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Sample records for stretch-induced electrophysiological alterations

  1. An electrophysiological analysis of altered cognitive functions in Huntington disease.

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    Münte, T F; Ridao-Alonso, M E; Preinfalk, J; Jung, A; Wieringa, B M; Matzke, M; Dengler, R; Johannes, S

    1997-09-01

    Neuropsychological deficits are a main feature of Huntington disease (HD) with previous data suggesting involvement of memory functions and visual processing. To increase the knowledge about cognitive malfunction in HD in the domains of visual processing and memory by the use of modern electrophysiological techniques (event-related potentials [ERPs]). A case-control design was used. Three ERP paradigms were used; a parallel visual search paradigm allowed for the simultaneous processing of a multi-element visual array in search of a target stimulus, while a serial search paradigm with varied numbers of distractor items necessitated a serial one by one scanning of the arrays. The third experiment was a word-recognition memory task. The measurements were obtained in a neurophysiological laboratory of a university hospital. Nine patients with HD and 9 control subjects matched for age, sex, and education were studied. Components of averaged ERPs were quantified by latency and amplitude measures and subjected to statistical analysis. Behavioral measures (search time, hit rate, and recognition accuracy) were assessed as well. The early visual components showed a significant latency shift (delay of about 50 milliseconds) in HD. In the search paradigms the P3 components differentiating target and standard stimuli were virtually absent in HD as was the ERP effect indexing word recognition. This was accompanied by a marked delay in search times and lower hit rates in the search tasks and a grossly reduced recognition accuracy in the memory task. The results suggest marked impairments of patients with HD in early visual sensory processing (early components). Deficits in visual search might be attributed to an impairment to deploy attentional resources across the visual field and/or an inability to control eye movements. The ERPs in the memory task differed grossly from similar data obtained by others in patients with Alzheimer disease, suggesting a different neural basis for

  2. Reduced delayed rectifier K+ current, altered electrophysiology, and increased ventricular vulnerability in MLP-deficient mice.

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    Gardiwal, Ajmal; Klein, Gunnar; Kraemer, Kirsten; Durgac, Tolga; Koenig, Thorben; Niehaus, Michael; Heineke, Joerg; Mohammadi, Bahram; Krampfl, Klaus; Schaefer, Arnd; Wollert, Kai C; Korte, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    Mice with a knockout (KO) of muscle LIM protein (MLP) exhibit many morphologic and clinical features of human cardiomyopathy. In humans, MLP-expression is downregulated both in ischemic and dilative cardiomyopathy. In this study, we investigated the effects of MLP on the electrophysiologic phenotype in vivo and on outward potassium currents. MLP-deficient (MLPKO) and wild-type (MLPWT) mice were subjected to long-term electrocardiogram (ECG) recording and in vivo electrophysiologic study. The whole-cell, patch-clamp technique was applied to measure voltage dependent outward K+ currents in isolated cardiomyocytes. Long-term ECG revealed a significant prolongation of RR mean (108 +/- 9 versus 99 +/- 5 ms), P (16 +/- 3 versus 14 +/- 1 ms), QRS (17 +/- 3 versus 13 +/- 1 ms), QT (68 +/- 8 versus 46 +/- 7 ms), QTc (66 +/- 6 versus 46 +/- 7 ms), JT (51 +/- 7 versus 34 +/- 7 ms), and JTc (49 +/- 5 versus 33 +/- 7 ms) in MLPKO versus MLPWT mice (P MLP exhibit significant prolongation of atrial and ventricular conduction and an increased ventricular vulnerability. A reduction in repolarizing outward K+ currents may be responsible for these alterations.

  3. Focal cortical dysplasia alters electrophysiological cortical hubs in the resting-state.

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    Jin, Seung-Hyun; Jeong, Woorim; Chung, Chun Kee

    2015-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that epilepsy patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) have different electrophysiological functional cortical hubs from those of healthy controls. Resting-state functional networks in the theta, alpha, beta and gamma frequency bands were evaluated in 35 epilepsy patients with histopathologically verified FCD as a single pathology and in 46 age-matched healthy controls. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), we investigated the network differences between the two groups by comparing the nodal efficiency (Enodal) and betweenness centrality (BC) values at the source level. The FCD patients had significant Enodal increases in the functional cortical hubs in the left anterior, middle, and posterior cortices and the medial orbital superior frontal cortex in the beta band. The left posterior cingulate cortex showed significant BC increases in the theta, alpha, and beta bands. There was a negative correlation between Enodal and age at seizure onset. Cortical dysplasia alters whole brain functional cortical hubs compared to healthy controls. The age at seizure onset was negatively correlated with Enodal in the beta band in FCD patients. Our study for the first time investigated the functional cortical hubs and their alteration in the resting-state functional network in epilepsy patients with FCD using noninvasive MEG signals. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Central administration of ghrelin alters emotional responses in rats: behavioural, electrophysiological and molecular evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, C; Haage, D; Taube, M; Egecioglu, E; Salomé, N; Dickson, S L

    2011-04-28

    The orexigenic and pro-obesity hormone ghrelin targets key hypothalamic and mesolimbic circuits involved in energy balance, appetite and reward. Given that such circuits are closely integrated with those regulating mood and cognition, we sought to determine whether chronic (>2 weeks) CNS exposure to ghrelin alters anxiety- and depression-like behaviour in rats as well as some physiological correlates. Rats bearing chronically implanted i.c.v. catheters were treated with ghrelin (10 μg/d) or vehicle for 4 weeks. Tests used to assess anxiety- and depression-like behaviour were undertaken during weeks 3-4 of the infusion. These revealed an increase in anxiety- and depression-like behaviour in the ghrelin-treated rats relative to controls. At the end of the 4-week infusion, brains were removed and the amygdala dissected for subsequent qPCR analysis that revealed changes in expression of a number of genes representing key systems implicated in these behavioural changes. Finally, given the key role of the dorsal raphe serotonin system in emotional reactivity, we examined the electrophysiological response of dorsal raphe neurons after a ghrelin challenge, and found mainly inhibitory responses in this region. We demonstrate that the central ghrelin signalling system is involved in emotional reactivity in rats, eliciting pro-anxiety and pro-depression effects and have begun to explore novel target systems for ghrelin that may be of importance for these effects. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Electrophysiological response during auditory gap detection: Biomarker for sensory and communication alterations in autism spectrum disorder?

    OpenAIRE

    Foss-Feig, JH; Stavropoulos, KKM; McPartland, JC; Wallace, MT; Stone, WL; Key, AP

    2018-01-01

    Sensory symptoms, including auditory processing deficits, are common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Processing of temporal aspects of auditory input is understudied; yet, deficits in this domain could contribute to language-related impairments. In children with ASD and well-matched controls, this study examined electrophysiological response to silent gaps in auditory stimuli. Results revealed attenuated amplitude of the P2 event-related potential (ERP) component in ASD. The P2 amplitude r...

  6. Electrophysiological response during auditory gap detection: Biomarker for sensory and communication alterations in autism spectrum disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss-Feig, Jennifer H; Stavropoulos, Katherine K M; McPartland, James C; Wallace, Mark T; Stone, Wendy L; Key, Alexandra P

    2018-01-01

    Sensory symptoms, including auditory processing deficits, are common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Processing of temporal aspects of auditory input is understudied; yet, deficits in this domain could contribute to language-related impairments. In children with ASD and well-matched controls, this study examined electrophysiological response to silent gaps in auditory stimuli. Results revealed attenuated amplitude of the P2 event-related potential (ERP) component in ASD. The P2 amplitude reduction was also associated with sensory, language, and diagnostic features. These results suggest that neural response during auditory gap detection is a promising ASD biomarker that could be useful for stratifying subgroups and evaluating treatment response.

  7. Electrophysiological evidence for altered visual, but not auditory, selective attention in adolescent cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jill; Kamke, Marc R

    2014-11-01

    Selective attention fundamentally alters sensory perception, but little is known about the functioning of attention in individuals who use a cochlear implant. This study aimed to investigate visual and auditory attention in adolescent cochlear implant users. Event related potentials were used to investigate the influence of attention on visual and auditory evoked potentials in six cochlear implant users and age-matched normally-hearing children. Participants were presented with streams of alternating visual and auditory stimuli in an oddball paradigm: each modality contained frequently presented 'standard' and infrequent 'deviant' stimuli. Across different blocks attention was directed to either the visual or auditory modality. For the visual stimuli attention boosted the early N1 potential, but this effect was larger for cochlear implant users. Attention was also associated with a later P3 component for the visual deviant stimulus, but there was no difference between groups in the later attention effects. For the auditory stimuli, attention was associated with a decrease in N1 latency as well as a robust P3 for the deviant tone. Importantly, there was no difference between groups in these auditory attention effects. The results suggest that basic mechanisms of auditory attention are largely normal in children who are proficient cochlear implant users, but that visual attention may be altered. Ultimately, a better understanding of how selective attention influences sensory perception in cochlear implant users will be important for optimising habilitation strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Periostin inhibits mechanical stretch-induced apoptosis in osteoblast-like MG-63 cells.

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    Yu, Kai-Wen; Yao, Chung-Chen; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei; Shieh, Hao-Ying; Chen, Yi-Jane

    2018-04-01

    Appropriate mechanical stress plays an important role in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts, whereas high-level mechanical stress may be harmful and compromise cell survival. Periostin, a matricellular protein, is essential in maintaining functional integrity of bone and collagen-rich connective tissue in response to mechanical stress. This study investigated whether or not high-level mechanical stretch induces cell apoptosis and the regulatory role of periostin in mechanical stretch-induced apoptosis in osteoblastic cells. Osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were seeded onto Bio-Flex I culture plates and subjected to cyclic mechanical stretching (15% elongation, 0.1 Hz) in a Flexercell tension plus system-5000. The same process was applied to cells pre-treated with exogenous human recombinant periostin before mechanical stretching. We used a chromatin condensation and membrane permeability dead cell apoptosis kit to evaluate the stretch-induced cell responses. Expression of caspase-3 and cPARP was examined by immunofluorescent stain and flow cytometry. The expression of periostin in MG-63 cells is involved in the TGF-β signaling pathway. High-level cyclic mechanical stretch induced apoptotic responses in MG-63 osteoblastic cells. The percentages of apoptotic cells and cells expressing cPARP protein increased in the groups of cells subjected to mechanical stretch, but these responses were absent in the presence of exogenous periostin. Our study revealed that high-level mechanical stretch induces apoptotic cell death, and that periostin plays a protective role against mechanical stretch-induced apoptosis in osteoblastic cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Overexpression of Dyrk1A is implicated in several cognitive, electrophysiological and neuromorphological alterations found in a mouse model of Down syndrome.

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    Susana García-Cerro

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS phenotypes result from the overexpression of several dosage-sensitive genes. The DYRK1A (dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A gene, which has been implicated in the behavioral and neuronal alterations that are characteristic of DS, plays a role in neuronal progenitor proliferation, neuronal differentiation and long-term potentiation (LTP mechanisms that contribute to the cognitive deficits found in DS. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Dyrk1A overexpression on the behavioral and cognitive alterations in the Ts65Dn (TS mouse model, which is the most commonly utilized mouse model of DS, as well as on several neuromorphological and electrophysiological properties proposed to underlie these deficits. In this study, we analyzed the phenotypic differences in the progeny obtained from crosses of TS females and heterozygous Dyrk1A (+/- male mice. Our results revealed that normalization of the Dyrk1A copy number in TS mice improved working and reference memory based on the Morris water maze and contextual conditioning based on the fear conditioning test and rescued hippocampal LTP. Concomitant with these functional improvements, normalization of the Dyrk1A expression level in TS mice restored the proliferation and differentiation of hippocampal cells in the adult dentate gyrus (DG and the density of GABAergic and glutamatergic synapse markers in the molecular layer of the hippocampus. However, normalization of the Dyrk1A gene dosage did not affect other structural (e.g., the density of mature hippocampal granule cells, the DG volume and the subgranular zone area or behavioral (i.e., hyperactivity/attention alterations found in the TS mouse. These results suggest that Dyrk1A overexpression is involved in some of the cognitive, electrophysiological and neuromorphological alterations, but not in the structural alterations found in DS, and suggest that pharmacological strategies targeting

  10. Cyclic Mechanical Stretching Induces Autophagic Cell Death in Tenofibroblasts Through Activation of Prostaglandin E2 Production

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    Hua Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Autophagic cell death has recently been implicated in the pathophysiology of tendinopathy. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, a known inflammatory mediator of tendinitis, inhibits tenofibroblast proliferation in vitro; however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. The present study investigated the relationship between PGE2 production and autophagic cell death in mechanically loaded human patellar tendon fibroblasts (HPTFs in vitro. Methods: Cultured HPTFs were subjected to exogenous PGE2 treatment or repetitive cyclic mechanical stretching. Cell death was determined by flow cytometry with acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. Induction of autophagy was assessed by autophagy markers including the formation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes (by electron microscopy, AO staining, and formation of GPF-LC3-labeled vacuoles and the expression of LC3-II and BECN1 (by western blot. Stretching-induced PGE2 release was determined by ELISA. Results: Exogenous PGE2 significantly induced cell death and autophagy in HPTFs in a dose-dependent manner. Blocking autophagy using inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine, or small interfering RNAs against autophagy genes Becn-1 and Atg-5 prevented PGE2-induced cell death. Cyclic mechanical stretching at 8% and 12% magnitudes for 24 h significantly stimulated PGE2 release by HPTFs in a magnitude-dependent manner. In addition, mechanical stretching induced autophagy and cell death. Blocking PGE2 production using COX inhibitors indomethacin and celecoxib significantly reduced stretching-induced autophagy and cell death. Conclusion: Taken together, cyclic mechanical stretching induces autophagic cell death in tenofibroblasts through activation of PGE2 production.

  11. Caspase-12 is involved in stretch-induced apoptosis mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress.

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    Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Jianing; Chen, Shulan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Lijuan; Liu, Guirong; Wang, Fang; Jiang, Wenxin; Zhang, Caixia; Wang, Shuangyu; Yuan, Xiao

    2016-04-01

    It is well recognized that mandibular growth, which is caused by a variety of functional appliances, is considered to be the result of both neuromuscular and skeletal adaptations. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that apoptosis plays an important role in the adaptation of skeletal muscle function. However, the underlying mechanism of apoptosis that is induced by stretch continues to be incompletely understood. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), a newly defined signaling pathway, initiates apoptosis. This study seeks to determine if caspase-12 is involved in stretch-induced apoptosis mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress in myoblast and its underlying mechanism. Apoptosis was assessed by Hochest staining, DAPI staining and annexin V binding and PI staining. ER chaperones, such as GRP78, CHOP and caspase-12, were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Furthermore, caspase-12 inhibitor was used to value the mechanism of the caspase-12 pathway. Apoptosis of myoblast, which is subjected to cyclic stretch, was observed in a time-dependent manner. We found that GRP78 mRNA and protein were significantly increased and CHOP and caspase-12 were activated in myoblast that was exposed to cyclic stretch. Caspase-12 inhibition reduced stretch-induced apoptosis, and caspase-12 activated caspase-3 to induce apoptosis. We concluded that caspase-12 played an important role in stretch-induced apoptosis that is associated by endoplasmic reticulum stress by activating caspase-3.

