to a relationship between the degree of impairment of striatal dopaminergic transmission and cannabis consumption history.

  10. Nerve injury evoked loss of latexin expression in spinal cord neurons contributes to the development of neuropathic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilmar Nils Kühlein

    Full Text Available Nerve injury leads to sensitization mechanisms in the peripheral and central nervous system which involve transcriptional and post-transcriptional modifications in sensory nerves. To assess protein regulations in the spinal cord after injury of the sciatic nerve in the Spared Nerve Injury model (SNI we performed a proteomic analysis using 2D-difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE technology. Among approximately 2300 protein spots separated on each gel we detected 55 significantly regulated proteins after SNI whereof 41 were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF MS. Out of the proteins which were regulated in the DIGE analyses after SNI we focused on the carboxypeptidase A inhibitor latexin because protease dysfunctions contribute to the development of neuropathic pain. Latexin protein expression was reduced after SNI which could be confirmed by Western Blot analysis, quantitative RT-PCR and in-situ hybridisation. The decrease of latexin was associated with an increase of the activity of carboxypeptidase A indicating that the balance between latexin and carboxypeptidase A was impaired in the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury due to a loss of latexin expression in spinal cord neurons. This may contribute to the development of cold allodynia because normalization of neuronal latexin expression in the spinal cord by AAV-mediated latexin transduction or administration of a small molecule carboxypeptidase A inhibitor significantly reduced acetone-evoked nociceptive behavior after SNI. Our results show the usefulness of proteomics as a screening tool to identify novel mechanisms of nerve injury evoked hypernociception and suggest that carboxypeptidase A inhibition might be useful to reduce cold allodynia.

  11. Nerve injury evoked loss of latexin expression in spinal cord neurons contributes to the development of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühlein, Hilmar Nils; Tegeder, Irmgard; Möser, Christine; Lim, Hee-Young; Häussler, Annett; Spieth, Katharina; Jennes, Ingo; Marschalek, Rolf; Beckhaus, Tobias; Karas, Michael; Fauth, Markus; Ehnert, Corina; Geisslinger, Gerd; Niederberger, Ellen

    2011-04-29

    Nerve injury leads to sensitization mechanisms in the peripheral and central nervous system which involve transcriptional and post-transcriptional modifications in sensory nerves. To assess protein regulations in the spinal cord after injury of the sciatic nerve in the Spared Nerve Injury model (SNI) we performed a proteomic analysis using 2D-difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) technology. Among approximately 2300 protein spots separated on each gel we detected 55 significantly regulated proteins after SNI whereof 41 were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF MS. Out of the proteins which were regulated in the DIGE analyses after SNI we focused on the carboxypeptidase A inhibitor latexin because protease dysfunctions contribute to the development of neuropathic pain. Latexin protein expression was reduced after SNI which could be confirmed by Western Blot analysis, quantitative RT-PCR and in-situ hybridisation. The decrease of latexin was associated with an increase of the activity of carboxypeptidase A indicating that the balance between latexin and carboxypeptidase A was impaired in the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury due to a loss of latexin expression in spinal cord neurons. This may contribute to the development of cold allodynia because normalization of neuronal latexin expression in the spinal cord by AAV-mediated latexin transduction or administration of a small molecule carboxypeptidase A inhibitor significantly reduced acetone-evoked nociceptive behavior after SNI. Our results show the usefulness of proteomics as a screening tool to identify novel mechanisms of nerve injury evoked hypernociception and suggest that carboxypeptidase A inhibition might be useful to reduce cold allodynia. © 2011 Kühlein et al.

  12. Loss of nuclear TDP-43 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) causes altered expression of splicing machinery and widespread dysregulation of RNA splicing in motor neurones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Highley, J. Robin; Kirby, Janine; Jansweijer, Joeri A.; Webb, Philip S.; Hewamadduma, Channa A.; Heath, Paul R.; Higginbottom, Adrian; Raman, Rohini; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Cooper-Knock, Johnathan; McDermott, Christopher J.; Wharton, Stephen B.; Shaw, Pamela J.; Ince, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of nuclear TDP-43 characterizes sporadic and most familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). TDP-43 (encoded by TARDBP) has multiple roles in RNA processing. We aimed to determine whether (1) RNA splicing dysregulation is present in lower motor neurones in ALS and in a motor

  13. Striatal dopamine in Parkinson disease: A meta-analysis of imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasinen, Valtteri; Vahlberg, Tero

    2017-12-01

    A meta-analysis of 142 positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography studies that have investigated striatal presynaptic dopamine function in Parkinson disease (PD) was performed. Subregional estimates of striatal dopamine metabolism are presented. The aromatic L-amino-acid decarboxylase (AADC) defect appears to be consistently smaller than the dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 defects, suggesting upregulation of AADC function in PD. The correlation between disease severity and dopamine loss appears linear, but the majority of longitudinal studies point to a negative exponential progression pattern of dopamine loss in PD. Ann Neurol 2017;82:873-882. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  14. Effects of zoxazolamine and related centrally acting muscle relaxants on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, R T; McMillen, B A; Speciale, S G; Jarrah, H; Shore, P A; Sanghera, M K; Shepard, P D; German, D C

    1984-05-01

    The effects of zoxazolamine (ZOX) and related centrally acting muscle relaxants on striatal dopamine (DA) metabolism and turnover, and substantia nigra zona compacta DA neuronal impulse flow were studied in rats. ZOX, chlorzoxazone and mephenesin, but not meprobamate, chloral hydrate, diazepam, pentobarbital, ethanol or dantrolene, decreased striatal DA metabolism without affecting striatal DA concentrations. More specifically, ZOX, as a representative muscle relaxant, was shown to decrease striatal DA turnover without directly affecting DA synthesis, catabolism, reuptake, or release. ZOX decreased nigral DA neuronal firing rates and dramatically decreased firing rate variability (normally many of the cells fire with bursting firing patterns but after ZOX the cells often fired with a very regular pacemaker-like firing pattern). ZOX and related centrally acting muscle relaxants appear to decrease striatal DA turnover by decreasing both neuronal firing rate and firing rate variability. The possible relationships between DA neuronal activity and muscle tone are discussed.

  15. Glutamine triggers long-lasting increase in striatal network activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Wiebke; Theiss, Stephan; Schnitzler, Alfons; Sergeeva, Olga

    2017-04-01

    Accumulation of ammonium and glutamine in blood and brain is a key factor in hepatic encephalopathy (HE) - a neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by various cognitive and motor deficits. MRI imaging identified abnormalities notably in the basal ganglia of HE patients, including its major input station, the striatum. While neurotoxic effects of ammonia have been extensively studied, glutamine is primarily perceived as "detoxified" form of ammonia. We applied ammonium and glutamine to striatal and cortical cells from newborn rats cultured on microelectrode arrays. Glutamine, but not ammonium significantly increased spontaneous spike rate with a long-lasting excitation outlasting washout. This effect was more prominent in striatal than in cortical cultures. Calcium imaging revealed that glutamine application caused a rise in intracellular calcium that depended both on system A amino acid transport and activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors. This pointed to downstream glutamate release that was triggered by intracellular glutamine. Using an enzymatic assay kit we confirmed glutamine-provoked glutamate release from striatal cells. Real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry demonstrated the presence of vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1 and VGLUT2) necessary for synaptic glutamate release in striatal neurons. We conclude that extracellular glutamine is taken up by neurons, triggers synaptic release of glutamate which is then taken up by astrocytes and again converted to glutamine. This feedback-loop causes a sustained long-lasting excitation of network activity. Thus, apart from ammonia also its "detoxified" form glutamine might be responsible for the neuropsychiatric symptoms in HE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuronal loss and decreased GLT-1 expression observed in the spinal cord of Pembroke Welsh Corgi dogs with canine degenerative myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, M; Uchida, K; Yamato, O; Inaba, M; Uddin, M M; Nakayama, H

    2014-05-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is frequently found in Pembroke Welsh Corgi (PWC) dogs. Canine DM is potentially a spontaneous animal model for human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) because of similar lesions and the involvement of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutation. However, the ventral horn lesion in DM has not been characterized in detail. Glutamate excitotoxicity due to deficiency of the glutamine-glutamate cycle has been implicated in neuron death in ALS. Thus, we examined 5 PWC dogs with an SOD1 mutation that were affected by DM, 5 non-DM PWC dogs, and 5 Beagle dogs without neurologic signs to assess the neuronal changes and the expression levels of 2 glial excitatory amino acid transporters (glutamate transporter 1 [GLT-1] and glutamate/aspartate transporter [GLAST]). The number of neurons in the spinal ventral horns of the DM dogs was significantly decreased, whereas no change was found in the cell size. Chromatolysis, lipofuscin-laden neurons, and marked synapse loss were also observed. GLT-1 expression was strikingly decreased in DM dogs, whereas GLAST expression showed no significant change. The results indicate that excitotoxicity related to the reduced expression of GLT-1, but not GLAST, may be involved in neuron loss in DM, as in human ALS, whereas intraneuronal events may differ between the 2 diseases.

  17. Representation of spontaneous movement by dopaminergic neurons is cell-type selective and disrupted in parkinsonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodson, Paul D.; Dreyer, Jakob K.; Jennings, Katie Ann

    2016-01-01

    receptor expressed by striatal neurons. Importantly, in aged mice harboring a genetic burden relevant for human Parkinson's disease, the precise movement-related firing of SNc dopaminergic neurons and the resultant striatal dopamine signaling were lost. These data show that distinct dopaminergic cell types......Midbrain dopaminergic neurons are essential for appropriate voluntary movement, as epitomized by the cardinal motor impairments arising in Parkinson's disease. Understanding the basis of such motor control requires understanding how the firing of different types of dopaminergic neuron relates...... of these dopaminergic neurons can manifest as rapid and robust fluctuations in striatal dopamine concentration and receptor activity. The exact nature of the movement-related signaling in the striatum depended on the type of dopaminergic neuron providing inputs, the striatal region innervated, and the type of dopamine...

  18. Decreased chronic-stage cortical C-11-flumazenil binding after focal ischemia-reperfusion in baboons - A marker of selective neuronal loss?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giffard, C.; Landeau, B.; Kerrouche, N.; Young, A.R.; Giffard, C.; Landeau, B.; Kerrouche, N.; Young, A.R.; Giffard, C.; Landeau, B.; Baron, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose - Although the penumbra can be saved by early reperfusion, in the rat it is consistently affected by selective neuronal loss. Mapping selective neuronal loss in the living primate would be desirable. Methods - Five young adult baboons underwent 15 O positron emission tomography for cerebral blood flow, cerebral oxygen consumption, and oxygen extraction fraction mapping at baseline and serially during and after 20-hours temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion. At approximately day 30, 11 C-flumazenil (FMZ), a potential positron emission tomography marker of selective neuronal loss, and structural magnetic resonance-based infarct mapping were obtained, and the brain was perfused-fixed. Reduced FMZ binding in non-infarcted cortical middle cerebral artery areas was searched voxel-wise, and specific binding was assessed using compartmental modeling of FMZ time-activity curves. Results - Visual inspection revealed reduced late FMZ uptake in the affected cortical territory, extending well beyond the infarct. Accordingly, the incidence of selected voxels was greater than chance, documenting mildly but significantly reduced FMZ uptake and specific binding. Serial 15 O positron emission tomography revealed moderately severe acute ischemia followed by reperfusion. Histopathology documented only mild neuronal changes in or near the affected areas. Conclusions - We document moderate but definite late FMZ binding decrements in non-infarcted cortical areas in the baboon, consistent with previous rat and human studies. These were acutely characterized by moderate ischemia followed by reperfusion, consistent with neuronal damage from ischemic or reperfusion injury in the salvaged at-risk tissue. Only mild histopathological changes subtended these FMZ alterations suggesting subtle processes such as isolated dendrite or synapse loss. Whether these changes impact on clinical outcome deserves studying because they may be targeted by specific neuro

  19. Decreased chronic-stage cortical C-11-flumazenil binding after focal ischemia-reperfusion in baboons - A marker of selective neuronal loss?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giffard, C.; Landeau, B.; Kerrouche, N.; Young, A.R. [Univ Caen, INSERM Avenir, INSERM U320, INSERM E 0218, F-14032 Caen (France); Giffard, C.; Landeau, B.; Kerrouche, N.; Young, A.R. [Univ Caen, CYCERON, F-14032 Caen (France); Giffard, C.; Landeau, B. [Univ Caen, CYCERON, CEA LRV 10, F-14032 Caen (France); Baron, J.C. [Univ Cambridge, Dept Clin Neurosci, Cambridge CB2 2QQ (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    Background and Purpose - Although the penumbra can be saved by early reperfusion, in the rat it is consistently affected by selective neuronal loss. Mapping selective neuronal loss in the living primate would be desirable. Methods - Five young adult baboons underwent {sup 15}O positron emission tomography for cerebral blood flow, cerebral oxygen consumption, and oxygen extraction fraction mapping at baseline and serially during and after 20-hours temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion. At approximately day 30, {sup 11}C-flumazenil (FMZ), a potential positron emission tomography marker of selective neuronal loss, and structural magnetic resonance-based infarct mapping were obtained, and the brain was perfused-fixed. Reduced FMZ binding in non-infarcted cortical middle cerebral artery areas was searched voxel-wise, and specific binding was assessed using compartmental modeling of FMZ time-activity curves. Results - Visual inspection revealed reduced late FMZ uptake in the affected cortical territory, extending well beyond the infarct. Accordingly, the incidence of selected voxels was greater than chance, documenting mildly but significantly reduced FMZ uptake and specific binding. Serial {sup 15}O positron emission tomography revealed moderately severe acute ischemia followed by reperfusion. Histopathology documented only mild neuronal changes in or near the affected areas. Conclusions - We document moderate but definite late FMZ binding decrements in non-infarcted cortical areas in the baboon, consistent with previous rat and human studies. These were acutely characterized by moderate ischemia followed by reperfusion, consistent with neuronal damage from ischemic or reperfusion injury in the salvaged at-risk tissue. Only mild histopathological changes subtended these FMZ alterations suggesting subtle processes such as isolated dendrite or synapse loss. Whether these changes impact on clinical outcome deserves studying because they may be targeted by specific

  20. Neonatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs disrupts striatal synaptic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcelli, Patrick A; Janssen, Megan J; Vicini, Stefano; Gale, Karen

    2012-09-01

    Drug exposure during critical periods of brain development may adversely affect nervous system function, posing a challenge for treating infants. This is of particular concern for treating neonatal seizures, as early life exposure to drugs such as phenobarbital is associated with adverse neurological outcomes in patients and induction of neuronal apoptosis in animal models. The functional significance of the preclinical neurotoxicity has been questioned due to the absence of evidence for functional impairment associated with drug-induced developmental apoptosis. We used patch-clamp recordings to examine functional synaptic maturation in striatal medium spiny neurons from neonatal rats exposed to antiepileptic drugs with proapoptotic action (phenobarbital, phenytoin, lamotrigine) and without proapoptotic action (levetiracetam). Phenobarbital-exposed rats were also assessed for reversal learning at weaning. Recordings from control animals revealed increased inhibitory and excitatory synaptic connectivity between postnatal day (P)10 and P18. This maturation was absent in rats exposed at P7 to a single dose of phenobarbital, phenytoin, or lamotrigine. Additionally, phenobarbital exposure impaired striatal-mediated behavior on P25. Neuroprotective pretreatment with melatonin, which prevents drug-induced neurodevelopmental apoptosis, prevented the drug-induced disruption in maturation. Levetiracetam was found not to disrupt synaptic development. Our results provide the first evidence that exposure to antiepileptic drugs during a sensitive postnatal period impairs physiological maturation of synapses in neurons that survive the initial drug insult. These findings suggest a mechanism by which early life exposure to antiepileptic drugs can impact cognitive and behavioral outcomes, underscoring the need to identify therapies that control seizures without compromising synaptic maturation. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  1. Adenosine–cannabinoid receptor interactions. Implications for striatal function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Sergi; Lluís, Carme; Justinova, Zuzana; Quiroz, César; Orru, Marco; Navarro, Gemma; Canela, Enric I; Franco, Rafael; Goldberg, Steven R

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine and endocannabinoids are very ubiquitous non-classical neurotransmitters that exert a modulatory role on the transmission of other more ‘classical’ neurotransmitters. In this review we will focus on their common role as modulators of dopamine and glutamate neurotransmission in the striatum, the main input structure of the basal ganglia. We will pay particular attention to the role of adenosine A2A receptors and cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Experimental results suggest that presynaptic CB1 receptors interacting with A2A receptors in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals that make synaptic contact with dynorphinergic medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) are involved in the motor-depressant and addictive effects of cannabinoids. On the other hand, postsynaptic CB1 receptors interacting with A2A and D2 receptors in the dendritic spines of enkephalinergic MSNs and postsynaptic CB1 receptors in the dendritic spines of dynorphinergic MSN are probably involved in the cataleptogenic effects of cannabinoids. These receptor interactions most probably depend on the existence of a variety of heteromers of A2A, CB1 and D2 receptors in different elements of striatal spine modules. Drugs selective for the different striatal A2A and CB1 receptor heteromers could be used for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders and drug addiction and they could provide effective drugs with fewer side effects than currently used drugs. This article is part of a themed issue on Cannabinoids. To view the editorial for this themed issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00831.x PMID:20590556

  2. Mechanisms mediating parallel action monitoring in fronto-striatal circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beste, Christian; Ness, Vanessa; Lukas, Carsten; Hoffmann, Rainer; Stüwe, Sven; Falkenstein, Michael; Saft, Carsten

    2012-08-01

    Flexible response adaptation and the control of conflicting information play a pivotal role in daily life. Yet, little is known about the neuronal mechanisms mediating parallel control of these processes. We examined these mechanisms using a multi-methodological approach that integrated data from event-related potentials (ERPs) with structural MRI data and source localisation using sLORETA. Moreover, we calculated evoked wavelet oscillations. We applied this multi-methodological approach in healthy subjects and patients in a prodromal phase of a major basal ganglia disorder (i.e., Huntington's disease), to directly focus on fronto-striatal networks. Behavioural data indicated, especially the parallel execution of conflict monitoring and flexible response adaptation was modulated across the examined cohorts. When both processes do not co-incide a high integrity of fronto-striatal loops seems to be dispensable. The neurophysiological data suggests that conflict monitoring (reflected by the N2 ERP) and working memory processes (reflected by the P3 ERP) differentially contribute to this pattern of results. Flexible response adaptation under the constraint of high conflict processing affected the N2 and P3 ERP, as well as their delta frequency band oscillations. Yet, modulatory effects were strongest for the N2 ERP and evoked wavelet oscillations in this time range. The N2 ERPs were localized in the anterior cingulate cortex (BA32, BA24). Modulations of the P3 ERP were localized in parietal areas (BA7). In addition, MRI-determined caudate head volume predicted modulations in conflict monitoring, but not working memory processes. The results show how parallel conflict monitoring and flexible adaptation of action is mediated via fronto-striatal networks. While both, response monitoring and working memory processes seem to play a role, especially response selection processes and ACC-basal ganglia networks seem to be the driving force in mediating parallel conflict

  3. Impaired striatal Akt signaling disrupts dopamine homeostasis and increases feeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Speed

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically worldwide. The obesity epidemic begs for novel concepts and therapeutic targets that cohesively address "food-abuse" disorders. We demonstrate a molecular link between impairment of a central kinase (Akt involved in insulin signaling induced by exposure to a high-fat (HF diet and dysregulation of higher order circuitry involved in feeding. Dopamine (DA rich brain structures, such as striatum, provide motivation stimuli for feeding. In these central circuitries, DA dysfunction is posited to contribute to obesity pathogenesis. We identified a mechanistic link between metabolic dysregulation and the maladaptive behaviors that potentiate weight gain. Insulin, a hormone in the periphery, also acts centrally to regulate both homeostatic and reward-based HF feeding. It regulates DA homeostasis, in part, by controlling a key element in DA clearance, the DA transporter (DAT. Upon HF feeding, nigro-striatal neurons rapidly develop insulin signaling deficiencies, causing increased HF calorie intake.We show that consumption of fat-rich food impairs striatal activation of the insulin-activated signaling kinase, Akt. HF-induced Akt impairment, in turn, reduces DAT cell surface expression and function, thereby decreasing DA homeostasis and amphetamine (AMPH-induced DA efflux. In addition, HF-mediated dysregulation of Akt signaling impairs DA-related behaviors such as (AMPH-induced locomotion and increased caloric intake. We restored nigro-striatal Akt phosphorylation using recombinant viral vector expression technology. We observed a rescue of DAT expression in HF fed rats, which was associated with a return of locomotor responses to AMPH and normalization of HF diet-induced hyperphagia.Acquired disruption of brain insulin action may confer risk for and/or underlie "food-abuse" disorders and the recalcitrance of obesity. This molecular model, thus, explains how even short-term exposure to "the fast food

  4. Striatal neuroinflammation promotes Parkinsonism in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Young Choi

    Full Text Available Sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with unknown cause, but it has been suggested that neuroinflammation may play a role in pathogenesis of the disease. Neuroinflammatory component in process of PD neurodegeneration was proposed by postmortem, epidemiological and animal model studies. However, it remains unclear how neuroinflammatory factors contribute to dopaminergic neuronal death in PD.In this study, we analyzed the relationship among inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS-derived NO, mitochondrial dysfunction and dopaminergic neurodegeneration to examine the possibility that microglial neuroinflammation may induce dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra. Unilateral injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS into the striatum of rat was followed by immunocytochemical, histological, neurochemical and biochemical analyses. In addition, behavioral assessments including cylinder test and amphetamine-induced rotational behavior test were employed to validate ipsilateral damage to the dopamine nigrostriatal pathway. LPS injection caused progressive degeneration of the dopamine nigrostriatal system, which was accompanied by motor impairments including asymmetric usage of forelimbs and amphetamine-induced turning behavior in animals. Interestingly, some of the remaining nigral dopaminergic neurons had intracytoplasmic accumulation of alpha-synuclein and ubiquitin. Furthermore, defect in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and extensive S-nitrosylation/nitration of mitochondrial complex I were detected prior to the dopaminergic neuronal loss. The mitochondrial injury was prevented by treatment with L-N(6-(l-iminoethyl-lysine, an iNOS inhibitor, suggesting that iNOS-derived NO is associated with the mitochondrial impairment.These results implicate neuroinflammation-induced S-nitrosylation/nitration of mitochondrial complex I in mitochondrial malfunction and subsequent degeneration of the nigral dopamine

  5. Loss of adenomatous polyposis coli in Bergmann glia disrupts their unique architecture and leads to cell non-autonomous neurodegeneration of cerebellar Purkinje neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Imura, Tetsuya; Sofroniew, Michael V.; Fushiki, Shinji

    2012-01-01

    The tumor suppressor adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) is a multifunctional protein that inhibits the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway and regulates the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Using conditional knockout (CKO) mice in which the APC gene is inactivated in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing cells, we show a selective and critical role for APC in maintaining the morphology and function of cerebellar Bergmann glia. APC-CKO mice developed Bergmann glia normally until the accumulation of beta-catenin started around postnatal day 10 (P10). Their radial fibers then became shortened with a marked reduction of branching collaterals and their cell bodies translocated into the molecular layer followed by loss of their pial contact and transformation into stellate-shaped cells by P21. Purkinje neurons were normal in appearance and number at P21, but there was significant loss of Purkinje neurons and cerebellar atrophy by middle age. Outside the cerebellum, neither beta-catenin accumulation nor morphological changes were identified in GFAP-expressing astroglia, indicating region-specific effects of APC deletion and an essential role for APC in maintaining the unique morphology of Bergmann glia as compared with other astroglia. These results demonstrate that loss of APC selectively disrupts the Bergmann glial scaffold in late postnatal development and leads to cerebellar degeneration with loss of Purkinje neurons in adults, providing another potential mechanism for region-specific non-cell autonomous neurodegeneration. PMID:21381115

  6. Adenosine Receptor Heteromers and their Integrative Role in Striatal Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Ferré

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available By analyzing the functional role of adenosine receptor heteromers, we review a series of new concepts that should modify our classical views of neurotransmission in the central nervous system (CNS. Neurotransmitter receptors cannot be considered as single functional units anymore. Heteromerization of neurotransmitter receptors confers functional entities that possess different biochemical characteristics with respect to the individual components of the heteromer. Some of these characteristics can be used as a “biochemical fingerprint” to identify neurotransmitter receptor heteromers in the CNS. This is exemplified by changes in binding characteristics that are dependent on coactivation of the receptor units of different adenosine receptor heteromers. Neurotransmitter receptor heteromers can act as “processors” of computations that modulate cell signaling, sometimes critically involved in the control of pre- and postsynaptic neurotransmission. For instance, the adenosine A1-A2A receptor heteromer acts as a concentration-dependent switch that controls striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission. Neurotransmitter receptor heteromers play a particularly important integrative role in the “local module” (the minimal portion of one or more neurons and/or one or more glial cells that operates as an independent integrative unit, where they act as processors mediating computations that convey information from diverse volume-transmitted signals. For instance, the adenosine A2A-dopamine D2 receptor heteromers work as integrators of two different neurotransmitters in the striatal spine module.

  7. The BACHD Rat Model of Huntington Disease Shows Signs of Fronto-Striatal Dysfunction in Two Operant Conditioning Tests of Short-Term Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemensson, Erik Karl Håkan; Clemensson, Laura Emily; Riess, Olaf; Nguyen, Huu Phuc

    2017-01-01

    The BACHD rat is a recently developed transgenic animal model of Huntington disease, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extensive loss of striatal neurons. Cognitive impairments are common among patients, and characterization of similar deficits in animal models of the disease is therefore of interest. The present study assessed the BACHD rats' performance in the delayed alternation and the delayed non-matching to position test, two Skinner box-based tests of short-term memory function. The transgenic rats showed impaired performance in both tests, indicating general problems with handling basic aspects of the tests, while short-term memory appeared to be intact. Similar phenotypes have been found in rats with fronto-striatal lesions, suggesting that Huntington disease-related neuropathology might be present in the BACHD rats. Further analyses indicated that the performance deficit in the delayed alternation test might be due to impaired inhibitory control, which has also been implicated in Huntington disease patients. The study ultimately suggests that the BACHD rats might suffer from neuropathology and cognitive impairments reminiscent of those of Huntington disease patients.

  8. The BACHD Rat Model of Huntington Disease Shows Signs of Fronto-Striatal Dysfunction in Two Operant Conditioning Tests of Short-Term Memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Karl Håkan Clemensson

    Full Text Available The BACHD rat is a recently developed transgenic animal model of Huntington disease, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extensive loss of striatal neurons. Cognitive impairments are common among patients, and characterization of similar deficits in animal models of the disease is therefore of interest. The present study assessed the BACHD rats' performance in the delayed alternation and the delayed non-matching to position test, two Skinner box-based tests of short-term memory function. The transgenic rats showed impaired performance in both tests, indicating general problems with handling basic aspects of the tests, while short-term memory appeared to be intact. Similar phenotypes have been found in rats with fronto-striatal lesions, suggesting that Huntington disease-related neuropathology might be present in the BACHD rats. Further analyses indicated that the performance deficit in the delayed alternation test might be due to impaired inhibitory control, which has also been implicated in Huntington disease patients. The study ultimately suggests that the BACHD rats might suffer from neuropathology and cognitive impairments reminiscent of those of Huntington disease patients.

  9. Neuronal Glud1 (glutamate dehydrogenase 1) over-expressing mice: increased glutamate formation and synaptic release, loss of synaptic activity, and adaptive changes in genomic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, E K; Wang, X; Pal, R; Bao, X; Hascup, K N; Wang, Y; Wang, W-T; Hui, D; Agbas, A; Choi, I-Y; Belousov, A; Gerhardt, G A

    2011-09-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GLUD1) is a mitochondrial enzyme expressed in all tissues, including brain. Although this enzyme is expressed in glutamatergic pathways, its function as a regulator of glutamate neurotransmitter levels is still not well defined. In order to gain an understanding of the role of GLUD1 in the control of glutamate levels and synaptic release in mammalian brain, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice that over-express this enzyme in neurons of the central nervous system. The Tg mice have increased activity of GLUD, as well as elevated levels and increased synaptic and depolarization-induced release of glutamate. These mice suffer age-associated losses of dendritic spines, nerve terminals, and neurons. The neuronal losses and dendrite structural changes occur in select regions of the brain. At the transcriptional level in the hippocampus, cells respond by increasing the expression of genes related to neurite growth and synapse formation, indications of adaptive or compensatory responses to the effects of increases in the release and action of glutamate at synapses. Because these Tg mice live to a relatively old age they are a good model of the effects of a "hyperglutamatergic" state on the aging process in the nervous system. The mice are also useful in defining the molecular pathways affected by the over-activation of GLUD in glutamatergic neurons of the brain and spinal cord. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Licochalcone A Prevents the Loss of Dopaminergic Neurons by Inhibiting Microglial Activation in Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-Induced Parkinson’s Disease Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingxu Huang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The neuroprotective effects of Licochalcone A (Lico.A, a flavonoid isolated from the herb licorice, in Parkinson’s disease (PD have not been elucidated. The prominent pathological feature of PD is the loss of dopaminergic neurons. The crucial role of neuroinflammation induced by activated microglia in dopaminergic neurodegeneration has been validated. In this study, we explore the therapeutic effects of Lico.A in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced PD models in vivo and in vitro. We find that Lico.A significantly inhibits LPS-stimulated production of pro-inflammatory mediators and microglial activation by blocking the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB p65 in BV-2 cells. In addition, through cultured primary mesencephalic neuron-glia cell experiments, we illustrate that Lico.A attenuates the decrease in [3H] dopamine (DA uptake and the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir neurons in LPS-induced PD models in vitro. Furthermore, LPS intoxication in rats results in microglial activation, dopaminergic neurodegeneration and significant behavioral deficits in vivo. Lico.A treatment prevents microglial activation and reduction of dopaminergic neuron and ameliorates PD-like behavioral impairments. Thus, these results demonstrate for the first time that the neuroprotective effects of Lico.A are associated with microglia and anti-inflammatory effects in PD models.

  11. Transiently increasing cAMP levels selectively in hippocampal excitatory neurons during sleep deprivation prevents memory deficits caused by sleep loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havekes, Robbert; Bruinenberg, Vibeke M; Tudor, Jennifer C; Ferri, Sarah L; Baumann, Arnd; Meerlo, Peter; Abel, Ted

    2014-11-19

    The hippocampus is particularly sensitive to sleep loss. Although previous work has indicated that sleep deprivation impairs hippocampal cAMP signaling, it remains to be determined whether the cognitive deficits associated with sleep deprivation are caused by attenuated cAMP signaling in the hippocampus. Further, it is unclear which cell types are responsible for the memory impairments associated with sleep deprivation. Transgenic approaches lack the spatial resolution to manipulate specific signaling pathways selectively in the hippocampus, while pharmacological strategies are limited in terms of cell-type specificity. Therefore, we used a pharmacogenetic approach based on a virus-mediated expression of a Gαs-coupled Drosophila octopamine receptor selectively in mouse hippocampal excitatory neurons in vivo. With this approach, a systemic injection with the receptor ligand octopamine leads to increased cAMP levels in this specific set of hippocampal neurons. We assessed whether transiently increasing cAMP levels during sleep deprivation prevents memory consolidation deficits associated with sleep loss in an object-location task. Five hours of total sleep deprivation directly following training impaired the formation of object-location memories. Transiently increasing cAMP levels in hippocampal neurons during the course of sleep deprivation prevented these memory consolidation deficits. These findings demonstrate that attenuated cAMP signaling in hippocampal excitatory neurons is a critical component underlying the memory deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning tasks associated with sleep deprivation. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3415715-07$15.00/0.

  12. Probenecid and N-Acetylcysteine Prevent Loss of Intracellular Glutathione and Inhibit Neuronal Death after Mechanical Stretch Injury In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lina; Empey, Philip E; Ji, Jing; Chao, Honglu; Kochanek, Patrick M; Bayır, Hülya; Clark, Robert S B

    2016-10-15

    Probenecid and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) can preserve intracellular levels of the vital antioxidant glutathione (GSH) via two distinct biochemical pathways. Probenecid inhibits transporter-mediated GSH efflux and NAC serves as a cysteine donor for GSH synthesis. We hypothesized that probenecid and NAC alone would maintain intracellular GSH concentrations and inhibit neuronal death after traumatic stretch injury, and that the drugs in combination would produce additive effects. Sex-segregated rat primary cortical neurons were treated with probenecid (100 μM) and NAC (50 μM), alone and in combination (Pro-NAC), then subjected to mechanical stretch (10s -1 strain rate, 50% membrane deformation). At 24 h, both probenecid and NAC inhibited trauma-induced intracellular GSH depletion, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and propidium iodide (PI) uptake in both XY- and XX-neurons. Combined Pro-NAC treatment was superior to probenecid or NAC alone in maintenance of intracellular GSH and neuronal death assessed by PI uptake. Interestingly, caspase 3 activity 24 h after mechanical trauma was more prominent in XX-neurons, and treatment effects (probenecid, NAC, and Pro-NAC) were observed in XX- but not XY-neurons; however, XY-neurons were ultimately more vulnerable to mechanical stretch-induced injury than their XX counterparts, as was evidenced by more neuronal death detected by LDH release and PI uptake. In addition, after stretch injury in HT22 hippocampal cells, both NAC and probenecid were highly effective at reducing oxidative stress detected by dichlorofluorescein fluorescence. These in vitro data support further testing of this drug combination in models of traumatic neuronal injury in vivo.

  13. Arginine vasopressin neuronal loss results from autophagy-associated cell death in a mouse model for familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, D; Arima, H; Morishita, Y; Wenjun, L; Azuma, Y; Ito, Y; Suga, H; Goto, M; Banno, R; Sugimura, Y; Shiota, A; Asai, N; Takahashi, M; Oiso, Y

    2014-01-01

    Familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus (FNDI) characterized by progressive polyuria is mostly caused by mutations in the gene encoding neurophysin II (NPII), which is the carrier protein of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Although accumulation of mutant NPII in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) could be toxic for AVP neurons, the precise mechanisms of cell death of AVP neurons, reported in autopsy studies, remain unclear. Here, we subjected FNDI model mice to intermittent water deprivation (WD) in order to promote the phenotypes. Electron microscopic analyses demonstrated that, while aggregates are confined to a certain compartment of the ER in the AVP neurons of FNDI mice with water access ad libitum, they were scattered throughout the dilated ER lumen in the FNDI mice subjected to WD for 4 weeks. It is also demonstrated that phagophores, the autophagosome precursors, emerged in the vicinity of aggregates and engulfed the ER containing scattered aggregates. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that expression of p62, an adapter protein between ubiquitin and autophagosome, was elicited on autophagosomal membranes in the AVP neurons, suggesting selective autophagy induction at this time point. Treatment of hypothalamic explants of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) transgenic mice with an ER stressor thapsigargin increased the number of GFP-LC3 puncta, suggesting that ER stress could induce autophagosome formation in the hypothalamus of wild-type mice as well. The cytoplasm of AVP neurons in FNDI mice was occupied with vacuoles in the mice subjected to WD for 12 weeks, when 30–40% of AVP neurons are lost. Our data thus demonstrated that autophagy was induced in the AVP neurons subjected to ER stress in FNDI mice. Although autophagy should primarily be protective for neurons, it is suggested that the organelles including ER were lost over time through autophagy, leading to autophagy

  14. Striatal fast-spiking interneurons: from firing patterns to postsynaptic impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eKlaus

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the striatal microcircuit, fast-spiking (FS interneurons have an important role in mediating inhibition onto neighboring medium spiny (MS projection neurons. In this study, we combined computational modeling with in vitro and in vivo electrophysiological measurements to investigate FS cells in terms of their discharge properties and their synaptic efficacies onto MS neurons. In vivo firing of striatal FS interneurons is characterized by a high firing variability. It is not known, however, if this variability results from the input that FS cells receive, or if it is promoted by the stuttering spike behavior of these neurons. Both our model and measurements in vitro show that FS neurons that exhibit random stuttering discharge in response to steady depolarization, do not show the typical stuttering behavior when they receive fluctuating input. Importantly, our model predicts that electrically coupled FS cells show substantial spike synchronization only when they are in the stuttering regime. Therefore, together with the lack of synchronized firing of striatal FS interneurons that has been reported in vivo, these results suggest that neighboring FS neurons are not in the stuttering regime simultaneously and that in vivo FS firing variability is more likely determined by the input fluctuations. Furthermore, the variability in FS firing is translated to variability in the postsynaptic amplitudes in MS neurons due to the strong synaptic depression of the FS-to-MS synapse. Our results support the idea that these synapses operate over a wide range from strongly depressed to almost fully recovered. The strong inhibitory effects that FS cells can impose on their postsynaptic targets, and the fact that the FS-to-MS synapse model showed substantial depression over extended periods of time might indicate the importance of cooperative effects of multiple presynaptic FS interneurons and the precise orchestration of their activity.

  15. Chemical anatomy of striatal interneurons in normal individuals and in patients with Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, F; Prensa, L; Wu, Y; Parent, A

    2000-11-01

    This paper reviews the major anatomical and chemical features of the various types of interneurons in the human striatum, as detected by immunostaining procedures applied to postmortem tissue from normal individuals and patients with Huntington's disease (HD). The human striatum harbors a highly pleomorphic population of aspiny interneurons that stain for either a calcium-binding protein (calretinin, parvalbumin or calbindin D-28k), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) or NADPH-diaphorase, or various combinations thereof. Neurons that express calretinin (CR), including multitudinous medium and a smaller number of large neurons, are by far the most abundant interneurons in the human striatum. The medium CR+ neurons do not colocalize with any of the known chemical markers of striatal neurons, except perhaps GABA, and are selectively spared in HD. Most large CR+ interneurons display ChAT immunoreactivity and also express substance P receptors. The medium and large CR+ neurons are enriched with glutamate receptor subunit GluR2 and GluR4, respectively. This difference in AMPA GluR subunit expression may account for the relative resistance of medium CR+ neurons to glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity that may be involved in HD. The various striatal chemical markers display a highly heterogeneous distribution pattern in human. In addition to the classic striosomes/matrix compartmentalization, the striosomal compartment itself is composed of a core and a peripheral region, each subdivided by distinct subsets of striatal interneurons. A proper knowledge of all these features that appear unique to humans should greatly help our understanding of the organization of the human striatum in both health and disease states.

