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Sample records for stretched wire measurement

  1. Stretched Wire Mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowden, Gordon; /SLAC

    2005-09-06

    Stretched wires are beginning to play an important role in the alignment of accelerators and synchrotron light sources. Stretched wires are proposed for the alignment of the 130 meter long LCLS undulator. Wire position technology has reached sub-micron resolution yet analyses of perturbations to wire straightness are hard to find. This paper considers possible deviations of stretched wire from the simple 2-dimensional catenary form.

  2. Analysis of ultra-relativistic charged particle beam and stretched wire measurement interactions with cylindrically symmetric structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deibele, C.E.

    1996-01-01

    The beam impedance and wakefield are quantities which describe the stability of charged particles in their trajectory within an accelerator. The stretched wire measurement technique is a method which estimates the beam impedance and wakefield. Definitions for the beam impedance, the wakefield, and the stretched wire measurement are presented. A pillbox resonator with circular beampipes is studied for its relatively simple profile and mode structure. Theoretical predictions and measurement data are presented for the interaction of various charged particle beams and center conductor geometries between the cavity and beampipe. Time domain predictions for the stretched wire measurement and wakefield are presented and are shown to be a linear interaction

  3. Results of stretched wire field integral measurements on the mini-undulator magnet - comparison of results obtained from circular and translational motion of the integrating wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, L.

    1998-05-01

    Measurements of the multipole content of the Mini-Undulator magnet have been made with two different integrating wire techniques. Both measurements used 43 strand Litz wire stretched along the length of the magnet within the magnet gap. In the first technique, the wire motion was purely translational, while in the second technique the wire was moved along a circular path. The induced voltage in the Litz wire was input into a Walker integrator, and the integrator output was analyzed as a function of wire position for determination of the multipole content of the magnetic field. The mini-undulator magnet is a 10 period, 80 mm per period hybrid insertion device. For all the data contained herein the magnet gap was set at 49 mm. In the mini-undulator magnet, the iron poles are 18mm x 32mm x 86 mm, and the Samarium Cobalt permanent magnet blocks are 22mm x 21mm x 110mm. For this magnet, which is a shortened prototype for the NSLS Soft X-Ray Undulator Magnet, the undulator parameter K = 0.934 B (Tesla)λ(cm), and B(tesla) = 0.534/sinh(πGap/λ). At a gap of 49 mm, the magnetic field is 1590 Gauss

  4. Command Wire Sensor Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    CFAR Constant False Alarm Rate CWIE Command Wire-Improvised Explosive Device EMI Electromagnetic Induction GPR Ground Penetrating Radar...this, some type of constant false alarm rate ( CFAR ) receiver is required. CFAR automatically raises the threshold level to keep clutter echoes and

  5. Minimum quench energy measurement for superconducting wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, K.; Morita, M.; Nakamura, S.; Yamada, T.; Jizo, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have developed a new method of measuring minimum quench energy (MQE) of superconducting wire. There have been conventional methods using heating wires, whose diameters are ∼0.1mm and are glued by epoxy resin. When they induce a pulse heat to superconducting wires, a duration of the pulse must be several hundreds micro seconds to demonstrate actual disturbances (for instance wire motion) in a superconducting magnet. In spite of this fact, thermal diffusion time constants of the conventional heaters are larger than the duration of the actual disturbance, because of these electrical insulator of the heating wire and the epoxy bind. Therefore, this kind of heater is not able to demonstrate the actual disturbance. To solve this problem, they have proposed a new constitution of a heater. In the method, heat generation is introduced in high resistive layer on a surface of a superconducting wire. The high resistive layer is consist of carbon paste. The thickness of the carbon paste layer is ∼20microm, thus a time constant of this heater is expected to be small enough to demonstrate the actual disturbance. Adopting the new method to the MQE measurement, they successfully evaluate MQE of superconducting wires with high precision. Several results are introduced in this paper

  6. In situ growth and electrical measurement of metal nanowires on DNA wire templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreda, Jorge; Hu, Longqian; Yu, Liuqi; Hudis, Jacob; Wang, Zhibin; Xia, Junfei; Guan, Jingjiao; Xiong, Peng; Guan's Group Team; Xiong's Group Team

    We report on the development of a process for controlled stretching and deposition of DNA wires as templates for in situ growth and electrical measurement of metal nanowires (NWs). The complete process is separated into three main steps: 1) stretching of DNA wires with a one-step dewetting of a DNA solution on a PDMS stamp where the DNA wires are suspended across an array of micropillars along a chosen direction; 2) transfer of the DNA wires to a Si/SiO2/SiNx substrate, via micro-contact printing, over and across a trench lithographically defined to have an opening in the SiNx layer and an undercut in the SiO2 layer; and 3) formation and electronic transport characterization of the metal NWs in ultrahigh vacuum at low temperature. The stretching process provides a high degree of control over the spacing and orientation of the DNA wires, as well as the lengths and widths of the metal NWs. For the metal NW growth, the DNA template is placed in a customized cryogenic system for low temperature quench-condensation deposition resulting in a metal NW. The thickness of the NW is increased incrementally and electrical measurement performed in situ at each thickness. Two-terminal and quasi-four terminal I-V measurements reveal that, with increasing thickness, a transition from strongly nonlinear IV to Ohmic behavior accompanies rapid increase of the NW conductance. Work supported by NSF Grant DMR-1308613.

  7. MDT WIRE TENSION MEASUREMENT USING AN ELECTROSTATIC METHOD

    CERN Document Server

    Balla, A; Esposito, B; Felici, G; Nedosekin, A; Ponzio, B; Russo, V; Spitalieri, M C

    1998-01-01

    An automated system to measure wire tension in MDT tubes is presented.The method uses electrostatic forces between wire and tube to excite mechanical oscillation around the wire harmonic resonance. A LC oscillating circuit is used to measure capacitance variation due towire oscillation. Wire tension is determined by the frequency at which the wirereaches the maximum oscillation amplitude. Both the excitation and measuring circuits are controlled by a computer.

  8. Measurement of Reversed Extension Flow using the Filament Stretch Rheometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Nielsen, Jens Kromann

    2008-01-01

    ). The latter is applicable on highly extensible elastomers, whereas in LAOE measurements on liquids (including polymer melts) the LAOE flow needs to be imposed upon a constant strain rate uniaxial elongation. The used Filament Stretching Rheometer allows measurements on polymeric fluids (including polymeric...... melts) from room temperature until 200 degrees C....

  9. Measurement of skin stretch using digital image speckle correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staloff, Isabelle Afriat; Rafailovitch, Miriam

    2008-08-01

    The surface of the skin is covered by intersecting grooves and ridges which produce characteristic skin surface patterns. It has been suggested that these folds provide a reserve of tissue, allowing the skin to stretch during normal muscle movements. More so, skin is anisotropic and under constant tension. Therefore, to characterize skin displacement following stretch, a discrete, description of the in-plane skin displacement during stretch is of interest. We introduce the use of digital image speckle correlation (DISC), a non-contact technique, to map, in two dimensions, the surface deformation patterns resulting from skin stretching. We analyze skin stretch under the mechanical action of a film former applied on a defined square surface on the back of the hand. This is achieved by taking a series of images, during the drying process of the film former. The images are then analyzed with DISC to create vector diagram and projection maps, from which we can obtain spatially resolved information regarding the skin displacement. We first show that DISC can provide spatially resolved information at any time point during the drying process: areas of de-wetting, wetting were identified using projection maps; we then extracted the value of the drying time. Finally using a vector map, we show the orientation of the skin displacement during stretching and calculated the magnitude of the total stretch. We have shown previously that DISC can be used to determine skin mechanical properties and muscular activity. We show here that DISC, as a non-contact technique, can map, in two dimensions, the surface deformation patterns of a polymer solution on a substrate at any time point during the drying process. DISC analysis generates for each speckle of the sample analyzed, the orientation and magnitude of displacement of the polymer solution. DISC can map in two dimensions the deformation undergone by the substrate and skin stretch is measured in this particular case. We therefore

  10. A Novel Stretch Sensor to Measure Venous Hemodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syrpailyne Wankhar

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic venous insufficiency is a debilitating condition causing varicose veins and venous ulcers. The pathophysiology includes reflux and venous obstruction. The diagnosis is often made by clinical examination and confirmed by Venous Doppler studies. Plethysmography helps to quantitatively examine the reflux and diagnose the burden of deep venous pathology to better understand venous hemodynamics, which is not elicited by venous duplex examination alone. However, most of these tests are qualitative, expensive, and not easily available. In this paper, we demonstrate the potential use of a novel stretch sensor in the assessment of venous hemodynamics during different maneuvers by measuring the change in calf circumference. We designed the stretch sensor by using semiconductor strain gauges pasted onto a small metal bar to form a load cell. The elastic and Velcro material attached to the load cell form a belt. It converts the change in limb circumference to a proportional tension (force of distension when placed around the calf muscle. We recorded the change in limb circumference from arrays of stretch sensors by using an in-house data acquisition system. We calculated the venous volume (VV, venous filling index (VFI, ejection fraction (EF and residual venous volume (RVV on two normal subjects and on two patients to assess venous hemodynamics. The values (VV > 60 ml, VFI 60%, RVV 2ml/s, EF 35% in patients were comparable to those reported in the literature.

  11. Experience of precision measuring distances by invar wires at accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porubaj, N.I.

    1977-01-01

    With a view to determining the deformations and displacements of the ring foundation of the ITEP accelerator, the method of very accurate distance measurements by means of invar wires and strips is described. Measurement errors are analyzed. This method has allowed to measure distances up to 40 m with a mean-square error of less than 40 μm. The calibration accuracy of 3 and 25-m measuring wires has been determined to be +- 27 μm. Time instability of the wires is +- 16 μm. It is shown that strips are more stable in time than wires. Elongation of 6, 19, 25 and 38 m invar wires has been measured as function of the tension time. The error due to tension of a 38-m wire may be tangible. Data on thermal coefficient variation in time has been obtained for invar wires and strips. The multiannual measurements of the ring foundation deformations show that variations of the mean radius are caused by increases of concrete temperature. Temperature increase by only 1 deg caused mean radius increase of 0.3 mm

  12. Strain sensing systems tailored for tensile measurement of fragile wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyilas, Arman

    2005-12-01

    Fundamental stress versus strain measurements were completed on superconducting Nb3Sn wires within the framework of IEC/TC90 and VAMAS/TWA16. A key task was the assessment of sensing systems regarding resolution, accuracy, and precision when measuring Young's modulus. Prior to actual Nb3Sn wire measurements metallic wires, consisting of copper and stainless steel having diameters similar to the Nb3Sn wire, were extensively investigated with respect to their elastic line properties using different types of extensometers. After these calibration tests Nb3Sn wire measurements of different companies resulted in several important facts with respect to total size and weight of the used extensometers. The size could be correlated to the initial stage of stress versus strain behaviour. In fact, the effect of wire curls resulting from the production line had a profound effect on Young's modulus measurements. Within this context, the possibility of determining Young's modulus from unloading compliance lines in the plastic regime of the stress-strain curve was considered. The data obtained using this test methodology were discussed under consideration of the composite nature of Nb3Sn wire. In addition, a non-contacting sensing system based on a double-beam laser extensometer was used to investigate the potential of this new sensing system.

  13. Strain sensing systems tailored for tensile measurement of fragile wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyilas, Arman

    2005-01-01

    Fundamental stress versus strain measurements were completed on superconducting Nb 3 Sn wires within the framework of IEC/TC90 and VAMAS/TWA16. A key task was the assessment of sensing systems regarding resolution, accuracy, and precision when measuring Young's modulus. Prior to actual Nb 3 Sn wire measurements metallic wires, consisting of copper and stainless steel having diameters similar to the Nb 3 Sn wire, were extensively investigated with respect to their elastic line properties using different types of extensometers. After these calibration tests Nb 3 Sn wire measurements of different companies resulted in several important facts with respect to total size and weight of the used extensometers. The size could be correlated to the initial stage of stress versus strain behaviour. In fact, the effect of wire curls resulting from the production line had a profound effect on Young's modulus measurements. Within this context, the possibility of determining Young's modulus from unloading compliance lines in the plastic regime of the stress-strain curve was considered. The data obtained using this test methodology were discussed under consideration of the composite nature of Nb 3 Sn wire. In addition, a non-contacting sensing system based on a double-beam laser extensometer was used to investigate the potential of this new sensing system

  14. Measurement of the saturation magnetostriction constant of amorphous wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, A.; Vazquez, M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of the magnetostriction constant of amorphous wire by conventional techniques is very difficult because of its small diameter. However, accurate determination of the magnetostriction constant is important in the study of amorphous wires. Here the saturation magnetostriction constant (λ s ) for a low-magnetostriction amorphous wire of nominal composition (Fe 6.3 Co 92.7 Nb 1 ) 77.5 Si 7.5 B 15 has been determined by means of the small-angle magnetization-rotation method. λ s has been evaluated to be 2.1x10 -7 for its as-received state. The dependence of thermal treatment is also reported

  15. On the Humidity Sensitivity of Hot-Wire Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling; Busch, N. E.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of humidity changes on hot-wire measurements is discussed. Indications are that the humidity sensitivity parameters obtained by the authors in an earlier paper should be changed. This means, however, that the agreement between predicted and measured sensitivities ceases to exist...

  16. Skin-friction measurements with hot-wire gages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdeville, R.; Juillen, J. C.; Cousteix, J.

    1983-11-01

    The development of two hot-wire gauges for implantation in wind-tunnel models and their application to the measurement of skin-friction phenomena are reported. The measurement principle is explained; the design and calibration of a single-wire gage containing a thermocouple for temperature determination (Cousteix and Juillen, 1982-1983) are summarized; and sample results for 2D and 3D flows with positive pressure gradients are shown. An advanced design employing a thin hot film deposited on an 80-micron-diameter quartz fiber extending into a 1-mm-sq 0.8-mm-deep cavity is characterized and demonstrated on a pulsed flow on a flat plate, Tollmien-Schlichting waves, and a turbulent boundary layer. Two cold-wire temperature sensors are added to this gage to permit detection of the skin of the skin friction in the separated flow over a cylinder.

  17. Sidewall roughness measurement of photonic wires and photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Garnæs, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    The performance of nanophotonic building blocks such as photonic wires and photonic crystals are rapidly improving, with very low propagation loss and very high cavity Q-factors being reported. In order to facilitate further improvements in performance the ability to quantitatively measure...

  18. Wire scanner data analysis for the SSC Linac emittance measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, C.Y.; Hurd, J.W.; Sage, J.

    1993-07-01

    The wire scanners are designed in the SSC Linac for measurement of beam emittance at various locations. In order to obtain beam parameters from the scan signal, a data analysis program was developed that considers the problems of noise reduction, machine modeling, parameter fitting, and correction. This program is intended as a tool for Linac commissioning and also as part of the Linac control program. Some of the results from commissioning runs are presented

  19. Measurement of Material Functions in Extensional Flow Using the Filament Stretch Rheometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Laille, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    The measurement of material functions other than startup and steady viscosity is demonstrated using the Filament Stretching Rheometer. This includes startup of uniaxial elongational flow (potentially until steady state) followed by stress relaxation, large amplitude oscillatory elongational flow ...... imposed upon a constant strain rate uni axial elongation and startup of uniaxial elongational flow followed by biaxial squeezing. The used Filament Stretching Rheometer allows measurements on polymeric fluids (including polymeric melts) from room temperatures until 200°C....

  20. Method for measuring the wire tensions in proportional and drift chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coupland, M. (University Coll., London (UK))

    1983-06-15

    A device to measure the resonant frequency of a proportional chamber wire is described. From this frequency the wire tension can be calculated. The device is self-tuning, and in some instances may be used without opening the chamber.

  1. Pressure drop measurements in LMFBR wire wrapped blanket assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, C.; Hawley, J.; Rohsenow, W.M.; Todreas, N.E.

    1977-07-01

    In this experiment, measurements of subchannel static pressure for an interior and edge subchannel were taken at two elevations in two wire-wrapped 61-pin bundles. One of the bundles has geometric characteristics of P/D = 1.067 and H/D = 8.0 (4 inch lead length and 0.501 inch rod diameter) and the other bundle has geometric characteristics of P/D = 1.067 and H/D = 4.0 (2 inch lead length and 0.501 inch rod diameter). The bundle average friction factors as well as the local subchannel friction factors for both interior and edge subchannels were determined from the experimental static pressure data. The average subchannel flow rates for both edge and interior subchannels were determined in a separate experiment. Results show that two correlations suggested by Rehme and Novendstern for the bundle average friction factor cannot predict the data within the range of experimental error. The bundle average friction factors for both bundles under test were underestimated by Rehme's correlation and overestimated by Novendstern's correlation. The results of the local subchannel friction factors indicate the effect of the wire lead length is more pronounced in the interior subchannel friction factor than in the edge subchannel friction factor. As the wire wrap lead length decreases, both interior and edge subchannel friction factors increase

  2. X-ray backlighting density measurements of tungsten and aluminum wire and wire array z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, D.A.; Pikuz, S.A.; Shelkovenko, T.A.; Greenly, J.B.; Sinars, D.B.; Mingaleev, A.R.

    1999-01-01

    Calibrated density measurements in both the coronal plasmas and dense cores of exploding W wire and wire array Z-pinches, powered by the ∼450 kA, 100 ns XP-pulser at Cornell University, have been made using two-frame x-ray backlighting in conjunction with known thickness W step wedges. The backlighting images are made by Mo wire X-pinch radiation filtered by 12.5 microm Ti impinging upon a sandwich of films (Micrat VR, Kodak GWL, Kodak DEF) which have different sensitivities to increase the dynamic range of the method. A W step wedge filter is placed in front of the films, giving absolute line density calibration of each exposure with estimated errors ranging from 20 to 50%. Assuming x-ray absorption by the W plasma is the same as for the solid material, the authors are able to measure W areal densities from 3.2 x 10 19 to 2 x 10 17 /cm 2 . These can be converted to number density assuming azimuthal symmetry. For example, for an exploded 7.5 microm wire with a 15--20 microm diameter dense core and a 1 mm corona diameter, the implied W volume density ranges from 2x10 18 to over 10 22 /cm 3 . Integration of the line density gives an estimate of the fraction of the wire mass in the corona and core. For example, with 100 kA peak current in a single 7.5 microm W wire, ∼70% (>90%) of the W mass is in the corona after 53 ns (61 ns). The authors also observe that the corona has large, roughly axisymmetric axial nonuniformity both in radius and in mass density. In addition, the coronal plasma contains more of the W mass, expands faster and is more uniform when the wire is surface-cleaned by preheating. In arrays of 2--8 wires with the same 100 kA total current, detectable coronal plasma appears after 25--35 ns, and much of it is swept toward the center of the array, forming a dense channel. The portion of the initial wire mass in the coronal plasma increases with smaller wire diameter and decreases with greater wire number: 15% for 4 x 13.5 microm, 35% for 4 x 7

  3. Regional stretch method to measure the elastic and hyperelastic properties of soft materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, JunYuan; Guo, HaoYuan; Cao, YanPing; Feng, XiQiao

    2018-02-01

    Characterizing the mechanical properties of soft materials and biological tissues is of great significance for understanding their deformation behaviors. In this paper, a regional stretching method is proposed to measure the elastic and hyperelastic properties of a soft material with an adhesive surface or with the aid of glue. Theoretical and dimensional analyses are performed to investigate the regional stretch problem for soft materials that obey the neo-Hookean model, the Mooney-Rivlin model, or the Arruda-Boyce model. Finite element simulations are made to determine the expressions of the dimensionless functions that correlate the stretch response with the constitutive parameters. Thereby, an inverse approach is established to determine the elastic and hyperelastic properties of the tested materials. The regional stretch method is also compared to the indentation technique. Finally, experiments are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Mixed and dynamic response of hot wires and cold wires and measurements of turbulence statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling; Højstrup, Jørgen; Fairall, C. W.

    1986-01-01

    Hot wires respond to temperature as well as to velocity, whereas cold wires respond to velocity as well as to temperature. The static and dynamic response characteristics are summarized and it is shown that the frequency transfer functions for the four different responses in general are different...

  5. A resonance measuring wire tension monitor for high-energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durkin, L.S.; Fisher, D.; Lennous, P.; Ling, T.Y.; Rush, C.

    1995-01-01

    The Ohio State group has built a device to automatically measure the wire tension on the sense wire in SDC (Solenoidal Detector Collaboration) barrel muon drift tubes using resonance techniques. The SDC experiment was part of the now canceled SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) project. The design, construction, and operation of a wire tension monitor is presented. The technique used is unique in that the electric force is used to excite the wire into harmonic resonance. The amplitude of the wire is in turn monitored using the variation of the oscillating wire's capacitance measured by a resonance circuit. Finally, the resonance is found electronically using phase lock loop techniques. Wire tension is measured to an accuracy of 0.3% with this device

  6. Development of a portable and fast wire tension measurement system for MWPC construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jing-Hui; Ma, Chang-Li; Gong, Xue-Yu; Sun, Zhi-Jia; Wang, Yan-Feng; Yin, Chen-Yan; Gong, Lei

    2016-09-01

    In a multi-wire proportional chamber detector (MWPC), the anode and signal wires must maintain suitable tension, which is very important for the detector’s stable and accurate performance. As a result, wire tension control and measurement is essential in MWPC construction. A high pressure 3He MWPC detector is to be used as the thermal neutron detector of the multi-functional reflectometer at China Spallation Neutron Source, and in the construction of the detector, we have developed a wire tension measurement system. This system is accurate, portable and time-saving. With it, the wire tension on an anode wire plane has been tested. The measurement results show that the wire tension control techniques used in detector manufacture are reliable. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (A050506), State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics and Key Laboratory of China Academy of Engineering Physics (Y490KF40HD)

  7. The effect of stretch-and-flow voice therapy on measures of vocal function and handicap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Christopher R; Diviney, Shelby S; Hamilton, Amy; Toles, Laura; Childs, Lesley; Mau, Ted

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the efficacy of stretch-and-flow voice therapy as a primary physiological treatment for patients with hyperfunctional voice disorders. Prospective case series. Participants with a diagnosis of primary muscle tension dysphonia or phonotraumatic lesions due to hyperfunctional vocal behaviors were included. Participants received stretch-and-flow voice therapy structured once weekly for 6 weeks. Outcome variables consisted of two physiologic measures (s/z ratio and maximum phonation time), an acoustic measure (cepstral peak prominence [CPP]), and a measure of vocal handicap (voice handicap index [VHI]). All measures were obtained at baseline before treatment and within 2 weeks posttreatment. The s/z ratio, maximum phonation time, sentence CPP, and VHI showed statistically significant (P < 0.05) improvement through therapy. Effect sizes reflecting the magnitude of change were large for s/z ratio and VHI (d = 1.25 and 1.96 respectively), and moderate for maximum phonation time and sentence CPP (d = 0.79 and 0.74, respectively). This study provides supporting evidence for preliminary efficacy of stretch-and-flow voice therapy in a small sample of patients. The treatment effect was large or moderate for multiple outcome measures. The data provide justification for larger, controlled clinical trials on the application of stretch-and-flow voice therapy in the treatment of hyperfunctional voice disorders. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Extensional viscosity for polymer melts measured in the filament stretching rheometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Anders; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2003-01-01

    A new filament stretching rheometer has been constructed to measure the elongational viscosity of polymer melts at high temperatures. Two polymer melts, a LDPE and a LLDPE, were investigated with this rheometer. A constant elongational rate has been obtained by an iterative application of the Orr...

  9. Assessing muscle spasticity with Myotonometric and passive stretch measurements: validity of the Myotonometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Shin, Henry; Li, Sheng; Zhou, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Spasticity of the biceps brachii muscle was assessed using the modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), Myotonometry and repeated passive stretch techniques, respectively. Fourteen subjects with chronic hemiplegia participated in the study. Spasticity was quantified by muscle displacements and compliance from the Myotonometer measurements and resistive torques from the repeated passive stretch at velocities of 5 °/s and 100 °/s, respectively. Paired t-tests indicated a significant decrease of muscle displacement and compliance in the spastic muscles as compared to the contralateral side (muscle displacement: spastic: 4.84 ± 0.33 mm, contralateral: 6.02 ± 0.49 mm, p = 0.038; compliance: spastic: 1.79 ± 0.12 mm/N, contralateral: 2.21 ± 0.18 mm/kg, p = 0.048). In addition, passive stretch tests indicated a significant increase of total torque at the velocity of 100 °/s compared with that of 5 °/s (Tt5 = 2.82 ± 0.41 Nm, Tt100 = 6.28 ± 1.01 Nm, p stretch test and the Myotonometer measurements (r spasticity in stroke. PMID:28281581

  10. Measurement of 3-Axis Magnetic Fields Induced by Current Wires Using a Smartphone in Magnetostatics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, B.; Septianto, R. D.; Suhendra, D.; Iskandar, F.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the use of an inexpensive smartphone's magnetic sensor to measure magnetic field components (B[subscript x], B[subscript y] and B[subscript z]) induced by current wires in magnetostatic experiments. The variable parameters used to measure the magnetic sensor's capabilities were: the geometrical shapes of the wire, current…

  11. First Experimental Results And Improvements On Profile Measurements With The Vibrating Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Arutunian, S G; Dobrovolski, N M; Mailian, M R; Soghoyan, H E; Vasiniuk, I E

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the first experimental results of transverse profile scans using a wire scanner based on a vibrating wire (vibrating wire scanner - VWS). The measurements were performed at the injector electron beam (6 nA) of the Yerevan synchrotron. The beam profile information is obtained by measuring the wire natural oscillations that depend on the wire temperature. This first experiments on weak electron beam proved this new method as a very sensitive tool, even suitable for tail measurements. Additional, improvements were tested to overcome some problems connected with signal conditioning and signal transfer in the presence of electromagnetic noise. As a result the noises were neatly separated and reduced. A mathematical method for rejection of distorted data was developed. Experiments with the scanner at the PETRA accelerator at DESY are planned for measurements of beam tails.

  12. Transverse Beam Halo Measurements at High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) using Vibrating Wire Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, M.; Hanna, B.; Scarpine, V.; Shiltsev, V.; Steimel, J.; Artinian, S.; Arutunian, S.

    2015-02-26

    The measurement and control of beam halos will be critical for the applications of future high-intensity hadron linacs. In particular, beam profile monitors require a very high dynamic range when used for the transverse beam halo measurements. In this study, the Vibrating Wire Monitor (VWM) with aperture 60 mm was installed at the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) front-end to measure the transverse beam halo. A vibrating wire is excited at its resonance frequency with the help of a magnetic feedback loop, and the vibrating and sensitive wires are connected through a balanced arm. The sensitive wire is moved into the beam halo region by a stepper motor controlled translational stage. We study the feasibility of the vibrating wire for the transverse beam halo measurements in the low-energy front-end of the proton linac.

  13. Hot Wire Measurements in a Axisymmetric Shear Layer with Swirl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, D.; Pollard, A.

    1996-11-01

    It is well known that the introduction of swirl in an axisymmetric jet can influence the development of and mixing in the near field of the jet. Recent efforts to compute this flow have demonstrated that the development of the near field is dependent on parameters at the jet outlet other than distribution of the swirl component, such as the distribution the mean radial velocity (Xai, J.L., Smith, B.L., Benim, A. C., Schmidli, J., and Yadigaroglu, G. (1996) Influence of Boundary Conditions on Swirling Flow in Combustors, Proc. ASME Fluid. Eng. Div. Summer Meeting), San Diego, Ca., July 7-11.. An experimental rig has been designed to produce co-axial round and annular swirling jets with uniform outlet conditions in each flow. The flow rate and swirl component from each of these jets can be controlled independently and the rig can be configured to produce both co- and counter-swirling flows. Thus, the rig can be used to carry out an extensive investigation of the effect of swirl on the development of axisymmetric flows. The key design features of the rig and the first sets of hot-wire measurements in the shear layer will be reported here.

  14. Virtual Instrument Systems in Reality (VISIR) for Remote Wiring and Measurement of Electronic Circuits on Breadboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, M.; Sancristobal, E.; Martin, S.; Gil, R.; Diaz, G.; Colmenar, A.; Peire, J.; Castro, M.; Nilsson, K.; Zackrisson, J.; Hakansson, L.; Gustavsson, I.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a state-of-the-art remote laboratory project called Virtual Instrument Systems in Reality (VISIR). VISIR allows wiring and measuring of electronic circuits remotely on a virtual workbench that replicates physical circuit breadboards. The wiring mechanism is developed by means of a relay switching matrix connected to a PCI…

  15. Comparison and analysis of BNCT radiation dose between gold wire and JCDS measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageji, T.; Mizobuchi, Y.; Nagahiro, S.; Nakagawa, Y.; Kumada, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    We compared and evaluated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) radiation dose between gold wire measurement and JAERI Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS). Gold wire analysis demonstrates the actual BNCT dose though it dose not reflect the real the maximum and minimum dose in tumor tissue. We can conclude that JCDS is precise and high-reliable dose planning system for BNCT. (author)

  16. A method for measuring the wire tensions in proportional and drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coupland, M.

    1983-01-01

    A device to measure the resonant frequency of a proportional chamber wire is described. From this frequency the wire tension can be calculated. The device is self-tuning, and in some instances may be used without opening the chamber. (orig.)

  17. Velocity derivative skewness in isotropic turbulence and its measurement with hot wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burattini, Paolo [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Physique Statistique et des Plasmas, Brussels (Belgium); University of Newcastle, Discipline of Mechanical Engineering, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Lavoie, Philippe [Imperial College London, Department of Aeronautics, London (United Kingdom); Antonia, Robert A. [University of Newcastle, Discipline of Mechanical Engineering, Newcastle, NSW (Australia)

    2008-09-15

    We investigate the effect of the hot wire resolution on the measurement of the velocity derivative skewness in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Single- and cross-wire configurations (with different lengths and separations of the wires, and temporal sampling resolution) are considered. Predictions of the attenuation on the basis of a model for the energy spectrum are compared to experimental and numerical data in grid and box turbulence, respectively. It is shown that the model-based correction is accurate for the single wire but not for the cross-wire. In the latter case, the effect of the separation between the wires is opposite to that found in the experiments and simulations. Moreover, the attenuation predicted by the numerical data is in good agreement with that observed in the experiment. For both probe configurations, the sampling resolution has a sizeable attenuation effect, but, for the X-probe, the impact of the separation between the wires is more important. In both cases, the length of the wires has only a minor effect, in the non-dimensional range of wire length investigated. Finally, the present experimental data support the conclusion that the skewness is constant with the Reynolds number, in agreement with Kolmogorov's 41 theory. (orig.)

  18. An Intelligent Computerized Stretch Reflex Measurement System For Clinical And Investigative Neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, P. M.; Chutkow, J. G.; Riggs, M. T.; Cristiano, V. D.

    1987-05-01

    We describe the design of a reliable, user-friendly preprototype system for quantifying the tendon stretch reflexes in humans and large mammals. A hand-held, instrumented reflex gun, the impactor of which contains a single force sensor, interfaces with a computer. The resulting test system can deliver sequences of reproducible stimuli at graded intensities and adjustable durations to a muscle's tendon ("tendon taps"), measure the impacting force of each tap, and record the subsequent reflex muscle contraction from the same tendon -- all automatically. The parameters of the reflex muscle contraction include latency; mechanical threshold; and peak time, peak magnitude, and settling time. The results of clinical tests presented in this paper illustrate the system's potential usefulness in detecting neurologic dysfunction affecting the tendon stretch reflexes, in documenting the course of neurologic illnesses and their response to therapy, and in clinical and laboratory neurologic research.

  19. Application of image analysis method for measurement of fabric stretch deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariyapunya, N.; Baheti, S.

    2017-10-01

    For design of comfortable knitted fabric garments, it is necessary to know their distribution of elastic properties under the deformation. The standard tensile testing methods are not sufficient to explain distribution of these stretch properties. However, digital image analysis technique adjusted to the standard tensile test method can perform detailed study on distribution of local elastic deformation properties. The aim of this research was to develop a new method for the measurement of the local deformations between dots of stretch knitted fabrics during tensile testing. The image analysis approach was selected to calculate the gradient deformation tensor under the extension ranging from 10 %, 20%, 30% and 40 % in respective course, wale and bias directions. Moreover, this method was applied to know the deformation distribution on cylindrical surface as well by stretching the fabric under different extension. Subsequently the analysis of the deformation distribution by image processing system in MATLAB was carried out to determine the compression between cylindrical model and specimens. The results of image analysis were compared with ASTM D4964-96 standard and the actual obtained experimental results.

  20. Analysis of pulsed wire method for field integral measurements in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we present a theoretical analysis of this technique by finding out the analytic solution of the differential equation for the forced vibration of the wire taking dispersion due to stiffness into account. Method of images is used to extend these solutions to include reflections at the ends. For long undulators, the effect of ...

  1. Analysis of pulsed wire method for field integral measurements in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the acoustic wave in the wire could be significant and our analysis provides a method for the evaluation of the magnetic field profile even in such cases taking the effect due to dispersion into account in an exact way. Keywords. Undulator; free-electron laser; synchrotron radiation source; magnetic char- acterization.

  2. The development of the high-tension wire for nuclear fusion superconductive magnet measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Morita, Yohsuke; Yamazaki, Takanori; Watanabe, Kiyoshi; Furusawa, Ken-ichi.

    1987-01-01

    Following on tokamak critical plasma testing device JT-60, experimental fusion reactor JT-100 is being developed. The 6 kV high-tension wire has been developed for use in JT-100 under ultra-low temperature and high radiation environment. Used for superconductive magnet measurement, the wire is inserted in the vacuum vessel, being immersed within the liquid helium. As the insulating material of this wire, polyetherimido was found to be most suitable in the respects of radiation resistance and voltage-withstand property. In an electric wire covered with polyetherimido, which was made in trial, its test in voltage-withstand and bending characteristics at ultra-low temperature showed the wire to be usable for the intended purpose. (Mori, K.)

  3. Measurement of wire deflection on loading may indicate union in Ilizarov constructs, an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineham, Beth; Stewart, Todd; Harwood, Paul

    2018-02-02

    No entirely reliable method exists for assessing union during Ilizarov treatment. Premature removal results in potential treatment failure; hence, alternative methods warrant investigation. Wire deflection might provide an indication of fracture site deformation on weight bearing, indicating progress towards union. This study aimed to test a method for assessing wire deflection within an Ilizarov frame. (1) To assess the repeatability of our novel measurement method in measuring wire deflection within an Ilizarov frame in vitro. (2) To compare the amount of wire deflection in an unstable model with that in an intact bone model. (3) To assess accuracy of this method by comparing wire deflection measured with overall machine extension. Tests were performed on clinical grade-tensioned fine wire 4-ring Ilizarov constructs stabilising a simulated fracture, with and without an unstable defect. Models were sequentially loaded to 700 N using an Instron testing machine. A digital depth gauge attached to the superior ring measured relative wire displacement at the ring closest to the fracture. Tests were repeated 3 times. (1) Both unstable and stable bone models produced highly repeatable load deformation curves (R 2  = 0.98 and 0.99). (2) In the unstable model, wires tensioned at 882 and 1274 N produced mean maximum deflections of 2.41 and 2.69 mm compared with 0.05 and 0.04 mm in the intact bone model (significant p measurable difference in wire deflection between stable and unstable situations exists using this method which appears accurate and repeatable, with clear correlation between displacement and load and displacement and machine extension. This approach might be clinically applicable, and further clinical testing is required.

  4. Application of Hot-wire Method for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Fine Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangxi WANG

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic substrate is preferred in high density packaging due to its high electrical resistivity and moderate expansion coefficient. The thermal conductivity is a key parameter for packaging substrates. There are two common methods to measure the thermal conductivity, which are the hot-wire method and the laser-flash method. Usually, the thermal conductivities of porcelain is low and meet the measurement range of hot-wire method, and the measured value by hot-wire method has little difference with that by laser-flash method. In recent years, with the requirement of high-powered LED lighting, some kinds of ceramic substrates with good thermal conductivity have been developed and their thermal conductivity always measured by the means of laser flash method, which needs expensive instrument. In this paper, in order to detect the thermal conductivity of fine ceramic with convenience and low cost, the feasibility of replacing the laser flash method with hot wire method to measure thermal conductivity of ceramic composites was studied. The experiment results showed that the thermal conductivity value of fine ceramics measured by the hot-wire method is severely lower than that by the laser-flash method. However, there is a positive relationship between them. It is possible to measure the thermal conductivity of fine ceramic workpiece instantly by hot-wire method via a correction formula.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.12543

  5. Measurement of gas flow velocity: anemometer with a vibrating hot wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiełbasa, Jan

    2010-01-01

    I propose a new method to measure velocity of a gas flow, which utilizes the time derivative of the voltage observed on a vibrating hot-wire sensor. The wire vibrates with an amplitude a and a frequency f, and is kept perpendicular to the gas flow direction in the plane containing the flow velocity vector v(g). When the parameters of vibrations are tuned, the number of zeros per vibration period of the hot-wire voltage function changes. I demonstrate that at the point of change, the unknown gas velocity is directly expressed by the parameters of vibrations v(g)=2pifa. Therefore, the velocity can be measured without any prior calibration of the hot-wire speed-voltage curve and the method can be used for gases of slowly changing temperature or composition.

  6. Gel stretch method: a new method to measure constitutive properties of cardiac muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zile, M. R.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, B. A.; Baicu, C. F.; Cooper G, I. V.; Gharpuray, V.

    1998-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is an important cause of congestive heart failure; however, the basic mechanisms causing diastolic congestive heart failure are not fully understood, especially the role of the cardiac muscle cell, or cardiocyte, in this process. Before the role of the cardiocyte in this pathophysiology can be defined, methods for measuring cardiocyte constitutive properties must be developed and validated. Thus this study was designed to evaluate a new method to characterize cardiocyte constitutive properties, the gel stretch method. Cardiocytes were isolated enzymatically from normal feline hearts and embedded in a 2% agarose gel containing HEPES-Krebs buffer and laminin. This gel was cast in a shape that allowed it to be placed in a stretching device. The ends of the gel were held between a movable roller and fixed plates that acted as mandibles. Distance between the right and left mandibles was increased using a stepper motor system. The force applied to the gel was measured by a force transducer. The resultant cardiocyte strain was determined by imaging the cells with a microscope, capturing the images with a CCD camera, and measuring cardiocyte and sarcomere length changes. Cardiocyte stress was characterized with a finite-element method. These measurements of cardiocyte stress and strain were used to determine cardiocyte stiffness. Two variables affecting cardiocyte stiffness were measured, the passive elastic spring and viscous damping. The passive spring was assessed by increasing the force on the gel at 1 g/min, modeling the resultant stress vs. strain relationship as an exponential [sigma = A/k(ekepsilon - 1)]. In normal cardiocytes, A = 23.0 kN/m2 and k = 16. Viscous damping was assessed by examining the loop area between the stress vs. strain relationship during 1 g/min increases and decreases in force. Normal cardiocytes had a finite loop area = 1.39 kN/m2, indicating the presence of viscous damping. Thus the gel stretch method provided accurate

  7. A Steel Wire Stress Measuring Sensor Based on the Static Magnetization by Permanent Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dongge; Wu, Xinjun; Zuo, Su

    2016-10-06

    A new stress measuring sensor is proposed to evaluate the axial stress in steel wires. Without using excitation and induction coils, the sensor mainly consists of a static magnetization unit made of permanent magnets and a magnetic field measurement unit containing Hall element arrays. Firstly, the principle is illustrated in detail. Under the excitation of the magnetization unit, a spatially varying magnetized region in the steel wire is utilized as the measurement region. Radial and axial magnetic flux densities at different lift-offs in this region are measured by the measurement unit to calculate the differential permeability curve and magnetization curve. Feature parameters extracted from the curves are used to evaluate the axial stress. Secondly, the special stress sensor for Φ5 and Φ7 steel wires is developed accordingly. At last, the performance of the sensor is tested experimentally. Experimental results show that the sensor can measure the magnetization curve accurately with the error in the range of ±6%. Furthermore, the obtained differential permeability at working points 1200 A/m and 10000 A/m change almost linearly with the stress in steel wires, the goodness of linear fits are all higher than 0.987. Thus, the proposed steel wire stress measuring sensor is feasible.

  8. A Steel Wire Stress Measuring Sensor Based on the Static Magnetization by Permanent Magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongge Deng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A new stress measuring sensor is proposed to evaluate the axial stress in steel wires. Without using excitation and induction coils, the sensor mainly consists of a static magnetization unit made of permanent magnets and a magnetic field measurement unit containing Hall element arrays. Firstly, the principle is illustrated in detail. Under the excitation of the magnetization unit, a spatially varying magnetized region in the steel wire is utilized as the measurement region. Radial and axial magnetic flux densities at different lift-offs in this region are measured by the measurement unit to calculate the differential permeability curve and magnetization curve. Feature parameters extracted from the curves are used to evaluate the axial stress. Secondly, the special stress sensor for Φ5 and Φ7 steel wires is developed accordingly. At last, the performance of the sensor is tested experimentally. Experimental results show that the sensor can measure the magnetization curve accurately with the error in the range of ±6%. Furthermore, the obtained differential permeability at working points 1200 A/m and 10000 A/m change almost linearly with the stress in steel wires, the goodness of linear fits are all higher than 0.987. Thus, the proposed steel wire stress measuring sensor is feasible.

  9. [Evaluation of the corrosion resistance of orthodontic wires by electrochemical measures and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, André El; Klein, Lorena; Frateur, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the corrosion resistance of orthodontic wires made of different alloys (stainless steel, chrome-cobalt, nickel-titanium and β-titanium) and for the same alloy from different vendors (GAC(®), RMO(®), 3M(®) and ORMCO(®)). Different electrochemical techniques (corrosion potential monitoring as a function of immersion time, current-potential curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)) were used. The wires' resistance to corrosion was measured and compared with the surface condition, assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Using the recorded data, a rating system based on the corrosion resistance of orthodontic wires was developed. The comparison of these data with the results of SEM shows that the surface chemical composition plays a primary role in the electrochemical behavior of the orthodontic wires and, unlike surface defects, is a key parameter for the corrosion resistance of the alloy. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2013.

  10. Computer-controlled rig for measurements of velocity and turbulence distributions by hot-wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehme, K.

    1984-06-01

    The long measuring times for hot-wire measurements require automation of rig control and data acquisition. The report describes test rig, measurement system and control. The effectiveness was increased by a factor of 60 by computer-control (orig.) [de

  11. Spatial averaging of velocity measurements in wall-bounded turbulence: single hot-wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philip, Jimmy; Hutchins, Nicholas; Monty, Jason P; Marusic, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in velocity measurements to understand high Reynolds number (Re) wall turbulence have pushed the boundaries of sensor size required to resolve the smallest scales. We present here a framework for studying the effect of finite sensor size on velocity measurements, and scrutinize in detail the behaviour of single-wire hot-wires. Starting with a general linear filter, expressions for the filtered correlation, spectrum and the corresponding variance are derived. Considering the special case of a box-type filter and a simple model for the two-point correlation, theoretical results are developed, which are favourably compared with the numerical simulation of hot-wires based on the turbulent channel flow direct numerical simulation databases. The results clarify the reason why previous studies found the approximate shape of the spectra not resolved by hot-wires as Gaussian. The length scale based on the correlation over the sensor length is found to be the appropriate length scale for characterizing averaging due to finite sensor size. The efficacy of the linear box filter is established by comparing the numerical simulation of hot-wires with experiments conducted at matched sensor lengths and Re in a channel flow, at least for hot-wire lengths of less than 40 in viscous scaling. Finally, a model of the streamwise two-point correlation is presented, which is employed to estimate the filtering effect on the peak of the streamwise velocity variances for a range of Re, and the model results compare favourably with that obtained from measurements. Even though the theoretical results are compared here in the case of wall turbulence, they are suitable for hot-wire measurements in turbulent flows in general. (paper)

  12. A fast wire scanner, used to measure the transverse density distribution of beams circulating in an accelerator or storage ring.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Fast wire scanners are used to measure the transverse density distribution of beams circulating in an accelerator or storage ring. In order to minimize blow-up of the beam through multiple Coulomb scattering, the wires are very thin (in the version shown here it is actually a twisted strand of carbon fibres with a total diameter of about 25 microns) and are swept through the beam at high speed (a linear motor, not mounted here, accelerates the wires to up to 20 m/s). One measures either the secondary emission current from the wire, or the signal from a scintillator/photomultiplier combination downstream from the wire scanner receiving the shower from nuclear reactions of beam particles with the wire nuclei. There are four such fast wire scanners in the 26 GeV PS and eight in the 1.4 GeV Booster.

  13. Measurement of 3-axis magnetic fields induced by current wires using a smartphone in magnetostatics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, B.; Septianto, R. D.; Suhendra, D.; Iskandar, F.

    2017-11-01

    This paper describes the use of an inexpensive smartphone’s magnetic sensor to measure magnetic field components (B x , B y and B z ) induced by current wires in magnetostatic experiments. The variable parameters used to measure the magnetic sensor’s capabilities were: the geometrical shapes of the wire, current flow, and the distance between wire and observation point. The experimental results are in good agreement with the results obtained from calculations using an analytical and numerical approach. In addition, the 2D vectors and magnitude of the magnetic field have been successfully illustrated. This study confirmed that the inexpensive smartphone’s magnetic sensor had a good ability to accurately measure the components of a magnetic field in a magnetostatic experiment, which is especially suitable for undergraduate students.

  14. Design of measuring system for wire diameter based on sub-pixel edge detection algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yudong; Zhou, Wang

    2016-09-01

    Light projection method is often used in measuring system for wire diameter, which is relatively simpler structure and lower cost, and the measuring accuracy is limited by the pixel size of CCD. Using a CCD with small pixel size can improve the measuring accuracy, but will increase the cost and difficulty of making. In this paper, through the comparative analysis of a variety of sub-pixel edge detection algorithms, polynomial fitting method is applied for data processing in measuring system for wire diameter, to improve the measuring accuracy and enhance the ability of anti-noise. In the design of system structure, light projection method with orthogonal structure is used for the detection optical part, which can effectively reduce the error caused by line jitter in the measuring process. For the electrical part, ARM Cortex-M4 microprocessor is used as the core of the circuit module, which can not only drive double channel linear CCD but also complete the sampling, processing and storage of the CCD video signal. In addition, ARM microprocessor can complete the high speed operation of the whole measuring system for wire diameter in the case of no additional chip. The experimental results show that sub-pixel edge detection algorithm based on polynomial fitting can make up for the lack of single pixel size and improve the precision of measuring system for wire diameter significantly, without increasing hardware complexity of the entire system.

  15. Inductive method to measure very small joint resistances of superconducting wires

    CERN Document Server

    Herzog, R

    1998-01-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is currently being developed at CERN, about 50,000 connections of superconducting wire will be necessary to implement all circuits for powering 6000 corrector magnets with a maximum current of 600 A. To minimise the generation of ohmic heat in the cryogenic system, it is necessary to reduce the contact resistance of these connections as much as possible. This paper describes a method to measure contact resistances of splices of superconducting wires, which has been used to optimise such connections. Additionally we present results of a number of measurements on different types of connections. (2 refs).

  16. Direct Measurement of the Electron Energy Relaxation Dynamics in Metallic Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsolle, Edouard; Rousseau, Alexandre; Lupien, Christian; Reulet, Bertrand

    2016-06-01

    We present measurements of the dynamical response of thermal noise to an ac excitation in conductors at low temperature. From the frequency dependence of this response function—the (noise) thermal impedance—in the range 1 kHz-1 GHz we obtain direct determinations of the inelastic relaxation times relevant in metallic wires at low temperature: the electron-phonon scattering time and the diffusion time of electrons along the wires. Combining these results with that of resistivity provides a measurement of heat capacity of samples made of thin film. The simplicity and reliability of this technique makes it very promising for future applications in other systems.

  17. Further elucidation of nanofluid thermal conductivity measurement using a transient hot-wire method apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Donghoon; Lee, Joohyun; Lee, Byeongchan; Kwon, Suyong; Koo, Junemo

    2018-02-01

    The Transient Hot-Wire Method (THWM) was developed to measure the absolute thermal conductivity of gases, liquids, melts, and solids with low uncertainty. The majority of nanofluid researchers used THWM to measure the thermal conductivity of test fluids. Several reasons have been suggested for the discrepancies in these types of measurements, including nanofluid generation, nanofluid stability, and measurement challenges. The details of the transient hot-wire method such as the test cell size, the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) and the sampling number are further investigated to improve the accuracy and consistency of the measurements of different researchers. It was observed that smaller test apparatuses were better because they can delay the onset of natural convection. TCR values of a coated platinum wire were measured and statistically analyzed to reduce the uncertainty in thermal conductivity measurements. For validation, ethylene glycol (EG) and water thermal conductivity were measured and analyzed in the temperature range between 280 and 310 K. Furthermore, a detailed statistical analysis was conducted for such measurements, and the results confirmed the minimum number of samples required to achieve the desired resolution and precision of the measurements. It is further proposed that researchers fully report the information related to their measurements to validate the measurements and to avoid future inconsistent nanofluid data.

  18. A Hot-Wire Method Based Thermal Conductivity Measurement Apparatus for Teaching Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, S.; Marin, E.; Juarez, A. G.; Calderon, A.; Ivanov, R.

    2012-01-01

    The implementation of an automated system based on the hot-wire technique is described for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of liquids using equipment easily available in modern physics laboratories at high schools and universities (basically a precision current source and a voltage meter, a data acquisition card, a personal computer…

  19. Eddy-correlation measurements above a maize crop using a simple cruciform hot-wire anemometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottemanne, F.A.

    1979-01-01

    For measurements of the vertical transport of heat and momentum in the turbulent and slightly unstable boundary layer above a maize crop eddy-correlation techniques were applied. In addition to a vertical Gill-propellor anemometer and a Gill-propellor bivane, a cruciform hot-wire probe, mounted on a

  20. Spasticity Measurement Based on Tonic Stretch Reflex Threshold in Children with Cerebral Palsy Using the PediAnklebot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Germanotta

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, objective measures are becoming prominent in spasticity assessment, to overcome limitations of clinical scales. Among others, Tonic Stretch Reflex Threshold (TSRT showed promising results. Previous studies demonstrated the validity and reliability of TSRT in spasticity assessment at elbow and ankle joints in adults. Purposes of the present study were to assess: (i the feasibility of measuring TSRT to evaluate spasticity at the ankle joint in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP, and (ii the correlation between objective measures and clinical scores. A mechatronic device, the pediAnklebot, was used to impose 50 passive stretches to the ankle of 10 children with CP and 3 healthy children, to elicit muscles response at 5 different velocities. Surface electromyography, angles, and angular velocities were recorded to compute dynamic stretch reflex threshold; TSRT was computed with a linear regression through angles and angular velocities. TSRTs for the most affected side of children with CP resulted into the biomechanical range (95.7 ± 12.9° and 86.7 ± 17.4° for Medial and Lateral Gastrocnemius, and 75.9 ± 12.5° for Tibialis Anterior. In three patients, the stretch reflex was not elicited in the less affected side. TSRTs were outside the biomechanical range in healthy children. However, no correlation was found between clinical scores and TSRT values. Here, we demonstrated the capability of TSRT to discriminate between spastic and non-spastic muscles, while no significant outcomes were found for the dorsiflexor muscle.

  1. In Vivo Sarcomere Length Measurement in Whole Muscles during Passive Stretch and Twitch Contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kevin W; Kuo, Bill P-P; O'Connor, Shawn M; Radic, Stojan; Lieber, Richard L

    2017-02-28

    Muscle force is dictated by micrometer-scale contractile machines called sarcomeres. Whole-muscle force drops from peak force production to zero with just a few micrometers of sarcomere length change. No current technology is able to capture adequate dynamic sarcomere data in vivo, and thus we lack fundamental data needed to understand human movement and movement disorders. Methods such as diffraction, endoscopy, and optical coherence tomography have been applied to muscle but are prohibitively invasive, sensitive to motion artifact, and/or imprecise. Here, we report dynamic sarcomere length measurement in vivo using a combination of our recently validated resonant reflection spectroscopy method combined with optical frequency domain interferometry. Using a 250-μm-wide fiber optic probe, we captured nanometer sarcomere length changes from thousands of sarcomeres on the sub-millisecond timescale during whole-muscle stretch and twitch contraction. We believe that this demonstrates the first large-scale sensing of sarcomere dynamics in vivo, which is a necessary first step to understand movement disorders and to create patient-specific surgical interventions and rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Comparisons between LES and Wind Tunnel Hot-Wire Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2012-01-01

    is constructed in a wind tunnel similar to the LM wind tunnel where the experiment for an NACA 0015 airfoil was carried out. The goal of this study is to validate the mixed scale SGS turbulence model against detailed measurements. Simulations are performed with the in-house EllipSys3D code on high performance...... computers. The stability and accuracy of the LES simulations are studied on various mesh configurations. The spanwise grid spacing is found important to produce correct flow disturbances along the airfoil span, which can affect the turbulent energy distribution.......Large-eddy simulations (LES) are carried out for flows over a NACA 0015 airfoil at AoA = 8o and a chord based Reynolds number of 1.71 × 106. To accurately simulate the complex flow on the suction side of the airfoil, a reasonably large number of grid points is required. The computational mesh...

  3. Applying hot-wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Shakhshir, Saher; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Berning, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand and more accurately measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, our group has recently proposed to apply hot wire anemometry in the fuel cell's anode outlet. It was theoretically shown that the electrical signal obtained from the hot wire senso...

  4. Stretching positions for the coracohumeral ligament: Strain measurement during passive motion using fresh/frozen cadaver shoulders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi Tomoki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contracture of the coracohumeral ligament is reported to restrict external rotation of the shoulder with arm at the side and restrict posterior-inferior shift of the humeral head. The contracture is supposed to restrict range of motion of the glenohumeral joint. Methods To obtain stretching position of the coracohumeral ligament, strain on the ligament was measured at the superficial fibers of the ligament using 9 fresh/frozen cadaver shoulders. By sequential measurement using a strain gauge, the ligament strain was measured from reference length (L0. Shoulder positions were determined using a 3 Space Tracker System. Through a combination of previously reported coracohumeral stretching positions and those observed in preliminary measurement, ligament strain were measured by passive external rotation from 10° internal rotation, by adding each 10° external rotation, to maximal external rotation. Results Stretching positions in which significantly larger strain were obtained compared to the L0 values were 0° elevation in scapula plane with 40°, 50° and maximum external rotation (5.68%, 7.2%, 7.87%, 30° extension with 50°, maximum external rotation (4.20%, 4.79%, and 30° extension + adduction with 30°, 40°, 50° and maximum external rotation (4.09%, 4.67%, 4.78%, 5.05%(P Conclusions Significant strain of the coracohumeral ligament will be achieved by passive external rotation at lower shoulder elevations, extension, and extension with adduction.

  5. Wire-Mesh Tomography Measurements of Void Fraction in Rectangular Bubble Columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy Vanga, B.N.; Lopez de Bertodano, M.A.; Zaruba, A.; Prasser, H.M.; Krepper, E.

    2004-01-01

    Bubble Columns are widely used in the process industry and their scale-up from laboratory scale units to industrial units have been a subject of extensive study. The void fraction distribution in the bubble column is affected by the column size, superficial velocity of the dispersed phase, height of the liquid column, size of the gas bubbles, flow regime, sparger design and geometry of the bubble column. The void fraction distribution in turn affects the interfacial momentum transfer in the bubble column. The void fraction distribution in a rectangular bubble column 10 cm wide and 2 cm deep has been measured using Wire-Mesh Tomography. Experiments were performed in an air-water system with the column operating in the dispersed bubbly flow regime. The experiments also serve the purpose of studying the performance of wire-mesh sensors in batch flows. A 'wall peak' has been observed in the measured void fraction profiles, for the higher gas flow rates. This 'wall peak' seems to be unique, as this distribution has not been previously reported in bubble column literature. Low gas flow rates yielded the conventional 'center peak' void profile. The effect of column height and superficial gas velocity on the void distribution has been investigated. Wire-mesh Tomography also facilitates the measurement of bubble size distribution in the column. This paper presents the measurement principle and the experimental results for a wide range of superficial gas velocities. (authors)

  6. Measuring the dynamic polarizability of tungsten atom via electrical wire explosion in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huantong; Zou, Xiaobing; Wang, Xinxin

    2018-02-01

    Electrical explosion of wire provides a practical approach to the experimental measurement of dynamic polarizability of metal atoms with high melting and boiling temperatures. With the help of insulation coating, a section of tungsten wire was transformed to the plasma state while the near electrode region was partially vaporized, which enabled us to locate the "neutral-region" (consisting of gaseous atoms) in the Mach-Zehnder interferogram. In this paper, the polarizability of the tungsten atom at 532 nm was reconstructed based on a technique previously used for the same purpose, and the basic preconditions of the measurement were verified in detail, including the existence of the neutral region, conservation of linear density of tungsten during wire expansion, and neglect of the vaporized insulation coating. The typical imaging time varied from 80 ns to as late as 200 ns and the reconstructed polarizability of the tungsten atom was 16 ± 1 Å3, which showed good statistical consistency and was also in good agreement with the previous results.