  12. Effects of hypertonic sodium chloride solution on the electrophysiologic alterations caused by bupivacaine in the dog heart

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    Scalabrini A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of various hypertonic solutions on the intraventricular conduction, ventricular repolarization and the arrhythmias caused by the intravenous (iv injection of bupivacaine (6.5 mg/kg were studied in sodium pentobarbital-anesthetized mongrel dogs. Hypertonic solutions, given iv 5 min before bupivacaine, were 7.5% (w/v NaCl, 5.4% (w/v LiCl, 50% (w/v glucose (2,400 mOsm/l, 5 ml/kg, or 20% (w/v mannitol (1,200 mOsm/l, 10 ml/kg. Bupivacaine induced severe arrhythmias and ventricular conduction and repolarization disturbances, as reflected by significant increases in QRS complex duration, HV interval, IV interval and monophasic action potential duration, as well as severe hemodynamic impairment. Significant prevention against ventricular electrophysiologic and hemodynamic disturbances and ventricular arrhythmias was observed with 7.5% NaCl (percent increase in QRS complex duration: 164.4 ± 21.8% in the non-pretreated group vs 74.7 ± 14.1% in the pretreated group, P<0.05; percent increase in HV interval: 131.4 ± 16.1% in the non-pretreated group vs 58.2 ± 7.5% in the pretreated group, P<0.05; percent increase in monophasic action potential duration: 22.7 ± 6.8% in the non-pretreated group vs 9.8 ± 6.3% in the pretreated group, P<0.05; percent decrease in cardiac index: -46 ± 6% in the non-pretreated group vs -28 ± 5% in the pretreated group, P<0.05. The other three hypertonic solutions were ineffective. These findings suggest an involvement of sodium ions in the mechanism of hypertonic protection.

  13. The role of gap junctions in stretch-induced atrial fibrillation.

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    Ueda, Norihiro; Yamamoto, Mitsuru; Honjo, Haruo; Kodama, Itsuo; Kamiya, Kaichiro

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of gap junctions in atrial fibrillation (AF) by analysing the effects of a gap junction enhancer and blocker on AF vulnerability and electrophysiological properties of isolated hearts. The acute atrial stretch model of AF in the isolated rabbit heart was used. Sustained AF (SAF) was induced by a burst of high-frequency stimulation of the Bachmann's bundle. The effective refractory period (ERP) was measured, and the total conduction time (TCT) and the pattern of conduction of the anterior surface of the left atrium were monitored by using an optical mapping system. The effect of enhancing gap junction function by 100-1000 nM rotigaptide (ZP123) and block by 30 μM carbenoxolone on these parameters was measured. SAF inducibility was increased with an elevation of intra-atrial pressure. Enhanced gap junction conductance induced by treatment with 100-1000 nM rotigaptide reduced SAF inducibility, and the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone increased SAF inducibility. In the absence of gap junction enhancer or blocker, normal conduction was observed at 0 cmH2O. When intra-atrial pressure was raised to 12 cmH2O, the conduction pattern was changed to a heterogeneous zig-zag pattern and TCT was prolonged. Conduction pattern was not affected by either agent. Rotigaptide shortened TCT, whereas carbenoxolone prolonged TCT. ERP was significantly shortened with an increase in intra-atrial pressure, but ERP was unaffected by either agent. Gap junction modulators changed AF inducibility through their effects on atrial conduction, not by altering ERP. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  14. Preventing effect of L-type calcium channel blockade on electrophysiological alterations in dentate gyrus granule cells induced by entorhinal amyloid pathology.

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    Hamid Gholami Pourbadie

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex (EC is one of the earliest affected brain regions in Alzheimer's disease (AD. EC-amyloid pathology induces synaptic failure in the dentate gyrus (DG with resultant behavioral impairment, but there is little known about its impact on neuronal properties in the DG. It is believed that calcium dyshomeostasis plays a pivotal role in the etiology of AD. Here, the effect of the EC amyloid pathogenesis on cellular properties of DG granule cells and also possible neuroprotective role of L-type calcium channel blockers (CCBs, nimodipine and isradipine, were investigated. The amyloid beta (Aβ 1-42 was injected bilaterally into the EC of male rats and one week later, electrophysiological properties of DG granule cells were assessed. Voltage clamp recording revealed appearance of giant sIPSC in combination with a decrease in sEPSC frequency which was partially reversed by CCBs in granule cells from Aβ treated rats. EC amyloid pathogenesis induced a significant reduction of input resistance (Rin accompanied by a profound decreased excitability in the DG granule cells. However, daily administration of CCBs, isradipine or nimodipine (i.c.v. for 6 days, almost preserved the normal excitability against Aβ. In conclusion, lower tendency to fire AP along with reduced Rin suggest that DG granule cells might undergo an alteration in the membrane ion channel activities which finally lead to the behavioral deficits observed in animal models and patients with early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

  15. A putative electrophysiological biomarker of auditory sensory memory encoding is sensitive to pharmacological alterations of excitatory/inhibitory balance in male macaque monkeys.

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    Holliday, William B; Gurnsey, Kate; Sweet, Robert A; Teichert, Tobias

    2017-12-13

    The amplitude of the auditory evoked N1 component that can be derived from noninvasive electroencephalographic recordings increases as a function of time between subsequent tones. N1 amplitudes in individuals with schizophrenia saturate at a lower asymptote, thus giving rise to a reduced dynamic range. Reduced N1 dynamic range is a putative electrophysiological biomarker of altered sensory memory function in individuals with the disease. To date, it is not clear what determines N1 dynamic range and what causes reduced N1 dynamic range in individuals with schizophrenia. Here we test the hypothesis that reduced N1 dynamic range results from a shift in excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) balance toward an excitation-deficient or inhibition-dominant state. We recorded auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) while 4 macaque monkeys passively listened to sequences of sounds of random pitch and stimulus-onset asynchrony (SOA). Three independent experiments tested the effect of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor channel blockers ketamine and MK-801 as well as the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor-positive allosteric modulator midazolam on the dynamic range of a putative monkey N1 homologue and 4 other AEP components. Ketamine, MK-801 and midazolam reduced peak N1 amplitudes for the longest SOAs. Other AEP components were also affected, but revealed distinct patterns of susceptibility for the glutamatergic and GABA-ergic drugs. Different patterns of susceptibility point toward differences in the circuitry maintaining E/I balance of individual components. The study used systemic pharmacological interventions that may have acted on targets outside of the auditory cortex. The N1 dynamic range may be a marker of altered E/I balance. Reduced N1 dynamic range in individuals with schizophrenia may indicate that the auditory cortex is in an excitation-deficient or inhibition-dominant state. This may be the result of an incomplete compensation for a primary deficit in excitatory drive.

  16. Genetic deletion of TREK-1 or TWIK-1/TREK-1 potassium channels does not alter the basic electrophysiological properties of mature hippocampal astrocytes in situ

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    Yixing eDu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We have recently shown that a linear current-to-voltage (I-V relationship of membrane conductance (passive conductance reflects the intrinsic property of K+ channels in mature astrocytes. While passive conductance is known to underpin a highly negative and stable membrane potential (VM essential for the basic homeostatic function of astrocytes, a complete repertoire of the involved K+ channels remains elusive. TREK-1 two-pore domain K+ channel (K2P is highly expressed in astrocytes, and covalent association of TREK-1 with TWIK-1, another highly expressed astrocytic K2P, has been reported as a mechanism underlying the trafficking of this heterodimer channel to the membrane and contributing to astrocytes’ passive conductance. To decipher the individual contribution of TREK-1 and address whether the appearance of passive conductance is conditional to the co-expression of TWIK-1/TREK-1 in astrocytes, TREK-1 single and TWIK-1/TREK-1 double gene knockout mice were used in the present study. The relative quantity of mRNA encoding other astrocyte K+ channels, such as Kir4.1, Kir5.1, and TREK-2, was not altered in these gene knockout mice. Whole-cell recording from hippocampal astrocytes in situ revealed no detectable changes in astrocyte passive conductance, VM, or membrane input resistance (Rin in either kind of gene knockout mouse. Additionally, TREK-1 proteins were mainly located in the intracellular compartments of the hippocampus. Altogether, genetic deletion of TREK-1 alone or together with TWIK-1 produced no obvious alteration in the basic electrophysiological properties of hippocampal astrocytes. Thus, future research focusing on other K+ channels may shed light on this long-standing and important question in astrocyte physiology.

  17. Does vibration counteract the static stretch-induced deficit on muscle force development?

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    Fernandes, Igor Alexandre; Kawchuk, Gregory; Bhambhani, Yagesh; Gomes, Paulo Sergio Chagas

    2013-09-01

    To determine the residual acute vibration-stretching effect on preactivation levels, short-latency stretch reflex, and performance during execution of drop jumps. Repeated measures. Eleven male recreational athletes performed a set of three 45cm drop jumps before and immediately after a 30s static stretching exercise with and without simultaneously imposed muscle vibration (45Hz, 5mm). Drop jump height, ground reaction forces and electromyographic data including Vastus Lateralis onset/levels of preactivation and short-latency stretch reflex were recorded. No changes were induced on drop jump height. However, stretching-induced decrements on ground reaction force peak and time to peak as well as an increment in contact time followed a delay in short-latency stretch reflex onset and a reduced preactivation level of Vastus Lateralis. Otherwise, when vibration was simultaneously imposed, there was no evidence of changes in high-speed force production variables or electromyographic recordings. Mechanical vibration, when applied simultaneously to static-stretching routines, appeared to be effective to counteract decreased musculotendinous unit stiffness-induced high-speed force production deficit during jumping performance. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Neurochemical and electrophysiological deficits in the ventral hippocampus and selective behavioral alterations caused by high-fat diet in female C57BL/6 mice.

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    Krishna, S; Keralapurath, M M; Lin, Z; Wagner, J J; de La Serre, C B; Harn, D A; Filipov, N M

    2015-06-25

    Mounting experimental evidence, predominantly from male rodents, demonstrates that high-fat diet (HFD) consumption and ensuing obesity are detrimental to the brain. To shed additional light on the neurological consequences of HFD consumption in female rodents and to determine the relatively early impact of HFD in the likely continuum of neurological dysfunction in the context of chronic HFD intake, this study investigated effects of HFD feeding for up to 12weeks on selected behavioral, neurochemical, and electrophysiological parameters in adult female C57BL/6 mice; particular focus was placed on the ventral hippocampus (vHIP). Selected locomotor, emotional and cognitive functions were evaluated using behavioral tests after 5weeks on HFD or control (low-fat diet) diets. One week later, mice were sacrificed and brain regional neurochemical (monoamine) analysis was performed. Behaviorally naïve mice were maintained on their respective diets for an additional 5-6weeks at which time synaptic plasticity was determined in ex vivo slices from the vHIP. HFD-fed female mice exhibited increased: (i) locomotor activity in the open field testing, (ii) mean turn time on the pole test, (iii) swimming time in the forced swim test, and (iv) number of marbles buried in the marble burying test. In contrast, the novel object recognition memory was unaffected. Mice on HFD also had decreased norepinephrine and dopamine turnover, respectively, in the prefrontal cortex and the vHIP. HFD consumption for a total of 11-12weeks altered vHIP synaptic plasticity, evidenced by significant reductions in the paired-pulse ratio and long-term potentiation (LTP) magnitude. In summary, in female mice, HFD intake for several weeks induced multiple behavioral alterations of mainly anxiety-like nature and impaired monoamine pathways in a brain region-specific manner, suggesting that in the female, certain behavioral domains (anxiety) and associated brain regions, i.e., the vHIP, are preferentially

  19. Cyclic stretch-induced stress fiber dynamics - Dependence on strain rate, Rho-kinase and MLCK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chin-Fu; Haase, Candice; Deguchi, Shinji; Kaunas, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Cyclic stretch induces stress fiber disassembly, reassembly and fusion perpendicular to the direction of stretch. → Stress fiber disassembly and reorientation were not induced at low stretch frequency. → Stretch caused actin fiber formation parallel to stretch in distinct locations in cells treated with Rho-kinase and MLCK inhibitors. -- Abstract: Stress fiber realignment is an important adaptive response to cyclic stretch for nonmuscle cells, but the mechanism by which such reorganization occurs is not known. By analyzing stress fiber dynamics using live cell microscopy, we revealed that stress fiber reorientation perpendicular to the direction of cyclic uniaxial stretching at 1 Hz did not involve disassembly of the stress fiber distal ends located at focal adhesion sites. Instead, these distal ends were often used to assemble new stress fibers oriented progressively further away from the direction of stretch. Stress fiber disassembly and reorientation were not induced when the frequency of stretch was decreased to 0.01 Hz, however. Treatment with the Rho-kinase inhibitor (Y27632) reduced stress fibers to thin fibers located in the cell periphery which bundled together to form thick fibers oriented parallel to the direction of stretching at 1 Hz. In contrast, these thin fibers remained diffuse in cells subjected to stretch at 0.01 Hz. Cyclic stretch at 1 Hz also induced actin fiber formation parallel to the direction of stretch in cells treated with the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7, but these fibers were located centrally rather than peripherally. These results shed new light on the mechanism by which stress fibers reorient in response to cyclic stretch in different regions of the actin cytoskeleton.

  20. Enhanced tolerance to stretch-induced performance degradation of stretchable MnO2-based supercapacitors.

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    Huang, Yan; Huang, Yang; Meng, Wenjun; Zhu, Minshen; Xue, Hongtao; Lee, Chun-Sing; Zhi, Chunyi

    2015-02-04

    The performance of many stretchable electronics, such as energy storage devices and strain sensors, is highly limited by the structural breakdown arising from the stretch imposed. In this article, we focus on a detailed study on materials matching between functional materials and their conductive substrate, as well as enhancement of the tolerance to stretch-induced performance degradation of stretchable supercapacitors, which are essential for the design of a stretchable device. It is revealed that, being widely utilized as the electrode material of the stretchable supercapacitor, metal oxides such as MnO2 nanosheets have serious strain-induced performance degradation due to their rigid structure. In comparison, with conducting polymers like a polypyrrole (PPy) film as the electrochemically active material, the performance of stretchable supercapacitors can be well preserved under strain. Therefore, a smart design is to combine PPy with MnO2 nanosheets to achieve enhanced tolerance to strain-induced performance degradation of MnO2-based supercapacitors, which is realized by fabricating an electrode of PPy-penetrated MnO2 nanosheets. The composite electrodes exhibit a remarkable enhanced tolerance to strain-induced performance degradation with well-preserved performance over 93% under strain. The detailed morphology and electrochemical impedance variations are investigated for the mechanism analyses. Our work presents a systematic investigation on the selection and matching of electrode materials for stretchable supercapacitors to achieve high performance and great tolerance to strain, which may guide the selection of functional materials and their substrate materials for the next-generation of stretchable electronics.

  1. Stretch induced endothelin-1 secretion by adult rat astrocytes involves calcium influx via stretch-activated ion channels (SACs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrow, Lyle W.; Suchyna, Thomas M.; Sachs, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Endothelin-1 expression by adult rat astrocytes correlates with cell proliferation. → Stretch-induced ET-1 is inhibited by GsMtx-4, a specific inhibitor of Ca 2+ permeant SACs. → The less specific SAC inhibitor streptomycin also inhibits ET-1 secretion. → Stretch-induced ET-1 production depends on a calcium influx. → SAC pharmacology may provide a new class of therapeutic agents for CNS pathology. -- Abstract: The expression of endothelins (ETs) and ET-receptors is often upregulated in brain pathology. ET-1, a potent vasoconstrictor, also inhibits the expression of astrocyte glutamate transporters and is mitogenic for astrocytes, glioma cells, neurons, and brain capillary endothelia. We have previously shown that mechanical stress stimulates ET-1 production by adult rat astrocytes. We now show in adult astrocytes that ET-1 production is driven by calcium influx through stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the ET-1 production correlates with cell proliferation. Mechanical stimulation using biaxial stretch ( 2+ threshold. This coupling of mechanical stress to the astrocyte endothelin system through SACs has treatment implications, since all pathology deforms the surrounding parenchyma.