  16. Regulation of drugs affecting striatal cholinergic activity by corticostriatal projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladinsky, H.

    1986-01-01

    Research demonstrates that the chronic degeneration of the corticostriatal excitatory pathway makes the cholinergic neurons of the striatum insensitive to the neuropharmacological action of a number of different drugs. Female rats were used; they were killed and after the i.v. infusion of tritium-choline precursor, choline acetyltransferase activity was measured. Striatal noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin content was measured by electrochemical detection coupled with high pressure liquid chromatography. Uptake of tritium-glutamic acid was estimated. The data were analyzed statistically. It is shown that there is evidence that the effects of a number of drugs capable of depressing cholinergic activity through receptor-mediated responses are operative only if the corticostriatal pathway is integral. Neuropharmacological responses in the brain appear to be the result of an interaction between several major neurotransmitter systems

  17. Astrocytosis in parkinsonism: considering tripartite striatal synapses in physiopathology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Giselle; Doudnikoff, Evelyne; Canron, Marie-Helene; Li, Qin; Véga, Céline; Marais, Sebastien; Baufreton, Jérôme; Vital, Anne; Oliet, Stéphane H R; Bezard, Erwan

    2014-01-01

    The current concept of basal ganglia organization and function in physiological and pathophysiological conditions excludes the most numerous cells in the brain, i.e., the astrocytes, present with a ratio of 10:1 neuron. Their role in neurodegenerative condition such as Parkinson's disease (PD) remains to be elucidated. Before embarking into physiological investigations of the yet-to-be-identified "tripartite" synapses in the basal ganglia in general and the striatum in particular, we therefore characterized anatomically the PD-related modifications in astrocytic morphology, the changes in astrocytic network connections and the consequences on the spatial relationship between astrocytic processes and asymmetric synapses in normal and PD-like conditions in experimental and human PD. Our results unravel a dramatic regulation of striatal astrocytosis supporting the hypothesis of a key role in (dys) regulating corticostriatal transmission. Astrocytes and their various properties might thus represent a therapeutic target in PD.

  18. Astrocytosis in parkinsonism: considering tripartite striatal synapses in physiopathology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle eCharron

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The current concept of basal ganglia organization and function in physiological and pathophysiological conditions excludes the most numerous cells in the brain, i.e. the astrocytes, present with a ratio of 10:1 neuron. Their role in neurodegenerative condition such as Parkinson’s disease (PD remains to be elucidated. Before embarking into physiological investigations of the yet-to-be-identified tripartite synapses in the basal ganglia in general and the striatum in particular, we therefore characterized anatomically the PD-related modifications in astrocytic morphology, the changes in astrocytic network connections and the consequences on the spatial relationship between astrocytic processes and asymmetric synapses in normal and PD-like conditions in experimental and human PD. Our results unravel a dramatic regulation of striatal astrocytosis supporting the hypothesis of a key role in (dysregulating corticostriatal transmission. Astrocytes and their various properties might thus represent a therapeutic target in PD.

  19. Up-regulation of striatal adenosine A2A receptors with iron deficiency in rats. Effects on locomotion and cortico-striatal neurotransmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, César; Pearson, Virginia; Gulyani, Seema; Allen, Richard; Earley, Christopher; Ferré, Sergi

    2010-01-01

    Brain iron deficiency leads to altered dopaminergic function in experimental animals, which can provide a mechanistic explanation for iron deficiency-related human sensory-motor disorders, such as Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). However, mechanisms linking both conditions have not been determined. Considering the strong modulation exerted by adenosine on dopamine signaling, one connection could involve changes in adenosine receptor expression or function. In the striatum, presynaptic A2A receptors are localized in glutamatergic terminals contacting GABAergic dynorphinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by the ability of A2A receptor antagonists to block the motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Postsynaptic A2A receptors are localized in the dendritic field of GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by studying the ability of A2A receptor antagonists to produce locomotor activity and to counteract striatal ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Increased density of striatal A2A receptors was found in rats fed during three weeks with an iron-deficient diet during the post-weaning period. In iron-deficient rats, the selective A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3, at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg, was more effective at blocking motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation (presynaptic A2A receptor-mediated effect) and at enhancing locomotor activation and blocking striatal ERK phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation (postsynaptic A2A receptor-mediated effects). These results indicate that brain iron deficiency induces a functional up-regulation of both striatal pre- and postsynaptic A2A receptor, which could be involved in sensory-motor disorders associated with iron deficiency such as RLS. PMID:20385128

  20. Up-regulation of striatal adenosine A(2A) receptors with iron deficiency in rats: effects on locomotion and cortico-striatal neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, César; Pearson, Virginia; Gulyani, Seema; Allen, Richard; Earley, Christopher; Ferré, Sergi

    2010-07-01

    Brain iron deficiency leads to altered dopaminergic function in experimental animals, which can provide a mechanistic explanation for iron deficiency-related human sensory-motor disorders, such as Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). However, mechanisms linking both conditions have not been determined. Considering the strong modulation exerted by adenosine on dopamine signaling, one connection could involve changes in adenosine receptor expression or function. In the striatum, presynaptic A(2A) receptors are localized in glutamatergic terminals contacting GABAergic dynorphinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by the ability of A(2A) receptor antagonists to block the motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Postsynaptic A(2A) receptors are localized in the dendritic field of GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by studying the ability of A(2A) receptor antagonists to produce locomotor activity and to counteract striatal ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Increased density of striatal A(2A) receptors was found in rats fed during 3 weeks with an iron-deficient diet during the post-weaning period. In iron-deficient rats, the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist MSX-3, at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg, was more effective at blocking motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation (presynaptic A(2A) receptor-mediated effect) and at enhancing locomotor activation and blocking striatal ERK phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation (postsynaptic A(2A) receptor-mediated effects). These results indicate that brain iron deficiency induces a functional up-regulation of both striatal pre- and postsynaptic A(2A) receptor, which could be involved in sensory-motor disorders associated with iron deficiency such as RLS. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Neurons other than motor neurons in motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffoli, Riccardo; Biagioni, Francesca; Busceti, Carla L; Gaglione, Anderson; Ryskalin, Larisa; Gambardella, Stefano; Frati, Alessandro; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is typically defined by a loss of motor neurons in the central nervous system. Accordingly, morphological analysis for decades considered motor neurons (in the cortex, brainstem and spinal cord) as the neuronal population selectively involved in ALS. Similarly, this was considered the pathological marker to score disease severity ex vivo both in patients and experimental models. However, the concept of non-autonomous motor neuron death was used recently to indicate the need for additional cell types to produce motor neuron death in ALS. This means that motor neuron loss occurs only when they are connected with other cell types. This concept originally emphasized the need for resident glia as well as non-resident inflammatory cells. Nowadays, the additional role of neurons other than motor neurons emerged in the scenario to induce non-autonomous motor neuron death. In fact, in ALS neurons diverse from motor neurons are involved. These cells play multiple roles in ALS: (i) they participate in the chain of events to produce motor neuron loss; (ii) they may even degenerate more than and before motor neurons. In the present manuscript evidence about multi-neuronal involvement in ALS patients and experimental models is discussed. Specific sub-classes of neurons in the whole spinal cord are reported either to degenerate or to trigger neuronal degeneration, thus portraying ALS as a whole spinal cord disorder rather than a disease affecting motor neurons solely. This is associated with a novel concept in motor neuron disease which recruits abnormal mechanisms of cell to cell communication.

  2. Neuronal Store-Operated Calcium Entry and Mushroom Spine Loss in Amyloid Precursor Protein Knock-In Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Wu, Lili; Pchitskaya, Ekaterina; Zakharova, Olga; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2015-09-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common reason for elderly dementia in the world. We proposed that memory loss in AD is related to destabilization of mushroom postsynaptic spines involved in long-term memory storage. We demonstrated previously that stromal interaction molecule 2 (STIM2)-regulated neuronal store-operated calcium entry (nSOC) in postsynaptic spines play a key role in stability of mushroom spines by maintaining activity of synaptic Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII). Furthermore, we demonstrated previously that the STIM2-nSOC-CaMKII pathway is downregulated in presenilin 1 M146V knock-in (PS1-M146V KI) mouse model of AD, leading to loss of hippocampal mushroom spines in this model. In the present study, we demonstrate that hippocampal mushroom postsynaptic spines are also lost in amyloid precursor protein knock-in (APPKI) mouse model of AD. We demonstrated that loss of mushroom spines occurs as a result of accumulation of extracellular β-amyloid 42 in APPKI culture media. Our results indicate that extracellular Aβ42 acts by overactivating mGluR5 receptor in APPKI neurons, leading to elevated Ca(2+) levels in endoplasmic reticulum, compensatory downregulation of STIM2 expression, impaired synaptic nSOC, and reduced CaMKII activity. Pharmacological inhibition of mGluR5 or overexpression of STIM2 rescued synaptic nSOC and prevented mushroom spine loss in APPKI hippocampal neurons. Our results indicate that downregulation of synaptic STIM2-nSOC-CaMKII pathway causes loss of mushroom synaptic spines in both presenilin and APPKI mouse models of AD. We propose that modulators/activators of this pathway may have a potential therapeutic value for treatment of memory loss in AD. Significance statement: A direct connection between amyloid-induced synaptic mushroom spine loss and neuronal store-operated calcium entry pathway is shown. These results provide strong support for the calcium hypothesis of neurodegeneration and further validate the synaptic

  3. Striatal activation by optogenetics induces dyskinesias in the 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    F Hernández, Ledia; Castela, Ivan; Ruiz-DeDiego, Irene; Obeso, Jose A; Moratalla, Rosario

    2017-04-01

    Long-term levodopa (l-dopa) treatment is associated with the development of l-dopa-induced dyskinesias in the majority of patients with Parkinson disease (PD). The etiopathogonesis and mechanisms underlying l-dopa-induced dyskinesias are not well understood. We used striatal optogenetic stimulation to induce dyskinesias in a hemiparkinsonian model of PD in rats. Striatal dopamine depletion was induced unilaterally by 6-hydroxydopamine injection into the medial forebrain bundle. For the optogenetic manipulation, we injected adeno-associated virus particles expressing channelrhodopsin to stimulate striatal medium spiny neurons with a laser source. Simultaneous optical activation of medium spiny neurons of the direct and indirect striatal pathways in the 6-hydroxydopamine lesion but l-dopa naïve rats induced involuntary movements similar to l-dopa-induced dyskinesias, labeled here as optodyskinesias. Noticeably, optodyskinesias were facilitated by l-dopa in animals that did not respond initially to the laser stimulation. In general, optodyskinesias lasted while the laser stimulus was applied, but in some instances remained ongoing for a few seconds after the laser was off. Postmortem tissue analysis revealed increased FosB expression, a molecular marker of l-dopa-induced dyskinesias, primarily in medium spiny neurons of the direct pathway in the dopamine-depleted hemisphere. Selective optogenetic activation of the dorsolateral striatum elicits dyskinesias in the 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of PD. This effect was associated with a preferential activation of the direct striato-nigral pathway. These results potentially open new avenues in the understanding of mechanisms involved in l-dopa-induced dyskinesias. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Rapid eye movement sleep loss induces neuronal apoptosis in the rat brain by noradrenaline acting on alpha 1-adrenoceptor and by triggering mitochondrial intrinsic pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu I Somarajan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many neurodegenerative disorders are associated with rapid eye movement sleep (REMS-loss, however the mechanism was unknown. As REMS-loss elevates noradrenaline (NA level in the brain as well as induces neuronal apoptosis and degeneration, in this study we have delineated the intracellular molecular pathway involved in REMS deprivation (REMSD associated NA-induced neuronal apoptosis. Rats were REMS deprived for 6 days by the classical flower-pot method, suitable controls were conducted and the effects on apoptosis markers evaluated. Further, the role of NA was studied by one, intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of NA-ergic alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin (PRZ and two, by down-regulation of NA synthesis in locus coeruleus (LC neurons by local microinjection of tyrosine hydroxylase siRNA (TH-siRNA. Immunoblot estimates showed that the expressions of pro-apoptotic proteins viz. Bcl2-associated death promoter (BAD protein, apoptotic protease activating factor-1 (Apaf-1, cytochrome c, caspase9, caspase3 were elevated in the REMS-deprived rat brains, while caspase8 level remained unaffected; PRZ treatment did not allow elevation of these pro-apoptotic factors. Further, REMSD increased cytochrome c expression, which was prevented if the NA synthesis from the LC neurons was blocked by microinjection of TH-siRNA in vivo into the LC during REMSD in freely moving normal rats. Mitochondrial damage was re-confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, which showed distinctly swollen mitochondria with disintegrated cristae, chromosomal condensation and clumping along the nuclear membrane and all these changes were prevented in PRZ treated rats. Combining findings of this study along with earlier reports we propose that upon REMSD NA level increases in the brain as the LC NA-ergic REM-OFF neurons do not cease firing and TH is up-regulated in those neurons. This elevated NA acting on alpha1-adrenoceptors damages mitochondria causing release of

  5. The Wnt receptor Ryk reduces neuronal and cell survival capacity by repressing FOXO activity during the early phases of mutant huntingtin pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cendrine Tourette

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt receptor Ryk is an evolutionary-conserved protein important during neuronal differentiation through several mechanisms, including γ-secretase cleavage and nuclear translocation of its intracellular domain (Ryk-ICD. Although the Wnt pathway may be neuroprotective, the role of Ryk in neurodegenerative disease remains unknown. We found that Ryk is up-regulated in neurons expressing mutant huntingtin (HTT in several models of Huntington's disease (HD. Further investigation in Caenorhabditis elegans and mouse striatal cell models of HD provided a model in which the early-stage increase of Ryk promotes neuronal dysfunction by repressing the neuroprotective activity of the longevity-promoting factor FOXO through a noncanonical mechanism that implicates the Ryk-ICD fragment and its binding to the FOXO co-factor β-catenin. The Ryk-ICD fragment suppressed neuroprotection by lin-18/Ryk loss-of-function in expanded-polyQ nematodes, repressed FOXO transcriptional activity, and abolished β-catenin protection of mutant htt striatal cells against cell death vulnerability. Additionally, Ryk-ICD was increased in the nucleus of mutant htt cells, and reducing γ-secretase PS1 levels compensated for the cytotoxicity of full-length Ryk in these cells. These findings reveal that the Ryk-ICD pathway may impair FOXO protective activity in mutant polyglutamine neurons, suggesting that neurons are unable to efficiently maintain function and resist disease from the earliest phases of the pathogenic process in HD.

  6. Deletion of mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 attenuates neuronal loss and improves locomotor function in a mouse model of spinal cord trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan-Feng; Xu, Da-Yuan; Zhang, Yuntong; Liu, Xiao-Bin; Xia, Yan; Zhou, Pan-Yu; Fu, Qing-Ge; Xu, Shuo-Gui

    2017-07-01

    Neuronal cell death following spinal cord injury (SCI) is an important contributor to neurological deficits. The purpose of our work was to delineate the function of mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 (Mst1), a pro-apoptotic kinase and key mediator of apoptotic signaling, in the pathogenesis of an experimental mouse model of SCI. Male mice received a mid-thoracic spinal contusion injury, and it was found that phosphorylation of Mst1 at the injured site was enhanced significantly following SCI. Furthermore, when compared to the wild-type controls, Mst1-deficient mice displayed improved locomotor function by increased Basso mouse scale score. Deletion of Mst1 in mice attenuated loss of motor neurons and suppressed microglial and glial activation following SCI. Deletion of Mst1 in mice reduced apoptosis via suppressing cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation following SCI. Deletion of Mst1 attenuated mitochondrial dysfunction and increased ATP formation following SCI. Deletion of Mst1 in mice inhibited local inflammation following SCI, evidenced by reduced activities of myeloperoxidase and protein levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that deletion of Mst1 attenuated neuronal loss and improved locomotor function in a mouse model of SCI, via preserving mitochondrial function, attenuating mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway, and suppressing inflammation, at least in part.

  7. Loss of adenomatous polyposis coli in Bergmann glia disrupts their unique architecture and leads to cell nonautonomous neurodegeneration of cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Imura, Tetsuya; Sofroniew, Michael V; Fushiki, Shinji

    2011-06-01

    The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a multifunctional protein that inhibits the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway and regulates the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Using conditional knockout (CKO) mice in which the APC gene is inactivated in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing cells, we show a selective and critical role for APC in maintaining the morphology and function of cerebellar Bergmann glia, which are specialized astroglia that extend polarized radial processes from the Purkinje cell layer to the pial surface. APC-CKO mice developed Bergmann glia normally until the accumulation of beta-catenin started around postnatal day 10 (P10). Their radial fibers then became shortened with a marked reduction of branching collaterals and their cell bodies translocated into the molecular layer followed by loss of their pial contact and transformation into stellate-shaped cells by P21. Purkinje neurons were normal in appearance and number at P21, but there was significant loss of Purkinje neurons and cerebellar atrophy by middle age. Outside the cerebellum, neither beta-catenin accumulation nor morphological changes were identified in GFAP-expressing astroglia, indicating region-specific effects of APC deletion and an essential role for APC in maintaining the unique morphology of Bergmann glia as compared with other astroglia. These results demonstrate that loss of APC selectively disrupts the Bergmann glial scaffold in late postnatal development and leads to cerebellar degeneration with loss of Purkinje neurons in adults, providing another potential mechanism for region-specific non-cell autonomous neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Key modulatory role of presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors in cortical neurotransmission to the striatal direct pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, César; Luján, Rafael; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Simoes, Ana Patrícia; Lerner, Talia N; Borycz, Janusz; Kachroo, Anil; Canas, Paula M; Orru, Marco; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Rosin, Diane L; Kreitzer, Anatol C; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ferré, Sergi

    2009-11-18

    Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  9. Key Modulatory Role of Presynaptic Adenosine A2A Receptors in Cortical Neurotransmission to the Striatal Direct Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Quiroz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  10. Early neonatal loss of inhibitory synaptic input to the spinal motor neurons confers spina bifida-like leg dysfunction in a chicken model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Sakirul Islam Khan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Spina bifida aperta (SBA, one of the most common congenital malformations, causes lifelong neurological complications, particularly in terms of motor dysfunction. Fetuses with SBA exhibit voluntary leg movements in utero and during early neonatal life, but these disappear within the first few weeks after birth. However, the pathophysiological sequence underlying such motor dysfunction remains unclear. Additionally, because important insights have yet to be obtained from human cases, an appropriate animal model is essential. Here, we investigated the neuropathological mechanisms of progression of SBA-like motor dysfunctions in a neural tube surgery-induced chicken model of SBA at different pathogenesis points ranging from embryonic to posthatch ages. We found that chicks with SBA-like features lose voluntary leg movements and subsequently exhibit lower-limb paralysis within the first 2 weeks after hatching, coinciding with the synaptic change-induced disruption of spinal motor networks at the site of the SBA lesion in the lumbosacral region. Such synaptic changes reduced the ratio of inhibitory-to-excitatory inputs to motor neurons and were associated with a drastic loss of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic inputs and upregulation of the cholinergic activities of motor neurons. Furthermore, most of the neurons in ventral horns, which appeared to be suffering from excitotoxicity during the early postnatal days, underwent apoptosis. However, the triggers of cellular abnormalization and neurodegenerative signaling were evident in the middle- to late-gestational stages, probably attributable to the amniotic fluid-induced in ovo milieu. In conclusion, we found that early neonatal loss of neurons in the ventral horn of exposed spinal cord affords novel insights into the pathophysiology of SBA-like leg dysfunction.

  11. A single exposure to alcohol during brain development induces microencephaly and neuronal losses in genetically susceptible mice, but not in wild type mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Licona, Hannah Klein; Karacay, Bahri; Mahoney, Jo; McDonald, Elizabeth; Luang, Thirath; Bonthius, Daniel J

    2009-05-01

    Maternal alcohol abuse during pregnancy can damage the fetal brain and lead to fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). Despite public warnings discouraging alcohol use during pregnancy, many pregnant women continue to drink intermittently because they do not believe that occasional exposures to alcohol can be harmful to a fetus. However, because of genetic differences, some fetuses are much more susceptible than others to alcohol-induced brain injury. Thus, a relatively low quantity of alcohol that may be innocuous to most fetuses could damage a genetically susceptible fetus. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) can protect developing mouse neurons against alcohol toxicity by synthesizing neuroprotective nitric oxide. This study examined whether a single exposure to alcohol, which causes no evident injury in wild type mice, can damage the brains of mice genetically deficient for nNOS (nNOS-/- mice). Wild type and nNOS-/- mice received intraperitoneal injections of alcohol (0.0, 2.2, or 4.4mg/g body weight) either as a single dose on postnatal day (PD) 4 or as repeated daily doses over PD4-9. Brain volumes and neuronal numbers within the hippocampus and cerebral cortex were determined on PD10. Alcohol exposure on PD4-9 restricted brain growth and caused neuronal death in both strains of mice, but the severity of microencephaly and neuronal loss were more severe in the nNOS-/- mice than in wild type. The 4.4 mg/g alcohol dose administered on PD4 alone caused significant neuronal loss and microencephaly in the nNOS-/- mice, while this same dose caused no evident injury in the wild type mice. Thus, during development, a single exposure to alcohol can injure a genetically vulnerable brain, while it leaves a wild type brain unaffected. Since the genes that confer alcohol resistance and vulnerability in developing humans are unknown, any particular human fetus is potentially vulnerable. Thus, women should be counseled to consume no alcohol during pregnancy.

  12. Striatal dopamine transmission is subtly modified in human A53Tα-synuclein overexpressing mice.

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    Nicola J Platt

    Full Text Available Mutations in, or elevated dosage of, SNCA, the gene for α-synuclein (α-syn, cause familial Parkinson's disease (PD. Mouse lines overexpressing the mutant human A53Tα-syn may represent a model of early PD. They display progressive motor deficits, abnormal cellular accumulation of α-syn, and deficits in dopamine-dependent corticostriatal plasticity, which, in the absence of overt nigrostriatal degeneration, suggest there are age-related deficits in striatal dopamine (DA signalling. In addition A53Tα-syn overexpression in cultured rodent neurons has been reported to inhibit transmitter release. Therefore here we have characterized for the first time DA release in the striatum of mice overexpressing human A53Tα-syn, and explored whether A53Tα-syn overexpression causes deficits in the release of DA. We used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to detect DA release at carbon-fibre microelectrodes in acute striatal slices from two different lines of A53Tα-syn-overexpressing mice, at up to 24 months. In A53Tα-syn overexpressors, mean DA release evoked by a single stimulus pulse was not different from wild-types, in either dorsal striatum or nucleus accumbens. However the frequency responsiveness of DA release was slightly modified in A53Tα-syn overexpressors, and in particular showed slight deficiency when the confounding effects of striatal ACh acting at presynaptic nicotinic receptors (nAChRs were antagonized. The re-release of DA was unmodified after single-pulse stimuli, but after prolonged stimulation trains, A53Tα-syn overexpressors showed enhanced recovery of DA release at old age, in keeping with elevated striatal DA content. In summary, A53Tα-syn overexpression in mice causes subtle changes in the regulation of DA release in the striatum. While modest, these modifications may indicate or contribute to striatal dysfunction.

  13. Functional role for cortical-striatal circuitry in modulating alcohol self-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Anel A; Randall, Patrick A; Stewart, Spencer; Fortino, Brayden; Van Voorhies, Kalynn; Besheer, Joyce

    2018-03-01

    The cortical-striatal brain circuitry is heavily implicated in drug-use. As such, the present study investigated the functional role of cortical-striatal circuitry in modulating alcohol self-administration. Given that a functional role for the nucleus accumbens core (AcbC) in modulating alcohol-reinforced responding has been established, we sought to test the role of cortical brain regions with afferent projections to the AcbC: the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the insular cortex (IC). Long-Evans rats were trained to self-administer alcohol (15% alcohol (v/v)+2% sucrose (w/v)) during 30 min sessions. To test the functional role of the mPFC or IC, we utilized a chemogenetic technique (hM4D i -Designer Receptors Activation by Designer Drugs) to silence neuronal activity prior to an alcohol self-administration session. Additionally, we chemogenetically silenced mPFC→AcbC or IC→AcbC projections, to investigate the role of cortical-striatal circuitry in modulating alcohol self-administration. Chemogenetically silencing the mPFC decreased alcohol self-administration, while silencing the IC increased alcohol self-administration, an effect absent in mCherry-Controls. Interestingly, silencing mPFC→AcbC projections had no effect on alcohol self-administration. In contrast, silencing IC→AcbC projections decreased alcohol self-administration, in a reinforcer-specific manner as there was no effect in rats trained to self-administer sucrose (0.8%, w/v). Additionally, no change in self-administration was observed in the mCherry-Controls. Together these data demonstrate the complex role of the cortical-striatal circuitry while implicating a role for the insula-striatal circuit in modulating ongoing alcohol self-administration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of estrogen replacement therapy in memory enhancement and the prevention of neuronal loss associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, J W; Green, P S; Gridley, K E; Singh, M; de Fiebre, N C; Rajakumar, G

    1997-09-22

    Recent evidence supports a role for estrogens in both normal neural development and neuronal maintenance throughout life. Women spend 25-33% of their life in an estrogen-deprived state and retrospective studies have shown an inverse correlation between dose and duration of estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) and incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD), suggesting a role for estrogen in the prevention and/or treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. To explore these observations further, an animal model was developed using ovariectomy (OVX) and ovariectomy with estradiol replacement (E2) in female Sprague-Dawley rats to mimic postmenopausal changes. Using an active-avoidance paradigm and a spatial memory task, the effects of estrogen deprivation were tested on memory-related behaviors. OVX caused a decline in avoidance behavior, and estrogen replacement normalized the response. In the Morris water task of spatial memory, OVX animals showed normal spatial learning but were deficient in spatial memory, an effect that was prevented by estrogen treatment. Together these data indicate that OVX in rats results in an estrogen-reversible impairment of learning/memory behavior. Because a plethora of information has been generated that links decline in memory-related behavior to dysfunction of cholinergic neurons, the effects of estrogens on cholinergic neurons were tested. We demonstrated that OVX causes a decrease in high affinity choline uptake and choline acetyltransferase activity in the hippocampus and frontal cortex; ERT reverses this effect. Further, we showed that estrogens promote the expression of mRNA for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), 2 neurotrophic substances that have been shown to ameliorate the effects of age and injury on cholinergic neurons. Tissue culture models were used to evaluate whether estrogen treatment increases the survival of neurons when exposed to a variety of insults. 17-beta-Estradiol (beta-E2) protects

  15. A C-terminal PDZ domain-binding sequence is required for striatal distribution of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Hansen, Freja Herborg; Sørensen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    transporter expression in the striatum, causing hyperlocomotion and attenuated response to amphetamine. In cultured dopaminergic neurons and striatal slices from dopamine transporter-AAA mice, we find markedly reduced dopamine transporter surface levels and evidence for enhanced constitutive internalization....... In dopamine transporter-AAA neurons, but not in wild-type neurons, surface levels are rescued in part by expression of a dominant-negative dynamin mutation (K44A). Our findings suggest that PDZ-domain interactions are critical for synaptic distribution of dopamine transporter in vivo and thereby for proper...

  16. Loss of neuronal integrity: a cause of hypometabolism in patients with traumatic brain injury without MRI abnormality in the chronic stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiga, Tohru; Matsuyama, Tetsuaki; Kageyama, Hiroyuki; Kohno, Tomoya; Tamaki, Nagara; Ikoma, Katsunori; Isoyama, Hirotaka; Katoh, Chietsugu; Kuge, Yuji; Terae, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes brain dysfunction in many patients. However, some patients have severe brain dysfunction but display no abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There have been some reports of hypometabolism even in such patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between metabolic abnormality and loss of neuronal integrity in TBI patients with some symptoms but without MRI abnormalities. The study population comprised ten patients with TBI and ten normal volunteers. All of the patients were examined at least 1 year after the injury. 15 O-labelled gas PET and [ 11 C]flumazenil (FMZ) positron emission tomography (PET) were carried out. The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ) and binding potential (BP) images of FMZ were calculated. Axial T2WI, T2*WI and FLAIR images were obtained. Coronal images were added in some cases. All of the patients had normal MRI findings, and all showed areas with abnormally low CMRO 2 . Low uptake on BP images was observed in six patients (60%). No lesions that showed low uptake on BP images were without low CMRO 2 . On the other hand, there were 14 lesions with low CMRO 2 but without BP abnormalities. These results indicate that there are metabolic abnormalities in TBI patients with some symptoms after brain injury but without abnormalities on MRI. Some of the hypometabolic lesions showed low BP, indicating a loss of neuronal integrity. Thus, FMZ PET may have potential to distinguish hypometabolism caused by neuronal loss from that caused by other factors. (orig.)

  17. Prolonged striatal disinhibition as a chronic animal model of tic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinner, Esther; Israelashvili, Michal; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2017-12-01

    Experimental findings and theoretical models have associated Tourette syndrome with abnormal striatal inhibition. The expression of tics, the hallmark symptom of this disorder, has been transiently induced in non-human primates and rodents by the injection of GABA A antagonists into the striatum, leading to temporary disinhibition. The novel chronic model of tic expression utilizes mini-osmotic pumps implanted subcutaneously in the rat's back for prolonged infusion of bicuculline into the dorsolateral striatum. Tics were expressed on the contralateral side to the infusion over a period of multiple days. Tic expression was stable, and maintained similar properties throughout the infusion period. Electrophysiological recordings revealed the existence of tic-related local field potential spikes and individual neuron activity changes that remained stable throughout the infusion period. The striatal disinhibition model provides a unique combination of face validity (tic expression) and construct validity (abnormal striatal inhibition) but is limited to sub-hour periods. The new chronic model extends the period of tic expression to multiple days and thus enables the study of tic dynamics and the effects of behavior and pharmacological agents on tic expression. The chronic model provides similar behavioral and neuronal correlates of tics as the acute striatal disinhibition model but over prolonged periods of time, thus providing a unique, basal ganglia initiated model of tic expression. Chronic expression of symptoms is the key to studying the time varying properties of Tourette syndrome and the effects of multiple internal and external factors on this disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Basal ganglia disorders associated with imbalances in the striatal striosome and matrix compartments

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    Jill R. Crittenden

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The striatum is composed principally of GABAergic, medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs that can be categorized based on their gene expression, electrophysiological profiles and input-output circuits. Major subdivisions of MSN populations include 1 those in ventromedial and dorsolateral striatal regions, 2 those giving rise to the direct and indirect pathways, and 3 those that lie in the striosome and matrix compartments. The first two classificatory schemes have enabled advances in understanding of how basal ganglia circuits contribute to disease. However, despite the large number of molecules that are differentially expressed in the striosomes or the extra-striosomal matrix, and the evidence that these compartments have different input-output connections, our understanding of how this compartmentalization contributes to striatal function is still not clear. A broad view is that the matrix contains the direct and indirect pathway MSNs that form parts of sensorimotor and associative circuits, whereas striosomes contain MSNs that receive input from parts of limbic cortex and project directly or indirectly to the dopamine-containing neurons of the substantia nigra, pars compacta. Striosomes are widely distributed within the striatum and are thought to exert global, as well as local, influences on striatal processing by exchanging information with the surrounding matrix, including through interneurons that send processes into both compartments. It has been suggested that striosomes exert and maintain limbic control over behaviors driven by surrounding sensorimotor and associative parts of the striatal matrix. Consistent with this possibility, imbalances between striosome and matrix functions have been reported in relation to neurological disorders, including Huntington’s disease, L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias, dystonia and drug addiction. Here, we consider how signaling imbalances between the striosomes and matrix might relate to symptomatology in

  19. Liquid computing on and off the edge of chaos with a striatal microcircuit

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    Carlos eToledo-Suárez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In reinforcement learning theories of the basal ganglia, there is a need for the expected rewards corresponding to relevant environmental states to be maintained and modified during the learning process. However, the representation of these states that allows them to be associated with reward expectations remains unclear. Previous studies have tended to rely on pre-defined partitioning of states encoded by disjunct neuronal groups or sparse topological drives. A more likely scenario is that striatal neurons are involved in the encoding of multiple different states through their spike patterns, and that an appropriate partitioning of an environment is learned on the basis of task constraints, thus minimizing the number of states involved in solving a particular task. Here we show that striatal activity is sufficient to implement a liquid state, an important prerequisite for such a computation, whereby transient patterns of striatal activity are mapped onto the relevant states. We develop a simple small scale model of the striatum which can reproduce key features of the experimentally observed activity of the major cell types of the striatum. We then use the activity of this network as input for the supervised training of four simple linear readouts to learn three different functions on a plane, where the network is stimulated with the spike coded position of the agent. We discover that the network configuration that best reproduces striatal activity statistics lies on the edge of chaos and has good performance on all three tasks, but that in general, the edge of chaosis a poor predictor of network performance.

  20. Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity after activation of subcortical pathways

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    Jan M Schulz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP is modulated by dopamine in vitro. The present study investigated STDP in vivo using alternative procedures for modulating dopaminergic inputs. Postsynaptic potentials (PSP were evoked in intracellularly recorded spiny neurons by electrical stimulation of the contralateral motor cortex. PSPs often consisted of up to three distinct components, likely representing distinct cortico-striatal pathways. After baseline recording, bicuculline (BIC was ejected into the superior colliculus (SC to disinhibit visual pathways to the dopamine cells and striatum. Repetitive cortical stimulation (~60; 0.2 Hz was then paired with postsynaptic spike discharge induced by an intracellular current pulse, with each pairing followed 250 ms later by a light flash to the contralateral eye (n=13. Changes in PSPs, measured as the maximal slope normalised to 5 min pre, ranged from potentiation (~120% to depression (~80%. The determining factor was the relative timing between PSP components and spike: PSP components coinciding or closely following the spike tended towards potentiation, whereas PSP components preceding the spike were depressed. Importantly, STDP was only seen in experiments with successful BIC-mediated disinhibition (n=10. Cortico-striatal high-frequency stimulation (50 pulses at 100 Hz followed 100 ms later by a light flash did not induce more robust synaptic plasticity (n=9. However, an elevated post-light spike rate correlated with depression across plasticity protocols (R2=0.55, p=0.009, n=11 active neurons. These results confirm that the direction of cortico-striatal plasticity is determined by the timing of pre- and postsynaptic activity and that synaptic modification is dependent on the activation of additional subcortical inputs.

  1. Alterations in Striatal Synaptic Transmission are Consistent across Genetic Mouse Models of Huntington's Disease

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    Damian M Cummings

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the identification of the gene responsible for HD (Huntington's disease, many genetic mouse models have been generated. Each employs a unique approach for delivery of the mutated gene and has a different CAG repeat length and background strain. The resultant diversity in the genetic context and phenotypes of these models has led to extensive debate regarding the relevance of each model to the human disorder. Here, we compare and contrast the striatal synaptic phenotypes of two models of HD, namely the YAC128 mouse, which carries the full-length huntingtin gene on a yeast artificial chromosome, and the CAG140 KI*** (knock-in mouse, which carries a human/mouse chimaeric gene that is expressed in the context of the mouse genome, with our previously published data obtained from the R6/2 mouse, which is transgenic for exon 1 mutant huntingtin. We show that striatal MSNs (medium-sized spiny neurons in YAC128 and CAG140 KI mice have similar electrophysiological phenotypes to that of the R6/2 mouse. These include a progressive increase in membrane input resistance, a reduction in membrane capacitance, a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents and a greater frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a subpopulation of striatal neurons. Thus, despite differences in the context of the inserted gene between these three models of HD, the primary electrophysiological changes observed in striatal MSNs are consistent. The outcomes suggest that the changes are due to the expression of mutant huntingtin and such alterations can be extended to the human condition.

  2. Differences in spontaneously avoiding or approaching mice reflect differences in CB1-mediated signaling of dorsal striatal transmission.

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    Daniela Laricchiuta

    Full Text Available Approach or avoidance behaviors are accompanied by perceptual vigilance for, affective reactivity to and behavioral predisposition towards rewarding or punitive stimuli, respectively. We detected three subpopulations of C57BL/6J mice that responded with avoiding, balancing or approaching behaviors not induced by any experimental manipulation but spontaneously displayed in an approach/avoidance conflict task. Although the detailed neuronal mechanisms underlying the balancing between approach and avoidance are not fully clarified, there is growing evidence that endocannabinoid system (ECS plays a critical role in the control of these balancing actions. The sensitivity of dorsal striatal synapses to the activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors was investigated in the subpopulations of spontaneously avoiding, balancing or approaching mice. Avoiding animals displayed decreased control of CB1 receptors on GABAergic striatal transmission and in parallel increase of behavioral inhibition. Conversely, approaching animals exhibited increased control of CB1 receptors and in parallel increase of explorative behavior. Balancing animals reacted with balanced responses between approach and avoidance patterns. Treating avoiding animals with URB597 (fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor or approaching animals with AM251 (CB1 receptor inverse agonist reverted their respective behavioral and electrophysiological patterns. Therefore, enhanced or reduced CB1-mediated control on dorsal striatal transmission represents the synaptic hallmark of the approach or avoidance behavior, respectively. Thus, the opposite spontaneous responses to conflicting stimuli are modulated by a different involvement of endocannabinoid signaling of dorsal striatal neurons in the range of temperamental traits related to individual differences.

  3. Caprylic triglyceride as a novel therapeutic approach to effectively improve the performance and attenuate the symptoms due to the motor neuron loss in ALS disease.