  7. Release measurement of great amount of waste. Conveyor belt versus wire mesh pallet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokcic-Kostic, Marina; Schultheis, Roland; Langer, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Great amount of waste has to be measured for release during the decommissioning and rebuilding of nuclear facilities and installation. Since the enclosed storage or decontamination is very expensive it is advisable for economic reasons to separate contaminated material. The necessary measurement is however a time and cost intensive work which has carefully provided. There are two general methods to perform this task: one is a continuously running system on the basis of a conveyor belt system. The other approach is a discontinuously running system using wire mesh pallets. With the knowledge from existing installations this article will discuss the pro's and contra's and show the limits of the systems.

  8. Accurate measurements of local skin friction coefficient using hot-wire anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Nick; Choi, Kwing-So

    2002-05-01

    The practicality and accuracy of many existing methods of local skin friction measurement suffer when the boundary layer flow under consideration is non-canonical. Such shortcomings are exacerbated in three-dimensional flows, by the necessity to map local cf over a wider area in order to characterise fully the contribution to global skin friction. These problems have led the authors to seek novel experimental methods of cf measurement. The technique proposed herein utilises velocity measurements made using hot-wire anemometry combined with accurate positioning of the sensor element in respect to the test surface. In essence it is proposed that the local skin friction can be evaluated via a single velocity measurement made at a known wall-normal distance within the linear region of the viscous sublayer. This technique relies on accurate probe positioning, and two methods of achieving this are outlined. A study of the hot-wire characteristics in near-wall proximity has revealed a previously unnoticed feature corresponding to probe-wall contact. It is shown that this anomaly can be used as a positional flag to accurately locate the aerodynamic origin of the hot-wire sensor. A second technique using a laser triangulation displacement sensor is also outlined. Both positional techniques are shown to offer positioning to a sufficient level of accuracy for the proposed cf measurement technique. Single-point local cf measurement is tested experimentally, demonstrating the improved repeatability and standard error as predicted by initial error analysis. In this way it is shown that a single 90 s velocity sample coupled with accurate wall positioning can define local cf to a standard error of σcf≈1.0%. Analysis of error contributions reveals that longer sampling periods can realise even greater accuracy. The proposed technique is also used to measure local cf in a three-dimensional boundary layer where micro-vortex generators have introduced large-scale spanwise

  9. A hot-wire method based thermal conductivity measurement apparatus for teaching purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, S.; Marín, E.; Juárez, A. G.; Calderón, A.; Ivanov, R.

    2012-07-01

    The implementation of an automated system based on the hot-wire technique is described for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of liquids using equipment easily available in modern physics laboratories at high schools and universities (basically a precision current source and a voltage meter, a data acquisition card, a personal computer and a high purity platinum wire). The wire, which is immersed in the investigated sample, is heated by passing a constant electrical current through it, and its temperature evolution, ΔT, is measured as a function of time, t, for several values of the current. A straightforward methodology is then used for data processing in order to obtain the liquid thermal conductivity. The start point is the well known linear relationship between ΔT and ln(t) predicted for long heating times by a model based on a solution of the heat conduction equation for an infinite lineal heat source embedded in an infinite medium into which heat is conducted without convective and radiative heat losses. A criterion is used to verify that the selected linear region is the one that matches the conditions imposed by the theoretical model. As a consequence the method involves least-squares fits in linear, semi-logarithmic (semi-log) and log-log graphs, so that it becomes attractive not only to teach about heat transfer and thermal properties measurement techniques, but also as a good exercise for students of undergraduate courses of physics and engineering learning about these kinds of mathematical functional relationships between variables. The functionality of the experiment was demonstrated by measuring the thermal conductivity in samples of liquids with well known thermal properties.

  10. A hot-wire method based thermal conductivity measurement apparatus for teaching purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado, S; Marín, E; Juárez, A G; Calderón, A; Ivanov, R

    2012-01-01

    The implementation of an automated system based on the hot-wire technique is described for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of liquids using equipment easily available in modern physics laboratories at high schools and universities (basically a precision current source and a voltage meter, a data acquisition card, a personal computer and a high purity platinum wire). The wire, which is immersed in the investigated sample, is heated by passing a constant electrical current through it, and its temperature evolution, ΔT, is measured as a function of time, t, for several values of the current. A straightforward methodology is then used for data processing in order to obtain the liquid thermal conductivity. The start point is the well known linear relationship between ΔT and ln(t) predicted for long heating times by a model based on a solution of the heat conduction equation for an infinite lineal heat source embedded in an infinite medium into which heat is conducted without convective and radiative heat losses. A criterion is used to verify that the selected linear region is the one that matches the conditions imposed by the theoretical model. As a consequence the method involves least-squares fits in linear, semi-logarithmic (semi-log) and log-log graphs, so that it becomes attractive not only to teach about heat transfer and thermal properties measurement techniques, but also as a good exercise for students of undergraduate courses of physics and engineering learning about these kinds of mathematical functional relationships between variables. The functionality of the experiment was demonstrated by measuring the thermal conductivity in samples of liquids with well known thermal properties. (paper)

  11. Joint angle measurement: a comparative study of the reliability of goniometry and wire tracing for the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, B; Bruton, A; Goddard, J R

    1997-11-01

    To compare the inter- and intra-rater reliability of goniometry and wire tracing in the assessment of finger joint angles: metacarpo-phalangeal (MCPJ), proximal (PIPJ) and distal interphalangeal joints (DIPJ). Twenty occupational therapists and 20 physiotherapists with a range of clinical experience were recruited from nine different centres. Using a masked goniometer and wire tracing they carried out repeated assessments of the MCPJ, PIPJ and DIPJ of a normal subject fixed in two different positions. The two assessment methods did not produce comparable angle measurements. Goniometry showed greater inter- and intra-rater reliability than wire tracing. Regardless of the assessment tool, the repeatability coefficient indicated that DIPJ measurement was less reliable than the other joints. Clinical and specialist experience did not affect reliability. Although both goniometry and wire tracing show limitations as reliable assessment tools, it is recommended that where possible goniometry should be used.

  12. Measure of thermal neutron flux in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor using 197 Au wire activation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Andre Luis Ferreira

    1995-01-01

    This dissertation has aimed at developing a neutron flux measurement technique by means of detectors activation analysis. The main task of this work was the implementation of this thermal neutron flux measurement technique, using gold wires as activation detectors in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor core. The neutron thermal flux spatial distribution was obtained by gold wire activation technique, with wire diameters of 0.125 mm and 0.250 mm in seven selected reactor experimental channels. The values of thermal flux were about 10 9 neutrons/cm 2 .s. This experiment has been the first one conducted with gold wires in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, being this technique implemented for use by experiments in flux mapping of the core

  13. USING HOT WIRE TECHNIQUE FOR MEASURING THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF INFUSIONS OF ORGANIC AND CONVENTIONAL COFFEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gordillo-Delgado

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The technique of hot wire, a versatile method of low cost and high accuracy for measuring the thermal conductivity of fluids through the increasing temperature of a wire that is immersed into the liquid and between its ends a potential difference is abruptly applied. Using well-known conductivity liquids: water, ethylene glycol and glycerine, the system was tested and calibrated. In this work, this procedure was used to measure the thermal conductivity of the infusion samples of organic and conventional coffee. The same roast degree of the beans was verified with a colorimeter and the preparation was made by pressing 22g of coffee powder in 110mL of water. The obtained data were subjected to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and this confirmed that the differences in the thermophysical parameter in the two samples are significant with a confidence level of 95\\%. On this way, it was proved that the thermal conductivity value of the coffee infusion allows differentiate between organic and conventional coffee.

  14. Measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals using a short hot wire method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Seiji; Maki, Syou; Tanaka, Seiichi; Maekawa, Ryunosuke; Masuda, Tomoki; Hagiwara, Masayuki

    2017-07-01

    Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals were examined by using the transient short hot wire method. This method is based on the conventional hot wire method, but improved by using a wire that is much shorter than conventional ones. The magneto-Archimedes levitation technique was utilized to attach the HEWL crystals onto the wire. Owing to the upward magnetic force, the HEWL crystals were deposited at the air-liquid interface of the protein buffer solution where the short hot wire was preliminarily fixed. In situ observation clarified that the wire was completely buried into the HEWL crystals. By means of these techniques, the measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of HEWL crystals was realized for the first time. Gadolinium chloride (a paramagnetic subject) was used as a precipitant agent of crystallization. Crystal growth was carried out over 20 h at 17.2 °C. The applied magnetic field was 4 T. Measurements were conducted during the crystal growth at two different times. The thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the HEWL crystals were determined to be 0.410 W/(m.K) and 3.77×10-8 m2/s at 14 h after, and 0.438 W/(m.K) and 5.18×10-8 m2/s at 20 h after, respectively. We emphasize that this method is versatile and applicable for other protein crystals.

  15. Local Neutron Flux Distribution Measurements by Wire-Dosimetry in the AMMON Experimental Program in the EOLE Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruel A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dosimetry measurements were carried out during the AMMON experimental program, in the EOLE facility. Al-0.1 wt% Au wires were positioned along curved fuel plates of JHR-type assemblies to investigate the azimuthal and axial gold capture rate profiles, directly linked to the thermal and epithermal flux. After irradiation, wires were cut into small segments (a few mm, and the gold capture rate of each part was measured by gamma spectrometry on the MADERE platform. This paper presents results in the “hafnium” configuration, and more specifically the azimuthal flux profile characterization. The final uncertainty on each measured wire lies below 1% (at 2 standard deviations. Experimental profiles are in a good agreement against Monte Carlo calculations, and the 4% capture rate increase at the plate edge is well observed. The flux dissymmetry due to assembly position in the core is also measured, and shows a 10% discrepancy between the two edges of the plate.

  16. Release measurement of great amount of waste. Conveyor belt versus wire mesh pallet systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokcic-Kostic, Marina; Schultheis, Roland; Langer, Felix [NUKEM Technologies Engineering Services GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Great amount of waste has to be measured for release during the decommissioning and rebuilding of nuclear facilities and installation. Since the enclosed storage or decontamination is very expensive it is advisable for economic reasons to separate contaminated material. The necessary measurement is however a time and cost intensive work which has carefully provided. There are two general methods to perform this task: one is a continuously running system on the basis of a conveyor belt system. The other approach is a discontinuously running system using wire mesh pallets. With the knowledge from existing installations this article will discuss the pro's and contra's and show the limits of the systems.

  17. Landing Gear Components Noise Study - PIV and Hot-Wire Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Burley, Casey L.; Stead, Daniel J.; Becker, Lawrence E.; Price, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    PIV and hot-wire measurements of the wake flow from rods and bars are presented. The test models include rods of different diameters and cross sections and a rod juxtaposed to a plate. The latter is representative of the latch door that is attached to an aircraft landing gear when the gear is deployed, while the single and multiple rod configurations tested are representative of some of the various struts and cables configuration present on an aircraft landing gear. The test set up is described and the flow measurements are presented. The effect of model surface treatment and freestream turbulence on the spanwise coherence of the vortex shedding is studied for several rod and bar configurations.

  18. Surface dose measurements under stretched, perforated thermoplast sheets and under protective wound dressings for high energy photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudenraus, J.; Christ, G.

    2000-01-01

    Patient fixation masks made of perforated thermoplast sheets are widely used in radiotherapy. These masks in particular serve to immobilize the head and neck region during radiation treatment. We placed samples made of differently stretched, perforated mask material on the surface of a white polystyrene (RW3) phantom and measured for high energy photon beams from Co-60 radiation up to 25 MV bremsstrahlung the dose increase resulting from the build-up under the hole and bridge areas. Depending on the energy of the incident beam and the thickness of the stretched mask material we observed a dose increase under the bridges at the phantom surface of 55% up to 140% compared to the dose without a layer of mask material. Under a hole the dose increase is almost half the value found under a bridge. However, deeper than 1 mm under the phantom surface this difference in dose increase under holes and bridges decreases to less than 10%. The mean dose increase under a perforated thermoplast sheet is lower than the dose increase under a homogeneous sheet made of the same material with the same mean thickness. Radiation induced skin lesions or an ulcerating tumour, respectively, may require a protective wound dressing under a patient fixation mask during radiation therapy. Choosing a thin hydrocolloid wound dressing the additional dose increase of the skin, compared to the dose increase due to the fixation mask, can be kept low. (orig.) [de

  19. New measurement technique for turbulent flow as a replacement for hot-wire anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2011-11-01

    We present latest developments of the 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-LCA), a sensor, which has been developed for highly resolved measurements of turbulent flows. Its measuring principle allows for high temporal resolutions of beyond 50kHz at spatial scales in sub millimeter range. This performance is achieved by measuring the deformation of a tiny cantilever via laser pointer, which experiences drag forces caused by the flow. The cantilever features two deformation modes, i.e. bending and twisting, whereas the latter occurs only for oblique inflow. Thus the sensor is capable of measuring two velocity components. Latest developments focus on the design of the cantilever. For example, an additional structure for a better sensitivity towards cross winds and an improved reflection pad were realized. Further improvements concern the laser beam guiding within the sensor. Beside this we are in the process of setting up advanced electronics and new types of PSD-elements with the goal of increasing the sensitivity. Comparison measurements between the re-designed 2d-LCA and older versions were performed and showed improvements relating signal quality and reliability. Further measurements in turbulent flow with an x-wire as a reference confirmed the ability of the new sensor to carry out measurements at comparable high resolutions.

  20. Proportional wire chamber system for beam definition in precision total cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, A.S.; Chiang, I.H.; Kycia, T.F.

    1978-03-01

    A PWC system was developed and extensively used in precision measurements of total cross sections at low momenta (0.4 to 1.1 GeV/c) and at high momenta (23 to 370 GeV/c). This ''electronic collimator'' operated simultaneously in a fast (250 nsec) decision making mode, and a slower (0.5 msec) readout mode. The decision making mode utilized adjustable hard-wired logic to define acceptable incident beam trajectories and reject multiple beam tracks. A sample of the events were read into an on-line computer for beam tuning, for chamber diagnostics, and for study of the effect of small angle scattering to verify the total cross section extrapolation procedure

  1. Creation of subsonic macro-and microjets facilities and automated measuring system (AMS-2) for the spatial - temporal hot - wire anemometric visualization of jet flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, A. M.; Grek, G. R.; Gilev, V. M.; Zverkov, I. D.

    2017-10-01

    Macro-and microjets facilities for generation of the round and plane subsonic jets are designed and fabricated. Automated measuring system (AMS - 2) for the spatial - temporal hot - wire anemometric visualization of jet flow field is designed and fabricated. Coordinate device and unit of the measurement, collecting, storage and processing of hot - wire anemometric information were integrated in the AMS. Coordinate device is intended for precision movement of the hot - wire probe in jet flow field according to the computer program. At the same time accuracy of the hot - wire probe movement is 5 microns on all three coordinates (x, y, z). Unit of measurement, collecting, storage and processing of hot - wire anemometric information is intended for the hot - wire anemometric measurement of the jet flow field parameters (registration of the mean - U and fluctuation - u' characteristics of jet flow velocity), their accumulation and preservation in the computer memory, and also carries out their processing according to certain programms.

  2. Stretch Reflex as a Simple Measure to Evaluate the Efficacy of Potential Flight Countermeasures Using the Bed Rest Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerisano, J. M.; Reschke, M. F.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Harm, D. L.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spaceflight is acknowledged to have significant effects on the major postural muscles. However, it has been difficult to separate the effects of ascending somatosensory changes caused by the unloading of these muscles during flight from changes in sensorimotor function caused by a descending vestibulo-cerebellar response to microgravity. It is hypothesized that bed rest is an adequate model to investigate postural muscle unloading given that spaceflight and bed rest may produce similar results in both nerve axon and muscle tissue. METHODS: To investigate this hypothesis, stretch reflexes were measured on 18 subjects who spent 60 to 90 days in continuous 6 head-down bed rest. Using a motorized system capable of rotating the foot around the ankle joint (dorsiflexion) through an angle of 10 deg at a peak velocity of approximately 250 deg/sec, a stretch reflex was recorded from the subject's left triceps surae muscle group. Using surface electromyography, about 300 reflex responses were obtained and ensemble-averaged on 3 separate days before bed rest, 3 to 4 times in bed, and 3 times after bed rest. The averaged responses for each test day were examined for reflex latency and conduction velocity (CV) across gender and compared with spaceflight data. RESULTS: Although no gender differences were found, bed rest induced changes in reflex latency and CV similar to the ones observed during spaceflight. Also, a relationship between CV and loss of muscle strength in the lower leg was observed for most bed rest subjects. CONCLUSION: Even though bed rest (limb unloading) alone may not mimic all of the synaptic and muscle tissue loss that is observed as a result of spaceflight, it can serve as a working analog of flight for the evaluation of potential countermeasures that may be beneficial in mitigating unwanted changes in the major postural muscles that are observed post flight.

  3. Hot wire anemometer measurements in the unheated air flow tests of the SRB nozzle-to-case joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.

    1988-01-01

    Hot-Wire Anemometer measurements made in the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) nozzle-to-case joint are discussed. The study was undertaken to glean additional information on the circumferential flow induced in the SRB nozzle joint and the effect of this flow on the insulation bonding flaws. The tests were conducted on a full-scale, 2-D representation of a 65-in long segment of the SRB nozzle joint, with unheated air as the working fluid. Both the flight Mach number and Reynolds number were matched simultaneously and different pressure gradients imposed along the joint face were investigated. Hot-wire anemometers were used to obtain velocity data for different joint gaps and debond configurations. The procedure adopted for hot-wire calibration and use is outlined and the results from the tests summarized.

  4. Control Method Stretches Suspensions by Measuring the Sag of Strands in Cable-Stayed Bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bętkowski, Piotr

    2017-10-01

    In the article is described the method that allows on evaluation and validation of measurement correctness of dynamometers (strain gauges, tension meters) used in systems of suspensions. Control of monitoring devices such as dynamometers is recommended in inspections of suspension bridges. Control device (dynamometer) works with an anchor, and the degree of this cooperation could have a decisive impact on the correctness of the results. Method, which determines the stress in the strand (cable), depending on the sag of stayed cable, is described. This method can be used to control the accuracy of measuring devices directly on the bridge. By measuring the strand sag, it is possible to obtain information about the strength (force) which occurred in the suspension cable. Digital camera is used for the measurement of cable sag. Control measurement should be made independently from the controlled parameter but should verify this parameter directly (it is the best situation). In many cases in practice the controlled parameter is not designation by direct measurement, but the calculations, i.e. relation measured others parameters, as in the method described in the article. In such cases occurred the problem of overlapping error of measurement of intermediate parameters (data) and the evaluation of the reliability of the results. Method of control calculations made in relation to installed in the bridge measuring devices is doubtful without procedure of uncertainty estimation. Such an assessment of the accuracy can be performed using the interval numbers. With the interval numbers are possible the analysis of parametric relationship accuracy of the designation of individual parameters and uncertainty of results. Method of measurements, relations and analytical formulas, and numerical example can be found in the text of the article.

  5. Wearable Stretch Sensors for Motion Measurement of the Wrist Joint Based on Dielectric Elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Li, Mingyu; Mei, Tao; McCoul, David; Qin, Shihao; Zhao, Zhanfeng; Zhao, Jianwen

    2017-11-23

    Motion capture of the human body potentially holds great significance for exoskeleton robots, human-computer interaction, sports analysis, rehabilitation research, and many other areas. Dielectric elastomer sensors (DESs) are excellent candidates for wearable human motion capture systems because of their intrinsic characteristics of softness, light weight, and compliance. In this paper, DESs were applied to measure all component motions of the wrist joints. Five sensors were mounted to different positions on the wrist, and each one is for one component motion. To find the best position to mount the sensors, the distribution of the muscles is analyzed. Even so, the component motions and the deformation of the sensors are coupled; therefore, a decoupling method was developed. By the decoupling algorithm, all component motions can be measured with a precision of 5°, which meets the requirements of general motion capture systems.

  6. Wearable Stretch Sensors for Motion Measurement of the Wrist Joint Based on Dielectric Elastomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Huang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Motion capture of the human body potentially holds great significance for exoskeleton robots, human-computer interaction, sports analysis, rehabilitation research, and many other areas. Dielectric elastomer sensors (DESs are excellent candidates for wearable human motion capture systems because of their intrinsic characteristics of softness, light weight, and compliance. In this paper, DESs were applied to measure all component motions of the wrist joints. Five sensors were mounted to different positions on the wrist, and each one is for one component motion. To find the best position to mount the sensors, the distribution of the muscles is analyzed. Even so, the component motions and the deformation of the sensors are coupled; therefore, a decoupling method was developed. By the decoupling algorithm, all component motions can be measured with a precision of 5°, which meets the requirements of general motion capture systems.

  7. Airflow Measurement of the Car HVAC Unit Using Hot-wire Anemometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fojtlín Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal environment in a vehicular cabin significantly influence drivers’ fatigue and passengers’ thermal comfort. This environment is traditionally managed by HVAC cabin system that distributes air and modifies its properties. In order to simulate cabin thermal behaviour, amount of the air led through car vents must be determined. The aim of this study was to develop methodology to measure airflow from the vents, and consequently calculate corresponding air distribution coefficients. Three climatic cases were selected to match European winter, summer, and spring / fall conditions. Experiments were conducted on a test vehicle in a climatic chamber. The car HVAC system was set to automatic control mode, and the measurements were executed after the system stabilisation—each case was independently measured three times. To be able to evaluate precision of the method, the airflow was determined at the system inlet (HVAC suction and outlet (each vent, and the total airflow values were compared. The airflow was calculated by determining a mean value of the air velocity multiplied by an area of inlet / outlet cross-section. Hot-wire anemometry was involved to measure the air velocity. Regarding the summer case, total airflow entering the cabin was around 57 l s-1 with 60 % of the air entering the cabin through dashboard vents; no air was supplied to the feet compartment. The remaining cases had the same total airflow of around 42 l s-1, and the air distribution was focused mainly on feet and windows. The inlet and outlet airflow values show a good match with a maximum mass differential of 8.3 %.

  8. Airflow Measurement of the Car HVAC Unit Using Hot-wire Anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojtlín, Miloš; Planka, Michal; Fišer, Jan; Pokorný, Jan; Jícha, Miroslav

    2016-03-01

    Thermal environment in a vehicular cabin significantly influence drivers' fatigue and passengers' thermal comfort. This environment is traditionally managed by HVAC cabin system that distributes air and modifies its properties. In order to simulate cabin thermal behaviour, amount of the air led through car vents must be determined. The aim of this study was to develop methodology to measure airflow from the vents, and consequently calculate corresponding air distribution coefficients. Three climatic cases were selected to match European winter, summer, and spring / fall conditions. Experiments were conducted on a test vehicle in a climatic chamber. The car HVAC system was set to automatic control mode, and the measurements were executed after the system stabilisation—each case was independently measured three times. To be able to evaluate precision of the method, the airflow was determined at the system inlet (HVAC suction) and outlet (each vent), and the total airflow values were compared. The airflow was calculated by determining a mean value of the air velocity multiplied by an area of inlet / outlet cross-section. Hot-wire anemometry was involved to measure the air velocity. Regarding the summer case, total airflow entering the cabin was around 57 l s-1 with 60 % of the air entering the cabin through dashboard vents; no air was supplied to the feet compartment. The remaining cases had the same total airflow of around 42 l s-1, and the air distribution was focused mainly on feet and windows. The inlet and outlet airflow values show a good match with a maximum mass differential of 8.3 %.

  9. Evaluation of stretching position by measurement of strain on the ilio-femoral ligaments: an in vitro simulation using trans-lumbar cadaver specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Egi; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Muraki, Takayuki; Izumi, Tomoki; Fujii, Misaki; Miyamoto, Shigenori

    2009-08-01

    The ilio-femoral ligament is known to cause flexion contracture of the hip joint. Stretching positioning is intended to elongate the ilio-femoral ligaments, however, no quantitative analysis to measure the effect of stretching positions on the ligament has yet been performed. Strains on the superior and inferior ilio-femoral ligaments in 8 fresh/frozen trans-lumbar cadaveric hip joints were measured using a displacement sensor, and the range of movement of the hip joints was recorded using a 3Space Magnetic Sensor. Reference length (L(0)) for each ligament was determined to measure strain on the ligaments. Hip positions at 10 degrees adduction with maximal external rotation, 20 degrees adduction with maximal external rotation, and maximal external rotation showed larger strain for the superior ilio-femoral ligament than the value obtained from L(0), and hip positions at 20 degrees external rotation with maximal extension and maximal extension had larger strain for the inferior ilio-femoral ligament than the value obtained from L(0) (pligaments exhibited positive strain values with specific stretching positions. Selective stretching for the ilio-femoral ligaments may contribute to achieve lengthening of the ligaments to treat flexion contracture of the hip joint.

  10. Basic Wiring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltwasser, Stan; And Others

    This module is the first in a series of three wiring publications; it serves as the foundation for students enrolled in a wiring program. It is a prerequisite to either "Residential Wiring" or "Commercial and Industrial Wiring." The module contains 16 instructional units that cover the following topics: occupational…

  11. Measurement of friction forces between stainless steel wires and "reduced-friction" self-ligating brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznikov, Natalie; Har-Zion, Gilad; Barkana, Idit; Abed, Yossi; Redlich, Meir

    2010-09-01

    In this study, we assessed the friction forces between various self-ligating brackets and stainless steel orthodontic wires, subjected to different shear and bending forces in the buccolingual plane. Three kinds of self-ligating brackets and 2 kinds of ligated controls were tested in a newly developed in-vitro system. Friction was tested with stainless steel orthodontic wire in 3 deflection states. The Bonferroni multiple comparisons test was applied to evaluate intergroup differences (P friction resistance in response to wire deflection. In nonzero buccolingual deflections, passive self-ligating brackets developed higher friction forces, comparable with those in the conventional elastic ligation control group. The control brackets with reduced friction ligature had considerably lower friction forces than any other group. The active self-ligating bracket ranked between the self-ligating brackets and the reduced friction ligature group. A tribologic survey showed substantial surface alterations among wire samples coupled with passive self-ligating brackets. In contrast to manufacturers' claims, this study illustrates that, in certain clinical situations, a firm passive bracket clip can have a negative influence on the wire-bracket frictional characteristics. 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Developing a Stretching Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, J E

    1981-11-01

    In brief: Although stretching exercises can prevent muscle injuries and enhance athletic performance, they can also cause injury. The author explains the four most common types of stretching exercises and explains why he considers static stretching the safest. He also sets up a stretching routine for runners. In setting up a safe stretching program, one should (1) precede stretching exercises with a mild warm-up; (2) use static stretching; (3) stretch before and after a workout; (4) begin with mild and proceed to moderate exercises; (5) alternate exercises for muscle groups; (6) stretch gently and slowly until tightness, not pain, is felt; and (7) hold the position for 30 to 60 seconds.

  13. Stretch Sensor Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for determining stretch values and movement of body parts, e.g. a foot, by analysing stretch data from a stretch sensor. By analysing data from the stretch sensor it is possible to determine stretch samples which are associated with particular motion phases...

  14. Influence of the profile of Iridium-192 wire in measurements of quality control for use in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Osvaldo L.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Moura, Joao A.; Feher, Anselmo; Moura, Eduardo S.; Souza, Carla D.; Somessari, Samir L.; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Mattos, Fabio R.

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a method used in the treatment of cancerous tumors, by ionizing radiation produced by sources, introduced into the tumor area, this method seeks a more direct to the tumor, thereby maximizing the radiation dose to diseased tissue, while minimizing the dose to healthy tissues. One of the radionuclides used in brachytherapy is iridium-192. The Radiation Technology Center (CTR), of the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN), has produced commercially, since 1998, iridium-192 wires used in low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy. To produce this radionuclides, firstly an iridium-platinum wire is irradiated in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 for 30 hours, with a neutron flux of 5x 10 13 n cm -2 s -1 , the wire is left to decay by 30 days to remove the main contaminants, and then goes through a quality control, before being sent to the hospital. In this quality control is checked the radiation homogeneity along each centimeter of the wire. To implement this procedure, is used a device, consisting of an ionization chamber, surrounded by a lead shield, with a samol 1 cm wide slit, linked to the ionization chamber is a voltage source, and a Keithley 617 electrometer, 2 minutes is the range used to measure the charge by the electrometer. The iridium wire is considered in accordance, when there is no variation higher than 5%, between the average measures and the maximum and minimum values. However, due to design features of the measurement system, the wire may appear to the detector through the slit in larger sizes than the ideal, improperly influencing the final quality control. This paper calculates the difference in size of these variations in profile, and their influence on the final count, it compares the actual values obtained, and describes the improvements, made in quality control procedures, that provided more accurate measurement data, analyzes the results, and suggests changes in devices, aimed at further improving the quality control of iridium-192

  15. Investigation of Axial Electric Field Measurements with Grounded-Wire TEM Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan-nan; Xue, Guo-qiang; Li, Hai; Hou, Dong-yang

    2018-01-01

    The grounded-wire transient electromagnetic (TEM) surveying is often performed along the equatorial direction with its observation lines paralleling to the transmitting wire with a certain transmitter-receiver distance. However, such method takes into account only the equatorial component of the electromagnetic field, and a little effort has been made on incorporating the other major component along the transmitting wire, here denoted as axial field. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of its fundamental characteristics and guide the designing of the corresponding observation system for reliable anomaly detection, this study for the first time investigates the axial electric field from three crucial aspects, including its decay curve, plane distribution, and anomaly sensitivity, through both synthetic modeling and real application to one major coal field in China. The results demonstrate a higher sensitivity to both high- and low-resistivity anomalies by the electric field in axial direction and confirm its great potentials for robust anomaly detection in the subsurface.

  16. A hot-wire probe for thermal measurements of nanowires and nanotubes inside a transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dames, C; Chen, S; Harris, C T; Huang, J Y; Ren, Z F; Dresselhaus, M S; Chen, G

    2007-10-01

    A hot wire probe has been developed for use inside a transmission electron microscope to measure the thermal resistance of individual nanowires, nanotubes, and their contacts. No microfabrication is involved. The probe is made from a platinum Wollaston wire and is pretensioned to minimize the effects of thermal expansion, intrinsic thermal vibrations, and Lorentz forces. An in situ nanomanipulator is used to select a particular nanowire or nanotube for measurement, and contacts are made with liquid metal droplets or by electron-beam induced deposition. Detailed thermal analysis shows that for best sensitivity, the thermal resistance of the hot-wire probe should be four times that of the sample, but a mismatch of more than two orders of magnitude may be acceptable. Data analysis using the ratio of two ac signals reduces the experimental uncertainty. The range of detectable sample thermal resistances spans from approximately 10(3) to 10(9) KW. The probe can also be adapted for measurements of the electrical conductance and Seebeck coefficient of the same sample. The probe was used to study a multiwalled carbon nanotube with liquid Ga contacts. The measured thermal resistance of 3.3 x 10(7) KW had a noise level of approximately +/-3% and was repeatable to within +/-10% upon breaking and re-making the contact.

  17. Experimental measurements of static pressure and pressure drop in a duct enclosing a seven wire-wrapped rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graca, M.C.; Ballve, H.; Fernandez y Fernandez, E.; Carajilescov, P.

    1981-01-01

    The friction factor and the static pressure distributions, in the axial and transversal directions, in the wall of the hexagonal duct, enclosing a seven wire-wrapped rod bundle, were experimentally measured, using an air opened loop. The Reynolds numbers are the range 10 3 - 5x10 4 . The friction factors are compared to existing correlations. The static pressure distributions show that the static pressure is not hydrostatic in the cross section of the flow. (Author) [pt

  18. Comparison between neutron diffraction measurements and numerical simulation of residual stresses of a wire-drawing process

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Tomaz Fantin de; Soares, Carla Adriana Theis; Zottis, Juliana; Nunes, Rafael Menezes; Rocha, Alexandre da Silva; Hirsch, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a drawing processed was simulated to calculate forces and the resulting residual stresses in the material. The calculated residual stresses were compared with experimentally measured residual stresses by the Neutron Diffraction Method. The modeled process was the Wire Drawing. The necessary parameters to model the process were taken from an industrial currently used process. Rods of an AISI 1045 steel with nominal diameters of 21.46 mm were reduced to 20.25 mm by drawing with an...

  19. Direct measurement of elastic modulus of Nb 3Sn using extracted filaments from superconducting composite wire and resin impregnation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, M.; Matsuoka, T.; Hashimoto, M.; Tanaka, M.; Sugano, M.; Ochiai, S.; Miyashita, K.

    2006-10-01

    Young's modulus of Nb3Sn filaments in Nb3Sn/Cu superconducting composite wire was investigated in detail. Nb3Sn filaments were first extracted from composite wire. Nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid were used to remove copper stabilizer, Nb3Sn/Nb barrier and bronze. Then, Nb3Sn filaments were impregnated with epoxy resin to form simple filament bundle composite rods. A large difference in Young's moduli of filaments and epoxy resin enhance the accuracy of the measurement of Nb3Sn filament modulus. The ratio of Nb3Sn to Nb in filaments and the number of filaments in the fiber bundle composite rods were used in the final calculation of the Young's modulus of Nb3Sn. The obtained modulus of 127 GPa was the lower bound of the already reported values.

  20. Direct measurement of elastic modulus of Nb3Sn using extracted filaments from superconducting composite wire and resin impregnation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojo, M.; Matsuoka, T.; Hashimoto, M.; Tanaka, M.; Sugano, M.; Ochiai, S.; Miyashita, K.

    2006-01-01

    Young's modulus of Nb 3 Sn filaments in Nb 3 Sn/Cu superconducting composite wire was investigated in detail. Nb 3 Sn filaments were first extracted from composite wire. Nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid were used to remove copper stabilizer, Nb 3 Sn/Nb barrier and bronze. Then, Nb 3 Sn filaments were impregnated with epoxy resin to form simple filament bundle composite rods. A large difference in Young's moduli of filaments and epoxy resin enhance the accuracy of the measurement of Nb 3 Sn filament modulus. The ratio of Nb 3 Sn to Nb in filaments and the number of filaments in the fiber bundle composite rods were used in the final calculation of the Young's modulus of Nb 3 Sn. The obtained modulus of 127 GPa was the lower bound of the already reported values

  1. Increased stability in laser metal wire deposition through feedback from optical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heralić, Almir; Christiansson, Anna-Karin; Ottosson, Mattias; Lennartson, Bengt

    2010-04-01

    Robotized laser metal-wire deposition is a fairly new technique being developed at University West in cooperation with Swedish industry for solid freeform fabrication of fully densed metal structures. It is developed around a standard welding cell and uses robotized fiber laser welding and wire filler material together with a layered manufacturing method to create metal structures. In this work a monitoring system, comprising two cameras and a projected laser line, is developed for on-line control of the deposition process. The controller is a combination of a PI-controller for the bead width and a feed-forward compensator for the bead height. It is evaluated through deposition of single-bead walls, and the results show that the process stability is improved when the proposed controller is used.

  2. Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  3. Wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1967-01-01

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber.Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  4. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Proportional multi-wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle. Proportional wire chambers allow a much quicker reading than the optical or magnetoscriptive readout wire chambers.

  5. Contact wire positions and contact forces. Measurements at high-speed lines in China; Fahrdrahtlage und Kontaktkraefte. Messungen an Hochgeschwindigkeitsstrecken in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heland, Joerg; Rick, Frank; Sarnes, Bernhard [DB Systemtechnik GmbH, Muenchen (Germany); Puschmann, Rainer [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany). Infrastructure and Cities

    2012-07-15

    The reliable energy transmission from overhead contact line to pantograph of traction units without interruption decides on the successful operation of high-speed railway lines. Measurements of contact wire position and contact forces are suited to assess interaction of overhead contact line and pantograph. Chinese Railways actually implement the biggest electrification program for high-speed lines worldwide. For these projects contact wire position and contact forces are monitored by procedures developed in Germany. The experience confirms that keeping the contact wire position within the specified limits lead to a superior energy transmission up to 350 km/h. (orig.)

  6. Simplified Transient Hot-Wire Method for Effective Thermal Conductivity Measurement in Geo Materials: Microstructure and Saturation Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Merckx

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity measurement by a simplified transient hot-wire technique is applied to geomaterials in order to show the relationships which can exist between effective thermal conductivity, texture, and moisture of the materials. After a validation of the used “one hot-wire” technique in water, toluene, and glass-bead assemblages, the investigations were performed (1 in glass-bead assemblages of different diameters in dried, water, and acetone-saturated states in order to observe the role of grain sizes and saturation on the effective thermal conductivity, (2 in a compacted earth brick at different moisture states, and (3 in a lime-hemp concrete during 110 days following its manufacture. The lime-hemp concrete allows the measurements during the setting, desiccation and carbonation steps. The recorded Δ/ln( diagrams allow the calculation of one effective thermal conductivity in the continuous and homogeneous fluids and two effective thermal conductivities in the heterogeneous solids. The first one measured in the short time acquisitions (<1 s mainly depends on the contact between the wire and grains and thus microtexture and hydrated state of the material. The second one, measured for longer time acquisitions, characterizes the mean effective thermal conductivity of the material.

  7. Hot-wire measurement in turbulent flow behind a parallel-line heat source

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Antoš, Pavel; Uruba, Václav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2012), s. 493-494 ISSN 1617-7061. [Annual Meeting of the International Association of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics /83./. Darmstadt, 26.03.2012-30.03.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP101/10/P556; GA ČR GAP101/12/1271 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : nonisotermal flow * hot wire anemometry Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pamm.201210235/abstract

  8. Computer programs for evaluation of turbulence characteristics from hot-wire measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vosahlo, L.

    1984-06-01

    This report describes the set of the computer programs for evaluation of the turbulent flow characteristics from hot-wire experimental data. Three different methods and, in addition, some variants are solved in these programs. This enables a comparison of the results obtained by these methods and the analysis of the influence of individual calculation parameters and calibration coefficients on the evaluated results. The results are printed in lucid numerical tables and written into files for further processing into graphs by plotting routines. (orig.) [de

  9. Feasibility studies on the direct wire readout on wire scanners in electron accelerators; Durchfuehrbarkeitsstudien zur direkten Drahtauslese an Wirescannern in Elektronen-Beschleunigern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markert, Michael

    2010-10-15

    This bachelor thesis deals essentially with the signal processing of a so-called wire scanner, a special monitor, which comes to application in the beam diagnostics of particle accelerators. In this direct wire readout the voltage signal, which is induced by the particle beam in the measurement wire of the wire scanner, shall be directly read out. The aim of this thesis is to show fundamental considerations and perform studies, which study, whether and how in the future by means of a suited data transmission as well as readout electronics conclusion on the most important parameters of the beam, like position and profile, are possible. The measurement system presented here is divided in three main components: Signal measurement, signal preparation, and signal stretching. A suited test facility was developed and is presented in detail, in which then all components, like for instance the transmission cables, the wire-scanner fork, and the developed measurement circuit, are studied, which are of importance for a faultless signal transmission and presentation. Extensive measurements on the single components, as well as calculations for the signal transmission on and in the wire scanner were performed, whereby a good agreement could be found. Thereafter a comparison and a selection of the component used in this project were made. Furthermore improvement proposals, new constructions, and outlooks are presented, which could be of importance in further works.

  10. The influence of contractures and variation in measurement stretching velocity on the reliability of the Modified Ashworth Scale in patients with severe brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrholz, Jan; Major, Yvonne; Meissner, Daniel; Sandi-Gahun, Sahr; Koch, Rainer; Pohl, Marcus

    2005-01-01

    To determine the influence of contractures and different stretching velocities on the reliability of the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in patients with severe brain injury and impaired consciousness. Cross-section observational study. A rehabilitation centre for adult persons with neurological disorders. Fifty patients with impaired consciousness due to severe cerebral damage of various aetiologies. MEASUREMENT PROTOCOL: Three experienced and trained medical professionals rated each patient in a randomized order once daily for two consecutive days. Shoulder, elbow, wrist, knee and ankle spasticity were assessed by the use of the MAS with different stretching velocities. The presence of contractures was assessed by a goniometer. Retest and inter-rater reliability (k(w) = weighted kappa) of the MAS. The retest reliability of the MAS was good (shoulder joints (k(w) 0.74), elbow joints (k(w) 0.74), wrist joints (k(w) 0.72), knee joints (k(w) 0.72), ankle joints (k(w) 0.77)) and the inter-rater reliability was moderate (shoulder joints (k(w) 0.49), elbow joints (k(w) 0.52), wrist joints (k(w) 0.51), knee joints (k(w) 0.54) ankle joints (k(w) 0.49)). The presence of contractures significantly influenced the reliability of MAS in shoulder and wrist joints. No influence of stretching velocity on the reliability of the MAS was found. In patients with impaired consciousness due to severe brain injury the MAS has good retest, but only limited inter-rater, reliability. The presence of contractures may influence reliability of the MAS, but stretching velocity does not.

  11. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Was used in ISR (Intersecting Storage Ring) split field magnet experiment. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  12. Wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  13. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  14. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  15. Noncontextual Wirings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Barbara; Cabello, Adán; Cunha, Marcelo Terra; Aolita, Leandro

    2018-03-01

    Contextuality is a fundamental feature of quantum theory necessary for certain models of quantum computation and communication. Serious steps have therefore been taken towards a formal framework for contextuality as an operational resource. However, the main ingredient of a resource theory—a concrete, explicit form of free operations of contextuality—was still missing. Here we provide such a component by introducing noncontextual wirings: a class of contextuality-free operations with a clear operational interpretation and a friendly parametrization. We characterize them completely for general black-box measurement devices with arbitrarily many inputs and outputs. As applications, we show that the relative entropy of contextuality is a contextuality monotone and that maximally contextual boxes that serve as contextuality bits exist for a broad class of scenarios. Our results complete a unified resource-theoretic framework for contextuality and Bell nonlocality.

  16. Numerical and experimental determination of the minimum and maximum measuring times for the hot wire parallel technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos W. N. dos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The hot wire technique is considered to be an effective and accurate means of determining the thermal conductivity of ceramic materials. However, specifically for materials of high thermal diffusivity, the appropriate time interval to be considered in calculations is a decisive factor for getting accurate and consistent results. In this work, a numerical simulation model is proposed with the aim of determining the minimum and maximum measuring time for the hot wire parallel technique. The temperature profile generated by this model is in excellent agreement with that one experimentally obtained by this technique, where thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat are simultaneously determined from the same experimental temperature transient. Eighteen different specimens of refractory materials and polymers, with thermal diffusivities ranging from 1x10-7 to 70x10-7 m²/s, in shape of rectangular parallelepipeds, and with different dimensions were employed in the experimental programme. An empirical equation relating minimum and maximum measuring times and the thermal diffusivity of the sample is also obtained.

  17. Stretching Safely and Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of stretching before or after hitting the trail, ballet floor or soccer field. Before you plunge into ... ballistic stretching on strength and muscular fatigue of ballet dancers and resistance-trained women. Journal of Strength ...

  18. A COMPARISION BETWEEN CROSSBODY STRETCH VERSUS SLEEPER STRETCH IN PERIARTHRITIS OF SHOULDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaik Raheem Saheb

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently Cross body stretch and Sleeper stretch are used to improve internal rotation Range of motion in Shoulder Pathologies. It was proposed to study the effect of cross body stretch and sleeper stretch in subjects with periarthritis of shoulder. Methods: 60 subjects with a mean age of 53 years having clinical diagnosis of Periarthritis of shoulder and full filled the inclusive criteria are taken. After the initial measurements, the subjects are randomly assigned into 2 stretching groups. Group-A performed the Sleeper stretch. Group-B performed a Cross body stretch. Both Groups performed the Stretch in Duration of 6weeks – once daily for 5 repetitions holding each stretch for 30 seconds for 5 days a week. Along with this technique conventional physiotherapy like IFT, overhead pulleys, Pendula exercises, Wall climbing exercises, mariners wheel exercises are performed. After the treatment, subjects were evaluated for their pain profile using visual analogue scale, Goniometer for measuring Range of motion. Results: For within group comparison we used Paired t-test analysis, For Between group comparison we used Independent t-test for statistical analysis. At the end of 6 weeks It was found that subjects treated with cross-body stretch showed significant improvement in terms of VAS scores and Range of motion scores (P=0.000 and patients treated with Sleeper stretch showed significant improvement in terms of VAS scores and Range of motion scores (P=0.000. When compared between Groups the VAS and Range of motion scores showed a significant improvement in Cross body stretch Group than the Sleeper stretch Group (P=0.000. Conclusion: It was concluded that both stretching techniques were found improvement in Range of motion and VAS and Cross-body Stretch showed more Significant improvement than the sleeper Stretch after 6 weeks treatment.

  19. Magnetic field measurements of the CEBAF (NIST) wiggler using the pulsed wire method. Master's thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    The Free Electron Laser (FEL) has proven to be a versatile photon source for many applications in science, industry and defense. It is capable of providing wide tunability and high efficiency, but has yet to yield high average power required as a weapon system. The proposed infrared and ultraviolet FELs at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) have been projected to provide high average power. The first section of this thesis will study the necessity of a FEL for shipboard defense, and state the advantages over other defense systems. The remainder will focus on use of the pulsed wire method for measuring the magnetic field errors of the CEBAF/National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST) wiggler. Data analysis indicates the wiggler will have a net electron beam deflection of x=5.2mm, which is much greater than the electron beam radius of re=0.4mm and the optical mode waist of wo=1mm... Free Electron Laser (FEL), Pulsed Wire Method, High Energy Laser (HEL), Shipboard High Energy Laser, Theater Ballistic Missile Defense (TBMD).

  20. Measurements of peripherical static pressure and pressure drop in a rod bundle with helical wire wrap spacers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballve, H.; Graca, M.C.; Fernandez y Fernandez, E.; Carajilescov, P.

    1981-07-01

    The fuel element of a LMFBR nuclear reactor consists of a wire wrapped rod bundle with triangular array with the coolant flowing parallel to the rods. Using this type of element with seven rods conected to an air open loop. The hydrodinamics behavior of the flow for p/d = 1.20 and l/d = 15.0, was simulated. Several measurements were performed in order to obtain the static pressure distribution at the walls of the hexagonal duct, for Reynolds number from 4.4x10 3 to 48.49x10 3 and for different axial and transverse positions, in a wire wrap lead. The axial pressure drop was obtained and determined the friction factor dependence with the Reynolds number. From the obtained results, it was observed the non-dependency of the non-dimensionalized axial and transverse local static pressure distribution at the wall of the hexagonal duct, with the Reynolds number. The obtained friction factor is compared to the results of previous works. (Author) [pt

  1. Distributed sensing: multiple capacitive stretch sensors on a single channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tairych, Andreas; Anderson, Iain A.

    2017-04-01

    "Soft, stretchable, and unobtrusive". These are some of the attributes frequently associated with capacitive dielectric elastomer (DE) sensors for body motion capture. While the sensors themselves are soft and elastic, they require rigid peripheral components for capacitance measurement. Each sensor is connected to a separate channel on the sensing circuitry through its own set of wires. In wearable applications with large numbers of sensors, this can lead to a considerable circuit board footprint, and cumbersome wiring. The additional equipment can obstruct movement and alter user behaviour. Previous work has demonstrated how a transmission line model can be applied to localise deformation on a single DE sensor. Building on this approach, we have developed a distributed sensing method by arranging capacitive DE sensors and external resistors to form a transmission line, which is connected to a single sensing channel with only one set of wires. The sensors are made from conductive fabric electrodes, and silicone dielectrics, and the external resistors are off-the-shelf metal film resistors. Excitation voltages with different frequencies are applied to the transmission line. The lumped transmission line capacitances at these frequencies are passed on to a mathematical model that calculates individual sensor capacitance changes. The prototype developed for this study is capable of obtaining separate readings for simultaneously stretched sensors.

  2. Test Measurements of a 20 ms-1 Carbon Wire Beam Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    De Freitas, J; Emery, J; Herranz Alvarez, J F; Koujili, M; Ramos, D; Sapinski, M; Ait-Amira, Y; Djerdir, A

    2011-01-01

    This paper pre­sents the de­sign of the ac­tu­a­tor for the fast and high ac­cu­ra­cy Wire Scan­ner sys­tem. The ac­tu­a­tor con­sists of a ro­tary brushless syn­chronous motor with the per­ma­nent mag­net rotor in­stalled in­side the vac­u­um cham­ber and the sta­tor in­stalled out­side. The fork, per­ma­nent mag­net rotor and two an­gu­lar po­si­tion sen­sors are mount­ed on the same axis and lo­cat­ed in­side the beam vac­u­um cham­ber. The system has to re­sist a bake-out tem­per­a­ture of 200 C and ion­iz­ing radi­a­tion up to tenths of kGy/year. Max­i­mum wire trav­el­ling speed of 20 m/s and a po­si­tion mea­sure­ment ac­cu­ra­cy of 4 um is re­quired. Therefore, the sys­tem must avoid gen­er­at­ing vi­bra­tion and electromagnet­ic in­ter­fer­ence. A dig­i­tal feed­back con­troller will allow max­i­mum flex­i­bil­i­ty for the loop pa­ram­e­ters and feeds the 3-phase lin­ear power driv­er. The per­for­mance of the pr...

  3. Minimization and Mitigation of Wire EDM Cutting Errors in the Application of the Contour Method of Residual Stress Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Bilal; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    The contour method of residual stress measurement relies on the careful application of wire electro-discharge machining (WEDM) for the cutting stage. Changes in material removal rates during the cut lead to errors in the final calculated values of residual stress. In this study, WEDM cutting parameters have been explored to identify the optimum conditions for contour method residual stress measurements. The influence of machine parameters on the surface roughness and cutting artifacts in the contour cut is discussed. It has been identified that the critical parameter in improving the surface finish is the spark pulse duration. A typical cutting artifact and its impact on measured stress values have been identified and demonstrated for a contour cut in a welded marine steel. A procedure is presented to correct contour displacement data from the influence of WEDM cutting artifacts, and is demonstrated on the correction of a measured weld residual stress. The corrected contour method improved the residual stress magnitude up to 150 MPa. The corrected contour method results were validated by X-ray diffraction, incremental center hole drilling, and neutron diffraction.

  4. Strain and Magnetic-Field Characterization of a Bronze-Route Nb3Sn ITER Wire: Benchmarking of Strain Measurements Facilities at NIST and University of Twente

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheggour, N.; Nijhuis, Arend; Krooshoop, Hendrikus J.G.; Lu, X.F.; Splett, J.; Stauffer, T.C.; Goodrich, L.; Jewell, M.C.; Devred, A.; Nabara, Y.

    2012-01-01

    A benchmarking experiment was conducted to compare strain measurement facilities at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Twente. The critical current of a bronze-route Nb3Sn wire, which was fabricated for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  5. Design and Development of Embedded System for the Measurement of Thermal Conductivity of Liquids by Transient Hot Wire Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagamani GOSALA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal conductivity of polymers is an important property for both polymer applications and processing industry. The successful application of thermal insulating fluids in the last several years has demonstrated that such fluids can effectively control the heat loss. Understanding and controlling the thermal environment for oilfield operations has been a concern and research topic. As a consequence of this trend, there is huge demand for new methods of instrumentation to evaluate the performance of material properties and characterization. The main aim of the present study is the development of hardware and software for measuring the thermal conductivity of liquids using transient hot wire method. Because of the relatively short experimental times and large amounts of parametric data involved in the measurement process, embedded control of the measurement is essential. The experimental implementation requires a suitable temperature sensing, automatic control, data acquisition, and data analysis systems accomplished using an embedded system that has been built around the ARM LPC 2103 mixed signal controller.

  6. Enhanced Strain Measurement Range of an FBG Sensor Embedded in Seven-Wire Steel Strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Chul-Min; Choi, Song-Yi; Lee, Bang Yeon

    2017-07-18

    FBG sensors offer many advantages, such as a lack of sensitivity to electromagnetic waves, small size, high durability, and high sensitivity. However, their maximum strain measurement range is lower than the yield strain range (about 1.0%) of steel strands when embedded in steel strands. This study proposes a new FBG sensing technique in which an FBG sensor is recoated with polyimide and protected by a polyimide tube in an effort to enhance the maximum strain measurement range of FBG sensors embedded in strands. The validation test results showed that the proposed FBG sensing technique has a maximum strain measurement range of 1.73% on average, which is 1.73 times higher than the yield strain of the strands. It was confirmed that recoating the FBG sensor with polyimide and protecting the FBG sensor using a polyimide tube could effectively enhance the maximum strain measurement range of FBG sensors embedded in strands.

  7. Stretching: Does It Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardiman, Phillip; Carrand, David; Gallagher, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Stretching prior to activity is universally accepted as an important way to improve performance and help prevent injury. Likewise, limited flexibility has been shown to decrease functional ability and predispose a person to injuries. Although this is commonly accepted, appropriate stretching for children and adolescents involved with sports and…

  8. Measurements of high-current electron beams from X pinches and wire array Z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Blesener, I. C.; McBride, R. D.; Bell, K. S.; Hammer, D. A.; Agafonov, A. V.; Romanova, V. M.; Mingaleev, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    Some issues concerning high-current electron beam transport from the X pinch cross point to the diagnostic system and measurements of the beam current by Faraday cups are discussed. Results of computer simulation of electron beam propagation from the pinch to the Faraday cup give limits for the measured current for beams having different energy spreads. The beam is partially neutralized as it propagates from the X pinch to a diagnostic system, but within a Faraday cup diagnostic, space charge effects can be very important. Experimental results show evidence of such effects.

  9. Limitations on the use of the pulsed-wire field-measuring technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.W.

    1987-09-01

    As wigglers become longer and the wavelength of the light they produce becomes shorter, the requirements for magnetic field uniformity and precision of wiggler construction become more severe. Techniques used to measure magnetic fields and to estimate the performance of wigglers are now being pushed to their limits in precision and are generally awkward and time consuming in practice. A new field-error measurement technique has been developed that has the usual advantages of a null technique, demonstrates high sensitivity to field errors, and is rapid and simple to employ. With this technique, it appears practical to use computer control to both measure and correct field errors. In a particularly attractive application, these measuring and correcting steps could be carried out on a daily basis for an operational wiggler, which is mounted under vacuum in its optical cavity. In this way, changes in the fields caused by aging or by thermal or radiation-induced deterioration effects could be rapidly identified and corrections could be instituted without significant interruption to normal operations. The principles and limitations of ths technique will be described and examples given of various implementations that have been examined experimentally. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Hot Wire Anemometer Turbulence Measurements in the wind Tunnel of LM Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Andreas

    Flow measurements were carried out in the wind tunnel of LM Wind Power A/S with a Dantec Streamline CTA system to characterize the flow turbulence. Besides the free tunnel flow with empty test section we also investigated the tunnel flow when two grids with different mesh size were introduced dow...

  11. Dynamic stretching is effective as static stretching at increasing flexibility

    OpenAIRE

    Coons, John M.; Gould, Colleen E.; Kim, Jwa K.; Farley, Richard S.; Caputo, Jennifer L.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effect of dynamic and static (standard) stretching on hamstring flexibility. Twenty-five female volleyball players were randomly assigned to dynamic (n = 12) and standard (n = 13) stretching groups. The experimental group trained with repetitive dynamic stretching exercises, while the standard modality group trained with static stretching exercises. The stretching interventions were equivalent in the time at stretch and were performed three days a week for four weeks. ...

  12. Novel corrosion experiments using the wire beam electrode: (III) Measuring electrochemical corrosion parameters from both the metallic and electrolytic phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Yong-Jun; Liu, Tie; Aung, Naing Naing

    2006-01-01

    The wire beam electrode (WBE) and the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) have been applied in a novel combination to measure, for the first time, electrochemical parameters simultaneously from both the metallic and electrolytic phases of a corroding metal surface. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the application of this combined WBE-SRET method in obtaining unique information on localised corrosion mechanism, by investigating typical corrosion processes occurring over a mild steel WBE surface exposed to the classic Evans solution. The WBE method was used to map current and potential distributions in the metallic phase, and the SRET was used to map current or potential distribution in the electrolytic phase. It has been found that the combined WBE-SRET method is able to gain useful information on macro-cell electrochemical corrosion processes that involve macro-scale separation of anodes and cathodes. In such macro-cell corrosion systems, maps measured using WBE and SRET were found to correlate with each other and both methods were able to detect the locations of anodic sites. However the movement of the scanning probe during SRET measurements was found to affect the SRET detection of cathodic sites. In micro-cell corrosion systems where the separation of anodic and cathodic sites were less distinct, SRET measurement was found to be insensitive in detecting anodic and cathodic sites, while the WBE method was still able to produce results that correlated well with observed corrosion behaviour. Results obtained from this work suggest that the WBE-SRET method is applicable for understanding the initiation, propagation and electrochemical behaviour of localised corrosion anodes and cathodes, and also their dependence on externally controllable variables, such as solution pH changes and the existence of surface coatings

  13. Measured surface magnetic field attenuation of shielded windows and wire mesh over an electrically small enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeft, L.O.; Hofstra, J.S.; Karaskiewicz, R.J.; Wiser, G.

