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Sample records for stretch-induced muscle damage

  1. Intermittent stretching induces fibrosis in denervated rat muscle.

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    Faturi, Fernanda M; Franco, Rúbia C; Gigo-Benato, Davilene; Turi, Andriette C; Silva-Couto, Marcela A; Messa, Sabrina P; Russo, Thiago L

    2016-01-01

    Stretching (St) has been used for treating denervated muscles. However, its effectiveness and safety claims require further study. Rats were divided into: (1) those with denervated (D) muscles, evaluated 7 or 15 days after sciatic nerve crush injury; (2) those with D muscles submitted to St during 7 or 15 days; and (3) those with normal muscles. Muscle fiber cross-sectional area, serial sarcomere number, sarcomere length, and connective tissue density were measured. MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TGF-β1, and myostatin mRNAs were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity was evaluated by zymography. Collagen I was localized using immunofluorescence. St did not prevent muscle atrophy due to denervation, but it increased fibrosis and collagen I deposition at day 15. St also upregulated MMP-9 and TGF-β1 gene expressions at day 7, and myostatin at day 15. Stretching denervated muscle does not prevent atrophy, but it increases fibrosis via temporal modulation of TGF-β1/myostatin and MMP-9 cascades. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Does vibration counteract the static stretch-induced deficit on muscle force development?

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    Fernandes, Igor Alexandre; Kawchuk, Gregory; Bhambhani, Yagesh; Gomes, Paulo Sergio Chagas

    2013-09-01

    To determine the residual acute vibration-stretching effect on preactivation levels, short-latency stretch reflex, and performance during execution of drop jumps. Repeated measures. Eleven male recreational athletes performed a set of three 45cm drop jumps before and immediately after a 30s static stretching exercise with and without simultaneously imposed muscle vibration (45Hz, 5mm). Drop jump height, ground reaction forces and electromyographic data including Vastus Lateralis onset/levels of preactivation and short-latency stretch reflex were recorded. No changes were induced on drop jump height. However, stretching-induced decrements on ground reaction force peak and time to peak as well as an increment in contact time followed a delay in short-latency stretch reflex onset and a reduced preactivation level of Vastus Lateralis. Otherwise, when vibration was simultaneously imposed, there was no evidence of changes in high-speed force production variables or electromyographic recordings. Mechanical vibration, when applied simultaneously to static-stretching routines, appeared to be effective to counteract decreased musculotendinous unit stiffness-induced high-speed force production deficit during jumping performance. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Stretch-induced force deficits in murine extensor digitorum longus muscles after cardiotoxin injection.

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    Markert, Chad; Petroski, Gregory F; Childers, Charles K; McDonald, Kerry S; Childers, Martin K

    2006-10-01

    A leftward shift in a muscle's length-tension relationship is thought to impair myofilament overlap. We hypothesized that left-shifted muscles would incur greater eccentric contraction-induced damage compared to controls. We evaluated contractile properties and force deficits in regenerating murine extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles 7, 14, and 21 days after cardiotoxin (CTX) injection. Specific tension recovered to control values by 21 days. CTX-injected muscles demonstrated left-shifted length-tension curves and incurred greater contraction-induced force deficits than controls (P < 0.001) on day 7. We speculate that increased contraction-induced damage in 7-day CTX-injected muscles results from changes in myofilament overlap that occurs during early regeneration.

  4. Nitric oxide mediates stretch-induced Ca2+ release via activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

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    Wei, Bin; Chen, Zheng; Zhang, Xu; Feldman, Morris; Dong, Xian-zhi; Doran, Robert; Zhao, Bao-Lu; Yin, Wen-xuan; Kotlikoff, Michael I; Ji, Guangju

    2008-06-25

    Hollow smooth muscle organs such as the bladder undergo significant changes in wall tension associated with filling and distension, with attendant changes in muscle tone. Our previous study indicated that stretch induces Ca(2+) release occurs in the form of Ca(2+) sparks and Ca(2+) waves in urinary bladder myocytes. While, the mechanism underlying stretch-induced Ca2+ release in smooth muscle is unknown. We examined the transduction mechanism linking cell stretch to Ca(2+) release. The probability and frequency of Ca(2+) sparks induced by stretch were closely related to the extent of cell extension and the time that the stretch was maintained. Experiments in tissues and single myocytes indicated that mechanical stretch significantly increases the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the amplitude and duration of muscle contraction. Stretch-induced Ca(2+) sparks and contractility increases were abrogated by the NO inhibitor L-NAME and were also absent in eNOS knockout mice. Furthermore, exposure of eNOS null mice to exogenously generated NO induced Ca(2+) sparks. The soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ did not inhibit SICR, but this process was effectively blocked by the PI3 kinase inhibitors LY494002 and wortmannin; the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS were up-regulated by 204+/-28.6% and 258+/-36.8% by stretch, respectively. Moreover, stretch significantly increased the eNOS protein expression level. Taking together, these results suggest that stretch-induced Ca2+ release is NO dependent, resulting from the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

  5. Nitric oxide mediates stretch-induced Ca2+ release via activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

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    Bin Wei

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Hollow smooth muscle organs such as the bladder undergo significant changes in wall tension associated with filling and distension, with attendant changes in muscle tone. Our previous study indicated that stretch induces Ca(2+ release occurs in the form of Ca(2+ sparks and Ca(2+ waves in urinary bladder myocytes. While, the mechanism underlying stretch-induced Ca2+ release in smooth muscle is unknown.We examined the transduction mechanism linking cell stretch to Ca(2+ release. The probability and frequency of Ca(2+ sparks induced by stretch were closely related to the extent of cell extension and the time that the stretch was maintained. Experiments in tissues and single myocytes indicated that mechanical stretch significantly increases the production of nitric oxide (NO and the amplitude and duration of muscle contraction. Stretch-induced Ca(2+ sparks and contractility increases were abrogated by the NO inhibitor L-NAME and were also absent in eNOS knockout mice. Furthermore, exposure of eNOS null mice to exogenously generated NO induced Ca(2+ sparks. The soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ did not inhibit SICR, but this process was effectively blocked by the PI3 kinase inhibitors LY494002 and wortmannin; the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS were up-regulated by 204+/-28.6% and 258+/-36.8% by stretch, respectively. Moreover, stretch significantly increased the eNOS protein expression level.Taking together, these results suggest that stretch-induced Ca2+ release is NO dependent, resulting from the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

  6. Cyclic stretch induces human bladder smooth muscle cell proliferation in vitro through muscarinic receptors.

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    Dai, Yi; Tian, Ye; Luo, De-Yi; Wazir, Romel; Yue, Xuan; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2015-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether the cyclic stretch‑induced proliferation of human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs) is mediated by muscarinic (M) receptors, together with the signal transduction mechanisms involved in this process. HBSMCs seeded onto silicone membranes were subjected to different cyclic stretches (5, 10, 15 and 20%) for 6 and 12 h. As the effect of cyclic stretch on M2 and M3 mRNA expression levels was maximal at 6 h 10% stretch, all subsequent experiments were performed at this stretch. Western blot analysis was used to quantify M2, M3, protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphorylated (p)‑PKC protein expression levels, flow cytometry was employed to examine cell cycle distribution and a 5-bromo‑2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assay was used to assess cell proliferation at this stretch. Subsequently, HBSMCs were exposed to different acetylcholine concentrations and/or cyclic stretch, M receptor antagonists [AF-DX16, an M2 receptor antagonist; 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (4-DAMP), an M3 receptor antagonist and atropine, a non‑selective antagonist] and GF 109203X, a PKC antagonist, to assess the possible underlying signaling mechanisms. Cyclic stretch was found to increase the proliferation of HBSMCs and the expression levels of M2, M3, PKC and p‑PKC proteins. M receptor and PKC antagonists exerted no apparent effect on nonstretched cells, but reduced the incorporation of BrdU into stretched cells; the most pronounced effects were observed when non‑selective M receptor and PKC antagonists were applied. Notably, 4‑DAMP did not inhibit stretch‑induced PKC activation. These results indicate that the activation of the M3 receptor signaling pathway in stretch‑induced HBSMC proliferation occurs via PKC-independent mechanisms.

  7. Cyclic Mechanical Stretch Induced Smooth Muscle Cell Changes in Cerebral Aneurysm Progress by Reducing Collagen Type IV and Collagen Type VI Levels

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    Peixi Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cerebral aneurysm growth is characterized by continuous structural weakness of local smooth muscle cells, though the mechanism is unclear. In this study, we examine protein changes in cerebral aneurysm and human brain vascular smooth muscle cells after cyclic mechanical stretch. We further explore the relationship between the smooth muscle cell changes and reductions in the levels of collagen types IV and VI. Methods: Saccular cerebral aneurysms (n=10 were collected, and temporal artery samples were used as controls. Quantitative proteomics were analyzed and histopathological changes were examined. Smooth muscle cells were cultured in a flexible silicone chamber and subjected to 15% cyclic mechanical stretch. The effect of stretch on the cell viability, function, gene and protein expression were further studied for the understanding the molecular mechanism of aneurysm development. Results: Proteomics analysis revealed 92 proteins with increased expression and 88 proteins with decreased expression compared to the controls (p<0.05. KEGG pathway analysis showed that the change in focal adhesion and extracellular matrix-receptor interaction, suggesting the involvement of collagen type IV and VI. The aneurysm tissue exhibited fewer smooth muscle cells and lower levels of collagen type IV and VI. Human brain vascular smooth muscle cell culture showed spindle-like cells and obvious smooth muscle cell layer. Cell proteomics analysis showed that decreased expression of 118 proteins and increased expression of 32 proteins in smooth muscle cells after cyclic mechanical stretch. KEGG pathway analysis indicated that focal adhesion and ECM-receptor interaction were involved. After cyclic mechanical stretch, collagen type IV and IV expression were decreased. Moreover, the stretch induced MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression elevation. Conclusion: We demonstrated that collagen type IV and VI were decreased in cerebral aneurysms and continuous cyclic

  8. The Effect of Anabolic Steroid Administration on Passive Stretching-Induced Expression of Mechano-Growth Factor in Skeletal Muscle

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    Satoshi Ikeda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stretching of skeletal muscle induces expression of the genes which encode myogenic transcription factors or muscle contractile proteins and results in muscle growth. Anabolic steroids are reported to strengthen muscles. We have previously studied the effects of muscle stretching on gene expression. Here, we studied the effect of a combination of passive stretching and the administration of an anabolic steroid on mRNA expression of a muscle growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-I autocrine variant, or mechano-growth factor (MGF. Methods. Twelve 8-week-old male Wistar rats were used. Metenolone was administered and passive repetitive dorsiflexion and plantar flexion of the ankle joint performed under deep anesthesia. After 24 h, the gastrocnemius muscles were removed and the mRNA expression of insulin-like growth factor-I autocrine variant was measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results. Repetitive stretching in combination with metenolone, but not stretching alone, significantly increased MGF mRNA expression. Conclusion. Anabolic steroids enhance the effect of passive stretching on MGF expression in skeletal muscle.

  9. The effect of anabolic steroid administration on passive stretching-induced expression of mechano-growth factor in skeletal muscle.

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    Ikeda, Satoshi; Kamikawa, Yurie; Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Harada, Katsuhiro; Yoshida, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Stretching of skeletal muscle induces expression of the genes which encode myogenic transcription factors or muscle contractile proteins and results in muscle growth. Anabolic steroids are reported to strengthen muscles. We have previously studied the effects of muscle stretching on gene expression. Here, we studied the effect of a combination of passive stretching and the administration of an anabolic steroid on mRNA expression of a muscle growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-I autocrine variant, or mechano-growth factor (MGF). Twelve 8-week-old male Wistar rats were used. Metenolone was administered and passive repetitive dorsiflexion and plantar flexion of the ankle joint performed under deep anesthesia. After 24 h, the gastrocnemius muscles were removed and the mRNA expression of insulin-like growth factor-I autocrine variant was measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Repetitive stretching in combination with metenolone, but not stretching alone, significantly increased MGF mRNA expression. Anabolic steroids enhance the effect of passive stretching on MGF expression in skeletal muscle.

  10. Muscle damage and muscle remodeling: no pain, no gain?

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    Flann, Kyle L; LaStayo, Paul C; McClain, Donald A; Hazel, Mark; Lindstedt, Stan L

    2011-02-15

    Skeletal muscle is a dynamic tissue that responds adaptively to both the nature and intensity of muscle use. This phenotypic plasticity ensures that muscle structure is linked to patterns of muscle use throughout the lifetime of an animal. The cascade of events that result in muscle restructuring - for example, in response to resistance exercise training - is often thought to be initiated by muscle damage. We designed this study to test the hypothesis that symptomatic (i.e. detectable) damage is a necessary precursor for muscle remodeling. Subjects were divided into two experimental populations: pre-trained (PT) and naive (NA). Demonstrable muscle damage was avoided in the PT group by a three-week gradual 'ramp-up' protocol. By contrast, the NA group was subjected to an initial damaging bout of exercise. Both groups participated in an eight-week high-force eccentric-cycle ergometry program (20 min, three times per week) designed to equate the total work done during training between the groups. The NA group experienced signs of damage, absent in the PT group, as indicated by greater than five times higher levels of plasma creatine kinase (CK) and self-reporting of initial perceived soreness and exertion, yet muscle size and strength gains were not different for the two groups. RT-PCR analysis revealed similar increases in levels of the growth factor IGF-1Ea mRNA in both groups. Likewise, the significant (Pmuscle volume) were equal in both groups. Finally, strength increases were identical for both groups (PT=25% and NA=26% improvement). The results of this study suggest that muscle rebuilding - for example, hypertrophy - can be initiated independent of any discernible damage to the muscle.

  11. Eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage impairs muscle glycogen repletion.

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    O'Reilly, K P; Warhol, M J; Fielding, R A; Frontera, W R; Meredith, C N; Evans, W J

    1987-07-01

    Five healthy untrained young male subjects were studied before, immediately after, and 10 days after a 45-min bout of eccentric exercise on a cycle ergometer (201 W). The subjects were sedentary at all other times and consumed a eucaloric meat-free diet. Needle biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscle were examined for intracellular damage and glycogen content. Immediately after exercise, muscle samples showed myofibrillar tearing and edema. At 10 days, there was myofibrillar necrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, and no evidence of myofibrillar regeneration. Glycogen utilization during the exercise bout was 33 mmol glycosyl units/kg muscle, consistent with the metabolic intensity of 44% of maximal O2 uptake; however, the significant glycogen use by type II fibers contrasted with concentric exercise performed at this intensity. At 10 days after exercise, muscle glycogen was still depleted, in both type I and II fibers. It is possible that the alterations in muscle ultrastructures were related to the lack of repletion of muscle glycogen. Damage produced by eccentric exercise was more persistent than previously reported, indicating that more than 10 days may be necessary for recovery of muscle ultrastructure and carbohydrate reserves.

  12. Natural pomegranate juice reduces inflammation, muscle damage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paired simple t-test showed a significant difference between PLA and POMj supplementation effects on systolic blood pressure (SAP), creatinine (CRE), hematological and muscle damage parameters and Creactive protein (CRP) (p < 0.01) with lower values using POMj. Similarly, a significant differences were shown for ...

  13. Effect of Contraction Velocity on Selected Muscle Damage Indices Following Acute Eccentric Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage: A Review

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    Farzaneh Movaseghi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Eccentric muscle action is mechanically more efficient but employs a unique activation strategy which predisposes the muscle to damage. Type II muscle fibers are more susceptible than type I fibers to muscle damage; hence, velocity probably interferes with mechanical stress and thus may modulate muscle damage. The purpose of this review study was to investigate the effect of contraction velocity on selected muscle damage indices following acute eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. Material & Method: Looking up related articles published in valid scientific databases such as PubMed, Springer, Elsevier, Science Direct, and SID with standard keywords and according to the research criteria, 16 studies (1980 to 2015 were selected. Results: Ten studies showed that high velocity eccentric exercise induced greater muscle damage. Five studies showed no differences between velocities, and a single study indicated a greater magnitude of muscle damage following slow eccentric exercise. Conclusion: Thus, greater magnitude of damage is induced by contractions performed at a higher velocity. However, considering differences during tension in the majority of studies, focusing on elbow flexor muscles and muscle damage profile variety in various muscle groups, and more animal and human studies in other muscular groups are necessary to confirm how the velocity of acute eccentric exercise would affect the muscle damage.

  14. Caspase-12 is involved in stretch-induced apoptosis mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress.

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    Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Jianing; Chen, Shulan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Lijuan; Liu, Guirong; Wang, Fang; Jiang, Wenxin; Zhang, Caixia; Wang, Shuangyu; Yuan, Xiao

    2016-04-01

    It is well recognized that mandibular growth, which is caused by a variety of functional appliances, is considered to be the result of both neuromuscular and skeletal adaptations. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that apoptosis plays an important role in the adaptation of skeletal muscle function. However, the underlying mechanism of apoptosis that is induced by stretch continues to be incompletely understood. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), a newly defined signaling pathway, initiates apoptosis. This study seeks to determine if caspase-12 is involved in stretch-induced apoptosis mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress in myoblast and its underlying mechanism. Apoptosis was assessed by Hochest staining, DAPI staining and annexin V binding and PI staining. ER chaperones, such as GRP78, CHOP and caspase-12, were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Furthermore, caspase-12 inhibitor was used to value the mechanism of the caspase-12 pathway. Apoptosis of myoblast, which is subjected to cyclic stretch, was observed in a time-dependent manner. We found that GRP78 mRNA and protein were significantly increased and CHOP and caspase-12 were activated in myoblast that was exposed to cyclic stretch. Caspase-12 inhibition reduced stretch-induced apoptosis, and caspase-12 activated caspase-3 to induce apoptosis. We concluded that caspase-12 played an important role in stretch-induced apoptosis that is associated by endoplasmic reticulum stress by activating caspase-3.

  15. Muscle damage and inflammation during recovery from exercise.

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    Peake, Jonathan M; Neubauer, Oliver; Della Gatta, Paul A; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2017-03-01

    Unaccustomed exercise consisting of eccentric (i.e., lengthening) muscle contractions often results in muscle damage characterized by ultrastructural alterations in muscle tissue, clinical signs, and symptoms (e.g., reduced muscle strength and range of motion, increased muscle soreness and swelling, efflux of myocellular proteins). The time course of recovery following exercise-induced muscle damage depends on the extent of initial muscle damage, which in turn is influenced by the intensity and duration of exercise, joint angle/muscle length, and muscle groups used during exercise. The effects of these factors on muscle strength, soreness, and swelling are well characterized. By contrast, much less is known about how they affect intramuscular inflammation and molecular aspects of muscle adaptation/remodeling. Although inflammation has historically been viewed as detrimental for recovery from exercise, it is now generally accepted that inflammatory responses, if tightly regulated, are integral to muscle repair and regeneration. Animal studies have revealed that various cell types, including neutrophils, macrophages, mast cells, eosinophils, CD8 and T-regulatory lymphocytes, fibro-adipogenic progenitors, and pericytes help to facilitate muscle tissue regeneration. However, more research is required to determine whether these cells respond to exercise-induced muscle damage. A large body of research has investigated the efficacy of physicotherapeutic, pharmacological, and nutritional interventions for reducing the signs and symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage, with mixed results. More research is needed to examine if/how these treatments influence inflammation and muscle remodeling during recovery from exercise. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Preferential type II muscle fiber damage from plyometric exercise.

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    Macaluso, Filippo; Isaacs, Ashwin W; Myburgh, Kathryn H

    2012-01-01

    Plyometric training has been successfully used in different sporting contexts. Studies that investigated the effect of plyometric training on muscle morphology are limited, and results are controversial with regard to which muscle fiber type is mainly affected. To analyze the skeletal muscle structural and ultrastructural change induced by an acute bout of plyometric exercise to determine which type of muscle fibers is predominantly damaged. Descriptive laboratory study. Research laboratory. Eight healthy, untrained individuals (age = 22 ± 1 years, height = 179.2 ± 6.4 cm, weight = 78.9 ± 5.9 kg). Participants completed an acute bout of plyometric exercise (10 sets of 10 squat-jumps with a 1-minute rest between sets). Blood samples were collected 9 days and immediately before and 6 hours and 1, 2, and 3 days after the acute intervention. Muscle samples were collected 9 days before and 3 days after the exercise intervention. Blood samples were analyzed for creatine kinase activity. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for damage using fluorescent and electron transmission microscopy. Creatine kinase activity peaked 1 day after the exercise bout (529.0 ± 317.8 U/L). Immunofluorescence revealed sarcolemmal damage in 155 of 1616 fibers analyzed. Mainly fast-twitch fibers were damaged. Within subgroups, 7.6% of type I fibers, 10.3% of type IIa fibers, and 14.3% of type IIx fibers were damaged as assessed by losses in dystrophin staining. Similar damage was prevalent in IIx and IIa fibers. Electron microscopy revealed clearly distinguishable moderate and severe sarcomere damage, with damage quantifiably predominant in type II muscle fibers of both the glycolytic and oxidative subtypes (86% and 84%, respectively, versus only 27% of slow-twitch fibers). We provide direct evidence that a single bout of plyometric exercise affected mainly type II muscle fibers.

  17. Myofibre damage in human skeletal muscle

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    Crameri, R M; Aagaard, P; Qvortrup, K

    2007-01-01

    to exercise and at 5, 24, 96 and 192 h postexercise. Muscle tenderness rose in VOL and ES after 24 h, and did not differ between groups. Maximal isometric contraction strength, rate of force development and impulse declined in the VOL leg from 4 h after exercise, but not in ES (except at 24 h). In contrast...... but not in humans using voluntary exercise. Untrained males (n=8, range 22-27 years) performed 210 maximal eccentric contractions with each leg on an isokinetic dynamometer, voluntarily (VOL) with one leg and electrically induced (ES) with the other leg. Assessments from the skeletal muscle were obtained prior......Disruption to proteins within the myofibre after a single bout of unaccustomed eccentric exercise is hypothesized to induce delayed onset of muscle soreness and to be associated with an activation of satellite cells. This has been shown in animal models using electrical stimulation...

  18. MUSCLE DAMAGE AFTER A TENNIS MATCH IN YOUNG PLAYERS

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    R.V. Gomes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated changes in indirect markers of muscle damage following a simulated tennis match play using nationally ranked young (17.6 ± 1.4 years male tennis players. Ten young athletes played a 3-hour simulated match play on outdoor red clay courts following the International Tennis Federation rules. Muscle soreness, plasma creatine kinase activity (CK, serum myoglobin concentration (Mb, one repetition maximum (1RM squat strength, and squat jump (SJ and counter movement jump (CMJ heights were assessed before, immediately after, and 24 and 48 h after the simulated match play. All parameters were also evaluated in a non-exercised group (control group. A small increase in the indirect markers of muscle damage (muscle soreness, CK and Mb was detected at 24-48 hours post-match (p<0.05. A marked acute decrement in neuromuscular performance (1RM squat strength: -35.2 ± 10.4%, SJ: -7.0 ± 6.0%, CMJ: -10.0 ± 6.3% was observed immediately post-match (p<0.05. At 24 h post-match, the 1RM strength and jump heights were not significantly different from the baseline values. However, several players showed a decrease of these measures at 24 h after the match play. The simulated tennis match play induced mild muscle damage in young players. Coaches could monitor changes in the indirect markers of muscle damage to assess athletes’ recovery status during training and competition.

  19. Muscle Damage Indicators after Land and Aquatic Plyometric Training Programmes

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    Vlatka Wertheimer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Plyometric training is an important part of athletic conditioning with many significant benefits, including improved motor abilities and performance, but it can also increase the serum indices of muscle damage, collagen breakdown, muscle swelling, and soreness. Due to the physical characteristics of water, plyometric training in water presents less eccentric contraction, facilitates faster transition from the eccentric to concentric phase of a jump and offers greater resistance during concentric contraction with acute lower indices of muscle damage. To advance our understanding of the long-term effects of an eight-week plyometric training programme on land and in water on muscle damage indicators (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, creatine kinase (CK and serum urea (SU, two experimental groups of physically active men (a group on land (EG1 and a group in water (EG2 were tested before and after the first and the last plyometric training to monitor muscle damage indicators and adaptations. The results showed changes in CK activity after both plyometric trainings for EG1 and only after the first training for EG2. Moreover, after the eight-week programme, significant difference was observed in CK activity in comparison with EG2. There were no observed changes in LDH activity while SU showed greater changes for the group on land. The plyometric training programme in water resulted in smaller levels of muscle damage indicators. Although both experimental groups conducted the same plyometric training with the same jump volume, the eccentric and concentric loads were not the same, so it can be concluded that adaptations in muscle damage processes are faster with smaller eccentric loads.

  20. CHANGES IN MUSCLE DAMAGE MARKERS IN FEMALE BASKETBALL PLAYERS

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    Alexandre Moreira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in muscle soreness, blood muscle damage markers, muscle strength and agility following an official basketball match. Eleven elite female professional basketball players (27.4 ± 4.8 years, 179.5 ± 5.5 cm, 72.0 ± 7.8 kg of a team participated in this study. The official match was the seventh match of the season in the first phase of the Brazilian National Female Basketball Championship. Muscle soreness, plasma creatine kinase activity (CK, and myoglobin concentration (Mb were determined before and after the match (post-match, 24 and 48 hours after the match. The 1RM strength for bench press and leg press, and the agility T test were assessed before and at 24 and 48 hours after the match. Significant increases in muscle soreness, CK and Mb were observed at 24 and 48 hours post-match  (p<0.05. No significant changes in the 1RM strength and T test were detected during recovery (24 and 48 hours after the match. These results suggest that a basketball match induced limited muscle damage with minimal effect on performance during recovery. The small increase in muscle damage markers following a basketball match did not affect strength and agility performance.

  1. Evidence of skeletal muscle damage following electrically stimulated isometric muscle contractions in humans

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    Mackey, Abigail; Bojsen-Moller, Jens; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    It is unknown whether muscle damage at the level of the sarcomere can be induced without lengthening contractions. To investigate this, we designed a study where seven young, healthy men underwent 30 min of repeated electrical stimulated contraction of m. gastrocnemius medialis, with the ankle...... changes at the level of the z-lines were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Blood samples were collected for measurement of creatine kinase activity, and muscle soreness was assessed in the days following stimulation. The biopsies from the stimulated muscle revealed macrophage infiltration...... of damage at the myofiber and sarcomere levels. These data support the hypothesis that muscle damage at the level of the sarcomere can be induced without lengthening muscle contractions....

  2. Muscle damage and its relationship with muscle fatigue during a half-iron triathlon.

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    Juan Del Coso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To investigate the cause/s of muscle fatigue experienced during a half-iron distance triathlon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recruited 25 trained triathletes (36±7 yr; 75.1±9.8 kg for the study. Before and just after the race, jump height and leg muscle power output were measured during a countermovement jump on a force platform to determine leg muscle fatigue. Body weight, handgrip maximal force and blood and urine samples were also obtained before and after the race. Blood myoglobin and creatine kinase concentrations were determined as markers of muscle damage. RESULTS: Jump height (from 30.3±5.0 to 23.4±6.4 cm; P0.05 but significantly correlated with myoglobin concentration (r = 0.65; P<0.001 and creatine kinase concentration (r = 0.54; P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: During a half-iron distance triathlon, the capacity of leg muscles to produce force was notably diminished while arm muscle force output remained unaffected. Leg muscle fatigue was correlated with blood markers of muscle damage suggesting that muscle breakdown is one of the most relevant sources of muscle fatigue during a triathlon.

  3. Creatine supplementation enhances muscle force recovery after eccentrically-induced muscle damage in healthy individuals

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    Cribb Paul J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eccentric exercise-induced damage leads to reductions in muscle force, increased soreness, and impaired muscle function. Creatine monohydrate's (Cr ergogenic potential is well established; however few studies have directly examined the effects of Cr supplementation on recovery after damage. We examined the effects of Cr supplementation on muscle proteins and force recovery after eccentrically-induced muscle damage in healthy individuals. Methods Fourteen untrained male participants (22.1 ± 2.3 yrs, 173 ± 7.7 cm, 76.2 ± 9.3 kg were randomly separated into 2 supplement groups: i Cr and carbohydrate (Cr-CHO; n = 7; or ii carbohydrate (CHO; n = 7. Participants consumed their supplement for a period of 5 days prior to, and 14 days following a resistance exercise session. Participants performed 4 sets of 10 eccentric-only repetitions at 120% of their maximum concentric 1-RM on the leg press, leg extension and leg flexion exercise machine. Plasma creatine kinase (CK and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity were assessed as relevant blood markers of muscle damage. Muscle strength was examined by voluntary isokinetic knee extension using a Cybex dynamometer. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA with an alpha of 0.05. Results The Cr-supplemented group had significantly greater isokinetic (10% higher and isometric (21% higher knee extension strength during recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage. Furthermore, plasma CK activity was significantly lower (by an average of 84% after 48 hrs (P Conclusion The major finding of this investigation was a significant improvement in the rate of recovery of knee extensor muscle function after Cr supplementation following injury.

  4. Investigations of ultrastructure of damaged and regenerated skeletal muscle fibers.

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    Lańcut, Mirosław; Godlewski, Piotr; Lis-Sochocka, Marta; Visconti, Józef; Czerny, Krystyna

    2004-01-01

    Our investigations concerned the head of the parietal part of quadriceps femoris, and we based our investigation on observations of the ultrastructure of muscle fibers using an electron microscope. We observed tissue samples taken from patients (10 men) 25-35 years old, who had old damage of knee joint ligament (after about 6 week's immobilization). In the first group, segments of tissue of parietal head of quadriceps femoris were taken inter-operationally from patients in whom there was found old damage of knee joint ligament. The second group was of tissue segments of this muscle after surgical repair of knee and rehabilitation, which consisted in power training using resistance machines. The muscle fiber samples of quadriceps femoris which were taken from patients during the first operation, showed big changes in their ultrastructure. These changes included: myofibrils disintegration; disturbance of regularly arranged striation in sarcomers; dissappearance of Z line. In the sarcoplasm, we observed large vacuolisation, and in the interfibrillar spaces--an accumulation of exudate and morphotic elements of blood outside the capillary vessels. Observations of muscle tissue after regeneration, showed a big improvement in the muscle cell's ultrastructure--the myofibrils were regularly arranged, and the sarcomers striations showed no deviations from normal structure. We also observed a considerable increase in the number of properly formed ultrastructure mitochondria when compared with the first group.

  5. Markers of muscle damage and performance recovery following exercise in the heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Girard, Olivier; Mohr, Magni

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether competitive intermittent exercise in the heat affects recovery, aggravates markers of muscle fiber damage, and delay the recovery of performance and muscle glycogen stores. METHODS: Plasma creatine kinase, serum myoglobin, muscle glycogen and performance parameters...

  6. Protein hydrolysates and recovery of muscle damage following eccentric exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A whey protein hydrolysate (NatraBoost XR; WPHNB has been shown to speed repair muscle damage. We sought to determine whether this benefit is specific to this hydrolysate to evaluate a marker for quality control. Methods: Three hydrolysates of the same whey protein isolate (WPI were prepared (WPHNB, WPH1 and WPH2. Isometric knee extensor strength was measured in 39 sedentary male participants before and after 100 maximal eccentric contractions of the knee extensors to induce muscle damage. Participants were then randomised to consume 250 ml of flavoured water (FW, n=9, or 250 ml of FW containing 25 g of either NatraBoost XR (n=3, WPH1 (n=9, WPH2 (n=9 or WPI (n=9. Strength was reassessed over the next seven days while the supplements were consumed daily. Fibroblasts were cultured for 48 hr in the presence of the different hydrolysates, WPI, saline or fetal bovine serum to ascertain effects on cell proliferation. Results: Strength was reduced in all treatment groups after eccentric exercise (P<0.001. Strength recovered steadily over 7 days in the FW, WPI, WPH1 and WPH2 treatment groups (P<0.001, with no difference between treatments (P=0.87. WPHNB promoted faster strength recovery compared with the other treatments (P<0.001. Fibroblast proliferation was greater with WPHNB compared with saline, WPI or the other hydrolysates (P<0.001. Conclusions: Promoting recovery from muscle damage seems unique to WPHNB. In vitro fibroblast proliferation may be a useful marker for quality control. It is not clear whether effects on fibroblast proliferation contribute to the in vivo effect of WPHNB on muscle damage.

  7. Effects of cryotherapy on muscle damage markers and perception of delayed onset muscle soreness after downhill running: A Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rossato

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Use of cryotherapy after exercise with eccentric contractions was effective to reestablish the level of biochemical markers of muscle damage and reduce muscle soreness and pain perception in subjects submitted to downhill running.

  8. Role of transforming growth factor-β in muscle damage and regeneration: focused on eccentric muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jooyoung; Lee, Joohyung

    2017-12-01

    High-intensity eccentric muscle contraction induces muscle damage. Damaged muscles recover through different processes, including degeneration, inflammation, regeneration, and fibrosis; some of these processes are mediated through the actions of cytokines. The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is one such cytokine involved in muscle recovery and repair. In this regard, TGF-β regulates the skeletal muscle inflammatory response, inhibits muscle regeneration, regulates extracellular matrix remodeling, and promotes fibrosis. Although some studies have suggested that inhibition of TGF-β after muscle damage promotes muscle regeneration and recovery, other studies have noted that TGF-β inhibition actually reduces muscle strength because it leads to incomplete muscle regeneration. Despite the importance of TGF-β in the repair of damaged muscles, most studies have focused on examining its role in muscle diseases such as chronic inflammatory diseases or Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. Here, we have reviewed the existing literature for examining the role of TGF-β in muscle damage and regeneration after eccentric muscle contraction.

  9. The Effects of Pre-Exercise Ginger Supplementation on Muscle Damage and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Melissa D; Zavorsky, Gerald S; Smoliga, James M

    2015-06-01

    Ginger possesses analgesic and pharmacological properties mimicking non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs. We aimed to determine if ginger supplementation is efficacious for attenuating muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) following high-intensity resistance exercise. Following a 5-day supplementation period of placebo or 4 g ginger (randomized groups), 20 non-weight trained participants performed a high-intensity elbow flexor eccentric exercise protocol to induce muscle damage. Markers associated with muscle damage and DOMS were repeatedly measured before supplementation and for 4 days following the exercise protocol. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed one repetition maximum lift decreased significantly 24 h post-exercise in both groups (p < 0.005), improved 48 h post-exercise only in the ginger group (p = 0.002), and improved at 72 (p = 0.021) and 96 h (p = 0.044) only in the placebo group. Blood creatine kinase significantly increased for both groups (p = 0.015) but continued to increase only in the ginger group 72 (p = 0.006) and 96 h (p = 0.027) post-exercise. Visual analog scale of pain was significantly elevated following eccentric exercise (p < 0.001) and was not influenced by ginger. In conclusion, 4 g of ginger supplementation may be used to accelerate recovery of muscle strength following intense exercise but does not influence indicators of muscle damage or DOMS. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Muscle-damaging exercise affects isokinetic torque more at short muscle length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurvydas, Albertas; Brazaitis, Marius; Kamandulis, Sigitas

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in the length-dependent changes in quadriceps muscle torque during voluntary isometric and isokinetic contractions performed after severe muscle-damaging exercise. Thirteen physically active men (age = 23.8 ± 3.2 years, body weight = 77.2 ± 4.5 kg) performed stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) exercise comprising 100 drop jumps with 30-second intervals between each jump. Changes in the voluntary and electrically evoked torque in concentric and isometric conditions at different muscle lengths, muscle soreness, and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were assessed within 72 hours after SSC exercise. Isokinetic knee extension torque decreased significantly (p torque were significantly smaller at 80° (where 180° = full knee extension) than at 110-130°. At 2 minutes after SSC exercise, the optimal angle for isokinetic knee extension torque shifted by 9.5 ± 8.9° to a longer muscle length (p torque at low-frequency (20-Hz) stimulation decreased significantly more at a knee joint angle of 130° than at 90°. The subjects felt acute muscle pain and CK activity in the blood increased to 1,593.9 ± 536.2 IU·L⁻¹ within 72 hours after SSC exercise (p muscle-damaging exercise on isokinetic torque is greatest for contractions at short muscle lengths. These findings have practical importance because the movements in most physical activities are dynamic in nature, and the decrease in torque at various points in the range of motion during exercise might affect overall performance.

  11. Relationship between physical exercise, muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Foschini

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between physical exercise involving muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS. A literature review of national and international periodicals was carried out. Muscle structures (membranes, Z-line, sarcomeres, T tubules and myofi brils can become damaged as a result of an imposed mechanical overload. Of greatest note are exercises requiring strength, particularly when muscular action is eccentric. Damage to skeletal musculature can be analyzed by direct methods (muscle biopsy or magnetic resonance or by indirect methods (maximum voluntary movement, subjective pain perception scales, analysis of enzyme and protein concentrations in blood. Creatine kinase (CK, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, myosin heavy chain fragments, troponin-I and myoglobin can be used as indirect markers of muscle damage. Both DOMS and muscle damage can be infl uenced by the type of activity, with emphasis on eccentric muscle movements, type of exercise, velocity of the movement, interval period between series, the level of individual fi tness, this last primarily affecting beginners. When myotrauma occurs, muscle damage repair is initiated by leukocytes migrating to the injured area, although, the histamines, prostaglandins, kinins and K+ produced by neutrophils and macrophages stimulate free nerve endings in the muscle, causing the DOMS. Despite this apparent relationship between muscle damage and DOMS, it is not possible toestablish a linear relationship between these two variables, since published data are divergent. RESUMO O objetivo desse estudo foi investigar as relações do exercício físico com o dano muscular e dor muscular de início tardio (DMIT. Para tanto, foi realizada uma revisão de literatura de periódicos nacionais e internacionais. O dano muscular pode ocorrer em estruturas musculares (membranas, linha Z, sarcolema, túbulos T e miofi brilas em função da sobrecarga mec

  12. Evaluation of Muscle Damage Marker after Mixed Martial Arts Matches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechmann, Gerald Julius; Saygili, Erol; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Behringer, Michael

    2016-03-21

    The aim of this paper is to identify predictors of serum muscle damage marker (MDM) response following mixed martial arts (MMA) matches. Creatine kinase activity (CK) and myoglobin concentration (Mb) were measured in ten male elite MMA fighters (aged 28±5.7 years) prior to, 2 h, 24 h, and 96 h following 9 different MMA matches. The number of performed upright punches and kicks (UKF) that failed the opponent, the number of obtained hits to the upper and lower body (LBH), as well as the total fight duration (TFD) were evaluated as potential predictors from video recordings. CK peaked 24 h (829±753 U/L(-1)) and Mb peaked 2 h (210±122 µg/L(-1)) post matches. Almost 80% of the peak CK variance could be explained by LBH and UKF, whereas 87% of the Mb variation was explained by TFD and LBH. MMA result in a significant skeletal muscle damage, which largely depends on LBH. Furthermore, eccentric contractions to decelerate kicks that missed the opponent and the TFD seem to contribute to the MDM response.

  13. Grounding after moderate eccentric contractions reduces muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard; Chevalier, Gaétan; Hill, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Grounding a human to the earth has resulted in changes in the physiology of the body. A pilot study on grounding and eccentric contractions demonstrated shortened duration of pain, reduced creatine kinase (CK), and differences in blood parameters. This follow-up study was conducted to investigate the effects of grounding after moderate eccentric contractions on pain, CK, and complete blood counts. Thirty-two healthy young men were randomly divided into grounded (n=16) and sham-grounded (n=16) groups. On days 1 through 4, visual analog scale for pain evaluations and blood draws were accomplished. On day 1, the participants performed eccentric contractions of 200 half-knee bends. They were then grounded or sham-grounded to the earth for 4 hours on days 1 and 2. Both groups experienced pain on all posttest days. On day 2, the sham-grounded group experienced significant CK increase (Pgrounded group did not increase significantly; the between-group difference was significant (P=0.04). There was also an increase in the neutrophils of the grounded group on day 3 (P=0.05) compared to the sham-grounded group. There was a significant increase in platelets in the grounded group on days 2 through 4. Grounding produced changes in CK and complete blood counts that were not shared by the sham-grounded group. Grounding significantly reduced the loss of CK from the injured muscles indicating reduced muscle damage. These results warrant further study on the effects of earthing on delayed onset muscle damage.

  14. Periostin inhibits mechanical stretch-induced apoptosis in osteoblast-like MG-63 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai-Wen; Yao, Chung-Chen; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei; Shieh, Hao-Ying; Chen, Yi-Jane

    2018-04-01

    Appropriate mechanical stress plays an important role in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts, whereas high-level mechanical stress may be harmful and compromise cell survival. Periostin, a matricellular protein, is essential in maintaining functional integrity of bone and collagen-rich connective tissue in response to mechanical stress. This study investigated whether or not high-level mechanical stretch induces cell apoptosis and the regulatory role of periostin in mechanical stretch-induced apoptosis in osteoblastic cells. Osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were seeded onto Bio-Flex I culture plates and subjected to cyclic mechanical stretching (15% elongation, 0.1 Hz) in a Flexercell tension plus system-5000. The same process was applied to cells pre-treated with exogenous human recombinant periostin before mechanical stretching. We used a chromatin condensation and membrane permeability dead cell apoptosis kit to evaluate the stretch-induced cell responses. Expression of caspase-3 and cPARP was examined by immunofluorescent stain and flow cytometry. The expression of periostin in MG-63 cells is involved in the TGF-β signaling pathway. High-level cyclic mechanical stretch induced apoptotic responses in MG-63 osteoblastic cells. The percentages of apoptotic cells and cells expressing cPARP protein increased in the groups of cells subjected to mechanical stretch, but these responses were absent in the presence of exogenous periostin. Our study revealed that high-level mechanical stretch induces apoptotic cell death, and that periostin plays a protective role against mechanical stretch-induced apoptosis in osteoblastic cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. The Dystrophin-Glycoprotein Complex in the Prevention of Muscle Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica D. Gumerson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are genetically diverse but share common phenotypic features of muscle weakness, degeneration, and progressive decline in muscle function. Previous work has focused on understanding how disruptions in the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex result in muscular dystrophy, supporting a hypothesis that the muscle sarcolemma is fragile and susceptible to contraction-induced injury in multiple forms of dystrophy. Although benign in healthy muscle, contractions in dystrophic muscle may contribute to a higher degree of muscle damage which eventually overwhelms muscle regeneration capacity. While increased susceptibility of muscle to mechanical injury is thought to be an important contributor to disease pathology, it is becoming clear that not all DGC-associated diseases share this supposed hallmark feature. This paper outlines experimental support for a function of the DGC in preventing muscle damage and examines the evidence that supports novel functions for this complex in muscle that when impaired, may contribute to the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy.

  16. Effects of protein supplements on muscle damage, soreness and recovery of muscle function and physical performance: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasiakos, Stefan M; Lieberman, Harris R; McLellan, Tom M

    2014-05-01

    Protein supplements are frequently consumed by athletes and recreationally-active individuals, although the decision to purchase and consume protein supplements is often based on marketing claims rather than evidence-based research. To provide a systematic and comprehensive analysis of literature examining the hypothesis that protein supplements enhance recovery of muscle function and physical performance by attenuating muscle damage and soreness following a previous bout of exercise. English language articles were searched with PubMed and Google Scholar using protein and supplements together with performance, exercise, competition and muscle, alone or in combination as keywords. Inclusion criteria required studies to recruit healthy adults less than 50 years of age and to evaluate the effects of protein supplements alone or in combination with carbohydrate on performance metrics including time-to-exhaustion, time-trial or isometric or isokinetic muscle strength and markers of muscle damage and soreness. Twenty-seven articles were identified of which 18 dealt exclusively with ingestion of protein supplements to reduce muscle damage and soreness and improve recovery of muscle function following exercise, whereas the remaining 9 articles assessed muscle damage as well as performance metrics during single or repeat bouts of exercise. Papers were evaluated based on experimental design and examined for confounders that explain discrepancies between studies such as dietary control, training state of participants, sample size, direct or surrogate measures of muscle damage, and sensitivity of the performance metric. High quality and consistent data demonstrated there is no apparent relationship between recovery of muscle function and ratings of muscle soreness and surrogate markers of muscle damage when protein supplements are consumed prior to, during or after a bout of endurance or resistance exercise. There also appears to be insufficient experimental data

  17. Low markers of muscle damage and inflammation following a 3-day ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of muscle.5 The extent of this damage is augmented by increases in exercise intensity, the eccentric component of contraction,6-8 ... of a multiday trail run on the markers of muscle damage and inflammation in experienced recreational runners, .... Elevation gain Elevation loss. Ambient temp- erature range (ºC). Day 1. 1 020.

  18. A sport-physiological perspective on bird migration : Evidence for flight-induced muscle damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guglielmo, C; Piersma, T; Williams, TD; Williams, Tony D.

    Exercise-induced muscle damage is a well-described consequence of strenuous exercise, but its potential importance in the evolution of animal activity patterns is unknown. We used plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity as an indicator of muscle damage to investigate whether the high intensity,

  19. Eccentric muscle damage increases intermuscular coherence during a fatiguing isometric contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmler, J G; Ebert, S A; Amarasena, J

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of eccentric muscle damage on muscle activation patterns and intermuscular coherence during a fatiguing isometric contraction involving the elbow flexor muscles. Ten young subjects participated in three experimental sessions that involved the performance of maximum voluntary contractions (MVCs), a constant-force task at 30% MVC, and a fatiguing isometric contraction at 30% MVC. The three sessions were performed before, 2 h after and 2 days after eccentric exercise to induce muscle damage in elbow flexor muscles. Task performance was quantified with electromyography (EMG) from the elbow flexor (biceps brachii, brachialis and brachioradialis) and extensor (triceps brachii) muscles, M-wave amplitude of biceps brachii, elbow flexor force fluctuations and endurance time of a fatiguing contraction. Intermuscular coherence during the fatiguing contraction was quantified from the rectified surface EMGs between muscle pairs. Eccentric exercise resulted in several indicators of muscle damage, such as a prolonged decline in muscle strength and an increase in muscle soreness 2 days after exercise. A 29% reduction in endurance time was observed 2 h after eccentric muscle damage, which returned to baseline 2 days later. The reduced endurance time 2 h after muscle damage was accompanied by an increase in EMG-EMG coherence between biceps brachii and brachialis muscles, which was observed at the end of the fatiguing contraction. These findings suggest that eccentric muscle damage produces a decrease in endurance time that is accompanied by an increase in intermuscular coherence in the presence of fatigue. © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Muscle Damage following Maximal Eccentric Knee Extensions in Males and Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether there is a sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. Materials and Method Vastus Lateralis and patella tendon properties were measured in males and females using ultrasonography. During maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions (12 reps x 6 sets), Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions torque were recorded every 10° of knee joint angle (20–90°). Isometric torque, Creatine Kinase and muscle soreness were measured pre, post, 48, 96 and 168 hours post damage as markers of exercise induced muscle damage. Results Patella tendon stiffness and Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening were significantly higher in males compared to females (ptorque loss and muscle soreness post exercise induced muscle damage (p>0.05). Creatine Kinase levels post exercise induced muscle damage were higher in males compared to females (ptorque, relative to estimated quadriceps anatomical cross sectional area, was taken as a covariate (ptorque loss, there is no sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. The higher Creatine Kinase in males could not be explained by differences in maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and patella tendon stiffness. Further research is required to understand the significant sex differences in Creatine Kinase levels following exercise induced muscle damage. PMID:26986066

  1. Characterization of muscle stretching and damage using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Zeng, Nan; Liu, Celong; Ma, Hui

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we study muscle elastic drawing and damage using our lab's polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) instrument and polarization sensitive Monte Carlo program. First, we acquire two-dimensional PS-OCT images of elastically drawn and injured muscle, injury processes including dehydration and hydrolysis, we extract some characteristics from experimental results including extinction coefficient, integral reflectivity and birefringence and so on, which will change during muscle is being elastically drawn or injured. In order to further understand and evaluate the degree of muscle elastic drawing or damage according to the measurements parameters mentioned above, we do some corresponding simulations using our lab's Monte Carlo program, which is based on a sphere cylinder birefringence model and can simulate complicated tissue containing anisotropic microstructures and various polarization imaging and measurement systems. For muscle elastic drawing, we find that integral reflectivity sometimes increases and decreases as muscle's elastic drawing continues, and through simulation we are unable to find the relationship between extinction coefficients and muscle elastic drawing. As for muscle damage, we simulate two processes: dehydration and hydrolysis. We find that as dehydration deepens, the birefringence of muscle is increasing but getting slowly and the integral reflectivity is decreasing, and as hydrolysis deepens, the birefringence decreases and the integral reflectivity decreases almost linearly. Through the analysis above, we demonstrate the validity of those parameters to characterize muscle elasticity and fiber structure and explain its potential for assessment of muscle damage.

  2. Blood flow restriction prevents muscle damage but not protein synthesis signaling following eccentric contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Mizuki; Ando, Soichi; Poole, David C; Kano, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that resistance training exercise combined with blood flow restriction (BFR) increases muscle size and strength in humans. Eccentric contraction (ECC) frequently induces severe muscle damage. However, it is not known whether and to what extent muscle damage occurs following ECC + BFR due to the difficulty of conducting definitive invasive studies. The purpose of this study was to examine muscle fiber damage following ECC + BFR at the cellular level. High-intensity ECC was purposefully selected to maximize the opportunity for muscle damage and hypertrophic signaling in our novel in vivo animal model. Male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to the following groups: ECC and ECC + BFR at varying levels of occlusion pressure (140, 160, and 200 Torr). In all conditions, electrical stimulation was applied to the dorsiflexor muscles simultaneously with electromotor-induced plantar flexion. We observed severe histochemical muscle fiber damage (area of damaged fibers/total fiber area analyzed) following ECC (26.4 ± 4.0%). Surprisingly, however, muscle damage was negligible following ECC + BFR140 (2.6 ± 1.2%), ECC+BFR160 (3.0 ± 0.5%), and ECC + BFR200 (0.2 ± 0.1%). Ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation, a downstream target of rapamycin (mTOR)-phosphorylation kinase, increased following ECC + BFR200 as well as ECC. In contrast, S6K1 phosphorylation was not altered by BFR alone. The present findings suggest that ECC combined with BFR, even at high exercise intensities, may enhance muscle protein synthesis without appreciable muscle fiber damage. PMID:26149281

  3. Effects of Light-Emitting Diode Therapy on Muscle Hypertrophy, Gene Expression, Performance, Damage, and Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Bertucci, Danilo; Schiavinato, Josiane; Reiff, Rodrigo; Araújo, Amélia; Panepucci, Rodrigo; Matheucci, Euclides; Cunha, Anderson Ferreira; Arakelian, Vivian Maria; Hamblin, Michael R.; Parizotto, Nivaldo; Bagnato, Vanderlei

    2016-01-01

    Ferraresi C, Bertucci D, Schiavinato J, Reiff R, Araújo A, Panepucci R, Matheucci E, Cunha AF, Arakelian VM, Hamblin MR, Parizotto N, Bagnato V: Effects of light-emitting diode therapy on muscle hypertrophy, gene expression, performance, damage, and delayed-onset muscle soreness: case-control study with a pair of identical twins. Objective The aim of this study was to verify how a pair of monozygotic twins would respond to light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) or placebo combined with a strength-training program during 12 weeks. Design This case-control study enrolled a pair of male monozygotic twins, allocated randomly to LEDT or placebo therapies. Light-emitting diode therapy or placebo was applied from a flexible light-emitting diode array (λ = 850 nm, total energy = 75 J, t = 15 seconds) to both quadriceps femoris muscles of each twin immediately after each strength training session (3 times/wk for 12 weeks) consisting of leg press and leg extension exercises with load of 80% and 50% of the 1-repetition maximum test, respectively. Muscle biopsies, magnetic resonance imaging, maximal load, and fatigue resistance tests were conducted before and after the training program to assess gene expression, muscle hypertrophy and performance, respectively. Creatine kinase levels in blood and visual analog scale assessed muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness, respectively, during the training program. Results Compared with placebo, LEDT increased the maximal load in exercise and reduced fatigue, creatine kinase, and visual analog scale. Gene expression analyses showed decreases in markers of inflammation (interleukin 1β) and muscle atrophy (myostatin) with LEDT. Protein synthesis (mammalian target of rapamycin) and oxidative stress defense (SOD2 [mitochondrial superoxide dismutase]) were up-regulated with LEDT, together with increases in thigh muscle hypertrophy. Conclusions Light-emitting diode therapy can be useful to reduce muscle damage, pain, and atrophy, as

  4. Cyclic Mechanical Stretching Induces Autophagic Cell Death in Tenofibroblasts Through Activation of Prostaglandin E2 Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Autophagic cell death has recently been implicated in the pathophysiology of tendinopathy. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, a known inflammatory mediator of tendinitis, inhibits tenofibroblast proliferation in vitro; however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. The present study investigated the relationship between PGE2 production and autophagic cell death in mechanically loaded human patellar tendon fibroblasts (HPTFs in vitro. Methods: Cultured HPTFs were subjected to exogenous PGE2 treatment or repetitive cyclic mechanical stretching. Cell death was determined by flow cytometry with acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. Induction of autophagy was assessed by autophagy markers including the formation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes (by electron microscopy, AO staining, and formation of GPF-LC3-labeled vacuoles and the expression of LC3-II and BECN1 (by western blot. Stretching-induced PGE2 release was determined by ELISA. Results: Exogenous PGE2 significantly induced cell death and autophagy in HPTFs in a dose-dependent manner. Blocking autophagy using inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine, or small interfering RNAs against autophagy genes Becn-1 and Atg-5 prevented PGE2-induced cell death. Cyclic mechanical stretching at 8% and 12% magnitudes for 24 h significantly stimulated PGE2 release by HPTFs in a magnitude-dependent manner. In addition, mechanical stretching induced autophagy and cell death. Blocking PGE2 production using COX inhibitors indomethacin and celecoxib significantly reduced stretching-induced autophagy and cell death. Conclusion: Taken together, cyclic mechanical stretching induces autophagic cell death in tenofibroblasts through activation of PGE2 production.

  5. Wnt and β-Catenin Signaling and Skeletal Muscle Myogenesis in Response to Muscle Damage and Resistance Exercise and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Newmire

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The factors that regulate skeletal muscle hypertrophy in human adults in response to resistance training (RT has largely focused on endogenous endocrine responses. However, the endocrine response to RT as having an obligatory role in muscle hypertrophy has come under scrutiny, as other mechanisms and pathways seem to also be involved in up-regulating muscle protein synthesis (MPS. Skeletal muscle myogenesis is a multifactorial process of tissue growth and repair in response to resistance training is regulated by many factors.  As a result, satellite cell-fused myogenesis is a possible factor in skeletal muscle regeneration and hypertrophy in response to RT.  The Wnt family ligands interact with various receptors and activate different downstream signaling pathways and have been classified as either canonical (β-catenin dependent or non-canonical (β-catenin independent.  Wnt is secreted from numerous tissues in a paracrine fashion. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is a highly-regulated and intricate pathway that is essential to skeletal muscle myogenesis.  The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway may influence satellite cells to myogenic commitment, differentiation, and fusion into muscle fibers in response to injury or trauma, self-renewal, and normal basal turnover.  The current literature has shown that, in response mechanical overload from acute resistance exercise and chronic resistance training, that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is stimulated which may actuate the process of muscle repair and hypertrophy in response to exercise-induced muscle damage. The purpose of this review is to elaborate on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling  pathway, the current literature investigating the relationship of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and its effects on myogenesis is response to muscle damage and resistance exercise and training.      Keywords: skeletal muscle, hypertrophy, myogenesis, cell signaling, protein synthesis, resistance

  6. The Effect of Taurine on the Recovery from Eccentric Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage in Males

    OpenAIRE

    McLeay, Yanita; Stannard, Stephen; Barnes, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Eccentric exercise is known to bring about microstructural damage to muscle, initiating an inflammatory cascade involving various reactive oxygen species. This, in turn, can significantly impair physical performance over subsequent days. Taurine, a powerful endogenous antioxidant, has previously been shown to have a beneficial effect on muscle damage markers and recovery when taken for a few days to several weeks prior to eccentric exercise. However, to date no studies have looked at the effe...

  7. Acute Muscle Stretching and Shoulder Position Sense

    OpenAIRE

    Björklund, Martin; Djupsjöbacka, Mats; Crenshaw, Albert G

    2006-01-01

    Context: Stretching is common among athletes as a potential method for injury prevention. Stretching-induced changes in the muscle spindle properties are a suggested mechanism, which may imply reduced proprioception after stretching; however, little is known of this association.

  8. Scintigraphic evaluation of muscle damage following extreme exercise: concise communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matin, P.; Lang, G.; Carretta, R.; Simon, G.

    1983-04-01

    Total body Tc-99m pyrophosphate scintigraphy was performed on 11 ''ultramarathon'' runners to assess the ability of nuclear medicine techniques to evaluate skeletal-muscle injury due to exercise. We found increased muscle radionuclide concentration in 90% of the runners. The pattern of muscle uptake correlated with the regions of maximum pain. The detection of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis appeared to be best when scintigraphy was performed within 48 hr after the race, and to be almost undetectable after about a week. It was possible to differentiate muscle injury from joint and osseous abnormalities such as bone infarct or stress fracture. Although 77% of the runners had elevated serum creatine kinase MB activity, cardiac scintigraphy showed no evidence of myocardial injury.

  9. Scintigraphic evaluation of muscle damage following extreme exercise: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matin, P.; Lang, G.; Carretta, R.; Simon, G.

    1983-01-01

    Total body Tc-99m pyrophosphate scintigraphy was performed on 11 ''ultramarathon'' runners to assess the ability of nuclear medicine techniques to evaluate skeletal-muscle injury due to exercise. We found increased muscle radionuclide concentration in 90% of the runners. The pattern of muscle uptake correlated with the regions of maximum pain. The detection of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis appeared to be best when scintigraphy was performed within 48 hr after the race, and to be almost undetectable after about a week. It was possible to differentiate muscle injury from joint and osseous abnormalities such as bone infarct or stress fracture. Although 77% of the runners had elevated serum creatine kinase MB activity, cardiac scintigraphy showed no evidence of myocardial injury

  10. Quantification of birefringence readily measures the level of muscle damage in zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Joachim; Sztal, Tamar; Currie, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Report of an unbiased quantification of the birefringence of muscle of fish larvae. ► Quantification method readily identifies level of overall muscle damage. ► Compare zebrafish muscle mutants for level of phenotype severity. ► Proposed tool to survey treatments that aim to ameliorate muscular dystrophy. -- Abstract: Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic disorders that progressively weaken and degenerate muscle. Many zebrafish models for human muscular dystrophies have been generated and analysed, including dystrophin-deficient zebrafish mutants dmd that model Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Under polarised light the zebrafish muscle can be detected as a bright area in an otherwise dark background. This light effect, called birefringence, results from the diffraction of polarised light through the pseudo-crystalline array of the muscle sarcomeres. Muscle damage, as seen in zebrafish models for muscular dystrophies, can readily be detected by a reduction in the birefringence. Therefore, birefringence is a very sensitive indicator of overall muscle integrity within larval zebrafish. Unbiased documentation of the birefringence followed by densitometric measurement enables the quantification of the birefringence of zebrafish larvae. Thereby, the overall level of muscle integrity can be detected, allowing the identification and categorisation of zebrafish muscle mutants. In addition, we propose that the establish protocol can be used to analyse treatments aimed at ameliorating dystrophic zebrafish models.

  11. Quantification of birefringence readily measures the level of muscle damage in zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Joachim, E-mail: Joachim.Berger@Monash.edu [Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute, EMBL Australia, Monash University, Clayton (Australia); Sztal, Tamar; Currie, Peter D. [Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute, EMBL Australia, Monash University, Clayton (Australia)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Report of an unbiased quantification of the birefringence of muscle of fish larvae. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantification method readily identifies level of overall muscle damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compare zebrafish muscle mutants for level of phenotype severity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proposed tool to survey treatments that aim to ameliorate muscular dystrophy. -- Abstract: Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic disorders that progressively weaken and degenerate muscle. Many zebrafish models for human muscular dystrophies have been generated and analysed, including dystrophin-deficient zebrafish mutants dmd that model Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Under polarised light the zebrafish muscle can be detected as a bright area in an otherwise dark background. This light effect, called birefringence, results from the diffraction of polarised light through the pseudo-crystalline array of the muscle sarcomeres. Muscle damage, as seen in zebrafish models for muscular dystrophies, can readily be detected by a reduction in the birefringence. Therefore, birefringence is a very sensitive indicator of overall muscle integrity within larval zebrafish. Unbiased documentation of the birefringence followed by densitometric measurement enables the quantification of the birefringence of zebrafish larvae. Thereby, the overall level of muscle integrity can be detected, allowing the identification and categorisation of zebrafish muscle mutants. In addition, we propose that the establish protocol can be used to analyse treatments aimed at ameliorating dystrophic zebrafish models.

  12. Effects of a Strength Training Session After an Exercise Inducing Muscle Damage on Recovery Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaïdia, Abd-Elbasset; Delecroix, Barthélémy; Leduc, Cédric; Lamblin, Julien; McCall, Alan; Baquet, Georges; Dupont, Grégory

    2017-01-01

    Abaïdia, A-E, Delecroix, B, Leduc, C, Lamblin, J, McCall, A, Baquet, G, and Dupont, G. Effects of a strength training session after an exercise inducing muscle damage on recovery kinetics. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 115-125, 2017-The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an upper-limb strength training session the day after an exercise inducing muscle damage on recovery of performance. In a randomized crossover design, subjects performed the day after the exercise, on 2 separate occasions (passive vs. active recovery conditions) a single-leg exercise (dominant in one condition and nondominant in the other condition) consisting of 5 sets of 15 eccentric contractions of the knee flexors. Active recovery consisted of performing an upper-body strength training session the day after the exercise. Creatine kinase, hamstring strength, and muscle soreness were assessed immediately and 20, 24, and 48 hours after exercise-induced muscle damage. The upper-body strength session, after muscle-damaging exercise accelerated the recovery of slow concentric force (effect size = 0.65; 90% confidence interval = -0.06 to 1.32), but did not affect the recovery kinetics for the other outcomes. The addition of an upper-body strength training session the day after muscle-damaging activity does not negatively affect the recovery kinetics. Upper-body strength training may be programmed the day after a competition.

  13. Benefits of dietary phytochemical supplementation on eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage: Is including antioxidants enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira Panza, Vilma Simões; Diefenthaeler, Fernando; da Silva, Edson Luiz

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this review was to critically discuss studies that investigated the effects of supplementation with dietary antioxidant phytochemicals on recovery from eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. The performance of physical activities that involve unaccustomed eccentric muscle actions-such as lowering a weight or downhill walking-can result in muscle damage, oxidative stress, and inflammation. These events may be accompanied by muscle weakness and delayed-onset muscle soreness. According to the current evidences, supplementation with dietary antioxidant phytochemicals appears to have the potential to attenuate symptoms associated with eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. However, there are inconsistencies regarding the relationship between muscle damage and blood markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. Furthermore, the effectiveness of strategies appear to depend on a number of aspects inherent to phytochemical compounds as well as its food matrix. Methodological issues also may interfere with the proper interpretation of supplementation effects. Thus, the study may contribute to updating professionals involved in sport nutrition as well as highlighting the interest of scientists in new perspectives that can widen dietary strategies applied to training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cross-Sectional Nakagami Images in Passive Stretches Reveal Damage of Injured Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Ping; Lin, Yi-Hsun; Fan, Shih-Chen; Huang, Bu-Miin; Lin, Wei-Yin; Wang, Shyh-Hau; Shung, K. Kirk; Su, Fong-Chin; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Muscle strain is still awanting a noninvasive quantitatively diagnosis tool. High frequency ultrasound (HFU) improves image resolution for monitoring changes of tissue structures, but the biomechanical factors may influence ultrasonography during injury detection. We aim to illustrate the ultrasonic parameters to present the histological damage of overstretched muscle with the consideration of biomechanical factors. Gastrocnemius muscles from mice were assembled and ex vivo passive stretching was performed before or after injury. After injury, the muscle significantly decreased mechanical strength. Ultrasonic images were obtained by HFU at different deformations to scan in cross and longitudinal orientations of muscle. The ultrasonography was quantified by echogenicity and Nakagami parameters (NP) for structural evaluation and correlated with histological results. The injured muscle at its original length exhibited decreased echogenicity and NP from HFU images. Cross-sectional ultrasonography revealed a loss of correlation between NP and passive muscle stretching that suggested a special scatterer pattern in the cross section of injured muscle. The independence of NP during passive stretching of injured muscle was confirmed by histological findings in ruptured collagen fibers, decreased muscle density, and increased intermuscular fiber space. Thus, HFU analysis of NP in cross section represents muscle injury that may benefit the clinical diagnosis. PMID:27034946

  15. Longer application of kinesio taping would be beneficial for exercise-induced muscle damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jooyoung; Kim, Seunghwan; Lee, Joohyung

    2016-01-01

    Kinesio taping (KT) has been widely used to prevent muscle pain and to improve range of motion in clinical settings. However, no previous research has examined how long KT should be applied to muscle following damaging exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the duration of KT application on markers of muscle damage following eccentric exercise. Thirty-two male subjects participated in the study and were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: control (CON), KT-post, KT-30 min, or KT-24 hr. Eccentric exercise consisted of 2 sets of 25 contractions of elbow flexors using the non-dominant arm. Maximal isometric strength, muscle soreness (SOR), range of motion, and creatine kinase activity were measured before, immediately after, and at 24, 48, 72, and 96 hr after exercise. The KT-24 hr group showed lesser muscle damage and a faster recovery time than the CON and KT-post groups. Both the KT-30 min and KT-24 hr groups showed lesser SOR than CON and KT-post groups. These findings suggested that prolonged application of KT had a positive effect on markers of muscle damage. PMID:27807525

  16. Minimal changes in indirect markers of muscle damage after an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Creatine kinase (CK) activity, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) muscle pain ratings, hip, knee and ankle joint range of motion and maximal quadriceps and hamstring isometric strength were measured 24 hours before, one hour and 24 hours after bowling and analysed using a one way ANOVA. Significance was set at p≤0.05.