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    Wei Zhao

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons causing progressive muscle weakness, paralysis, and finally death. ALS patients suffer from asthenia and their progressive weakness negatively impacts quality of life, limiting their daily activities. They have impaired energy balance linked to lower activity of mitochondrial electron transport chain enzymes in ALS spinal cord, suggesting that improving mitochondrial function may present a therapeutic approach for ALS. When fed a ketogenic diet, the G93A ALS mouse shows a significant increase in serum ketones as well as a significantly slower progression of weakness and lower mortality rate. In this study, we treated SOD1-G93A mice with caprylic triglyceride, a medium chain triglyceride that is metabolized into ketone bodies and can serve as an alternate energy substrate for neuronal metabolism. Treatment with caprylic triglyceride attenuated progression of weakness and protected spinal cord motor neuron loss in SOD1-G93A transgenic animals, significantly improving their performance even though there was no significant benefit regarding the survival of the ALS transgenic animals. We found that caprylic triglyceride significantly promoted the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate in vivo. Our results demonstrated that caprylic triglyceride alleviates ALS-type motor impairment through restoration of energy metabolism in SOD1-G93A ALS mice, especially during the overt stage of the disease. These data indicate the feasibility of using caprylic acid as an easily administered treatment with a high impact on the quality of life of ALS patients.

  4. Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss, Reduced Neurite Complexity and Autophagic Abnormalities in Transgenic Mice Expressing G2019S Mutant LRRK2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Brian M.; Stafa, Klodjan; Kim, Jaekwang; Banerjee, Rebecca; Westerlund, Marie; Pletnikova, Olga; Glauser, Liliane; Yang, Lichuan; Liu, Ying; Swing, Deborah A.; Beal, M. Flint; Troncoso, Juan C.; McCaffery, J. Michael; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Galter, Dagmar; Thomas, Bobby; Lee, Michael K.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Moore, Darren J.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene cause late-onset, autosomal dominant familial Parkinson's disease (PD) and also contribute to idiopathic PD. LRRK2 mutations represent the most common cause of PD with clinical and neurochemical features that are largely indistinguishable from idiopathic disease. Currently, transgenic mice expressing wild-type or disease-causing mutants of LRRK2 have failed to produce overt neurodegeneration, although abnormalities in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurotransmission have been observed. Here, we describe the development and characterization of transgenic mice expressing human LRRK2 bearing the familial PD mutations, R1441C and G2019S. Our study demonstrates that expression of G2019S mutant LRRK2 induces the degeneration of nigrostriatal pathway dopaminergic neurons in an age-dependent manner. In addition, we observe autophagic and mitochondrial abnormalities in the brains of aged G2019S LRRK2 mice and markedly reduced neurite complexity of cultured dopaminergic neurons. These new LRRK2 transgenic mice will provide important tools for understanding the mechanism(s) through which familial mutations precipitate neuronal degeneration and PD. PMID:21494637

  5. Dopaminergic neuronal loss, reduced neurite complexity and autophagic abnormalities in transgenic mice expressing G2019S mutant LRRK2.

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    David Ramonet

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene cause late-onset, autosomal dominant familial Parkinson's disease (PD and also contribute to idiopathic PD. LRRK2 mutations represent the most common cause of PD with clinical and neurochemical features that are largely indistinguishable from idiopathic disease. Currently, transgenic mice expressing wild-type or disease-causing mutants of LRRK2 have failed to produce overt neurodegeneration, although abnormalities in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurotransmission have been observed. Here, we describe the development and characterization of transgenic mice expressing human LRRK2 bearing the familial PD mutations, R1441C and G2019S. Our study demonstrates that expression of G2019S mutant LRRK2 induces the degeneration of nigrostriatal pathway dopaminergic neurons in an age-dependent manner. In addition, we observe autophagic and mitochondrial abnormalities in the brains of aged G2019S LRRK2 mice and markedly reduced neurite complexity of cultured dopaminergic neurons. These new LRRK2 transgenic mice will provide important tools for understanding the mechanism(s through which familial mutations precipitate neuronal degeneration and PD.

  6. Morphological features of neurons containing calcium-binding proteins in the human striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prensa, L; Giménez-Amaya, J M; Parent, A

    1998-01-26

    An immunohistochemical approach was used to characterize the morphological phenotype of neurons containing the calcium-binding proteins calretinin (CR), parvalbumin (PV), or calbindin-D28k (CB) in the normal human striatum. The protein CR occurs in at least four morphologically distinct types of neurons. Apart from the numerous medium-sized aspiny interneurons and the less abundant giant aspiny interneurons, CR also labels some medium-sized spiny neurons morphologically identical to striatal projection neurons. This finding indicates that CR is not only confined to striatal interneurons but also may be involved in the function of certain projection neurons. Some small and peculiar bushy-like aspiny neurons also are enriched with CR. These neurons could correspond to the dwarf or neurogliform neurons first described by Ramón y Cajal (1911). Three types of PV-immunoreactive striatal neurons can be visualized in the human striatum: 1) the common medium-sized aspiny leptodendritic neurons, 2) some smaller and profusely arborized aspiny neurons, and 3) a few large and intensely stained neurons with conspicuously beaded and poorly branched dendrites. The protein CB labels virtually all medium-sized spiny projection neurons located in the striatal matrix but also identifies a small subset of large and more intensely immunostained aspiny neurons. The latter finding indicates that CB is not entirely confined to striatal projection neurons but also may play a role in local circuit neurons. These normative data should help our understanding of the chemical anatomy of the human striatum in both health and disease.

  7. Impaired dual tasking in Parkinson's disease is associated with reduced focusing of cortico-striatal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwhof, Freek; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Reelick, Miriam F; Aarts, Esther; Maidan, Inbal; Mirelman, Anat; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M; Toni, Ivan; Helmich, Rick C

    2017-05-01

    See Bell et al. (doi:10.1093/awx063) for a scientific commentary on this article. Impaired dual tasking, namely the inability to concurrently perform a cognitive and a motor task (e.g. 'stops walking while talking'), is a largely unexplained and frequent symptom of Parkinson's disease. Here we consider two circuit-level accounts of how striatal dopamine depletion might lead to impaired dual tasking in patients with Parkinson's disease. First, the loss of segregation between striatal territories induced by dopamine depletion may lead to dysfunctional overlaps between the motor and cognitive processes usually implemented in parallel cortico-striatal circuits. Second, the known dorso-posterior to ventro-anterior gradient of dopamine depletion in patients with Parkinson's disease may cause a funnelling of motor and cognitive processes into the relatively spared ventro-anterior putamen, causing a neural bottleneck. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we measured brain activity in 19 patients with Parkinson's disease and 26 control subjects during performance of a motor task (auditory-cued ankle movements), a cognitive task (implementing a switch-stay rule), and both tasks simultaneously (dual task). The distribution of task-related activity respected the known segregation between motor and cognitive territories of the putamen in both groups, with motor-related responses in the dorso-posterior putamen and task switch-related responses in the ventro-anterior putamen. During dual task performance, patients made more motor and cognitive errors than control subjects. They recruited a striatal territory (ventro-posterior putamen) not engaged during either the cognitive or the motor task, nor used by controls. Relatively higher ventro-posterior putamen activity in controls was associated with worse dual task performance. These observations suggest that dual task impairments in Parkinson's disease are related to reduced spatial focusing of striatal activity. This

  8. Human neural stem cells improve cognition and promote synaptic growth in two complementary transgenic models of Alzheimer's disease and neuronal loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager, Rahasson R; Davis, Joy L; Agazaryan, Andy; Benavente, Francisca; Poon, Wayne W; LaFerla, Frank M; Blurton-Jones, Mathew

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorder, affecting over 35 million people worldwide. Pathologically, AD is characterized by the progressive accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles within the brain. Together, these pathologies lead to marked neuronal and synaptic loss and corresponding impairments in cognition. Current treatments, and recent clinical trials, have failed to modify the clinical course of AD; thus, the development of novel and innovative therapies is urgently needed. Over the last decade, the potential use of stem cells to treat cognitive impairment has received growing attention. Specifically, neural stem cell transplantation as a treatment for AD offers a novel approach with tremendous therapeutic potential. We previously reported that intrahippocampal transplantation of murine neural stem cells (mNSCs) can enhance synaptogenesis and improve cognition in 3xTg-AD mice and the CaM/Tet-DT(A) model of hippocampal neuronal loss. These promising findings prompted us to examine a human neural stem cell population, HuCNS-SC, which has already been clinically tested for other neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we provide the first evidence that transplantation of research grade HuCNS-SCs can improve cognition in two complementary models of neurodegeneration. We also demonstrate that HuCNS-SC cells can migrate and differentiate into immature neurons and glia and significantly increase synaptic and growth-associated markers in both 3xTg-AD and CaM/Tet-DTA mice. Interestingly, improvements in aged 3xTg-AD mice were not associated with altered Aβ or tau pathology. Rather, our findings suggest that human NSC transplantation improves cognition by enhancing endogenous synaptogenesis. Taken together, our data provide the first preclinical evidence that human NSC transplantation could be a safe and effective therapeutic approach for treating AD. © 2014 The Authors. Hippocampus

  9. Reactive Neuroblastosis in Huntington’s Disease: A Putative Therapeutic Target for Striatal Regeneration in the Adult Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Kandasamy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the reciprocal relationship between adult neurogenesis, cognitive and motor functions have been an important focus of investigation in the establishment of effective neural replacement therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. While neuronal loss, reactive gliosis and defects in the self-repair capacity have extensively been characterized in neurodegenerative disorders, the transient excess production of neuroblasts detected in the adult striatum of animal models of Huntington’s disease (HD and in post-mortem brain of HD patients, has only marginally been addressed. This abnormal cellular response in the striatum appears to originate from the selective proliferation and ectopic migration of neuroblasts derived from the subventricular zone (SVZ. Based on and in line with the term “reactive astrogliosis”, we propose to name the observed cellular event “reactive neuroblastosis”. Although, the functional relevance of reactive neuroblastosis is unknown, we speculate that this process may provide support for the tissue regeneration in compensating the structural and physiological functions of the striatum in lieu of aging or of the neurodegenerative process. Thus, in this review article, we comprehend different possibilities for the regulation of striatal neurogenesis, neuroblastosis and their functional relevance in the context of HD.

  10. Multicistronic lentiviral vector-mediated striatal gene transfer of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and GTP cyclohydrolase I induces sustained transgene expression, dopamine production, and functional improvement in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouz, Mimoun; Martin-Rendon, Enca; Barber, Robert D; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Carter, Emma E; Rohll, Jonathan B; Kingsman, Susan M; Kingsman, Alan J; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2002-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. This loss leads to complete dopamine depletion in the striatum and severe motor impairment. It has been demonstrated previously that a lentiviral vector system based on equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) gives rise to highly efficient and sustained transduction of neurons in the rat brain. Therefore, a dopamine replacement strategy using EIAV has been investigated as a treatment in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) animal model of PD. A self-inactivating EIAV minimal lentiviral vector that expresses tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic amino acid dopa decarboxylase (AADC), and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (CH1) in a single transcription unit has been generated. In cultured striatal neurons transduced with this vector, TH, AADC, and CH1 proteins can all be detected. After stereotactic delivery into the dopamine-denervated striatum of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat, sustained expression of each enzyme and effective production of catecholamines were detected, resulting in significant reduction of apomorphine-induced motor asymmetry compared with control animals (p < 0.003). Expression of each enzyme in the striatum was observed for up to 5 months after injection. These data indicate that the delivery of three catecholaminergic synthetic enzymes by a single lentiviral vector can achieve functional improvement and thus open the potential for the use of this vector for gene therapy of late-stage PD patients.

  11. Overeating Behavior and Striatal Dopamine with 6-[18F]-Fluoro-L--Tyrosine PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. Wilcox

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Eating behavior may be affected by dopamine synthesis capacity. In this study, 6-[18F]-fluoro-L--tyrosine (FMT positron emission tomography (PET uptake in striatal subregions was correlated with BMI (kg/m2 and an estimate of the frequency of prior weight loss attempts in 15 healthy subjects. BMI was negatively correlated with FMT uptake in the dorsal caudate. Although the association between BMI and FMT uptake in the dorsal caudate was not significant upon correction for age and sex, the association fell within the range of a statistical trend. Weight loss attempts divided by years trying was also negatively correlated with FMT uptake in the dorsal putamen (=.05. These results suggest an association between low dorsal striatal presynaptic dopamine synthesis capacity and overeating behavior.

  12. Transmission et plasticité activité-dépendante au niveau des synapses cortico-striatales

    OpenAIRE

    Fino, Elodie

    2007-01-01

    Le striatum a pour rôle de sélectionner et d'intégrer les informations provenant du cortex et ainsi construire et transmettre une réponse adaptée aux stimuli environnementaux. Nous avons caractérisé les propriétés électrophysiologiques des différents neurones du striatum (neurones de sortie, NETM, et interneurones) dans des conditions normales, et lors d'une déplétion de dopamine striatale. Grâce à un modèle de tranche de cerveau de rat dans laquelle les afférences cortico-striatales sont con...

  13. Striatal connectivity changes following gambling wins and near-misses: Associations with gambling severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth J. van Holst

    2014-01-01

    These findings corroborate the ‘non-categorical’ nature of reward processing in gambling: near-misses and full-misses are objectively identical outcomes that are processed differentially. Ventral striatal connectivity with the insula correlated positively with gambling severity in the illusion of control contrast, which could be a risk factor for the cognitive distortions and loss-chasing that are characteristic of problem gambling.

  14. Bilateral quinolinic acid-induced lipid peroxidation, decreased striatal monoamine levels and neurobehavioral deficits are ameliorated by GIP receptor agonist D-Ala2GIP in rat model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahip K; Goel, Rajan; Nandakumar, Krishnadas; Nemmani, Kumar V S

    2018-03-22

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited complex progressive neurodegenerative disorder with an established etiopathology linked to neuronal oxidative stress and corticostriatal excitotoxicity. Present study explores the effects of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) receptor agonist on the neurobehavioral sequelae of quinolinic acid-induced phenotype of Huntington's disease in rats. Bilateral administration of quinolinic acid (300 nmol/4 μl) to the rat striatum led to characteristic deficits in, locomotor activity, motor coordination, neuromuscular coordination and short-term episodic memory. Therapeutic treatment for 14 days with a stable and brain penetrating GIP receptor agonist, D-Ala 2 GIP (100 nmol/kg, i.p.), attenuated the neurobehavioral deficits due to quinolinic acid (QA) administration. Protective actions of D-Ala 2 GIP were sensitive to blockade with a GIP receptor antagonist, (Pro 3 )GIP (50 nmol/kg, i.p.), indicating specific involvement of GIP receptor signaling pathway. Stimulation of GIP receptor with D-Ala 2 GIP attenuated lipid peroxidation, evidenced by reduced levels of brain malondialdehyde (MDA), and restoration of reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in brain. Quinolinic acid administration led to significant loss of striatal monoamines, e.g., norepinephrine, epinephrine, serotonin, dopamine, and metabolites, 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). D-Ala 2 GIP attenuated the QA-induced depletion of striatal monoamines, without affecting the monoamine degradation pathways. Thus, observed effects with D-Ala 2 GIP in the QA-induced Huntington's disease model could be attributable to reduction in lipid peroxidation, restoration of endogenous antioxidants and decreased striatal monoamine levels. These findings together suggest that stimulation of GIP receptor signaling pathway in brain could be a potential therapeutic strategy in the symptomatic management of

  15. Molecular Regulation of Striatal Development: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Evans

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system is composed of the brain and the spinal cord. The brain is a complex organ that processes and coordinates activities of the body in bilaterian, higher-order animals. The development of the brain mirrors its complex function as it requires intricate genetic signalling at specific times, and deviations from this can lead to brain malformations such as anencephaly. Research into how the CNS is specified and patterned has been studied extensively in chick, fish, frog, and mice, but findings from the latter will be emphasised here as higher-order mammals show most similarity to the human brain. Specifically, we will focus on the embryonic development of an important forebrain structure, the striatum (also known as the dorsal striatum or neostriatum. Over the past decade, research on striatal development in mice has led to an influx of new information about the genes involved, but the precise orchestration between the genes, signalling molecules, and transcription factors remains unanswered. We aim to summarise what is known to date about the tightly controlled network of interacting genes that control striatal development. This paper will discuss early telencephalon patterning and dorsal ventral patterning with specific reference to the genes involved in striatal development.

  16. Regulation of GABA and benzodiazepine receptors following neurotoxin-induced striatal and medial forebrain bundle lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, H.S.I.

    1985-01-01

    GABA, a major inhibitory transmitter, is used by many projection neurons of the striatum. To investigate the role of GABA in striatal function, the GABA receptor complex was studied after lesions of the striatum or the nigrostriatal neurons. Quantitative receptor autoradiography using thaw-mounted tissue slices was developed for the study of GABA and benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors. With the technique established, binding to GABA and BDZ receptors after unilateral striatal kainate lesions was examined. Subsequently, changes in GABA and BDZ receptors were studied following the destruction of dopaminergic nigrostriatal cells by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the medial forebrain bundle. In summary, quantitative receptor autoradiography allowed the detection of GABA and BDZ receptor changes in multiple small areas in each lesioned brain. This technique made it feasible to carry out kinetic saturation, and competition studies using less than 1 mg of tissue. The data suggest that dopamine is functionally inhibitory on striatopallidal neurons but is functionally excitatory on striatoentopeduncular and striatonigral cells which in turn inhibit the thalamus. This quantitative autoradiographic technique can be generalized to study other transmitter receptors and can be combined with 2-deoxyglucose uptake studies

  17. Optogenetic approaches to evaluate striatal function in animal models of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Krystal L; Kim, Youngcho; Alberico, Stephanie L; Emmons, Eric B; Narayanan, Nandakumar S

    2016-03-01

    Optogenetics refers to the ability to control cells that have been genetically modified to express light-sensitive ion channels. The introduction of optogenetic approaches has facilitated the dissection of neural circuits. Optogenetics allows for the precise stimulation and inhibition of specific sets of neurons and their projections with fine temporal specificity. These techniques are ideally suited to investigating neural circuitry underlying motor and cognitive dysfunction in animal models of human disease. Here, we focus on how optogenetics has been used over the last decade to probe striatal circuits that are involved in Parkinson disease, a neurodegenerative condition involving motor and cognitive abnormalities resulting from degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. The precise mechanisms underlying the striatal contribution to both cognitive and motor dysfunction in Parkinson disease are unknown. Although optogenetic approaches are somewhat removed from clinical use, insight from these studies can help identify novel therapeutic targets and may inspire new treatments for Parkinson disease. Elucidating how neuronal and behavioral functions are influenced and potentially rescued by optogenetic manipulation in animal models could prove to be translatable to humans. These insights can be used to guide future brain-stimulation approaches for motor and cognitive abnormalities in Parkinson disease and other neuropsychiatric diseases.

  18. Fluorodopa is a Promising Fluorine-19 MRI Probe for Evaluating Striatal Dopaminergic Function in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Oda, Keisuke; Inden, Masatoshi; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Inubushi, Toshiro; Taniguchi, Takashi; Hijioka, Masanori; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2017-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra projecting to the striatum. It has been estimated that approximately 80% of the striatal dopamine and 50% of nigral dopaminergic neurons are lost before the onset of typical motor symptoms, indicating that early diagnosis of PD using noninvasive imaging is feasible. Fluorine-19 ( 19 F) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents a highly sensitive, easily available, low-background, and cost-effective approach to evaluate dopaminergic function using non-radioactive fluorine-containing dopaminergic agents. The aim of this study was to find a potent 19 F MRI probe to evaluate dopaminergic presynaptic function in the striatum. To select candidates for 19 F MRI probes, we investigated the following eight non-radioactive fluorine-containing dopaminergic agents: fluorodopa (F-DOPA), F-tyrosine, haloperidol, GBR13069 duhydrochloride, GBR12909 duhydrochloride, 3-bis-(4-fluorophenyl) methoxytropane hydrochloride, flupenthixol, and fenfluramine. In 19 F nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, F-tyrosine and F-DOPA displayed a relatively higher signal-to-noise ratio value in brain homogenates than in others. F-DOPA, but not F-tyrosine, induced the rotational behavior in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced hemiparkinsonian rat model. In addition, a significantly high amount of F-DOPA accumulated in the ipsilateral striatum of hemiparkinsonian rats after the injection. We performed 19 F MRI in PC12 cells and isolated rat brain using a 7T MR scanner. Our findings suggest that F-DOPA is a promising 19 F MRI probe for evaluating dopaminergic presynaptic function in the striatum of hemiparkinsonian rats. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Morin hydrate mitigates rapid eye movement sleep deprivation-induced neurobehavioural impairments and loss of viable neurons in the hippocampus of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olonode, Elizabeth T; Aderibigbe, Adegbuyi O; Adeoluwa, Olusegun A; Eduviere, Anthony T; Ben-Azu, Benneth

    2017-12-25

    Rapid eye movement sleep deprivation distorts the body's homeostasis and results in oxidative breakdown which may be responsible for a variety of neurological disorders. Some naturally occurring compounds of plant origin with antioxidant and neuroprotective properties are known to attenuate the detrimental effects of REM sleep deprivation. Morin hydrate, a flavonoid from Mulberry has demonstrated antioxidant and neuroprotective activities but its effect in sleep disturbed mice is unknown. The study was designed to explore the neuroprotective effect of Morin hydrate on 48 h. REM sleep deprivation-induced behavioural impairments and neuronal damage in mice. Mice were allotted into six treatment groups (n = 6): groups 1 and 2 received vehicle (10 ml/kg normal saline), groups 3-5 received Morin hydrate (5, 10, 20 mg/kg i.p) while group 6 received ginseng (25 mg/kg) which served as the reference drug. Treatment was performed daily for 5 days and animals were sleep-deprived on the last 48 h. Various behavioural tests (Elevated plus maze, Y-maze, locomotor activity) followed by oxidative parameters (malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, reduced glutathione) and histolopathological changes in the Cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) region of the hippocampus were assessed. Data were analysed using ANOVA at α 0.05 . Morin hydrate (5, 10, 20 mg/kg) significantly enhanced memory performance, improves anxiolytic-like behaviour, reverses hyperlocomotion, restored depleted reduced glutathione, attenuated raised malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels as compared to control animals and protects against loss of hippocampal neurons. Results of this present study suggest that Morin hydrate possess neuroprotective effects against sleep deprivation-induced behavioural impairments, oxidative stress and neuronal damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Testing Proposed Neuronal Models of Effective Connectivity Within the Cortico-basal Ganglia-thalamo-cortical Loop During Loss of Consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, Julia Sophia; Lutkenhoff, Evan Scott; Bio, Branden Joseph; Laureys, Steven; Monti, Martin Max

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, a number of brain regions and connectivity patterns have been proposed to be crucial for loss and recovery of consciousness but have not been compared in detail. In a 3 T resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm, we test the plausibility of these different neuronal models derived from theoretical and empirical knowledge. Specifically, we assess the fit of each model to the dynamic change in effective connectivity between specific cortical and subcortical regions at different consecutive levels of propofol-induced sedation by employing spectral dynamic causal modeling. Surprisingly, our findings indicate that proposed models of impaired consciousness do not fit the observed patterns of effective connectivity. Rather, the data show that loss of consciousness, at least in the context of propofol-induced sedation, is marked by a breakdown of corticopetal projections from the globus pallidus. Effective connectivity between the globus pallidus and the ventral posterior cingulate cortex, present during wakefulness, fades in the transition from lightly sedated to full loss of consciousness and returns gradually as consciousness recovers, thereby, demonstrating the dynamic shift in brain architecture of the posterior cingulate "hub" during changing states of consciousness. These findings highlight the functional role of a previously underappreciated direct pallido-cortical connectivity in supporting consciousness. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Vitamin B1-deficient mice show impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation and loss of hippocampal neurons and dendritic spines: potential microendophenotypes of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hiroyoshi; Kishimoto, Takuya; Oishi, Satoru; Nagata, Kan; Hasegawa, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Tamae; Kida, Satoshi

    2016-12-01

    Patients with severe Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) associated with vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency (TD) show enduring impairment of memory formation. The mechanisms of memory impairment induced by TD remain unknown. Here, we show that hippocampal degeneration is a potential microendophenotype (an endophenotype of brain disease at the cellular and synaptic levels) of WKS in pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) mice, a rodent model of WKS. PTD mice show deficits in the hippocampus-dependent memory formation, although they show normal hippocampus-independent memory. Similarly with WKS, impairments in memory formation did not recover even at 6 months after treatment with PTD. Importantly, PTD mice exhibit a decrease in neurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampus and reduced density of wide dendritic spines in the DG. Our findings suggest that TD induces hippocampal degeneration, including the loss of neurons and spines, thereby leading to enduring impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation.

  2. Curcumin inhibition of JNKs prevents dopaminergic neuronal loss in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease through suppressing mitochondria dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Jing

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Curcumin,a natural polyphenol obtained from turmeric,has been implicated to be neuroprotective in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders although the mechanism remains poorly understood. The results of our recent experiments indicated that curcumin could protect dopaminergic neurons from apoptosis in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP mouse model of Parkinson’s disease (PD. The death of dopaminergic neurons and the loss of dopaminergic axon in the striatum were significantly suppressed by curcumin in MPTP mouse model. Further studies showed that curcumin inhibited JNKs hyperphosphorylation induced by MPTP treatment. JNKs phosphorylation can cause translocation of Bax to mitochondria and the release of cytochrome c which both ultimately contribute to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. These pro-apoptosis effect can be diminished by curcumin. Our experiments demonstrated that curcumin can prevent nigrostriatal degeneration by inhibiting the dysfunction of mitochondrial through suppressing hyperphosphorylation of JNKs induced by MPTP. Our results suggested that JNKs/mitochondria pathway may be a novel target in the treatment of PD patients.

  3. Loss of Angelman Syndrome Protein E6AP Disrupts a Novel Antagonistic Estrogen-Retinoic Acid Transcriptional Crosstalk in Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hokayem, Jimmy; Weeber, Edwin; Nawaz, Zafar

    2018-01-31

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a complex genetic disorder that affects the nervous system. AS affects an estimated 1 in 12,000 to 20,000 individuals. Characteristic features of AS includes developmental delay or intellectual disability, severe speech impairment, seizures, small head size (microcephaly), and problems with movement and balance (ataxia). AS individuals usually have microdeletion of the maternal copy of 15q11.2-15q13 region of chromosome 15. The E6-associated protein (E6AP, an E3 ubiquitin protein ligase enzyme) is encoded by the gene UBE3A, which is located in this region, and it has been shown that deregulation of E6AP gives rise to AS and neuropathology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) (e.g., autism and Rett syndromes). We have shown that E6AP also acts as a coactivator of the estrogen receptor (ER). ER is a ligand-induced transcription factor that exerts potent and wide-ranging effects on the developing brain. Furthermore, the expression pattern of ER in the brain overlaps with that of E6AP. Up till now, all the published studies have examined the role of the ubiquitin-protein ligase activity of E6AP in the development of AS, and it is not known what role the newly discovered coactivation functions of E6AP and ER plays in the pathology of AS. Here, we demonstrate that E6AP and ER co-immunoprecipitate and are in the same protein complex in neuronal cells (Neuro2a). In addition, both colocalize in nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of the mouse hippocampal neurons and Neuro2a cells. Moreover, we identified a novel E6AP and ER direct transcriptional regulation of a gene Cyp26b1 known to be involved in learning and memory processes. This transcriptional regulation involves recruitment of E6AP and ER to a newly discovered functional estrogen response element (ERE) located at the Cyp26b1 gene promoter and is associated with transcription permissive epigenetic events leading to increase of active transcription of the gene in neurons upon estrogen

  4. Free radical production induced by methamphetamine in rat striatal synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pubill, David; Chipana, Carlos; Camins, Antonio; Pallàs, Mercè; Camarasa, Jordi; Escubedo, Elena

    2005-04-01

    The pro-oxidative effect of methamphetamine (METH) in dopamine terminals was studied in rat striatal synaptosomes. Flow cytometry analysis showed increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in METH-treated synaptosomes, without reduction in the density of dopamine transporters. In synaptosomes from dopamine (DA)-depleted animals, METH did not induce ROS production. Reserpine, in vitro, completely inhibited METH-induced ROS production. These results point to endogenous DA as the main source of ROS induced by METH. Antioxidants and inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and protein kinase C (PKC) prevented the METH-induced oxidative effect. EGTA and the specific antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA, 50 microM) prevented METH-induced ROS production, thus implicating calcium and alpha7 nicotinic receptors in such effect. Higher concentrations of MLA (>100 microM) showed nonspecific antioxidant effect. Preincubation of synaptosomes with METH (1 microM) for 30 min reduced [(3)H]DA uptake by 0%. The METH effect was attenuated by MLA and EGTA and potentiated by nicotine, indicating that activation of alpha(7) nicotinic receptors and Ca(2+) entry are necessary and take place before DAT inhibition. From these findings, it can be postulated that, in our model, METH induces DA release from synaptic vesicles to the cytosol. Simultaneously, METH activates alpha(7) nicotinic receptors, probably inducing depolarization and an increase in intrasynaptosomal Ca(2+). This would lead to DAT inhibition and NOS and PKC activation, initiating oxidation of cytosolic DA.

  5. Transcription factors Foxa1 and Foxa2 are required for adult dopamine neurons maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii eDomanskyi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The proteins Foxa1 and Foxa2 belong to the forkhead family of transcription factors and are involved in the development of several tissues, including liver, pancreas, lung, prostate, and the neural system. Both Foxa1 and Foxa2 are also crucial for the specification and differentiation of dopamine (DA neurons during embryonic development, while about 30% of mice with an embryonic deletion of a single allele of the Foxa2 gene exhibit an age-related asymmetric loss of DA neurons and develop locomotor symptoms resembling Parkinson’s disease (PD. Notably, both Foxa1 and Foxa2 factors continue to be expressed in the adult dopamine system. To directly assess their functions selectively in adult DA neurons, we induced genetic deletions of Foxa1/2 transcription factors in mice using a tamoxifen inducible tissue-specific CreERT2 recombinase expressed under control of the dopamine transporter (DAT promoter (DATCreERT2. The conditional DA neurons-specific ablation of both genes, but not of Foxa2 alone, in early adulthood, caused a decline of striatal dopamine and its metabolites, along with locomotor deficits. At early pre-symptomatic stages, we observed a decline in aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1, subfamily A1 (Aldh1a1 protein expression in DA neurons. Further analyses revealed a decline of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC and a complete loss of DAT expression in these neurons. These molecular changes ultimately led to a reduction of DA neuron numbers in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc of aged cFoxa1/2-/- mice, resembling the progressive course of PD in humans. Altogether, in this study, we address the molecular, cellular and functional role of both Foxa1 and Foxa2 factors in the maintenance of the adult dopamine system which may help to find better approaches for PD treatment.

  6. Transcription factors Foxa1 and Foxa2 are required for adult dopamine neurons maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanskyi, Andrii; Alter, Heike; Vogt, Miriam A; Gass, Peter; Vinnikov, Ilya A

    2014-01-01

    The proteins Foxa1 and Foxa2 belong to the forkhead family of transcription factors and are involved in the development of several tissues, including liver, pancreas, lung, prostate, and the neural system. Both Foxa1 and Foxa2 are also crucial for the specification and differentiation of dopamine (DA) neurons during embryonic development, while about 30% of mice with an embryonic deletion of a single allele of the Foxa2 gene exhibit an age-related asymmetric loss of DA neurons and develop locomotor symptoms resembling Parkinson's disease (PD). Notably, both Foxa1 and Foxa2 factors continue to be expressed in the adult dopamine system. To directly assess their functions selectively in adult DA neurons, we induced genetic deletions of Foxa1/2 transcription factors in mice using a tamoxifen inducible tissue-specific CreERT2 recombinase expressed under control of the dopamine transporter (DAT) promoter (DATCreERT2). The conditional DA neurons-specific ablation of both genes, but not of Foxa2 alone, in early adulthood, caused a decline of striatal dopamine and its metabolites, along with locomotor deficits. At early pre-symptomatic stages, we observed a decline in aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1, subfamily A1 (Aldh1a1) protein expression in DA neurons. Further analyses revealed a decline of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) and a complete loss of DAT expression in these neurons. These molecular changes ultimately led to a reduction of DA neuron numbers in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) of aged cFoxa1/2 (-/-) mice, resembling the progressive course of PD in humans. Altogether, in this study, we address the molecular, cellular, and functional role of both Foxa1 and Foxa2 factors in the maintenance of the adult dopamine system which may help to find better approaches for PD treatment.

  7. Striatal dopamine transporter binding correlates with serum BDNF levels in patients with striatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziebell, Morten; Khalid, Usman; Klein, Anders B

    2012-01-01

    BDNF levels in patients with parkinsonism. Twenty-one patients with abnormal in vivo striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) binding as evidenced with [(123)I]PE2I SPECT brain scanning were included. Samples for serum BDNF levels were collected at the time of the SPECT scanning, and BDNF was measured...

  8. Seizure frequency correlates with loss of dentate gyrus GABAergic neurons in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmaster, Paul S; Abrams, Emily; Wen, Xiling

    2017-08-01

    Epilepsy occurs in one of 26 people. Temporal lobe epilepsy is common and can be difficult to treat effectively. It can develop after brain injuries that damage the hippocampus. Multiple pathophysiological mechanisms involving the hippocampal dentate gyrus have been proposed. This study evaluated a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy to test which pathological changes in the dentate gyrus correlate with seizure frequency and help prioritize potential mechanisms for further study. FVB mice (n = 127) that had experienced status epilepticus after systemic treatment with pilocarpine 31-61 days earlier were video-monitored for spontaneous, convulsive seizures 9 hr/day every day for 24-36 days. Over 4,060 seizures were observed. Seizure frequency ranged from an average of one every 3.6 days to one every 2.1 hr. Hippocampal sections were processed for Nissl stain, Prox1-immunocytochemistry, GluR2-immunocytochemistry, Timm stain, glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunocytochemistry, glutamic acid decarboxylase in situ hybridization, and parvalbumin-immunocytochemistry. Stereological methods were used to measure hilar ectopic granule cells, mossy cells, mossy fiber sprouting, astrogliosis, and GABAergic interneurons. Seizure frequency was not significantly correlated with the generation of hilar ectopic granule cells, the number of mossy cells, the extent of mossy fiber sprouting, the extent of astrogliosis, or the number of GABAergic interneurons in the molecular layer or hilus. Seizure frequency significantly correlated with the loss of GABAergic interneurons in or adjacent to the granule cell layer, but not with the loss of parvalbumin-positive interneurons. These findings prioritize the loss of granule cell layer interneurons for further testing as a potential cause of temporal lobe epilepsy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Convergence of dopamine and glutamate signalling onto striatal ERK activation in response to drugs of abuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma eCahill

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite their distinct targets, all addictive drugs commonly abused by humans evoke increases in dopamine (DA concentration within the striatum. The main DA G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs expressed by medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs of the striatum are the D1R and D2R, which are positively and negatively coupled to cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA signalling, respectively. These two DA GPCRs are largely segregated into distinct neuronal populations, where they are co-expressed with glutamate receptors in dendritic spines. Direct and indirect interactions between DA GPCRs and glutamate receptors are the molecular basis by which DA modulates glutamate transmission and controls striatal plasticity and behaviour induced by drugs of abuse. A major downstream target of striatal D1R is the Extracellular signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK kinase pathway. ERK activation by drugs of abuse behaves as a key integrator of D1R and glutamate NMDAR signalling. Once activated, ERK can trigger chromatin remodelling and induce gene expression that permits long-term cellular alterations and drug-induced morphological and behavioural changes. Besides the classical cAMP/PKA pathway, downstream of D1R, recent evidence implicates a cAMP-independent crosstalk mechanism by which the D1R potentiates NMDAR-mediated calcium influx and ERK activation. The mounting evidence of reciprocal modulation of DA and glutamate receptors adds further intricacy to striatal synaptic signalling and is liable to prove relevant for addictive drug-induced signalling, plasticity and behaviour. Herein, we review the evidence that built our understanding of the consequences of this synergistic signalling for the actions of drugs of abuse.

  10. Depressive-like phenotype induced by AAV-mediated overexpression of human α-synuclein in midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudal, D; Alvarsson, A; Björklund, A; Svenningsson, P

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and by the presence of aggregates containing α-synuclein called Lewy bodies. Viral vector-induced overexpression of α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons represents a model of PD which recapitulates disease progression better than commonly used neurotoxin models. Previous studies using this model have reported motor and cognitive impairments, whereas depression, mood and anxiety phenotypes are less described. To investigate these psychiatric phenotypes, Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral injections of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing human α-synuclein or GFP into the substantia nigra pars compacta. Behavior was assessed at two timepoints: 3 and 8 weeks post-injection. We report that nigral α-synuclein overexpression led to a pronounced nigral dopaminergic cell loss accompanied by a smaller cell loss in the ventral tegmental area, and to a decreased striatal density of dopaminergic fibers. The AAV-α-synuclein group exhibited modest, but significant motor impairments 8 weeks after vector administration. The AAV-α-synuclein group displayed depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test after 3 weeks, and reduced sucrose preference at week 8. At both timepoints, overexpression of α-synuclein was linked to a hyperactive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation of corticosterone. The depressive-like phenotype was also correlated with decreased nigral brain-derived neurotrophic factor and spinophilin levels, and with decreased striatal levels of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein. This study demonstrates that AAV-mediated α-synuclein overexpression in dopamine neurons is not only useful to model motor impairments of PD, but also depression. This study also provides evidence that depression in experimental Parkinsonism is correlated to dysregulation of the HPA axis and to

  11. Partial genetic suppression of a loss-of-function mutant of the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-associated protease TPP1 in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E. Phillips

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL is the most common childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease. NCL is inevitably fatal, and there is currently no treatment available. Children with NCL show a progressive decline in movement, vision and mental abilities, and an accumulation of autofluorescent deposits in neurons and other cell types. Late-infantile NCL is caused by mutations in the lysosomal protease tripeptidyl peptidase 1 (TPP1. TPP1 cleaves tripeptides from the N-terminus of proteins in vitro, but little is known about the physiological function of TPP1. TPP1 shows wide conservation in vertebrates but it is not found in Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we characterize ddTpp1, a TPP1 ortholog present in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Lysates from cells lacking ddTpp1 show a reduced but not abolished ability to cleave a TPP1 substrate, suggesting that other Dictyostelium enzymes can perform this cleavage. ddTpp1 and human TPP1 localize to the lysosome in Dictyostelium, indicating conserved function and trafficking. Cells that lack ddTpp1 show precocious multicellular development and a reduced ability to form spores during development. When cultured in autophagy-stimulating conditions, cells lacking ddTpp1 rapidly decrease in size and are less viable than wild-type cells, suggesting that one function of ddTpp1 could be to limit autophagy. Cells that lack ddTpp1 exhibit strongly impaired development in the presence of the lysosome-perturbing drug chloroquine, and this phenotype can be suppressed through a secondary mutation in the gene that we name suppressor of tpp1− A (stpA, which encodes a protein with some similarity to mammalian oxysterol-binding proteins (OSBPs. Taken together, these results suggest that targeting specific proteins could be a viable way to suppress the effects of loss of TPP1 function.