  2. Nitric oxide mediates stretch-induced Ca2+ release via activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

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    Wei, Bin; Chen, Zheng; Zhang, Xu; Feldman, Morris; Dong, Xian-zhi; Doran, Robert; Zhao, Bao-Lu; Yin, Wen-xuan; Kotlikoff, Michael I; Ji, Guangju

    2008-06-25

    Hollow smooth muscle organs such as the bladder undergo significant changes in wall tension associated with filling and distension, with attendant changes in muscle tone. Our previous study indicated that stretch induces Ca(2+) release occurs in the form of Ca(2+) sparks and Ca(2+) waves in urinary bladder myocytes. While, the mechanism underlying stretch-induced Ca2+ release in smooth muscle is unknown. We examined the transduction mechanism linking cell stretch to Ca(2+) release. The probability and frequency of Ca(2+) sparks induced by stretch were closely related to the extent of cell extension and the time that the stretch was maintained. Experiments in tissues and single myocytes indicated that mechanical stretch significantly increases the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the amplitude and duration of muscle contraction. Stretch-induced Ca(2+) sparks and contractility increases were abrogated by the NO inhibitor L-NAME and were also absent in eNOS knockout mice. Furthermore, exposure of eNOS null mice to exogenously generated NO induced Ca(2+) sparks. The soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ did not inhibit SICR, but this process was effectively blocked by the PI3 kinase inhibitors LY494002 and wortmannin; the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS were up-regulated by 204+/-28.6% and 258+/-36.8% by stretch, respectively. Moreover, stretch significantly increased the eNOS protein expression level. Taking together, these results suggest that stretch-induced Ca2+ release is NO dependent, resulting from the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

  3. Nitric oxide mediates stretch-induced Ca2+ release via activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

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    Bin Wei

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Hollow smooth muscle organs such as the bladder undergo significant changes in wall tension associated with filling and distension, with attendant changes in muscle tone. Our previous study indicated that stretch induces Ca(2+ release occurs in the form of Ca(2+ sparks and Ca(2+ waves in urinary bladder myocytes. While, the mechanism underlying stretch-induced Ca2+ release in smooth muscle is unknown.We examined the transduction mechanism linking cell stretch to Ca(2+ release. The probability and frequency of Ca(2+ sparks induced by stretch were closely related to the extent of cell extension and the time that the stretch was maintained. Experiments in tissues and single myocytes indicated that mechanical stretch significantly increases the production of nitric oxide (NO and the amplitude and duration of muscle contraction. Stretch-induced Ca(2+ sparks and contractility increases were abrogated by the NO inhibitor L-NAME and were also absent in eNOS knockout mice. Furthermore, exposure of eNOS null mice to exogenously generated NO induced Ca(2+ sparks. The soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ did not inhibit SICR, but this process was effectively blocked by the PI3 kinase inhibitors LY494002 and wortmannin; the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS were up-regulated by 204+/-28.6% and 258+/-36.8% by stretch, respectively. Moreover, stretch significantly increased the eNOS protein expression level.Taking together, these results suggest that stretch-induced Ca2+ release is NO dependent, resulting from the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

  4. Can color changes alter the neural correlates of recognition memory? Manipulation of processing affects an electrophysiological indicator of conceptual implicit memory.

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    Cui, Xiaoyu; Gao, Chuanji; Zhou, Jianshe; Guo, Chunyan

    2016-09-28

    It has been widely shown that recognition memory includes two distinct retrieval processes: familiarity and recollection. Many studies have shown that recognition memory can be facilitated when there is a perceptual match between the studied and the tested items. Most event-related potential studies have explored the perceptual match effect on familiarity on the basis of the hypothesis that the specific event-related potential component associated with familiarity is the FN400 (300-500 ms mid-frontal effect). However, it is currently unclear whether the FN400 indexes familiarity or conceptual implicit memory. In addition, on the basis of the findings of a previous study, the so-called perceptual manipulations in previous studies may also involve some conceptual alterations. Therefore, we sought to determine the influence of perceptual manipulation by color changes on recognition memory when the perceptual or the conceptual processes were emphasized. Specifically, different instructions (perceptually or conceptually oriented) were provided to the participants. The results showed that color changes may significantly affect overall recognition memory behaviorally and that congruent items were recognized with a higher accuracy rate than incongruent items in both tasks, but no corresponding neural changes were found. Despite the evident familiarity shown in the two tasks (the behavioral performance of recognition memory was much higher than at the chance level), the FN400 effect was found in conceptually oriented tasks, but not perceptually oriented tasks. It is thus highly interesting that the FN400 effect was not induced, although color manipulation of recognition memory was behaviorally shown, as seen in previous studies. Our findings of the FN400 effect for the conceptual but not perceptual condition support the explanation that the FN400 effect indexes conceptual implicit memory.

  5. Mutation I136V alters electrophysiological properties of the NaV1.7 channel in a family with onset of erythromelalgia in the second decade

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    Dib-Hajj Sulayman D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary erythromelalgia is an autosomal dominant pain disorder characterized by burning pain and skin redness in the extremities, with onset of symptoms during the first decade in the families whose mutations have been physiologically studied to date. Several mutations of voltage-gated Na+ channel NaV1.7 have been linked with primary erythromelalgia. Recently, a new substitution NaV1.7/I136V has been reported in a Taiwanese family, in which pain appeared at later ages (9–22 years, with onset at 17 years of age or later in 5 of 7 family members, with relatively slow progression (8–10 years to involvement of the hands. The proband reported onset of symptoms first in his feet at the age of 11, which then progressed to his hands at the age of 19. The new mutation is located in transmembrane segment 1 (S1 of domain I (DI in contrast to all NaV1.7 mutations reported to date, which have been localized in the voltage sensor S4, the linker joining segments S4 and S5 or pore-lining segments S5 and S6 in DI, II and III. Results In this study, we characterized the gating and kinetic properties of I136V mutant channels in HEK293 cells using whole-cell patch clamp. I136V shifts the voltage-dependence of activation by -5.7 mV, a smaller shift in activation than the other erythromelalgia mutations that have been characterized. I136V also decreases the deactivation rate, and generates larger ramp currents. Conclusion The I136V substitution in NaV1.7 alters channel gating and kinetic properties. Each of these changes may contribute to increased excitability of nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons, which underlies pain in erythromelalgia. The smaller shift in voltage-dependence of activation of NaV1.7, compared to the other reported cases of inherited erythromelalgia, may contribute to the later age of onset and slower progression of the symptoms reported in association with this mutation.

  6. Visual electrophysiology in children

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    Jelka Brecelj

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electrophysiological assessment of vision in children helps to recognise abnormal development of the visual system when it is still susceptible to medication and eventual correction. Visual electrophysiology provides information about the function of the retina (retinal pigment epithelium, cone and rod receptors, bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells, optic nerve, chiasmal and postchiasmal visual pathway, and visual cortex.Methods: Electroretinograms (ERG and visual evoked potentials (VEP are recorded non-invasively; in infants are recorded simultaneously ERG with skin electrodes, while in older children separately ERG with HK loop electrode in accordance with ISCEV (International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision recommendations.Results: Clinical and electrophysiological changes in children with nystagmus, Leber’s congenital amaurosis, achromatopsia, congenital stationary night blindness, progressive retinal dystrophies, optic nerve hypoplasia, albinism, achiasmia, optic neuritis and visual pathway tumours are presented.Conclusions: Electrophysiological tests can help to indicate the nature and the location of dysfunction in unclear ophthalmological and/or neurological cases.

  7. Imaging for cardiac electrophysiology

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    Benoit Desjardins

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical cardiac electrophysiology is the study of the origin and treatment of arrhythmia. There has been considerable recent development in this field, where imaging has had a transformational impact. In this invited review, we offer a global overview of the most important developments in the use of imaging in cardiac electrophysiology. We first describe the radiological imaging modalities involved in cardiac electrophysiology, to assess cardiac anatomy, function and scar. We then introduce an imaging modality with which readers are probably unfamiliar (electroanatomical mapping [EAM], but which is routinely used by electrophysiologists to plan and guide cardiac mapping and cardiac ablation therapy by catheter, a therapy which can reduce or even cure arrhythmia. We identify the limitations of EAM and describe how radiological imaging modalities can complement this technique. We then describe and illustrate how imaging has helped the diagnosis of arrhythmogenic conditions, and how imaging is used to plan and guide clinical cardiac electrophysiologic procedures and assess their results and complications. We focus on the two most common arrhythmias for which imaging has the greatest impact: atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia.

  8. Protective role of Nrf2 against mechanical-stretch-induced apoptosis in mouse fibroblasts: a potential therapeutic target of mechanical-trauma-induced stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiannan; Li, Bingshu; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Linlin; Tang, Jianming; Hong, Li

    2018-01-10

    We investigated the protective effect and underlying molecular mechanism of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) against mechanical-stretch-induced apoptosis in mouse fibroblasts. Normal cells, Nrf2 silencing cells, and Nrf2 overexpressing cells were respectively divided into two groups-nonintervention and cyclic mechanical strain (CMS)-subjected to CMS of 5333 μ (1.0 Hz for 4 h), six groups in total (control, CMS, shNfe212, shNfe212 + CMS, LV-shNfe212, and LV-shNfe212 + CMS). After treatment, cell apoptosis; cell-cycle distribution; expressions of Nrf2, Bax, Bcl-2, Cyt-C, caspase-3, caspase-9, cleaved-caspase-3, and cleaved-caspase-9; mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm); reactive oxygen species (ROS); and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured. Thirty virgin female C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups: control (without intervention) and vaginal distension (VD) groups, which underwent VD for 1 h with an 8-mm dilator (0.3 ml saline). Leak-point pressure (LPP) was tested on day 7 after VD; Nrf2 expression, apoptosis, and MDA levels were then measured in urethra and anterior vaginal wall. Mechanical stretch decreased Nrf2 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions. Overexpression of Nrf2 alleviated mechanical-stretch-induced cell apoptosis; S-phase arrest of cell cycle; up-regulation of Bax, cytochrome C (Cyt-C), ROS, MDA, ratio of cleaved-caspase-3/caspase-3 and cleaved-caspase-9/caspase-9; and exacerbated the decrease of Bcl2 and ΔΨm in L929 cells. On the contrary, silencing of Nrf2 showed opposite effects. Besides, VD reduced LPP levels and Nrf2 expression and increased cell apoptosis and MDA generation in the urethra and anterior vaginal wall. Nrf2 exhibits a protective role against mechanical-stretch -induced apoptosis on mouse fibroblasts, which might indicate a potential therapeutic target of mechanical-trauma-induced stress urinary incontinence (SUI).

  9. Electrophysiology of action representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadiga, Luciano; Craighero, Laila

    2004-01-01

    We continuously act on objects, on other individuals, and on ourselves, and actions represent the only way we have to manifest our own desires and goals. In the last two decades, electrophysiological experiments have demonstrated that actions are stored in the brain according to a goal-related organization. The authors review a series of experimental data showing that this "vocabulary of motor schemata" could also be used for non-strictly motor purposes. In the first section, they present data from monkey experiments describing the functional properties of inferior premotor cortex and, in more detail, the properties of visuomotor neurons responding to objects and others' actions observation (mirror neurons). In the second section, human data are reviewed, with particular regard to electrophysiological experiments aiming to investigate how action representations are stored and addressed. The specific facilitatory effect of motor imagery, action/object observation, and speech listening on motor excitability shown by these experiments provides strong evidence that the motor system is constantly involved whenever the idea of an action is evoked.

  10. Stretch-induced nerve injury: a proposed technique for the study of nerve regeneration and evaluation of the influence of gabapentin on this model

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    J.A. Machado

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The rat models currently employed for studies of nerve regeneration present distinct disadvantages. We propose a new technique of stretch-induced nerve injury, used here to evaluate the influence of gabapentin (GBP on nerve regeneration. Male Wistar rats (300 g; n=36 underwent surgery and exposure of the median nerve in the right forelimbs, either with or without nerve injury. The technique was performed using distal and proximal clamps separated by a distance of 2 cm and a sliding distance of 3 mm. The nerve was compressed and stretched for 5 s until the bands of Fontana disappeared. The animals were evaluated in relation to functional, biochemical and histological parameters. Stretching of the median nerve led to complete loss of motor function up to 12 days after the lesion (P<0.001, compared to non-injured nerves, as assessed in the grasping test. Grasping force in the nerve-injured animals did not return to control values up to 30 days after surgery (P<0.05. Nerve injury also caused an increase in the time of sensory recovery, as well as in the electrical and mechanical stimulation tests. Treatment of the animals with GBP promoted an improvement in the morphometric analysis of median nerve cross-sections compared with the operated vehicle group, as observed in the area of myelinated fibers or connective tissue (P<0.001, in the density of myelinated fibers/mm2 (P<0.05 and in the degeneration fragments (P<0.01. Stretch-induced nerve injury seems to be a simple and relevant model for evaluating nerve regeneration.

  11. Cyclic Mechanical Stretch Induced Smooth Muscle Cell Changes in Cerebral Aneurysm Progress by Reducing Collagen Type IV and Collagen Type VI Levels

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    Peixi Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cerebral aneurysm growth is characterized by continuous structural weakness of local smooth muscle cells, though the mechanism is unclear. In this study, we examine protein changes in cerebral aneurysm and human brain vascular smooth muscle cells after cyclic mechanical stretch. We further explore the relationship between the smooth muscle cell changes and reductions in the levels of collagen types IV and VI. Methods: Saccular cerebral aneurysms (n=10 were collected, and temporal artery samples were used as controls. Quantitative proteomics were analyzed and histopathological changes were examined. Smooth muscle cells were cultured in a flexible silicone chamber and subjected to 15% cyclic mechanical stretch. The effect of stretch on the cell viability, function, gene and protein expression were further studied for the understanding the molecular mechanism of aneurysm development. Results: Proteomics analysis revealed 92 proteins with increased expression and 88 proteins with decreased expression compared to the controls (p<0.05. KEGG pathway analysis showed that the change in focal adhesion and extracellular matrix-receptor interaction, suggesting the involvement of collagen type IV and VI. The aneurysm tissue exhibited fewer smooth muscle cells and lower levels of collagen type IV and VI. Human brain vascular smooth muscle cell culture showed spindle-like cells and obvious smooth muscle cell layer. Cell proteomics analysis showed that decreased expression of 118 proteins and increased expression of 32 proteins in smooth muscle cells after cyclic mechanical stretch. KEGG pathway analysis indicated that focal adhesion and ECM-receptor interaction were involved. After cyclic mechanical stretch, collagen type IV and IV expression were decreased. Moreover, the stretch induced MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression elevation. Conclusion: We demonstrated that collagen type IV and VI were decreased in cerebral aneurysms and continuous cyclic

  12. Hearing Aid Fitting & Electrophysiologic Procedure

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    Bahram Jalaei

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation of deaf individual is one of the important subjects that has attracted attention of many researchers during past centuries. Different opinions have been established in this direction. Electrophysiologic tests were established and developed parallel to developments in rehabilitation. Therefore, opinion of using electrophysiologic test for evaluation and fitting of hearing aid became gradually popular. Ultimately, the electrophysiologic tests are used in evaluation and fitting of hearing aid in two ways: 1-Direct way 2- Indirect way "nIn direct way aided ABR is obtained and special attention is paid to wave V. This technique has many difficulties. Inindirect way, electrophysiologic tests such, ECochG, OAE and ABR, AMLR, ALR and P300 and other objective tests are used, especially in infants and neonates for evaluating the state of hearing. Researches are continuing in this field. It is probable to have aided electrophysiologic responses with speech stimuli in near future.