  17. A single dose of histamine-receptor antagonists before downhill running alters markers of muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Matthew R; Romero, Steven A; Sieck, Dylan C; Mangum, Joshua E; Luttrell, Meredith J; Halliwill, John R

    2017-03-01

    Histamine contributes to elevations in skeletal muscle blood flow following exercise, which raises the possibility that histamine is an important mediator of the inflammatory response to exercise. We examined the influence of antihistamines on postexercise blood flow, inflammation, muscle damage, and delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in a model of moderate exercise-induced muscle damage. Subjects consumed either a combination of fexofenadine and ranitidine (blockade, n = 12) or nothing (control, n = 12) before 45 min of downhill running (-10% grade). Blood flow to the leg was measured before and throughout 120 min of exercise recovery. Markers of inflammation, muscle damage, and DOMS were obtained before and at 0, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h postexercise. At 60 min postexercise, blood flow was reduced ~29% with blockade compared with control ( P histamine-receptor blockade reduced postexercise blood flow, had no effect on the pattern of inflammatory markers, increased serum creatine kinase concentrations, attenuated muscle strength loss, and reduced pain perception following muscle-damaging exercise. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Histamine appears to be intimately involved with skeletal muscle during and following exercise. Blocking histamine's actions during muscle-damaging exercise, via common over-the-counter antihistamines, resulted in increased serum creatine kinase, an indirect marker of muscle damage. Paradoxically, blocking histamine's actions attenuated muscle strength loss and reduced perceptions of muscle pain for 72 h following muscle-damaging exercise. These results indicate that exercise-induced histamine release may have a broad impact on protecting muscle from exercise-induced damage. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Metabolic and muscle damage profiles of concentric versus repeated eccentric cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñailillo, Luis; Blazevich, Anthony; Numazawa, Hideo; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2013-09-01

    Eccentric cycling is an exercise modality that could elicit multiple health benefits with low metabolic cost, but unaccustomed performance results in significant muscle damage. It is not known whether muscle damage is attenuated when eccentric cycling is repeated; thus, this study compared metabolic and muscle damage responses to concentric (CONC) and two consecutive eccentric (ECC1 and ECC2) cycling bouts. Ten men (28 ± 8 yr) performed each cycling bout for 30 min at 60% of the maximal concentric power output at 60 rpm, with 2 wk between bouts. HR, oxygen consumption (V˙O2), blood lactate (BLa), RPE, and muscle activity (EMG) data were collected during cycling. Maximal voluntary isometric knee extensor (MVC) strength, squat (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ) height, muscle soreness indicators, and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were measured before, immediately after, and 1-4 d after exercise. Average HR, V˙O2, BLa, and RPE were lower (P < 0.05) during ECC1 than CONC, and EMG amplitude was also lower during ECC1 than CONC. Decreases in MVC, CMJ, and SJ and the increase in muscle soreness were greater (P x0003C; 0.05) after ECC1 than CONC. Increases in creatine kinase were minimal after all bouts. When comparing ECC1 and ECC2, HR and BLa were lower (P < 0.05) during ECC2 than ECC1, and decreases in MVC, CMJ, and SJ and the increase in muscle soreness were greater (P < 0.05) after ECC1 than ECC2. After ECC2, MVC, CMJ, and SJ did not change and no muscle soreness was developed. Eccentric cycling was less metabolically demanding than concentric cycling, and HR and BLa were further reduced during ECC2. Muscle damage is minimal after ECC2 and should not influence the choice to undertake eccentric cycling training.

  19. Overtraining is associated with DNA damage in blood and skeletal muscle cells of Swiss mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Bruno Cesar; Pauli, José Rodrigo; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; de Freitas, Ellen Cristini; de Almeida, Mara Ribeiro; de Paula Venâncio, Vinícius; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete; de Souza, Claudio Teodoro; Cintra, Dennys Esper; Papoti, Marcelo; da Silva, Adelino Sanchez Ramos

    2013-10-08

    The alkaline version of the single-cell gel (comet) assay is a useful method for quantifying DNA damage. Although some studies on chronic and acute effects of exercise on DNA damage measured by the comet assay have been performed, it is unknown if an aerobic training protocol with intensity, volume, and load clearly defined will improve performance without leading to peripheral blood cell DNA damage. In addition, the effects of overtraining on DNA damage are unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the effects of aerobic training and overtraining on DNA damage in peripheral blood and skeletal muscle cells in Swiss mice. To examine possible changes in these parameters with oxidative stress, we measured reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in total blood, and GSH levels and lipid peroxidation in muscle samples. Performance evaluations (i.e., incremental load and exhaustive tests) showed significant intra and inter-group differences. The overtrained (OTR) group showed a significant increase in the percentage of DNA in the tail compared with the control (C) and trained (TR) groups. GSH levels were significantly lower in the OTR group than in the C and TR groups. The OTR group had significantly higher lipid peroxidation levels compared with the C and TR groups. Aerobic and anaerobic performance parameters can be improved in training at maximal lactate steady state during 8 weeks without leading to DNA damage in peripheral blood and skeletal muscle cells or to oxidative stress in skeletal muscle cells. However, overtraining induced by downhill running training sessions is associated with DNA damage in peripheral blood and skeletal muscle cells, and with oxidative stress in skeletal muscle cells and total blood.

  20. Numerical simulation of the damage evolution in the pelvic floor muscles during childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Dulce A; Parente, Marco P L; Calvo, Begoña; Mascarenhas, Teresa; Natal Jorge, Renato M

    2016-02-29

    Several studies have shown that pelvic floor injuries during a vaginal delivery can be considered a significant factor in the development of pelvic floor dysfunction. Such disorders include a group of conditions affecting women like urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse and fecal incontinence. Numerical simulations are valuable tools that are contributing to the clarification of the mechanisms behind pelvic floor disorders. The aim of this work is to propose a mechanical model implemented in the finite element method context to estimate the damage in the pelvic floor muscles by mechanical effects during a vaginal delivery of a fetus in vertex presentation and occipitoanterior position. The constitutive model adopted has already been successfully used in the simulation of childbirth and the structural damage model added has previously been applied to characterize the damage process in biological soft tissues undergoing finite deformations. The constitutive parameters were fit to experimental data available in the literature and the final proposed material model is suitable to estimate the mechanical damage in the pelvic floor muscle during a vaginal delivery. The computational model predicts that even an apparently uneventful vaginal delivery inflicts injuries to the pelvic floor muscles, particularly during the extension of the fetus head, having been obtained more than 10% of damaged fibers. As a clinical evidence, the present work allows to conclude that the puborectalis component of the levator ani muscle is the most prone to damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Discovery of Novel Small Molecules that Activate Satellite Cell Proliferation and Enhance Repair of Damaged Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billin, Andrew N; Bantscheff, Marcus; Drewes, Gerard; Ghidelli-Disse, Sonja; Holt, Jason A; Kramer, Henning F; McDougal, Alan J; Smalley, Terry L; Wells, Carrow I; Zuercher, William J; Henke, Brad R

    2016-02-19

    Skeletal muscle progenitor stem cells (referred to as satellite cells) represent the primary pool of stem cells in adult skeletal muscle responsible for the generation of new skeletal muscle in response to injury. Satellite cells derived from aged muscle display a significant reduction in regenerative capacity to form functional muscle. This decrease in functional recovery has been attributed to a decrease in proliferative capacity of satellite cells. Hence, agents that enhance the proliferative abilities of satellite cells may hold promise as therapies for a variety of pathological settings, including repair of injured muscle and age- or disease-associated muscle wasting. Through phenotypic screening of isolated murine satellite cells, we identified a series of 2,4-diaminopyrimidines (e.g., 2) that increased satellite cell proliferation. Importantly, compound 2 was effective in accelerating repair of damaged skeletal muscle in an in vivo mouse model of skeletal muscle injury. While these compounds were originally prepared as c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK-1) inhibitors, structure-activity analyses indicated JNK-1 inhibition does not correlate with satellite cell activity. Screening against a broad panel of kinases did not result in identification of an obvious molecular target, so we conducted cell-based proteomics experiments in an attempt to identify the molecular target(s) responsible for the potentiation of the satellite cell proliferation. These data provide the foundation for future efforts to design improved small molecules as potential therapeutics for muscle repair and regeneration.

  2. Supplementation Strategies to Reduce Muscle Damage and Improve Recovery Following Exercise in Females: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Köhne

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD caused by unaccustomed or strenuous exercise can result in reduced muscle force, increased muscle soreness, increased intramuscular proteins in the blood, and reduced performance. Pre- and post-exercise optimal nutritional intake is important to assist with muscle-damage repair and reconditioning to allow for an accelerated recovery. The increased demand for training and competing on consecutive days has led to a variety of intervention strategies being used to reduce the negative effects of EIMD. Nutritional intervention strategies are largely tested on male participants, and few report on sex-related differences relating to the effects of the interventions employed. This review focuses on nutritional intervention strategies employed to negate the effects of EIMD, focussing solely on females.

  3. Polyphenols in Exercise Performance and Prevention of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Malaguti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although moderate physical exercise is considered an essential component of a healthy lifestyle that leads the organism to adapt itself to different stresses, exercise, especially when exhaustive, is also known to induce oxidative stress, inflammation, and muscle damage. Many efforts have been carried out to identify dietary strategies or micronutrients able to prevent or at least attenuate the exercise-induced muscle damage and stress. Unfortunately most studies have failed to show protection, and at the present time data supporting the protective effect of micronutrients, as antioxidant vitamins, are weak and trivial. This review focuses on those polyphenols, present in the plant kingdom, that have been recently suggested to exert some positive effects on exercise-induced muscle damage and oxidative stress. In the last decade flavonoids as quercetin, catechins, and other polyphenols as resveratrol have caught the scientists attention. However, at the present time drawing a clear and definitive conclusion seems to be untimely.

  4. Causes of excitation-induced muscle cell damage in isometric contractions: mechanical stress or calcium overload?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsted, Anne; Gissel, Hanne; Madsen, Klavs

    2007-01-01

    Prolonged or unaccustomed exercise leads to muscle cell membrane damage, detectable as release of the intracellular enzyme lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH). This is correlated to excitation-induced influx of Ca2+, but it cannot be excluded that mechanical stress contributes to the damage. We here...... to the Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Electrical stimulation increased 45Ca influx 3-5 fold. This was followed by a progressive release of LDH, which was correlated to the influx of Ca2+. BTS (50 microM) caused a 90% inhibition of contractile force but had no effect on the excitation-induced 45Ca influx. After...... release both in control and BTS-treated muscles. In conclusion, after isometric contractions, muscle cell membrane damage depends on Ca2+ influx and energy status and not on mechanical stress....

  5. Contraction-induced muscle damage in humans following calcium channel blocker administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Louise J; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Phillips, Stuart M

    2002-01-01

    Following contraction-induced damage of skeletal muscle there is a loss of calcium homeostasis. Attenuating the damage-induced rise in myocellular calcium concentration may reduce proteolytic activation and attenuate other indices of damage; calcium channel blockers have been shown to be effective in this regard. The effect of administration of a calcium channel blocker (CCB), amlodipine, on indices of muscle damage following a unilateral ‘damage protocol’, during which subjects performed 300 maximal isokinetic (0.52 rad s−1) eccentric contractions with the knee extensors was investigated. The design was a randomized, double-blind crossover. On one occasion, prior to the damage protocol, subjects consumed CCB for 7 days prior to and for 7 days following the damage protocol. Biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis prior to (baseline) and following the damage protocol at 4 h and 24 h post-damage. Isometric peak knee extensor torque was reduced (P < 0.05) immediately post-, 24 h post- and 48 h post-damage protocol compared to pre-exercise values with no effect of treatment. Desmin disruption was attenuated (P < 0.05) with CCB versus placebo at 4 h post-damage. Z-band streaming was significantly (P < 0.05) elevated compared to baseline at both times post-damage, but was lower with CCB at 4 h (P < 0.05). Damage resulted in increased inflammatory cell (macrophage) infiltration into skeletal muscle at both 4 h and 24 h post-damage, with no effect of CCB. Neutrophil number was elevated by the damage protocol, but was higher at 24 h post-damage in the CCB condition (P < 0.05). Creatine kinase (CK) activity was higher (P < 0.05) at 24 h and 48 h following the damage protocol compared to baseline, with no effect of treatment. In conclusion, the reduction in desmin disruption and Z-band streaming indicates that CCB attenuated, or delayed, the contraction-induced damage to sarcomeric proteins. PMID:12411528

  6. Effect of eccentric contraction velocity on muscle damage in repeated bouts of elbow flexor exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Renato; Roschel, Hamilton; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Araújo, Rubens; Nosaka, Kazunori; Tricoli, Valmor

    2010-08-01

    Eccentric exercise induces muscle damage, but controversy exists concerning the effect of contraction velocity on the magnitude of muscle damage, and little is known about the effect of contraction velocity on the repeated-bout effect. This study examined slow (60 degrees.s(-1)) and fast (180 degrees.s(-1)) velocity eccentric exercises for changes in indirect markers of muscle damage following 3 exercise bouts that were performed every 2 weeks. Fifteen young men were divided into 2 groups based on the velocity of eccentric exercise: 7 in the Ecc60 (60 degrees.s(-1)) group, and 8 in the Ecc180 (180 degrees.s(-1)) group. The exercise consisted of 30 maximal eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors at each velocity, in which the elbow joint was forcibly extended from 60 degrees to 180 degrees (full extension) on an isokinetic dynamometer. Changes in maximal voluntary isometric contraction strength, range of motion, muscle soreness, and plasma creatine kinase activity before and for 4 days after the exercise were compared in the 2 groups using a mixed-model analysis (groupxboutxtime). No significant differences between groups were evident for changes in any variables following exercise bouts; however, the changes were significantly smaller (pcontraction velocity does not influence muscle damage or the repeated-bout effect.

  7. Detection of titin fragments in urine in response to exercise-induced muscle damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazue Kanda

    Full Text Available Many studies have attempted to determine the associations between blood biomarkers and exercise-induced muscle damage. However, poor correlations between the changes in biomarker levels and the magnitude of muscle symptoms have been reported. Recent advances in proteomic tools offer a strategy for the comprehensive analysis of protein expression, which can be used to identify biomarkers. Here, we used a proteomic analysis to identify urinary proteins that appear in response to a calf-raise exercise, including repetitive eccentric muscle contractions, and found that a titin (also known as connectin N-terminal fragment molecule appears in the urine after eccentric exercise. We measured the titin fragment in urine samples from nine individuals before and after eccentric exercise using a newly-established enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and found that the titin fragment excretion rate increased 96 h after the exercise (5.1 to 77.6 pg/min, p <0.01. The changes in the titin fragment excretion rate were correlated strongly with blood markers of muscle damage and with muscle symptoms. These findings suggest that the urinary titin fragment is potentially a noninvasive biomarker of muscle damage.

  8. Controlled intermittent shortening contractions of a muscle-tendon complex: muscle fibre damage and effects on force transmission from a single head of rat EDL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, H.; Lehti, T.M.; Tiihonen, V.; Komulainen, J.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2005-01-01

    This study was performed to examine effects of prolonged (3 h) intermittent shortening (amplitude 2 mm) contractions (muscles were excited maximally) of head III of rat extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL III) on indices of muscle damage and on force transmission within the intact anterior crural

  9. Probiotic Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 reduces exercise-induced muscle damage and increases recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Jäger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Probiotics have been reported to support healthy digestive and immune function, aid in protein absorption, and decrease inflammation. Further, a trend to increase vertical jump power has been observed following co-administration of protein and probiotics in resistance-trained subjects. However, to date the potential beneficial effect of probiotics on recovery from high intensity resistance exercise have yet to be explored. Therefore, this study examined the effect of co-administration of protein and probiotics on muscle damage, recovery and performance following a damaging exercise bout. Design. Twenty nine (n = 29 recreationally-trained males (mean ± SD; 21.5 ± 2.8 years; 89.7 ± 28.2 kg; 177.4 ± 8.0 cm were assigned to consume either 20 g of casein (PRO or 20 g of casein plus probiotic (1 billion CFU Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086, PROBC in a crossover, diet-controlled design. After two weeks of supplementation, perceptional measures, athletic performance, and muscle damage were analyzed following a damaging exercise bout. Results. The damaging exercise bout significantly increased muscle soreness, and reduced perceived recovery; however, PROBC significantly increased recovery at 24 and 72 h, and decreased soreness at 72 h post exercise in comparison to PRO. Perceptual measures were confirmed by increases in CK (PRO: +266.8%, p = 0.0002; PROBC: +137.7%, p = 0.01, with PROBC showing a trend towards reduced muscle damage (p = 0.08. The muscle-damaging exercise resulted in significantly increased muscle swelling and Blood Urea Nitrogen levels in both conditions with no difference between groups. The strenuous exercise significantly reduced athletic performance in PRO (Wingate Peak Power; PRO: (−39.8 watts, −5.3%, p = 0.03, whereas PROBC maintained performance (+10.1 watts, +1.7%. Conclusions. The results provide evidence that probiotic supplementation in combination with protein tended to reduce indices of muscle damage

  10. Combined effect of branched-chain amino acids and taurine supplementation on delayed onset muscle soreness and muscle damage in high-intensity eccentric exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Ra, Song-Gyu; Miyazaki, Teruo; Ishikura, Keisuke; Nagayama, Hisashi; Komine, Shoichi; Nakata, Yoshio; Maeda, Seiji; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Ohmori, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have evaluated the effectiveness of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation for preventing delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and muscle damage induced by eccentric exercise, their findings have been inconclusive. Since taurine has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects, the present study investigated the combined effect of BCAA and taurine on DOMS and muscle damage. Methods Thirty-six untrained male subjects (22.5???3.8 years) were assigned to fou...

  11. The acute response of pericytes to muscle-damaging eccentric contraction and protein supplementation in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lisio, Michael; Farup, Jean; Sukiennik, Richard A; Clevenger, Nicole; Nallabelli, Julian; Nelson, Brett; Ryan, Kelly; Rahbek, Stine K; de Paoli, Frank; Vissing, Kristian; Boppart, Marni D

    2015-10-15

    Skeletal muscle pericytes increase in quantity following eccentric exercise (ECC) and contribute to myofiber repair and adaptation in mice. The purpose of the present investigation was to examine pericyte quantity in response to muscle-damaging ECC and protein supplementation in human skeletal muscle. Male subjects were divided into protein supplement (WHY; n = 12) or isocaloric placebo (CHO; n = 12) groups and completed ECC using an isokinetic dynamometer. Supplements were consumed 3 times/day throughout the experimental time course. Biopsies were collected prior to (PRE) and 3, 24, 48, and 168 h following ECC. Reflective of the damaging protocol, integrin subunits, including α7, β1A, and β1D, increased (3.8-fold, 3.6-fold and 3.9-fold, respectively, P < 0.01) 24 h post-ECC with no difference between supplements. Pericyte quantity did not change post-ECC. WHY resulted in a small, but significant, decrease in ALP(+) pericytes when expressed as a percentage of myonuclei (CHO 6.8 ± 0.3% vs. WHY 5.8 ± 0.3%, P < 0.05) or per myofiber (CHO 0.119 ± 0.01 vs. WHY 0.098 ± 0.01, P < 0.05). The quantity of myonuclei expressing serum response factor and the number of pericytes expressing serum response factor, did not differ as a function of time post-ECC or supplement. These data demonstrate that acute muscle-damaging ECC increases α7β1 integrin content in human muscle, yet pericyte quantity is largely unaltered. Future studies should focus on the capacity for ECC to influence pericyte function, specifically paracrine factor release as a mechanism toward pericyte contribution to repair and adaptation postexercise. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. The time course of short-term hypertrophy in the absence of eccentric muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Matt S; Mota, Jacob A; DeFranco, Ryan N; Grue, Katherine A; Jacobo, A Unique; Chung, Eunhee; Moon, Jordan R; DeFreitas, Jason M; Beck, Travis W

    2017-05-01

    It has been proposed that the increase in skeletal muscle mass observed during the initial weeks of initiating a resistance training program is concomitant with eccentric muscle damage and edema. We examined the time course of muscle hypertrophy during 4 weeks of concentric-only resistance training. Thirteen untrained men performed unilateral concentric-only dumbbell curls and shoulder presses twice per week for 4 weeks. Sets of 8-12 repetitions were performed to failure, and training loads were increased during each session. Subjects consumed 500 ml of whole milk during training. Assessments of soreness, lean mass, echo intensity, muscle thickness, relaxed and flexed arm circumference, and isokinetic strength were performed every 72 or 96 h. Soreness, echo intensity, relaxed circumference, and peak torque data did not significantly change. Significant increases in lean mass, muscle thickness, and flexed circumference were observed within seven training sessions. Lean mass was elevated at tests #7 (+109.3 g, p = .002) and #8 (+116.1 g, p = .035), with eight different subjects showing changes above the minimal difference of 139.1 g. Muscle thickness was elevated at tests #6 (+0.23 cm, p = .004), #7 (+0.31 cm, p hypertrophy may occur in the absence of eccentric muscle damage within seven training sessions.

  13. Effects of Massage on Muscular Strength and Proprioception After Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), which is commonly associated with eccentric exercise, unaccustomed exercise, and resistance training, may lead to delayed onset muscle soreness, swelling, decreased muscle strength, and range of motion. Many researchers have evaluated various interventions to treat the signs and symptoms of EIMD. However, the effects of massage after EIMD are unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of massage on muscle strength and proprioception after EIMD. All subjects randomly were divided into an EIMD-treated control group (n = 10) and a massage-treated after EIMD experimental group (n = 11). Exercise-induced muscle damage was induced by repeated exercise. Massage treatment was provided by physiotherapist for 15 minutes. It consists of light stroking, milking, friction, and skin rolling. Lactate was evaluated by Lactate Pro analyzer in pre- and postexercise. Surface electromyography (muscle activity) and sonography (muscle thickness) were used to confirm the muscular characteristics. Proprioception was investigated by dual inclinometer. As a result, massage treatment on the gastrocnemius after EIMD increased activation of the medial gastrocnemius during contraction (p ≤ 0.05). In the lateral and medial gastrocnemius, the θs, which is the angle between muscle fibers and superficial aponeurosis, showed a significant change (p ≤ 0.05). However, there are no differences in the θd, which is the angle between muscle fibers and deep aponeurosis. We also found that proprioceptive acuity in the ankle joint was significantly greater in the massage-treated experimental group compared with that in the control group (p ≤ 0.05). These findings suggest that massage of the gastrocnemius after EIMD can improve muscle strength and proprioception by influencing the superficial layer of the gastrocnemius.

  14. The Effect of Taurine on the Recovery from Eccentric Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage in Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeay, Yanita; Stannard, Stephen; Barnes, Matthew

    2017-10-17

    Eccentric exercise is known to bring about microstructural damage to muscle, initiating an inflammatory cascade involving various reactive oxygen species. This, in turn, can significantly impair physical performance over subsequent days. Taurine, a powerful endogenous antioxidant, has previously been shown to have a beneficial effect on muscle damage markers and recovery when taken for a few days to several weeks prior to eccentric exercise. However, to date no studies have looked at the effects of supplementing over the days following eccentric exercise on performance recovery. Thus, this study aimed to determine whether supplementing with taurine over three days following eccentric exercise attenuated the rise in serum creatine kinase and improved performance recovery in males. In a blinded, randomized, crossover design, ten recreationally-fit male participants completed 60 eccentric contractions of the biceps brachii muscle at maximal effort. Following this, participants were supplemented with 0.1 g∙kg -1 body weight∙day -1 of either taurine or rice flour in capsules. Over the next three mornings participants underwent blood tests for the analysis of the muscle damage marker creatine kinase and carried out performance measures on the isokinetic dynamometer. They also continued to consume the capsules in the morning and evening. The entire protocol was repeated two weeks later on the alternate arm and supplement. Significant decreases were seen in all performance measures from pre- to 24-h post-eccentric exercise ( p taurine and placebo, indicating the attainment of muscle damage. Significant treatment effects were observed only for peak eccentric torque ( p effects were observed (all p > 0.05). Serum creatine kinase levels did not significantly differ over time for either treatments, nor between treatments ( p > 0.05). These findings suggest that taurine supplementation taken twice daily for 72 h following eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage may help

  15. The Effect of Taurine on the Recovery from Eccentric Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage in Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanita McLeay

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Eccentric exercise is known to bring about microstructural damage to muscle, initiating an inflammatory cascade involving various reactive oxygen species. This, in turn, can significantly impair physical performance over subsequent days. Taurine, a powerful endogenous antioxidant, has previously been shown to have a beneficial effect on muscle damage markers and recovery when taken for a few days to several weeks prior to eccentric exercise. However, to date no studies have looked at the effects of supplementing over the days following eccentric exercise on performance recovery. Thus, this study aimed to determine whether supplementing with taurine over three days following eccentric exercise attenuated the rise in serum creatine kinase and improved performance recovery in males. In a blinded, randomized, crossover design, ten recreationally-fit male participants completed 60 eccentric contractions of the biceps brachii muscle at maximal effort. Following this, participants were supplemented with 0.1 g∙kg−1 body weight∙day−1 of either taurine or rice flour in capsules. Over the next three mornings participants underwent blood tests for the analysis of the muscle damage marker creatine kinase and carried out performance measures on the isokinetic dynamometer. They also continued to consume the capsules in the morning and evening. The entire protocol was repeated two weeks later on the alternate arm and supplement. Significant decreases were seen in all performance measures from pre- to 24-h post-eccentric exercise (p < 0.001 for both taurine and placebo, indicating the attainment of muscle damage. Significant treatment effects were observed only for peak eccentric torque (p < 0.05. No significant time × treatment effects were observed (all p > 0.05. Serum creatine kinase levels did not significantly differ over time for either treatments, nor between treatments (p > 0.05. These findings suggest that taurine supplementation taken twice

  16. Caffeine Supplementation and muscle damage in soccer players

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    Marco Machado

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of caffeine supplementation and intermittent exercise on the muscle injury markers in soccer players. 15 male professional soccer players completed a placebo controlled double blind test protocol. 45 minutes before exercise, participants ingested 5.5 mg.kg-1 body mass of caffeine (EXP, n=8 or placebo (CONT, n=7. The exercise was 12 sets of 10 sprints (20 m each with 10 sec recovery time between sprints and 2 min between sets. Blood samples were collected before (PRE and 48h after exercise (POST. Serum activity of CK, LDH, AST, and ALT were quantified. Serum enzyme activity was enhanced by exercise in both groups, without a synergistic effect of caffeine. The findings suggest muscle injury markers concentration increases after physical activities, but caffeine supplementation (as used in this study has no influence upon muscle cellular integrity.O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar o efeito da cafeína e do exercício intermitente nos marcadores de lesão muscular em jogadores de futebol. 15 jogadores de futebol profissional completaram um estudo duplo-cego placebo controlado. 45 minutos antes do exercício, os participantes ingeriram 5.5 mg.kg-1 do peso corporal de cafeína (EXP, n=8 ou placebo (CONT, n=7. O exercício consistiu em 12 séries de 10 sprints (com 20 m cada com 10 segundos de recuperação entre os sprints e 2 min entre as séries. Amostras de sangue foram coletadas antes (PRE e 48h depois do exercício (POST. As atividades séricas de CK, LDH, AST e ALT foram quantificadas. A atividade sérica de todas as enzimas aumentou em ambos os grupos, sem efeito sinérgico da suplementação de cafeína. Os achados confirmam que o exercício aumenta a atividade sérica das enzimas, mas a cafeína (como a usada neste estudo não interfere na integridade da fibra muscular.

  17. Vitamin D2 Supplementation Amplifies Eccentric Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage in NASCAR Pit Crew Athletes

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    David C. Nieman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study determined if 6-weeks vitamin D2 supplementation (vitD2, 3800 IU/day had an influence on muscle function, eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD, and delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS in National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR NASCAR pit crew athletes. Subjects were randomized to vitD2 (n = 13 and placebo (n = 15, and ingested supplements (double-blind for six weeks. Blood samples were collected and muscle function tests conducted pre- and post-study (leg-back and hand grip dynamometer strength tests, body weight bench press to exhaustion, vertical jump, 30-s Wingate test. Post-study, subjects engaged in 90 min eccentric-based exercise, with blood samples and DOMS ratings obtained immediately after and 1- and 2-days post-exercise. Six weeks vitD2 increased serum 25(OHD2 456% and decreased 25(OHD3 21% versus placebo (p < 0.001, p = 0.036, respectively, with no influence on muscle function test scores. The post-study eccentric exercise bout induced EIMD and DOMS, with higher muscle damage biomarkers measured in vitD2 compared to placebo (myoglobin 252%, 122% increase, respectively, p = 0.001; creatine phosphokinase 24 h post-exercise, 169%, 32%, p < 0.001, with no differences for DOMS. In summary, 6-weeks vitD2 (3800 IU/day significantly increased 25(OHD2 and decreased 25(OHD3, had no effect on muscle function tests, and amplified muscle damage markers in NASCAR pit crew athletes following eccentric exercise.

  18. Creatine-Kinase- and Exercise-Related Muscle Damage Implications for Muscle Performance and Recovery

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    Marianne F. Baird

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine current evidence and opinion relating to the release of CK from skeletal muscle in response to physical activity and examine if elevated concentrations are a health concern.

  19. Electro-membrane microcurrent therapy reduces signs and symptoms of muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Michael I; Marcus, Paul; Burgess, Theresa; Noakes, Timothy D

    2002-04-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) occurs after unaccustomed physical activity or competitive sport, resulting in stiff, painful muscles with impaired function. Acustat electro-membrane microcurrent therapy has been used to treat postoperative pain and soft tissue injury; however, its efficacy in reducing symptoms of muscle damage is not known. Thirty healthy men were recruited for a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The muscles of their nondominant arms were damaged using an eccentric-exercise protocol. Subjects were then randomly assigned to treatment with either Acustat or a matching placebo membrane for 96 h and monitored for a total of 168 h. Subjects in both groups experienced severe pain and swelling of the elbow flexors after the eccentric exercise. After 24 h, the elbow joint angle of the placebo group had increased significantly more than those in the Acustat group (13.7 +/- 8.9 degrees vs 7.5 +/- 5.5 degrees; placebo vs Acustat, P microcurrent therapy reduces the severity of the symptoms. The mechanisms of action are unknown but are likely related to maintenance of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis after muscle damaging exercise.

  20. Monitoring markers of muscle damage during a 3 week periodized drop-jump exercise programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas; Snieckus, Audrius

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in indirect markers of muscle damage during 3 weeks of stretch-shortening exercise with a progressively increasing load and continued modulation of various key training variables. Eight healthy untrained men performed a drop-jump programme involving......-stimulation-evoked torque decreased acutely after each training session relative to pre-exercise values (P ...

  1. Heat-Induced Calcium Leakage Causes Mitochondrial Damage inCaenorhabditis elegansBody-Wall Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momma, Kenta; Homma, Takashi; Isaka, Ruri; Sudevan, Surabhi; Higashitani, Atsushi

    2017-08-01

    Acute onset of organ failure in heatstroke is triggered by rhabdomyolysis of skeletal muscle. Here, we showed that elevated temperature increases free cytosolic Ca 2+ [Ca 2+ ]f from RYR (ryanodine receptor)/UNC-68 in vivo in the muscles of an experimental model animal, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans This subsequently leads to mitochondrial fragmentation and dysfunction, and breakdown of myofilaments similar to rhabdomyolysis. In addition, treatment with an inhibitor of RYR (dantrolene) or activation of FoxO (Forkhead box O)/DAF-16 is effective against heat-induced muscle damage. Acute onset of organ failure in heatstroke is triggered by rhabdomyolysis of skeletal muscle. To gain insight into heat-induced muscle breakdown, we investigated alterations of Ca 2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial morphology in vivo in body-wall muscles of C. elegans exposed to elevated temperature. Heat stress for 3 hr at 35° increased the concentration of [Ca 2+ ]f, and led to mitochondrial fragmentation and subsequent dysfunction in the muscle cells. A similar mitochondrial fragmentation phenotype is induced in the absence of heat stress by treatment with a calcium ionophore, ionomycin. Mutation of the unc-68 gene, which encodes the ryanodine receptor that is linked to Ca 2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, could suppress the mitochondrial dysfunction, muscle degeneration, and reduced mobility and life span induced by heat stress. In addition, in a daf-2 mutant, in which the DAF-16/FoxO transcription factor is activated, resistance to calcium overload, mitochondrial fragmentation, and dysfunction was observed. These findings reveal that heat-induced Ca 2+ accumulation causes mitochondrial damage and consequently induces muscle breakdown. Copyright © 2017 Momma et al.

  2. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in skeletal muscle of humans exposed to high-altitude hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Carsten; Pilegaard, Henriette; van Hall, Gerrit

    2003-01-01

    -consuming tissue. Muscle biopsies from seven healthy humans were obtained at sea level and after 2 and 8 weeks of hypoxia at 4100 m.a.s.l. We found increased levels of strand breaks and endonuclease III-sensitive sites after 2 weeks of hypoxia, whereas oxidative DNA damage detected by formamidopyrimidine DNA......) was unaltered by prolonged hypoxia, in accordance with the notion that HO-1 is an acute stress response protein. In conclusion, our data indicate high-altitude hypoxia may serve as a good model for oxidative stress and that antioxidant genes are not upregulated in muscle tissue by prolonged hypoxia despite......Recent research suggests that high-altitude hypoxia may serve as a model for prolonged oxidative stress in healthy humans. In this study, we investigated the consequences of prolonged high-altitude hypoxia on the basal level of oxidative damage to nuclear DNA in muscle cells, a major oxygen...

  3. Whey protein isolate attenuates strength decline after eccentrically-induced muscle damage in healthy individuals

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    Cribb Paul J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined the effects of short-term consumption of whey protein isolate on muscle proteins and force recovery after eccentrically-induced muscle damage in healthy individuals. Methods Seventeen untrained male participants (23 ± 5 yr, 180 ± 6 cm, 80 ± 11 kg were randomly separated into two supplement groups: i whey protein isolate (WPH; n = 9; or ii carbohydrate (CHO; n = 8. Participants consumed 1.5 g/kg.bw/day supplement (~30 g consumed immediately, and then once with breakfast, lunch, in the afternoon and after the evening meal for a period of 14 days following a unilateral eccentric contraction-based resistance exercise session, consisting of 4 sets of 10 repetitions at 120% of maximum voluntary contraction on the leg press, leg extension and leg flexion exercise machine. Plasma creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH levels were assessed as blood markers of muscle damage. Muscle strength was examined by voluntary isokinetic knee extension using a Cybex dynamometer. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA with an alpha of 0.05. Results Isometric knee extension strength was significantly higher following WPH supplementation 3 (P Conclusions The major finding of this investigation was that whey protein isolate supplementation attenuated the impairment in isometric and isokinetic muscle forces during recovery from exercise-induced muscle injury.

  4. Regenerative capacity of old muscle stem cells declines without significant accumulation of DNA damage.

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    Wendy Cousin

    Full Text Available The performance of adult stem cells is crucial for tissue homeostasis but their regenerative capacity declines with age, leading to failure of multiple organs. In skeletal muscle this failure is manifested by the loss of functional tissue, the accumulation of fibrosis, and reduced satellite cell-mediated myogenesis in response to injury. While recent studies have shown that changes in the composition of the satellite cell niche are at least in part responsible for the impaired function observed with aging, little is known about the effects of aging on the intrinsic properties of satellite cells. For instance, their ability to repair DNA damage and the effects of a potential accumulation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs on their regenerative performance remain unclear. This work demonstrates that old muscle stem cells display no significant accumulation of DNA DSBs when compared to those of young, as assayed after cell isolation and in tissue sections, either in uninjured muscle or at multiple time points after injury. Additionally, there is no significant difference in the expression of DNA DSB repair proteins or globally assayed DNA damage response genes, suggesting that not only DNA DSBs, but also other types of DNA damage, do not significantly mark aged muscle stem cells. Satellite cells from DNA DSB-repair-deficient SCID mice do have an unsurprisingly higher level of innate DNA DSBs and a weakened recovery from gamma-radiation-induced DNA damage. Interestingly, they are as myogenic in vitro and in vivo as satellite cells from young wild type mice, suggesting that the inefficiency in DNA DSB repair does not directly correlate with the ability to regenerate muscle after injury. Overall, our findings suggest that a DNA DSB-repair deficiency is unlikely to be a key factor in the decline in muscle regeneration observed upon aging.

  5. Exogenous skeletal muscle satellite cells promote the repair of levator palpebrae superioris mechanical damage in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lin; Yao, Yuanyuan; Guo, Hui; Peng, Yun

    2018-04-13

    Blepharoptosis is a drooping of the upper eyelid, usually due to dysfunction of the levator palpebrae superioris (LPS). Recently, skeletal muscle satellite cells (SSCs) have been reported to promote the repair of damaged skeletal muscle. This study aims to investigate the potential contribution of exogenous SSCs to the regeneration of mechanically damaged LPS. Thirty-two rats were randomly divided into four groups, including control group, SSCs-treated group, SSCs-treated injury group and non-treated injury group. After rats in injury groups were artificially lacerated on both the left and right LPS, HBBS (Hank's Balanced Salt Solution) containing SSCs was injected into upper eyelid tissue. After 7 days, the LPS muscle tissues were excised. In addition, skeletal muscle cells (SMCs) and SSCs were co-cultured for use as an in vitro model, and the protective effects of SSCs on cultured SMCs were also investigated. Histological staining revealed that exogenous SSCs repaired the damaged muscle fibers and attenuated the fibrosis of LPS, possibly due to the increased level of IGF-1. In contrast, the level of IL-1β, IL-6, TGF-β1 and Smad2/3(phospho-T8) were significantly reduced in the SSCs-treated group. The in vitro model using co-culture of skeletal muscle cells (SMCs) and SSCs also revealed an increased level of IGF-1 and reduced level of inflammatory factors, resulting in a better cell survival rate. This study found that exogenous SSCs can promote the repair of LPS mechanical damage and provides new insight into the development of novel therapeutic approaches for blepharoptosis.

  6. A Comparison of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage Following Maximal Eccentric Contractions in Men and Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deli, Chariklia K; Fatouros, Ioannis G; Paschalis, Vassilis; Georgakouli, Kalliopi; Zalavras, Athanasios; Avloniti, Alexandra; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z

    2017-08-01

    Research regarding exercise-induced muscle-damage mainly focuses on adults. The present study examined exercise-induced muscle-damage responses in adults compared with children. Eleven healthy boys (10-12 y) and 15 healthy men (18-45 y) performed 5 sets of 15 maximal eccentric contractions of the knee extensors. Range of motion (ROM), delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) during squat and walking, and peak isometric, concentric and eccentric torque were assessed before, post, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hr postexercise. Creatine kinase (CK) activity was assessed before and 72 hr postexercise. Eccentric exercise resulted in DOMS during squat that persisted for up to 96h in men, and 48 hr in boys (p < .05), and DOMS during walking that persisted for up to 72 hr in men, and 48 hr in boys (p < .01). The ROM was lower in both age groups 48 hr postexercise (p < .001). Isometric (p < .001), concentric (p < .01) and eccentric (p < .01) force decreased post, and up to 48 hr postexercise in men. Except for a reduction in isometric force immediately after exercise, no other changes occurred in boys' isokinetic force. CK activity increased in men at 72 hr postexercise compared with pre exercise levels (p = .05). Our data provide further confirmation that children are less susceptible to exercise-induced muscle damage compared with adults.

  7. Leukocytosis, muscle damage and increased lymphocyte proliferative response after an adventure sprint race

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    R. Tossige-Gomes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of an adventure sprint race (ASR on T-cell proliferation, leukocyte count and muscle damage was evaluated. Seven young male runners completed an ASR in the region of Serra do Espinhaço, Brazil. The race induced a strong leukocytosis (6.22±2.04×103 cells/mm3 before vs 14.81±3.53×103 cells/mm3 after the race, marked by a significant increase of neutrophils and monocytes (P<0.05, but not total lymphocytes, CD3+CD4+ or CD3+CD8+ cells. However, the T-cell proliferative response to mitogenic stimulation was increased (P=0.025 after the race, which contradicted our hypothesis that ASR, as a high-demand competition, would inhibit T-cell proliferation. A positive correlation (P=0.03, r=0.79 was observed between the proliferative response of lymphocytes after the race and the time to complete the race, suggesting that the proliferative response was dependent on exercise intensity. Muscle damage was evident after the race by increased serum levels of aspartate amino transferase (24.99±8.30 vs 50.61±15.76 U/L, P=0.003. The results suggest that humoral factors and substances released by damaged muscle may be responsible for lymphocyte activation, which may be involved in muscle recovery and repair.

  8. Effects of cryotherapy on muscle damage markers and perception of delayed onset muscle soreness after downhill running: A Pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    M. Rossato; E. de Souza Bezerra; D.A. de Ceselles Seixas da Silva; T. Avila Santana; W. Rafael Malezam; F.P. Carpes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of cryotherapy on markers of muscle damage, as well as the perception of muscle soreness caused by eccentric exercise after downhill running. Methods: Ten participants (age = 26 ± 5 year, height = 173 ± 8 cm and body mass = 70 ± 4 kg) performed two running trials on a treadmill tilted –6.6%, separated by one-week period. Cryotherapy (∼15 °C for 30 minutes) was conducted after one of the trials of exercise. Blood samples were analyzed for markers of mus...

  9. Infrared thermography as an effective tool to detect damaged muscle areas after running a marathon

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    Randall Gutiérrez-Vargas

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infrared thermography (IT is an imaging technique that detects heat radiation emitted by an object and collects it to convert it into temperature values. In sports, it is used to identify damage to musculoskeletal structures based on the variation of body temperature in affected anatomical areas. Objective: To assess the effectiveness of IT as a tool to detect damaged muscles after running a marathon. Materials and methods: 17 runners were assessed before and after running a marathon (42.196 km using thermographic equipment. Results: Statistically significant temperature differences were found before and after running a marathon. There was a difference between previous and posterior measurement >1°C in the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, rectus femoris and adductor of the dominant leg, which, based on clinical parameters, indicates damage in these muscles. Increases in temperature were heterogeneous among anatomical areas. Conclusions: IT is an effective tool for detecting damaged muscle areas in runners after participating in a marathon.

  10. Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK Gene Influences Exercise Induced Muscle Damage during a Competitive Marathon.

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    Juan Del Coso

    Full Text Available Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK phosphorylates the regulatory light chain (RLC of myosin producing increases in force development during skeletal muscle contraction. It has been suggested that MLCK gene polymorphisms might alter RLC phosphorylation thereby decreasing the ability to produce force and to resist strain during voluntary muscle contractions. Thus, the genetic variations in the MLCK gene might predispose some individuals to higher values of muscle damage during exercise, especially during endurance competitions. The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of MLCK genetic variants on exercise-induced muscle damage produced during a marathon. Sixty-seven experienced runners competed in a marathon race. The MLCK genotype (C37885A of these marathoners was determined. Before and after the race, a sample of venous blood was obtained to assess changes in serum myoglobin concentrations and leg muscle power changes were measured during a countermovement jump. Self-reported leg muscle pain and fatigue were determined by questionnaires. A total of 59 marathoners (88.1% were CC homozygotes and 8 marathoners (11.9% were CA heterozygotes. The two groups of participants completed the race with a similar time (228 ± 33 vs 234 ± 39 min; P = 0.30 and similar self-reported values for fatigue (15 ± 2 vs 16 ± 2 A.U.; P = 0.21 and lower-limb muscle pain (6.2 ± 1.7 vs 6.6 ± 1.8 cm; P = 0.29. However, CC marathoners presented higher serum myoglobin concentrations (739 ± 792 vs 348 ± 144 μg·mL-1; P = 0.03 and greater pre-to-post- race leg muscle power reduction (-32.7 ± 15.7 vs -21.2 ± 21.6%; P = 0.05 than CA marathoners. CA heterozygotes for MLCK C37885A might present higher exercise-induced muscle damage after a marathon competition than CC counterparts.

  11. MUSCLE STRENGTH AND DAMAGE FOLLOWING TWO MODES OF VARIABLE RESISTANCE TRAINING

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    Saied Jalal Aboodarda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nautilus Machine (NM and Elastic Resistance (ER have gained considerable popularity among athletes and recreational lifters seeking to increase muscle strength. However, there is controversy concerning the use of ER for increasing muscle hypertrophy and strength among healthy-trained individuals. The aim of the study was to compare the effect of repeated near maximal contractions by ER/NM on indicators of muscle damage including: maximal strength decrement (MVIC, rate of muscle soreness (DOMS, concentration of plasma creatine kinase (CK and increased high muscle signal on T2 weighted images using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Nine healthy male subjects completed two modalities of exercise (5 sets × 10RM ER/NM in a counterbalance cross-over study design with three weeks "wash-out" period between experiments. The MVIC was measured and DOMS rated and recorded for 4 consecutive days while blood samples were collected on day 1, 3, 5 and 7. Prior to and forty eight hours after completion of each mode of exercise, subjects underwent MRI scanning. The average of applied forces demonstrated significantly higher value for NM compared with ER (362 ± 34.2 N vs 266.73 ± 44.6 N respectively throughout the 5 sets of dynamic exercise (all p < 0.05. However, the indicators of muscle damage (T2 relaxation time, DOMS, MVIC and serum CK exhibited a very similar response across both modes of training. Plasma CK increased significantly following both modes of training with the peak value on Day 3 (p < 0.05. The time course of muscle soreness reached a significant level after both modes of exercise and showed a peak value on the 2nd day (p < 0.05. The T2 relaxation time demonstrated a statistically significant increase following ER and NM compared with the pre-test value (p < 0.05. The similarity of these responses following both the ER and NM exercise training session suggests that both modes of training provide a similar training stress; despite a considerably

  12. Single dose of intra-muscular platelet rich plasma reverses the increase in plasma iron levels in exercise-induced muscle damage: A pilot study

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    Zekine Punduk

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Acute exhaustive exercise increased muscle damage markers, including plasma iron, IBC, and ferritin levels, indicating muscle damage induced by exercise. PRP administration improves inflammation by reversing the increase in the iron levels post-exercise without displaying any myotoxicity and may have a role to play in the recovery of exercise-induced muscle damage.

  13. Polygenic Profile and Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage by a Competitive Half-Ironman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Coso, Juan; Salinero, Juan J; Lara, Beatriz; Gallo-Salazar, César; Areces, Francisco; Herrero, David; Puente, Carlos

    2017-11-14

    Del Coso, J, Salinero, JJ, Lara, B, Gallo-Salazar, C, Areces, F, Herrero, D, and Puente, C. Polygenic profile and exercise-induced muscle damage by a competitive half-ironman. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2017-To date, it is still unknown why some individuals develop higher levels of muscle damage than other individuals, despite participating in exercise with comparable levels of physical intensity. The aim of this investigation was to analyze 7 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are candidates to explain individual variations in the level of muscle damage attained during a half-ironman competition. Using the model of Williams and Folland (2, 1, and 0 points for optimal, intermediate, and suboptimal genotype), we determined the total genotype score from the accumulated combination of 7 SNPs (ACE = 287bp Ins/Del; ACTN3 = p.R577X; creatine kinase, muscle type = NcoI; insulin-like growth factor 2 = C13790G; interleukin-6 = 174G>C; myosin light chain kinase = C37885A; and tumor necrosis factor-α = 308G>A) in 22 experienced triathletes. Before and after the race, a sample of venous blood was obtained to measure serum markers of muscle damage. Two groups of triathletes were established according to their postcompetition serum CK concentration: low CK responders (n = 10; 377 ± 86 U·L) vs. high CK responders (n = 12; 709 ± 136 U·L). At the end of the race, low CK responders had lower serum myoglobin concentrations (384 ± 243 vs. 597 ± 293 ng·ml, p = 0.04). Although the groups were similar in age, anthropometric characteristics, and training habits, total genotype score was higher in low CK responders than in high CK responders (7.7 ± 1.1 vs. 5.5 ± 1.1 point, p < 0.01). A favorable polygenic profile can contribute to reducing the level of muscle damage developed during endurance exercise.

  14. Age-related functional changes and susceptibility to eccentric contraction-induced damage in skeletal muscle cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Jun Choi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Depending upon external loading conditions, skeletal muscles can either shorten, lengthen, or remain at a fixed length as they produce force. Fixed-end or isometric contractions stabilize joints and allow muscles to act as active struts during locomotion. Active muscles dissipate energy when they are lengthened by an external force that exceeds their current force producing capacity. These unaccustomed eccentric activities often lead to muscle weakness, soreness, and inflammation. During aging, the ability to produce force under these conditions is reduced and appears to be due to not only reductions in muscle mass but also to alterations in the basic mechanisms of contraction. These alterations include impairments in the excitation–contraction process, and the action of the cross-bridges. Also, it is well known that age-related skeletal muscle atrophy is characterized by a preferential atrophy of fast fibers, and increased susceptibility to fast muscle fiber when aged muscles are exposed to eccentric contraction followed by the impaired recovery process has been reported. Taken together, the selective loss of fast muscle fiber in aged muscle could be affected by eccentric-induced muscle damage, which has significant implication to identify the etiology of the age-related functional changes. Therefore, in this review the alteration of age-related muscle function and its impact to/of eccentric induced muscle damage and recovery will be addressed in detail.

  15. Age-related functional changes and susceptibility to eccentric contraction-induced damage in skeletal muscle cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung-Jun

    2016-09-01

    Depending upon external loading conditions, skeletal muscles can either shorten, lengthen, or remain at a fixed length as they produce force. Fixed-end or isometric contractions stabilize joints and allow muscles to act as active struts during locomotion. Active muscles dissipate energy when they are lengthened by an external force that exceeds their current force producing capacity. These unaccustomed eccentric activities often lead to muscle weakness, soreness, and inflammation. During aging, the ability to produce force under these conditions is reduced and appears to be due to not only reductions in muscle mass but also to alterations in the basic mechanisms of contraction. These alterations include impairments in the excitation-contraction process, and the action of the cross-bridges. Also, it is well known that age-related skeletal muscle atrophy is characterized by a preferential atrophy of fast fibers, and increased susceptibility to fast muscle fiber when aged muscles are exposed to eccentric contraction followed by the impaired recovery process has been reported. Taken together, the selective loss of fast muscle fiber in aged muscle could be affected by eccentric-induced muscle damage, which has significant implication to identify the etiology of the age-related functional changes. Therefore, in this review the alteration of age-related muscle function and its impact to/of eccentric induced muscle damage and recovery will be addressed in detail.

  16. Intermittent vibration protects aged muscle from mechanical and oxidative damage under prolonged compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sing Wan; Cheung, Brian Chun Ho; Pang, Bruce Tak Keung; Kwong, Ateline; Chung, Anna; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Mak, Arthur Fut Tak

    2017-04-11

    Deep tissue pressure ulcers, a serious clinical challenge originating in the muscle layer, are hardly detectable at the beginning. The challenge apparently occurs in aged subjects more frequently. As the ulcer propagates to the skin surface, it becomes very difficult to manage and can lead to fatal complications. Preventive measures are thus highly desirable. Although the complex pathological mechanisms have not been fully understood, prolonged and excessive physical challenges and oxidative stress are believed to be involved in the ulcer development. Previous reports have demonstrated that oxidative stress could compromise the mechanical properties of muscle cells, making them easier to be damaged when physical challenges are introduced. In this study, we used senescence accelerated (SAMP8) mice and its control breed (SAMR1) to examine the protective effects of intermittent vibration on aged and control muscle tissues during prolonged epidermal compression under 100mmHg for 6h. Results showed that an application of 35Hz, 0.25g intermittent vibration during compression decreased the compression-induced muscle breakdown in SAMP8 mice, as indicated histologically in terms of number of interstitial nuclei. The fact that no significant difference in muscle damage could be established in the corresponding groups in SAMR1 mice suggests that SAMR1 mice could better accommodate the compression insult than SAMP8 mice. Compression-induced oxidative damage was successfully curbed using intermittent vibration in SAMP8 mice, as indicated by 8-OHdG. A possible explanation is that the anti-oxidative defense could be maintained with intermittent vibration during compression. This was supported by the expression level of PGC-1-alpha, catalase, Gpx-1 and SOD1. Our data suggested intermittent vibration could serve as a preventive measure for deep tissue ulcer, particularly in aged subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Wheat Germ Oil Attenuates Gamma Radiation- Induced Skeletal Muscles Damage in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Said, U.Z.; Saada, H.N.; Shedid, Sh.M.; Mahdy, E.M.E.; Shousha, W.Gh.

    2008-01-01

    Muscular strength is important in sport as well as in daily activities. Exposure to ionizing radiation is thought to increase oxidative stress and damage muscle tissue. Wheat germ oil is a natural unrefined vegetable oil. It is an excellent source of vitamin E, octacosanol, linoleic and linolenic essential fatty acids, which may be beneficial in neutralizing the free oxygen radicals. The present study was designed to investigate the efficacy of wheat germ oil, on radiation-induced oxidative damage in rats skeletal muscle. Wheat germ oil was supplemented orally via gavages to rats at a dose of 54 mg/ kg body weight/day for 14 successive days pre- and 7 post-exposure to 5 Gy (one shot dose) of whole body gamma irradiation. Animals were sacrificed 7, 14 and 21 days post radiation exposure. The results revealed that whole body gamma-irradiation of rats induces oxidative stress in skeletal muscles obvious by significant elevation in the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) associated with significant decreases in the content of reduced glutathione (GSE1), as well as decreases in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities. Irradiated rats showed, also, significant decreases in creatine phosphokinase (CPK), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) activities. Furthermore, total iron, total copper and total calcium levels were significantly increased in skeletal muscles of irradiated rats group compared to control group. Wheat germ oil treated-irradiated rats showed significantly less sever damage and remarkable improvement in all the measured parameters, compared to irradiated rats. It could be concluded that wheat germ oil by attenuating radiation induced oxidative stress might play a role in maintaining skeletal muscle integrity

  18. Strenuous exercise induces mitochondrial damage in skeletal muscle of old mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sangho; Kim, Minjung; Lim, Wonchung; Kim, Taeyoung; Kang, Chounghun

    2015-01-01

    Strenuous exercise is known to cause excessive ROS generation and inflammation. However, the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of mitochondrial integrity in the senescent muscle during high-intensity exercise (HE) are not well studied. Here, we show that HE suppresses up-regulation of mitochondrial function despite increase in mitochondrial copy number, following excessive ROS production, proinflammatory cytokines and NFκB activation. Moreover, HE in the old group resulted in the decreasing of both fusion (Mfn2) and fission (Drp1) proteins that may contribute to alteration of mitochondrial morphology. This study suggests that strenuous exercise does not reverse age-related mitochondrial damage and dysfunction by the increased ROS and inflammation. - Highlights: • Effect of exercise on mitochondrial function of aged skeletal muscles was studied. • Strenuous exercise triggered excessive ROS production and inflammatory cytokines. • Strenuous exercise suppressed mitochondrial function in senescent muscle

  19. Strenuous exercise induces mitochondrial damage in skeletal muscle of old mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sangho; Kim, Minjung [Department of Physical Education, Hankuk Univrsity of Foreign Studies, Seoul 130-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Wonchung [Department of Sports Medicine, College of Health Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju 363-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Taeyoung [Department of Physical Education, Hankuk Univrsity of Foreign Studies, Seoul 130-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chounghun, E-mail: kangx119@umn.edu [Department of Physical Education, Hankuk Univrsity of Foreign Studies, Seoul 130-791 (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene and Exercise Science, School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota at Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2015-05-29

    Strenuous exercise is known to cause excessive ROS generation and inflammation. However, the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of mitochondrial integrity in the senescent muscle during high-intensity exercise (HE) are not well studied. Here, we show that HE suppresses up-regulation of mitochondrial function despite increase in mitochondrial copy number, following excessive ROS production, proinflammatory cytokines and NFκB activation. Moreover, HE in the old group resulted in the decreasing of both fusion (Mfn2) and fission (Drp1) proteins that may contribute to alteration of mitochondrial morphology. This study suggests that strenuous exercise does not reverse age-related mitochondrial damage and dysfunction by the increased ROS and inflammation. - Highlights: • Effect of exercise on mitochondrial function of aged skeletal muscles was studied. • Strenuous exercise triggered excessive ROS production and inflammatory cytokines. • Strenuous exercise suppressed mitochondrial function in senescent muscle.

  20. Effect of carbohydrate-protein supplement timing on acute exercise-induced muscle damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St John Noah

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To determine if timing of a supplement would have an effect on muscle damage, function and soreness. Methods Twenty-seven untrained men (21 ± 3 yrs were given a supplement before or after exercise. Subjects were randomly assigned to a pre exercise (n = 9, received carbohydrate/protein drink before exercise and placebo after, a post exercise (n = 9, received placebo before exercise and carbohydrate/protein drink after, or a control group (n = 9, received placebo before and after exercise. Subjects performed 50 eccentric quadriceps contractions on an isokinetic dynamometer. Tests for creatine kinase (CK, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC and muscle soreness were recorded before exercise and at six, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h post exercise. Repeated measures ANOVA were used to analyze data. Results There were no group by time interactions however, CK significantly increased for all groups when compared to pre exercise (101 ± 43 U/L reaching a peak at 48 h (661 ± 1178 U/L. MVC was significantly reduced at 24 h by 31.4 ± 14.0%. Muscle soreness was also significantly increased from pre exercise peaking at 48 h. Conclusion Eccentric exercise caused significant muscle damage, loss of strength, and soreness; however timing of ingestion of carbohydrate/protein supplement had no effect.

  1. The efficacy of protein supplementation during recovery from muscle-damaging concurrent exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddens, Lee; Browne, Sarah; Stevenson, Emma J; Sanderson, Brad; van Someren, Ken; Howatson, Glyn

    2017-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of protein supplementation on recovery following muscle-damaging exercise, which was induced with a concurrent exercise design. Twenty-four well-trained male cyclists were randomised to 3 independent groups receiving 20 g protein hydrolysate, iso-caloric carbohydrate, or low-calorific placebo supplementation, per serve. Supplement serves were provided twice daily, from the onset of the muscle-damaging exercise, for a total of 4 days and in addition to a controlled diet (6 g·kg -1 ·day -1 carbohydrate, 1.2 g·kg -1 ·day -1 protein, remainder from fat). Following the concurrent exercise session at time-point 0 h, comprising a simulated high-intensity road cycling trial and 100 drop-jumps, recovery of outcome measures was assessed at 24, 48, and 72 h. The concurrent exercise protocol was deemed to have caused exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), owing to time effects (p protein concentrations. No group or interaction effects (p > 0.05) were observed for any of the outcome measures. The present results indicate that protein supplementation does not attenuate any of the indirect indices of EIMD imposed by concurrent exercise, when employing great rigour around the provision of a quality habitual diet and the provision of appropriate supplemental controls.

  2. Effect of short term caffeine supplementation and intermittent exercise on muscle damage markers

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    M Machado

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effect of oral caffeine supplementation and strenuous intermittent exercise on muscle damage markers in soccer players. Materials and Methods: 15 male professional soccer players completed a placebo controlled double blind test protocol. At 45 min before exercise, participants ingested 5.5 mg•kg-1 body mass of caffeine (CAF, n=8 or cellulose (CEL, n=7. The exercise was 2 trials of 6 sets of 10 sprints (20 m each with 10 s recovery time between sprints, 2 min between sets and 15 min between trials. Blood samples were collected before (PRE, 24, 48 and 72 h after exercise. Serum activity of creatine kinase (CK, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, aspartate aminotransaminase (AST, and alanine aminotrasaminase (ALT were quantified. Results: Serum enzyme activity was enhanced by exercise in both groups, without a synergistic effect of caffeine. Conclusion: Our results suggest muscle damage markers increases after physical activities, but caffeine supplementation (5.5 mg•kg-1 body mass has no influence upon serum enzymes reflective of muscle integrity and damage.

  3. Curcumin and Piperine Supplementation and Recovery Following Exercise Induced Muscle Damage: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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    Barthélémy Delecroix, Abd Elbasset Abaïdia, Cédric Leduc, Brian Dawson, Grégory Dupont

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of oral consumption of curcumin and piperine in combination on the recovery kinetics after exercise-induced muscle damage. Forty-eight hours before and following exercise-induced muscle damage, ten elite rugby players consumed curcumin and piperine (experimental condition or placebo. A randomized cross-over design was performed. Concentric and isometric peak torque for the knee extensors, one leg 6 seconds sprint performance on a non-motorized treadmill, counter movement jump performance, blood creatine kinase concentration and muscle soreness were assessed immediately after exercise, then at 24h, 48h and 72h post-exercise. There were moderate to large effects of the exercise on the concentric peak torque for the knee extensors (Effect size (ES = -1.12; Confidence interval at 90% (CI90%: -2.17 to -0.06, the one leg 6 seconds sprint performance (ES=-1.65; CI90% = -2.51to -0.80 and the counter movement jump performance (ES = -0.56; CI90% = -0.81 to -0.32 in the 48h following the exercise. There was also a large effect of the exercise on the creatine kinase level 72h after the exercise in the control group (ES = 3.61; CI90%: 0.24 to 6.98. This decrease in muscle function and this elevation in creatine kinase indicate that the exercise implemented was efficient to induce muscle damage. Twenty four hours post-exercise, the reduction (from baseline in sprint mean power output was moderately lower in the experimental condition (-1.77 ± 7.25%; 1277 ± 153W in comparison with the placebo condition (-13.6 ± 13.0%; 1130 ± 241W (Effect Size = -1.12; Confidence Interval 90%=-1.86 to -0.86. However, no other effect was found between the two conditions. Curcumin and piperine supplementation before and after exercise can attenuate some, but not all, aspects of muscle damage.

  4. Pulsed ultrasound therapy accelerates the recovery of skeletal muscle damage induced by Bothrops jararacussu venom

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    J. Saturnino-Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effect of pulsed ultrasound therapy (UST and antibothropic polyvalent antivenom (PAV on the regeneration of mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle following damage by Bothrops jararacussu venom. Animals (Swiss male and female mice weighing 25.0 ± 5.0 g; 5 animals per group received a perimuscular injection of venom (1 mg/kg and treatment with UST was started 1 h later (1 min/day, 3 MHz, 0.3 W/cm², pulsed mode. Three and 28 days after injection, muscles were dissected and processed for light microscopy. The venom caused complete degeneration of muscle fibers. UST alone and combined with PAV (1.0 mL/kg partially protected these fibers, whereas muscles receiving no treatment showed disorganized fascicules and fibers with reduced diameter. Treatment with UST and PAV decreased the effects of the venom on creatine kinase content and motor activity (approximately 75 and 48%, respectively. Sonication of the venom solution immediately before application decreased the in vivo and ex vivo myotoxic activities (approximately 60 and 50%, respectively. The present data show that UST counteracts some effects of B. jararacussu venom, causing structural and functional improvement of the regenerated muscle after venom injury.

  5. Use of Cold-Water Immersion to Reduce Muscle Damage and Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness and Preserve Muscle Power in Jiu-Jitsu Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Líllian Beatriz; Brito, Ciro J; Silva, Roberto Jerônimo S; Silva-Grigoletto, Marzo Edir; da Silva, Walderi Monteiro; Franchini, Emerson

    2016-07-01

    Cold-water immersion (CWI) has been applied widely as a recovery method, but little evidence is available to support its effectiveness. To investigate the effects of CWI on muscle damage, perceived muscle soreness, and muscle power recovery of the upper and lower limbs after jiu-jitsu training. Crossover study. Laboratory and field. A total of 8 highly trained male athletes (age = 24.0 ± 3.6 years, mass = 78.4 ± 2.4 kg, percentage of body fat = 13.1% ± 3.6%) completed all study phases. We randomly selected half of the sample for recovery using CWI (6.0°C ± 0.5°C) for 19 minutes; the other participants were allocated to the control condition (passive recovery). Treatments were reversed in the second session (after 1 week). We measured serum levels of creatine phosphokinase, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase enzymes; perceived muscle soreness; and recovery through visual analogue scales and muscle power of the upper and lower limbs at pretraining, postrecovery, 24 hours, and 48 hours. Athletes who underwent CWI showed better posttraining recovery measures because circulating LDH levels were lower at 24 hours postrecovery in the CWI condition (441.9 ± 81.4 IU/L) than in the control condition (493.6 ± 97.4 IU/L; P = .03). Estimated muscle power was higher in the CWI than in the control condition for both upper limbs (757.9 ± 125.1 W versus 695.9 ± 56.1 W) and lower limbs (53.7 ± 3.7 cm versus 35.5 ± 8.2 cm; both P values = .001). In addition, we observed less perceived muscle soreness (1.5 ± 1.1 arbitrary units [au] versus 3.1 ± 1.0 au; P = .004) and higher perceived recovery (8.8 ± 1.9 au versus 6.9 ± 1.7 au; P = .005) in the CWI than in the control condition at 24 hours postrecovery. Use of CWI can be beneficial to jiu-jitsu athletes because it reduces circulating LDH levels, results in less perceived muscle soreness, and helps muscle power recovery at 24 hours postrecovery.

  6. Cyclic stretch-induced stress fiber dynamics - Dependence on strain rate, Rho-kinase and MLCK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chin-Fu; Haase, Candice; Deguchi, Shinji; Kaunas, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Cyclic stretch induces stress fiber disassembly, reassembly and fusion perpendicular to the direction of stretch. → Stress fiber disassembly and reorientation were not induced at low stretch frequency. → Stretch caused actin fiber formation parallel to stretch in distinct locations in cells treated with Rho-kinase and MLCK inhibitors. -- Abstract: Stress fiber realignment is an important adaptive response to cyclic stretch for nonmuscle cells, but the mechanism by which such reorganization occurs is not known. By analyzing stress fiber dynamics using live cell microscopy, we revealed that stress fiber reorientation perpendicular to the direction of cyclic uniaxial stretching at 1 Hz did not involve disassembly of the stress fiber distal ends located at focal adhesion sites. Instead, these distal ends were often used to assemble new stress fibers oriented progressively further away from the direction of stretch. Stress fiber disassembly and reorientation were not induced when the frequency of stretch was decreased to 0.01 Hz, however. Treatment with the Rho-kinase inhibitor (Y27632) reduced stress fibers to thin fibers located in the cell periphery which bundled together to form thick fibers oriented parallel to the direction of stretching at 1 Hz. In contrast, these thin fibers remained diffuse in cells subjected to stretch at 0.01 Hz. Cyclic stretch at 1 Hz also induced actin fiber formation parallel to the direction of stretch in cells treated with the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7, but these fibers were located centrally rather than peripherally. These results shed new light on the mechanism by which stress fibers reorient in response to cyclic stretch in different regions of the actin cytoskeleton.