  12. Effects of memantine and galantamine given separately or in association, on memory and hippocampal neuronal loss after transient global cerebral ischemia in gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorrio, Silvia; Negredo, Pilar; Roda, José M; García, Antonio G; López, Manuela G

    2009-02-13

    Galantamine is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and memantine is a non competitive antagonist of NMDA receptors that are being used to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The fact that drugs with different mechanisms of action are available to treat AD introduces the prospect of prescribing drug combinations to amplify drug efficacy. This study was planed to evaluate the potential neuroprotective effects of galantamine combined with memantine in a transient global cerebral ischemia model in gerbils. Animal groups included in the study were: sham, ischemia, and ischemia plus galantamine (1 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg), memantine (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg), 1 mg/kg galantamine plus 10 mg/kg memantine, and 10 mg/kg galantamine plus 10 mg/kg memantine, respectively. Surviving pyramidal neurons in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus, TUNEL, caspase-3 and SOD-2 immunohistochemistries, and the object placement test were evaluated 72 h after reperfusion. Memantine did not exert a clear neuroprotective effect, nor did it prevent spatial memory loss. In a previous study using the same experimental model, galantamine was neuroprotective and improved spatial memory. In this study, the association of 10 mg/kg memantine with 10 mg/kg galantamine increased the number of living pyramidal neurons, reduced TUNEL, active caspase-3 and SOD-2 immunoreactivity, and preserved spatial memory after ischemia-reperfusion injury; however, the effects of the combination were not statistically different from those observed in animals treated with galantamine alone. We believe these results are of interest from a clinical point of view because the association of both drugs is being used in clinical practice and in clinical trials to treat Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

  13. Gain in Body Fat Is Associated with Increased Striatal Response to Palatable Food Cues, whereas Body Fat Stability Is Associated with Decreased Striatal Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokum, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional brain-imaging studies reveal that obese versus lean humans show greater responsivity of reward and attention regions to palatable food cues, but lower responsivity of reward regions to palatable food receipt. However, these individual differences in responsivity may result from a period of overeating. We conducted a repeated-measures fMRI study to test whether healthy weight adolescent humans who gained body fat over a 2 or 3 year follow-up period show an increase in responsivity of reward and attention regions to a cue signaling impending milkshake receipt and a simultaneous decrease in responsivity of reward regions to milkshake receipt versus adolescents who showed stability of or loss of body fat. Adolescents who gained body fat, who largely remained in a healthy weight range, showed increases in activation in the putamen, mid-insula, Rolandic operculum, and precuneus to a cue signaling impending milkshake receipt versus those who showed stability of or loss of body fat, though these effects were partially driven by reductions in responsivity among the latter groups. Adolescents who gained body fat reported significantly greater milkshake wanting and milkshake pleasantness ratings at follow-up compared to those who lost body fat. Adolescents who gained body fat did not show a reduction in responsivity of reward regions to milkshake receipt or changes in responsivity to receipt and anticipated receipt of monetary reward. Data suggest that initiating a prolonged period of overeating may increase striatal responsivity to food cues, and that maintaining a balance between caloric intake and expenditure may reduce striatal, insular, and Rolandic operculum responsivity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This novel, repeated-measures brain-imaging study suggests that adolescents who gained body fat over our follow-up period experienced an increase in striatal responsivity to cues for palatable foods compared to those who showed stability of or loss of body fat

  14. α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated neuroprotection against dopaminergic neuron loss in an MPTP mouse model via inhibition of astrocyte activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yuan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although evidence suggests that the prevalence of Parkinson’s disease (PD is lower in smokers than in non-smokers, the mechanisms of nicotine-induced neuroprotection remain unclear. Stimulation of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR seems to be a crucial mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory potential of cholinergic agonists in immune cells, including astrocytes, and inhibition of astrocyte activation has been proposed as a novel strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as PD. The objective of the present study was to determine whether nicotine-induced neuroprotection in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP mouse model occurs via α7-nAChR-mediated inhibition of astrocytes. Methods Both in vivo (MPTP and in vitro (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+ and lipopolysaccharide (LPS models of PD were used to investigate the role(s of and possible mechanism(s by which α7-nAChRs protect against dopaminergic neuron loss. Multiple experimental approaches, including behavioral tests, immunochemistry, and stereology experiments, astrocyte cell cultures, reverse transcriptase PCR, laser scanning confocal microscopy, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α assays, and western blotting, were used to elucidate the mechanisms of the α7-nAChR-mediated neuroprotection. Results Systemic administration of nicotine alleviated MPTP-induced behavioral symptoms, improved motor coordination, and protected against dopaminergic neuron loss and the activation of astrocytes and microglia in the substantia nigra. The protective effects of nicotine were abolished by administration of the α7-nAChR-selective antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA. In primary cultured mouse astrocytes, pretreatment with nicotine suppressed MPP+-induced or LPS-induced astrocyte activation, as evidenced by both decreased production of TNF-α and inhibition of extracellular regulated kinase1/2 (Erk1/2 and p38 activation in

  15. The Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Michael J.; Rakheja, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL's, Batten disease) represent a group of severe neurodegenerative diseases, which mostly present in childhood. The phenotypes are similar and include visual loss, seizures, loss of motor and cognitive function, and early death. At autopsy, there is massive neuronal loss with characteristic storage in…

  16. Selective Increase of Auditory Cortico-Striatal Coherence during Auditory-Cued Go/NoGo Discrimination Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Andreas L.; Woldeit, Marie L.; Gonçalves, Ana I.; Saldeitis, Katja; Ohl, Frank W.

    2016-01-01

    Goal directed behavior and associated learning processes are tightly linked to neuronal activity in the ventral striatum. Mechanisms that integrate task relevant sensory information into striatal processing during decision making and learning are implicitly assumed in current reinforcement models, yet they are still weakly understood. To identify the functional activation of cortico-striatal subpopulations of connections during auditory discrimination learning, we trained Mongolian gerbils in a two-way active avoidance task in a shuttlebox to discriminate between falling and rising frequency modulated tones with identical spectral properties. We assessed functional coupling by analyzing the field-field coherence between the auditory cortex and the ventral striatum of animals performing the task. During the course of training, we observed a selective increase of functional coupling during Go-stimulus presentations. These results suggest that the auditory cortex functionally interacts with the ventral striatum during auditory learning and that the strengthening of these functional connections is selectively goal-directed. PMID:26793085

  17. Selective increase of auditory cortico-striatal coherence during auditory-cued Go/NoGo discrimination learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas L. Schulz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal directed behavior and associated learning processes are tightly linked to neuronal activity in the ventral striatum. Mechanisms that integrate task relevant sensory information into striatal processing during decision making and learning are implicitly assumed in current reinforcementmodels, yet they are still weakly understood. To identify the functional activation of cortico-striatal subpopulations of connections during auditory discrimination learning, we trained Mongolian gerbils in a two-way active avoidance task in a shuttlebox to discriminate between falling and rising frequency modulated tones with identical spectral properties. We assessed functional coupling by analyzing the field-field coherence between the auditory cortex and the ventral striatum of animals performing the task. During the course of training, we observed a selective increase of functionalcoupling during Go-stimulus presentations. These results suggest that the auditory cortex functionally interacts with the ventral striatum during auditory learning and that the strengthening of these functional connections is selectively goal-directed.

  18. The clinical benefit of imaging striatal dopamine transporters with [123I]FP-CIT SPET in differentiating patients with presynaptic parkinsonism from those with other forms of parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booij, J.; Speelman, J.DE.; Horstink, M. W.I.M.; Wolters, E.C.

    2001-01-01

    [ 123 I]FP-CIT (N-ω-fluoropropyl-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane) has been developed successfully as a radioligand for single-photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging of dopamine transporters, which are situated in the membrane of dopaminergic neurons. Imaging of these transporters has shown promise as a clinical tool to detect degeneration of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway. Several ''presynaptic parkinsonian'' syndromes, such as Parkinson's disease or multiple system atrophy, are characterised by degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway. [ 123 I]FP-CIT SPET imaging studies have shown the ability to detect loss of striatal dopamine transporters in such syndromes. However, in clinical practice it is sometimes difficult, but important, to discriminate patients with ''presynaptic parkinsonism'' from those with other forms of parkinsonism not characterised by loss of presynaptic dopaminergic cells (e.g. psychogenic parkinsonism or drug-induced postsynaptic parkinsonism). In these inconclusive cases, it may be of value to confirm or exclude the existence of degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic cells by using imaging techniques such as [ 123 I]FP-CIT SPET. Using [ 123 I]FP-CIT SPET, we have imaged the striatal dopamine transporters in a group of patients with inconclusive forms of parkinsonism, and, moreover, have been able to perform clinical follow-up of these patients 2-4 years after imaging. In 33 inconclusive cases, ratios of specific to non-specific binding were calculated for the caudate nucleus and putamen following [ 123 I]FP-CIT SPET imaging and compared with ratios obtained in healthy controls. In nine of the patients, degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway was found scintigraphically and in all these cases, presynaptic parkinsonism was confirmed by clinical follow-up. In the other 24 subjects no degeneration was found scintigraphically. Forms of parkinsonism other than the presynaptic were confirmed at follow-up in 19 cases

  19. The I2020T Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 transgenic mouse exhibits impaired locomotive ability accompanied by dopaminergic neuron abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maekawa Tatsunori

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 is the gene responsible for autosomal-dominant Parkinson’s disease (PD, PARK8, but the mechanism by which LRRK2 mutations cause neuronal dysfunction remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated for the first time a transgenic (TG mouse strain expressing human LRRK2 with an I2020T mutation in the kinase domain, which had been detected in the patients of the original PARK8 family. Results The TG mouse expressed I2020T LRRK2 in dopaminergic (DA neurons of the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, and olfactory bulb. In both the beam test and rotarod test, the TG mice exhibited impaired locomotive ability in comparison with their non-transgenic (NTG littermates. Although there was no obvious loss of DA neurons in either the substantia nigra or striatum, the TG brain showed several neurological abnormalities such as a reduced striatal dopamine content, fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus in DA neurons, and an increased degree of microtubule polymerization. Furthermore, the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive primary neurons derived from the TG mouse showed an increased frequency of apoptosis and had neurites with fewer branches and decreased outgrowth in comparison with those derived from the NTG controls. Conclusions The I2020T LRRK2 TG mouse exhibited impaired locomotive ability accompanied by several dopaminergic neuron abnormalities. The TG mouse should provide valuable clues to the etiology of PD caused by the LRRK2 mutation.

  20. Traumatic Brain Injury in Adult Rats Causes Progressive Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Cell Loss and Enhanced Vulnerability to the Pesticide Paraquat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Che Brown; Lazo, Carlos R.; Mortazavi, Farzad; Giza, Christopher C.; Hovda, David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and the accumulation of alpha-synuclein. Both traumatic brain injury (TBI) and pesticides are risk factors for PD, but whether TBI causes nigrostriatal dopaminergic cell loss in experimental models and whether it acts synergistically with pesticides is unknown. We have examined the acute and long-term effects of TBI and exposure to low doses of the pesticide paraquat, separately and in combination, on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in adult male rats. In an acute study, rats received moderate TBI by lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury, were injected with saline or paraquat (10 mg/kg IP) 3 and 6 days after LFP, were sacrificed 5 days later, and their brains processed for immunohistochemistry. TBI alone increased microglial activation in the substantia nigra, and caused a 15% loss of dopaminergic neurons ipsilaterally. Paraquat increased the TBI effect, causing a 30% bilateral loss of dopaminergic neurons, reduced striatal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity more than TBI alone, and induced alpha-synuclein accumulation in the substantia nigra pars compacta. In a long-term study, rats received moderate LFP, were injected with saline or paraquat at 21 and 22 weeks post-injury, and were sacrificed 4 weeks later. At 26 weeks post injury, TBI alone induced a 30% bilateral loss of dopaminergic neurons that was not exacerbated by paraquat. These data suggest that TBI is sufficient to induce a progressive degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, TBI and pesticide exposure, when occurring within a defined time frame, could combine to increase the PD risk. PMID:21644813

  1. Protective effects of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents against manganese-induced oxidative damage and neuronal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milatovic, Dejan; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Yu, Yingchun; Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; Aschner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels leads to neurotoxicity, referred to as manganism, which resembles Parkinson's disease (PD). Manganism is caused by neuronal injury in both cortical and subcortical regions, particularly in the basal ganglia. The basis for the selective neurotoxicity of Mn is not yet fully understood. However, several studies suggest that oxidative damage and inflammatory processes play prominent roles in the degeneration of dopamine-containing neurons. In the present study, we assessed the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Results from our in vitro study showed a significant (p 2 -isoprostanes (F 2 -IsoPs), as well as the depletion of ATP in primary rat cortical neurons following exposure to Mn (500 μM) for 2 h. These effects were protected when neurons were pretreated for 30 min with 100 of an antioxidant, the hydrophilic vitamin E analog, trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), or an anti-inflammatory agent, indomethacin. Results from our in vivo study confirmed a significant increase in F 2 -IsoPs levels in conjunction with the progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of the striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of mice exposed to Mn (100 mg/kg, s.c.) 24 h. Additionally, pretreatment with vitamin E (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or ibuprofen (140 μg/ml in the drinking water for two weeks) attenuated the Mn-induced increase in cerebral F 2 -IsoPs? and protected the MSNs from dendritic atrophy and dendritic spine loss. Our findings suggest that the mediation of oxidative stress/mitochondrial dysfunction and the control of alterations in biomarkers of oxidative injury, neuroinflammation and synaptodendritic degeneration may provide an effective, multi-pronged therapeutic strategy for protecting dysfunctional dopaminergic transmission and slowing of the progression of Mn-induced neurodegenerative

  2. Protective effects of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents against manganese-induced oxidative damage and neuronal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milatovic, Dejan, E-mail: dejan.milatovic@vanderbilt.edu [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Gupta, Ramesh C. [Murray State University, Breathitt Veterinary Center, Hopkinsville, KY (United States); Yu, Yingchun; Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Aschner, Michael [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Pharmacology and the Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels leads to neurotoxicity, referred to as manganism, which resembles Parkinson's disease (PD). Manganism is caused by neuronal injury in both cortical and subcortical regions, particularly in the basal ganglia. The basis for the selective neurotoxicity of Mn is not yet fully understood. However, several studies suggest that oxidative damage and inflammatory processes play prominent roles in the degeneration of dopamine-containing neurons. In the present study, we assessed the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Results from our in vitro study showed a significant (p < 0.01) increase in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs), as well as the depletion of ATP in primary rat cortical neurons following exposure to Mn (500 {mu}M) for 2 h. These effects were protected when neurons were pretreated for 30 min with 100 of an antioxidant, the hydrophilic vitamin E analog, trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), or an anti-inflammatory agent, indomethacin. Results from our in vivo study confirmed a significant increase in F{sub 2}-IsoPs levels in conjunction with the progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of the striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of mice exposed to Mn (100 mg/kg, s.c.) 24 h. Additionally, pretreatment with vitamin E (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or ibuprofen (140 {mu}g/ml in the drinking water for two weeks) attenuated the Mn-induced increase in cerebral F{sub 2}-IsoPs? and protected the MSNs from dendritic atrophy and dendritic spine loss. Our findings suggest that the mediation of oxidative stress/mitochondrial dysfunction and the control of alterations in biomarkers of oxidative injury, neuroinflammation and synaptodendritic degeneration may provide an effective, multi-pronged therapeutic strategy for protecting dysfunctional

  3. Assessment of striatal & postural deformities in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Pandey

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that striatal and postural deformities were common and present in about half of the patients with PD. These deformities we more common in patients with advanced stage of PD.

  4. Prefrontal cortex and striatal activation by feedback in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keitz, Martijn; Koerts, Janneke; Kortekaas, Rudie; Renken, Remco; de Jong, Bauke M.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2008-01-01

    Positive feedbacks reinforce goal-directed behavior and evoke pleasure. in Parkinson's disease (PD) the striatal dysfunction impairs motor performance, but also may lead to decreased positive feedback (reward) processing. This study investigates two types of positive feedback processing (monetary

  5. Striatal dysfunction in attention deficit and hyperkinetic disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, H.C.; Henriksen, L.; Bruhn, P.; Borner, H.; Nielsen, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    We have previously reported that periventricular structures are hypoperfused in attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study has expanded the number of patients, who were divided into two groups: six patients with pure ADHD, and 13 patients with ADHD in combination with other neurologic symptoms. By using xenon 133 inhalation and emission tomography, the regional cerebral blood flow distribution was determined and compared with a control group. Striatal regions were found to be hypoperfused and, by inference, hypofunctional in both groups. This hypoperfusion was statistically significant in the right striatum in ADHD, and in both striatal regions in ADHD with other neuropsychologic and neurologic symptoms. The primary sensory and sensorimotor cortical regions were highly perfused. Methylphenidate increased flow to striatal and posterior periventricular regions, and tended to decrease flow to primary sensory regions. Low striatal activity, partially reversible with methylphenidate, appears to be a cardinal feature in ADHD.

  6. Striatal dysfunction in attention deficit and hyperkinetic disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, H.C.; Henriksen, L.; Bruhn, P.; Borner, H.; Nielsen, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    We have previously reported that periventricular structures are hypoperfused in attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study has expanded the number of patients, who were divided into two groups: six patients with pure ADHD, and 13 patients with ADHD in combination with other neurologic symptoms. By using xenon 133 inhalation and emission tomography, the regional cerebral blood flow distribution was determined and compared with a control group. Striatal regions were found to be hypoperfused and, by inference, hypofunctional in both groups. This hypoperfusion was statistically significant in the right striatum in ADHD, and in both striatal regions in ADHD with other neuropsychologic and neurologic symptoms. The primary sensory and sensorimotor cortical regions were highly perfused. Methylphenidate increased flow to striatal and posterior periventricular regions, and tended to decrease flow to primary sensory regions. Low striatal activity, partially reversible with methylphenidate, appears to be a cardinal feature in ADHD

  7. Lower levels of uric acid and striatal dopamine in non-tremor dominant Parkinson's disease subtype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Huertas

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD patients who present with tremor and maintain a predominance of tremor have a better prognosis. Similarly, PD patients with high levels of uric acid (UA, a natural neuroprotectant, have also a better disease course. Our aim was to investigate whether PD motor subtypes differ in their levels of UA, and if these differences correlate with the degree of dopamine transporter (DAT availability. We included 75 PD patients from whom we collected information about their motor symptoms, DAT imaging and UA concentration levels. Based on the predominance of their motor symptoms, patients were classified into postural instability and gait disorder (PIGD, n = 36, intermediate (I, n = 22, and tremor-dominant (TD, n = 17 subtypes. The levels of UA and striatal DAT were compared across subtypes and the correlation between these two measures was also explored. We found that PIGD patients had lower levels of UA (3.7 vs 4.5 vs 5.3 mg/dL; P<0.001 and striatal DAT than patients with an intermediate or TD phenotype. Furthermore, UA levels significantly correlated with the levels of striatal DAT. We also observed that some PIGD (25% and I (45% patients had a predominance of tremor at disease onset. We speculate that UA might be involved in the maintenance of the less damaging TD phenotype and thus also in the conversion from TD to PIGD. Low levels of this natural antioxidant could lead to a major neuronal damage and therefore influence the conversion to a more severe motor phenotype.

  8. De Novo Mutations in PDE10A Cause Childhood-Onset Chorea with Bilateral Striatal Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencacci, Niccolò E; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Nakashima, Kosuke; R'Bibo, Lea; Lynch, David S; Balint, Bettina; Willemsen, Michèl A A P; Adams, Matthew E; Wiethoff, Sarah; Suzuki, Kazunori; Davies, Ceri H; Ng, Joanne; Meyer, Esther; Veneziano, Liana; Giunti, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Raymond, F Lucy; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Barzaghi, Chiara; Garavaglia, Barbara; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M; Houlden, Henry; Kurian, Manju A; Kimura, Haruhide; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Wood, Nicholas W; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2016-04-07

    Chorea is a hyperkinetic movement disorder resulting from dysfunction of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs), which form the main output projections from the basal ganglia. Here, we used whole-exome sequencing to unravel the underlying genetic cause in three unrelated individuals with a very similar and unique clinical presentation of childhood-onset chorea and characteristic brain MRI showing symmetrical bilateral striatal lesions. All individuals were identified to carry a de novo heterozygous mutation in PDE10A (c.898T>C [p.Phe300Leu] in two individuals and c.1000T>C [p.Phe334Leu] in one individual), encoding a phosphodiesterase highly and selectively present in MSNs. PDE10A contributes to the regulation of the intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Both substitutions affect highly conserved amino acids located in the regulatory GAF-B domain, which, by binding to cAMP, stimulates the activity of the PDE10A catalytic domain. In silico modeling showed that the altered residues are located deep in the binding pocket, where they are likely to alter cAMP binding properties. In vitro functional studies showed that neither substitution affects the basal PDE10A activity, but they severely disrupt the stimulatory effect mediated by cAMP binding to the GAF-B domain. The identification of PDE10A mutations as a cause of chorea further motivates the study of cAMP signaling in MSNs and highlights the crucial role of striatal cAMP signaling in the regulation of basal ganglia circuitry. Pharmacological modulation of this pathway could offer promising etiologically targeted treatments for chorea and other hyperkinetic movement disorders. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lower levels of uric acid and striatal dopamine in non-tremor dominant Parkinson's disease subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Ismael; Jesús, Silvia; Lojo, José Antonio; García-Gómez, Francisco Javier; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Oropesa-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Carrillo, Fátima; Vargas-Gonzalez, Laura; Martín Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; García-Solís, David; Mir, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who present with tremor and maintain a predominance of tremor have a better prognosis. Similarly, PD patients with high levels of uric acid (UA), a natural neuroprotectant, have also a better disease course. Our aim was to investigate whether PD motor subtypes differ in their levels of UA, and if these differences correlate with the degree of dopamine transporter (DAT) availability. We included 75 PD patients from whom we collected information about their motor symptoms, DAT imaging and UA concentration levels. Based on the predominance of their motor symptoms, patients were classified into postural instability and gait disorder (PIGD, n = 36), intermediate (I, n = 22), and tremor-dominant (TD, n = 17) subtypes. The levels of UA and striatal DAT were compared across subtypes and the correlation between these two measures was also explored. We found that PIGD patients had lower levels of UA (3.7 vs 4.5 vs 5.3 mg/dL; P<0.001) and striatal DAT than patients with an intermediate or TD phenotype. Furthermore, UA levels significantly correlated with the levels of striatal DAT. We also observed that some PIGD (25%) and I (45%) patients had a predominance of tremor at disease onset. We speculate that UA might be involved in the maintenance of the less damaging TD phenotype and thus also in the conversion from TD to PIGD. Low levels of this natural antioxidant could lead to a major neuronal damage and therefore influence the conversion to a more severe motor phenotype.

  10. Striatal grafts in a rat model of Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzman, R; Meyer, M; Lövblad, K O

    1999-01-01

    Survival and integration into the host brain of grafted tissue are crucial factors in neurotransplantation approaches. The present study explored the feasibility of using a clinical MR scanner to study striatal graft development in a rat model of Huntington's disease. Rat fetal lateral ganglionic...... eminences grown as free-floating roller-tube cultures can be successfully grafted in a rat Huntington model and that a clinical MR scanner offers a useful noninvasive tool for studying striatal graft development....

  11. Striatal direct and indirect pathways control decision-making behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Macpherson, Tom; Morita, Makiko; Hikida, Takatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Despite our ever-changing environment, animals are remarkably adept at selecting courses of action that are predictive of optimal outcomes. While requiring the contribution of a number of brain regions, a vast body of evidence implicates striatal mechanisms of associative learning and action selection to be critical to this ability. While numerous models of striatal-based decision-making have been developed, it is only recently that we have begun to understand the precise contributions of spe...

  12. Transgenic supplementation of SIRT1 fails to alleviate acute loss of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons and gliosis in a mouse model of MPTP-induced parkinsonism [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5a9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Kitao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Dopamine (DA neuron-selective uptake and toxicity of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP causes parkinsonism in humans. Loss of DA neurons via mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress is reproduced by systemic injection of MPTP in animals, which serves as models of parkinsonism and Parkinson’s disease (PD. This study aimed to test whether pan-neural supplementation of the longevity-related, pleiotropic deacetylase SIRT1, which confers partial tolerance to at least three models of stroke and neurodegeneration, could also alleviate MPTP-induced acute pathological changes in nigrostriatal DA neurons and neighboring glia. Results We employed a line of prion promoter-driven Sirt1-transgenic (Sirt1Tg mice that chronically overexpress murine SIRT1 in the brain and spinal cord. Sirt1Tg and wild-type (WT male littermates (3‒4 months old were subjected to intraperitoneal injection of MPTP. Acute histopathological changes in the midbrain and striatum (caudoputamen were assessed with serial coronal sections triply labeled for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and nuclear DNA. In the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc of the midbrain, the number of TH-positive neurons and the reactive gliosis were comparable between the Sirt1Tg and WT littermates. In the striatum, the relative fluorescence intensity of TH-positive nerve terminals and the level of gliosis did not differ by the genotypes. Conclusions Sirt1Tg and WT littermate mice exhibited comparable acute histopathological reactions to the systemic injection of MPTP, loss of TH-positive neurons and reactive gliosis. Thus, the genetic supplementation of SIRT1 does not confer histologically recognizable protection on nigrostriatal DA neurons against acute toxicity of MPTP.

  13. Transfer after Dual n-Back Training Depends on Striatal Activation Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Tiina; Kühn, Simone; Frensch, Peter A; Schubert, Torsten

    2016-09-28

    The dual n-back working memory (WM) training paradigm (comprising auditory and visual stimuli) has gained much attention since studies have shown widespread transfer effects. By including a multimodal dual-task component, the task is demanding to the human cognitive system. We investigated whether dual n-back training improves general cognitive resources or a task-specific WM updating process in participants. We expected: (1) widespread transfer effects and the recruitment of a common neuronal network by the training and the transfer tasks and (2) narrower transfer results and that a common activation network alone would not produce transfer, but instead an activation focus on the striatum, which is associated with WM updating processes. The training group showed transfer to an untrained dual-modality WM updating task, but not to single-task versions of the training or the transfer task. They also showed diminished neuronal overlap between the training and the transfer task from pretest to posttest and an increase in striatal activation in both tasks. Furthermore, we found an association between the striatal activation increase and behavioral improvement. The control groups showed no transfer and no change in the amount of activation overlap or in striatal activation from pretest to posttest. We conclude that, instead of improving general cognitive resources (which would have required a transfer effect to all transfer tasks and that a frontal activation overlap between the tasks produced transfer), dual n-back training improved a task-specific process: WM updating of stimuli from two modalities. The current study allows for a better understanding of the cognitive and neural effects of working memory (WM) training and transfer. It shows that dual n-back training mainly improves specific processes of WM updating, and this improvement leads to narrow transfer effects to tasks involving the same processes. On a neuronal level this is accompanied by increased neural

  14. Failure of action potential propagation in sensory neurons: mechanisms and loss of afferent filtering in C-type units after painful nerve injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemes, Geza; Koopmeiners, Andrew; Rigaud, Marcel; Lirk, Philipp; Sapunar, Damir; Bangaru, Madhavi Latha; Vilceanu, Daniel; Garrison, Sheldon R.; Ljubkovic, Marko; Mueller, Samantha J.; Stucky, Cheryl L.; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2013-01-01

    The T-junction of sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is a potential impediment to action potential (AP) propagation towards the CNS. Using intracellular recordings from rat DRG neuronal somata during stimulation of the dorsal root, we determined that the maximal rate at which all of

  15. Adenosine A2A receptors and A2A receptor heteromers as key players in striatal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi eFerre

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A very significant density of adenosine adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs is present in the striatum, where they are preferentially localized postsynaptically in striatopallidal medium spiny neurons (MSNs. In this localization A2ARs establish reciprocal antagonistic interactions with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs. In one type of interaction, A2AR and D2R are forming heteromers and, by means of an allosteric interaction, A2AR counteracts D2R-mediated inhibitory modulation of the effects of NMDA receptor stimulation in the striato-pallidal neuron. This interaction is probably mostly responsible for the locomotor depressant and activating effects of A2AR agonist and antagonists, respectively. The second type of interaction involves A2AR and D2R that do not form heteromers and takes place at the level of adenylyl-cyclase (AC. Due to a strong tonic effect of endogenous dopamine on striatal D2R, this interaction keeps A2AR from signaling through AC. However, under conditions of dopamine depletion or with blockade of D2R, A2AR-mediated AC activation is unleashed with an increased gene expression and activity of the striato-pallidal neuron and with a consequent motor depression. This interaction is probably the main mechanism responsible for the locomotor depression induced by D2R antagonists. Finally, striatal A2ARs are also localized presynaptically, in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals that contact the striato-nigral MSN. These presynaptic A2ARs heteromerize with A1 receptors (A1Rs and their activation facilitates glutamate release. These three different types of A2ARs can be pharmacologically dissected by their ability to bind ligands with different affinity and can therefore provide selective targets for drug development in different basal ganglia disorders.

  16. Decreased striatal D2 receptor density associated with severe behavioral abnormality in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Meguro, Kenichi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi

    2003-01-01

    Since patients manifesting behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are a burden for their families and caregivers, the underlying neurobiological mechanism of this condition should be clarified. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we previously reported that wandering behavior in dementia was associated with a disturbed dopaminergic neuron system. We herein investigated the relationship between the severity of BPSD and the striatal D 2 receptor density in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Ten patients with probable AD as per the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke (NINCDS) and the AD and Related Disorders Association (ADRDA) criteria and five normal subjects were examined with PET. The tracer used was [ 11 C]raclopride (D 2 antagonist). The uptake of [ 11 C]raclopride was calculated as the estimation of binding potential (BP) of the striatum to the cerebellum. The AD patients were institutionalized in multiple nursing homes, and their BPSD were evaluated by the Behavioral Pathology in AD Frequency Weighted Severity Scale (BEHAVE-AD-FW) scale (Reisberg). There was a significant inverse Spearman's correlation between BEHAVE-AD-FW score and the BP, especially between the score of the behavioral domain and the BP values. The BP was found to be lower in severer BPSD patients. Patients with AD who manifest severe BPSD may have some dysfunction of striatal dopamine metabolism compared with those without BPSD. (author)

  17. Levodopa administration modulates striatal processing of punishment-associated items in healthy participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Bianca C; D'Esposito, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Appetitive and aversive processes share a number of features such as their relevance for action and learning. On a neural level, reward and its predictors are associated with increased firing of dopaminergic neurons, whereas punishment processing has been linked to the serotonergic system and to decreases in dopamine transmission. Recent data indicate, however, that the dopaminergic system also responds to aversive stimuli and associated actions. In this pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we investigated the contribution of the dopaminergic system to reward and punishment processing in humans. Two groups of participants received either placebo or the dopamine precursor levodopa and were scanned during alternating reward and punishment anticipation blocks. Levodopa administration increased striatal activations for cues presented in punishment blocks. In an interaction with individual personality scores, levodopa also enhanced striatal activation for punishment-predictive compared with neutral cues in participants scoring higher on the novelty-seeking dimension. These data support recent indications that dopamine contributes to punishment processing and suggest that the novelty-seeking trait is a measure of susceptibility to drug effects on motivation. These findings are also consistent with the possibility of an inverted U-shaped response function of dopamine in the striatum, suggesting an optimal level of dopamine release for motivational processing.

  18. Phasic dopamine release drives rapid activation of striatal D2-receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcott, Pamela F; Mamaligas, Aphroditi A; Ford, Christopher P

    2014-01-01

    Summary Striatal dopamine transmission underlies numerous goal-directed behaviors. Medium spiny neurons (MSNs) are a major target of dopamine in the striatum. However, as dopamine does not directly evoke a synaptic event in MSNs, the time course of dopamine signaling in these cells remains unclear. To examine how dopamine release activates D2-receptors on MSNs, G-protein activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK2; Kir 3.2) channels were virally overexpressed in the striatum and the resulting outward currents were used as a sensor of D2-receptor activation. Electrical and optogenetic stimulation of dopamine terminals evoked robust D2-receptor inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) in GIRK2-expressing MSNs that occurred in under a second. Evoked D2-IPSCs could be driven by repetitive stimulation and were not occluded by background dopamine tone. Together, the results indicate that D2-receptors on MSNs exhibit functional low affinity and suggest that striatal D2-receptors can encode both tonic and phasic dopamine signals. PMID:25242218

  19. Somatostatin regulates dopamine release in rat striatal slices and cat caudate nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesselet, M.F.; Reisine, T.D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of somatostatin on the release of tritiated dopamine (DA) formed continuously from tritiated tyrosine were studied in vitro in superfused striatal slices and in vivo in both caudate nuclei and both substantiae nigrae of halothane-anesthetized cats using a push-pull cannula technique. Somatostatin (3 X 10(-10) to 3 X 10(-7) M) increased the spontaneous tritiated dopamine release from rat striatal slices. This effect was dose dependent and was completely prevented by tetrodotoxin (5 X 10(-7) M). When applied for 30 min in one cat caudate nucleus, somatostatin (10(-7) M) immediately increased the local release of tritiated DA, while a gradual inhibition of the tritiated amine's efflux was observed in the contralateral caudate nucleus. No changes in tritiated dopamine were seen in either substantia nigra during or after the peptide's application in the caudate nucleus. These results suggest that somatostatin in the striatum may play a role in the local and the distal control of dopamine release from the terminals of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons

  20. VCE-003.2, a novel cannabigerol derivative, enhances neuronal progenitor cell survival and alleviates symptomatology in murine models of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Alonso, Javier; Paraíso-Luna, Juan; Navarrete, Carmen; Del Río, Carmen; Cantarero, Irene; Palomares, Belén; Aguareles, José; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Bellido, María Luz; Pollastro, Federica; Appendino, Giovanni; Calzado, Marco A; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2016-07-19

    Cannabinoids have shown to exert neuroprotective actions in animal models by acting at different targets including canonical cannabinoid receptors and PPARγ. We previously showed that VCE-003, a cannabigerol (CBG) quinone derivative, is a novel neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory cannabinoid acting through PPARγ. We have now generated a non-thiophilic VCE-003 derivative named VCE-003.2 that preserves the ability to activate PPARγ and analyzed its neuroprotective activity. This compound exerted a prosurvival action in progenitor cells during neuronal differentiation, which was prevented by a PPARγ antagonist, without affecting neural progenitor cell proliferation. In addition, VCE-003.2 attenuated quinolinic acid (QA)-induced cell death and caspase-3 activation and also reduced mutant huntingtin aggregates in striatal cells. The neuroprotective profile of VCE-003.2 was analyzed using in vivo models of striatal neurodegeneration induced by QA and 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP) administration. VCE-003.2 prevented medium spiny DARPP32(+) neuronal loss in these Huntington's-like disease mice models improving motor deficits, reactive astrogliosis and microglial activation. In the 3NP model VCE-003.2 inhibited the upregulation of proinflammatory markers and improved antioxidant defenses in the brain. These data lead us to consider VCE-003.2 to have high potential for the treatment of Huntington's disease (HD) and other neurodegenerative diseases with neuroinflammatory traits.