  13. Cyclic stretch induces upregulation of endothelin-1 with keratinocytes in vitro: Possible role in mechanical stress-induced hyperpigmentation

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    Kurita, Masakazu, E-mail: masakazukurita@gmail.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Okazaki, Mutsumi [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Fujino, Takashi [Department of Pathology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Takushima, Akihiko; Harii, Kiyonori [Department of Plastic Surgery, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan)

    2011-05-27

    Highlights: {yields} Influence of cyclic stretch on melanogenetic paracrine cytokines was investigated. {yields} Keratinocyte-derived endothelin-1 was upregulated with cyclic stretch. {yields} Degree of upregulation increases dose-dependently. {yields} This upregulation possibly plays a role in the pathogenesis of pigmented disorders. -- Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the possible pathological relation between mechanical stress and hyperpigmentation. We did this by investigating the influence of cyclic stretch on the expression of keratinocyte- and fibroblast-derived melanogenetic paracrine cytokines in vitro. Using primary human keratinocytes and fibroblasts, alterations of mRNA expression of melanogenetic paracrine cytokines due to cyclic stretch were investigated using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The cytokines included basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-1{alpha}, and endothelin-1 (ET-1) for keratinocytes and bFGF, SCF, and hepatocyte growth factor for fibroblasts. The dose dependence of keratinocyte-derived ET-1 upregulation was further investigated using real-time PCR and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We also investigated the effects of cyclic stretch on the proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. Among the melanogenetic paracrine cytokines investigated, keratinocyte-derived ET-1 was consistently upregulated in all four cell lines. The degree of upregulation increased with the degree of the length and frequency of the stretch; in contrast, cell number and differentiation markers showed no obvious alterations with cyclic stretch. Keratinocyte-derived ET-1 upregulation possibly plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of pigmented disorders, such as friction melanosis, caused by mechanical stress.

  14. The kinase Pyk2 is involved in renal fibrosis by means of mechanical stretch-induced growth factor expression in renal tubules.

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    Sonomura, Kazuhiro; Okigaki, Mitsuhiko; Kimura, Taikou; Matsuoka, Eiko; Shiotsu, Yayoi; Adachi, Takaomi; Kado, Hiroshi; Ishida, Ryo; Kusaba, Tetsuro; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Mori, Yasukiyo

    2012-03-01

    Unilateral ureteral obstruction is a well-established experimental model of progressive renal fibrosis. We tested whether mechanical stretch and subsequent renal tubular distension might lead to renal fibrosis by first studying renal tubular epithelial cells in culture. We found that mechanical stretch induced reactive oxygen species that in turn activated the cytoplasmic proline-rich tyrosine kinase-2 (Pyk2). This kinase is abundantly expressed in tubular epithelial cells where it is activated by several stimuli. Using mice with deletion of Pyk2 we found that the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 induced by mechanical stretch in renal tubular epithelial cells was significantly reduced. The expression of connective tissue growth factor was also reduced in the Pyk2(-/-) mice. We also found that expression of connective tissue growth factor was independent of transforming growth factor-β1, but dependent on the Rho-associated coiled-coil forming protein kinase pathway. Thus, Pyk2 may be an important initiating factor in renal fibrosis and might be a new therapeutic target for ameliorating renal fibrosis.

  15. Electrophysiological studies of malaria parasite-infected erythrocytes: Current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, Henry M.; Alkhalil, Abdulnaser; Allen, Richard J.; De Jonge, Hugo R.; Derbyshire, Elvira; Egée, Stéphane; Ginsburg, Hagai; Hill, David A.; Huber, Stephan M.; Kirk, Kiaran; Lang, Florian; Lisk, Godfrey; Oteng, Eugene; Pillai, Ajay D.; Rayavara, Kempaiah; Rouhani, Sherin; Saliba, Kevin J.; Shen, Crystal; Solomon, Tsione; Thomas, Serge L. Y.; Verloo, Patrick; Desai, Sanjay A.

    2009-01-01

    The altered permeability characteristics of erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites have been a source of interest for over 30 years. Recent electrophysiological studies have provided strong evidence that these changes reflect transmembrane transport through ion channels in the host erythrocyte plasma membrane. However, conflicting results and differing interpretations of the data have led to confusion in this field. In an effort to unravel these issues, the groups involved recently came together for a week of discussion and experimentation. In this article, the various models for altered transport are reviewed, together with the areas of consensus in the field and those that require a better understanding. PMID:17292372

  16. Altered cortical synaptic plasticity in response to 5-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation as a new electrophysiological finding in amnestic mild cognitive impairment converting to Alzheimer’s disease: results from a four-year prospective cohort study

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    Alessandro eTrebbastoni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To investigate cortical excitability and synaptic plasticity in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI using 5Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (5Hz-rTMS and to assess whether specific TMS parameters predict conversion time to Alzheimer’s disease (AD.Material and Methods: Forty aMCI patients (single- and multi-domain and twenty healthy controls underwent, at baseline, a neuropsychological examination and 5Hz-rTMS delivered in trains of ten stimuli and 120% of resting motor threshold intensity over the dominant motor area. The resting motor threshold and the ratio between amplitude of the first and the tenth motor-evoked potential elicited by the train (X/I-MEP ratio were calculated as measures of cortical excitability and synaptic plasticity, respectively. Patients were followed-up annually over a period of 48 months. ANOVA for repeated measures was used to compare TMS parameters in patients with those in controls. Spearman’s correlation was performed by considering demographic variables, aMCI subtype, neuropsychological test scores, TMS parameters and conversion time.Results: Thirty-five aMCI subjects completed the study; 60% of these converted to AD. The baseline resting motor threshold and X/I-MEP ratio were significantly lower in patients than in controls (p=0.04 and p=0.01. Spearman’s analysis showed that conversion time correlated with the resting motor threshold (0.40 and X/I-MEP ratio (0.51. Discussion: aMCI patients displayed cortical hyperexcitability and altered synaptic plasticity to 5Hz-rTMS when compared with healthy subjects. The extent of these changes correlated with conversion time. These alterations, which have previously been observed in AD, are thus present in the early stages of disease and may be considered as potential neurophysiological markers of conversion from aMCI to AD.

  17. Spinal myelopathy induced by subarachnoid batrachotoxin: ultrastructure and electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, J H; Deshpande, S S; Pence, R S; Albuquerque, E X

    1978-01-20

    A combined structural and electrophysiologic analysis on the effects of subarachnoid injections of batrachotoxin was conducted in rats. Swelling of neuronal perikarya, accompanied by areas of clearing, satellitosis, fatty metamorphosis and central chromatolysis were demonstrated in the spinal anterior horns. Studies on isolated extensor digitorum longus (fast) and soleus (slow) muscles showed membrane depolarization in the extensor 24 h after injection, with progressive augmentation of this phenomenon in animals given multiple injections of the toxin. Differential sensitivity of fast and slow muscles was evident: soleus was only slightly affected. Subarachnoid injections of batrachotoxin, which induced swelling of neuronal perikarya and axonal processes, also caused signs of denervation in the extensor muscle 7 days after injection, while spontaneous transmitter release was still present. Some structural and and most electrophysiologic alterations after batrachotoxin injections were reversible.

  18. Antivenom Evaluation by Electrophysiological Analysis

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    Rita Restano-Cassulini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Scorpion stings on humans are medically relevant because they may contain toxins that specifically target ion channels. During antivenom production, pharmaceutical companies must use a large number of experimental animals to ensure the antivenom’s efficacy according to pharmacopeia methods. Here we present an electrophysiological alternative for the evaluation of horse antivenoms produced against two species of Moroccan scorpions: Buthus mardochei and Androctonus mauretanicus. Human sodium and potassium channels and acetylcholine nicotinic receptors were analyzed by standard patch-clamp techniques. The results showed that the antivenom is capable of reversing ion current disruption caused by the venom application. We propose the use of this in vitro technique for antivenom evaluation as an alternative to using a large number of live animals.

  19. Current concepts in nuclear pore electrophysiology.

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    Bustamante, José Omar

    2006-01-01

    Over 4 decades ago, microelectrode studies of in situ nuclei showed that, under certain conditions, the nuclear envelope (NE) behaves as a barrier opposing the nucleocytoplasmic flow of physiological ions. As the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) of the NE are the only pathways for direct nucleocytoplasmic flow, those experiments implied that the NPCs are capable of restricting ion flow. These early studies validated electrophysiology as a useful approach to quantify some of the mechanisms by which NPCs mediate gene activity and expression. Since electron microscopy (EM) and other non-electrophysiological investigations, showed that the NPC lumen is a nanochannel, the opinion prevailed that the NPC could not oppose the flow of ions and, therefore, that electrophysiological observations resulted from technical artifacts. Consequently, the initial enthusiasm with nuclear electrophysiology faded out in less than a decade. In 1990, nuclear electrophysiology was revisited with patch-clamp, the most powerful electrophysiological technique to date. Patch-clamp has consistently demonstrated that the NE has intrinsic ion channel activity. Direct demonstrations of the NPC on-off ion channel gating behavior were published for artificial conditions in 1995 and for intact living nuclei in 2002. This on-off switching/gating behavior can be interpreted in terms of a metastable energy barrier. In the hope of advancing nuclear electrophysiology, and to complement the other papers contained in this special issue of the journal, here I review some of the main technical, experimental, and theoretical issues of the field, with special focus on NPCs.

  20. Atrio-hisian fibers anatomy and electrophysiology.

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    Brechenmacher, Claude J

    2013-02-01

    In this case, electrophysiology and histology could be studied in the same heart. Clinical investigation, clinical electrophysiology, and postmortem serial histological sections of the septum were analyzed. A patient with repeated seizures and a short PR interval with narrow QRS complex underwent electrophysiologic studies. The patient died while experiencing a very rapid supraventricular tachycardia and histologic examination showed a atrio-hisian bypass tract. In our study, the lack of lengthening of the PR interval in spite of progressively premature atrial stimulation connected with the presence of atrio-hisian bypass tract. ©2012, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Electrophysiologic Study of Exhaustive Exercise

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    MA Babaee Bigi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exhaustive exercise is well known to pose a variety ofhealth hazards, such as sudden cardiac death reported in ultra-marathon runners.Depressed parasympathetic tone is associated with increased risk of suddencardiac death, thus parasympathetic withdrawal in post-exercise phase may be ahigh risk period for sudden death. To date, the effect on cardiacelectrophysiology after exhaustive strenuous exercise has not been described.The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of severe exhaustive exerciseon cardiac electrophysiology.Methods: The subjects in ranger training were invited to participatein this prospective study. The parameters measured consisted of PR interval, QRSduration, and macro T wave alternans as well as corrected QT, QTc dispersion,Tpeak –Tend interval and Tpeak –Tend dispersion.Results: The study group consisted of 40 consecutive male rangers whocompleted training and the control group (22 healthy age and height matched malesubjects. In regard to electrocardiographic criteria, no differences were foundbetween rangers before and after training program. In respect of therepolarization markers, there were no significant differences between therangers before and after training program.

  2. [Negative symptoms of schizophrenia: from electrophysiology to electrotherapy].

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    Micoulaud Franchi, J-A; Quiles, C; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this review of the literature is to summarize the state of the knowledge concerning the relationship between negative symptoms in schizophrenia, electrophysiology and electrotherapy. The scientific literature search of international articles was performed during August and September 2015 using the PubMed electronic database. We used the following MeSH terms: "Negative symptoms", "Schizophrenia", "Electrophysiology", "Neurophysiology", "EEG power", "Alpha rhythm", "Transcranial magnetic stimulation", "Transcranial direct current stimulation", "Electroconvulsive therapy", "Neurofeedback", "Vagus Nerve Stimulation", "Deep Brain Stimulation", and "State dependent". Negative symptoms in schizophrenia are associated with altered activity in prefrontal cortex in functional neuroimaging studies. This is in line with electrophysiological measurements that found a change in EEG spectral power in the alpha frequency band over prefrontal brain regions. The notion of functional hypofrontality has led to hypotheses that electrotherapy applied to the prefrontal cortex may be an effective treatment of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) were used to increase cortical activity in schizophrenia and achieve a clinical effect on negative symptoms. Three meta-analyses confirmed, with a moderate effect size, that rTMS is an effective treatment option for negative symptoms in schizophrenia. The two subsequently published prospective multicenter studies, however, found opposite results from each other. Two randomized controlled studies suggested that tDCS is an effective treatment option for negative symptoms. There is no study on the efficacy of neurofeedback, vagal nerve stimulation or deep brain stimulation on negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Additional studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of rTMS and tDCS on negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Influencing factors

  3. Experimental Study of the Effects of EIPA, Losartan, and BQ-123 on Electrophysiological Changes Induced by Myocardial Stretch.

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    Chorro, Francisco J; Canto, Irene Del; Brines, Laia; Such-Miquel, Luis; Calvo, Conrado; Soler, Carlos; Zarzoso, Manuel; Trapero, Isabel; Tormos, Álvaro; Such, Luis

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical response to myocardial stretch has been explained by various mechanisms, which include Na(+)/H(+) exchanger activation by autocrine-paracrine system activity. Drug-induced changes were analyzed to investigate the role of these mechanisms in the electrophysiological responses to acute myocardial stretch. Multiple epicardial electrodes and mapping techniques were used to analyze changes in ventricular fibrillation induced by acute myocardial stretch in isolated perfused rabbit hearts. Four series were studied: control (n = 9); during perfusion with the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan (1 μM, n = 8); during perfusion with the endothelin A receptor blocker BQ-123 (0.1 μM, n = 9), and during perfusion with the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger inhibitor EIPA (5-[N-ethyl-N-isopropyl]-amiloride) (1 μM, n = 9). EIPA attenuated the increase in the dominant frequency of stretch-induced fibrillation (control=40.4%; losartan=36% [not significant]; BQ-123=46% [not significant]; and EIPA=22% [P<.001]). During stretch, the activation maps were less complex (P<.0001) and the spectral concentration of the arrhythmia was greater (greater regularity) in the EIPA series: control=18 (3%); EIPA = 26 (9%) (P < .02); losartan=18 (5%) (not significant); and BQ-123=18 (4%) (not significant). The Na(+)/H(+) exchanger inhibitor EIPA attenuated the electrophysiological effects responsible for the acceleration and increased complexity of ventricular fibrillation induced by acute myocardial stretch. The angiotensin II receptor antagonist losartan and the endothelin A receptor blocker BQ-123 did not modify these effects. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Historical perspectives on interventional electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüderitz, Berndt

    2003-10-01

    The history of interventional electrophysiology is long and fascinating. In the beginning, there is not simply the anatomy and physiology of the heart, but also analysis of the pulse, which indicates the activity of the heart. The analysis of the (peripheral) pulse as a mechanical expression of heart activity goes back several millennia. In China, in 280 B.C., Wang Chu Ho wrote ten books about the pulse. The Greeks called the pulse "sphygmos", and the sphygmology thus deals with a theory of this natural occurrence. In Roman times, Galen interpreted the various types of pulse according to the widespread presumption of the time, that each organ in every disease has its own form of pulse. The basic tool for arrhythmia diagnosis became the electrocardiography introduced by Willem Einthoven who obtained the first human electrogram 1902 in Leiden, The Netherlands. The growing clinical importance of electrical cardiac stimulation has been recognized and renewed as Zoll (1911-1999) in 1952 reported a successful resuscitation in cardiac standstill by external stimulation. Meanwhile all over the world, millions of patients with cardiac arrhythmias have been treated with pacemakers in the last 45 years. The concept of a fully automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator system (ICD) for recognition and treatment of ventricular tachyarrhythmias was first suggested in 1970. The first implantation of the device in a human being was performed in February 1980. Further developments concern atrial and atrioventricular defibrillators, radiofrequency ablation, laser therapy and advanced antiarrhythmic surgery, new antiarrhythmic drugs and sophisticated devices for preventive pacing. The advances in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic application of pharmacologic and electrical tools as well as alternative methods will continue as rapidly as before in order to give us further significant aid in taking care of the patient.