    1984-01-01

    The surface magnetic field attenuation of five types of shielded transparency (window) material was measured over the frequency range 10 kHz to 100 MHz by installing them on an .61 m x .61 m x .2 m enclosure, placing the enclosure on the wall of a TEM cell and measuring the surface and interior magnetic fields using a computer-controlled network analyzer system. The samples included two thicknesses of conductive grids on acrylic, hardware, cloth with 1/8 and 1/4-inch mesh, and a fine mesh laminated optical display window. These measurements are indicative of an enclosure with aperture coupling; namely, they become frequency-independent at high frequencies. Coarse mesh samples (1/8-1/4-inch mesh) were able to provide 50 to 60 dB of magnetic field reduction at tens of MHz, whereas the finer mesh did slightly better. This behavior is consistent with magnetic polarizability theory. Material thickness did not have an appreciable effect for frequencies above a MHz

  14. Biaxial stretching of polyethylene, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakami, Hiroshi; Iida, Shozo

    1976-01-01

    The mechanism of oriented crystallization in mutually perpendicular direction to each other was investigated on the crosslinked linear polyethylene stretched successively and biaxially above melting point of raw material. To investigate the mechanism, the shrinkage stress, the degree of polarization and DSC of the film at the fixed length were measured on the crystallization process. The behavior observed on crystallization could be divided into that in the first period and that in the second period. The first period showed the domain of highly oriented crystallization of the crosslinked molecular chain, and in the second period the fold type crystals grew with highly oriented crystals in the first period as nuclear. Therefore, the formation of bi-component crystal structure is supposed for the crystallization. The biaxially oriented crystallization proceeded as follows: the uniaxial orientation to MD was observed in the first stretching in the initial stage, and then the further processing by the second stretching at a right angle caused the fold type crystallization of molecular chain oriented to TD. The film stretched fully and biaxially could be considered to have the oriented crystalline structure in which highly oriented fibril crystals and fold type crystals distribute at random. (auth.)

  15. The influence of instantaneous velocity gradients on turbulence properties measured with multi-sensor hot-wire probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Ryong; Wallace, James M.

    1993-11-01

    The necessary assumption that the instantaneous flow field seen by hot-wire probes with two or more sensors is uniform, i.e. that all sensors are cooled by identically the same instantaneous velocity field, is often quite erroneous in highly sheared turbulent flow, such as near the wall in a turbulent boundary layer. Intense local shear layers occur, resulting in large instantaneous velocity gradients across the sensing volume of the probe. The effects of these neglected velocity gradients on the ability of a four-sensor probe, consisting of a pair of orthogonal X-arrays, to measure the three velocity and the streamwise vorticity components is assessed. This is done by determining the synthetic response of the probe to the turbulent boundary layer database of Balint et al. (1991), in which all the velocity gradients are known. The effects of neglecting the binormal components of velocity which cool each sensor are also assessed, when the probe is treated as two uncoupled X-arrays. A small improvement to the probe's coupled X-array response is found when an estimate of the mean wall-normal velocity gradient is incorporated in the response equations.

  16. Comparison between Neutron Diffraction measurements and numerical simulation of residual stresses of a Wire-Drawing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaz Fantin de Souza

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a drawing processed was simulated to calculate forces and the resulting residual stresses in the material. The calculated residual stresses were compared with experimentally measured residual stresses by the Neutron Diffraction Method. The modeled process was the Wire Drawing. The necessary parameters to model the process were taken from an industrial currently used process. Rods of an AISI 1045 steel with nominal diameters of 21.46 mm were reduced to 20.25 mm by drawing with an drawing angle of 15°. Compression tests were used to determinate flow curves of the real material an used in the simulation models. The possibility to estimate drawing forces by numerical simulation was evaluated by comparing simulated results with values from empirical equations given by the literature. The results have shown a sufficient accuracy for the calculation of forces, but the comparison of residual stresses has shown differences to the experimentally determined ones that can be minimized by the consideration of high strain rates in the compression tests, anisotropy of the material and kinematic hardening.

  17. Transition over C4 leading edge and measurement of intermittency factor using PDF of hot-wire signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazarika, B.K.; Hirsch, C. [Vrije Univ. Brussel, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Fluid Mechanics

    1997-07-01

    The variation of intermittency factors in the transition region of a C4 leading edge flat plate is measured at three incidence angles in a low-turbulence free stream. During the determination of intermittency factor, the threshold value of the detector function and the validity of conditional averaging are verified by a method based on the direct application of PDF of the hot-wire output. As the angle of incidence is increased, the transition progressively moves through all the three modes on the suction surface: at zero incidence the bypass transition, at 2 deg incidence the natural transition, and at 4 deg incidence the separated-flow transition occur, respectively. All three modes of transition exhibited the chordwise intermittency factor variation in accordance with Narasinha`s universal intermittency distribution; thus, the method based on spot production rate is applicable to all the three modes of transition. In the transition zone of the attached boundary layers, the conditionally averaged interturbulent profiles are fuller than the Blasius profile, while the conditionally averaged turbulent profiles follow a logarithmic profile with a variable additive parameter.

  18. Effect of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching on hamstring muscle flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hashim; Iqbal, Amir; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to compare the effectiveness of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five male subjects with hamstring tightness were included in this study. The subjects were randomly placed into three groups: the modified hold-relax stretching, static stretching and control groups. The modified hold-relax stretching group performed 7 seconds of isometric contraction and then relaxed for 5 seconds, and this was repeated five times daily for five consecutive days. The static stretching group received 10 minutes of static stretching with the help of a pulley and weight system for five consecutive days. The control group received only moist heat for 20 minutes for five consecutive days. A baseline reading of passive knee extension (PKE) was taken prior to the intervention; rest measurements were taken immediate post intervention on day 1, day 3, day 5, and after a 1 week follow-up, i.e., at the 12th day. [Results] On comparing the baseline readings of passive knee extension (PKE), there was no difference noted between the three groups. On comparing the posttest readings on day 5 between the 3 groups, a significant difference was noted. However, post hoc analysis revealed an insignificant difference between the modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching groups. There was a significant difference between the static stretching and control groups and between the modified hold-relax stretching and control groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that both the modified hold-relax stretching technique and static stretching are equally effective, as there was no significant difference in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility between the two groups.

  19. Time stretch and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoubfar, Ata; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Barland, Stéphane; Broderick, Neil; Turitsyn, Sergei K.; Jalali, Bahram

    2017-06-01

    Observing non-repetitive and statistically rare signals that occur on short timescales requires fast real-time measurements that exceed the speed, precision and record length of conventional digitizers. Photonic time stretch is a data acquisition method that overcomes the speed limitations of electronic digitizers and enables continuous ultrafast single-shot spectroscopy, imaging, reflectometry, terahertz and other measurements at refresh rates reaching billions of frames per second with non-stop recording spanning trillions of consecutive frames. The technology has opened a new frontier in measurement science unveiling transient phenomena in nonlinear dynamics such as optical rogue waves and soliton molecules, and in relativistic electron bunching. It has also created a new class of instruments that have been integrated with artificial intelligence for sensing and biomedical diagnostics. We review the fundamental principles and applications of this emerging field for continuous phase and amplitude characterization at extremely high repetition rates via time-stretch spectral interferometry.

  20. Wire Mesh Dampers for Semi-Floating Ring Bearings in Automotive Turbochargers: Measurements of Structural Stiffness and Damping Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keun Ryu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The current work introduces a new semi-floating ring bearing (SFRB system developed for improving the rotordynamic and vibration performance of automotive turbochargers (TCs at extreme operation conditions, such as high temperature, severe external force excitation, and large rotor imbalance. The new bearing design replaces outer oil films, i.e., squeeze film dampers (SFDs, in TC SFRBs with wire mesh dampers (WMDs. This SFRB configuration integrating WMDs aims to implement reliable mechanical components, as an inexpensive and simple alternative to SFDs, with consistent and superior damping capability, as well as predictable forced performance. Since WMDs are in series with the inner oil films of SFRBs, experimentally determined force coefficients of WMDs are of great importance in the design process of TC rotor-bearing systems (RBSs. Presently, the measurements of applied static load and ensuing deflection determine the structural stiffnesses of the WMDs. The WMD damping parameters, including dissipated energy, loss factor, and dry friction coefficient, are estimated from the area of the distinctive local hysteresis loop of the load versus WMD displacement data recorded during consecutive loading-unloading cycles as a function of applied preload with a constant amplitude of motion. The changes in WMD loss factor and dry friction coefficient due to increases in preload are more significant for the WMDs with lower density. The present work shows, to date, the most comprehensive measurements of static load characteristics on the WMDs for application into small automotive TCs. More importantly, the extensive test measurements of WMD deflection versus increasing static loads will aid to anchor predictions of future computation model.

  1. Comparisons between LES and wind tunnel hot-wire measurements of a NACA 0015 airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Bertagnolio, Franck

    2012-01-01

    is constructed in a wind tunnel similar as the condition where the experiments were carried out. The goal of this study is to validate the LES model against detailed measurements. The simulations are performed with in-house EllipSys3D code on high performance computers. Numerical study are focused...... on the stability and accuracy of the LES simulations on various mesh configurations. The spanwise grid spacing was found important to produce correct flow disturbance along the airfoil span, which further affects the turbulent energy distribution.......Large-eddy simulations (LES) are carried out for flow over a NACA 0015 airfoil at AoA = 8o and chord based Reynolds number of 1.71106. To accurately simulate the complex flow at the suction side of the airfoil, a reasonably large number of grid points are required. The computational mesh...

  2. Wire Position Monitoring with FPGA based Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, N.; Lysenko, O.

    2009-01-01

    This fall the first Tesla-style cryomodule cooldown test is being performed at Fermilab. Instrumentation department is preparing the electronics to handle the data from a set of wire position monitors (WPMs). For simulation purposes a prototype pipe with a WMP has been developed and built. The system is based on the measurement of signals induced in pickups by 320 MHz signal carried by a wire through the WPM. The wire is stretched along the pipe with a tensioning load of 9.07 kg. The WPM consists of four 50 (Omega) striplines spaced 90 o apart. FPGA based digitizer scans the WPM and transmits the data to a PC via VME interface. The data acquisition is based on the PC running LabView. In order to increase the accuracy and convenience of the measurements some modifications were required. The first is implementation of an average and decimation filter algorithm in the integrator operation in the FPGA. The second is the development of alternative tool for WPM measurements in the PC. The paper describes how these modifications were performed and test results of a new design. The last cryomodule generation has a single chain of seven WPMs (placed in critical positions: at each end, at the three posts and between the posts) to monitor a cold mass displacement during cooldown. The system was developed in Italy in collaboration with DESY. Similar developments have taken place at Fermilab in the frame of cryomodules construction for SCRF research. This fall preliminary cryomodule cooldown test is being performed. In order to prepare an appropriate electronic system for the test a prototype pipe with a WMP has been developed and built, figure 1. The system is based on the measurement of signals induced in pickups by 320 MHz signal carried by a wire through the WPM. The 0.5 mm diameter Cu wire is stretched along the pipe with a tensioning load of 9.07 kg and has a length of 1.1 m. The WPM consists of four 50 (Omega) striplines spaced 90 o apart. An FPGA based digitizer

  3. Comparison of two stretching methods and optimization of stretching protocol for the piriformis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulledge, Brett M; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Levine, David; Tillman, Larry; Harrysson, Ola L A; Osborne, Jason A; Baxter, Blaise

    2014-02-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an uncommon diagnosis for a non-discogenic form of sciatica whose treatment has traditionally focused on stretching the piriformis muscle (PiM). Conventional stretches include hip flexion, adduction, and external rotation. Using three-dimensional modeling, we quantified the amount of (PiM) elongation resulting from two conventional stretches and we investigated by use of a computational model alternate stretching protocols that would optimize PiM stretching. Seven subjects underwent three CT scans: one supine, one with hip flexion, adduction, then external rotation (ADD stretch), and one with hip flexion, external rotation, then adduction (ExR stretch). Three-dimensional bone models were constructed from the CT scans. PiM elongation during these stretches, femoral neck inclination, femoral head anteversion, and trochanteric anteversion were measured. A computer program was developed to map PiM length over a range of hip joint positions and was validated against the measured scans. ExR and ADD stretches elongated the PiM similarly by approximately 12%. Femoral head and greater trochanter anteversion influenced PiM elongation. Placing the hip joints in 115° of hip flexion, 40° of external rotation and 25° of adduction or 120° of hip flexion, 50° of external rotation and 30° of adduction increased PiM elongation by 30-40% compared to conventional stretches (15.1 and 15.3% increases in PiM muscle length, respectively). ExR and ADD stretches elongate the PiM similarly and therefore may have similar clinical effectiveness. The optimized stretches led to larger increases in PiM length and may be more easily performed by some patients due to increased hip flexion. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biocatalysis: Unmasked by stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharlampieva, Eugenia; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.

    2009-09-01

    The biocatalytic activity of enzyme-loaded responsive layer-by-layer films can be switched on and off by simple mechanical stretching. Soft materials could thus be used to trigger biochemical reactions under mechanical action, with potential therapeutic applications.

  5. Alignment Tools Used to Locate a Wire and a Laser Beam in the VISA Undulator Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Z.; Ruland, R.; Dix, B.; Arnett, D.; /SLAC

    2005-08-17

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is evaluating the feasibility of placing a free electron laser (FEL) at the end of the linear accelerator. The proposal is to inject electrons two thirds of the way down the linac, accelerate the electrons for the last one third of the linac, and then send the electrons into the FEL. This project is known as the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source). To test the feasibility of the LCLS, a smaller experiment VISA (Visual to Infrared SASE (Self Amplified Stimulated Emission) Amplifier) is being performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. VISA consists of four wiggler segments, each 0.99 m long. The four segments are required to be aligned to the beam axis with an rms error less than 50 {micro}m [1]. This very demanding alignment is carried out in two steps [2]. First the segments are fiducialized using a pulsed wire system. Then the wiggler segments are placed along a reference laser beam which coincides with the electron beam axis. In the wiggler segment fiducialization, a wire is stretched through a wiggler segment and a current pulse is sent down the wire. The deflection of the wire is monitored. The deflection gives information about the electron beam trajectory. The wire is moved until its x position, the coordinate without wire sag, is on the ideal beam trajectory. (The y position is obtained by rotating the wiggler 90{sup o}.) Once the wire is on the ideal beam trajectory, the wire's location is measured relative to tooling balls on the wiggler segment. To locate the wire, a device was constructed which measures the wire position relative to tooling balls on the device. The device is called the wire finder. It will be discussed in this paper. To place the magnets along the reference laser beam, the position of the laser beam must be determined. A device which can locate the laser beam relative to tooling balls was constructed and is also discussed in this paper. This device is called the laser finder. With a total

  6. Emittance growth due to Tevatron flying wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syphers, M; Eddy, Nathan

    2004-06-01

    During Tevatron injection, Flying Wires have been used to measure the transverse beam size after each transfer from the Main Injector in order to deduce the transverse emittances of the proton and antiproton beams. This amounts to 36 + 9 = 45 flies of each of 3 wire systems, with an individual wire passing through each beam bunch twice during a single ''fly''. below they estimate the emittance growth induced by the interaction of the wires with the particles during these measurements. Changes of emittance from Flying Wire measurements conducted during three recent stores are compared with the estimations.

  7. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Berning, Torsten

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive to stationary such as powering telecom back-up units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce electricity and waste......-hoc and real time electrical signal of the fuel cell water balance by employing hot wire anemometry. The hot wire sensor is placed into a binary mixture of hydrogen and water vapour, and the voltage signal received gives valuable insight into heat and mass transfer phenomena in a PEMFC. A central question...

  8. Effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching and static stretching on maximal voluntary contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Yutetsu; Naito, Hisashi; Ogura, Yuji; Katamoto, Shizuo; Aoki, Junichiro

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate and compare the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching and static stretching on maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Thirteen male university students (age, 20 ± 1 years; height, 172.2 ± 4.6 cm; weight, 68.4 ± 6.7 kg; mean ± SD) completed 3 different conditions on 3 nonconsecutive days in randomized order: static stretching (SS), PNF stretching (PNF), and no stretching (control, CON). Each condition consisted of a 5-minute rest accompanied by one of the following activities: (a) control, (b) SS, or (c) PNF stretching. The hip flexion range of motion (ROM) was evaluated immediately before and after the activity. The MVC of knee flexion was then measured. Surface electromyography was recorded from the biceps femoris and vastus lateralis muscles during MVC tests and stretching. Although increases in ROM were significantly greater after PNF than after SS (p < 0.01), the decreases in MVC were similar between the 2 treatments. These results suggest that, although PNF stretching increases ROM more than SS, PNF stretching and SS is detrimental to isometric maximal strength.

  9. Slice of LHC dipole wiring

    CERN Multimedia

    Dipole model slice made in 1994 by Ansaldo. The high magnetic fields needed for guiding particles around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring are created by passing 12’500 amps of current through coils of superconducting wiring. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC is the largest superconducting installation ever built. The magnetic field must also be extremely uniform. This means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Indeed, nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. 50’000 tonnes of steel sheets are used to make the magnet yokes that keep the wiring firmly in place. The yokes constitute approximately 80% of the accelerator's weight and, placed side by side, stretch over 20 km!

  10. Highly stretchable wrinkled gold thin film wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Park, Sun-Jun; Nguyen, Thao; Chu, Michael; Pegan, Jonathan D; Khine, Michelle

    2016-02-08

    With the growing prominence of wearable electronic technology, there is a need to improve the mechanical reliability of electronics for more demanding applications. Conductive wires represent a vital component present in all electronics. Unlike traditional planar and rigid electronics, these new wearable electrical components must conform to curvilinear surfaces, stretch with the body, and remain unobtrusive and low profile. In this paper, the piezoresistive response of shrink induced wrinkled gold thin films under strain demonstrates robust conductive performance in excess of 200% strain. Importantly, the wrinkled metallic thin films displayed negligible change in resistance of up to 100% strain. The wrinkled metallic wires exhibited consistent performance after repetitive strain. Importantly, these wrinkled thin films are inexpensive to fabricate and are compatible with roll to roll manufacturing processes. We propose that these wrinkled metal thin film wires are an attractive alternative to conventional wires for wearable applications.

  11. Comparison of active stretching technique and static stretching technique on hamstring flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meroni, Roberto; Cerri, Cesare Giuseppe; Lanzarini, Carlo; Barindelli, Guido; Morte, Giancesare Della; Gessaga, Viviana; Cesana, Gian Carlo; De Vito, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    To compare a passive and an active stretching technique to determine which one would produce and maintain the greatest gain in hamstring flexibility. To determine whether a passive or an active stretching technique results in a greater increase in hamstring flexibility and to compare whether the gains are maintained. Randomized controlled trial. Institutional. Sixty-five volunteer healthy subjects completed the enrollment questionnaire, 33 completed the required 75% of the treatment after 6 weeks, and 22 were assessed 4 weeks after the training interruption. A 6-week stretching program with subjects divided into 2 groups with group 1 performing active stretching exercises and group 2 performing passive stretching exercises. Range of motion (ROM) was measured after 3 and 6 weeks of training and again 4 weeks after the cessation of training and compared with the initial measurement. After 3 weeks of training, the mean gain in group 1 (active stretching) on performing the active knee extension range of motion (AKER) test was 5.7 degrees, whereas the mean gain in group 2 (passive stretching) was 3 degrees (P = .015). After 6 weeks of training, the mean gain in group 1 was 8.7 degrees , whereas the mean gain in group 2 was 5.3 degrees (P = .006). Twenty-two subjects were reassessed 4 weeks after the cessation of the training with the maintained gain of ROM in group 1 being 6.3 degrees , whereas the maintained gain in group 2 was 0.1 degrees (P = .003). Active stretching produced the greater gain in the AKER test, and the gain was almost completely maintained 4 weeks after the end of the training, which was not seen with the passive stretching group. Active stretching was more time efficient compared with the static stretching and needed a lower compliance to produce effects on flexibility.

  12. Measurements of the effects of a wire-wrap spacer on the thermalhydraulics of heated annular upward flow of supercritical R134a in steady and transient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinink, S.; Copping, A.; Kedare, S.; Hovell, K.; Yaras, M.I. [Carleton University, Ottawa (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Experiments were conducted at supercritical pressures and temperatures on a vertically-oriented annular heating rod with a wire-wrap spacer using upward-flowing R134a to determine the effect of a wire-wrap spacer on heat transfer in proximity of the pseudocritical point. Measurements were taken at quasi-steady-state and pressure-transient conditions. During each instance of deteriorated heat transfer, the Nusselt number is greater than values predicted by the Dittus-Boelter correlation. Heat transfer during the pressure transients is observed to be insensitive to the time rate of change of the fluid pressure, which implies that the transience does not affect the instantaneous state of the heat-transfer process. (author)

  13. Intra-wire resistance and AC loss in multi-filamentary MgB2 wires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Chao; Offringa, Wietse; Bergen, Anne-Henriette; Wessel, Wilhelm A.J.; Krooshoop, Hendrikus J.G.; Dhalle, Marc M.J.; Sumption, M.D.; Collings, E.W.; Rindfleisch, M.; Tomsic, M.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.; Nijhuis, Arend

    2013-01-01

    Intra-wire resistance and AC loss of various multi-filamentary MgB2 wires with filaments surrounded by Nb barriers have been measured and analyzed. The intra-wire resistance is measured with a direct four-probe voltage–current method at various temperatures. The AC loss is acquired by both vibrating

  14. Wire chamber gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Va'vra, J.

    1992-04-01

    In this paper, we describe new developments in gas mixtures which have occurred during the last 3--4 years. In particular, we discuss new results on the measurement and modeling of electron drift parameters, the modeling of drift chamber resolution, measurements of primary ionization and the choice of gas for applications such as tracking, single electron detection, X-ray detection and visual imaging. In addition, new results are presented on photon feedback, breakdown and wire aging

  15. BSDB: the Biomolecule Stretching Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Marek; Sikora, Mateusz; Sulkowska, Joanna I.; Witkowski, Bartlomiej

    2011-03-01

    Despite more than a decade of experiments on single biomolecule manipulation, mechanical properties of only several scores of proteins have been measured. A characteristic scale of the force of resistance to stretching, Fmax , has been found to range between ~ 10 and 480 pN. The Biomolecule Stretching Data Base (BSDB) described here provides information about expected values of Fmax for, currently, 17 134 proteins. The values and other characteristics of the unfolding proces, including the nature of identified mechanical clamps, are available at www://info.ifpan.edu.pl/BSDB/. They have been obtained through simulations within a structure-based model which correlates satisfactorily with the available experimental data on stretching. BSDB also lists experimental data and results of the existing all-atom simulations. The database offers a Protein-Data-Bank-wide guide to mechano-stability of proteins. Its description is provided by a forthcoming Nucleic Acids Research paper. Supported by EC FUNMOL project FP7-NMP-2007-SMALL-1, and European Regional Development Fund: Innovative Economy (POIG.01.01.02-00-008/08).

  16. Minimisation of the wire position uncertainties of the new CERN vacuum wire scanner

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069346; Barjau Condomines, A

    In the next years the luminosity of the LHC will be significantly increased. This will require a much higher accuracy of beam profile measurement than actually achievable by the current wire scanner. The new fast wire scanner is foreseen to measure small emittance beams throughout the LHC injector chain, which demands a wire travelling speed up to 20 ms-1 and position measurement accuracy of the order of a few microns. The vibrations of the mechanical parts of the system, and particularly the vibrations of the thin carbon wire, were identified as the major error sources of wire position uncertainty. Therefore the understanding of the wire vibrations is a high priority for the design and operation of the new device. This document presents the work performed to understand the main causes of the wire vibrations observed in one of the existing wire scanner and the new proposed design.

  17. Development, implementation, and characterization of a standalone embedded viscosity measurement system based on the impedance spectroscopy of a vibrating wire sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, José; Ramos, Pedro M; Janeiro, Fernando M

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an embedded liquid viscosity measurement system based on a vibrating wire sensor. Although multiple viscometers based on different working principles are commercially available, there is still a market demand for a dedicated measurement system capable of performing accurate, fast measurements and requiring little or no operator training for simple systems and solution monitoring. The developed embedded system is based on a vibrating wire sensor that works by measuring the impedance response of the sensor, which depends on the viscosity and density of the liquid in which the sensor is immersed. The core of the embedded system is a digital signal processor (DSP) which controls the waveform generation and acquisitions for the measurement of the impedance frequency response. The DSP also processes the acquired waveforms and estimates the liquid viscosity. The user can interact with the measurement system through a keypad and an LCD or through a computer with a USB connection for data logging and processing. The presented system is tested on a set of viscosity standards and the estimated values are compared with the standard manufacturer specified viscosity values. A stability study of the measurement system is also performed. (paper)

  18. Development, implementation, and characterization of a standalone embedded viscosity measurement system based on the impedance spectroscopy of a vibrating wire sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, José; Janeiro, Fernando M.; Ramos, Pedro M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an embedded liquid viscosity measurement system based on a vibrating wire sensor. Although multiple viscometers based on different working principles are commercially available, there is still a market demand for a dedicated measurement system capable of performing accurate, fast measurements and requiring little or no operator training for simple systems and solution monitoring. The developed embedded system is based on a vibrating wire sensor that works by measuring the impedance response of the sensor, which depends on the viscosity and density of the liquid in which the sensor is immersed. The core of the embedded system is a digital signal processor (DSP) which controls the waveform generation and acquisitions for the measurement of the impedance frequency response. The DSP also processes the acquired waveforms and estimates the liquid viscosity. The user can interact with the measurement system through a keypad and an LCD or through a computer with a USB connection for data logging and processing. The presented system is tested on a set of viscosity standards and the estimated values are compared with the standard manufacturer specified viscosity values. A stability study of the measurement system is also performed.

  19. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance of a Commercial Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Berning, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive (e.g. the Toyota Mirai) to stationary such as powering telecom backup units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce...... and increased degradation rates. Clearly, a fundamental understanding of all aspects of water management in PEMFC is imperative. This includes the fuel cell water balance, i.e. which fraction of the product water leaves the fuel cell via the anode channels versus the cathode channel. Our research group...... is currently developing a novel technique to obtain an ad-hoc and real time electrical signal of the fuel cell water balance by employing hot wire anemometry. In this work, the hot wire sensor is placed in the anode outlet of a commercial air-cooled fuel cell stack by Ballard Power Systems, and the voltage...

  20. Hamstring Stiffness Returns More Rapidly After Static Stretching Than Range of Motion, Stretch Tolerance, and Isometric Peak Torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Genki; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Matsuo, Shingo; Kataura, Satoshi; Yokoi, Kazuaki; Fukaya, Taizan; Fujiwara, Mitsuhiro; Asai, Yuji; Iwata, Masahiro

    2017-12-18

    Hamstring injuries are common, and lack of hamstring flexibility may predispose to injury. Static stretching increases range of motion (ROM) but also results in reduced muscle strength after stretching. The effects of stretching on the hamstring muscles and the duration of these effects remain unclear. To determine the effects of static stretching on the hamstrings and the duration of these effects. Randomized crossover study. University laboratory. Twenty-four healthy volunteers. We measured the torque-angle relationship (ROM, passive torque (PT) at the onset of pain, and passive stiffness) and isometric muscle force using an isokinetic dynamometer. After a 60-minute rest, the ROM of the dynamometer was set at maximum tolerable intensity; this position was maintained for 300 seconds while static passive torque (SPT) was measured continuously. We remeasured the torque-angle relationship and isometric muscle force after rest periods of 10, 20, and 30 minutes. Change in SPT during stretching; changes in ROM, PT at the onset of pain, passive stiffness, and isometric muscle force before stretching compared with 10, 20, and 30 minutes after stretching. SPT decreased significantly during stretching. Passive stiffness decreased significantly 10 and 20 minutes after stretching, but there was no significant pre- vs. post-stretching difference after 30 minutes. PT at the onset of pain and ROM increased significantly after stretching at all rest intervals, while isometric muscle force decreased significantly after all rest intervals. The effect of static stretching on passive stiffness of the hamstrings was not maintained as long as the changes in ROM, stretch tolerance, and isometric muscle force. Therefore, frequent stretching is necessary to improve the viscoelasticity of the muscle-tendon unit. Muscle force was decreased for 30 minutes after stretching; this should be considered prior to activities requiring maximal muscle strength.

  1. Vibrating wire for beam profile scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Arutunian

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available A method that measures the transverse profile (emittance of the bunch by detecting radiation arising at the scattering of the bunch on scanning wire is widely used. In this work information about bunch scattering is obtained by measuring the oscillation frequency of the tightened scanning wire. In such a way, the system of radiation (or secondary particles extraction and measurement can be removed. The entire unit consists of a compact fork with tightened wire and a scanning system. Normal oscillation frequency of a wire depends on wire tension, its geometric parameters, and, in a second approximation, its elastic characteristics. Normal oscillations are generated by interaction of an alternating current through the wire with magnetic field of a permanent magnet. In this case, it is suggested that the magnetic field of the accelerator (field of dipole magnets or quadrupole magnets be used for excitation of oscillations. The dependence of oscillation frequency on beam scattering is determined by several factors, including changes of wire tension caused by transverse force of the beam and influence of beam self-field. Preliminary calculations show that the influence of wire heating will dominate. We have studied strain gauges on the basis of vibrating wire from various materials (tungsten, beryl bronze, and niobium zirconium alloys. A scheme of normal oscillation generation by alternating current in autogeneration circuit with automatic frequency adjustment was selected. A special method of wire fixation and elimination of transverse degrees of freedom allows us to achieve relative stability better than 10^{-5} during several days at a relative resolution of 10^{-6}. Experimental results and estimates of wire heating of existing scanners show that the wire heats up to a few hundred grades, which is enough for measurements. The usage of wire of micrometer thickness diminishes the problem of wire thermalization speed during the scanning of the bunch.

  2. Stretching & Flexibility: An Interactive Encyclopedia of Stretching. [CD-ROM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    This CD-ROM offers 140 different stretches in full-motion video sequences. It focuses on the proper techniques for overall physical fitness, injury prevention and rehabilitation, and 23 different sports (e.g., golf, running, soccer, skiing, climbing, football, and baseball). Topics include stretching for sports; stretching awareness and education…

  3. Stretching of macromolecules and proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strick, T R; Dessinges, M-N; Charvin, G; Dekker, N H; Allemand, J-F; Bensimon, D; Croquette, V

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we review the biophysics revealed by stretching single biopolymers. During the last decade various techniques have emerged allowing micromanipulation of single molecules and simultaneous measurements of their elasticity. Using such techniques, it has been possible to investigate some of the interactions playing a role in biology. We shall first review the simplest case of a non-interacting polymer and then present the structural transitions in DNA, RNA and proteins that have been studied by single-molecule techniques. We shall explain how these techniques permit a new approach to the protein folding/unfolding transition

  4. Immediate effects of quantified hamstring stretching: hold-relax proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation versus static stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentedura, Emilio J; Huijbregts, Peter A; Celeste, Shelley; Edwards, Dale; In, Alastair; Landers, Merrill R; Fernandez-de-Las-Penas, Cesar

    2011-08-01

    To compare the immediate effects of a hold-relax proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching (HR-PNF) versus static stretch (SS) on hamstring flexibility in healthy, asymptomatic subjects. Thirty subjects (13 female; mean age 25.7 ± 3.0, range 22-37) without excessive hamstring muscle flexibility were randomly assigned to one of two stretch groups: HR-PNF or SS. The left leg was treated as a control and did not receive any intervention. The right leg was measured for ROM pre- and post-stretch interventions, with subjects receiving randomly assigned interventions one week apart. Data were analyzed with a 3 (intervention: HR-PNF, SS, control) × 2 (time: pre and post) factorial ANOVA with repeated measures and appropriate post-hoc analyses. A significant interaction was observed between intervention and time for hamstring extensibility, F(2,58) = 25.229, p < .0005. Main effect of intervention for the tested leg was not significant, p = .782 indicating that there was no difference between the two stretch conditions. However, main effect for time was significant (p < .0005), suggesting that hamstring extensibility (for both stretching conditions) after intervention was greater than before. No significant differences were found when comparing the effectiveness of HR-PNF and SS techniques. Both stretching methods resulted in significant immediate increases in hamstring length. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Stretching the Border

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horstmann, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I hope to add a complementary perspective to James Scott’s recent work on avoidance strategies of subaltern mountain people by focusing on what I call the refugee public. The educated Karen elite uses the space of exile in the Thai borderland to reconstitute resources and to re-ent......-based organizations succeed to stretch the border by establishing a firm presence that is supported by the international humanitarian economy in the refugee camps in Northwestern Thailand....

  6. Mechanical stretch influence on lifetime of dielectric elastomer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannarelli, A.; Niasar, M. Ghaffarian

    2017-04-01

    Film pre-stretching is a widely adopted solution to improve dielectric strength of the DEA systems. However, to date, long term reliability of this solution has not been investigated. In this work it is explored how the dielectric elastomer lifetime is affected by film pre-stretching. The dielectric loss of soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films is studied for different stretch ratios by measuring tanδ. Additionally, time-to-breakdown was measured at DC electric stress for different stretch ratios. For this purpose, accelerated life test (ALT) were performed. The results obtained are compared with non-pre-stretched samples. This study suggests that no additional dielectric losses are caused by film stretching up to 80% of original dimensions.

  7. A simple homogeneous model for regular and irregular metallic wire media samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosulnikov, S. Y.; Mirmoosa, M. S.; Simovski, C. R.

    2018-02-01

    To simplify the solution of electromagnetic problems with wire media samples, it is reasonable to treat them as the samples of a homogeneous material without spatial dispersion. The account of spatial dispersion implies additional boundary conditions and makes the solution of boundary problems difficult especially if the sample is not an infinitely extended layer. Moreover, for a novel type of wire media - arrays of randomly tilted wires - a spatially dispersive model has not been developed. Here, we introduce a simplistic heuristic model of wire media samples shaped as bricks. Our model covers WM of both regularly and irregularly stretched wires.

  8. A Vibrating Wire System For Quadrupole Fiducialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-13

    A vibrating wire system is being developed to fiducialize the quadrupoles between undulator segments in the LCLS. This note provides a detailed analysis of the system. The LCLS will have quadrupoles between the undulator segments to keep the electron beam focused. If the quadrupoles are not centered on the beam axis, the beam will receive transverse kicks, causing it to deviate from the undulator axis. Beam based alignment will be used to move the quadrupoles onto a straight line, but an initial, conventional alignment must place the quadrupole centers on a straight line to 100 {micro}m. In the fiducialization step of the initial alignment, the position of the center of the quadrupole is measured relative to tooling balls on the outside of the quadrupole. The alignment crews then use the tooling balls to place the magnet in the tunnel. The required error on the location of the quadrupole center relative to the tooling balls must be less than 25 {micro}m. In this note, we analyze a system under construction for the quadrupole fiducialization. The system uses the vibrating wire technique to position a wire onto the quadrupole magnetic axis. The wire position is then related to tooling balls using wire position detectors. The tooling balls on the wire position detectors are finally related to tooling balls on the quadrupole to perform the fiducialization. The total 25 {micro}m fiducialization error must be divided between these three steps. The wire must be positioned onto the quadrupole magnetic axis to within 10 {micro}m, the wire position must be measured relative to tooling balls on the wire position detectors to within 15 {micro}m, and tooling balls on the wire position detectors must be related to tooling balls on the quadrupole to within 10 {micro}m. The techniques used in these three steps will be discussed. The note begins by discussing various quadrupole fiducialization techniques used in the past and discusses why the vibrating wire technique is our method

  9. Comparison of friction forces between stainless orthodontic steel brackets and TiNi wires in wet and dry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phukaoluan, Aphinan; Khantachawana, Anak; Kaewtatip, Pongpan; Dechkunakorn, Surachai; Anuwongnukroh, Niwat; Santiwong, Peerapong; Kajornchaiyakul, Julathep

    2017-03-01

    In sliding mechanics, frictional force is an important counter-balancing element to orthodontic tooth movement, which must be controlled in order to allow application of light continuous forces. The purpose of this study was to compare the frictional forces between a stainless steel bracket and five different wire alloys under dry and wet (artificial saliva) conditions. TiNi, TiNiCu, TiNiCo, commercial wires A and commercial wires B with equal dimensions of 0.016×0.022'' were tested in this experiment. The stainless steel bracket was chosen with a slot dimension of 0.022''. Micro-hardness of the wires was measured by the Vickers micro-hardness test. Surface topography of wires was measured by an optical microscope and quantified using surface roughness testing. Static and kinetic friction forces were measured using a custom-designed apparatus, with a 3-mm stretch of wire alloy at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. The static and dynamic frictions in the wet condition tended to decrease more slowly than those in the dry condition. Therefore, the friction of TiNiCu and commercial wires B would increase. Moreover, these results were associated with scarred surfaces, i.e. the increase in friction would result in a larger bracket microfracture. From the results, it is seen that copper addition resulted in an increase in friction under both wet and dry conditions. However, the friction in the wet condition was less than that in dry condition due to the lubricating effect of artificial saliva. Copyright © 2016 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. submitter Dynamical Models of a Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Barjau, Ana; Dehning, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of the beam profile measurements achievable by the current wire scanners at CERN is limited by the vibrations of their mechanical parts. In particular, the vibrations of the carbon wire represent the major source of wire position uncertainty which limits the beam profile measurement accuracy. In the coming years, due to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, a wire traveling speed up to 20 $m s^{−1}$ and a position measurement accuracy of the order of 1 μm will be required. A new wire scanner design based on the understanding of the wire vibration origin is therefore needed. We present the models developed to understand the main causes of the wire vibrations observed in an existing wire scanner. The development and tuning of those models are based on measurements and tests performed on that CERN proton synchrotron (PS) scanner. The final model for the (wire + fork) system has six degrees-of-freedom (DOF). The wire equations contain three different excitation terms: inertia...

  11. Effects of stretching the scalene muscles on slow vital capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juncheol; Hwang, Sehee; Han, Seungim; Han, Dongwook

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether stretching of the scalene muscles would improve slow vital capacity (SVC). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students to whom the study's methods and purpose were explained and their agreement for participation was obtained. The SVC was measured using spirometry (Pony FX, COSMED Inc., Italy). The intervention used was stretching of the scalene muscles. Stretching was carried out for 15 min, 10 times at per each portion of scalene muscles: the anterior, middle, and posterior parts. [Results] Expiratory vital capacity (EVC) and tidal volume (Vt) noticeably increased after stretching. However, there were no changes in any of the SVC items in the control group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that stretching of the scalene muscles can effectively improve SVC. In particular, we confirmed that stretching of the scalene muscles was effective in increasing EVC and Vt, which are items of SVC.

  12. Kontrola kvalitete stretch folije

    OpenAIRE

    Gržanić, Nino

    2016-01-01

    U završnom radu opisan je postupak ekstrudiranja i kontrole kvalitete stretch folije koji se koristi u firmi Bomark-Pak radi osiguravanja najbolje kvalitete. Kontrola kreče kod uvoza repromaterijala, nastavlja se kod izrade folije na stroju, te se glavni dio odvija nakon izrade gotovg proizvoda. U radu ćemo detaljno objasniti svaki pojedini korak, zašto se on vrši, te uz pomoć kojih mjernih instrumenata se izvršava.

  13. Contact angles on stretched solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensink, Liz; Snoeijer, Jacco

    2017-11-01

    The surface energy of solid interfaces plays a central role in wetting, as they dictate the liquid contact angle. Yet, it has been challenging to measure the solid surface energies independently, without making use of Young's law. Here we present Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations by which we measure the surface properties for all interfaces, including the solids. We observe change in contact angles upon stretching the solid substrates, showing that the surface energy is actually strain dependent. This is clear evidence of the so-called Shuttleworth effect, making it necessary to distinguish surface energy from surface tension. We discuss how this effect gives rise to a new class of elasto-capillary phenomena. ERC Consolidator Grant No. 616918.

  14. EFFECTIVENESS OF PNF STRETCHING AND CYCLIC STRETCHING OF CALF TIGHTNESS ON COLLEGE GOING GIRLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlesha Sirari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Flexibility helps with injury prevention, the reduction of soreness following a workout, and a general sense of well-being. There are different stretching techniques and protocols for improvements in calf extensibility and flexibility. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of two techniques i.e. CYCLIC and PNF stretching which improves calf flexibility. This study was done to find the effectiveness of calf Cyclic and PNF stretching technique to improve calf flexibility. Methods: 30 subjects with age group 21-22 years were randomly allocated to 2 groups equally. Group 1(n=15 were given CYCLIC and group 2(n=15 were given PNF stretching technique. Plantar flexion was used to measure the calf tightness which was done before and after the treatment. Treatment was given for 7 days and on the 7th day the calf tightness was again measured. Results: The mean difference of the CYCLIC is 4.6 and mean difference of PNF is 4.7 which indicate that CYCLIC and PNF both are effective to improve calf flexibility but PNF is more effective than CYCLIC to improve calf flexibility. Conclusion: The neurophysiological basis of PNF, stating that the excitatory efficient of the neuromuscular spindle or the inhibitory afferent of the Golgi tendon organ (GTO or both are responsible for the effects. During PNF stretch and isometric contraction of stretched agonists for extended period may cause activation of its neuromuscular spindle. The increase in tension created during the isometric contraction of the pre – lengthened agonist contracts concentrically. Both the fascia & the spindle of the agonist adjust to the nearly lengthened position. These impulses travel via causing post synaptic inhibition of the motor neuron to agonist increasing the tension from the GTO. These impulses can override the impulses coming from the neuromuscular spindles arousing the muscle to reflexly resist to the change in length, thus helping in lengthening

  15. Bias of purine stretches in sequenced chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Soumpasis, Dikeos Mario; Brunak, Søren

    2002-01-01

    We examined more than 700 DNA sequences (full length chromosomes and plasmids) for stretches of purines (R) or pyrimidines (Y) and alternating YR stretches; such regions will likely adopt structures which are different from the canonical B-form. Since one turn of the DNA helix is roughly 10 bp, we...... measured the fraction of each genome which contains purine (or pyrimidine) tracts of lengths of 10 by or longer (hereafter referred to as 'purine tracts'), as well as stretches of alternating pyrimidines/purine ('pyr/pur tracts') of the same length. Using this criteria, a random sequence would be expected...... to contain 1.0% of purine tracts and also 1.0% of the alternating pyr/pur tracts. In the vast majority of cases, there are more purine tracts than would be expected from a random sequence, with an average of 3.5%, significantly larger than the expectation value. The fraction of the chromosomes containing pyr...

  16. New development of a measuring instrument for wear classification of diamond wires; Neuentwicklung eines Messgeraets zur Verschleissklassifizierung von Diamantseilen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentes, Sascha; Knecht, Daniel [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Abt. fuer Technologie und Management des Rueckbaus kerntechnischer Anlagen (TMRK)

    2013-07-01

    For the retrofitting and dismantling of nuclear facilities the automated and remote disassembly of installations and reinforced concrete structures are gaining in importance. This makes it possible to optimize processes, reduce personnel expenses and therfore to reduce costs. But, apart from these economic aspects, health aspects play a key role in the area of the dismantling of nuclear facilities. Thus, remote separation processes, e.g. the wire cutting technology has a positive effect on radiation protection by minimizing the ionizing radiation on the staff by means of remote handling. In this regard, research and equipments are being carried out and developed at the 'Karlsruhe Institute of Technology' (KIT), the 'Institute of Technology and Management in Construction' (TMB) in the professorship 'Technology and Management of the Dismantling of Nuclear Installations' (TMRK) which minimize the necessary presence of personnel in control areas. In this context, the wire cutting process is investigated and further developed in order to effectively dismantle contaminated power plant components under water with the least possible personnel use. [German] Fuer die Ertuechtigung und den Rueckbau von kerntechnischen Anlagen wird das automatisierte und fernhantierte Zerlegen von Einbauten und Stahlbetonstrukturen eine immer groessere Bedeutung gewinnen. Dies ermoeglicht es, Prozesse zu optimieren, Personalaufwand zu verringern und damit die Kosten zu reduzieren. Aber auch abseits von diesen wirtschaftlichen Gesichtspunkten spielen im Bereich des Rueckbaus kerntechnischer Anlagen gesundheitliche Aspekte eine tragende Rolle. So wirken sich fernhantierte Trennprozesse wie z.B. die Seilsaegetechnologie positiv auf den Strahlenschutz aus, indem durch die Fernhantierung die ionisierende Strahlung auf das Personal minimiert wird. Unter diesem Aspekt werden am 'Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie' (KIT), am 'Institut fuer Technologie und

  17. EFFECTIVENESS OF PNF STRETCHING VERSUS STATIC STRETCHING ON PAIN AND HAMSTRING FLEXIBILITY FOLLOWING MOIST HEAT IN INDIVIDUALS WITH KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena .V

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative joint disease and one of the major public health problem that causesfunctional impairment and reduced quality of life. To compare the effectiveness of PNF Hold relax stretching versus Static stretching on pain and flexibility of hamstring following moist heat in individuals with knee osteoarthritis. Hamstring tightness is the major problem in knee osteoarthritis individuals. Therefore the need of study is comparing the effectiveness of PNF Hold relax stretching versus static stretching on pain and flexibility of hamstrings following moist heat in knee osteoarthritis participants. Determining the effects of PNF Hold relax stretching versus Static stretching along with moist heat on pain and hamstring flexibility by VAS and Active knee extension range of motion in knee osteoarthritis individuals. Methods: 30 subjects with symptoms of knee osteoarthritis were randomly distributed into 2 groups 15 in each group. PNF Hold relax stretching along with moist heat is compared to Static stretching along with moist heat. Pain was measured by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and hamstring flexibility by Active knee Extension Range of Motion (AKEROM by universal goniometer. Measurements are taken pre and post intervention. Results: The results indicated PNF Hold relax stretching along with moist heat showed a statistically significant improvement in pain (p<0.05 and improvement in hamstring flexibility (p<0.05 when compared to Static stretching along with moist heat. Conclusion: Subjects with PNF Hold relax stretching along with moist heat showed significant improvement in pain reduction and improving hamstring flexibility than Static stretching along with moist heat.

  18. The effects of acute self myofascial release (MFR) and stretching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Baseline measurements were taken initially and then participants were randomly divided into four groups (control [n=10, static stretching [n=10], dynamic stretching [n=10] and self MFR [n=10]). Each group performed a 60-minute intervention. During the intervention programme the various groups took part in prescribed ...

  19. Passive Stretch Versus Active Stretch on Intervertebral Movement in Non - Specific Neck Pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El - Aziz, A.H.; Amin, D.I.; Moustafa, I.

    2016-01-01

    Neck pain is one of the most common and painful musculoskeletal conditions. Point prevalence ranges from 6% to 22% and up to 38% of the elderly population, while lifetime prevalence ranges from 14,2% to 71%. Up till now no randomized study showed the effect between controversy of active and passive stretch on intervertebral movement. The purpose: the current study was to investigate the effect of the passive and active stretch on intervertebral movement in non - specific neck pain. Material and methods: Forty five subjects from both sexes with age range between 18 and 30 years and assigned in three groups, group I (15) received active stretch, ultrasound and TENS. Group II (15) received passive stretch, ultrasound and TENS. Group III (15) received ultrasound and TENS. The radiological assessment was used to measure rotational and translational movement of intervertebral movement before and after treatment. Results: MANOVA test was used for radiological assessment before and after treatment there was significant increase in intervertebral movement in group I as p value =0.0001. Conclusion: active stretch had a effect in increasing the intervertebral movement compared to the passive stretch

  20. Wire bonding in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Harman, George G

    2010-01-01

    Wire Bonding in Microelectronics, Third Edition, has been thoroughly revised to help you meet the challenges of today's small-scale and fine-pitch microelectronics. This authoritative guide covers every aspect of designing, manufacturing, and evaluating wire bonds engineered with cutting-edge techniques. In addition to gaining a full grasp of bonding technology, you'll learn how to create reliable bonds at exceedingly high yields, test wire bonds, solve common bonding problems, implement molecular cleaning methods, and much more. Coverage includes: Ultrasonic bonding systems and technologies, including high-frequency systems Bonding wire metallurgy and characteristics, including copper wire Wire bond testing Gold-aluminum intermetallic compounds and other interface reactions Gold and nickel-based bond pad plating materials and problems Cleaning to improve bondability and reliability Mechanical problems in wire bonding High-yield, fine-pitch, specialized-looping, soft-substrate, and extreme-temperature wire bo...

  1. Measurements of Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Diffusivity of Hen Egg-White Lysozyme Crystals and Its Solution Using the Transient Short Hot Wire Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Seiji; Maki, Syou; Maekawa, Ryunosuke; Tanaka, Seiichi; Hagiwara, Masayuki

    2017-08-01

    Protein crystals are an essentially important biological sample to advance the analysis of X-ray structure, but their thermophysical properties, especially thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity, have not been studied sufficiently. This current situation can be attributed to various kinds of technical problems; e.g., the fragility of protein crystals and the difficulty of nucleation control. Ideally speaking, protein crystallization should be carried out under a " containerless condition" to eliminate any mechanical distortion of the crystals from the walls. To realize the condition, we have developed an original crystallization method by means of the magneto-Archimedes effect. In this paper, a transient short hot wire method was combined with the technique of magneto-Archimedes effect to realize simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals. As the results, thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of HEWL crystals were found to be 0.410-0.438 \\hbox {W}\\cdot \\hbox {m}^{-1}\\cdot \\hbox {K}^{-1} and 3.77-5.18× 10^{-8} \\hbox {m}2\\cdot \\hbox {s}^{-1}, respectively. We clarified by the crystallizing process of HEWL that the crystals were magnetically levitated at the air-liquid interface and the short hot wire was completely buried into them as the crystals grew. We also measured the HEWL solution by the same methods. The thermal conductivity of the solution had almost the same value as that of water and had little dependency on the concentration of HEWL, but the thermal diffusivity was unclear.

  2. Water Desalination with Wires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porada, S.; Sales, B.B.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Biesheuvel, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    We show the significant potential of water desalination using a novel capacitive wire-based technology in which anode/cathode wire pairs are constructed from coating a thin porous carbon electrode layer on top of electrically conducting rods (or wires). By alternately dipping an array of electrode

  3. Effects on hamstring muscle extensibility, muscle activity, and balance of different stretching techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kyoung-Il; Nam, Hyung-Chun; Jung, Kyoung-Sim

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two different stretching techniques on range of motion (ROM), muscle activation, and balance. [Subjects] For the present study, 48 adults with hamstring muscle tightness were recruited and randomly divided into three groups: a static stretching group (n=16), a PNF stretching group (n=16), a control group (n=16). [Methods] Both of the stretching techniques were applied to the hamstring once. Active knee extension angle, muscle activation during maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC), and static balance were measured before and after the application of each stretching technique. [Results] Both the static stretching and the PNF stretching groups showed significant increases in knee extension angle compared to the control group. However, there were no significant differences in muscle activation or balance between the groups. [Conclusion] Static stretching and PNF stretching techniques improved ROM without decrease in muscle activation, but neither of them exerted statistically significant effects on balance.

  4. PS wire chamber

    CERN Document Server

    1970-01-01

    A wire chamber used at CERN's Proton Synchrotron accelerator in the 1970s. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  5. Immediate effects of different types of stretching exercises on badminton jump smash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hwi S; Kim, Daeho; Park, Jihong

    2017-04-13

    Since different types of stretching exercises may alter athletic performance, we compared the effects of three types of stretching exercises on badminton jump smash. Sixteen male collegiate badminton players performed one of three different stretching exercises in a counterbalanced order on different days. Static stretching had seven typical stretches, while dynamic stretching involved nine dynamic movements, and resistance dynamic stretching was performed with weighted vests and dumbbells. Before and after each stretching exercise, subjects performed 20 trials of jump smashes. Dependent measurements were the jump heights during jump smashes, velocities of jump-smashed shuttlecocks, and drop points of jump-smashed shuttlecocks. To test the effects of each stretching exercise, we performed mixed model ANOVAs and calculated between-time effect sizes (ES). Each stretching exercise improved the jump heights during jump smashes (type main effect: F2,75= 1.19, p=0.31; static stretching: 22.1%, pstretching: 30.1%, pstretching: 17.7%, p=0.03, ES: 0.98) and velocities of jump-smashed shuttlecocks (type main effect: F2,75= 2.18, p=0.12; static stretching: 5.7%, p=0.61, ES: 0.39; dynamic stretching: 3.4%, p=0.94, ES: 0.28; resistance dynamic stretching: 6%, p=0.50, ES: 0.66). However, there were no differences among the stretching exercises for any measurement. The drop point of jump-smashed shuttlecocks did not change (interaction: F2,75= 0.88, p=0.42). All stretching exercises improved badminton jump smash performance, but we could not determine the best protocol. Since badminton requires high-speed movement and explosive force, we suggest performing dynamic stretching or resistance dynamic stretching.

  6. The Effect of Wire Dimension, Type and Thickness of Coating Layer on Friction of Coated Stainless-Steel Arch Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdulhussain Abbas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: Esthetic coated arch wires are the desired types to match esthetic brackets in the clinical orthodontics, but the presence of coating layer is greatly affect friction during sliding mechanics. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of total wire dimension with the type and thickness of coating layer on friction of coated stainless-steel wires. Methods: The sample of this study consisted of 140 segments of coated stainless-steel arch wires involving two wire dimensions (0.016 × 0.022 inch and 0.019 × 0.025 inch. The samples were supplied from seven companies (DB, RMO, TP, DANY, G&H, Highland and Hubit and the uncoated control samples were supplied from IOS company. Wire dimensions and thickness of coating layer were measured by the metallurgical light incident microscope and the static frictional force was measured using pulling the wire through set of ceramic brackets by the universal testing machine. The data were then statistically analyzed using ANOVA tests. Results: Generally measured wire dimensions do not match the stated dimensions by the manufacturer. The frictional forces of coated wires differ from uncoated control being higher in the labially coated wires and lesser in the fully Teflon coated wires owing to differences in the wire dimension, thickness of coating layer, and physical properties of coating materials. Conclusion: when tested in vitro, Teflon fully coated wires produce the least amount of friction.

  7. Dual solutions of Casson fluid flow over a stretching or shrinking sheet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cations in engineering processes such as in the extraction of polymer sheets, paper production, wire drawing and glass-fibre production. During the manufacturing process, a stretching ..... Casson M 1959 A flow equation for pigment-oil suspensions of the printing ink type. In: C.C.Mills (ed.),. Rheology of disperse systems, ...