  7. Enhanced tolerance to stretch-induced performance degradation of stretchable MnO2-based supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Huang, Yang; Meng, Wenjun; Zhu, Minshen; Xue, Hongtao; Lee, Chun-Sing; Zhi, Chunyi

    2015-02-04

    The performance of many stretchable electronics, such as energy storage devices and strain sensors, is highly limited by the structural breakdown arising from the stretch imposed. In this article, we focus on a detailed study on materials matching between functional materials and their conductive substrate, as well as enhancement of the tolerance to stretch-induced performance degradation of stretchable supercapacitors, which are essential for the design of a stretchable device. It is revealed that, being widely utilized as the electrode material of the stretchable supercapacitor, metal oxides such as MnO2 nanosheets have serious strain-induced performance degradation due to their rigid structure. In comparison, with conducting polymers like a polypyrrole (PPy) film as the electrochemically active material, the performance of stretchable supercapacitors can be well preserved under strain. Therefore, a smart design is to combine PPy with MnO2 nanosheets to achieve enhanced tolerance to strain-induced performance degradation of MnO2-based supercapacitors, which is realized by fabricating an electrode of PPy-penetrated MnO2 nanosheets. The composite electrodes exhibit a remarkable enhanced tolerance to strain-induced performance degradation with well-preserved performance over 93% under strain. The detailed morphology and electrochemical impedance variations are investigated for the mechanism analyses. Our work presents a systematic investigation on the selection and matching of electrode materials for stretchable supercapacitors to achieve high performance and great tolerance to strain, which may guide the selection of functional materials and their substrate materials for the next-generation of stretchable electronics.

  8. Type of Ground Surface during Plyometric Training Affects the Severity of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage

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    Hamid Arazi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the changes in the symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage from a bout of plyometric exercise (PE; 10 × 10 vertical jumps performed in aquatic, sand and firm conditions. Twenty-four healthy college-aged men were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Aquatic (AG, n = 8, Sand (SG, n = 8 and Firm (FG, n = 8. The AG performed PE in an aquatic setting with a depth of ~130 cm. The SG performed PE on a dry sand surface at a depth of 20 cm, and the FG performed PE on a 10-cm-thick wooden surface. Plasma creatine kinase (CK activity, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS, knee range of motion (KROM, maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MIVC of the knee extensors, vertical jump (VJ and 10-m sprint were measured before and 24, 48 and 72 h after the PE. Compared to baseline values, FG showed significantly (p < 0.05 greater changes in CK, DOMS, and VJ at 24 until 48 h. The MIVC decreased significantly for the SG and FG at 24 until 48 h post-exercise in comparison to the pre-exercise values. There were no significant (p > 0.05 time or group by time interactions in KROM. In the 10-m sprint, all the treatment groups showed significant (p < 0.05 changes compared to pre-exercise values at 24 h, and there were no significant (p > 0.05 differences between groups. The results indicate that PE in an aquatic setting and on a sand surface induces less muscle damage than on a firm surface. Therefore, training in aquatic conditions and on sand may be beneficial for the improvement of performance, with a concurrently lower risk of muscle damage and soreness.

  9. A high-caloric diet rich in soy oil alleviates oxidative damage of skeletal muscles induced by dexamethasone in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Hongchao; Zhou, Kaifeng; Zhao, Jingpeng; Wang, Xiaojuan; Lin, Hai

    2018-12-01

    Objective Glucocorticoids (GCs) can induce oxidative damage in skeletal muscles. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate a high caloric (HC) diet rich in soy oil would change the oxidative stress induced by a GC. Methods The effect of dexamethasone (DEX) and HC diet on oxidative stress in plasma, skeletal muscles (M. pectoralis major, PM; M. biceps femoris, BF), and mitochondria were determined. The biomarkers of oxidative damage and antioxidative enzyme activity were determined. The fatty acid profile of muscles and the activities of complex I and II in mitochondria were measured. Results The results showed that DEX increased the concentrations of oxidative damage markers in plasma, muscles, and mitochondria. The activity of complex I was significantly suppressed by DEX. DEX-chickens had higher proportions of polyunsaturated fatty acids and lower proportions of monounsaturated fatty acids in the PM. A HC diet decreased the levels of oxidative damage biomarkers in plasma, muscles, and mitochondria. The interaction between DEX and diet suppressed the activities of complex I and II in HC-chickens. Discussion Oxidative damage in skeletal muscles and mitochondria was the result of GC-induced suppression of the activity of mitochondrial complex I. A HC diet improved the antioxidative capacity and reduced the oxidative damage induced by the GC.

  10. Effects Of Whole Body Vibration On Vertical Jump Performance Following Exercise Induced Muscle Damage

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    Nicole C. Dabbs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing vertical jump performance is critical for many sports. Following high intensity training, individuals often experience exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD. Many recovery modalities have been tested with conflicting results. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of whole-body vibration (WBV on vertical jump performance following EIMD. 27 females volunteered for 7 sessions and were randomly assigned to a treatment or control group and administered each testing day. Vertical jump performance was assessed via vertical jump height (VJH, peak power output (PPO, rate of force development (RFD, relative ground reaction force (GRFz, and peak activation ratio of the vastus medialis (VM via electromyography (EMG before and after 3 days of EIMD via split squats. Two testing sets were collected each day, consisting of pre measures followed by WBV or control, and then post second measures. A 2x8 (group x time mixed factor analysis of variance (ANOVA was conducted for each variable. No significant interactions or group differences were found in any variable. Significant main effects for time were found in any variable, indicating performance declined following muscle damage. These results indicate that WBV does not aid in muscle recovery or vertical jump performance following EIMD.

  11. THE EFFECTS OF MULTIPLE COLD WATER IMMERSIONS ON INDICES OF MUSCLE DAMAGE

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    Glyn Howatson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation was to elucidate the efficacy of repeated cold water immersions (CWI in the recovery of exercise induced muscle damage. A randomised group consisting of eighteen males, mean ± s age, height and body mass were 24 ± 5 years, 1.82 ± 0.06 m and 85.7 ± 16.6 kg respectively, completed a bout of 100 drop jumps. Following the bout of damaging exercise, participants were randomly but equally assigned to either a 12 min CWI (15 ± 1 °C; n = 9 group who experienced immersions immediately post-exercise and every 24 h thereafter for the following 3 days, or a control group (no treatment; n = 9. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC of the knee extensors, creatine kinase activity (CK, muscle soreness (DOMS, range of motion (ROM and limb girth were measured pre-exercise and then for the following 96 h at 24 h increments. In addition MVC was also recorded immediately post-exercise. Significant time effects were seen for MVC, CK, DOMS and limb girth (p 0.05. These results suggest that repeated CWI do not enhance recovery from a bout of damaging eccentric contractions

  12. Acute Oxidative Effect and Muscle Damage after a Maximum 4 Min Test in High Performance Athletes.

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    Heros Ribeiro Ferreira

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to determine lipid peroxidation markers, physiological stress and muscle damage in elite kayakers in response to a maximum 4-min kayak ergometer test (KE test, and possible correlations with individual 1000m kayaking performances. The sample consisted of twenty-three adult male and nine adult female elite kayakers, with more than three years' experience in international events, who voluntarily took part in this study. The subjects performed a 10-min warm-up, followed by a 2-min passive interval, before starting the test itself, which consisted of a maximum 4-min work paddling on an ergometer; right after the end of the test, an 8 ml blood sample was collected for analysis. 72 hours after the test, all athletes took part in an official race, when then it was possible to check their performance in the on site K1 1000m test (P1000m. The results showed that all lipoproteins and hematological parameters tested presented a significant difference (p≤0.05 after exercise for both genders. In addition, parameters related to muscle damage such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and creatine kinase (CK presented significant differences after stress. Uric acid presented an inverse correlation with the performance (r = -0.76, while CK presented a positive correlation (r = 0.46 with it. Based on these results, it was possible to verify muscle damage and the level of oxidative stress caused by indoor training with specific ergometers for speed kayaking, highlighting the importance of analyzing and getting to know the physiological responses to this type of training, in order to provide information to coaches and optimize athletic performance.

  13. Anabolic-androgenic steroid does not enhance compensatory muscle hypertrophy but significantly diminish muscle damages in the rat surgical ablation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Okada, Yoshinori; Tono, Kayoko; Nitta, Masahiro; Hoshi, Akio; Akatsuka, Akira

    2009-07-01

    Cellular responses in the compensatory hypertrophied (plantaris) muscle induced by surgical ablation of synergistic muscles (soleus and gastrocnemius) were determined during 10-week anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) treatment. Adult Wistar male rats were divided randomly into the Control and Steroid groups, and contralateral surgery was performed. Nandrolone decanoate was administered to the Steroid group. [3H]thymidine and [14C]leucine labeling were used to determine the serial changes in cellular mitotic activity and amino acid uptake. Myogenic cells and cellular responses in blood vessels and nerve fibers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Significantly lower cellular mitotic activity associated with lower volume of muscle fiber necrosis was observed in the Steroid group during the first week. However, amino acid uptake and final muscle wet weight gain did not differ between the groups. Marked activation/proliferation of muscular, vascular, and peripheral nerve-related cells was seen with the inflammatory responses in both groups. However, this activation was dependent on the volume of muscle fiber damage and was not preferentially accelerated by AAS loading. These results indicated that AAS loading significantly diminished muscle fiber damages, but they did not accelerate final muscle wet weight gain and activation of myogenic, vascular, and peripheral nerve related cells in the compensatory enlarged muscles.

  14. Preconditioning of skeletal muscle against contraction-induced damage: the role of adaptations to oxidants in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, F; Spiers, S; Aldemir, H; Vasilaki, A; Beaver, A; Iwanejko, L; McArdle, A; Jackson, M J

    2004-11-15

    Adaptations of skeletal muscle following exercise are accompanied by changes in gene expression, which can result in protection against subsequent potentially damaging exercise. One cellular signal activating these adaptations may be an increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a short period of non-damaging contractions on the subsequent susceptibility of muscle to contraction-induced damage and to examine the changes in gene expression that occur following the initial contraction protocol. Comparisons with changes in gene expression in cultured myotubes following treatment with a non-damaging concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) were used to identify redox-sensitive genes whose expression may be modified by the increased ROS production during contractions. Hindlimb muscles of mice were subjected to a preconditioning, non-damaging isometric contraction protocol in vivo. After 4 or 12 h, extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles were removed and subjected to a (normally) damaging contraction protocol in vitro. Muscles were also analysed for changes in gene expression induced by the preconditioning protocol using cDNA expression techniques. In a parallel study, C(2)C(12) myotubes were treated with a non-damaging concentration (100 microM) of H(2)O(2) and, at 4 and 12 h following treatment, myotubes were treated with a damaging concentration of H(2)O(2) (2 mM). Myotubes were analysed for changes in gene expression at 4 h following treatment with 100 microM H(2)O(2) alone. Data demonstrate that a prior period of non-damaging contractile activity resulted in significant protection of EDL and soleus muscles against a normally damaging contraction protocol 4 h later. This protection was associated with significant changes in gene expression. Prior treatment of myotubes with a non-damaging concentration of H(2)O(2) also resulted in significant protection against a damaging

  15. Ballet dancers cardiorespiratory, oxidative and muscle damage responses to classes and rehearsals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Krause, Josianne; Krause, Mauricio; Cunha, Giovani Dos Santos; Perin, Diana; Martins, Jocelito B; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Schaun, Maximiliano I; De Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to describe and compare ballet dancers' cardiorespiratory responses, muscle damage and oxidative stress levels during a ballet class (practice of isolated ballet exercises performed with barre/hand-rail support and across-the-floor movements to improve technical skills) and rehearsal (practice of ballet choreography involving technical-artistic skills to improve dancers' performance for shows). The 12 advanced female ballet dancers undertook three exercise sessions: maximum effort test, class and rehearsal. Heart rate (HR) and oxygen consumption (VO2) were continuously measured. Lactate was determined before 15 min and after class and rehearsal. Blood was sampled pre, post and 48 h after class and rehearsal for creatine kinase (CK), lipid peroxides (LPO) and glutathione analysis (GSSG/GSH). Class was of lower intensity than rehearsal as shown by VO2, HR and lactate values: VO2 (mL.kg(-1).min(-1)): 14.5±2.1 vs. 19.1±1.7 (p Ballet dancers' muscle damage and oxidative stress responses seem not to be dependent on exercise intensity based on VO2 responses.

  16. Is Branched-Chain Amino Acids Supplementation an Efficient Nutritional Strategy to Alleviate Skeletal Muscle Damage? A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fouré

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Amino acids and more precisely, branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs, are usually consumed as nutritional supplements by many athletes and people involved in regular and moderate physical activities regardless of their practice level. BCAAs have been initially shown to increase muscle mass and have also been implicated in the limitation of structural and metabolic alterations associated with exercise damage. This systematic review provides a comprehensive analysis of the literature regarding the beneficial effects of BCAAs supplementation within the context of exercise-induced muscle damage or muscle injury. The potential benefit of a BCAAs supplementation was also analyzed according to the supplementation strategy—amount of BCAAs, frequency and duration of the supplementation—and the extent of muscle damage. The review protocol was registered prospectively with Prospective Register for Systematic Reviews (registration number CRD42017073006 and followed Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Literature search was performed from the date of commencement until August 2017 using four online databases (Medline, Cochrane library, Web of science and ScienceDirect. Original research articles: (i written in English; (ii describing experiments performed in Humans who received at least one oral BCAAs supplementation composed of leucine, isoleucine and valine mixture only as a nutritional strategy and (iii reporting a follow-up of at least one day after exercise-induced muscle damage, were included in the systematic review analysis. Quality assessment was undertaken independently using the Quality Criteria Checklist for Primary Research. Changes in indirect markers of muscle damage were considered as primary outcome measures. Secondary outcome measures were the extent of change in indirect markers of muscle damage. In total, 11 studies were included in the analysis. A high heterogeneity was found regarding the

  17. Neuromuscular responses to mild-muscle damaging eccentric exercise in a low glycogen state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, James P; Myers, Stephen D; Willems, Mark E T

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of low muscle glycogen on the neuromuscular responses to maximal eccentric contractions. Fourteen healthy men (22 ± 3 years) performed single-leg cycling (20 min at ~75% maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2 max); eight 90 s sprints at a 1:1 work-to-rest ratio (5% decrements from 90% to 55% V̇O2 max until exhaustion) the evening before 100 eccentric (1.57 rads(-1)) with reduced (RED) and normal glycogen (NORM). Neuromuscular responses were measured during and up to 48 h after with maximal voluntary and involuntary (twitch, 20 Hz and 50 Hz) isometric contractions. During eccentric contractions, peak torque decreased (RED: -16.1 ± 2.5%; NORM: -6.2 ± 5.1%) and EMG frequency increased according to muscle length. EMG activity decreased for RED only. After eccentric contractions, maximal isometric force was reduced up to 24h for NORM (-13.5 ± 5.8%) and 48 h for RED (-7.4 ± 10.9%). Twelve hours after eccentric contractions, twitch force and the 20:50 Hz ratio were decreased for RED but not for NORM. Immediate involuntary with prolonged voluntary force loss suggests that reduced glycogen is associated with increased susceptibility to mild muscle-damaging eccentric exercise with contributions of peripheral and central mechanisms to be different during recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Strenuous exercise aggravates MDMA-induced skeletal muscle damage in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, Jose A.; Leao, Anabela; Magalhaes, Jose; Ascensao, Antonio; Bastos, Maria L.; Amado, Francisco L.; Vilarinho, Laura; Quelhas, Dulce; Appell, Hans J.; Carvalho, Felix

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of ecstasy (MDMA) administration on body temperature and soleus muscle histology in exercised and non-exercised mice. Charles-River mice were distributed into four groups: Control (C), exercise (EX), MDMA treated (M), and M + EX. The treated animals received an i.p. injection (10 mg/kg) of MDMA (saline for C and EX), and the exercise consisted of a 90 min level run at a velocity of 900 m/h, immediately after the MDMA or saline administration. Body temperature was recorded every 30 min via subcutaneous implanted transponder. Animals were sacrificed 1.5, 25.5, and 49.5 h after i.p. injection and the soleus muscles were removed and processed for light and electron microscopy. The MDMA-treated animals showed a significant increase in body temperature (similar in M and M + EX groups), reaching the peak 90 min after i.p. administration; their temperature remained higher than control for more than 5 h. The EX group evidenced a similar and parallel, yet lower temperature increase during exercise and recovery. Morphological signs of damage were rarely encountered in the EX group; they were more pronounced in M group and even aggravated in M + EX group. In conclusion, MDMA and exercise per se increased body temperature but in conjunction did not have a cumulated effect. However, ecstasy and concomitant physical activity might severely accumulate with regard to skeletal muscle toxicity and may lead to rhabdomyolysis

  19. Estrogen supplementation failed to attenuate biochemical indices of neutrophil infiltration or damage in rat skeletal muscles following ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiidus, Peter M; Deller, Mirada; Bombardier, Eric; Gül, Mustafa; Liu, X Linda

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effects of estrogen supplementation on markers of neutrophil infiltration and damage in skeletal muscle of rats following ischemia. Male and female gonad-intact rats, with or without 14 days of estrogen supplementation were subjected to two hours of hind-limb ischemia and sacrificed at 24, 48 or 72 hours post-ischemia. Control animals were sacrificed without ischemia. Plantaris and red and white gastrocneimus muscles were removed and assayed for myeloperoxidase (MPO), a marker of neutrophil infiltration, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and beta-glucuronidase (betaGLU), as markers of muscle damage. Significant elevations of MPO, G6PD and betaGLU activities were observed at various time points post-ischemia. No systematic differences between genders were noted in any of the measures. Estrogen supplementation in both male and female animals failed to significantly attenuate post-ischemia increases in MPO, G6PD and betaGLU activities in any of the muscles studied and in some cases accentuated activities of some of these measures. Unlike previous findings following exercise in skeletal muscle, this study failed to demonstrate estrogen-induced attenuation of indices of neutrophil infiltration or damage in skeletal muscles of rats up to 72 hours following ischemia. This demonstrates that estrogen may not consistently attenuate neutrophil infiltration and that a number of variables including damage modality, tissue or estrogen level may influence this.

  20. Estrogen supplementation failed to attenuate biochemical indices of neutrophil infiltration or damage in rat skeletal muscles following ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PETER M TIIDUS

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of estrogen supplementation on markers of neutrophil infiltration and damage in skeletal muscle of rats following ischemia. Male and female gonad-intact rats, with or without 14 days of estrogen supplementation were subjected to two hours of hind-limb ischemia and sacrificed at 24, 48 or 72 hours post-ischemia. Control animals were sacrificed without ischemia. Plantaris and red and white gastrocneimus muscles were removed and assayed for myeloperoxidase (MPO, a marker of neutrophil infiltration, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD and ß-glucuronidase (GLU, as markers of muscle damage. Significant elevations of MPO, G6PD and GLU activities were observed at various time points post-ischemia. No systematic differences between genders were noted in any of the measures. Estrogen supplementation in both male and female animals failed to significantly attenuate post-ischemia increases in MPO, G6PD and GLU activities in any of the muscles studied and in some cases accentuated activities of some of these measures. Unlike previous findings following exercise in skeletal muscle, this study failed to demonstrate estrogen-induced attenuation of indices of neutrophil infiltration or damage in skeletal muscles of rats up to 72 hours following ischemia. This demonstrates that estrogen may not consistently attenuate neutrophil infiltration and that a number of variables including damage modality, tissue or estrogen level may influence this.

  1. Effects of light emitting diode (LED) therapy and cold water immersion therapy on exercise-induced muscle damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Mariana Zingari; Siqueira, Cláudia Patrícia Cardoso Martins; Preti, Maria Carla Perozim; Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo; de Lima, Franciele Mendes; Dias, Ivan Frederico Lupiano; Toginho Filho, Dari de Oliveira; Ramos, Solange de Paula

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effects of LED therapy at 940 nm or cold water immersion therapy (CWI) after an acute bout of exercise on markers of muscle damage and inflammation. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were allocated into four groups: animals kept at rest (control), exercised animals (E), exercised + CWI (CWI), and exercised + LED therapy (LED). The animals swam for 100 min, after which blood samples were collected for lactate analysis. Animals in the E group were returned to their cages without treatment, the CWI group was placed in cold water (10°C) for 10 min and the LED group received LED irradiation on both gastrocnemius muscles (4 J/cm(2) each). After 24 h, the animals were killed and the soleus muscles were submitted to histological analysis. Blood samples were used for hematological and CK analyses. The results demonstrated that the LED group presented fewer areas of muscle damage and inflammatory cell infiltration and lower levels of CK activity than the E group. Fewer areas of damaged muscle fiber were observed in the LED group than in CWI. CWI and LED did not reduce edema areas. Hematological analysis showed no significant effect of either treatment on leukocyte counts. The results suggest that LED therapy is more efficient than CWI in preventing muscle damage and local inflammation after exercise.

  2. [Benefits of Decumanum Phlebodium intake on the muscle damage in the response to intense physical exercise in sedentary subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Corzo, M C; Aguilar Cordero, M J; de Teresa Galván, C; Segura Millán, D; Miranda Leon, M T; Castillo Rueda, G; Guisado Barrilao, R

    2014-06-01

    Intense physical exercise provoke muscle damage, that in sedentary people can increase cardiovascular risk. Phlebodium decumanum (PD) has shown to have immunomodulator effects in models of moderate intense physical activities in well conditioned groups. To evaluate the PD effects during eccentric exercise, as a model of muscle inflammation protocol, on a sedentary population with cardiovascular risk. This is an experimental, double-blind, multigroup randomized study. Experimental Group 1 (n = 17)received PD, 9 doses of 400 mg (total amount 3.6 g) every 8 hours during 3 days, and Control Group 2 (n = 16)received a placebo. All the subjects performed two treadmill ergoespirometry tests: first, a modified Bruce protocol to discard ischemic responses during exercise and to evaluate VO2max before the experimental phase;and second, with an eccentric protocol (14% descending ramp test) during 10 minutes in stable state at 70-80%VO2max, as experimental inflammatory protocol.We compared intra and inter groups to evaluate differences in the pre and post-test differences results on blood muscle damage variables. The study shown statistically significant differences in all pre-post intra-groups results in muscle damage variables (CK, LDH and Myoglobin, but not in Cardiac Troponin), and in functional lower-limb test (SJand CMJ). The comparison of inter-group results shown less muscle damage and less functional lower-limb deterioration in Group 1 compared with Control group, with statistical significance in both cases. Differences in handgrip dynamometry were no statistically significant. The eccentric exercise protocol in that study has proven to be a good model to induce muscle and functional damage in sedentary people. Short PD treatment has shown to reduce muscle and functional acute damages compared with placebo control group in this specific population. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  3. Resistance training-induced changes in integrated myofibrillar protein synthesis are related to hypertrophy only after attenuation of muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damas, Felipe; Phillips, Stuart M; Libardi, Cleiton A; Vechin, Felipe C; Lixandrão, Manoel E; Jannig, Paulo R; Costa, Luiz A R; Bacurau, Aline V; Snijders, Tim; Parise, Gianni; Tricoli, Valmor; Roschel, Hamilton; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos

    2016-09-15

    Skeletal muscle hypertrophy is one of the main outcomes from resistance training (RT), but how it is modulated throughout training is still unknown. We show that changes in myofibrillar protein synthesis (MyoPS) after an initial resistance exercise (RE) bout in the first week of RT (T1) were greater than those seen post-RE at the third (T2) and tenth week (T3) of RT, with values being similar at T2 and T3. Muscle damage (Z-band streaming) was the highest during post-RE recovery at T1, lower at T2 and minimal at T3. When muscle damage was the highest, so was the integrated MyoPS (at T1), but neither were related to hypertrophy; however, integrated MyoPS at T2 and T3 were correlated with hypertrophy. We conclude that muscle hypertrophy is the result of accumulated intermittent increases in MyoPS mainly after a progressive attenuation of muscle damage. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy is one of the main outcomes of resistance training (RT), but how hypertrophy is modulated and the mechanisms regulating it are still unknown. To investigate how muscle hypertrophy is modulated through RT, we measured day-to-day integrated myofibrillar protein synthesis (MyoPS) using deuterium oxide and assessed muscle damage at the beginning (T1), at 3 weeks (T2) and at 10 weeks of RT (T3). Ten young men (27 (1) years, mean (SEM)) had muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) taken to measure integrated MyoPS and muscle damage (Z-band streaming and indirect parameters) before, and 24 h and 48 h post resistance exercise (post-RE) at T1, T2 and T3. Fibre cross-sectional area (fCSA) was evaluated using biopsies at T1, T2 and T3. Increases in fCSA were observed only at T3 (P = 0.017). Changes in MyoPS post-RE at T1, T2 and T3 were greater at T1 (P Muscle damage was the highest during post-RE recovery at T1, attenuated at T2 and further attenuated at T3. The change in MyoPS post-RE at both T2 and T3, but not at T1, was strongly correlated (r ≈ 0.9, P muscle hypertrophy. Initial Myo

  4. Pomegranate Supplementation Accelerates Recovery of Muscle Damage and Soreness and Inflammatory Markers after a Weightlifting Training Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Achraf; Turki, Mouna; Chtourou, Hamdi; Hammouda, Omar; Trabelsi, Khaled; Kallel, Choumous; Abdelkarim, Osama; Hoekelmann, Anita; Bouaziz, Mohamed; Ayadi, Fatma; Driss, Tarak; Souissi, Nizar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of natural Pomegranate juice supplementation on performance and acute and delayed responses of muscle soreness and biomarkers of muscle damage after a weightlifting training session. Nine elite weightlifters (21±0.5 years) performed two Olympic-Weightlifting-sessions after either placebo (PLA) or natural pomegranate juice (POMj) supplementations. Heart rate, blood pressure and blood samples (hematological parameters, muscle damage and C-reactive protein (CRP)) were collected at rest, 3min and 48h after each session. Weightlifting performance, RPE, and DOMS were also assessed after each training session. T-test showed higher performance (+8.30%) and lower RPE values (-4.37%) using POMj supplementation (p0.05). Additionally, during the 48h following the training session, POMj improved the recovery kinetic of SBP (pweightlifters are advised to use natural POMj during intensive training program and competition to accelerate muscle recovery. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02697903.

  5. Fiber-type susceptibility to eccentric contraction-induced damage of hindlimb-unloaded rat AL muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, K.; Thompson, J. L.; Norenberg, K. M.; Fitts, R. H.; Riley, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    Slow oxidative (SO) fibers of the adductor longus (AL) were predominantly damaged during voluntary reloading of hindlimb unloaded (HU) rats and appeared explainable by preferential SO fiber recruitment. The present study assessed damage after eliminating the variable of voluntary recruitment by tetanically activating all fibers in situ through the motor nerve while applying eccentric (lengthening) or isometric contractions. Muscles were aldehyde fixed and resin embedded, and semithin sections were cut. Sarcomere lesions were quantified in toluidine blue-stained sections. Fibers were typed in serial sections immunostained with antifast myosin and antitotal myosin (which highlights slow fibers). Both isometric and eccentric paradigms caused fatigue. Lesions occurred only in eccentrically contracted control and HU muscles. Fatigue did not cause lesions. HU increased damage because lesioned- fiber percentages within fiber types and lesion sizes were greater than control. Fast oxidative glycolytic (FOG) fibers were predominantly damaged. In no case did damaged SO fibers predominate. Thus, when FOG, SO, and hybrid fibers are actively lengthened in chronically unloaded muscle, FOG fibers are intrinsically more susceptible to damage than SO fibers. Damaged hybrid-fiber proportions ranged between these extremes.

  6. Stretch induced endothelin-1 secretion by adult rat astrocytes involves calcium influx via stretch-activated ion channels (SACs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrow, Lyle W.; Suchyna, Thomas M.; Sachs, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Endothelin-1 expression by adult rat astrocytes correlates with cell proliferation. → Stretch-induced ET-1 is inhibited by GsMtx-4, a specific inhibitor of Ca 2+ permeant SACs. → The less specific SAC inhibitor streptomycin also inhibits ET-1 secretion. → Stretch-induced ET-1 production depends on a calcium influx. → SAC pharmacology may provide a new class of therapeutic agents for CNS pathology. -- Abstract: The expression of endothelins (ETs) and ET-receptors is often upregulated in brain pathology. ET-1, a potent vasoconstrictor, also inhibits the expression of astrocyte glutamate transporters and is mitogenic for astrocytes, glioma cells, neurons, and brain capillary endothelia. We have previously shown that mechanical stress stimulates ET-1 production by adult rat astrocytes. We now show in adult astrocytes that ET-1 production is driven by calcium influx through stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the ET-1 production correlates with cell proliferation. Mechanical stimulation using biaxial stretch ( 2+ threshold. This coupling of mechanical stress to the astrocyte endothelin system through SACs has treatment implications, since all pathology deforms the surrounding parenchyma.

  7. The Effects of Aquatic Plyometric Training on Repeated Jumps, Drop Jumps and Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado-Lavanant, A; Alvero-Cruz, J R; Pareja-Blanco, F; Melero-Romero, C; Rodríguez-Rosell, D; Fernandez-Garcia, J C

    2015-09-22

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of land- vs. aquatic based plyometric training programs on the drop jump, repeated jump performance and muscle damage. Sixty-five male students were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups: aquatic plyometric training group (APT), plyometric training group (PT) and control group (CG). Both experimental groups trained twice a week for 10 weeks performing the same number of sets and total jumps. The following variables were measured prior to, halfway through and after the training programs: creatine kinase (CK) concentration, maximal height during a drop jump from the height of 30 (DJ30) and 50 cm (DJ50), and mean height during a repeated vertical jump test (RJ). The training program resulted in a significant increase (Pplyometric training, PT produced greater gains on reactive jumps performance than APT. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Effects of concentric and repeated eccentric exercise on muscle damage and calpain-calpastatin gene expression in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, K.; Overgaard, K.; Nedergaard, A.

    2008-01-01

    , and was compared to a control-group (n = 6). Muscle strength and soreness and plasma creatine kinase and myoglobin were measured before and during 7 days following exercise bouts. Muscle biopsies were collected from m. vastus lateralis of both legs prior to and at 3, 24 h and 7 days after exercise and quantified...... for muscle Ca2+-content and mRNA levels for calpain isoforms and calpastatin. Exercise reduced muscle strength and increased muscle soreness predominantly in the eccentric leg (P

  9. Spirulina does not decrease muscle damage nor oxdidative stress in cycling athletes with adequate nutritional status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A.M. Franca

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the effect of Spirulina maxima on oxidative stress and muscle damage in cycling athletes subjected to high volume and intensity of training. Eighteen male athletes were randomly divided into an experimental group (n=11 with age 27.8±3.5 and placebo (n=7 with age 34.3±2.3 in a double-blind fashion. They carried out a protocol of Spirulina dietary supplementation (7.5 g/day of placebo for four weeks and maintained their trainings during this period. A nutritional anamnesis was performed and blood tests were done to determine pre and post levels of creatine kinase (CK, lactic dehydrogenase (LHD, superoxide dismutase (SOD and malondialdehyde (MDA. The supplemented and placebo groups performed the same volume training, has adequate macronutrients and antioxidant vitamins ingestion before study, as well as initial CK, LDH, SOD and MDA levels. Supplementation did not promote a significant alteration in CK levels on supplemented group (158.4±16.3 for 140.0±16.6 U/l, p>0.05, LDH (420±13.2 for 394.9±27.9 UI/l, p>0.05, MDA (2.8±0.2 for 2.9±0.4 nmol/ml, p>0.05, nor an increase in the SOD (7.3±0.6 for 7.0±0.6 U/mg Hb, p>0.05. We conclude that administration of Spirulina does not interfere in the magnitude of muscle damage nor in antioxidant status of cycling athletes that practice intense training.

  10. Effect of astaxanthin supplementation on muscle damage and oxidative stress markers in elite young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, B; Baralic, I; Kotur-Stevuljevic, J; Stefanovic, A; Ivanisevic, J; Radivojevic, N; Andjelkovic, M; Dikic, N

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the effect of Astaxanthin (Asx) supplementation on muscle enzymes as indirect markers of muscle damage, oxidative stress markers and antioxidant response in elite young soccer players. Thirty-two male elite soccer players were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to Asx and placebo (P) group. After the 90 days of supplementation, the athletes performed a 2 hour acute exercise bout. Blood samples were obtained before and after 90 days of supplementation and after the exercise at the end of observational period for analysis of thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), superoxide anion (O2•¯), total antioxidative status (TAS), sulphydril groups (SH), superoxide-dismutase (SOD), serum creatine kinase (CK) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). TBARS and AOPP levels did not change throughout the study. Regular training significantly increased O2•¯ levels (main training effect, PAsx and P groups experienced increase in total SH groups content (by 21% and 9%, respectively) and supplementation effect was marginally significant (P=0.08). Basal SOD activity significantly decreased both in P and in Asx group by the end of the study (main training effect, PAsx group compared to P group (PAsx could prevent exercise induced free radical production and depletion of non-enzymatic antioxidant defense in young soccer players.

  11. Detection and characterization of exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD) via thermography and image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdelidis, N. P.; Kappatos, V.; Georgoulas, G.; Karvelis, P.; Deli, C. K.; Theodorakeas, P.; Giakas, G.; Tsiokanos, A.; Koui, M.; Jamurtas, A. Z.

    2017-04-01

    Exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD), is usually experienced in i) humans who have been physically inactive for prolonged periods of time and then begin with sudden training trials and ii) athletes who train over their normal limits. EIMD is not so easy to be detected and quantified, by means of commonly measurement tools and methods. Thermography has been used successfully as a research detection tool in medicine for the last 6 decades but very limited work has been reported on EIMD area. The main purpose of this research is to assess and characterize EIMD, using thermography and image processing techniques. The first step towards that goal is to develop a reliable segmentation technique to isolate the region of interest (ROI). A semi-automatic image processing software was designed and regions of the left and right leg based on superpixels were segmented. The image is segmented into a number of regions and the user is able to intervene providing the regions which belong to each of the two legs. In order to validate the image processing software, an extensive experimental investigation was carried out, acquiring thermographic images of the rectus femoris muscle before, immediately post and 24, 48 and 72 hours after an acute bout of eccentric exercise (5 sets of 15 maximum repetitions), on males and females (20-30 year-old). Results indicate that the semi-automated approach provides an excellent bench-mark that can be used as a clinical reliable tool.

  12. Greater eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage by large versus small range of motion with the same end-point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fochi, AG; Damas, F; Berton, R; Alvarez, I; Miquelini, M; Salvini, TF

    2016-01-01

    Several factors can affect the magnitude of eccentric exercise (ECC)-induced muscle damage, but little is known regarding the effect of the range of motion (ROM) in ECC-induced muscle damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether elbow flexor ECC with 120° of ROM (from 60° of elbow flexion until elbow full extension - 180° [120ROM]) induces a greater magnitude of muscle damage compared with a protocol with 60° of ROM (120-180° of elbow flexion [60ROM]). Twelve healthy young men (age: 22 ± 3.1 years; height: 1.75 ± 0.05 m; body mass: 75.6 ± 13.6 kg) performed the ECC with 120ROM and 60ROM using different arms in a random order separated by 2 weeks and were tested before and 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after ECC for maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque (MVC-ISO), ROM and muscle soreness. The 120ROM protocol showed greater changes and effect sizes (ES) for MVC-ISO (-35%, ES: 1.97), ROM (-11.5°, ES: 1.27) and muscle soreness (19 mm, ES: 1.18) compared with the 60ROM protocol (-23%, ES: 0.93; -12%, ES: 0.56; 17°, ES: 0.63; 8 mm, ES: 1.07, respectively). In conclusion, ECC of the elbow flexors with 120° of ROM promotes a greater magnitude of muscle damage compared with a protocol with 60° of ROM, even when both protocols are performed at long muscle lengths. PMID:27601784

  13. Vibration Therapy Is No More Effective Than the Standard Practice of Massage and Stretching for Promoting Recovery From Muscle Damage After Eccentric Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Joel T; Thomson, Rebecca L; Howe, Peter R C; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if vibration therapy is more effective than the standard treatment of stretching and massage for improving recovery of muscle strength and reducing muscle soreness after muscle damage induced by eccentric exercise. A randomized, single-blinded parallel intervention trial design was used. Research laboratory. Fifty untrained men aged 18 to 30 years completed the study. Participants performed 100 maximal eccentric muscle actions (ECCmax) of the right knee extensor muscles. For the next 7 days, 25 participants applied cycloidal vibration therapy to the knee extensors twice daily and 25 participants performed stretching and sports massage (SSM) twice daily. Changes in markers of muscle damage [peak isometric torque (PIT), serum creatine kinase (CK), and serum myoglobin (Mb)], muscle soreness (visual analog scale), and inflammation [serum C-reactive protein (CRP)] were assessed. After ECCmax, there was no difference in recovery of PIT and muscle soreness or serum CK, Mb, and CRP levels between vibration and SSM groups (P > 0.28). Cycloidal vibration therapy is no more effective than the standard practice of stretching and massage to promote muscle recovery after the performance of muscle-damaging exercise. Prescription of vibration therapy after maximal exercise involving eccentric muscle damage did not alleviate signs and symptoms of muscle damage faster than the standard prescription of stretching and massage.

  14. Additional effects of taurine on the benefits of BCAA intake for the delayed-onset muscle soreness and muscle damage induced by high-intensity eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Song-Gyu; Miyazaki, Teruo; Ishikura, Keisuke; Nagayama, Hisashi; Suzuki, Takafumi; Maeda, Seiji; Ito, Masaharu; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Ohmori, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    Taurine (TAU) has a lot of the biological, physiological, and pharmocological functions including anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative stress. Although previous studies have appreciated the effectiveness of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) on the delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), consistent finding has not still convinced. The aim of this study was to examine the additional effect of TAU with BCAA on the DOMS and muscle damages after eccentric exercise. Thirty-six untrained male volunteers were equally divided into four groups, and ingested a combination with 2.0 g TAU (or placebo) and 3.2 g BCAA (or placebo), thrice a day, 2 weeks prior to and 4 days after elbow flexion eccentric exercise. Following the period after eccentric exercise, the physiological and blood biochemical markers for DOMS and muscle damage showed improvement in the combination of TAU and BCAA supplementation rather than in the single or placebo supplementations. In conclusion, additional supplement of TAU with BCAA would be a useful way to attenuate DOMS and muscle damages induced by high-intensity exercise.

  15. Combined effect of branched-chain amino acids and taurine supplementation on delayed onset muscle soreness and muscle damage in high-intensity eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Song-Gyu; Miyazaki, Teruo; Ishikura, Keisuke; Nagayama, Hisashi; Komine, Shoichi; Nakata, Yoshio; Maeda, Seiji; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Ohmori, Hajime

    2013-11-06

    Previous studies have evaluated the effectiveness of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation for preventing delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and muscle damage induced by eccentric exercise, their findings have been inconclusive. Since taurine has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects, the present study investigated the combined effect of BCAA and taurine on DOMS and muscle damage. Thirty-six untrained male subjects (22.5 ± 3.8 years) were assigned to four groups (placebo + placebo [placebo], BCAA + placebo, placebo + taurine, and BCAA + taurine [combined]) and given a combination of 3.2 g BCAA (or placebo) and 2.0 g taurine (or placebo), three times a day, for two weeks prior to and three days after eccentric elbow flexor exercises. DOMS and muscle damage in the biceps brachii were subjectively and objectively evaluated using the visual analogue scale (VAS), upper arm circumference (CIR), and blood parameters (creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase [LDH], aldolase, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine [8-OHdG]). In the combined group, VAS and 8-OHdG two days after exercise, CIR two and three days after exercise and LDH from one to three days after exercise were significantly lower than the placebo group. The area under the curve from before exercise to four days later for CIR, LDH, and aldolase was also significantly lower in the combined group than in the placebo group. A combination of 3.2 g BCAA and 2.0 g taurine, three times a day, for two weeks prior to and three days after exercise may be a useful nutritional strategy for attenuating exercise-induced DOMS and muscle damage.

  16. Combined effect of branched-chain amino acids and taurine supplementation on delayed onset muscle soreness and muscle damage in high-intensity eccentric exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have evaluated the effectiveness of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation for preventing delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and muscle damage induced by eccentric exercise, their findings have been inconclusive. Since taurine has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects, the present study investigated the combined effect of BCAA and taurine on DOMS and muscle damage. Methods Thirty-six untrained male subjects (22.5 ± 3.8 years) were assigned to four groups (placebo + placebo [placebo], BCAA + placebo, placebo + taurine, and BCAA + taurine [combined]) and given a combination of 3.2 g BCAA (or placebo) and 2.0 g taurine (or placebo), three times a day, for two weeks prior to and three days after eccentric elbow flexor exercises. DOMS and muscle damage in the biceps brachii were subjectively and objectively evaluated using the visual analogue scale (VAS), upper arm circumference (CIR), and blood parameters (creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase [LDH], aldolase, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine [8-OHdG]). Results In the combined group, VAS and 8-OHdG two days after exercise, CIR two and three days after exercise and LDH from one to three days after exercise were significantly lower than the placebo group. The area under the curve from before exercise to four days later for CIR, LDH, and aldolase was also significantly lower in the combined group than in the placebo group. Conclusion A combination of 3.2 g BCAA and 2.0 g taurine, three times a day, for two weeks prior to and three days after exercise may be a useful nutritional strategy for attenuating exercise-induced DOMS and muscle damage. PMID:24195702

  17. Supplementation with a Polyphenol-Rich Extract, TensLess®, Attenuates Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness and Improves Muscle Recovery from Damages After Eccentric Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romain, Cindy; Freitas, Tomás T; Martínez-Noguera, Francisco J; Laurent, Caroline; Gaillet, Sylvie; Chung, Linda H; Alcaraz, Pedro E; Cases, Julien

    2017-11-01

    High-intensity exercises are known to provoke delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Delayed onset muscle soreness typically occurs within the first 24 h, peaks between 24 and 72 h, and can last as long as 5-7 days post-exercise. Delayed onset muscle soreness is a multifactorial process involving both mechanical and biochemical components, associated with clinical features that may limit range of motion, and athletes seek for effective recovery strategies to optimize future training sessions. TensLess ® is a food supplement developed to help manage post-exercise recovery. The supplement has been investigated on 13 recreationally active athletes of both sex, during a randomized, double-blind, and crossover clinical investigation, including a 3-week washout period. The clinical investigation was based on the study of TensLess ® effects for DOMS management and on the reduction of associated muscle damages following an eccentric exercise protocol. Supplementation with TensLess ® induced significant decrease in DOMS perception (-33%; p = 0.008) as of the first 24 h; this was significantly correlated with a lowered release of muscle damage-associated biomarkers, namely myoglobin, creatinine, and creatine kinase, for the whole length of the recovery period. Taken together, these positive results clearly indicate that post-exercise supplementation with TensLess ® may preserve myocytes and reduce soreness following eccentric exercise-induced damages, and, accordingly, significantly shorten muscle recovery. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Prolonged passive static stretching-induced innervation zone shift in biceps brachii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin; Beck, Travis W; Wages, Nathan P

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of a bout of repeated and prolonged passive static stretching on the innervation zone (IZ) location of the human biceps brachii muscle. Eleven men performed 12 sets of 100-s passive stretches on their biceps brachii. Before (Pre) and immediately after (Post) the stretching intervention, isometric strength was tested during the maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) of the forearm flexors. The subjects also performed several separate isometric forearm flexion muscle actions at 30%, 50%, and 70% of their predetermined MVCs for examining the locations of the IZ at different contraction intensities. The IZ was identified through multi-channel surface electromyographic (EMG) recordings from a linear electrode array. The stretching intervention induced an average of 10% isometric strength loss for the forearm flexors (mean±SD: Pre-MVC vs. Post-MVC=332.12±59.40 N vs. 299.53±70.51 N; p<0.001). In addition, the average IZ shift was nearly 4.5 mm in average in the proximal direction. However, this shift was not specific to the contraction intensity. We believe that the IZ shift was caused by the elongation of the entire muscle-tendon unit in the proximal direction. Therefore, caution should be taken when using surface EMG technique to examine possible changes in the EMG variables after a stretching protocol, as these variables can be contaminated by the shift of the IZ.

  19. Effects of concentric and repeated eccentric exercise on muscle damage and calpain-calpastatin gene expression in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, K.; Overgaard, K.; Nedergaard, A.

    2008-01-01

    , and was compared to a control-group (n = 6). Muscle strength and soreness and plasma creatine kinase and myoglobin were measured before and during 7 days following exercise bouts. Muscle biopsies were collected from m. vastus lateralis of both legs prior to and at 3, 24 h and 7 days after exercise and quantified...... for muscle Ca2+-content and mRNA levels for calpain isoforms and calpastatin. Exercise reduced muscle strength and increased muscle soreness predominantly in the eccentric leg (P ... eccentric exercise bout (P muscle Ca2+-content did not differ between interventions. mRNA levels for calpain 2 and calpastatin were upregulated exclusively by eccentric exercise 24 h post-exercise (P

  20. Pomegranate Supplementation Accelerates Recovery of Muscle Damage and Soreness and Inflammatory Markers after a Weightlifting Training Session.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achraf Ammar

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of natural Pomegranate juice supplementation on performance and acute and delayed responses of muscle soreness and biomarkers of muscle damage after a weightlifting training session.Nine elite weightlifters (21±0.5 years performed two Olympic-Weightlifting-sessions after either placebo (PLA or natural pomegranate juice (POMj supplementations. Heart rate, blood pressure and blood samples (hematological parameters, muscle damage and C-reactive protein (CRP were collected at rest, 3min and 48h after each session. Weightlifting performance, RPE, and DOMS were also assessed after each training session.T-test showed higher performance (+8.30% and lower RPE values (-4.37% using POMj supplementation (p0.05. Additionally, during the 48h following the training session, POMj improved the recovery kinetic of SBP (p<0.01, 7.97%, CK (p<0.001, 11.34%, LDH (p<0.05, 7.30% and ASAT (p<0.05, 6.77%. Indeed, the present study showed that 48h of recovery associated to natural POMj supplementation was sufficient to reach the resting values of the selected muscle damage markers after intensive training session.Natural POMj seems to ameliorate the capacity to adhere to an intensive training program. Therefore, elite weightlifters are advised to use natural POMj during intensive training program and competition to accelerate muscle recovery.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02697903.

  1. Pomegranate Supplementation Accelerates Recovery of Muscle Damage and Soreness and Inflammatory Markers after a Weightlifting Training Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Achraf; Turki, Mouna; Chtourou, Hamdi; Hammouda, Omar; Trabelsi, Khaled; Kallel, Choumous; Abdelkarim, Osama; Hoekelmann, Anita; Bouaziz, Mohamed; Ayadi, Fatma; Driss, Tarak; Souissi, Nizar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of natural Pomegranate juice supplementation on performance and acute and delayed responses of muscle soreness and biomarkers of muscle damage after a weightlifting training session. Methods Nine elite weightlifters (21±0.5 years) performed two Olympic-Weightlifting-sessions after either placebo (PLA) or natural pomegranate juice (POMj) supplementations. Heart rate, blood pressure and blood samples (hematological parameters, muscle damage and C-reactive protein (CRP)) were collected at rest, 3min and 48h after each session. Weightlifting performance, RPE, and DOMS were also assessed after each training session. Results T-test showed higher performance (+8.30%) and lower RPE values (-4.37%) using POMj supplementation (p0.05). Additionally, during the 48h following the training session, POMj improved the recovery kinetic of SBP (p<0.01, 7.97%), CK (p<0.001, 11.34%), LDH (p<0.05, 7.30%) and ASAT (p<0.05, 6.77%). Indeed, the present study showed that 48h of recovery associated to natural POMj supplementation was sufficient to reach the resting values of the selected muscle damage markers after intensive training session. Conclusion Natural POMj seems to ameliorate the capacity to adhere to an intensive training program. Therefore, elite weightlifters are advised to use natural POMj during intensive training program and competition to accelerate muscle recovery. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02697903 PMID:27764091

  2. Chest Press Exercises With Different Stability Requirements Result in Similar Muscle Damage Recovery in Resistance-Trained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Diogo V; Ferreira-Júnior, João B; Soares, Saulo R S; Cadore, Eduardo L; Izquierdo, Mikel; Brown, Lee E; Bottaro, Martim

    2017-01-01

    Ferreira, DV, Ferreira-Júnior, JB, Soares, SRS, Cadore, EL, Izquierdo, M, Brown, LE, and Bottaro, M. Chest press exercises with different stability requirements result in similar muscle damage recovery in resistance trained men. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 71-79, 2017-This study investigated the time course of 96 hours of muscle recovery after 3 different chest press exercises with different stability requirements in resistance-trained men. Twenty-seven men (23.5 ± 3.8 years) were randomly assigned to one of the 3 groups: (a) Smith machine bench press; (b) barbell bench press; or (c) dumbbell bench press. Participants performed 8 sets of 10 repetition maximum with 2 minutes rest between sets. Muscle thickness, peak torque (PT), and soreness were measured pre, post, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours after exercise. There were no differences in the time course of PT or muscle thickness values of the pectoralis major (p = 0.98 and p = 0.91, respectively) or elbow extensors (p = 0.07 and p = 0.86, respectively) between groups. Muscle soreness of the pectoralis major was also not different between groups (p > 0.05). However, the Smith machine and barbell groups recovered from triceps brachii muscle soreness by 72 hours after exercise (p > 0.05), whereas the dumbbell group did not present any triceps brachii muscle soreness after exercise (p > 0.05). In conclusion, resistance-trained men experience similar muscle damage recovery after Smith machine, barbell, and dumbbell chest press exercise. However, muscle soreness of the elbow extensors takes a longer time to recover after using a barbell chest press exercise.

  3. Gluteal muscle damage leads to higher in vivo hip joint loads 3 months after total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, Philipp; Zonneveld, Jip; Brackertz, Sophie; Streitparth, Florian; Winkler, Tobias

    2018-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is in most cases improving patients´ life quality immediately after surgery. However, a closer look at these patients, especially with modern gait analysis methods, reveals also negative consequences due to the surgical approach related injury to the pelvic muscles. We hypothesized that this damage will have a negative impact on hip joint contact forces during activities of daily living (ADL). 10 patients undergoing THA received an instrumented hip joint implant enabling real time in vivo measurements of hip joint loads using a direct lateral approach. Pre- and 3 months postoperative computed tomography (CT) scans were used for evaluation of the periarticular muscle status, using muscle volume, fat ratio and lean muscle volume as parameters. An analysis of in vivo hip contact forces was made 3 months after THA during ADL (walking, stair climbing, chair rising and sitting) and correlated with the morphology of the periarticular muscles. We found a significant decrease of volume by 25% (-3 to -45, p = 0.005) and increase in fat ratio of the Gluteus Minimus (Gmin), resulting in a decrease in lean muscle volume of 28% (-48 to 0, p = 0.008). This was accompanied by an inverse development in the Tensor Fasciae Latae (TFL) resulting in a lean muscle volume increase of 34% (-2 to -102, p = 0.013). Changes in Gluteus Medius (Gmed) and Gluteus Maximus (Gmax) have not been observed in the short-term follow up. A decreased Gmin lean muscle volume was found to strongly correlate with high in vivo joint contact forces in all tested ADL. The decrease of Gmin volume can be seen as a direct effect of THA surgery, whereas the increase of TFL might compensate for loss of Gmin volume. Lean muscle volume and fat ratio were better predictors for joint contact forces than total muscle volume. These effects were most pronounced during sitting down and standing up due to the higher demand on the gluteal muscles during these activities.

  4. Biomechanics Analysis of Pressure Ulcer Using Damaged Interface Model between Bone and Muscle in the Human Buttock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamet, Samuel Susanto; Takano, Naoki; Tanabe, Yoshiyuki; Hatano, Asako; Nagasao, Tomohisa

    This paper aims at building up a computational procedure to study the bio-mechanism of pressure ulcer using the finite element method. Pressure ulcer is a disease that occurs in the human body after 2 hours of continuous external force. In the very early stage of pressure ulcer, it is found that the tissues inside the body are damaged, even though skin surface looks normal. This study assumes that tension and/or shear strain will cause damage to loose fibril tissue between the bone and muscle and that propagation of damaged area will lead to fatal stage. Analysis was performed using the finite element method by modeling the damaged fibril tissue as a cutout. By varying the loading directions and watching both tensile and shear strains, the risk of fibril tissue damage and propagation of the damaged area is discussed, which may give new insight for the careful nursing for patients, particularly after surgical treatment. It was found that the pressure ulcer could reoccur for a surgical flap treatment. The bone cut and surgical flap surgery is not perfect to prevent the bone-muscle interfacial damage.

  5. Eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage of pre-adolescent and adolescent boys in comparison to young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Trevor C; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Liu, Yi-Chuen; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2014-06-01

    This study compared changes in indirect muscle damage markers after maximal eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors (EF) among pre-adolescent (9-10 years), adolescent (14-15 years) and post-adolescent (20-25 years) men to test the hypothesis that the magnitude of muscle damage would increase with increase in age. Thirteen untrained men of each age group performed two bouts (ECC1, ECC2) of 30 maximal EF eccentric contractions. Several indirect muscle damage markers were measured from the exercised arm before, immediately after, and 1-5 days post-exercise. Changes in maximal voluntary concentric contraction torque of the EF (MVC), range of motion of the elbow joint, upper arm circumference (CIR), muscle passive stiffness, muscle soreness, plasma creatine kinase activity and myoglobin concentration after ECC1 and ECC2 were compared amongst groups by a mixed-design two-way ANOVA. MVC before exercise was smaller (P < 0.05) for pre-adolescent (8.9 ± 1.9 Nm) than adolescent (25.1 ± 3.9 Nm) and adult (35.3 ± 4.6 Nm), and for adolescent than adult. Changes in all variables after ECC1 were smaller (P < 0.05) for pre-adolescent and adolescent when compared with adult, and all except CIR changes were smaller (P < 0.05) for pre-adolescent than adolescent. After ECC2, changes in all variables were smaller (P < 0.05) than those after ECC1 for all groups, but the magnitude of the changes was different among groups (P < 0.05) in the same way as that after ECC1. These results indicate that the magnitude of muscle damage is increased from pre-adolescent, adolescent to post-adolescent men.

  6. Magnitude of spinal muscle damage is not statistically associated with exercise-induced low back pain intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Mark D.; Horn, Maggie E.; Lott, Donovan J.; Arpan, Ishu; George, Steven Z.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT Findings on imaging of noncontractile anatomic abnormalities and the intensity of low back pain have weak associations because of false-positive rates among asymptomatic individuals. This association might be stronger for contractile tissues. PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between location and reports of pain intensity in the low back and exercise-induced muscle damage to the lumbar paraspinal muscles. STUDY DESIGN Nondiagnostic observational study in a laboratory setting. METHODS Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced in the low back of healthy pain-free volunteers. Measures of pain intensity (100-mm visual analog scale [VAS]) and location (area on the pain diagram) were taken before and 48 hours after exercise. Muscle damage was quantified using mechanical pain thresholds, motor performance deficits, and transverse relaxation time (T2)–weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Changes pre- to postexercise in signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging within the erector spinae, pain intensity, pain area, mechanical pain threshold, and isometric torque were assessed using paired t tests. Bivariate correlations were conducted to assess associations among muscle damage, pain intensity, and pain drawing area. RESULTS Twenty participants volunteered (11 women; average age, 22.3 years; average body mass index, 23.5) for study participation. Reports of pain intensity at 48 hours ranged from 0 to 59 mm on the VAS. Muscle damage was confirmed by reductions in mechanical threshold (p=.011) and motor performance (perector spinae and reported pain intensity in the low back. In future studies, larger cohorts may report statistically significant associations, but our data suggest that there will be low magnitude potentially indicating limited clinical relevance. PMID:22208857

  7. Muscle Damage After Total Hip Arthroplasty Through the Direct Anterior Approach for Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Masashi; Hasegawa, Yukiharu; Okura, Toshiaki; Ochiai, Satoshi; Fujibayashi, Takayoshi

    2017-08-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) through the direct anterior approach (DAA) is known to cause less muscle damage than other surgical approaches. However, more complex primary cases, such as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), might often cause muscle damage. The objective of the present study was to clarify the muscle damage observed 1 year after THA through the DAA for DDH using magnetic resonance imaging. We prospectively compared the muscle cross-sectional area (M-CSA) and fatty atrophy (FA) in muscles by magnetic resonance imaging and the Harris hip score before and at 1-year follow-up after THA through the DAA in 3 groups: 37 patients with Crowe group 1 DDH (D1), 13 patients with Crowe group 2 and 3 DDH (D2 + 3), and 12 patients with osteonecrosis as a control. THA through the DAA for D1 displayed significantly decreased M-CSA and significantly increased FA in the gluteus minimus (Gmini), the tensor fasciae latae (TFL), and the obturator internus (OI). Patients with D2 + 3 group did not have decreased M-CSA in the TFL or increased FA in the Gmini. Postoperatively, a significant negative correlation was observed between the M-CSA and FA for the OI in patients with D1 and D2 + 3. THA through the DAA for DDH caused the damage in the Gmini, the TFL, and the OI; severe damage was observed in the OI, showing increased FA with decreased M-CSA in patients with both D1 and D2 + 3. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of aqueous extract of saffron (crocus sativus L.) against gamma radiation-induced skeletal muscles damage in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Tahawy, N.A; Said, U.Z

    2010-01-01

    Muscular strength is important in sport as well as in daily activities. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative damage are the most important factors in radiation-induced acute damage to muscle tissue. Saffron, obtained from dried stigmas of Crocus sativus L. (Iridaceae), is a highly valued spice, commonly used in flavouring and food colouring in different parts of the world and is known to possess the richest source of carotenoids. The present study was designed to investigate the efficacy of an aqueous extract of saffron to protect against radiation-induced oxidative damage in rat's skeletal muscle. Saffron was supplemented orally, via gavages to rats at a dose of 80 mg/ kg body wt/ day for 2 week pre- and 1 week post-exposure to 5 Gy (one shot dose) of whole body gamma-irradiation. Animals were sacrificed 1, 2 and 3 weeks post radiation exposure. The results revealed that whole body gamma-irradiation of rats induce oxidative stress in skeletal muscles obvious by significant elevation in the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances associated with significant decreases in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. Also, radiation-induces skeletal muscles damage evidenced by significant decreases in the level of pyruvic acid, creatine phosphokinase, glutamate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities as well as significant increases in lactic acid, total iron, and copper and calcium levels. Saffron treated-irradiated rats showed significantly less severe damage and remarkable improvement in all the measured parameters, compared to irradiated rats. It could be concluded that saffron by attenuating radiation-induced oxidative stress might play a role in maintaining skeletal muscle integrity.

  9. Effect of New Zealand blueberry consumption on recovery from eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLeay Yanita

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD is accompanied by localized oxidative stress / inflammation which, in the short-term at least, is associated with impaired muscular performance. Dietary antioxidants have been shown to reduce excessive oxidative stress; however, their effectiveness in facilitating recovery following EIMD is not clear. Blueberries demonstrate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study we examine the effect of New Zealand blueberries on EIMD after strenuous eccentric exercise. Methods In a randomized cross-over design, 10 females consumed a blueberry smoothie or placebo of a similar antioxidant capacity 5 and 10 hours prior to and then immediately, 12 and 36 hours after EIMD induced by 300 strenuous eccentric contractions of the quadriceps. Absolute peak and average peak torque across the knee, during concentric, isometric, and eccentric actions were measured. Blood biomarkers of oxidative stress, antioxidant capacity, and inflammation were assessed at 12, 36 and 60 hours post exercise. Data were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA. Results A significant (p p = 0.047 interaction effect was seen for peak isometric tension suggesting a faster rate of recovery in the blueberry intervention group. A similar trend was observed for concentric and eccentric strength. An increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers was also observed in both treatment groups following EIMD. Although a faster rate of decrease in oxidative stress was observed in the blueberry group, it was not significant (p  Conclusions This study demonstrates that the ingestion of a blueberry smoothie prior to and after EIMD accelerates recovery of muscle peak isometric strength. This effect, although independent of the beverage’s inherent antioxidant capacity, appears to involve an up-regulation of adaptive processes, i.e. endogenous antioxidant processes, activated by the combined actions of the eccentric exercise

  10. Running pace decrease during a marathon is positively related to blood markers of muscle damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Del Coso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Completing a marathon is one of the most challenging sports activities, yet the source of running fatigue during this event is not completely understood. The aim of this investigation was to determine the cause(s of running fatigue during a marathon in warm weather. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recruited 40 amateur runners (34 men and 6 women for the study. Before the race, body core temperature, body mass, leg muscle power output during a countermovement jump, and blood samples were obtained. During the marathon (27 °C; 27% relative humidity running fatigue was measured as the pace reduction from the first 5-km to the end of the race. Within 3 min after the marathon, the same pre-exercise variables were obtained. RESULTS: Marathoners reduced their running pace from 3.5 ± 0.4 m/s after 5-km to 2.9 ± 0.6 m/s at the end of the race (P 15% pace reduction had elevated post-race myoglobin (1318 ± 1411 v 623 ± 391 µg L(-1; P<0.05, lactate dehydrogenase (687 ± 151 v 583 ± 117 U L(-1; P<0.05, and creatine kinase (564 ± 469 v 363 ± 158 U L(-1; P = 0.07 in comparison with marathoners that preserved their running pace reasonably well throughout the race. However, they did not differ in their body mass change (-3.1 ± 1.0 v -3.0 ± 1.0%; P = 0.60 or post-race body temperature (38.7 ± 0.7 v 38.9 ± 0.9 °C; P = 0.35. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Running pace decline during a marathon was positively related with muscle breakdown blood markers. To elucidate if muscle damage during a marathon is related to mechanistic or metabolic factors requires further investigation.

  11. Muscle Tissue Damage Induced by the Venom of Bothrops asper: Identification of Early and Late Pathological Events through Proteomic Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Herrera

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The time-course of the pathological effects induced by the venom of the snake Bothrops asper in muscle tissue was investigated by a combination of histology, proteomic analysis of exudates collected in the vicinity of damaged muscle, and immunodetection of extracellular matrix proteins in exudates. Proteomic assay of exudates has become an excellent new methodological tool to detect key biomarkers of tissue alterations for a more integrative perspective of snake venom-induced pathology. The time-course analysis of the intracellular proteins showed an early presence of cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins in exudates, while cytoskeletal proteins increased later on. This underscores the rapid cytotoxic effect of venom, especially in muscle fibers, due to the action of myotoxic phospholipases A2, followed by the action of proteinases in the cytoskeleton of damaged muscle fibers. Similarly, the early presence of basement membrane (BM and other extracellular matrix (ECM proteins in exudates reflects the rapid microvascular damage and hemorrhage induced by snake venom metalloproteinases. The presence of fragments of type IV collagen and perlecan one hour after envenoming suggests that hydrolysis of these mechanically/structurally-relevant BM components plays a key role in the genesis of hemorrhage. On the other hand, the increment of some ECM proteins in the exudate at later time intervals is likely a consequence of the action of endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs or of de novo synthesis of ECM proteins during tissue remodeling as part of the inflammatory reaction. Our results offer relevant insights for a more integrative and systematic understanding of the time-course dynamics of muscle tissue damage induced by B. asper venom and possibly other viperid venoms.

  12. Muscle Tissue Damage Induced by the Venom of Bothrops asper: Identification of Early and Late Pathological Events through Proteomic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Cristina; Macêdo, Jéssica Kele A; Feoli, Andrés; Escalante, Teresa; Rucavado, Alexandra; Gutiérrez, José María; Fox, Jay W

    2016-04-01

    The time-course of the pathological effects induced by the venom of the snake Bothrops asper in muscle tissue was investigated by a combination of histology, proteomic analysis of exudates collected in the vicinity of damaged muscle, and immunodetection of extracellular matrix proteins in exudates. Proteomic assay of exudates has become an excellent new methodological tool to detect key biomarkers of tissue alterations for a more integrative perspective of snake venom-induced pathology. The time-course analysis of the intracellular proteins showed an early presence of cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins in exudates, while cytoskeletal proteins increased later on. This underscores the rapid cytotoxic effect of venom, especially in muscle fibers, due to the action of myotoxic phospholipases A2, followed by the action of proteinases in the cytoskeleton of damaged muscle fibers. Similarly, the early presence of basement membrane (BM) and other extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in exudates reflects the rapid microvascular damage and hemorrhage induced by snake venom metalloproteinases. The presence of fragments of type IV collagen and perlecan one hour after envenoming suggests that hydrolysis of these mechanically/structurally-relevant BM components plays a key role in the genesis of hemorrhage. On the other hand, the increment of some ECM proteins in the exudate at later time intervals is likely a consequence of the action of endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) or of de novo synthesis of ECM proteins during tissue remodeling as part of the inflammatory reaction. Our results offer relevant insights for a more integrative and systematic understanding of the time-course dynamics of muscle tissue damage induced by B. asper venom and possibly other viperid venoms.

  13. Acute effects of static active or dynamic active stretching on eccentric-exercise-induced hamstring muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Che-Hsiu; Chen, Trevor C; Jan, Mei-Hwa; Lin, Jiu-Jenq

    2015-04-01

    To examine whether an acute bout of active or dynamic hamstring-stretching exercises would reduce the amount of muscle damage observed after a strenuous eccentric task and to determine whether the stretching protocols elicit similar responses. A randomized controlled clinical trial. Thirty-six young male students performed 5 min of jogging as a warm-up and were allocated to 1 of 3 groups: 3 min of static active stretching (SAS), 3 min of dynamic active stretching (DAS), or control (CON). All subjects performed eccentric exercise immediately after stretching. Heart rate, core temperature, maximal voluntary isometric contraction, passive hip flexion, passive hamstring stiffness (PHS), plasma creatine kinase activity, and myoglobin were recorded at prestretching, at poststretching, and every day after the eccentric exercises for 5 d. After stretching, the change in hip flexion was significantly higher in the SAS (5°) and DAS (10.8°) groups than in the CON (-4.1°) group. The change in PHS was significantly higher in the DAS (5.6%) group than in the CON (-5.7%) and SAS (-6.7%) groups. Furthermore, changes in muscle-damage markers were smaller in the SAS group than in the DAS and CON groups. Prior active stretching could be useful for attenuating the symptoms of muscle damage after eccentric exercise. SAS is recommended over DAS as a stretching protocol in terms of strength, hamstring range of motion, and damage markers.

  14. Exercise-induced muscle damage is reduced in resistance-trained males by branched chain amino acids: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howatson Glyn

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well documented that exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD decreases muscle function and causes soreness and discomfort. Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA supplementation has been shown to increase protein synthesis and decrease muscle protein breakdown, however, the effects of BCAAs on recovery from damaging resistance training are unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of a BCAA supplementation on markers of muscle damage elicited via a sport specific bout of damaging exercise in trained volunteers. Methods Twelve males (mean ± SD age, 23 ± 2 y; stature, 178.3 ± 3.6 cm and body mass, 79.6 ± 8.4 kg were randomly assigned to a supplement (n = 6 or placebo (n = 6 group. The damaging exercise consisted of 100 consecutive drop-jumps. Creatine kinase (CK, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC, muscle soreness (DOMS, vertical jump (VJ, thigh circumference (TC and calf circumference (CC were measured as markers of muscle damage. All variables were measured immediately before the damaging exercise and at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h post-exercise. Results A significant time effect was seen for all variables. There were significant group effects showing a reduction in CK efflux and muscle soreness in the BCAA group compared to the placebo (P Conclusion The present study has shown that BCAA administered before and following damaging resistance exercise reduces indices of muscle damage and accelerates recovery in resistance-trained males. It seems likely that BCAA provided greater bioavailablity of substrate to improve protein synthesis and thereby the extent of secondary muscle damage associated with strenuous resistance exercise. Clinical Trial Registration Number: NCT01529281.