  5. Pelvic floor electrophysiology patterns associated with faecal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hussein Al-Moghazy Sultan

    2012-12-28

    Dec 28, 2012 ... a Physical Medicine, Rheumatology and Rehabilitation Department, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alexandria, Egypt ... Aim: The present study was conducted to determine the patterns of pelvic floor electrophysiology that are associated ..... decision of the appropriate therapy whether conservative or.

  6. Electrophysiological Correlates of Observational Learning in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Buritica, Julia M.; Eppinger, Ben; Schuck, Nicolas W.; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Li, Shu-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Observational learning is an important mechanism for cognitive and social development. However, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying observational learning in children are not well understood. In this study, we used a probabilistic reward-based observational learning paradigm to compare behavioral and electrophysiological markers of…

  7. Study progress of clinical electrophysiology on amblyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiology examination is an important technique in studying amblyopia, which mainly includes electrooculography(EOG, electroretinography(ERG, visual evoked potential(VEP. This study does not only summarizes the definition, the mechanisms and the meaning of these indexes in the relevant research progress in recent years, but also makes a comment on the controversies among the relevant research conclusions.

  8. THE ROLE OF NEURO-ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL DIAGNOSTIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2006-01-01

    Jan 1, 2006 ... Objective: To summarise and discuss the role of neuro-electrophysiological diagnostic tests in clinical medicine. Data Sources: Published original research and reviews to date. Study Selection: The review was with emphasis on diagnosis of peripheral neuropathic and neuromuscular disorders.

  9. On the electrophysiology of aesthetic processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    One important method that can be applied for gaining an understanding of the underpinning of aesthetics in the brain is that of electrophysiology. Cognitive electrophysiology, in particular, allows the identification of components in a mental processing architecture. The present chapter reviews findings in the neurocognitive psychology of aesthetics, or neuroaesthetics, that have been obtained with the method of event-related brain potentials, as derived from the human electroencephalogram. The cognitive-perceptual bases as well as affective substages of aesthetic processing have been investigated and those are described here. The event-related potential method allows for the identification of mental processing modes in cognitive and aesthetic processing. It also provides an assessment of the mental chronometry of cognitive and affective stages in aesthetic appreciation. As the work described here shows, distinct processes in the brain are engaged in aesthetic judgments. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Electrophysiological studies in healthy subjects involving caffeine

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Mamede de; Marcelino, Erica; Mendonça, Alexandre de

    2010-01-01

    Copyright ©2012 IOS Press All rights reserved. We review the electrophysiological studies concerning the effects of caffeine on muscle, lower and upper motor neuron excitability and cognition. Several different methods have been used, such as electromyography, recruitment analysis, H-reflex, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electroencephalography and event-related potentials. The positive effect of caffeine on vigilance, attention, speed of reaction, information processing and arou...

  11. The reliability of commonly used electrophysiology measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K E; Lohse, K R; Mayer, I M S; Strigaro, G; Desikan, M; Casula, E P; Meunier, S; Popa, T; Lamy, J-C; Odish, O; Leavitt, B R; Durr, A; Roos, R A C; Tabrizi, S J; Rothwell, J C; Boyd, L A; Orth, M

    Electrophysiological measures can help understand brain function both in healthy individuals and in the context of a disease. Given the amount of information that can be extracted from these measures and their frequent use, it is essential to know more about their inherent reliability. To understand the reliability of electrophysiology measures in healthy individuals. We hypothesized that measures of threshold and latency would be the most reliable and least susceptible to methodological differences between study sites. Somatosensory evoked potentials from 112 control participants; long-latency reflexes, transcranial magnetic stimulation with resting and active motor thresholds, motor evoked potential latencies, input/output curves, and short-latency sensory afferent inhibition and facilitation from 84 controls were collected at 3 visits over 24 months at 4 Track-On HD study sites. Reliability was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficients for absolute agreement, and the effects of reliability on statistical power are demonstrated for different sample sizes and study designs. Measures quantifying latencies, thresholds, and evoked responses at high stimulator intensities had the highest reliability, and required the smallest sample sizes to adequately power a study. Very few between-site differences were detected. Reliability and susceptibility to between-site differences should be evaluated for electrophysiological measures before including them in study designs. Levels of reliability vary substantially across electrophysiological measures, though there are few between-site differences. To address this, reliability should be used in conjunction with theoretical calculations to inform sample size and ensure studies are adequately powered to detect true change in measures of interest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Electrophysiologic and cellular characteristics of cardiomyocytes after X-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frieß, Johannes L., E-mail: johannes.friess@h-ab.de [University for Applied Sciences Aschaffenburg, biomems lab, Würzburger Straße 45, 63743 Aschaffenburg (Germany); Heselich, Anja [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Developmental Biology and Neurogenetics, Schnittspahnstraße 13, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Ritter, Sylvia [Helmholtz Institute for Heavy Ion Research (GSI), Biophysics Department, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Haber, Angelina; Kaiser, Nicole; Layer, Paul G. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Developmental Biology and Neurogenetics, Schnittspahnstraße 13, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Thielemann, Christiane [University for Applied Sciences Aschaffenburg, biomems lab, Würzburger Straße 45, 63743 Aschaffenburg (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Electrophysiologic and cellular effects of X-rays on primary cardiac cell cultures. • X-ray doses between 0.5 and 7 Gy. • Higher beat rate at reduced field action potential durations 7 days after exposure. • More increased cell cycle checkpoint arrest in G2/M than in G1/S phase. • Induced DSBs were mostly repaired within 24 h after irradiation. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate possible effects of ionizing irradiation on the electrophysiological functionality of cardiac myocytes in vitro. Primary chicken cardiomyocytes with spontaneous beating activity were irradiated with X-rays (dose range of 0.5–7 Gy). Functional alterations of cardiac cell cultures were evaluated up to 7 days after irradiation using microelectrode arrays. As examined endpoints, cell proliferation, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage were evaluated. The beat rate of the cardiac networks increased in a dose-dependent manner over one week. The duration of single action potentials was slightly shortened. Additionally, we observed lower numbers of mitotic and S-phase cells at certain time points after irradiation. Also, the number of cells with γH2AX foci increased as a function of the dose. No significant changes in the level of ROS were detected. Induction of apoptosis was generally negligibly low. This is the first report to directly show alterations in cardiac electrophysiology caused by ionizing radiation, which were detectable up to one week after irradiation.

  13. Electrophysiologic and cellular characteristics of cardiomyocytes after X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frieß, Johannes L.; Heselich, Anja; Ritter, Sylvia; Haber, Angelina; Kaiser, Nicole; Layer, Paul G.; Thielemann, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrophysiologic and cellular effects of X-rays on primary cardiac cell cultures. • X-ray doses between 0.5 and 7 Gy. • Higher beat rate at reduced field action potential durations 7 days after exposure. • More increased cell cycle checkpoint arrest in G2/M than in G1/S phase. • Induced DSBs were mostly repaired within 24 h after irradiation. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate possible effects of ionizing irradiation on the electrophysiological functionality of cardiac myocytes in vitro. Primary chicken cardiomyocytes with spontaneous beating activity were irradiated with X-rays (dose range of 0.5–7 Gy). Functional alterations of cardiac cell cultures were evaluated up to 7 days after irradiation using microelectrode arrays. As examined endpoints, cell proliferation, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage were evaluated. The beat rate of the cardiac networks increased in a dose-dependent manner over one week. The duration of single action potentials was slightly shortened. Additionally, we observed lower numbers of mitotic and S-phase cells at certain time points after irradiation. Also, the number of cells with γH2AX foci increased as a function of the dose. No significant changes in the level of ROS were detected. Induction of apoptosis was generally negligibly low. This is the first report to directly show alterations in cardiac electrophysiology caused by ionizing radiation, which were detectable up to one week after irradiation

  14. Optimizing Nanoelectrode Arrays for Scalable Intracellular Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jeffrey; Ye, Tianyang; Ham, Donhee; Park, Hongkun

    2018-03-20

    Electrode technology for electrophysiology has a long history of innovation, with some decisive steps including the development of the voltage-clamp measurement technique by Hodgkin and Huxley in the 1940s and the invention of the patch clamp electrode by Neher and Sakmann in the 1970s. The high-precision intracellular recording enabled by the patch clamp electrode has since been a gold standard in studying the fundamental cellular processes underlying the electrical activities of neurons and other excitable cells. One logical next step would then be to parallelize these intracellular electrodes, since simultaneous intracellular recording from a large number of cells will benefit the study of complex neuronal networks and will increase the throughput of electrophysiological screening from basic neurobiology laboratories to the pharmaceutical industry. Patch clamp electrodes, however, are not built for parallelization; as for now, only ∼10 patch measurements in parallel are possible. It has long been envisioned that nanoscale electrodes may help meet this challenge. First, nanoscale electrodes were shown to enable intracellular access. Second, because their size scale is within the normal reach of the standard top-down fabrication, the nanoelectrodes can be scaled into a large array for parallelization. Third, such a nanoelectrode array can be monolithically integrated with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics to facilitate the large array operation and the recording of the signals from a massive number of cells. These are some of the central ideas that have motivated the research activity into nanoelectrode electrophysiology, and these past years have seen fruitful developments. This Account aims to synthesize these findings so as to provide a useful reference. Summing up from the recent studies, we will first elucidate the morphology and associated electrical properties of the interface between a nanoelectrode and a cellular membrane

  15. Normal Values for Heart Electrophysiology Parameters of Healthy Swine Determined on Electrophysiology Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noszczyk-Nowak, Agnieszka; Cepiel, Alicja; Janiszewski, Adrian; Pasławski, Robert; Gajek, Jacek; Pasławska, Urszula; Nicpoń, Józef

    2016-01-01

    Swine are a well-recognized animal model for human cardiovascular diseases. Despite the widespread use of porcine model in experimental electrophysiology, still no reference values for intracardiac electrical activity and conduction parameters determined during an invasive electrophysiology study (EPS) have been developed in this species thus far. The aim of the study was to develop a set of normal values for intracardiac electrical activity and conduction parameters determined during an invasive EPS of swine. The study included 36 healthy domestic swine (24-40 kg body weight). EPS was performed under a general anesthesia with midazolam, propofol and isoflurane. The reference values for intracardiac electrical activity and conduction parameters were calculated as arithmetic means ± 2 standard deviations. The reference values were determined for AH, HV and PA intervals, interatrial conduction time at its own and imposed rhythm, sinus node recovery time (SNRT), corrected sinus node recovery time (CSNRT), anterograde and retrograde Wenckebach points, atrial, atrioventricular node and ventricular refractory periods. No significant correlations were found between body weight and heart rate of the examined pigs and their electrophysiological parameters. The hereby presented reference values can be helpful in comparing the results of various studies, as well as in more accurately estimating the values of electrophysiological parameters that can be expected in a given experiment.

  16. Electrophysiological studies in healthy subjects involving caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Mamede; Marcelino, Erica; de Mendonça, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    We review the electrophysiological studies concerning the effects of caffeine on muscle, lower and upper motor neuron excitability and cognition. Several different methods have been used, such as electromyography, recruitment analysis, H-reflex, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electroencephalography and event-related potentials. The positive effect of caffeine on vigilance, attention, speed of reaction, information processing and arousal is supported by a number of electrophysiological studies. The evidence in favor of an increased muscle fiber resistance is not definitive, but higher or lower motor neuron excitability can occur as a consequence of a greater excitation of the descending input from the brainstem and upper motor neurons. TMS can address the influence of caffeine on the upper motor neuron. Previous studies showed that cortico-motor threshold and intracortical excitatory and inhibitory pathways are not influenced by caffeine. Nonetheless, our results indicate that cortical silent period (CSP) is reduced in resting muscles after caffeine consumption, when stimulating the motor cortex with intensities slightly above threshold. We present new data demonstrating that this effect is also observed in fatigued muscle. We conclude that CSP can be considered a surrogate marker of the effect of caffeine in the brain, in particular of its central ergogenic effect.

  17. Ultraconformable Temporary Tattoo Electrodes for Electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Laura M.; Sudha, Sudha; Tarantino, Sergio; Esposti, Roberto; Bolzoni, Francesco; Cavallari, Paolo; Cipriani, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Electrically interfacing the skin for monitoring personal health condition is the basis of skin‐contact electrophysiology. In the clinical practice the use of stiff and bulky pregelled or dry electrodes, in contrast to the soft body tissues, imposes severe restrictions to user comfort and mobility while limiting clinical applications. Here, in this work dry, unperceivable temporary tattoo electrodes are presented. Customized single or multielectrode arrays are readily fabricated by inkjet printing of conducting polymer onto commercial decal transfer paper, which allows for easy transfer on the user's skin. Conformal adhesion to the skin is provided thanks to their ultralow thickness (Tattoo electrode–skin contact impedance is characterized on short‐ (1 h) and long‐term (48 h) and compared with standard pregelled and dry electrodes. The viability in electrophysiology is validated by surface electromyography and electrocardiography recordings on various locations on limbs and face. A novel concept of tattoo as perforable skin‐contact electrode, through which hairs can grow, is demonstrated, thus permitting to envision very long‐term recordings on areas with high hair density. The proposed materials and patterning strategy make this technology amenable for large‐scale production of low‐cost sensing devices. PMID:29593975

  18. Pelvic floor electrophysiology in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankisi, H; Pugdahl, K; Rasmussen, M M; Clemmensen, D; Rawashdeh, Y F; Christensen, P; Krogh, K; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, A

    2016-05-01

    The study aimed to investigate sacral peripheral nerve function and continuity of pudendal nerve in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) using pelvic floor electrophysiological tests. Twelve patients with low cervical or thoracic SCI were prospectively included. Quantitative external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle electromyography (EMG), pudendal nerve terminal motor latency (PNTML) testing, bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR) testing and pudendal short-latency somatosensory-evoked potential (SEP) measurement were performed. In EAS muscle EMG, two patients had abnormal increased spontaneous activity and seven prolonged motor unit potential duration. PNTML was normal in 10 patients. BCR was present with normal latency in 11 patients and with prolonged latency in one. The second component of BCR could be recorded in four patients. SEPs showed absent cortical responses in 11 patients and normal latency in one. Pudendal nerve and sacral lower motor neuron involvement are significantly associated with chronic SCI, most prominently in EAS muscle EMG. The frequent finding of normal PNTML latencies supports earlier concerns on the utility of this test; however, BCR and pudendal SEPs may have clinical relevance. As intact peripheral nerves including pudendal nerve are essential for efficient supportive therapies, pelvic floor electrophysiological testing prior to these interventions is highly recommended. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Minimum Information about a Cardiac Electrophysiology Experiment (MICEE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quinn, T A; Granite, S; Allessie, M A

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac experimental electrophysiology is in need of a well-defined Minimum Information Standard for recording, annotating, and reporting experimental data. As a step towards establishing this, we present a draft standard, called Minimum Information about a Cardiac Electrophysiology Experiment (M...