  8. Measurements for the radiation spectra of fast Z-pinches produced at compression of multi-wire arrays on the 'Angara-5-1' facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolkhovitinov, E.A.; Rupasov, A.A.; Shikanov, A.S.; Fedulov, M.V.; Grabovsky, E.V.; Gritsuk, A.N.; Oleinik, G.M.; Volkov, G.S.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The measurements results on the radiation spectra of fast z-pinches produced at compression of cylindrical multi-wire tungsten and aluminum arrays in the experiments on a high-current 'Angara-5-1' facility are presented. Cylindrical multi-wire arrays has linear mass 200-400 μg/cm and the initial diameter 12-20 mm. The pinch current was about 3 MA with pulse duration of 140 ns and peak power 3 TW. The radiation spectra are measured within the range of 50-900 eV quanta by a spectrometer with transmission diffraction grating, where the radiation is recorded on the UF-4 X-ray film. An electromagnetic curtain shutter was used to protect the transmission grating from fast microparticles produced by the erosion of high-voltage electrodes. The radiation spectrum of 1-3 keV quanta was recorded by a convex crystal wide-range spectrometer. Total yield of the radiation was measured by a thermocouple calorimeter. The main part of the tungsten plasma radiative energy proves to correspond to the quasi-continuous spectrum within the range of 80-300 eV quanta. Measurements of the tungsten plasma radiation spectrum with spatial resolution by a pinch radius have shown that the effective transversal size (diameter) of the pinch as not higher than 1 mm. In the case of aluminum plasma an intensive linear radiation of the [H]- and [He]-like ions have been recorded along with a continuous and linear radiation of the [Li]- and [Be]-like ions with the range of 100-300 eV quanta. Spectral measurements of the aluminum plasma radiation with spatial resolution by the pinch radius have shown that the effective transversal size (diameter) of the pinch is around the value of 1.5 mm. Within the framework of the stationary collisional-radiative model, in respect of the [H]- and [He]-like ion spectral lines relative intensities, the parameters of the aluminum plasma pinch, namely, the electron temperature T e ∼ 550 eV and electron density n e ∼ 3 x 10 20 cm

  9. Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Orthosis Augmented by Either Stretching or Stretching and Strengthening for Stage II Tibialis Posterior Tendon Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Jeff; Neville, Christopher; Tome, Josh; Flemister, Adolph

    2015-09-01

    The value of strengthening and stretching exercises combined with orthosis treatment in a home-based program has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of augmenting orthosis treatment with either stretching or a combination of stretching and strengthening in participants with stage II tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction (TPTD). Participants included 39 patients with stage II TPTD who were recruited from a medical center and then randomly assigned to a strengthening or stretching treatment group. Excluding 3 dropouts, there were 19 participants in the strengthening group and 17 in the stretching group. The stretching treatment consisted of a prefabricated orthosis used in conjunction with stretching exercises. The strengthening treatment consisted of a prefabricated orthosis used in conjunction with the stretching and strengthening exercises. The main outcome measures were self-report (ie, Foot Function Index and Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment) and isometric deep posterior compartment strength. Two-way analysis of variance was used to test for differences between groups at 6 and 12 weeks after starting the exercise programs. Both groups significantly improved in pain and function over the 12-week trial period. The self-report measures showed minimal differences between the treatment groups. There were no differences in isometric deep posterior compartment strength. A moderate-intensity, home-based exercise program was minimally effective in augmenting orthosis wear alone in participants with stage II TPTD. Level I, prospective randomized study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Basic Wiring. Third Edition. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltwasser, Stan; Flowers, Gary; Blasingame, Don; Batson, Larry; Ipock, Dan; Carroll, Charles; Friesen, Wade; Fleming, Glenn

    This publication contains both a teacher edition and a student edition of materials for a foundation course in an electrical wiring program. The course introduces basic concepts and skills that are prerequisites to residential wiring and commercial and industrial wiring courses. The contents of the materials are tied to measurable and observable…

  11. A laser-wire system for the International Linear Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laser-wire; accelerator test facility; laser; optical system; Compton; beam emittance; MOPA; fiber laser. Abstract. A new laser-wire has been installed in the extraction line of the ATF at KEK. It aims at demonstrating that laser-wires can be used to measure micrometre scale beam size. In parallel, studies have been made to ...

  12. A laser-wire system for the International Linear Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... line of the ATF at KEK. It aims at demonstrating that laser-wires can be used to measure micrometre scale beam size. In parallel, studies have been made to specify a laser suitable for the ILC laser-wires. Keywords. Laser-wire; accelerator test facility; laser; optical system; Compton; beam emittance; MOPA; fiber laser.

  13. An X-ray scanner for wire chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akesson, T.; Arik, E.; Assamagan, K.; Baker, K.; Benjamin, D.; Bertelsen, H.; Bytchkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Capeans-Garrido, M.; Catinaccio, A.; Cetin, A.; Cwetanski, P.; Danielsson, H.; Dittus, F.; Dolgoshein, B.; Dressnandt, N.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eerola, P.; Farthouat, P.; Froidevaux, D.; Grichkevitch, Y.; Hajduk, Z.; Hansen, J. R.; Keener, P. K.; Kekelidze, G.; Konovalov, S.; Kowalski, T.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kruger, K.; Lundberg, B.; Luehring, F.; Manara, A.; McFarlane, K.; Mitsou, V. A.; Morozov, S.; Muraviev, S.; Nadtochy, A.; Newcomer, F. M.; Olszowska, J.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Peshekhonov, V.; Price, M.; Rembser, C.; Romaniouk, A.; Rust, D. R.; Schegelsky, V.; Sapinski, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Smirnov, S.; Smirnova, L. N.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Soutchkov, S.; Spiridenkov, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; VanBerg, R.; Vassilakopoulos, V.; Wang, C.; Williams, H. H.

    2003-07-01

    The techniques to measure the position of sense wires and field wires, the gas gain and the gas flow rate inside wire chambers using a collimated and filtered X-ray beam are reported. Specific examples are given using barrel modules of the Transition Radiation Tracker of the ATLAS experiment.

  14. Acute effect of different stretching methods on isometric muscle strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Vasconcellos de Lima Costa e Silva

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the acute effect of static stretching methods (SS and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF on the static muscle strength (SMS. Eleven young male subjects with strength training experience, performed 3 tests with a 48h interval between them, randomly selected, where each one subject carried out all procedures: a hand grip without stretching; b hand grip preceded by static stretching of wrist flexors muscles; c hand grip preceded by PNF stretching of wrist flexors muscles. The Shapiro-Wilk test verified the normality of data, and a one-way ANOVA with repeated measures, followed by Tukey’s post hoc test, evaluated the differences between the groups. The significance was set at p 0.05. In conclusion, both stretching methods had caused negative effects on isometric strength, reducing its levels.

  15. The effect of warm-up, static stretching and dynamic stretching on hamstring flexibility in previously injured subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Kieran; Murray, Elaine; Sainsbury, David

    2009-04-16

    Warm-up and stretching are suggested to increase hamstring flexibility and reduce the risk of injury. This study examined the short-term effects of warm-up, static stretching and dynamic stretching on hamstring flexibility in individuals with previous hamstring injury and uninjured controls. A randomised crossover study design, over 2 separate days. Hamstring flexibility was assessed using passive knee extension range of motion (PKE ROM). 18 previously injured individuals and 18 uninjured controls participated. On both days, four measurements of PKE ROM were recorded: (1) at baseline; (2) after warm-up; (3) after stretch (static or dynamic) and (4) after a 15-minute rest. Participants carried out both static and dynamic stretches, but on different days. Data were analysed using Anova. Across both groups, there was a significant main effect for time (p static stretching (p = 0.04) but significantly decreased after dynamic stretching (p = 0.013). The increased flexibility after warm-up and static stretching reduced significantly (p 0.05). Using ANCOVA to adjust for the non-significant (p = 0.141) baseline difference between groups, the previously injured group demonstrated a greater response to warm-up and static stretching, however this was not statistically significant (p = 0.05). Warm-up significantly increased hamstring flexibility. Static stretching also increased hamstring flexibility, whereas dynamic did not, in agreement with previous findings on uninjured controls. The effect of warm-up and static stretching on flexibility was greater in those with reduced flexibility post-injury, but this did not reach statistical significance. Further prospective research is required to validate the hypothesis that increased flexibility improves outcomes. ACTRN12608000638336.

  16. Stretch-minimising stream surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Barton, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We study the problem of finding stretch-minimising stream surfaces in a divergence-free vector field. These surfaces are generated by motions of seed curves that propagate through the field in a stretch minimising manner, i.e., they move without stretching or shrinking, preserving the length of their arbitrary arc. In general fields, such curves may not exist. How-ever, the divergence-free constraint gives rise to these \\'stretch-free\\' curves that are locally arc-length preserving when infinitesimally propagated. Several families of stretch-free curves are identified and used as initial guesses for stream surface generation. These surfaces are subsequently globally optimised to obtain the best stretch-minimising stream surfaces in a given divergence-free vector field. Our algorithm was tested on benchmark datasets, proving its applicability to incompressible fluid flow simulations, where our stretch-minimising stream surfaces realistically reflect the flow of a flexible univariate object. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute Muscle Stretching and Shoulder Position Sense

    OpenAIRE

    Björklund, Martin; Djupsjöbacka, Mats; Crenshaw, Albert G

    2006-01-01

    Context: Stretching is common among athletes as a potential method for injury prevention. Stretching-induced changes in the muscle spindle properties are a suggested mechanism, which may imply reduced proprioception after stretching; however, little is known of this association.

  18. Pre-exercise stretching does not impact upon running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Philip R; Walker, Adrian

    2007-11-01

    Pre-exercise stretching has been widely reported to reduce performance in tasks requiring maximal or near-maximal force or torque. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 3 different pre-exercise stretching routines on running economy. Seven competitive male middle and long-distance runners (mean +/- SD) age: 32.5 +/- 7.7 years; height: 175.0 +/- 8.8 cm; mass: 67.8 +/- 8.6 kg; V(.-)O2max: 66.8 +/- 7.0 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) volunteered to participate in this study. Each participant completed 4 different pre-exercise conditions: (a) a control condition, (b) static stretching, (c) progressive static stretching, and (d) dynamic stretching. Each stretching routine consisted of 2 x 30-second stretches for each of 5 exercises. Dependent variables measured were sit and reach test before and after each pre-exercise routine, running economy (ml x kg(-1) x km(-1)), and steady-state oxygen uptake (ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)), which were measured during the final 3 minutes of a 10-minute run below lactate threshold. All 3 stretching routines resulted in an increase in the range of movement (p = 0.008). There was no change in either running economy (p = 0.915) or steady-state V(.-)O2 (p = 0.943). The lack of change in running economy was most likely because it was assessed after a period of submaximal running, which may have masked any effects from the stretching protocols. Previously reported reductions in performance have been attributed to reduced motor unit activation, presumably IIX. In this study, these motor units were likely not to have been recruited; this may explain the unimpaired performance. This study suggests that pre-exercise stretching has no impact upon running economy or submaximal exercise oxygen cost.

  19. Towards plant wires

    OpenAIRE

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In experimental laboratory studies we evaluate a possibility of making electrical wires from living plants. In scoping experiments we use lettuce seedlings as a prototype model of a plant wire. We approximate an electrical potential transfer function by applying direct current voltage to the lettuce seedlings and recording output voltage. We analyse oscillation frequencies of the output potential and assess noise immunity of the plant wires. Our findings will be used in future designs of self...

  20. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells' cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here, we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression manoeuvres. After pressure equilibration, cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics.

  1. Soleus stretch reflex during cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Pierce, C. W.; Milner, T. E.

    2001-01-01

    the crank cycle, producing ankle dorsiflexion perturbations of similar trajectory. The stretch reflex was greatest during the power phase of the crank cycle and was decreased to the level of background EMG during recovery. Matched perturbations were induced under static conditions at the same crank angle...... active cycling as has been shown with the H-reflex. This lack of depression may reflect a decreased susceptibility of the stretch reflex to inhibition, possibly originating from presynaptic mechanisms....

  2. Photovoltaic Wire, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will investigate a new architecture for photovoltaic devices based on nanotechnology: photovoltaic wire. The...

  3. Photovoltaic Wire Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will investigate a new architecture for photovoltaic devices based on nanotechnology: photovoltaic wire. The...

  4. Charpak hemispherical wire chamber

    CERN Document Server

    1970-01-01

    pieces. Mesures are of the largest one. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  5. The effectiveness of manual stretching in the treatment of plantar heel pain: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parish Ben

    2011-06-01

    measures, blinded assessors and long-term follow up are needed to assess the efficacy of stretching.

  6. Acute effects of constant torque and constant angle stretching on the muscle and tendon tissue properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Andreas; Budini, Francesco; Tilp, Markus

    2017-08-01

    Static stretching induces acute structural changes of the muscle-tendon unit (MTU) that are related to the intensity or duration of stretching. It has been reported that stretching with a constant torque (CT) leads to greater joint range of motion changes than stretching with a constant angle (CA). Whether or not this difference is due to different structural changes of the MTUs of the lower leg and ankle plantar flexors is not known. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of single CA and CT stretching on various muscle and tendon mechanical properties. Seventeen young, healthy volunteers were tested on two separate days using either CT or CA stretching (4 × 30 s each). Before and after stretching, dorsiflexion range of motion (RoM), passive resistive torque (PRT), and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) were measured with a dynamometer. Ultrasonography of the medial gastrocnemius (GM) muscle-tendon junction (MTJ) displacement allowed us to determine the length changes in the tendon and muscle, respectively, and hence to calculate their stiffness. Maximum dorsiflexion increased while PRT, muscle-tendon stiffness, and muscle stiffness decreased following both CA and CT stretching. There was a greater increase in RoM following CT stretching compared to CA stretching. Moreover, the decline in PRT was greater during CT stretching compared to CA stretching. As expected, several functional adaptations (RoM, PRT) were different between CT and CA stretching due to the higher intensity of CT stretching. However, no structural differences in the adaptations to the stretching modalities could be detected. We suggest that the different functional adaptations between CA and CT stretching are the consequence of different adaptations in the perception of stretch and pain.

  7. Acute Effect of Static Stretching Exercise on Arterial Stiffness in Healthy Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, Yosuke; Hasegawa, Natsuki; Sato, Koji; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Iemitsu, Motoyuki

    2016-10-01

    Habitual stretching exercise increases carotid arterial compliance, and acute stretching exercise increases arterial compliance in patients with myocardial infarction. However, it is not known whether this arterial adaptation is sustained after exercise. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a single bout of stretching exercise on the time course of systemic, central, and peripheral arterial stiffness in healthy young subjects. Twenty-six healthy young men performed static stretching exercise involving the entire body (trunk, upper limb, and lower limb) for 40 mins. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV; an index of arterial stiffness), blood pressure, and heart rate were measured before and 0, 15, 30, and 60 mins after stretching exercise. Femoral-ankle PWV and brachial-ankle PWV were reduced relative to baseline 15 and 30 mins after acute stretching (P stretch stimulation may result in chronic high arterial compliance, although a single bout of stretch exercise acutely affects arterial compliance.

  8. Tensosensitivity of the Hot-Wire Probe

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pak, A

    2002-01-01

    ...., on the anemometer type. In a constant current anemometer, it is possible to measure and separate out the noise moving to the electric circuit of the anemometer, it is not the case with hot-wire anemometers of other types...

  9. 1998 wire development workshop proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    This report consists of vugraphs of the presentations at the conference. The conference was divided into the following sessions: (1) First Generation Wire Development: Status and Issues; (2) First Generation Wire in Pre-Commercial Prototypes; (3) Second Generation Wire Development: Private Sector Progress and Issues; (4) Second Generation Wire Development: Federal Laboratories; and (5) Fundamental Research Issues for HTS Wire Development

  10. Applying hot wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell - Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Al Shakhshir, Saher

    2015-01-01

    for all current densities. Therefore, only one curve-fit equation will be required. The voltage curve E0 is an arbitrary calibration curve, and this can be conveniently chosen to be the voltage signal for a dry hydrogen stream at a given temperature and various flow rates which can be easily measured....

  11. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  12. Load-Deflection and Friction Properties of PEEK Wires as Alternative Orthodontic Wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Yoshifumi; Hayakawa, Tohru; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2017-08-09

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is now attracting attention as an alternative to metal alloys in the dental field. In the present study, we evaluated the load-deflection characteristics of PEEK wires in addition to their frictional properties. Three types of PEEK wires are used: two sizes of rectangular shape, 0.016 × 0.022 in² and 0.019 × 0.025 in² (19-25PEEK), and rounded shape, diameter 0.016 in (16PEEK). As a control, Ni-Ti orthodontic wire, diameter 0.016 in, was used. The three-point bending properties were evaluated in a modified three-point bending system for orthodontics. The static friction between the orthodontic wire and the bracket was also measured. The load-deflection curves were similar among Ni-Ti and PEEK wires, except for 16PEEK with slot-lid ligation. The bending force of 19-25PEEK wire was comparable with that of Ni-Ti wire. 19-25PEEK showed the highest load at the deflection of 1500 μm ( p 0.05). No significant difference was seen in static friction between all three PEEK wires and Ni-Ti wire ( p > 0.05). It is suggested that 19-25PEEK will be applicable for orthodontic treatment with the use of slot-lid ligation.

  13. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance in a Proton Exchange membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Hussain, Nabeel; Berning, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) remains a critical problem for their durability, cost, and performance. Because the anode side of this fuel cell has the tendency to become dehydrated, measuring the water balance can be an important diagnosis tool during fuel cell...... operation. The water balance indicates how much of the product water leaves at the anode side versus the cathode side. Previous methods of determining the fuel cell water balance often relied on condensing the water in the exhaust gas streams and weighing the accumulated mass which is a time consuming...... can be directly converted into the fuel cell water balance. In this work, experimental ex-situ results are presented and the elegance and usefulness of this method is demonstrated....

  14. Automating wiring formboard design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Berg, T.

    2013-01-01

    Increase in aircraft wiring complexity call for manufacturing design improvements to reduce cost and lead-time. To achieve such improvements, a joint research project was performed by the Flight Performance and Propulsion (FPP) group and Fokker Elmo BV, the second largest aircraft wiring harness

  15. Relationship Between Stretch Duration And Shoulder Musculature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To date, studies focussing on the effect of stretching on flexibility have focused almost solely on the effect of chronic stretching rather than the effects of acute stretching performed immediately prior to physical activity. The effects of different static stretches were assessed on passive shoulder range of motion (ROM).

  16. Resonant tunneling of electrons in quantum wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krive, I.V.; Shekhter, R.I.; Jonson, M.; Krive, I.V.

    2010-01-01

    We considered resonant electron tunneling in various nanostructures including single wall carbon nanotubes, molecular transistors and quantum wires formed in two-dimensional electron gas. The review starts with a textbook description of resonant tunneling of noninteracting electrons through a double-barrier structure. The effects of electron-electron interaction in sequential and resonant electron tunneling are studied by using Luttinger liquid model of electron transport in quantum wires. The experimental aspects of the problem (fabrication of quantum wires and transport measurements) are also considered. The influence of vibrational and electromechanical effects on resonant electron tunneling in molecular transistors is discussed.

  17. Efficacy of static stretching and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretch on hamstrings length after a single session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hora, John; Cartwright, Abigail; Wade, Clive D; Hough, Alan D; Shum, Gary L K

    2011-06-01

    A number of studies have investigated the efficacy of several repetitions of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching (PNF) and static stretching (SS). However, there is limited research comparing the effects of a single bout of these stretching maneuvers. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of a single bout of a therapist-applied 30-second SS vs. a single bout of therapist-applied 6-second hamstring (agonist) contract PNF. Forty-five healthy subjects between the ages of 21 and 35 were randomly allocated to 1 of the 2 stretching groups or a control group, in which no stretching was received. The flexibility of the hamstring was determined by a range of passive knee extension, measured using a universal goniometer, with the subject in the supine position and the hip at 90° flexion, before and after intervention. A significant increase in knee extension was found for both intervention groups after a single stretch (SS group = 7.53°, p < 0.01 and PNF group = 11.80°, p < 0.01). Both interventions resulted in a significantly greater increase in knee extension when compared to the control group (p < 0.01). The PNF group demonstrated significantly greater gains in knee extension compared to the SS group (mean difference 4.27°, p < 0.01). It can be concluded that a therapist applied SS or PNF results in a significant increase in hamstring flexibility. A hamstring (agonist) contract PNF is more effective than an SS in a single stretching session. These findings are important to physiotherapists or trainers working in clinical and sporting environments. Where in the past therapists may have spent time conducting multiple repetitions of a PNF and an SS, a single bout of either technique may be considered just as effective. A key component of the study methodology was the exclusion of a warm-up period before stretching. Therefore, the findings of efficacy of a single PNF are of particular relevance in sporting environments and busy clinical

  18. Atomic Stretch: Optimally bounded real-time stretching and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Nielsen, Jannik Boll

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Stretch is a plugin for your preferred Adobe video editing tool, allowing real-time smooth and optimally bounded retarget-ting from and to any aspect ratio. The plugin allows preserving of high interest pixels through a protected region, attention redirection through color-modification, co......Atomic Stretch is a plugin for your preferred Adobe video editing tool, allowing real-time smooth and optimally bounded retarget-ting from and to any aspect ratio. The plugin allows preserving of high interest pixels through a protected region, attention redirection through color...

  19. Effects of right atrial stretch on plasma renin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annat, G; Grandjean, B; Vincent, M; Jarsaillon, E; Sassard, J

    1976-04-01

    In anaesthetized dog, right atrial stretch leads in the first five minutes to a decrease in plasma renin activity, when measured in inferior vena cava just above the renal veins. Bilateral cervical vagotomy increases plasma renin activity. After vagotomy, atrial stretch no longer has any effect on plasma renin activity. The results support the hypothesis of a control of renin secretion originating from atrial volume receptors.

  20. A comparison of assisted and unassisted proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques and static stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddigan, Meaghan E; Peach, Ashley A; Behm, David G

    2012-05-01

    A comparison of assisted and unassisted proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques and static stretching. J Strength Cond Res 26(5): 1238-1244, 2012-Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching often requires a partner. Straps are available allowing an individual to perform PNF stretching alone. It is not known if a strap provides similar improvements in the range of motion (ROM) as partner-assisted PNF or static stretching. The purpose of this study was to compare assisted and unassisted (with a strap) PNF stretching and static stretching. Hip joint ROM, reaction time (RT), and movement time (MT) were measured prestretching and poststretching. Thirteen recreationally active adults participated in this study. The participants were subjected to 5 different stretch interventions in a random order on separate days. Stretch conditions included unassisted PNF stretching using (a) isometric, (b) concentric, and (c) eccentric contractions with a stretch strap, (d) partner-assisted isometric PNF, and (e) static stretching. The RT, MT, dynamic, active, passive hip flexion angle, and angular velocity with dynamic hip flexion were measured before and after the intervention. The ROM improved (p < 0.05) 2.6, 2.7, and 5.4%, respectively, with dynamic, active static, and passive static ROM, but there was no significant difference between the stretching protocols. There was a main effect for time (p < 0.05) with all stretching conditions negatively impacting dynamic angular velocity (9.2%). Although there was no significant effect on RT, MT showed a negative main effect for time (p < 0.05) slowing 3.4%. In conclusion, it was found that all 3 forms of active stretching provided similar improvements in the ROM and poststretching performance decrements in MT and angular velocity. Thus, individuals can implement PNF stretching techniques with a partner or alone with a strap to improve ROM, but athletes should not use these techniques before important

  1. Stretch Moduli of Ribonucleotide Embedded Short DNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Koh, Kyung Duk; Riedo, Elisa; Storici, Francesca

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of DNA is essential to comprehending the dynamics of many cellular functions. DNA deformations are involved in many mechanisms when genetic information needs to be stored and used. In addition, recent studies have found that Ribonucleotides (rNMPs) are among the most common non-standard nucleotides present in DNA. The presences of rNMPs in DNA might cause mutation, fragility or genotoxicity of chromosome but how they influence the structure and mechanical properties of DNA remains unclear. By means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based single molecule spectroscopy, we measure the stretch moduli of double stranded DNAs (dsDNA) with 30 base pairs and 5 equally embedded rNMPs. The dsDNAs are anchored on gold substrate via thiol chemistry, while the AFM tip is used to pick up and stretch the dsDNA from its free end through biotin-streptavidin bonding. Our preliminary results indicate that the inclusion of rNMPs in dsDNA might significantly change its stretch modulus, which might be important in some biological processes.

  2. Note: Improved wire-wound heater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Ricardo G; Vitoux, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The authors have measured, at cryogenic temperature, the upper limit of the heat transfer in different configurations of a wire-wound heater. We found that the heat transferred has an upper limit of about 15 W/cm(2) and is dependent on the diameter of the wire. In this paper, we present three ways of increasing the heat transferred by this type of heater and its application in different continuous flow cryostats.

  3. COBRA-IV wire wrap data comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, T.E.; George, T.L.; Wheeler, C.L.

    1979-02-01

    Thermal hydraulic analyses of hexagonally packed wire-wrapped fuel assemblies are complicated by the induced crossflow between adjacent subchannels. The COBRA-IV computer code simultaneously solves the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of fuel assemblies. The modifications and the results are presented which are predicted by the COBRA-IV calculation. Comparisons are made with data measured in five experimental models of a wire-wrapped fuel assembly

  4. EFFECT OF STATIC STRETCHING ON STRENGTH OF HAMSTRING MUSCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta P Pachpute

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Flexibility is an indisputable component of fitness defined as the ability to move a single joint or series of joints through an unrestricted pain free range of motion. Static stretching consists of stretching a muscle or group of muscle to its farthest point and then maintaining or holding that position. The literature supports that muscles are capable of exerting their greatest strength when they are fully lengthen. Hence this study was conducted to find the effect of static stretching on hamstring muscle. Methods: The study was experimental study design. 40 samples were selected by purposive sampling method. Flexibility of the hamstring muscle unilaterally right side (arbitrarily chosen was measured by active knee extension test of all the subjects who met the inclusion criteria of the study. After measuring the flexibility of hamstring muscle, strength was measured by 1RM for the same side (right hamstring muscle. Static Stretching Protocol was given for 5 days per week for 6 weeks to all the participants. After the 6 weeks of training, knee extension deficiency and 1RM was documented. Result: Statistical analysis using Paired t-test was done. The t-test showed that there was significant effect of static stretching on 1RM of hamstring muscle (p<0.05 & active knee extension test (p=0.000. Conclusion: Static stretching showed significant change in pre and post 1RM of hamstring muscle and active knee extension test. There was significant improvement of hamstring muscles flexibility and strength after giving static stretching in female population. So it is possible that females who are unable to participate in traditional strength training activities may be able to experience gains through static stretching.

  5. A numerical method for measuring capacitive soft sensors through one channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tairych, Andreas; Anderson, Iain A.

    2018-03-01

    Soft capacitive stretch sensors are well suited for unobtrusive wearable body motion capture. Conventional sensing methods measure sensor capacitances through separate channels. In sensing garments with many sensors, this results in high wiring complexity, and a large footprint of rigid sensing circuit boards. We have developed a more efficient sensing method that detects multiple sensors through only one channel, and one set of wires. It is based on a R-C transmission line assembled from capacitive conductive fabric stretch sensors, and external resistors. The unknown capacitances are identified by solving a system of nonlinear equations. These equations are established by modelling and continuously measuring transmission line reactances at different frequencies. Solving these equations numerically with a Newton–Raphson solver for the unknown capacitances enables real time reading of all sensors. The method was verified with a prototype comprising three sensors that is capable of detecting both individually and simultaneously stretched sensors. Instead of using three channels and six wires to detect the sensors, the task was achieved with only one channel and two wires.

  6. Thermosonic wire bonding of IC devices using palladium wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shze, J.H.; Poh, M.T.; Tan, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    The feasibility of replacing gold wire by palladium wire in thermosonic wire bonding of CMOS and bipolar devices are studied in terms of the manufacturability, physical, electrical and assembly performance. The results that palladium wire is a viable option for bonding the bipolar devices but not the CMOS devices

  7. Towards plant wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    In experimental laboratory studies we evaluate a possibility of making electrical wires from living plants. In scoping experiments we use lettuce seedlings as a prototype model of a plant wire. We approximate an electrical potential transfer function by applying direct current voltage to the lettuce seedlings and recording output voltage. We analyse oscillation frequencies of the output potential and assess noise immunity of the plant wires. Our findings will be used in future designs of self-growing wetware circuits and devices, and integration of plant-based electronic components into future and emergent bio-hybrid systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Equibiaxial cyclic stretch stimulates fibroblasts to rapidly remodel fibrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Jenna Leigh; Billiar, Kristen Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the effects of the mechanical environment on wound healing is critical for developing more effective treatments to reduce scar formation and contracture. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dynamic mechanical stretch on cell-mediated early wound remodeling independent of matrix alignment which obscures more subtle remodeling mechanisms. Cyclic equibiaxial stretch (16% stretch at 0.2 Hz) was applied to fibroblast-populated fibrin gel in vitro wound models for eight days. Compaction, density, tensile strength, and collagen content were quantified as functional measures of remodeling. Stretched samples were approximately ten times stronger, eight-fold more dense, and eight times thinner than statically cultured samples. These changes were accompanied by a 15% increase in net collagen but no significant differences in cell number or viability. When collagen crosslinking was inhibited in stretched samples, the extensibility increased and the strength decreased. The apparent weakening was due to a reduction in compaction rather than a decrease in ability of the tissue to withstand tensile forces. Interestingly, inhibiting collagen crosslinking had no measurable effects on the statically cultured samples. These results indicate that amplified cell-mediated compaction and even a slight addition in collagen content play substantial roles in mechanically induced wound strengthening. These findings increase our understanding of how mechanical forces guide the healing response in skin, and the methods employed in this study may also prove valuable tools for investigating stretch-induced remodeling of other planar connective tissues and for creating mechanically robust engineered tissues.

  9. Effects of Stretching Exercise on Heart Rate Variability During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jeongok G; Yeo, SeonAe

    Little evidence exists for effects of low-intensity exercises such as stretching on cardiovascular health in pregnant women. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of a 20-minute stretching exercise on heart rate variability (HRV), blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) in healthy pregnant women. In 15 pregnant women with a mean (SD) age of 29.47 (4.07) years and mean (SD) gestational weeks of 26.53 (8.35), HRV, and BP were measured before and after the 20-minute stretching exercise. Compared with before the stretching exercise, standard deviation of the normal-to-normal intervals, total variability of heart rate, increased by 7.40 milliseconds (t = -2.31, P = .04) and root mean square of successive differences, a surrogate measure of parasympathetic outflow, also increased by 11.68 milliseconds (Z = -2.04, P = .04) after the stretching exercise. Diastolic BP and HR decreased by 2.13 mm Hg (t = 1.93, P = .07) and 3.31 bpm (t = 2.17, P = .05), respectively, but they did not reach statistical significance. These preliminary data suggest that 20 minutes of stretching exercise may promote cardiovascular health by attenuating the loss of parasympathetic tone associated with pregnancy.

  10. Acute effects of unilateral static stretching on handgrip strength of the stretched and non-stretched limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelmini, Jacob D; Cornwell, Andrew; Khodiguian, Nazareth; Thayer, Jennifer; Araujo, And John

    2018-02-16

    To determine the effects of an acute bout of unilateral static stretching on handgrip strength of both the stretched and non-stretched limb. It was reasoned that if the non-stretched limb experienced a decrease in force output, further evidence for a neural mechanism to explain a post-stretch force reduction would be obtained as no mechanical adaptation would have occurred. Thirty participants performed maximum voluntary unilateral handgrip contractions of both limbs before and after stretching the finger flexors of the strength-dominant side only. Each trial was assessed for peak force, muscle activity (iEMG), and rate of force generation. Following the stretching bout, peak force and iEMG decreased by 4.4% (p = 0.001) and 6.4% (p = 0.000) respectively in the stretched limb only. However, rate of force generation was significantly impaired in both the stretched (- 17.3%; p = 0.000) and non-stretched limbs (- 10.8%; p = 0.003) 1 min post-stretch, and remained similarly depressed for both limbs 15 min later. Acute stretching negatively impacts rate of force generation more than peak force. Moreover, a reduced rate of force generation from the non-stretched limb indicates the presence of a cross-over inhibitory effect through the nervous system, which provides additional evidence for a neural mechanism.

  11. Cryogenic Pressure Seal for Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciana, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    High-pressure-seal formed by forcing polyurethane into space surrounding wire or cable in special fitting. Wire or cable routed through fitting then through a tightly fitting cap. Wire insulation left intact. Cap filled with sealant and forced onto the fitting: this pushes sealant into fitting so it seals wire or cable in fitting as well as in cap.

  12. Soleus stretch reflex during cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Pierce, C. W.; Milner, T. E.

    2001-01-01

    The modulation and strength of the human soleus short latency stretch reflex was investigated by mechanically perturbing the ankle during an unconstrained pedaling task. Eight subjects pedaled at 60 rpm against a preload of 10 Nm. A torque pulse was applied to the crank at various positions durin...

  13. On the generalised stretch function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kharlamov, Alexander A.; Filip, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 4 (2012), s. 272-278 ISSN 1022-1344 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/09/2066 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : molecular length * recurrence equations * rubber * strain * stretch functions Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.606, year: 2012

  14. Optical tweezers stretching of chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pope, L.H.; Bennink, Martin L.; Greve, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Recently significant success has emerged from exciting research involving chromatin stretching using optical tweezers. These experiments, in which a single chromatin fibre is attached by one end to a micron-sized bead held in an optical trap and to a solid surface or second bead via the other end,

  15. Transient filament stretching rheometer II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    1997-01-01

    The Lagrangian sspecification is used to simulate the transient stretching filament rheometer. Simulations are performed for dilute PIB-solutions modeled as a four mode Oldroyd-B fluid and a semidilute PIB-solution modeled as a non-linear single integral equation. The simulations are compared...

  16. Research on wire rope deformation distribution of WR-CVT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wu; Guo, Wei; Zhang, Chuanwei; Lu, Zhengxiong; Xu, Xiaobin

    2017-07-01

    A wire rope continuously variable transmissions (WR-CVT) has been introduced in the paper, in view of its less research, this paper mainly studied the deformation distribution of 6×7+IWS bending wire rope. The results shown that in the same section, half of the side strands are in a stretched state and half are in a compressed state. When the transmission ratio i=2.35, the maximum deformation and the minimum deformation are decrease when section U1 to U2, U3 transition. Wire deformation distribution when the transmission ratio i=0.42 is similar to that of i=0.2.35. Wire deformation amount and the deformation difference decrease as the transmission ratio decreases, this shows that the increase in the bending radius of the wire will make the wire deformation more uniform, and the reduction of the deformation difference will also reduce the wear. This study provides a basis for the study of fatigue and wears failure of WR-CVT components.

  17. Comparing the effects of 3 weeks of upper-body vibration training, vibration and stretching, and stretching alone on shoulder flexibility in college-aged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Steven L; Kim, Eonho; Seo, Dong-Il; Bemben, Michael G

    2013-12-01

    This study compared the effects of 3 weeks of upper-body vibration training, vibration and stretching, and stretching alone on shoulder flexibility in college-aged men. Twenty-one men were randomly assigned to vibration-stretching (VS; n = 8), vibration only (VO; n = 6), or stretching only (SO; n = 7) groups that trained 3 times per week for 3 weeks. All 3 groups performed 9 total sets of 30-second stretches. The VS group performed four 30-second upper-body vibration exercises and five 30-second upper-body stretching exercises. The VO group performed nine 30-second upper-body vibration exercises. The SO group performed nine 30-second upper-body stretching exercises. Shoulder flexion (SF), shoulder extension (SE), and shoulder transverse extension (STE) were assessed by a Leighton Flexometer and back scratch tests bilaterally (BSR, BSL) were measured via tape measure. A 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) evaluated groups at baseline and a 2-way repeated-measures ANOVA evaluated the interventions over time. At baseline, there were no group differences in age, height, or weight. There was a significant (p alone or combined with stretching, is a viable alternative to a standard stretching routine when attempting to increase shoulder flexibility. Adding vibration training to a flexibility regimen may improve the likelihood of regularly performing flexibility sessions because of increased variety.

  18. Copper wire bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Zhong, ZhaoWei; Pecht, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    This critical volume provides an in-depth presentation of copper wire bonding technologies, processes and equipment, along with the economic benefits and risks.  Due to the increasing cost of materials used to make electronic components, the electronics industry has been rapidly moving from high cost gold to significantly lower cost copper as a wire bonding material.  However, copper wire bonding has several process and reliability concerns due to its material properties.  Copper Wire Bonding book lays out the challenges involved in replacing gold with copper as a wire bond material, and includes the bonding process changes—bond force, electric flame off, current and ultrasonic energy optimization, and bonding tools and equipment changes for first and second bond formation.  In addition, the bond–pad metallurgies and the use of bare and palladium-coated copper wires on aluminum are presented, and gold, nickel and palladium surface finishes are discussed.  The book also discusses best practices and re...

  19. Acute effects of 15min static or contract-relax stretching modalities on plantar flexors neuromuscular properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babault, Nicolas; Kouassi, Blah Y L; Desbrosses, Kevin

    2010-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the immediate effects of 15 min static or sub-maximal contract-relax stretching modalities on the neuromuscular properties of plantar flexor muscles. Ten male volunteers were tested before and immediately after 15 min static or contract-relax stretching programs of plantar flexor muscles (20 stretches). Static stretching consisted in 30s stretches to the point of discomfort. For the contract-relax stretching modality, subjects performed 6s sub-maximal isometric plantar flexion before 24s static stretches. Measurements included maximal voluntary isometric torque (MVT) and the corresponding electromyographic activity of soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles (RMS values), as well as maximal peak torque (Pt) elicited at rest by single supramaximal electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve. After 15 min stretching, significant MVT and SOL RMS decreases were obtained (-6.9+/-11.6% and -6.5+/-15.4%, respectively). No difference was obtained between stretching modalities. Pt remained unchanged after stretching. MG RMS changes were significantly different between stretching modalities (-9.4+/-18.3% and +3.5+/-11.6% after static and contract-relax stretching modalities, respectively). These findings indicated that performing 15 min static or contract-relax stretching had detrimental effects on the torque production capacity of plantar flexor muscles and should be precluded before competition. Mechanisms explaining this alteration seemed to be stretch modality dependent. Copyright 2009 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Intermittent But Not Continuous Static Stretching Improves Subsequent Vertical Jump Performance In Flexibility-Trained Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanis, Gregory C; Donti, Olyvia; Tsolakis, Charilaos; Smilios, Ilias; Bishop, David J

    2017-02-23

    This study examined changes in countermovement jump (CMJ) height after an intermittent or a continuous static stretching protocol of equal total duration. Sixteen male, elite-level gymnasts performed 90 s of intermittent (3 x 30 s with 30 s rest) or continuous stretching (90 s) of the quadriceps muscle. A single-leg stretching and jumping design was used, with the contra-lateral limb serving as a control. The same individuals performed both conditions with alternate legs in a randomized, counterbalanced order. One leg CMJ height was measured for the stretched and the control leg after warm-up, immediately after stretching, and at regular intervals for 10 min after stretching. Range of motion (ROM) of the hip and knee joints was measured before, after, and 10 min post-stretching. Compared to the control leg, intermittent stretching increased CMJ height by 8.1±2.0%, 4 min into recovery (+2.2±2.0 cm, 95%CI: 1.0-3.4 cm, p=0.001), while continuous stretching decreased CMJ height by 17.5±3.3% immediately after (-2.9±1.7 cm, 95%CI: -2.0 to -3.7 cm, p=0.001) and by 12.0±2.7% one min after stretching (-2.2±2.1 cm, 95%CI: -1.2 to -3.2 cm, p=0.001). The increases in hip (2.9 and 3.6, p=0.001. d=2.4) and knee joint ROM (5.1 and 6.1, p=0.001. d=0.85) after the intermittent and continuous stretching protocols were not different. The opposite effects of intermittent vs. continuous stretching on subsequent CMJ performance suggests that stretching mode is an important variable when examining the acute effects of static stretching on performance in flexibility-trained athletes.

  1. Research regarding stiffness optimization of wires used for joints actuation from an elephant's trunk robotic arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofu, C.; Stan, G.

    2016-11-01

    Elephant's trunk robotic arms driven by wires and pulley mechanisms have issues with wires stiffness because of the entailed elastic deformations that is causing errors of positioning. Static and dynamic loads from each joint of the robotic arm affect the stiffness of driving wires and precision positioning. The influence of wires elastic deformation on precision positioning decreases with the increasing of wires stiffness by using different pre-tensioning devices. In this paper, we analyze the variation of driving wires stiffness particularly to each wire driven joint. We obtain optimum wires stiffness variation by using an analytical method that highlights the efficiency of pre-tensioning mechanism. The analysis of driving wires stiffness is necessary for taking appropriate optimization measures of robotic arm dynamic behavior and, thus, for decreasing positioning errors of the elephant's trunk robotic arm with inner actuation through wires/cables.

  2. Effects of Static and Dynamic Stretching on the Isokinetic Peak Torques and Electromyographic Activities of the Antagonist Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Serefoglu, Ufuk Sekir, Hakan Gür, Bedrettin Akova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate if static and dynamic stretching exercises of the knee muscles (quadriceps and hamstring muscles have any effects on concentric and eccentric isokinetic peak torques and electromyographic amplitudes (EMG of the antagonist muscles. Twenty healthy male athletes (age between 18-30 years voluntarily participated in this study. All of the subjects visited the laboratory to complete the following intervention in a randomized order on 5 separate days; (a non-stretching (control, (b static stretching of the quadriceps muscles, (c static stretching of the hamstring muscles, (d dynamic stretching of the quadriceps muscles, and (e dynamic stretching of the hamstring muscles. Static stretching exercises either for the quadriceps or the hamstring muscles were carried out at the standing and sitting positions. Subjects performed four successive repetitions of each stretching exercises for 30 seconds in both stretching positions. Similar to static stretching exercises two different stretching modes were designed for dynamic stretching exercises. Concentric and eccentric isokinetic peak torque for the non-stretched antagonist quadriceps or hamstring muscles at angular velocities of 60°/sec and 240°/sec and their concurrent electromyographic (EMG activities were measured before and immediately after the intervention. Isokinetic peak torques of the non-stretched agonist hamstring and quadriceps muscles did not represent any significant (p > 0.05 differences following static and dynamic stretching of the antagonist quadriceps and hamstring muscles, respectively. Similarly, the EMG activities of the agonist muscles exhibited no significant alterations (p > 0.05 following both stretching exercises of the antagonist muscles. According to the results of the present study it is possible to state that antagonist stretching exercises either in the static or dynamic modes do not affect the isokinetic peak torques and the EMG

  3. Effects of Static and Dynamic Stretching on the Isokinetic Peak Torques and Electromyographic Activities of the Antagonist Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serefoglu, Abdullah; Sekir, Ufuk; Gür, Hakan; Akova, Bedrettin

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if static and dynamic stretching exercises of the knee muscles (quadriceps and hamstring muscles) have any effects on concentric and eccentric isokinetic peak torques and electromyographic amplitudes (EMG) of the antagonist muscles. Twenty healthy male athletes (age between 18-30 years) voluntarily participated in this study. All of the subjects visited the laboratory to complete the following intervention in a randomized order on 5 separate days; (a) non-stretching (control), (b) static stretching of the quadriceps muscles, (c) static stretching of the hamstring muscles, (d) dynamic stretching of the quadriceps muscles, and (e) dynamic stretching of the hamstring muscles. Static stretching exercises either for the quadriceps or the hamstring muscles were carried out at the standing and sitting positions. Subjects performed four successive repetitions of each stretching exercises for 30 seconds in both stretching positions. Similar to static stretching exercises two different stretching modes were designed for dynamic stretching exercises. Concentric and eccentric isokinetic peak torque for the non-stretched antagonist quadriceps or hamstring muscles at angular velocities of 60°/sec and 240°/sec and their concurrent electromyographic (EMG) activities were measured before and immediately after the intervention. Isokinetic peak torques of the non-stretched agonist hamstring and quadriceps muscles did not represent any significant (p > 0.05) differences following static and dynamic stretching of the antagonist quadriceps and hamstring muscles, respectively. Similarly, the EMG activities of the agonist muscles exhibited no significant alterations (p > 0.05) following both stretching exercises of the antagonist muscles. According to the results of the present study it is possible to state that antagonist stretching exercises either in the static or dynamic modes do not affect the isokinetic peak torques and the EMG activities

  4. The effect of warm-up, static stretching and dynamic stretching on hamstring flexibility in previously injured subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Elaine

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Warm-up and stretching are suggested to increase hamstring flexibility and reduce the risk of injury. This study examined the short-term effects of warm-up, static stretching and dynamic stretching on hamstring flexibility in individuals with previous hamstring injury and uninjured controls. Methods A randomised crossover study design, over 2 separate days. Hamstring flexibility was assessed using passive knee extension range of motion (PKE ROM. 18 previously injured individuals and 18 uninjured controls participated. On both days, four measurements of PKE ROM were recorded: (1 at baseline; (2 after warm-up; (3 after stretch (static or dynamic and (4 after a 15-minute rest. Participants carried out both static and dynamic stretches, but on different days. Data were analysed using Anova. Results Across both groups, there was a significant main effect for time (p 0.05. Using ANCOVA to adjust for the non-significant (p = 0.141 baseline difference between groups, the previously injured group demonstrated a greater response to warm-up and static stretching, however this was not statistically significant (p = 0.05. Conclusion Warm-up significantly increased hamstring flexibility. Static stretching also increased hamstring flexibility, whereas dynamic did not, in agreement with previous findings on uninjured controls. The effect of warm-up and static stretching on flexibility was greater in those with reduced flexibility post-injury, but this did not reach statistical significance. Further prospective research is required to validate the hypothesis that increased flexibility improves outcomes. Trial Registration ACTRN12608000638336

  5. The effect of warm-up, static stretching and dynamic stretching on hamstring flexibility in previously injured subjects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Kieran

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Warm-up and stretching are suggested to increase hamstring flexibility and reduce the risk of injury. This study examined the short-term effects of warm-up, static stretching and dynamic stretching on hamstring flexibility in individuals with previous hamstring injury and uninjured controls. METHODS: A randomised crossover study design, over 2 separate days. Hamstring flexibility was assessed using passive knee extension range of motion (PKE ROM). 18 previously injured individuals and 18 uninjured controls participated. On both days, four measurements of PKE ROM were recorded: (1) at baseline; (2) after warm-up; (3) after stretch (static or dynamic) and (4) after a 15-minute rest. Participants carried out both static and dynamic stretches, but on different days. Data were analysed using Anova. RESULTS: Across both groups, there was a significant main effect for time (p < 0.001). PKE ROM significantly increased with warm-up (p < 0.001). From warm-up, PKE ROM further increased with static stretching (p = 0.04) but significantly decreased after dynamic stretching (p = 0.013). The increased flexibility after warm-up and static stretching reduced significantly (p < 0.001) after 15 minutes of rest, but remained significantly greater than at baseline (p < 0.001). Between groups, there was no main effect for group (p = 0.462), with no difference in mean PKE ROM values at any individual stage of the protocol (p > 0.05). Using ANCOVA to adjust for the non-significant (p = 0.141) baseline difference between groups, the previously injured group demonstrated a greater response to warm-up and static stretching, however this was not statistically significant (p = 0.05). CONCLUSION: Warm-up significantly increased hamstring flexibility. Static stretching also increased hamstring flexibility, whereas dynamic did not, in agreement with previous findings on uninjured controls. The effect of warm-up and static stretching on flexibility was greater in those with reduced

  6. Evolution of cementite morphology in pearlitic steel wire during wet wire drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaodan; Godfrey, Andrew; Hansen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    decreasing from 19 nm (ε = 0) to 2 nm (ε = 3.7) in correspondence with the reduction in wire diameter. The deformation of the cementite is strongly related to plastic deformation in the ferrite, with coarse slip steps, shear bands and cracks in the cementite plates/particles observed parallel to either {110...... microscope observations show that cementite plates become increasingly aligned with the wire axis as the drawing strain is increased. Measurements in the transmission electron microscope show that the cementite deforms plastically during wire drawing , with the average thickness of the cementite plates...

  7. Duration of static stretching influences muscle force production in hamstring muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Yuji; Miyahara, Yutetsu; Naito, Hisashi; Katamoto, Shizuo; Aoki, Junichiro

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether duration of static stretching could affect the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Volunteer male subjects (n = 10) underwent 2 different durations of static stretching of their hamstring muscles in the dominant leg: 30 and 60 seconds. No static stretching condition was used as a control condition. Before and after each stretching trial, hamstring flexibility was measured by a sit and reach test. MVC was then measured using the maximal effort of knee flexion. The hamstring flexibility was significantly increased by 30 and 60 seconds of static stretching (control: 0.5 +/- 1.1 cm; 30 seconds: 2.1 +/- 1.8 cm; 60 seconds: 3.0 +/- 1.6 cm); however, there was no significant difference between 30 and 60 seconds of static stretching conditions. The MVC was significantly lowered with 60 seconds of static stretching compared to the control and 30 seconds of the stretching conditions (control: 287.6 +/- 24.0 N; 30 seconds: 281.8 +/- 24.2 N; 60 seconds: 262.4 +/- 36.2 N). However, there was no significant difference between control and 30 seconds of static stretching conditions. Therefore, it was concluded that the short duration (30 seconds) of static stretching did not have a negative effect on the muscle force production.

  8. Static stretching does not alter pre and post-landing muscle activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moss Wesley R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Static stretching may result in various strength and power deficiencies. Prior research has not determined, however, if static stretching causes a change in muscle activation during a functional task requiring dynamic stability. The purpose of this study was to determine if static stretching has an effect on mean pre and postlanding muscle (vastus medialis VM, vastus lateralis VL, medial hamstring MH, and biceps femoris BF activity. Methods 26 healthy, physically active subjects were recruited, from which 13 completed a 14-day static stretching regimen for the quadriceps and hamstrings. Using the data from the force plate and EMG readings, a mean of EMG amplitude was calculated for 150 msec before and after landing. Each trial was normalized to an isometric reference position. Means were calculated for the VM, VL, MH, and BF from 5 trials in each session. Measures were collected pre, immediately following the 1st stretching session, and following 2 weeks of stretching. Results A 14-day static stretching regimen resulted in no significant differences in pre or postlanding mean EMG amplitude during a drop landing either acutely or over a 14-day period. Conclusions Static stretching, done acutely or over a 14-day period does not result in measurable differences of mean EMG amplitude during a drop landing. Static stretching may not impede dynamic stability of joints about which stretched muscles cross.

  9. FiberWire is superior in strength to stainless steel wire for tension band fixation of transverse patellar fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, P B; Kosmopoulos, V; Coté, R E; Tayag, T J; Nana, A D

    2009-11-01

    The metal implants used to achieve fixation of displaced transverse patellar fractures are associated with implant failure, postoperative pain and a significant re-operation rate. Recent studies have examined braided suture as a possible alternative to stainless steel wire to increase patient satisfaction and decrease re-operation rates, but suture has not demonstrated clearly superior fixation strength. FiberWire is a reinforced braided polyblend suture that has demonstrated superior characteristics to the previous sutures studied and has not to our knowledge been examined as a material for tension band fixation of transverse patellar fractures. Materials testing was performed on repeated samples of No. 5 FiberWire suture and 18-gauge stainless steel wire. The strength and stiffness of each material was measured. The two materials were then used for tension band fixation on a novel transverse patellar fracture model and tested to failure by three-point bending. The constructs included a single stainless steel wire, a single-strand FiberWire tied with a sliding knot, double-strand FiberWire tied with sliding knots and double-strand FiberWire tied with a Wagoner's Hitch. The fixation strength and stiffness of the constructs were measured. Unlike stainless steel, FiberWire maintained its initial stiffness until failure. Furthermore, during three-point-bend testing, double-strand FiberWire was found to have a significantly higher failure load than stainless steel wire when the suture was tied and locked under the tension produced by a modified Wagoner's Hitch. FiberWire is a potentially superior alternative to stainless steel wire in tension band fixation of transverse patellar fractures.

  10. Stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this topic for: Teens Dehydration Safety Tips: Running Knee Injuries Repetitive Stress Injuries Sports and Exercise Safety Dealing With Sports Injuries Sports Center Strains and Sprains View more Partner Message About Us Contact Us ...

  11. Modeling of Service-Drop Wires and Interior-Wiring Cables for Lightning Overvoltage Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Susumu; Noda, Taku; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Sakai, Hiroshi

    As the information society progresses, a variety of electronic appliances have come into wide use in common houses. If a lightning stroke causes faults or incorrect operations of these electronic appliances, a social economic loss is considered to be large. For this reason, the focus of lightning protection measures for distribution lines in Japan has expanded to include the low-voltage side of the distribution line in addition to the high-voltage side. In order to calculate lightning overvoltages at the low-voltage side, the surge characteristics of service-drop wires and interior-wiring cables have to be modeled accurately. First, this paper describes test results of the surge characteristics of service-drop wires and interior-wiring cables. The modal surge impedances and the propagation velocities of various service-drop wires and interior-wiring cables are obtained by the test. Based on the test results obtained, this paper proposes a modeling methodology of these wires and cables for accurate EMTP (Electro-Magnetic Transients Program) lightning overvoltage simulations. The proposed model is validated by comparing EMTP simulation results with field test results.

  12. WIRELESS TENSION BAND WIRING FOR OLECRANON FRACTURES. Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukoz, Sami; Bayoud, Wael

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluates the results of wireless tension band wire (WTBW) which is a modified technique of tension band wires (TBW) for Mayo type II A and III A olecranon fractures. In this technique the K-wires of the TBW are replaced by a cerclage wire while keeping the figure of eight wiring. We reviewed retrospectively our WTBW cases done between 2000 and 2015 where we replaced the K-wires by a cerclage wire. In this technique no hardware migration is possible. Patients were evaluated clinically, radiographicaly and a DASH score was measured. Seventeen patients were reviewed with a mean age of 58.5 years. The mean follow-up period was 58.5 months. The mean DASH score was 12 with 7 patients having a DASH score of zero. Joint mobility was near normal compared to the other side with loss of a mean of 4º in elbow extension and a mean of 3º in elbow flexion. In comparison with other series, in addition to good results, hardware removal for medical reasons was the lowest in our technique. It was needed in three patients for pain on elbow contact and in one with ulnar nerve irritation. This represents a rate of 23.5%. Undesirable events related to the use of K-wires in standard tension band wiring, such as wire migration, wire protrusion through the skin and wire impingement, are absent in the wireless tension band wiring. The high rate of patient satisfaction, good clinical results as well as low rate of needed hardware removal make this technique preferable for fixing Mayo Type II A olecranon fractures.

  13. Fluoride influences nickel-titanium orthodontic wires' surface texture and friction resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbassy, Mona Aly

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects exerted by the acidulated fluoride gel on stainless steel and nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) orthodontic wires. Sixty stainless steel and Ni-Ti orthodontic archwires were distributed into forty archwires used for in vitro study and twenty for in situ study. Fluoride was applied for 1 h in the in vitro experiment while it was applied for 5 min in the in situ experiment. The friction resistance of all wires with ceramic brackets before/after topical fluoride application was measured using a universal testing machine at 1 min intervals of moving wire. Moreover, surface properties of the tested wires before/after fluoride application and before/after friction test were examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Dunnett's t -test was used to compare frictional resistance of as-received stainless steel wires and Ni-Ti wires to the wires treated by fluoride in vitro and in situ ( P wire on friction resistance in vitro and in situ ( P wires recorded significantly high friction resistance after fluoride application when compared to stainless steel wires in vitro , P wires in situ , P wires after fluoride application in vitro and in situ . The in vitro fluoride application caused an increase in friction resistance of Ni-Ti wires when compared to stainless steel wires. In vitro and in situ fluoride application caused deterioration in surface properties of Ni-Ti wires.

  14. Effects of Static Stretching and Playing Soccer on Knee Laxity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Christian; Gokeler, Alli; Donath, Lars; Hoppe, Matthias W; Freiwald, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated exercise-induced effects of static stretching and playing soccer on anterior tibial translation (ATT) of the knee joint. Randomized controlled trial. University biomechanics laboratory. Thirty-one athletes were randomly assigned into a stretching (26.9 ± 6.2 years, 1.77 ± 0.09 m, 67.9 ± 10.7 kg) and a control group (27.9 ± 7.4 years, 1.75 ± 0.08 m, 72.0 ± 14.9 kg). Thirty-one amateur soccer players in an additional soccer group (25.1 ± 5.6 years, 1.74 ± 0.10 m, 71.8 ± 14.8 kg). All participants had no history of knee injury requiring surgery and any previous knee ligament or cartilage injury. The stretching group performed 4 different static stretching exercises with a duration of 2 × 20 seconds interspersed with breaks of 10 seconds. The soccer group completed a 90-minute soccer-specific training program. The control group did not perform any physical activity for approximately 30 minutes. Anterior tibial translation was measured with the KT-1000 knee arthrometer at forces of 67 N, 89 N, and maximal manual force (Max) before and after the intervention. There was a significant increase in ATT after static stretching and playing soccer at all applied forces. Maximal manual testing revealed a mean increase of ATT after static stretching of 2.1 ± 1.6 mm (P static stretching at 67 and 89 N is significantly higher than in controls. At maximum manual testing, significant differences were evident between all groups. Static stretching and playing soccer increase ATT and may consequently influence mechanical factors of the anterior cruciate ligament. The ATT increase after static stretching was greater than after playing soccer. The observed increase in ATT after static stretching and playing soccer may be associated with changes in kinesthetic perception and sensorimotor control, activation of muscles, joint stability, overall performance, and higher injury risk.

  15. Correlation of the Elastic Properties of Stretch Film on Unit Load Containment

    OpenAIRE

    Bisha, James Victor

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to correlate the applied material properties of stretch film with its elastic properties measured in a laboratory setting. There are currently no tools available for a packaging engineer to make a scientific decision on how one stretch film performs against another without applying the film. The system for stretch wrap comparison is mostly based on trial and error which can lead to a significant loss of product when testing a new film or shipping a new product...