  1. Role of DARPP-32 and ARPP-21 in the Emergence of Temporal Constraints on Striatal Calcium and Dopamine Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Upinder S.; Hellgren Kotaleski, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    In reward learning, the integration of NMDA-dependent calcium and dopamine by striatal projection neurons leads to potentiation of corticostriatal synapses through CaMKII/PP1 signaling. In order to elicit the CaMKII/PP1-dependent response, the calcium and dopamine inputs should arrive in temporal proximity and must follow a specific (dopamine after calcium) order. However, little is known about the cellular mechanism which enforces these temporal constraints on the signal integration. In this computational study, we propose that these temporal requirements emerge as a result of the coordinated signaling via two striatal phosphoproteins, DARPP-32 and ARPP-21. Specifically, DARPP-32-mediated signaling could implement an input-interval dependent gating function, via transient PP1 inhibition, thus enforcing the requirement for temporal proximity. Furthermore, ARPP-21 signaling could impose the additional input-order requirement of calcium and dopamine, due to its Ca2+/calmodulin sequestering property when dopamine arrives first. This highlights the possible role of phosphoproteins in the temporal aspects of striatal signal transduction. PMID:27584878

  2. Striatal dysfunction in X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism is associated with disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, N; Rosales, R L; Waugh, J L; Blood, A J; Domingo, A; Heldmann, M; Jamora, R D; Münchau, A; Münte, T F; Lee, L V; Buchmann, I; Klein, C

    2017-05-01

    X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism (XDP) is an inherited neurodegenerative adult-onset movement disorder associated with striatal atrophy. As the dopaminergic system has not yet been systemically studied in this basal ganglia model disease, it is unclear whether nigrostriatal dysfunction contributes to parkinsonism in XDP. Pre- and post-synaptic dopaminergic function was assessed in XDP. A total of 10 123 jod-benzamide (IBZM) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images were obtained for nine patients aged 42.3 ± 9.5 years (SD; range 30-52) and one asymptomatic mutation carrier (38 years), and four ioflupane (FP-CIT) SPECT images were obtained for four patients, aged 41.5 ± 11.6 years (range 30-52 years). Structural magnetic resonance imaging was also performed for all mutation carriers and 10 matched healthy controls. All patients were men who suffered from severe, disabling segmental or generalized dystonia and had varying degrees of parkinsonism. IBZM SPECT images were pathological in 8/9 symptomatic patients with distinct reduced post-synaptic tracer uptake in the caudate nucleus and putamen, and unremarkable in the asymptomatic mutation carrier. Longer disease duration was correlated with lower IBZM binding ratios. All subjects exhibited slightly reduced FP-CIT uptake values compared to controls for each analyzed region (-37% to -41%) which may be linked to basal ganglia volume loss. Visual inspection revealed physiological FP-CIT uptake in 1/4 patients. This nuclear imaging study provides evidence that the functional decline of post-synaptic dopaminergic neurotransmission is related to disease duration and ongoing neurodegeneration. Given the severe striatal cell loss which could be verified with post-synaptic nuclear imaging, both parkinsonism and dystonia in XDP are probably mainly due to striatal dysfunction. © 2017 EAN.

  3. Understanding Neuronal Mechanisms of Epilepsy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    20 μM glutamate,. Recording epileptogenesis. Long term connectivity c. 10 min neuronal loss. (De Lorenzo et al., 2000) injury epileptogenesis. Neuronal loss .... decay. Control Condition. Relative Increase in τ decay. Values in. Epileptic Condition. The relative contribution of the Na+/Ca2+ exchangers in Ca2+ extrusion.

  4. A single-neuron tracing study of arkypallidal and prototypic neurons in healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyama, Fumino; Nakano, Takashi; Matsuda, Wakoto; Furuta, Takahiro; Udagawa, Jun; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    The external globus pallidus (GP) is known as a relay nucleus of the indirect pathway of the basal ganglia. Recent studies in dopamine-depleted and healthy rats indicate that the GP comprises two main types of pallidofugal neurons: the so-called "prototypic" and "arkypallidal" neurons. However, the reconstruction of complete arkypallidal neurons in healthy rats has not been reported. Here we visualized the entire axonal arborization of four single arkypallidal neurons and six single prototypic neurons in rat brain using labeling with a viral vector expressing membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein and examined the distribution of axon boutons in the target nuclei. Results revealed that not only the arkypallidal neurons but nearly all of the prototypic neurons projected to the striatum with numerous axon varicosities. Thus, the striatum is a major target nucleus for pallidal neurons. Arkypallidal and prototypic GP neurons located in the calbindin-positive and calbindin-negative regions mainly projected to the corresponding positive and negative regions in the striatum. Because the GP and striatum calbindin staining patterns reflect the topographic organization of the striatopallidal projection, the striatal neurons in the sensorimotor and associative regions constitute the reciprocal connection with the GP neurons in the corresponding regions.

  5. Lutein protects dopaminergic neurons against MPTP-induced apoptotic death and motor dysfunction by ameliorating mitochondrial disruption and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, Jagatheesan; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy Justin; Essa, Musthafa Mohammed

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis plays an important role in various neurodegenerative diseases including Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), the most widely used neurotoxin mimics the symptoms of PD by inhibiting mitochondrial complex I that stimulates excessive intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and finally leads to mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis. Lutein, a carotenoid of xanthophyll family, is found abundantly in leafy green vegetables such as spinach, kale and in egg yolk, animal fat and human eye retinal macula. Increasing evidence indicates that lutein has offers benefits against neuronal damages during diabetic retinopathy, ischemia and AD by virtue of its mitochondrial protective, antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties. Male C57BL/6 mice (23-26 g) were randomized and grouped in to Control, MPTP, and Lutein treated groups. Lutein significantly reversed the loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons by increasing the striatal dopamine level in mice. Moreover, lutein-ameliorated MPTP induced mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and motor abnormalities. In addition, lutein repressed the MPTP-induced neuronal damage/apoptosis by inhibiting the activation of pro-apoptotic markers (Bax, caspases-3, 8 and 9) and enhancing anti-apoptotic marker (Bcl-2) expressions. Our current results revealed that lutein possessed protection on dopaminergic neurons by enhancing antioxidant defense and diminishing mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptotic death, suggesting the potential benefits of lutein for PD treatment.

  6. Early exposure to paraquat sensitizes dopaminergic neurons to subsequent silencing of PINK1 gene expression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongxia; Huang, Cao; Tong, Jianbin; Xia, Xu-Gang

    2011-01-01

    Environmental exposure, genetic modification, and aging are considered risky for Parkinson's disease (PD). How these risk factors cooperate to induce progressive neurodegeneration in PD remains largely unknown. Paraquat is an herbicide commonly used for weed and grass control. Exposure to paraquat is associated with the increased incidence of PD. In contrast to familial PD, most sporadic PD cases do not have genetic mutation, but may suffer from partial dysfunction of neuron-protective genes as aging. Using conditional transgenic RNAi, we showed that temporal silencing of PINK1 expression in adult mice increased striatal dopamine, the phenotype that could not be induced by constitutive gene silencing. Moreover, early exposure to paraquat sensitized dopaminergic neurons to subsequent silencing of PINK1 gene expression, leading to a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons. Our findings suggest a novel pathogenesis of PD: exposure to environmental toxicants early in the life reduces the threshold of developing PD and partial dysfunction of neuron-protective genes later in the life initiates a process of progressive neurodegeneration to cross the reduced threshold of disease onset.

  7. In vivo evaluation of striatal dopamine reuptake sites using 11C-nomifensine and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquilonius, S.-M.; Bergstroem, K.; Eckernaes, S.-Aa.; Leenders, K.L.; Hartvig, P.; Lundquist, H.; Antoni, G.; Gee, A.; Rimland, A.; Uhlin, J.; Langstroem, B.

    1987-01-01

    In vitro nomifensine demonstrates high affinity and specificity for dopamine reuptake sites in the brain. In the present study 11 C-nomifensine was administered i.v. in trace amounts (10-50 μg) to ketamine anaesthetized Rhesus monkeys (6-10 kg b.w.) and the timecourse of radioactivity within different brain regions was measured by positron emission tomography (PET). Six base-line experiments lasting for 60-80 min were performed. The procedure was repeated after pretreatment with nomifensine (2-6 mg/kg i.v.), another reuptake inhibitor, mazindol (0.3 mg/kg i.v.), desipramine (0.5 mg/kg i.v.) or spiperone (0.3 mg/kg i.v.) before the administration of a second 11 C-nomifensine dose. The highest radioactivity uptake was found in the dopamine innervated striatum and the lowest in a region containing the cerebellum, known to be almost devoid of dopaminergic neurons. The difference between striatal and cerebellar uptake of 11 C-nomifensine derived radioactivity was markedly reduced after nomifensine and mazindol but not after desipramine and spiperone. These results indicate that in vivo the striatal uptake of 11 C-nomifensine, as measured with PET, involves specific binding with the dopamine reuptake sites. In the first human applications of 11 C-nomifensine and PET in a healthy volunteer, the regional uptake of radioactivity was similar to that in base-line experiments with Rhesus monkeys. In the healthy subject the striatal/cerebellar ratio was 1.6, 50 min after the injection of 11 C-nomifensine. In a hemi-parkinsonian patient this ratio was 1.1 contralaterally and 1.3 ipsilaterally to the affected side. 11 C-nomifensine and PET seems to be an auspicious method to measure the striatal dopaminergic nerve terminals of man in vivo. (author)

  8. In vivo evaluation of striatal dopamine reuptake sites using /sup 11/C-nomifensine and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquilonius, S.-M.; Bergstroem, K.; Eckernaes, S.-Aa.; Leenders, K.L.; Hartvig, P.; Lundquist, H.; Antoni, G.; Gee, A.; Rimland, A.; Uhlin, J.

    1987-01-01

    In vitro nomifensine demonstrates high affinity and specificity for dopamine reuptake sites in the brain. In the present study /sup 11/C-nomifensine was administered i.v. in trace amounts (10-50 ..mu..g) to ketamine anaesthetized Rhesus monkeys (6-10 kg b.w.) and the timecourse of radioactivity within different brain regions was measured by positron emission tomography (PET). Six base-line experiments lasting for 60-80 min were performed. The procedure was repeated after pretreatment with nomifensine (2-6 mg/kg i.v.), another reuptake inhibitor, mazindol (0.3 mg/kg i.v.), desipramine (0.5 mg/kg i.v.) or spiperone (0.3 mg/kg i.v.) before the administration of a second /sup 11/C-nomifensine dose. The highest radioactivity uptake was found in the dopamine innervated striatum and the lowest in a region containing the cerebellum, known to be almost devoid of dopaminergic neurons. The difference between striatal and cerebellar uptake of /sup 11/C-nomifensine derived radioactivity was markedly reduced after nomifensine and mazindol but not after desipramine and spiperone. These results indicate that in vivo the striatal uptake of /sup 11/C-nomifensine, as measured with PET, involves specific binding with the dopamine reuptake sites. In the first human applications of /sup 11/C-nomifensine and PET in a healthy volunteer, the regional uptake of radioactivity was similar to that in base-line experiments with Rhesus monkeys. In the healthy subject the striatal/cerebellar ratio was 1.6, 50 min after the injection of /sup 11/C-nomifensine. In a hemi-parkinsonian patient this ratio was 1.1 contralaterally and 1.3 ipsilaterally to the affected side. /sup 11/C-nomifensine and PET seems to be an auspicious method to measure the striatal dopaminergic nerve terminals of man in vivo.

  9. Increased expression of the dopamine transporter leads to loss of dopamine neurons, oxidative stress and L-DOPA reversible motor deficits

    OpenAIRE

    Masoud, ST; Vecchio, LM; Bergeron, Y; Hossain, MM; Nguyen, LT; Bermejo, MK; Kile, B; Sotnikova, TD; Siesser, WB; Gainetdinov, RR; Wightman, RM; Caron, MG; Richardson, JR; Miller, GW; Ramsey, AJ

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine transporter is a key protein responsible for regulating dopamine homeostasis. Its function is to transport dopamine from the extracellular space into the presynaptic neuron. Studies have suggested that accumulation of dopamine in the cytosol can trigger oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Previously, ectopic expression of the dopamine transporter was shown to cause damage in non-dopaminergic neurons due to their inability to handle cytosolic dopamine. However, it is unknown wheth...

  10. Does human presynaptic striatal dopamine function predict social conformity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Paul R A; Benecke, Aaf; Puraite, Julita; Bloomfield, Michael A P; Shotbolt, Paul; Reeves, Suzanne J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Howes, Oliver; Egerton, Alice

    2014-03-01

    Socially desirable responding (SDR) is a personality trait which reflects either a tendency to present oneself in an overly positive manner to others, consistent with social conformity (impression management (IM)), or the tendency to view one's own behaviour in an overly positive light (self-deceptive enhancement (SDE)). Neurochemical imaging studies report an inverse relationship between SDR and dorsal striatal dopamine D₂/₃ receptor availability. This may reflect an association between SDR and D₂/₃ receptor expression, synaptic dopamine levels or a combination of the two. In this study, we used a [¹⁸F]-DOPA positron emission tomography (PET) image database to investigate whether SDR is associated with presynaptic dopamine function. Striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA uptake, (k(i)(cer), min⁻¹), was determined in two independent healthy participant cohorts (n=27 and 19), by Patlak analysis using a cerebellar reference region. SDR was assessed using the revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R) Lie scale, and IM and SDE were measured using the Paulhus Deception Scales. No significant associations were detected between Lie, SDE or IM scores and striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA k(i)(cer). These results indicate that presynaptic striatal dopamine function is not associated with social conformity and suggests that social conformity may be associated with striatal D₂/₃ receptor expression rather than with synaptic dopamine levels.

  11. Failure of action potential propagation in sensory neurons: mechanisms and loss of afferent filtering in C-type units after painful nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemes, Geza; Koopmeiners, Andrew; Rigaud, Marcel; Lirk, Philipp; Sapunar, Damir; Bangaru, Madhavi Latha; Vilceanu, Daniel; Garrison, Sheldon R; Ljubkovic, Marko; Mueller, Samantha J; Stucky, Cheryl L; Hogan, Quinn H

    2013-02-15

    The T-junction of sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is a potential impediment to action potential (AP) propagation towards the CNS. Using intracellular recordings from rat DRG neuronal somata during stimulation of the dorsal root, we determined that the maximal rate at which all of 20 APs in a train could successfully transit the T-junction (following frequency) was lowest in C-type units, followed by A-type units with inflected descending limbs of the AP, and highest in A-type units without inflections. In C-type units, following frequency was slower than the rate at which AP trains could be produced in either dorsal root axonal segments or in the soma alone, indicating that the T-junction is a site that acts as a low-pass filter for AP propagation. Following frequency was slower for a train of 20 APs than for two, indicating that a cumulative process leads to propagation failure. Propagation failure was accompanied by diminished somatic membrane input resistance, and was enhanced when Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) currents were augmented or when Ca(2+)-sensitive Cl(-) currents were blocked. After peripheral nerve injury, following frequencies were increased in axotomized C-type neurons and decreased in axotomized non-inflected A-type neurons. These findings reveal that the T-junction in sensory neurons is a regulator of afferent impulse traffic. Diminished filtering of AP trains at the T-junction of C-type neurons with axotomized peripheral processes could enhance the transmission of activity that is ectopically triggered in a neuroma or the neuronal soma, possibly contributing to pain generation.

  12. Striatal dopamine release codes uncertainty in pathological gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob; Mouridsen, Kim; Peterson, Ericka

    2012-01-01

    Two mechanisms of midbrain and striatal dopaminergic projections may be involved in pathological gambling: hypersensitivity to reward and sustained activation toward uncertainty. The midbrain—striatal dopamine system distinctly codes reward and uncertainty, where dopaminergic activation is a linear...... dopamine release, and we used performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) to determine overall reward and uncertainty. We hypothesized that we would find a linear function between dopamine release and IGT performance, if dopamine release coded reward in pathological gambling. If, on the other hand......, dopamine release coded uncertainty, we would find an inversely U-shaped function. The data supported an inverse U-shaped relation between striatal dopamine release and IGT performance if the pathological gambling group, but not in the healthy control group. These results are consistent with the hypothesis...

  13. Reduced striatal D2 receptor binding in myoclonus-dystonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beukers, R.J.; Weisscher, N.; Tijssen, M.A.J.; Booij, J.; Zijlstra, F.; Amelsvoort, T.A.M.J. van

    2009-01-01

    To study striatal dopamine D 2 receptor availability in DYT11 mutation carriers of the autosomal dominantly inherited disorder myoclonus-dystonia (M-D). Fifteen DYT11 mutation carriers (11 clinically affected) and 15 age- and sex-matched controls were studied using 123 I-IBZM SPECT. Specific striatal binding ratios were calculated using standard templates for striatum and occipital areas. Multivariate analysis with corrections for ageing and smoking showed significantly lower specific striatal to occipital IBZM uptake ratios (SORs) both in the left and right striatum in clinically affected patients and also in all DYT11 mutation carriers compared to control subjects. Our findings are consistent with the theory of reduced dopamine D 2 receptor (D2R) availability in dystonia, although the possibility of increased endogenous dopamine, and consequently, competitive D2R occupancy cannot be ruled out. (orig.)

  14. Neuronal Entropy-Rate Feature of Entopeduncular Nucleus in Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbin, Olivier; Jin, Xingxing; Von Wrangel, Christof; Schwabe, Kerstin; Nambu, Atsushi; Naritoku, Dean K; Krauss, Joachim K; Alam, Mesbah

    2016-03-01

    The function of the nigro-striatal pathway on neuronal entropy in the basal ganglia (BG) output nucleus, i.e. the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN) was investigated in the unilaterally 6-hyroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). In both control subjects and subjects with 6-OHDA lesion of dopamine (DA) the nigro-striatal pathway, a histological hallmark for parkinsonism, neuronal entropy in EPN was maximal in neurons with firing rates ranging between 15 and 25 Hz. In 6-OHDA lesioned rats, neuronal entropy in the EPN was specifically higher in neurons with firing rates above 25 Hz. Our data establishes that the nigro-striatal pathway controls neuronal entropy in motor circuitry and that the parkinsonian condition is associated with abnormal relationship between firing rate and neuronal entropy in BG output nuclei. The neuronal firing rates and entropy relationship provide putative relevant electrophysiological information to investigate the sensory-motor processing in normal condition and conditions such as movement disorders.

  15. Impairment of striatal mitochondrial function by acute paraquat poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerniczyniec, Analía; Lanza, E M; Karadayian, A G; Bustamante, J; Lores-Arnaiz, S

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondria are essential for survival. Their primary function is to support aerobic respiration and to provide energy for intracellular metabolic pathways. Paraquat is a redox cycling agent capable of generating reactive oxygen species. The aim of the present study was to evaluate changes in cortical and striatal mitochondrial function in an experimental model of acute paraquat toxicity and to compare if the brain areas and the molecular mechanisms involved were similar to those observed after chronic exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats received paraquat (25 mg/Kg i.p.) or saline and were sacrificed after 24 h. Paraquat treatment decreased complex I and IV activity by 37 and 21 % respectively in striatal mitochondria. Paraquat inhibited striatal state 4 and state 3 KCN-sensitive respiration by 80 % and 62 % respectively, indicating a direct effect on respiratory chain. An increase of 2.2 fold in state 4 and 2.3 fold in state 3 in KCN-insensitive respiration was observed in striatal mitochondria from paraquat animals, suggesting that paraquat redox cycling also consumed oxygen. Paraquat treatment increased hydrogen peroxide production (150 %), TBARS production (42 %) and cardiolipin oxidation/depletion (12 %) in striatal mitochondria. Also, changes in mitochondrial polarization was induced after paraquat treatment. However, no changes were observed in any of these parameters in cortical mitochondria from paraquat treated-animals. These results suggest that paraquat treatment induced a clear striatal mitochondrial dysfunction due to both paraquat redox cycling reactions and impairment of the mitochondrial electron transport, causing oxidative damage. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction could probably lead to alterations in cellular bioenergetics.

  16. Loss of Kdm5c Causes Spurious Transcription and Prevents the Fine-Tuning of Activity-Regulated Enhancers in Neurons

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    Marilyn Scandaglia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available During development, chromatin-modifying enzymes regulate both the timely establishment of cell-type-specific gene programs and the coordinated repression of alternative cell fates. To dissect the role of one such enzyme, the intellectual-disability-linked lysine demethylase 5C (Kdm5c, in the developing and adult brain, we conducted parallel behavioral, transcriptomic, and epigenomic studies in Kdm5c-null and forebrain-restricted inducible knockout mice. Together, genomic analyses and functional assays demonstrate that Kdm5c plays a critical role as a repressor responsible for the developmental silencing of germline genes during cellular differentiation and in fine-tuning activity-regulated enhancers during neuronal maturation. Although the importance of these functions declines after birth, Kdm5c retains an important genome surveillance role preventing the incorrect activation of non-neuronal and cryptic promoters in adult neurons.

  17. Narcolepsy: Autoimmunity, Effector T Cell Activation Due to Infection, or T Cell Independent, Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Induced Neuronal Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Adriano; Gast, Heidemarie; Reith, Walter; Recher, Mike; Birchler, Thomas; Bassetti, Claudio L.

    2010-01-01

    Human narcolepsy with cataplexy is a neurological disorder, which develops due to a deficiency in hypocretin producing neurons in the hypothalamus. There is a strong association with human leucocyte antigens HLA-DR2 and HLA-DQB1*0602. The disease typically starts in adolescence. Recent developments in narcolepsy research support the hypothesis of…

  18. DRD4 and striatal modulation of the link between childhood behavioral inhibition and adolescent anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardee, Jillian E.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Benson, Brenda E.; Nelson, Eric E.; Gorodetsky, Elena; Goldman, David; Fox, Nathan A.; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral inhibition (BI), a temperament characterized by vigilance to novelty, sensitivity to approach–withdrawal cues and social reticence in childhood, is associated with risk for anxiety in adolescence. Independent studies link reward hyper-responsivity to BI, adolescent anxiety and dopamine gene variants. This exploratory study extends these observations by examining the impact of DRD4 genotype and reward hyper-responsivity on the BI–anxiety link. Adolescents (N = 78) completed a monetary incentive delay task in the fMRI environment. Participants were characterized based on a continuous score of BI and the 7-repeat allele (7R+) of the DRD4 functional polymorphism. Parent-report and self-report measures of anxiety were also collected. Across the entire sample, striatal activation increased systematically with increases in the magnitude of anticipated monetary gains and losses. DRD4 status moderated the relation between BI and activation in the caudate nucleus. Childhood BI was associated with parent report of adolescent anxiety among 7R+ participants with elevated levels of striatal response to incentive cues. DRD4 genotype influenced the relations among neural response to incentives, early childhood BI and anxiety. The findings help refine our understanding of the role reward-related brain systems play in the emergence of anxiety in temperamentally at-risk individuals, building a foundation for future larger scale studies. PMID:23314010

  19. Distinct roles of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in striatal inhibition dynamics

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    Ruixi eLuo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Striatonigral and striatopallidal projecting medium spiny neurons (MSNs express dopamine D1 (D1+ and D2 receptors (D2+, respectively. Both classes receive extensive GABAergic input via expression of synaptic, perisynaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors. The activation patterns of different presynaptic GABAergic neurons produce transient and sustained GABAA receptor-mediated conductance that fulfill distinct physiological roles. We performed single and dual whole cell recordings from striatal neurons in mice expressing fluorescent proteins in interneurons and MSNs. We report specific inhibitory dynamics produced by distinct activation patterns of presynaptic GABAergic neurons as source of synaptic, perisynaptic and extrasynaptic inhibition. Synaptic GABAA receptors in MSNs contain the α2, γ2 and a β subunit. In addition, there is evidence for the developmental increase of the α1 subunit that contributes to faster inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSC. Tonic GABAergic currents in MSNs from adult mice are carried by extrasynaptic receptors containing the α4 and δ subunit, while in younger mice this current is mediated by receptors that contain the α5 subunit. Both forms of tonic currents are differentially expressed in D1+ and D2+ MSNs. This study extends these findings by relating presynaptic activation with pharmacological analysis of inhibitory conductance in mice where the β3 subunit is conditionally removed in fluorescently labeled D2+ MSNs and in mice with global deletion of the δ subunit. Our results show that responses to low doses of gaboxadol (2μM, a GABAA receptor agonist with preference to δ subunit, are abolished in the δ but not the β3 subunit knock out mice. This suggests that the β3 subunit is not a component of the adult extrasynaptic receptor pool, in contrast to what has been shown for tonic current in young mice. Deletion of the β3 subunit from D2+ MSNs however, removed slow spontaneous IPSCs, implicating its

  20. Striatal volume predicts level of video game skill acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Kirk I; Boot, Walter R; Basak, Chandramallika; Neider, Mark B; Prakash, Ruchika S; Voss, Michelle W; Graybiel, Ann M; Simons, Daniel J; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele; Kramer, Arthur F

    2010-11-01

    Video game skills transfer to other tasks, but individual differences in performance and in learning and transfer rates make it difficult to identify the source of transfer benefits. We asked whether variability in initial acquisition and of improvement in performance on a demanding video game, the Space Fortress game, could be predicted by variations in the pretraining volume of either of 2 key brain regions implicated in learning and memory: the striatum, implicated in procedural learning and cognitive flexibility, and the hippocampus, implicated in declarative memory. We found that hippocampal volumes did not predict learning improvement but that striatal volumes did. Moreover, for the striatum, the volumes of the dorsal striatum predicted improvement in performance but the volumes of the ventral striatum did not. Both ventral and dorsal striatal volumes predicted early acquisition rates. Furthermore, this early-stage correlation between striatal volumes and learning held regardless of the cognitive flexibility demands of the game versions, whereas the predictive power of the dorsal striatal volumes held selectively for performance improvements in a game version emphasizing cognitive flexibility. These findings suggest a neuroanatomical basis for the superiority of training strategies that promote cognitive flexibility and transfer to untrained tasks.

  1. Dorsal striatal dopamine, food preference and health perception in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallace, D.L.; Aarts, E.; Dang, L.C.; Greer, S.M.; Jagust, W.J.; D'Esposito, M.

    2014-01-01

    To date, few studies have explored the neurochemical mechanisms supporting individual differences in food preference in humans. Here we investigate how dorsal striatal dopamine, as measured by the positron emission tomography (PET) tracer [(18)F]fluorometatyrosine (FMT), correlates with food-related

  2. Differences in striatal dopamine transporter density between tremor dominant and non-tremor Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaasinen, Valtteri; Kinos, Maija; Joutsa, Juho [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Turku (Finland); University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Seppaenen, Marko [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku (Finland); Noponen, Tommi [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku (Finland)

    2014-10-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) can manifest with a tremor-dominant or a non-tremor (akinetic-rigid) phenotype. Although the tremor-dominant subtype may show a better prognosis, there is limited information on the phenotypic differences regarding the level of striatal dopamine transmission. The present study investigated striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) binding characteristics in a large sample of patients with and without tremor. [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT scans of 231 patients with a clinical diagnosis of PD and abnormal FP-CIT binding (157 with tremor, 74 without tremor) and 230 control patients with normal FP-CIT binding (148 with tremor, 82 without tremor) were analysed using an automated region-of-interest analysis of the scans (BRASS). Specific striatal binding ratios were compared between phenotypes and groups using age, sex, and symptom duration, predominant side of symptoms, dopaminergic medications and scanner as covariates. Patients with PD had 28.1 - 65.0 % lower binding in all striatal regions compared to controls (p < 0.001). The mean FP-CIT caudate nucleus uptake and the left caudate nucleus uptake were higher in PD patients with tremor than in PD patients without tremor (mean 9.0 % higher, left 10.5 % higher; p < 0.05), whereas there were no differences between tremor and non-tremor control patients. No significant effects of tremor on DAT binding were observed in the anterior or posterior putamen. The motor phenotype is associated with the extent of caudate dopamine terminal loss in PD, as dopamine function is relatively more preserved in tremor patients. Symptom type is related to caudate dopamine function only in association with Parkinsonian dopaminergic degeneration, not in intact dopamine systems in patients with non-PD tremor. (orig.)

  3. Effect of in vitro inorganic lead on dopamine release from superfused rat striatal synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minnema, D.J.; Greenland, R.D.; Michaelson, I.A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of inorganic lead in vitro in several aspects of [ 3 H]dopamine release from superfused rat striatal synaptosomes was examined. Under conditions of spontaneous release, lead (1-30 microM) induced dopamine release in a concentration-dependent manner. The onset of the lead-induced release was delayed by approximately 15-30 sec. The magnitude of dopamine release induced by lead was increased when calcium was removed from the superfusing buffer. Lead-induced release was unaffected in the presence of putative calcium, sodium, and/or potassium channel blockers (nickel, tetrodotoxin, tetraethylammonium, respectively). Depolarization-evoked dopamine release, produced by a 1-sec exposure to 61 mM potassium, was diminished at calcium concentrations below 0.254 mM. The onset of depolarization-evoked release was essentially immediate following exposure of the synaptosomes to high potassium. The combination of lead (3 or 10 microM) with high potassium reduced the magnitude of depolarization-evoked dopamine release. This depression of depolarization-evoked release by lead was greater in the presence of 0.25 mM than 2.54 mM calcium in the superfusing buffer. These findings demonstrate multiple actions of lead on synaptosomal dopamine release. Lead can induce dopamine release by yet unidentified neuronal mechanisms independent of external calcium. Lead can also reduce depolarization-evoked dopamine release by apparent competition with calcium influx at the neuronal membrane calcium channel

  4. Striatal Pre- and Postsynaptic Profile of Adenosine A2A Receptor Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, César; Beaumont, Vahri; Goldberg, Steven R.; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I.; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Striatal adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) are highly expressed in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the indirect efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs). A2ARs are also localized presynaptically in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals contacting MSNs of the direct efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs). It has been hypothesized that postsynaptic A2AR antagonists should be useful in Parkinson's disease, while presynaptic A2AR antagonists could be beneficial in dyskinetic disorders, such as Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorders and drug addiction. The aim or this work was to determine whether selective A2AR antagonists may be subdivided according to a preferential pre- versus postsynaptic mechanism of action. The potency at blocking the motor output and striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation and the potency at inducing locomotor activation were used as in vivo measures of pre- and postsynaptic activities, respectively. SCH-442416 and KW-6002 showed a significant preferential pre- and postsynaptic profile, respectively, while the other tested compounds (MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261) showed no clear preference. Radioligand-binding experiments were performed in cells expressing A2AR-D2R and A1R-A2AR heteromers to determine possible differences in the affinity of these compounds for different A2AR heteromers. Heteromerization played a key role in the presynaptic profile of SCH-442416, since it bound with much less affinity to A2AR when co-expressed with D2R than with A1R. KW-6002 showed the best relative affinity for A2AR co-expressed with D2R than co-expressed with A1R, which can at least partially explain the postsynaptic profile of this compound. Also, the in vitro pharmacological profile of MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 was is in accordance with their mixed pre- and postsynaptic profile. On the basis of their preferential

  5. Striatal pre- and postsynaptic profile of adenosine A(2A receptor antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Orru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Striatal adenosine A(2A receptors (A(2ARs are highly expressed in medium spiny neurons (MSNs of the indirect efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with dopamine D(2 receptors (D(2Rs. A(2ARs are also localized presynaptically in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals contacting MSNs of the direct efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with adenosine A(1 receptors (A(1Rs. It has been hypothesized that postsynaptic A(2AR antagonists should be useful in Parkinson's disease, while presynaptic A(2AR antagonists could be beneficial in dyskinetic disorders, such as Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorders and drug addiction. The aim or this work was to determine whether selective A(2AR antagonists may be subdivided according to a preferential pre- versus postsynaptic mechanism of action. The potency at blocking the motor output and striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation and the potency at inducing locomotor activation were used as in vivo measures of pre- and postsynaptic activities, respectively. SCH-442416 and KW-6002 showed a significant preferential pre- and postsynaptic profile, respectively, while the other tested compounds (MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 showed no clear preference. Radioligand-binding experiments were performed in cells expressing A(2AR-D(2R and A(1R-A(2AR heteromers to determine possible differences in the affinity of these compounds for different A(2AR heteromers. Heteromerization played a key role in the presynaptic profile of SCH-442416, since it bound with much less affinity to A(2AR when co-expressed with D(2R than with A(1R. KW-6002 showed the best relative affinity for A(2AR co-expressed with D(2R than co-expressed with A(1R, which can at least partially explain the postsynaptic profile of this compound. Also, the in vitro pharmacological profile of MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 was is in accordance with their mixed pre- and postsynaptic profile

  6. Cadmium induced ROS alters M1 and M3 receptors, leading to SN56 cholinergic neuronal loss, through AChE variants disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano, Paula; de Frias, Mariano; Lobo, Margarita; Anadon, María José; Sola, Emma; Pelayo, Adela; Díaz, María Jesús; Frejo, María Teresa; Del Pino, Javier

    2018-02-01

    Cadmium, an environmental neurotoxic compound, produces cognitive disorders, although the mechanism remains unknown. Previously, we described that cadmium induces a more pronounced cell death on cholinergic neurons from basal forebrain (BF). This effect, partially mediated by M1 receptor blockade, triggering it through AChE splices variants alteration, may explain cadmium effects on learning and memory processes. Cadmium has been also reported to induce oxidative stress generation leading to M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors alteration, in hippocampus and frontal cortex, which are necessary to maintain cell viability and cognitive regulation, so their alteration in BF could also mediate this effect. Moreover, it has been reported that antioxidant treatment could reverse cognitive disorders, muscarinic receptor and AChE variants alterations induced by cadmium. Thus, we hypothesized that cadmium induced cell death of BF cholinergic neurons is mediated by oxidative stress generation and this mechanism could produce this effect, in part, through AChE variants altered by muscarinic receptors disruption. To prove this, we evaluated in BF SN56 cholinergic neurons, whether cadmium induces oxidative stress and alters muscarinic receptors, and their involvement in the induction of cell death through alteration of AChE variants. Our results show that cadmium induces oxidative stress, which mediates partially the alteration of AChE variants and M2 to M4 muscarinic receptors expression and blockage of M1 receptor. In addition, cadmium induced oxidative stress generation by M1 and M3 receptors alteration through AChE variants disruption, leading to cell death. These results provide new understanding of the mechanisms contributing to cadmium harmful effects on cholinergic neurons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Reduced Levels of Proteasome Products in a Mouse Striatal Cell Model of Huntington's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayani Dasgupta

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease is the result of a long polyglutamine tract in the gene encoding huntingtin protein, which in turn causes a large number of cellular changes and ultimately results in neurodegeneration of striatal neurons. Although many theories have been proposed, the precise mechanism by which the polyglutamine expansion causes cellular changes is not certain. Some evidence supports the hypothesis that the long polyglutamine tract inhibits the proteasome, a multiprotein complex involved in protein degradation. However, other studies report normal proteasome function in cells expressing long polyglutamine tracts. The controversy may be due to the methods used to examine proteasome activity in each of the previous studies. In the present study, we measured proteasome function by examining levels of endogenous peptides that are products of proteasome cleavage. Peptide levels were compared among mouse striatal cell lines expressing either 7 glutamines (STHdhQ7/Q7 or 111 glutamines in the huntingtin protein, either heterozygous (STHdhQ7/Q111 or homozygous (STHdhQ111/Q111. Both of the cell lines expressing huntingtin with 111 glutamines showed a large reduction in nearly all of the peptides detected in the cells, relative to levels of these peptides in cells homozygous for 7 glutamines. Treatment of STHdhQ7/Q7 cells with proteasome inhibitors epoxomicin or bortezomib also caused a large reduction in most of these peptides, suggesting that they are products of proteasome-mediated cleavage of cellular proteins. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that proteasome function is impaired by the expression of huntingtin protein containing long polyglutamine tracts.

  8. Cortical-striatal gene expression in neonatal hippocampal lesion (NVHL)-amplified cocaine sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, R A; McClintick, J N; Sentir, A M; Berg, S A; Runyan, M; Choi, K H; Edenberg, H J

    2013-07-01

    Cortical-striatal circuit dysfunction in mental illness may enhance addiction vulnerability. Neonatal ventral hippocampal lesions (NVHL) model this dual diagnosis causality by producing a schizophrenia syndrome with enhanced responsiveness to addictive drugs. Rat genome-wide microarrays containing >24 000 probesets were used to examine separate and co-occurring effects of NVHLs and cocaine sensitization (15 mg/kg/day × 5 days) on gene expression within medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), nucleus accumbens (NAC), and caudate-putamen (CAPU). Two weeks after NVHLs robustly amplified cocaine behavioral sensitization, brains were harvested for genes of interest defined as those altered at P cocaine effects or interactions. Among 135 genes so impacted, NVHLs altered twofold more than cocaine, with half of all changes in the NAC. Although no genes were changed in the same direction by both NVHL and cocaine history, the anatomy and directionality of significant changes suggested synergy on the neural circuit level generative of compounded behavioral phenotypes: NVHL predominantly downregulated expression in MPFC and NAC while NVHL and cocaine history mostly upregulated CAPU expression. From 75 named genes altered by NVHL or cocaine, 27 had expression levels that correlated significantly with degree of behavioral sensitization, including 11 downregulated by NVHL in MPFC/NAC, and 10 upregulated by NVHL or cocaine in CAPU. These findings suggest that structural and functional impoverishment of prefrontal-cortical-accumbens circuits in mental illness is associated with abnormal striatal plasticity compounding with that in addictive disease. Polygenetic interactions impacting neuronal signaling and morphology within these networks likely contribute to addiction vulnerability in mental illness. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  9. Multiple intracerebroventricular injections of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells delay motor neurons loss but not disease progression of SOD1G93A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Francesca; Vallarola, Antonio; Violatto, Martina Bruna; Talamini, Laura; Freschi, Mattia; De Gioia, Roberta; Capelli, Chiara; Agostini, Azzurra; Moscatelli, Davide; Tortarolo, Massimo; Bigini, Paolo; Introna, Martino; Bendotti, Caterina

    2017-12-01

    Stem cell therapy is considered a promising approach in the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seem to be the most effective in ALS animal models. The umbilical cord (UC) is a source of highly proliferating fetal MSCs, more easily collectable than other MSCs. Recently we demonstrated that human (h) UC-MSCs, double labeled with fluorescent nanoparticles and Hoechst-33258 and transplanted intracerebroventricularly (ICV) into SOD1G93A transgenic mice, partially migrated into the spinal cord after a single injection. This prompted us to assess the effect of repeated ICV injections of hUC-MSCs on disease progression in SOD1G93A mice. Although no transplanted cells migrated to the spinal cord, a partial but significant protection of motor neurons (MNs) was found in the lumbar spinal cord of hUC-MSCs-treated SOD1G93A mice, accompanied by a shift from a pro-inflammatory (IL-6, IL-1β) to anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) and neuroprotective (IGF-1) environment in the lumbar spinal cord, probably linked to the activation of p-Akt survival pathway in both motor neurons and reactive astrocytes. However, this treatment neither prevented the muscle denervation nor delayed the disease progression of mice, emphasizing the growing evidence that protecting the motor neuron perikarya is not sufficient to delay the ALS progression. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Loss of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors in synapses of tonic firing substantia gelatinosa neurons in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yishen; Derkach, Victor A; Smith, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    Synapses transmitting nociceptive information in the spinal dorsal horn undergo enduring changes following peripheral nerve injury. Indeed, such injury alters the expression of the GluA2 subunit of glutamatergic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in the substantia gelatinosa and this predicts altered channel conductance and calcium permeability, leading to an altered function of excitatory synapses. We therefore investigated the functional properties of synaptic AMPA receptors in rat substantia gelatinosa neurons following 10-20d chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve; a model of neuropathic pain. We measured their single-channel conductance and sensitivity to a blocker of calcium permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs), IEM1460 (50μM). In putative inhibitory, tonic firing neurons, CCI reduced the average single-channel conductance of synaptic AMPAR from 14.4±3.5pS (n=12) to 9.2±1.0pS (n=10, pinjury acting at synapses of inhibitory neurons to reduce their drive and therefore inhibitory tone in the spinal cord, therefore contributing to the central sensitization associated with neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Paraquat induces oxidative stress, neuronal loss in substantia nigra region and Parkinsonism in adult rats: Neuroprotection and amelioration of symptoms by water-soluble formulation of Coenzyme Q10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar TS

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease, for which currently there is no cure, develops as a result of progressive loss of dopamine neurons in the brain; thus, identification of any potential therapeutic intervention for disease management is of a great importance. Results Here we report that prophylactic application of water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10 could effectively offset the effects of environmental neurotoxin paraquat, believed to be a contributing factor in the development of familial PD. In this study we utilized a model of paraquat-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in adult rats that received three weekly intra-peritoneal injections of the herbicide paraquat. Histological and biochemical analyses of rat brains revealed increased levels of oxidative stress markers and a loss of approximately 65% of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra region. The paraquat-exposed rats also displayed impaired balancing skills on a slowly rotating drum (rotorod evidenced by their reduced spontaneity in gait performance. In contrast, paraquat exposed rats receiving a water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10 in their drinking water prior to and during the paraquat treatment neither developed neurodegeneration nor reduced rotorod performance and were indistinguishable from the control paraquat-untreated rats. Conclusion Our data confirmed that paraquat-induced neurotoxicity represents a convenient rat model of Parkinsonian neurodegeneration suitable for mechanistic and neuroprotective studies. This is the first preclinical evaluation of a water-soluble coenzyme Q10 formulation showing the evidence of prophylactic neuroprotection at clinically relevant doses.