  20. Evaluation of Optogenetic Electrophysiology Tools in Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Björk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Current cardiac drug safety assessments focus on hERG channel block and QT prolongation for evaluating arrhythmic risks, whereas the optogenetic approach focuses on the action potential (AP waveform generated by a monolayer of human cardiomyocytes beating synchronously, thus assessing the contribution of several ion channels on the overall drug effect. This novel tool provides arrhythmogenic sensitizing by light-induced pacing in combination with non-invasive, all-optical measurements of cardiomyocyte APs and will improve assessment of drug-induced electrophysiological aberrancies. With the help of patch clamp electrophysiology measurements, we aimed to investigate whether the optogenetic modifications alter human cardiomyocytes' electrophysiology and how well the optogenetic analyses perform against this gold standard. Patch clamp electrophysiology measurements of non-transduced stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes compared to cells expressing the commercially available optogenetic constructs Optopatch and CaViar revealed no significant changes in action potential duration (APD parameters. Thus, inserting the optogenetic constructs into cardiomyocytes does not significantly affect the cardiomyocyte's electrophysiological properties. When comparing the two methods against each other (patch clamp vs. optogenetic imaging we found no significant differences in APD parameters for the Optopatch transduced cells, whereas the CaViar transduced cells exhibited modest increases in APD-values measured with optogenetic imaging. Thus, to broaden the screen, we combined optogenetic measurements of membrane potential and calcium transients with contractile motion measured by video motion tracking. Furthermore, to assess how optogenetic measurements can predict changes in membrane potential, or early afterdepolarizations (EADs, cells were exposed to cumulating doses of E-4031, a hERG potassium channel blocker, and drug effects were measured at both spontaneous and

  1. Human Atrial Cell Models to Analyse Haemodialysis-Related Effects on Cardiac Electrophysiology: Work in Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Passini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During haemodialysis (HD sessions, patients undergo alterations in the extracellular environment, mostly concerning plasma electrolyte concentrations, pH, and volume, together with a modification of sympathovagal balance. All these changes affect cardiac electrophysiology, possibly leading to an increased arrhythmic risk. Computational modeling may help to investigate the impact of HD-related changes on atrial electrophysiology. However, many different human atrial action potential (AP models are currently available, all validated only with the standard electrolyte concentrations used in experiments. Therefore, they may respond in different ways to the same environmental changes. After an overview on how the computational approach has been used in the past to investigate the effect of HD therapy on cardiac electrophysiology, the aim of this work has been to assess the current state of the art in human atrial AP models, with respect to the HD context. All the published human atrial AP models have been considered and tested for electrolytes, volume changes, and different acetylcholine concentrations. Most of them proved to be reliable for single modifications, but all of them showed some drawbacks. Therefore, there is room for a new human atrial AP model, hopefully able to physiologically reproduce all the HD-related effects. At the moment, work is still in progress in this specific field.

  2. The earliest electrophysiological correlate of visual awareness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koivisto, Mika; Lähteenmäki, Mikko; Sørensen, Thomas Alrik

    2008-01-01

    To examine the neural correlates and timing of human visual awareness, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) in two experiments while the observers were detecting a grey dot that was presented near subjective threshold. ERPs were averaged for conscious detections of the stimulus (hits......) and nondetections (misses) separately. Our results revealed that hits, as compared to misses, showed a negativity around 180-350 ms at occipital and posterior temporal sites. It was followed by a positive wave after 400-500 ms, peaking at parietal sites. These correlates were not affected by a manipulation...... of attention. The early negativity, called 'visual awareness negativity' (VAN), may be a general, primary electrophysiological correlate of visual awareness. The present data show that it can be observed in response to appearance of a stimulus in visual awareness and that it generalizes across different...

  3. Indications for Electrophysiology Study in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seshadri Balaji

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The advent of electrophysiology (EP testing revolutionized the care of children with arrhythmia. Precise mechanistic and anatomical diagnosis of arrhythmias became possible. The later development of catheter-based ablation transformed the care of these children by allowing many arrhythmias to be cured during the same procedure. Indications for EP testing vary depending on the age of the child, the underlying cardiac anatomy, and the suspected arrhythmia. In the current era, the indications for EPS and for ablation are virtually identical. There are a few situations where EPS is sometimes performed without the use of ablation, and these will be pointed out. This paper will address the common conditions for which EP testing is performed.

  4. Biofeedback in psychomotor training. Electrophysiological basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazanova, O M; Mernaya, E M; Shtark, M B

    2009-06-01

    The influences of individual musical practice and the same practice supplemented with biofeedback using electrophysiological markers for optimum music-performing activity were studied in 39 music students. Traditional technical practice produced increases in integral EMG power and decreases in alpha activity in most of the students with initially low maximum alpha activity peak frequencies. Similar practice but combined with individual sessions of alpha-EEG/EMG biofeedback were accompanied by increases in the frequency, bandwidth, and activation responses of EEG alpha rhythms in all subjects, along with decreases in EEG integral power. The efficacy of training with biofeedback and the ability to experience psychomotor learning depended on the initial individual characteristics of EEG alpha activity.

  5. [Biofeedback in psychomotor training. Electrophysiological bases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazanova, O M; Mernaia, E M; Shtark, M B

    2008-05-01

    Comparison of influence of usual musical practice and the same trainings but using biofeedback on electrophysiological and psychological markers of optimal psychomotor functioning in 39 students-musicians revealed that the obvious musical practice caused psychomotor pressure in most students (with initially low individual alpha peak frequency), whereas similar practice combined with an individualized session of alpha-EEG/EMG biofeedback was accompanied by increase of alpha-activity in all examinees and a decrease (reduction) of integrated EMG that indicated reaching of optimal psychomotor functioning. It appears that the psychomotor learning ability depends on the baseline individual alpha-activity. Individual alpha peak frequency was associated with fluency and efficiency of psychomotor performance, individual alpha band width--with plasticity and creativity, individual amount of alpha suppression in response to opening eyes--with the level of selfactualization. These alpha activity EEG indices correlated with efficiency of the biofeedback training.

  6. Oyster Electrophysiology: Electrocardiogram Signal Recognition and Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico M. Batista

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available After 100 years of published recording traces pertaining to the oyster electrocardiogram (ECG, we revisited the original experiments of Eiger (1913, using state-of-the-art electrophysiology recorders. Our aim was to confirm that a recordable ECG, similar to that of higher vertebrates, is present in the oyster heart. Portuguese oysters Crassostrea angulata, collected from the Guadiana estuary, Portugal, were used. The oysters were drilled through the right valve to reveal the pericardium. Gold and silver electrodes were placed through the hole and electrophysiological recordings were obtained. Stimulation of the oyster heart was performed in vivo and in vitro using a constant current power supply. Placement of electrodes around the heart revealed a trace that very closely matched the published ECG of Eiger (1913. However, we were unable to confirm that the recording was an ECG of the oyster heart. Moreover, measurements on isolated oyster hearts revealed a low conductivity (0.10 S m‒1. We did, however, record a depolarization signal from what we believe to be the visceral ganglia, and this preceded contractions of the oyster heart. Our findings indicate that so-called ECGs, previously recorded by [2] in Ostrea edulis, but also the “ECG” recorded by [4] in C. virginica from oyster hearts, are in fact an artifact arising from relative movement of the recording electrodes, giving rise to a baseline shift that mimics in some ways the P and QRS features of a typical ECG. Nevertheless, such recordings provide information pertaining to heart rate and are not without importance.

  7. Effects of aspartame on the evaluation of electrophysiological responses in Wistar albino rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbind Kumar Choudhary

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aspartame is a non-nutritive sweetener that is used predominantly in various ‘diet’ and ‘low-calorie’ products, such as beverages, instant breakfasts, desserts, breath mints, sugar-free chewing gum, vitamins, and pharmaceuticals, consumed by millions of people who are attempting weight loss, young adults and diabetic persons. On a weight basis, the metabolism of aspartame generates approximately 50% phenylalanine, 40% aspartic acid and 10% methanol. The detailed mechanisms of the effects of aspartame on the electrophysiological response are still unclear; therefore, this study was designed to clarify whether longer-term aspartame consumption has any effect on the electrophysiological response in Wistar albino rats. The oral administration of aspartame in a safe dose of 40 mg/kg bodyweight/day (as recommended by EFSA, 2012 was tested in Wistar albino rats for a longer period (90 days. Electrophysiological responses, including heart rate variability (HRV and electroencephalogram (EEG pattern, were assessed in a folate-deficient animal model along with control animals using BIOPAC and EEG equipment (model RMS EEG–24 brain new-plus: RMS – Recorder and Medicare systems. In this study, the folate-deficient animal model was used to mimic human methanol metabolism in rats. After 90 days of aspartame treatment, a significant alteration was observable in the time domain [Mean RR (ms SDNN (ms RMSSD (ms PNN50 (%] and the frequency domain [LF, HF, and LF/HF ratio] with significantly impaired frequency and amplitude of the fronto-parietal and occipital EEG waves at p ≤ 0.05. The results of this study clearly indicate that the oral consumption of aspartame reduced HRV, with sympathetic dominance and loss of vagal tone, and altered sympathovagal activity along with impairment of learning and memory, showing an additional effect on health within this study duration. The aspartame metabolites methanol and formaldehyde may be the causative factors

  8. Uncovering phase-coupled oscillatory networks in electrophysiological data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, R. van der; Jacobs, J.; Maris, E.G.G.

    2015-01-01

    Phase consistent neuronal oscillations are ubiquitous in electrophysiological recordings, and they may reflect networks of phase-coupled neuronal populations oscillating at different frequencies. Because neuronal oscillations may reflect rhythmic modulations of neuronal excitability, phase-coupled

  9. Dynamic clamp: a powerful tool in cardiac electrophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilders, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic clamp is a collection of closely related techniques that have been employed in cardiac electrophysiology to provide direct answers to numerous research questions regarding basic cellular mechanisms of action potential formation, action potential transfer and action potential synchronization

  10. Stimfit: quantifying electrophysiological data with Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segundo Jose Guzman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular electrophysiological recordings provide crucial insights into elementary neuronal signals such as action potentials and synaptic currents. Analyzing and interpreting these signals is essential for a quantitative understanding of neuronal information processing, and requires both fast data visualization and ready access to complex analysis routines. To achieve this goal, we have developed Stimfit, a free software package for cellular neurophysiology with a Python scripting interface and a built-in Python shell. The program supports most standard file formats for cellular neurophysiology and other biomedical signals through the Biosig library. To quantify and interpret the activity of single neurons and communication between neurons, the program includes algorithms to characterize the kinetics of presynaptic action potentials and postsynaptic currents, estimate latencies between pre- and postsynaptic events, and detect spontaneously occurring events. We validate and benchmark these algorithms, give estimation errors, and provide sample use cases, showing that Stimfit represents an efficient, accessible and extensible way to accurately analyze and interpret neuronal signals.

  11. Integrated platform and API for electrophysiological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Andrey; Stoewer, Adrian; Leonhardt, Aljoscha; Rautenberg, Philipp L; Kellner, Christian J; Garbers, Christian; Wachtler, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancements in technology and methodology have led to growing amounts of increasingly complex neuroscience data recorded from various species, modalities, and levels of study. The rapid data growth has made efficient data access and flexible, machine-readable data annotation a crucial requisite for neuroscientists. Clear and consistent annotation and organization of data is not only an important ingredient for reproducibility of results and re-use of data, but also essential for collaborative research and data sharing. In particular, efficient data management and interoperability requires a unified approach that integrates data and metadata and provides a common way of accessing this information. In this paper we describe GNData, a data management platform for neurophysiological data. GNData provides a storage system based on a data representation that is suitable to organize data and metadata from any electrophysiological experiment, with a functionality exposed via a common application programming interface (API). Data representation and API structure are compatible with existing approaches for data and metadata representation in neurophysiology. The API implementation is based on the Representational State Transfer (REST) pattern, which enables data access integration in software applications and facilitates the development of tools that communicate with the service. Client libraries that interact with the API provide direct data access from computing environments like Matlab or Python, enabling integration of data management into the scientist's experimental or analysis routines.

  12. Electrophysiological study in neuromuscular junction disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Cherian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This review is on ultrastructure and subcellular physiology at normal and abnormal neuromuscular junctions. The clinical and electrophysiological findings in myasthenia gravis, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS, congenital myasthenic syndromes, and botulinum intoxication are discussed. Single fiber electromyography (SFEMG helps to explain the basis of testing neuromuscular junction function by repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS. SFEMG requires skill and patience and its availability is limited to a few centers. For RNS supramaximal stimulation is essential and so is display of the whole waveform of each muscle response at maximum amplitude. The amplitudes of the negative phase of the first and fourth responses are measured from baseline to negative peak, and the percent change of the fourth response compared with the first represents the decrement or increment. A decrement greater than 10% is accepted as abnormal and smooth progression of response amplitude train and reproducibility form the crux. In suspected LEMS the effect of fast rates of stimulation should be determined after RNS response to slow rates of stimulation. Caution is required to avoid misinterpretation of potentiation and pseudofacilitation.

  13. A brain electrophysiological correlate of depth perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akay, Ahmet; Celebi, Gurbuz

    2009-01-01

    To investigate brain electrical activity accompanying depth perception using random-dot stereograms. Additional experiments were conducted to ascertain the specificity of this potential to depth perception. In the present study, we performed 3 different and independent experiments on 34 subjects to establish the relationship between depth perception and its cortical electrophysiological correlate. Visual evoked potentials in response to visual stimulation by random-dot stereograms were recorded. To achieve this goal, a data acquisition and analysis system, different from common visual evoked potential recording systems, consisting of 2 personal computers, was used. One of the computers was used to generate the visual stimulus patterns and the other to record and digitally average the potentials evoked by the stimuli. This study was carried out at the Department of Biophysics of Ege University Medical School, Izmir, Turkey, from April to December, 2006. A negative potential component, which is thought to arise in association with depth perception, was recorded from the occipital region from 30 of the 34 subjects. Typically, it had a mean latency of 211.46 ms and 6.40 micron V amplitude. The negative potential is related to depth perception, as this component is present in the responses to stimulus, which carries disparity information but is absent when the stimulus is switched to no disparity information. Additional experiments also showed that the specificity of this component to depth perception becomes evident beyond doubt. (author)

  14. Electrophysiology of pumpkin seeds: Memristors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; Nyasani, Eunice K; Tuckett, Clayton; Greeman, Esther A; Markin, Vladislav S

    2016-01-01

    Leon Chua, the discoverer of a memristor, theoretically predicted that voltage gated ion channels can be memristors. We recently found memristors in different plants such as the Venus flytrap, Mimosa pudica, Aloe vera, apple fruits, and in potato tubers. There are no publications in literature about the existence of memristors in seeds. The goal of this work was to discover if pumpkin seeds might have memristors. We selected Cucurbita pepo L., cv. Cinderella, Cucurbita maxima L. cv Warty Goblin, and Cucurbita maxima L., cv. Jarrahdale seeds for this analysis. In these seeds, we found the presence of resistors with memory. The analysis was based on cyclic voltammetry where a memristor should manifest itself as a nonlinear two-terminal electrical element, which exhibits a pinched hysteresis loop on a current-voltage plane for any bipolar cyclic voltage input signal. Dry dormant pumpkin seeds have very high electrical resistance without memristive properties. The electrostimulation by bipolar sinusoidal or triangular periodic waves induces electrical responses in imbibed pumpkin seeds with fingerprints of memristors. Tetraethylammonium chloride, an inhibitor of voltage gated K(+) channels, transforms a memristor to a resistor in pumpkin seeds. NPPB (5-Nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid) inhibits the memristive properties of imbibed pumpkin seeds. The discovery of memristors in pumpkin seeds creates a new direction in the understanding of electrophysiological phenomena in seeds.