  16. Wired to freedom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Kim Sune Karrasch; Bertilsson, Margareta

    2017-01-01

    dimension of life science through a notion of public politics adopted from the political theory of John Dewey. We show how cochlear implantation engages different social imaginaries on the collective and individual levels and we suggest that users share an imaginary of being “wired to freedom” that involves...... new access to social life, continuous communicative challenges, common practices, and experiences. In looking at their lives as “wired to freedom,” we hope to promote a wider spectrum of civic participation in the benefit of future life science developments within and beyond the field of Cochlear...

  17. Wiring and lighting

    CERN Document Server

    Kitcher, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Wiring and Lighting provides a comprehensive guide to DIY wiring around the home. It sets out the regulations and legal requirements surrounding electrical installation work, giving clear guidelines that will enable the reader to understand what electrical work they are able to carry out, and what the testing and certification requirements are once the work is completed. Topics covered include: Different types of circuits; Types of cables and cable installation under floors and through joists; Isolating, earthing and bonding; Accessory boxes and fixings; Voltage bands; Detailed advice on safe

  18. Electric wiring domestic

    CERN Document Server

    Coker, A J

    1992-01-01

    Electric Wiring: Domestic, Tenth Edition, is a clear and reliable guide to the practical aspects of domestic electric wiring. Intended for electrical contractors, installation engineers, wiremen and students, its aim is to provide essential up to date information on modern methods and materials in a simple, clear, and concise manner. The main changes in this edition are those necessary to bring the work into line with the 16th Edition of the Regulations for Electrical Installations issued by the Institution of Electrical Engineers. The book begins by introducing the basic features of domestic

  19. Modern wiring practice

    CERN Document Server

    Steward, W E

    2012-01-01

    Continuously in print since 1952, Modern Wiring Practice has now been fully revised to provide an up-to-date source of reference to building services design and installation in the 21st century. This compact and practical guide addresses wiring systems design and electrical installation together in one volume, creating a comprehensive overview of the whole process for contractors and architects, as well as electricians and other installation engineers. Best practice is incorporated throughout, combining theory and practice with clear and accessible explanation, all

  20. Acute effects of static, dynamic, and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching on muscle power in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoel, Mateus E; Harris-Love, Michael O; Danoff, Jerome V; Miller, Todd A

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of 3 types of stretching-static, dynamic, and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF)-on peak muscle power output in women. Concentric knee extension power was measured isokinetically at 60 degrees x s(-1) and 180 degrees x s(-1) in 12 healthy and recreationally active women (mean age +/- SD, 24 +/- 3.3 years). Testing occurred before and after each of 3 different stretching protocols and a control condition in which no stretching was performed. During 4 separate laboratory visits, each subject performed 5 minutes of stationary cycling at 50 W before performing the control condition, static stretching protocol, dynamic stretching protocol, or PNF protocol. Three submaximal warm-up trials preceded 3 maximal knee extensions at each testing velocity. A 2-minute rest was allowed between testing at each velocity. The results of the statistical analysis indicated that none of the stretching protocols caused a decrease in knee extension power. Dynamic stretching produced percentage increases (8.9% at 60 degrees x s(-1) and 6.3% at 180 degrees x s(-1)) in peak knee extension power at both testing velocities that were greater than changes in power after static and PNF stretching. The findings suggest that dynamic stretching may increase acute muscular power to a greater degree than static and PNF stretching. These findings may have important implications for athletes who participate in events that rely on a high level of muscular power.

  1. Stretching of red blood cells at high strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, J. E.; Ristenpart, W. D.

    2017-10-01

    Most work on the mechanical behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) in flow has focused on simple shear flows. Relatively little work has examined RBC deformations in the physiologically important extensional flow that occurs at the entrance to a constriction. In particular, previous work suggests that RBCs rapidly stretch out and then retract upon entering the constriction, but to date no model predicts this behavior for the extremely high strain rates typically experienced there. In this Rapid Communication, we use high speed video to perform systematic measurements of the dynamic stretching behavior of RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. We demonstrate that both the Kelvin-Voigt and Skalak viscoelastic models capture the observed stretching dynamics, up to strain rates as high as 2000 s-1. The results indicate that the effective elastic modulus of the RBC membrane at these strain rates is an order of magnitude larger than moduli measured by micropipette aspiration or other low strain rate techniques.

  2. The time course of the effects of constant-angle and constant-torque stretching on the muscle-tendon unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herda, T J; Costa, P B; Walter, A A; Ryan, E D; Cramer, J T

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the time course of passive range of motion (PROM), passive torque (PASTQ), and musculo-tendinous stiffness (MTS) responses during constant-angle (CA) and constant-torque (CT) stretching of the leg flexors. Eleven healthy men [mean ± standard deviation (SD): age = 21.5 ± 2.3 years] performed 16 30-s bouts of CA and CT stretching of the leg flexors. PROM, PASTQ , and MTS were measured during stretches 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16. For PROM and PASTQ , there were no differences between CA and CT stretching treatments (P > 0.05); however, there were stretch-related differences (P stretching (collapsed across CA and CT stretching) with additional increases up to 8 min of stretching. PASTQ decreased following one 30-s bout of stretching (collapsed across CA and CT stretching) and continued to decrease up to 4 min of stretching. In contrast, only the CT stretching treatment resulted in changes to MTS (P stretching, with subsequent decreases in MTS up to 6 min of stretching. These results suggested that CT stretching may be more appropriate than a stretch held at a constant muscle length for decreasing MTS. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Measure of thermal neutron flux in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor using {sup 197} Au wire activation detectors; Medida do fluxo de neutrons termicos do reator IPEN/MB-01 com detectores de ativacao de fios de {sup 197} Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Andre Luis Ferreira

    1995-12-31

    This dissertation has aimed at developing a neutron flux measurement technique by means of detectors activation analysis. The main task of this work was the implementation of this thermal neutron flux measurement technique, using gold wires as activation detectors in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor core. The neutron thermal flux spatial distribution was obtained by gold wire activation technique, with wire diameters of 0.125 mm and 0.250 mm in seven selected reactor experimental channels. The values of thermal flux were about 10{sup 9} neutrons/cm{sup 2}.s. This experiment has been the first one conducted with gold wires in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, being this technique implemented for use by experiments in flux mapping of the core 73 refs., 60 figs., 31 tabs.

  4. Effects of Static and Dynamic Stretching on the Isokinetic Peak Torques and Electromyographic Activities of the Antagonist Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serefoglu, Abdullah; Sekir, Ufuk; Gür, Hakan; Akova, Bedrettin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if static and dynamic stretching exercises of the knee muscles (quadriceps and hamstring muscles) have any effects on concentric and eccentric isokinetic peak torques and electromyographic amplitudes (EMG) of the antagonist muscles. Twenty healthy male athletes (age between 18-30 years) voluntarily participated in this study. All of the subjects visited the laboratory to complete the following intervention in a randomized order on 5 separate days; (a) non-stretching (control), (b) static stretching of the quadriceps muscles, (c) static stretching of the hamstring muscles, (d) dynamic stretching of the quadriceps muscles, and (e) dynamic stretching of the hamstring muscles. Static stretching exercises either for the quadriceps or the hamstring muscles were carried out at the standing and sitting positions. Subjects performed four successive repetitions of each stretching exercises for 30 seconds in both stretching positions. Similar to static stretching exercises two different stretching modes were designed for dynamic stretching exercises. Concentric and eccentric isokinetic peak torque for the non-stretched antagonist quadriceps or hamstring muscles at angular velocities of 60°/sec and 240°/sec and their concurrent electromyographic (EMG) activities were measured before and immediately after the intervention. Isokinetic peak torques of the non-stretched agonist hamstring and quadriceps muscles did not represent any significant (p > 0.05) differences following static and dynamic stretching of the antagonist quadriceps and hamstring muscles, respectively. Similarly, the EMG activities of the agonist muscles exhibited no significant alterations (p > 0.05) following both stretching exercises of the antagonist muscles. According to the results of the present study it is possible to state that antagonist stretching exercises either in the static or dynamic modes do not affect the isokinetic peak torques and the EMG activities

  5. Practical wiring in SI units

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Henry A

    2013-01-01

    Practical Wiring, Volume 1 is a 13-chapter book that first describes some of the common hand tools used in connection with sheathed wiring. Subsequent chapters discuss the safety in wiring, cables, conductor terminations, insulating sheathed wiring, conductor sizes, and consumer's control equipments. Other chapters center on socket outlets, plugs, lighting subcircuits, lighting accessories, bells, and primary and secondary cells. This book will be very valuable to students involved in this field of interest.

  6. Wire EDM for Refractory Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellars, G. R.; Harris, F. E.; Lowell, C. E.; Pollman, W. M.; Rys, V. J.; Wills, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce fabrication time and costs, Wire Electrical Discharge Machine (Wire EDM) method was investigated as tool for fabricating matched blade roots and disk slots. Eight high-strength nickel-base superalloys were used. Computer-controlled Wire EDM technique provided high quality surfaces with excellent dimensional tolerances. Wire EDM method offers potential for substantial reductions in fabrication costs for "hard to machine" alloys and electrically conductive materials in specific high-precision applications.

  7. Wire chambers: Trends and alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regler, Meinhard

    1992-01-01

    The subtitle of this year's Vienna Wire Chamber Conference - 'Recent Trends and Alternative Techniques' - signalled that it covered a wide range of science and technology. While an opening Vienna talk by wire chamber pioneer Georges Charpak many years ago began 'Les funerailles des chambres a fils (the burial of wire chambers)', the contrary feeling this year was that wire chambers are very much alive!

  8. Silicon Nano wires with MoSx and Pt as Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, S.H.; Ho, S.T.; Chen, W.J.

    2016-01-01

    A convenient method was used for synthesizing Pt-nanoparticle//silicon nano wires nano composites. Obtained Pt-/silicon nano wires electrocatalysts were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The hydrogen evolution reaction efficiency of the Pt-/silicon nano wire nano composite catalysts was assessed by examining polarization and electrolysis measurements under solar light irradiations. The electrochemical characterizations demonstrate that Pt-/silicon nano wire electrodes exhibited an excellent catalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction in an acidic electrolyte. The hydrogen production capability of Pt-/silicon nano wires is also comparable to /silicon nano wires and Pt/silicon nano wires. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy experiments suggest that the enhanced performance of Pt-/silicon nano wires can be attributed to the fast electron transfer between Pt-/silicon nano wire electrodes and electrolyte interfaces.

  9. Transport in quantum wires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transport in quantum wires. SIDDHARTHA LAL, SUMATHI RAO£ and DIPTIMAN SEN. Centre for Theoretical Studies, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India. £ Harish-chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhusi, Allahabad 211 019, India. Abstract. With a brief introduction to one-dimensional channels ...

  10. Wire chamber conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartl, W.; Neuhofer, G.; Regler, M.

    1986-02-01

    This booklet contains program and the abstracts of the papers presented at the conference, most of them dealing with performance testing of various types of wire chambers. The publication of proceedings is planned as a special issue of 'Nuclear instruments and methods' later on. All abstracts are in English. An author index for the book of abstracts is given. (A.N.)

  11. Effect of stretching techniques on hamstring flexibility in female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flexibility can be achieved by a variety of stretching techniques and the benefits of stretching are known. However, controversy remains about the best type of stretching for achieving a particular goal or outcome. The four most basic stretches are static stretching, dynamic stretching, PNF hold-relax and PNF contract-relax ...

  12. Bending and stretching of plates

    CERN Document Server

    Mansfield, E H; Hemp, W S

    1964-01-01

    The Bending and Stretching of Plates deals with elastic plate theory, particularly on small- and large-deflexion theory. Small-deflexion theory concerns derivation of basic equations, rectangular plates, plates of various shapes, plates whose boundaries are amenable to conformal transformation, plates with variable rigidity, and approximate methods. Large-deflexion theory includes general equations and some exact solutions, approximate methods in large-deflexion theory, asymptotic large-deflexion theories for very thin plates. Asymptotic theories covers membrane theory, tension field theory, a

  13. EDITORIAL More than a wire More than a wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-10-01

    Nanowires are the natural evolution of the connections in circuits when scaled down to nanometre sizes. On closer inspection, of course, the role of nanowires in developing new technologies is much more than just a current-bearing medium. By sizing the diameters of these objects down to the nanoscale, their properties become increasingly sensitive to factors such as the gas composition, temperature and incident light of their surrounding environment, as well as defects and variations in diameter. What becomes important in modern electronics innovations is not just what is connected, but how. Nanowires had already begun to attract the attention of researchers in the early 1990s as advances in imaging and measurement devices invited researchers to investigate the properties of these one-dimensional structures [1, 2]. This interest has sparked ingenious ways of fabricating nanowires such as the use of a DNA template. A collaboration of researchers at Louisiana Tech University in the US hs provided an overview of various methods to assemble conductive nanowires on a DNA template, including a summary of different approaches to stretching and positioning the templates [3]. Work in this area demonstrates a neat parallel for the role of DNA molecules as the building blocks of life and the foundations of nanoscale device architectures. Scientists at HP Labs in California are using nanowires to shrink the size of logic arrays [4]. One aspect of electronic interconnects that requires particular attention at nanoscale sizes is the effect of defects. The researchers at HP Labs demonstrate that their approach, which they name FPNI (field-programmable nanowire interconnect), is extremely tolerant of the high defect rates likely to be found in these nanoscale structures, and allows reduction in size and power without significantly sacrificing the clock rate. Another issue in scaling down electronics is the trend for an increasing resistivity with decreasing wire width. Researchers

  14. A High-Temperature Transient Hot-Wire Thermal Conductivity Apparatus for Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins, R. A.; Roder, H. M.; Nieto de Castro, C. A.

    1991-01-01

    A new apparatus for measuring both the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of fluids at temperatures from 220 to 775 K at pressures to 70 MPa is described. The instrument is based on the step-power-forced transient hot-wire technique. Two hot wires are arranged in different arms of a Wheatstone bridge such that the response of the shorter compensating wire is subtracted from the response of the primary wire. Both hot wires are 12.7 ?m diameter platinum wire and are simultaneously use...

  15. Mechanical optimisation of a high-precision fast wire scanner at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Samuelsson, Sebastian; Veness, Raymond

    Wire scanners are instruments used to measure the transverse beam prole in particle accelerators by passing a thin wire through the particle beam. To avoid the issues of vacuum leakage through the bellows and wire failure related to current designs of wire scanners, a new concept for a wire scanner has been developed at CERN. This design has all moving parts inside the beam vacuum and has a nominal wire scanning speed of 20 m/s. The demands on the design associated with this together with the high precision requirements create a need for\

  16. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloot, Lizeth H; van den Noort, Josien C; van der Krogt, Marjolein M; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Harlaar, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163-191 ms). Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally measure reflexes during

  17. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizeth H Sloot

    Full Text Available Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163-191 ms. Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally

  18. Power generation with laterally packaged piezoelectric fine wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rusen; Qin, Yong; Dai, Liming; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2009-01-01

    Converting mechanical energy into electricity could have applications in sensing, medical science, defence technology and personal electronics, and the ability of nanowires to 'scavenge' energy from ambient and environmental sources could prove useful for powering nanodevices. Previously reported nanowire generators were based on vertically aligned piezoelectric nanowires that were attached to a substrate at one end and free to move at the other. However, there were problems with the output stability, mechanical robustness, lifetime and environmental adaptability of such devices. Here we report a flexible power generator that is based on cyclic stretching-releasing of a piezoelectric fine wire that is firmly attached to metal electrodes at both ends, is packaged on a flexible substrate, and does not involve sliding contacts. Repeatedly stretching and releasing a single wire with a strain of 0.05-0.1% creates an oscillating output voltage of up to approximately 50 mV, and the energy conversion efficiency of the wire can be as high as 6.8%.

  19. Effects of hamstring stretching on passive muscle stiffness vary between hip flexion and knee extension maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, N; Hirata, K; Kanehisa, H

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the effects of hamstring stretching on the passive stiffness of each of the long head of the biceps femoris (BFl), semitendinosus (ST), and semimembranosus (SM) vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In 12 male subjects, before and after five sets of 90 s static stretching, passive lengthening measurements where knee or hip joint was passively rotated to the maximal range of motion (ROM) were performed. During the passive lengthening, shear modulus of each muscle was measured by ultrasound shear wave elastography. Both stretching maneuvers significantly increased maximal ROM and decreased passive torque at a given joint angle. Passive knee extension stretching maneuver significantly reduced shear modulus at a given knee joint angle in all of BFl, ST, and SM. In contrast, the stretching effect by passive hip flexion maneuver was significant only in ST and SM. The present findings indicate that the effects of hamstring stretching on individual passive muscles' stiffness vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In terms of reducing the muscle stiffness of BFl, stretching of the hamstring should be performed by passive knee extension rather than hip flexion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Acute decrease in the stiffness of resting muscle belly due to static stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, K; Shinohara, M; Nozaki, S; Katayose, M

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the acute effect of static stretching exercise on the resting stiffness of gastrocnemius muscle belly. Ten healthy young adults performed standing wall stretching in dorsiflexion for 1 min at a time and repeated five times. Before and after stretching, the shear modulus was measured in medial and lateral heads of the resting gastrocnemius muscle with ultrasound shear-wave elastography. After the stretching, dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joint increased (P stretching, shear modulus decreased (P stretching across muscle heads. The decrease in shear modulus returned in 20 min after stretching. In the comparison group of 10 additional subjects, the standing intervention without stretching had no influence on these measures. There was a negative correlation between dorsiflexion ROM and shear modulus in either head before and after stretching. The results demonstrate the transient decreases in the stiffness of the resting gastrocnemius muscle belly and indicate that joint flexibility is greater in individuals with lower resting stiffness of the muscle belly. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Rat cutaneous RA afferents activated by two-dimensional skin stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Peter; Robichaud, Daniel R

    2004-07-01

    Skin develops biaxial stresses and strains when stretched. Rapidly adapting cutaneous mechanoreceptor neurons are known to be stretch sensitive, yet in the past, they have been studied using stretch stimuli applied along only a single direction. In this study, cutaneous rapidly adapting mechanoreceptors were studied in preparations of isolated skin in which the skin was stretched dynamically using biaxial stretch stimuli and in which loads and displacements were measured along two directions. Stretch stimuli followed a pseudo-Gaussian waveform and were applied along either one or two directions simultaneously. Associations between spikes and mechanical variables were determined using multiple logistic regression. When the skin was actuated along a single direction, holding the orthogonal axis fixed, spike responses were strongly associated with mechanical variables along the actuated direction. The variables were stress and its rate of change, the rate of change of strain, and the product of stress and its rate of change, which is proportional to strain energy density. When the skin was stretched along a single direction, spikes were very poorly associated with stress variables measured along the direction orthogonal to the stretch. Afferents showed weak directional selectivity: they were slightly more responsive to the variable stress along the circumferential direction of the hindlimb. When the skin was stretched biaxially (i.e., along both directions simultaneously) with identical pseudo-Gaussian noise stimuli, neuronal responses were associated with the same variables as above, but the associations were weaker.

  2. Applying hot-wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell for a pre-humidified hydrogen stream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Shakhshir, Saher Al

    2016-01-01

    was originally believed to be limited to the fuel cell anode operating on dry hydrogen. In the current work, it is expanded for the case of a pre-humidified hydrogen stream. In addition, useful correlations are derived that link the fuel cell water balance with the anode side inlet and outlet thermodynamic state......In a recent publication it has been shown how the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell can be determined employing hot wire anemometry. The hot wire sensor has to be placed into the anode outlet pipe of the operating fuel cell, and the voltage signal E that is read from the sensor...... has to be divided by a pre-determined voltage signal E0 that has been obtained for a stream of dry hydrogen where the molar flow rate corresponds to a total current I of the fuel cell stack and a stoichiometric flow ratio, ξ. Because the last two properties are usually continuously known in fuel cell...

  3. Degradation of orthodontic wires under simulated cariogenic and erosive conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cavalcante Lima JABER

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of cariogenic and erosive challenges (CCs and ECs, respectively on the degradation of copper-nickel-titanium (CuNiTi orthodontic wires. Sixty wire segments were divided into four treatment groups and exposed to CCs, ECs, artificial saliva, or dry storage (no-treatment control. CC and EC were simulated using a demineralizing solution (pH 4.3 and a citric acid solution (pH 2.3, respectively. Following treatment, the average surface roughness (Ra of the wires was assessed, and friction between the wires and a passive self-ligating bracket was measured. CuNiTi wires subjected to ECs exhibited significantly higher Ra values than did those that were stored in artificial saliva. In contrast, surface roughness was not affected by CCs. Finally, friction between the treated wires and brackets was not affected by ECs or CCs. Our results indicate that CuNiTi orthodontic wires may suffer degradation within the oral cavity, as ECs increased the surface roughness of these wires. However, rougher surfaces did not increase friction between the wire and the passive self-ligating bracket.

  4. Degradation of orthodontic wires under simulated cariogenic and erosive conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Laura Cavalcante Lima; Rodrigues, José Augusto; Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of cariogenic and erosive challenges (CCs and ECs, respectively) on the degradation of copper-nickel-titanium (CuNiTi) orthodontic wires. Sixty wire segments were divided into four treatment groups and exposed to CCs, ECs, artificial saliva, or dry storage (no-treatment control). CC and EC were simulated using a demineralizing solution (pH 4.3) and a citric acid solution (pH 2.3), respectively. Following treatment, the average surface roughness (Ra) of the wires was assessed, and friction between the wires and a passive self-ligating bracket was measured. CuNiTi wires subjected to ECs exhibited significantly higher Ra values than did those that were stored in artificial saliva. In contrast, surface roughness was not affected by CCs. Finally, friction between the treated wires and brackets was not affected by ECs or CCs. Our results indicate that CuNiTi orthodontic wires may suffer degradation within the oral cavity, as ECs increased the surface roughness of these wires. However, rougher surfaces did not increase friction between the wire and the passive self-ligating bracket.

  5. Cyclic Stretch Alters Vascular Reactivity of Mouse Aortic Segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Leloup

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Large, elastic arteries buffer the pressure wave originating in the left ventricle and are constantly exposed to higher amplitudes of cyclic stretch (10% than muscular arteries (2%. As a crucial factor for endothelial and smooth muscle cell function, cyclic stretch has, however, never been studied in ex vivo aortic segments of mice. To investigate the effects of cyclic stretch on vaso-reactivity of mouse aortic segments, we used the Rodent Oscillatory Tension Set-up to study Arterial Compliance (ROTSAC. The aortic segments were clamped at frequencies of 6–600 bpm between two variable preloads, thereby mimicking dilation as upon left ventricular systole and recoiling as during diastole. The preloads corresponding to different transmural pressures were chosen to correspond to a low, normal or high amplitude of cyclic stretch. At different time intervals, cyclic stretch was interrupted, the segments were afterloaded and isometric contractions by α1-adrenergic stimulation with 2 μM phenylephrine in the absence and presence of 300 μM L-NAME (eNOS inhibitor and/or 35 μM diltiazem (blocker of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels were measured. As compared with static or cyclic stretch at low amplitude (<10 mN or low frequency (0.1 Hz, cyclic stretch at physiological amplitude (>10 mN and frequency (1–10 Hz caused better ex vivo conservation of basal NO release with time after mounting. The relaxation of PE-precontracted segments by addition of ACh to stimulate NO release was unaffected by cyclic stretch. In the absence of basal NO release (hence, presence of L-NAME, physiological in comparison with aberrant cyclic stretch decreased the baseline tension, attenuated the phasic contraction by phenylephrine in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ and shifted the smaller tonic contraction more from a voltage-gated Ca2+ channel-mediated to a non-selective cation channel-mediated. Data highlight the need of sufficient mechanical activation of endothelial and

  6. Lack of effect of moderate-duration static stretching on plantar flexor force production and series compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavan, Dale; Coleman, David R; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2012-03-01

    The effects of an acute bout of moderate-duration static stretching on plantar flexor force production, series compliance of the muscle-tendon unit, and levels of neuromuscular activation were examined. Eighteen active individuals (9 men and 9 women) performed four 45-s static plantar flexor stretches and a time-matched control of no stretch (where subjects remained seated in the dynamometer for 4 min with no stretch being performed). Measures of peak isometric moment, rate of force development, neuromuscular activation (interpolated twitch technique and electromyography), twitch force characteristics, passive moment during stretch, and tendon elongation during maximal voluntary contractions were taken before and after the stretching. Despite a significant stress-relaxation response during stretch (9.3%, Pforce development (P=0.93; effect size 0.01), neuromuscular activation (interpolated twitch: P=0.86; electromyography: P=0.09; effect size 0.02), or tendon elongation (P=0.61; effect size 0.07) after stretching. Twitch characteristics were also unchanged after stretching, although there was a reduction in the rate of twitch torque relaxation (RR(t); Pstatic stretching did not impair the force generating capacity of the plantar flexors or negatively affect muscle-tendon mechanical properties. Static stretching may not always have detrimental consequences for force production. Thus, clinicians may be able to apply moderate-duration stretches to patients without risk of reducing muscular performance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Short Term Effects of Neurodynamic Stretching and Static Stretching Techniques on Hamstring Muscle Flexibility in Healthy Male Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Rashad Ahmed

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Flexibility is a key component of rehabilitation and inadequate muscle extensibility remains a commonly accepted factor for musculoskeletal disorders. Studies on the most optimal technique for improving muscle flexibility are a widely debated. The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness of neurodynamic and static stretching techniques on hamstring flexibility in healthy male subjects. This study was a randomized experimental trial; forty healthy male subjects with hamstring tightness were randomly divided into two equal groups: The neurodynamic group and the static stretching group. Treatment was given for 5 consecutive days and the outcomes were measured using Active knee Extension Test and Straight Leg Raising. There was a significant improvement in hamstring flexibility following application of both neurodynamic and static stretching but the improvement in the neurodynamic group (p<0.001 was better than that of the static group (p<0.02. Results suggest that a neurodynamic stretching could increase hamstring flexibility to a greater extent than static stretching in healthy male subjects with a tight hamstring.

  8. PROPRIOCEPTIVE NEUROMUSCULAR FACILITATION STRETCHING VERSUS STATIC STRETCHING ON SPRINTING PERFORMANCE AMONG COLLEGIATE SPRINTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaram Maharjan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: A warm-up is important part of preparation for sprinting. There is popularity of doing stretching as part of warm up before athletic activity. The static stretching and PNF stretching is performed by athletes but their effectiveness on sprinting performance is in state of debate. The objective is to determine the effect of static stretching and PNF stretching on sprinting performance in college sprinters and to compare the effects of PNF stretching over static stretching on sprinting performance in college sprinters. Method: A total of 100 subjects were taken for the study that fulfill the inclusion criteria and all were divided into group- A (static stretching and group- B (PNF stretching by simple random sampling method. Both the groups received 5 minutes of warm-up exercises. Pre-Post design was used, which consisted of running a 40-yard sprint immediately following 2 stretching conditions aimed at the lower limb muscles Results: In static stretching group sprint time changed from 6.55 with standard deviation of 0.93 to 6.12 with standard deviation of 1.02 (P.605. Conclusion: Hence both static stretching and PNF stretching can be performed before sprinting activity to improve the sprinting performance.

  9. Acute Effects of the Different Intensity of Static Stretching on Flexibility and Isometric Muscle Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Matsuo, Shingo; Hatano, Genki; Iwata, Masahiro; Yokoi, Kazuaki; Tsuchida, Wakako; Banno, Yasuhiro; Asai, Yuji

    2017-12-01

    Kataura, S, Suzuki, S, Matsuo, S, Hatano, G, Iwata, M, Yokoi, K, Tsuchida, W, Banno, Y, and Asai, Y. Acute effects of the different intensity of static stretching on flexibility and isometric muscle force. J Strength Cond Res 31(12): 3403-3410, 2017-In various fields, static stretching is commonly performed to improve flexibility, whereas the acute effects of different stretch intensities are unclear. Therefore, we investigated the acute effects of different stretch intensities on flexibility and muscle force. Eighteen healthy participants (9 men and 9 women) performed 180-second static stretches of the right hamstrings at 80, 100, and 120% of maximum tolerable intensity without stretching pain, in random order. The following outcomes were assessed as markers of lower limb function and flexibility: static passive torque (SPT), range of motion (ROM), passive joint (muscle-tendon) stiffness, passive torque (PT) at onset of pain, and isometric muscle force. Static passive torque was significantly decreased after all stretching intensities (p ≤ 0.05). Compared with before stretching at 100 and 120% intensities, ROM and PT were significantly increased after stretching (p ≤ 0.05), and passive stiffness (p = 0.05) and isometric muscle force (p ≤ 0.05) were significantly decreased. In addition, ROM was significantly greater after stretching at 100 and 120% than at 80%, and passive stiffness was significantly lower after 120% than after 80% (p ≤ 0.05). However, all measurements except SPT were unchanged after 80% intensity. There was a weak positive correlation between the intensities of stretching and the relative change for SPT (p ≤ 0.05), a moderate positive correlation with ROM (p ≤ 0.05), and a moderate positive correlation with passive stiffness (p ≤ 0.05). These results indicate that static stretching at greater intensity is more effective for increasing ROM and decreasing passive muscle-tendon stiffness.

  10. STATIC VERSUS PNF STRETCHING IN HAMSTRING FLEXIBILITY-A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Naga Prahalada Karnati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stretching used as a technique for injury prevention in the clinical settings, the study aimed to determine the early findings of hamstring tightness with both groups in the population, now a days the sedentary activities like prolonged sitting might cause hamstring tightness and change in path kinematics of gait intern lead to postural defects and back pain, understanding of the stretching helps clinician to make decisions for rehabilitation. Methods: Across-sectional study, counterbalanced with repeated-measures , one group with static stretch – (double hamstring stretch and hurdlers stretch for 3 times,30seconds subsequently in another group PNF contract relax(agonist contraction technique for 10 seconds position and 10 seconds stretch repeated for 3 times. Results: The results from data and statistical analysis by using t-test, SPSS obtained by using goniometer are tabulated in terms of mean, standard deviation and p-value in both groups. In experimental group flexion with PNF showed improvement 9.27±1.91(right side, 9.53±2.42(left side and static stretching showed 7.8±2.91(right side, 7.47±1.96(left side this proves that PNF has consistent improvement than static stretching. Conclusions: Static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching both have produced greater improvement but compared with PNF contract relax(agonist stretching showed significant change in hamstring flexibility compared with control group . The effect sizes, however corresponding to these stretching-induced changes were small, which suggests the need for practitioners to consider a risk-to-benefit ratio when incorporating static or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching.

  11. Dental Arch Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Straightening teeth is an arduous process requiring months, often years, of applying corrective pressure by means of arch wires-better known as brace-which may have to be changed several times in the course of treatment. A new method has been developed by Dr. George Andreasen, orthodontist and dental scientist at the University of Iowa. The key is a new type of arch wire material, called Nitinol, with exceptional elasticity which helps reduce the required number of brace changes. An alloy of nickel and titanium, Nitinol was originally developed for aerospace applications by the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, now the Naval Surface Weapons Laboratory, White Oaks, Maryland. NASA subsequently conducted additional research on the properties of Nitinol and on procedures for processing the metal.

  12. Effect of Ankle Positioning During Hamstring Stretches for Improving Straight Leg Hip Flexion Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudner, Kevin G; Benjamin, Peter J; Selkow, Noelle M

    2016-03-01

    To compare the effects of stretching the hamstrings with the ankle in either a plantar-flexed (PF) or dorsiflexed (DF) position for improving straight leg hip flexion range of motion (ROM) over a 4-week period. Randomized, single-blinded, pretest, posttest design. Athletic training facility. Each limb of 34 asymptomatic individuals (15 males, 19 females) was randomly assigned to one of the 3 groups. Twenty-four limbs received hamstring stretches with the ankle in DF, 24 limbs received hamstring stretches with the ankle in PF, and 20 limbs received no stretch (control). Ankle position (PF, DF) during hamstring stretching. We measured pretest and posttest passive straight leg hip flexion ROM with the test ankle in a neutral position. For the intervention groups, the test limb was passively stretched with the ankle held in end range DF or PF for their respective group. Each stretch was held for 30 seconds for a total of 3 applications. Two treatment sessions were completed per week for a total of 4 weeks. The control limbs received no stretching during the 4-week period. We conducted 1-way analyses of covariance to determine significant changes in ROM between groups (P hamstrings in either PF or DF improve straight leg hip ROM compared with a control group. The results of this study should be considered by clinicians when determining the optimal stretching techniques aimed at increasing hamstring length.

  13. The acute effects of stretching with vibration on dynamic flexibility in young female gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Aaron W; Warcup, Caisa N; Seeley, Matthew K; Eggett, Dennis; Feland, Jeffery B

    2018-01-10

    While stretching with vibration has been shown to improve static flexibility; the effect of stretching with vibration on dynamic flexibility is not well known. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of stretching with vibration on acute dynamic flexibility and jump height in novice and advanced competitive female gymnasts during a split jump. Female gymnast (n=27, age: 11.5 ± 1.7 years, Junior Olympic levels 5-10) participated in this cross-over study. Dynamic flexibility during gymnastic split jumps were video recorded and analyzed with Dartfish software. All participants completed both randomized stretching protocols with either the vibration platform turned on (VIB) (frequency of 30 Hz and 2 mm amplitude) or off (NoVIB) separated by 48 h. Participants performed 4 sets of three stretches on the vibration platform. Each stretch was held for 30 s with 5 s rest for a total of 7 min of stretch. Split jump flexibility decreased significantly from pre to post measurement in both VIB (-5.8°±5.9°) (pstatic stretching with or without vibration immediately before performance does not alter jump height. Stretching with vibration immediately prior to gymnastics competition decreases split jump flexibility in lower level gymnasts more than upper level gymnasts.

  14. Vienna Wire Chamber Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    After those of 1978 and 1980, a third Wire Chamber Conference was held from 15-18 February in the Technical University of Vienna. Eight invited speakers covered the field from sophisticated applications in biology and medicine, via software, to the state of the art of gaseous detectors. In some forty other talks the speakers tackled in more detail the topics of gaseous detectors, calorimetry and associated electronics and software

  15. High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements of simple bending of pseudoelastic NiTi shape memory alloy wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Baozhuo; Young, Marcus L.

    2016-05-23

    Many technological applications of austenitic shape memory alloys (SMAs) involve cyclical mechanical loading and unloading in order to take advantage of pseudoelasticity. In this paper, we investigated the effect of mechanical bending of pseudoelastic NiTi SMA wires using high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD). Differential scanning calorimetry was performed to identify the phase transformation temperatures. Scanning electron microscopy images show that micro-cracks in compressive regions of the wire propagate with increasing bend angle, while tensile regions tend not to exhibit crack propagation. SR-XRD patterns were analyzed to study the phase transformation and investigate micromechanical properties. By observing the various diffraction peaks such as the austenite (200) and the martensite (${\\bar 1}12$), (${\\bar 1}03$), (${\\bar 1}11$), and (101) planes, intensities and residual strain values exhibit strong anisotropy, depending upon whether the sample is in compression or tension during bending.

  16. New potential for the Leitz Infinity Coordinate Measuring Machine

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz, Claude; MAINAUD DURAND , Hélène; Schneider, Jurgen; Steffens, Norbert; Morantz , Paul; Shore , Paul

    2015-01-01

    The following study is realised within the frame of the PACMAN project: a study on Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometre scale, which is a Marie Curie program supported by the European commission and hosted by CERN (European Organisation for Nuclear Research). The aim of this program is to develop and build a pre-alignment bench on which each component is aligned to the required level in one single step using a stretched wire. During the operation, the centre of the stretched wire is aligned with the magnetic axis of the magnet. Then, the position of the wire is measured to the highest possible accuracy using a 3D Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) Leitz PMM-C Infinity from HEXAGON Metrology. The research described in this paper is two-fold: on one hand we apply a strong magnetic field to the head of the CMM and evaluate its influence on the measurement accuracy; on the other hand we measure the position

  17. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  18. Linear viscoelastic characterization from filament stretching rheometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, Sara Lindeblad; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Hassager, Ole

    Traditionally, linear viscoelasticity is measured using small amplitude oscillatory shear flow. Due to experimental difficulties, shear flows are predominately confined to the linear and mildly nonlinear regime. On the other hand, extensional flows have proven more practical in measuring viscoela......Traditionally, linear viscoelasticity is measured using small amplitude oscillatory shear flow. Due to experimental difficulties, shear flows are predominately confined to the linear and mildly nonlinear regime. On the other hand, extensional flows have proven more practical in measuring...... viscoelasticity well into the nonlinear regime. Therefore at present, complete rheological characterization of a material requires two apparatuses: a shear and an extensional rheometer. This work is focused on developing a linear viscoelastic protocol for the filament stretching rheometer (FSR) in order...... to measure both linear and nonlinear dynamics on a single apparatus. With a software modification to the FSR motor control, we show that linear viscoelasticity can be measured via small amplitude squeeze flow (SASF). Squeeze flow is a combination of both shear and extensional flow applied by axially...

  19. Effect of acute stretch injury on action potential and network activity of rat neocortical neurons in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magou, George C; Pfister, Bryan J; Berlin, Joshua R

    2015-10-22

    The basis for acute seizures following traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains unclear. Animal models of TBI have revealed acute hyperexcitablility in cortical neurons that could underlie seizure activity, but studying initiating events causing hyperexcitability is difficult in these models. In vitro models of stretch injury with cultured cortical neurons, a surrogate for TBI, allow facile investigation of cellular changes after injury but they have only demonstrated post-injury hypoexcitability. The goal of this study was to determine if neuronal hyperexcitability could be triggered by in vitro stretch injury. Controlled uniaxial stretch injury was delivered to a spatially delimited region of a spontaneously active network of cultured rat cortical neurons, yielding a region of stretch-injured neurons and adjacent regions of non-stretched neurons that did not directly experience stretch injury. Spontaneous electrical activity was measured in non-stretched and stretch-injured neurons, and in control neuronal networks not subjected to stretch injury. Non-stretched neurons in stretch-injured cultures displayed a three-fold increase in action potential firing rate and bursting activity 30-60 min post-injury. Stretch-injured neurons, however, displayed dramatically lower rates of action potential firing and bursting. These results demonstrate that acute hyperexcitability can be observed in non-stretched neurons located in regions adjacent to the site of stretch injury, consistent with reports that seizure activity can arise from regions surrounding the site of localized brain injury. Thus, this in vitro procedure for localized neuronal stretch injury may provide a model to study the earliest cellular changes in neuronal function associated with acute post-traumatic seizures. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Direct relation of acute effects of static stretching on isokinetic torque production with initial flexibility level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babault, Nicolas; Bazine, Wacef; Deley, Gaëlle; Paizis, Christos; Lattier, Grégory

    2015-01-01

    To examine the acute effect of a single static-stretching session of hamstring muscles on torque production in relation with individual flexibility. Maximal voluntary concentric torque of hamstring muscles was measured before and after a static-stretching session (6 × 30 s). Torque changes were correlated with the flexibility level determined at the onset of the experimental procedure. The hamstring-stretching intervention significantly reduced maximal concentric torque in participants with low and high hamstring flexibility. Hamstring flexibility and torque decrease, determined immediately after the stretching procedure, were negatively correlated. Torque decrease measured after the static-stretching session is dependent on participant flexibility. Participants with low flexibility are much more likely to demonstrate large torque decreases poststretching.

  1. Metering Wheel-Wire Track Wire Boom Deployment Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granoff, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA MMS Spin Plane Double Probe (SDP) Deployer utilizes a helical path, rotating Metering Wheel and a spring loaded Wire "Holding" Track to pay out a "fixed end" 57 meter x 1.5 mm diameter Wire Boom stored between concentric storage cylinders. Unlike rotating spool type storage devices, the storage cylinders remain stationary, and the boom wire is uncoiled along the length of the cylinder via the rotation of the Metering Wheel. This uncoiling action avoids the need for slip-ring contacts since the ends of the wire can remain stationary. Conventional fixed electrical connectors (Micro-D type) are used to terminate to operational electronics.

  2. Anharmonic Bend-Stretch Coupling in Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindner, Jörg; Vöhringer, Peter; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Cringus, Dan; Wiersma, Douwe A.; Corkum, Paul; Jonas, David M.; Miller, R.J. Dwayne.; Weiner, Andrew M.

    2006-01-01

    Following excitation of the H-O-H bending mode of water molecules in solution the stretching mode region is monitored over its entire width. The anharmonic coupling between the two modes results in a substantial change of the transient stretch absorption that decays with the bend depopulation time.

  3. Self-organization of mesoscopic silver wires by electrochemical deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Zhong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Long, straight mesoscale silver wires have been fabricated from AgNO3 electrolyte via electrodeposition without the help of templates, additives, and surfactants. Although the wire growth speed is very fast due to growth under non-equilibrium conditions, the wire morphology is regular and uniform in diameter. Structural studies reveal that the wires are single-crystalline, with the [112] direction as the growth direction. A possible growth mechanism is suggested. Auger depth profile measurements show that the wires are stable against oxidation under ambient conditions. This unique system provides a convenient way for the study of self-organization in electrochemical environments as well as for the fabrication of highly-ordered, single-crystalline metal nanowires.

  4. Beam Position and Phase Monitor - Wire Mapping System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, Heath A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shurter, Robert B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-10

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) deploys many cylindrical beam position and phase monitors (BPPM) throughout the linac to measure the beam central position, phase and bunched-beam current. Each monitor is calibrated and qualified prior to installation to insure it meets LANSCE requirements. The BPPM wire mapping system is used to map the BPPM electrode offset, sensitivity and higher order coefficients. This system uses a three-axis motion table to position the wire antenna structure within the cavity, simulating the beam excitation of a BPPM at a fundamental frequency of 201.25 MHz. RF signal strength is measured and recorded for the four electrodes as the antenna position is updated. An effort is underway to extend the systems service to the LANSCE facility by replacing obsolete electronic hardware and taking advantage of software enhancements. This paper describes the upgraded wire positioning system's new hardware and software capabilities including its revised antenna structure, motion control interface, RF measurement equipment and Labview software upgrades. The main purpose of the wire mapping system at LANSCE is to characterize the amplitude response versus beam central position of BPPMs before they are installed in the beam line. The wire mapping system is able to simulate a beam using a thin wire and measure the signal response as the wire position is varied within the BPPM aperture.

  5. Comparison of frictional forces between aesthetic orthodontic coated wires and self-ligation brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunmi; Cha, Jung-Yul; Hwang, Chung-Ju; Yu, Hyung Seog; Tahk, Seon Gun

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of polymer- and rhodium-coated wires compared to uncoated wires by measuring the frictional forces using self-ligation brackets. 0.016-inch nickel titanium (NiTi) wires and 0.017 × 0.025-inch stainless steel (SS) wires were used, and the angulations between the brackets and wires were set to 0°, 5°, and 10°. Upper maxillary premolar brackets (Clippy-C®) with a 0.022-inch slot were selected for the study and a tensile test was performed with a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. The maximum static frictional forces and kinetic frictional forces were recorded and compared. The maximum static frictional forces and the kinetic frictional forces of coated wires were equal to or higher than those of the uncoated wires (p forces of rhodium-coated wires were significantly higher than those of polymer-coated wires when the angulations between the brackets and wires were set to (i) 5° in the 0.016-inch NiTi wires and (ii) all angulations in the 0.017 × 0.025-inch SS wires (p kinetic frictional forces of rhodium-coated wires were higher than those of polymer-coated wires, except when the angulations were set to 0° in the 0.016-inch NiTi wires (p forces of the coated wires with regards to aesthetics were equal to or greater than those of the uncoated wires, a study under similar conditions regarding the oral cavity is needed in order to establish the clinical implications.

  6. Comparison of frictional forces between aesthetic orthodontic coated wires and self-ligation brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunmi; Cha, Jung-Yul; Hwang, Chung-Ju; Tahk, Seon Gun

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of polymer- and rhodium-coated wires compared to uncoated wires by measuring the frictional forces using self-ligation brackets. Methods 0.016-inch nickel titanium (NiTi) wires and 0.017 × 0.025-inch stainless steel (SS) wires were used, and the angulations between the brackets and wires were set to 0°, 5°, and 10°. Upper maxillary premolar brackets (Clippy-C®) with a 0.022-inch slot were selected for the study and a tensile test was performed with a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. The maximum static frictional forces and kinetic frictional forces were recorded and compared. Results The maximum static frictional forces and the kinetic frictional forces of coated wires were equal to or higher than those of the uncoated wires (p wires were significantly higher than those of polymer-coated wires when the angulations between the brackets and wires were set to (i) 5° in the 0.016-inch NiTi wires and (ii) all angulations in the 0.017 × 0.025-inch SS wires (p wires were higher than those of polymer-coated wires, except when the angulations were set to 0° in the 0.016-inch NiTi wires (p wires with regards to aesthetics were equal to or greater than those of the uncoated wires, a study under similar conditions regarding the oral cavity is needed in order to establish the clinical implications. PMID:25133130

  7. The Acute Effects of Upper Extremity Stretching on Throwing Velocity in Baseball Throwers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Williams

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To examine the effects of static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF stretching of the shoulder internal rotators on throwing velocity. Subjects. 27 male throwers (mean age = 25.1 years old, SD = 2.4 with adequate knowledge of demonstrable throwing mechanics. Study Design. Randomized crossover trial with repeated measures. Methods. Subjects warmed up, threw 10 pitches at their maximum velocity, were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 stretching protocols (static, PNF, or no stretch, and then repeated their 10 pitches. Velocities were recorded after each pitch and average and peak velocities were recorded after each session. Results. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures ANOVA. No significant interaction between stretching and throwing velocity was observed. Main effects for time were not statistically significant. Main effects for the stretching groups were statistically significant. Discussion. Results suggest that stretching of the shoulder internal rotators did not significantly affect throwing velocity immediately after stretching. This may be due to the complexity of the throwing task. Conclusions. Stretching may be included in a thrower's warm-up without any effects on throwing velocity. Further research should be performed using a population with more throwing experience and skill.

  8. Anisotropic instability of a stretching film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bingrui; Li, Minhao; Deng, Daosheng

    2017-11-01

    Instability of a thin liquid film, such as dewetting arising from Van der Waals force, has been well studied, and is typically characterized by formation of many droplets. Interestingly, a thin liquid film subjected to an applied stretching during a process of thermal drawing is evolved into an array of filaments, i.e., continuity is preserved along the direction of stretching while breakup occurs exclusively in the plane of cross section. Here, to understand this anisotropic instability, we build a physical model by considering both Van der Waals force and the effect of stretching. By using the linear instability analysis method and then performing a numerical calculation, we find that the growth rate of perturbations at the cross section is larger than that along the direction of stretching, resulting in the anisotropic instability of the stretching film. These results may provide theoretical guidance to achieve more diverse structures for nanotechnology.

  9. Wire communication engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Byeong Tae

    1997-02-01

    This book describes wire telecommunication engineering/ It is divided into eleven chapter, which deal with Introduction with development of telecommunication, voice and sound wave and communication network, Telegraphy with summary of telegraphy, code of telegraphy, communication speed, morse and telex, Telephone on structure, circuit and image telephone, Traffic on telecommunication traffic, transmission of line about theory, cable line and loaded cable, carrier communication with carrier telegraphy and carrier telephone, optical communication with types, structure, specialty, laser and equipment, DATA, Mobile telecommunication on summary, mobile telephone, radio paging and digital mobile telecommunication, ISDN with channel of ISDN, and service of ISDN, and design of telecommunication.

  10. Wiring regulations in brief

    CERN Document Server

    Tricker, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Tired of trawling through the Wiring Regs?Perplexed by Part P?Confused by cables, conductors and circuits?Then look no further! This handy guide provides an on-the-job reference source for Electricians, Designers, Service Engineers, Inspectors, Builders, Students, DIY enthusiastsTopic-based chapters link areas of working practice - such as cables, installations, testing and inspection, special locations - with the specifics of the Regulations themselves. This allows quick and easy identification of the official requirements relating to the situati

  11. The Micro Wire Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeva, B.; Gomez, F.; Pazos, A.; Pfau, R.; Plo, M. E-mail: maximo.plo@cern.ch; Rodriguez, J.M.; Vazquez, P.; Labbe, J.C

    1999-10-11

    We present the performance of a new proportional gas detector. Its geometry consists of a cathode plane with 70x70 {mu}m{sup 2} apertures, crossed by 25 {mu}m anode strips to which it is attached by 50 {mu}m kapton spacers. In the region where the avalanche takes place, the anode strips are suspended in the gas mixture as in a standard wire chamber. This detector exhibits high rate capability and large gains, introducing very little material. (author)

  12. Epitaxial semiconductor quantum wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Chen, Y H; Wang, Z G

    2008-07-01

    The investigation on the direct epitaxial quantum wires (QWR) using MBE or MOCVD has been persuited for more than two decades, more lengthy in history as compared with its quantum dot counterpart. Up to now, QWRs with various structural configurations have been produced with different growth methods. This is a reviewing article consisting mainly of two parts. The first part discusses QWRs of various configurations, together with laser devices based on them, in terms of the two growth mechanisms, self-ordering and self-assembling. The second part gives a brief review of the electrical and optical properties of QWRs.

  13. Single wire drift chamber design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krider, J.

    1987-03-30

    This report summarizes the design and prototype tests of single wire drift chambers to be used in Fermilab test beam lines. The goal is to build simple, reliable detectors which require a minimum of electronics. Spatial resolution should match the 300 ..mu..m rms resolution of the 1 mm proportional chambers that they will replace. The detectors will be used in beams with particle rates up to 20 KHz. Single track efficiency should be at least 99%. The first application will be in the MT beamline, which has been designed for calibration of CDF detectors. A set of four x-y modules will be used to track and measure the momentum of beam particles.

  14. 46 CFR 111.60-11 - Wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wire. 111.60-11 Section 111.60-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-11 Wire. (a) Wire must be in an enclosure. (b) Wire must be...

  15. Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion After Ankle Self-Stretching Using a Strap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, In-cheol; Kwon, Oh-yun; Yi, Chung-Hwi; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Hwang, Ui-jae

    2015-01-01

    Context  A variety of ankle self-stretching exercises have been recommended to improve ankle-dorsiflexion range of motion (DFROM) in individuals with limited ankle dorsiflexion. A strap can be applied to stabilize the talus and facilitate anterior glide of the distal tibia at the talocrural joint during ankle self-stretching exercises. Novel ankle self-stretching using a strap (SSS) may be a useful method of improving ankle DFROM. Objective  To compare the effects of 2 ankle-stretching techniques (static stretching versus SSS) on ankle DFROM. Design  Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting  University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants  Thirty-two participants with limited active dorsiflexion (<20°) while sitting (14 women and 18 men) were recruited. Main Outcome Measure(s)  The participants performed 2 ankle self-stretching techniques (static stretching and SSS) for 3 weeks. Active DFROM (ADFROM), passive DFROM (PDFROM), and the lunge angle were measured. An independent t test was used to compare the improvements in these values before and after the 2 stretching interventions. The level of statistical significance was set at α = .05. Results  Active DFROM and PDFROM were greater in both stretching groups after the 3-week interventions. However, ADFROM, PDFROM, and the lunge angle were greater in the SSS group than in the static-stretching group (P < .05). Conclusions  Ankle SSS is recommended to improve ADFROM, PDFROM, and the lunge angle in individuals with limited DFROM. PMID:26633750

  16. A comparative evaluation of rate of space closure after extraction using E-chain and stretched modules in bimaxillary dentoalveolar protrusion cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Rajat; Londhe, S M; Kumar, Prasanna

    2011-04-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the rate of space closure between E-chain mechanics in one side of upper arch and by elastomeric module with ligature wire on the contralateral side in same patient. Thirty bimaxillary dentoalveolar protrusion cases were taken up for comprehensive fixed orthodontic treatment after extraction of all first premolars to retract both upper and lower anterior teeth. After initial alignment and levelling, alginate impressions were made for upper and lower arches and models constructed. In the upper arch model a vernier caliper was used to measure the extraction space in both sides from middle point of distal surface of canine to the middle most point of mesial surface of second premolar. This is the amount of space present before the onset of retraction mechanics. During space closure procedure two different retracting components were applied in right and left sides of each case. On right side elastic chain (E-chain) applied in both upper and lower arches and on left side elastomeric module with steel ligature (0.010") stretched double its diameter fixed in both arches. Both the mechanisms produced approximately 250-300 g of force as measured by a tension gauge. After onset of retraction mechanism all patients were recalled after every six weeks for three visits. In all these three visits modules and E-chains were changed. In all three visits impression was made, models constructed, and the remaining available space was measured by a vernier caliper up to 0.1 mm level variations. Mean value for total space closure in case of E-chain was 2.777 mm whereas in case of module with ligature wire the value increased to 3.017 mm. Mean value for rate of space closure in case of E-chain was 0.2143 mm, whereas in case of module with ligature wire the value increased to 0.2343 mm with a standard deviation of 0.001104 and 0.001194, respectively. The standard deviation for total space closure was 0.1305 for E-chain and 0.1487 for module with ligature

  17. Strategy as stretch and leverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, G; Prahalad, C K

    1993-01-01

    Global competition is not just product versus product or company versus company. It is mind-set versus mind-set. Driven to understand the dynamics of competition, we have learned a lot about what makes one company more successful than another. But to find the root of competitiveness--to understand why some companies create new forms of competitive advantage while others watch and follow--we must look at strategic mind-sets. For many managers, "being strategic" means pursuing opportunities that fit the company's resources. This approach is not wrong, Gary Hamel and C.K. Prahalad contend, but it obscures an approach in which "stretch" supplements fit and being strategic means creating a chasm between ambition and resources. Toyota, CNN, British Airways, Sony, and others all displaced competitors with stronger reputations and deeper pockets. Their secret? In each case, the winner had greater ambition than its well-endowed rivals. Winners also find less resource-intensive ways of achieving their ambitious goals. This is where leverage complements the strategic allocation of resources. Managers at competitive companies can get a bigger bang for their buck in five basic ways: by concentrating resources around strategic goals; by accumulating resources more efficiently; by complementing one kind of resource with another; by conserving resources whenever they can; and by recovering resources from the market-place as quickly as possible. As recent competitive battles have demonstrated, abundant resources can't guarantee continued industry leadership.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Corrosion of Wires on Wooden Wire-Bound Packaging Crates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Stan Lebow

    2015-01-01

    Wire-bound packaging crates are used by the US Army to transport materials. Because these crates may be exposed to harsh environments, they are dip-treated with a wood preservative (biocide treatment). For many years, zinc-naphthenate was the most commonly used preservative for these packaging crates and few corrosion problems with the wires were observed. Recently,...

  19. A study of viscoelasticity index for evaluating muscle hypotonicity during static stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Naomi; Tsukune, Mariko; Kobayashi, Yo; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2014-01-01

    Static stretching is widely used as a preventative treatment for musculoskeletal disabilities by providing muscle hypotonicity, which results from changes in muscle tissue structure. However, the quantitative evaluation of hypotonicity during stretching has had limited success owing to the confounding factor of mechanical stress relaxation. To resolve this problem, we propose a new evaluation method for hypotonicity based on a viscoelastic muscle model using fractional calculus, which is known to be effective for biomaterials. We made continuous measurements of rectus skin indentation during static stretching as an indicator of reaction force in the rectus femoris muscle. The viscoelastic ratio and modulus were computed from the indentation trace. Both viscoelastic parameters decreased significantly between the early and final phases of stretching. The results suggest that our method is useful for quantitative evaluation of muscle hypotonicity during stretching.

  20. Measurement of Thermal Conductivities of Two Cryoprotective Agent Solutions for Vitreous Cryopreservation of Organs at the Temperature Range of 77 K-300 K Using a Thermal Sensor Made of Microscale Enamel Copper Wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yufang; Zhao, Gang; Hossain, S M Chapal; Panhwar, Fazil; Sun, Wenyu; Kong, Fei; Zang, Chuanbao; Jiang, Zhendong

    2017-06-01

    Biobanking of organs by cryopreservation is an enabling technology for organ transplantation. Compared with the conventional slow freezing method, vitreous cryopreservation has been regarded to be a more promising approach for long-term storage of organs. The major challenges to vitrification are devitrification and recrystallization during the warming process, and high concentrations of cryoprotective agents (CPAs) induced metabolic and osmotic injuries. For a theoretical model based optimization of vitrification, thermal properties of CPA solutions are indispensable. In this study, the thermal conductivities of M22 and vitrification solution containing ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide (two commonly used vitrification solutions) were measured using a self-made microscaled hot probe with enameled copper wire at the temperature range of 77 K-300 K. The data obtained by this study will further enrich knowledge of the thermal properties for CPA solutions at low temperatures, as is of primary importance for optimization of vitrification.