  12. Classification of H2O2 as a Neuromodulator that Regulates Striatal Dopamine Release on a Subsecond Time Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Here we review evidence that the reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), meets the criteria for classification as a neuromodulator through its effects on striatal dopamine (DA) release. This evidence was obtained using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to detect evoked DA release in striatal slices, along with whole-cell and fluorescence imaging to monitor cellular activity and H2O2 generation in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). The data show that (1) exogenous H2O2 suppresses DA release in dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens shell and the same effect is seen with elevation of endogenous H2O2 levels; (2) H2O2 is generated downstream from glutamatergic AMPA receptor activation in MSNs, but not DA axons; (3) generation of modulatory H2O2 is activity dependent; (4) H2O2 generated in MSNs diffuses to DA axons to cause transient DA release suppression by activating ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels on DA axons; and (5) the amplitude of H2O2-dependent inhibition of DA release is attenuated by enzymatic degradation of H2O2, but the subsecond time course is determined by H2O2 diffusion rate and/or KATP-channel kinetics. In the dorsal striatum, neuromodulatory H2O2 is an intermediate in the regulation of DA release by the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA, as well as other neuromodulators, including cannabinoids. However, modulatory actions of H2O2 occur in other regions and cell types, as well, consistent with the widespread expression of KATP and other H2O2-sensitive channels throughout the CNS. PMID:23259034

  13. Neuronal-glial trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachelard, H.S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The name 'glia' originates from the Greek word for glue, because astro glia (or astrocytes) were thought only to provide an anatomical framework for the electrically-excitable neurones. However, awareness that astrocytes perform vital roles in protecting the neurones, which they surround, emerged from evidence that they act as neuroprotective K + -sinks, and that they remove potentially toxic extracellular glutamate from the vicinity of the neurones. The astrocytes convert the glutamate to non-toxic glutamine which is returned to the neurones and used to replenish transmitter glutamate. This 'glutamate-glutamine cycle' (established in the 1960s by Berl and his colleagues) also contributes to protecting the neurones against a build-up of toxic ammonia. Glial cells also supply the neurones with components for free-radical scavenging glutathione. Recent studies have revealed that glial cells play a more positive interactive role in furnishing the neurones with fuels. Studies using radioactive 14 C, 13 C-MRS and 15 N-GCMS have revealed that glia produce alanine, lactate and proline for consumption by neurones, with increased formation of neurotransmitter glutamate. On neuronal activation the release of NH 4 + and glutamate from the neurones stimulates glucose uptake and glycolysis in the glia to produce more alanine, which can be regarded as an 'alanine-glutamate cycle' Use of 14 C-labelled precursors provided early evidence that neurotransmitter GABA may be partly derived from glial glutamine, and this has been confirmed recently in vivo by MRS isotopomer analysis of the GABA and glutamine labelled from 13 C-acetate. Relative rates of intermediary metabolism in glia and neurones can be calculated using a combination of [1- 13 C] glucose and [1,2- 13 C] acetate. When glutamate is released by neurones there is a net neuronal loss of TCA intermediates which have to be replenished. Part of this is derived from carboxylation of pyruvate, (pyruvate carboxylase

  14. Learning new sequential stepping patterns requires striatal plasticity during the earliest phase of acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Toru; Nagata, Masatoshi; Yagi, Takeshi; Graybiel, Ann M; Yamamori, Tetsuo; Kitsukawa, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    Animals including humans execute motor behavior to reach their goals. For this purpose, they must choose correct strategies according to environmental conditions and shape many parameters of their movements, including their serial order and timing. To investigate the neurobiology underlying such skills, we used a multi-sensor equipped, motor-driven running wheel with adjustable sequences of foothold pegs on which mice ran to obtain water reward. When the peg patterns changed from a familiar pattern to a new pattern, the mice had to learn and implement new locomotor strategies in order to receive reward. We found that the accuracy of stepping and the achievement of water reward improved with the new learning after changes in the peg-pattern, and c-Fos expression levels assayed after the first post-switch session were high in both dorsolateral striatum and motor cortex, relative to post-switch plateau levels. Combined in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry of striatal sections demonstrated that both enkephalin-positive (indirect pathway) neurons and substance P-positive (direct pathway) neurons were recruited specifically after the pattern switches, as were interneurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase. When we blocked N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the dorsolateral striatum by injecting the NMDA receptor antagonist, D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5), we found delays in early post-switch improvement in performance. These findings suggest that the dorsolateral striatum is activated on detecting shifts in environment to adapt motor behavior to the new context via NMDA-dependent plasticity, and that this plasticity may underlie forming and breaking skills and habits as well as to behavioral difficulties in clinical disorders. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Loss of GPRC5B impairs synapse formation of Purkinje cells with cerebellar nuclear neurons and disrupts cerebellar synaptic plasticity and motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Takamitsu; Kohyama-Koganeya, Ayako; Kinoshita, Masami O; Tatsukawa, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Chika; Oshima, Eriko; Yamada, Kazuyuki; Le, Tung Dinh; Akagi, Takumi; Tohyama, Koujiro; Nagao, Soichi; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2018-02-23

    GPRC5B is a membrane glycoprotein robustly expressed in mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). Its function is unknown. In Gprc5b -/- mice that lack GPRC5B, PCs develop distal axonal swellings in deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). Numerous misshapen mitochondria, which generated excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), accumulated in these distal axonal swellings. In primary cell cultures of Gprc5b -/- PCs, pharmacological reduction of ROS prevented the appearance of such swellings. To examine the physiological role of GPRC5B in PCs, we analyzed cerebellar synaptic transmission and cerebellum-dependent motor learning in Gprc5b -/- mice. Patch-clamp recordings in cerebellum slices in vitro revealed that the induction of long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-PC synapses was normal in adult Gprc5b -/- mice, whereas the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) at mossy fiber-DCN neuron synapses was attenuated in juvenile Gprc5b -/- mice. In Gprc5b -/- mice, long-term motor learning was impaired in both the rotarod test and the horizontal optokinetic response eye movement (HOKR) test. These observations suggest that GPRC5B plays not only an important role in the development of distal axons of PCs and formation of synapses with DCN neurons, but also in the synaptic plasticity that underlies long-term motor learning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Striatal dopamine release codes uncertainty in pathological gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob; Mouridsen, Kim; Peterson, Ericka

    2012-01-01

    Two mechanisms of midbrain and striatal dopaminergic projections may be involved in pathological gambling: hypersensitivity to reward and sustained activation toward uncertainty. The midbrain—striatal dopamine system distinctly codes reward and uncertainty, where dopaminergic activation is a linear...... function of expected reward and an inverse U-shaped function of uncertainty. In this study, we investigated the dopaminergic coding of reward and uncertainty in 18 pathological gambling sufferers and 16 healthy controls. We used positron emission tomography (PET) with the tracer [11C]raclopride to measure...... dopamine release, and we used performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) to determine overall reward and uncertainty. We hypothesized that we would find a linear function between dopamine release and IGT performance, if dopamine release coded reward in pathological gambling. If, on the other hand...

  17. Endocannabinoid-dopamine interactions in striatal synaptic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Neil Mathur

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The nigrostriatal dopaminergic system is implicated in action control and learning. A large body of work has focused on the contribution of this system to modulation of the corticostriatal synapse, the predominant synapse type in the striatum. Signaling through the D2 dopamine receptor is necessary for endocannabinoid-mediated depression of corticostriatal glutamate release. Here we review the known details of this mechanism and discuss newly discovered signaling pathways interacting with this system that ultimately exert dynamic control of cortical input to the striatum and striatal output. This topic is timely with respect to Parkinson’s disease given recent data indicating changes in the striatal endocannabinoid system in patients with this disorder.

  18. The Cognitive Architecture of Spatial Navigation: Hippocampal and Striatal Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, Fabian; Burgess, Neil

    2015-10-07

    Spatial navigation can serve as a model system in cognitive neuroscience, in which specific neural representations, learning rules, and control strategies can be inferred from the vast experimental literature that exists across many species, including humans. Here, we review this literature, focusing on the contributions of hippocampal and striatal systems, and attempt to outline a minimal cognitive architecture that is consistent with the experimental literature and that synthesizes previous related computational modeling. The resulting architecture includes striatal reinforcement learning based on egocentric representations of sensory states and actions, incidental Hebbian association of sensory information with allocentric state representations in the hippocampus, and arbitration of the outputs of both systems based on confidence/uncertainty in medial prefrontal cortex. We discuss the relationship between this architecture and learning in model-free and model-based systems, episodic memory, imagery, and planning, including some open questions and directions for further experiments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cognition and behavior in motor neuron disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaphorst, J.

    2015-01-01

    Motor neuron disease (MND) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive motor neuron loss, leading to weakness of the muscles of arms and legs, bulbar and respiratory muscles. Depending on the involvement of the lower and the upper motor neuron, amyotrophic lateral

  20. In vivo neurochemical characterization of clothianidin induced striatal dopamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faro, L R F; Oliveira, I M; Durán, R; Alfonso, M

    2012-12-16

    Clothianidin (CLO) is a neonicotinoid insecticide with selective action on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The aim of this study was to determine the neurochemical basis for CLO-induced striatal dopamine release using the microdialysis technique in freely moving and conscious rats. Intrastriatal administration of CLO (3.5mM), produced an increase in both spontaneous (2462 ± 627% with respect to basal values) and KCl-evoked (4672 ± 706% with respect to basal values) dopamine release. This effect was attenuated in Ca(2+)-free medium, and was prevented in reserpine pre-treated animals or in presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX). To investigate the involvement of dopamine transporter (DAT), the effect of CLO was observed in presence of nomifensine. The coadministration of CLO and nomifensine produced an additive effect on striatal dopamine release. The results suggest that the effect of CLO on striatal dopamine release is predominantly mediated by an exocytotic mechanism, Ca(2+), vesicular and TTX-dependent and not by a mechanism mediated by dopamine transporter. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Neuroinflammation alters voltage-dependent conductance in striatal astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpuk, Nikolay; Burkovetskaya, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Neuroinflammation has the capacity to alter normal central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis and function. The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of an inflammatory milieu on the electrophysiological properties of striatal astrocyte subpopulations with a mouse bacterial brain abscess model. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in striatal glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-green fluorescent protein (GFP)+ astrocytes neighboring abscesses at postinfection days 3 or 7 in adult mice. Cell input conductance (Gi) measurements spanning a membrane potential (Vm) surrounding resting membrane potential (RMP) revealed two prevalent astrocyte subsets. A1 and A2 astrocytes were identified by negative and positive Gi increments vs. Vm, respectively. A1 and A2 astrocytes displayed significantly different RMP, Gi, and cell membrane capacitance that were influenced by both time after bacterial exposure and astrocyte proximity to the inflammatory site. Specifically, the percentage of A1 astrocytes was decreased immediately surrounding the inflammatory lesion, whereas A2 cells were increased. These changes were particularly evident at postinfection day 7, revealing increased cell numbers with an outward current component. Furthermore, RMP was inversely modified in A1 and A2 astrocytes during neuroinflammation, and resting Gi was increased from 21 to 30 nS in the latter. In contrast, gap junction communication was significantly decreased in all astrocyte populations associated with inflamed tissues. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the heterogeneity of striatal astrocyte populations, which experience distinct electrophysiological modifications in response to CNS inflammation. PMID:22457466

  2. Fractal analysis of striatal dopamine re-uptake sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuikka, J.T.; Bergstroem, K.A.; Tiihonen, J.; Raesaenen, P.; Karhu, J.

    1997-01-01

    Spatial variation in regional blood flow, metabolism and receptor density within the brain and in other organs is measurable even with a low spatial resolution technique such as emission tomography. It has been previously shown that the observed variance increases with increasing number of subregions in the organ/tissue studied. This resolution-dependent variance can be described by fractal analysis. We studied striatal dopamine re-uptake sites in 39 healthy volunteers with high-resolution single-photon emission tomography using iodine-123 labelled 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ([ 123 I]β-CIT). The mean fractal dimension was 1.15±0.07. The results indicate that regional striatal dopamine re-uptake sites involve considerable spatial heterogeneity which is higher than the uniform density (dimension=1.00) but much lower than complete randomness (dimension=1.50). There was a gender difference, with females having a higher heterogeneity in both the left and the right striatum. In addition, we found striatal asymmetry (left-to-right heterogeneity ratio of 1.19±0.15; P<0.001), suggesting functional hemispheric lateralization consistent with the control of motor behaviour and integrative functions. (orig.). With 5 figs., 1 tab

  3. The effects of gestational and chronic atrazine exposure on motor behaviors and striatal dopamine in male Sprague-Dawley rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, Jennifer L.; Lansdell, Theresa A.; Lookingland, Keith J.; Baker, Lisa E.

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the effects of environmentally relevant gestational followed by continued chronic exposure to the herbicide, atrazine, on motor function, cognition, and neurochemical indices of nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) activity in male rats. Dams were treated with 100 μg/kg atrazine, 10 mg/kg atrazine, or vehicle on gestational day 1 through postnatal day 21. Upon weaning, male offspring continued daily vehicle or atrazine gavage treatments for an additional six months. Subjects were tested in a series of behavioral assays, and 24 h after the last treatment, tissue samples from the striatum were analyzed for DA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC). At 10 mg/kg, this herbicide was found to produce modest disruptions in motor functioning, and at both dose levels it significantly lowered striatal DA and DOPAC concentrations. These results suggest that exposures to atrazine have the potential to disrupt nigrostriatal DA neurons and behaviors associated with motor functioning. - Highlights: • Male rats received gestational and chronic exposure to ATZ (10 mg/kg and 100 μg/kg). • ATZ altered locomotor activity and impaired motor coordination. • ATZ lowered striatal DA and DOPAC concentrations. • ATZ produced a potential anxiogenic effect. • ATZ did not impair performance in learning and memory assessments.

  4. Sustained Neural Stem Cell-Based Intraocular Delivery of CNTF Attenuates Photoreceptor Loss in the nclf Mouse Model of Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowiak, Wanda; Kruszewski, Katharina; Flachsbarth, Kai; Skevas, Christos; Richard, Gisbert; Rüther, Klaus; Braulke, Thomas; Bartsch, Udo

    2015-01-01

    A sustained intraocular administration of neurotrophic factors is among the strategies aimed at establishing treatments for currently untreatable degenerative retinal disorders. In the present study we have analyzed the neuroprotective effects of a continuous neural stem (NS) cell-based intraocular delivery of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on photoreceptor cells in the nclf mouse, an animal model of the neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder variant late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (vLINCL). To this aim, we genetically modified adherently cultivated NS cells with a polycistronic lentiviral vector encoding a secretable variant of CNTF together with a Venus reporter gene (CNTF-NS cells). NS cells for control experiments (control-NS cells) were modified with a vector encoding the reporter gene tdTomato. Clonal CNTF-NS and control-NS cell lines were established using fluorescent activated cell sorting and intravitreally grafted into 14 days old nclf mice at the onset of retinal degeneration. The grafted cells preferentially differentiated into astrocytes that were attached to the posterior side of the lenses and the vitreal side of the retinas and stably expressed the transgenes for at least six weeks, the latest post-transplantation time point analyzed. Integration of donor cells into host retinas, ongoing proliferation of grafted cells or adverse effects of the donor cells on the morphology of the host eyes were not observed. Quantitative analyses of host retinas two, four and six weeks after cell transplantation revealed the presence of significantly more photoreceptor cells in eyes with grafted CNTF-NS cells than in eyes with grafted control-NS cells. This is the first demonstration that a continuous intraocular administration of a neurotrophic factor attenuates retinal degeneration in an animal model of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. PMID:25992714

  5. Sustained Neural Stem Cell-Based Intraocular Delivery of CNTF Attenuates Photoreceptor Loss in the nclf Mouse Model of Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Jankowiak

    Full Text Available A sustained intraocular administration of neurotrophic factors is among the strategies aimed at establishing treatments for currently untreatable degenerative retinal disorders. In the present study we have analyzed the neuroprotective effects of a continuous neural stem (NS cell-based intraocular delivery of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF on photoreceptor cells in the nclf mouse, an animal model of the neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder variant late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (vLINCL. To this aim, we genetically modified adherently cultivated NS cells with a polycistronic lentiviral vector encoding a secretable variant of CNTF together with a Venus reporter gene (CNTF-NS cells. NS cells for control experiments (control-NS cells were modified with a vector encoding the reporter gene tdTomato. Clonal CNTF-NS and control-NS cell lines were established using fluorescent activated cell sorting and intravitreally grafted into 14 days old nclf mice at the onset of retinal degeneration. The grafted cells preferentially differentiated into astrocytes that were attached to the posterior side of the lenses and the vitreal side of the retinas and stably expressed the transgenes for at least six weeks, the latest post-transplantation time point analyzed. Integration of donor cells into host retinas, ongoing proliferation of grafted cells or adverse effects of the donor cells on the morphology of the host eyes were not observed. Quantitative analyses of host retinas two, four and six weeks after cell transplantation revealed the presence of significantly more photoreceptor cells in eyes with grafted CNTF-NS cells than in eyes with grafted control-NS cells. This is the first demonstration that a continuous intraocular administration of a neurotrophic factor attenuates retinal degeneration in an animal model of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

  6. Pharmacological modifications of dopamine transmission do not influence the striatal in vivo binding of [3H]mazindol or [3H]cocaine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibaut, F; Bonnet, J J; Vaugeois, J M; Costentin, J

    1996-03-01

    We have considered the in vivo striatal binding of two ligands of the neuronal dopamine uptake complex: [3H]cocaine and [3H]mazindol. The [3H]cocaine tracer dose labelled the dopamine uptake complex in striatum but not the noradrenaline complex in cerebellum. On the contrary, the [3H]mazindol tracer dose induced a marked labelling of the noradrenaline uptake complex in cerebellum; its prevention by desipramine (5 mg/kg) increased simultaneously the cerebral bioavailability and thereby the striatal labelling of the dopamine transporter. In mice submitted to treatments modifying dopaminergic transmission either to decrease it (gammabutyrolactone, 750 mg/kg, i.p.) or to increase it (L-DOPA, 200 mg/kg, i.p., dexamphetamine, 4 mg/kg, s.c., or their combination), only dexamphetamine pretreatment significantly reduced [3H]cocaine and [3H]mazindol binding. Thus it appears that the level of dopamine transmission would not interfere with the in vivo quantification of striatal dopamine uptake sites assessed with either ligands.

  7. [3H]Dopamine accumulation and release from striatal slices in young, mature and senescent rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Examinations of [ 3 H]dopamine ([ 3 H]DA) release following KCl or amphetamine administration in striatal slices from young (7 month), mature (12 month) and senescent (24 month) Wistar rats showed no age-related changes. Further, the amount of [ 3 H]DA accumulated in the striatal slices showed no changes with age. Thus, previously reported age-related deficits in motor behavior (i.e. rotational) are not produced by changes in striatal DA accumulation or release. (Auth.)

  8. A high-fat jelly diet restores bioenergetic balance and extends lifespan in the presence of motor dysfunction and lumbar spinal cord motor neuron loss in TDP-43A315T mutant C57BL6/J mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Coughlan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Transgenic transactivation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43 mice expressing the A315T mutation under control of the murine prion promoter progressively develop motor function deficits and are considered a new model for the study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; however, premature sudden death resulting from intestinal obstruction halts disease phenotype progression in 100% of C57BL6/J congenic TDP-43A315T mice. Similar to our recent results in SOD1G93A mice, TDP-43A315T mice fed a standard pellet diet showed increased 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation at postnatal day (P80, indicating elevated energetic stress during disease progression. We therefore investigated the effects of a high-fat jelly diet on bioenergetic status and lifespan in TDP-43A315T mice. In contrast to standard pellet-fed mice, mice fed high-fat jelly showed no difference in AMPK activation up to P120 and decreased phosphorylation of acetly-CoA carboxylase (ACC at early-stage time points. Exposure to a high-fat jelly diet prevented sudden death and extended survival, allowing development of a motor neuron disease phenotype with significantly decreased body weight from P80 onward that was characterised by deficits in Rotarod abilities and stride length measurements. Development of this phenotype was associated with a significant motor neuron loss as assessed by Nissl staining in the lumbar spinal cord. Our work suggests that a high-fat jelly diet improves the pre-clinical utility of the TDP-43A315T model by extending lifespan and allowing the motor neuron disease phenotype to progress, and indicates the potential benefit of this diet in TDP-43-associated ALS.

  9. Transiently increasing cAMP levels selectively in hippocampal excitatory neurons during sleep deprivation prevents memory deficits caused by sleep loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havekes, Robbert; Bruinenberg, Vibeke M.; Tudor, Jennifer C.; Ferri, Sarah L.; Baumann, Arnd; Meerlo, Peter; Abel, Ted

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus is particularly sensitive to sleep loss. Although previous work has indicated that sleep deprivation impairs hippocampal cAMP signaling, it remains to be determined whether the cognitive deficits associated with sleep deprivation are caused by attenuated cAMP signaling in the

  10. Noisy Neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Nerves are fibres that conduct electrical signals and hence pass on information from and to the brain. Nerves are made of nerve cells called neurons (Figure 1). Instructions in our body are sent via electrical signals that present themselves as variations in the potential across neuronal membranes. These potential differences ...

  11. Increased impulsivity retards the transition to dorsolateral striatal dopamine control of cocaine seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jennifer E; Dilleen, Ruth; Pelloux, Yann; Economidou, Daina; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Belin, David; Everitt, Barry J

    2014-07-01

    Development of maladaptive drug-seeking habits occurs in conjunction with a ventral-to-dorsal striatal shift in dopaminergic control over behavior. Although these habits readily develop as drug use continues, high impulsivity predicts loss of control over drug seeking and taking. However, whether impulsivity facilitates the transition to dorsolateral striatum (DLS) dopamine-dependent cocaine-seeking habits or whether impulsivity and cocaine-induced intrastriatal shifts are additive processes is unknown. High- and low-impulsive rats identified in the five-choice serial reaction-time task were trained to self-administer cocaine (.25 mg/infusion) with infusions occurring in the presence of a cue-light conditioned stimulus. Dopamine transmission was blocked in the DLS after three stages of training: early, transition, and late-stage, by bilateral intracranial infusions of α-flupenthixol (0, 5, 10, or 15 μg/side) during 15-min cocaine-seeking test sessions in which each response was reinforced by a cocaine-associated conditioned stimulus presentation. In early-stage tests, neither group was affected by DLS dopamine receptor blockade. In transition-stage tests, low-impulsive rats showed a significant dose-dependent reduction in cocaine seeking, whereas high-impulsive rats were still unaffected by α-flupenthixol infusions. In the final, late-stage seeking test, both groups showed dose-dependent sensitivity to dopamine receptor blockade. The results demonstrate that high impulsivity is associated with a delayed transition to DLS-dopamine-dependent control over cocaine seeking. This suggests that, if impulsivity confers an increased propensity to addiction, it is not simply through a more rapid development of habits but instead through interacting corticostriatal and striato-striatal processes that result ultimately in maladaptive drug-seeking habits. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry Published by Society of Biological Psychiatry All rights reserved.

  12. S100B Inhibitor Pentamidine Attenuates Reactive Gliosis and Reduces Neuronal Loss in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Cirillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the different signaling molecules released during reactive gliosis occurring in Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the astrocyte-derived S100B protein plays a key role in neuroinflammation, one of the hallmarks of the disease. The use of pharmacological tools targeting S100B may be crucial to embank its effects and some of the pathological features of AD. The antiprotozoal drug pentamidine is a good candidate since it directly blocks S100B activity by inhibiting its interaction with the tumor suppressor p53. We used a mouse model of amyloid beta- (Aβ- induced AD, which is characterized by reactive gliosis and neuroinflammation in the brain, and we evaluated the effect of pentamidine on the main S100B-mediated events. Pentamidine caused the reduction of glial fibrillary acidic protein, S100B, and RAGE protein expression, which are signs of reactive gliosis, and induced p53 expression in astrocytes. Pentamidine also reduced the expression of proinflammatory mediators and markers, thus reducing neuroinflammation in AD brain. In parallel, we observed a significant neuroprotection exerted by pentamidine on CA1 pyramidal neurons. We demonstrated that pentamidine inhibits Aβ-induced gliosis and neuroinflammation in an animal model of AD, thus playing a role in slowing down the course of the disease.

  13. Huntingtin cleavage product A forms in neurons and is reduced by gamma-secretase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betschart Claudia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mutation in Huntington's disease is a polyglutamine expansion near the N-terminus of huntingtin. Huntingtin expressed in immortalized neurons is cleaved near the N-terminus to form N-terminal polypeptides known as cleavage products A and B (cpA and cpB. CpA and cpB with polyglutamine expansion form inclusions in the nucleus and cytoplasm, respectively. The formation of cpA and cpB in primary neurons has not been established and the proteases involved in the formation of these fragments are unknown. Results Delivery of htt cDNA into the mouse striatum using adeno-associated virus or into primary cortical neurons using lentivirus generated cpA and cpB, indicating that neurons in brain and in vitro can form these fragments. A screen of small molecule protease inhibitors introduced to clonal striatal X57 cells and HeLa cells identified compounds that reduced levels of cpA and are inhibitors of the aspartyl proteases cathepsin D and cathepsin E. The most effective compound, P1-N031, is a transition state mimetic for aspartyl proteases. By western blot analysis, cathepsin D was easily detected in clonal striatal X57 cells, mouse brain and primary neurons, whereas cathepsin E was only detectible in clonal striatal X57 cells. In primary neurons, levels of cleavage product A were not changed by the same compounds that were effective in clonal striatal cells or by mRNA silencing to partially reduce levels of cathepsin D. Instead, treating primary neurons with compounds that are known to inhibit gamma secretase activity either indirectly (Imatinib mesylate, Gleevec or selectively (LY-411,575 or DAPT reduced levels of cpA. LY-411,575 or DAPT also increased survival of primary neurons expressing endogenous full-length mutant huntingtin. Conclusion We show that cpA and cpB are produced from a larger huntingtin fragment in vivo in mouse brain and in primary neuron cultures. The aspartyl protease involved in forming cpA has cathepsin

  14. Huntingtin cleavage product A forms in neurons and is reduced by gamma-secretase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Kimberly B; Sapp, Ellen; Alexander, Jonathan; Reeves, Patrick; Bleckmann, Dorothee; Sobin, Linsday; Masso, Nicholas; Valencia, Antonio; Jeong, Hyunkyung; Krainc, Dimitri; Palacino, James; Curtis, Daniel; Kuhn, Rainer; Betschart, Claudia; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Aronin, Neil; Paganetti, Paolo; Difiglia, Marian

    2010-12-14

    The mutation in Huntington's disease is a polyglutamine expansion near the N-terminus of huntingtin. Huntingtin expressed in immortalized neurons is cleaved near the N-terminus to form N-terminal polypeptides known as cleavage products A and B (cpA and cpB). CpA and cpB with polyglutamine expansion form inclusions in the nucleus and cytoplasm, respectively. The formation of cpA and cpB in primary neurons has not been established and the proteases involved in the formation of these fragments are unknown. Delivery of htt cDNA into the mouse striatum using adeno-associated virus or into primary cortical neurons using lentivirus generated cpA and cpB, indicating that neurons in brain and in vitro can form these fragments. A screen of small molecule protease inhibitors introduced to clonal striatal X57 cells and HeLa cells identified compounds that reduced levels of cpA and are inhibitors of the aspartyl proteases cathepsin D and cathepsin E. The most effective compound, P1-N031, is a transition state mimetic for aspartyl proteases. By western blot analysis, cathepsin D was easily detected in clonal striatal X57 cells, mouse brain and primary neurons, whereas cathepsin E was only detectible in clonal striatal X57 cells. In primary neurons, levels of cleavage product A were not changed by the same compounds that were effective in clonal striatal cells or by mRNA silencing to partially reduce levels of cathepsin D. Instead, treating primary neurons with compounds that are known to inhibit gamma secretase activity either indirectly (Imatinib mesylate, Gleevec) or selectively (LY-411,575 or DAPT) reduced levels of cpA. LY-411,575 or DAPT also increased survival of primary neurons expressing endogenous full-length mutant huntingtin. We show that cpA and cpB are produced from a larger huntingtin fragment in vivo in mouse brain and in primary neuron cultures. The aspartyl protease involved in forming cpA has cathepsin-D like properties in immortalized neurons and gamma

  15. Untangling cortico-striatal connectivity and cross-frequency coupling in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana eBelic

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We simultaneously recorded local field potentials in the primary motor cortex and sensorimotor striatum in awake, freely behaving, 6-OHDA lesioned hemi-parkinsonian rats in order to study the features directly related to pathological states such as parkinsonian state and levodopa-induced dyskinesia. We analysed the spectral characteristics of the obtained signals and observed that during dyskinesia the most prominent feature was a relative power increase in the high gamma frequency range at around 80 Hz, while for the parkinsonian state it was in the beta frequency range. Here we show that during both pathological states effective connectivity in terms of Granger causality is bidirectional with an accent on the striatal influence on the cortex. In the case of dyskinesia, we also found a high increase in effective connectivity at 80 Hz. In order to further understand the 80- Hz phenomenon, we performed cross-frequency analysis and observed characteristic patterns in the case of dyskinesia but not in the case of the parkinsonian state or the healthy state. We noted a large decrease in the modulation of the amplitude at 80 Hz by the phase of low frequency oscillations (up to ~10 Hz across both structures in the case of dyskinesia. This may suggest a lack of coupling between the low frequency activity of the recorded network and the group of neurons active at ~80 Hz.

  16. Translocator Protein (18 kDa Mapping with [125I]-CLINDE in the Quinolinic Acid Rat Model of Excitotoxicity: A Longitudinal Comparison with Microglial Activation, Astrogliosis, and Neuronal Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Arlicot

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Excitotoxicity leads to an inflammatory reaction involving an overexpression of: translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO in cerebral microglia and astrocytes. Therefore, we performed ex vivo explorations with [125]-CLINDE, a TSPO-specific radioligand, to follow the time course of TSPO expression, in parallel with lesion progression, over 90 days after induction of cerebral excitotoxicity in rats intrastriatally injected with quinolinic acid. Biodistribution data showed a significant increase in CLINDE uptake on the injured side from 1 days postlesion (dpl; the maximal striatal binding values evidenced a plateau between 7 and 30 dpl. [125I]-CLINDE binding was displaced from the lesion by PK11195, suggesting TSPO specificity. These results were confirmed by ex vivo autoradiography. Combined immunohistochemical studies showed a marked increase in microglial expression in the lesion, peaking at 14 dpl, and astrocytic reactivity enhanced at 7 and 14 dpl, whereas a prominent neuronal cell loss was observed. At 90 dpl, CLINDE binding and immunoreactivity targeting activated microglia, astrogliosis, and neuronal cell density returned to a basal level. These results show that both neuroinflammation and neuronal loss profiles occurred concomitantly and appeared to be transitory processes. These findings provide the possibility of a therapeutic temporal window to compare the differential effects of antiinflammatory treatments in slowing down neurodegeneration in this rodent model, with potential applications to humans.

  17. Translocator protein (18 kDa) mapping with [125I]-CLINDE in the quinolinic acid rat model of excitotoxicity: a longitudinal comparison with microglial activation, astrogliosis, and neuronal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlicot, Nicolas; Tronel, Claire; Bodard, Sylvie; Garreau, Lucette; de la Crompe, Brice; Vandevelde, Inge; Guilloteau, Denis; Antier, Daniel; Chalon, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Excitotoxicity leads to an inflammatory reaction involving an overexpression of: translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) in cerebral microglia and astrocytes. Therefore, we performed ex vivo explorations with [125]-CLINDE, a TSPO-specific radioligand, to follow the time course of TSPO expression, in parallel with lesion progression, over 90 days after induction of cerebral excitotoxicity in rats intrastriatally injected with quinolinic acid. Biodistribution data showed a significant increase in CLINDE uptake on the injured side from 1 days postlesion (dpl); the maximal striatal binding values evidenced a plateau between 7 and 30 dpl. [125I]-CLINDE binding was displaced from the lesion by PK11195, suggesting TSPO specificity. These results were confirmed by ex vivo autoradiography. Combined immunohistochemical studies showed a marked increase in microglial expression in the lesion, peaking at 14 dpl, and astrocytic reactivity enhanced at 7 and 14 dpl, whereas a prominent neuronal cell loss was observed. At 90 dpl, CLINDE binding and immunoreactivity targeting activated microglia, astrogliosis, and neuronal cell density returned to a basal level. These results show that both neuroinflammation and neuronal loss profiles occurred concomitantly and appeared to be transitory processes. These findings provide the possibility of a therapeutic temporal window to compare the differential effects of antiinflammatory treatments in slowing down neurodegeneration in this rodent model, with potential applications to humans.

  18. Learning intrinsic excitability in medium spiny neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    We present an unsupervised, local activation-dependent learning rule for intrinsic plasticity (IP) which affects the composition of ion channel conductances for single neurons in a use-dependent way. We use a single-compartment conductance-based model for medium spiny striatal neurons in order to show the effects of parameterization of individual ion channels on the neuronal membrane potential-curent relationship (activation function). We show that parameter changes within the physiological ranges are sufficient to create an ensemble of neurons with significantly different activation functions. We emphasize that the effects of intrinsic neuronal modulation on spiking behavior require a distributed mode of synaptic input and can be eliminated by strongly correlated input. We show how modulation and adaptivity in ion channel conductances can be utilized to store patterns without an additional contribution by synaptic plasticity (SP). The adaptation of the spike response may result in either "positive" or "negative" pattern learning. However, read-out of stored information depends on a distributed pattern of synaptic activity to let intrinsic modulation determine spike response. We briefly discuss the implications of this conditional memory on learning and addiction.

  19. Dichotomous Effects of Mu Opioid Receptor Activation on Striatal Low-Threshold Spike Interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Elghaba

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Striatal low-threshold spike interneurons (LTSIs are tonically active neurons that express GABA and nitric oxide synthase and are involved in information processing as well as neurovascular coupling. While mu opioid receptors (MORs and their ligand encephalin are prominent in the striatum, their action on LTSIs has not been investigated. We addressed this issue carrying out whole-cell recordings in transgenic mice in which the NPY-expressing neurons are marked with green fluorescent protein (GFP. The MOR agonist (D-Ala(2, N-MePhe(4, Gly-ol-enkephalin (DAMGO produced dual effects on subpopulations of LTSIs. DAMGO caused inhibitory effects, accompanied by decreases of spontaneous firing, in 62% of LTSIs, while depolarizing effects (accompanied by an increase in spontaneous firing were observed in 23% of LTSIs tested. The dual effects of DAMGO persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX, a sodium channel blocker or in the presence of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine. However, in the presence of either the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin or the muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist atropine, DAMGO only elicited inhibitory effects on LTSIs. Furthermore, we found that DAMGO decreased the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous GABAergic events. Unexpectedly, these effects of DAMGO on spontaneous GABAergic events disappeared after blocking of the muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic blockers, showing that GABA inputs to LTSIs are not directly modulated by presynaptic MORs. These finding suggest that activation of MORs affect LTSIs both directly and indirectly, through modulation of GABAergic and cholinergic tones. The complex balance between direct and indirect effects determines the net effect of DAMGO on LTSIs.

  20. Subcellular Location of PKA Controls Striatal Plasticity: Stochastic Simulations in Spiny Dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rodrigo F.; Kim, MyungSook; Blackwell, Kim T.