  15. Effects of winter military training on energy balance, whole-body protein balance, muscle damage, soreness, and physical performance.

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    Margolis, Lee M; Murphy, Nancy E; Martini, Svein; Spitz, Marissa G; Thrane, Ingjerd; McGraw, Susan M; Blatny, Janet-Martha; Castellani, John W; Rood, Jennifer C; Young, Andrew J; Montain, Scott J; Gundersen, Yngvar; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2014-12-01

    Physiological consequences of winter military operations are not well described. This study examined Norwegian soldiers (n = 21 males) participating in a physically demanding winter training program to evaluate whether short-term military training alters energy and whole-body protein balance, muscle damage, soreness, and performance. Energy expenditure (D2(18)O) and intake were measured daily, and postabsorptive whole-body protein turnover ([(15)N]-glycine), muscle damage, soreness, and performance (vertical jump) were assessed at baseline, following a 4-day, military task training phase (MTT) and after a 3-day, 54-km ski march (SKI). Energy intake (kcal·day(-1)) increased (P soreness increased and performance decreased progressively (P < 0.05). The physiological consequences observed during short-term winter military training provide the basis for future studies to evaluate nutritional strategies that attenuate protein loss and sustain performance during severe energy deficits.

  16. IL-6 induced STAT3 signalling is associated with the proliferation of human muscle satellite cells following acute muscle damage.

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    Kyle G Toth

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the satellite cell (SC is a key regulator of muscle growth during development and muscle adaptation following exercise, the regulation of human muscle SC function remains largely unexplored. STAT3 signalling mediated via interleukin-6 (IL-6 has recently come to the forefront as a potential regulator of SC proliferation. The early response of the SC population in human muscle to muscle-lengthening contractions (MLC as mediated by STAT3 has not been studied.Twelve male subjects (21±2 y; 83±12 kg performed 300 maximal MLC of the quadriceps femoris at 180°•s(-1 over a 55° range of motion with muscle samples (vastus lateralis and blood samples (antecubital vein taken prior to exercise (PRE, 1 hour (T1, 3 hours (T3 and 24 hours (T24 post-exercise. Cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions of muscle biopsies were purified and analyzed for total and phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3 by western blot. p-STAT3 was detected in cytoplasmic fractions across the time course peaking at T24 (p<0.01 vs. PRE. Nuclear total and p-STAT3 were not detected at appreciable levels. However, immunohistochemical analysis revealed a progressive increase in the proportion of SCs expressing p-STAT3 with ∼60% of all SCs positive for p-STAT3 at T24 (p<0.001 vs. PRE. Additionally, cMyc, a STAT3 downstream gene, was significantly up-regulated in SCs at T24 versus PRE (p<0.05. Whole muscle mRNA analysis revealed induction of the STAT3 target genes IL-6, SOCS3, cMyc (peaking at T3, p<0.05, IL-6Rα and GP130 (peaking at T24, p<0.05. In addition, Myf5 mRNA was up-regulated at T24 (p<0.05 with no appreciable change in MRF4 mRNA.We demonstrate that IL-6 induction of STAT3 signaling occurred exclusively in the nuclei of SCs in response to MLC. An increase in the number of cMyc+ SCs indicated that human SCs were induced to proliferate under the control of STAT3 signaling.

  17. IL-6 Induced STAT3 Signalling Is Associated with the Proliferation of Human Muscle Satellite Cells Following Acute Muscle Damage

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    Toth, Kyle G.; McKay, Bryon R.; De Lisio, Michael; Little, Jonathon P.; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Parise, Gianni

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the satellite cell (SC) is a key regulator of muscle growth during development and muscle adaptation following exercise, the regulation of human muscle SC function remains largely unexplored. STAT3 signalling mediated via interleukin-6 (IL-6) has recently come to the forefront as a potential regulator of SC proliferation. The early response of the SC population in human muscle to muscle-lengthening contractions (MLC) as mediated by STAT3 has not been studied. Methodology/Principal Findings Twelve male subjects (21±2 y; 83±12 kg) performed 300 maximal MLC of the quadriceps femoris at 180°•s−1 over a 55° range of motion with muscle samples (vastus lateralis) and blood samples (antecubital vein) taken prior to exercise (PRE), 1 hour (T1), 3 hours (T3) and 24 hours (T24) post-exercise. Cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions of muscle biopsies were purified and analyzed for total and phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3) by western blot. p-STAT3 was detected in cytoplasmic fractions across the time course peaking at T24 (p<0.01 vs. PRE). Nuclear total and p-STAT3 were not detected at appreciable levels. However, immunohistochemical analysis revealed a progressive increase in the proportion of SCs expressing p-STAT3 with ∼60% of all SCs positive for p-STAT3 at T24 (p<0.001 vs. PRE). Additionally, cMyc, a STAT3 downstream gene, was significantly up-regulated in SCs at T24 versus PRE (p<0.05). Whole muscle mRNA analysis revealed induction of the STAT3 target genes IL-6, SOCS3, cMyc (peaking at T3, p<0.05), IL-6Rα and GP130 (peaking at T24, p<0.05). In addition, Myf5 mRNA was up-regulated at T24 (p<0.05) with no appreciable change in MRF4 mRNA. Conclusions/Significant Findings We demonstrate that IL-6 induction of STAT3 signaling occurred exclusively in the nuclei of SCs in response to MLC. An increase in the number of cMyc+ SCs indicated that human SCs were induced to proliferate under the control of STAT3 signaling. PMID:21408055

  18. The Effect of Green Tea and Sour Tea (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) Supplementation on Oxidative Stress and Muscle Damage in Athletes.

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    Hadi, Amir; Pourmasoumi, Makan; Kafeshani, Marzieh; Karimian, Jahangir; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Entezari, Mohammad Hasan

    2017-05-04

    Additional oxygen consumption during intense exercises may lead to oxidative stress and contribute to muscular fatigue. Green tea and sour tea (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.), which contain various flavonoids and polyphenols, have many healthful properties such as anticarcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, and heart protecting effects. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of green tea and sour tea supplementation on oxidative stress and muscle damage in soccer athletes. This randomized, double-blind control trial was conducted on 54 male soccer players. Participants were randomly assigned to three groups to receive: 450 mg/d green tea extract (GTE) in the first group (n = 18), 450 mg/d sour tea extract (STE) in the second group (n = 18) and 450 mg/d maltodextrin in the control group (n = 18). Fasting whole blood samples were taken under resting conditions at the beginning and the end of the study to quantify the serum levels of muscle damage indices, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and oxidative stress biomarkers, malondialdehyde (MDA), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). After six weeks intervention, athletes who received GTE and STE supplements compared with the placebo had a significantly decreased MDA level (P = 0.008). Furthermore, STE supplementation resulted in a significant increase in TAC level compared with GTE and placebo groups (P = 0.01). However, supplementation with GTE and STE had no significant effects on muscle damage indices. GTE and STE supplementation have beneficial effects on oxidative stress status in male athletes. However, both kinds of tea extract did not affect muscle damage status.

  19. The effects of the intake of an isotonic sports drink before orienteering competitions on skeletal muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colakoglu, Filiz Fatma; Cayci, Banu; Yaman, Metin; Karacan, Selma; Gonulateş, Suleyman; Ipekoglu, Gökhan; Er, Fatmanur

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the intake of an isotonic sports drink (500 ml water, 32 gr carbonhydrate, 120 mg calcium, 248 mg chloride, 230 mg sodium) the level of the skeletal muscle damage of orienteering athletes. [Subjects and Methods] The study was carried out on 21 male elite orienteering athletes. The athletes were divided into two groups by randomized double-blind selection. The experimental group (n=11) was given the isotonic sports drink, while the placebo group (n=10) was given 500 ml pure water. Blood samples were taken pre-competition, post-competition, 2 hours post-competition and 24 hours post-competition. [Results] The pre-c troponin, myoglobin and creatinine kinase serum levels of the placebo group were significantly lower than the post-competition and 2 hours post-competition values. The 24 hours post-competition levels of the same analyses were also significantly lower than the post-c and 2 hours post-competition. The pre-competition troponin, myoglobin and creatinine kinase levels of the experimental group were found to be significantly lower than the post-competition, 2 hours post-competition 24 hours post-competition values. In conclusion, the present results suggest that the intake of supportive sports drinks before exercising significantly prevents the observed muscle damage. The study showed that serum myoglobin levels between the experimental and the placebo group is significantly different during the 2 hours post-competition period. [Conclusion] The level of serum creatinine kinase and myoglobin accurately shows the extent of the muscle damage. However, further studies on the effect of isotonic sports drink in different training programs on the cell membrane and the muscle damage are needed.

  20. The Effect of a Simulated Basketball Game on Players’ Sprint and Jump Performance, Temperature and Muscle Damage

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    Pliauga Vytautas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive data regarding the demands of playing basketball, the relative importance of factors that cause fatigue and muscle potentiation has been explored only tentatively and remains unclear. The aim of this experimental field study was to assess changes in leg muscle power and relate these changes to body temperature modifications and indices of exercise-induced muscle damage in response to a simulated basketball game. College-level male basketball players (n=10 were divided into two teams to play a simulated basketball game. Ten-meter sprint and vertical counter-movement jump tests, core body temperature and creatine-kinase activity were measured within 48 h after the game. The participants’ body temperatures increased after a warm-up (1.9%, p200%, p30%, p<0.05 after the game, indicating damage to the players’ muscles. The basketball players’ sprint and jump performance appear to be at least in part associated with body temperature changes, which might contribute to counteract fatigue during the larger part of a basketball game.

  1. Acute and timing effects of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB on indirect markers of skeletal muscle damage

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    Manninen Anssi H

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While chronic β-Hydroxy β-Methylbutyrate (HMB supplementation (≥ 2 wk lowers exercise induced muscle damage, its acute or timing effects have not been examined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute and timing effects of oral HMB supplementation on serum creatine kinase (CK, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, muscle soreness, and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC. Methods Sixteen non-resistance trained men (22 ± 2 yrs were assigned to HMB-Pre or HMB-Post groups. In a crossover design, all subjects performed 55 maximal eccentric knee extension/flexion contractions on 2 occasions on either the right or left leg. HMB-Pre (N = 8 randomly received 3 grams of either a placebo or HMB before and a placebo after exercise. HMB-Post (N = 8 received a placebo before and either 3 grams of HMB or a placebo after exercise. Muscle damage tests were recorded before, at 8, 24, 48, and 72 hrs post exercise. Results There was a reduction in MVC and an increase in soreness in the quadriceps and hamstrings following exercise (p p = 0.07, there was no time × group effect. Serum indices of damage increased, peaking at 48 hrs for CK (773% (p p Conclusion Our findings suggest no clear acute or timing effects of HMB supplementation. However, consuming HMB before exercise appeared to prevent increases in LDH.

  2. EFFECTS OF TWO DIFFERENT DOSAGE OF BCAA SUPPLEMENTATION ON SERUM INDICES OF MUSCLE DAMAGE AND SORENESS IN SOCCER PLAYERS

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    Payam Mohamad-Panahi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigation of the effects of two different dose of BCAA supplementation on serum indices of muscle damage and soreness in soccer players. 30 male soccer players (age: 20.2+-0.6 yr participated as subjects in this study. Subjects were randomly divided into three groups (double-blind design. All subjects performed lower- body resistance exercise (6 sets, 10 repetitions, 70% 1RM. The BCAA was given at doses of 200 and 450 mg.kg -1 BW for supplemental groups 1 and 2, respectively, 30 minutes before and after to exercise tests and carbohydrate was given at dose of 200 mg.kg -1 BW for placebo group. To identify enzymes activity (IU/L, venous blood samples were collected 30 min prior to exercise and at 24 and 48 hrs post exercise. Data were statistically analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and Bonfferoni test. Baseline CK, CK-MB and muscle soreness were determined 30 minutes before the exercise test. Baseline serum values for CK, CK-MB and baseline muscle soreness were not different between groups in the 30 minutes before the exercise test (p>0/05. However, there were significant increases between the pre-exercise and post-exercise values for CK, CK-MB and muscle soreness from 24 hrs to 48 hrs post-test (p<0/05, but there were no significant differences between two groups (p< 0.05(. These results suggested that two different dosages of BCAA supplementation did not affect muscle damage and muscle sureness during resistance exercise bout in soccer players.

  3. Mixed martial arts induces significant fatigue and muscle damage up to 24 hours post-combat.

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    Ghoul, Nihel; Tabben, Montassar; Miarka, Bianca; Tourny, Claire; Chamari, Karim; Coquart, Jeremy

    2017-06-22

    This study investigates the physiological/physical responses to a simulated mixed martial arts (MMA) competition over 24 hr. Twelve fighters performed a simulated MMA competition, consisting of three 5-min MMA matches. Physiological/physical data were assessed before (Trest), directly after round 1 (Trd1), round 2 (Trd2) and round 3 (Trd3), and then 30-min (Trecovery30min) and/or 24-hr (Trecovery24h) post-competition. Heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and blood lactate concentration ([La]) were assessed at Trest, Trd1, Trd2 and Trd3. Biological data were collected at Trest, Trd3, Trecovery30min and Trecovery24h. Physical tests were performed at Trest, Trecovery30min and Trecovery24h. HR, RPE and [La] were high during competition. Leukocytes, hemoglobin, total protein and glycemia were increased at Trd3 compared with all other time points (p<0.05). Cortisol was increased at Trd3 compared with Trest and Trecovery24h (p<0.05). Testosterone was higher at Trd3 and Trecovery30min than Trest (p<0.001). Higher values of uric acid were noted during recovery periods (p<0.001). Lactate dehydrogenase was lower at Trest compared with Trd3, Trecovery30min and Trecovery24h (p<0.05). Countermovement jump was higher at Trest than Trecovery30min (p=0.020). Consequently, MMA is a high-intensity intermittent combat sport that induces significant fatigue and muscle damage, both of which are still present 24-hr post-competition.

  4. Muscle damage and immune responses to prolonged exercise in environmental extreme conditions.

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    Hassan, Emad S

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of prolonged exercise with and without a thermal clamp on leukocyte cell, stress hormones, cytokine and muscle damage responses. Fifteen healthy male volunteers (means±SD: age 22±3 yr; mass 75.8±3.2 kg; maximal oxygen uptake 55±7 mL/min/kg) randomly completed four chamber trials of 1 hour each, in different environment and separated by 7 days. Trials were: 1) exercise induced heating (EX-heating [EX-H]: temperature/humidity, 38° C/50%); 2) exercise with a thermal clamp (EX-cooling [EX-C]: temperature/humidity, 18° C/50%); 3) passive heating (PA-H: temperature/ humidity, 38° C/50%); 4) passive cooling (PA-C: temperature/ humidity, 18° C/50%). EX-H and EX-C were composed of 1h treadmill runs at 80% individual anaerobic threshold (IAT). Blood samples were collected at pre-post, and 1h postenvironments exposure. Compared to EX-H, exercise-induced increases in core temperature, heart rate, cortisol, human growth hormone (hGH)), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), leukocyte counts and creatine kinase (CK) and Myoglobin (Mb) were significantly (P<0.01) more pronounced than in EX-C. These results suggest that the additional impact of elevated ambient temperatures on stress responses to endurance exercise in trained subjects seems to affect primarily the hormonal systems and resulting changes in leukocyte number, creatine kinase, Myoglobin and interleukine-6.

  5. Could mesenchymal stem cell therapy help in the treatment of muscle damage caused by Bothrops alternatus venom?

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    Thalita da Costa Telles

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in the treatment of myonecrosis induced by Bothrops alternatus venom in rats. Seventy-five male adult Wistar rats were divided into three experimental groups. G1 and G2 were injected in the gastrocnemius muscle with 120μg of B. alternatus venom, while G3 received 200μL of PBS only. Three days after the venom injection, 12 rats from G1 were treated with 5.0 x 106 MSC in PBS, whereas G2 and G3 rats received PBS. Every three days, blood and muscle samples of five animals from each group were taken for serum biochemical and pathological analyses. Histological examinations showed more intense muscle lesions following MSC treatment, characterized by disorganization and loss of muscle fibers, with focal necrosis and inflammatory infiltration by mononuclear cells. In conclusion, the use of MSC for the treatment of local damage caused by inoculation of B. alternatus venom impaired muscle regeneration and interfered in the healing process.

  6. A prophylactic effect of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching on symptoms of muscle damage induced by eccentric exercise of the wrist extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamwong, Peanchai; Pirunsan, Ubon; Paungmali, Aatit

    2011-10-01

    Stretching with proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) is frequently used before exercise. The prophylactic effect of PNF on symptoms of muscle damage induced by eccentric exercise of the wrist extensors was examined in this study. Twenty-eight healthy males were randomly divided into the PNF group (n = 14) and the control group (n = 14). PNF was used before eccentric exercise induction in the wrist extensors. All subjects were tested to examine muscle damage characteristics including sensory-motor functions at baseline, immediately, and from 1st to 8th days after the exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). The results demonstrated that the PNF group showed a lesser deficit in some sensory-motor functions (p < 0.05) than the control group. The prior PNF stretching application could be useful for attenuating the signs and symptoms of muscle damage after eccentric exercise. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Muscle-Damaging Eccentric Exercise on Running Kinematics and Economy for Running at Different Intensities.

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    Satkunskienė, Danguolė; Stasiulis, Arvydas; Zaičenkovienė, Kristina; Sakalauskaitė, Raminta; Rauktys, Donatas

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the changes in running kinematics and economy during running at different intensities 1 and 24 hours after a muscle-damaging bench-stepping exercise. Healthy, physically active adult women were recruited for this study. The subjects' running kinematics, heart rate, gas exchange, minute ventilation, and perceived exertion were continuously recorded during the increasing-intensity running test on a treadmill for different testing conditions: a control condition and 1 and 24 hours after the bench-stepping exercise test. Two muscle damage markers, muscle soreness and blood creatine kinase (CK) activity, were measured before and 24 hours after the stepping exercise. Muscle soreness and blood CK activity were significantly altered (exact p ≤ 0.05, Monte Carlo test) 24 hours after the bench-stepping exercise. The stride length, stride frequency, and support time at different running intensities did not change. Twenty-four hours after the previous step exercise, ankle dorsiflexion in the support phase was significantly higher during severe-intensity running, the range of knee flexion at the stance phase was significantly lower during moderate-intensity running, and knee flexion at the end of the amortization phase was significantly lower during heavy-intensity running compared with the control values (exact p ≤ 0.05, Monte Carlo test). The running economy at moderate and heavy intensities, maximum ventilation, and maximum heart rate did not change. We conclude that, given moderate soreness in the calf muscles 24 hours after eccentric exercise, the running kinematics are slightly but significantly changed without a detectable effect on running economy.

  8. Tribulus terrestris extracts alleviate muscle damage and promote anaerobic performance of trained male boxers and its mechanisms: Roles of androgen, IGF-1, and IGF binding protein-3

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    Yiming Ma

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Taking 1250 mg capsules containing TT extracts did not change muscle mass and plasma levels of testosterone, DHT, and IGF-1 but significantly alleviated muscle damage and promoted anaerobic performance of trained male boxers, which may be related to the decrease of plasma IGFBP-3 rather than androgen in plasma.

  9. Influence of Maturation Status on Eccentric Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage and the Repeated Bout Effect in Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Ju; Nosaka, Kazunori; Ho, Chih-Chiao; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Tseng, Kuo-Wei; Ratel, Sébastien; Chen, Trevor Chung-Ching

    2018-01-01

    This study compared changes in indirect muscle damage markers, proprioception and arterial stiffness after elbow flexor eccentric exercise between pre-pubescent (9–10 y), pubescent (14–15 y), and post-pubescent (20–24 y) healthy, untrained females (n = 13/group). The maturation of the participants was confirmed by the hand bone age. All participants performed two bouts of 30 sub-maximal eccentric contractions (EC1, EC2) using a dumbbell set at 60% of pre-exercise maximal voluntary isometric elbow flexion strength at 90°. Changes in maximal voluntary concentric contraction (MVC) torque, muscle soreness (SOR), plasma creatine kinase activity, proprioception (position sense, joint reaction angle) and arterial stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity: cfPWV) before to 5 days after EC1 and EC2 were compared among groups by a mixed-design two-way ANOVA. Pre-exercise MVC torque and cfPWV were smaller (P 0.05) among the groups. These results show that the extents of muscle damage, and proprioception and arterial stiffness changes after eccentric exercise are greater at later stages of maturation, but the repeated bout effect is not affected by maturation. PMID:29354073

  10. The impact of exercise-induced muscle damage on performance test outcomes in elite female basketball players.

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    Doma, Kenji; Leicht, Anthony; Sinclair, Wade; Schumann, Moritz; Damas, Felipe; Burt, Dean; Woods, Carl

    2017-09-11

    The purpose of this study was two-fold. First, to examine the impact exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) on physical fitness qualities following a basketball-specific training session. Secondly, to determine the reproducibility of the sport-specific performance measures in elite female basketball players. Ten elite female basketball players (age 25.6 ± 4.5 years; height 1.8 ± 0.7m; body mass 76.7 ± 8.3kg) undertook a 90-minute training session involving repeated jumping, sprinting and game-simulated training. Indirect muscle damage markers (i.e., countermovement jump [CMJ], delayed-onset of muscle soreness [DOMS] and creatine kinase [CK]) and sport-specific performances (i.e., change of direction [COD] and suicide test [ST]) were measured prior to and 24 hours post training. These measures were also collected one week following training to determine the reproducibility of the basketball-specific performance measures. A significant reduction in lower-body power (-3.5±3.6%; P0.05). The intra-class correlation coefficient and coefficient of variation for the COD and ST were 0.81 and 0.90, respectively, and 1.9% and 1.5%, respectively. In conclusion, appropriate recovery should be considered the day following basketball-specific training sessions in elite basketball players. Furthermore, this study showed the usability of performance measures to detect changes during periods of EIMD, with acceptable reproducibility and minimal measurement error.

  11. Lower oxidative DNA damage despite greater ROS production in muscles from rats selectively bred for high running capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedie, Constance; Romestaing, Caroline; Burelle, Yan; Safdar, Adeel; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Seadon, Scott; Britton, Steven L.; Koch, Lauren G.

    2011-01-01

    Artificial selection in rat has yielded high-capacity runners (HCR) and low-capacity runners (LCR) that differ in intrinsic (untrained) aerobic exercise ability and metabolic disease risk. To gain insight into how oxygen metabolism may have been affected by selection, we compared mitochondrial function, oxidative DNA damage (8-dihydroxy-guanosine; 8dOHG), and antioxidant enzyme activities in soleus muscle (Sol) and gastrocnemius muscle (Gas) of adult and aged LCR vs. HCR rats. In Sol of adult HCR rats, maximal ADP-stimulated respiration was 37% greater, whereas in Gas of adult HCR rats, there was a 23% greater complex IV-driven respiratory capacity and 54% greater leak as a fraction of electron transport capacity (suggesting looser mitochondrial coupling) vs. LCR rats. H2O2 emission per gram of muscle was 24–26% greater for both muscles in adult HCR rats vs. LCR, although H2O2 emission in Gas was 17% lower in HCR, after normalizing for citrate synthase activity (marker of mitochondrial content). Despite greater H2O2 emission, 8dOHG levels were 62–78% lower in HCR rats due to 62–96% higher superoxide dismutase activity in both muscles and 47% higher catalase activity in Sol muscle in adult HCR rats, with no evidence for higher 8 oxoguanine glycosylase (OGG1; DNA repair enzyme) protein expression. We conclude that genetic segregation for high running capacity has generated a molecular network of cellular adaptations, facilitating a superior response to oxidative stress. PMID:21148474

  12. Effects of resistance exercise and the use of anabolic androgenic steroids on hemodynamic characteristics and muscle damage markers in bodybuilders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseri, Azadeh; Nadimi, Amir; Nikookheslat, Saeed D

    2016-09-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), synthetic compounds of testosterone commonly used as sport performance enhancers, could cause cardiovascular dysfunction and cell damage. Even though the side effects of AAS intake have been widely studied, yet little is known about how resistance exercise can alter these side effects. This study aimed to determine the effects of one session resistance exercise and the use of AAS on hemodynamic characteristics and muscle damage markers in professional bodybuilders. Sixteen bodybuilders were divided into two groups: bodybuilders using AAS for at least 5 years (users; N.=8) and AAS-free bodybuilders (non-users; N.=8). The exercise protocol was a circuit strength training session involved three sets of 8-9 repetitions at 80-85% of 1-RM. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP) and concentrations of serum creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured at three different time points, immediately before and after the exercise session and 24 hours following the exercise session. The users group showed greater basal levels of hemodynamic characteristics (i.e. HR and BP) and cell damage markers (i.e. CK and LDH) compared to those in the non-users group (all P0.05). These findings indicate that the use of AAS could be potentially harmful as it enhances the levels of the hemodynamic characteristics and the muscle enzymes. These harmful effects of AAS intake could be more evident in response to resistance exercise.

  13. Natural pomegranate juice reduces inflammation, muscle damage and increase platelets blood levels in active healthy Tunisian aged men

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    Ammar Achraf

    2018-03-01

    Paired simple t-test showed a significant difference between PLA and POMj supplementation effects on systolic blood pressure (SAP, creatinine (CRE, hematological and muscle damage parameters and C-reactive protein (CRP (p < 0.01 with lower values using POMj. Similarly, a significant differences were shown for platelets PLT (p < 0.01 with higher values using POMj supplementation. POMj rich in polyphenols seems to have a power anti-inflammatory effect and to be an effective treatment for patients who suffer from the thrombocyto-penia disease. Therefore, aged populations are advised to add natural POMj to their daily nutrition behavior.

  14. Influence of nutrient intake on antioxidant capacity, muscle damage and white blood cell count in female soccer players

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    Gravina Leyre

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soccer is a form of exercise that induces inflammatory response, as well as an increase in free radicals potentially leading to muscle injury. Balanced nutritional intake provides important antioxidant vitamins, including vitamins A, C and E, which may assist in preventing exercise-related muscle damage. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of macro/micronutrient intake on markers of oxidative stress, muscle damage, inflammatory and immune response in female soccer players. Methods Twenty-eight female players belonging to two soccer teams of the same professional soccer club participated in this study after being informed about the aims and procedures and after delivering written consent. Each team completed an 8-day dietary record and played one competition match the same week. Participants were divided into two groups: the REC group (who complied with recommended intakes and the NO-REC group (who were not compliant. Laboratory blood tests were carried out to determine hematological, electrolytic and hormonal variables, as well as to monitor markers of cell damage and oxidative stress. Blood samples were obtained 24 h before, immediately after and 18 h after official soccer matches. Student t-test or Mann–Whitney U-test was used to compare both groups throughout the match. Results At rest, we observed that the REC group had higher levels of total antioxidant status (TAS, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and lower levels of creatine kinase (CK and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in comparison to the NO-REC group. Immediately after the match, levels of TAS, GPx, superoxide dismutase (SOD, LDH and % lymphocytes were higher and the % of neutrophils were lower in the REC group compared to the NO-REC group. These differences were also maintained 18 h post-match, only for TAS and GPx. Conclusions Our data reveal an association between nutritional intake and muscle damage, oxidative stress, immunity and inflammation

  15. No effect of short-term amino acid supplementation on variables related to skeletal muscle damage in 100 km ultra-runners - a randomized controlled trial

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    Rosemann Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of short-term supplementation of amino acids before and during a 100 km ultra-marathon on variables of skeletal muscle damage and muscle soreness. We hypothesized that the supplementation of amino acids before and during an ultra-marathon would lead to a reduction in the variables of skeletal muscle damage, a decrease in muscle soreness and an improved performance. Methods Twenty-eight experienced male ultra-runners were divided into two groups, one with amino acid supplementation and the other as a control group. The amino acid group was supplemented a total of 52.5 g of an amino acid concentrate before and during the 100 km ultra-marathon. Pre- and post-race, creatine kinase, urea and myoglobin were determined. At the same time, the athletes were asked for subjective feelings of muscle soreness. Results Race time was not different between the groups when controlled for personal best time in a 100 km ultra-marathon. The increases in creatine kinase, urea and myoglobin were not different in both groups. Subjective feelings of skeletal muscle soreness were not different between the groups. Conclusions We concluded that short-term supplementation of amino acids before and during a 100 km ultra-marathon had no effect on variables of skeletal muscle damage and muscle soreness.

  16. Pathways of Ca2+ entry and cytoskeletal damage following eccentric contractions in mouse skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bao-Ting; Whitehead, Nicholas P.; Gervasio, Othon L.; Reardon, Trent F.; Vale, Molly; Fatkin, Diane; Dietrich, Alexander; Yeung, Ella W.

    2012-01-01

    Muscles that are stretched during contraction (eccentric contractions) show deficits in force production and a variety of structural changes, including loss of antibody staining of cytoskeletal proteins. Extracellular Ca2+ entry and activation of calpains have been proposed as mechanisms involved in these changes. The present study used isolated mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles subjected to 10 eccentric contractions and monitored force production, immunostaining of cytoskeletal proteins, and resting stiffness. Possible pathways for Ca2+ entry were tested with streptomycin (200 μM), a blocker of stretch-activated channels, and with muscles from mice deficient in the transient receptor potential canonical 1 gene (TRPC1 KO), a candidate gene for stretch-activated channels. At 30 min after the eccentric contractions, the isometric force was decreased to 75 ± 3% of initial control and this force loss was reduced by streptomycin but not in the TRPC1 KO. Desmin, titin, and dystrophin all showed patchy loss of immunostaining 30 min after the eccentric contractions, which was substantially reduced by streptomycin and in the TRPC1 KO muscles. Muscles showed a reduction of resting stiffness following eccentric contractions, and this reduction was eliminated by streptomycin and absent in the TRPC1 KO muscles. Calpain activation was determined by the appearance of a lower molecular weight autolysis product and μ-calpain was activated at 30 min, whereas the muscle-specific calpain-3 was not. To test whether the loss of stiffness was caused by titin cleavage, protein gels were used but no significant titin cleavage was detected. These results suggest that Ca2+ entry following eccentric contractions is through a stretch-activated channel that is blocked by streptomycin and encoded or modulated by TRPC1. PMID:22461447

  17. Excitation-induced cell damage and beta2-adrenoceptor agonist stimulated force recovery in rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer; Gissel, Hanne; Fredsted, Anne; Clausen, Torben

    2006-02-01

    Intensive exercise leads to a loss of force, which may be long lasting and associated with muscle cell damage. To simulate this impairment and to develop means of compensating the loss of force, extensor digitorum longus muscles from 4-wk-old rats were fatigued using intermittent 40-Hz stimulation (10 s on, 30 s off). After stimulation, force recovery, cell membrane leakage, and membrane potential were followed for 240 min. The 30-60 min of stimulation reduced tetanic force to approximately 10% of the prefatigue level, followed by a spontaneous recovery to approximately 20% in 120-240 min. Loss of force was associated with a decrease in K+ content, gain of Na+ and Ca2+ content, leakage of the intracellular enzyme lactic acid dehydrogenase (10-fold increase), and depolarization (13 mV). Stimulation of the Na+-K+ pump with either the beta2-adrenoceptor agonist salbutamol, epinephrine, rat calcitonin gene-related peptide (rCGRP), or dibutyryl cAMP improved force recovery by 40-90%. The beta-blocker propranolol abolished the effect of epinephrine on force recovery but not that of CGRP. Both spontaneous and salbutamol-induced force recovery were prevented by ouabain. The salbutamol-induced force recovery was associated with repolarization of the membrane potential (12 mV) to the level measured in unfatigued muscles. In conclusion, in muscles exposed to fatiguing stimulation leading to a considerable loss of force, cell leakage, and depolarization, stimulation of the Na+-K+ pump induces repolarization and improves force recovery, possibly due to the electrogenic action of the Na+-K+ pump. This mechanism may be important for the restoration of muscle function after intense exercise.

  18. The influence of capillarization on satellite cell pool expansion and activation following exercise-induced muscle damage in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederveen, Joshua P; Joanisse, Sophie; Snijders, Tim; Thomas, Aaron C Q; Kumbhare, Dinesh; Parise, Gianni

    2018-03-15

    Skeletal muscle stem cells (satellite cells) play a crucial role in repair and remodelling of muscle in response to exercise. Satellite cells are in close spatial proximity to muscle capillaries and therefore may be influenced by them. In this study, we describe the activation and expansion of the satellite cell pool in response to eccentric contraction-induced muscle damage in individuals with significantly different levels of muscle capillarization. Individuals with greater capillarization and capacity for muscle perfusion demonstrated enhanced activation and/or expansion of the satellite cell pool allowing for an accelerated recovery of muscle function. These results provide insight into the critical relationship between muscle capillarization and satellite cells during skeletal muscle repair. Factors that determine the skeletal muscle satellite cell (SC) response remain incompletely understood. It is known, however, that SC activation status is closely related to the anatomical relationship between SCs and muscle capillaries. We investigated the impact of muscle fibre capillarization on the expansion and activation status of SCs following a muscle-damaging exercise protocol in healthy young men. Twenty-nine young men (21 ± 0.5 years) performed 300 unilateral eccentric contractions (180 deg s -1 ) of the knee extensors. Percutaneous muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis and blood samples from the antecubital vein were taken prior to (Pre) exercise and at 6, 24, 72 and 96 h of post-exercise recovery. A comparison was made between subjects who had a relative low mixed muscle capillary-to-fibre perimeter exchange index (CFPE; Low group) and high mixed muscle CFPE index (High group) at baseline. Type I and type II muscle fibre size, myonuclear content, capillarization, and SC response were determined via immunohistochemistry. Overall, there was a significant correlation (r = 0.39; P < 0.05) between the expansion of SC content (change in total Pax7

  19. Irreversible muscle damage in bodybuilding due to long-term intramuscular oil injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banke, I J; Prodinger, P M; Waldt, S; Weirich, G; Holzapfel, B M; Gradinger, R; Rechl, H

    2012-10-01

    Intramuscular oil injections generating slowly degrading oil-based depots represent a controversial subject in bodybuilding and fitness. However they seem to be commonly reported in a large number of non-medical reports, movies and application protocols for 'site-injections'. Surprisingly the impact of long-term (ab)use on the musculature as well as potential side-effects compromising health and sports ability are lacking in the medical literature. We present the case of a 40 year old male semi-professional bodybuilder with systemic infection and painful reddened swellings of the right upper arm forcing him to discontinue weightlifting. Over the last 8 years he daily self-injected sterilized sesame seed oil at numerous intramuscular locations for the purpose of massive muscle building. Whole body MRI showed more than 100 intramuscular rather than subcutaneous oil cysts and loss of normal muscle anatomy. 2-step septic surgery of the right upper arm revealed pus-filled cystic scar tissue with the near-complete absence of normal muscle. MRI 1 year later revealed the absence of relevant muscle regeneration. Persistent pain and inability to perform normal weight training were evident for at least 3 years post-surgery. This alarming finding indicating irreversible muscle mutilation may hopefully discourage people interested in bodybuilding and fitness from oil-injections. The impact of such chronic tissue stress on other diseases like malignancy remains to be determined. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. The benefit of a supplement with the antioxidant melatonin on redox status and muscle damage in resistance-trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardo-Mendonça, Roberto C; Ocaña-Wilhelmi, Javier; de Haro, Tomás; de Teresa-Galván, Carlos; Guerra-Hernández, Eduardo; Rusanova, Iryna; Fernández-Ortiz, Marisol; Sayed, Ramy K A; Escames, Germaine; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío

    2017-07-01

    Previous data showed that the administration of high doses of melatonin improved the circadian system in athletes. Here, we investigated in the same experimental paradigm whether the antioxidant properties of melatonin has also beneficial effects against exercise-induced oxidative stress and muscle damage in athletes. Twenty-four athletes were treated with 100 mg·day -1 of melatonin or placebo 30 min before bedtime during 4 weeks in a randomized double-blind scheme. Exercise intensity was higher during the study that before starting it. Blood samples were collected before and after treatment, and plasma was used for oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC), lipid peroxidation (LPO), nitrite plus nitrate (NOx), and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) determinations. Glutathione (GSH), glutathione disulphide (GSSG) levels, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and reductase (GRd) activities, were measured in erythrocytes. Melatonin intake increased ORAC, reduced LPO and NOx levels, and prevented the increase of AOPP, compared to placebo group. Melatonin was also more efficient than placebo in reducing GSSG·GSH -1 and GPx·GRd -1 ratios. Melatonin, but not placebo, reduced creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatinine, and total cholesterol levels. Overall, the data reflect a beneficial effect of melatonin treatment in resistance-training athletes, preventing extra- and intracellular oxidative stress induced by exercise, and yielding further skeletal muscle protection against exercise-induced oxidative damage.

  1. A comparison of muscle damage, soreness and performance following a simulated contact and non-contact team sport activity circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tarveen K R; Guelfi, Kym J; Landers, Grant; Dawson, Brian; Bishop, David

    2011-09-01

    The aim was to compare the effect of a simulated team sport activity circuit (reflective of the activity demands of Australian football) either with or without body 'contact' on muscle soreness, damage, and performance when the circuit was repeated 48 h later. Eleven male, team-sport athletes completed a 'non-contact' (NCON) and a 'contact' (CON) version of the team sport activity circuit in a crossover design with at least 1 week between trials. The effect of CON and NCON on repeated 15m sprint and vertical jump performance was assessed by completing the same version of the circuit 48 h after the initial trial. The effect on perceived soreness and blood markers of muscle damage and inflammation was also determined. Subsequent performance was affected to a greater extent by CON, with both best and mean sprint times significantly slower 48h following CON (psoreness and pressure sensitivity were elevated following both NCON and CON (psoreness was greater with CON (p=0.012). Both CON and NCON resulted in elevated serum creatine kinase, myoglobin and lactate dehydrogenase, while c-reactive protein increased following CON but not NCON. In conclusion, Greater perceived soreness and decrements in performance of the simulated team sport activity circuit when repeated 48 h later were observed following CON. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Effect of a Simulated Basketball Game on Players' Sprint and Jump Performance, Temperature and Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliauga, Vytautas; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Dargevičiūtė, Gintarė; Jaszczanin, Jan; Klizienė, Irina; Stanislovaitienė, Jūratė; Stanislovaitis, Aleksas

    2015-06-27

    Despite extensive data regarding the demands of playing basketball, the relative importance of factors that cause fatigue and muscle potentiation has been explored only tentatively and remains unclear. The aim of this experimental field study was to assess changes in leg muscle power and relate these changes to body temperature modifications and indices of exercise-induced muscle damage in response to a simulated basketball game. College-level male basketball players (n=10) were divided into two teams to play a simulated basketball game. Ten-meter sprint and vertical counter-movement jump tests, core body temperature and creatine-kinase activity were measured within 48 h after the game. The participants' body temperatures increased after a warm-up (1.9%, pjump height (3.8%, pbasketball game. There was a significant increase in creatine-kinase at 24 h (>200%, p30%, pbasketball players' sprint and jump performance appear to be at least in part associated with body temperature changes, which might contribute to counteract fatigue during the larger part of a basketball game.

  3. The Effect of a Simulated Basketball Game on Players’ Sprint and Jump Performance, Temperature and Muscle Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliauga, Vytautas; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Dargevičiūtė, Gintarė; Jaszczanin, Jan; Klizienė, Irina; Stanislovaitienė, Jūratė; Stanislovaitis, Aleksas

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive data regarding the demands of playing basketball, the relative importance of factors that cause fatigue and muscle potentiation has been explored only tentatively and remains unclear. The aim of this experimental field study was to assess changes in leg muscle power and relate these changes to body temperature modifications and indices of exercise-induced muscle damage in response to a simulated basketball game. College-level male basketball players (n=10) were divided into two teams to play a simulated basketball game. Ten-meter sprint and vertical counter-movement jump tests, core body temperature and creatine-kinase activity were measured within 48 h after the game. The participants’ body temperatures increased after a warm-up (1.9%, pjump height (3.8%, pbasketball game. There was a significant increase in creatine-kinase at 24 h (>200%, p30%, pbasketball players’ sprint and jump performance appear to be at least in part associated with body temperature changes, which might contribute to counteract fatigue during the larger part of a basketball game. PMID:26240660

  4. The effects of low-level laser on muscle damage caused by Bothrops neuwiedi venom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dourado, D.M.; Matias, R.; Almeida, M.F.; Paula, K.R. de; Carvalho, P.T.C. [University for the Development of the State and of the Region of Pantanal (UNIDERP), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Lab. of Experimental Histopathology]. E-mail: ccfi@uniderp.br; Vieira, R.P. [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine. Dept. of Pathology and Physical Therapy; Oliveira, L.V.F. [Nove de Julho University (UNINOVE), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Masters Program in Rehabilitation Sciences

    2008-07-01

    The present study aimed to assess the effects of low-level laser (660 nm) on myonecrosis caused by the insertion of Bothrops neuwiedi venom in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups (n = 24 each): Group S (0.9% saline solution); Group V (venom) and Group VLLL (venom plus low-level laser). These categories were subdivided into four additional groups (n = 6) based on the euthanasia timing (3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days and 7 days). The groups V and VLLL were inoculated with 100 {mu}L of concentrated venom (40 {mu}g/mL) in the gastrocnemius muscle. The muscle was irradiated using a gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser (GaAlAs) at 35 mW power and 4 J/cm{sup 2} energy density for 3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days or 7 days after venom inoculation. To evaluate the myotoxic activity of the venom, CK activity was measured and the muscle was histologically analyzed. The low-level laser reduced venom-induced CK activity in the groups euthanized at 3 hours, 24 hours and 3 days (p < 0.0001). Histological analysis revealed that low-level laser reduced neutrophilic inflammation as well as myofibrillar edema, hemorrhage and myonecrosis following B. neuwiedi envenomation. These results suggest that low-level laser can be useful as an adjunct therapy following B. neuwiedi envenomation. (author)

  5. The effects of low-level laser on muscle damage caused by Bothrops neuwiedi venom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dourado, D.M.; Matias, R.; Almeida, M.F.; Paula, K.R. de; Carvalho, P.T.C.; Vieira, R.P.; Oliveira, L.V.F.

    2008-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess the effects of low-level laser (660 nm) on myonecrosis caused by the insertion of Bothrops neuwiedi venom in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups (n = 24 each): Group S (0.9% saline solution); Group V (venom) and Group VLLL (venom plus low-level laser). These categories were subdivided into four additional groups (n = 6) based on the euthanasia timing (3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days and 7 days). The groups V and VLLL were inoculated with 100 μL of concentrated venom (40 μg/mL) in the gastrocnemius muscle. The muscle was irradiated using a gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser (GaAlAs) at 35 mW power and 4 J/cm 2 energy density for 3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days or 7 days after venom inoculation. To evaluate the myotoxic activity of the venom, CK activity was measured and the muscle was histologically analyzed. The low-level laser reduced venom-induced CK activity in the groups euthanized at 3 hours, 24 hours and 3 days (p < 0.0001). Histological analysis revealed that low-level laser reduced neutrophilic inflammation as well as myofibrillar edema, hemorrhage and myonecrosis following B. neuwiedi envenomation. These results suggest that low-level laser can be useful as an adjunct therapy following B. neuwiedi envenomation. (author)

  6. The effects of low-level laser on muscle damage caused by Bothrops neuwiedi venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DM Dourado

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to assess the effects of low-level laser (660 nm on myonecrosis caused by the insertion of Bothrops neuwiedi venom in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups (n = 24 each: Group S (0.9% saline solution; Group V (venom and Group VLLL (venom plus low-level laser. These categories were subdivided into four additional groups (n = 6 based on the euthanasia timing (3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days and 7 days. The groups V and VLLL were inoculated with 100 µL of concentrated venom (40 µg/mL in the gastrocnemius muscle. The muscle was irradiated using a gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser (GaAlAs at 35 mW power and 4 J/cm² energy density for 3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days or 7 days after venom inoculation. To evaluate the myotoxic activity of the venom, CK activity was measured and the muscle was histologically analyzed. The low-level laser reduced venom-induced CK activity in the groups euthanized at 3 hours, 24 hours and 3 days (p < 0.0001. Histological analysis revealed that low-level laser reduced neutrophilic inflammation as well as myofibrillar edema, hemorrhage and myonecrosis following B. neuwiedi envenomation. These results suggest that low-level laser can be useful as an adjunct therapy following B. neuwiedi envenomation.

  7. Low markers of muscle damage and inflammation following a 3-day ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hour post-race concentrations of serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK), high sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hsCRP), cortisol, cardiac Troponin T (cTnT), and osmolality (sOsm) as well as urinary myoglobin (uMb), changes in body mass, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and thigh circumference (TC) were measured.

  8. Connective tissue cells expressing fibro/adipogenic progenitor markers increase under chronic damage: relevance in fibroblast-myofibroblast differentiation and skeletal muscle fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Osvaldo; Rebolledo, Daniela L; Oyarzún, Juan Esteban; Olguín, Hugo C; Brandan, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    Fibrosis occurs in skeletal muscle under various pathophysiological conditions such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a devastating disease characterized by fiber degeneration that results in progressive loss of muscle mass, weakness and increased extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation. Fibrosis is also observed after skeletal muscle denervation and repeated cycles of damage followed by regeneration. The ECM is synthesized largely by fibroblasts in the muscle connective tissue under normal conditions. Myofibroblasts, cells that express α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), play a role in many tissues affected by fibrosis. In skeletal muscle, fibro/adipogenic progenitors (FAPs) that express cell-surface platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFR-α) and the transcription factor Tcf4 seem to be responsible for connective tissue synthesis and are good candidates for the origin of myofibroblasts. We show that cells positive for Tcf4 and PDGFR-α are expressed in skeletal muscle under normal conditions and are increased in various skeletal muscles of mdx mice, a murine model for DMD, wild type muscle after sciatic denervation and muscle subjected to chronic damage. These cells co-label with the myofibroblast marker α-SMA in dystrophic muscle but not in normal tissue. The Tcf4-positive cells lie near macrophages mainly concentrated in dystrophic necrotic-regenerating foci. The close proximity of Tcf4-positive cells to inflammatory cells and their previously described role in muscle regeneration might reflect an active interaction between these cell types and growth factors, possibly resulting in a muscular regenerative or fibrotic condition.

  9. Blood-flow restricted training leads to myocelullar macrophage infiltration and upregulation of heat-shock proteins, but no apparent muscle damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob L; Aagaard, Per; Prokhorova, Tatyana A

    2017-01-01

    into the intervention (Mid8) and 3 and 10 days after training cessation (Post3,Post10) to examine macrophage (M1/M2) content as well as heat-shock protein (HSP27/70) and tenascin-C expression. Blood samples (1 wk) were collected before and after (0.1-24 h) the first and last training session to examine markers...... of muscle damage (CK), oxidative stress (TAC,GSH) and inflammation (MCP1,IL-6,TNFa). M1-macrophage content increased 108-165% with BFRE and LLE at Post3 (P macrophages increased (163%) with BFRE only (P ... with BFRE (P markers of muscle damage, oxidative stress and inflammation. The amplitude, timing and localization of the above changes indicate that only limited muscle damage was evoked with BFRE. This study is the first to show...

  10. Protection by taurine against INOS-dependent DNA damage in heavily exercised skeletal muscle by inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Hiromichi; Okita, Shinya; Kato, Toshihiro; Naka, Toru; Kawanishi, Shosuke; Ohnishi, Shiho; Oshida, Yoshiharu; Ma, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Taurine protects against tissue damage in a variety of models involving inflammation, especially the muscle. We set up a heavy exercise bout protocol for rats consisting of climbing ran on a treadmill to examine the effect of an intraabdominal dose of taurine (300 mg/kg/day) administered 1 h before heavy exercise for ten consecutive days. Each group ran on the treadmill at 20 m/min, 25% grade, for 20 min or until exhaustion within 20 min once each 10 days. Exhaustion was the point when an animal was unable to right itself when placed on its side. The muscle damage was associated with an increased accumulation of 8-nitroguanine and 8-OHdG in the nuclei of skeletal muscle cells. The immunoreactivities for NF-κB and iNOS were also increased in the exercise group. Taurine ameliorated heavy exercise-induced muscle DNA damage to a significant extent since it reduced the accumulation of 8-nitroguanine and 8-OHdG, possibly by down-regulating the expression of iNOS through a modulatory action on NF-κB signaling pathway. This study demonstrates for the first time that taurine can protect against intense exercise-induced nitrosative inflammation and ensuing DNA damage in the skeletal muscle of rats by preventing iNOS expression and the nitrosative stress generated by heavy exercise.

  11. The rate of torque development: a unique, non-invasive indicator of eccentric-induced muscle damage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, N D M; Housh, T J; Traylor, D A; Cochrane, K C; Bergstrom, H C; Lewis, R W; Schmidt, R J; Johnson, G O; Cramer, J T

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the time courses of recovery for isometric peak torque and rate of torque development (RTD) after eccentric-induced muscle damage. 18 men completed 6 sets of 10 maximal eccentric isokinetic muscle actions at 30° · s(-1). Peak torque, peak RTD and RTD at 10 (RTD10), 50 (RTD50), 100 (RTD100) and 200 ms (RTD200), serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase were measured before (PRE), immediately after (POST), 24, 48 and 72 h after eccentric exercise. Creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase increased from 139 to 6 457 and from 116 to 199 IU · L(-1) from PRE to 72 h, respectively. Peak torque and all RTDs decreased at POST. Peak torque and RTD200 remained lower than PRE through 72 h. Peak RTD remained lower than PRE through 48 h, but was not different from PRE at 72 h. RTD10 and RTD100 were lower than PRE through 24 h, but were not different from PRE at 48 and 72 h. RTD50 decreased at POST, but was not different from PRE at 24 h. Early phase RTDs recovered more quickly than PT and RTD200. Early phase RTDs may reflect neural mechanisms underlying eccentric-induced force decrements, while late RTDs may describe the same physiological mechanisms as PT. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Degree of disability, pain levels, muscle strength, and electromyographic function in patients with Hansen's disease with common peroneal nerve damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Véras, Larissa Sales Téles; Vale, Rodrigo Gomesde Souza; Mello, Danielli Braga de; Castro, José Adail Fonseca de; Lima, Vicente; Silva, Kelson Nonato Gomes da; Trott, Alexis; Dantas, Estélio Henrique Martin

    2012-06-01

    This study evaluated the degree of disability, pain levels, muscle strength, and electromyographic function (RMS) in individuals with leprosy. We assessed 29 individuals with leprosy showing common peroneal nerve damage and grade 1 or 2 disability who were referred for physiotherapeutic treatment, as well as a control group of 19 healthy participants without leprosy. All subjects underwent analyses of degree of disability, electromyographic tests, voluntary muscle force, and the Visual Analog Pain Scale. McNemar's test found higher levels of grade 2 of disability (Δ = 75.9%; p = 0.0001) among individuals with leprosy. The Mann-Whitney test showed greater pain levels (Δ = 5.0; p = 0.0001) in patients with leprosy who had less extension strength in the right and left extensor hallucis longus muscles (Δ = 1.28, p = 0.0001; Δ = 1.55, p = 0.0001, respectively) and dorsiflexion of the right and left feet (Δ = 1.24, p = 0.0001; Δ = 1.45, p = 0.0001, respectively) than control subjects. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the RMS score for dorsiflexion of the right (Δ = 181.66 m·s-2, p = 0.001) and left (Δ = 102.57m·s-2, p = 0.002) feet was lower in patients with leprosy than in control subjects, but intragroup comparisons showed no difference. Leprosy had a negative influence on all of the study variables, indicating the need for immediate physiotherapeutic intervention in individuals with leprosy. This investigation opens perspectives for future studies that analyze leprosy treatment with physical therapeutic intervention.

  13. Degree of disability, pain levels, muscle strength, and electromyographic function in patients with Hansen's disease with common peroneal nerve damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Sales Téles Véras

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study evaluated the degree of disability, pain levels, muscle strength, and electromyographic function (RMS in individuals with leprosy. METHODS: We assessed 29 individuals with leprosy showing common peroneal nerve damage and grade 1 or 2 disability who were referred for physiotherapeutic treatment, as well as a control group of 19 healthy participants without leprosy. All subjects underwent analyses of degree of disability, electromyographic tests, voluntary muscle force, and the Visual Analog Pain Scale. RESULTS: McNemar's test found higher levels of grade 2 of disability (Δ = 75.9%; p = 0.0001 among individuals with leprosy. The Mann-Whitney test showed greater pain levels (Δ = 5.0; p = 0.0001 in patients with leprosy who had less extension strength in the right and left extensor hallucis longus muscles (Δ = 1.28, p = 0.0001; Δ = 1.55, p = 0.0001, respectively and dorsiflexion of the right and left feet (Δ = 1.24, p = 0.0001; Δ = 1.45, p = 0.0001, respectively than control subjects. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the RMS score for dorsiflexion of the right (Δ = 181.66 m·s-2, p = 0.001 and left (Δ = 102.57m·s-2, p = 0.002 feet was lower in patients with leprosy than in control subjects, but intragroup comparisons showed no difference. CONCLUSIONS: Leprosy had a negative influence on all of the study variables, indicating the need for immediate physiotherapeutic intervention in individuals with leprosy. This investigation opens perspectives for future studies that analyze leprosy treatment with physical therapeutic intervention.

  14. Effects of whole-body cryotherapy vs. far-infrared vs. passive modalities on recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage in highly-trained runners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Hausswirth

    Full Text Available Enhanced recovery following physical activity and exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD has become a priority for athletes. Consequently, a number of post-exercise recovery strategies are used, often without scientific evidence of their benefits. Within this framework, the purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of whole body cryotherapy (WBC, far infrared (FIR or passive (PAS modalities in hastening muscular recovery within the 48 hours after a simulated trail running race. In 3 non-adjoining weeks, 9 well-trained runners performed 3 repetitions of a simulated trail run on a motorized treadmill, designed to induce muscle damage. Immediately (post, post 24 h, and post 48 h after exercise, all participants tested three different recovery modalities (WBC, FIR, PAS in a random order over the three separate weeks. Markers of muscle damage (maximal isometric muscle strength, plasma creatine kinase [CK] activity and perceived sensations [i.e. pain, tiredness, well-being] were recorded before, immediately after (post, post 1 h, post 24 h, and post 48 h after exercise. In all testing sessions, the simulated 48 min trail run induced a similar, significant amount of muscle damage. Maximal muscle strength and perceived sensations were recovered after the first WBC session (post 1 h, while recovery took 24 h with FIR, and was not attained through the PAS recovery modality. No differences in plasma CK activity were recorded between conditions. Three WBC sessions performed within the 48 hours after a damaging running exercise accelerate recovery from EIMD to a greater extent than FIR or PAS modalities.

  15. Influence of Maturation Status on Eccentric Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage and the Repeated Bout Effect in Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ju Lin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared changes in indirect muscle damage markers, proprioception and arterial stiffness after elbow flexor eccentric exercise between pre-pubescent (9–10 y, pubescent (14–15 y, and post-pubescent (20–24 y healthy, untrained females (n = 13/group. The maturation of the participants was confirmed by the hand bone age. All participants performed two bouts of 30 sub-maximal eccentric contractions (EC1, EC2 using a dumbbell set at 60% of pre-exercise maximal voluntary isometric elbow flexion strength at 90°. Changes in maximal voluntary concentric contraction (MVC torque, muscle soreness (SOR, plasma creatine kinase activity, proprioception (position sense, joint reaction angle and arterial stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity: cfPWV before to 5 days after EC1 and EC2 were compared among groups by a mixed-design two-way ANOVA. Pre-exercise MVC torque and cfPWV were smaller (P < 0.05 for the pre-pubescent (MVC: 10.0 ± 0.9 Nm, cfPWV: 903 ± 60 cm/s and the pubescent (14.3 ± 1.1 Nm, 967 ± 61 cm/s than the post-pubescent (19.1 ± 1.4 Nm, 1,103 ± 73 cm/s. Changes in all variables after EC1 were smaller (P < 0.05 for the pre-pubescent (e.g., MVC at 1 d post-exercise: −10 ± 6%, peak SOR: 5 ± 2 mm than the pubescent (−15 ± 9%, 12 ± 6 mm and the post-pubescent (−25 ± 7%, 19 ± 13 mm. After EC2, changes in all variables were smaller (P < 0.05 than those after EC1 for all groups (e.g., MVC at 1 d post-exercise, pre-pubescent: −4 ± 6%, pubescent: −9 ± 4%, post-pubescent: −14 ± 5%; peak SOR: 3 ± 2, 7 ± 3, 11 ± 6 mm, but the magnitude of the repeated bout effect was not different (P > 0.05 among the groups. These results show that the extents of muscle damage, and proprioception and arterial stiffness changes after eccentric exercise are greater at later stages of maturation, but the repeated bout effect is not affected by maturation.

  16. Blood lipid peroxides and muscle damage increased following intensive resistance training of female weightlifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jen-Fang; Chang, Wei-Yin; Chan, Kuei-Hui; Tsai, Wen-Yee; Lin, Chen-Li; Hsu, Mei-Chieh

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in muscle cell injury and antioxidant capacity of weightlifters following a 1-week intensive resistance-training regimen. Thirty-six female subjects participated in this study, and their ages ranged from 18 to 25 years. The sample group included 19 elite weightlifters with more than 3 years of weightlifting training experience, while the control group comprised 17 non-athletic individuals. Compared with non-athletes, weightlifters had significantly lower glutathione peroxidase activity and plasma vitamin C concentrations. Weightlifters also had significantly higher malondialdehyde + 4-hydroxy 2-(E)-nonenal (MDA+4-HNE) and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) levels and creatine kinase (CK) activity. For weightlifters, the plasma vitamin E level and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased, and CK activity increased significantly (P weightlifters (P weightlifters. Furthermore, proper rest after intensive training was found to be important for recovery.

  17. Detection and characterization of exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD) via thermography and image processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avdelidis, Nicolas; Kappatos, Vassilios; Georgoulas, George

    2017-01-01

    of commonly measurement tools and methods. Thermography has been used successfully as a research detection tool in medicine for the last 6 decades but very limited work has been reported on EIMD area. The main purpose of this research is to assess and characterize EIMD, using thermography and image processing...... techniques. The first step towards that goal is to develop a reliable segmentation technique to isolate the region of interest (ROI). A semi-automatic image processing software was designed and regions of the left and right leg based on superpixels were segmented. The image is segmented into a number...... of regions and the user is able to intervene providing the regions which belong to each of the two legs. In order to validate the image processing software, an extensive experimental investigation was carried out, acquiring thermographic images of the rectus femoris muscle before, immediately post and 24, 48...

  18. Co-expression of IGF-1 family members with myogenic regulatory factors following acute damaging muscle-lengthening contractions in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Bryon R; O'Reilly, Ciara E; Phillips, Stuart M; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Parise, Gianni

    2008-01-01

    Muscle regeneration following injury is dependent on the ability of muscle satellite cells to activate, proliferate and fuse with damaged fibres. This process is controlled by the myogenic regulatory factors (MRF). Little is known about the temporal relation of the MRF with the expression of known myogenic growth factors (i.e. IGF-1) in humans following muscle damage. Eight subjects (20.6 ± 2.1 years; 81.4 ± 9.8 kg) performed 300 lengthening contractions (180 deg s−1) of their knee extensors in one leg on a dynamometer. Blood and muscle samples were collected before and at 4 (T4), 24 (T24), 72 (T72) and 120 h (T120) post-exercise. Mechano growth factor (MGF), IGF-1Ea and IGF-1Eb mRNA were quantified. Serum IGF-1 did not change over the post-exercise time course. IGF-1Ea and IGF-1Eb mRNA increased ∼4- to 6-fold by T72 (P marked by an increase in both Myf5 and MyoD, while IGF-1Ea and -Eb may be temporally related to differentiation as marked by an increase in MRF4 and myogenin expression following acute muscle damage. PMID:18818249

  19. Comparative effect of order based resistance exercises on number of repetitions, rating of perceived exertion and muscle damage biomarkers in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Arazi

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: It can be concluded that both of the resistance exercise orders were equally effective in muscle damage parameters (CK, lactate, RPE and the average of the total number of exercise repetitions, although when the exercise session progressed, the number of repetitions performed to volitional failure decreased in last exercise in one single order, and the exercise order can influence performance.

  20. Dynamic Contractility and Efficiency Impairments in Stretch-Shortening Cycle Are Stretch-Load-Dependent After Training-Induced Muscle Damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaczi, Mark; Racz, Levente; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Tihanyi, Jozsef

    Vaczi, M, Racz, L, Hortobagyi, T, and Tihanyi, J. Dynamic contractility and efficiency impairments in stretch-shortening cycle are stretch-load-dependent after training-induced muscle damage. J Strength Cond Res 27(8): 2171-2179, 2013To determine the acute task and stretch-load dependency of

  1. Effect of low-level laser therapy (808 nm) on markers of muscle damage: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felismino, Amanda Soares; Costa, Eduardo Caldas; Aoki, Marcelo Saldanha; Ferraresi, Cleber; de Araújo Moura Lemos, Telma Maria; de Brito Vieira, Wouber Hérickson

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study was to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on markers of muscle damage (creatine kinase (CK) and strength performance) in the biceps brachii. Twenty-two physically active men were randomized into two groups: placebo and laser. All volunteers were submitted to an exercise-induced muscle damage protocol for biceps brachii (biceps curl, 10 sets of 10 repetitions with load of 50% of one-repetition maximum test (1RM)). Active LLLT (808 nm; 100 mW; 35.7 W/cm(2), 357.14 J/cm(2) per point, energy of 1 J per point applied for 10 s on four points of the biceps brachii belly of each arm) or placebo was applied between the sets of the biceps curl exercise. CK activity and maximum strength performance (1RM) were measured before, immediately after, 24, 48, and 72 h after the exercise-induced muscle damage protocol. There was an increase in CK activity after the muscle damage protocol in both groups; however, this increase was attenuated in the laser group compared to the placebo group at 72 h (placebo = 841 vs. laser = 357%; p effect on the recovery of strength performance.

  2. Loss of nNOS inhibits compensatory muscle hypertrophy and exacerbates inflammation and eccentric contraction-induced damage in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehner, Stanley C; Reed, Sarah M; Anderson, Kendra N; Huang, Paul L; Percival, Justin M

    2015-01-15

    Approaches targeting nitric oxide (NO) signaling show promise as therapies for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies. However, the mechanisms by which NO benefits dystrophin-deficient muscle remain unclear, but may involve nNOSβ, a newly discovered enzymatic source of NO in skeletal muscle. Here we investigate the impact of dystrophin deficiency on nNOSβ and use mdx mice engineered to lack nNOSμ and nNOSβ to discern how the loss of nNOS impacts dystrophic skeletal muscle pathology. In mdx muscle, nNOSβ was mislocalized and its association with the Golgi complex was reduced. nNOS depletion from mdx mice prevented compensatory skeletal muscle cell hypertrophy, decreased myofiber central nucleation and increased focal macrophage cell infiltration, indicating exacerbated dystrophic muscle damage. Reductions in muscle integrity in nNOS-null mdx mice were accompanied by decreases in specific force and increased susceptibility to eccentric contraction-induced muscle damage compared with mdx controls. Unexpectedly, muscle fatigue was unaffected by nNOS depletion, revealing a novel latent compensatory mechanism for the loss of nNOS in mdx mice. Together with previous studies, these data suggest that localization of both nNOSμ and nNOSβ is disrupted by dystrophin deficiency. They also indicate that nNOS has a more complex role as a modifier of dystrophic pathology and broader therapeutic potential than previously recognized. Importantly, these findings also suggest nNOSβ as a new drug target and provide a new conceptual framework for understanding nNOS signaling and the benefits of NO therapies in dystrophinopathies. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Loss of nNOS inhibits compensatory muscle hypertrophy and exacerbates inflammation and eccentric contraction-induced damage in mdx mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehner, Stanley C.; Reed, Sarah M.; Anderson, Kendra N.; Huang, Paul L.; Percival, Justin M.

    2015-01-01

    Approaches targeting nitric oxide (NO) signaling show promise as therapies for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies. However, the mechanisms by which NO benefits dystrophin-deficient muscle remain unclear, but may involve nNOSβ, a newly discovered enzymatic source of NO in skeletal muscle. Here we investigate the impact of dystrophin deficiency on nNOSβ and use mdx mice engineered to lack nNOSμ and nNOSβ to discern how the loss of nNOS impacts dystrophic skeletal muscle pathology. In mdx muscle, nNOSβ was mislocalized and its association with the Golgi complex was reduced. nNOS depletion from mdx mice prevented compensatory skeletal muscle cell hypertrophy, decreased myofiber central nucleation and increased focal macrophage cell infiltration, indicating exacerbated dystrophic muscle damage. Reductions in muscle integrity in nNOS-null mdx mice were accompanied by decreases in specific force and increased susceptibility to eccentric contraction-induced muscle damage compared with mdx controls. Unexpectedly, muscle fatigue was unaffected by nNOS depletion, revealing a novel latent compensatory mechanism for the loss of nNOS in mdx mice. Together with previous studies, these data suggest that localization of both nNOSμ and nNOSβ is disrupted by dystrophin deficiency. They also indicate that nNOS has a more complex role as a modifier of dystrophic pathology and broader therapeutic potential than previously recognized. Importantly, these findings also suggest nNOSβ as a new drug target and provide a new conceptual framework for understanding nNOS signaling and the benefits of NO therapies in dystrophinopathies. PMID:25214536

  4. Effects of Light-Emitting Diode Therapy on Muscle Hypertrophy, Gene Expression, Performance, Damage, and Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness: Case-control Study with a Pair of Identical Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Bertucci, Danilo; Schiavinato, Josiane; Reiff, Rodrigo; Araújo, Amélia; Panepucci, Rodrigo; Matheucci, Euclides; Cunha, Anderson Ferreira; Arakelian, Vivian Maria; Hamblin, Michael R; Parizotto, Nivaldo; Bagnato, Vanderlei

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to verify how a pair of monozygotic twins would respond to light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) or placebo combined with a strength-training program during 12 weeks. This case-control study enrolled a pair of male monozygotic twins, allocated randomly to LEDT or placebo therapies. Light-emitting diode therapy or placebo was applied from a flexible light-emitting diode array (λ = 850 nm, total energy = 75 J, t = 15 seconds) to both quadriceps femoris muscles of each twin immediately after each strength training session (3 times/wk for 12 weeks) consisting of leg press and leg extension exercises with load of 80% and 50% of the 1-repetition maximum test, respectively. Muscle biopsies, magnetic resonance imaging, maximal load, and fatigue resistance tests were conducted before and after the training program to assess gene expression, muscle hypertrophy and performance, respectively. Creatine kinase levels in blood and visual analog scale assessed muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness, respectively, during the training program. Compared with placebo, LEDT increased the maximal load in exercise and reduced fatigue, creatine kinase, and visual analog scale. Gene expression analyses showed decreases in markers of inflammation (interleukin 1β) and muscle atrophy (myostatin) with LEDT. Protein synthesis (mammalian target of rapamycin) and oxidative stress defense (SOD2 [mitochondrial superoxide dismutase]) were up-regulated with LEDT, together with increases in thigh muscle hypertrophy. Light-emitting diode therapy can be useful to reduce muscle damage, pain, and atrophy, as well as to increase muscle mass, recovery, and athletic performance in rehabilitation programs and sports medicine.