  1. Improved superconducting magnet wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-08-16

    This invention is directed to a superconducting tape or wire composed of alternating layers of copper and a niobium-containing superconductor such as niobium of NbTi, Nb/sub 3/Sn or Nb/sub 3/Ge. In general, each layer of the niobium-containing superconductor has a thickness in the range of about 0.05 to 1.5 times its coherence length (which for Nb/sub 3/Si is 41 A) with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170 to 600 A. With the use of very thin layers of the niobium composition having a thickness within the desired range, the critical field (H/sub c/) may be increased by factors of 2 to 4. Also, the thin layers of the superconductor permit the resulting tape or wire to exhibit suitable ductility for winding on a magnet core. These compositions are also characterized by relatively high values of critical temperature and therefore will exhibit a combination of useful properties as superconductors.

  2. The Effect of Lithotomy Position on Nerve Stretch: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveneau, Nicolette E; Forbis, Courtney; Lipetskaia, Lioudmilla; Kinman, Casey L; Agrawal, Anubhav; Herring, Nicole R; Francis, Sean L

    The objective of our study was to design a method to measure nerve stretch in cadaveric subjects and then use the method to assess femoral nerve stretch in the lithotomy position with varying degrees of flexion and extension. A university-based, cadaveric observational study of femoral nerve stretch was conducted. In 6 cadaveric subjects, femoral nerve near the inguinal ligament was dissected in each cadaveric subject. The nerve was marked, and digital images of the nerve were obtained in the supine position and lithotomy position in both flexion and extension. Distances were calculated using the ratio of pixels to millimeter specific for each image. The average distance for each set of images was then used to calculate the percent change from supine for each position. We were able to assess nerve stretch using photo-editing software. For extended position, all nerves showed some degree of stretch with the mean percent change in nerve length being 10.35%. For all other positions, most showed a decrease of nerve length. There was not a significant relation between degree of extension and stretch (Pearson r, P < 0.05). Hip extension between 10 and 20 degrees consistently stretches the femoral nerve greater than 5%. The potential for femoral nerve stretch and avoiding hip extension should be considered when positioning a patient in lithotomy for surgical procedures.

  3. Acute effect of different stretching methods on flexibility and jumping performance in competitive artistic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, G; Smirniotou, A; Tsiganos, G; Tsopani, D; Di Cagno, A; Tsolakis, Ch

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of 3 different warm up methods of stretching (static, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, and stretching exercises on a Vibration platform) on flexibility and legs power-jumping performance in competitive artistic gymnasts. Eighteen competitive artistic gymnasts were recruited to participate in this study. Subjects were exposed to each of 3 experimental stretching conditions: static stretching (SS), proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching (PNF), and stretching exercises on a Vibration platform (S+V). Flexibility assessed with sit and reach test (S & R) and jumping performance with squat jump (SJ) and counter movement jump (CMJ) and were measured before, immediately after and 15 min after the interventions. Significant differences were observed for flexibility after all stretching conditions for S+V (+1.1%), SS (+5.7%) and PNF (+6.8%) (P=0.000), which remained higher 15 min after interventions (S+V (1.1%), SS (5.3%) and PNF (5.5%), respectively (P=0.000). PNF stretching increased flexibility in competitive gymnasts, while S+V maintained jumping performance when both methods were used as part of a warm-up procedure.

  4. Comparison of 2 Dosages of Stretching Treatment in Infants with Congenital Muscular Torticollis: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lu; Yan, Xiaohua; Li, Jinling; Guan, Buyun; Ma, Liying; Chen, Ying; Mai, Jianning; Xu, Kaishou

    2017-05-01

    To compare the short-term efficacy of 2 dosages of stretching treatment on the clinical outcomes in infants with congenital muscular torticollis. This was a prospective randomized controlled study. Fifty infants with congenital muscular torticollis who were randomly assigned to 100-times stretching group and 50-times stretching group received stretching treatment for the affected sternocleidomastoid muscle. The outcomes including the head tilt, the cervical passive range of motion, and the muscle function of cervical lateral flexors determined by the muscle function scale were assessed at baseline and at 4 and 8 weeks after treatment. The sternocleidomastoid muscle growth analyzed by the thickness ratio of sternocleidomastoid muscles was measured using ultrasonography at baseline and 8 weeks after treatment. Except the ratio of muscle function scale scores, the postintervention outcomes were all significantly improved in both groups compared with baseline (P stretching group showed greater improvement compared with 50-times stretching group in head tilt and cervical passive range of motion at 4 and 8 weeks after treatment (P Stretching treatment of 2 dosages may effectively improve head tilt, cervical passive range of motion, and sternocleidomastoid muscle growth in infants with congenital muscular torticollis. The stretching treatment of 100 times per day is likely to associate with greater improvement in head tilt and cervical passive range of motion.

  5. Secondary structure estimation and properties analysis of stretched Asian and Caucasian hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, A J; Liu, H L; Du, Z Q

    2015-02-01

    In this previous work, we investigated the secondary structure changes of stretched yak hairs by deconvolution, secondary derivation, and curve fitting and determined the number of bands and their positions in order to resolve the protein spectrum of Raman spectroscopy. The secondary structure estimation and properties analysis of stretched Asian and Caucasian hair were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, tensile curves, and measurement of density. The hairs were stretched, dried, and baked at ratios 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100%. The analysis of the amide I band indicated that the transformation from α-helix to β-pleated structure occurred during the stretching process, which could be verified from the tensile analysis. The cysteine oxide in S-O vibration area exhibited that stretching led to the breakage of the disulfide bonds. When the stretching ratio of Caucasian hair was more than a certain ratio, the fiber macromolecular structure was destroyed because Caucasian hair had finer diameter and less medulla than Asian hair. The β turn was easier to retract compared with other conformations, resulted in the content increase. The density measurements revealed that the structure of Caucasian hair was indeed more destroyed than that of Asian hair. The cuticles characterization indicated the length of scales was stretched longer and the thickness became thinner. Caucasian hair tended to collapse to form small fragments at the early stage of stretching. With the increase in stretching ratio, the scales of Caucasian hair lifted up, then flaked off and the scale interval increased accordingly. Asian hair was more easily peeled off than Caucasian hair cuticles with the increase in stretching ratio. The secondary structure of Caucasian hair was destroyed more easily than that of Asian hair. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Stretch due to Penile Prosthesis Reservoir Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Baten

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 43-year old patient presented to the emergency department with stretch, due to impossible deflation of the penile prosthesis, 4 years after successful implant. A CT-scan showed migration of the reservoir to the left rectus abdominis muscle. Refilling of the reservoir was inhibited by muscular compression, causing stretch. Removal and replacement of the reservoir was performed, after which the prosthesis was well-functioning again. Migration of the penile prosthesis reservoir is extremely rare but can cause several complications, such as stretch.

  7. Deflection load characteristics of laser-welded orthodontic wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Etsuko; Stigall, Garrett; Elshahawy, Waleed; Watanabe, Ikuya

    2012-07-01

    To compare the deflection load characteristics of homogeneous and heterogeneous joints made by laser welding using various types of orthodontic wires. Four kinds of straight orthodontic rectangular wires (0.017 inch × 0.025 inch) were used: stainless-steel (SS), cobalt-chromium-nickel (Co-Cr-Ni), beta-titanium alloy (β-Ti), and nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti). Homogeneous and heterogeneous end-to-end joints (12 mm long each) were made by Nd:YAG laser welding. Two types of welding methods were used: two-point welding and four-point welding. Nonwelded wires were also used as a control. Deflection load (N) was measured by conducting the three-point bending test. The data (n  =  5) were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance/Tukey test (P wires measured were as follows: SS: 21.7 ± 0.8 N; Co-Cr-Ni: 20.0 ± 0.3 N; β-Ti: 13.9 ± 1.3 N; and Ni-Ti: 6.6 ± 0.4 N. All of the homogeneously welded specimens showed lower deflection loads compared to corresponding control wires and exhibited higher deflection loads compared to heterogeneously welded combinations. For homogeneous combinations, Co-Cr-Ni/Co-Cr-Ni showed a significantly (P wires provide a deflection load that is comparable to that of homogeneously welded orthodontic wires.

  8. The effect of clamping a tensioned wire: implications for the Ilizarov external fixation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, M A; Mathias, K J; Maffulli, N; Hukins, D W L

    2003-01-01

    This study demonstrates that clamping a tensioned wire can cause a reduction in wire tension. Tension (about 1275 N) was applied to a wire that was subsequently clamped, using cannulated bolts, to the steel half-ring of an Ilizarov external fixator. The tension in the wire was monitored before, during and after clamping. The apparatus was disassembled and the deformations in the wire caused by the clamps were measured. This experiment was repeated 15 times. When the wire was clamped to the frame, the wire tension was reduced by 22 +/- 7 per cent (mean +/- standard deviation, SD). The drop in wire tension was linearly correlated (r = 0.96; p toothpaste from a tube) and so reduce its tension during fixator assembly. To assess the magnitude of this effect in the clinical situation, the FE model analysis was repeated to replicate clamping a 1.8-mm-diameter wire to a 180-mm-diameter steel Ilizarov ring component. The analysis showed that for these conditions the tension reduced by 8-29 per cent. The results of this study highlight a general engineering problem: how can a tensioned wire be secured to a structure without an appreciable loss of tension? If the performance of the structure depends on the wire tension, this performance will change when the wire is secured.

  9. Investigation of Constant Temperature Hot-wire System Response using Laser Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffa, Nicholas; Morris, Scott; Cameron, Joshua

    2016-11-01

    Constant temperature hot-wire systems use a Wheatstone bridge and feedback amplifier circuit to maintain a constant average temperature across the wire yielding frequency responses of order 100 kHz. This high frequency response allows hot-wires to be used extensively for aerodynamic measurements in high speed flows and uncertainty at these high frequencies can be difficult to diagnose. The standard frequency response check for constant temperature hot-wires uses an electronic pulse across the circuit to check the electronic feedback circuit response time, but does not account for the impact of the heat transfer along the wire. In order to investigate the frequency response of the entire constant temperature hot-wire system, including the heat transfer along the wire, a novel method was developed using a pulsed PIV laser focused to illuminate only the hot-wire. The laser pulse duration was effectively an instantaneous change in wire surface temperature through radiation. A hot-wire was placed in a uniform open calibration jet for a range of flow conditions. The response of the entire hot-wire system was observed across a range of conditions including changes in flow, wire temperature, and thermal boundary conditions and compared with the electronic pulse test.

  10. Wire and Packing Tape Sandwiches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how students can combine craft wire with clear packing tape to create a two-dimensional design that can be bent and twisted to create a three-dimensional form. Students sandwich wire designs between two layers of tape. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  11. Effect of electrical spot welding on load deflection rate of orthodontic wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Shiva; Abrishami, Arezoo

    2015-01-01

    One of the methods used for joining metals together is welding, which can be carried out using different techniques such as electric spot welding. This study evaluated the effect of electric spot welding on the load deflection rate of stainless steel and chromium-cobalt orthodontic wires. In this experimental-laboratory study, load deflection rate of 0.016 × 0.022 inch stainless steel and chromium cobalt wires were evaluated in five groups (n =18): group one: Stainless steel wires, group two: chromium-cobalt wires, group three: stainless steel wires welded to stainless steel wires, group four: Stainless steel wires welded to chromium-cobalt wires, group five: chromium-cobalt wire welded to chromium-cobalt wires. Afterward, the forces induced by the samples in 0.5 mm, 1 mm, 1.5 mm deflection were measured using a universal testing machine. Then mean force measured for each group was compared with other groups. The data were analyzed using repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA), one-way ANOVA, and paired t-test by the SPSS software. The significance level was set as 0.05. The Tukey test showed that there were significant differences between the load deflection rates of welded groups compared to control ones (P wires increased their load deflection rates.

  12. Comparison of frictional forces between aesthetic orthodontic coated wires and self-ligation brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yunmi; Cha, Jung-Yul; Hwang, Chung-Ju; Yu, Hyung Seog; Tahk, Seon Gun

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of polymer- and rhodium-coated wires compared to uncoated wires by measuring the frictional forces using self-ligation brackets. Methods 0.016-inch nickel titanium (NiTi) wires and 0.017 × 0.025-inch stainless steel (SS) wires were used, and the angulations between the brackets and wires were set to 0°, 5°, and 10°. Upper maxillary premolar brackets (Clippy-C®) with a 0.022-inch slot were selected for the study and a te...

  13. Influence of posture and muscle length on stretch reflex activity in poststroke patients with spasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleuren, J.F.M.; Fleuren, Judith F.; Nederhand, Marcus Johannes; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    Objective To investigate the influence of different positions on stretch reflex activity of knee flexors and extensors measured by electromyography in poststroke patients with spasticity and its expression in the Ashworth Scale.

  14. Wire metamaterials: physics and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simovski, Constantin R; Belov, Pavel A; Atrashchenko, Alexander V; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2012-08-16

    The physics and applications of a broad class of artificial electromagnetic materials composed of lattices of aligned metal rods embedded in a dielectric matrix are reviewed. Such structures are here termed wire metamaterials. They appear in various settings and can operate from microwaves to THz and optical frequencies. An important group of these metamaterials is a wire medium possessing extreme optical anisotropy. The study of wire metamaterials has a long history, however, most of their important and useful properties have been revealed and understood only recently, especially in the THz and optical frequency ranges where the wire media correspond to the lattices of microwires and nanowires, respectively. Another group of wire metamaterials are arrays and lattices of nanorods of noble metals whose unusual properties are driven by plasmonic resonances. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Measurement of Thermal Conductivity of Porcine Liver in the Temperature Range of Cryotherapy and Hyperthermia (250~315k) by A Thermal Sensor Made of A Micron-Scale Enameled Copper Wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z D; Zhao, G; Lu, G R

      BACKGROUND: Cryotherapy and hyperthermia are effective treatments for several diseases, especially for liver cancers. Thermal conductivity is a significant thermal property for the prediction and guidance of surgical procedure. However, the thermal conductivities of organs and tissues, especially over the temperature range of both cryotherapy and hyperthermia are scarce. To provide comprehensive thermal conductivity of liver for both cryotherapy and hyperthermia. A hot probe made of stain steel needle and micron-sized copper wire is used for measurement. To verify data processing, both the least square method and the Monte Carlo inversion method are used to determine the hot probe constants, respectively, with reference materials of water and 29.9 % Ca 2 Cl aqueous solution. Then the thermal conductivities of Hanks solution and pork liver bathed in Hanks solution are measured. The effective length for two methods is nearly the same, but the heat capacity of probe calibrated by the Monte Carlo inversion is temperature dependent. Fairly comprehensive thermal conductivity of porcine liver measured with these two methods in the target temperature range is verified to be similar. We provide an integrated thermal conductivity of liver for cryotherapy and hyperthermia in two methods, and make more accurate predictions possible for surgery. The least square method and the Monte Carlo inversion method have their advantages and disadvantages. The least square method is available for measurement of liquids that not prone to convection or solids in a wide temperature range, while the Monte Carlo inversion method is available for accurate and rapid measurement.

  16. Effect of static and dynamic stretching on the diurnal variations of jump performance in soccer players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdi Chtourou

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The present study addressed the lack of data on the effect of different types of stretching on diurnal variations in vertical jump height - i.e., squat-jump (SJ and countermovement-jump (CMJ. We hypothesized that dynamic stretching could affect the diurnal variations of jump height by producing a greater increase in short-term maximal performance in the morning than the evening through increasing core temperature at this time-of-day. METHODS: Twenty male soccer players (age, 18.6±1.3 yrs; height, 174.6±3.8 cm; body-mass, 71.1±8.6 kg; mean ± SD completed the SJ and CMJ tests either after static stretching, dynamic stretching or no-stretching protocols at two times of day, 07:00 h and 17:00 h, with a minimum of 48 hours between testing sessions. One minute after warming-up for 5 minutes by light jogging and performing one of the three stretching protocols (i.e., static stretching, dynamic stretching or no-stretching for 8 minutes, each subject completed the SJ and CMJ tests. Jumping heights were recorded and analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures (3 [stretching]×2 [time-of-day]. RESULTS: The SJ and CMJ heights were significantly higher at 17:00 than 07:00 h (p<0.01 after the no-stretching protocol. These daily variations disappeared (i.e., the diurnal gain decreased from 4.2±2.81% (p<0.01 to 1.81±4.39% (not-significant for SJ and from 3.99±3.43% (p<0.01 to 1.51±3.83% (not-significant for CMJ after dynamic stretching due to greater increases in SJ and CMJ heights in the morning than the evening (8.4±6.36% vs. 4.4±2.64%, p<0.05 for SJ and 10.61±5.49% vs. 6.03±3.14%, p<0.05 for CMJ. However, no significant effect of static stretching on the diurnal variations of SJ and CMJ heights was observed. CONCLUSION: Dynamic stretching affects the typical diurnal variations of SJ and CMJ and helps to counteract the lower morning values in vertical jump height.

  17. Investing in a Large Stretch Press

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, M.; Nealson, W.; Jay, G.; Buss, W.

    1986-01-01

    Press for forming large aluminum parts from plates provides substantial economies. Study assessed advantages and disadvantages of investing in large stretch-forming press, and also developed procurement specification for press.

  18. Excluded Volume Effects in Gene Stretching

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Pui-Man

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the effects excluded volume on the stretching of a single DNA in solution. We find that for small force F, the extension h is not linear in F but proportion to F^{\\chi}, with \\chi=(1-\

  19. 3D Wire 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordi, Moréton; F, Escribano; J. L., Farias

    , therefore, we’ve drawn conclusions and recommendations for future editions of the event, also generalizable to other experiences of gamification especially in events. This report details the methodology and working elements from the design phase, human resources and organization of production......This document is a general report on the implementation of gamification in 3D Wire 2015 event. As the second gamification experience in this event, we have delved deeply in the previous objectives (attracting public areas less frequented exhibition in previous years and enhance networking) and have...... proposed new ones (viralization of the event on social networks and improvement of the integration of international attendees). On the other hand we defined a set of research objectives related to the study of gamification in an eminently social place like an event. Most of the goals have been met and...

  20. DNA stretching on functionalized gold surfaces.

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, R M; Cox, E C

    1994-01-01

    We describe a method for anchoring bacteriophage lambda DNA by one end to gold by Au-biotin-streptavidin-biotin-DNA bonds. DNA anchored to a microfabricated Au line could be aligned and stretched in flow and electric fields. The anchor was shown to resist a force of at least 11 pN, a linkage strong enough to allow DNA molecules of chromosome size to be stretched and aligned.

  1. Acute effect of stretching one leg on regional arterial stiffness in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, Yosuke; Hasegawa, Natsuki; Fujie, Shumpei; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Iemitsu, Motoyuki

    2017-06-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that a single bout of stretching exercises acutely reduced arterial stiffness. We hypothesized that this acute vascular response is due to regional mechanical stimulation of the peripheral arteries. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of a single bout of passive one leg stretching on arterial stiffness, comparing the stretched and the non-stretched leg in the same subject. Twenty-five healthy young men (20.9 ± 0.3 years, 172.5 ± 1.4 cm, 64.1 ± 1.2 kg) volunteered for the study. Subjects underwent a passive calf stretching on one leg (six repetitions of 30-s static stretch with a 10-s recovery). Pulse wave velocity (PWV, an index of arterial stiffness), blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) were measured before and immediately, 15, and 30 min after the stretching. Femoral-ankle PWV (faPWV) in the stretched leg was significantly decreased from baseline (835.0 ± 15.9 cm/s) to immediately (802.9 ± 16.8 cm/s, P leg was not significantly altered at any time. Brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) also showed similar responses with faPWV, but this response was not significant. Additionally, the passive stretching did not alter carotid-femoral PWV (cfPWV). These results suggest that mechanical stimulation to peripheral arteries as induced by static passive stretch may modulate arterial wall properties directly, rather than resulting in a systemic effect.

  2. The role of temperature in copper wire drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noseda, Corrado

    -isothermal temperature conditions at 25°C, 100°C, 150°C, 200°C, and 250°C using a custom designed apparatus. The surface appearance, together with the calculated coefficients of friction, gave indications as to the prevailing lubrication mechanism, which turned out to be of the boundary type in most cases, except at 100°C, where surface shaving was observed. Hardness measurements, tensile testing, metallographical investigations, as well as texture analysis indicated that at least partial recrystallization occurs when the wire is exposed to temperatures of 200°C and beyond during drawing. An account was also given on the annealing response of the as-drawn wire, by applying the concept of annealing index, a parameter that encompasses annealing time and temperature.

  3. Acute Effects of Static and Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching on Muscle Strength and Power Output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Sarah M; Cramer, Joel T; Fincher, A Louise; Massey, Laurie L; Dangelmaier, Suzanne M; Purkayastha, Sushmita; Fitz, Kristi A; Culbertson, Julie Y

    2005-06-01

    Context: Stretching is commonly used as a technique for injury prevention in the clinical setting. Our findings may improve the understanding of the neuromuscular responses to stretching and help clinicians make decisions for rehabilitation progression and return to play.Objective: To examine the short-term effects of static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching on peak torque (PT), mean power output (MP), active range of motion (AROM), passive range of motion (PROM), electromyographic (EMG) amplitude, and mechanomyographic (MMG) amplitude of the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris muscles during voluntary maximal concentric isokinetic leg extensions at 60 and 300 degrees .s.Design: A randomized, counterbalanced, cross-sectional, repeated-measures design.Setting: A university human research laboratory.Patients or Other Participants: Ten female (age, 23 +/- 3 years) and 9 male (age, 21 +/- 3 years) apparently healthy and recreationally active volunteers.Intervention(s): Four static or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching exercises to stretch the leg extensor muscles of the dominant limb during 2 separate, randomly ordered laboratory visits.Main Outcome Measure(s): The PT and MP were measured at 60 and 300 degrees .s, EMG and MMG signals were recorded, and AROM and PROM were measured at the knee joint before and after the stretching exercises.Results: Static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching reduced PT (P = .051), MP (P = .041), and EMG amplitude (P = .013) from prestretching to poststretching at 60 and 300 degrees .s (P proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching. The MMG amplitude increased in the rectus femoris muscle in response to the static stretching at 60 degrees .s (P = .031), but no other changes in MMG amplitude were observed (P > .05).Conclusions: Both static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching caused similar deficits in strength, power output, and muscle activation at

  4. Wire chambers with their magnetostrictive readout

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    This set of wire chamber planes shaped as a cylinder sector was installed inside the magnet of a polarized spin target modified to allow as well momentum analysis of the produced particles. The experiment (S126) was set up by the CERN-Trieste Collaboration in the PS beam m9 to measure spin effects in the associated production of of a positive kaon and a positive Sigma by interaction of a positive pion with polarized protons.

  5. Warm-up effects from concomitant use of vibration and static stretching after cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Wen; Liu, Chiang; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang

    2017-04-01

    Static stretch is routinely used in traditional warm-up but impaired muscle performance. Combining vibration with static stretching as a feasible component may be an alternative to static stretching after submaximal aerobic exercise to improve jumping as well as flexibility. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the effects of aerobic exercise, static stretching, and vibration with static stretching on flexibility and vertical jumping performance. A repeated measures experimental design was used in this study. Twelve participants randomly underwent 5 different warm-ups including cycling alone (C warm-up), static stretching alone (S warm-up), combining vibration with static stretching (VS warm-up), cycling followed by S (C+S warm-up), and cycling followed by VS (C+VS warm-up) on 5 separate days. Sit-and-reach, squat jump (SJ), and counter movement jump (CMJ) were measured for pre- and post- tests. The sit-and-reach scores after the S, VS, C+S and C+VS warm-ups were significantly enhanced (Pafter the C and C+VS warm-ups were significantly increased (Pafter the S warm-up (Pstretching after submaximal cycling exercise (C+VS warm-up) could be a feasible warm-up protocol to improve both flexibility and vertical jump performance, compared with the traditional warm-up (C+S warm-up).

  6. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, J.

    1990-05-01

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an 55 Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed

  7. Effects of stretching and disuse on amino acids in muscles of rat hind limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Stephen R.; Henriksen, Erik J.; Satarug, Soisungwan; Tischler, Marc E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of disuse and passive stretch on the concentrations of amino acids and ammonia in the unloaded soleus muscle was investigated in hindquarter-suspended (for six days by casting one foot in dorsiflexion) tail-casted rats. For a comparison with the condition of unloading, amino acids and ammonia were also measured in shortened extensor digitorum longus in the same casted limb and in denervated leg muscles. The results obtained suggest that passive stretch diminishes some of the characteristic alterations of amino acid concentrations due to unloading. This effect of stretch is considered to be due to the maintenance of muscle tension.

  8. Local and Systemic Changes in Pain Sensitivity After 4 Weeks of Calf Muscle Stretching in a Nonpainful Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Cecilie; Zangger, Graziella; Hansen, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stretching is often used in clinical practice for a variety of purposes, including pain therapy. The possible mechanism behind the effect of stretching remains to be clarified. AIM: To investigate whether 4 weeks of unilateral stretching of the calf muscles would affect local...... and central pain sensitivity. METHOD: This study was a randomized assessor-blinded clinical study. Healthy participants (age 18 to 40) were included and randomized. Participants in the intervention group were instructed to perform 2 stretching exercises targeting the calf muscles; 3 times 30 seconds, 7 days...... intervention group/19 control group). No statistically significant group differences in the changes from baseline were found regarding PPT and TS measurements for the stretched calf, the contra-lateral calf, and the arm. CONCLUSION: Four weeks of regular stretching of the calf muscles does not affect pressure...

  9. Effects of a diamond-like carbon coating on the frictional properties of orthodontic wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muguruma, Takeshi; Iijima, Masahiro; Brantley, William A; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2011-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that a diamond-like carbon coating does not affect the frictional properties of orthodontic wires. Two types of wires (nickel-titanium and stainless steel) were used, and diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on the wires. Three types of brackets, a conventional stainless steel bracket and two self-ligating brackets, were used for measuring static friction. DLC layers were observed by three-dimensional scanning electron microscopy (3D-SEM), and the surface roughness was measured. Hardness and elastic modulus were obtained by nanoindentation testing. Frictional forces and surface roughness were compared by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. The hardness and elastic modulus of the wires were compared using Student's t-test. When angulation was increased, the DLC-coated wires showed significantly less frictional force than the as-received wires, except for some wire/bracket combinations. Thin DLC layers were observed on the wire surfaces by SEM. As-received and DLC-coated wires had similar surface morphologies, and the DLC-coating process did not affect the surface roughness. The hardness of the surface layer of the DLC-coated wires was much higher than for the as-received wires. The elastic modulus of the surface layer of the DLC-coated stainless steel wire was less than that of the as-received stainless steel wire, whereas similar values were found for the nickel-titanium wires. The hypothesis is rejected. A DLC-coating process does reduce the frictional force.

  10. Analytic modeling, simulation and interpretation of broadband beam coupling impedance bench measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedermayer, U., E-mail: niedermayer@temf.tu-darmstadt.de [Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstraße 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Eidam, L. [Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstraße 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Boine-Frankenheim, O. [Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstraße 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-03-11

    First, a generalized theoretical approach towards beam coupling impedances and stretched-wire measurements is introduced. Applied to a circular symmetric setup, this approach allows to compare beam and wire impedances. The conversion formulas for TEM scattering parameters from measurements to impedances are thoroughly analyzed and compared to the analytical beam impedance solution. A proof of validity for the distributed impedance formula is given. The interaction of the beam or the TEM wave with dispersive material such as ferrite is discussed. The dependence of the obtained beam impedance on the relativistic velocity β is investigated and found as material property dependent. Second, numerical simulations of wakefields and scattering parameters are compared. The applicability of scattering parameter conversion formulas for finite device length is investigated. Laboratory measurement results for a circularly symmetric test setup, i.e. a ferrite ring, are shown and compared to analytic and numeric models. The optimization of the measurement process and error reduction strategies are discussed.

  11. Acute effects of static stretching on peak and end-range hamstring-to-quadriceps functional ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekir, Ufuk; Arabaci, Ramiz; Akova, Bedrettin

    2015-10-18

    To evaluate if static stretching influences peak and end-range functional hamstring-to-quadriceps (H/Q) strength ratios in elite women athletes. Eleven healthy female athletes in an elite competitive level participated to the study. All the participants fulfilled the static stretching or non-stretching (control) intervention protocol in a randomized design on different days. Two static unassisted stretching exercises, one in standing and one in sitting position, were used to stretch both the hamstring and quadriceps muscles during these protocols. The total time for the static stretching was 6 ± 1 min. The isokinetic peak torque measurements for the hamstring and quadriceps muscles in eccentric and concentric modes and the calculations for the functional H/Q strength ratios at angular velocities of 60°/s and 180°/s were made before (pre) and after (post) the control or stretching intervention. The strength measurements and functional strength ratio calculations were based during the entire- and end-range of knee extension. The pre-test scores for quadriceps and hamstring peak torque and end range values were not significantly different between the groups (P > 0.05). Subsequently, although the control group did not exhibit significant changes in quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength (P > 0.05), static stretching decreased eccentric and concentric quadriceps muscle strength at both the 60°/s and 180°/s test speeds (P static stretching also decreased eccentric and concentric hamstring muscle strength at both the 60°/s and 180°/s test speeds (P 0.05). Furthermore, the functional H/Q strength ratios exhibited no significant alterations during the entire and end ranges of knee extension both in the static stretching or the control intervention (P > 0.05). According to our results, static stretching routine does not influence functional H/Q ratio. Athletes can confidently perform static stretching during their warm-up routines.

  12. Disorder and Interaction Effects in Quantum Wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L W; Ritchie, D A; Farrer, I; Griffiths, J P; Jones, G A C; Thomas, K J; Pepper, M

    2012-01-01

    We present conductance measurements of quasi-one-dimensional quantum wires affected by random disorder in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. In addition to quantised conductance plateaux, we observe structure superimposed on the conductance characteristics when the channel is wide and the density is low. Magnetic field and temperature are varied to characterize the conductance features which depend on the lateral position of the 1D channel formed in a split-gate device. Our results suggest that there is enhanced backscattering in the wide channel limit, which gives rise to quantum interference effects. When the wires are free of disorder and wide, the confinement is weak so that the mutual repulsion of the electrons forces a single row to split into two. The relationship of this topological change to the disorder in the system will be discussed.

  13. Neutron refraction by cylindrical metal wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plomp, J.; Barker, J.G.; Haan, V.O. de; Bouwman, W.G.; Well, A.A. van

    2007-01-01

    Undesired Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) from interior features of an object can be minimised by reducing the sample thickness. However, refraction effects produced by the exterior shape of the object depend upon the scattering cross-section and not on the thickness of the object. In the field of polarised neutrons a wire coil is often used to manipulate the polarisation vector of the neutron. In this paper, we show that the cylindrical shape of the wire together with the refractive index introduces an angular distribution in the neutron beam. This can be observed in instrumentation sensitive to SANS. We show results measured on three different SANS instruments: Ultra Small-Angle Neutrons Scattering (USANS), Spin-Echo Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SESANS) and a Time-of-Flight (TOF) SESANS. These results are all in good agreement with the theory of refraction

  14. Neutron refraction by cylindrical metal wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plomp, J. [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)]. E-mail: j.plomp@tudelft.nl; Barker, J.G. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Haan, V.O. de [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Bouwman, W.G. [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Well, A.A. van [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2007-05-01

    Undesired Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) from interior features of an object can be minimised by reducing the sample thickness. However, refraction effects produced by the exterior shape of the object depend upon the scattering cross-section and not on the thickness of the object. In the field of polarised neutrons a wire coil is often used to manipulate the polarisation vector of the neutron. In this paper, we show that the cylindrical shape of the wire together with the refractive index introduces an angular distribution in the neutron beam. This can be observed in instrumentation sensitive to SANS. We show results measured on three different SANS instruments: Ultra Small-Angle Neutrons Scattering (USANS), Spin-Echo Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SESANS) and a Time-of-Flight (TOF) SESANS. These results are all in good agreement with the theory of refraction.

  15. Does vibration counteract the static stretch-induced deficit on muscle force development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Igor Alexandre; Kawchuk, Gregory; Bhambhani, Yagesh; Gomes, Paulo Sergio Chagas

    2013-09-01

    To determine the residual acute vibration-stretching effect on preactivation levels, short-latency stretch reflex, and performance during execution of drop jumps. Repeated measures. Eleven male recreational athletes performed a set of three 45cm drop jumps before and immediately after a 30s static stretching exercise with and without simultaneously imposed muscle vibration (45Hz, 5mm). Drop jump height, ground reaction forces and electromyographic data including Vastus Lateralis onset/levels of preactivation and short-latency stretch reflex were recorded. No changes were induced on drop jump height. However, stretching-induced decrements on ground reaction force peak and time to peak as well as an increment in contact time followed a delay in short-latency stretch reflex onset and a reduced preactivation level of Vastus Lateralis. Otherwise, when vibration was simultaneously imposed, there was no evidence of changes in high-speed force production variables or electromyographic recordings. Mechanical vibration, when applied simultaneously to static-stretching routines, appeared to be effective to counteract decreased musculotendinous unit stiffness-induced high-speed force production deficit during jumping performance. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. A comparison of two stretching programs for hamstring muscles: A randomized controlled assessor-blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoulin, Christophe; Wolfs, Sébastien; Chevalier, Madeline; Granado, Caroline; Grosdent, Stéphanie; Depas, Yannick; Roussel, Nathalie; Hage, Renaud; Vanderthommen, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Most parameters regarding hamstring flexibility training programs have been investigated; however, the joint (i.e. hip or knee) on which the stretching should preferentially be focused needs to be further explored. This randomized controlled assessor-blinded study aimed to investigate the influence of this parameter. We randomly assigned 111 asymptomatic participants with tight hamstring muscles in three groups: a control group and two groups following a different home-based 8-week (five 10-minute sessions per week) hamstring stretching program (i.e. stretching performed by flexing the hip while keeping the knee extended [SH] or by first flexing the hip with a flexed knee and then extending the knee [SK]). Range of motion (ROM) of hip flexion and knee extension were measured before and after the stretching program by means of the straight leg raising test and the passive knee extension angle test, respectively. Eighty-nine participants completed the study. A significant increase in ROM was observed at post-test. Analyses showed significant group-by-time interactions for changes regarding all outcomes. Whereas the increase in hip flexion and knee extension ROM was higher in the stretching groups than in the CG (especially for the SH group p 0.05). In conclusion, the fact that both stretching programs resulted in similar results suggests no influence of the joint at which the stretching is focused upon, as assessed by the straight leg raising and knee extension angle tests.

  17. Effects of Static Stretching Exercise on Lumbar Flexibility and Central Arterial Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jeongok G; Kim, Suk-Sun; Lee, Mijung; Byon, Ha Do; Yeo, SeonAe

    2018-01-23

    Previous studies have demonstrated that arterial stiffness is associated with lumbar flexibility (LF). Stretching exercise targeted to improve LF may have a beneficial effect on reducing arterial stiffness. We examined the effects of a single bout of a structured, static stretching exercise on arterial stiffness, LF, peripheral and central blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) and tested the association between LF and central arterial stiffness. The study had a pretest-posttest design without a control group. Thirty healthy women followed a video demonstration of a 30-minute whole-body stretching exercise. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV), augmentation index, LF, peripheral and central BP, and HR were measured before and after the stretching exercise. One bout of a static stretching exercise significantly reduced cf-PWV (t29 = 2.708, P = .011) and HR (t29 = 7.160, P = .000) and increased LF (t29 = 12.248, P static stretching exercise on central arterial stiffness, an independent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity. Static stretching exercise conducted in the sitting position may be used as an effective intervention to reduce cardiovascular risk after a cardiac event or for patients whose sympathetic function should not be overly activated or whose gaits are not stable.

  18. The acute benefits and risks of passive stretching to the point of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muanjai, Pornpimol; Jones, David A; Mickevicius, Mantas; Satkunskiene, Danguole; Snieckus, Audrius; Skurvydas, Albertas; Kamandulis, Sigitas

    2017-06-01

    This study evaluated the acute effects of two different stretch intensities on muscle damage and extensibility. Twenty-two physically active women (age 20 ± 1.0 years) were divided into two matched groups and undertook eight sets of 30-s passive hamstring stretching. One group stretched to the point of discomfort (POD) and the other to the point of pain (POP). Hamstring passive torque, sit and reach (S&R), straight leg raise (SLR), and markers of muscle damage were measured before, immediately after stretching and 24 h later. S&R acutely increased and was still increased at 24 h with median (interquartile range) of 2.0 cm (0.5-3.75 cm) and 2.0 cm (0.25-3.0 cm) for POP and POD (p muscle tenderness occurred at 24 h in both groups and there was a very small increase in thigh circumference in both groups which persisted at 24 h in POP. Plasma CK activity was not raised at 24 h. Stretching to the point of pain had no acute advantages over stretching to the discomfort point. Both forms of stretching resulted in very mild muscle tenderness but with no evidence of muscle damage. The increased ROM was not associated with changes in passive stiffness of the muscle but most likely resulted from increased tolerance of the discomfort.

  19. Muscle-specific acute changes in passive stiffness of human triceps surae after stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Kosuke; Miyamoto-Mikami, Eri; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Naokazu

    2016-05-01

    It remains unclear whether the acute effect of stretching on passive muscle stiffness differs among the synergists. We examined the muscle stiffness responses of the medial (MG) and lateral gastrocnemii (LG), and soleus (Sol) during passive dorsiflexion before and after a static stretching by using ultrasound shear wave elastography. Before and after a 5-min static stretching by passive dorsiflexion, shear modulus of the triceps surae and the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion in the knee extended position were measured in 12 healthy subjects. Before the static stretching, shear modulus was the greatest in MG and smallest in Sol. The stretching induced significant reductions in shear modulus of MG, but not in shear modulus of LG and Sol. The slack angle was observed at more plantar flexed position in the following order: AT, MG, LG, and Sol. After the stretching, the slack angles of each muscle and AT were significantly shifted to more dorsiflexed positions with a similar extent. When considering the shift in slack angle, the change in MG shear modulus became smaller. The present study indicates that passive muscle stiffness differs among the triceps surae, and that the acute effect of a static stretching is observed only in the stiff muscle. However, a large part of the reduction of passive muscle stiffness at a given joint angle could be due to an increase in the slack length.

  20. 49 CFR 393.28 - Wiring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wiring systems. 393.28 Section 393.28... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.28 Wiring systems. Electrical wiring shall be installed and maintained to conform to SAE J1292—Automobile, Truck, Truck-Tractor...

  1. Wire Array Solar Cells: Fabrication and Photoelectrochemical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurgeon, Joshua Michael

    Despite demand for clean energy to reduce our addiction to fossil fuels, the price of these technologies relative to oil and coal has prevented their widespread implementation. Solar energy has enormous potential as a carbon-free resource but is several times the cost of coal-produced electricity, largely because photovoltaics of practical efficiency require high-quality, pure semiconductor materials. To produce current in a planar junction solar cell, an electron or hole generated deep within the material must travel all the way to the junction without recombining. Radial junction, wire array solar cells, however, have the potential to decouple the directions of light absorption and charge-carrier collection so that a semiconductor with a minority-carrier diffusion length shorter than its absorption depth (i.e., a lower quality, potentially cheaper material) can effectively produce current. The axial dimension of the wires is long enough for sufficient optical absorption while the charge-carriers are collected along the shorter radial dimension in a massively parallel array. This thesis explores the wire array solar cell design by developing potentially low-cost fabrication methods and investigating the energy-conversion properties of the arrays in photoelectrochemical cells. The concept was initially investigated with Cd(Se, Te) rod arrays; however, Si was the primary focus of wire array research because its semiconductor properties make low-quality Si an ideal candidate for improvement in a radial geometry. Fabrication routes for Si wire arrays were explored, including the vapor-liquid-solid growth of wires using SiCl4. Uniform, vertically aligned Si wires were demonstrated in a process that permits control of the wire radius, length, and spacing. A technique was developed to transfer these wire arrays into a low-cost, flexible polymer film, and grow multiple subsequent arrays using a single Si(111) substrate. Photoelectrochemical measurements on Si wire array

  2. Modeling birds on wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydoğdu, A; Frasca, P; D'Apice, C; Manzo, R; Thornton, J M; Gachomo, B; Wilson, T; Cheung, B; Tariq, U; Saidel, W; Piccoli, B

    2017-02-21

    In this paper we introduce a mathematical model to study the group dynamics of birds resting on wires. The model is agent-based and postulates attraction-repulsion forces between the interacting birds: the interactions are "topological", in the sense that they involve a given number of neighbors irrespective of their distance. The model is first mathematically analyzed and then simulated to study its main properties: we observe that the model predicts birds to be more widely spaced near the borders of each group. We compare the results from the model with experimental data, derived from the analysis of pictures of pigeons and starlings taken in New Jersey: two different image elaboration protocols allow us to establish a good agreement with the model and to quantify its main parameters. We also discuss the potential handedness of the birds, by analyzing the group organization features and the group dynamics at the arrival of new birds. Finally, we propose a more refined mathematical model that describes landing and departing birds by suitable stochastic processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A comparison of wire- and Kevlar-reinforced provisional restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, D B; Nicholls, J I; Yuodelis, R A; Strygler, H

    1994-01-01

    Stainless steel wire 0.036 inch in diameter was compared with Kevlar 49 polyaramid fiber as a means of reinforcing a four-unit posterior provisional fixed restoration with 2 pontics. Three reinforcement patterns for wire and two for Kevlar 49 were evaluated and compared with the control, which was an unreinforced provisional restoration. A central tensile load was placed on the cemented provisional restoration and the variables were measured: (1) the initial stiffness; (2) the load at initial fracture; and (3) the unit toughness, or the energy stored in the beam at a point where the load had undergone a 1.0-mm deflection. Statistical analysis showed (1) the bent wire configuration had a significantly higher initial stiffness (P < or = .05), (2) there was no difference between designs for load at initial fracture, and (3) the bent wire had a significantly higher unit toughness value (P < or = .05).

  4. Torsion-induced magnetoimpedance in nanocrystalline Fe-based wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, J.D.; Olivera, J.; Alvarez, P.; Sanchez, T.; Perez, M.J.; Sanchez, M.L.; Gorria, P.; Hernando, B.

    2007-01-01

    The magnetic field influence on the real and imaginary parts of axial-diagonal (ζ zz ) and off-diagonal (ζ φz ) components of the surface magnetoimpedance (MI) tensor has been studied in amorphous and nanocrystalline Fe 73.5 Si 13.5 B 9 Cu 1 Nb 3 wires. Twisted and untwisted wires were annealed at a temperature near to that of primary crystallization. The MI response has been measured at 1MHz and 5mA rms drive current in all the samples. Even though the higher values for both components of the MI tensor are achieved for the untwisted annealed wire, the most interesting features are observed in the torsion annealed wire

  5. Researching on Control Device of Prestressing Wire Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jianhui; Guo, Yangbo; Liu, Maoshe

    2017-06-01

    This paper mainly introduces a device for controlling prestress and its related research methods, the advantage of this method is that the reinforcement process is easy to operate and control the prestress of wire rope accurately. The relationship between the stress and strain of the steel wire rope is monitored during the experiment, and the one - to - one relationship between the controllable position and the pretightening force of the steel wire rope is confirmed by the 5mm steel wire rope, and the results are analyzed theoretically by the measured elastic modulus. The results show that the method can effectively control the prestressing force, and the result provides a reference method for strengthening the concrete column with prestressed steel strand.

  6. How to determine local stretching and tension in a flow-stretched DNA molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Marie, Rodolphe; Kristensen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    We determine the nonuniform stretching of and tension in amega base pairs-long fragment of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is flow stretched in a nanofluidic chip. We use no markers, do not know the contour length of the DNA, and do not have the full DNA molecule inside our field of view. Instead...

  7. Topology Optimized Photonic Wire Splitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Borel, Peter Ingo; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2006-01-01

    Photonic wire splitters have been designed using topology optimization. The splitters have been fabricated in silicon-on-insulator material and display broadband low-loss 3dB splitting in a bandwidth larger than 100 nm.......Photonic wire splitters have been designed using topology optimization. The splitters have been fabricated in silicon-on-insulator material and display broadband low-loss 3dB splitting in a bandwidth larger than 100 nm....

  8. Composite conductor containing superconductive wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, W.L.; Wong, J.

    1974-03-26

    A superconductor cable substitute made by coworking multiple rods of superconductive niobium--titanium or niobium--zirconium alloy with a common copper matrix to extend the copper and rods to form a final elongated product which has superconductive wires distributed in a reduced cross-section copper conductor with a complete metallurgical bond between the normal-conductive copper and the superconductor wires contained therein is described. The superconductor cable can be in the form of a tube.

  9. 30 CFR 75.701-4 - Grounding wires; capacity of wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grounding wires; capacity of wires. 75.701-4... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 75.701-4 Grounding wires; capacity of wires. Where grounding wires are used to ground metallic sheaths, armors, conduits, frames...

  10. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MUSCLE STRETCHING FOR EXERCISE AND REHABILITATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Stretching is a common activity used by athletes, older adults, rehabilitation patients, and anyone participating in a fitness program. While the benefits of stretching are known, controversy remains about the best type of stretching for a particular goal or outcome. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss the current concepts of muscle stretching interventions and summarize the evidence related to stretching as used in both exercise and rehabilitation. PMID:22319684

  11. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MUSCLE STRETCHING FOR EXERCISE AND REHABILITATION

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Stretching is a common activity used by athletes, older adults, rehabilitation patients, and anyone participating in a fitness program. While the benefits of stretching are known, controversy remains about the best type of stretching for a particular goal or outcome. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss the current concepts of muscle stretching interventions and summarize the evidence related to stretching as used in both exercise and rehabilitation.

  12. 1 mil gold bond wire study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huff, Johnathon; McLean, Michael B.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Rutherford, Brian Milne

    2013-05-01

    In microcircuit fabrication, the diameter and length of a bond wire have been shown to both affect the current versus fusing time ratio of a bond wire as well as the gap length of the fused wire. This study investigated the impact of current level on the time-to-open and gap length of 1 mil by 60 mil gold bond wires. During the experiments, constant current was provided for a control set of bond wires for 250ms, 410ms and until the wire fused; non-destructively pull-tested wires for 250ms; and notched wires. The key findings were that as the current increases, the gap length increases and 73% of the bond wires will fuse at 1.8A, and 100% of the wires fuse at 1.9A within 60ms. Due to the limited scope of experiments and limited data analyzed, further investigation is encouraged to confirm these observations.

  13. Cavitation and formation of foam-like structures inside exploding wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhakhovsky, Vasily V.; Pikuz, Sergei A.; Tkachenko, Svetlana I.; Sasorov, Pavel V.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Knapp, Patrick F.; Saylor, Charles C.; Hammer, David A.

    2012-03-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study explosions of aluminum wires heated by electric current pulses. It is shown that the observed nonuniform radial expansion of the heated wire is associated with a liquid-vapor phase transition, which is caused by convergence of a radial tensile wave towards the center of the wire. Tension within the wave leads to cavitation in stretched melt that subsequently forms into a low-density foam-like material surrounded by a dense liquid shell. The foam decays into liquid droplets before the outer shell breaks apart. Simulated density profiles demonstrate good qualitative agreement with experimental high-resolution X-ray images showing the complex hollow structures within the long-living dense core.

  14. Outcome of Specific Piriformis Stretching Technique in Females with Piriformis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quratulain Saeed

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pain and functional limitation affect the quality of life in piriformis syndrome. Stretching of piriformis is essential in the treatment protocols in physiotherapy, however, which sequence of stretching provides optimal improvement is only determined by trial and error. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of specific stretching technique in terms of functional outcome in female with piriformis syndrome and to determine the normative length of piriformis at different reference points in females. METHODS: This study was a randomized controlled trial that was conducted in the Physiotherapy Department of the Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, Rawalpindi, Pakistan between July to December, 2015. This study enrolled 30 patients with piriformis syndrome at outpatient department between the ages of 20 and 50 years. These patients were randomly assigned into two groups. In one group, external rotator sequence of self-stretching (ERS was practiced while in the second group, adductor sequence of passive stretching (APS was performed. Each group was treated for two weeks. Pre and post intervention, the assessment was made on Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS, Functional Performance of Lower Extremity Scale (FPLES and by measured length at three reference positions. Independent T-test was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Both groups showed improvement in outcome in term of a decrease in pain score on NRPS, FPLES and measured reference lengths at all three positions (p-value 0.05 when results of pain score and measured reference length at three different positions were compared. However, on the FPLES, external rotator stretching technique was more effective than adductor stretching technique (p value < 0.05. CONCLUSION: The two studied sequence of piriformis stretching exercises have the same effect on outcomes in terms of clinically measured referenced length and decrease in pain score. Future studies will

  15. HTS Wire Development Workshop: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The 1994 High-Temperature Superconducting Wire Development Workshop was held on February 16--17 at the St. Petersburg Hilton and Towers in St. Petersburg, Florida. The meeting was hosted by Florida Power Corporation and sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. The meeting focused on recent high-temperature superconducting wire development activities in the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Systems program. The meeting opened with a general discussion on the needs and benefits of superconductivity from a utility perspective, the US global competitiveness position, and an outlook on the overall prospects of wire development. The meeting then focused on four important technology areas: Wire characterization: issues and needs; technology for overcoming barriers: weak links and flux pinning; manufacturing issues for long wire lengths; and physical properties of HTS coils. Following in-depth presentations, working groups were formed in each technology area to discuss the most important current research and development issues. The working groups identified research areas that have the potential for greatly enhancing the wire development effort. These areas are discussed in the summary reports from each of the working groups. This document is a compilation of the workshop proceedings including all general session presentations and summary reports from the working groups.

  16. Textured YBCO films grown on wires: application to superconducting cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dechoux, N; Jiménez, C; Chaudouët, P; Rapenne, L; Sarigiannidou, E; Robaut, F; Petit, S; Garaudée, S; Porcar, L; Soubeyroux, J L; Odier, P; Bruzek, C E; Decroux, M

    2012-01-01

    Efforts to fabricate superconducting wires made of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 (YBCO) on La 2 Zr 2 O 7 (LZO) buffered and biaxially textured Ni-5 at.%W (NiW) are described. Wires were manually shaped from LZO buffered NiW tapes. Different diameters were produced: 1.5, 2 and 3 mm. The wires were further covered with YBCO grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). We developed an original device in which the round substrate undergoes an alternated rotation of 180° around its axis in addition to a reel-to-reel translation. This new approach allows covering the whole circumference of the wire with a YBCO layer. This was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis coupled to a scanning electron microscope (SEM). For all wire diameters, the YBCO layer thickness varied from 300 to 450 nm, and the cationic composition was respected. Electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) measurements were performed directly on an as-deposited wire without surface preparation allowing the investigation of the crystalline quality of the film surface. Combining EBSD with XRD results we show that YBCO grows epitaxially on the LZO buffered NiW wires. For the first time, superconductive behaviors have been detected on round substrates in both the rolling and circular direction. J c reached 0.3 MA cm −2 as measured at 77 K by transport and third-harmonic detection. Those preliminary results confirm the effectiveness of the MOCVD for complex geometries, especially for YBCO deposition on small diameter wires. This approach opens huge perspectives for the elaboration of a new generation of YBCO-based round conductors. (paper)

  17. Acute effects of static and dynamic stretching on balance, agility, reaction time and movement time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzopoulos, Dimitris; Galazoulas, Christos; Patikas, Dimitrios; Kotzamanidis, Christos

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of three different stretching protocols on balance, agility, reaction time and movement time of the upper limbs. Participants were thirty one female high school athletes (age = 17.3 ± 0.5 yr.). All participants performed one of the following protocols on different days: (a) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min static stretching (SS), (b) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min dynamic stretching (DS), and (c) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min of rest (NS). After the protocols participants performed the following tests: dynamic balance, 505 agility test, reaction time (time between a sound stimulus and release of a button) and movement time (movement of the upper extremity over a 0.5 m distance). The order of stretching protocols and performance tests were counterbalanced to avoid carryover effects. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed significant main effects for all variables except reaction time. The DS protocol compared to SS performed significantly better in balance, agility and movement time. Additionally, the DS protocol compared to NS performed significantly better in agility. According to the results of the study, a DS protocol is more appropriate than SS for activities that require balance, rapid change of running direction (agility) and movement time of the upper extremities. Key pointsStatic stretching has a negative effect on balance and agility performance compared to dynamic stretching.There was no effect of the stretching protocols on reaction time.Dynamic stretching was more effective than static stretching for increasing movement time of the upper extremities.

  18. Intermittent stretch training of rabbit plantarflexor muscles increases soleus mass and serial sarcomere number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jaeger, Dominique; Joumaa, Venus; Herzog, Walter

    2015-06-15

    In humans, enhanced joint range of motion is observed after static stretch training and results either from an increased stretch tolerance or from a change in the biomechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit. We investigated the effects of an intermittent stretch training on muscle biomechanical and structural variables. The left plantarflexors muscles of seven anesthetized New Zealand (NZ) White rabbits were passively and statically stretched three times a week for 4 wk, while the corresponding right muscles were used as nonstretched contralateral controls. Before and after the stretching protocol, passive torque produced by the left plantarflexor muscles as a function of the ankle angle was measured. The left and right plantarflexor muscles were harvested from dead rabbits and used to quantify possible changes in muscle structure. Significant mass and serial sarcomere number increases were observed in the stretched soleus but not in the plantaris or medial gastrocnemius. This difference in adaptation between the plantarflexors is thought to be the result of their different fiber type composition and pennation angles. Neither titin isoform nor collagen amount was modified in the stretched compared with the control soleus muscle. Passive torque developed during ankle dorsiflexion was not modified after the stretch training on average, but was decreased in five of the seven experimental rabbits. Thus, an intermittent stretching program similar to those used in humans can produce a change in the muscle structure of NZ White rabbits, which was associated in some rabbits with a change in the biomechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Summary of the stretching tectonics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dagan

    1994-01-01

    The rise of stretching tectonics is established on the basis of recent structural geology theory, the establishment of metamorphic nucleus complex structural model on one hand plays an important promoting art to the development of stretching structure, on the other hand, it needs constant supplement and perfection in practice. Metamorphic nucleus complex is the carrier of comparatively deep geological information in vertical section of the crust and has wide distribution in the era of south China. Evidently, it can be taken as the 'key' to understanding the deep and studying the basement, Strengthening the study will play the important promoting role to the deep prospecting. The study of stretching tectonics is not only limited within the range of structure and metamorphism, but combine with the studies of sedimentation, magmatism, metamorphism and mineralization, thus form a new field of tectonic geology of self-developing system

  20. Optofluidic time-stretch microscopy: recent advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Cheng; Nitta, Nao; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2018-04-01

    Flow cytometry is an indispensable method for valuable applications in numerous fields such as immunology, pathology, pharmacology, molecular biology, and marine biology. Optofluidic time-stretch microscopy is superior to conventional flow cytometry methods for its capability to acquire high-quality images of single cells at a high-throughput exceeding 10,000 cells per second. This makes it possible to extract copious information from cellular images for accurate cell detection and analysis with the assistance of machine learning. Optofluidic time-stretch microscopy has proven its effectivity in various applications, including microalga-based biofuel production, evaluation of thrombotic disorders, as well as drug screening and discovery. In this review, we discuss the principles and recent advances of optofluidic time-stretch microscopy.

  1. Optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Baoshan; Lei, Cheng; Wu, Yi; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Ito, Takuro; Yalikun, Yaxiaer; Lee, Sangwook; Isozaki, Akihiro; Li, Ming; Jiang, Yiyue; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Di Carlo, Dino; Tanaka, Yo; Yatomi, Yutaka; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2018-03-01

    Innovations in optical microscopy have opened new windows onto scientific research, industrial quality control, and medical practice over the last few decades. One of such innovations is optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy - an emerging method for high-throughput quantitative phase imaging that builds on the interference between temporally stretched signal and reference pulses by using dispersive properties of light in both spatial and temporal domains in an interferometric configuration on a microfluidic platform. It achieves the continuous acquisition of both intensity and phase images with a high throughput of more than 10,000 particles or cells per second by overcoming speed limitations that exist in conventional quantitative phase imaging methods. Applications enabled by such capabilities are versatile and include characterization of cancer cells and microalgal cultures. In this paper, we review the principles and applications of optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy and discuss its future perspective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Bias of purine stretches in sequenced chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Soumpasis, Dikeos Mario; Brunak, Søren

    2002-01-01

    We examined more than 700 DNA sequences (full length chromosomes and plasmids) for stretches of purines (R) or pyrimidines (Y) and alternating YR stretches; such regions will likely adopt structures which are different from the canonical B-form. Since one turn of the DNA helix is roughly 10 bp, we...... to contain 1.0% of purine tracts and also 1.0% of the alternating pyr/pur tracts. In the vast majority of cases, there are more purine tracts than would be expected from a random sequence, with an average of 3.5%, significantly larger than the expectation value. The fraction of the chromosomes containing pyr......, in eukaryotes there is an abundance of long stretches of purines or alternating purine/pyrimidine tracts, which cannot be explained in this way; these sequences are likely to play an important role in eukaryotic chromosome organisation....