  15. Electrophysiological measurements of spectral sensitivities: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.D. DeVoe

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Spectral sensitivities of visual systems are specified as the reciprocals of the intensities of light (quantum fluxes needed at each wavelength to elicit the same criterion amplitude of responses. This review primarily considers the methods that have been developed for electrophysiological determinations of criterion amplitudes of slow-wave responses from single retinal cells. Traditional flash methods can require tedious dark adaptations and may yield erroneous spectral sensitivity curves which are not seen in such modifications as ramp methods. Linear response methods involve interferometry, while constant response methods involve manual or automatic adjustments of continuous illumination to keep response amplitudes constant during spectral scans. In DC or AC computerized constant response methods, feedback to determine intensities at each wavelength is derived from the response amplitudes themselves. Although all but traditional flash methods have greater or lesser abilities to provide on-line determinations of spectral sensitivities, computerized constant response methods are the most satisfactory due to flexibility, speed and maintenance of a constant adaptation level

  16. Whodunnit? Electrophysiological correlates of agency judgements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Kühn

    Full Text Available Sense of agency refers to the feeling that "I" am responsible for those external events that are directly produced by one's own voluntary actions. Recent theories distinguish between a non-conceptual "feeling" of agency linked to changes in the processing of self-generated sensory events, and a higher-order judgement of agency, which attributes sensory events to the self. In the current study we explore the neural correlates of the judgement of agency by means of electrophysiology. We measured event-related potentials to tones that were either perceived or not perceived as triggered by participants' voluntary actions and related these potentials to later judgements of agency over the tones. Replicating earlier findings on predictive sensory attenuation, we found that the N1 component was attenuated for congruent tones that corresponded to the learned action-effect mapping as opposed to incongruent tones that did not correspond to the previously acquired associations between actions and tones. The P3a component, but not the N1, directly reflected the judgement of agency: deflections in this component were greater for tones judged as self-generated than for tones judged as externally produced. The fact that the outcome of the later agency judgement was predictable based on the P3a component demonstrates that agency judgements incorporate early information processing components and are not purely reconstructive, post-hoc evaluations generated at time of judgement.

  17. Electrophysiology of pumpkin seeds: Memristors in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G.; Nyasani, Eunice K.; Tuckett, Clayton; Greeman, Esther A.; Markin, Vladislav S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Leon Chua, the discoverer of a memristor, theoretically predicted that voltage gated ion channels can be memristors. We recently found memristors in different plants such as the Venus flytrap, Mimosa pudica, Aloe vera, apple fruits, and in potato tubers. There are no publications in literature about the existence of memristors in seeds. The goal of this work was to discover if pumpkin seeds might have memristors. We selected Cucurbita pepo L., cv. Cinderella, Cucurbita maxima L. cv Warty Goblin, and Cucurbita maxima L., cv. Jarrahdale seeds for this analysis. In these seeds, we found the presence of resistors with memory. The analysis was based on cyclic voltammetry where a memristor should manifest itself as a nonlinear two-terminal electrical element, which exhibits a pinched hysteresis loop on a current-voltage plane for any bipolar cyclic voltage input signal. Dry dormant pumpkin seeds have very high electrical resistance without memristive properties. The electrostimulation by bipolar sinusoidal or triangular periodic waves induces electrical responses in imbibed pumpkin seeds with fingerprints of memristors. Tetraethylammonium chloride, an inhibitor of voltage gated K+ channels, transforms a memristor to a resistor in pumpkin seeds. NPPB (5-Nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid) inhibits the memristive properties of imbibed pumpkin seeds. The discovery of memristors in pumpkin seeds creates a new direction in the understanding of electrophysiological phenomena in seeds. PMID:26926652

  18. Integrated platform and API for electrophysiological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey eSobolev

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent advancements in technology and methodology have led to growing amounts of increasingly complex neuroscience data recorded from various species, modalities, and levels of study. The rapid data growth has made efficient data access and flexible, machine-readable data annotation a crucial requisite for neuroscientists. Clear and consistent annotation and organization of data is not only an important ingredient for reproducibility of results and re-use of data, but also essential for collaborative research and data sharing. In particular, efficient data management and interoperability requires a unified approach that integrates data and metadata and provides a common way of accessing this information.In this paper we describe GNData, a data management platform for neurophysiological data. GNData provides a storage system based on a data representation that is suitable to organize data and metadata from any electrophysiological experiment, with a functionality exposed via a common application programming interface (API. Data representation and API structure are compatible with existing approaches for data and metadata representation in neurophysiology. The API implementation is based on the Representational State Transfer (REST pattern, which enables data access integration in software applications and facilitates the development of tools that communicate with the service. Client libraries that interact with the API provide direct data access from computing environments like Matlab or Python, enabling integration of data management into the scientist's experimental or analysis routines.

  19. Dynamics of intrinsic electrophysiological properties in spinal cord neurones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, R E; Hounsgaard, J

    1999-01-01

    The spinal cord is engaged in a wide variety of functions including generation of motor acts, coding of sensory information and autonomic control. The intrinsic electrophysiological properties of spinal neurones represent a fundamental building block of the spinal circuits executing these tasks. ....... Specialised, cell specific electrophysiological phenotypes gradually differentiate during development and are continuously adjusted in the adult animal by metabotropic synaptic interactions and activity-dependent plasticity to meet a broad range of functional demands....

  20. Correlations of clinical, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological features in Hirayama disease

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Ming-Feng; Chang, Hong-Shiu; Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Ro, Long-Sun; Chu, Chun-Che; Kuo, Hung-Chou; Lyu, Rong-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hirayama disease (HD) is characterized by development of asymmetric forearm muscle atrophy during adolescence with or without focal cervical spinal cord atrophy. The purpose of this study is to assess the correlation of clinical symptoms, disease progression, and electrophysiological findings with cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. The medical records, cervical spine MRIs, and electrophysiological findings of 44 HD patients were retrospectively reviewed and ana...

  1. Autoclave Sterilization of PEDOT:PSS Electrophysiology Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uguz, Ilke; Ganji, Mehran; Hama, Adel; Tanaka, Atsunori; Inal, Sahika; Youssef, Ahmed; Owens, Roisin M; Quilichini, Pascale P; Ghestem, Antoine; Bernard, Christophe; Dayeh, Shadi A; Malliaras, George G

    2016-12-01

    Autoclaving, the most widely available sterilization method, is applied to poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) electrophysiology devices. The process does not harm morphology or electrical properties, while it effectively kills E. coli intentionally cultured on the devices. This finding paves the way to widespread introduction of PEDOT:PSS electrophysiology devices to the clinic. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Electrophysiological effects of trace amines on mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada eLedonne

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Trace amines (TAs are a class of endogenous compounds strictly related to classic monoamine neurotransmitters with regard to their structure, metabolism and tissue distribution. Although the presence of TAs in mammalian brain has been recognized for decades, until recently they were considered to be by-products of amino acid metabolism or as ‘false’ neurotransmitters. The discovery in 2001 of a new family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, namely trace amines receptors, has re-ignited interest in TAs. In particular, two members of the family, trace amine receptor 1 (TA1 and trace amine receptor 2 (TA2, were shown to be highly sensitive to these endogenous compounds. Experimental evidence suggests that TAs modulate the activity of catecholaminergic neurons and that TA dysregulation may contribute to neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression and Parkinson’s disease, all of which are characterised by altered monoaminergic networks. Here we review recent data concerning the electrophysiological effects of TAs on the activity of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons. In the context of recent data obtained with TA1 receptor knockout mice, we also discuss the mechanisms by which the activation of these receptors modulates the activity of these neurons. Three important new aspects of TAs action have recently emerged: (a inhibition of firing due to increased release of dopamine; (b reduction of D2 and GABAB receptor-mediated inhibitory responses (excitatory effects due to dysinhibition; and (c a direct TA1 receptor-mediated activation of GIRK channels which produce cell membrane hyperpolarization. While the first two effects have been well documented in our laboratory, the direct activation of GIRK channels by TA1 receptors has been reported by others, but has not been seen in our laboratory (Geracitano et al., 2004. Further research is needed to address this point, and to further

  3. Electrophysiological signatures of atypical intrinsic brain connectivity networks in autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Guofa; Mosconi, Matthew W.; Wang, Jun; Ethridge, Lauren E.; Sweeney, John A.; Ding, Lei

    2017-08-01

    Objective. Abnormal local and long-range brain connectivity have been widely reported in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), yet the nature of these abnormalities and their functional relevance at distinct cortical rhythms remains unknown. Investigations of intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) and their coherence across whole brain networks hold promise for determining whether patterns of functional connectivity abnormalities vary across frequencies and networks in ASD. In the present study, we aimed to probe atypical intrinsic brain connectivity networks in ASD from resting-state electroencephalography (EEG) data via characterizing the whole brain network. Approach. Connectivity within individual ICNs (measured by spectral power) and between ICNs (measured by coherence) were examined at four canonical frequency bands via a time-frequency independent component analysis on high-density EEG, which were recorded from 20 ASD and 20 typical developing (TD) subjects during an eyes-closed resting state. Main results. Among twelve identified electrophysiological ICNs, individuals with ASD showed hyper-connectivity in individual ICNs and hypo-connectivity between ICNs. Functional connectivity alterations in ASD were more severe in the frontal lobe and the default mode network (DMN) and at low frequency bands. These functional connectivity measures also showed abnormal age-related associations in ICNs related to frontal, temporal and motor regions in ASD. Significance. Our findings suggest that ASD is characterized by the opposite directions of abnormalities (i.e. hypo- and hyper-connectivity) in the hierarchical structure of the whole brain network, with more impairments in the frontal lobe and the DMN at low frequency bands, which are critical for top-down control of sensory systems, as well as for both cognition and social skills.

  4. Encoding and Decoding Models in Cognitive Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdgraf, Christopher R; Rieger, Jochem W; Micheli, Cristiano; Martin, Stephanie; Knight, Robert T; Theunissen, Frederic E

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscience has seen rapid growth in the size and complexity of data recorded from the human brain as well as in the computational tools available to analyze this data. This data explosion has resulted in an increased use of multivariate, model-based methods for asking neuroscience questions, allowing scientists to investigate multiple hypotheses with a single dataset, to use complex, time-varying stimuli, and to study the human brain under more naturalistic conditions. These tools come in the form of "Encoding" models, in which stimulus features are used to model brain activity, and "Decoding" models, in which neural features are used to generated a stimulus output. Here we review the current state of encoding and decoding models in cognitive electrophysiology and provide a practical guide toward conducting experiments and analyses in this emerging field. Our examples focus on using linear models in the study of human language and audition. We show how to calculate auditory receptive fields from natural sounds as well as how to decode neural recordings to predict speech. The paper aims to be a useful tutorial to these approaches, and a practical introduction to using machine learning and applied statistics to build models of neural activity. The data analytic approaches we discuss may also be applied to other sensory modalities, motor systems, and cognitive systems, and we cover some examples in these areas. In addition, a collection of Jupyter notebooks is publicly available as a complement to the material covered in this paper, providing code examples and tutorials for predictive modeling in python. The aim is to provide a practical understanding of predictive modeling of human brain data and to propose best-practices in conducting these analyses.

  5. Encoding and Decoding Models in Cognitive Electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Holdgraf

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive neuroscience has seen rapid growth in the size and complexity of data recorded from the human brain as well as in the computational tools available to analyze this data. This data explosion has resulted in an increased use of multivariate, model-based methods for asking neuroscience questions, allowing scientists to investigate multiple hypotheses with a single dataset, to use complex, time-varying stimuli, and to study the human brain under more naturalistic conditions. These tools come in the form of “Encoding” models, in which stimulus features are used to model brain activity, and “Decoding” models, in which neural features are used to generated a stimulus output. Here we review the current state of encoding and decoding models in cognitive electrophysiology and provide a practical guide toward conducting experiments and analyses in this emerging field. Our examples focus on using linear models in the study of human language and audition. We show how to calculate auditory receptive fields from natural sounds as well as how to decode neural recordings to predict speech. The paper aims to be a useful tutorial to these approaches, and a practical introduction to using machine learning and applied statistics to build models of neural activity. The data analytic approaches we discuss may also be applied to other sensory modalities, motor systems, and cognitive systems, and we cover some examples in these areas. In addition, a collection of Jupyter notebooks is publicly available as a complement to the material covered in this paper, providing code examples and tutorials for predictive modeling in python. The aim is to provide a practical understanding of predictive modeling of human brain data and to propose best-practices in conducting these analyses.