  5. Angiotensin II receptor type 1 blockade decreases CTGF/CCN2-mediated damage and fibrosis in normal and dystrophic skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Morales, María Gabriela; Cabrera, Daniel; Vio, Carlos P; Brandan, Enrique

    2012-04-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN-2) is mainly involved in the induction of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The levels of CTGF correlate with the degree and severity of fibrosis in many tissues, including dystrophic skeletal muscle. The CTGF overexpression in tibialis anterior skeletal muscle using an adenoviral vector reproduced many of the features observed in dystrophic muscles including muscle damage and regeneration, fibrotic response and decrease in the skeletal muscle strength. The renin-angiotensin system is involved in the genesis and progression of fibrotic diseases through its main fibrotic components angiotensin-II and its transducer receptor AT-1. The use of AT-1 receptor blockers (ARB) has been shown to decrease fibrosis. In this paper, we show the effect of AT-1 receptor blockade on CTGF-dependent biological activity in skeletal muscle cells as well as the response to CTGF overexpression in normal skeletal muscle. Our results show that in myoblasts ARB decreased CTGF-mediated increase of ECM protein levels, extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK-1/2) phosphorylation and stress fibres formation. In tibialis anterior muscle overexpressing CTGF using an adenovirus, ARB treatment decreased CTGF-mediated increase of ECM molecules, α-SMA and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation levels. Quite remarkable, ARB was able to prevent the loss of contractile force of tibialis anterior muscles overexpressing CTGF. Finally, we show that ARB decreased the levels of fibrotic proteins, CTGF and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation augmented in a dystrophic skeletal muscle from mdx mice. We propose that ARB is a novel pharmacological tool that can be used to decrease the fibrosis induced by CTGF in skeletal muscle associated with muscular dystrophies. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2011 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. CT evaluation of the damaged upper limb muscle in patients with Duchenne type progressive muscular dystrophy (DMD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Hiroshi; Matsuke, Yutaka.

    1992-01-01

    In order to evaluate the changes of CT numbers and cross sectional areas of the muscles, we determined CT scores of the muscle. In twelve patients with Duchenne type progressive muscular dystrophy (DMD), we assessed the difference of CT scores of the muscle and the correlation between CT score of the muscle and 9-stage classification of upper extremities. CT scores of the subscapularis muscle and infraspinatus muscle were significantly lower than deltoideus muscle at the level of the shoulder, and flexor muscles showed also significantly lower than extensor muscles at the level of the upper extremity. Good correlations between CT score of the muscle and 9-stage classification of upper extremities were observed in the muscles of shoulder and upper arm. (author)

  7. No Differences Between Alter G-Trainer and Active and Passive Recovery Strategies on Isokinetic Strength, Systemic Oxidative Stress and Perceived Muscle Soreness After Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Matthew B; Nix, Carrie M; Greenwood, Lori D; Greenwood, Mike C

    2018-03-01

    Cooke, MB, Nix, C, Greenwood, L, and Greenwood, M. No Differences Between Alter G-Trainer and Active and Passive Recovery Strategies on Isokinetic Strength, Systemic Oxidative Stress and Perceived Muscle Soreness After Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage. J Strength Cond Res 32(3): 736-747, 2018-The incidence of muscle injuries is prevalent in elite sport athletes and weekend warriors and strategies that safely and effectively hasten recovery are highly desirable. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences between 3 recovery methods after eliciting muscle damage in recreationally active men relative to maximal isokinetic contractions, perceived muscle soreness, and psychological mood states. Twenty-five recreationally active men (22.15 ± 3.53 years, 75.75 ± 11.91 kg, 180.52 ± 7.3 cm) were randomly matched by V[Combining Dot Above]O2 peak (53.86 ± 6.65 ml·kg·min) and assigned to one of 3 recovery methods: anti-gravity treadmill (G-Trainer) (N = 8), conventional treadmill (N = 8) or static stretching (N = 9). Recovery methods were performed 30 minutes, 24, 48, and 72 hours after a 45-minute downhill run. Following eccentrically biased running, no significant differences were noted in isokinetic knee flexion and extension peak torque, systemic markers of muscle damage, oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation such as serum creatine kinase (CK), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA), respectively, and subjective ratings of perceived muscle soreness between recovery methods. The G-Trainer group did however display a higher mood state as indicated by the Profile of Mood State global scores at 24 hours postexercise when compared to the conventional treadmill recovery group (p = 0.035). The improved mood state after the use of the anti-gravity treadmill may provide clinical relevance to other populations.

  8. Effects of contract-relax vs static stretching on stretch-induced strength loss and length-tension relationship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, S S; Magnusson, S P; McHugh, M P

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the acute effects of contract-relax stretching (CRS) vs static stretching (SS) on strength loss and the length-tension relationship. We hypothesized that there would be a greater muscle length-specific effect of CRS vs SS. Isometric hamstring strength...... loss compared with SS. These results support the use of SS for stretching the hamstrings....

  9. Protective role of Nrf2 against mechanical-stretch-induced apoptosis in mouse fibroblasts: a potential therapeutic target of mechanical-trauma-induced stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiannan; Li, Bingshu; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Linlin; Tang, Jianming; Hong, Li

    2018-01-10

    We investigated the protective effect and underlying molecular mechanism of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) against mechanical-stretch-induced apoptosis in mouse fibroblasts. Normal cells, Nrf2 silencing cells, and Nrf2 overexpressing cells were respectively divided into two groups-nonintervention and cyclic mechanical strain (CMS)-subjected to CMS of 5333 μ (1.0 Hz for 4 h), six groups in total (control, CMS, shNfe212, shNfe212 + CMS, LV-shNfe212, and LV-shNfe212 + CMS). After treatment, cell apoptosis; cell-cycle distribution; expressions of Nrf2, Bax, Bcl-2, Cyt-C, caspase-3, caspase-9, cleaved-caspase-3, and cleaved-caspase-9; mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm); reactive oxygen species (ROS); and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured. Thirty virgin female C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups: control (without intervention) and vaginal distension (VD) groups, which underwent VD for 1 h with an 8-mm dilator (0.3 ml saline). Leak-point pressure (LPP) was tested on day 7 after VD; Nrf2 expression, apoptosis, and MDA levels were then measured in urethra and anterior vaginal wall. Mechanical stretch decreased Nrf2 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions. Overexpression of Nrf2 alleviated mechanical-stretch-induced cell apoptosis; S-phase arrest of cell cycle; up-regulation of Bax, cytochrome C (Cyt-C), ROS, MDA, ratio of cleaved-caspase-3/caspase-3 and cleaved-caspase-9/caspase-9; and exacerbated the decrease of Bcl2 and ΔΨm in L929 cells. On the contrary, silencing of Nrf2 showed opposite effects. Besides, VD reduced LPP levels and Nrf2 expression and increased cell apoptosis and MDA generation in the urethra and anterior vaginal wall. Nrf2 exhibits a protective role against mechanical-stretch -induced apoptosis on mouse fibroblasts, which might indicate a potential therapeutic target of mechanical-trauma-induced stress urinary incontinence (SUI).

  10. Local and Generalized Endogenous Pain Modulation in Healthy Men: Effects of Exercise and Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Christopher D; Tynes, Brandon K; Gonglach, Alexander R; Waddell, Dwight E

    2016-12-01

    Isometric exercise has been shown to activate endogenous pain inhibitory pathways in healthy adults, but not in some clinical pain populations.  Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) and the associated delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) are a model for studying clinical pain; thus, our purpose was to examine the effects of isometric exercise on pressure pain threshold (PPT) in the presence and absence of DOMS.  Data were collected on 23 males (22.8 ± 2.5 yrs). PPT was assessed in the right (exercising) and left (resting) quadriceps prior to, every 30 seconds during, and 2 and 15 minutes following an isometric contraction of the right quadriceps at 25% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) held until fatigue. Unilateral eccentric exercise was performed to induce DOMS in the exercising leg and testing was repeated 48 hours later.  DOMS increased (P exercise in the exercising (P ≤ 0.002) and resting (P ≤ 0.002) quadriceps but did not differ between the control and EIMD conditions in either leg (P ≤ 0.61). PPT remained elevated 2 and 15 minutes postexercise (P exercised quadriceps in both conditions, but values returned to baseline at 2 (P = 0.91) and 15 minutes (P = 0.28) postisometric exercise in the resting quadriceps.  Unlike clinical pain, DOMS had no effect on the PPT response during exercise in either the exercising or resting quadriceps. The fact that exercise altered PPT in both quadriceps during exercise suggests a generalized pain inhibitory mechanism was activated. However, the restriction of postexercise effects to the exercised limb suggests localized inhibitory mechanism(s) were activated after exercise. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Percutaneous Needle Tenotomy for the Treatment of Muscle and Tendon Contractures in Adults With Brain Damage: Results and Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroian, Flavia; Jourdan, Claire; Froger, Jérome; Anquetil, Claire; Choquet, Olivier; Coulet, Bertand; Laffont, Isabelle

    2017-05-01

    To study the results and complications of percutaneous needle tenotomy for superficial retracted tendons in patients with brain damage. Prospective observational study. University hospital. Patients with severe brain damage (N=38; mean age, 60.7y; age range, 24-93y; 21 women) requiring surgical management of contractures and eligible for percutaneous needle tenotomy were enrolled between February 2015 and February 2016. The percutaneous needle tenotomy gesture was performed by a physical medicine and rehabilitation physician trained by an orthopedic surgeon, under local or locoregional anesthesia. Treated tendons varied among patients. All patients were evaluated at 1, 3, and 6 months to assess surgical outcomes (joint range of motion [ROM], pain, and functional improvement) while screening for complications. Improvements in ROM (37/38) and contractures-related pain (12/12) were satisfactory. Functional results were satisfactory (Goal Attainment Scale score ≥0) for most patients (37/38): nursing (n=12), putting shoes on (n=8), getting in bed or sitting on a chair (n=6), verticalization (n=7), transfers and gait (n=8), and grip (n=2). Five patients had complications related to the surgical gesture: cast-related complications (n=2), hand hematoma (n=2), and cutaneous necrosis of the Achilles tendon in a patient with previous obliterative arteriopathy of the lower limbs (n=1). Percutaneous needle tenotomy yields good results in the management of selected superficial muscle and tendon contractures. The complications rate is very low, and this treatment can be an alternative to conventional surgery in frail patients with neurologic diseases. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Stretch-induced nerve injury: a proposed technique for the study of nerve regeneration and evaluation of the influence of gabapentin on this model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Machado

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The rat models currently employed for studies of nerve regeneration present distinct disadvantages. We propose a new technique of stretch-induced nerve injury, used here to evaluate the influence of gabapentin (GBP on nerve regeneration. Male Wistar rats (300 g; n=36 underwent surgery and exposure of the median nerve in the right forelimbs, either with or without nerve injury. The technique was performed using distal and proximal clamps separated by a distance of 2 cm and a sliding distance of 3 mm. The nerve was compressed and stretched for 5 s until the bands of Fontana disappeared. The animals were evaluated in relation to functional, biochemical and histological parameters. Stretching of the median nerve led to complete loss of motor function up to 12 days after the lesion (P<0.001, compared to non-injured nerves, as assessed in the grasping test. Grasping force in the nerve-injured animals did not return to control values up to 30 days after surgery (P<0.05. Nerve injury also caused an increase in the time of sensory recovery, as well as in the electrical and mechanical stimulation tests. Treatment of the animals with GBP promoted an improvement in the morphometric analysis of median nerve cross-sections compared with the operated vehicle group, as observed in the area of myelinated fibers or connective tissue (P<0.001, in the density of myelinated fibers/mm2 (P<0.05 and in the degeneration fragments (P<0.01. Stretch-induced nerve injury seems to be a simple and relevant model for evaluating nerve regeneration.

  13. Preconditioning by light-load eccentric exercise is equally effective as low-level laser therapy in attenuating exercise-induced muscle damage in collegiate men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nausheen, Samar; Moiz, Jamal Ali; Raza, Shahid; Shareef, Mohammad Yakub; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad H

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have already reported an independent effect of light-load eccentric exercise (10% eccentric exercise contraction [EEC]) and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) as a protective measure against more strenuous eccentric exercise. However, the difference between these two interventions is largely unknown. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare the preconditioning effect of 10% EEC vs. LLLT on subjective, physiological, and biochemical markers of muscle damage in elbow flexors in collegiate men. All 36 enrolled subjects were randomly assigned to either 10% EEC or LLLT group. Subjects in 10% EEC group performed 30 repetitions of an eccentric exercise with 10% maximal voluntary contraction strength 2 days prior to maximal eccentric exercise bout, whereas subjects in LLLT group were given LLLT. All the indirect markers of muscle damage were measured pre-exercise and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the exercise-induced muscle damage protocol. The muscle soreness was reduced in both groups ( p = 0.024); however, soreness was attenuated more in LLLT group at 48 hours (33.5 vs. 42.7, p = 0.004). There was no significant difference between the effect of 10% EEC and LLLT groups on other markers of muscle damage like a maximum voluntary isometric contraction ( p = 0.47), range of motion ( p = 0.16), upper arm circumference ( p = 0.70), creatine kinase ( p = 0.42), and lactate dehydrogenase ( p = 0.08). Within-group analysis showed both interventions provided similar protection over time. This study indicated that light-load eccentric exercise confers similar protective effect against subsequent maximal eccentric exercise as LLLT. Both the treatments could be used reciprocally based on the patient preference, costs, and feasibility of the equipment.

  14. Neutrophils do not contribute to local tissue damage, but play a key role in skeletal muscle regeneration, in mice injected with Bothrops asper snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, C F P; Zamunér, S R; Zuliani, J P; Fernandes, C M; Cruz-Hofling, M A; Fernandes, I; Chaves, F; Gutiérrez, J M

    2003-10-01

    Local tissue damage induced by crotaline snake venoms includes edema, myonecrosis, hemorrhage, and an inflammatory response associated with a prominent cellular infiltrate. The role of neutrophils in the local tissue damage induced by Bothrops asper snake venom and by myotoxin I, a phospholipase A2 isolated from this venom, was investigated. Male Swiss mice were pretreated with either an antimouse granulocyte rat monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody or with isotype-matched control antibody. No significant differences in these local effects were observed between mice pretreated with antigranulocyte antibodies and those receiving control IgG. Moreover, myotoxicity induced by B. asper myotoxin I was similar in neutrophil-depleted and control mice. The role of neutrophils in the process of skeletal muscle regeneration was also assessed. Muscle regeneration was assessed by quantifying the muscle levels of creatine kinase and by morphometric histological analysis of the area comprised by regenerating cells in damaged regions of skeletal muscle. Mice depleted of neutrophils and then injected with B. asper venom showed a more deficient regenerative response than mice pretreated with control IgG. Moreover, a drastic difference in the regenerative response was observed in mice injected with myotoxin I, because animals pretreated with control IgG showed a successful regeneration, whereas those depleted of neutrophils had abundant areas of necrotic tissue that had not been removed 7 days after injection, associated with reduced contents of creatine kinase. It is concluded that (1) neutrophils do not play a significant role in the acute local pathological alterations induced by the venom of B. asper, and (2) neutrophils play a prominent role in the process of skeletal muscle regeneration after injection of B. asper venom and myotoxin I, probably related to the phagocytosis of necrotic material and the recruitment of other inflammatory cells, two events directly associated

  15. [Effect of exhaustive weightlifting exercise on EMG, biochemical markers of muscle damage and performance capacity in young male subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minigalin, A D; Shumakov, A R; Novozhilov, A V; Samsonova, A V; Kos'mina, E A; Kalinskiĭ, M I; Baranova, T I; Kubasov, I V; Morozov, V I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of exhaustive weightlifting exercise on electrical and biochemical variables and performance capacity in young male subjects. The onset of exercise (80-50% 1RM) was associated with a decrease in the amount of work performed, which was followed by a steady performance capacity at 40-10% 1RM. There were no significant changes of m. rectus femoris EMG maximal amplitude though it tended to be increased during the first half of exercise. A significant blood lactate concentration increase indicated that an anaerobic metabolism was a predominant mechanism of muscle contraction energy-supply. CK level in blood plasma did not change but plasma myoglobin concentration doubled immediately post-exercise. The data presented here suggest that decrease in performance capacity was likely due to progressive "refusal of work" of the fast motor units and work prolongation of weaker, intermediate and slow motor units. Unchangeable CK activity and relatively small increase in myoglobin concentration in plasma suggest that used weightlifting exercise did not induced substantial damage in myocytes' membranes in our subjects.

  16. Influence of different types of compression garments on exercise-induced muscle damage markers after a soccer match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marqués-Jiménez, Diego; Calleja-González, Julio; Arratibel-Imaz, Iñaki; Delextrat, Anne; Uriarte, Fernando; Terrados, Nicolás

    2018-01-01

    There is not enough evidence of positive effects of compression therapy on the recovery of soccer players after matches. Therefore, the objective was to evaluate the influence of different types of compression garments in reducing exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) during recovery after a friendly soccer match. Eighteen semi-professional soccer players (24 ± 4.07 years, 177 ± 5 cm; 71.8 ± 6.28 kg and 22.73 ± 1.81 BMI) participated in this study. A two-stage crossover design was chosen. Participants acted as controls in one match and were assigned to an experimental group (compression stockings group, full-leg compression group, shorts group) in the other match. Participants in experimental groups played the match wearing the assigned compression garments, which were also worn in the 3 days post-match, for 7 h each day. Results showed a positive, but not significant, effect of compression garments on attenuating EIMD biomarkers response, and inflammatory and perceptual responses suggest that compression may improve physiological and psychological recovery.

  17. Seasonal Training Load Distribution of Professional Futsal Players: Effects on Physical Fitness, Muscle Damage and Hormonal Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloski, Bernardo; de Freitas, Victor H; Nakamura, Fábio Y; de A Nogueira, Francine C; Bara-Filho, Maurício G

    2016-06-01

    The aims of the present study were to describe the training load (TL) distribution of a professional futsal team and verify its subsequent effects on physical performance, muscle damage, and hormonal status. Twelve male professional futsal players (24.3 ± 4.7 years old; 75.5 ± 7.7 kg; and 173.4 ± 4.5 cm) participated in this study. A training program of 22 weeks (6 weeks of pre-season and 16 weeks of in-season) was analyzed. The session rating of perceived exertion method was used to monitor TLs. Physical tests (PTs; countermovement jump (CMJ), 5- and 20-m sprint, T-test, and multistage 20-m shuttle-run tests) were performed 4 times throughout the season (PT1-PT4). Blood sample (BS) collection (Creatine kinase [CK], testosterone, and cortisol) was performed in 7 occasions (BS1-BS7). TLs were higher in pre-season compared to in-season (p training program demonstrated higher TLs during the periods with low incidence of matches, emphasis on endurance and strength training during pre-season, speed and power training throughout in-season. This TL organization provides sufficient stimulus for appropriate physical fitness development in professional futsal players, without causing negative disturbances.

  18. The effects of a multi-ingredient supplement on markers of muscle damage and inflammation following downhill running in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhne, Jessica L; Ormsbee, Michael J; McKune, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    The effects of a multi-ingredient performance supplement (MIPS) on markers of inflammation and muscle damage, perceived soreness and lower limb performance are unknown in endurance-trained female athletes. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of MIPS (NO-Shotgun®) pre-loaded 4 weeks prior to a single-bout of downhill running (DHR) on hsC-Reactive Protein (hsCRP), interleukin (IL)-6, creatine kinase (CK), muscle soreness, lower limb circumferences and performance. Trained female runners ( n  = 8; 29 ± 5.9 years) (VO 2max : ≥ 50 ml -1 .kg -1 .min -1 , midfollicular phase (7-11 days post-menses) were randomly assigned in a double-blind manner into two groups: MIPS ( n  = 4) ingested one serving of NO Shotgun daily for 28 days prior to DHR and 30 min prior to all post-testing visits; Control (CON) ( n  = 4) consumed an isocaloric maltodextrin placebo in an identical manner to MIPS. hsCRP, IL-6, CK, perceived soreness, limb circumferences, and performance measures (flexibility, squat jump peak power) were tested on 5 occasions; immediately before (PRE), immediately post-DHR, 24, 48 and 72 h post-DHR. There were main effects of time for CK ( p  = 0.05), pain pressure threshold (right tibialis anterior ( p  = 0.010), right biceps femoris ( p  = 0.01), and left iliotibial band (ITB) ( p  = 0.05) across all time points), and maximum squat jump power ( p  = 0.04). Compared with 24 h post-DHR, maximum squat jump power was significantly lower at 48 h post-DHR ( p  = 0.05). Lower body perceived soreness was significantly increased at 24 h ( p  = 0.02) and baseline to 48 h ( p  = 0.02) post DHR. IL-6 peaked immediately post-DHR ( p  = 0.03) and hsCRP peaked at 24 h post-DHR ( p  = 0.06). Calculation of effect sizes indicated a moderate attenuation of hsCRP in MIPS at 72 h post-DHR. Consumption of MIPS for 4 weeks prior to a single bout of DHR attenuated inflammation three days post, but did

  19. Sequenced response of extracellular matrix deadhesion and fibrotic regulators after muscle damage is involved in protection against future injury in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Brandstetter, Simon; Schjerling, Peter

    2011-01-01

    ) 30 d later, or 30 d after a single stimulation bout (RBc). A muscle biopsy was collected from the control leg for comparison with the stimulated leg. Satellite cell content, tenascin C, and muscle regeneration were assessed by immunohistochemistry; real-time PCR was used to measure mRNA levels...

  20. The omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, prevents the damaging effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha during murine skeletal muscle cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearson Stephen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA is a ώ-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid with anti-inflammatory and anti-cachetic properties that may have potential benefits with regards to skeletal muscle atrophy conditions where inflammation is present. It is also reported that pathologic levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α are associated with muscle wasting, exerted through inhibition of myogenic differentiation and enhanced apoptosis. These findings led us to hypothesize that EPA may have a protective effect against skeletal muscle damage induced by the actions of TNF-α. Results The deleterious effects of TNF-α on C2C12 myogenesis were completely inhibited by co-treatment with EPA. Thus, EPA prevented the TNF-mediated loss of MyHC expression and significantly increased myogenic fusion (p p p p p p Conclusion In conclusion, EPA has a protective action against the damaging effects of TNF-α on C2C12 myogenesis. These findings support further investigations of EPA as a potential therapeutic agent during skeletal muscle regeneration following injury.

  1. Effect of Maximal Versus Supra-Maximal Exhausting Race on Lipid Peroxidation, Antioxidant Activity and Muscle-Damage Biomarkers in Long-Distance and Middle-Distance Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Said; Lamya, Ncir; Hamda, Mansour

    2016-03-01

    Exhausting physical exercise increases lipid peroxidation and causes important muscle damages. The human body tries to mitigate these adverse effects by mobilizing its antioxidant defenses. This study aims to investigate the effect of a maximal versus supra-maximal race sustained until exhaustion on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant activity and muscle-damage biomarkers in trained (i.e. long-distance and middle-distance runners) and sedentary subjects. The study has been carried out on 8 middle-distance runners (MDR), 9 long-distance runners (LDR), and 8 sedentary subjects (SS). Each subject has undergone two exhaustive running tests, the first one is an incremental event (VAMEVAL test), the second one is a constant supra-maximal intensity test (limited-time test). Blood samples were collected at rest and immediately after each test. A significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations was observed in SS and MDR after the VAMEVAL test and in LDR after the Limited-Time test. A significant difference was also observed between LDR and the other two groups after the VAMEVAL test, and between LDR and MDR after the Limited-Time test. Significant modifications, notably, in myoglobin, CK, LDH, IL-6, TNF-α, and TAS were likewise noted but depending on the race-type and the sportive specialty. Maximal and supra-maximal races induce a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and cause non-negligible inflammation and muscle damage. These effects were relatively related to the physical exercise type and the sportive specialty.

  2. Relationship between biomarkers of muscle damage and redox status in response to a weightlifting training session: effect of time-of-day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, A; Chtourou, H; Hammouda, O; Turki, M; Ayedi, F; Kallel, C; AbdelKarim, O; Hoekelmann, A; Souissi, N

    2016-06-01

    The aims of the present study were to: (1) investigate the effect of a weightlifting training session and time-of-day (TOD) upon biological parameters (i.e., oral temperature, hematological, C-reactive protein (CRP), and oxidative stress) and (2) assess their possible link with muscle damage responses. Nine weightlifters (21 ± 0.5 years) performed, in a randomized order, three Olympic-Weightlifting sessions (i.e., at 08:00, 14:00, and 18:00). Blood samples were collected at rest, 3 min and 48 h after each training session. Between pre- and post-training session, ANOVA showed significant increases in oxidative stress markers at the three TODs (p training session, given the higher rate of increase during the morning session, these diurnal variations persisted for temperature and WBC (p training sessions; (2) CK and CRP only during the morning session (r = 0.5); and (3) CRP and WBC during the three training sessions (r = 0.8). In conclusion, the present findings: (1) confirm that the muscle damage responses could be induced by a high level of oxidative stress and (2) suggest to avoid scheduling training sessions in the morning given the higher muscle damage, inflammatory, and oxidative responses at this TOD.

  3. The relationship between lower-limb strength and match-related muscle damage in elite level professional European soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Adam; Dunlop, Gordon; Rouissi, Mehdi; Chtara, Moktar; Paul, Darren; Zouhal, Hassane; Wong, Del P

    2015-01-01

    In professional soccer, the benefits of lower limb strength training have been advocated. However, from an aspect of performance development, specifically with respect to expression of fatigue and injury prevention, the advantages of increased lower body strength have received limited attention at the elite level of the game. The primary aim of this cross-sectional investigation was to examine the association between lower body strength and the expression of markers of fatigue as evaluated through muscle damage assessment following match play in professional soccer players. Ten male professional soccer players participated in this investigation (mean ± SD age 26.2 ± 4.3 years, height 181.6 ± 4.8 cm and body mass 78.7 ± 6.1 kg); creatine kinase (CK) was collected 2-days post-match for a 5-month period and at three different time points (Phase 1, Phase 2 and Phase 3); muscular strength (e.g. 4 repetition half-squat) was measured 3-day post-match. No significant change in CK and muscular force across three time points was found (F = 0.60, P = 0.56, η(2) = 0.06 and F = 2.65, P = 0.10, η(2) = 0.23, respectively). Muscular force was negatively correlated (moderate to very large) with CK. It can be concluded that players who produce greater lower body force as a result of being stronger in the lower limbs show reduced levels of CK 48 h post-match.

  4. Short-term exposure to formaldehyde promotes oxidative damage and inflammation in the trachea and diaphragm muscle of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Luiza Fagundes; Murta, Giselle Luciane; Bandeira, Ana Carla Balthar; Nardeli, Clarissa Rodrigues; Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Bezerra, Frank Silva

    2015-11-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an environmental pollutant widely used in industry. Exposure to FA causes irritation of the respiratory mucosa and is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in the airways. This study aimed at investigating the oxidative effects on the inflammatory response in the trachea and the diaphragm muscle (DM) of rats exposed to different concentrations of formaldehyde. Twenty-eight Fischer male rats were divided into four groups: control group (CG) exposed to the ambient air; and three groups exposed to the following formaldehyde concentrations of 1% (FA1), 5% (FA5) and 10% (FA10), respectively. The exposure occurred for twenty minutes, three times a day for five days. Oxidative stress analyses were performed by carbonyl protein, lipid peroxidation and catalase activity. The assessment of inflammatory cell influx in both organs and the mucus production in the trachea was carried out. There was an increase of lipid peroxidation in the trachea and the DM of FA1 and FA5 groups compared to the CG and FA10. The oxidation of DM proteins increased in FA10 group compared to CG, FA1 and FA5. The catalase enzyme activity in the DM was reduced in FA1, FA5 and FA10 compared to the CG. Meanwhile, there was a reduction in the enzymatic activity of FA10 compared to the CG in the trachea. The morphometric analysis in the DM demonstrated an influx of inflammatory cells in FA10 compared to the CG. In FA10 group, the tracheal epithelium showed metaplasia and ulceration. In addition, the tracheal epithelium showed more mucus deposits in FA5 compared to CG, FA1 and FA10. The results demonstrated that the exposure to formaldehyde at different concentrations in a short period of time promotes oxidative damage and inflammation in the DM and the trachea and causes metaplasia, ulceration and increased mucus at the latter. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Time-Course of Muscle Mass Loss, Damage, and Proteolysis in Gastrocnemius following Unloading and Reloading: Implications in Chronic Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Chacon-Cabrera

    Full Text Available Disuse muscle atrophy is a major comorbidity in patients with chronic diseases including cancer. We sought to explore the kinetics of molecular mechanisms shown to be involved in muscle mass loss throughout time in a mouse model of disuse muscle atrophy and recovery following immobilization.Body and muscle weights, grip strength, muscle phenotype (fiber type composition and morphometry and muscle structural alterations, proteolysis, contractile proteins, systemic troponin I, and mitochondrial content were assessed in gastrocnemius of mice exposed to periods (1, 2, 3, 7, 15 and 30 days of non-invasive hindlimb immobilization (plastic splint, I cohorts and in those exposed to reloading for different time-points (1, 3, 7, 15, and 30 days, R cohorts following a seven-day period of immobilization. Groups of control animals were also used.Compared to non-exposed controls, muscle weight, limb strength, slow- and fast-twitch cross-sectional areas, mtDNA/nDNA, and myosin content were decreased in mice of I cohorts, whereas tyrosine release, ubiquitin-proteasome activity, muscle injury and systemic troponin I levels were increased. Gastrocnemius reloading following splint removal improved muscle mass loss, strength, fiber atrophy, injury, myosin content, and mtDNA/nDNA, while reducing ubiquitin-proteasome activity and proteolysis.A consistent program of molecular and cellular events leading to reduced gastrocnemius muscle mass and mitochondrial content and reduced strength, enhanced proteolysis, and injury, was seen in this non-invasive mouse model of disuse muscle atrophy. Unloading of the muscle following removal of the splint significantly improved the alterations seen during unloading, characterized by a specific kinetic profile of molecular events involved in muscle regeneration. These findings have implications in patients with chronic diseases including cancer in whom physical activity may be severely compromised.

  6. Time-Course of Muscle Mass Loss, Damage, and Proteolysis in Gastrocnemius following Unloading and Reloading: Implications in Chronic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Cabrera, Alba; Lund-Palau, Helena; Gea, Joaquim; Barreiro, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Background Disuse muscle atrophy is a major comorbidity in patients with chronic diseases including cancer. We sought to explore the kinetics of molecular mechanisms shown to be involved in muscle mass loss throughout time in a mouse model of disuse muscle atrophy and recovery following immobilization. Methods Body and muscle weights, grip strength, muscle phenotype (fiber type composition and morphometry and muscle structural alterations), proteolysis, contractile proteins, systemic troponin I, and mitochondrial content were assessed in gastrocnemius of mice exposed to periods (1, 2, 3, 7, 15 and 30 days) of non-invasive hindlimb immobilization (plastic splint, I cohorts) and in those exposed to reloading for different time-points (1, 3, 7, 15, and 30 days, R cohorts) following a seven-day period of immobilization. Groups of control animals were also used. Results Compared to non-exposed controls, muscle weight, limb strength, slow- and fast-twitch cross-sectional areas, mtDNA/nDNA, and myosin content were decreased in mice of I cohorts, whereas tyrosine release, ubiquitin-proteasome activity, muscle injury and systemic troponin I levels were increased. Gastrocnemius reloading following splint removal improved muscle mass loss, strength, fiber atrophy, injury, myosin content, and mtDNA/nDNA, while reducing ubiquitin-proteasome activity and proteolysis. Conclusions A consistent program of molecular and cellular events leading to reduced gastrocnemius muscle mass and mitochondrial content and reduced strength, enhanced proteolysis, and injury, was seen in this non-invasive mouse model of disuse muscle atrophy. Unloading of the muscle following removal of the splint significantly improved the alterations seen during unloading, characterized by a specific kinetic profile of molecular events involved in muscle regeneration. These findings have implications in patients with chronic diseases including cancer in whom physical activity may be severely compromised. PMID

  7. Preconditioning by light-load eccentric exercise is equally effective as low-level laser therapy in attenuating exercise-induced muscle damage in collegiate men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nausheen S

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Samar Nausheen,1 Jamal Ali Moiz,1 Shahid Raza,1 Mohammad Yakub Shareef,2 Shahnawaz Anwer,3,4 Ahmad H Alghadir3 1Centre for Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, India; 2Faculty of Dentistry, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, India; 3Rehabilitation Research Chair, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India Background/objective: Previous studies have already reported an independent effect of light-load eccentric exercise (10% eccentric exercise contraction [EEC] and low-level laser therapy (LLLT as a protective measure against more strenuous eccentric exercise. However, the difference between these two interventions is largely unknown. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare the preconditioning effect of 10% EEC vs. LLLT on subjective, physiological, and biochemical markers of muscle damage in elbow flexors in collegiate men.Methods: All 36 enrolled subjects were randomly assigned to either 10% EEC or LLLT group. Subjects in 10% EEC group performed 30 repetitions of an eccentric exercise with 10% maximal voluntary contraction strength 2 days prior to maximal eccentric exercise bout, whereas subjects in LLLT group were given LLLT. All the indirect markers of muscle damage were measured pre-exercise and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the exercise-induced muscle damage protocol.Results: The muscle soreness was reduced in both groups (p = 0.024; however, soreness was attenuated more in LLLT group at 48 hours (33.5 vs. 42.7, p = 0.004. There was no significant difference between the effect of 10% EEC and LLLT groups on other markers of muscle damage like a maximum voluntary isometric contraction (p = 0.47, range of motion (p = 0.16, upper arm circumference (p = 0.70, creatine kinase (p = 0.42, and lactate dehydrogenase (p = 0.08. Within-group analysis showed both interventions provided

  8. Effects of low-level laser therapy applied before or after plyometric exercise on muscle damage markers: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Carolina Gassen; Dornelles, Maurício Pinto; Severo-Silveira, Lucas; Marques, Vanessa Bernardes; Rosso, Isabele de Albuquerque; Baroni, Bruno Manfredini

    2016-12-01

    Promising effects of phototherapy on markers of exercise-induced muscle damage has been already demonstrated in constant load or isokinetic protocols. However, its effects on more functional situations, such as plyometric exercises, and when is the best moment to apply this treatment (pre- or post-exercise) remain unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) before or after plyometric exercise on quadriceps muscle damage markers. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial was conducted with 24 healthy men, 12 at pre-exercise treatment group and 12 at post-exercise treatment group. Placebo and LLLT (810 nm, 200 mW per diode, 6 J per diode, 240 J per leg) were randomly applied on right/left knee extensor muscles of each volunteer before/after a plyometric exercise protocol. Muscular echo intensity (ultrasonography images), soreness (visual analogue scale - VAS), and strength impairment (maximal voluntary contraction - MVC) were assessed at baseline, 24, 48, and 72 h post-exercise. Legs treated with LLLT before or after exercise presented significantly smaller increments of echo intensity (values up to 1 %) compared to placebo treatments (increased up to ∼7 %). No significant treatment effect was found for VAS and MVC, although a trend toward better results on LLLT legs have been found for VAS (mean values up to 30 % lesser than placebo leg). In conclusion, LLLT applied before or after plyometric exercise reduces the muscle echo intensity response and possibly attenuates the muscle soreness. However, these positive results were not observed on strength impairment.

  9. The kinase Pyk2 is involved in renal fibrosis by means of mechanical stretch-induced growth factor expression in renal tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonomura, Kazuhiro; Okigaki, Mitsuhiko; Kimura, Taikou; Matsuoka, Eiko; Shiotsu, Yayoi; Adachi, Takaomi; Kado, Hiroshi; Ishida, Ryo; Kusaba, Tetsuro; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Mori, Yasukiyo

    2012-03-01

    Unilateral ureteral obstruction is a well-established experimental model of progressive renal fibrosis. We tested whether mechanical stretch and subsequent renal tubular distension might lead to renal fibrosis by first studying renal tubular epithelial cells in culture. We found that mechanical stretch induced reactive oxygen species that in turn activated the cytoplasmic proline-rich tyrosine kinase-2 (Pyk2). This kinase is abundantly expressed in tubular epithelial cells where it is activated by several stimuli. Using mice with deletion of Pyk2 we found that the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 induced by mechanical stretch in renal tubular epithelial cells was significantly reduced. The expression of connective tissue growth factor was also reduced in the Pyk2(-/-) mice. We also found that expression of connective tissue growth factor was independent of transforming growth factor-β1, but dependent on the Rho-associated coiled-coil forming protein kinase pathway. Thus, Pyk2 may be an important initiating factor in renal fibrosis and might be a new therapeutic target for ameliorating renal fibrosis.

  10. Influence of football match time-motion parameters on recovery time course of muscle damage and jump ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hoyo, Moisés; Cohen, Daniel Dylan; Sañudo, Borja; Carrasco, Luis; Álvarez-Mesa, Alejandro; Del Ojo, Juan José; Domínguez-Cobo, Sergio; Mañas, Víctor; Otero-Esquina, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    We analysed the time course of recovery of creatine kinase (CK) and countermovement jump (CMJ) parameters after a football match, and correlations between changes in these variables and match time-motion parameters (GPS-accelerometry) in 15 U-19 elite male players. Plasma CK and CMJ height (CMJH), average concentric force (CMJCON) and average eccentric force (CMJECC) were assessed 2 h before and 30 min, 24 h and 48 h post-match. There were substantially higher CK levels 30 min, 24 h and 48 h (ES: 0.43, 0.62, 0.40, respectively), post-match. CMJECC (ES: -0.38), CMJH (ES: -0.35) decreased 30 min post, CMJCON (ES: -0.35), CMJECC (ES: -0.35) and CMJH (ES: -1.35) decreased 24 h post, and CMJCON (ES: -0.41) and CMJH (ES: -0.53) decreased 48 h post. We found correlations between distance covered at velocities ≤21 km · h(-1) and changes in CK at 24 h (r = 0.56) and at 48 h (r = 0.54) and correlations between CK and distance covered >14 km · h(-1) (r = 0.50), accelerations (r = 0.48), and decelerations (r = 0.58) at 48 h. Changes in CMJCON 30 min and 24 h post (both r = -0.68) correlated with impacts >7.1·G. Decelerations >2 m · s(-)(2) correlated with changes CMJCON (r = -0.49) at 48 h and CMJECC (r = -0.47) at 30 min. Our results suggest that match GPS-accelerometry parameters may predict muscle damage and changes in components of neuromuscular performance immediately and 24-48 h post-match.

  11. Contraction-induced muscle fiber damage is increased in soleus muscle of streptozotocin-diabetic rats and is associated with elevated expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA in muscle fibers and activated satellite cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copray, S; Liem, R; Brouwer, N; Greenhaff, P; Habens, F; Fernyhough, P

    The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is elevated in the soleus muscle of streptozotocin-diabetic rats. To determine whether this diabetes-induced elevation was associated with or enhanced by muscle activity we have induced high-intensity muscle contraction by electrically

  12. Phenotypic switching induced by damaged matrix is associated with DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A activity and nuclear localization in smooth muscle cells (SMC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Xin Jiang

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix changes are often crucial inciting events for fibroproliferative disease. Epigenetic changes, specifically DNA methylation, are critical factors underlying differentiated phenotypes. We examined the dependency of matrix-induced fibroproliferation and SMC phenotype on DNA methyltransferases. The cooperativity of matrix with growth factors, cell density and hypoxia was also examined. Primary rat visceral SMC of early passage (0-2 were plated on native collagen or damaged/heat-denatured collagen. Hypoxia was induced with 3% O2 (balanced 5% CO2 and 95% N2 over 48 hours. Inhibitors were applied 2-3 hours after cells were plated on matrix, or immediately before hypoxia. Cells were fixed and stained for DNMT3A and smooth muscle actin (SMA or smooth muscle myosin heavy chain. Illumina 450 K array of CpG sites was performed on bisulfite-converted DNA from smooth muscle cells on damaged matrix vs native collagen. Matrix exquisitely regulates DNMT3A localization and expression, and influences differentiation in SMCs exposed to denatured matrix +/- hypoxia. Analysis of DNA methylation signatures showed that Matrix caused significant DNA methylation alterations in a discrete number of CpG sites proximal to genes related to SMC differentiation. Matrix has a profound effect on the regulation of SMC phenotype, which is associated with altered expression, localization of DNMTs and discrete changes DNA methylation.

  13. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks

    OpenAIRE

    Camc?o?lu, Burcu; Bo?nak-G??l?, Meral; Karadall?, M??errefe Nur; Ak?, ?ahika Zeynep; T?rk?z-Sucak, G?lsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity w...

  14. The Effects of Adding Whey Protein and Branched-chain Amino Acid to Carbohydrate Beverages on Indices of Muscle Damage after Eccentric Resistance Exercise in Untrained Young Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foad Asjodi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of supplementation of Branched-Chain Amino Acids (BCAAs plus carbohydrate (CHO and whey protein plus CHO on muscle damage indices after eccentric resistant exercise. Materials and Methods: Twenty four untrained healthy males participated in this study. They were randomly divided into three groups, BCAA +glucose (0.1+0.1g/kg supplement group (n=8, Whey+glucose (0.1+0.1g/kg supplement group (n=8, and placebo (malto dextrin 0.2g/kg group (n=8. Each subject consumed a carbohydrate beverage with addition of whey protein or branched-chain amino acid or placebo 30 minutes before exercise in a randomized,double-blind fashion. Serum levels of Creatine Kinase (CK, Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, and muscle pain were measured before, 24, 48, 72 h after exercise. Follow-up analyses included 1-way repeated measures ANOVAs, and Bonferroni post hoc comparisons. Results: 24 h after test, serum levels of CK, LDH and muscle pain in both supplement groups were increased less than placebo group (0.015, 0.001 and 0.001, respectively. Also, the levels of CK and LDH showed significant changes in both intervention groups compared to placebo group at 24 h (0.001, 0. 015, respectively. Similarly, significant differences in the levels of CK and LDH between groups were observed. Conclusion: These data indicate that muscle damage and pain after resistant exercise were reduced by an ingestion of either BCAA drink or whey protein drink.

  15. Power Production and Biochemical Markers of Metabolic Stress and Muscle Damage Following a Single Bout of Short-Sprint and Heavy Strength Exercise in Well-Trained Cyclists

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    Morten Kristoffersen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Although strength and sprint training are widely used methods in competitive cycling, no previous studies have compared the acute responses and recovery rates following such sessions among highly trained cyclists. The primary aim of the current study was to compare power production and biochemical markers of metabolic stress and muscle damage following a session of heavy strength (HS and short-sprint training (SS.Methods: Eleven well-trained male cyclists (18 ± 2 years with maximal oxygen uptake of 67.2 ± 5.0 mL·kg−1·min−1 completed one HS session and one SS session in a randomized order, separated by 48 h. Power production and biochemical variables were measured at baseline and at different time points during the first 45 h post exercise.Results: Lactate and human growth hormone were higher 5 min, 30 min and 1 h post the SS compared to the HS session (all p ≤ 0.019. Myoglobin was higher following the HS than the SS session 5 min, 30 min and 1 h post exercise (all p ≤ 0.005, while creatine kinase (CK was higher following the HS session 21 and 45 h post exercise (p ≤ 0.038. Counter movement jump and power production during 4 sec sprint returned to baseline levels at 23 and 47 h with no difference between the HS and SS session, whereas the delayed muscle soreness score was higher 45 h following the HS compared to the SS session (p = 0.010.Conclusion: Our findings indicate that SS training provides greater metabolic stress than HS training, whereas HS training leads to more muscle damage compared to that caused by SS training. The ability to produce power remained back to baseline already 23 h after both training sessions, indicating maintained performance levels although higher CK level and muscle soreness were present 45 h post the HS training session.

  16. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Camcıoğlu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS. Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS.

  17. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camcıoğlu, Burcu; Boşnak-Güçlü, Meral; Karadallı, Müşerrefe Nur; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Türköz-Sucak, Gülsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS.

  18. Smooth muscle actin as a novel serologic marker of severe intestinal damage in rat intestinal ischemia-reperfusion and human necrotising enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evennett, Nicholas; Cerigioni, Elisabetta; Hall, Nigel J; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Despite emergence of markers of intestinal mucosal damage such as intestinal fatty-acid binding protein (i-FABP), there are no specific markers of damage extending into the muscle layers. We hypothesized that smooth muscle actin (SMA) released from the intestinal muscularis would be detectable in plasma after severe intestinal injury. Serial blood samples were collected from rats (n = 10) undergoing intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) and controls (n = 5). Additionally, admission and/or preoperative plasma samples were collected from twelve neonates with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and five age- and weight-matched controls. Plasma ileal fatty-acid binding protein (rat) or i-FABP (human) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and plasma SMA was detected by western blotting. Plasma ileal fatty-acid binding protein was low in both the control group and IRI at baseline, but became rapidly elevated in the IRI group even during ischemia. SMA was detected in reperfusion plasma samples of all IRI rats, but in none of the control samples. Plasma i-FABP was higher in infants with NEC than age- and weight-matched controls. Although i-FABP was higher in infants with severe surgical disease compared with focal disease, there was no difference between the operative and nonoperative groups. SMA was detected in the plasma of all four neonates with severe surgical NEC, but not in those with focal disease or those who were successfully conservatively managed. SMA is detectable in plasma after severe intestinal injury and maybe a clinically useful maker of intestinal muscle damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Increased running speed and pre-race muscle damage as risk factors for exercise-associated muscle cramps in a 56 km ultra-marathon: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwellnus, Martin P; Allie, Siddieq; Derman, Wayne; Collins, Malcolm

    2011-11-01

    Despite the high prevalence of exercise-associated muscle cramping (EAMC) in endurance runners, the aetiology and risk factors for this condition are not fully understood. The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to identify risk factors associated with the development of EAMC in ultra-distance runners. 49 runners participating in a 56 km race completed a validated pre-race questionnaire. Pre-race muscle pain in the calves, hamstrings and quadriceps muscles was recorded (visual analogue scale) and pre-race serum creatine kinase (CK) activity was measured. 20 runners reported EAMC (EAMC group) during or within 6 h after the event, while 29 runners reported no cramping (CON group). EAMC was not associated with age, body mass index, sex, recent and past personal best running times, pre-race muscle pain and pre-race training (duration and frequency). Runners in the EAMC group tended to report on average longer training sessions during the 3 days before the race (EAMC 1.2 (1.1), CON 0.6 (1.0); p=0.077). Significant risk factors for EAMC were a past history of EAMC (EAMC 100%, CON 48%; p<0.001) and a faster running time (min) for the first 28 km split time of the race (EAMC 144 (20), CON 157 (14); p=0.029) despite being matched for recent (<15 weeks before race) personal best times in the 42.2 km race. Pre-race CK activity tended to be higher in the EAMC group (EAMC 89 (80), CON 58 (35); p=0.066). Novel risk factors for EAMC in distance runners are a past history of EAMC, faster running pace at the early stage of a race and possibly pre-race muscle damage.

  20. Damage to Liver and Skeletal Muscles in Marathon Runners During a 100 km Run With Regard to Age and Running Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jastrzębski Zbigniew

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine: (1 whether damage to liver and skeletal muscles occurs during a 100 km run; (2 whether the metabolic response to extreme exertion is related to the age or running speed of the participant; (3 whether it is possible to determine the optimal running speed and distance for long-distance runners’ health by examining biochemical parameters in venous blood. Fourteen experienced male amateur ultra-marathon runners, divided into two age groups, took part in a 100 km run. Blood samples for liver and skeletal muscle damage indexes were collected from the ulnar vein just before the run, after 25, 50, 75 and 100 km, and 24 hours after termination of the run. A considerable increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST was observed with the distance covered (p < 0.05, which continued during recovery. An increase in the mean values of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, creatine kinase (CK and C-reactive protein (CRP (p < 0.05 was observed with each sequential course. The biggest differences between the age groups were found for the activity of liver enzymes and LDH after completing 75 km as well as after 24 hours of recovery. It can be concluded that the response to extreme exertion deteriorates with age in terms of the active movement apparatus.

  1. Effect of sulphurous mineral water in haematological and biochemical markers of muscle damage after an endurance exercise in well-trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Marisol; González-Haro, Carlos; Esteva, Santiago; Escanero, Jesús F; Pina, José R

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effects of sulphurous mineral water (SMW) after a hydroponic treatment on muscle damage, antioxidant activity and peripheral blood changes induced by submaximal exercise. Thirty well-trained male triathletes were supplemented with SMW or placebo: 3 weeks of placebo, 30 days of wash out and 3 weeks of SMW. After both periods, participants ran for 2 h at 70% maximal aerobic speed. Antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant capacity and blood cell markers were compared between placebo and SMW at pre-exercise (T0), immediately post-exercise (T1), 24 h post-exercise (T2) and 48 h post-exercise (T3). Total thiols decreased until T3 vs. T0 for both placebo and SMW; transient red blood cells, haemoglobin and haematocrit increased were shown at T1 vs. T0 and for leucocytes until T2 vs. T0, only for placebo group. Total thiols increased significantly in SMW vs. placebo at T0; Thiobarbituric acid reactive species was significantly higher at T0, T1, T2 and T3; catalase increased significantly at T1; creatine phosphokinase decreased significantly at T1, T2 and T3, although no significant differences were found at T0. Furthermore, red blood cells, haemoglobin and haematocrit were significantly higher and leucocytes were significantly lower at T0 and T1 in SMW group vs. placebo group. This study suggests that three weeks of SMW supplementation may protect from exercise-induced muscle damage.

  2. Effects of Freshwater Clam Extract Supplementation on Time to Exhaustion, Muscle Damage, Pro/Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines, and Liver Injury in Rats after Exhaustive Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Wen Liao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The potent anti-inflammatory activities and tissue-protective effects of freshwater clams (Corbicula fluminea have been well reported. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of freshwater clam extract (FCE supplementation on time to exhaustion, muscle damage, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and liver injury in rats after exhaustive exercise. Thirty-two rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control (SC; SC group with FCE supplementation (SC+FCE; exhaustive exercise (E; and E group with FCE supplementation (E+FCE. The SC+FCE and E+FCE groups were treated with gavage administration of 20 mg/kg for seven consecutive days. Blood samples were collected for the evaluation of biochemical parameters. The cytokine levels of TNF-α and IL-10 were also examined. Twenty-four hours after exhaustive exercise, the rat livers were removed for H & E staining. The FCE supplementation could extend the time to exhaustion in exercised rats. The levels of CPK, LDH, AST, ALT, lactate, TNF-α and H & E stains of the liver injury were significantly decreased in the E+FCE group, but the blood glucose and IL-10 were significantly higher in comparison with the E group. This study suggests that FCE supplementation may improve endurance performance and reduce exercise-induced muscle damage, inflammatory stress and liver injury.

  3. Effects of exercise-induced muscle damage on resting metabolic rate, sub-maximal running and post-exercise oxygen consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Dean Gareth; Lamb, Kevin; Nicholas, Ceri; Twist, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), described as the acute weakness of the musculature after unaccustomed eccentric exercise, increases oxidative metabolism at rest and during endurance exercise. However, it is not known whether oxygen uptake during recovery from endurance exercise is increased when experiencing symptoms of EIMD. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of EIMD on physiological and metabolic responses before, during and after sub-maximal running. After a 12 h fast, eight healthy male participants completed baseline measurements comprising resting metabolic rate (RMR), indirect markers of EIMD, 10 min of sub-maximal running and 30 min of recovery to ascertain excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). Measurements were then repeated at 24 and 48 h after 100 Smith-machine squats. Data analysis revealed significant (PEPOC were increased in the two days after squatting exercise (PEPOC. Individuals engaging in unaccustomed resistance exercise that results in muscle damage should be mindful of the increases in resting energy expenditure and increased metabolic demand to exercise in the days that follow.

  4. Reduced susceptibility to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage in resistance-trained men is not linked to resistance training-related neural adaptations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X Ye

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of maximal concentric vs. eccentric exercise on the isometric strength of the elbow flexor, as well as the biceps brachii muscle electromyographic (EMG responses in resistance-trained (RT vs. untrained (UT men. Thirteen RT men (age: 24 ± 4 years; height: 180.2 ± 7.7 cm; body weight: 92.2 ± 16.9 kg and twelve UT men (age: 23 ± 4 years; height: 179.2 ± 5.0 cm; body weight: 81.5 ± 8.6 kg performed six sets of ten maximal concentric isokinetic (CON or eccentric isokinetic (ECC elbow flexion exercise in two separate visits. Before and after the exercise interventions, maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs were performed for testing isometric strength. In addition, bipolar surface EMG signals were detected from the biceps brachii muscle during the strength testing. Both CON and ECC caused isometric strength to decrease, regardless of the training status. However, ECC caused greater isometric strength decline than CON did for the UT group (p = 0.006, but not for the RT group. Both EMG amplitude and mean frequency significantly decreased and increased, respectively, regardless of the training status and exercise intervention. Resistance-trained men are less susceptible to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage, but this advantage is not likely linked to the chronic resistance training-induced neural adaptations.

  5. Enteric Neuronal Damage, Intramuscular Denervation and Smooth Muscle Phenotype Changes as Mechanisms of Chagasic Megacolon: Evidence from a Long-Term Murine Model of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila França Campos

    Full Text Available We developed a novel murine model of long-term infection with Trypanosoma cruzi with the aim to elucidate the pathogenesis of megacolon and the associated adaptive and neuromuscular intestinal disorders. Our intent was to produce a chronic stage of the disease since the early treatment should avoid 100% mortality of untreated animals at acute phase. Treatment allowed animals to be kept infected and alive in order to develop the chronic phase of infection with low parasitism as in human disease. A group of Swiss mice was infected with the Y strain of T. cruzi. At the 11th day after infection, a sub-group was euthanized (acute-phase group and another sub-group was treated with benznidazole and euthanized 15 months after infection (chronic-phase group. Whole colon samples were harvested and used for studying the histopathology of the intestinal smooth muscle and the plasticity of the enteric nerves. In the acute phase, all animals presented inflammatory lesions associated with intense and diffuse parasitism of the muscular and submucosa layers, which were enlarged when compared with the controls. The occurrence of intense degenerative inflammatory changes and increased reticular fibers suggests inflammatory-induced necrosis of muscle cells. In the chronic phase, parasitism was insignificant; however, the architecture of Aüerbach plexuses was focally affected in the inflamed areas, and a significant decrease in the number of neurons and in the density of intramuscular nerve bundles was detected. Other changes observed included increased thickness of the colon wall, diffuse muscle cell hypertrophy, and increased collagen deposition, indicating early fibrosis in the damaged areas. Mast cell count significantly increased in the muscular layers. We propose a model for studying the long-term (15 months pathogenesis of Chagasic megacolon in mice that mimics the human disease, which persists for several years and has not been fully elucidated. We

  6. Copper exposure induces toxicity to the antioxidant system via the destruction of Nrf2/ARE signaling and caspase-3-regulated DNA damage in fish muscle: Amelioration by myo-inositol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Fish Nutrition and Safety Production University Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Jiang, Jun [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Wu, Pei [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Fish Nutrition and Safety Production University Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Feng, Lin, E-mail: fenglin@sicau.edu.cn [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Fish Nutrition and Safety Production University Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Zhou, Xiao-Qiu, E-mail: zhouxq@sicau.edu.cn [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Fish Nutrition and Safety Production University Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Cu stress decreased fish muscle CuZnSOD, GPx1a, GPx1b and PKCδ mRNA levels. • Cu stress caused fish muscle lower nuclear Nrf2 levels and poor ARE binding ability. • Cu stress induced caspase-3 signaling-modulated DNA fragmentation in fish muscle. • Pre-treatment with MI prevented fish muscle from Cu-induced oxidative damages. - Abstract: The muscle is the main portion of fish that is consumed by humans. Copper (Cu) can induce oxidative damage in fish muscle. However, the effects of Cu exposure on the muscle antioxidant system and molecular patterns and preventive measures against these effects remain unclear. In this study, ROS production, enzymatic and mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling-related molecules, antioxidant response element (ARE) binding ability, DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 activities were analyzed in fish muscle following Cu exposure or myo-inositol (MI) pre-administration. The results indicated that contamination due to copper exposure caused an approximately three-fold increase in ROS production, induced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, and resulted in depletion of the glutathione (GSH) content of fish muscle. Moreover, Cu exposure caused decreases in the activities of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), CuZnSOD, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) that were accompanied by decreases in CuZnSOD, GPx1a, GPx1b and signaling factor protein kinase C delta mRNA levels. The decreases in the antioxidant enzyme gene mRNA levels were confirmed to be partly due to the reduced nuclear Nrf2 protein levels, poor ARE binding ability and increased caspase-3 signaling-modulated DNA fragmentation in the fish muscle. Interestingly, MI pre-treatment prevented fish muscle from Cu-induced oxidative damages mainly through increasing the GSH content, and increasing the CuZnSOD and GPx activities and corresponding mRNA levels and ARE binding ability. Taken together, our results show for the first

  7. Copper exposure induces toxicity to the antioxidant system via the destruction of Nrf2/ARE signaling and caspase-3-regulated DNA damage in fish muscle: Amelioration by myo-inositol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Feng, Lin; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Cu stress decreased fish muscle CuZnSOD, GPx1a, GPx1b and PKCδ mRNA levels. • Cu stress caused fish muscle lower nuclear Nrf2 levels and poor ARE binding ability. • Cu stress induced caspase-3 signaling-modulated DNA fragmentation in fish muscle. • Pre-treatment with MI prevented fish muscle from Cu-induced oxidative damages. - Abstract: The muscle is the main portion of fish that is consumed by humans. Copper (Cu) can induce oxidative damage in fish muscle. However, the effects of Cu exposure on the muscle antioxidant system and molecular patterns and preventive measures against these effects remain unclear. In this study, ROS production, enzymatic and mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling-related molecules, antioxidant response element (ARE) binding ability, DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 activities were analyzed in fish muscle following Cu exposure or myo-inositol (MI) pre-administration. The results indicated that contamination due to copper exposure caused an approximately three-fold increase in ROS production, induced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, and resulted in depletion of the glutathione (GSH) content of fish muscle. Moreover, Cu exposure caused decreases in the activities of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), CuZnSOD, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) that were accompanied by decreases in CuZnSOD, GPx1a, GPx1b and signaling factor protein kinase C delta mRNA levels. The decreases in the antioxidant enzyme gene mRNA levels were confirmed to be partly due to the reduced nuclear Nrf2 protein levels, poor ARE binding ability and increased caspase-3 signaling-modulated DNA fragmentation in the fish muscle. Interestingly, MI pre-treatment prevented fish muscle from Cu-induced oxidative damages mainly through increasing the GSH content, and increasing the CuZnSOD and GPx activities and corresponding mRNA levels and ARE binding ability. Taken together, our results show for the first

  8. Analysis of High-Intensity Skating in Top-Class Ice Hockey Match-Play in Relation to Training Status and Muscle Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lignell, Erik; Fransson, Dan; Krustrup, Peter

    2018-01-01

    -sprint sport that provokes fatigue in the latter half of a game. Forwards perform more intense skating than defensemen. Moreover, high-intensity game activities during top-class ice hockey are correlated with cardiovascular loading during a submaximal skating test. Taken together, training of elite ice......Lignell, E, Fransson, D, Krustrup, P, and Mohr, M. Analysis of high-intensity skating in top-class ice hockey match-play in relation to training status and muscle damage. J Strength Cond Res 32(5): 1303-1310, 2018-We examined high-intensity activities in a top-class ice-hockey game and the effect...... of training status. Male ice-hockey players (n = 36) from the National Hockey League participated. Match analysis was performed during a game and physical capacity was assessed by a submaximal Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Ice-hockey test, level 1 (YYIR1-IHSUB). Venous blood samples were collected 24-hour post...

  9. The Effect of High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT on Gelatinase-A (MMP-2 Serum Levels and Muscle Damage Indices in Young Sedentary Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazari M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The current study aims to investigate the impact of high intensity interval training (HIIT on serum levels of CK and LDH as the muscle damage indicators and on Gelatinase-A (MMP-2 serum levels as the tissae inflammatory marker among young sedentary girls. Materials and Methods: For this quasi-experimental study, 14 sedentary female college students were selected and randomly divided into two groups; including the exercise HIIT group (means and standard deviations of age: 21/28 ± 2/56 (years; weight:52/86 ±4/95 (kg; and height: 163/1±3/7 (cm and the control group (means and standard deviations of age: 20/25 ±7/50 (years; weight:52/64 ±3/67 (kg; and height: 162/4±4/5 (cm. The experimental group performed six repetitions of one-minute runs at 90%- 95% of HRmax. The blood samples were collected before and 30 minutes after the exercise protocol. The serum CK, LDH and MMP-2 levels were measured using corresponding kits. The data were analyzed through the independent t-test at the significance level of 0.05 (p<0/05. Results: After collecting and analyzing Data, the results showed that CK and LDH levels increased significantly after performing HIIT, while there was no significant change in MMP-2 due to the HIIT. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the HIIT protocol will lead to an increase in some indicators of muscle damage such as CK, LDH, and that no significant changes could be observed for MMP-2 as the body's inflammation response.

  10. Effect of BCAA supplement timing on exercise-induced muscle soreness and damage: a pilot placebo-controlled double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Song-Gyu; Miyazaki, Teruo; Kojima, Ryo; Komine, Shoichi; Ishikura, Keisuke; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Honda, Akira; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Ohmori, Hajime

    2017-09-22

    The aim of present study was to compare the effects of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation taken before or after exercise on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). Fifteen young men (aged 21.5 ± 0.4 years) were given either BCAA (9.6 g·day-1) or placebo before and after exercise (and for 3 days prior to and following the exercise day) in three independent groups: the Control group (placebo before and after exercise), the PRE group (BCAA before exercise and placebo after exercise), and the POST group (placebo before exercise and BCAA after exercise). Participants performed 30 repetitions of eccentric exercise with the non-dominant arm. DOMS, upper arm circumference (CIR), elbow range of motion (ROM), serum creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and aldolase, BCAA, and Beta-hydroxy-Beta-methylbutyrate (3HMB) were measured immediately before and after the exercise and on the following 4 days. Serum BCAA and 3HMB concentrations increased significantly in the PRE group immediately after the exercise, recovering to baseline over the following days. In the days following the exercise day, DOMS, CIR, and ROM were significantly improved in the PRE group compared to the Control group, with weaker effects in the POST group. Serum activities of CK, LDH, and aldolase in the days following the exercise day were significantly suppressed in the PRE group compared to Control group. Present study confirmed that repeated BCAA supplementation before exercise had a more beneficial effect in attenuating DOMS and EIMD induced by eccentric exercise than repeated supplementation after exercise.

  11. Stretch-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle is regulated by Rac1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, Lykke; Møller, Lisbeth L V; Kleinert, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    regulating stretch-stimulated glucose transport is not well understood. We recently reported that the actin cytoskeleton regulating GTPase, Rac1 was activated in mouse muscle in response to stretching. Rac1 is a regulator of contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose transport but its role in stretch......-stimulated glucose transport and signaling is unknown. We therefore investigated whether stretch-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle required Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton. We used muscle specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice as well as pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton...... in isolated soleus and EDL muscles. In addition, Rac1's role in contraction-stimulated glucose transport during conditions without mechanical load on the muscles was evaluated in loosely hanging muscles and muscles in which crossbridge formation was blocked by the myosin ATPase inhibitors BTS and Blebbistatin...

  12. Comparison of markers for muscle damage, inflammation, and pain using minimally invasive direct anterior versus direct lateral approach in total hip arthroplasty: A prospective, randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjaaland, Knut Erik; Kivle, Kjetil; Svenningsen, Svein; Pripp, Are Hugo; Nordsletten, Lars

    2015-09-01

    It is proposed that the use of biochemical markers for muscle damage and inflammation provides an objective measure on invasiveness in total hip arthroplasty. We analyzed levels of creatine kinase and C-reactive protein (CRP) after total hip arthroplasty in patients randomized to minimally invasive direct anterior approach or direct lateral approach, also recording consumption of pain medication and levels of pain postoperatively. Eighty-three patients were operated by the use of anterior approach and eighty using lateral. Creatine kinase and CRP levels were measured preoperatively, creatine kinase directly after surgery, and both creatine kinase and CRP on postoperative day 1 through 4. The use of pain medication and levels of pain were recorded. Creatine kinase were higher in the anterior group compared to the lateral group, reaching statistical significance directly postoperative and on day 4. Levels of CRP did not differ, reaching a maximum of mean 52 mg/L on day 3. The use of pain medication was higher in the lateral group on the day of surgery (p = 0.011), and pain levels were higher on all days in the lateral group (p pain, but higher postoperative levels of CK, than the use of direct lateral approach. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. , 1584), increase in lean body mass (ID 1579, 1582, 1583), increase in muscle strength (ID 1578, 1583, 1587), increase in endurance performance (ID 1580, 1581), skeletal muscle tissue repair (ID 1586) and faster recovery from muscle fatigue after exercise (ID 1576, 1585) pursuant to Article 13, EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to β-hydroxy β-methylbutyrate monohydrate (HMB) alone or in combination with α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) and reduction of muscle tissue damage during exercise (ID 1577

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    claims in relation to β-hydroxy β-methylbutyrate monohydrate (HMB) alone or in combination with α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) and reduction of muscle tissue damage during exercise, increase in lean body mass, increase in muscle strength, increase in endurance performance, skeletal muscle tissue repair...... and faster recovery from muscle fatigue after exercise. The scientific substantiation is based on the information provided by the Member States in the consolidated list of Article 13 health claims and references that EFSA has received from Member States or directly from stakeholders. The food constituent...

  14. Are the Bcaas/Leucine Supplementation Effects on Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage Related Immunity Response or to Hmβ?

    OpenAIRE

    Humberto Nicastro

    2014-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), mainly leucine, have been described as potential modulators of resistance exercise-induced muscle adaptations which includes stimulation of muscle protein synthesis and attenuation of proteolysis. However, until the moment, there are no well controlled chronic studies (randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled) in humans assessing the effects of BCAAs/leucine supplementation on muscle hypertrophy and strength. The most well documented benefits of BCAA...