  3. Anisotropic dewetting on stretched elastomeric substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, L; He, L H

    2008-08-01

    We study the instability of a very thin liquid film resting on a uniformly stretched soft elastomeric substrate driven by van der Waals forces. A linear stability analysis shows that the critical fluctuation wavelength in the tensile direction is larger than those in the other directions. The magnitudes of the critical wavelengths are adjustable in the sense that they depend on the principal stretch of the substrate. For example, when the principal stretch of the substrate varies from 1.0 (unstretched) to 3.0, the range of the critical wavelength in the tensile direction increases by 7.0% while that normal to the tensile direction decreases by 8.7%. Therefore, the phenomenon may find potential applications in creating tunable topographically patterned surfaces with nano- to microscale features.

  4. Eccentric Training and Static Stretching Improve Hamstring Flexibility of High School Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Russell T; Bandy, William D

    2004-09-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if the flexibility of high-school-aged males would improve after a 6-week eccentric exercise program. In addition, the changes in hamstring flexibility that occurred after the eccentric program were compared with a 6-week program of static stretching and with a control group (no stretching). DESIGN AND SETTING: We used a test-retest control group design in a laboratory setting. Subjects were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 groups: eccentric training, static stretching, or control. SUBJECTS: A total of 69 subjects, with a mean age of 16.45 +/- 0.96 years and with limited hamstring flexibility (defined as 20 degrees loss of knee extension measured with the thigh held at 90 degrees of hip flexion) were recruited for this study. MEASUREMENTS: Hamstring flexibility was measured using the passive 90/90 test before and after the 6-week program. RESULTS: Differences were significant for test and for the test-by-group interaction. Follow-up analysis indicated significant differences between the control group (gain = 1.67 degrees ) and both the eccentric-training (gain = 12.79 degrees ) and static-stretching (gain = 12.05 degrees ) groups. No difference was found between the eccentric and static-stretching groups. CONCLUSIONS: The gains achieved in range of motion of knee extension (indicating improvement in hamstring flexibility) with eccentric training were equal to those made by statically stretching the hamstring muscles.

  5. Dynamic Stretching does not Change the Stiffness of the Muscle-Tendon Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, T; Umemura, Y

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify changes in ankle range of motion and passive mechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit after dynamic stretching. 12 healthy subjects participated in this study. Displacement of the muscle-tendon junction was measured using ultrasonography while the ankle was passively dorsiflexed at 1°/sec to its maximal dorsiflexion angle. Passive torque was also measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Measurements were conducted pre-intervention, immediately after the intervention and 5, 10, 15 and 30 min post-intervention. The dynamic stretching consisted of four 30-s periods of ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. Ankle range of motion was significantly increased immediately (from 18.3±1.8° to 21.4±1.7°) and 10 min (20.9±1.9°) after dynamic stretching, but this change disappeared within 15 min. However, stiffness of the muscle-tendon unit and displacement of the muscle-tendon junction at the submaximal dorsiflexion angle did not differ between the experimental conditions. These results demonstrate that dynamic stretching by contracting an antagonist muscle group increases ankle range of motion temporarily without changing the passive mechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit. The increased range of motion of the ankle after dynamic stretching might be caused by enhanced stretch tolerance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Molecular wires, switches and memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia

    Molecular electronics, an emerging field, makes it possible to build individual molecules capable of performing functions identical or analogous to present- day conductors, switches, or memories. These individual molecules, with a nano-meter scale characteristic length, can be designed and chemically synthesized with specific atoms, geometries and charge distribution. This thesis focuses on the design, and measurements of molecular wires, and related strategically engineered structures-molecular switches and memories. The experimental system relies on a thermodynamically driven self-assembling process to attach molecules onto substrate surfaces without intervention from outside. The following topics will be discussed: directed nanoscale manipulation of self-assembled molecules using scanning tunneling microscope; investigation on through-bond transport of nanoscale symmetric metal/conjugated self- assembled monolayers (SAM)/metal junctions, where non- Ohmic thermionic emission was observed to be the dominant process, with isocyanide-Pd contacts showing the lowest thermionic barrier of 0.22 eV; the first realization of robust and large reversible switching behavior in an electronic device that utilizes molecules containing redox centers as the active component, exhibiting negative differential resistance (NDR) and large on-off peak-to-valley ratio (PVR); observation of erasable storage of higher conductivity states in these redox- center containing molecular devices, and demonstration of a two-terminal electronically programmable and erasable molecular memory cell with long bit retention time.

  7. Stretching versus transitory icing: which is the more effective treatment for attenuating muscle fatigue after repeated manual labor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Yasumasa; Jinde, Manabu; Murooka, Kazuki; Konno, Yoshimasa; Ohta, Masanori; Yamato, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Effective recovery from muscle fatigue, especially during rest intervals between periods of high-intensity activity, is important to ensure optimal subsequent performance. Stretching and icing are two types of treatment used for muscle recovery in such situations. However, their effectiveness remains unclear because of a lack of adequate evidence and/or discrepant results of previous studies. We performed a study to elucidate the effects of stretching and icing on muscle fatigue in subjects performing alternating muscle contraction and rest. Sixteen healthy male subjects aged 21-27 years were evaluated. Each subject performed repeated isometric muscle contraction exercises that involved lifting and holding a dumbbell to induce muscle fatigue. Four treatments were performed during the rest periods between isometric muscle contraction: static stretching, ballistic stretching, no stretching, or icing. Electromyography and relative muscle oxygen saturation measurements were performed during the exercises. Muscle fatigue was indirectly estimated by the decline in the median frequency of the electromyographic signal. Stretching between alternate isometric muscle contraction exercises resulted in a significantly lower median frequency of the electromyographic signal than did no stretching. There was no significant difference in the change in the median frequency between static and ballistic stretching. Conversely, icing between alternate exercises did not decrease the median frequency. Stretching, whether static or ballistic, is not beneficial for recovery from muscle fatigue and may actually inhibit recovery. Icing may more effectively induce such recovery and thus may be a better choice between the two treatment techniques.

  8. Genetic stretching factors in masseter muscle after orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuel, Wiebke; Krause, Micaela; Schneider, Matthias; Harzer, Winfried

    2013-09-01

    Up to 30% of patients relapse after orthognathic operations, and one reason might be incomplete neuromuscular adaptation of the masticatory muscles. Displacement of the mandible in sagittal or vertical directions, or both, leads to stretching or compression of these muscles. The aim of this study was to analyse stretching factors in 35 patients with retrognathism or prognathism of the mandible (Classes II and III). Tissue samples were taken from both sides of the masseter muscle (anterior and posterior) both before and 6 months after operation. Developmental myosin heavy chains MYH3 and MYH8, the fast and slow MYH 1, 2, and 7, and cyclo-oxygenase (COX) 2, forkhead transcription factor (FOX)O3a, calcineurin, and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)1c (stretching and regeneration-specific), were analysed by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Correlations of Class II and III with sagittal and vertical cephalometric measurements ANB and ML-NL-angle were examined, and the results showed significant differences in amounts of MYH8 (pstretching indicators FOXO3a, calcineurin, and NFAT1c only in Class II patients. This means that stretching of the masseter muscle caused by lengthening of the mandible and raising of the bite in Class II patients was more likely to lead to relapse (similar to that in patients with open bite) than in Class III patients. In conclusion, deep bite should be reduced more by incisor intrusion than by skeletal opening. The focus in these patients should be directed towards physiotherapeutic strengthening of the muscles of mastication, and more consideration should be given to change in the vertical dimension. Copyright © 2012 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Flow of nanofluid by nonlinear stretching velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Rashid, Madiha; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Ahmad, Bashir

    2018-03-01

    Main objective in this article is to model and analyze the nanofluid flow induced by curved surface with nonlinear stretching velocity. Nanofluid comprises water and silver. Governing problem is solved by using homotopy analysis method (HAM). Induced magnetic field for low magnetic Reynolds number is not entertained. Development of convergent series solutions for velocity and skin friction coefficient is successfully made. Pressure in the boundary layer flow by curved stretching surface cannot be ignored. It is found that magnitude of power-law index parameter increases for pressure distibutions. Magnitude of radius of curvature reduces for pressure field while opposite trend can be observed for velocity.

  10. Lattice stretching bistability and dynamic heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Savin, A. V.; Zolotaryuk, A. V.

    2012-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional lattice model is suggested to describe the experimentally observed plateau in force-stretching diagrams for some macromolecules. This chain model involves the nearest-neighbor interaction of a Morse-like potential (required to have a saturation branch) and a harmonic second......-neighbor coupling. Under an external stretching applied to the chain ends, the intersite Morse-like potential results in the appearance of a double-well potential within each chain monomer, whereas the interaction between the second neighbors provides a homogeneous bistable (degenerate) ground state, at least...

  11. Stretching and folding mechanism in foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufaile, Alberto [Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades, Soft Matter Laboratory, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 03828-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: tufaile@usp.br; Pedrosa Biscaia Tufaile, Adriana [Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades, Soft Matter Laboratory, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 03828-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-10-13

    We have described the stretching and folding of foams in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell containing air and a surfactant solution, from a sequence of upside-down flips. Besides the fractal dimension of the foam, we have observed the logistic growth for the soap film length. The stretching and folding mechanism is present during the foam formation, and this mechanism is observed even after the foam has reached its respective maximum fractal dimension. Observing the motion of bubbles inside the foam, large bubbles present power spectrum associated with random walk motion in both directions, while the small bubbles are scattered like balls in a Galton board.

  12. The anchors of steel wire ropes, testing methods and their results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Krešák

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper introduces an application of the acoustic and thermographic method in the defectoscopic testing of immobile steel wire ropes at the most critical point, the anchor. First measurements and their results by these new defectoscopic methods are shown. In defectoscopic tests at the anchor, the widely used magnetic method gives unreliable results, and therefore presents a problem for steel wire defectoscopy. Application of the two new methods in the steel wire defectoscopy at the anchor point will enable increased safety measures at the anchor of steel wire ropes in bridge, roof, tower and aerial cable lift constructions.

  13. Optical absorption in a thin nickel wire

    OpenAIRE

    INAGAKI, Takashi; Goudonnet, J.P.; ARAKAWA, E.T.

    1986-01-01

    Absorption of a 633-nm phonton in a cylindrical nickel wire with diameter 13 m was measured by a photoacoustic method as a function of angle of phonton incidence . A good photoacoustic signal was obtained with a 6-m W He-Ne laser as a light source without employing focusing optics. The absorption measured for p-polarized phontons was found to be in good agreement with geometrical optics calculation. For s-polarized light, however, significant excess absorption was found for >35.

  14. Magnetic field measurements and mapping techniques

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    These lectures will present an overview of the most common techniques used for the measurement of magnetic field in accelerator magnets. The formalism for a harmonic description of the magnetic field will be presented, including a discussion of harmonics allowed under various types of symmetries in the magnet. The harmonic coil technique for measurement of field harmonics will be covered in depth. Using examples from recent projects, magnetic measurements will be shown to be a powerful tool for monitoring magnet production. Measurements of magnetic axis using extensions of the harmonic coil technique, as well as other techniques, such as the colloidal cell and stretched wire, will be covered. Topics of interest in superconducting magnets, such as time decay and snapback, requiring relatively fast measurements of the harmonics, will also be described.

  15. Effectiveness of passive stretching versus hold relax technique in flexibility of hamstring muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Shankar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the effectiveness of passive stretching and hold relax technique in the flexibility of hamstring muscle. Methods: A total of 80 normal healthy female subjects between age group 20-30 years referred to the department of physiotherapy, Sumandeep Vidyapeeth University, sampling method being convenient sampling. The subjects were randomly divided in two groups i.e. passive stretching group (n=40 and PNF group (n=40 and given passive stretching and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation technique respectively. Active knee extension range was measured before and after the intervention by goniometer. Results: t test showed a highly significant (p=0.000 increase in range of motion in PNF group. Conclusion: Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation technique is more effective in increasing hamstring flexibility than the passive stretching.

  16. Forces generated in guide-wires when drilling human bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuaib, I; Hillery, M

    1995-01-01

    In orthopaedic surgery guide-wires are extensively used for the drilling of pilot holes in human bones to allow further drilling, reaming and screw-tapping to take place in the repair and reconstruction of fractures. The guide-wires are generally 1.5 to 2.5 mm in diameter and have a three-faceted point with or without a screw thread. This paper describes drilling tests carried out using both types of guide-wire and these are compared with results obtained from a two-faceted geometry developed during this research. Tests were performed on the heads of femurs which had been removed during hip arthroplasty. A variable speed drilling machine together with a very sensitive drilling dynamometer were used for measuring the torque and thrust during the experimental stage of the research. This equipment was developed as part of an overall research programme into the mechanics of drilling of human bone. The indications are, firstly, that little advantage is gained by using a threaded-point guide-wire. In fact using a thread on the guide-wire can be a disadvantage. Secondly, the thrust cutting force is dependent on the spindle speed and feed. An optimum set of speeds of between 800 and 1400 r/min is recommended for 2.5 mm diameter guide-wires.

  17. Faraday and Kerr Effects Diagnostics for Underwater Exploding Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Fedotov-Gefen, A. V.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2012-10-01

    Two-channel laser polarimeter was used to measure magnetic and electric fields in vicinity of underwater exploding wire. Nd:YAG Q-switch laser with 532nm wavelength, 100mJ energy and 5ns pulse width was used for probing. Single wire, parallel wires and X and V- shaped wires was used in experiments. Electric and magnetic field induced birefringes in the water results in changing of polarization stage of probing beam after propagation through this anisotropic medium. Magnetic field results in circular anisotropy of the water, while electric field creates linear anisotropy. Magnetic field results in rotation of polarization plan of linear-polarized probing beam. Electric field effect is more complicated- polarization plan of the laser beam subjected to pulsation and changing of ellipticity. Effect of electric field depends on initial probing geometry- angle between electrical field vector E and polarization plane of probing wave. In our exploding wire experiments we found influence of both Faraday and Kerr effects. It was demonstrated existence of Kerr effect inside bubbles at high voltage electrode. Effect of magnetic fields interaction for multi-wire loads was observed.

  18. The influence of foot position on lower leg muscle activity during a heel raise exercise measured with fine-wire and surface EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuzawa, Hiroshi; Imai, Atsushi; Iizuka, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Naoto; Kaneoka, Koji

    2017-11-01

    Exercises for lower leg muscles are important to improve function. To examine the influence of foot position on lower leg muscle activity during heel raises. Cross-sectional laboratory study. Laboratory. Fourteen healthy men participated in this study. The muscle activity levels of the tibialis posterior (TP), peroneus longus (PL), flexor digitorum longus (FDL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) were measured. The heel raises consisted of three foot positions: 1) neutral, 2) 30° abduction, and 3) 30° adduction. The EMG data for five repetitions of each foot position were normalized to maximum voluntary contraction. One-way repeated measure ANOVA was employed for statistical analysis. The muscle activity level of TP, PL and FDL was significantly different between the three foot positions during the heel raises. TP and FDL showed the highest activity level in 30° foot adduction while PL demonstrated the highest activity level in 30° foot abduction. Heel raises with 30° foot adduction and abduction positions can change lower leg muscle activity; These findings suggest that altering foot posture during the heel raise exercise may benefit patients with impaired TP, PL or FDL function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Does K-wire position in tension band wiring of olecranon fractures affect its complications and removal of metal rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K W; Donnelly, K J

    2015-06-01

    Despite the recognised complications of migration of wires and soft tissue irritation, tension band wiring (TBW) remains the gold standard for fixation of displaced, minimally comminuted olecranon fractures. There is much variation in placement of the K-wires with current AO guidance stating that each wire should be drilled through the anterior cortex and then backed up by 1 cm. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of K-wire position (intramedullary vs. transcortical) on stability of the construct and significant local complications. All patients who underwent TBW for an isolated olecranon fracture in our trauma unit between 1/1/2009 and 31/12/2011 were included in this retrospective study. Mean follow-up was 14 months (range 5-29 months). Data was gathered from medical records and radiographs. The outcome measured was removal of metal due to complications such as wound problems or proximal migration of wires as standard practice within out trauma unit. Sixty-three patients met the inclusion criteria. Forty-seven had an intramedullary compared with 16 with transcortical configuration (ratio 3:1). Nine patients (19%) with intramedullary K-wires required removal of metalwork - seven due to prominent metalwork and two with wound infection. Four patients (25%) with transcortical K-wires required removal of metalwork - three due to prominent metalwork and one with failure of metalwork. There was no significant statistical difference between transcortical and intramedullary K-wire placement with regards to complication rates following tension band wiring of an isolated olecranon fracture requiring removal of metal (Chi squared test with Yates' correction p = 0.89). We concluded that we found no difference in complications or metalwork removal rate in the placement of K-wire in tension band wiring for isolated olecranon fracture. We recognise our study was limited by small numbers and is based on the experience of one trauma unit.

  20. Effect of a dielectric coating on terahertz surface plasmon polaritons on metal wires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Valk, N.C.J.; Planken, P.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    The authors present measurements and calculations on the effect of thin dielectric coatings on the propagation of terahertz pulses along the surface of metal wires. Our measurements show that propagation over only a few centimeters of wire having a thin dielectric coating, strongly distorts the

  1. Acute effects of static stretching on peak and end-range hamstring-to-quadriceps functional ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekir, Ufuk; Arabaci, Ramiz; Akova, Bedrettin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate if static stretching influences peak and end-range functional hamstring-to-quadriceps (H/Q) strength ratios in elite women athletes. METHODS: Eleven healthy female athletes in an elite competitive level participated to the study. All the participants fulfilled the static stretching or non-stretching (control) intervention protocol in a randomized design on different days. Two static unassisted stretching exercises, one in standing and one in sitting position, were used to stretch both the hamstring and quadriceps muscles during these protocols. The total time for the static stretching was 6 ± 1 min. The isokinetic peak torque measurements for the hamstring and quadriceps muscles in eccentric and concentric modes and the calculations for the functional H/Q strength ratios at angular velocities of 60°/s and 180°/s were made before (pre) and after (post) the control or stretching intervention. The strength measurements and functional strength ratio calculations were based during the entire- and end-range of knee extension. RESULTS: The pre-test scores for quadriceps and hamstring peak torque and end range values were not significantly different between the groups (P > 0.05). Subsequently, although the control group did not exhibit significant changes in quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength (P > 0.05), static stretching decreased eccentric and concentric quadriceps muscle strength at both the 60°/s and 180°/s test speeds (P hamstring muscle strength at both the 60°/s and 180°/s test speeds (P 0.05). Furthermore, the functional H/Q strength ratios exhibited no significant alterations during the entire and end ranges of knee extension both in the static stretching or the control intervention (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: According to our results, static stretching routine does not influence functional H/Q ratio. Athletes can confidently perform static stretching during their warm-up routines. PMID:26495249

  2. Realistic searches on stretched exponential networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vol. 71, No. 2. — journal of. August 2008 physics pp. 313–317. Realistic searches on stretched exponential networks. PARONGAMA SEN. Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road,. Kolkata 700 009, India .... [4] S Milgram, Psychology Today 1, 60 (1967). J Travers and S Milgram, ...

  3. Filament stretching rheometry of polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    The Filament Stretching Rheometry (FSR) method developed by Sridhar, McKinley and coworkers for polymer solutions has been extended to be used also for polymer melts. The design of a melt-FSR will be described and differences to conventional melt elongational rheometers will be pointed out. Results...

  4. Cloud Network Helps Stretch IT Dollars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Hilton

    2012-01-01

    No matter how many car washes or bake sales schools host to raise money, adding funds to their coffers is a recurring problem. This perpetual financial difficulty makes expansive technology purchases or changes seem like a pipe dream for school CIOs and has education technologists searching for ways to stretch money. In 2005, state K-12 school…

  5. The stretch zone of automotive steel sheets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    on steel grade, on the rolling direction as well as on the loading rate. Stretch zones ... This interaction is demonstrated at a fracture surface as a bounded transition between initiatory crack (e.g., fatigue) and either ... The materials examined in this study are three grades of thin automotive steel sheets: XSG,. HR 45 and DP.

  6. Fractional behaviour at cyclic stretch-bending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmens, W.C.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Kazantzis, A.V.; de Hosson, J.Th.M.; Kolleck, R

    2010-01-01

    The fractional behaviour at cyclic stretch-bending has been studied by performing tensile tests at long specimens that are cyclically bent at the same time, on mild steel, dual-phase steel, stainless steel, aluminium and brass. Several types of fracture are observed, these are discussed, as are the

  7. Mechanical behavior of M-Wire and conventional NiTi wire used to manufacture rotary endodontic instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Erika S J; Gomes, Renata O; Leroy, Agnès M F; Singh, Rupinderpal; Peters, Ove A; Bahia, Maria G A; Buono, Vicente T L

    2013-12-01

    Comparison of physical and mechanical properties of one conventional and a new NiTi wire, which had received an additional thermomechanical treatment. Specimens of both conventional (NiTi) and the new type of wire, called M-Wire (MW), were subjected to tensile and three-point bending tests, Vickers microhardness measurements, and to rotating-bending fatigue tests at a strain-controlled level of 6%. Fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy and the non-deformed microstructures by transmission electron microscopy. The thermomechanical treatment applied to produce the M-Wire apparently increased the tensile strength and Vickers microhardness of the material, but its apparent Young modulus was smaller than that of conventionally treated NiTi. The three-point bending tests showed a higher flexibility for MW which also exhibited a significantly higher number of cycles to failure. M-Wire presented mechanical properties that can render endodontic instruments more flexible and fatigue resistant than those made with conventionally processed NiTi wires. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Elastography Study of Hamstring Behaviors during Passive Stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Sant, Guillaume; Ates, Filiz; Brasseur, Jean-Louis; Nordez, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The mechanical properties of hamstring muscles are usually inferred from global passive torque/angle relationships, in combination with adjoining tissues crossing the joint investigated. Shear modulus measurement provides an estimate of changes in muscle-tendon stiffness and passive tension. This study aimed to assess the passive individual behavior of each hamstring muscle in different stretching positions using shear wave elastography. Methods/Results The muscle shear modulus of each hamstring muscle was measured during a standardized slow passive knee extension (PKE, 80% of maximal range of motion) on eighteen healthy male volunteers. Firstly, we assessed the reliability of the measurements. Results were good for semitendinosus (ST, CV: 8.9%-13.4%), semimembranosus (SM, CV: 10.3%-11.2%) and biceps femoris long-head (BF-lh, CV: 8.6%-13.3%), but not for biceps femoris short-head (BF-sh, CV: 20.3%-44.9%). Secondly, we investigated each reliable muscle in three stretch positions: 70°, 90° and 110° of hip flexion. The results showed different values of shear modulus for the same amount of perceived stretch, with the highest measurements in the high-flexed hip situation. Moreover, individual muscles displayed different values, with values increasing or BF-lh, SM and ST, respectively. The inter-subject variability was 35.3% for ST, 27.4% for SM and 30.2% for BF-lh. Conclusion This study showed that the hip needs to be high-flexed to efficiently tension the hamstrings, and reports a higher muscle-tendon stress tolerance at 110° of hip angle. In addition muscles have different passive behaviors, and future works will clarify if it can be linked with rate of injury. PMID:26418862

  9. Elastography Study of Hamstring Behaviors during Passive Stretching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Le Sant

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of hamstring muscles are usually inferred from global passive torque/angle relationships, in combination with adjoining tissues crossing the joint investigated. Shear modulus measurement provides an estimate of changes in muscle-tendon stiffness and passive tension. This study aimed to assess the passive individual behavior of each hamstring muscle in different stretching positions using shear wave elastography.The muscle shear modulus of each hamstring muscle was measured during a standardized slow passive knee extension (PKE, 80% of maximal range of motion on eighteen healthy male volunteers. Firstly, we assessed the reliability of the measurements. Results were good for semitendinosus (ST, CV: 8.9%-13.4%, semimembranosus (SM, CV: 10.3%-11.2% and biceps femoris long-head (BF-lh, CV: 8.6%-13.3%, but not for biceps femoris short-head (BF-sh, CV: 20.3%-44.9%. Secondly, we investigated each reliable muscle in three stretch positions: 70°, 90° and 110° of hip flexion. The results showed different values of shear modulus for the same amount of perceived stretch, with the highest measurements in the high-flexed hip situation. Moreover, individual muscles displayed different values, with values increasing or BF-lh, SM and ST, respectively. The inter-subject variability was 35.3% for ST, 27.4% for SM and 30.2% for BF-lh.This study showed that the hip needs to be high-flexed to efficiently tension the hamstrings, and reports a higher muscle-tendon stress tolerance at 110° of hip angle. In addition muscles have different passive behaviors, and future works will clarify if it can be linked with rate of injury.

  10. Clinical and mechanical factors associated with the removal of temporary epicardial pacemaker wires after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmistekawy, Elsayed; Gee, Yen-Yen; Une, Dai; Lemay, Matthieu; Stolarik, Anne; Rubens, Fraser D

    2016-01-16

    Temporary pacemaker wires are placed in the majority of patients after cardiac surgery. There is no information on mechanical factors related to wire removal. Clinical information related to temporary wire use and removal was prospectively collected from a large cardiac surgical unit over one year. Measurements of maximal tension that nurses and doctors would apply to remove temporary wires was determined using a hand-held portable scale. In a prospective trial, patients (n = 41) had their wires extracted in series to the portable scale to determine the maximal tension required for safe removal. Ventricular wires were placed in 86.5 % of patients during the observed year. Pacing facilitated weaning from CPB in over 15 % of patients and pacer dependence was seen in 2.1 %. No patients suffered major complications after wire removal. There was no difference in the tension that physicians or nurses would apply to comfortably extract temporary wires. In the prospective trial, there was no difference in the tension required for removal of atrial or ventricular wires (atrial 18.3 ± 17.9 oz versus 14.5 ± 14.2 oz, p = 0.430). There were no patient factors that correlated with the degree of resistance and there was no significant difference between the tension required to remove wires with (21.0 ± 22.5 oz) or without (14.1 ± 5.1 oz) an atrial button. Temporary epicardial wire removal is innocuous and was not associated with any complications. In some patients tension required for safe removal exceeded 20 ounces. Strategies to standardize wire removal may prevent complications and may minimize unnecessary wire retention.

  11. The effects of a combined static-dynamic stretching protocol on athletic performance in elite Gaelic footballers: A randomised controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughran, Martin; Glasgow, Philip; Bleakley, Chris; McVeigh, Joseph

    2017-05-01

    To determine the effect of three different static-dynamic stretching protocols on sprint and jump performance in Gaelic footballers. Double-blind, controlled, crossover trial. Sports Institute research environment. Seventeen male elite level Gaelic footballers, aged 18-30 years, completed three stretching protocols. Athletic performance was measured by countermovement jump height and power, and timed 10 m, 20 m, and 40 m sprints. Static stretching reduced sprint speed by 1.1% over 40 m and 1.0% over 20 m. Static stretching also reduced countermovement jump height by 10.6% and jump power by 6.4%. When static stretching was followed by dynamic stretching, sprint speed improved by 1.0% over 20 m and 0.7% over 40 m (p static - dynamic stretching protocol also improved countermovement jump height by 8.7% (p Static stretching reduces sprint speed and jump performance. Static stretching should be followed by dynamic stretching during warm-up to nullify any performance deficits caused by static stretching. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Wire Rupture Optimization in Wire Electrical Discharge Machining using Taguchi Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Ibrahem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM is one of the most important nontraditional machining process that is well-known for cutting difficult to machine materials. The wire electrode along with machining parameters control the WEDM process. This research work focuses on optimizing WEDM parameters using Taguchi technique to minimize wire rupture. Experiments have been done using the L18 orthogonal array. Each experiment is repeated three times to ensure accurate readings of the wire rupture. The statistical methods of signal to noise ratio (S/N ratio is applied to study effects of peak current, pulse width, charging time, wire speed, and wire tension on wire rupture. As a results, the peak current, pulse width, and wire tension have the most significant effect on wire rupture followed by charging time and wire speed. The developed analysis can be used in the metal cutting field to identify the optimum machining parameters for less wire rupture.

  13. One minute static stretch of plantar flexors transiently increases H reflex excitability and exerts no effect on corticospinal pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budini, Francesco; Gallasch, Eugen; Christova, Monica; Rafolt, Dietmar; Rauscher, Andreas Benedikt; Tilp, Markus

    2017-08-01

    What is the central question of this study? What mediates neural responses following static stretching, and how long do these influences last? What is the main finding and its importance? This study shows that 1 min of static stretching inhibits the tendon tap reflex and facilitates the H reflex without influencing motor-evoked potentials. The results indicate that at least two different mechanisms mediate neural responses after static stretching. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the neural responses observed after static stretching are mediated by sensitivity of muscle spindles, spinal excitability or cortical excitability and how long these influences last. Nineteen volunteers (25.7 ± 5.6 years old) were tested for the tendon tap reflex (T-reflex), H reflex and motor-evoked potentials on ankle flexors and extensors immediately, 5 and 10 min after 1 min static stretching applied at individual maximal ankle dorsiflexion, as well as immediately, 5 and 10 min after a control period of the same duration. Comparison of measurements collected immediately after stretching or control conditions revealed that the T-reflex was weaker after stretching than after control (-59.2% P = 0.000). The T-reflex showed a slow recovery rate within the first 150 s after stretching, but 5 min after the inhibition had disappeared. The H reflex increased immediately after stretching (+18.3%, P = 0.036), showed a quick tendency to recover and returned to control values within 5 min from stretching. Motor-evoked potentials were not affected by the procedure. These results suggest that 1 min of static stretching primarily decreases muscle spindle sensitivity and facilitates the H reflex, whereas effects on the motor cortex can be excluded. © 2017 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  14. Flexibility training in preadolescent female athletes: Acute and long-term effects of intermittent and continuous static stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donti, Οlyvia; Papia, Konstantina; Toubekis, Argyris; Donti, Anastasia; Sands, William A; Bogdanis, Gregory C

    2018-07-01

    This study compared the acute and long-term effects of intermittent and continuous static stretching training on straight leg raise range of motion (ROM). Seventy-seven preadolescent female gymnasts were divided into a stretching (n = 57), and a control group (n = 20). The stretching group performed static stretching of the hip extensors of both legs, three times per week for 15 weeks. One leg performed intermittent (3 × 30 s with 30 s rest) while the other leg performed continuous stretching (90 s). ROM pre- and post-stretching was measured at baseline, on weeks 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and after 2 weeks of detraining. ROM was increased during both intermittent and continuous stretching training, but remained unchanged in the control group. Intermittent stretching conferred a larger improvement in ROM compared to both continuous stretching and control from week 3, until the end of training, and following detraining (p = 0.045 to 0.001 and d = 0.80 to 1.41). During detraining, ROM after the intermittent protocol decreased (p = 0.001), while it was maintained after the continuous protocol (p = 0.36). Acute increases in ROM following the intermittent stretching were also larger than in the continuous (p = 0.038). Intermittent stretching was more effective than continuous, for both long-term and acute ROM enhancement in preadolescent female athletes.

  15. AC loss properties of MgB{sub 2} multifilament wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Kazuhide; Funaki, Kazuo; Sueyoshi, Takahiro; Sasashige, Yushi; Kajikawa, Kazuhiro; Iwakuma, Masataka [Kyushu University Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Okada, Michiya [HRL Hitachi, Ltd, 7-1-1 Oomika, Hitachi 319-1292 (Japan); Kumakura, Hiroaki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Hayashi, Hidemi [Kyushu Electric Power Co., Incorporated, 2-1-47 Shiobaru, Minami-ku, Fukuoka 815-8520 (Japan)], E-mail: kazuhide.tanaka.je@hitachi.com

    2008-09-15

    We designed and fabricated two types of composite wires with 6 MgB{sub 2} filaments. One is a Cu-sheathed Nb-barrier wire and the other is a CuNi-sheathed Ta-barrier wire. The transverse-field losses of the trial wires were measured with a standardized pickup coil system in liquid helium. We evaluated the observed AC losses using two structural models, a multifilament conductor model and a hollow-cylindrical one. For the CuNi-sheathed Ta-barrier wire, the AC loss property can be explained by the usual model of multifilament conductors. Further reductions in AC loss can be expected by making the filaments thinner. For the Cu-sheathed Nb-barrier wire, theoretical considerations suggest the multifilament structure behaves as a hollow-cylindrical superconductor in the AC loss property. Thus, we need to pay particular attention to designing the barrier material for reduction in the AC loss.

  16. Effects of acute static, ballistic, and PNF stretching exercise on the muscle and tendon tissue properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, A; Stafilidis, S; Tilp, M

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of a single static, ballistic, or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching exercise on the various muscle-tendon parameters of the lower leg and to detect possible differences in the effects between the methods. Volunteers (n = 122) were randomly divided into static, ballistic, and PNF stretching groups and a control group. Before and after the 4 × 30 s stretching intervention, we determined the maximum dorsiflexion range of motion (RoM) with the corresponding fascicle length and pennation angle of the gastrocnemius medialis. Passive resistive torque (PRT) and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) were measured with a dynamometer. Observation of muscle-tendon junction (MTJ) displacement with ultrasound allowed us to determine the length changes in the tendon and muscle, respectively, and hence to calculate stiffness. Although RoM increased (static: +4.3%, ballistic: +4.5%, PNF: +3.5%), PRT (static: -11.4%, ballistic: -11.5%, PNF: -13,7%), muscle stiffness (static: -13.1%, ballistic: -20.3%, PNF: -20.2%), and muscle-tendon stiffness (static: -11.3%, ballistic: -10.5%, PNF: -13.7%) decreased significantly in all the stretching groups. Only in the PNF stretching group, the pennation angle in the stretched position (-4.2%) and plantar flexor MVC (-4.6%) decreased significantly. Multivariate analysis showed no clinically relevant difference between the stretching groups. The increase in RoM and the decrease in PRT and muscle-tendon stiffness could be explained by more compliant muscle tissue following a single static, ballistic, or PNF stretching exercise. © 2017 The Authors Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Cyclic mechanical stretch enhances BMP9-induced osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Tang, Yinhong; Song, Jinlin; Lei, Mingxing; Liang, Panpan; Fu, Tiwei; Su, Xudong; Zhou, Pengfei; Yang, Li; Huang, Enyi

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether mechanical stretch can enhance the bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9)-induced osteogenic differentiation in MSCs. Recombinant adenoviruses were used to overexpress the BMP9 in C3H10T1/2 MSCs. Cells were seeded onto six-well BioFlex collagen I-coated plates and subjected to cyclic mechanical stretch [6% elongation at 60 cycles/minute (1 Hz)] in a Flexercell FX-4000 strain unit for up to 12 hours. Immunostaining and confocal microscope were used to detect cytoskeleton organization. Cell cycle progression was checked by flow cytometry. Alkaline phosphatase activity was measured with a Chemiluminescence Assay Kit and was quantified with a histochemical staining assay. Matrix mineralization was examined by Alizarin Red S Staining. Mechanical stretch induces cytoskeleton reorganization and inhibits cell proliferation by preventing cells entry into S phase of the cell cycle. Although mechanical stretch alone does not induce the osteogenic differentiation of C3H10T1/2 MSCs, co-stimulation with mechanical stretch and BMP9 enhances alkaline phosphatase activity. The expression of key lineage-specific regulators (e.g., osteocalcin (OCN), SRY-related HMG-box 9, and runt-related transcription factor 2) is also increased after the co-stimulation, compared to the mechanical stretch stimulation along. Furthermore, mechanical stretch augments the BMP9-mediated bone matrix mineralization of C3H10T1/2 MSCs. Our results suggest that mechanical stretch enhances BMP9-induced osteoblastic lineage specification in C3H10T1/2 MSCs.

  18. Effect of single bout versus repeated bouts of stretching on muscle recovery following eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Rui; Pinho, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Cabri, Jan M H

    2013-11-01

    To analyze the effects of a single bout and repeated bouts of stretching on indirect markers of exercise-induced muscle damage. A randomized controlled clinical trial at a university human research laboratory was conducted. Fifty-six untrained males were randomly divided into four groups. (I) a single stretching group underwent a single bout of stretching on the quadriceps muscle; (II) an eccentric exercised group underwent eccentric quadriceps muscle contractions until exhaustion; (III) an eccentric exercise group followed by a single bout of stretching; (IV) an eccentric exercised group submitted to repeated bouts of stretching performed immediately and 24, 48, and 72 h post-exercise. Muscle stiffness, muscle soreness, maximal concentric peak torque, and plasma creatine kinase activity were assessed before exercise and 1, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h post-exercise. All exercised groups showed significant reduction in maximal concentric peak torque and significant increases in muscle soreness, muscle stiffness, and plasma creatine kinase. There were no differences between these groups in all assessed variables, with the exception of markers of muscle stiffness, which were significantly lower in the eccentric exercise group followed by single or repeated bouts. The single stretching group showed no change in any assessed variables during the measurement period. Muscle stretching performed after exercise, either as single bout or as repeated bouts, does not influence the levels of the main markers of exercise-induced muscle damage; however, repeated bouts of stretching performed during the days following exercise may have favorable effects on muscle stiffness. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Muscle oxygenation and fascicle length during passive muscle stretching in ballet-trained subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, A; Fujita, E; Ikegawa, S; Kuno-Mizumura, M

    2011-07-01

    Muscle stretching transiently decreases muscle-blood flow corresponding to a muscle extension. It may disturb a balance between muscular oxygen demand and oxygen supply to muscles and reduce muscle oxygenation. However, muscle-stretching training may improve blood circulatory condition, resulting in the maintained muscle oxygenation during muscle stretching. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in muscle-blood volume (tHb) and tissue oxygenation index (TOI) during muscle stretching determined by using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in ballet-trained (BT) and untrained (C) subjects. 11 BT women who regularly perform muscle stretching and 11 C women participated in this study. Fascicle lengths, tHb and TOI in the tibialis anterior muscle were measured during passive plantar flexion from ankle joint angles of 120° (baseline) to 140°, 160°, the maximal comfortable position without pain (CP), and the maximal position (MP). At 160°, the % fascicle-length change from baseline was significantly lower in the BT than the C group, however, for the changes in tHb and TOI the significant interaction effect between the 2 groups was not detected. On the other hand, although the increases in the fascicle length from baseline to CP and MP were greater in BT than C, the tHb and TOI reductions were comparable between groups. We concluded that it appears that BT can extend their muscles without excessive reduction in muscle-blood volume and muscle oxygenation at relatively same but absolutely greater muscle-stretching levels than C. The attenuation in these indices during high-level muscle stretching may be associated with the repetitive muscle stretching of long-term ballet training. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Enhancing wire-composite bond strength of bonded retainers with wire surface treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesterle, L J; Shellhart, W C; Henderson, S

    2001-06-01

    Bonded orthodontic retainers with wires embedded in composite resin are commonly used for orthodontic retention. The purpose of this study was to test, in vitro, various wire surface treatments to determine the optimal method of enhancing the wire-composite bond strength. Coaxial wires and stainless steel wires with different surface treatments were bonded to bovine enamel and then pulled along their long axes with an Instron universal testing machine. Wire surface treatments included placing a right-angle bend in the wire, microetching the wire, and treating the wire with adhesion promoters; combinations of treatments were also examined. The results demonstrated a 24-fold increase in the wire-composite bond strength of wire that was microetched (sandblasted), compared with that of untreated straight wire. The difference between the amount of force required to break the bond produced by microetching alone (246.1 +/- 46.0 MPa) and that required for the bonds produced by the retentive bend (87.8 +/- 16.3 MPa), the adhesion promoters (silane, 11.0 +/- 3.1 MPa; Metal Primer, 28.5 +/- 15.8 MPa), or for any combination of surface treatments, was statistically significant. Microetching a stainless steel wire produced a higher wire-composite bond strength than that obtained from a coaxial wire (113.5 +/- 27.5 MPa). The results of this study indicate that microetching or sandblasting a stainless steel wire significantly increases the strength of the wire-composite bond.

  1. Comparison of the Effects of Local Cryotherapy and Passive Cross-Body Stretch on Extensibility in Subjects with Posterior Shoulder Tightness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyue-nam Park

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to compare the immediate effects of local cryotherapy (LC and passive cross-body stretch on the extensibility of the posterior shoulder muscle in individuals with posterior shoulder tightness. Eighty-seven healthy subjects with a between-shoulder difference in internal rotation (IR range of motion (ROM greater than 10° were randomly divided into three groups: LC group, stretching group, and control group (n = 29 in each group. Subjects in the LC group received LC on infraspinatus and posterior deltoid muscles and subjects in the stretching group performed passive cross-body stretch. Stretch sensation was measured at the end range of passive IR and horizontal adduction (HA using numerical rating scale, and the pressure pain threshold (PPT at the infraspinatus and posterior deltoid muscles was measured using pressure algometry. Passive and active ROM of IR and HA of the glenohumeral joint were measured using an inclinometer. All measurements were performed at pre-intervention, post- intervention, and 10-min follow-up. Stretch sensation was significantly decreased and PPT was significantly increased in the LC and stretching groups at post-intervention, and these effects were maintained at 10-min follow-up, compared to the control group. Both the LC group and stretching group had a significantly greater increase in passive and active ROM of IR and HA, compared to the control group at post-intervention and 10-min follow-up. However, there were no significant differences in stretch sensation, PPT, or ROM of IR and HA between the LC group and stretching group. LC can be used to decrease the stretch sensation and increase PPT and ROM of IR and HA as much as a stretching exercise. LC could be an alternative method for increasing the restricted ROM of glenohumeral IR and HA for individuals with posterior shoulder tightness, especially for patients and sports players who have severe stretching discomfort.

  2. A high resolution wire scanner beam profile monitor with a microprocessor data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutler, R.I.; Mohr, D.L.; Whittaker, J.K.; Yoder, N.R.

    1983-01-01

    A beam profile monitor has been constructed for the NBS-LANL Racetrack Microtron. The monitor consists of two perpendicular 30 μm diameter carbon wires that are driven through an electron beam by a pneumatic actuator. A long-lifetime, electroformed nickel bellows is used for the linear-motion vacuum feedthrough. Secondary emission current from the wires and a signal from a transducer measuring the position of the wires are simultaneously digitized by a microprocessor to yield beam current density profiles in two dimensions. The wire scanner is designed for use with both pulsed and cw beams

  3. Growth and Characterization of Indium Doped ZnO Nano wires Using Thermal Evaporation Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrar Ismardi; Dee, C.F.; Majlis, B.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Indium doped ZnO nano wires were grown on silicon substrate using vapor thermal deposition method without using any catalyst. Morphological structures were extensively investigated using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and show that the nano wires have uniformly hexagonal nano structures with diameters less than 100 nm and lengths from one to a few microns. The sample was measured for elemental composition with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, Zn, In and O elements were found on the sample. XRD spectrum of indium doped ZnO nano wires revealed that the nano wires have a high crystalline structure. (author)

  4. The influence of the manufacturing method on the microstructure and drawing properties of copper wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, A.; Jeglitsch, F.

    1982-01-01

    Copper is the third most important common metal from production figures after iron and aluminium and is largely used as pure metal in the electroindustry mainly here in the form of wires of different sizes due to its excellent electrical properties. Therefore all factors influencing the drawing ability are very important. The following work deals with the influence of impurity measurements as well as of the microstructure on the deformation or recrystallization behaviour in manufacturing continuous casting and rolling wire and dip-forming wire, and gives a rupture cause specific to each manufacturing method in the wire drawing process. (orig.) [de

  5. How to Stretch Your Ankle After a Sprain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ankle After A Sprain How to Stretch Your Ankle After A Sprain Page Content You should perform the following stretches ... Consider these home exercises when recuperating from an ankle sprain. Perform them twice per day. While seated, bring ...

  6. In-situ transmission electron microscopy observation of electromigration in Au thin wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yosuke; Arita, Masashi; Hamada, Kouichi; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2012-11-01

    Electromigration of thin Au wire is studied by the use of in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques from the viewpoint of nanogap formation. We use a relatively wide Au wire as a starting material because the position-dependent structure change in the wire provides information of the thermal effect caused by the current flow. In-situ TEM observation, in which current measurements of the Au wire are simultaneously performed, reveals the process of the growth of voids and grains. Finally the formation of a nanogap by electromigration is observed doing with current measurements. All the results observed by in-situ TEM indicate the fact that the thermal effects or temperature increase in the wire region take an important role for the structure change caused by electromigration of Au in the wire. It is suggested that the position of the nanogap can roughly be arranged by setting the wire structure and current direction even though a relatively wide wire was used. The detailed observation by in-situ TEM also suggests that the control of heat generation in the wire makes the nanogap sharp because of the well-controlled recrystallization of Au nanowires.

  7. Shape of a clamped stiff harpsichord wire driven at a resonant frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Roger J.; Macomber, Hilliard Kent; Boucher, Mathew A.

    2002-05-01

    A wire transversely driven by a sinusoidal force at the resonant frequency of a vibrational mode vibrates at the driving frequency and at harmonics generated by nonlinear processes in the wire. If the amplitude of a harmonic is measured as a function of position along the wire, its shape is revealed. It differs significantly from a sinusoid in the vicinity of either end of the wire because the ends are clamped and the wire has significant stiffness. The shapes of various harmonics have been determined for a brass harpsichord wire, 70 cm long, from optical detector measurements made at different distances from a clamped end. Knowledge of shape facilitates the determination of antinode amplitudes of harmonics when the gross motion of the wire is so large that the detectors must be positioned near an end of the wire because of their very limited dynamic range. Some observations of harmonics and related phenomena were reported previously [Hanson et al., J. Acoust Soc. Am. 108, 2592 (2000); 106, 2141 (1999)]. The shape information is also needed to help separate nonlinear effects possibly occurring in the detectors from those of interest, occurring in the wire itself.

  8. Z-Pinch Wire-Electrode Contact Resistance Studies Using Weighted and Soft Metal Gasket Contacts*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, M. R.; Zier, J. C.; Thurtell, A. F.; French, D. M.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Tang, W.; Lau, Y. Y.

    2008-11-01

    The contact made between z-pinch wires and electrodes has a significant effect on both the energy deposited in the wires and the uniformity of the expansion profile of the wires. We have shown that using soft metal gaskets can improve wire-electrode contact significantly over typical weighted contacts. Images of wire expansion profile and wire plasma emission will be presented for single and double wire shots on a 16 kA, 100 kV 4-stage Marx bank with 150 ns risetime. Bench resistance measurements for aluminum, stainless steel, and tungsten wires with diameters ranging from 7.5 um to 30 um will be presented. These measurements utilized both soft metal gasket contacts (gaskets include: indium, silver, aluminum, tin, and lead) and double-ended wire weight contacts (weights ranged from 0.4 g to 1.9 g). *This research was supported by U. S. DoE through Sandia National Laboratories award document numbers 240985, 768225, 790791 and 805234 to the University of Michigan. MRG supported by NNSA Fellowship and JCZ supported by NPSC Fellowship sponsored by Sandia National Labs.

  9. The Establishment of Surface Roughness as Failure Criterion of Al–Li Alloy Stretch-Forming Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Wen Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking Al–Li–S4–T8 Al–Li alloy as the study object, based on the stretching and deforming characteristics of sheet metals, this paper proposes a new approach of critical orange peel state characterizations on the basis of the precise measurement of stretch-forming surface roughness and establishes the critical criterion for the occurrence of orange peel surface defects in the stretch-forming process of Al–Li alloy sheet metals. Stretching experiments of different strain paths are conducted on the specimens with different notches so as to establish the Al–Li–S4–T8 Al–Li alloy, forming limit diagram and forming limit curve equation, with the surface roughness of characteristic critical orange peel structure as the stretch-forming failure criterion.

  10. Put Your Cable Wiring to the Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, C. William

    2001-01-01

    Discusses why schools and universities should use testing procedures in any wire bid specification for cable wiring and also know how experienced the installers are in testing and installing structured cabling systems. Key cabling terms are included. (GR)

  11. Joining characteristics of orthodontic wires with laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro; Brantley, William A; Yuasa, Toshihiro; Muguruma, Takeshi; Kawashima, Isao; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2008-01-01

    Laser welding 0.016 x 0.022 in. beta-Ti, Ni-Ti, and Co-Cr-Ni orthodontic wires was investigated by measuring joint tensile strength, measuring laser penetration depth, determining metallurgical phases using micro X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD), and examining microstructures with an scanning electron microscope (SEM). Welding was performed from 150 to 230 V. Mean tensile strength for Ni-Ti groups was significantly lower (p Ni was significantly lower than for control specimens joined by silver soldering, it was sufficient for clinical use. The beta-Ti orthodontic wire showed deeper penetration depth from laser welding than the Ni-Ti and Co-Cr-Ni orthodontic wires. Micro-XRD patterns of laser-welded beta-Ti and Ni-Ti obtained 2 mm from the boundary were similar to as-received specimens, indicating that original microstructures were maintained. When output voltages of 190 V and higher were used, most peaks from joint areas disappeared or were much weaker, perhaps because of a directional solidification effect, evidenced by SEM observation of fine striations in welded beta-Ti. Laser welding beta-Ti and Co-Cr-Ni wires may be acceptable clinically, since joints had sufficient strength and metallurgical phases in the original wires were not greatly altered.

  12. Potential axillary nerve stretching during RSA implantation: an anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Blandine; Leclère, Franck Marie; Casoli, Vincent; Paganini, Federico; Unglaub, Frank; Spies, Christian; Valenti, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    Clinical and subclinical neurological injury after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) may jeopardize functional outcomes due to the risk of irreversible damage to the axillary nerve. We proposed a simple anatomical study in order to assess the macroscopic effects on the axillary nerve when lowering the humerus as performed during RSA implantation. We also measured the effect on the axillary nerve of a lateralization of the humerus. Between 2011 and 2012, cadaveric dissections of 16 shoulder specimens from nine fresh human cadavers were performed in order to assess the effects on the axillary nerve after the lowering and lateralization of the humerus. We assessed the extent of stretching of the axillary nerve in four positions in the sagittal plane [lowering of the humerus: great tuberosity in contact with the acromion (position 1), in contact with the upper (position 2), middle (position 3) and lower rim of the glenoid (position 4)] and three positions in the frontal plane [lateralization of the humerus: humerus in contact with the glenoid (position 1), humerus lateralized 1 cm (position 2) and 2 cm (position 3)]. When the humerus was lowered, clear macroscopical changes appeared below the middle of the glenoid (the highest level of tension). As regards the lateralization of the humerus, macroscopic study and measurements confirm the absence of stretching of the nerve in those positions. Lowering of the humerus below the equator of the glenoid changes the course and tension of the axillary nerve and may lead to stretching and irreversible damage, compromising the function of the deltoid. Improvements in the design of the implants and modification of the positioning of the glenosphere to avoid notching and to increase mobility must take into account the anatomical changes induced by the prosthesis and its impact on the brachial plexus. Level of Evidence and study type Level IV.

  13. Hemodynamic responses during and after multiple sets of stretching exercises performed with and without the Valsalva maneuver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tainah P. Lima

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the acute hemodynamic responses to multiple sets of passive stretching exercises performed with and without the Valsalva maneuver. METHODS: Fifteen healthy men aged 21 to 29 years with poor flexibility performed stretching protocols comprising 10 sets of maximal passive unilateral hip flexion, sustained for 30 seconds with equal intervals between sets. Protocols without and with the Valsalva maneuver were applied in a random counterbalanced order, separated by 48-hour intervals. Hemodynamic responses were measured by photoplethysmography pre-exercise, during the stretching sets, and post-exercise. RESULTS: The effects of stretching sets on systolic and diastolic blood pressure were cumulative until the fourth set in protocols performed with and without the Valsalva maneuver. The heart rate and rate pressure product increased in both protocols, but no additive effect was observed due to the number of sets. Hemodynamic responses were always higher when stretching was performed with the Valsalva maneuver, causing an additional elevation in the rate pressure product. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple sets of unilateral hip flexion stretching significantly increased blood pressure, heart rate, and rate pressure product values. A cumulative effect of the number of sets occurred only for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, at least in the initial sets of the stretching protocols. The performance of the Valsalva maneuver intensified all hemodynamic responses, which resulted in significant increases in cardiac work during stretching exercises.

  14. Hemodynamic responses during and after multiple sets of stretching exercises performed with and without the Valsalva maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Tainah P; Farinatti, Paulo T V; Rubini, Ercole C; Silva, Elirez B; Monteiro, Walace D

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the acute hemodynamic responses to multiple sets of passive stretching exercises performed with and without the Valsalva maneuver. Fifteen healthy men aged 21 to 29 years with poor flexibility performed stretching protocols comprising 10 sets of maximal passive unilateral hip flexion, sustained for 30 seconds with equal intervals between sets. Protocols without and with the Valsalva maneuver were applied in a random counterbalanced order, separated by 48-hour intervals. Hemodynamic responses were measured by photoplethysmography pre-exercise, during the stretching sets, and post-exercise. The effects of stretching sets on systolic and diastolic blood pressure were cumulative until the fourth set in protocols performed with and without the Valsalva maneuver. The heart rate and rate pressure product increased in both protocols, but no additive effect was observed due to the number of sets. Hemodynamic responses were always higher when stretching was performed with the Valsalva maneuver, causing an additional elevation in the rate pressure product. Multiple sets of unilateral hip flexion stretching significantly increased blood pressure, heart rate, and rate pressure product values. A cumulative effect of the number of sets occurred only for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, at least in the initial sets of the stretching protocols. The performance of the Valsalva maneuver intensified all hemodynamic responses, which resulted in significant increases in cardiac work during stretching exercises.

  15. The efficacy of two modified proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching techniques in subjects with reduced hamstring muscle length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youdas, James W; Haeflinger, Kristin M; Kreun, Melissa K; Holloway, Andrew M; Kramer, Christine M; Hollman, John H

    2010-05-01

    Difference scores in knee extension angle and electromyographic (EMG) activity were quantified before and after modified proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) hold-relax (HR) and hold-relax-antagonist contraction (HR-AC) stretching procedures in 35 healthy individuals with reduced hamstring muscle length bilaterally (knee extension angle <160 degrees ). Participants were randomly assigned each PNF procedure to opposite lower extremities. Knee extension values were measured by using a goniometer. EMG data were collected for 10 seconds before and immediately after each PNF stretching technique and normalized to maximum voluntary isometric contraction (% MVIC). A significant time by stretch-type interaction was detected (F(1,34) = 21.1; p < 0.001). Angles of knee extension for HR and HR-AC were not different prior to stretching (p = 0.45). Poststretch knee extension angle was greater in the HR-AC condition than the HR condition (p < 0.007). The proportion of subjects who exceeded the minimal detectable change (MDC(95)) with the HR-AC stretch (97%) did not differ (p = 0.07) from the proportion who exceeded the MDC(95) with the HR stretch (80%). Because EMG activation increased (p < 0.013) after the HR-AC procedure, it is doubtful a relationship exists between range of motion improvement after stretching and inhibition of the hamstrings. On average the 10-second modified HR procedure produced an 11 degrees gain in knee extension angle within a single stretch session.

  16. Novel Wiring Technologies for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Tracy L.; Parrish, Lewis M.

    2014-01-01

    Because wire failure in aerospace vehicles could be catastrophic, smart wiring capabilities have been critical for NASA. Through the years, researchers at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have developed technologies, expertise, and research facilities to meet this need. In addition to aerospace applications, NASA has applied its knowledge of smart wiring, including self-healing materials, to serve the aviation industry. This webinar will discuss the development efforts of several wiring technologies at KSC and provide insight into both current and future research objectives.

  17. Clinical bending of nickel titanium wires

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Chain; Priyank Seth; Namrata Rastogi; Kenneth Tan; Mayank Gupta; Richa Singh

    2015-01-01

    Since the evolution and the involvement of Nickel Titanium wires in the field of Orthodontics. The treatment plan has evolved with the use of low force Nickel Titanium wires. Because of their high springback, low stiffness, they are the key initial wires in leveling and alignment but have poor formability. Since poor formability limits its ability to create variable arch forms thus; limits the form of treatment. We have devised a method to bend the Nickel Titanium wires to help in our invento...