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine release in the striatum has been implicated in various forms of reward dependent learning. Dopamine leads to production of cAMP and activation of protein kinase A (PKA), which are involved in striatal synaptic plasticity and learning. PKA and its protein targets are not diffusely located throughout the neuron, but are confined to various subcellular compartments by anchoring molecules such as A-Kinase Anchoring Proteins (AKAPs). Experiments have shown that blocking the interaction of PKA with AKAPs disrupts its subcellular location and prevents LTP in the hippocampus and striatum; however, these experiments have not revealed whether the critical function of anchoring is to locate PKA near the cAMP that activates it or near its targets, such as AMPA receptors located in the post-synaptic density. We have developed a large scale stochastic reaction-diffusion model of signaling pathways in a medium spiny projection neuron dendrite with spines, based on published biochemical measurements, to investigate this question and to evaluate whether dopamine signaling exhibits spatial specificity post-synaptically. The model was stimulated with dopamine pulses mimicking those recorded in response to reward. Simulations show that PKA colocalization with adenylate cyclase, either in the spine head or in the dendrite, leads to greater phosphorylation of DARPP-32 Thr34 and AMPA receptor GluA1 Ser845 than when PKA is anchored away from adenylate cyclase. Simulations further demonstrate that though cAMP exhibits a strong spatial gradient, diffusible DARPP-32 facilitates the spread of PKA activity, suggesting that additional inactivation mechanisms are required to produce spatial specificity of PKA activity. PMID:22346744

  1. Pauses in Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons: What is Revealed by Their Common Themes and Variations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Feng Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Striatal cholinergic interneurons, the so-called tonically active neurons (TANs, pause their firing in response to sensory cues and rewards during classical conditioning and instrumental tasks. The respective pause responses observed can demonstrate many commonalities, such as constant latency and duration, synchronous occurrence in a population of cells, and coincidence with phasic activities of midbrain dopamine neurons (DANs that signal reward predictions and errors. Pauses can however also show divergent properties. Pause latencies and durations can differ in a given TAN between appetitive vs. aversive outcomes in classical conditioning, initial excitation can be present or absent, and a second pause can variably follow a rebound. Despite more than 20 years of study, the functions of these pause responses are still elusive. Our understanding of pause function is hindered by an incomplete understanding of how pauses are generated. In this mini-review article, we compare pause types, as well as current key hypotheses for inputs underlying pauses that include dopamine-induced inhibition through D2-receptors, a GABA input from ventral tegmental area, and a prolonged afterhyperpolarization induced by excitatory input from the cortex or from the thalamus. We review how each of these mechanisms alone explains some but not all aspects of pause responses. These mechanisms might need to operate in specific but variable sets of sequences to generate a full range of pause responses. Alternatively, these mechanisms might operate in conjunction with an underlying control mechanism within cholinergic interneurons which could potentially provide a framework to generate the common themes and variations seen amongst pause responses.

  2. Neural differentiation of transplanted neural stem cells in a rat model of striatal lacunar infarction: light and electron microscopic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñetón-Gómez, Vilma C.; Doncel-Pérez, Ernesto; Fernandez, Ana P.; Serrano, Julia; Pozo-Rodrigálvarez, Andrea; Vellosillo-Huerta, Lara; Taylor, Julian S.; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria P.; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The increased risk and prevalence of lacunar stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) makes the search for better experimental models an important requirement for translational research. In this study we assess ischemic damage of the nigrostriatal pathway in a model of lacunar stroke evoked by damaging the perforating arteries in the territory of the substantia nigra (SN) of the rat after stereotaxic administration of endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor peptide. We hypothesized that transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) with the capacity of differentiating into diverse cell types such as neurons and glia, but with limited proliferation potential, would constitute an alternative and/or adjuvant therapy for lacunar stroke. These cells showed neuritogenic activity in vitro and a high potential for neural differentiation. Light and electron microscopy immunocytochemistry was used to characterize GFP-positive neurons derived from the transplants. 48 h after ET-1 injection, we characterized an area of selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons within the nigrostriatal pathway characterized with tissue necrosis and glial scar formation, with subsequent behavioral signs of Parkinsonism. Light microscopy showed that grafted cells within the striatal infarction zone differentiated with a high yield into mature glial cells (GFAP-positive) and neuron types present in the normal striatum. Electron microscopy revealed that NSCs-derived neurons integrated into the host circuitry establishing synaptic contacts, mostly of the asymmetric type. Astrocytes were closely associated with normal small-sized blood vessels in the area of infarct, suggesting a possible role in the regulation of the blood brain barrier and angiogenesis. Our results encourage the use of NSCs as a cell-replacement therapy for the treatment of human vascular Parkinsonism. PMID:22876219

  3. 3-Nitropropionic acid neurotoxicity in organotypic striatal and corticostriatal slice cultures is dependent on glucose and glutamate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, J; Kornblit, B T; Zimmer, J

    2000-01-01

    Mitochondrial inhibition by 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) causes striatal degeneration reminiscent of Huntington's disease. We studied 3-NPA neurotoxicity and possible indirect excitotoxicity in organotypic striatal and corticostriatal slice cultures. Neurotoxicity was quantified by assay...

  4. Striatal degeneration impairs language learning: evidence from Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Diego-Balaguer, R; Couette, M; Dolbeau, G; Dürr, A; Youssov, K; Bachoud-Lévi, A-C

    2008-11-01

    Although the role of the striatum in language processing is still largely unclear, a number of recent proposals have outlined its specific contribution. Different studies report evidence converging to a picture where the striatum may be involved in those aspects of rule-application requiring non-automatized behaviour. This is the main characteristic of the earliest phases of language acquisition that require the online detection of distant dependencies and the creation of syntactic categories by means of rule learning. Learning of sequences and categorization processes in non-language domains has been known to require striatal recruitment. Thus, we hypothesized that the striatum should play a prominent role in the extraction of rules in learning a language. We studied 13 pre-symptomatic gene-carriers and 22 early stage patients of Huntington's disease (pre-HD), both characterized by a progressive degeneration of the striatum and 21 late stage patients Huntington's disease (18 stage II, two stage III and one stage IV) where cortical degeneration accompanies striatal degeneration. When presented with a simplified artificial language where words and rules could be extracted, early stage Huntington's disease patients (stage I) were impaired in the learning test, demonstrating a greater impairment in rule than word learning compared to the 20 age- and education-matched controls. Huntington's disease patients at later stages were impaired both on word and rule learning. While spared in their overall performance, gene-carriers having learned a set of abstract artificial language rules were then impaired in the transfer of those rules to similar artificial language structures. The correlation analyses among several neuropsychological tests assessing executive function showed that rule learning correlated with tests requiring working memory and attentional control, while word learning correlated with a test involving episodic memory. These learning impairments significantly

  5. Dysregulation of Striatal Dopamine Receptor Binding in Suicide.

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    Fitzgerald, Megan L; Kassir, Suham A; Underwood, Mark D; Bakalian, Mihran J; Mann, J John; Arango, Victoria

    2017-03-01

    Inconsistent evidence implicates disruptions of striatal dopaminergic indices in suicide and major depression. To determine whether there are alterations in the striatal dopamine system in suicide, we conducted a quantitative autoradiographic survey of dopamine transporter (DAT; [ 3 H]mazindol), D1 receptor ([ 3 H]SCH23390), and D2 receptor ([ 3 H]sulpiride) binding in the dorsal striatum postmortem from matched suicides and controls. Axis I and axis II psychiatric diagnosis, recent treatment history, and early life adversity (ELA) were determined by psychological autopsy. Mean DAT, D2, and D1 receptor binding did not differ in suicide. However, there was a positive correlation between D1 and D2 receptor binding in the dorsal striatum of control subjects (R 2 =0.31, p<0.05) that was not present in suicides (R 2 =0.00, p=0.97). In suicides and controls with reported ELA, there was no correlation between striatal DAT and D1 receptor binding (R 2 =0.07, p=0.33), although DAT and D1 receptor binding was positively correlated in subjects with no report of ELA (R 2 =0.32, p<0.05). After controlling for age, there were no significant ELA-related mean differences. Binding of D1 receptors and DAT throughout the striatum correlated negatively with age (D1 receptor: R 2 =0.12, p<0.05; DAT: R 2 =0.36, p<0.001). There appears to be an imbalance in dopaminergic receptor and transporter expression related to suicide that differs from that associated with ELA or age.

  6. Neuroinflammation alters voltage-dependent conductance in striatal astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpuk, Nikolay; Burkovetskaya, Maria; Kielian, Tammy

    2012-07-01

    Neuroinflammation has the capacity to alter normal central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis and function. The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of an inflammatory milieu on the electrophysiological properties of striatal astrocyte subpopulations with a mouse bacterial brain abscess model. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in striatal glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-green fluorescent protein (GFP)(+) astrocytes neighboring abscesses at postinfection days 3 or 7 in adult mice. Cell input conductance (G(i)) measurements spanning a membrane potential (V(m)) surrounding resting membrane potential (RMP) revealed two prevalent astrocyte subsets. A1 and A2 astrocytes were identified by negative and positive G(i) increments vs. V(m), respectively. A1 and A2 astrocytes displayed significantly different RMP, G(i), and cell membrane capacitance that were influenced by both time after bacterial exposure and astrocyte proximity to the inflammatory site. Specifically, the percentage of A1 astrocytes was decreased immediately surrounding the inflammatory lesion, whereas A2 cells were increased. These changes were particularly evident at postinfection day 7, revealing increased cell numbers with an outward current component. Furthermore, RMP was inversely modified in A1 and A2 astrocytes during neuroinflammation, and resting G(i) was increased from 21 to 30 nS in the latter. In contrast, gap junction communication was significantly decreased in all astrocyte populations associated with inflamed tissues. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the heterogeneity of striatal astrocyte populations, which experience distinct electrophysiological modifications in response to CNS inflammation.

  7. Small Interfering RNA Specific for N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor 2B Offers Neuroprotection to Dopamine Neurons through Activation of MAP Kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia T.W. Ng

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B (NR2B-specific siRNA was applied in parkinsonian models. Our previous results showed that reduction in expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 (NR1, the key subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, by antisense oligos amelio-rated the motor symptoms in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA-lesioned rat, an animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD [Lai et al.: Neurochem Int 2004;45:11-22]. To further the investigation on the efficacy of gene silencing, small interference RNA (siRNA specific for the NR2B subunit was designed and administered in the striatum of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. The present results show that administration of NR2B-specific siRNA decreased the number of apomorphine-induced rotations in the lesioned rats and that there was a significant reduction in NR2B proteins levels after NR2B-specific siRNA administration. Furthermore, attenuation of the loss of dopaminergic neurons was found in both the striatal and substantia nigra regions of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rats that had been continuously infused with siRNA for 7 days. In addition, a significant upregulation of p-p44/42 MAPK (ERK1/2; Thr202/Tyr204 and p-CREB (Ser133 in striatal neurons was found. These results suggest that application of the gene silencing targeting NR2B could be a potential treatment of PD, and they also revealed the possibility of NR2B-specific siRNA being involved in the prosurvival pathway.

  8. Enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and intrinsic excitability of NAc medium spiny neurons in adult but not in adolescent rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginsky, Max F; Maust, Joel D; Corthell, John T; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2016-03-01

    Basal and diet-induced differences in mesolimbic function, particularly within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), may contribute to human obesity; these differences may be more pronounced in susceptible populations. We examined differences in cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity in rats that are susceptible vs. resistant to diet-induced obesity and basal differences in striatal neuron function in adult and in adolescent obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Susceptible and resistant outbred rats were identified based on "junk-food" diet-induced obesity. Then, the induction and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, which is mediated by enhanced striatal function and is associated with increased motivation for rewards and reward-paired cues, were evaluated. Basal differences in mesolimbic function were examined in selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats (P70-80 and P30-40) using both cocaine-induced locomotion and whole-cell patch clamping approaches in NAc core medium spiny neurons (MSNs). In rats that became obese after eating junk-food, the expression of locomotor sensitization was enhanced compared to non-obese rats, with similarly strong responses to 7.5 and 15 mg/kg cocaine. Without diet manipulation, obesity-prone rats were hyper-responsive to the acute locomotor-activating effects of cocaine, and the intrinsic excitability of NAc core MSNs was enhanced by ∼60 % at positive and negative potentials. These differences were present in adult, but not adolescent rats. Post-synaptic glutamatergic transmission was similar between groups. Mesolimbic systems, particularly NAc MSNs, are hyper-responsive in obesity-prone individuals, and interactions between predisposition and experience influence neurobehavioral plasticity in ways that may promote weight gain and hamper weight loss in susceptible rats.

  9. Enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and intrinsic excitability of NAc medium spiny neurons in adult but not adolescent rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginsky, Max F.; Maust, Joel D.; Corthell, John T.; Ferrario, Carrie R.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Basal and diet-induced differences in mesolimbic function, particularly within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), may contribute to human obesity; these differences may be more pronounced in susceptible populations. Objectives We determined whether there are differences in cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity in rats that are susceptible vs. resistant to diet-induced obesity, and basal differences in the striatal neuron function in adult and adolescent obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Methods Susceptible and resistant outbred rats were identified based on “junk-food” diet-induced obesity. Then, the induction and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, which is mediated by enhanced striatal function and is associated with increased motivation for rewards and reward-paired cues, were evaluated. Basal differences in mesolimbic function were examined in selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats (P70-80 and P30-40) using both cocaine induced locomotion and whole-cell patch clamping approaches in NAc core medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Results In rats that became obese after eating “junk-food”, the expression of locomotor sensitization was enhanced compared to non-obese rats, with similarly strong responses to 7.5 and 15 mg/kg cocaine. Without diet manipulation, obesity-prone rats were hyper-responsive to the acute locomotor-activating effects of cocaine, and the intrinsic excitability of NAc core MSNs was enhanced by ~60% at positive and negative potentials. These differences were present in adult, but not adolescent rats. Post-synaptic glutamatergic transmission was similar between groups. Conclusions Mesolimbic systems, particularly NAc MSNs, are hyper-responsive in obesity-prone individuals; and interactions between predisposition and experience influence neurobehavioral plasticity in ways that may promote weight gain and hamper weight loss in susceptible rats. PMID:26612617

  10. Secretory phospholipase A2 potentiates glutamate-induced rat striatal neuronal cell death in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, M; Bruhn, T; Christensen, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) OS2 (10, 20 and 50 pmol) or OS1, (50 pmol) purified from taipan snake Oxyuranus scutellatus scutellatus venom, and the excitatory amino acid glutamate (Glu) (2.5 and 5.0 micromol) were injected into the right striatum of male Wistar rats. Injection of 10 an...

  11. Orbitofrontal lesions eliminate signalling of biological significance in cue-responsive ventral striatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooch, Nisha K; Stalnaker, Thomas A; Wied, Heather M; Bali-Chaudhary, Sheena; McDannald, Michael A; Liu, Tzu-Lan; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2015-05-21

    The ventral striatum has long been proposed as an integrator of biologically significant associative information to drive actions. Although inputs from the amygdala and hippocampus have been much studied, the role of prominent inputs from orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) are less well understood. Here, we recorded single-unit activity from ventral striatum core in rats with sham or ipsilateral neurotoxic lesions of lateral OFC, as they performed an odour-guided spatial choice task. Consistent with prior reports, we found that spiking activity recorded in sham rats during cue sampling was related to both reward magnitude and reward identity, with higher firing rates observed for cues that predicted more reward. Lesioned rats also showed differential activity to the cues, but this activity was unbiased towards larger rewards. These data support a role for OFC in shaping activity in the ventral striatum to represent the biological significance of associative information in the environment.

  12. Cognitive emotion regulation modulates the balance of competing influences on ventral striatal aversive prediction error signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulej Bratec, Satja; Xie, Xiyao; Wang, Yijun; Schilbach, Leonhard; Zimmer, Claus; Wohlschläger, Afra M; Riedl, Valentin; Sorg, Christian

    2017-02-15

    Cognitive emotion regulation (CER) is a critical human ability to face aversive emotional stimuli in a flexible way, via recruitment of specific prefrontal brain circuits. Animal research reveals a central role of ventral striatum in emotional behavior, for both aversive conditioning, with striatum signaling aversive prediction errors (aPE), and for integrating competing influences of distinct striatal inputs from regions such as the prefrontal cortex (PFC), amygdala, hippocampus and ventral tegmental area (VTA). Translating these ventral striatal findings from animal research to human CER, we hypothesized that successful CER would affect the balance of competing influences of striatal afferents on striatal aPE signals, in a way favoring PFC as opposed to 'subcortical' (i.e., non-isocortical) striatal inputs. Using aversive Pavlovian conditioning with and without CER during fMRI, we found that during CER, superior regulators indeed reduced the modulatory impact of 'subcortical' striatal afferents (hippocampus, amygdala and VTA) on ventral striatal aPE signals, while keeping the PFC impact intact. In contrast, inferior regulators showed an opposite pattern. Our results demonstrate that ventral striatal aPE signals and associated competing modulatory inputs are critical mechanisms underlying successful cognitive regulation of aversive emotions in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fronto-striatal atrophy correlates of neuropsychiatric dysfunction in frontotemporal dementia (FTD and Alzheimer's disease (AD

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    Dong Seok Yi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Behavioural disturbances in frontotemporal dementia (FTD are thought to reflect mainly atrophy of cortical regions. Recent studies suggest that subcortical brain regions, in particular the striatum, are also significantly affected and this pathology might play a role in the generation of behavioural symptoms. Objective: To investigate prefrontal cortical and striatal atrophy contributions to behavioural symptoms in FTD. Methods: One hundred and eighty-two participants (87 FTD patients, 39 AD patients and 56 controls were included. Behavioural profiles were established using the Cambridge Behavioural Inventory Revised (CBI-R and Frontal System Behaviour Scale (FrSBe. Atrophy in prefrontal (VMPFC, DLPFC and striatal (caudate, putamen regions was established via a 5-point visual rating scale of the MRI scans. Behavioural scores were correlated with atrophy rating scores. Results: Behavioural and atrophy ratings demonstrated that patients were significantly impaired compared to controls, with bvFTD being most severely affected. Behavioural-anatomical correlations revealed that VMPFC atrophy was closely related to abnormal behaviour and motivation disturbances. Stereotypical behaviours were associated with both VMPFC and striatal atrophy. By contrast, disturbance of eating was found to be related to striatal atrophy only. Conclusion: Frontal and striatal atrophy contributed to the behavioural disturbances seen in FTD, with some behaviours related to frontal, striatal or combined fronto-striatal pathology. Consideration of striatal contributions to the generation of behavioural disturbances should be taken into account when assessing patients with potential FTD.

  14. GABAERGIC MODULATION OF STRIATAL CHOLINERGIC INTERNEURONS - AN IN-VIVO MICRODIALYSIS STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBOER, P; WESTERINK, BHC

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons have been shown to receive input from striatal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing cell elements. GABA is known to act on two different types of receptors, the GABA(A) and the GABA(B) receptor. Using in vivo microdialysis, we have studied the effect of

  15. No association between striatal dopamine transporter binding and body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van de Giessen, Elsmarieke; Hesse, Swen; Caan, Matthan W A

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine is one among several neurotransmitters that regulate food intake and overeating. Thus, it has been linked to the pathophysiology of obesity and high body mass index (BMI). Striatal dopamine D(2) receptor availability is lower in obesity and there are indications that striatal dopamine tr...

  16. Mechanisms of permanent loss of olfactory receptor neurons induced by the herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile: Effects on stem cells and noninvolvement of acute induction of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Fang; Fang, Cheng [Laboratory of Molecular Toxicology, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Schnittke, Nikolai [Department of Anatomy and Cellular Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Program in Cell, Molecular and Developmental Biology, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Schwob, James E. [Department of Anatomy and Cellular Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Ding, Xinxin, E-mail: xding@wadsworth.org [Laboratory of Molecular Toxicology, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany, NY 12201 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We explored the mechanisms underlying the differential effects of two olfactory toxicants, the herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCBN) and the anti-thyroid drug methimazole (MMZ), on olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) regeneration in mouse olfactory epithelium (OE). DCBN, but not MMZ, induced inflammation-like pathological changes in OE, and DCBN increased interleukin IL-6 levels in nasal-wash fluid to much greater magnitude and duration than did MMZ. At 24 h after DCBN injection, the population of horizontal basal cells (HBCs; reserve, normally quiescent OE stem cells) lining the DMM became severely depleted as some of them detached from the basal lamina, and sloughed into the nasal cavity along with the globose basal cells (GBCs; heterogeneous population of stem and progenitor cells), neurons, and sustentacular cells of the neuroepithelium. In contrast, the layer of HBCs remained intact in MMZ-treated mice, as only the mature elements of the neuroepithelium were shed. Despite the respiratory metaplasia accompanying the greater severity of the DCBN lesion, residual HBCs that survived intoxication were activated by the injury and contributed to the metaplastic respiratory epithelium, as shown by tracing their descendants in a K5CreEr{sup T2}::fl(stop)TdTomato strain of mice in which recombination causes HBCs to express TdTomato in advance of the lesion. But, contrary to published observations with MMZ, the HBCs failed to form ORNs. A role for IL-6 in suppressing ORN regeneration in DCBN-treated mice was rejected by the failure of the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone to prevent the subsequent respiratory metaplasia in the DMM, suggesting that other factors lead to HBC neuro-incompetence. - Highlights: • The herbicide dichlobenil (DCBN) can damage olfactory epithelium stem cells. • Another olfactory toxicant, methimazole, leaves the olfactory stem cells intact. • DCBN, but not methimazole, induces a prolonged increase in nasal IL-6 levels. • Dexamethasone

  17. Muscles in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy show profound defects in neuromuscular development even in the absence of failure in neuromuscular transmission or loss of motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Il; Mikesh, Michelle; Smith, Ian; Rimer, Mendell; Thompson, Wesley

    2011-08-15

    A mouse model of the devastating human disease "spinal muscular atrophy" (SMA) was used to investigate the severe muscle weakness and spasticity that precede the death of these animals near the end of the 2nd postnatal week. Counts of motor units to the soleus muscle as well as of axons in the soleus muscle nerve showed no loss of motor neurons. Similarly, neither immunostaining of neuromuscular junctions nor the measurement of the tension generated by nerve stimulation gave evidence of any significant impairment in neuromuscular transmission, even when animals were maintained up to 5days longer via a supplementary diet. However, the muscles were clearly weaker, generating less than half their normal tension. Weakness in 3 muscles examined in the study appears due to a severe but uniform reduction in muscle fiber size. The size reduction results from a failure of muscle fibers to grow during early postnatal development and, in soleus, to a reduction in number of fibers generated. Neuromuscular development is severely delayed in these mutant animals: expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms, the elimination of polyneuronal innervation, the maturation in the shape of the AChR plaque, the arrival of SCs at the junctions and their coverage of the nerve terminal, the development of junctional folds. Thus, if SMA in this particular mouse is a disease of motor neurons, it can act in a manner that does not result in their death or disconnection from their targets but nonetheless alters many aspects of neuromuscular development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential striatal levels of TNF-alpha, NFkappaB p65 subunit and dopamine with chronic typical and atypical neuroleptic treatment: role in orofacial dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnoi, Mahendra; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Kulkarni, Shrinivas K

    2008-08-01

    Long term use of typical neuroleptics such as haloperidol may be limited by unwanted motor side effects like tardive dyskinesia characterized by repetitive involuntary movements, involving the mouth, face and trunk. Atypical neuroleptics, such as clozapine and risperidone are devoid of these side effects. However the precise mechanisms of the neuronal toxicity induced by haloperidol are poorly understood. It is possible that typical and atypical antipsychotic differently affects neuronal survival and death and that these effects considerably contribute to the differences in the development of TD. The aim of the present study is to investigate the role of TNF-alpha and NFkappaB on the toxicity induced by chronic haloperidol administration in an animal model of tardive dyskinesia. Rats were treated for 21 days with: haloperidol (5 mg/kg), clozapine (5 and 10 mg/kg), risperidone (5 mg/kg) or saline. Orofacial dyskinetic movements and total locomotor activity was evaluated. Striatal levels of dopamine were measure by HPLC/ED whereas striatal levels of TNF-alpha and NFkappaB p65 subunit were measured by ELISA technique. Haloperidol increased orofacial dyskinetic movements and total locomotor activity (on day 22) (PClozapine and risperidone also increased the orofacial dyskinetic movements but that significantly less than haloperidol (Pclozapine and risperidone did not. Haloperidol but not clozapine and risperidone significantly increased the levels of TNF-alpha and NFkappaB p65 subunit (Pdyskinesia in rats, an animal model for human tardive dyskinesia.

  19. A multi-ingredient dietary supplement abolishes large-scale brain cell loss, improves sensory function, and prevents neuronal atrophy in aging mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, J A; Aksenov, V; Samigullina, R; Aksenov, S; Rodgers, W H; Rollo, C D; Boreham, D R

    2016-06-01

    Transgenic growth hormone mice (TGM) are a recognized model of accelerated aging with characteristics including chronic oxidative stress, reduced longevity, mitochondrial dysfunction, insulin resistance, muscle wasting, and elevated inflammatory processes. Growth hormone/IGF-1 activate the Target of Rapamycin known to promote aging. TGM particularly express severe cognitive decline. We previously reported that a multi-ingredient dietary supplement (MDS) designed to offset five mechanisms associated with aging extended longevity, ameliorated cognitive deterioration and significantly reduced age-related physical deterioration in both normal mice and TGM. Here we report that TGM lose more than 50% of cells in midbrain regions, including the cerebellum and olfactory bulb. This is comparable to severe Alzheimer's disease and likely explains their striking age-related cognitive impairment. We also demonstrate that the MDS completely abrogates this severe brain cell loss, reverses cognitive decline and augments sensory and motor function in aged mice. Additionally, histological examination of retinal structure revealed markers consistent with higher numbers of photoreceptor cells in aging and supplemented mice. We know of no other treatment with such efficacy, highlighting the potential for prevention or amelioration of human neuropathologies that are similarly associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and cellular dysfunction. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:382-404, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. [3H]mazindol binding associated with neuronal dopamine and norepinephrine uptake sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javitch, J A; Blaustein, R O; Snyder, S H

    1984-07-01

    [3H]Mazindol labels neuronal dopamine uptake sites in corpus striatum membranes (KD = 18 nM) and neuronal norepinephrine uptake sites in cerebral cortex and submaxillary/sublingual gland membranes (KD = 4 nM). The potencies of various inhibitors of biogenic amine uptake in reducing [3H]mazindol binding in striatal membranes correlate with their potencies for inhibition of neuronal [3H]dopamine accumulation, whereas their potencies in reducing [3H]mazindol binding to cortical and salivary gland membranes correlate with their potencies for inhibition of neuronal [3H]norepinephrine accumulation. Similar to the dopamine and norepinephrine uptake systems, [3H]mazindol binding in all three tissues is dependent upon sodium (with potassium, lithium, rubidium, and Tris being ineffective substitutes) and chloride (with sulfate and phosphate being ineffective substitutes). In membranes of the cerebral cortex and salivary gland, half-maximal stimulation is observed at 50-80 mM NaCl, whereas in membranes of the corpus striatum half-maximal stimulation occurs at 240 mM NaCl. In striatal membranes NaCl increases the affinity of [3H]mazindol binding with no effect on the maximal number of sites. The enhancement of affinity is due to a selective slowing of the dissociation of the ligand from its binding site. The association of [3H]mazindol binding sites with neuronal dopamine uptake sites in the corpus striatum is further supported by the reduction of [3H]mazindol binding sites in striatal membranes following destruction of dopaminergic neurons by 6-hydroxydopamine. Similarly, the association of [3H]mazindol binding sites with neuronal norepinephrine uptake sites in cerebral cortex is supported by the reduction of [3H]mazindol binding to cortical membranes following destruction of noradrenergic neurons by N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine.

  1. Frontal, Striatal, and Medial Temporal Sensitivity to Value Distinguishes Risk-Taking from Risk-Aversive Older Adults during Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Joshua O S; Su, Yu-Shiang; Tang, Yong-Jheng; McCarrey, Anna C; Tereshchenko, Alexander; Elkins, Wendy; Resnick, Susan M

    2016-12-07

    Aging compromises the frontal, striatal, and medial temporal areas of the reward system, impeding accurate value representation and feedback processing critical for decision making. However, substantial variability characterizes age-related effects on the brain so that some older individuals evince clear neurocognitive declines whereas others are spared. Moreover, the functional correlates of normative individual differences in older-adult value-based decision making remain unclear. We performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in 173 human older adults during a lottery choice task in which costly to more desirable stakes were depicted using low to high expected values (EVs) of points. Across trials that varied in EVs, participants decided to accept or decline the offered stakes to maximize total accumulated points. We found that greater age was associated with less optimal decisions, accepting stakes when losses were likely and declining stakes when gains were likely, and was associated with increased frontal activity for costlier stakes. Critically, risk preferences varied substantially across older adults and neural sensitivity to EVs in the frontal, striatal, and medial temporal areas dissociated risk-aversive from risk-taking individuals. Specifically, risk-averters increased neural responses to increasing EVs as stakes became more desirable, whereas risk-takers increased neural responses with decreasing EV as stakes became more costly. Risk preference also modulated striatal responses during feedback with risk-takers showing more positive responses to gains compared with risk-averters. Our findings highlight the frontal, striatal, and medial temporal areas as key neural loci in which individual differences differentially affect value-based decision-making ability in older adults. Frontal, striatal, and medial temporal functions implicated in value-based decision processing of rewards and costs undergo substantial age-related changes. However, age

  2. Reward-related dorsal striatal activity differences between former and current cocaine dependent individuals during an interactive competitive game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Hyatt

    Full Text Available Cocaine addiction is characterized by impulsivity, impaired social relationships, and abnormal mesocorticolimbic reward processing, but their interrelationships relative to stages of cocaine addiction are unclear. We assessed blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD signal in ventral and dorsal striatum during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in current (CCD; n = 30 and former (FCD; n = 28 cocaine dependent subjects as well as healthy control (HC; n = 31 subjects while playing an interactive competitive Domino game involving risk-taking and reward/punishment processing. Out-of-scanner impulsivity-related measures were also collected. Although both FCD and CCD subjects scored significantly higher on impulsivity-related measures than did HC subjects, only FCD subjects had differences in striatal activation, specifically showing hypoactivation during their response to gains versus losses in right dorsal caudate, a brain region linked to habituation, cocaine craving and addiction maintenance. Right caudate activity in FCD subjects also correlated negatively with impulsivity-related measures of self-reported compulsivity and sensitivity to reward. These findings suggest that remitted cocaine dependence is associated with striatal dysfunction during social reward processing in a manner linked to compulsivity and reward sensitivity measures. Future research should investigate the extent to which such differences might reflect underlying vulnerabilities linked to cocaine-using propensities (e.g., relapses.

  3. Modeling fall propensity in Parkinson's disease: deficits in the attentional control of complex movements in rats with cortical-cholinergic and striatal-dopaminergic deafferentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucinski, Aaron; Paolone, Giovanna; Bradshaw, Marc; Albin, Roger L; Sarter, Martin

    2013-10-16

    Cognitive symptoms, complex movement deficits, and increased propensity for falls are interrelated and levodopa-unresponsive symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We developed a test system for the assessment of fall propensity in rats and tested the hypothesis that interactions between loss of cortical cholinergic and striatal dopaminergic afferents increase fall propensity. Rats were trained to traverse stationary and rotating rods, placed horizontally or at inclines, and while exposed to distractors. Rats also performed an operant Sustained Attention Task (SAT). Partial cortical cholinergic and/or caudate dopaminergic deafferentation were produced by bilateral infusions of 192 IgG-saporin (SAP) into the basal forebrain and/or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the caudate nucleus, respectively, modeling the lesions seen in early PD. Rats with dual cholinergic-dopaminergic lesions (DL) fell more frequently than SAP or 6-OHDA rats. Falls in DL rats were associated with incomplete rebalancing after slips and low traversal speed. Ladder rung walking and pasta handling performance did not indicate sensorimotor deficits. SAT performance was impaired in DL and SAP rats; however, SAT performance and falls were correlated only in DL rats. Furthermore, in DL rats, but not in rats with only dopaminergic lesions, the placement and size of dopaminergic lesion correlated significantly with fall rates. The results support the hypothesis that after dual cholinergic-dopaminergic lesions, attentional resources can no longer be recruited to compensate for diminished striatal control of complex movement, thereby "unmasking" impaired striatal control of complex movements and yielding falls.

  4. [Mirror neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal. Some of them also respond to the emotional expression of other animals of the same species. These mirror neurons have also been found in humans. They respond to or "reflect" actions of other individuals in the brain and are thought to represent the basis for imitation and empathy and hence the neurobiological substrate for "theory of mind", the potential origin of language and the so-called moral instinct.

  5. Just watching the game ain’t enough: Striatal fMRI reward responses to successes and failures in a video game during active and vicarious playing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari eKätsyri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the multimodal stimulation provided by modern audiovisual video games is pleasing by itself, the rewarding nature of video game playing depends critically also on the players’ active engagement in the gameplay. The extent to which active engagement influences dopaminergic brain reward circuit responses remains unsettled. Here we show that striatal reward circuit responses elicited by successes (wins and failures (losses in a video game are stronger during active than vicarious gameplay. Eleven healthy males both played a competitive first-person tank shooter game (active playing and watched a pre-recorded gameplay video (vicarious playing while their hemodynamic brain activation was measured with 3-tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Wins and losses were paired with symmetrical monetary rewards and punishments during active and vicarious playing so that the external reward context remained identical during both conditions. Brain activation was stronger in the orbitomedial prefrontal cortex (omPFC during winning than losing, both during active and vicarious playing conditions. In contrast, both wins and losses suppressed activations in the midbrain and striatum during active playing; however, the striatal suppression, particularly in the anterior putamen, was more pronounced during loss than win events. Sensorimotor confounds related to joystick movements did not account for the results. Self-ratings indicated losing to be more unpleasant during active than vicarious playing. Our findings demonstrate striatum to be selectively sensitive to self-acquired rewards, in contrast to frontal components of the reward circuit that process both self-acquired and passively received rewards. We propose that the striatal responses to repeated acquisition of rewards that are contingent on game related successes contribute to the motivational pull of video-game playing.

  6. Just watching the game ain't enough: striatal fMRI reward responses to successes and failures in a video game during active and vicarious playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kätsyri, Jari; Hari, Riitta; Ravaja, Niklas; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2013-01-01

    Although the multimodal stimulation provided by modern audiovisual video games is pleasing by itself, the rewarding nature of video game playing depends critically also on the players' active engagement in the gameplay. The extent to which active engagement influences dopaminergic brain reward circuit responses remains unsettled. Here we show that striatal reward circuit responses elicited by successes (wins) and failures (losses) in a video game are stronger during active than vicarious gameplay. Eleven healthy males both played a competitive first-person tank shooter game (active playing) and watched a pre-recorded gameplay video (vicarious playing) while their hemodynamic brain activation was measured with 3-tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Wins and losses were paired with symmetrical monetary rewards and punishments during active and vicarious playing so that the external reward context remained identical during both conditions. Brain activation was stronger in the orbitomedial prefrontal cortex (omPFC) during winning than losing, both during active and vicarious playing. In contrast, both wins and losses suppressed activations in the midbrain and striatum during active playing; however, the striatal suppression, particularly in the anterior putamen, was more pronounced during loss than win events. Sensorimotor confounds related to joystick movements did not account for the results. Self-ratings indicated losing to be more unpleasant during active than vicarious playing. Our findings demonstrate striatum to be selectively sensitive to self-acquired rewards, in contrast to frontal components of the reward circuit that process both self-acquired and passively received rewards. We propose that the striatal responses to repeated acquisition of rewards that are contingent on game related successes contribute to the motivational pull of video-game playing.

  7. Noisy Neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 1. Noisy Neurons: Hodgkin-Huxley Model and Stochastic Variants. Shurti Paranjape. General Article Volume 20 Issue 1 January 2015 pp 34-43. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  8. Stimulated serotonin release from hyperinnervated terminals subsequent to neonatal dopamine depletion regulates striatal tachykinin, but not enkephalin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, G J; Walker, P D

    2000-09-30

    Dopamine (DA) depletion in neonatal rodents results in depressed tachykinin and elevated enkephalin gene expression in the adult striatum (STR). Concurrently, serotonin (5-HT) fibers sprout to hyperinnervate the DA-depleted anterior striatum (A-STR). The present study was designed to determine if increased 5-HT release from sprouted terminals influences dysregulated preprotachykinin (PPT) and preproenkephalin (PPE) mRNA expression in the DA-depleted STR. Three-day-old Sprague-Dawley rat pups received bilateral intracerebroventricular injections of vehicle or the DA neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 100 microg). Two months later, rats received a single intraperitoneal injection of vehicle or the acute 5-HT releasing agent p-chloroamphetamine (PCA; 10 mg/kg). Rats were killed 4 h later and striata processed for monoamine content by HPLC-ED and mRNA expression by in situ hybridization within specific subregions of the A-STR and posterior striatum (P-STR). 6-OHDA treatment severely (>98%) reduced striatal DA levels, while 5-HT content in the A-STR was significantly elevated (doubled), indicative of 5-HT hyperinnervation. Following 6-OHDA, PPT mRNA levels were depressed 60-66% across three subregions of the A-STR and 52-59% across two subregions of the P-STR, while PPE mRNA expression was elevated in both the A-STR (50-62%) and P-STR (55-82%). PCA normalized PPT mRNA levels in all regions of the DA-depleted A-STR and P-STR, yet did not alter PPE levels in either dorsal central or medial regions from 6-OHDA alone, but reduced PPE to control levels in the dorsal lateral A-STR. These data indicate that increased 5-HT neurotransmission, following neonatal 6-OHDA treatment, primarily influences PPT-containing neurons of the direct striatal output pathway.