  15. Fermented Rice Germ Extract Alleviates Morphological and Functional Damage to Murine Gastrocnemius Muscle by Inactivation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Miyu; Yoshino, Yuta; Takeda, Shogo; Toda, Kazuya; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-10-01

    Sarcopenia, loss of muscle mass and function, is mainly observed in elderly people. In this study, we investigated whether fermented rice germ extract (FRGE) has some effects on the mouse gastrocnemius muscle by using behavioral and morphological analyses, Western blotting, and a murine model of immobilization-induced muscle atrophy. Daily oral FRGE administration increased muscle weight and strength. In addition, myofiber size in gastrocnemius muscle of FRGE-treated mice was increased as revealed by morphological quantification. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, which inhibits protein synthesis and stimulates protein degradation in gastrocnemius muscle, was significantly attenuated in the FRGE-treated mice compared with control mice. Expression level of forkhead box 3a (FOXO3a) protein was also significantly decreased in the FRGE-treated group. Moreover, the decrease in mean myofiber cross-sectional area in immobilized hindlimb in vehicle-treated mice was inhibited by FRGE treatment in histological analysis. In conclusion, FRGE increased the strength and weight of gastrocnemius muscle and myofiber size, and reduced immobilization-induced muscle atrophy in mice. These findings indicated that FRGE might be beneficial in preventing motor dysfunction in a range of conditions, including sarcopenia.

  16. Increments in cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases in skeletal muscle after injection of tissue-damaging toxins from the venom of the snake Bothrops asper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Rucavado

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Envenomations by the snake Bothrops asper are characterized by prominent local tissue damage (i.e. myonecrosis, blistering, hemorrhage and edema. Various phospholipases A2 and metalloproteinases that induce local pathological alterations have been purified from this venom. Since these toxins induce a conspicuous inflammatory response, it has been hypothesized that inflammatory mediators may contribute to the local pathological alterations described. This study evaluated the local production of cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs as a consequence of intramuscular injections of an Asp-49 myotoxic phospholipase A2 (myotoxin III (MT-III and a P-I type hemorrhagic metalloproteinase (BaP1 isolated from B. asper venom. Both enzymes induced prominent tissue alterations and conspicuous increments in interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6 and a number of MMPs, especially gelatinase MMP-9, rapidly after injection. In contrast, no increments in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interferon-γ were detected. In agreement, MT-III and BaP1 did not induce the synthesis of TNF-α by resident peritoneal macrophages in vitro. Despite the conspicuous expression of latent forms of MMPs in muscle, evidenced by zymography, there were no increments in activated MMP-2 and only a small increase in activated MMP-9, as detected by a functional enzymatic assay. This suggests that MMP activity was regulated by a highly controlled activation of latent forms and, probably, by a concomitant synthesis of MMP inhibitors. Since no hemorrhage nor dermonecrosis were observed after injection of MT-III, despite a prominent increase in MMP expression, and since inflammatory exudate did not enhance hemorrhage induced by BaP1, it is suggested that endogenous MMPs released in the tissue are not responsible for the dermonecrosis and hemorrhage characteristic of B. asper envenomation. Moreover, pretreatment of mice with the peptidomimetic MMP inhibitor batimastat did not reduce myotoxic nor

  17. Enalapril treatment discloses an early role of angiotensin II in inflammation- and oxidative stress-related muscle damage in dystrophic mdx mice☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzoli, Anna; Nico, Beatrice; Sblendorio, Valeriana Teresa; Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Dinardo, Maria Maddalena; Longo, Vito; Gagliardi, Sara; Montagnani, Monica; De Luca, Annamaria

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitors of angiotensin converting enzymes (ACE) are clinically used to control cardiomyopathy in patients of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Various evidences suggest potential usefulness of long-term treatment with ACE inhibitors to reduce advanced fibrosis of dystrophic muscle in the mdx mouse model. However, angiotensin II is known to exert pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidative actions that might contribute to early events of dystrophic muscle degeneration. The present study has been aimed at evaluating the effects of an early treatment with enalapril on the pathology signs of exercised mdx mouse model. The effects of 1 and 5 mg/kg enalapril i.p. for 4–8 weeks have been compared with those of 1 mg/kg α-methyl-prednisolone (PDN), as positive control. Enalapril caused a dose-dependent increase in fore limb strength, the highest dose leading to a recovery score similar to that observed with PDN. A dose-dependent reduction of superoxide anion production was observed by dihydroethidium staining in tibialis anterior muscle of enalapril-treated mice, approaching the effect observed with PND. In parallel, a significant reduction of the activated form of the pro-inflammatory Nuclear Factor-kB has been observed in gastrocnemious muscle. Histologically, 5 mg/kg enalapril reduced the area of muscle necrosis in both gastrocnemious muscle and diaphragm, without significant effect on non-muscle area. In parallel no significant changes have been observed in both muscle TGF-β1 and myonuclei positive to phosphorylated Smad2/3. Myofiber functional indices were also monitored by microelectrodes recordings. A dose-dependent recovery of macroscopic chloride conductance has been observed upon enalapril treatment in EDL muscle, with minor effects being exerted in diaphragm. However a modest effect, if any, was found on mechanical threshold, a functional index of calcium homeostasis. No recovery was observed in creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase. Finally the results suggest

  18. Growth hormone secretagogues hexarelin and JMV2894 protect skeletal muscle from mitochondrial damages in a rat model of cisplatin-induced cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirago, Giuseppe; Conte, Elena; Fracasso, Flavio; Cormio, Antonella; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; Musicco, Clara; Camerino, Giulia Maria; Fonzino, Adriano; Rizzi, Laura; Torsello, Antonio; Lezza, Angela Maria Serena; Liantonio, Antonella; Cantatore, Palmiro; Pesce, Vito

    2017-10-12

    Chemotherapy can cause cachexia, which consists of weight loss associated with muscle atrophy. The exact mechanisms underlying this skeletal muscle toxicity are largely unknown and co-therapies to attenuate chemotherapy-induced side effects are lacking. By using a rat model of cisplatin-induced cachexia, we here characterized the mitochondrial homeostasis in tibialis anterior cachectic muscle and evaluated the potential beneficial effects of the growth hormone secretagogues (GHS) hexarelin and JMV2894 in this setting. We found that cisplatin treatment caused a decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α, NRF-1, TFAM, mtDNA, ND1), mitochondrial mass (Porin and Citrate synthase activity) and fusion index (MFN2, Drp1), together with changes in the expression of autophagy-related genes (AKT/FoxO pathway, Atg1, Beclin1, LC3AII, p62) and enhanced ROS production (PRX III, MnSOD). Importantly, JMV2894 and hexarelin are capable to antagonize this chemotherapy-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Thus, our findings reveal a key-role played by mitochondria in the mechanism responsible for GHS beneficial effects in skeletal muscle, strongly indicating that targeting mitochondrial dysfunction might be a promising area of research in developing therapeutic strategies to prevent or limit muscle wasting in cachexia.

  19. Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex regulates muscle nitric oxide production through mechanoregulation of AMPK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbincius, Joanne F; Michele, Daniel E

    2015-11-03

    Patients deficient in dystrophin, a protein that links the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix via the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), exhibit muscular dystrophy, cardiomyopathy, and impaired muscle nitric oxide (NO) production. We used live-cell NO imaging and in vitro cyclic stretch of isolated adult mouse cardiomyocytes as a model system to investigate if and how the DGC directly regulates the mechanical activation of muscle NO signaling. Acute activation of NO synthesis by mechanical stretch was impaired in dystrophin-deficient mdx cardiomyocytes, accompanied by loss of stretch-induced neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) S1412 phosphorylation. Intriguingly, stretch induced the acute activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in normal cardiomyocytes but not in mdx cardiomyocytes, and specific inhibition of AMPK was sufficient to attenuate mechanoactivation of NO production. Therefore, we tested whether direct pharmacologic activation of AMPK could bypass defective mechanical signaling to restore nNOS activity in dystrophin-deficient cardiomyocytes. Indeed, activation of AMPK with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside or salicylate increased nNOS S1412 phosphorylation and was sufficient to enhance NO production in mdx cardiomyocytes. We conclude that the DGC promotes the mechanical activation of cardiac nNOS by acting as a mechanosensor to regulate AMPK activity, and that pharmacologic AMPK activation may be a suitable therapeutic strategy for restoring nNOS activity in dystrophin-deficient hearts and muscle.

  20. Injection of high dose botulinum-toxin A leads to impaired skeletal muscle function and damage of the fibrilar and non-fibrilar structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Nielsen, Mikkel Schou; Lauridsen, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    dose intramuscular BoNT/A injections (6 UI = 60 pg) on muscle tissue. The gait pattern of the rats was significantly affected 3 weeks after BoNT/A injection. The ankle joint rotated externally, the rats became flat footed, and the stride length decreased after BoNT/A injection. Additionally...

  1. A MRI-Compatible Combined Mechanical Loading and MR Elastography Setup to Study Deformation-Induced Skeletal Muscle Damage in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelissen, Jules L.; de Graaf, Larry; Traa, Willeke A.; Schreurs, Tom J. L.; Moerman, Kevin M.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Sinkus, Ralph; Oomens, Cees W. J.; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J.

    2017-01-01

    Deformation of skeletal muscle in the proximity of bony structures may lead to deep tissue injury category of pressure ulcers. Changes in mechanical properties have been proposed as a risk factor in the development of deep tissue injury and may be useful as a diagnostic tool for early detection. MRE

  2. Stretch-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle is regulated by Rac1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylow, Lykke; Møller, Lisbeth L V; Kleinert, Maximilian; Richter, Erik A; Jensen, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    An alternative to the canonical insulin signalling pathway for glucose transport is muscle contraction/exercise. Mechanical stress is an integrated part of the muscle contraction/relaxation cycle, and passive stretch stimulates muscle glucose transport. However, the signalling mechanism regulating stretch-stimulated glucose transport is not well understood. We recently reported that the actin cytoskeleton regulating GTPase, Rac1, was activated in mouse muscle in response to stretching. Rac1 is a regulator of contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose transport, however, its role in stretch-stimulated glucose transport and signalling is unknown. We therefore investigated whether stretch-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle required Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton. We used muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice as well as pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton in isolated soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. In addition, the role of Rac1 in contraction-stimulated glucose transport during conditions without mechanical load on the muscles was evaluated in loosely hanging muscles and muscles in which cross-bridge formation was blocked by the myosin ATPase inhibitors BTS and Blebbistatin. Knockout as well as pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 reduced stretch-stimulated glucose transport by 30–50% in soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscle. The actin depolymerizing agent latrunculin B similarly decreased glucose transport in response to stretching by 40–50%. Rac1 inhibition reduced contraction-stimulated glucose transport by 30–40% in tension developing muscle but did not affect contraction-stimulated glucose transport in muscles in which force development was prevented. Our findings suggest that Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton regulate stretch-stimulated glucose transport and that Rac1 is a required part of the mechanical stress-component of the contraction-stimulus to glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Key

  3. Experimental investigation and histopathological identification of acute thermal damage in skeletal porcine muscle in relation to whole-body SAR, maximum temperature, and CEM43 °C due to RF irradiation in an MR body coil of birdcage type at 123 MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadobny, Jacek; Klopfleisch, Robert; Brinker, Gerhard; Stoltenburg-Didinger, Gisela

    2015-06-01

    This study is an investigation of the relationship between several characteristic parameters and acute thermal damage in porcine skeletal muscle. Fourteen pigs under injection anaesthesia were placed into a magnetic resonance body coil and exposed for different time durations to different specific energy absorption rate (SAR) levels at 123 MHz. Local temperatures were measured using four temperature sensors. Sensors 1-3 were placed in skeletal muscle and one sensor was placed in the rectum. Sensors 1 and 2 were placed in hot-spot areas and sensor 3 was placed at the periphery of the animals. The pigs were exposed to whole-body SAR (SAR-wb) between 2.5 W/kg and 5.2 W/kg for 30 or 60 min. Three animals received no SAR. After each experiment, muscle samples adjacent to the positions of sensors 1-3 were taken for frozen section analysis. Three characteristic parameters were chosen for investigation: SAR-wb, maximum sensor temperature (T-max), and cumulative equivalent minutes at 43 °C (CEM43 °C). Histopathological criteria were established to detect acute thermal tissue damage in frozen sections such as widening of intercellular space between the muscle fibres and loss of glycogen. Clear tissue damage thresholds were found for T-max and CEM43 °C, though not for SAR-wb. For all animals with high thermal exposure, damage was also found for muscle samples adjacent to the peripheral sensor 3. Both T-max and CEM43, are able to predict thermal damage in porcine muscle. However, CEM43 is the less ambiguous parameter. The reasons for the occurrence of the aforementioned damage at low local temperatures at the animals' periphery remain unclear and further investigations are needed.

  4. Improvement of physical performance, hormonal profile, recovery-stress balance and increase of muscle damage in a specific futsal pre-season planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.C. de A. Nogueira

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to verify the effects of a specific pre-season planning on physical performance, recovery-stress state, hormonal and muscle damage markers in high-level futsal players. Method: Fifteen male futsal players, members of a high level Brazilian futsal team participated in this study. Before and after four weeks of pre-season, blood samples were collected, the Recovery Stress Questionnaire for Athletes was applied, and vertical jump tests and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 2 tests were performed. The Internal Training Load was measured in all training sessions. Repeated measure ANOVA was used to compare the Total Weekly Training Load between different weeks. To compare the differences between pre- and post-training of all other dependent variables (except the Recovery Stress Questionnaire for Athletes scales the Student's t-test and the magnitude based inference were used. Results: The futsal pre-season improved performance in the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 2 and Squat Jump tests. The improvement in performance tests was accompanied by an increase in testosterone, creatine kinase, testosterone/creatine kinase ratio and in the majority of the Recovery Stress Questionnaire for Athletes scales. Cortisol and the social recovery and general well-being of Recovery Stress Questionnaire for Athletes scales decreased during the futsal pre-season. Conclusions: In summary, players improved their performance in the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 2 and Squat Jump tests in response to a futsal pre-season. Furthermore, the Internal Training Load behavior of the futsal training promoted a favorable hormonal anabolic environment and did not promote a negative disturbance in creatine kinase or stress/recovery balance, suggesting that futsal players did not report fatigue accumulation after this pre-season design. Resumen: Objetivo: El objetivo de este estudio fue investigar los efectos de una planificación espec

  5. Acute effect of muscle stretching on the steadiness of sustained submaximal contractions of the plantar flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Emika; Vieillevoye, Stéphanie; Balestra, Costantino; Guissard, Nathalie; Duchateau, Jacques

    2011-02-01

    This paper examines the acute effect of a bout of static stretches on torque fluctuation during an isometric torque-matching task that required subjects to sustain isometric contractions as steady as possible with the plantar flexor muscles at four intensities (5, 10, 15, and 20% of maximum) for 20 s. The stretching bout comprised five 60-s passive stretches, separated by 10-s rest. During the torque-matching tasks and muscle stretching, the torque (active and passive) and surface electromyogram (EMG) of the medial gastrocnemius (MG), soleus (Sol), and tibialis anterior (TA) were continuously recorded. Concurrently, changes in muscle architecture (fascicle length and pennation angle) of the MG were monitored by ultrasonography. The results showed that during stretching, passive torque decreased and fascicle length increased gradually. Changes in these two parameters were significantly associated (r(2) = 0.46; P stretches induced greater torque fluctuation (P muscles with no change in coactivation. Furthermore, stretching maneuvers produced a greater decrease (∼15%; P stretches can decrease torque steadiness by increasing muscle compliance and EMG activity of muscles around the joint. The relative influence of such adaptations, however, may depend on the torque level during the torque-matching task.

  6. Cognitive and motor function after administration of hydrocodone bitartrate plus ibuprofen, ibuprofen alone, or placebo in healthy subjects with exercise-induced muscle damage: a randomized, repeated-dose, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, George J; Hartl, Tamara L; Duffany, Shannon; Smith, Stefanie F; VanHeest, Jaci L; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Hoffman, Jay R; Kraemer, William J; Maresh, Carl M

    2003-03-01

    Medications combining hydrocodone bitartrate and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents appear more beneficial than anti-inflammatory medications alone in treating pain and inflammation from acute soft tissue trauma, but opiate side effects may include sedation and impaired cognitive and motor performance. Performance on complex cognitive and motor tasks was evaluated in healthy subjects with exercise-induced muscle damage who were treated with a hydrocodone-ibuprofen combination, ibuprofen alone, or placebo. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, repeated-dose clinical trial compared the effects of hydrocodone bitartrate (7.5 mg) plus ibuprofen (200 mg), ibuprofen alone, and placebo on cognitive and motor function in 72 healthy college men. Muscle damage in the quadriceps of each subject's dominant leg was induced by an eccentric exercise protocol. Subjects took the study medication four times daily (every 4-6 h) for 5 days. Forty minutes after medication ingestion at the same time each day, subjects underwent tests of attention/concentration, motor performance, and reaction time. Four trained assessors rotated among subjects so that none tested the same participant on more than three occasions. Repeated measures analyses of covariance revealed no between-group differences on a complex memory and cognition task or complex reaction time. Subjects using hydrocodone bitartrate plus ibuprofen performed significantly less well on a simple tracking task and made significantly more errors on a simple reaction-time task than the other two groups. These deficits were found to be highly transitory and not related to confusion or fatigue. Hydrocodone plus ibuprofen was not associated with deterioration in complex cognition but was related to very transitory decrements in tasks involving simple hand-eye coordination.

  7. Muscle Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after ... It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves that malfunction. Sometimes ...

  8. Brain and muscle Arnt-like protein-1 (BMAL1) controls circadian cell proliferation and susceptibility to UVB-induced DNA damage in the epidermis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Liu, Qiang; Ruiz, Rolando; Gordon, William; Espitia, Francisco; Cam, Eric; Millar, Sarah E.; Smyth, Padhraic; Ihler, Alexander; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Andersen, Bogi

    2012-01-01

    The role of the circadian clock in skin and the identity of genes participating in its chronobiology remain largely unknown, leading us to define the circadian transcriptome of mouse skin at two different stages of the hair cycle, telogen and anagen. The circadian transcriptomes of telogen and anagen skin are largely distinct, with the former dominated by genes involved in cell proliferation and metabolism. The expression of many metabolic genes is antiphasic to cell cycle-related genes, the former peaking during the day and the latter at night. Consistently, accumulation of reactive oxygen species, a byproduct of oxidative phosphorylation, and S-phase are antiphasic to each other in telogen skin. Furthermore, the circadian variation in S-phase is controlled by BMAL1 intrinsic to keratinocytes, because keratinocyte-specific deletion of Bmal1 obliterates time-of-day–dependent synchronicity of cell division in the epidermis leading to a constitutively elevated cell proliferation. In agreement with higher cellular susceptibility to UV-induced DNA damage during S-phase, we found that mice are most sensitive to UVB-induced DNA damage in the epidermis at night. Because in the human epidermis maximum numbers of keratinocytes go through S-phase in the late afternoon, we speculate that in humans the circadian clock imposes regulation of epidermal cell proliferation so that skin is at a particularly vulnerable stage during times of maximum UV exposure, thus contributing to the high incidence of human skin cancers. PMID:22753467

  9. Azelnidipine inhibits cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cell death induced by cyclic mechanical stretch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    Full Text Available Acute aortic dissection is the most common life-threatening vascular disease, with sudden onset of severe pain and a high fatality rate. Clarifying the detailed mechanism for aortic dissection is of great significance for establishing effective pharmacotherapy for this high mortality disease. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of biomechanical stretch, which mimics an acute rise in blood pressure using an experimental apparatus of stretching loads in vitro, on rat aortic smooth muscle cell (RASMC death. Then, we examined the effects of azelnidipine and mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors on mechanical stretch-induced RASMC death. The major findings of the present study are as follows: (1 cyclic mechanical stretch on RASMC caused cell death in a time-dependent manner up to 4 h; (2 cyclic mechanical stretch on RASMC induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and p38 activation with peaks at 10 min; (3 azelnidipine inhibited RASMC death in a concentration-dependent manner as well as inhibited JNK and p38 activation by mechanical stretch; and (4 SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor and SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor protected against stretch-induced RASMC death; (5 Antioxidants, diphenylene iodonium and tempol failed to inhibit stretch-induced RASMC death. On the basis of the above findings, we propose a possible mechanism where an acute rise in blood pressure increases biomechanical stress on the arterial walls, which induces RASMC death, and thus, may lead to aortic dissection. Azelnidipine may be used as a pharmacotherapeutic agent for prevention of aortic dissection independent of its blood pressure lowering effect.

  10. Mechanical stretch modulates microRNA 21 expression, participating in proliferation and apoptosis in cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian tao Song

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Stretch affects vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and apoptosis, and several responsible genes have been proposed. We tested whether the expression of microRNA 21 (miR-21 is modulated by stretch and is involved in stretch-induced proliferation and apoptosis of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs. METHODS AND RESULTS: RT-PCR revealed that elevated stretch (16% elongation, 1 Hz increased miR-21 expression in cultured HASMCs, and moderate stretch (10% elongation, 1 Hz decreased the expression. BrdU incorporation assay and cell counting showed miR-21 involved in the proliferation of HASMCs mediated by stretch, likely by regulating the expression of p27 and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (p-Rb. FACS analysis revealed that the complex of miR-21 and programmed cell death protein 4 (PDCD4 participated in regulating apoptosis with stretch. Stretch increased the expression of primary miR-21 and pre-miR-21 in HASMCs. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA demonstrated that stretch increased NF-κB and AP-1 activities in HASMCs, and blockade of AP-1 activity by c-jun siRNA significantly suppressed stretch-induced miR-21 expression. CONCLUSIONS: Cyclic stretch modulates miR-21 expression in cultured HASMCs, and miR-21 plays important roles in regulating proliferation and apoptosis mediated by stretch. Stretch upregulates miR-21 expression at least in part at the transcription level and AP-1 is essential for stretch-induced miR-21 expression.

  11. CREB is activated by muscle injury and promotes muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Randi; Flechner, Lawrence; Montminy, Marc; Berdeaux, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) plays key roles in differentiation of embryonic skeletal muscle progenitors and survival of adult skeletal muscle. However, little is known about the physiologic signals that activate CREB in normal muscle. Here we show that CREB phosphorylation and target genes are induced after acute muscle injury and during regeneration due to genetic mutation. Activated CREB localizes to both myogenic precursor cells and newly regenerating myofibers within regenerating areas. Moreover, we found that signals from damaged skeletal muscle tissue induce CREB phosphorylation and target gene expression in primary mouse myoblasts. An activated CREB mutant (CREBY134F) potentiates myoblast proliferation as well as expression of early myogenic transcription factors in cultured primary myocytes. Consistently, activated CREB-YF promotes myoblast proliferation after acute muscle injury in vivo and enhances muscle regeneration in dystrophic mdx mice. Our findings reveal a new physiologic function for CREB in contributing to skeletal muscle regeneration.

  12. Growth Factors and Tension-Induced Skeletal Muscle Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1994-01-01

    The project investigated biochemical mechanisms to enhance skeletal muscle growth, and developed a computer based mechanical cell stimulator system. The biochemicals investigated in this study were insulin/(Insulin like Growth Factor) IGF-1 and Steroids. In order to analyze which growth factors are essential for stretch-induced muscle growth in vitro, we developed a defined, serum-free medium in which the differentiated, cultured avian muscle fibers could be maintained for extended periods of time. The defined medium (muscle maintenance medium, MM medium) maintains the nitrogen balance of the myofibers for 3 to 7 days, based on myofiber diameter measurements and myosin heavy chain content. Insulin and IGF-1, but not IGF-2, induced pronounced myofiber hypertrophy when added to this medium. In 5 to 7 days, muscle fiber diameters increase by 71 % to 98% compared to untreated controls. Mechanical stimulation of the avian muscle fibers in MM medium increased the sensitivity of the cells to insulin and IGF-1, based on a leftward shift of the insulin dose/response curve for protein synthesis rates. (54). We developed a ligand binding assay for IGF-1 binding proteins and found that the avian skeletal muscle cultures produced three major species of 31, 36 and 43 kD molecular weight (54) Stretch of the myofibers was found to have no significant effect on the efflux of IGF-1 binding proteins, but addition of exogenous collagen stimulated IGF-1 binding protein production 1.5 to 5 fold. Steroid hormones have a profound effect on muscle protein turnover rates in vivo, with the stress-related glucocorticoids inducing rapid skeletal muscle atrophy while androgenic steroids induce skeletal muscle growth. Exercise in humans and animals reduces the catabolic effects of glucocorticoids and may enhance the anabolic effects of androgenic steroids on skeletal muscle. In our continuing work on the involvement of exogenrus growth factors in stretch-induced avian skeletal muscle growth, we

  13. Ethanol Exposure Causes Muscle Degeneration in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C. Coffey

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic myopathies are characterized by neuromusculoskeletal symptoms such as compromised movement and weakness. Although these symptoms have been attributed to neurological damage, EtOH may also target skeletal muscle. EtOH exposure during zebrafish primary muscle development or adulthood results in smaller muscle fibers. However, the effects of EtOH exposure on skeletal muscle during the growth period that follows primary muscle development are not well understood. We determined the effects of EtOH exposure on muscle during this phase of development. Strikingly, muscle fibers at this stage are acutely sensitive to EtOH treatment: EtOH induces muscle degeneration. The severity of EtOH-induced muscle damage varies but muscle becomes more refractory to EtOH as muscle develops. NF-kB induction in muscle indicates that EtOH triggers a pro-inflammatory response. EtOH-induced muscle damage is p53-independent. Uptake of Evans blue dye shows that EtOH treatment causes sarcolemmal instability before muscle fiber detachment. Dystrophin-null sapje mutant zebrafish also exhibit sarcolemmal instability. We tested whether Trichostatin A (TSA, which reduces muscle degeneration in sapje mutants, would affect EtOH-treated zebrafish. We found that TSA and EtOH are a lethal combination. EtOH does, however, exacerbate muscle degeneration in sapje mutants. EtOH also disrupts adhesion of muscle fibers to their extracellular matrix at the myotendinous junction: some detached muscle fibers retain beta-Dystroglycan indicating failure of muscle end attachments. Overexpression of Paxillin, which reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish deficient for beta-Dystroglycan, is not sufficient to rescue degeneration. Taken together, our results suggest that EtOH exposure has pleiotropic deleterious effects on skeletal muscle.

  14. The influence of passive stretch on the growth and protein turnover of the denervated extensor digitorum longus muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldspink, David F.

    1978-01-01

    At 7 days after cutting the sciatic nerve, the extensor digitorum longus muscle was smaller and contained less protein than its innervated control. Correlating with these changes was the finding of elevated rates of protein degradation (measured in vitro) in the denervated tissue. However, at this time, rates of protein synthesis (measured in vitro) and nucleic acid concentrations were also higher in the denervated tissue, changes more usually associated with an active muscle rather than a disused one. These anabolic trends have, at least in part, been explained by the possible greater exposure of the denervated extensor digitorum longus to passive stretch. When immobilized under a maintained influence of stretch the denervated muscle grew to a greater extent. Although this stretch-induced growth appeared to occur predominantly through a stimulation of protein synthesis, it was opposed by smaller increases in degradative rates. Nucleic acids increased at a similar rate to the increase in muscle mass when a continuous influence of stretch was imposed on the denervated tissue. In contrast, immobilization of the denervated extensor digitorum longus in a shortened unstretched state reversed most of the stretch-induced changes; that is, the muscle became even smaller, with protein synthesis decreasing to a greater extent than breakdown after the removal of passive stretch. The present investigation suggests that stretch will promote protein synthesis and hence growth of the extensor digitorum longus even in the absence of an intact nerve supply. However, some factor(s), in addition to passive stretch, must contribute to the anabolic trends in this denervated muscle. PMID:708412

  15. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  16. Muscle pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key Summary Points. • Muscle pain, known as myalgia, can be in one targeted area or across many muscles, occurring with overexertion or overuse of these muscles. • Pain can be classified as acute or chronic pain and further categorized as nociceptive or neuropathic. • Causes of muscle pain include stress, physical ...

  17. Muscle-specific acute changes in passive stiffness of human triceps surae after stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Kosuke; Miyamoto-Mikami, Eri; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Naokazu

    2016-05-01

    It remains unclear whether the acute effect of stretching on passive muscle stiffness differs among the synergists. We examined the muscle stiffness responses of the medial (MG) and lateral gastrocnemii (LG), and soleus (Sol) during passive dorsiflexion before and after a static stretching by using ultrasound shear wave elastography. Before and after a 5-min static stretching by passive dorsiflexion, shear modulus of the triceps surae and the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion in the knee extended position were measured in 12 healthy subjects. Before the static stretching, shear modulus was the greatest in MG and smallest in Sol. The stretching induced significant reductions in shear modulus of MG, but not in shear modulus of LG and Sol. The slack angle was observed at more plantar flexed position in the following order: AT, MG, LG, and Sol. After the stretching, the slack angles of each muscle and AT were significantly shifted to more dorsiflexed positions with a similar extent. When considering the shift in slack angle, the change in MG shear modulus became smaller. The present study indicates that passive muscle stiffness differs among the triceps surae, and that the acute effect of a static stretching is observed only in the stiff muscle. However, a large part of the reduction of passive muscle stiffness at a given joint angle could be due to an increase in the slack length.

  18. ACUTE EXERCISE-INDUCED MUSCLE INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J McKune

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available While much research has recently been focussing on the chronic effects of overtraining, the acute damaging effects of individual eccentric exercise bouts on muscle remain of interest and underlie long-term training effects. Systemic markers of muscle damage are limited in terms of sensitivity and reliability. A clearer insight into the extent of the damage and mechanisms involved are being obtained from ultrastructural, functional and molecular examination of the muscle. There are currently indications that while the initial muscle damage may appear to have negative consequences in the short term, intense eccentric exercise appears to initiate a remodelling process and promote favourable adaptation of muscle following training, which has applications for promoting health, rehabilitation and sports performance.

  19. Natural pomegranate juice reduces inflammation, muscle damage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ammar Achraf

    Currently, it's well established that aging is associated with various health problems that may interfere with the maintenance of a good nutritional status. Otherwise, pomegranate (POM) was shown to prevent or treat various disease risk factors in adults. However, its efficacy is still not well widespread in elderly population.

  20. Are interstitial cells of Cajal involved in mechanical stress-induced gene expression and impairment of smooth muscle contractility in bowel obstruction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chester C Wu

    Full Text Available The network of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC is altered in obstructive bowel disorders (OBD. However, whether alteration in ICC network is a cause or consequence of OBD remains unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that mechanical dilation in obstruction disrupts the ICC network and that ICC do not mediate mechanotranscription of COX-2 and impairment of smooth muscle contractility in obstruction.Medical-grade silicon bands were wrapped around the distal colon to induce partial obstruction in wild-type and ICC deficient (W/W(v mice.In wild-type mice, colon obstruction led to time-dependent alterations of the ICC network in the proximal colon segment. Although unaffected on days 1 and 3, the ICC density decreased markedly and the network was disrupted on day 7 of obstruction. COX-2 expression increased, and circular muscle contractility decreased significantly in the segment proximal to obstruction. In W/W(v control mice, COX-2 mRNA level was 4.0 (±1.1-fold higher (n=4 and circular muscle contractility was lower than in wild-type control mice. Obstruction further increased COX-2 mRNA level in W/W(v mice to 7.2 (±1.0-fold vs. W/W(v controls [28.8 (±4.1-fold vs. wild-type controls] on day 3. Obstruction further suppressed smooth muscle contractility in W/W(v mice. However, daily administration of COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 significantly improved muscle contractility in both W/W(v sham and obstruction mice.Lumen dilation disrupts the ICC network. ICC deficiency has limited effect on stretch-induced expression of COX-2 and suppression of smooth muscle contractility in obstruction. Rather, stretch-induced COX-2 plays a critical role in motility dysfunction in partial colon obstruction.

  1. Striated Muscle Function, Regeneration, and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadrin, I.Y.; Khodabukus, A.; Bursac, N.

    2016-01-01

    As the only striated muscle tissues in the body, skeletal and cardiac muscle share numerous structural and functional characteristics, while exhibiting vastly different size and regenerative potential. Healthy skeletal muscle harbors a robust regenerative response that becomes inadequate after large muscle loss or in degenerative pathologies and aging. In contrast, the mammalian heart loses its regenerative capacity shortly after birth, leaving it susceptible to permanent damage by acute injury or chronic disease. In this review, we compare and contrast the physiology and regenerative potential of native skeletal and cardiac muscles, mechanisms underlying striated muscle dysfunction, and bioengineering strategies to treat muscle disorders. We focus on different sources for cellular therapy, biomaterials to augment the endogenous regenerative response, and progress in engineering and application of mature striated muscle tissues in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we discuss the challenges and perspectives in translating muscle bioengineering strategies to clinical practice. PMID:27271751

  2. Muscle injuries and strategies for improving their repair

    OpenAIRE

    Laumonier, Thomas; Menetrey, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Satellite cells are tissue resident muscle stem cells required for postnatal skeletal muscle growth and repair through replacement of damaged myofibers. Muscle regeneration is coordinated through different mechanisms, which imply cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions as well as extracellular secreted factors. Cellular dynamics during muscle regeneration are highly complex. Immune, fibrotic, vascular and myogenic cells appear with distinct temporal and spatial kinetics after muscle injury. Th...

  3. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  4. Heat stress inhibits skeletal muscle hypertrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Frier, Bruce C.; Locke, Marius

    2007-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are molecular chaperones that aid in protein synthesis and trafficking and have been shown to protect cells/tissues from various protein damaging stressors. To determine the extent to which a single heat stress and the concurrent accumulation of Hsps influences the early events of skeletal muscle hypertrophy, Sprague-Dawley rats were heat stressed (42°C, 15 minutes) 24 hours prior to overloading 1 plantaris muscle by surgical removal of the gastrocnemius muscle. The...

  5. Tort Damages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.T. Visscher (Louis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: In this Chapter, I provide an overview of Law and Economics literature regarding tort damages. Where necessary, attention is also spent to rules of tort liability. Both types of rules provide behavioral incentives to both injurers and victims, with respect to their level of

  6. Muscle biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, G; Bugiardini, E; Cardani, R

    2012-04-01

    Muscle biopsy is required to provide a definitive diagnosis in many neuromuscular disorders. It can be performed through an open or needle technique under local anesthesia. The major limitations of the needle biopsy technique are the sample size, which is smaller than that obtained with open biopsy, and the impossibility of direct visualization of the sampling site. However, needle biopsy is a less invasive procedure than open biopsy and is particularly indicated for diagnosis of neuromuscular disease in infancy and childhood. The biopsied muscle should be one affected by the disease but not be too weak or too atrophic. Usually, in case of proximal muscle involvement, the quadriceps and the biceps are biopsied, while under suspicion of mitochondrial disorder, the deltoid is preferred. The samples must be immediately frozen or fixed after excision to prevent loss of enzymatic reactivity, DNA depletion or RNA degradation. A battery of stainings is performed on muscle sections from every frozen muscle biopsy arriving in the pathology laboratory. Histological, histochemical, and histoenzymatic stainings are performed to evaluate fiber atrophy, morphological, and structural changes and metabolic disorders. Moreover, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting analysis may be used for expression analysis of muscle proteins to obtain a specific diagnosis. There are myopathies that do not need muscle biopsy since a genetic test performed on a blood sample is enough for definitive diagnosis. Muscle biopsy is a useful technique which can make an enormous contribution in the field of neuromuscular disorders but should be considered and interpreted together with the patient's family and clinical history.

  7. Recommendations for the Avoidance of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the possible causes of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), which include buildup of lactic acid in muscle, increased intracellular calcium concentration, increased intramuscular inflammation, and muscle fiber and connective tissue damage. Proposed methods to reduce DOMS include warming up before exercise and performing repeated bouts…

  8. Stress-induced Skeletal Muscle Gadd45a Expression Reprograms Myonuclei and Causes Muscle Atrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Scott M.; Dyle, Michael C.; Kunkel, Steven D.; Bullard, Steven A.; Bongers, Kale S.; Fox, Daniel K.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Foster, Eric D.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Diverse stresses including starvation and muscle disuse cause skeletal muscle atrophy. However, the molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy are complex and not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45a protein (Gadd45a) is a critical mediator of muscle atrophy. We identified Gadd45a through an unbiased search for potential downstream mediators of the stress-inducible, pro-atrophy transcription factor ATF4. We show that Gadd45a is required for skeletal muscle atrophy induced by three distinct skeletal muscle stresses: fasting, muscle immobilization, and muscle denervation. Conversely, forced expression of Gadd45a in muscle or cultured myotubes induces atrophy in the absence of upstream stress. We show that muscle-specific ATF4 knock-out mice have a reduced capacity to induce Gadd45a mRNA in response to stress, and as a result, they undergo less atrophy in response to fasting or muscle immobilization. Interestingly, Gadd45a is a myonuclear protein that induces myonuclear remodeling and a comprehensive program for muscle atrophy. Gadd45a represses genes involved in anabolic signaling and energy production, and it induces pro-atrophy genes. As a result, Gadd45a reduces multiple barriers to muscle atrophy (including PGC-1α, Akt activity, and protein synthesis) and stimulates pro-atrophy mechanisms (including autophagy and caspase-mediated proteolysis). These results elucidate a critical stress-induced pathway that reprograms muscle gene expression to cause atrophy. PMID:22692209

  9. Acute effects of stretching exercise on the soleus muscle of female aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotz, Talita Gnoato; Capriglione, Luiz Guilherme A; Zotz, Rafael; Noronha, Lucia; Viola De Azevedo, Marina Louise; Fiuza Martins, Hilana Rickli; Silveira Gomes, Anna Raquel

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that stretching exercises can improve the flexibility and independence of the elderly. However, although these exercises commonly constitute training programs, the morphological adaptations induced by stretching exercises in aged skeletal muscle are still unclear. To assess the acute effects of passive mechanical static stretching on the morphology, sarcomerogenesis and modulation of important components of the extracellular matrix of the soleus muscle of aged female rats. Fifteen old female rats with 26 months were divided into two groups: stretching (n=8, SG) and control (n=7, CG): The stretching protocol consisted of 4 repetitions each of 1 min with 30s interval between sets. Stretching was performed on the left soleus muscle, 3 times a week for 1 week. After three sessions, the rats were anesthetized to remove the left soleus muscle, and then euthanized. The following analyses were carried out: muscle fiber cross-sectional area and serial sarcomere number; immunohistochemistry for the quantification of collagen I, III and TGFβ-1. a decrease in muscle fiber cross-sectional area of the SG was observed when compared to the CG (p=0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis); the percentage of type I collagen was significantly lower in the SG when compared to the CG (p=0.01, Kruskal-Wallis), as well as the percentage of TGFβ-1 (p=0.04, Kruskal-Wallis); collagen III was significantly higher in the SG than in the CG (7.06±6.88% vs 4.92±5.30%, p=0.01, Kruskal-Wallis). Although the acute stretching induced muscle hypotrophy, an antifibrotic action was detected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Redox Control of Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moal, Emmeran; Pialoux, Vincent; Juban, Gaëtan; Groussard, Carole; Zouhal, Hassane; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Mounier, Rémi

    2017-08-10

    Skeletal muscle shows high plasticity in response to external demand. Moreover, adult skeletal muscle is capable of complete regeneration after injury, due to the properties of muscle stem cells (MuSCs), the satellite cells, which follow a tightly regulated myogenic program to generate both new myofibers and new MuSCs for further needs. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have long been associated with skeletal muscle physiology, their implication in the cell and molecular processes at work during muscle regeneration is more recent. This review focuses on redox regulation during skeletal muscle regeneration. An overview of the basics of ROS/RNS and antioxidant chemistry and biology occurring in skeletal muscle is first provided. Then, the comprehensive knowledge on redox regulation of MuSCs and their surrounding cell partners (macrophages, endothelial cells) during skeletal muscle regeneration is presented in normal muscle and in specific physiological (exercise-induced muscle damage, aging) and pathological (muscular dystrophies) contexts. Recent advances in the comprehension of these processes has led to the development of therapeutic assays using antioxidant supplementation, which result in inconsistent efficiency, underlying the need for new tools that are aimed at precisely deciphering and targeting ROS networks. This review should provide an overall insight of the redox regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration while highlighting the limits of the use of nonspecific antioxidants to improve muscle function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 276-310.

  11. Evaluation of muscle function of the extensor digitorum longus muscle ex vivo and tibialis anterior muscle in situ in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Chady H; Wasala, Nalinda B; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-02-09

    absence of dystrophin, the sarcolemma is damaged by the shearing force generated during force transmission. This membrane tearing initiates a chain reaction which leads to muscle cell death and loss of contractile machinery. As a consequence, muscle force is reduced and dead myofibers are replaced by fibrotic tissues (5). This later change increases muscle stiffness (6). Accurate measurement of these changes provides important guide to evaluate disease progression and to determine therapeutic efficacy of novel gene/cell/pharmacological interventions. Here, we present two methods to evaluate both contractile and passive mechanical properties of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and the contractile properties of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle.

  12. Getting Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re thinking about aren't possible for kids. Superheroes, of course, aren't real, and professional athletes ... can make you stronger. Why? Because you're using your muscles when you do it. Eat Strong ...

  13. Muscle cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the lower leg/calf Back of the thigh (hamstrings) Front of the thigh (quadriceps) Cramps in the ... Names Cramps - muscle Images Chest stretch Groin stretch Hamstring stretch Hip stretch Thigh stretch Triceps stretch References ...

  14. Musculoskeletal modelling of the lumbar spine to explore functional interactions between back muscle loads and intervertebral disc multiphysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Themis eToumanidou

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available During daily activities, complex biomechanical interactions influence the biophysical regulation of intervertebral discs (IVDs, and transfers of mechanical loads are largely controlled by the stabilizing action of spine muscles. Muscle and other internal forces cannot be easily measured directly in the lumbar spine. Hence, biomechanical models are important tools for the evaluation of the loads in those tissues involved in low back disorders. Muscle force estimations in most musculoskeletal models mainly rely, however, on inverse calculations and static optimizations that limit the predictive power of the numerical calculations. In order to contribute to the development of predictive systems, we coupled a predictive muscle model with the passive resistance of the spine tissues, in a L3-S1 musculoskeletal finite element model with osmo-poromechanical IVD descriptions. The model included 46 fascicles of the major back muscles that act on the lower spine. The muscle model interacted with activity-related loads imposed to the osteoligamentous structure, as standing position and night rest were simulated through distributed upper body mass and free IVD swelling, respectively. Calculations led to intradiscal pressure values within ranges of values measured in vivo. Disc swelling led to muscle activation and muscle force distributions that seemed particularly appropriate to counterbalance the anterior body mass effect in standing. Our simulations pointed out a likely existence of a functional balance between stretch-induced muscle activation and IVD multiphysics towards improved mechanical stability of the lumbar spine under standing. This balance suggests that proper night rest contributes to mechanically strengthen the spine during day activity.

  15. Coordinated collagen and muscle protein synthesis in human patella tendon and quadriceps muscle after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Benjamin F; Olesen, Jens L; Hansen, Mette

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesized that an acute bout of strenuous, non-damaging exercise would increase rates of protein synthesis of collagen in tendon and skeletal muscle but these would be less than those of muscle myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins. Two groups (n = 8 and 6) of healthy young men were studie...

  16. Progressive Muscle Atrophy and Weakness After Treatment by Mantle Field Radiotherapy in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeuwen-Segarceanu, Elena M. van, E-mail: e.segarceanu@antoniusziekenhuis.nl [Department of Internal Medicine, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Dorresteijn, Lucille D.A. [Department of Neurology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Pillen, Sigrid [Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Donders Center for Neuroscience, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Biesma, Douwe H. [Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Vogels, Oscar J.M. [Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Alfen, Nens van [Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Donders Center for Neuroscience, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. Methods and Materials: We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998. Besides evaluation of their symptoms, the following tests were performed: dynamometry; ultrasound of the sternocleidomastoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles; and needle electromyography of the neck, deltoid, and ultrasonographically affected arm muscles. Results: Ten patients (83%) experienced neck complaints, mostly pain and muscle weakness. On clinical examination, neck flexors were more often affected than neck extensors. On ultrasound, the sternocleidomastoid was severely atrophic in 8 patients, but abnormal echo intensity was seen in only 3 patients. Electromyography of the neck muscles showed mostly myogenic changes, whereas the deltoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles seemed to have mostly neurogenic damage. Conclusions: Many patients previously treated by mantle field radiotherapy develop severe atrophy and weakness of the neck muscles. Neck muscles within the radiation field show mostly myogenic damage, and muscles outside the mantle field show mostly neurogenic damage. The discrepancy between echo intensity and atrophy suggests that muscle damage is most likely caused by an extrinsic factor such as progressive microvascular fibrosis. This is also presumed to cause damage to nerves within the radiated field, resulting in neurogenic damage of the deltoid and arm muscles.

  17. Progressive muscle atrophy and weakness after treatment by mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen-Segarceanu, Elena M; Dorresteijn, Lucille D A; Pillen, Sigrid; Biesma, Douwe H; Vogels, Oscar J M; van Alfen, Nens

    2012-02-01

    To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998. Besides evaluation of their symptoms, the following tests were performed: dynamometry; ultrasound of the sternocleidomastoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles; and needle electromyography of the neck, deltoid, and ultrasonographically affected arm muscles. Ten patients (83%) experienced neck complaints, mostly pain and muscle weakness. On clinical examination, neck flexors were more often affected than neck extensors. On ultrasound, the sternocleidomastoid was severely atrophic in 8 patients, but abnormal echo intensity was seen in only 3 patients. Electromyography of the neck muscles showed mostly myogenic changes, whereas the deltoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles seemed to have mostly neurogenic damage. Many patients previously treated by mantle field radiotherapy develop severe atrophy and weakness of the neck muscles. Neck muscles within the radiation field show mostly myogenic damage, and muscles outside the mantle field show mostly neurogenic damage. The discrepancy between echo intensity and atrophy suggests that muscle damage is most likely caused by an extrinsic factor such as progressive microvascular fibrosis. This is also presumed to cause damage to nerves within the radiated field, resulting in neurogenic damage of the deltoid and arm muscles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Progressive Muscle Atrophy and Weakness After Treatment by Mantle Field Radiotherapy in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeuwen-Segarceanu, Elena M. van; Dorresteijn, Lucille D.A.; Pillen, Sigrid; Biesma, Douwe H.; Vogels, Oscar J.M.; Alfen, Nens van

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. Methods and Materials: We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998. Besides evaluation of their symptoms, the following tests were performed: dynamometry; ultrasound of the sternocleidomastoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles; and needle electromyography of the neck, deltoid, and ultrasonographically affected arm muscles. Results: Ten patients (83%) experienced neck complaints, mostly pain and muscle weakness. On clinical examination, neck flexors were more often affected than neck extensors. On ultrasound, the sternocleidomastoid was severely atrophic in 8 patients, but abnormal echo intensity was seen in only 3 patients. Electromyography of the neck muscles showed mostly myogenic changes, whereas the deltoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles seemed to have mostly neurogenic damage. Conclusions: Many patients previously treated by mantle field radiotherapy develop severe atrophy and weakness of the neck muscles. Neck muscles within the radiation field show mostly myogenic damage, and muscles outside the mantle field show mostly neurogenic damage. The discrepancy between echo intensity and atrophy suggests that muscle damage is most likely caused by an extrinsic factor such as progressive microvascular fibrosis. This is also presumed to cause damage to nerves within the radiated field, resulting in neurogenic damage of the deltoid and arm muscles.

  19. Effect of dietary fats with odd or even numbers of carbon atoms on metabolic response and muscle damage with exercise in Quarter Horse-type horses with type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgia, Lisa A; Valberg, Stephanie J; McCue, Molly E; Pagan, Joe D; Roe, Charles R

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate effects of fats with odd and even numbers of carbon atoms on muscle metabolism in exercising horses with polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM). 8 horses with PSSM (6 females and 2 males; mean +/- SD age, 6.3 +/- 3.9 years). Isocaloric diets (grain, triheptanoin, corn oil, and high-fat, low-starch [HFLS] feed) were fed for 3 weeks each; horses performed daily treadmill exercise. Grain was fed to establish an exercise target, and HFLS feed was fed as a negative control diet. Daily plasma samples were obtained. For each diet, a 15-minute exercise test was performed, and gluteus medius muscle specimens and blood samples were obtained before and after exercise. Feeding triheptanoin, compared with the corn oil diet, resulted in exercise intolerance; higher plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity and concentrations of C3:0- and C7:0-acylcarnitine and insulin; and lower concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and C16:0-, C18:1-, and C18:2-acylcarnitine, without changes in concentrations of plasma glucose or resting muscle substrates and metabolites. Feeding grain induced higher CK activity and insulin concentrations and lower NEFA concentrations than did corn oil or HFLS feed. Feeding grain induced higher glucose concentrations than did triheptanoin and corn oil. In muscle, feeding grain resulted in lower glucose-6-phosphate, higher citrate, and higher postexercise lactate concentrations than did the other diets. Triheptanoin had detrimental effects, reflecting decreased availability of NEFA, increased insulin stimulation of glycogen synthesis, and potential inhibition of lipid oxidation. Long-chain fats are the best dietetic for PSSM.

  20. Acute effects of constant torque and constant angle stretching on the muscle and tendon tissue properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Andreas; Budini, Francesco; Tilp, Markus

    2017-08-01

    Static stretching induces acute structural changes of the muscle-tendon unit (MTU) that are related to the intensity or duration of stretching. It has been reported that stretching with a constant torque (CT) leads to greater joint range of motion changes than stretching with a constant angle (CA). Whether or not this difference is due to different structural changes of the MTUs of the lower leg and ankle plantar flexors is not known. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of single CA and CT stretching on various muscle and tendon mechanical properties. Seventeen young, healthy volunteers were tested on two separate days using either CT or CA stretching (4 × 30 s each). Before and after stretching, dorsiflexion range of motion (RoM), passive resistive torque (PRT), and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) were measured with a dynamometer. Ultrasonography of the medial gastrocnemius (GM) muscle-tendon junction (MTJ) displacement allowed us to determine the length changes in the tendon and muscle, respectively, and hence to calculate their stiffness. Maximum dorsiflexion increased while PRT, muscle-tendon stiffness, and muscle stiffness decreased following both CA and CT stretching. There was a greater increase in RoM following CT stretching compared to CA stretching. Moreover, the decline in PRT was greater during CT stretching compared to CA stretching. As expected, several functional adaptations (RoM, PRT) were different between CT and CA stretching due to the higher intensity of CT stretching. However, no structural differences in the adaptations to the stretching modalities could be detected. We suggest that the different functional adaptations between CA and CT stretching are the consequence of different adaptations in the perception of stretch and pain.

  1. Metformin protects skeletal muscle from cardiotoxin induced degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Langone

    Full Text Available The skeletal muscle tissue has a remarkable capacity to regenerate upon injury. Recent studies have suggested that this regenerative process is improved when AMPK is activated. In the muscle of young and old mice a low calorie diet, which activates AMPK, markedly enhances muscle regeneration. Remarkably, intraperitoneal injection of AICAR, an AMPK agonist, improves the structural integrity of muscles of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. Building on these observations we asked whether metformin, a powerful anti-hyperglycemic drug, which indirectly activates AMPK, affects the response of skeletal muscle to damage. In our conditions, metformin treatment did not significantly influence muscle regeneration. On the other hand we observed that the muscles of metformin treated mice are more resilient to cardiotoxin injury displaying lesser muscle damage. Accordingly myotubes, originated in vitro from differentiated C2C12 myoblast cell line, become more resistant to cardiotoxin damage after pre-incubation with metformin. Our results indicate that metformin limits cardiotoxin damage by protecting myotubes from necrosis. Although the details of the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effect remain to be elucidated, we report a correlation between the ability of metformin to promote resistance to damage and its capacity to counteract the increment of intracellular calcium levels induced by cardiotoxin treatment. Since increased cytoplasmic calcium concentrations characterize additional muscle pathological conditions, including dystrophies, metformin treatment could prove a valuable strategy to ameliorate the conditions of patients affected by dystrophies.

  2. Soft tissue damage after minimally invasive THA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oldenrijk, Jakob; Hoogland, Piet V. J. M.; Tuijthof, Gabriëlle J. M.; Corveleijn, Ruby; Noordenbos, Tom W. H.; Schafroth, Matthias U.

    2010-01-01

    Methods 5 surgeons each performed a total hip arthroplasty on 5 fresh frozen cadaver hips, using either a MIS anterior, MIS anterolateral, MIS 2-incision, MIS posterior, or lateral transgluteal approach. Postoperatively, the hips were dissected and muscle damage color-stained. We measured

  3. Structural damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.E.; Bruhn, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    Virtually all structures show some signs of distress due to deterioration of the building components, to changed loads, or to changed support conditions. Changed support conditions result from ground movements. In mining regions many cases of structural distress are attributed to mining without considering alternative causes. This is particularly true of coal mining since it occurs under extensive areas. Coal mining is estimated to have already undermined more than eight million acres and may eventually undermine 40 million acres in the United States. Other nonmetal and metal underground mines impact much smaller areas. Although it is sometimes difficult, even with careful study, to identify the actual cause of damage, persons responsible for underground coal mining should at least be aware of possible causes of building stress other than mine subsidence. This paper presents information on distress to structures and briefly reviews a number of causes of ground movements other than subsidence: Mass movements, dissolution, erosion, frost action, shrinking and swelling, yield into excavations and compressibility

  4. Damaged Skylab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The Saturn V vehicle, carrying the unmarned orbital workshop for the Skylab-1 mission, lifted off successfully and all systems performed normally. Sixty-three seconds into the flight, engineers in the operation support and control center saw an unexpected telemetry indication that signalled that damages occurred on one solar array and the micrometeoroid shield during the launch. The micrometeoroid shield, a thin protective cylinder surrounding the workshop protecting it from tiny space particles and the sun's scorching heat, ripped loose from its position around the workshop. This caused the loss of one solar wing and jammed the other. Still unoccupied, the Skylab was stricken with the loss of the heat shield and sunlight beat mercilessly on the lab's sensitive skin. Internal temperatures soared, rendering the station uninhabitable, threatening foods, medicines, films, and experiments. This image, taken during a fly-around inspection by the Skylab-2 crew, shows a crippled Skylab in orbit. The crew found their home in space to be in serious shape; the heat shield gone, one solar wing gone, and the other jammed. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed, tested, rehearsed, and approved three repair options. These options included a parasol sunshade and a twin-pole sunshade to restore the temperature inside the workshop, and a set of metal cutting tools to free the jammed solar panel.

  5. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids attenuate muscle soreness and improve muscle protein synthesis after eccentric contractions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiromi; Mimura, Masako; Inoue, Yoshiko; Sugita, Mayu; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Hisamine

    2015-06-01

    Eccentric exercise results in prolonged muscle weakness and muscle soreness, which are typical symptoms of muscle damage. Recovery from muscle damage is related to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids (LEAAs) stimulate muscle protein synthesis via activation of the mTOR pathway. Therefore, we investigated the effect of LEAAs on muscle protein synthesis and muscle soreness after eccentric contractions (EC). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (9-11 weeks old) were administered an LEAA solution (AminoL40; containing 40 % leucine and 60 % other essential amino acids) at 1 g/kg body weight or distilled water (control) 30 min before and 10 min after EC. Tibialis anterior (TA) muscle was exposed to 500 EC by electrical stimulation under anesthesia. The fractional synthesis rate (FSR; %/h) in the TA muscle was measured by incorporating L-[ring-(2)H5] phenylalanine into skeletal muscle protein. Muscle soreness was evaluated by the paw withdrawal threshold using the Randal-Selitto test with some modifications from 1 to 3 days after EC. The FSR in the EC-control group (0.147 ± 0.016 %/h) was significantly lower than in the sedentary group (0.188 ± 0.016 %/h, p soreness. Furthermore, AminoL40 administration alleviated the decreased paw withdrawal threshold. These findings suggest that LEAA supplementation improves the rate of muscle protein synthesis and ameliorates muscle soreness after eccentric exercise.

  6. Immediate effects of hamstring stretching alone or combined with ischemic compression of the masseter muscle on hamstrings extensibility, active mouth opening and pain in athletes with temporomandibular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo-Antúnez, Luis; Castro-Valenzuela, Elisa; Ribeiro, Fernando; Albornoz-Cabello, Manuel; Silva, Anabela; Rodríguez-Mansilla, Juan

    2016-07-01

    To assess the immediate effects of hamstrings stretching alone or combined with ischemic compression of the masseter muscle on hamstrings extensibility, active mouth opening and pain in athletes with temporomandibular dysfunction and hamstrings shortening. Forty-two participants were randomized to receive the stretching technique (n = 21) or the stretching plus the ischemic compression (n = 21). Outcome measures were: hamstrings extensibility, active mouth opening, pressure pain thresholds and pain intensity. Both interventions improved significantly active mouth opening (group 1: 35.7 ± 6.7 to 39.1 ± 7.6 mm, p Hamstrings stretching induced an acute improvement in hamstrings extensibility, active mouth opening and pain. Moreover, the addition of ischemic compression did not induce further improvements on the assessed parameters. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Determinants of muscle carnosine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R C; Wise, J A; Price, K A; Kim, H J; Kim, C K; Sale, C

    2012-07-01

    The main determinant of muscle carnosine (M-Carn) content is undoubtedly species, with, for example, aerobically trained female vegetarian athletes [with circa 13 mmol/kg dry muscle (dm)] having just 1/10th of that found in trained thoroughbred horses. Muscle fibre type is another key determinant, as type II fibres have a higher M-Carn or muscle histidine containing dipeptide (M-HCD) content than type I fibres. In vegetarians, M-Carn is limited by hepatic synthesis of β-alanine, whereas in omnivores this is augmented by the hydrolysis of dietary supplied HCD's resulting in muscle levels two or more times higher. β-alanine supplementation will increase M-Carn. The same increase in M-Carn occurs with administration of an equal molar quantity of carnosine as an alternative source of β-alanine. Following the cessation of supplementation, M-Carn returns to pre-supplementation levels, with an estimated t1/2 of 5-9 weeks. Higher than normal M-Carn contents have been noted in some chronically weight-trained subjects, but it is unclear if this is due to the training per se, or secondary to changes in muscle fibre composition, an increase in β-alanine intake or even anabolic steroid use. There is no measureable loss of M-Carn with acute exercise, although exercise-induced muscle damage may result in raised plasma concentrations in equines. Animal studies indicate effects of gender and age, but human studies lack sufficient control of the effects of diet and changes in muscle fibre composition.

  8. Cyclic Mechanical Stretch Up-regulates Hepatoma-Derived Growth Factor Expression in Cultured Rat Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Ying-Hsien; Chen, Po-Han; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chang, Yo-Chen; Lin, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Ming-Shian; Lee, Po-Huang; Cheng, Cheng-I

    2018-02-21

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is a potent mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) during embryogenesis and injury repair of vessel walls. Whether mechanical stimuli modulate HDGF expression remains unknown. This study aimed at investigating whether cyclic mechanical stretch plays a regulatory role in HDGF expression and regenerative cytokine production in aortic SMCs. A SMC cell line was grown on a silicone-based elastomer chamber with extracellular matrix coatings (either type I collagen or fibronectin) and received cyclic and uni-axial mechanical stretches with 10% deformation at frequency 1 Hz. Morphological observation showed that fibronectin coating provided better cell adhesion and spreading and that consecutive 6 hours of cyclic mechanical stretch remarkably induced reorientation and realignment of SMCs. Western blotting detection demonstrated that continuous mechanical stimuli elicited up-regulation of HDGF and PCNA, a cell proliferative marker. Signal kinetic profiling study indicated that cyclic mechanical stretch induced signaling activity in RhoA/ROCK and PI3K/Akt cascades. Kinase inhibition study further showed that blockade of PI3K activity suppressed the stretch-induced TNF-a, whereas RhoA/ROCK inhibition significantly blunted the IL-6 production and HDGF over-expression. Moreover, siRNA-mediated HDGF gene silencing significantly suppressed constitutive expression of IL-6, but not TNF-α, in SMCs. These findings support the role of HDGF in maintaining vascular expression of IL-6, which has been regarded a crucial regenerative factor for acute vascular injury. In conclusion, cyclic mechanical stretch may maintain constitutive expression of HDGF in vascular walls and be regarded an important biophysical regulator in vascular regeneration. ©2018 The Author(s).

  9. Acute effects of passive stretching of the plantarflexor muscles on neuromuscular function: the influence of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Eric D; Herda, Trent J; Costa, Pablo B; Herda, Ashley A; Cramer, Joel T

    2014-01-01

    The acute effects of stretching on peak force (Fpeak), percent voluntary activation (%VA), electromyographic (EMG) amplitude, maximum range of motion (MROM), peak passive torque, the passive resistance to stretch, and the percentage of ROM at EMG onset (%EMGonset) were examined in 18 young and 19 old men. Participants performed a MROM assessment and a maximal voluntary contraction of the plantarflexors before and immediately after 20 min of passive stretching. Fpeak (-11 %), %VA (-6 %), and MG EMG amplitude (-9 %) decreased after stretching in the young, but not the old (P > 0.05). Changes in Fpeak were related to reductions in all muscle activation variables (r = 0.56-0.75), but unrelated to changes in the passive resistance to stretch (P ≥ 0.24). Both groups experienced increases in MROM and peak passive torque and decreases in the passive resistance to stretch. However, the old men experienced greater changes in MROM (P stretching for both groups (P = 0.213), but occurred earlier in the old (P = 0.06). The stretching-induced impairments in strength and activation in the young but not the old men may suggest that the neural impairments following stretching are gamma-loop-mediated. In addition, the augmented changes in MROM and passive torque and the lack of change in %EMGonset for the old men may be a result of age-related changes in muscle-tendon behavior.

  10. Loss of the inducible Hsp70 delays the inflammatory response to skeletal muscle injury and severely impairs muscle regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Senf

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle regeneration following injury is a highly coordinated process that involves transient muscle inflammation, removal of necrotic cellular debris and subsequent replacement of damaged myofibers through secondary myogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms which coordinate these events are only beginning to be defined. In the current study we demonstrate that Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 is increased following muscle injury, and is necessary for the normal sequence of events following severe injury induced by cardiotoxin, and physiological injury induced by modified muscle use. Indeed, Hsp70 ablated mice showed a significantly delayed inflammatory response to muscle injury induced by cardiotoxin, with nearly undetected levels of both neutrophil and macrophage markers 24 hours post-injury. At later time points, Hsp70 ablated mice showed sustained muscle inflammation and necrosis, calcium deposition and impaired fiber regeneration that persisted several weeks post-injury. Through rescue experiments reintroducing Hsp70 intracellular expression plasmids into muscles of Hsp70 ablated mice either prior to injury or post-injury, we confirm that Hsp70 optimally promotes muscle regeneration when expressed during both the inflammatory phase that predominates in the first four days following severe injury and the regenerative phase that predominates thereafter. Additional rescue experiments reintroducing Hsp70 protein into the extracellular microenvironment of injured muscles at the onset of injury provides further evidence that Hsp70 released from damaged muscle may drive the early inflammatory response to injury. Importantly, following induction of physiological injury through muscle reloading following a period of muscle disuse, reduced inflammation in 3-day reloaded muscles of Hsp70 ablated mice was associated with preservation of myofibers, and increased muscle force production at later time points compared to WT. Collectively our

  11. CT based muscle density predicts muscle function and health-related quality of life in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Laura C.; Crofford, Leslie J.; Long, Douglas; Charnigo, Richard; Clasey, Jody; Beaman, Francesca; Jenkins, Kirk A.; Fraser, Natasha; Srinivas, Archana; Dhaon, Nicole; Hanaoka, Beatriz Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of low-density (lipid-rich) muscle measured by computed tomography (CT) with skeletal muscle function and health-related quality of life in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs). Methods Seventeen patients and ten healthy controls underwent CT of the mid-thigh to quantify high (30-100HU) and low density (0-29HU) skeletal muscle areas. Anthropometric measures, body composition, physical activity level, health-related quality of life, skeletal muscle strength, endurance and fatigue were assessed. Patients were compared against controls. The relationship of anthropometric, body composition and disease variables with measures of muscle function were examined using Spearman’s test on the patient group. Linear regression was used to assess the age-and disease-adjusted relationship of muscle quality to physical function and muscle strength. Results Patients had higher body fat% (p=0.042), trunk fat mass (p=0.042), android/gynoid fat (p=0.033) and mid-thigh low density muscle/total muscle area (p<0.001) compared to controls. Mid-thigh low density muscle/total muscle area was negatively correlated with self-reported physical function, strength and endurance; the SF-36 physical functioning (p=0.004), manual muscle testing (p=0.020), knee maximal voluntary isometric contraction/thigh mineral free lean mass (p<0.001) and the endurance step test (p<0.001), suggesting that muscle quality impacts function in IIM. Using multiple linear regression adjusted for age, global disease damage, and total fat mass, poor muscle quality as measured by mid-thigh low density muscle/total muscle area was negatively associated with SF-36 physical functioning (p= 0.009). Conclusion Mid-thigh low density muscle/ total muscle area is a good predictor of muscle strength, endurance and health-related quality of life as it pertains to physical functioning in patients with IIMs. PMID:25623494

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor, capillarization, and function of the rat plantaris muscle at the onset of hypertrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degens, H.; Moore, J.A.; Alway, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    Capillary proliferation occurs during compensatory hypertrophy. We investigated whether the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is elevated at the onset of hypertrophy when capillary proliferation is minimal, and whether muscle damage as assessed by muscle force deficits, may

  13. Absent abdominal muscles, nephro-urologic abnormalities, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Absent abdominal muscles, cryptorchidism, and hydroureteronephrosis are known to occur in the prune belly syndrome (PBS). We present a male with absent abdominal muscles, severe neurologic damage, with global developmental delay, hydroureteronephrosis, and cryptorchidism. The patient also had arthrogryposis ...

  14. Absent abdominal muscles, nephro-urologic abnormalities, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kamal F. Akl

    2014-12-23

    Dec 23, 2014 ... Abstract Absent abdominal muscles, cryptorchidism, and hydroureteronephrosis are known to occur in the prune belly syndrome (PBS). We present a male with absent abdominal muscles, severe neurologic damage, with global devel- opmental ... hands with bilateral simian creases, contractures at elbows.