  18. Towards Unconventional Applications of Wire Bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Schröder, Stephan

    2018-01-01

    This thesis presents novel heterogeneous integration approaches of wire materials to fabricated and package MEMS devices by exploring unconventional applications of wire bonding technology. Wire bonding, traditionally endemic in the realm of device packaging to establish electrical die-to-package interconnections, is an attractive back-end technology, offering promising features, such as high throughput, flexibility and placement accuracy. Exploiting the advantages of state-of-the-art wire bo...

  19. Different mechanical properties in Seldinger guide wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Schummer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Most central venous catheters are placed using Seldinger guide wires. EN ISO 11070 is the guideline for testing guide wire flexing performance and tensile strength, and we can safely assume that guide wires in use meet these requirements. Unfortunately, EN ISO 11070 guidelines do not reflect the clinical requirements and we continue to see mechanical failures and their associated complications. Material and Methods: This in vitro study was performed in an accredited laboratory. With regard to flexing, we: (1 Established the minimum flexing performance needed to meet clinical requirements, (2 developed flexing performance tests which mimic clinical requirement, and (3 evaluated the mechanical properties of various guide wires relative to these requirements. With regard to tensile strength, we used the testing method prescribed in ISO 11070, but did not end the test at 5 Newton (N. We continued until the guide wire was damaged, or we reached maximum tractive force. We then did a wire-to-wire comparison. We examined two basic wire constructions, monofil and core and coil. Results: Tensile strength: All wires tested, except one, met EN ISO 11070 requirements for 5 N tensile strength. The mean of the wire types tested ranged from 15.06 N to 257.76 N. Flexing performance: None of the wires kinked. The monofil had no evidence of bending. Two core/coil wires displayed minor bending (angle 1.5°. All other wires displayed bending angles between 22.5° and 43.0°. Conclusion: We recommend that: (1 Clinicians use guide wires with high-end mechanical properties, (2 EN ISO 11070 incorporate our flexing test into their testing method, raise the flexing requirement to kink-proof, (3 and raise the tensile strength requirement to a minimum of 30 N, and (3 all manufacturers and suppliers be required to display mechanical properties of all guide wire, and guide wire kits sold.

  20. Vocational Preparation Curriculum: Electrical Wiring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usoro, Hogan

    This document is a curriculum guide for instructors teaching vocational preparation for electrical wiring to special needs students. The purpose of the curriculum guide is to provide minimum skills for disadvantaged and handicapped students entering the mainstream; to supplement vocational skills of those students already in a regular training…

  1. Transparency in nanophotonic quantum wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Mahi R

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the quantum optics of a photonic quantum nanowire doped with an ensemble of three-level nanoparticles. The wire is made from two photonic crystals A and B. Crystal A is embedded within crystal B and acts as a photonic nanowire. It is considered that the conduction band of crystal A lies below that of crystal B. As a result, photons are confined in crystal A and are reflected from crystal B. The bound states of the confined photons are calculated using the transfer matrix method. It is found that the number of bound states in the wire depends on the size of the wire and the energy difference between the conduction band extrema of crystals A and B. The absorption coefficient of the system has also been calculated using the Schroedinger equation method. It is considered that the nanoparticles interact with the photonic bound states. Numerical simulations show that when one of the resonance energies lies near the bound state, the system becomes transparent. However, when the resonance energy lies away from the bound state the crystal reverts to an absorbing state. Similarly, when the radius of the dielectric spheres is changed the location of the transparency peak is shifted. This means that the present system can be switched between two states by changing the size of the wire and the transition energy. These findings can be used to make new types of optical devices.

  2. Health care's 100 most wired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovy, A; Serb, C

    1999-02-01

    They're wired all right, and America's 100 most techno-savvy hospitals and health systems share one more thing: a commitment to using technology to link with employees, patients, suppliers, and insurers. "We want to be a health care travel agency for our community," says one chief information officer. "And we see Internet technology as a key."

  3. Transparent conducting film: Effect of mechanical stretching to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    posite was fixed to a tabletop clamp and unidirectionally stretched after cutting the paper support at two opposite sides. To hold the film under the stretched condition, both edges of stretched CNT-mat/transparent-film composite was then adhered to a PMMA substrate by epoxy glue and both the sheet resistance and the ...

  4. Effects of dynamic stretches on Isokinetic hamstring and Quadriceps ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In conclusion, dynamic stretches have positive effects on muscle strength, H/Q ratios and ROM. Therefore, dynamic stretches may increase performance and reduce the risk of injury to athletes. Keywords: Quadriceps; Hamstrings; Muscles Isokinetic; Dynamic stretches. South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical ...

  5. Effect of spinal manipulative therapy with stretching compared with stretching alone on full-swing performance of golf players: a randomized pilot trial☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Soraya M.V.; Chibana, Yumi E.T.; Giavarotti, Leandro; Compagnoni, Débora S.; Shiono, Adriana H.; Satie, Janice; Bracher, Eduardo S.B.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective There has been a steady growth of chiropractic treatment using spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) that aims to increase the performance of athletes in various sports. This study evaluates the effect of SMT by chiropractors on the performance of golf players. Methods Golfers of 2 golf clubs in São Paulo, Brazil, participated in this study. They were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: Group I received a stretch program, and group II received a stretch program in addition to SMT. Participants in both groups performed the same standardized stretching program. Spinal manipulative therapy to dysfunctional spinal segments was performed on group II only. All golfers performed 3 full-swing maneuvers. Ball range was considered as the average distance for the 3 shots. Treatment was performed after the initial measurement, and the same maneuvers were performed afterward. Each participant repeated these procedures for a 4-week period. Student t test, Mann-Whitney nonparametric test, and 1-way analysis of variance for repeated measures with significance level of 5% were used to analyze the study. Results Forty-three golfers completed the protocol. Twenty participants were allocated to group I and 23 to group II. Average age, handicap, and initial swing were comparable. No improvement of full-swing performance was observed during the 4 sessions on group I (stretch only). An improvement was observed at the fourth session of group II (P = .005); when comparing the posttreatment, group II had statistical significance at all phases (P = .003). Conclusions Chiropractic SMT in association with muscle stretching may be associated with an improvement of full-swing performance when compared with muscle stretching alone. PMID:19948307

  6. Stretched cell cycle model for proliferating lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Mark R.; Kan, Andrey; Heinzel, Susanne; Zhou, Jie H. S.; Marchingo, Julia M.; Wellard, Cameron J.; Markham, John F.; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic variation in cell cycle time is a consistent feature of otherwise similar cells within a growing population. Classic studies concluded that the bulk of the variation occurs in the G1 phase, and many mathematical models assume a constant time for traversing the S/G2/M phases. By direct observation of transgenic fluorescent fusion proteins that report the onset of S phase, we establish that dividing B and T lymphocytes spend a near-fixed proportion of total division time in S/G2/M phases, and this proportion is correlated between sibling cells. This result is inconsistent with models that assume independent times for consecutive phases. Instead, we propose a stretching model for dividing lymphocytes where all parts of the cell cycle are proportional to total division time. Data fitting based on a stretched cell cycle model can significantly improve estimates of cell cycle parameters drawn from DNA labeling data used to monitor immune cell dynamics. PMID:24733943

  7. String Stretching, Frequency Modulation, and Banjo Clang

    OpenAIRE

    Politzer, David

    2014-01-01

    The banjo’s floating bridge, string break angle, and flexible drumhead all contribute to substantial audio range frequency modulation. From the world of electronic music synthesis, it is known that modulating higher frequency sounds with lower acoustic frequencies leads to metallic and bell-like tone. The mechanics of the banjo does just that quite naturally, modulating fundamentals and harmonics with the motion of the bridge. In technical terms, with a floating bridge, string stretching is f...

  8. The stretch zone of automotive steel sheets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The stretch zone of automotive steel sheets. L' AMBRIŠKO1,∗ and L PEŠEK2. 1Institute of Structural Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering,. Technical University of Košice, Vysokoškolská 4, 042 00 Košice, Slovak Republic. 2Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Metallurgy,. Technical University of Košice, Letná 9, ...

  9. Multi-anode wire straw tube tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S.H.; Ebenstein, W.L.; Wang, C.W.

    2011-01-01

    We report on a test of a straw tube detector design having several anode (sense) wires inside a straw tube. The anode wires form a circle inside the tube and are read out independently. This design could solve several shortcomings of the traditional single wire straw tube design such as double hit capability and stereo configuration.

  10. Home and School Technology: Wired versus Wireless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, Royal

    2001-01-01

    Presents results of informal research on smart homes and appliances, structured home wiring, whole-house audio/video distribution, hybrid cable, and wireless networks. Computer network wiring is tricky to install unless all-in-one jacketed cable is used. Wireless phones help installers avoid pre-wiring problems in homes and schools. (MLH)

  11. On the preparation of superconducting wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topare, R.J.; Chinchure, A.D.; Shah, S.S.; Hadole, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The different methods of preparation of superconducting wires have been discussed. The powder-in-tube technique is followed for the preparation of YBCO and BISCCO superconducting wires. The results are discussed. The present status of the industries in preparing the superconducting wires having the maximum J c values is discussed. (author). 30 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Pre-wired systems prove their worth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    The 'new generation' of modular wiring systems from Apex Wiring Solutions have been specified for two of the world's foremost teaching hospitals - the Royal London and St Bartholomew's Hospital, as part of a pounds sterling 1 billion redevelopment project, to cut electrical installation times, reduce on-site waste, and provide a pre-wired, factory-tested, power and lighting system. HEJ reports.

  13. 75 FR 4584 - Wire Decking From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-28

    ... COMMISSION Wire Decking From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Scheduling... retarded, by reason of subsidized and less-than-fair-value imports from China of wire decking, provided for..., producers, or exporters in China of wire decking, and that such ] products are being sold in the United...

  14. Spontaneous bending of pre-stretched bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSimone, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    We discuss spontaneously bent configurations of pre-stretched bilayer sheets that can be obtained by tuning the pre-stretches in the two layers. The two-dimensional nonlinear plate model we use for this purpose is an adaptation of the one recently obtained for thin sheets of nematic elastomers, by means of a rigorous dimensional reduction argument based on the theory of Gamma-convergence (Agostiniani and DeSimone in Meccanica. doi:10.1007/s11012-017-0630-4, 2017, Math Mech Solids. doi:10.1177/1081286517699991, arXiv:1509.07003, 2017). We argue that pre-stretched bilayer sheets provide us with an interesting model system to study shape programming and morphing of surfaces in other, more complex systems, where spontaneous deformations are induced by swelling due to the absorption of a liquid, phase transformations, thermal or electro-magnetic stimuli. These include bio-mimetic structures inspired by biological systems from both the plant and the animal kingdoms.

  15. Dynamics and structure of stretched flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, C.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program aims to gain fundamental understanding on the structure, geometry, and dynamics of laminar premixed flames, and relate these understanding to the practical issues of flame extinction and stabilization. The underlying fundamental interest here is the recent recognition that the response of premixed flames can be profoundly affected by flame stretch, as manifested by flow nonuniformity, flame curvature, and flame/flow unsteadiness. As such, many of the existing understanding on the behavior of premixed flames need to be qualitatively revised. The research program consists of three major thrusts: (1) detailed experimental and computational mapping of the structure of aerodynamically-strained planar flames, with emphasis on the effects of heat loss, nonequidiffusion, and finite residence time on the flame thickness, extent of incomplete reaction, and the state of extinction. (2) Analytical study of the geometry and dynamics of stretch-affected wrinkled flame sheets in simple configurations, as exemplified by the Bunsen flame and the spatially-periodic flame, with emphasis on the effects of nonlinear stretch, the phenomena of flame cusping, smoothing, and tip opening, and their implications on the structure and burning rate of turbulent flames. (3) Stabilization and blowoff of two-dimensional inverted premixed and stabilization and determining the criteria governing flame blowoff. The research is synergistically conducted through the use of laser-based diagnostics, computational simulation of the flame structure with detailed chemistry and transport, and mathematical analysis of the flame dynamics.

  16. Torque resistance of different stainless steel wires commonly used for fixed retainers in orthodontics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnold, Dario; Dalstra, Michel; Verna, Carlalberta

    2016-01-01

    retainers in orthodontics. Materials and Methods: Torquing moments acting on a retainer wire were measured in a mechanical force testing system by applying buccal crown torque to an upper lateral incisor in both a 3-teeth and in a 2-teeth setup. Seven stainless steel wires with different shape, type (plain...

  17. Direct correlation between strengthening mechanisms and electrical noise in strained copper wires

    OpenAIRE

    Bellido, Natalia; Pautrat, Alain; Keller, Clement; Hug, Eric

    2011-01-01

    We have measured the resistance noise of copper metallic wires during a tensile stress. The time variation of the main resistance is continuous up to the wire breakdown, but its fluctuations reveal the intermittent and heterogeneous character of plastic flow. We show in particular direct correlations between strengthening mechanisms and noise spectra characteristics.

  18. Excess noise in the steel suspension wires for the laser gravitational wave detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageev, A. Yu.; Bilenko, I. A.; Braginsky, V. B.

    1998-09-01

    Progress in the research in mechanical excess noise is reported. An improved technique for wire oscillation measurement has been applied to the investigation of the suspension of a test mass for a GW detector. The dependence of the excess noise intensity in the fundamental violin mode of the steel wires on the stress value is obtained.

  19. Short Durations of Static Stretching when Combined with Dynamic Stretching do not Impair Repeated Sprints and Agility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Del P.; Chaouachi, Anis; Lau, Patrick W.C.; Behm, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and change of direction (COD). Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s). Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total). Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. Key points The duration of combined static and dynamic stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit and reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). No significant differences in RSA and COD between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. The short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. PMID:24149890

  20. Torque resistance of different stainless steel wires commonly used for fixed retainers in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Dario T; Dalstra, Michel; Verna, Carlalberta

    2016-06-01

    Movements of teeth splinted by fixed retention wires after orthodontic treatment have been observed. The aetiological factors for these movements are unknown. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the resistance to torque of different stainless steel wires commonly used for fixed retainers in orthodontics. Torquing moments acting on a retainer wire were measured in a mechanical force testing system by applying buccal crown torque to an upper lateral incisor in both a 3-teeth and in a 2-teeth setup. Seven stainless steel wires with different shape, type (plain, braided, coaxial, or chain) and dimensions were selected for this study. For a torquing angle of 16.2° in the 3-teeth setup torsion moments can vary between 390 cNmm and 3299 cNmm depending on the retainer wire. For the 2-teeth setup the torsion moments are much smaller. Exposure to the flame of a butane-gas torch for 10 seconds to anneal the wire reduces the stiffness of the retainer wire. Clinicians must select wires for fixed retainers very carefully since the difference in resistance to torque is large. A high level of torque control can be achieved with a plain 0.016 × 0.016-inch or a braided 0.016 × 0.022-inch stainless steel wire. A tooth attached by a retainer wire to only one neighbouring tooth is less resistant to torque than a tooth connected to two neighbouring teeth. Annealing a retainer wire with a flame reduces the stiffness of the wire markedly and can lead to a non-uniform and non-reproducible effect.

  1. Release of metal ions from round and rectangular NiTi wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Azizi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of nickel and titanium ions released from two wires with different shapes and a similar surface area. Methods Forty round nickel-titanium (NiTi arch wires with the diameter of 0.020 in. and 40 rectangular NiTi arch wires with the diameter of 0.016 × 0.016 in. were immersed in artificial saliva during a 21-day period. The surface area of both wires was 0.44 in.2. Wires were separately dipped into polypropylene tubes containing 50 ml of buffer solution and were incubated and maintained at 37 °C. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES was used to measure the amount of ions released after exposure lengths of 1 h, 24 h, 1 week, and 3 weeks. Repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey tests were used to evaluate the data. Results The results indicated that the amount of nickel and titanium concentrations was significantly higher in the rectangular wire group. The most significant release of all metals was measured after the first hour of immersion. In the rectangular wire group, 243 ± 4.2 ng/ml of nickel was released after 1 h, while 221.4 ± 1.7 ng/ml of nickel was released in the round wire group. Similarly, 243.3 ± 2.8 ng/ml of titanium was released in the rectangular wire group and a significantly lower amount of 211.9 ± 2.3 ng/ml of titanium was released in the round wire group. Conclusions Release of metal ions was influenced by the shape of the wire and increase of time.

  2. Release of metal ions from round and rectangular NiTi wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Arash; Jamilian, Abdolreza; Nucci, Francesca; Kamali, Zinat; Hosseinikhoo, Nima; Perillo, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of nickel and titanium ions released from two wires with different shapes and a similar surface area. Forty round nickel-titanium (NiTi) arch wires with the diameter of 0.020 in. and 40 rectangular NiTi arch wires with the diameter of 0.016 × 0.016 in. were immersed in artificial saliva during a 21-day period. The surface area of both wires was 0.44 in.(2). Wires were separately dipped into polypropylene tubes containing 50 ml of buffer solution and were incubated and maintained at 37 °C. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used to measure the amount of ions released after exposure lengths of 1 h, 24 h, 1 week, and 3 weeks. Repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey tests were used to evaluate the data. The results indicated that the amount of nickel and titanium concentrations was significantly higher in the rectangular wire group. The most significant release of all metals was measured after the first hour of immersion. In the rectangular wire group, 243 ± 4.2 ng/ml of nickel was released after 1 h, while 221.4 ± 1.7 ng/ml of nickel was released in the round wire group. Similarly, 243.3 ± 2.8 ng/ml of titanium was released in the rectangular wire group and a significantly lower amount of 211.9 ± 2.3 ng/ml of titanium was released in the round wire group. Release of metal ions was influenced by the shape of the wire and increase of time.

  3. Synthesise of Zn O nano wires by direct oxidation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farbod, M.; Ahangarpour, A.

    2007-01-01

    Zn O is a semiconductor which has a direct and wide energy band which is about 3.37 eV at room temperature. It has various applications from UV lasers, sensitive sensors, solar cells to photo catalysis applications. Zn O has different nano structures such as nanoparticles, nano wires, nano rods, nano tubes and nano belts. The one dimensional Zn O nano structures such as nano wires are very important because of their applications in nano electronics and nano photonics so different methods have been proposed to synthesize them. In this work large scale of Zn O nano wires are produced by direct oxidation a Zn substrate (which was cleaned by chemical methods) in air or oxygen atmosphere at 400 d eg C . Nano wires were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray measurements. Their diameter is about 30-150 nanometer and their length is about several micrometer. This method which acts without any catalyst is a convenient method to synthesis semiconductor nano wires.

  4. Mechanical properties and surface characterization of beta titanium and stainless steel orthodontic wire following topical fluoride treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mary P; Ries, David; Kula, Katherine; Ellis, Micheal; Fricke, Brian

    2007-03-01

    To study the effect of fluoride prophylactic agents on the loading and unloading mechanical properties and surface quality of beta titanium and stainless steel orthodontic wires. Rectangular beta titanium and stainless steel wires were immersed in either an acidulated fluoride agent, a neutral fluoride agent, or distilled water (control) for 1.5 hours at 37 degrees C. After immersion, the loading and unloading elastic modulus and yield strength of the wires were measured using a 3-point bend test in a water bath at 37 degrees C. A one-way analysis of variance and Dunnett's post hoc, alpha = .05, were used to analyze the mechanical testing data. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to qualitatively evaluate the wire topography as a function of the fluoride treatments. Unloading mechanical properties of beta titanium and stainless steel wires were significantly decreased (P steel wire could decrease the functional unloading mechanical properties of the wires and potentially contribute to prolonged orthodontic treatment.

  5. Dispersion Relation of an OH-Stretching Vibration from Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Björn; Friedrich, Alexandra; Wilson, Dan J.; Haussühl, Eiken; Krisch, Michael; Bosak, Alexei; Refson, Keith; Milman, Victor

    2008-08-01

    We show that recent advances now allow us to measure the wave vector dependence of OH-stretching frequencies at energies around 400 meV by inelastic x-ray scattering using ID28@ESRF. We found a large, unexpected dispersion when we measured the dispersion relations of the hydrogen stretching frequencies of diaspore, α-AlOOH, where the hydrogen atoms participate in a hydrogen bond of intermediate strength. We can account for this behavior with density functional perturbation theory calculations and a simple model based on H-H interactions.

  6. Clinical bending of nickel titanium wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Chain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the evolution and the involvement of Nickel Titanium wires in the field of Orthodontics. The treatment plan has evolved with the use of low force Nickel Titanium wires. Because of their high springback, low stiffness, they are the key initial wires in leveling and alignment but have poor formability. Since poor formability limits its ability to create variable arch forms thus; limits the form of treatment. We have devised a method to bend the Nickel Titanium wires to help in our inventory but also customized the wire according to the treatment.

  7. Acute Effects of Foam Rolling, Static Stretching, and Dynamic Stretching During Warm-ups on Muscular Flexibility and Strength in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hsuan; Chang, Nai-Jen; Wu, Wen-Lan; Guo, Lan-Yuen; Chu, I-Hua

    2017-11-01

    Foam rolling has been proposed to improve muscle function, performance, and joint range of motion (ROM). However, whether a foam rolling protocol can be adopted as a warm-up to improve flexibility and muscle strength is unclear. To examine and compare the acute effects of foam rolling, static stretching, and dynamic stretching used as part of a warm-up on flexibility and muscle strength of knee flexion and extension. Crossover study. University research laboratory. 15 male and 15 female college students (age 21.43 ± 1.48 y, weight 65.13 ± 12.29 kg, height 166.90 ± 6.99 cm). Isokinetic peak torque was measured during knee extension and flexion at an angular velocity of 60°/second. Flexibility of the quadriceps was assessed by the modified Thomas test, while flexibility of the hamstrings was assessed using the sit-and-reach test. The 3 interventions were performed by all participants in random order on 3 days separated by 48-72 hours. The flexibility test scores improved significantly more after foam rolling as compared with static and dynamic stretching. With regard to muscle strength, only knee extension peak torque (pre vs. postintervention) improved significantly after the dynamic stretching and foam rolling, but not after static stretching. Knee flexion peak torque remained unchanged. Foam rolling is more effective than static and dynamic stretching in acutely increasing flexibility of the quadriceps and hamstrings without hampering muscle strength, and may be recommended as part of a warm-up in healthy young adults.

  8. Differential effects of 30- vs. 60-second static muscle stretching on vertical jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Matheus D; Wilhelm, Eurico N; Tricoli, Valmor; Pinto, Ronei S; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2014-12-01

    It has been proposed that pre-exercise static stretching may reduce muscle force and power. Recent systematic and meta-analytical reviews have proposed a threshold regarding the effect of short (stretching durations on subsequent performance in a multi-joint task (e.g., jump performance), although its effect on power output remains less clear. Furthermore, no single experimental study has explicitly compared the effect of short (e.g., 30 seconds) and moderate (60 seconds) durations of continuous static stretching on multi-joint performance. Therefore, the aim of the present study was determine the effect of acute short- and moderate-duration continuous stretching interventions on vertical jump performance and power output. Sixteen physically active men (21.0 ± 1.9 years; 1.7 ± 0.1 m; 78.4 ± 12.1 kg) volunteered for the study. After familiarization, subjects attended the laboratory for 3 testing sessions. In the nonstretching (NS) condition, subjects performed a countermovement jump (CMJ) test without a preceding stretching bout. In the other 2 conditions, subjects performed 30-second (30SS; 4 minutes) or 60-second (60SS; 8 minutes) static stretching bouts in calf muscles, hamstrings, gluteus maximus, and quadriceps, respectively, followed by the CMJ test. Results were compared by repeated-measures analysis of variance. In comparison with NS, 60SS resulted in a lower CMJ height (-3.4%, p ≤ 0.05) and average (-2.7%, p ≤ 0.05) and peak power output (-2.0%, p ≤ 0.05), but no difference was observed between 30SS and the other conditions (p > 0.05). These data suggest a dose-dependent effect of stretching on muscular performance, which is in accordance with previous studies. The present results suggest a threshold of continuous static stretching in which muscular power output in a multi-joint task may be impaired immediately following moderate-duration (60 seconds; 8 minutes) static stretching while short-duration (30 seconds; 4 minutes) stretching has a

  9. The effect of electrostatic and gravity force on offset wire inside tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S. H.; Hazineh, D.; Wang, C.

    2018-04-01

    In a straw-tube detector, a wire that is offset with respect to the tube axis experiences a Coulomb force when high voltage is applied between the anode wire and the tube. This force results in a shifting of the wire and straw, in addition to the gravitational sag, and is a function of the tube and wire radius, initial offset, high voltage, tension and length. The presence of such effects is well known, but the precise magnitude of the shift for the anode wires under conditions of detector operation have not been previously documented with measurable confidence. In this work, we provide the first systematic measurements for the wire shift in straw-tube detectors due to gravity and the electrostatic force using an x-ray scanner developed for the Mu2e experiment. The data are compared to the solutions of the differential equations governing the system, and we find a good match between the two. The solutions can predict the final wire and straw positions from the initial positions measured without the high voltage, and the final wire and straw positions can then be used as an input to the track reconstruction software to improve the track position resolution.

  10. COMPARATIVE EFFECT OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC STRETCHING EXERCISE TO IMPROVE FLEXIBILITY OF HAMSTRING MUSCLES AMONG NON ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibi Paul

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stretching exercises have been routinely used in persons with hamstring tightness and athletes to increase flexibility of muscle and to reduce joint injuries. Many studies have reported effect of static and dynamic stretching on flexibility of this muscle. Finding the best method to improve flexibility of hamstring muscle is important for athletes and individuals to reduce their injuries. Objective of the study was to find out the effect of static stretching exercise and dynamic stretching exercise on flexibility of hamstring muscle and also to compare the effect of static and dynamic stretching exercise on flexibility of hamstring muscle. Methods: This was a comparative experimental study with seventy four female healthy subjects from physiotherapy department of KPJ Healthcare University College, Malaysia. Convenient sampling method used to select the samples. The subjects were selected by inclusion criteria and randomly divided equally in to two with 37 subjects in each group. Static stretching exercise and dynamic stretching exercise were given as intervention program for four weeks respectively for experimental and control group. Pre and post data of restricted range of movement for knee extension was measured using goniometry and documented separately for both group. Result: In experimental and control group, pre-post statistical analysis found significant effect in increase of hamstring flexibility with P<0.0001, for right and left side. Comparative study between experimental and control group found that static stretching exercise have significant effect in increase of hamstring flexibility for right and left side with P<0.04. Conclusion: This study concluded that static stretching exercise is more effective to improve hamstring flexibility compared to dynamic stretching exercise.

  11. The Relevance of Stretch Intensity and Position: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos eApostolopoulos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stretching exercises to increase the range of motion (ROM of joints have been used by sports coaches and medical professionals for improving performance and rehabilitation. The ability of connective and muscular tissues to change their architecture in response to stretching is important for their proper function, repair and performance. Given the dearth of relevant data in the literature, this review examined two key elements of stretching: stretch intensity and stretch position; and their significance to ROM, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS, and inflammation in different populations. A search of three databases, Pub-Med, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Reviews, identified 152 articles, which were subsequently categorized into four groups; athletes (n = 24, clinical (n = 29, elderly (n = 12, and general population (n = 87. The use of different populations facilitated a wider examination of the stretching components and their effects. All 152 articles incorporated information regarding duration, frequency and stretch position, whereas only 79 referred to the intensity of stretching and 22 of these 79 studies were deemed high quality. It appears that the intensity of stretching is relatively under-researched, and the importance of body position and its influence on stretch intensity, is largely unknown. In conclusion, this review has highlighted areas for future research, including stretch intensity and position and their effect on musculo-tendinous tissue, in relation to the sensation of pain, delayed onset muscle soreness, inflammation, as well as muscle health and performance

  12. Si, Ge and SiGe wires for sensor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druzhinin, A.A.; Khoverko, Yu.M.; Ostrovskii, I.P.; Nichkalo, S.I.; Nikolaeva, A.A.; Konopko, L.A.; Stich, I.

    2011-01-01

    Resistance and magnetoresistance of Si, Ge and Si-Ge micro- and nanowires were studied in temperature range 4,2-300 K at magnetic fields up to 14 T. The wires diameters range from 200 nm to 20 μm. Ga-In gates were created to wires and ohmic I-U characteristics were observed in all temperature range. It was found high elastic strain for Ge nanowires (of about 0,7%) as well as high magnitude of magnetoresistance (of about 250% at 14 T), which was used to design multifunctional sensor of simultaneous measurements of strain and magnetic field intensity. (authors)

  13. Stretching exercises enhance vascular endothelial function and improve peripheral circulation in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kazuki; Kamiya, Kentaro; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Yokoyama, Misako; Nakamura-Ogura, Misao; Tabata, Minoru; Kamekawa, Daisuke; Akiyama, Ayako; Kato, Michitaka; Noda, Chiharu; Matsunaga, Atsuhiko; Masuda, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the acute effects of a single session of stretching exercises on vascular endothelial function and peripheral circulation in patients with acute myocardial infarction. This study evaluated 32 patients (mean age, 66 ± 9 years) who received phase I cardiac rehabilitation after acute myocardial infarction. Five types of stretching exercises were performed on the floor: wrist dorsiflexion, close-legged trunk flexion, open-legged trunk flexion, open-legged lateral trunk bending, and cross-legged trunk flexion. Each exercise entailed a 30-second stretching followed by a 30-second relaxation, and was repeated twice. Low- and high-frequency components (LF and HF) of heart rate variability (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz; HF, 0.15-0.40 Hz) were analyzed, and HF and LF/HF were used as indices of parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous activities, respectively. Reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT) index was measured and used as a parameter for vascular endothelial function. Transcutaneous oxygen pressure (tcPO2) on the right foot and chest was also measured, and the Foot-tcPO2/Chest-tcPO2 ratio was used as a parameter for peripheral circulation. The HF, RH-PAT index, and Foot-tcPO2/Chest-tcPO2 ratio were significantly higher after the exercises than before (P after stretching exercises. These findings demonstrate that stretching exercises improve vascular endothelial function and peripheral circulation in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  14. Aerosols produced by evaporation of a uranium wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, C.

    1968-03-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the aerosols formed when an uranium wire is evaporated in a normal or rarefied atmosphere, either with or without a drying agent. The heating of the wire can be either fast or slow. The first part is a study of aerosol production apparatus and of methods of measuring the aerosol. The second part presents the results obtained with various aerosols: the particles produced by the wire are less than one micron; during rapid heating, the granulometric distribution of the aerosol obeys a log-normal law; during slow heating, the distribution has two modes: one near 0.05 micron, the other close to 0.01 micron. (author) [fr

  15. Magnetoresistance peculiarities of bismuth wires in high magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condrea, E., E-mail: condrea@nano.asm.md [Institute of Electronic Engineering and Nanotechnologies, Academy of Science of Moldova, 2028 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); International Laboratory of High Magnetic Fields and Low Temperatures, Gajowicka 95, 51-421 Wroclaw (Poland); Gilewski, A. [International Laboratory of High Magnetic Fields and Low Temperatures, Gajowicka 95, 51-421 Wroclaw (Poland); MagNet, 50-421 Wroclaw (Poland); Nicorici, A. [Institute of Electronic Engineering and Nanotechnologies, Academy of Science of Moldova, 2028 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of)

    2016-03-11

    Magnetoresistance measurements of Bi wires performed in the magnetic field oriented along the bisector axis revealed unexpected anomalous peaks in a high magnetic field far above the quantum limit of the electrons. By combining a magnetic field and an uniaxial strain, we obtained a modification of the electronic structure; as a result, the quantum limit for light and heavy electrons is changed in a different way. For the case where heavy electrons are in the quantum limit, a correlation between the exit of the lowest Landau level of light electrons and the Lifshitz transition was found. - Highlights: • Glass-coated single-crystalline Bi wires attain high limit of elastic strain of up to 3.0%. • Selective modification of the electronic structure of Bi wires is obtained by combining a high magnetic field and uniaxial strain. • The correlation between the exit of the lowest Landau level of electrons and Lifshitz transition was found.

  16. Magnetoresistance peculiarities of bismuth wires in high magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condrea, E.; Gilewski, A.; Nicorici, A.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoresistance measurements of Bi wires performed in the magnetic field oriented along the bisector axis revealed unexpected anomalous peaks in a high magnetic field far above the quantum limit of the electrons. By combining a magnetic field and an uniaxial strain, we obtained a modification of the electronic structure; as a result, the quantum limit for light and heavy electrons is changed in a different way. For the case where heavy electrons are in the quantum limit, a correlation between the exit of the lowest Landau level of light electrons and the Lifshitz transition was found. - Highlights: • Glass-coated single-crystalline Bi wires attain high limit of elastic strain of up to 3.0%. • Selective modification of the electronic structure of Bi wires is obtained by combining a high magnetic field and uniaxial strain. • The correlation between the exit of the lowest Landau level of electrons and Lifshitz transition was found.

  17. Electromechanical behaviour of PIT $Nb_{3}Sn$ wires for NED

    CERN Document Server

    Seeber, B; Buta, F; Flükiger, R; Boutboul, T; Scheuerlein, C; Oberli, L; Rossi, L

    2009-01-01

    The critical current vs. axial tensile strain and transverse compressive force for two PIT Nb3Sn conductors, manufactured by SMI (now EAS), has been investigated. In addition, the distribution of the critical temperature has been determined by specific heat measurements. After identical reaction heat treatments wire #B207 has a slightly broader Tc distribution than wire #B215 and less volume fraction of Nb3Sn. The behaviour under axial tensile strain is as expected, although the strain for maximum current, m, is relativly low. However the studied wires are rather sensitive to transverse compressive forces. For instance at 10 kN and 15 T the critical current is reduced to 48% of its initial value and recovers only partially after unloading.

  18. Characterization and coating stability evaluation of nickel-titanium orthodontic esthetic wires: an in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina ARGALJI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to compare coating dimensions and surface characteristics of two different esthetic covered nickel-titanium orthodontic rectangular archwires, as-received from the manufacturer and after oral exposure. The study was designed for comparative purposes. Both archwires, as-received from the manufacturer, were observed using a stereomicroscope to measure coating thickness and inner metallic dimensions. The wires were also exposed to oral environment in 11 orthodontic active patients for 21 days. After removing the samples, stereomicroscopy images were captured, coating loss was measured and its percentage was calculated. Three segments of each wire (one as-received and two after oral exposure were observed using scanning electron microscopy for a qualitative analysis of the labial surface of the wires. The Lilliefors test and independent t-test were applied to verify normality of data and statistical differences between wires, respectively. The significance level adopted was 0.05. The results showed that the differences between the wires while comparing inner height and thickness were statistically significant (p < 0.0001. In average, the most recently launched wire presented a coating thickness twice that of the control wire, which was also a statistically significant difference. The coating loss percentage was also statistically different (p = 0.0346 when the latest launched wire (13.27% was compared to the control (29.63%. In conclusion, the coating of the most recent wire was thicker and more uniform, whereas the control had a thinner coating on the edges. After oral exposure, both tested wires presented coating loss, but the most recently launched wire exhibited better results.

  19. The Strengthening Effect of Phase Boundaries in a Severely Plastically Deformed Ti-Al Composite Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Marr

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An accumulative swaging and bundling technique is used to prepare composite wires made of Ti and an Al alloy. These wires show reasonable higher yield stresses than expected from the pure material flow curves. The additional strengthening in the composite is analyzed using nanoindentation measurements, tensile testings and investigations of the microstructure. In addition, these properties are analyzed in relation to the fracture surface of the mechanically tested wires. Additional strengthening due to the presence of phase boundaries could be verified. Indications for residual stresses are found that cause a global hardness gradient from the center to the wire rim. Finally, the yield stress of the wires are calculated based on local hardness measurements.

  20. SHORT DURATIONS OF STATIC STRETCHING WHEN COMBINED WITH DYNAMIC STRETCHING DO NOT IMPAIR REPEATED SPRINTS AND AGILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Del P. Wong; Anis Chaouachi; Patrick W.C. Lau; David G. Behm

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and change of direction (COD). Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s). Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performe...

  1. Upper body force production after a low-volume static and dynamic stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, D C P G; Pezarat, P; Valamatos, M J; Fernandes, O; Freitas, S; Moraes, A C

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the acute effect of a low-volume static and dynamic stretching on maximal isometric peak force (MIPF), time to maximal isometric force (TMIF), rate of force production (RFP) and average amplitude of the surface EMG (AvgEMG) of the main agonist muscles acting on the bench press maximum isometric force exercise. Thirty subjects were randomly divided into three groups: static stretch (SG: 22.8 ± 5.6 years, 176.6 ± 3.5 cm, 74.4 ± 5.9 kg), dynamic stretch (DG: 21.4 ± 3.9 years, 178.4 ± 7.2 cm, 71.7 ± 8.2 kg) and control group (CG: 20.4 ± 3.6 years, 179.8 ± 5.8 cm, 74.4 ± 9.8 kg). SG performed two 30-s repetitions and DG performed 10 repetitions of each of the two different exercises for the pectoralis major and triceps brachii. The MIPF, TMIF, RFP and AvgEMG of the pectoralis major (sternocostal part) and triceps brachii (long and lateral head) were measured before and immediately after the stretching protocols. A significant decrease in the MIPF from pre- to post-stretching was observed in both SG (p force parameters. No significant differences in the TMIF and RFP from pre- to post-stretching were found in the three groups. The SG showed a significant (p static and dynamic stretching adversely affects efforts of muscle maximal strength of the upper limb muscles studied, but it does not seem to affect TMIF or RFP.

  2. Shoulder horizontal abduction stretching effectively increases shear elastic modulus of pectoralis minor muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Jun; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Fujita, Kosuke; Kusano, Ken; Nishishita, Satoru; Araki, Kojiro; Tanaka, Hiroki; Yanase, Ko; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2017-07-01

    Stretching maneuvers for the pectoralis minor muscle, which involve shoulder horizontal abduction or scapular retraction, are performed in clinical and sports settings because the tightness of this muscle may contribute to scapular dyskinesis. The effectiveness of stretching maneuvers for the pectoralis minor muscle is unclear in vivo. The purpose of this study was to verify the effectiveness of stretching maneuvers for the pectoralis minor muscle in vivo using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. Eighteen healthy men participated in this study. Elongation of the pectoralis minor muscle was measured for 3 stretching maneuvers (shoulder flexion, shoulder horizontal abduction, and scapular retraction) at 3 shoulder elevation angles (30°, 90°, and 150°). The shear elastic modulus, used as the index of muscle elongation, was computed using ultrasonic shear wave elastography for the 9 aforementioned stretching maneuver-angle combinations. The shear elastic modulus was highest in horizontal abduction at 150°, followed by horizontal abduction at 90°, horizontal abduction at 30°, scapular retraction at 30°, scapular retraction at 90°, scapular retraction at 150°, flexion at 150°, flexion at 90°, and flexion at 30°. The shear elastic moduli of horizontal abduction at 90° and horizontal abduction at 150° were significantly higher than those of other stretching maneuvers. There was no significant difference between horizontal abduction at 90° and horizontal abduction at 150°. This study determined that shoulder horizontal abduction at an elevation of 90° and horizontal abduction at an elevation of 150° were the most effective stretching maneuvers for the pectoralis minor muscle in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Optimization of electron beam crosslinking of wire and cable insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimek, Z.; Przybytniak, G.; Nowicki, A.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The computer simulations based on Monte Carlo method and the ModeCEB software program were carried out in connection with EB radiation set-up for crosslinking of electrical wire and cable insulation, located at the Center for Radiation Research and Technology of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The theoretical predictions for absorbed dose distribution in irradiated electrical wire and cable insulation caused by scanned EB were compared to the experimental results of irradiation which were carried out in the experimental set-up based on ILU 6 electron accelerator, which is characterized by the following parameters: Electron energy 0.5-2.0 MeV; Average beam current 40-10 mA, pulse duration 400 μs; Width of scanning up to 80 cm; Scan frequency up to 50 Hz. The computer simulation of the dose distributions in two-sided irradiation system by a scanned electron beam in multilayer circular objects was performed for different process parameters; electrical wire and cable geometry (thickness of insulation layers and cupper wire diameter), type of polymer isolation, electron energy, energy spread, geometry of electron beam and electrical wire and cable distribution at irradiation zone. The geometry of electron beam distribution in irradiation zone was measured using TVA and PVC foil dosimeters for electron energy range available in ILU 6 accelerator. The temperature rise of irradiated electrical wire and irradiation homogeneity were evaluated for different experimental conditions to optimize process parameters. The obtained results of computer simulation were supported by experimental data of dose distribution based on gel-fraction measurements. Such agreement indicates that computer simulation ModeCEB is correct and sufficient for modelling of absorbed dose distribution in multi-layer circular objects irradiated with scanned electron beams. Acknowledgement: The R and D activities are supported by the European

  4. Optimization of electron beam crosslinking of wire and cable insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimek, Zbigniew; Przybytniak, Grażyna; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The computer simulations based on Monte Carlo (MC) method and the ModeCEB software were carried out in connection with electron beam (EB) radiation set-up for crosslinking of electric wire and cable insulation. The theoretical predictions for absorbed dose distribution in irradiated electric insulation induced by scanned EB were compared to the experimental results of irradiation that was carried out in the experimental set-up based on ILU 6 electron accelerator with electron energy 0.5–2.0 MeV. The computer simulation of the dose distributions in two-sided irradiation system by a scanned electron beam in multilayer circular objects was performed for various process parameters, namely electric wire and cable geometry (thickness of insulation layers and copper wire diameter), type of polymer insulation, electron energy, energy spread and geometry of electron beam, electric wire and cable layout in irradiation zone. The geometry of electron beam distribution in the irradiation zone was measured using CTA and PVC foil dosimeters for available electron energy range. The temperature rise of the irradiated electric wire and irradiation homogeneity were evaluated for different experimental conditions to optimize technological process parameters. The results of computer simulation are consistent with the experimental data of dose distribution evaluated by gel-fraction measurements. Such conformity indicates that ModeCEB computer simulation is reliable and sufficient for optimization absorbed dose distribution in the multi-layer circular objects irradiated with scanned electron beams. - Highlights: ► We model wire and cables irradiation process by Monte Carlo simulations. ► We optimize irradiation configuration for various process parameters. ► Temperature rise and irradiation homogeneity were evaluated. ► Calculation (dose) and experimental (gel-fraction) results were compared. ► Computer simulation was found reliable and sufficient for process optimization.

  5. Design of a Probe for Strain Sensitivity Studies of Critical Current Densities in SC Wires and Tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanaraj, N.; Barzi, E.; Turrioni, D.; Rusy, A.; Lombardo, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    The design of a variable-temperature probe used to perform strain sensitivity measurements on LTS wires and HTS wires and tapes is described. The measurements are intended to be performed at liquid helium temperatures (4.2 K). The wire or tape to be measured is wound and soldered on to a helical spring device, which is fixed at one end and subjected to a torque at the free end. The design goal is to be able to achieve {+-} 0.8 % strain in the wire and tape. The probe is designed to carry a current of 2000A.

  6. Modifications in straight wire treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Alvin

    2010-01-01

    Orthodontic treatments have been modified with each new generation of clinicians. Today the emphasis is on facial esthetics and healthy temporomandibular joints. With orthopedic treatment, we can develop dental arches to get the necessary space to align the teeth and we can reach adequate function and esthetics, all within relatively good stability. By combining two-phase treatment with low friction fixed orthodontics and super elastic wires we produce light but continuous forces and we can provide better treatment than before. These types of forces cause physiological and functional orthopedic orthodontic reactions. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate our fixed orthopedic and orthodontic approach called "Modified Straight Wire" or "Physiologic Arch Technique." This technique is very successful with our patients because it can exert slow and continuous forces with minimal patient cooperation.

  7. Sintered wire cesium dispenser photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Eric J; Ives, R. Lawrence; Falce, Louis R

    2014-03-04

    A photoelectric cathode has a work function lowering material such as cesium placed into an enclosure which couples a thermal energy from a heater to the work function lowering material. The enclosure directs the work function lowering material in vapor form through a low diffusion layer, through a free space layer, and through a uniform porosity layer, one side of which also forms a photoelectric cathode surface. The low diffusion layer may be formed from sintered powdered metal, such as tungsten, and the uniform porosity layer may be formed from wires which are sintered together to form pores between the wires which are continuous from the a back surface to a front surface which is also the photoelectric surface.

  8. Comparison of PIV and Hot-Wire statistics of turbulent boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dróżdż, A; Uruba, V

    2014-01-01

    The paper shows a cross checking of turbulent boundary layer measurements using large field of view PIV and hot-wire anemometry techniques. The time-resolved PIV method was used for the experiments. The measuring plane was oriented perpendicularly to the wall and parallel to the mean flow. Hot wire measurement has been performed using the special probe with perpendicular hot wire. The HW point measurements were performed in the same place as PIV experiments. The hot-wire probe has the wire length of l + < 20 in considered range of Reynolds numbers. Various evaluation methods were applied on PIV data. The profiles of statistical characteristics of streamwise velocity components were evaluated from the data. Mean values, standard deviations as well as skewness and kurtosis coefficients were compared for a few values of Re θ . Reynolds number ranges from 1000 to 5500. The result shows that with the increasing Reynolds number the attenuation of fluctuations maximum in PIV measurements occurs with respect to Hot-Wire measurements, however representation of velocity fluctuations using the PIV method is satisfactory. The influence of wall-normal fluctuation component on Hot-Wire near wall peak was also investigated.

  9. Pin Wire Coating Trip Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spellman, G P

    2004-01-01

    A meeting to discuss the current pin wire coating problems was held at the Reynolds plant in Los Angeles on 2MAR04. The attendance list for Reynolds personnel is attached. there was an initial presentation which gave a brief history and the current status of pin wire coating at Reynolds. There was a presentation by Lori Primus on the requirements and issues for the coating. There was a presentation by Jim Smith of LANL on the chemistry and to some extent process development done to date. There was a long session covering what steps should be taken in the short term and, to a lesser extent, the long term. The coating currently being used is a blend of two polymers, polyethersulfone and polyparabanic acid (PPA) and some TiO2 filler. This system was accepted and put into production when the pin wire coating was outsourced to another company in 1974. When that company no longer was interested, the wire coating was brought in-house to Reynolds. At that time polyparabanic acid was actually a commercial product available from Exxon under the trade name Tradlon. However, it appears that the material used at Reynolds was synthesized locally. Also, it appears that a single large batch was synthesized in that time period and used up to 1997 when the supply ran out. The reason for the inclusion of TiO2 is not known although it does act as a rheological thickener. However, a more controlled thickening can be obtained with materials such as fumed silica. This material would have less likelihood of causing point imperfections in the coatings. Also, the mixing technique being used for all stages of the process is a relatively low shear ball mill process and the author recommends a high shear process such as a three roll paint mill, at least for the final mixing. Since solvent is added to the powder at Reynolds, it may be that they need to have the paint mill there

  10. SHORT DURATIONS OF STATIC STRETCHING WHEN COMBINED WITH DYNAMIC STRETCHING DO NOT IMPAIR REPEATED SPRINTS AND AGILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del P. Wong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA and change of direction (COD. Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s. Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total. Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p < 0.001. However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (< 90 s static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments

  11. Wear of dragline wire ropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayawansa, D.; Kuruppu, M.; Mashiri, F.; Bartosiewicz, H. [Monash University (Caulfield Campus), Caulfield East, Vic. (Australia). Department of Mechanical Engineering,

    2005-07-01

    Wire ropes are one of the most heavily used components in a dragline. Hoist ropes are subjected to fatigue due to the cyclic nature of load handling as well as due to rope bending over the sheaves and the drum under load. This leads to wire breaks due to fatigue. Accumulation of a number of wire breaks close to each other can have a detrimental effect on the rope. Furthermore, to allow for the increasing demand for higher load capacity coupled with the inconvenience of having very large ropes, the factor of safety is often compromised, which increases the wear rate. Drag ropes are also subjected to heavy loads. More importantly, they are allowed to drag along the rough mine surface subjecting them to external physical abrasion. This makes the life of drag ropes one of the lowest among those used in a dragline. Suspension and IBS ropes are relatively uniformly loaded during their regular usage although they need to withstand dynamic load cycles as well as bending. Hence they tend to last for a number of years on average. The paper analyses the wear types and their severity of each of these rope applications, and suggests methods to determine rope wear rates and the resulting rope life. The paper further gives suggestions for good operating and maintenance practice that can extend the rope life and help reduce the large expenditure associated with every major rope change in a dragline. 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Effects of stretching and warm-up routines on stability and balance during weight-lifting: a pilot investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Adelsberger, Rolf; Tr?ster, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Background The efficacy of warm-up and stretching in weight-lifting remains unknown, especially for the weight-lifter?s stability and balance during lifting. Methods 13 subjects were randomly assigned a 10-minute stretching routine (SR) or a 10-minute warm-up routine (WR) and compared against 5 controls (no stretching or warm-up). Before and after the individually assigned routine, the participants? centre of pressure (CoP) was assessed using plantar-pressure sensors. The subjects were measur...

  13. Wired and Wireless Camera Triggering with Arduino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauhanen, H.; Rönnholm, P.

    2017-10-01

    Synchronous triggering is an important task that allows simultaneous data capture from multiple cameras. Accurate synchronization enables 3D measurements of moving objects or from a moving platform. In this paper, we describe one wired and four wireless variations of Arduino-based low-cost remote trigger systems designed to provide a synchronous trigger signal for industrial cameras. Our wireless systems utilize 315 MHz or 434 MHz frequencies with noise filtering capacitors. In order to validate the synchronization accuracy, we developed a prototype of a rotating trigger detection system (named RoTriDeS). This system is suitable to detect the triggering accuracy of global shutter cameras. As a result, the wired system indicated an 8.91 μs mean triggering time difference between two cameras. Corresponding mean values for the four wireless triggering systems varied between 7.92 and 9.42 μs. Presented values include both camera-based and trigger-based desynchronization. Arduino-based triggering systems appeared to be feasible, and they have the potential to be extended to more complicated triggering systems.

  14. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  15. Development of Ti-sheathed MgB2 wires with high critical current density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, G; Fang, H; Hanna, M; Yen, F; Lv, B; Alessandrini, M; Keith, S; Hoyt, C; Tang, Z; Salama, K

    2006-01-01

    Working towards developing lightweight superconducting magnets for future space and other applications, we have successfully fabricated mono-core Ti-sheathed MgB 2 wires by the powder-in-tube method. The wires were characterized by magnetization, electrical resistivity, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry measurements. The results indicate that the Ti sheath does not react with the magnesium and boron, and the present wire rolling process can produce MgB 2 wires with a superconducting volume fraction of at least 64% in the core. Using the Bean model, it was found that at 5 K, the magnetic critical current densities, J c , measured in magnetic fields of 0, 5, and 8 T are about 4.2 x 10 5 , 3.6 x 10 4 , and 1.4 x 10 4 A cm -2 , respectively. At 20 K and 0 T, the magnetic J c is about 2.4 x 10 5 A cm -2 . These results show that at zero and low fields, the values of the magnetic J c for Ti-sheathed MgB 2 wires are comparable with the best results available for the Fe-sheathed MgB 2 wires. At high fields, however, the J c for Ti-sheathed MgB 2 wires appears higher than that for the Fe-sheathed MgB 2 wires

  16. Investigation of surface treatment of conductive wire in cylindrical atmospheric pressure plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Rubin; Kagohashi, Tsutomu; Zheng Wei

    2009-01-01

    Polyethylene insulated electric wire was treated in He and Ar dielectric barrier discharge atmospheric pressure plasmas generated in a quartz tube wound with tubular electrodes. The wire was put penetrating through the high voltage and the grounded electrodes, improving the discharge and facilitating uniform surface treatment. In this work, the influences of conductivity of the wire on the effects of surface treatment and discharge behavior were investigated. Surface properties of the wire samples were analyzed by means of surface energy measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In order to reveal the mechanism for treating the conductive wire, I-V discharge waveforms were measured and time-resolved plasma images were taken. It was demonstrated that the conductive wire was involved in the discharge process, reducing the breakdown voltage significantly and enhancing the discharge. It shows that the discharge mode was strongly dependent on the conductivity of a wire. Intensive surface discharges developed along the conductive wire were found to be mainly responsible for noticeable improvement in the treatment effect.

  17. The effect of two types of stretching on flexibility in selected joints in youth soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mahrová

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The nature of soccer causes overloading of certain muscles and muscle groups that are most often involved in typical training activities of players. Often the absence of additional leisure-time activities typical for children and adolescents leads to an increased risk of muscle imbalance. Objective: We were interested in the occurrence of muscle imbalance, specifically an occurrence of muscle shortening and limited flexibility of the spine as well as decreased range of motion (ROM in selected joints among young soccer players. Methods: The players were randomly selected to take part in the study. Twelve young soccer players took part in the first group and thirteen in the second group (age 13 years, body weight 40.5 ± 3.9 vs. 41.5 ± 7.8 kg, height 150.0 ± 5.0 vs. 153.0 ± 9.8 cm. The first team performed only static stretching exercises at the end of the training session and the other team performed, except for static stretching, also dynamic stretching exercises always at the beginning of the training session. The effect of the stretching program on range of motion in chosen joints was assessed by 2 × 2 repeated-measures ANOVA (stretching methods × time. The statistical significance of a-level was set to .05 and partial ηp2. Results: Pre-test measurements revealed an occurrence of muscle shortening and limited ROM of the spine and selected joints mostly in the pelvis and lower limbs in all study participants. Comparison of ROM in selected joints between pre-test and post-test in program including both static and dynamic stretching showed significant increase of left hip during flexion (p = .03, ηp2 = .20. The program with only static stretching showed significant decrease the ROM of ankle plantar flexion (p = .04, ηp2 = .18. We did not find any significant difference between stretching programs on ROM. As for muscle shortening, both side improvements (higher number of subjects with no

  18. Basic ideas and concepts in hot wire anemometry: an experimental approach for introductory physics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Abed, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of hot wire anemometry is to measure the speed of an air stream. The classical method is based on the measure of the value of a temperature dependant resistor inserted in a Wheatstone bridge (Lomas 1986 Fundamentals of Hot Wire Anemometry (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)). In this paper we exhibit the physics behind this method and show that by using a wire whose resistance does not vary on the field of temperature explored (from 20 °C to 200 °C), it is however possible to make accurate measurements. Finally, limitations of the method are discussed.

  19. Intermittent stretching induces fibrosis in denervated rat muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faturi, Fernanda M; Franco, Rúbia C; Gigo-Benato, Davilene; Turi, Andriette C; Silva-Couto, Marcela A; Messa, Sabrina P; Russo, Thiago L

    2016-01-01

    Stretching (St) has been used for treating denervated muscles. However, its effectiveness and safety claims require further study. Rats were divided into: (1) those with denervated (D) muscles, evaluated 7 or 15 days after sciatic nerve crush injury; (2) those with D muscles submitted to St during 7 or 15 days; and (3) those with normal muscles. Muscle fiber cross-sectional area, serial sarcomere number, sarcomere length, and connective tissue density were measured. MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TGF-β1, and myostatin mRNAs were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity was evaluated by zymography. Collagen I was localized using immunofluorescence. St did not prevent muscle atrophy due to denervation, but it increased fibrosis and collagen I deposition at day 15. St also upregulated MMP-9 and TGF-β1 gene expressions at day 7, and myostatin at day 15. Stretching denervated muscle does not prevent atrophy, but it increases fibrosis via temporal modulation of TGF-β1/myostatin and MMP-9 cascades. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. To Stretch and Search for Better Ways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    2000-06-01

    There's a lot to do to get each issue of this Journal ready for publication, and there's a lot that can go awry during that process. We the editorial staff do our utmost to make certain that each issue is the best it can possibly be, but, of necessity, a lot of our effort is focused on solving problems, correcting errors, and avoiding pitfalls. It is not surprising that we sometimes lose sight of the bigger picture--all of the things that came out as well as or better than we hoped they would. Therefore it gives us great pleasure when a reader applauds (and thereby rewards) our efforts. One such communication inspired this editorial. I have appreciated the extra effort put forward by the staff to make the Journal really come alive. The high quality of the Journal serves as an incentive to chemical educators to stretch and search for better ways to inspire our students. I fervently hope that we do encourage you "to stretch and search for better ways", not only to inspire students but in everything you do. Stretching and searching for better ways is what life, science, chemistry, and teaching are all about, and it is a wonderfully stimulating and exciting way to approach anything and everything. Sometimes, though, one's ability to stretch is akin to that of a rubber band exposed too long to sunlight. Change becomes a threat or a burden instead of an opportunity. This often happens in one area but not others, as in the case of someone doing original research but whose lecture notes are yellow with age, or someone who experiments with new teaching approaches but neglects the latest chemical discoveries. Whatever its manifestation, failure to stretch and search for better ways is a great loss, both for the individual directly involved and for others. Fortunately there are many who continually stretch and search, often in conjunction with JCE. For example, some time ago the Chair of the Board of Publication, Jerry Bell, challenged Journal readers to become Journal