  9. A53T-alpha-synuclein overexpression impairs dopamine signaling and striatal synaptic plasticity in old mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kurz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, the second most frequent neurodegenerative disorder at old age, can be caused by elevated expression or the A53T missense mutation of the presynaptic protein alpha-synuclein (SNCA. PD is characterized pathologically by the preferential vulnerability of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal projection neurons.Here, we used two mouse lines overexpressing human A53T-SNCA and studied striatal dysfunction in the absence of neurodegeneration to understand early disease mechanisms. To characterize the progression, we employed young adult as well as old mice. Analysis of striatal neurotransmitter content demonstrated that dopamine (DA levels correlated directly with the level of expression of SNCA, an observation also made in SNCA-deficient (knockout, KO mice. However, the elevated DA levels in the striatum of old A53T-SNCA overexpressing mice may not be transmitted appropriately, in view of three observations. First, a transcriptional downregulation of the extraneural DA degradation enzyme catechol-ortho-methytransferase (COMT was found. Second, an upregulation of DA receptors was detected by immunoblots and autoradiography. Third, extensive transcriptome studies via microarrays and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR of altered transcript levels of the DA-inducible genes Atf2, Cb1, Freq, Homer1 and Pde7b indicated a progressive and genotype-dependent reduction in the postsynaptic DA response. As a functional consequence, long term depression (LTD was absent in corticostriatal slices from old transgenic mice.Taken together, the dysfunctional neurotransmission and impaired synaptic plasticity seen in the A53T-SNCA overexpressing mice reflect early changes within the basal ganglia prior to frank neurodegeneration. As a model of preclinical stages of PD, such insights may help to develop neuroprotective therapeutic approaches.

  10. Striatal dopamine release induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex: effect of aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Seong Ae; Cho, Sang Soo; Yoon, Eun Jin; Kim, Ji Sun; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    We previously demonstrated dopamine (DA) release in the bilateral striatal regions following prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in young subjects. Several lines of evidence support substantial age-related changes in human dopaminergic neurotransmission. One possible explanation is alteration of cortico striatal neural connection with aging. Therefore, we investigated how frontal activation by rTMS influences striatal DA release in the elderly with SPECT measurements of striatal binding of [123I]iodobenzamide (lBZM), a DA D2 receptor radioligand that is sensitive to endogenous DA. Five healthy elderly male subjects (age, 64 3 y) were studied with brain [123I]IBZM SPECT under three conditions (resting, sham stimulation, and active rTMS over left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC)), while receiving a bolus plus constant infusion of [123I]IBZM. rTMS session consisted of three blocks. In each block, 15 trains of 2 sec duration were delivered with 10 Hz stimulation frequency and 100% motor threshold. Striatal V3', calculated as (striatal - occipital)/occipital radioactivity, was measured under equilibrium condition at baseline and after sham and active rTMS. Sham stimulation did not affect striatal V3'. rTMS over left DLPFC induced no significant change in V3' in the right striatum compared with baseline condition (0.91 0.25 vs. 0.96 0.25, P = NS). Interestingly, left striatal V3' showed a significant increase after rTMS over left DLPFC compared with sham condition (1.09 0.33 vs. 0.93 0.27, P < 0.05; 17.0 11.1% increase). These results are discrepant from previous ones from young subjects, who showed frontal rTMS-induced reduction of striatal V3', indicating rTMS-induced striatal DA release. We found no significant striatal DA release induced by rTMS over DLPFC in healthy elderly subjects using in vivo binding competition techniques. These results may support an altered cortico striatal circuit in normal aging.

  11. Striatal grafts in a rat model of Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzman, R; Meyer, M; Lövblad, K O

    1999-01-01

    , which was found unaltered for the first 21 days posttransplantation, whereas a hypointense graft signal was detected at 99 days posttransplantation. At 2 days posttransplantation, T2-weighted images showed the graft region as a hyperintense area surrounded by a rim of low signal intensity but at later...... time-points graft location could not be further verified. Measures for graft size and ventricle size obtained from MR images highly correlated with measures obtained from histologically processed sections (R = 0.8, P ...Survival and integration into the host brain of grafted tissue are crucial factors in neurotransplantation approaches. The present study explored the feasibility of using a clinical MR scanner to study striatal graft development in a rat model of Huntington's disease. Rat fetal lateral ganglionic...

  12. Two distinct populations of projection neurons in the rat lateral parafascicular thalamic nucleus and their cholinergic responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, J A; Sylwestrak, E L; Cox, C L

    2009-08-04

    The lateral parafascicular nucleus (lPf) is a member of the intralaminar thalamic nuclei, a collection of nuclei that characteristically provides widespread projections to the neocortex and basal ganglia and is associated with arousal, sensory, and motor functions. Recently, lPf neurons have been shown to possess different characteristics than other cortical-projecting thalamic relay neurons. We performed whole cell recordings from lPf neurons using an in vitro rat slice preparation and found two distinct neuronal subtypes that were differentiated by distinct morphological and physiological characteristics: diffuse and bushy. Diffuse neurons, which had been previously described, were the predominant neuronal subtype (66%). These neurons had few, poorly-branching, extended dendrites, and rarely displayed burst-like action potential discharge, a ubiquitous feature of thalamocortical relay neurons. Interestingly, we discovered a smaller population of bushy neurons (34%) that shared similar morphological and physiological characteristics with thalamocortical relay neurons of primary sensory thalamic nuclei. In contrast to other thalamocortical relay neurons, activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors produced a membrane hyperpolarization via activation of M(2) receptors in most lPf neurons (60%). In a minority of lPf neurons (33%), muscarinic agonists produced a membrane depolarization via activation of predominantly M(3) receptors. The muscarinic receptor-mediated actions were independent of lPf neuronal subtype (i.e. diffuse or bushy neurons); however the cholinergic actions were correlated with lPf neurons with different efferent targets. Retrogradely-labeled lPf neurons from frontal cortical fluorescent bead injections primarily consisted of bushy type lPf neurons (78%), but more importantly, all of these neurons were depolarized by muscarinic agonists. On the other hand, lPf neurons labeled by striatal injections were predominantly hyperpolarized by muscarinic

  13. The Impact of Exercise on the Vulnerability of Dopamine Neurons to Cell Death in Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zigmond, Michael J; Smith, Amanda; Liou, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease results in part from the loss of dopamine neurons. We hypothesize that exercise reduces the vulnerability of dopamine neurons to neurotoxin exposure, whereas stress increases vulnerability...

  14. Regulation of bat echolocation pulse acoustics by striatal dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tressler, Jedediah; Schwartz, Christine; Wellman, Paul; Hughes, Samuel; Smotherman, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The ability to control the bandwidth, amplitude and duration of echolocation pulses is a crucial aspect of echolocation performance but few details are known about the neural mechanisms underlying the control of these voice parameters in any mammal. The basal ganglia (BG) are a suite of forebrain nuclei centrally involved in sensory-motor control and are characterized by their dependence on dopamine. We hypothesized that pharmacological manipulation of brain dopamine levels could reveal how BG circuits might influence the acoustic structure of bat echolocation pulses. A single intraperitoneal injection of a low dose (5 mg kg(-1)) of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPTP), which selectively targets dopamine-producing cells of the substantia nigra, produced a rapid degradation in pulse acoustic structure and eliminated the bat's ability to make compensatory changes in pulse amplitude in response to background noise, i.e. the Lombard response. However, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements of striatal dopamine concentrations revealed that the main effect of MPTP was a fourfold increase rather than the predicted decrease in striatal dopamine levels. After first using autoradiographic methods to confirm the presence and location of D(1)- and D(2)-type dopamine receptors in the bat striatum, systemic injections of receptor subtype-specific agonists showed that MPTP's effects on pulse acoustics were mimicked by a D(2)-type dopamine receptor agonist (Quinpirole) but not by a D(1)-type dopamine receptor agonist (SKF82958). The results suggest that BG circuits have the capacity to influence echolocation pulse acoustics, particularly via D(2)-type dopamine receptor-mediated pathways, and may therefore represent an important mechanism for vocal control in bats.

  15. Speech-induced striatal dopamine release is left lateralized and coupled to functional striatal circuits in healthy humans: A combined PET, fMRI and DTI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonyan, Kristina; Herscovitch, Peter; Horwitz, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been recently made in understanding the brain mechanisms underlying speech and language control. However, the neurochemical underpinnings of normal speech production remain largely unknown. We investigated the extent of striatal endogenous dopamine release and its influences on the organization of functional striatal speech networks during production of meaningful English sentences using a combination of positron emission tomography (PET) with the dopamine D2/D3 receptor radioligand [11C]raclopride and functional MRI (fMRI). In addition, we used diffusion tensor tractography (DTI) to examine the extent of dopaminergic modulatory influences on striatal structural network organization. We found that, during sentence production, endogenous dopamine was released in the ventromedial portion of the dorsal striatum, in its both associative and sensorimotor functional divisions. In the associative striatum, speech-induced dopamine release established a significant relationship with neural activity and influenced the left-hemispheric lateralization of striatal functional networks. In contrast, there were no significant effects of endogenous dopamine release on the lateralization of striatal structural networks. Our data provide the first evidence for endogenous dopamine release in the dorsal striatum during normal speaking and point to the possible mechanisms behind the modulatory influences of dopamine on the organization of functional brain circuits controlling normal human speech. PMID:23277111

  16. Correlation of in vivo neuroimaging abnormalities with postmortem human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis and dendritic loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archibald, Sarah L.; Masliah, Eliezer; Fennema-Notestine, Christine

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the absence of significant opportunistic infection, the most common alterations on neuroimaging in the brains of patients with AIDS include enlarged cerebrospinal fluid spaces, white-matter loss, volume loss in striatal structures, and white-matter signal abnormalities. Although...

  17. Huntington's disease modeling and treatment: from primary neuronal cultures to rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Zala, Diana; Aebischer, Patrick; Déglon, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a mid-life-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized by involuntary movements, personality changes and dementia. It progresses to death within 10-20 years after onset. There is currently no cure to treat this fatal disease. In HD patients, the protein huntingtin contains an abnormal expansion of a polyglutamine tract, which leads to the selective death of striatal neurons. The functions of huntingtin, as well as the dysfunctions induced by the mutation are st...

  18. Common Variation in the DOPA Decarboxylase (DDC) Gene and Human Striatal DDC Activity In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Daniel P; Kohn, Philip D; Hegarty, Catherine E; Ianni, Angela M; Kolachana, Bhaskar; Gregory, Michael D; Masdeu, Joseph C; Berman, Karen F

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of multiple amine neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, and trace amines, relies in part on DOPA decarboxylase (DDC, AADC), an enzyme that is required for normative neural operations. Because rare, loss-of-function mutations in the DDC gene result in severe enzymatic deficiency and devastating autonomic, motor, and cognitive impairment, DDC common genetic polymorphisms have been proposed as a source of more moderate, but clinically important, alterations in DDC function that may contribute to risk, course, or treatment response in complex, heritable neuropsychiatric illnesses. However, a direct link between common genetic variation in DDC and DDC activity in the living human brain has never been established. We therefore tested for this association by conducting extensive genotyping across the DDC gene in a large cohort of 120 healthy individuals, for whom DDC activity was then quantified with [(18)F]-FDOPA positron emission tomography (PET). The specific uptake constant, Ki, a measure of DDC activity, was estimated for striatal regions of interest and found to be predicted by one of five tested haplotypes, particularly in the ventral striatum. These data provide evidence for cis-acting, functional common polymorphisms in the DDC gene and support future work to determine whether such variation might meaningfully contribute to DDC-mediated neural processes relevant to neuropsychiatric illness and treatment.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to study striatal iron accumulation in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Virel

    Full Text Available Abnormal accumulation of iron is observed in neurodegenerative disorders. In Parkinson's disease, an excess of iron has been demonstrated in different structures of the basal ganglia and is suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Using the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease, the edematous effect of 6-OHDA and its relation with striatal iron accumulation was examined utilizing in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The results revealed that in comparison with control animals, injection of 6-OHDA into the rat striatum provoked an edematous process, visible in T2-weighted images that was accompanied by an accumulation of iron clearly detectable in T2*-weighted images. Furthermore, Prussian blue staining to detect iron in sectioned brains confirmed the existence of accumulated iron in the areas of T2* hypointensities. The presence of ED1-positive microglia in the lesioned striatum overlapped with this accumulation of iron, indicating areas of toxicity and loss of dopamine nerve fibers. Correlation analyses demonstrated a direct relation between the hyperintensities caused by the edema and the hypointensities caused by the accumulation of iron.

  20. Striatal and extra-striatal dopamine transporter in cannabis and tobacco addiction: a high resolution PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, C.; Martinot, J.L.; Duchesnay, E.; Artiges, E.; Ribeiro, M.J.; Trichard, Ch.; Karila, L.; Lukasiewicz, M.; Benyamina, A.; Reynaud, M.; Martinot, J.L.; Duchesnay, E.; Artiges, E.; Comtat, C.; Artiges, E.; Trichard, Ch.

    2011-01-01

    The dopamine (DA) system is known to be involved in the reward and dependence mechanisms of addiction. However, modifications in dopaminergic neurotransmission associated with long-term tobacco and cannabis use have been poorly documented in vivo. In order to assess striatal and extra-striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in tobacco and cannabis addiction, three groups of male age-matched subjects were compared: 11 healthy non-smoker subjects, 14 tobacco-dependent smokers (17.6 ± 5.3 cigarettes/day for 12.1 ± 8.5 years) and 13 cannabis and tobacco smokers (CTS) (4.8 ± 5.3 cannabis joints/day for 8.7 ± 3.9 years). DAT availability was examined in positron emission tomography (HRRT) with a high resolution research tomograph after injection of [ 11 C]PE2I, a selective DAT radioligand. Region of interest and voxel-by-voxel approaches using a simplified reference tissue model were performed for the between-group comparison of DAT availability. Measurements in the dorsal striatum from both analyses were concordant and showed a mean 20% lower DAT availability in drug users compared with controls. Whole-brain analysis also revealed lower DAT availability in the ventral striatum, the midbrain, the middle cingulate and the thalamus (ranging from -15 to -30%). The DAT availability was slightly lower in all regions in CTS than in subjects who smoke tobacco only, but the difference does not reach a significant level. These results support the existence of a decrease in DAT availability associated with tobacco and cannabis addictions involving all dopaminergic brain circuits. These findings are consistent with the idea of a global decrease in cerebral DA activity in dependent subjects. (authors)

  1. Activating Developmental Reserve Capacity Via Cognitive Training or Non-invasive Brain Stimulation: Potentials for Promoting Fronto-Parietal and Hippocampal-Striatal Network Functions in Old Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, Susanne; Thurm, Franka; Li, Shu-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Existing neurocomputational and empirical data link deficient neuromodulation of the fronto-parietal and hippocampal-striatal circuitries with aging-related increase in processing noise and declines in various cognitive functions. Specifically, the theory of aging neuronal gain control postulates that aging-related suboptimal neuromodulation may attenuate neuronal gain control, which yields computational consequences on reducing the signal-to-noise-ratio of synaptic signal transmission and hampering information processing within and between cortical networks. Intervention methods such as cognitive training and non-invasive brain stimulation, e.g., transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), have been considered as means to buffer cognitive functions or delay cognitive decline in old age. However, to date the reported effect sizes of immediate training gains and maintenance effects of a variety of cognitive trainings are small to moderate at best; moreover, training-related transfer effects to non-trained but closely related (i.e., near-transfer) or other (i.e., far-transfer) cognitive functions are inconsistent or lacking. Similarly, although applying different tDCS protocols to reduce aging-related cognitive impairments by inducing temporary changes in cortical excitability seem somewhat promising, evidence of effects on short- and long-term plasticity is still equivocal. In this article, we will review and critically discuss existing findings of cognitive training- and stimulation-related behavioral and neural plasticity effects in the context of cognitive aging, focusing specifically on working memory and episodic memory functions, which are subserved by the fronto-parietal and hippocampal-striatal networks, respectively. Furthermore, in line with the theory of aging neuronal gain control we will highlight that developing age-specific brain stimulation protocols and the concurrent applications of tDCS during cognitive training may potentially facilitate

  2. Reduced capacity to sustain positive emotion in major depression reflects diminished maintenance of fronto-striatal brain activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Aaron S; Johnstone, Tom; Shackman, Alexander J; Light, Sharee N; Peterson, Michael J; Kolden, Gregory G; Kalin, Ned H; Davidson, Richard J

    2009-12-29

    Anhedonia, the loss of pleasure or interest in previously rewarding stimuli, is a core feature of major depression. While theorists have argued that anhedonia reflects a reduced capacity to experience pleasure, evidence is mixed as to whether anhedonia is caused by a reduction in hedonic capacity. An alternative explanation is that anhedonia is due to the inability to sustain positive affect across time. Using positive images, we used an emotion regulation task to test whether individuals with depression are unable to sustain activation in neural circuits underlying positive affect and reward. While up-regulating positive affect, depressed individuals failed to sustain nucleus accumbens activity over time compared with controls. This decreased capacity was related to individual differences in self-reported positive affect. Connectivity analyses further implicated the fronto-striatal network in anhedonia. These findings support the hypothesis that anhedonia in depressed patients reflects the inability to sustain engagement of structures involved in positive affect and reward.

  3. Neuronal oscillations in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcher, Mark; Moran, Rosalyn; Tatter, Stephen B; Laxton, Adrian W

    2014-06-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD), characterized by tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia, is one of the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorders in the world. The pathological hallmark of PD is the loss of dopaminergic cells in the substantia nigra and other brain regions. The pathophysiological mechanisms by which dopaminergic cell loss leads to the motor manifestations of PD are yet to be fully elucidated. A growing body of evidence has revealed abnormal neuronal oscillations within and between multiple brain regions in PD. Unique oscillatory patterns are associated with specific motor abnormalities in PD. Therapies, such as dopaminergic medication and deep brain stimulation that disrupt these abnormal neuronal oscillatory patterns produce symptomatic improvement in PD patients. These findings emphasize the importance of abnormal neuronal oscillations in the pathophysiology of PD, making the disruption of these oscillatory patterns a promising target in the development of effective PD treatments.

  4. Motor Neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2017-01-01

    Motor neurons translate synaptic input from widely distributed premotor networks into patterns of action potentials that orchestrate motor unit force and motor behavior. Intercalated between the CNS and muscles, motor neurons add to and adjust the final motor command. The identity and functional...... properties of this facility in the path from synaptic sites to the motor axon is reviewed with emphasis on voltage sensitive ion channels and regulatory metabotropic transmitter pathways. The catalog of the intrinsic response properties, their underlying mechanisms, and regulation obtained from motoneurons...... in in vitro preparations is far from complete. Nevertheless, a foundation has been provided for pursuing functional significance of intrinsic response properties in motoneurons in vivo during motor behavior at levels from molecules to systems....

  5. β-asarone and levodopa coadministration increases striatal levels of dopamine and levodopa and improves behavioral competence in Parkinson's rat by enhancing dopa decarboxylase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liping; Deng, Minzhen; Zhang, Sheng; Lu, Shiyao; Gui, Xuehong; Fang, Yongqi

    2017-10-01

    Levodopa (L-dopa) is the key component in Parkinson's disease (PD) treatment. Recently, we demonstrated that β-asarone improves the motor behavior of rats with unilateral striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. Striatal level of dopamine (DA) and L-dopa increased after β-asarone and L-dopa co-administered treatment in healthy rat. Since its effects and mechanisms on PD rats are still unclear, we investigated whether coadministration could help treat PD rats. Here, PD rats were randomly divided into seven groups (n=10/group): an untreated group, a Madopar-treated group, a L-dopa-treated group, a β-asarone-treated group, and groups receiving low, medium or high doses of β-asarone respectively plus the same dose of L-dopa. The sham-operated group rats were injected with saline. Treatments were administered to the rats twice per day continuously for 30days. The behavioral tests were assessed. Neurotransmitters, dopa decarboxylase (DDC), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) and dopamine transporter (DAT) levels were detected. The pathological characteristics of liver and kidney and ultrastructure of dopaminergic neurons were observed. The behavior of PD rats improved significantly after co-administered treatment compared with the untreated group. In addition, our results also showed that co-administered treatment increased L-dopa, DA, DOPAC, HVA and 5-HT levels, enhanced the MAO-B, COMT, TH and DAT levels, reduced creatinine level, decreased the amount of lysosome and mitochondria and showed no liver and kidney toxicity. These findings suggest that co-administered treatment could elevate striatal levels of L-dopa and DA and improve the behavioral abilities in PD rats by regulating the DDC, TH, MAO-B, COMT and DAT levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Hypocretin deficiency : neuronal loss and functional consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    The first part deals with the hypothalamic hypocretin system in disorders that are accompanied by narcolepsy-like sleep disturbances, i.e. Prader-Willi Syndrome, Parkinson’s Disease and Huntington’s Disease. To determine whether the hypocretin system is affected in these disorders, the total number

  7. Corticostriatal interactions in the generation of tic-like behaviors after local striatal disinhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelov, Vladimir; Xu, Meiyu; Smith, Haleigh R.; Buchanan, Gordon F.; Pittenger, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of the tics that define Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (TS) is not well understood. Local disinhibition within the striatum has been hypothesized to play a pathogenic role. In support of this, experimental disinhibition by local antagonism of GABA-A receptors within the striatum produces tic-like phenomenology in monkey and rat. We replicated this effect in mice via local picrotoxin infusion into the dorsal striatum. Infusion of picrotoxin into sensorimotor cortex produced similar movements, accompanied by signs of behavioral activation; higher-dose picrotoxin in the cortex produced seizures. Striatal inhibition with local muscimol completely abolished tic-like movements after either striatal or cortical picrotoxin, confirming their dependence on the striatal circuitry; in contrast, cortical muscimol attenuated but did not abolish movements produced by striatal picrotoxin. Striatal glutamate blockade eliminated tic-like movements after striatal picrotoxin, indicating that glutamatergic afferents are critical for their generation. These studies replicate and extend previous work in monkey and rat, providing additional validation for the local disinhibition model of tic generation. Our results reveal a key role for corticostriatal glutamatergic afferents in the generation of tic-like movements in this model. PMID:25597650

  8. Pivotal role of early B-cell factor 1 in development of striatonigral medium spiny neurons in the matrix compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Mary Kay; Yeh, Christopher; Yang, X William

    2008-08-01

    The mammalian striatum plays a critical function in motor control, motor and reward learning, and cognition. Dysfunction and degeneration of the striatal neurons are implicated in major neurological and psychiatric disorders. The vast majority of striatal neurons are medium spiny neurons (MSNs). MSNs can be further subdivided into distinct subtypes based on their physical localization in the striatal patch vs. matrix compartments and based on their axonal projections and marker gene expression (i.e., striatonigral MSNs vs. striatopallidal MSNs). Despite our extensive knowledge on the striatal cytoarchitecture and circuitry, little is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling the development of the MSN subtypes in the striatum. Early B-cell factor 1 (Ebf1) is a critical transcription factor implicated in striatal MSN development. One study shows that Ebf1 is critical for the differentiation of MSNs in the matrix, and our separate study demonstrates that Ebf1 is selectively expressed in the striatonigral MSNs and is essential for their postnatal differentiation. In the present study, we further validate the striatonigral MSN deficits in Ebf1(-/-) mice using multiple striatonigral MSN reporter mice. Moreover, we demonstrate that the striatonigral MSN deficits in these mice are restricted to those in the matrix, with relative sparing of those in the patch. Finally, we demonstrate that Ebf1 deficiency also results in reduced expression of another striatonigral-specific transcription factor, zinc finger binding protein 521 (Zfp521), which is a known Ebf1 functional partner. Overall, our study reveals that Ebf1 may play an essential role in controlling the differentiation of the striatonigral MSNs in the matrix compartment.

  9. GDE2 regulates subtype-specific motor neuron generation through inhibition of Notch signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Priyanka; Lee, Changhee; Park, Sungjin; Rao, Meenakshi; Sockanathan, Shanthini

    2011-09-22

    The specification of spinal interneuron and motor neuron identities initiates within progenitor cells, while motor neuron subtype diversification is regulated by hierarchical transcriptional programs implemented postmitotically. Here we find that mice lacking GDE2, a six-transmembrane protein that triggers motor neuron generation, exhibit selective losses of distinct motor neuron subtypes, specifically in defined subsets of limb-innervating motor pools that correlate with the loss of force-generating alpha motor neurons. Mechanistically, GDE2 is expressed by postmitotic motor neurons but utilizes extracellular glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase activity to induce motor neuron generation by inhibiting Notch signaling in neighboring motor neuron progenitors. Thus, neuronal GDE2 controls motor neuron subtype diversity through a non-cell-autonomous feedback mechanism that directly regulates progenitor cell differentiation, implying that subtype specification initiates within motor neuron progenitor populations prior to their differentiation into postmitotic motor neurons. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reduced Striatal Dopamine Transporters in People with Internet Addiction Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Hou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, internet addiction disorder (IAD has become more prevalent worldwide and the recognition of its devastating impact on the users and society has rapidly increased. However, the neurobiological mechanism of IAD has not bee fully expressed. The present study was designed to determine if the striatal dopamine transporter (DAT levels measured by T99mc-TRODAT-1 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT brain scans were altered in individuals with IAD. SPECT brain scans were acquired on 5 male IAD subjects and 9 healthy age-matched controls. The volume (V and weight (W of bilateral corpus striatum as well as the T99mc-TRODAT-1 uptake ratio of corpus striatum/the whole brain (Ra were calculated using mathematical models. It was displayed that DAT expression level of striatum was significantly decreased and the V, W, and Ra were greatly reduced in the individuals with IAD compared to controls. Taken together, these results suggest that IAD may cause serious damages to the brain and the neuroimaging findings further illustrate IAD is associated with dysfunctions in the dopaminergic brain systems. Our findings also support the claim that IAD may share similar neurobiological abnormalities with other addictive disorders.

  11. Frontal and striatal alterations associated with psychopathic traits in adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaling; Narr, Katherine L.; Baker, Laura A.; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Jahanshad, Neda; Raine, Adrian; Thompson, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging research has demonstrated a range of structural deficits in adults with psychopathy, but little is known about structural correlates of psychopathic tendencies in adolescents. Here we examined structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) data obtained from 14-year-old adolescents (n=108) using tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to isolate global and localized differences in brain tissue volumes associated with psychopathic traits in this otherwise healthy developmental population. We found that greater levels of psychopathic traits were correlated with increased brain tissue volumes in the left putamen, left ansa peduncularis, right superiomedial prefrontal cortex, left inferior frontal cortex, right orbitofrontal cortex, and right medial temporal regions and reduced brain tissues volumes in the right middle frontal cortex, left superior parietal lobule, and left inferior parietal lobule. Post hoc analyses of parcellated regional volumes also showed putamen enlargements to correlate with increased psychopathic traits. Consistent with earlier studies, findings suggest poor decision-making and emotional dysregulation associated with psychopathy may be due, in part, to structural anomalies in frontal and temporal regions whereas striatal structural variations may contribute to sensation-seeking and reward-driven behavior in psychopathic individuals. Future studies will help clarify how disturbances in brain maturational processes might lead to the developmental trajectory from psychopathic tendencies in adolescents to adult psychopathy. PMID:25676553

  12. Hypercholesterolemia causes psychomotor abnormalities in mice and alterations in cortico-striatal biogenic amine neurotransmitters: Relevance to Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rajib; Choudhury, Amarendranath; Chandra Boruah, Dulal; Devi, Rajlakshmi; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta; Borah, Anupom

    2017-09-01

    The symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) include motor behavioral abnormalities, which appear as a result of the extensive loss of the striatal biogenic amine, dopamine. Various endogenous molecules, including cholesterol, have been put forward as putative contributors in the pathogenesis of PD. Earlier reports have provided a strong link between the elevated level of plasma cholesterol (hypercholesterolemia) and onset of PD. However, the role of hypercholesterolemia on brain functions in terms of neurotransmitter metabolism and associated behavioral manifestations remain elusive. We tested in Swiss albino mice whether hypercholesterolemia induced by high-cholesterol diet would affect dopamine and serotonin metabolism in discrete brain regions that would precipitate in psychomotor behavioral manifestations. High-cholesterol diet for 12 weeks caused a significant increase in blood total cholesterol level, which validated the model as hypercholesterolemic. Tests for akinesia, catalepsy, swimming ability and gait pattern (increased stride length) have revealed that hypercholesterolemic mice develop motor behavioral abnormalities, which are similar to the behavioral phenotypes of PD. Moreover, hypercholesterolemia caused depressive-like behavior in mice, as indicated by the increased immobility time in the forced swim test. We found a significant depletion of dopamine in striatum and serotonin in cortex of hypercholesterolemic mice. The significant decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in striatum supports the observed depleted level dopamine in striatum, which is relevant to the pathophysiology of PD. In conclusion, hypercholesterolemia-induced depleted levels of cortical and striatal biogenic amines reported hereby are similar to the PD pathology, which might be associated with the observed psychomotor behavioral abnormalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cortico–Amygdala–Striatal Circuits Are Organized as Hierarchical Subsystems through the Primate Amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngsun T.; Ernst, Monique

    2013-01-01

    The prefrontal and insula cortex, amygdala, and striatum are key regions for emotional processing, yet the amygdala's role as an interface between the cortex and striatum is not well understood. In the nonhuman primate (Macaque fascicularis), we analyzed a collection of bidirectional tracer injections in the amygdala to understand how cortical inputs and striatal outputs are organized to form integrated cortico–amygdala–striatal circuits. Overall, diverse prefrontal and insular cortical regions projected to the basal and accessory basal nuclei of the amygdala. In turn, these amygdala regions projected to widespread striatal domains extending well beyond the classic ventral striatum. Analysis of the cases in aggregate revealed a topographic colocalization of cortical inputs and striatal outputs in the amygdala that was additionally distinguished by cortical cytoarchitecture. Specifically, the degree of cortical laminar differentiation of the cortical inputs predicted amygdalostriatal targets, and distinguished three main cortico–amygdala–striatal circuits. These three circuits were categorized as “primitive,” “intermediate,” and “developed,” respectively, to emphasize the relative phylogenetic and ontogenetic features of the cortical inputs. Within the amygdala, these circuits appeared arranged in a pyramidal-like fashion, with the primitive circuit found in all examined subregions, and subsequent circuits hierarchically layered in discrete amygdala subregions. This arrangement suggests a stepwise integration of the functions of these circuits across amygdala subregions, providing a potential mechanism through which internal emotional states are managed with external social and sensory information toward emotionally informed complex behaviors. PMID:23986238

  14. Altered resting state cortico-striatal connectivity in mild to moderate stage Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngbin Kwak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by dopamine depletion in the striatum. One consistent pathophysiological hallmark of PD is an increase in spontaneous oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia thalamocortical networks. We evaluated these effects using resting state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI in mild to moderate stage Parkinson’s patients on and off L-DOPA and age-matched controls using six different striatal seed regions. We observed an overall increase in the strength of cortico-striatal functional connectivity in PD patients off L-DOPA compared to controls. This enhanced connectivity was down-regulated by L-DOPA as shown by an overall decrease in connectivity strength, particularly within motor cortical regions. We also performed a frequency content analysis of the BOLD signal time course extracted from the six striatal seed regions. PD off L-DOPA exhibited increased power in the frequency band 0.02 – 0.05 Hz compared to controls and to PD on L-DOPA. The L-DOPA associated decrease in the power of this frequency range modulated the L-DOPA associated decrease in connectivity strength between striatal seeds and the thalamus. In addition, the L-DOPA associated decrease in power in this frequency band also correlated with the L-DOPA associated improvement in cognitive performance. Our results demonstrate that PD and L-DOPA modulate striatal resting state BOLD signal oscillations and corticostriatal network coherence.

  15. Altered resting-state functional connectivity of striatal-thalamic circuit in bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Teng

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder is characterized by internally affective fluctuations. The abnormality of inherently mental state can be assessed using resting-state fMRI data without producing task-induced biases. In this study, we hypothesized that the resting-state connectivity related to the frontal, striatal, and thalamic regions, which were associated with mood regulations and cognitive functions, can be altered for bipolar disorder. We used the Pearson's correlation coefficients to estimate functional connectivity followed by the hierarchical modular analysis to categorize the resting-state functional regions of interest (ROIs. The selected functional connectivities associated with the striatal-thalamic circuit and default mode network (DMN were compared between bipolar patients and healthy controls. Significantly decreased connectivity in the striatal-thalamic circuit and between the striatal regions and the middle and posterior cingulate cortex was observed in the bipolar patients. We also observed that the bipolar patients exhibited significantly increased connectivity between the thalamic regions and the parahippocampus. No significant changes of connectivity related to the frontal regions in the DMN were observed. The changed resting-state connectivity related to the striatal-thalamic circuit might be an inherent basis for the altered emotional and cognitive processing in the bipolar patients.

  16. Striatal lesions produce distinctive impairments in reaction time performance in two different operant chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasted, P J; Döbrössy, M D; Robbins, T W; Dunnett, S B

    1998-08-01

    The dorsal striatum plays a crucial role in mediating voluntary movement. Excitotoxic striatal lesions in rats have previously been shown to impair the initiation but not the execution of movement in a choice reaction time task in an automated lateralised nose-poke apparatus (the "nine-hole box"). Conversely, when a conceptually similar reaction time task has been applied in a conventional operant chamber (or "Skinner box"), striatal lesions have been seen to impair the execution rather than the initiation of the lateralised movement. The present study was undertaken to compare directly these two results by training the same group of rats to perform a choice reaction time task in the two chambers and then comparing the effects of a unilateral excitotoxic striatal lesion in both chambers in parallel. Particular attention was paid to adopting similar parameters and contingencies in the control of the task in the two test chambers. After striatal lesions, the rats showed predominantly contralateral impairments in both tasks. However, they showed a deficit in reaction time in the nine-hole box but an apparent deficit in response execution in the Skinner box. This finding confirms the previous studies and indicates that differences in outcome are not simply attributable to procedural differences in the lesions, training conditions or tasks parameters. Rather, the pattern of reaction time deficit after striatal lesions depends critically on the apparatus used and the precise response requirements for each task.

  17. Caffeine and a selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist induce sensitization and cross-sensitization behavior associated with increased striatal dopamine in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Chih W

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caffeine, a nonselective adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonist, is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world. Evidence demonstrates that caffeine and selective adenosine A2A antagonists interact with the neuronal systems involved in drug reinforcement, locomotor sensitization, and therapeutic effect in Parkinson's disease (PD. Evidence also indicates that low doses of caffeine and a selective adenosine A2A antagonist SCH58261 elicit locomotor stimulation whereas high doses of these drugs exert locomotor inhibition. Since these behavioral and therapeutic effects are mediated by the mesolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways which project to the striatum, we hypothesize that low doses of caffeine and SCH58261 may modulate the functions of dopaminergic neurons in the striatum. Methods In this study, we evaluated the neuroadaptations in the striatum by using reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC to quantitate the concentrations of striatal dopamine and its metabolites, dihydroxylphenylacetic acid (DOPAC and homovanilic acid (HVA, and using immunoblotting to measure the level of phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH at Ser31, following chronic caffeine and SCH58261 sensitization in mice. Moreover, to validate further that the behavior sensitization of caffeine is through antagonism at the adenosine A2A receptor, we also evaluate whether chronic pretreatment with a selective adenosine A2A antagonist SCH58261 or a selective adenosine A1 antagonist DPCPX can sensitize the locomotor stimulating effects of caffeine. Results Chronic treatments with low dose caffeine (10 mg/kg or SCH58261 (2 mg/kg increased the concentrations of dopamine, DOPAC and HVA, concomitant with increased TH phosphorylation at Ser31 and consequently enhanced TH activity in the striatal tissues in both caffeine- and SCH58261-sensitized mice. In addition, chronic caffeine or SCH58261 administration induced

  18. Response properties of neurons in the cat's putamen during auditory discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhenling; Sato, Yu; Qin, Ling

    2015-10-01

    The striatum integrates diverse convergent input and plays a critical role in the goal-directed behaviors. To date, the auditory functions of striatum are less studied. Recently, it was demonstrated that auditory cortico-striatal projections influence behavioral performance during a frequency discrimination task. To reveal the functions of striatal neurons in auditory discrimination, we recorded the single-unit spike activities in the putamen (dorsal striatum) of free-moving cats while performing a Go/No-go task to discriminate the sounds with different modulation rates (12.5 Hz vs. 50 Hz) or envelopes (damped vs. ramped). We found that the putamen neurons can be broadly divided into four groups according to their contributions to sound discrimination. First, 40% of neurons showed vigorous responses synchronized to the sound envelope, and could precisely discriminate different sounds. Second, 18% of neurons showed a high preference of ramped to damped sounds, but no preference for modulation rate. They could only discriminate the change of sound envelope. Third, 27% of neurons rapidly adapted to the sound stimuli, had no ability of sound discrimination. Fourth, 15% of neurons discriminated the sounds dependent on the reward-prediction. Comparing to passively listening condition, the activities of putamen neurons were significantly enhanced by the engagement of the auditory tasks, but not modulated by the cat's behavioral choice. The coexistence of multiple types of neurons suggests that the putamen is involved in the transformation from auditory representation to stimulus-reward association. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Contribution of vesicular and cytosolic dopamine to the increased striatal dopamine efflux elicited by intrastriatal injection of SKF38393.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saigusa, T.; Aono, Y.; Sekino, R.; Uchida, T.; Takada, K.; Oi, Y.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Like dexamphetamine, SKF38393 induces an increase in striatal dopamine efflux which is insensitive for tetrodotoxin, Ca(2+) independent and prevented by a dopamine transporter inhibitor. The dexamphetamine-induced striatal dopamine efflux originates from both the reserpine-sensitive vesicular

  20. Astrocytosis in parkinsonism: considering tripartite striatal synapses in physiopathology?

    OpenAIRE

    Charron, Giselle; Doudnikoff, Evelyne; Canron, Marie-Helene; Li, Qin; Véga, Céline; Marais, Sebastien; Baufreton, Jérôme; Vital, Anne; Oliet, Stéphane H. R.; Bezard, Erwan

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The current concept of basal ganglia organization and function in physiological and pathophysiological conditions excludes the most numerous cells in the brain, i.e., the astrocytes, present with a ratio of 10:1 neuron. Their role in neurodegenerative condition such as Parkinson's disease (PD) remains to be elucidated. Before embarking into physiological in