  15. The Effect of Smoking on Muscle Adaptation to Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    emphasize the importance of limiting activity for at least a week after a muscle biopsy. Key words: rhabdomyolysis , muscle damage, creatine kinase...differential diagnosis focused on compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis , infection, and hematoma. Compartment syndrome was eliminated due to the lack...of hematuria coupled with relatively modest CK elevation excluded diagnosis of clinically relevant rhabdomyolysis (i.e. danger of renal failure). X

  16. Muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statland, Jeffrey; Phillips, Lauren; Trivedi, Jaya R

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle channelopathies are rare heterogeneous diseases with marked genotypic and phenotypic variability. Despite advances in understanding of the molecular pathology of these disorders, the diverse phenotypic manifestations remain a challenge in diagnosis and therapeutics. These disorders can cause lifetime disability and affect quality of life. There is no treatment of these disorders approved by the US Food and Drug Administration at this time. Recognition and treatment of symptoms might reduce morbidity and improve quality of life. This article summarizes the clinical manifestations, diagnostic studies, pathophysiology, and treatment options in nondystrophic myotonia, congenital myasthenic syndrome, and periodic paralyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. O músculo estraga a mulher? a produção de feminilidades no fisiculturismo Does the muscle damage a woman? The production of femininities in bodybuilding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelita Alice Jaeger

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Este texto analisa a relação entre a potencialização muscular e as representações de feminilidade que circulam em uma modalidade esportiva específica: o fisiculturismo. Ancora-se nos estudos culturais e em vertentes do feminismo pós-estruturalista, estabelecendo um diálogo com a teorização de Michel Foucault. As análises indicam que no esporte há um investimento para que as atletas preservem atributos culturalmente relacionados a uma representação de feminilidade normalizada. No entanto, essa recomendação não as interpela da mesma forma: algumas são capturadas por esse discurso, outras reagem e resistem indicando que uma arquitetura corporal muscularmente potencializada não estraga a mulher. Ao contrário, mostra-se como outra feminilidade, tencionando, portanto, as representações binárias de gênero.This paper analyzes the relationship between muscle potentiation and representations of femininity involved in bodybuilding. It is anchored in cultural studies and aspects of the poststructuralist feminism establishing a dialogue with the theories of Michel Foucault. The results of the analysis indicate that there is an investment in bodybuilding so that the female athletes preserve cultural attributes related to a normalized representation of femininity. However, this recommendation does not reach all the female athletes the same way. Some of them are caught by this speech, others react and resist indicating that a muscularly potentiated body architecture does not ruin the woman. On the contrary, it is seen as another femininity which questions, therefore, the binary representations of gender.

  18. Decreased muscle GLUT-4 and contraction-induced glucose transport after eccentric contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, S; Asp, Svend; Richter, Erik

    1996-01-01

    Eccentric exercise causes muscle damage and decreased muscle glycogen and glucose transporter isoform (GLUT-4) protein content. We investigated whether the contraction-induced increase in skeletal muscle glucose transport and muscle performance is affected by prior eccentric contractions. The calf...... muscles from rats were stimulated for eccentric (EC) or concentric (CC) contractions or were passively stretched (ST). Muscles from unstimulated control (CT) rats were also studied. Two days later, all rats had their isolated hindlimbs perfused either at rest or during 15 min of isometric muscle...... contractions. EC rats had a significantly lower total GLUT-4 protein content in the white gastrocnemius (GW) muscle (55%) and red gastrocnemius (GR) muscle (34%) compared with muscle from the CT, ST, and CC rats. In contrast, GLUT-1 protein content was approximately twofold higher in the GW muscle in EC rats...

  19. PEDF-derived peptide promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through its mitogenic effect on muscle progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tsung-Chuan; Chiang, Yi-Pin; Chuang, Chih-Kuang; Chen, Show-Li; Hsieh, Jui-Wen; Lan, Yu-Wen; Tsao, Yeou-Ping

    2015-08-01

    In response injury, intrinsic repair mechanisms are activated in skeletal muscle to replace the damaged muscle fibers with new muscle fibers. The regeneration process starts with the proliferation of satellite cells to give rise to myoblasts, which subsequently differentiate terminally into myofibers. Here, we investigated the promotion effect of pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF) on muscle regeneration. We report that PEDF and a synthetic PEDF-derived short peptide (PSP; residues Ser(93)-Leu(112)) induce satellite cell proliferation in vitro and promote muscle regeneration in vivo. Extensively, soleus muscle necrosis was induced in rats by bupivacaine, and an injectable alginate gel was used to release the PSP in the injured muscle. PSP delivery was found to stimulate satellite cell proliferation in damaged muscle and enhance the growth of regenerating myofibers, with complete regeneration of normal muscle mass by 2 wk. In cell culture, PEDF/PSP stimulated C2C12 myoblast proliferation, together with a rise in cyclin D1 expression. PEDF induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt, and STAT3 in C2C12 myoblasts. Blocking the activity of ERK, Akt, or STAT3 with pharmacological inhibitors attenuated the effects of PEDF/PSP on the induction of C2C12 cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine pulse-labeling demonstrated that PEDF/PSP stimulated primary rat satellite cell proliferation in myofibers in vitro. In summary, we report for the first time that PSP is capable of promoting the regeneration of skeletal muscle. The signaling mechanism involves the ERK, AKT, and STAT3 pathways. These results show the potential utility of this PEDF peptide for muscle regeneration. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Damage analysis: damage function development and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The derivation and application of damage functions, including recent developments for the U.S. LMFBR and CTR programs, is reviewed. A primary application of damage functions is in predicting component life expectancies; i.e., the fluence required in a service spectrum to attain a specified design property change. An important part of the analysis is the estimation of the uncertainty in such fluence limit predictions. The status of standardizing the procedures for the derivation and application of damage functions is discussed. Improvements in several areas of damage function development are needed before standardization can be completed. These include increasing the quantity and quality of the data used in the analysis, determining the limitations of the analysis due to the presence of multiple damage mechanisms, and finally, testing of damage function predictions against data obtained from material surveillance programs in operating thermal and fast reactors. 23 references. (auth)

  1. Material Induced Anisotropic Damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, Muhammad Sohail; Wisselink, H.H.; Meinders, Vincent T.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Hora, P.

    2012-01-01

    The anisotropy in damage can be driven by two different phenomena; anisotropic defor-mation state named Load Induced Anisotropic Damage (LIAD) and anisotropic (shape and/or distribution) second phase particles named Material Induced Anisotropic Damage (MIAD). Most anisotropic damage models are based

  2. Properties of regenerated mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle following notexin injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, S I; Houweling, P J; Chan, S; Chen, G; Hardeman, E C

    2014-04-01

    Muscles of mdx mice are known to be more susceptible to contraction-induced damage than wild-type muscle. However, it is not clear whether this is because of dystrophin deficiency or because of the abnormal branching morphology of dystrophic muscle fibres. This distinction has an important bearing on our traditional understanding of the function of dystrophin as a mechanical stabilizer of the sarcolemma. In this study, we address the question: 'Does dystrophin-positive, regenerated muscle containing branched fibres also show an increased susceptibility to contraction-induced damage?' We produced a model of fibre branching by injecting dystrophin-positive extensor digitorum longus muscles with notexin. The regenerated muscle was examined at 21 days postinjection. Notexin-injected muscle contained 29% branched fibres and was not more susceptible to damage from mild eccentric contractions than contralateral saline-injected control muscle. Regenerated muscles also had greater mass, greater cross-sectional area and lower specific force than control muscles. We conclude that the number of branched fibres in this regenerated muscle is below the threshold needed to increase susceptibility to damage. However, it would serve as an ideal control for muscles of young mdx mice, allowing for clearer differentiation of the effects of dystrophin deficiency from the effects of fibre regeneration and morphology.

  3. Overweight in elderly people induces impaired autophagy in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potes, Yaiza; de Luxán-Delgado, Beatriz; Rodriguez-González, Susana; Guimarães, Marcela Rodrigues Moreira; Solano, Juan J; Fernández-Fernández, María; Bermúdez, Manuel; Boga, Jose A; Vega-Naredo, Ignacio; Coto-Montes, Ana

    2017-09-01

    Sarcopenia is the gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass, strength and quality associated with aging. Changes in body composition, especially in skeletal muscle and fat mass are crucial steps in the development of chronic diseases. We studied the effect of overweight on skeletal muscle tissue in elderly people without reaching obesity to prevent this extreme situation. Overweight induces a progressive protein breakdown reflected as a progressive withdrawal of anabolism against the promoted catabolic state leading to muscle wasting. Protein turnover is regulated by a network of signaling pathways. Muscle damage derived from overweight displayed by oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induces inflammation and insulin resistance and forces the muscle to increase requirements from autophagy mechanisms. Our findings showed that failure of autophagy in the elderly deprives it to deal with the cell damage caused by overweight. This insufficiently efficient autophagy leads to an accumulation of p62 and NBR1, which are robust markers of protein aggregations. This impaired autophagy affects myogenesis activity. Depletion of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) without links to variations in myostatin levels in overweight patients suggest a possible reduction of satellite cells in muscle tissue, which contributes to declined muscle quality. This discovery has important implications that improve the understanding of aged-related atrophy caused by overweight and demonstrates how impaired autophagy is one of the main responsible mechanisms that aggravate muscle wasting. Therefore, autophagy could be an interesting target for therapeutic interventions in humans against muscle impairment diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids attenuate inflammation in rat muscle and enhance muscle repair after eccentric contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Miura, Kyoko; Nakano, Sayako; Suzuki, Katsuya; Bannai, Makoto; Inoue, Yoshiko

    2016-09-01

    Eccentric exercise results in prolonged muscle damage that may lead to muscle dysfunction. Although inflammation is essential to recover from muscle damage, excessive inflammation may also induce secondary damage, and should thus be suppressed. In this study, we investigated the effect of leucine-enriched essential amino acids on muscle inflammation and recovery after eccentric contraction. These amino acids are known to stimulate muscle protein synthesis via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which, is also considered to alleviate inflammation. Five sets of 10 eccentric contractions were induced by electrical stimulation in the tibialis anterior muscle of male SpragueDawley rats (8-9 weeks old) under anesthesia. Animals received a 1 g/kg dose of a mixture containing 40 % leucine and 60 % other essential amino acids or distilled water once a day throughout the experiment. Muscle dysfunction was assessed based on isometric dorsiflexion torque, while inflammation was evaluated by histochemistry. Gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and myogenic regulatory factors was also measured. We found that leucine-enriched essential amino acids restored full muscle function within 14 days, at which point rats treated with distilled water had not fully recovered. Indeed, muscle function was stronger 3 days after eccentric contraction in rats treated with amino acids than in those treated with distilled water. The amino acid mix also alleviated expression of interleukin-6 and impeded infiltration of inflammatory cells into muscle, but did not suppress expression of myogenic regulatory factors. These results suggest that leucine-enriched amino acids accelerate recovery from muscle damage by preventing excessive inflammation.

  5. Dano muscular: resposta inflamatória sistêmica após ações excêntricas máximas Daño muscular: respuesta inflamatoria sistémica después de acciones excéntricas máximas Muscle damage: systemic inflammatory response after maximal eccentric actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Paes de Barros Berton

    2012-09-01

    émica.The objective of this study was to analyze the magnitude of the inflammatory response induced by a high number of eccentric actions (AE of the elbow flexors. Participated on this study nine young men who performed 35 sets of six AE of the elbow flexors, with an one minute interval, using an isokinetic dynamometer at 210º.s-1. Maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC, range of motion (ROM, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS, interleukin 6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α were measured. Significant changes were observed for markers of muscle damage (MVIC, ROM and DOMS, however, there were no changes on inflammatory markers IL-6 and TNF-α. In conclusion, the results show that even with large numbers of AE and changes in indirect markers of muscle damage, no change was observed in the systemic inflammatory response.

  6. A pilot study of muscle plasma protein changes after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlqvist, Julia R; Voss, Line G; Lauridsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    profiles were measured before and after exercise in 3 groups: subjects affected by either Becker muscular dystrophy or McArdle disease, and healthy subjects. RESULTS: Mb and TnI appeared early in the blood, and the increase of TnI was only observed in patients with muscle disease. The CK increase was more...... delayed in plasma. Tcap was not detectable at any time. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that TnI is a marker of more severe damage signifying sarcomeric damage, and it could therefore be an important supplement to CK and Mb in clinical practice. Tcap is not useful as a marker for skeletal muscle damage....

  7. Muscle biopsies from human muscle diseases with myopathic pathology reveal common alterations in mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunitha, Balaraju; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Kumar, Manish; Keshava Prasad, Thottethodi Subrahmanya; Nalini, Atchayaram; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2016-07-01

    Muscle diseases are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and manifest as dystrophic, inflammatory and myopathic pathologies, among others. Our previous study on the cardiotoxin mouse model of myodegeneration and inflammation linked muscle pathology with mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether human muscle diseases display mitochondrial changes. Muscle biopsies from muscle disease patients, represented by dysferlinopathy (dysfy) (dystrophic pathology; n = 43), polymyositis (PM) (inflammatory pathology; n = 24), and distal myopathy with rimmed vacuoles (DMRV) (distal myopathy; n = 31) were analyzed. Mitochondrial damage (ragged blue and COX-deficient fibers) was revealed in dysfy, PM, and DMRV cases by enzyme histochemistry (SDH and COX-SDH), electron microscopy (vacuolation and altered cristae) and biochemical assays (significantly increased ADP/ATP ratio). Proteomic analysis of muscle mitochondria from all three muscle diseases by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis demonstrated down-regulation of electron transport chain (ETC) complex subunits, assembly factors and Krebs cycle enzymes. Interestingly, 80 of the under-expressed proteins were common among the three pathologies. Assay of ETC and Krebs cycle enzyme activities validated the MS data. Mitochondrial proteins from muscle pathologies also displayed higher tryptophan (Trp) oxidation and the same was corroborated in the cardiotoxin model. Molecular modeling predicted Trp oxidation to alter the local structure of mitochondrial proteins. Our data highlight mitochondrial alterations in muscle pathologies, represented by morphological changes, altered mitochondrial proteome and protein oxidation, thereby establishing the role of mitochondrial damage in human muscle diseases. We investigated whether human muscle diseases display mitochondrial changes. Muscle biopsies

  8. Eccentric muscle contractions: their contribution to injury, prevention, rehabilitation, and sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaStayo, Paul C; Woolf, John M; Lewek, Michael D; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Reich, Trude; Lindstedt, Stan L

    2003-10-01

    Muscles operate eccentrically to either dissipate energy for decelerating the body or to store elastic recoil energy in preparation for a shortening (concentric) contraction. The muscle forces produced during this lengthening behavior can be extremely high, despite the requisite low energetic cost. Traditionally, these high-force eccentric contractions have been associated with a muscle damage response. This clinical commentary explores the ability of the muscle-tendon system to adapt to progressively increasing eccentric muscle forces and the resultant structural and functional outcomes. Damage to the muscle-tendon is not an obligatory response. Rather, the muscle can hypertrophy and a change in the spring characteristics of muscle can enhance power; the tendon also adapts so as to tolerate higher tensions. Both basic and clinical findings are discussed. Specifically, we explore the nature of the structural changes and how these adaptations may help prevent musculoskeletal injury, improve sport performance, and overcome musculoskeletal impairments.

  9. The effect of temperature on eccentric contraction-induced isometric force loss in isolated perfused rat medial gastrocnemius muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Vasaghi Gharamaleki B; Keshavarz M; Gharibzadeh Sh; Marvi H; Mosayebnejad J; Ebrahimi Takamjani E

    2008-01-01

    "nBackground: The typical features of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage are delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and prolonged loss of muscle strength. It has been shown that passive warmth is effective in reducing muscle injury. Due to the interaction of different systems in vivo, we used isolated perfused medial gastrocnemius skeletal muscle to study the direct effect of temperature on the eccentric contraction-induced force loss. "nMethods: After femoral artery cannulation...

  10. Delayed onset muscle soreness after inspiratory threshold loading in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Sunita; Sheel, A William; Road, Jeremy D; Reid, W Darlene

    2010-03-01

    Skeletal muscle damage occurs following high-intensity or unaccustomed exercise; however, it is difficult to monitor damage to the respiratory muscles, particularly in humans. The aim of this study was to use clinical measures to investigate the presence of skeletal muscle damage in the inspiratory muscles. Ten healthy subjects underwent 60 minutes of voluntary inspiratory threshold loading (ITL) at 70% of maximal inspiratory pressure. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressures, delayed onset muscle soreness on a visual analogue scale and plasma creatine kinase were measured prior to ITL, and at repeated time points after ITL (4, 24 and 48 hours post-ITL). Delayed onset muscle soreness was present in all subjects 24 hours following ITL (intensity = 22 +/- 6 mm; significantly higher than baseline p = 0.02). Muscle soreness was reported primarily in the anterior neck region, and was correlated to the amount of work done by the inspiratory muscles during ITL (r = 0.72, p = 0.02). However, no significant change was observed in maximal inspiratory or expiratory pressures or creatine kinase. These findings suggest that an intense bout of ITL results in muscle soreness primarily in the accessory muscles of inspiration, however, may be insufficient to cause significant muscle damage in healthy adults.

  11. Magnitude-dependent proliferation and contractility modulation of human bladder smooth muscle cells under physiological stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, De-Yi; Wazir, Romel; Du, Caigan; Tian, Ye; Yue, Xuan; Wei, Tang-Qiang; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and test a kind of stretch pattern which is based on modified BOSE BioDynamic system to produce optimum physiological stretch during bladder cycle. Moreover, we aimed to emphasize the effects of physiological stretch's amplitude upon proliferation and contractility of human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs). HBSMCs were seeded onto silicone membrane and subjected to stretch simulating bladder cycle at the range of stretches and time according to customized software on modified BOSE BioDynamic bioreactor. Morphological changes were assessed using immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscope. Cell proliferation and cell viability were determined by BrdU incorporation assay and Cell Counting Kit-8, respectively. Contractility of the cells was determined using collagen gel contraction assay. RT-PCR was used to assess phenotypic and contractility markers. HBSMCs were found to show morphologically spindle-shaped and orientation at various elongations in the modified bioreactor. Stretch-induced proliferation and viability depended on the magnitude of stretch, and stretches also regulate contractility and contraction markers in a magnitude-dependent manner. We described and tested a kind of stretch pattern which delivers physiological stretch implemented during bladder cycle. The findings also showed that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent morphological, proliferative and contractile modulation of HBSMCs in vitro.

  12. The purinergic component of human bladder smooth muscle cells’ proliferation and contraction under physiological stretch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wazir, Romel; Luo, De-Yi; Tian, Ye; Yue, Xuan; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-Jie, E-mail: kunjiewangatscu@163.com

    2013-07-26

    Highlights: •Stretch induces proliferation and contraction. •Optimum applied stretch in vitro is 5% and 10% equibiaxial stretching respectively. •Expression of P2X1 and P2X2 is upregulated after application of stretch. •P2X2 is possibly more susceptible to stretch related changes. •Purinoceptors functioning may explain conditions with atropine resistance. -- Abstract: Objective: To investigate whether cyclic stretch induces proliferation and contraction of human smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs), mediated by P2X purinoceptor 1 and 2 and the signal transduction mechanisms of this process. Methods: HBSMCs were seeded on silicone membrane and stretched under varying parameters; (equibiaxial elongation: 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%), (Frequency: 0.05 Hz, 0.1 Hz, 0.2 Hz, 0.5 Hz, 1 Hz). 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine assay was employed for proliferative studies. Contractility of the cells was determined using collagen gel contraction assay. After optimal physiological stretch was established; P2X1 and P2X2 were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot. Specificity of purinoceptors was maintained by employing specific inhibitors; (NF023 for P2X1, and A317491for P2X2), in some experiments. Results: Optimum proliferation and contractility were observed at 5% and 10% equibiaxial stretching respectively, applied at a frequency of 0.1 Hz; At 5% stretch, proliferation increased from 0.837 ± 0.026 (control) to 1.462 ± 0.023%, p < 0.05. Mean contraction at 10% stretching increased from 31.7 ± 2.3%, (control) to 78.28 ±1.45%, p < 0.05. Expression of P2X1 and P2X2 was upregulated after application of stretch. Inhibition had effects on proliferation (1.232 ± 0.051, p < 0.05 NF023) and (1.302 ± 0.021, p < 0.05 A314791) while contractility was markedly reduced (68.24 ± 2.31, p < 0.05 NF023) and (73.2 ± 2.87, p < 0.05 A314791). These findings shows that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent proliferative and contractile modulation of HBSMCs in

  13. Imaging of muscle injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, G.Y. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Brandser, E.A. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Kathol, M.H. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Tearse, D.S. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery; Callaghan, J.J. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery

    1996-01-01

    Although skeletal muscle is the single largest tissue in the body, there is little written about it in the radiologic literature. Indirect muscle injuries, also called strains or tears, are common in athletics, and knowing the morphology and physiology of the muscle-tendon unit is the key to the understanding of these injuries. Eccentric muscle activation produces more tension within the muscle tan when it is activated concentrically, making it more susceptible to tearing. Injuries involving the muscle belly tend to occur near the myotendinous junction. In adolescents, the weakest link in the muscle-tendon-bone complex is the apophysis. Traditionally, plain radiography has been the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of these injuries; however, with the advent of MRI it has become much easier to diagnose injuries primarily affecting the soft tissues. This article reviews the anatomy and physiology of the muscle-tendon unit as they relate to indirect muscle injuries. Examples of common muscle injuries are illustrated. (orig.)

  14. Chronic Prosopis Glandulosa Treatment Blunts Neutrophil Infiltration and Enhances Muscle Repair after Contusion Injury

    OpenAIRE

    George, Cindy; Smith, Carine; Isaacs, Ashwin; Huisamen, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The current treatment options for soft tissue injuries remain suboptimal and often result in delayed/incomplete recovery of damaged muscle. The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of oral Prosopis glandulosa treatment on inflammation and regeneration in skeletal muscle after contusion injury, in comparison to a conventional treatment. The gastrocnemius muscle of rats was subjected to mass-drop injury and muscle samples collected after 1-, 3 h, 1- and 7 days post-injury. Rats were tre...

  15. Apophyseal damage in adolescent athlete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehrer, S.; Huber, W.; Dirisamer, A.; Kainberger, F.

    2002-01-01

    The increasing demands on the adolescent athlete in high perfomance sports puts high biomechanical stress on the growing structures of the active and passive locomotor system. The ''growing factor'' itself increases stretching forces on tendon insertions, which are often overloaded when a physical demanding sport is performed additionally. The apophysis is an ossification nucleus near the tendon insertion, which appears before the growing age resumes and these apophysis finally fuses with the adjacent bone. The tensile forces from vigorous sports activity leads to a chronic or acute avulsion of the ossifying tendon insertion. The radiological appearance of this apophyseal damage with ossification and osteolytic processes is sometimes difficult with respect to differential diagnoses. Apophyseal impairment is associated with pain, tenderness to palpation and decreased muscle function. If it is not diagnosed and treated properly it can lead to end of career in many adolescent athletes. (orig.) [de

  16. Metformin Treatment Prevents Sedentariness Related Damages in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Senesi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metformin (METF, historical antihyperglycemic drug, is a likely candidate for lifespan extension, treatment and prevention of sedentariness damages, insulin resistance, and obesity. Skeletal muscle is a highly adaptable tissue, capable of hypertrophy response to resistance training and of regeneration after damage. Aims of this work were to investigate METF ability to prevent sedentariness damage and to enhance skeletal muscle function. Sedentary 12-week-old C57BL/6 mice were treated with METF (250 mg/kg per day, in drinking water for 60 days. METF role on skeletal muscle differentiation was studied in vitro using murine C2C12 myoblasts. Muscular performance evaluation revealed that METF enhanced mice physical performance (Estimated VO2max. Biochemical analyses of hepatic and muscular tissues indicated that in liver METF increased AMPK and CAMKII signaling. In contrast, METF inactivated ERKs, the principal kinases involved in hepatic stress. In skeletal muscle, METF activated AKT, key kinase in skeletal muscle mass maintenance. In in vitro studies, METF did not modify the C2C12 proliferation capacity, while it positively influenced the differentiation process and myotube maturation. In conclusion, our novel results suggest that METF has a positive action not only on the promotion of healthy aging but also on the prevention of sedentariness damages.

  17. Engineering Skeletal Muscle Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Juhas, Mark; Bursac, Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Healthy skeletal muscle has a remarkable capacity for regeneration. Even at a mature age, muscle tissue can undergo a robust rebuilding process that involves the formation of new muscle cells and extracellular matrix and the re-establishment of vascular and neural networks. Understanding and reverse-engineering components of this process is essential for our ability to restore loss of muscle mass and function in cases where the natural ability of muscle for self-repair is exhausted or impaire...

  18. Exogenous glycosaminoglycans coat damaged bladder surfaces in experimentally damaged mouse bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurst Robert E

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstital cystitis is often treated with exogenous glycosaminoglycans such as heparin, chondroitin sulphate (Uracyst, hyaluronate (Cystistat or the semi-synthetic pentosan polysulphate (Elmiron. The mechanism of action is presumed to be due to a coating of the bladder surface to replace the normally present chondroitin sulphate and heparan sulphate lost as a result of the disease. This study used fluorescent labelled chondroitin sulphate to track the distribution of glycosaminoglycans administered intravesically to mouse bladder that had been damaged on the surface. Methods The surfaces of mouse bladders were damaged by 3 mechanisms – trypsin, 10 mM HCl, and protamine sulphate. Texas Red-labeled chondroitin sulphate was instilled into the bladders of animals with damaged bladders and controls instilled only with saline. Bladders were harvested, frozen, and sectioned for examination by fluorescence. Results The normal mouse bladder bound a very thin layer of the labelled chondroitin sulphate on the luminal surface. Trypsin- and HCl-damaged bladders bound the labelled chondroitin sulphate extensively on the surface with little penetration into the bladder muscle. Protamine produced less overt damage, and much less labelling was seen, presumably due to loss of the label as it complexed with the protamine intercalated into the bladder surface. Conclusion Glycosaminoglycan administered intravesically does bind to damaged bladder. Given that the changes seen following bladder damage resemble those seen naturally in interstitial cystitis, the mechanisms proposed for the action of these agents is consistent with a coating of damaged bladder.

  19. Skeletal Muscle Mitochondria and Aging: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney M. Peterson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is characterized by a progressive loss of muscle mass and muscle strength. Declines in skeletal muscle mitochondria are thought to play a primary role in this process. Mitochondria are the major producers of reactive oxygen species, which damage DNA, proteins, and lipids if not rapidly quenched. Animal and human studies typically show that skeletal muscle mitochondria are altered with aging, including increased mutations in mitochondrial DNA, decreased activity of some mitochondrial enzymes, altered respiration with reduced maximal capacity at least in sedentary individuals, and reduced total mitochondrial content with increased morphological changes. However, there has been much controversy over measurements of mitochondrial energy production, which may largely be explained by differences in approach and by whether physical activity is controlled for. These changes may in turn alter mitochondrial dynamics, such as fusion and fission rates, and mitochondrially induced apoptosis, which may also lead to net muscle fiber loss and age-related sarcopenia. Fortunately, strategies such as exercise and caloric restriction that reduce oxidative damage also improve mitochondrial function. While these strategies may not completely prevent the primary effects of aging, they may help to attenuate the rate of decline.

  20. Exercise training and return to a well-balanced diet activate the neuregulin 1/ErbB pathway in skeletal muscle of obese rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennequin, Gaël; Boisseau, Nathalie; Caillaud, Kevin; Chavanelle, Vivien; Gerbaix, Maude; Metz, Lore; Etienne, Monique; Walrand, Stéphane; Masgrau, Aurélie; Guillet, Christelle; Courteix, Daniel; Niu, Airu; Li, Yi-Ping; Capel, Fréderic; Sirvent, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Some studies suggest that the signalling pathway of neuregulin 1 (NRG1), a protein involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism, could be altered by nutritional and exercise interventions. We hypothesized that diet-induced obesity could lead to alterations of the NRG1 signalling pathway and that chronic exercise could improve NRG1 signalling in rat skeletal muscle. To test this hypothesis, male Wistar rats received a high fat/high sucrose (HF/HS) diet for 16 weeks. At the end of this period, NRG1 and ErbB expression/activity in skeletal muscle was assessed. The obese rats then continued the HF/HS diet or were switched to a well-balanced diet. Moreover, in both groups, half of the animals also performed low intensity treadmill exercise training. After another 8 weeks, NRG1 and ErbB expression/activity in skeletal muscle were tested again. The 16 week HF/HS diet induced obesity, but did not significantly affect the NRG1/ErbB signalling pathway in rat skeletal muscle. Conversely, after the switch to a well-balanced diet, NRG1 cleavage ratio and ErbB4 amount were increased. Chronic exercise training also promoted NRG1 cleavage, resulting in increased ErbB4 phosphorylation. This result was associated with increased protein expression and phosphorylation ratio of the metalloprotease ADAM17, which is involved in NRG1 shedding. Similarly, in vitro stretch-induced activation of ADAM17 in rat myoblasts induced NRG1 cleavage and ErbB4 activation. These results show that low intensity endurance training and well-balanced diet activate the NRG1-ErbB4 pathway, possibly via the metalloprotease ADAM17, in skeletal muscle of diet-induced obese rats. PMID:25820551

  1. Collagen and Stretch Modulate Autocrine Secretion of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins from Differentiated Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Carmen E.; Fenwick-Smith, Daniela; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1995-01-01

    Stretch-induced skeletal muscle growth may involve increased autocrine secretion of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) since IGF-1 is a potent growth factor for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and stretch elevates IGF-1 mRNA levels in vivo. In tissue cultures of differentiated avian pectoralis skeletal muscle cells, nanomolar concentrations of exogenous IGF-1 stimulated growth in mechanically stretched but not static cultures. These cultures released up to 100 pg of endogenously produced IGF-1/micro-g of protein/day, as well as three major IGF binding proteins of 31, 36, and 43 kilodaltons (kDa). IGF-1 was secreted from both myofibers and fibroblasts coexisting in the muscle cultures. Repetitive stretch/relaxation of the differentiated skeletal muscle cells stimulated the acute release of IGF-1 during the first 4 h after initiating mechanical activity, but caused no increase in the long-term secretion over 24-72 h of IGF-1, or its binding proteins. Varying the intensity and frequency of stretch had no effect on the long-term efflux of IGF-1. In contrast to stretch, embedding the differentiated muscle cells in a three-dimensional collagen (Type I) matrix resulted in a 2-5-fold increase in long-term IGF-1 efflux over 24-72 h. Collagen also caused a 2-5-fold increase in the release of the IGF binding proteins. Thus, both the extracellular matrix protein type I collagen and stretch stimulate the autocrine secretion of IGF-1, but with different time kinetics. This endogenously produced growth factor may be important for the growth response of skeletal myofibers to both types of external stimuli.

  2. Macrophage Plasticity and the Role of Inflammation in Skeletal Muscle Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacine Kharraz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective repair of damaged tissues and organs requires the coordinated action of several cell types, including infiltrating inflammatory cells and resident cells. Recent findings have uncovered a central role for macrophages in the repair of skeletal muscle after acute damage. If damage persists, as in skeletal muscle pathologies such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, macrophage infiltration perpetuates and leads to progressive fibrosis, thus exacerbating disease severity. Here we discuss how dynamic changes in macrophage populations and activation states in the damaged muscle tissue contribute to its efficient regeneration. We describe how ordered changes in macrophage polarization, from M1 to M2 subtypes, can differently affect muscle stem cell (satellite cell functions. Finally, we also highlight some of the new mechanisms underlying macrophage plasticity and briefly discuss the emerging implications of lymphocytes and other inflammatory cell types in normal versus pathological muscle repair.

  3. Muscle stem cell dysfunction impairs muscle regeneration in a mouse model of Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowski, Bradley; Betta, Nicole Dalla; Elston, Tiffany; Williams, Darian A; Olwin, Bradley B

    2018-03-09

    Down syndrome, caused by trisomy 21, is characterized by a variety of medical conditions including intellectual impairments, cardiovascular defects, blood cell disorders and pre-mature aging phenotypes. Several somatic stem cell populations are dysfunctional in Down syndrome and their deficiencies may contribute to multiple Down syndrome phenotypes. Down syndrome is associated with muscle weakness but skeletal muscle stem cells or satellite cells in Down syndrome have not been investigated. We find that a failure in satellite cell expansion impairs muscle regeneration in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome. Ts65Dn satellite cells accumulate DNA damage and over express Usp16, a histone de-ubiquitinating enzyme that regulates the DNA damage response. Impairment of satellite cell function, which further declines as Ts65Dn mice age, underscores stem cell deficiencies as an important contributor to Down syndrome pathologies.

  4. Neuromuscular Damage and Repair after Dry Needling in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ares Domingo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Some dry needling treatments involve repetitive and rapid needle insertions into myofascial trigger points. This type of treatment causes muscle injury and can also damage nerve fibers. The aim of this study is to determine the injury caused by 15 repetitive punctures in the muscle and the intramuscular nerves in healthy mouse muscle and its ulterior regeneration. Methods. We repeatedly needled the levator auris longus muscle of mice, and then the muscles were processed with immunohistochemistry, methylene blue, and electron microscopy techniques. Results. Three hours after the dry needling procedure, the muscle fibers showed some signs of an inflammatory response, which progressed to greater intensity 24 hours after the procedure. Some inflammatory cells could still be seen when the muscle regeneration was almost complete seven days after the treatment. One day after the treatment, some changes in the distribution of receptors could be observed in the denervated postsynaptic component. Reinnervation was complete by the third day after the dry needling procedure. We also saw very fine axonal branches reinnervating all the postsynaptic components and some residual sprouts the same day. Conclusion. Repeated dry needling punctures in muscle do not perturb the different stages of muscle regeneration and reinnervation.

  5. Delayed onset muscle soreness: Involvement of neurotrophic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumura, Kazue; Taguchi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is quite a common consequence of unaccustomed strenuous exercise, especially exercise containing eccentric contraction (lengthening contraction, LC). Its typical sign is mechanical hyperalgesia (tenderness and movement related pain). Its cause has been commonly believed to be micro-damage of the muscle and subsequent inflammation. Here we present a brief historical overview of the damage-inflammation theory followed by a discussion of our new findings. Different from previous observations, we have observed mechanical hyperalgesia in rats 1-3 days after LC without any apparent microscopic damage of the muscle or signs of inflammation. With our model we have found that two pathways are involved in inducing mechanical hyperalgesia after LC: activation of the B2 bradykinin receptor-nerve growth factor (NGF) pathway and activation of the COX-2-glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) pathway. These neurotrophic factors were produced by muscle fibers and/or satellite cells. This means that muscle fiber damage is not essential, although it is sufficient, for induction of DOMS, instead, NGF and GDNF produced by muscle fibers/satellite cells play crucial roles in DOMS.

  6. Autophagy in Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis and in Muscular Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bonaldo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscles are the agent of motion and one of the most important tissues responsible for the control of metabolism. The maintenance of muscle homeostasis is finely regulated by the balance between catabolic and anabolic process. Macroautophagy (or autophagy is a catabolic process that provides the degradation of protein aggregation and damaged organelles through the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes. Proper regulation of the autophagy flux is fundamental for the homeostasis of skeletal muscles during physiological situations and in response to stress. Defective as well as excessive autophagy is harmful for muscle health and has a pathogenic role in several forms of muscle diseases. This review will focus on the role of autophagy in muscle homeostasis and diseases.

  7. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Zibert, John R; Gissel, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    ) followed by a long low voltage pulse (LV, 100 V/cm, 400 ms); a pulse combination optimised for efficient and safe gene transfer. Muscles were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and excised at 4 hours, 48 hours or 3 weeks after treatment. RESULTS: Differentially expressed genes were...... with the control muscles. Most interestingly, no changes in the expression of proteins involved in inflammatory responses or muscle regeneration was detected, indicating limited muscle damage and regeneration. Histological analysis revealed structural changes with loss of cell integrity and striation pattern......BACKGROUND: Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer) to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have...

  8. ROS and myokines promote muscle adaptation to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheele, Camilla; Nielsen, Søren; Pedersen, Bente K

    2009-01-01

    in skeletal muscle. In fact, it seems that exercise-induced ROS are able to stimulate cytokine production from skeletal muscle. Despite the initial view that ROS were potentially cell damaging, it now seems possible that these substances have important roles in the regulation of cell signaling. Muscle......-derived cytokines, so-called 'myokines', are distinguished from inflammation and instead possess important anti-inflammatory and metabolic properties. In this opinion piece, we suggest that both ROS and myokines are important players in muscle adaptation to exercise.......Physical exercise induces a network of alterations in the transcriptome and proteome of the skeletal muscle, resulting in modifications of the muscle physiology. Intriguingly, exercise also transiently induces the production of both reactive oxygen species (ROS) and some inflammatory cytokines...

  9. Aging and oxidatively damaged nuclear DNA in animal organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Løhr, Mille; Folkmann, Janne K

    2010-01-01

    with limited cell proliferation, i.e., liver, kidney, brain, heart, pancreas, and muscle, tended to show accumulation of DNA damage with age, whereas organs with highly proliferating cells, such as intestine, spleen, and testis, showed more equivocal or no effect of age. A restricted analysis of studies......Oxidative stress is considered to contribute to aging and is associated with the generation of oxidatively damaged DNA, including 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine. We have identified 69 studies that have measured the level of oxidatively damaged DNA in organs of animals at various ages. In general, organs...... reporting a baseline level of damaged DNA that was fewer than 5 lesions/10(6) dG showed that 21 of 29 studies reported age-associated accumulation of DNA damage. The standardized mean difference in oxidatively damaged DNA between the oldest and the youngest age groups was 1.49 (95% CI 1...

  10. A Systematic Review on the Effects of Botanicals on Skeletal Muscle Health in Order to Prevent Sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rondanelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed a systematic review to evaluate the evidence-based medicine regarding the main botanical extracts and their nutraceutical compounds correlated to skeletal muscle health in order to identify novel strategies that effectively attenuate skeletal muscle loss and enhance muscle function and to improve the quality of life of older subjects. This review contains all eligible studies from 2010 to 2015 and included 57 publications. We focused our attention on effects of botanical extracts on growth and health of muscle and divided these effects into five categories: anti-inflammation, muscle damage prevention, antifatigue, muscle atrophy prevention, and muscle regeneration and differentiation.

  11. Air pollution and brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Azzarelli, Biagio; Acuna, Hilda; Garcia, Raquel; Gambling, Todd M; Osnaya, Norma; Monroy, Sylvia; DEL Tizapantzi, Maria Rosario; Carson, Johnny L; Villarreal-Calderon, Anna; Rewcastle, Barry

    2002-01-01

    Exposure to complex mixtures of air pollutants produces inflammation in the upper and lower respiratory tract. Because the nasal cavity is a common portal of entry, respiratory and olfactory epithelia are vulnerable targets for toxicological damage. This study has evaluated, by light and electron microscopy and immunohistochemical expression of nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-kappaB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the olfactory and respiratory nasal mucosae, olfactory bulb, and cortical and subcortical structures from 32 healthy mongrel canine residents in Southwest Metropolitan Mexico City (SWMMC), a highly polluted urban region. Findings were compared to those in 8 dogs from Tlaxcala, a less polluted, control city. In SWMMC dogs, expression of nuclear neuronal NF-kappaB and iNOS in cortical endothelial cells occurred at ages 2 and 4 weeks; subsequent damage included alterations of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), degenerating cortical neurons, apoptotic glial white matter cells, deposition of apolipoprotein E (apoE)-positive lipid droplets in smooth muscle cells and pericytes, nonneuritic plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles. Persistent pulmonary inflammation and deteriorating olfactory and respiratory barriers may play a role in the neuropathology observed in the brains of these highly exposed canines. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's may begin early in life with air pollutants playing a crucial role.

  12. Muscle cell membrane damage by very low serum sodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 63-year-old male was admitted with complaints of upper gastrointestinal symptoms with fatigue and myalgia. Investigations revealed severe hyponatremia with elevated creatine phosphokinase levels. Following further workup, it was diagnosed as a case of hyponatremia induced rhabdomyolysis. Because of prompt ...

  13. ACE2 is augmented in dystrophic skeletal muscle and plays a role in decreasing associated fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Riquelme

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common inherited neuromuscular disease and is characterized by absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin, muscle wasting, and fibrosis. We previously demonstrated that systemic infusion or oral administration of angiotensin-(1-7 (Ang-(1-7, a peptide with opposing effects to angiotensin II, normalized skeletal muscle architecture, decreased local fibrosis, and improved muscle function in mdx mice, a dystrophic model for DMD. In this study, we investigated the presence, activity, and localization of ACE2, the enzyme responsible for Ang-(1-7 production, in wild type (wt and mdx skeletal muscle and in a model of induced chronic damage in wt mice. All dystrophic muscles studied showed higher ACE2 activity than wt muscle. Immunolocalization studies indicated that ACE2 was localized mainly at the sarcolemma and, to a lesser extent, associated with interstitial cells. Similar results were observed in the model of chronic damage in the tibialis anterior (TA muscle. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of ACE2 overexpression in mdx TA muscle using an adenovirus containing human ACE2 sequence and showed that expression of ACE2 reduced the fibrosis associated with TA dystrophic muscles. Moreover, we observed fewer inflammatory cells infiltrating the mdx muscle. Finally, mdx gastrocnemius muscles from mice infused with Ang-(1-7, which decreases fibrosis, contain less ACE2 associated with the muscle. This is the first evidence supporting ACE2 as an important therapeutic target to improve the dystrophic skeletal muscle phenotype.

  14. Muscle conduction velocity, surface electromyography variables, and echo intensity during concentric and eccentric fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Izal, Miriam; Lusa Cadore, Eduardo; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2014-03-01

    Concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) contractions may involve different mechanisms related to changes in sarcolemma status and the consequent alteration of action potential transmission along muscle fibers. Muscle conduction velocity (CV), surface electromyography signal (sEMG), muscle quality, and blood lactate concentrations were analyzed during CON and ECC actions. Compared with ECC, the CON protocol resulted in greater muscle force losses, blood lactate concentrations, and changes in sEMG parameters. Similar reductions in CV were detected in both protocols. Higher echo intensity values were observed 2 days after ECC due to greater muscle damage. The effects of the muscle damage produced by ECC exercise on the transmission of action potentials along muscle fibers (measured as the CV) may be comparable with the effects of hydrogen accumulation produced by CON exercise (related to greater lactate concentrations), which causes greater force loss and change in other sEMG variables during CON than during ECC actions.

  15. Oxidative proteome alterations during skeletal muscle ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Lourenço dos Santos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia corresponds to the degenerative loss of skeletal muscle mass, quality, and strength associated with ageing and leads to a progressive impairment of mobility and quality of life. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process are not completely understood. A hallmark of cellular and tissular ageing is the accumulation of oxidatively modified (carbonylated proteins, leading to a decreased quality of the cellular proteome that could directly impact on normal cellular functions. Although increased oxidative stress has been reported during skeletal muscle ageing, the oxidized protein targets, also referred as to the ‘oxi-proteome’ or ‘carbonylome’, have not been characterized yet. To better understand the mechanisms by which these damaged proteins build up and potentially affect muscle function, proteins targeted by these modifications have been identified in human rectus abdominis muscle obtained from young and old healthy donors using a bi-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteomic approach coupled with immunodetection of carbonylated proteins. Among evidenced protein spots, 17 were found as increased carbonylated in biopsies from old donors comparing to young counterparts. These proteins are involved in key cellular functions such as cellular morphology and transport, muscle contraction and energy metabolism. Importantly, impairment of these pathways has been described in skeletal muscle during ageing. Functional decline of these proteins due to irreversible oxidation may therefore impact directly on the above-mentioned pathways, hence contributing to the generation of the sarcopenic phenotype.

  16. Differential Muscle Involvement in Mice and Humans Affected by McArdle Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Thomas O; Pinós, Tomàs; Nielsen, Tue L

    2016-01-01

    , variations in fiber size, vacuoles, and some internal nuclei associated with cytosolic glycogen accumulation and ongoing regeneration; structural damage was seen only in a minority of human patients. Neither liver nor brain isoforms of glycogen phosphorylase were upregulated in muscles, thus providing...... no substitution for the missing muscle isoform. In the mice, the tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were invariably more damaged than the quadriceps muscles. This may relate to a 7-fold higher level of myophosphorylase in TA compared to quadriceps in wild-type mice and suggests higher glucose turnover in the TA. Thus...

  17. Ibuprofen Ingestion Does Not Affect Markers of Post-exercise Muscle Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Luke; Markworth, James F.; Paulsen, Gøran; Raastad, Truls; Peake, Jonathan M.; Snow, Rod J.; Cameron-Smith, David; Russell, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated if oral ingestion of ibuprofen influenced leucocyte recruitment and infiltration following an acute bout of traditional resistance exercise Methods: Sixteen male subjects were divided into two groups that received the maximum over-the-counter dose of ibuprofen (1200mg d−1) or a similarly administered placebo following lower body resistance exercise. Muscle biopsies were taken from m.vastus lateralis and blood serum samples were obtained before and immediately after exercise, and at 3 and 24 h after exercise. Muscle cross-sections were stained with antibodies against neutrophils (CD66b and MPO) and macrophages (CD68). Muscle damage was assessed via creatine kinase and myoglobin in blood serum samples, and muscle soreness was rated on a ten-point pain scale. Results: The resistance exercise protocol stimulated a significant increase in the number of CD66b+ and MPO+ cells when measured 3 h post exercise. Serum creatine kinase, myoglobin and subjective muscle soreness all increased post-exercise. Muscle leucocyte infiltration, creatine kinase, myoglobin and subjective muscle soreness were unaffected by ibuprofen treatment when compared to placebo. There was also no association between increases in inflammatory leucocytes and any other marker of cellular muscle damage. Conclusion: Ibuprofen administration had no effect on the accumulation of neutrophils, markers of muscle damage or muscle soreness during the first 24 h of post-exercise muscle recovery. PMID:27064890

  18. Healthy Muscles Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do. Exercising, getting enough rest, and eating a balanced diet will help to keep your muscles healthy for ... keep your muscles in good health. Eating a balanced diet will help manage your weight and provide a ...

  19. Obturator internus muscle strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caoimhe Byrne, MB BCh, BAO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of obturator internus muscle strains. The injuries occurred in young male athletes involved in kicking sports. Case 1 details an acute obturator internus muscle strain with associated adductor longus strain. Case 2 details an overuse injury of the bilateral obturator internus muscles. In each case, magnetic resonance imaging played a crucial role in accurate diagnosis.

  20. the sternalis muscle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-08-17

    Aug 17, 2009 ... scan of the chest wall was performed to gain clarity of the mam- mographic findings (Figs 1a, 1b and 2). The CT scan demonstrated a flattened band of muscle density lying anterior to the medial margin of the pectoralis muscle. This structure was separated from the underlying pectoralis muscle by a thin ...

  1. Oxygen reperfusion damage in an insect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R B Lighton

    Full Text Available The deleterious effects of anoxia followed by reperfusion with oxygen in higher animals including mammals are well known. A convenient and genetically well characterized small-animal model that exhibits reproducible, quantifiable oxygen reperfusion damage is currently lacking. Here we describe the dynamics of whole-organism metabolic recovery from anoxia in an insect, Drosophila melanogaster, and report that damage caused by oxygen reperfusion can be quantified in a novel but straightforward way. We monitored CO(2 emission (an index of mitochondrial activity and water vapor output (an index of neuromuscular control of the spiracles, which are valves between the outside air and the insect's tracheal system during entry into, and recovery from, rapid-onset anoxia exposure with durations ranging from 7.5 to 120 minutes. Anoxia caused a brief peak of CO(2 output followed by knock-out. Mitochondrial respiration ceased and the spiracle constrictor muscles relaxed, but then re-contracted, presumably powered by anaerobic processes. Reperfusion to sustained normoxia caused a bimodal re-activation of mitochondrial respiration, and in the case of the spiracle constrictor muscles, slow inactivation followed by re-activation. After long anoxia durations, both the bimodality of mitochondrial reactivation and the recovery of spiracular control were impaired. Repeated reperfusion followed by episodes of anoxia depressed mitochondrial respiratory flux rates and damaged the integrity of the spiracular control system in a dose-dependent fashion. This is the first time that physiological evidence of oxygen reperfusion damage has been described in an insect or any invertebrate. We suggest that some of the traditional approaches of insect respiratory biology, such as quantifying respiratory water loss, may facilitate using D. melanogaster as a convenient, well-characterized experimental model for studying the underlying biology and mechanisms of ischemia and

  2. Impact damage of composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsi-Young T.; Springer, George S.

    1986-01-01

    A model is described for estimating the impact damage of fiber reinforced composite plates. The displacements and stresses are calculated by a three dimensional transient, finite element method of solution of the governing equations applicable to a linearly elastic body. The region in which damage occurs is estimated using the Tsai-Wu failure criterion. A computer code was developed which can be used to calculate the impact force, displacements and velocities of the plate and the impact body, stresses and strains in the plate, and the damage area. Sample numerical results are presented illustrating the type of information provided by the code. Comparisons between measured and calculated damage areas are also given.

  3. The roles of muscle stem cells in muscle injury, atrophy, and hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, So-Ichiro

    2018-01-31

    Skeletal muscle is composed of multinuclear cells called myofibers. Muscular dystrophy (a genetic muscle disorder) induces instability in the cell membrane of myofibers and eventually causes myofiber damage. Non-genetic muscle disorders, including sarcopenia, diabetes, bedridden immobility, and cancer cachexia, lead to atrophy of myofibers. In contrast, resistance training induces myofiber hypertrophy. Thus, myofibers exhibit a plasticity that is strongly affected by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. There is no doubt that muscle stem cells (MuSCs, also known as muscle satellite cells) are indispensable for muscle repair/regeneration, but their contributions to atrophy and hypertrophy are still controversial. The present review focuses on the relevance of MuSCs to (1) muscle diseases, and (2) hypertrophy. Further, this review addresses fundamental questions about MuSCs to clarify the onset or progression of these diseases, and which might lead to development of a MuSC-based therapy. © The Authors 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Delayed onset muscle soreness: is massage effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nicole

    2013-10-01

    Despite the widespread occurrence of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), there is little consensus as to the exact cause or which treatments may be most effective at alleviating symptoms. Greater understanding of DOMS can give sports medicine and fitness professionals an opportunity to help prevent or speed recovery of this performance limiting condition. This article will review the DOMS literature, including the potential role of psychosocial factors and explore studies which involve massage therapy as a treatment modality. Articles from PubMed, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, and references from articles are included in this review. Search words and phrases included delayed onset muscle soreness, repeated bout effect, massage effectiveness, exercise induced muscle damage, and eccentric exercise. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effects of inspiratory muscle training in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Dean E; Johnson, Michael A; Barnett, Yvonne A; Smith, William H T; Sharpe, Graham R

    2015-04-01

    Declining inspiratory muscle function and structure and systemic low-level inflammation and oxidative stress may contribute to morbidity and mortality during normal ageing. Therefore, we examined the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in older adults on inspiratory muscle function and structure and systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, and reexamined the reported positive effects of IMT on respiratory muscle strength, inspiratory muscle endurance, spirometry, exercise performance, physical activity levels (PAL), and quality of life (QoL). Thirty-four healthy older adults (68 ± 3 yr) with normal spirometry, respiratory muscle strength, and physical fitness were divided equally into a pressure-threshold IMT or sham-hypoxic placebo group. Before and after an 8-wk intervention, measurements were taken for dynamic inspiratory muscle function and inspiratory muscle endurance using a weighted plunger pressure-threshold loading device; diaphragm thickness by using B-mode ultrasonography; plasma cytokine concentrations by using immunoassays; DNA damage levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by using comet assays; spirometry, maximal mouth pressures, and exercise performance by using a 6-min walk test; PAL by using a questionnaire and accelerometry; and QoL using a questionnaire. Compared with placebo, IMT increased maximal inspiratory pressure (+34% ± 43%, P = 0.008), diaphragm thickness at residual volume (+38% ± 39%, P = 0.03), and peak inspiratory flow (+35% ± 42%, P = 0.049) but did not change other spirometry measures, plasma cytokine concentrations, DNA damage levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, dynamic inspiratory muscle function, inspiratory muscle endurance, exercise performance, PAL, or QoL. These novel data indicate that in healthy older adults, IMT elicits some positive changes in inspiratory muscle function and structure but neither attenuates systemic inflammation and oxidative stress nor improves exercise performance, PAL

  6. Time Course and Association of Functional and Biochemical Markers in Severe Semitendinosus Damage Following Intensive Eccentric Leg Curls: Differences between and within Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Carmona

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the extent and evolution of hamstring muscle damage caused by an intensive bout of eccentric leg curls (ELCs by (1 assessing the time course and association of different indirect markers of muscle damage such as changes in the force-generating capacity (FGC, functional magnetic resonance (fMRI, and serum muscle enzyme levels and (2 analyzing differences in the degree of hamstring muscle damage between and within subjects (limb-to-limb comparison.Methods: Thirteen male participants performed six sets of 10 repetitions of an ELC with each leg. Before and at regular intervals over 7 days after the exercise, FGC was measured with maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC. Serum enzyme levels, fMRI transverse relaxation time (T2 and perceived muscle soreness were also assessed and compared against the FGC.Results: Two groups of subjects were identified according to the extent of hamstring muscle damage based on decreased FGC and increased serum enzyme levels: high responders (n = 10, severe muscle damage and moderate responders (n = 3, moderate muscle damage. In the high responders, fMRI T2 analysis revealed that the semitendinosus (ST muscle suffered severe damage in the three regions measured (proximal, middle, and distal. The biceps femoris short head (BFsh muscle was also damaged and there were significant differences in the FGC within subjects in the high responders.Conclusion: FGC and serum enzyme levels measured in 10 of the subjects from the sample were consistent with severe muscle damage. However, the results showed a wide range of peak MVC reductions, reflecting different degrees of damage between subjects (high and moderate responders. fMRI analysis confirmed that the ST was the hamstring muscle most damaged by ELCs, with uniform T2 changes across all the measured sections of this muscle. During intensive ELCs, the ST muscle could suffer an anomalous recruitment pattern due to fatigue and damage, placing an

  7. Time Course and Association of Functional and Biochemical Markers in Severe Semitendinosus Damage Following Intensive Eccentric Leg Curls: Differences between and within Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Gerard; Mendiguchía, Jurdan; Alomar, Xavier; Padullés, Josep M.; Serrano, David; Nescolarde, Lexa; Rodas, Gil; Cussó, Roser; Balius, Ramón; Cadefau, Joan A.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the extent and evolution of hamstring muscle damage caused by an intensive bout of eccentric leg curls (ELCs) by (1) assessing the time course and association of different indirect markers of muscle damage such as changes in the force-generating capacity (FGC), functional magnetic resonance (fMRI), and serum muscle enzyme levels and (2) analyzing differences in the degree of hamstring muscle damage between and within subjects (limb-to-limb comparison). Methods: Thirteen male participants performed six sets of 10 repetitions of an ELC with each leg. Before and at regular intervals over 7 days after the exercise, FGC was measured with maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC). Serum enzyme levels, fMRI transverse relaxation time (T2) and perceived muscle soreness were also assessed and compared against the FGC. Results: Two groups of subjects were identified according to the extent of hamstring muscle damage based on decreased FGC and increased serum enzyme levels: high responders (n = 10, severe muscle damage) and moderate responders (n = 3, moderate muscle damage). In the high responders, fMRI T2 analysis revealed that the semitendinosus (ST) muscle suffered severe damage in the three regions measured (proximal, middle, and distal). The biceps femoris short head (BFsh) muscle was also damaged and there were significant differences in the FGC within subjects in the high responders. Conclusion: FGC and serum enzyme levels measured in 10 of the subjects from the sample were consistent with severe muscle damage. However, the results showed a wide range of peak MVC reductions, reflecting different degrees of damage between subjects (high and moderate responders). fMRI analysis confirmed that the ST was the hamstring muscle most damaged by ELCs, with uniform T2 changes across all the measured sections of this muscle. During intensive ELCs, the ST muscle could suffer an anomalous recruitment pattern due to fatigue and damage, placing an

  8. Acute Effects of Constant-Angle and Constant-Torque Static Stretching on Passive Stiffness of the Posterior Hip and Thigh Muscles in Healthy, Young and Old Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Ty B

    2017-07-24

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of constant-angle (CA) and constant-torque (CT) static stretching on passive stiffness of the posterior hip and thigh muscles in healthy, young and old men. Fifteen young (25±3 years) and 15 old (71±4 years) men underwent 2 passive straight-leg raise (SLR) assessments before and after 8 min of CA and CT stretching using an isokinetic dynamometer. Passive stiffness was calculated during each SLR as the slope of the final 10% of the angle-torque curve. The results indicated that passive stiffness decreased from pre- to post-stretching for both treatments (P≤0.001-0.002) and age groups (P≤0.001-0.046); however, greater decreases were observed for the CT than the CA stretching (P=0.045) and for the old than the young men (Pstretching. These findings suggest that holding stretches at a constant tension may be a more effective strategy for altering passive stiffness of the posterior hip and thigh muscles. The greater stretch-induced stiffness decreases observed for the older men provide support that acute static stretching may be particularly effective for reducing stiffness in the elderly. As a result, it may be advantageous to prescribe static stretching prior to exercise for older adults, as this may be used to elicit substantial declines in passive stiffness, which could help reduce the risk of subsequent injury events in this population.

  9. Damage Theory Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    1998-01-01

    This report contains a series of validation examples for the theoretical model implemented in the computer program DAMAGE. note that the validation examples are for assembled structures.......This report contains a series of validation examples for the theoretical model implemented in the computer program DAMAGE. note that the validation examples are for assembled structures....

  10. DNA damage and autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I.; Franco, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response.

  11. Animal damage management handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugh C. Black

    1994-01-01

    This handbook treats animal damage management (ADM) in the West in relation to forest, range, and recreation resources; predator management is not addressed. It provides a comprehensive reference of safe, effective, and practical methods for managing animal damage on National Forest System lands. Supporting information is included in references after each chapter and...

  12. Animal damage to birch

    Science.gov (United States)

    James S. Jordan; Francis M. Rushmore

    1969-01-01

    A relatively few animal species are responsible for most of the reported damage to the birches. White-tailed deer, yellow-bellied sapsuckers, porcupines, moose, and hares are the major animals involved. We will review reports of damage, discuss the underlying causes, and describe possible methods of control. For example, heavy deer browsing that eliminates birch...

  13. Nuclear damage - civil liability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoes, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is made of the civil liability for nuclear damage since there is a need to adjust the existing rules to the new situations created. The conventions that set up the new disciplining rules not considered in the common law for the liability of nuclear damage are also mentioned. (A.L.) [pt

  14. Lipolysis in Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Annette Karen Lundbeck

    of AMPK in regulation of lipid handling and lipolysis in the basal non-contracting state and during muscle contractions in skeletal muscle. To evaluate the role of AMPK, we measured protein expression and phosphorylation as well as gene expression of proteins important for regulation of lipid handling...... and lipolysis in skeletal muscle from wildtype mice and mice overexpressing a kinase dead AMPKα2 construct (AMPKα2 KD) in the basal non-contracting state and during in situ stimulated muscle contractions. We found, that IMTG levels were ~50% lower in AMPKα2 KD in the basal resting state, explained by a lower....... IMTG was in wildtype mice reduced with ~50% after muscle contractions with no effect of contractions in AMPKα2 KD mice. Concomitantly, ATGL was phosphorylated at ser406 and HSL on ser565 with muscle contractions in an AMPK dependent manner, suggesting that these sites actives lipolysis during muscle...

  15. Exercise training and return to a well-balanced diet activate the neuregulin 1/ErbB pathway in skeletal muscle of obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennequin, Gaël; Boisseau, Nathalie; Caillaud, Kevin; Chavanelle, Vivien; Gerbaix, Maude; Metz, Lore; Etienne, Monique; Walrand, Stéphane; Masgrau, Aurélie; Guillet, Christelle; Courteix, Daniel; Niu, Airu; Li, Yi-Ping; Capel, Fréderic; Sirvent, Pascal

    2015-06-15

    associated with increased protein expression and phosphorylation ratio of the metalloprotease ADAM17, which is involved in NRG1 shedding. Similarly, in vitro stretch-induced activation of ADAM17 in rat myoblasts induced NRG1 cleavage and ErbB4 activation. These results show that low intensity endurance training and well-balanced diet activate the NRG1-ErbB4 pathway, possibly via the metalloprotease ADAM17, in skeletal muscle of diet-induced obese rats. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  16. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Emerson Randolph

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies, such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some muscular dystrophies. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on their embryologic origins and the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease.

  17. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  18. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Andrew D. [Horticultural Sciences Department and; Henry, Christopher S. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, email:; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637; Fiehn, Oliver [Genome Center, University of California, Davis, California 95616, email:; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie [Microbiology and Cell Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, email: ,

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms.

  19. Denervated muscle fibers induce mitochondrial peroxide generation in neighboring innervated fibers: Role in muscle aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Natalie; Staunton, Caroline A; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2017-11-01

    Disruption of neuromuscular junctions and denervation of some muscle fibers occurs in ageing skeletal muscle and contribute to loss of muscle mass and function. Aging is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of redox homeostasis potentially occurs through increased mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). No specific link between increased mitochondrial ROS generation and denervation has been defined in muscle ageing. To address this, we have examined the effect of experimental denervation of all fibers, or only a proportion of the fibers, in the mouse tibialis anterior (TA) muscle on muscle mitochondrial peroxide generation. Transection of the peroneal nerve of mice caused loss of pre-synaptic axons within 1-3 days with no significant morphological changes in post-synaptic structures up to 10 days post-surgery when decreased TA mass and fiber size were apparent. Mitochondria in the denervated muscle showed increased peroxide generation by 3 days post-transection. Use of electron transport chain (ETC) substrates and inhibitors of specific pathways indicated that the ETC was unlikely to contribute to increased ROS generation, but monoamine oxidase B, NADPH oxidase and phospholipase enzymes were implicated. Transection of one of the 3 branches of the peroneal nerve caused denervation of some TA muscle fibers while others retained innervation, but increased mitochondrial peroxide generation occurred in both denervated and innervated fibers. Thus the presence of recently denervated fibers leads to increased ROS generation by mitochondria in neighboring innervated fibers providing a novel explanation for the increased mitochondrial oxidative stress and damage seen with aging in skeletal muscles. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inferior oblique muscle injury from local anesthesia for cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, D G; Lam, G C; Guyton, D L

    1995-03-01

    Vertical rectus muscle injury is commonly cited as a cause of strabismus after cataract surgery. Injury to the inferior oblique muscle or nerve as a complication of cataract surgery has not been described previously. Four patients without pre-existing strabismus who had diplopia after cataract surgery were studied. Analysis included prism and cover testing, Lancaster red-green testing, and fundus torsion assessment. Three patients had a delayed-onset hypertropia with fundus extorsion in the eye that underwent surgery, which is consistent with inferior oblique muscle overaction secondary to presumed contracture. The fourth patient had an immediate-onset hypotropia with fundus intorsion in the eye that underwent surgery, which is consistent with inferior oblique muscle paresis. Damage to a vertical rectus muscle or "unmasking" of a pre-existing superior oblique muscle paresis could not explain the history and findings in this group of four patients. The inferior oblique muscle contracture observed in three patients may have been caused by local anesthetic myotoxicity, whereas the paresis observed in one patient may have been due to mechanical trauma or anesthetic toxicity directly to the nerve innervating the muscle. Inferior oblique muscle or nerve injury should be considered as another possible cause of postoperative strabismus, especially when significant fundus torsion accompanies a vertical deviation.

  1. Decreased muscle GLUT-4 and contraction-induced glucose transport after eccentric contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, S; Asp, Svend; Richter, Erik

    1996-01-01

    Eccentric exercise causes muscle damage and decreased muscle glycogen and glucose transporter isoform (GLUT-4) protein content. We investigated whether the contraction-induced increase in skeletal muscle glucose transport and muscle performance is affected by prior eccentric contractions. The calf...... muscles from rats were stimulated for eccentric (EC) or concentric (CC) contractions or were passively stretched (ST). Muscles from unstimulated control (CT) rats were also studied. Two days later, all rats had their isolated hindlimbs perfused either at rest or during 15 min of isometric muscle...... than in CT rats. In the GW and GR muscle, prior eccentric exercise decreased contraction-induced stimulation of glucose transport compared with CT, ST, and CC rats despite no difference in tension development and oxygen uptake among the groups. There was no change in total GLUT-4 content and glucose...

  2. Rehabilitation of muscle after injury - the role of anti-inflammatory drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Mikkelsen, U R; Magnusson, S P

    2012-01-01

    junction, whereas contusion or overload injury can damage both myofibers and intramuscular connective tissue. The role of NSAIDs in muscle repair is complicated by differences in injury models used, variables evaluated, and time point(s) selected for evaluations. While the temporal pattern of the influence......Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely consumed among athletes worldwide in relation to muscle injury and soreness. This review aims to provide an overview of studies investigating their effects on skeletal muscle, in particular the repair processes in injured muscle. Muscle...... injury occurs in diverse situations and the nature of muscle injuries varies significantly, complicating extrapolations between experimental models and "real life." Classical muscle strain injuries occur at the interphase between the muscle fibers and connective tissue, most often in the myotendinuous...

  3. Catalase overexpression does not impair extensor digitorum longus muscle function in normal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingju; Yue, Yongping; Li, Dejia; Duan, Dongsheng

    2007-12-01

    Catalase is a major antioxidant enzyme. Increasing catalase expression represents a promising avenue to improve muscle function in certain physiological conditions and in some muscle diseases. We hypothesized that catalase overexpression should not impair normal muscle contraction. We delivered a hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged human catalase gene to normal mouse muscle by an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV). Western blot and immunostaining revealed efficient expression of HA-tagged catalase. Enzymatic assay demonstrated an approximately threefold increase in catalase activity in AAV-infected muscles. Catalase overexpression impaired neither twitch nor tetanic tension in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. Furthermore, EDL fatigue response was not altered. Taken together, we have developed a novel AAV vector to enhance catalase expression. Lack of apparent toxicity in normal muscle strongly supports further exploration of this vector to reduce oxidative stress-induced muscle damage.

  4. Health effects of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasimova, K; Azizova, F; Mehdieva, K.

    2012-01-01

    Full text : A summary of the nature of radiactive contamination would be incomplete without some mention of the human health effects relatied to radioactivity and radioactive materials. Several excellent reviews at the variety of levels of detail have been written and should be consulted by the reader. Internal exposures of alpha and beta particles are important for ingested and inhaled radionuclides. Dosimetry models are used to estimate the dose from internally deposited radioactive particles. As mentioned above weighting parameters that take into account the radiation type, the biological half-life and the tissue or organ at risk are used to convert the physically absorbed dose in units of gray (or red) to the biologically significant committed equivalent dose and effective dose, measured in units of Sv (or rem). There is considerable controversy over the shape of the dose-response curve at the chronic low dose levels important for enviromental contamination. Proposed models include linear models, non-linear models and threshold models. Because risks at low dose must be extrapolated from available date at high doses, the shape of the dose-response curve has important implications for the environmental regulations used to protect the general public. The health effect of radiation damage depends on a combination of events of on the cellular, tissue and systemic levels. These lead to mutations and cellular of the irradiated parent cell. The dose level at which significant damage occurs depends on the cell type. Cells that reproduce rapidily, such as those found in bone marrow or the gastrointestinal tract, will be more sensitive to radiation than those that are longer lived, such as striated muscle or nerve cells. The effects of high radiation doses on an organ depends on the various cell types it contains

  5. Effects of strenuous exercise with eccentric muscle contraction: physiological and functional aspects of human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Osamu; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Okumura, Koji; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2010-01-01

    we used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and ultrasonography in combination with a dynamometer to assess physiological and functional aspects of the skeletal muscles after strenuous exercise that included eccentric contraction. seven male subjects (mean age, 21.7 years) performed ankle plantar flexion that included eccentric contraction and underwent diffusion-weighted MR imaging for calculation of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the triceps surae muscles. We used ultrasonography combined with a dynamometer to measure the displacement of the myotendinous junction (MTJ) of the medial gastrocnemius and maximal isometric force during ankle plantar flexion. We also assessed the level of muscle soreness of the calf using a visual analogue scale. We measured these parameters before exercise and one, 2, 3, 5, and 8 days after exercise and examined significant changes from the pre-exercise value using repeated-measures analysis of variance with Dunnett's test for each measurement parameter. one day after exercise, we observed increased muscle soreness (Peccentric contraction manifests as muscle soreness and dysfunction early after exercise and later increases water diffusion within damaged muscle.

  6. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  7. Continuous damage mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaboche, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The classical structural life predictions are based on stabilized stress-strain analysis and some parametric relations with the number of cycles to failure. During the last ten years a different approach, initiated by the works of Kachanov and Rabotnov for creep rupture, has been developed by different laboratories. This continuous Damage Mechanics, treating the damaged material as a macroscopically homogeneous one, leads to the possibility of globally modelling the nucleation and the propagation of microdefects including their effect on the stress-strain behaviour. This paper presents the general theory and several applications to a turbine blade refractory alloy. It includes the description of sequence effects and creep-fatigue interaction. The generalization for three-dimensional conditions, where anisotropic damage effects are possible, is discussed and some new proposals are given for the determination of simple anisotropic damage equations. (orig.)

  8. LSD and Genetic Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishotsky, Norman I.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Reviews studies of the effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) on man and other organisms. Concludes that pure LSD injected in moderate doses does not cause chromosome or detectable genetic damage and is not a teratogen or carcinogen. (JM)

  9. The hamstring muscle complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Made, A D; Wieldraaijer, T; Kerkhoffs, G M; Kleipool, R P; Engebretsen, L; van Dijk, C N; Golanó, P

    2015-07-01

    The anatomical appearance of the hamstring muscle complex was studied to provide hypotheses for the hamstring injury pattern and to provide reference values of origin dimensions, muscle length, tendon length, musculotendinous junction (MTJ) length as well as width and length of a tendinous inscription in the semitendinosus muscle known as the raphe. Fifty-six hamstring muscle groups were dissected in prone position from 29 human cadaveric specimens with a median age of 71.5 (range 45-98). Data pertaining to origin dimensions, muscle length, tendon length, MTJ length and length as well as width of the raphe were collected. Besides these data, we also encountered interesting findings that might lead to a better understanding of the hamstring injury pattern. These include overlapping proximal and distal tendons of both the long head of the biceps femoris muscle and the semimembranosus muscle (SM), a twist in the proximal SM tendon and a tendinous inscription (raphe) in the semitendinosus muscle present in 96 % of specimens. No obvious hypothesis can be provided purely based on either muscle length, tendon length or MTJ length. However, it is possible that overlapping proximal and distal tendons as well as muscle architecture leading to a resultant force not in line with the tendon predispose to muscle injury, whereas the presence of a raphe might plays a role in protecting the muscle against gross injury. Apart from these architectural characteristics that may contribute to a better understanding of the hamstring injury pattern, the provided reference values complement current knowledge on surgically relevant hamstring anatomy. IV.

  10. MASTR directs MyoD-dependent satellite cell differentiation during skeletal muscle regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokalled, Mayssa H.; Johnson, Aaron N.; Creemers, Esther E.; Olson, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    In response to skeletal muscle injury, satellite cells, which function as a myogenic stem cell population, become activated, expand through proliferation, and ultimately fuse with each other and with damaged myofibers to promote muscle regeneration. Here, we show that members of the Myocardin family

  11. Progressive muscle atrophy and weakness after treatment by mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen-Segarceanu, E.M. van; Dorresteijn, L.D.A.; Pillen, S.; Biesma, D.H.; Vogels, O.J.M.; Alfen, N. van

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998.

  12. Decreased insulin action on muscle glucose transport after eccentric contractions in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asp, S; Richter, Erik

    1996-01-01

    We have recently shown that eccentric contractions (Ecc) of rat calf muscles cause muscle damage and decreased glycogen and glucose transporter GLUT-4 protein content in the white (WG) and red gastrocnemius (RG) but not in the soleus (S) (S. Asp, S. Kristiansen, and E. A. Richter. J. Appl. Physio...

  13. Technetium 99m pyrophosphate quantitation of skeletal muscle ischemia and reperfusion injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blebea, J.; Kerr, J.C.; Franco, C.D.; Padberg, F.T. Jr.; Hobson, R.W. II

    1988-01-01

    The study of ischemia and reperfusion injury in the extremity has been hampered by lack of an accurate method of measuring skeletal muscle injury. We used a bilateral isolated in vivo canine gracilis muscle model in 15 anesthetized dogs. The experimental muscles had 4, 6, or 8 hours of ischemia and 1 hour of reperfusion. The contralateral gracilis muscle served as a control. Technetium 99m pyrophosphate (99mTc-PYP), an agent which localizes in injured muscle cells, was used to quantitate canine skeletal muscle damage. After 6 hours of ischemia and 1 hour of reperfusion, there was a significant increase of 215% of 99mTc-PYP uptake in the experimental vs the control muscle. Experimental muscle uptake was 8% greater than control after 4 hours and 405% more after 8 hours of ischemia and reperfusion. Segmental distribution of 99mTc-PYP uptake showed localization to be greatest in the middle of the muscle at the entry site of the gracilis artery. Electron microscopic evaluation also documented this area to have undergone the most severe injury. Distal portions of the muscle did not show increased damage. Our results show that 99mTc-PYP effectively quantitates skeletal muscle ischemia and reperfusion injury. The pattern of 99mTc-PYP uptake suggests that considerable injury is caused during reperfusion

  14. MUSCLE INJURIES IN ATHLETES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Guilherme Campos; Thiele, Edilson Schwansee

    2011-01-01

    This article had the aim of demonstrating the physiology, diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries, focusing on athletes and their demands and expectations. Muscle injuries are among the most common complaints in orthopedic practice, occurring both among athletes and among non-athletes. These injuries present a challenge for specialists, due to the slow recovery, during which time athletes are unable to take part in training and competitions, and due to frequent sequelae and recurrences of the injuries. Most muscle injuries (between 10% and 55% of all injuries) occur during sports activities. The muscles most commonly affected are the ischiotibial, quadriceps and gastrocnemius. These muscles go across two joints and are more subject to acceleration and deceleration forces. The treatment for muscle injuries varies from conservative treatment to surgery. New procedures are being used, like the hyperbaric chamber and the use of growth factors. However, there is still a high rate of injury recurrence. Muscle injury continues to be a topic of much controversy. New treatments are being researched and developed, but prevention through muscle strengthening, stretching exercises and muscle balance continues to be the best "treatment".

  15. An artificial muscle computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc O'Brien, Benjamin; Alexander Anderson, Iain

    2013-03-01

    We have built an artificial muscle computer based on Wolfram's "2, 3" Turing machine architecture, the simplest known universal Turing machine. Our computer uses artificial muscles for its instruction set, output buffers, and memory write and addressing mechanisms. The computer is very slow and large (0.15 Hz, ˜1 m3); however by using only 13 artificial muscle relays, it is capable of solving any computable problem given sufficient memory, time, and reliability. The development of this computer shows that artificial muscles can think—paving the way for soft robots with reflexes like those seen in nature.

  16. Accessory piriformis muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat Develi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Piriformis muscle originates from facies pelvica of sacrum and inserts on the trochanter major. It is one of the lateral rotator muscles of the hip and a landmark point in the gluteal region since n. ischiadicus descends to the thigh by passing close to the muscle. This contiguity may be associated with the irritation of the nerve which is known as piriformis syndrome. A rare anatomic variation of the muscle which observed on 74 years old male cadaver is discussed in this case report. [Cukurova Med J 2017; 42(1.000: 182-183

  17. Initial Pulmonary Respiration Causes Massive Diaphragm Damage and Hyper-CKemia in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Akinori; Kobayashi, Masanori; Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Yuasa, Katsutoshi; Yugeta, Naoko; Okada, Takashi; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of muscle degeneration in a lethal muscle disorder Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD) has not been fully elucidated. The dystrophic dog, a model of DMD, shows a high mortality rate with a marked increase in serum creatine kinase (CK) levels in the neonatal period. By measuring serum CK levels in cord and venous blood, we found initial pulmonary respiration resulted in massive diaphragm damage in the neonates and thereby lead to the high serum CK levels. Furthermore, molecular biological techniques revealed that osteopontin was prominently upregulated in the dystrophic diaphragm prior to the respiration, and that immediate-early genes (c-fos and egr-1) and inflammation/immune response genes (IL-6, IL-8, COX-2, and selectin E) were distinctly overexpressed after the damage by the respiration. Hence, we segregated dystrophic phases at the molecular level before and after mechanical damage. These molecules could be biomarkers of muscle damage and potential targets in pharmaceutical therapies. PMID:23851606

  18. Acute Effects of Static and Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching on Muscle Strength and Power Output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Sarah M; Cramer, Joel T; Fincher, A Louise; Massey, Laurie L; Dangelmaier, Suzanne M; Purkayastha, Sushmita; Fitz, Kristi A; Culbertson, Julie Y

    2005-06-01

    both slow (60 degrees .s) and fast (300 degrees .s) velocities. The effect sizes, however, corresponding to these stretching-induced changes were small, which suggests the need for practitioners to consider a risk-to-benefit ratio when incorporating static or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching.

  19. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsic, Nikola; Mamaeva, Daria; Lamb, Ned J.; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal β III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders

  20. Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate supplementation and skeletal muscle in healthy and muscle-wasting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holeček, Milan

    2017-08-01

    Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) is a metabolite of the essential amino acid leucine that has been reported to have anabolic effects on protein metabolism. The aims of this article were to summarize the results of studies of the effects of HMB on skeletal muscle and to examine the evidence for the rationale to use HMB as a nutritional supplement to exert beneficial effects on muscle mass and function in various conditions of health and disease. The data presented here indicate that the beneficial effects of HMB have been well characterized in strength-power and endurance exercise. HMB attenuates exercise-induced muscle damage and enhances muscle hypertrophy and strength, aerobic performance, resistance to fatigue, and regenerative capacity. HMB is particularly effective in untrained individuals who are exposed to strenuous exercise and in trained individuals who are exposed to periods of high physical stress. The low effectiveness of HMB in strength-trained athletes could be due to the suppression of the proteolysis that is induced by the adaptation to training, which may blunt the effects of HMB. Studies performed with older people have demonstrated that HMB can attenuate the development of sarcopenia in elderly subjects and that the optimal effects of HMB on muscle growth and strength occur when it is combined with exercise. Studies performed under in vitro conditions and in various animal models suggest that HMB may be effective in treatment of muscle wasting in various forms of cachexia. However, there are few clinical reports of the effects of HMB on muscle wasting in cachexia; in addition, most of these studies evaluated the therapeutic potential of combinations of various agents. Therefore, it has not been possible to determine whether HMB was effective or if there was a synergistic effect. Although most of the endogenous HMB is produced in the liver, there are no reports regarding the levels and the effects of HMB supplementation in subjects with

  1. Neonatal epicardial-derived progenitors aquire myogenic traits in skeletal muscle, but not cardiac muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte C; Jensen, Charlotte H; Skovrind, Ida

    2016-01-01

    heart missing regenerative signals essential for directed differentiation of EPDCs. Herein, we aimed to evaluate the myogenic potential of neonatal EPDCs in adult and neonatal mouse myocardium, as well as in skeletal muscle. The two latter tissues have an intrinsic capability to develop and regenerate......, in contrast to the adult heart. METHODS: Highly purified mouse EPDCs were transplanted into damaged neonatal and adult myocardium as well as regenerating skeletal muscle. Co-cultures with skeletal myoblasts were used to distinguish fusion independent myogenic conversion. RESULTS: No donor EPDC......-derived cardiomyocytes were observed in hearts. In contrast, a remarkable contribution of EPDCs to skeletal muscle myofiber formation was evident in vivo. Furthermore, co-cultures of EPDCs with myoblasts showed that EPDCs became part of multinucleated fibers and appeared to acquire myogenic traits independent...

  2. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  3. Physical Rehabilitation Improves Muscle Function Following Volumetric Muscle Loss Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-19

    muscle , but it did so without significant morphological adaptations (e.g., no hypertrophy and hyperplasia). Wheel running up-regulated metabolic genes...been shown to foster regeneration of injured muscle [5,32,33] and promote hypertrophy (i.e., increased protein synthesis or muscle weight) in muscle ...remaining muscle tissue. Strengthening of synergist muscles can partially compensate for the loss of function due to VML injury. Compensatory hypertrophy

  4. Calpain inhibition attenuated morphological and molecular changes in skeletal muscle of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sookyoung; Nozaki, Kenkichi; Guyton, M Kelly; Smith, Joshua A; Ray, Swapan K; Banik, Naren L

    2012-11-01

    Muscle weakness and atrophy are important manifestations of multiple sclerosis (MS). To investigate the pathophysiological mechanisms of skeletal muscle change in MS, we induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in Lewis male rats and examined morphological and molecular changes in skeletal muscle. We also treated EAE rats with calpepetin, a calpain inhibitor, to examine its beneficial effects on skeletal muscle damage. Morphological changes in muscle tissue of EAE rats included smaller and irregularly shaped muscle fibers and fibrosis. Western blot analysis demonstrated increased calpain:calpastatin ratio, inflammation-related transcription factors (nuclear factor-κB:inhibitor of κB α ratio), and proinflammatory enzymes (cyclooxygenase-2). TUNEL-positive myonuclei in skeletal muscle cells of EAE rats indicated cell death. In addition, markers of apoptotic cell death (Bax:Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-12 protein levels) were elevated. Expression of muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases (muscle atrophy F-box and muscle ring finger protein 1), was upregulated in muscle tissue of EAE-vehicle animals. Both prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with calpeptin partially attenuated muscle changes noted in EAE animals. These results indicate that morphological and molecular changes including apoptotic cell death and protein breakdown develop in skeletal muscle of EAE animals and that these changes can be reversed by calpain inhibition. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Gamma dosimetric parameters in some skeletal muscle relaxants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H C MANJUNATHA

    2017-08-29

    Aug 29, 2017 ... However, the ionizing treatment is not selective, and also affects healthy cells, which makes it toxic for the organism [2]. Although gamma radiation therapy is often an effective method for killing cancer cells, it can also damage nearby blood vessels that nour- ish the skin, ligaments, tendons, muscles, nerves ...

  6. Histopathology of gill, liver, muscle and brain of Cyprinus carpio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Histological studies in organs like gill, liver, muscle and brain of Cyprinus carpio communis were made to assess tissue damage due to sublethal concentration of heavy metals lead and cadmium after 28 days of exposure. In lead treated gill, disintegration and fusion of primary lamellae, extensive vacuolization with ...

  7. Eccentric Contraction-Induced Muscle Fibre Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arabadzhiev T. I.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hard-strength training induces strength increasing and muscle damage, especially after eccentric contractions. Eccentric contractions also lead to muscle adaptation. Symptoms of damage after repeated bout of the same or similar eccentrically biased exercises are markedly reduced. The mechanism of this repeated bout effect is unknown. Since electromyographic (EMG power spectra scale to lower frequencies, the adaptation is related to neural adaptation of the central nervous system (CNS presuming activation of slow-non-fatigable motor units or synchronization of motor unit firing. However, the repeated bout effect is also observed under repeated stimulation, i.e. without participation of the CNS. The aim of this study was to compare the possible effects of changes in intracellular action potential shape and in synchronization of motor units firing on EMG power spectra. To estimate possible degree of the effects of central and peripheral changes, interferent EMG was simulated under different intracellular action potential shapes and different degrees of synchronization of motor unit firing. It was shown that the effect of changes in intracellular action potential shape and muscle fibre propagation velocity (i.e. peripheral factors on spectral characteristics of EMG signals could be stronger than the effect of synchronization of firing of different motor units (i.e. central factors.

  8. Muscles, exercise and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente K; Febbraio, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    of yet unidentified factors, secreted from muscle cells, which may influence cancer cell growth and pancreas function. Many proteins produced by skeletal muscle are dependent upon contraction; therefore, physical inactivity probably leads to an altered myokine response, which could provide a potential...

  9. Proteomics of Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and plays an important role in locomotion and whole body metabolism. It accounts for ~80% of insulin stimulated glucose disposal. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance, a primary feature of Type 2 diabetes, is caused by a decreased ability of m...

  10. The hamstring muscle complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Made, A. D.; Wieldraaijer, T.; Kerkhoffs, G. M.; Kleipool, R. P.; Engebretsen, L.; van Dijk, C. N.; Golanó, P.

    2015-01-01

    The anatomical appearance of the hamstring muscle complex was studied to provide hypotheses for the hamstring injury pattern and to provide reference values of origin dimensions, muscle length, tendon length, musculotendinous junction (MTJ) length as well as width and length of a tendinous

  11. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  12. [Diabetic muscle infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Bals, Edske; van der Woude, Henk-Jan; Smets, Yves F C

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction is a rare complication of diabetes mellitus that typically presents in the thigh; microvascular abnormalities may play a role. A 32-year-old female presented at the outpatient clinic with a painful, swollen thigh. She had suffered from type 1 diabetes for 22 years. The patient was admitted to the nephrology ward for further evaluation. Deep-venous thrombosis and abscess were excluded with echography. After additional investigations - MRI and a biopsy of skin, muscle and fascia - the diagnosis diabetic muscle infarction was made. The patient was treated with bed rest and analgesics. With hindsight, the muscle biopsy was not actually required in reaching a diagnosis. The diagnosis 'diabetic muscle infarction' is made on the basis of clinical presentation in combination with MRI findings. The treatment consists of bed rest and analgesics.

  13. Development of Human Muscle Protein Measurement with MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen; Evans, Harlan; Leblanc, Adrian D.

    1997-01-01

    It is known that micro-gravity has a strong influence on the human musculoskeletal system. A number of studies have shown that significant changes in skeletal muscles occur in both space flight and bedrest simulation. In our 5 week bedrest study, the cross-sectional area of soleus-gastrocnemius decreased about 12% while the cross-sectional area of anterior calf muscles decreased about 4%. Using volume measurements, these losses increased after 17 weeks to approximately 30% and 21% respectively. Significant muscle atrophy was also found on the SL-J crew members after only 8 days in space. It is important that these effects are fully understood so that countermeasures can be developed. The same knowledge might also be useful in preventing muscle atrophy related to other medical problems. A major problem with anatomical measurements of muscle during bed rest and microgravity is the influence of fluid shifts and water balance on the measurement of muscle volume, especially when the exposure duration is short and the atrophy is relatively small. Fluid shifts were documented in Skylab by visual observations of blood vessel distention, rapid changes in limb volume, center of mass measurements and subjective descriptions such as puffy faces and head fullness. It has been reported that the muscle water content of biopsied soleus muscles decreased following 8 hours of head down tilt bed rest. Three aspects of fluid shifts that can affect volume measurements are: first, the shift of fluid that occurs whenever there is a change from upright to a recumbent position and vice versa; second, the potential for fluid accumulation in the lower limbs resulting from muscle damage caused by overextending atrophied muscle or swelling caused by deconditioned precapillary sphincter muscles during reambulation; third, the net change of hydration level during and after bed rest or spaceflight. Because of these transitory fluid shifts, muscle protein is expected to represent muscle capacity

  14. Natural resource damage assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddelmeyer, J.

    1991-01-01

    The assessment and collection of natural resource damages from petroleum and chemical companies unfortunate enough to have injured publicly owned natural resources is perhaps the most rapidly expanding area of environmental liability. The idea of recovering for injury to publicly owned natural resources is an extension of traditional common law tort concepts under which a person who negligently injures another or his property is called upon to compensate the injured party. Normally, once liability has been established, it is a fairly straightforward matter to calculate the various elements of loss, such as the cost to repair or replace damaged property, or medical expenses, and lost income. More difficult questions, such as the amount to be awarded for pain and suffering or emotional distress, are left to the jury, although courts limit the circumstances in which the jury is permitted to award such damages

  15. Coal transportation road damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtraw, D.; Harrison, K.; Pawlowski, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Heavy trucks are primarily responsible for pavement damage to the nation's highways. In this paper we evaluate the pavement damage caused by coal trucks. We analyze the chief source of pavement damage (vehicle weight per axle, not total vehicle weight) and the chief cost involved (the periodic overlay that is required when a road's surface becomes worn). This analysis is presented in two stages. In the first section we present a synopsis of current economic theory including simple versions of the formulas that can be: used to calculate costs of pavement wear. In the second section we apply this theory to a specific example proximate to the reference environment for the Fuel Cycle Study in New Mexico in order to provide a numerical measure of the magnitude of the costs

  16. Prophylactic Effects of Sauna on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness of the Wrist Extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamwong, Peanchai; Paungmali, Aatit; Pirunsan, Ubon; Joseph, Leonard

    2015-06-01

    High-intensity of exercise or unaccustomed eccentric exercise can cause the phenomenon of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage (EIMD) which usually results in cramps, muscle strain, impaired muscle function and delayed-onset muscle soreness. This study investigated the prophylactic effects of sauna towards the symptoms associated with muscle damage from eccentric exercises of wrist extensor muscle group. A total of twenty-eight subjects (mean age 20.9 years old, SD = 1.6) were randomly divided into the sauna group (n = 14) and the control group (n = 14). In the sauna group, subjects received sauna before eccentric exercise of the wrist extensor. The eccentric exercises were conducted on the non-dominant arm by using an isokinetic dynamometer. Pain Intensity (PI), Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) and passive range of motion of wrist flexion (PF-ROM) and extension (PE-ROM) were measured as pain variables. Grip Strength (GS) and Wrist Extension Strength (WES) were measured as variables of wrist extensor muscle function. All the measurements were performed at baseline, immediately after and from 1st to 8th days after the exercise-induced muscle damage. The sauna group significantly demonstrated a lower deficit in ROM (passive flexion and passive extension), GS and WES following exercise than that of the control group (P < 0.05). Sauna application prior to the exercise-induced muscle damage demonstrated effectiveness in reduction of sensory impairment (PF-ROM and PE-ROM) and improvement of muscle functions (GS, and WES) in wrist extensor muscle group.

  17. A muscle model for hybrid muscle activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klauer Christian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To develop model-based control strategies for Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES in order to support weak voluntary muscle contractions, a hybrid model for describing joint motions induced by concurrent voluntary-and FES induced muscle activation is proposed. It is based on a Hammerstein model – as commonly used in feedback controlled FES – and exemplarily applied to describe the shoulder abduction joint angle. Main component of a Hammerstein muscle model is usually a static input nonlinearity depending on the stimulation intensity. To additionally incorporate voluntary contributions, we extended the static non-linearity by a second input describing the intensity of the voluntary contribution that is estimated by electromyography (EMG measurements – even during active FES. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN is used to describe the static input non-linearity. The output of the ANN drives a second-order linear dynamical system that describes the combined muscle activation and joint angle dynamics. The tunable parameters are adapted to the individual subject by a system identification approach using previously recorded I/O-data. The model has been validated in two healthy subjects yielding RMS values for the joint angle error of 3.56° and 3.44°, respectively.

  18. Expression and proliferation profiles of PKC, JNK and p38MAPK in physiologically stretched human bladder smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wazir, Romel; Luo, De-Yi; Dai, Yi; Yue, Xuan; Tian, Ye; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Stretch induces proliferation in human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMC). •5% Equibiaxial elongation produces maximum proliferation. •Physiologic stretch decreases apoptotic cell death. •PKC is involved in functional modulation of bladder. •JNK and p38 are not involved in proliferating HBSMC. -- Abstract: Objective: To determine protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase (JNK) and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38MAPK) expression levels and effects of their respective inhibitors on proliferation of human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs) when physiologically stretched in vitro. Materials and methods: HBSMCs were grown on silicone membrane and stretch was applied under varying conditions; (equibiaxial elongation: 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%), (frequency: 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1 Hz). Optimal physiological stretch was established by assessing proliferation with 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assay and flow cytometry. PKC, JNK and p38 expression levels were analyzed by Western blot. Specificity was maintained by employing specific inhibitors; (GF109203X for PKC, SP600125 for JNK and SB203580 for p38MAPK), in some experiments. Results: Optimum proliferation was observed at 5% equibiaxial stretch (BrdU: 0.837 ± 0.026 (control) to 1.462 ± 0.023)%, (P 0.05 SP600125) and (1.461 ± 0.01, P > 0.05 SB203580). These findings show that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent proliferative modulation through PKC and possibly JNK but not via p38MAPK in hBSMCs

  19. [More muscle mass in men: explanatory model for superior outcome after total hip arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preininger, B; Schmorl, K; von Roth, P; Winkler, T; Matziolis, G; Perka, C; Tohtz, S

    2013-02-01

    Men show better functional results after total hip arthroplasty (THA). The aim of this study was a patient-specific analysis of the hip joint muscles in comparison to the joint geometry. In this study 93 computed tomography (CT) scans of the pelvis (45 men, 48 women) were analyzed to determine hip joint geometry and the volume of the gluteus medius (GMV), gluteus maximus (GXV) and tensor fasciae latae (TFL) muscles. The abduction muscle volumes were analyzed with respect to patient-specific adduction moments. The absolute total volume of the hip muscular system (TMV) was larger in men than in women (1913 ccm vs. 1479 ccm; p abduction muscle mass in order to balance adduction moments occurring in the hip joint and therefore have more muscle mass to compensate the inevitable intraoperative muscle damage during THA. This argument supports the extraordinary importance of muscle sparing surgical techniques in women.

  20. Lsd1 regulates skeletal muscle regeneration and directs the fate of satellite cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosic, Milica; Allen, Anita; Willmann, Dominica; Lepper, Christoph; Kim, Johnny; Duteil, Delphine; Schüle, Roland

    2018-01-25

    Satellite cells are muscle stem cells required for muscle regeneration upon damage. Of note, satellite cells are bipotent and have the capacity to differentiate not only into skeletal myocytes, but also into brown adipocytes. Epigenetic mechanisms regulating fate decision and differentiation of satellite cells during muscle regeneration are not yet fully understood. Here, we show that elevated levels of lysine-specific demethylase 1 (Kdm1a, also known as Lsd1) have a beneficial effect on muscle regeneration and recovery after injury, since Lsd1 directly regulates key myogenic transcription factor genes. Importantly, selective Lsd1 ablation or inhibition in Pax7-positive satellite cells, not only delays muscle regeneration, but changes cell fate towards brown adipocytes. Lsd1 prevents brown adipocyte differentiation of satellite cells by repressing expression of the novel pro-adipogenic transcription factor Glis1. Together, downregulation of Glis1 and upregulation of the muscle-specific transcription program ensure physiological muscle regeneration.

  1. SPARC is up-regulated during skeletal muscle regeneration and inhibits myoblast differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson, Stine Juhl; Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Andersen, Ditte C

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle repair is mediated primarily by the muscle stem cell, the satellite cell. Several factors, including extracellular matrix, are known to regulate satellite cell function and regeneration. One factor, the matricellular Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC) is highly up......-regulated during skeletal muscle disease, but its function remains elusive. In the present study, we demonstrate a prominent yet transient increase in SPARC mRNA and protein content during skeletal muscle regeneration that correlates with the expression profile of specific muscle factors like MyoD, Myf5, Myf6......, Myogenin, NCAM, CD34, and M-Cadherin, all known to be implicated in satellite cell activation/proliferation following muscle damage. This up regulation was detected in more cell types. Ectopic expression of SPARC in the muscle progenitor cell line C2C12 was performed to mimic the high levels of SPARC seen...

  2. Skeletal muscles of aged male mice fail to adapt following contractile activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilaki, A; Iwanejko, L M; McArdle, F; Broome, C S; Jackson, M J; McArdle, A

    2003-04-01

    Skeletal muscle adapts rapidly following exercise by the increased production of heat-shock proteins (HSPs). The aim of this study was to examine the ability of muscle from adult and aged mice to produce HSPs following non-damaging exercise. Adult and aged B6XSJL mice were anaesthetized and their hind limbs were subjected to isometric contractions. At different time points, muscles were analysed for HSP production by Western and Northern blotting and by electrophoretic mobility-shift assay. HSP protein and mRNA levels in muscles from adult mice increased significantly following exercise. This was not evident in muscles of aged mice. In contrast, binding of the transcription factor heat-shock factor 1 (HSF1) was not grossly altered in muscles of aged mice compared with adult mice. The data suggest that the inability of muscles of aged mice to produce HSPs appears to be due to alterations during gene transcription.

  3. A stepwise procedure to test contractility and susceptibility to injury for the rodent quadriceps muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J.P. Pratt

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In patients with muscle injury or muscle disease, assessment of muscle damage is typically limited to clinical signs, such as tenderness, strength, range of motion, and more recently, imaging studies.  Biological markers can also be used in measuring muscle injury, such as increased creatine kinase levels in the blood, but these are not always correlated with loss in muscle function (i.e. loss of force production.  This is even true of histological findings from animals, which provide a “direct measure” of damage, but do not account for loss of function.  The most comprehensive measure of the overall health of the muscle is contractile force.  To date, animal models testing contractile force have been limited to the muscle groups moving the ankle.  Here we describe an in vivo animal model for the quadriceps, with abilities to measure torque, produce a reliable muscle injury, and follow muscle recovery within the same animal over time.  We also describe a second model used for direct measurement of force from an isolated quadriceps muscle in situ. 

  4. Satellite cell proliferation in adult skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Frank W. (Inventor); Thomason, Donald B. (Inventor); Morrison, Paul R. (Inventor); Stancel, George M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel methods of retroviral-mediated gene transfer for the in vivo corporation and stable expression of eukaryotic or prokaryotic foreign genes in tissues of living animals is described. More specifically, methods of incorporating foreign genes into mitotically active cells are disclosed. The constitutive and stable expression of E. coli .beta.-galactosidase gene under the promoter control of the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat is employed as a particularly preferred embodiment, by way of example, establishes the model upon which the incorporation of a foreign gene into a mitotically-active living eukaryotic tissue is based. Use of the described methods in therapeutic treatments for genetic diseases, such as those muscular degenerative diseases, is also presented. In muscle tissue, the described processes result in genetically-altered satellite cells which proliferate daughter myoblasts which preferentially fuse to form a single undamaged muscle fiber replacing damaged muscle tissue in a treated animal. The retroviral vector, by way of example, includes a dystrophin gene construct for use in treating muscular dystrophy. The present invention also comprises an experimental model utilizable in the study of the physiological regulation of skeletal muscle gene expression in intact animals.

  5. Respiratory Muscle Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gransee, Heather M.; Mantilla, Carlos B.; Sieck, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle plasticity is defined as the ability of a given muscle to alter its structural and functional properties in accordance with the environmental conditions imposed on it. As such, respiratory muscle is in a constant state of remodeling, and the basis of muscle’s plasticity is its ability to change protein expression and resultant protein balance in response to varying environmental conditions. Here, we will describe the changes of respiratory muscle imposed by extrinsic changes in mechanical load, activity, and innervation. Although there is a large body of literature on the structural and functional plasticity of respiratory muscles, we are only beginning to understand the molecular-scale protein changes that contribute to protein balance. We will give an overview of key mechanisms regulating protein synthesis and protein degradation, as well as the complex interactions between them. We suggest future application of a systems biology approach that would develop a mathematical model of protein balance and greatly improve treatments in a variety of clinical settings related to maintaining both muscle mass and optimal contractile function of respiratory muscles. PMID:23798306

  6. Motor evoked potentials of trunk muscles in traumatic brain injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Min-Ho; Park, Sung-Hee; Ko, Myoung-Hwan; Seo, Jeong-Hwan

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the motor innervation of trunk muscles in traumatic brain injury patients. Twenty patients (12 men and 8 women) with traumatic brain injury were enrolled in this study. Their mean age was 41 years. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were performed on the motor cortex. Electromyographic activities were recorded from the bilateral rectus abdominis muscles, the external oblique abdominal muscles, and the 4th and 9th thoracic erector spinae muscles. The onset latency and amplitude of contralateral and ipsilateral MEPs were measured. All patients were assessed by the Korean version of the Berg Balance Scale (K-BBS) to investigate the relationship between the frequency of MEPs in trunk muscles and gait ability. The mean frequency of ipsilateral MEPs was 23.8% with more damaged hemisphere stimulation, while the contralateral MEPs showed a mean frequency of 47.5% with more damaged hemisphere stimulation in traumatic brain injury patients. The latencies and amplitudes of MEPs obtained from the more damaged hemisphere were not significantly different from those of the less damaged hemisphere. There was no correlation between the manifestation of MEPs in trunk muscles and gait ability. The ipsilateral and contralateral corticospinal pathways to trunk muscles are less likely to be activated in traumatic brain injury patients because of direct injury of the descending corticospinal motor tract or decreased excitability of the corticospinal tract from prefrontal contusion.

  7. Muscle fascicle behavior during eccentric cycling and its relation to muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñailillo, Luis; Blazevich, Anthony J; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2015-04-01

    A single bout of eccentric exercise confers a protective effect against muscle damage and soreness in subsequent eccentric exercise bouts, but the mechanisms underpinning this effect are unclear. This study compared vastus lateralis (VL) muscle-tendon behavior between two eccentric cycling bouts to test the hypothesis that muscle-tendon behavior would be different between bouts and would be associated with the protective effect. Eleven untrained men (27.1 ± 7.0 yr) performed two bouts of eccentric cycling (ECC1 and ECC2) separated by 2 wk for 10 min at 65% of maximal concentric workload (191.9 ± 44.2 W) each. Muscle soreness (by visual analog scale) and maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) torque of the knee extensors were assessed before and 1-2 d after exercise. Using ultrasonography, VL fascicle length and angle changes during cycling were assessed, and tendinous tissue (TT) length changes were estimated. VL EMG amplitude, crank torque, and knee joint angles were measured during cycling. Soreness was greater (P soreness after ECC2 than ECC1; thus, changes in muscle-tendon behavior may be an important mechanism underpinning the protective effect.

  8. Genomic-wide transcriptional profiling in primary myoblasts reveals Runx1-regulated genes in muscle regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kfir Baruch Umansky

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In response to muscle damage the muscle adult stem cells are activated and differentiate into myoblasts that regenerate the damaged tissue. We have recently showed that following myopathic damage the level of the Runx1 transcription factor (TF is elevated and that during muscle regeneration this TF regulates the balance between myoblast proliferation and differentiation (Umansky et al.. We employed Runx1-dependent gene expression, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq, Assay for Transposase-Accessible Chromatin with high-throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq and histone H3K4me1/H3K27ac modification analyses to identify a subset of Runx1-regulated genes that are co-occupied by the TFs MyoD and c-Jun and are involved in muscle regeneration (Umansky et al.. The data is available at the GEO database under the superseries accession number GSE56131.

  9. Core damage risk indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szikszai, T.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to show a method for the fast recalculation of the PSA. To avoid the information loose, it is necessary to simplify the PSA models, or at least reorganize them. The method, introduced in this document, require that preparation, so we try to show, how to do that. This document is an introduction. This is the starting point of the work related to the development of the risk indicators. In the future, with the application of this method, we are going to show an everyday use of the PSA results to produce the indicators of the core damage risk. There are two different indicators of the plant safety performance, related to the core damage risk. The first is the core damage frequency indicator (CDFI), and the second is the core damage probability indicator (CDPI). Of course, we cannot describe all of the possible ways to use these indicators, rather we will try to introduce the requirements to establish such an indicator system and the calculation process

  10. mapDamage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ginolhac, Aurélien; Rasmussen, Morten; Gilbert, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Ancient DNA extracts consist of a mixture of contaminant DNA molecules, most often originating from environmental microbes, and endogenous fragments exhibiting substantial levels of DNA damage. The latter introduce specific nucleotide misincorporations and DNA fragmentation signatures in sequenci...... of the SAMtools suite and R environment and has been validated on both GNU/Linux and MacOSX operating systems....

  11. Contribution of elastic tissues to the mechanics and energetics of muscle function during movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Muscle force production occurs within an environment of tissues that exhibit spring-like behavior, and this elasticity is a critical determinant of muscle performance during locomotion. Muscle force and power output both depend on the speed of contraction, as described by the isotonic force-velocity curve. By influencing the speed of contractile elements, elastic structures can have a profound effect on muscle force, power and work. In very rapid movements, elastic mechanisms can amplify muscle power by storing the work of muscle contraction slowly and releasing it rapidly. When energy must be dissipated rapidly, such as in landing from a jump, energy stored rapidly in elastic elements can be released more slowly to stretch muscle contractile elements, reducing the power input to muscle and possibly protecting it from damage. Elastic mechanisms identified so far rely primarily on in-series tendons, but many structures within muscles exhibit spring-like properties. Actomyosin cross-bridges, actin and myosin filaments, titin, and the connective tissue scaffolding of the extracellular matrix all have the potential to store and recover elastic energy during muscle contraction. The potential contribution of these elements can be assessed from their stiffness and estimates of the strain they undergo during muscle function. Such calculations provide boundaries for the possible roles these springs might play in locomotion, and may help to direct future studies of the uses of elastic elements in muscle. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Muscle Bioenergetic Considerations for Intrinsic Laryngeal Skeletal Muscle Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandage, Mary J.; Smith, Audrey G.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Intrinsic laryngeal skeletal muscle bioenergetics, the means by which muscles produce fuel for muscle metabolism, is an understudied aspect of laryngeal physiology with direct implications for voice habilitation and rehabilitation. The purpose of this review is to describe bioenergetic pathways identified in limb skeletal muscle and…

  13. Xanthine oxidase in human skeletal muscle following eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Frandsen, Ulrik; Orthenblad, N.

    1997-01-01

    1. The present study tested the hypothesis that the level of xanthine oxidase is elevated in injured human skeletal muscle in association with inflammatory events. Seven male subjects performed five bouts of strenuous one-legged eccentric exercise. Muscle biopsies from both the exercised...... and the control leg, together with venous blood samples, were obtained prior to exercise and at 45 min, 24, 48 and 96 h after exercise. The time courses of xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity and indicators of muscle damage and inflammation were examined. 2. The number of xanthine oxidase structures observed...... by immunohistological methods in the exercised muscle was up to eightfold higher than control from day 1 to day 4 after exercise (P

  14. Deltoid contracture: a case with multiple muscle contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Chang; Huang, Tung-Fu; Chou, Po-Hsin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung

    2008-11-01

    Deltoid contracture is relatively uncommon. The literature consists primarily of case reports and few articles on large case series. The pathogenesis has been well studied. Muscle contractures can occur in the deltoid, biceps, triceps, gluteus and quadriceps muscles; however, cases of multiple muscle contractures are rare. We reported a patient with multiple contractures of the bilateral deltoid, bilateral gluteus, and bilateral quadriceps muscles, who had received repeated intramuscular injections during childhood and adulthood. The radiographic, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), features of the bone and joint abnormalities are presented. Some literatures reported that damage to the structures of the body due to intramuscular injection is related to the site of injection, age of the patient, and the volume, pH, chemical composition, and diffusional capacity of the injectate. Our patient had muscular contracture induced by needle injection regardless of her age, medication and injection site.

  15. Xanthine oxidase in human skeletal muscle following eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Frandsen, Ulrik; Orthenblad, N.

    1997-01-01

    1. The present study tested the hypothesis that the level of xanthine oxidase is elevated in injured human skeletal muscle in association with inflammatory events. Seven male subjects performed five bouts of strenuous one-legged eccentric exercise. Muscle biopsies from both the exercised...... and the control leg, together with venous blood samples, were obtained prior to exercise and at 45 min, 24, 48 and 96 h after exercise. The time courses of xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity and indicators of muscle damage and inflammation were examined. 2. The number of xanthine oxidase structures observed...... by immunohistological methods in the exercised muscle was up to eightfold higher than control from day 1 to day 4 after exercise (P xanthine oxidase in microvascular endothelial cells and an invasion of leucocytes containing xanthine oxidase. 3...

  16. Multi-scale and multi-physics model of the uterine smooth muscle with mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yochum, Maxime; Laforêt, Jérémy; Marque, Catherine

    2018-02-01

    Preterm labor is an important public health problem. However, the efficiency of the uterine muscle during labor is complex and still poorly understood. This work is a first step towards a model of the uterine muscle, including its electrical and mechanical components, to reach a better understanding of the uterus synchronization. This model is proposed to investigate, by simulation, the possible role of mechanotransduction for the global synchronization of the uterus. The electrical diffusion indeed explains the local propagation of contractile activity, while the tissue stretching may play a role in the synchronization of distant parts of the uterine muscle. This work proposes a multi-physics (electrical, mechanical) and multi-scales (cell, tissue, whole uterus) model, which is applied to a realistic uterus 3D mesh. This model includes electrical components at different scales: generation of action potentials at the cell level, electrical diffusion at the tissue level. It then links these electrical events to the mechanical behavior, at the cellular level (via the intracellular calcium concentration), by simulating the force generated by each active cell. It thus computes an estimation of the intra uterine pressure (IUP) by integrating the forces generated by each active cell at the whole uterine level, as well as the stretching of the tissue (by using a viscoelastic law for the behavior of the tissue). It finally includes at the cellular level stretch activated channels (SACs) that permit to create a loop between the mechanical and the electrical behavior (mechanotransduction). The simulation of different activated regions of the uterus, which in this first "proof of concept" case are electrically isolated, permits the activation of inactive regions through the stretching (induced by the electrically active regions) computed at the whole organ scale. This permits us to evidence the role of the mechanotransduction in the global synchronization of the uterus. The

  17. Painful unilateral temporalis muscle enlargement: reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsetos, Christos D; Bianchi, Michael A; Jaffery, Fizza; Koutzaki, Sirma; Zarella, Mark; Slater, Robert

    2014-06-01

    An instance of isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy (reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy with fiber type 1 predominance) confirmed by muscle biopsy with histochemical fiber typing and image analysis in a 62 year-old man is reported. The patient presented with bruxism and a painful swelling of the temple. Absence of asymmetry or other abnormalities of the craniofacial skeleton was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and cephalometric analyses. The patient achieved symptomatic improvement only after undergoing botulinum toxin injections. Muscle biopsy is key in the diagnosis of reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy and its distinction from masticatory muscle myopathy (hypertrophic branchial myopathy) and other non-reactive causes of painful asymmetric temporalis muscle enlargement.

  18. Dystrophin deficiency compromises force production of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle in the canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao T Yang

    Full Text Available Loss of muscle force is a salient feature of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, a fatal disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Assessment of force production from a single intact muscle has been considered as the gold standard for studying physiological consequences in murine models of DMD. Unfortunately, equivalent assays have not been established in dystrophic dogs. To fill the gap, we developed a novel in situ protocol to measure force generated by the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU muscle of a dog. We also determined the muscle length to fiber length ratio and the pennation angle of the ECU muscle. Muscle pathology and contractility were compared between normal and affected dogs. Absence of dystrophin resulted in marked histological damage in the ECU muscle of affected dogs. Central nucleation was significantly increased and myofiber size distribution was altered in the dystrophic ECU muscle. Muscle weight and physiological cross sectional area (PCSA showed a trend of reduction in affected dogs although the difference did not reach statistical significance. Force measurement revealed a significant decrease of absolute force, and the PCSA or muscle weight normalized specific forces. To further characterize the physiological defect in affected dog muscle, we conducted eccentric contraction. Dystrophin-null dogs showed a significantly greater force loss following eccentric contraction damage. To our knowledge, this is the first convincing demonstration of force deficit in a single intact muscle in the canine DMD model. The method described here will be of great value to study physiological outcomes following innovative gene and/or cell therapies.

  19. Muscle wasting in myotonic dystrophies: a model of premature aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Judith eMateos-Aierdi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1 or Steinert’s disease and type II (DM2 are multisystem disorders of genetic origin. Progressive muscular weakness, atrophy and myotonia are the most prominent neuromuscular features of these diseases, and other clinical manifestations such as cardiomyopathy, insulin-resistance and cataracts are also common. From a clinical perspective, most DM symptoms are interpreted as a result of an accelerated aging (cataracts, muscular weakness and atrophy, cognitive decline, metabolic dysfunction, etc., including an increased risk of developing tumors. From this point of view, DM1 could be described as a progeroid syndrome since a notable age-dependent dysfunction of all systems occurs. The underlying molecular disorder in DM1 consists of the existence of a pathological (CTGn triplet expansion in the 3’ untranslated region of the DMPK gene, whereas (CCTGn repeats in the first intron of the CNBP/ZNF9 gene cause DM2. The expansions are transcribed into (CUGn and (CCUGn-containing RNA, respectively, which form secondary structures and sequester RNA-binding proteins, such as the splicing factor muscleblind-like protein (MBNL, forming nuclear aggregates known as foci. Other splicing factors, such as CUGBP, are also disrupted, leading to a spliceopathy of a large number of downstream genes linked to the clinical features of these diseases. Skeletal muscle regeneration relies on muscle progenitor cells, known as satellite cells, which are activated after muscle damage, and which proliferate and differentiate to muscle cells, thus regenerating the damaged tissue. Satellite cell dysfunction seems to be a common feature of both age-dependent muscle degeneration (sarcopenia and muscle wasting in DM and other muscle degenerative diseases. This review aims to describe the cellular, molecular and macrostructural processes involved in the muscular degeneration seen in DM patients, highlighting the similarities found with muscle aging.

  20. Cytokines and Chemokines as Regulators of Skeletal Muscle Inflammation: Presenting the Case of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boel De Paepe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe inherited muscle disease that affects 1 in 3500 boys worldwide. Infiltration of skeletal muscle by inflammatory cells is an important facet of disease pathophysiology and is strongly associated with disease severity in the individual patient. In the chronic inflammation that characterizes Duchenne muscle, cytokines and chemokines are considered essential activators and recruiters of inflammatory cells. In addition, they provide potential beneficiary effects on muscle fiber damage control and tissue regeneration. In this review, current knowledge of cytokine and chemokine expression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its relevant animal disease models is listed, and implications for future therapeutic avenues are discussed.

  1. Experiment K-6-09. Morphological and biochemical investigation of microgravity-induced nerve and muscle breakdown. Part 1: Investigation of nerve and muscle breakdown during spaceflight; Part 2: Biochemical analysis of EDL and PLT muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, D. A.; Ellis, S.; Bain, J.; Sedlak, F.; Slocum, G.; Oganov, V.

    1990-01-01

    The present findings on rat hindlimb muscles suggest that skeletal muscle weakness induced by prolonged spaceflight can result from a combination of muscle fiber atrophy, muscle fiber segmental necrosis, degeneration of motor nerve terminals and destruction of microcirculatory vessels. Damage was confined to the red adductor longus (AL) and soleus muscles. The midbelly region of the AL muscle had more segmental necrosis and edema than the ends. Macrophages and neutrophils were the major mononucleated cells infiltrating and phagocytosing the cellular debris. Toluidine blue-positive mast cells were significantly decreased in Flight AL muscles compared to controls; this indicated that degranulation of mast cells contributed to tissue edema. Increased ubiquitination of disrupted myofibrils may have promoted myofilament degradation. Overall, mitochondria content and SDH activity were normal, except for a decrease in the subsarcolemmal region. The myofibrillar ATPase activity shifted toward the fast type in the Flight AL muscles. Some of the pathological changes may have occurred or been exacerbated during the 2 day postflight period of readaptation to terrestrial gravity. While simple atrophy should be reversible by exercise, restoration of pathological changes depends upon complex processes of regeneration by stem cells. Initial signs of muscle and nerve fiber regeneration were detected. Even though regeneration proceeds on Earth, the space environment may inhibit repair and cause progressive irreversible deterioration during long term missions. Muscles obtained from Flight rats sacrificed immediately (within a few hours) after landing are needed to distinguish inflight changes from postflight readaptation.

  2. Muscle Disorders - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Translations Spanish (español) Expand Section Muscle Disorders: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English ... Health Information Translations Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  3. Neurogenic muscle cramps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-08-01

    Muscle cramps are sustained, painful contractions of muscle and are prevalent in patients with and without medical conditions. The objective of this review is to present updates on the mechanism, investigation and treatment of neurogenic muscle cramps. PubMed and Embase databases were queried between January 1980 and July 2014 for English-language human studies. The American Academy of Neurology classification of studies (classes I-IV) was used to assess levels of evidence. Mechanical disruption, ephaptic transmission, disruption of sensory afferents and persistent inward currents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurogenic cramps. Investigations are directed toward identifying physiological triggers or medical conditions predisposing to cramps. Although cramps can be self-limiting, disabling or sustained muscle cramps should prompt investigation for underlying medical conditions. Lifestyle modifications, treatment of underlying conditions, stretching, B-complex vitamins, diltiezam, mexiletine, carbamazepine, tetrahydrocannabinoid, leveteracitam and quinine sulfate have shown evidence for treatment.

  4. Human airway smooth muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. de Jongste (Johan)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe function of airway smooth muscle in normal subjects is not evident. Possible physiological roles include maintenance of optimal regional ventilation/perfusion ratios, reduction of anatomic dead space, stabilisation of cartilaginous bronchi, defense against impurities and, less

  5. Water and Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Grazi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between water and the protein of the contractile machinery as well as the tendency of these proteins to form geometrically ordered structures provide a link between water and muscle contraction. Protein osmotic pressure is strictly related to the chemical potential of the contractile proteins, to the stiffness of muscle structures and to the viscosity of the sliding of the thin over the thick filaments. Muscle power output and the steady rate of contraction are linked by modulating a single parameter, a viscosity coefficient. Muscle operation is characterized by working strokes of much shorter length and much quicker than in the classical model. As a consequence the force delivered and the stiffness attained by attached cross-bridges is much larger than usually believed.

  6. Muscle glycogenolysis during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ruderman, N B; Gavras, H

    1982-01-01

    glycogenolysis during exercise: contractions principally stimulate glycogenolysis early in exercise, and a direct effect of epinephrine on muscle is needed for continued glycogenolysis. In addition, epinephrine increased oxygen consumption and glucose uptake in both resting and electrically stimulated...

  7. Pneumatic Muscle Actuator Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lilly, John

    2000-01-01

    This research is relevant to the Air Fore mission because pneumatic muscle actuation devices arc advantageous for certain types of robotics as well as for strength and/or mobility assistance for humans...

  8. Human airway smooth muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Jongste, Johan

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe function of airway smooth muscle in normal subjects is not evident. Possible physiological roles include maintenance of optimal regional ventilation/perfusion ratios, reduction of anatomic dead space, stabilisation of cartilaginous bronchi, defense against impurities and, less likely, squeezing mucus out of mucous glands and pulling open the alveoli next to the airways1 . Any role of airway smooth muscle is necessarily limited, because an important degree of contraction will l...

  9. Fetal stem cells and skeletal muscle regeneration: a therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela ePozzobon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available More than 40% of the body mass is represented by muscle tissue, which possesses the innate ability to regenerate after damage through the activation of muscle specific stem cell, namely satellite cells. Muscle diseases, in particular chronic degenerative state of skeletal muscle such as dystrophies, lead to a perturbation of the regenerative process, which causes the premature exhaustion of satellite cell reservoir due to continue cycles of degeneration/regeneration. Nowadays, the research is focused on different therapeutic approaches, ranging from gene and cell to pharmacological therapy, but still there is not a definitive cure in particular for genetic muscle disease. Taking this in mind, in this article we will give special consideration to muscle diseases and the use of fetal derived stem cells as new approach for therapy. Cells of fetal origin, from cord blood to placenta and amniotic fluid, can be easily obtained without ethical concern, expanded and differentiated in culture, and possess immunemodulatory properties. The in vivo approach in animal models can be helpful to study the mechanism underneath the operating principle of the stem cell reservoir, namely the niche, which holds great potential to understand the onset of muscle pathologies.

  10. The Effects of Acute Post Exercise Consumption of Two Cocoa-Based Beverages with Varying Flavanol Content on Indices of Muscle Recovery Following Downhill Treadmill Running

    OpenAIRE

    Katelyn Peschek; Robert Pritchett; Ethan Bergman; Kelly Pritchett

    2013-01-01

    Dietary flavanols have been associated with reduced oxidative stress, however their efficacy in promoting recovery after exercise induced muscle damage is unclear. This study examined the effectiveness of acute consumption of cocoa-flavanols on indices of muscle recovery including: subsequent exercise performance, creatine kinase, muscle tenderness, force, and self-perceived muscle soreness. Eight endurance-trained athletes (VO2max 64.4 ± 7.6 mL/kg/min) completed a downhill running protocol t...

  11. Effects of lemon verbena extract (Recoverben®) supplementation on muscle strength and recovery after exhaustive exercise: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Buchwald-Werner, Sybille; Naka, Ioanna; Wilhelm, Manfred; Schütz, Elivra; Schoen, Christiane; Reule, Claudia

    2018-01-01

    Background Exhaustive exercise causes muscle damage accompanied by oxidative stress and inflammation leading to muscle fatigue and muscle soreness. Lemon verbena leaves, commonly used as tea and refreshing beverage, demonstrated antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a proprietary lemon verbena extract (Recoverben®) on muscle strength and recovery after exhaustive exercise in comparison to a placebo product. Methods The study was ...

  12. Radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, V.

    1978-01-01

    A number of experiments are described with the purpose to obtain a better insight in the chemical nature and the biological significance of radiation-induced damage in DNA, with some emphasis on the significance of alkali-labile sites. It is shown that not only reactions of OH radicals but also of H radicals introduce breaks and other inactivating damage in single-standed phiX174 DNA. It is found that phosphate buffer is very suitable for the study of the reactions of H radicals with DNA, as the H 2 PO 4 - ions convert the hydrated electrons into H radicals. The hydrated electron, which does react with DNA, does not cause a detectable inactivation. (Auth.)

  13. Muscle Strength and Poststroke Hemiplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Otto H; Stenager, Egon; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To systematically review (1) psychometric properties of criterion isokinetic dynamometry testing of muscle strength in persons with poststroke hemiplegia (PPSH); and (2) literature that compares muscle strength in patients poststroke with that in healthy controls assessed by criterion...... test in persons with stroke, generally showing marked reductions in muscle strength of paretic and, to a lesser degree, nonparetic muscles when compared with healthy controls, independent of muscle group, contraction mode, and contraction velocity....

  14. Radiation damage of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarevic, Dj.

    1966-11-01

    Study of radiation damage covered the following: Kinetics of electric resistance of uranium and uranium alloy with 1% of molybdenum dependent on the second phase and burnup rate; Study of gas precipitation and diffusion of bubbles by transmission electron microscopy; Numerical analysis of the influence of defects distribution and concentration on the rare gas precipitation in uranium; study of thermal sedimentation of uranium alloy with molybdenum; diffusion of rare gas in metal by gas chromatography method

  15. Nondestructive damage detection and evaluation technique for seismically damaged structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yukio; Unjoh, Shigeki; Kondoh, Masuo; Ohsumi, Michio

    1999-02-01

    The development of quantitative damage detection and evaluation technique, and damage detection technique for invisible damages of structures are required according to the lessons from the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu earthquake. In this study, two quantitative damage sensing techniques for highway bridge structures are proposed. One method is to measure the change of vibration characteristics of the bridge structure. According to the damage detection test for damaged bridge column by shaking table test, this method can successfully detect the vibration characteristic change caused by damage progress due to increment excitations. The other method is to use self-diagnosis intelligent materials. According to the reinforced concrete beam specimen test, the second method can detect the damage by rupture of intelligent sensors, such as optical fiber or carbon fiber reinforced plastic rod.

  16. Contractures and involuntary muscle overactivity in severe brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Marcus; Mehrholz, Jan; Rockstroh, Günter; Rückriem, Stefan; Koch, Rainer

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of contractures with an increase or reduction of non-spastic muscle overactivity due to severe cerebral damage. Forty-five patients with tetraparesis after severe cerebral damage were investigated. Three groups were defined based on the presence of spasticity (revealed as resistance to passive stretch (= hypertonia)), and the presence of contracture of the relevant knee joint: Group(s) (17 patients with hypertonia without contracture), Group(s+c) (20 patients with hypertonia and contracture), and Group(c) (eight patients without hypertonia and with contracture). In all groups spontaneous involuntary muscle activity was assessed continuously over a 12-hour period through isometric measurement of knee joint flexion torque. A mathematical algorithm differentiated an hourly muscle activity spectrum (PI(h)). The frequency of peaks (peaks(h)) from the activity spectrum was determined. We revealed that Group(s) had higher PI(h) and more frequent peaks(h) compared with Group(s+c) and Group(c) (p0.05). The presence of contractures was associated with lower involuntary muscle overactivity in terms of lower PI(h) and less frequent peaks(h), indicating that contractures may be associated with reduced non-spastic positive features of the upper motor neurone syndrome in patients with severe brain damage.

  17. Damage by air pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darley, E.F.; Middleton, J.T.

    1961-01-12

    Photochemical air pollution in the Los Angeles and San Francisco bay areas of California causes damage to the foliage of many plants and reduces the growth of a variety of glasshouse-grown crops. Not only is commercial flower production adversely affected, but a wide variety of critically controlled plant experiments conducted by several research institutions also are hampered. Moderate to severe plant damage has been experienced during the past several years for all but a few weeks in the winter months in standard glasshouses at the University of California at Riverside. Plants in glasshouses can be protected from photochemical air pollution by passing all of the air entering the house through activated carbon filters. The phytotoxic products of the photochemical reactions are ozone, the recently described peroxyacetyl nitrite PAN and the oxidants, as yet unidentified, produced by ozone-olefin reactions. Although ethylene occurs in the photochemical air pollution complex and is damaging to a variety of plants, it is not removed by activated carbon. A combination of filter-cooler unit is described which filters phytotoxicants from the air in greenhouses.

  18. Absence of insulin signalling in skeletal muscle is associated with reduced muscle mass and function: evidence for decreased protein synthesis and not increased degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Elaine D; Wilding, John P H; Kahn, C Ronald; Van Remmen, Holly; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J; Close, Graeme L

    2010-06-01

    Loss of skeletal muscle mass and function is observed in many insulin-resistant disease states such as diabetes, cancer cachexia, renal failure and ageing although the mechanisms for this remain unclear. We hypothesised that impaired insulin signalling results in reduced muscle mass and function and that this decrease in muscle mass and function is due to both increased production of atrogenes and aberrant reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Maximum tetanic force of the extensor digitorum longus of muscle insulin receptor knockout (MIRKO) and lox/lox control mice was measured in situ. Muscles were removed for the measurement of mass, histological examination and ROS production. Activation of insulin signalling pathways, markers of muscle atrophy and indices of protein synthesis were determined in a separate group of MIRKO and lox/lox mice 15 min following treatment with insulin. Muscles from MIRKO mice had 36% lower maximum tetanic force generation compared with muscles of lox/lox mice. Muscle fibres of MIRKO mice were significantly smaller than those of lox/lox mice with no apparent structural abnormalities. Muscles from MIRKO mice demonstrated absent phosphorylation of AKT in response to exogenous insulin along with a failure to phosphorylate ribosomal S6 compared with lox/lox mice. Atrogin-1 and MuRF1 relative mRNA expression in muscles from MIRKO mice were decreased compared with muscles from lox/lox mice following insulin treatment. There were no differences in markers of reactive oxygen species damage between muscles from MIRKO mice and lox/lox mice. These data support the hypothesis that the absence of insulin signalling contributes to reduced muscle mass and function though decreased protein synthesis rather than proteasomal atrophic pathways.

  19. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillou, Thomas; Lanner, Johanna T

    2016-12-01

    Reduced oxygen (O 2 ) levels (hypoxia) are present during embryogenesis and exposure to altitude and in pathologic conditions. During embryogenesis, myogenic progenitor cells reside in a hypoxic microenvironment, which may regulate their activity. Satellite cells are myogenic progenitor cells localized in a local environment, suggesting that the O 2 level could affect their activity during muscle regeneration. In this review, we present the idea that O 2 levels regulate myogenesis and muscle regeneration, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying myogenesis and muscle regeneration in hypoxia and depict therapeutic strategies using changes in O 2 levels to promote muscle regeneration. Severe hypoxia (≤1% O 2 ) appears detrimental for myogenic differentiation in vitro, whereas a 3-6% O 2 level could promote myogenesis. Hypoxia impairs the regenerative capacity of injured muscles. Although it remains to be explored, hypoxia may contribute to the muscle damage observed in patients with pathologies associated with hypoxia (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and peripheral arterial disease). Hypoxia affects satellite cell activity and myogenesis through mechanisms dependent and independent of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Finally, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and transplantation of hypoxia-conditioned myoblasts are beneficial procedures to enhance muscle regeneration in animals. These therapies may be clinically relevant to treatment of patients with severe muscle damage.-Chaillou, T. Lanner, J. T. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity. © FASEB.

  20. Effects of eccentric cycling exercise on IGF-I splice variant expression in the muscles of young and elderly people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hameed, M.; Toft, A.D.; Harridge, S.D.

    2008-01-01

    Recovery from micro damage resulting from intensive exercise has been shown to take longer in older muscles. To investigate the factors that may contribute to muscle repair, we have studied the expression of two splice variants of the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) gene. IGF-IEa and mechano...... damage-inducing exercise and is differentially regulated compared with IGF-IEa Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8...

  1. Aberrant repair and fibrosis development in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Christopher J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The repair process of damaged tissue involves the coordinated activities of several cell types in response to local and systemic signals. Following acute tissue injury, infiltrating inflammatory cells and resident stem cells orchestrate their activities to restore tissue homeostasis. However, during chronic tissue damage, such as in muscular dystrophies, the inflammatory-cell infiltration and fibroblast activation persists, while the reparative capacity of stem cells (satellite cells is attenuated. Abnormal dystrophic muscle repair and its end stage, fibrosis, represent the final common pathway of virtually all chronic neurodegenerative muscular diseases. As our understanding of the pathogenesis of muscle fibrosis has progressed, it has become evident that the muscle provides a useful model for the regulation of tissue repair by the local microenvironment, showing interplay among muscle-specific stem cells, inflammatory cells, fibroblasts and extracellular matrix components of the mammalian wound-healing response. This article reviews the emerging findings of the mechanisms that underlie normal versus aberrant muscle-tissue repair.

  2. Loss of a single allele for Ku80 leads to progenitor dysfunction and accelerated aging in skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Nathalie; Hourdé, Christophe; Amthor, Helge; Marazzi, Giovanna; Sassoon, David

    2012-01-01

    Muscle wasting is a major cause of morbidity in the elderly. Ku80 is required for DNA double strand repair and is implicated in telomere maintenance. Complete loss-of-function leads to reduced post-natal growth and severe progeria in mice. We examined the role of Ku80 in age-related skeletal muscle atrophy. While complete loss of Ku80 leads to pronounced aging in muscle as expected, accompanied by accumulation of DNA damage, loss of a single allele is sufficient to accelerate aging in skeletal muscle although post-natal growth is normal. Ku80 heterozygous muscle shows no DNA damage accumulation but undergoes premature telomere shortening that alters stem cell self-renewal through stress response pathways including p53. These data reveal an unexpected requirement for both Ku80 alleles for optimal progenitor function and prevention of early onset aging in muscle, as well as providing a useful model for therapeutic approaches. PMID:22915554

  3. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of muscle aging and sarcopenia and effects of electrical stimulation in seniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Barberi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The prolongation of skeletal muscle strength in aging and neuromuscular disease has been the objective of numerous studies employing a variety of approaches. It is generally accepted that cumulative failure to repair damage related to an overall decrease in anabolic processes is a primary cause of functional impairment in muscle. The functional performance of skeletal muscle tissues declines during post- natal life and it is compromised in different diseases, due to an alteration in muscle fiber composition and an overall decrease in muscle integrity as fibrotic invasions replace functional contractile tissue. Characteristics of skeletal muscle aging and diseases include a conspicuous reduction in myofiber plasticity (due to the progressive loss of muscle mass and in particular of the most powerful fast fibers, alteration in muscle-specific transcriptional mechanisms, and muscle atrophy. An early decrease in protein synthetic rates is followed by a later increase in protein degradation, to affect biochemical, physiological, and morphological parameters of muscle fibers during the aging process. Alterations in regenerative pathways also compromise the functionality of muscle tissues. In this review we will give an overview of the work on molecular and cellular mechanisms of aging and sarcopenia and the effects of electrical stimulation in seniors.

  4. Impaired Muscle Regeneration in Ob/ob and Db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai-Huong Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In obesity and type 2 diabetes, efficient skeletal muscle repair following injury may be required, not only for restoring muscle structure and function, but also for maintaining exercise capacity and insulin sensitivity. The hypothesis of this study was that muscle regeneration would be impaired in ob/ob and db/db mice, which are common mouse models of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Muscle injury was produced by cardiotoxin injection, and regeneration was assessed by morphological and immunostaining techniques. Muscle regeneration was delayed in ob/ob and db/db mice, but not in a less severe model of insulin resistance – feeding a high-fat diet to wild-type mice. Angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and myoblast accumulation were also impaired in ob/ob and db/db mice, but not the high-fat diet mice. The impairments in muscle regeneration were associated with impaired macrophage accumulation; macrophages have been shown previously to be required for efficient muscle regeneration. Impaired regeneration in ob/ob and db/db mice could be due partly to the lack of leptin signaling, since leptin is expressed both in damaged muscle and in cultured muscle cells. In summary, impaired muscle regeneration in ob/ob and db/db mice was associated with reduced macrophage accumulation, angiogenesis, and myoblast activity, and could have implications for insulin sensitivity in the skeletal muscle of obese and type 2 diabetic patients.

  5. Schisandrae Fructus Supplementation Ameliorates Sciatic Neurectomy-Induced Muscle Atrophy in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)</