  6. Right brain, left brain in depressive disorders: Clinical and theoretical implications of behavioral, electrophysiological and neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Gerard E; Stewart, Jonathan W; McGrath, Patrick J

    2017-07-01

    The right and left side of the brain are asymmetric in anatomy and function. We review electrophysiological (EEG and event-related potential), behavioral (dichotic and visual perceptual asymmetry), and neuroimaging (PET, MRI, NIRS) evidence of right-left asymmetry in depressive disorders. Recent electrophysiological and fMRI studies of emotional processing have provided new evidence of altered laterality in depressive disorders. EEG alpha asymmetry and neuroimaging findings at rest and during cognitive or emotional tasks are consistent with reduced left prefrontal activity in depressed patients, which may impair downregulation of amygdala response to negative emotional information. Dichotic listening and visual hemifield findings for non-verbal or emotional processing have revealed abnormal perceptual asymmetry in depressive disorders, and electrophysiological findings have shown reduced right-lateralized responsivity to emotional stimuli in occipitotemporal or parietotemporal cortex. We discuss models of neural networks underlying these alterations. Of clinical relevance, individual differences among depressed patients on measures of right-left brain function are related to diagnostic subtype of depression, comorbidity with anxiety disorders, and clinical response to antidepressants or cognitive behavioral therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Serial electrophysiology in Guillain-Barré syndrome: A retrospective cohort and case-by-case multicentre analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, J; Grapperon, A-M; Manfredonia, F; van den Bergh, P Y; Attarian, S; Rajabally, Y A

    2018-03-01

    To assess the usefulness of serial electrophysiology in Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) in a multicenter setting and the reasons for change in electrodiagnostic subtypes with serial studies. We retrospectively analysed serial electrophysiology of 51 patients with GBS from 4 European centres. Proportions of subtypes were determined at each timing. Individual case analyses were also performed where diagnostic changes occurred with either criteria, to ascertain if changes were due to disease progression or criteria inadequacy. At first study, comparing old vs new criteria, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) was diagnosed in 70.6% vs 51%, axonal GBS in 15.7% vs 39.2%, equivocal forms in 11.8% vs 7.8%. At second study, AIDP was diagnosed in 72.5% vs 52.9%, axonal GBS in 9.8% vs 33.3%, equivocal forms in 15.7% vs 11.7%. Subtype proportions were unchanged, indicating serial studies did not, in the cohort, alter diagnostic rates for each subtype irrespective of criteria used. Individual review of cases where subtype electrodiagnosis changed indicated suboptimal specificity for AIDP/sensitivity for axonal GBS as main cause of diagnostic shifts with old criteria, whereas disease progression explained most changes with new criteria (55.6% vs 81.8%; P = .039). Serial electrophysiology is unhelpful in GBS. Repeat studies cannot represent the gold standard as electrodiagnosis may alter due to disease progression. Changes in electrodiagnosis relate more often to disease progression with new criteria but are more frequently due to suboptimal sensitivity/specificity with old criteria. A single electrophysiological study using the most accurate available criteria appears sufficient in GBS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Electrophysiological findings in patients with adult tethered cord syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Oguzhan; Ulas, Umit Hidir; Duz, Bulent; Yucel, Mehmet; Odabasi, Zeki

    2010-01-01

    This study was planned for detailed evaluation of electrophysiological findings in patients with adult TCS. Patients were retrospectively assessed for clinical, radiological and electrophysiological data between 1999 and 2008. Tibial somatosensorial evoked potentials, needle electromyography, nerve conduction studies and late responses (H reflex and F response) were studied in thirty (1 female, 29 males) TCS patients diagnosed by lumbar magnetic resonance imaging. Tibial somato-sensorial evoked potentials cortical response latency was abnormal in 18 (60%) patients. Needle electromyography revealed chronic neurogenic involvement in 13 (43.3%) patients. In nerve conduction studies, motor unit action potential amplitudes were reduced in 5 (16.6%) patients and H reflexes were abnormal in 13 (43.3%) patients. Different electrophysiological abnormalities may be seen in patients with adult TCS. Our results indicated that tibial SEP abnormalities are most sensitive electrophysiological finding in patients with adult TCS. Patients with TCS should undergo electrophysiological examinations whether they have subjective or objective complaints. These examinations should evaluate different systems and treatment planning should be done with the data obtained.

  9. TI Workbench, an integrated software package for electrophysiology and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takafumi

    2018-03-15

    TI Workbench is a software package that serves as a control and analysis center for cellular imaging and electrophysiological experiments. It is unique among general-purpose software packages where it integrates the control of cellular imaging and electrophysiological devices, as well as sophisticated data analyses, which provides superior usability in imaging experiments combined with electrophysiology. During the development over the last 20 years, the range of supported image acquisition devices has expanded from cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras to multi-photon microscope systems. In this review, I outline the concept of TI Workbench together with its unique functions and features derived from ideas emerging during daily experiments in my own lab and in those of my collaborators over the last 20 years. TI Workbench includes standard functions required for time-lapse multicolor fluorescence imaging and electrophysiological experiments, in addition to specialized functions such as random-scan or conventional raster-scan two-photon microscopy packages and fluorescence life time imaging (FLIM) utilities. Data analysis modules, e.g. digital data filters for temporal waveforms of time-lapse image data and electrophysiology and for 2-D image data, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis functions, are well integrated with data acquisition functions. A notebook function holds formatted text, graphs, image and movie data altogether, which are linked to the actual data files. TI Workbench uses Igor Pro software as a back-end output for publishing. In addition, TI Workbench imports several different formats of image and electrophysiology data, serving as a general-purpose data analysis software package.

  10. Electrophysiological properties of computational human ventricular cell action potential models under acute ischemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sara; Mincholé, Ana; Quinn, T Alexander; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2017-10-01

    Acute myocardial ischemia is one of the main causes of sudden cardiac death. The mechanisms have been investigated primarily in experimental and computational studies using different animal species, but human studies remain scarce. In this study, we assess the ability of four human ventricular action potential models (ten Tusscher and Panfilov, 2006; Grandi et al., 2010; Carro et al., 2011; O'Hara et al., 2011) to simulate key electrophysiological consequences of acute myocardial ischemia in single cell and tissue simulations. We specifically focus on evaluating the effect of extracellular potassium concentration and activation of the ATP-sensitive inward-rectifying potassium current on action potential duration, post-repolarization refractoriness, and conduction velocity, as the most critical factors in determining reentry vulnerability during ischemia. Our results show that the Grandi and O'Hara models required modifications to reproduce expected ischemic changes, specifically modifying the intracellular potassium concentration in the Grandi model and the sodium current in the O'Hara model. With these modifications, the four human ventricular cell AP models analyzed in this study reproduce the electrophysiological alterations in repolarization, refractoriness, and conduction velocity caused by acute myocardial ischemia. However, quantitative differences are observed between the models and overall, the ten Tusscher and modified O'Hara models show closest agreement to experimental data. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Rabbit models as tools for preclinical cardiac electrophysiological safety testing: Importance of repolarization reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczkó, István; Jost, Norbert; Virág, László; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Varró, András

    2016-07-01

    It is essential to more reliably assess the pro-arrhythmic liability of compounds in development. Current guidelines for pre-clinical and clinical testing of drug candidates advocate the use of healthy animals/tissues and healthy individuals and focus on the test compound's ability to block the hERG current and prolong cardiac ventricular repolarization. Also, pre-clinical safety tests utilize several species commonly used in cardiac electrophysiological studies. In this review, important species differences in cardiac ventricular repolarizing ion currents are considered, followed by the discussion on electrical remodeling associated with chronic cardiovascular diseases that leads to altered ion channel and transporter expression and densities in pathological settings. We argue that the choice of species strongly influences experimental outcome and extrapolation of results to human clinical settings. We suggest that based on cardiac cellular electrophysiology, the rabbit is a useful species for pharmacological pro-arrhythmic investigations. In addition to healthy animals and tissues, the use of animal models (e.g. those with impaired repolarization reserve) is suggested that more closely resemble subsets of patients exhibiting increased vulnerability towards the development of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A highly versatile and easily configurable system for plant electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunsé, Benet; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Rankl, Simone; Schröeder, Peter; Rodrigo-Moreno, Ana; Barceló, Juan

    2016-01-01

    In this study we present a highly versatile and easily configurable system for measuring plant electrophysiological parameters and ionic flow rates, connected to a computer-controlled highly accurate positioning device. The modular software used allows easy customizable configurations for the measurement of electrophysiological parameters. Both the operational tests and the experiments already performed have been fully successful and rendered a low noise and highly stable signal. Assembly, programming and configuration examples are discussed. The system is a powerful technique that not only gives precise measuring of plant electrophysiological status, but also allows easy development of ad hoc configurations that are not constrained to plant studies. •We developed a highly modular system for electrophysiology measurements that can be used either in organs or cells and performs either steady or dynamic intra- and extracellular measurements that takes advantage of the easiness of visual object-oriented programming.•High precision accuracy in data acquisition under electrical noisy environments that allows it to run even in a laboratory close to electrical equipment that produce electrical noise.•The system makes an improvement of the currently used systems for monitoring and controlling high precision measurements and micromanipulation systems providing an open and customizable environment for multiple experimental needs.

  13. Sedation for paediatric auditory electrophysiology in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The sedation of children in the medical and allied professional fields has been a topic of controversy and debate internationally. Limited information is available on the use of sedation for auditory electrophysiology testing in South Africa. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine how sedation ...

  14. The role of neuro-electrophysiological diagnostic tests in clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To summarise and discuss the role of neuro-electrophysiological diagnostic tests in clinical medicine. Data Sources: Published original research and reviews to date. Study Selection: The review was with emphasis on diagnosis of peripheral neuropathic and neuromuscular disorders. Data extraction and ...

  15. Electrophysiological Monitoring of Brain Injury and Recovery after Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxian Deng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reliable prognostic methods for cerebral functional outcome of post cardiac-arrest (CA patients are necessary, especially since therapeutic hypothermia (TH as a standard treatment. Traditional neurophysiological prognostic indicators, such as clinical examination and chemical biomarkers, may result in indecisive outcome predictions and do not directly reflect neuronal activity, though they have remained the mainstay of clinical prognosis. The most recent advances in electrophysiological methods—electroencephalography (EEG pattern, evoked potential (EP and cellular electrophysiological measurement—were developed to complement these deficiencies, and will be examined in this review article. EEG pattern (reactivity and continuity provides real-time and accurate information for early-stage (particularly in the first 24 h hypoxic-ischemic (HI brain injury patients with high sensitivity. However, the signal is easily affected by external stimuli, thus the measurements of EP should be combined with EEG background to validate the predicted neurologic functional result. Cellular electrophysiology, such as multi-unit activity (MUA and local field potentials (LFP, has strong potential for improving prognostication and therapy by offering additional neurophysiologic information to understand the underlying mechanisms of therapeutic methods. Electrophysiology provides reliable and precise prognostication on both global and cellular levels secondary to cerebral injury in cardiac arrest patients treated with TH.

  16. Sedation for paediatric auditory electrophysiology in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The sedation of children in the medical and allied professional fields has been a topic of controversy and debate internationally. Limited information is available on the use of sedation for auditory electrophysiology testing in South Africa. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine how sedation ...

  17. Cardiac Electrophysiology: Normal and Ischemic Ionic Currents and the ECG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klabunde, Richard E.

    2017-01-01

    Basic cardiac electrophysiology is foundational to understanding normal cardiac function in terms of rate and rhythm and initiation of cardiac muscle contraction. The primary clinical tool for assessing cardiac electrical events is the electrocardiogram (ECG), which provides global and regional information on rate, rhythm, and electrical…

  18. Electrophysiological assessment in patients with Mobius syndrome and clumsiness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, H.T.F.M.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    The authors studied the nature of clumsiness in Mobius syndrome in terms of motor or sensory deficits, and sought to clarify the pathophysiological mechanism of the syndrome. Standardized electrophysiologic studies were conducted, with special emphasis on the long motor and sensory tracts and

  19. Atrioventricular junctional tissue. Discrepancy between histological and electrophysiological characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGuire, M. A.; de Bakker, J. M.; Vermeulen, J. T.; Moorman, A. F.; Loh, P.; Thibault, B.; Vermeulen, J. L.; Becker, A. E.; Janse, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous work has demonstrated that cells with AV nodal-type action potentials are not confined to Koch's triangle but may extend along the AV orifices. The aim of this study was to examine the histological and electrophysiological characteristics of this tissue. METHODS AND RESULTS:

  20. Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease patient-derived motor neurons demonstrate disease-specific phenotypes including abnormal electrophysiological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saporta, Mario A; Dang, Vu; Volfson, Dmitri; Zou, Bende; Xie, Xinmin Simon; Adebola, Adijat; Liem, Ronald K; Shy, Michael; Dimos, John T

    2015-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a group of inherited peripheral neuropathies associated with mutations or copy number variations in over 70 genes encoding proteins with fundamental roles in the development and function of Schwann cells and peripheral axons. Here, we used iPSC-derived cells to identify common pathophysiological mechanisms in axonal CMT. iPSC lines from patients with two distinct forms of axonal CMT (CMT2A and CMT2E) were differentiated into spinal cord motor neurons and used to study axonal structure and function and electrophysiological properties in vitro. iPSC-derived motor neurons exhibited gene and protein expression, ultrastructural and electrophysiological features of mature primary spinal cord motor neurons. Cytoskeletal abnormalities were found in neurons from a CMT2E (NEFL) patient and corroborated by a mouse model of the same NEFL point mutation. Abnormalities in mitochondrial trafficking were found in neurons derived from this patient, but were only mildly present in neurons from a CMT2A (MFN2) patient. Novel electrophysiological abnormalities, including reduced action potential threshold and abnormal channel current properties were observed in motor neurons derived from both of these patients. Human iPSC-derived motor neurons from axonal CMT patients replicated key pathophysiological features observed in other models of MFN2 and NEFL mutations, including abnormal cytoskeletal and mitochondrial dynamics. Electrophysiological abnormalities found in axonal CMT iPSC-derived human motor neurons suggest that these cells are hyperexcitable and have altered sodium and calcium channel kinetics. These findings may provide a new therapeutic target for this group of heterogeneous inherited neuropathies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Software and Hardware Infrastructure for Research in Electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman eMouček

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As in other areas of experimental science, operation of electrophysiological laboratory, design and performance of electrophysiological experiments, collection, storage and sharing of experimental data and metadata, analysis and interpretation of these data, and publication of results are time consuming activities. If these activities are well organized and supported by a suitable infrastructure, work efficiency of researchers increases significantly.This article deals with the main concepts, design, and development of software and hardware infrastructure for research in electrophysiology. The described infrastructure has been primarily developed for the needs of neuroinformatics laboratory at the University of West Bohemia, the Czech Republic. However, from the beginning it has been also designed and developed to be open and applicable in laboratories that do similar research.After introducing the laboratory and the whole architectural concept the individual parts of the infrastructure are described. The central element of the software infrastructure is a web-based portal that enables community researchers to store, share, download and search data and metadata from electrophysiological experiments. The data model, domain ontology and usage of semantic web languages and technologies are described. Current data publication policy used in the portal is briefly introduced. The registration of the portal within Neuroscience Information Framework is described. Then the methods used for processing of electrophysiological signals are presented. The specific modifications of these methods introduced by laboratory researches are summarized; the methods are organized into a laboratory workflow. Other parts of the software infrastructure include mobile and offline solutions for data/metadata storing and a hardware stimulator communicating with an EEG amplifier and recording software.

  2. Trpm4 gene invalidation leads to cardiac hypertrophy and electrophysiological alterations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Demion

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: TRPM4 is a non-selective Ca2+-activated cation channel expressed in the heart, particularly in the atria or conduction tissue. Mutations in the Trpm4 gene were recently associated with several human conduction disorders such as Brugada syndrome. TRPM4 channel has also been implicated at the ventricular level, in inotropism or in arrhythmia genesis due to stresses such as ß-adrenergic stimulation, ischemia-reperfusion, and hypoxia re-oxygenation. However, the physiological role of the TRPM4 channel in the healthy heart remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate the role of the TRPM4 channel on whole cardiac function with a Trpm4 gene knock-out mouse (Trpm4-/- model. METHODS AND RESULTS: Morpho-functional analysis revealed left ventricular (LV eccentric hypertrophy in Trpm4-/- mice, with an increase in both wall thickness and chamber size in the adult mouse (aged 32 weeks when compared to Trpm4+/+ littermate controls. Immunofluorescence on frozen heart cryosections and qPCR analysis showed no fibrosis or cellular hypertrophy. Instead, cardiomyocytes in Trpm4-/- mice were smaller than Trpm4+/+with a higher density. Immunofluorescent labeling for phospho-histone H3, a mitosis marker, showed that the number of mitotic myocytes was increased 3-fold in the Trpm4-/-neonatal stage, suggesting hyperplasia. Adult Trpm4-/- mice presented multilevel conduction blocks, as attested by PR and QRS lengthening in surface ECGs and confirmed by intracardiac exploration. Trpm4-/-mice also exhibited Luciani-Wenckebach atrioventricular blocks, which were reduced following atropine infusion, suggesting paroxysmal parasympathetic overdrive. In addition, Trpm4-/- mice exhibited shorter action potentials in atrial cells. This shortening was unrelated to modifications of the voltage-gated Ca2+ or K+ currents involved in the repolarizing phase. CONCLUSIONS: TRPM4 has pleiotropic roles in the heart, including the regulation of conduction and cellular electrical activity which impact heart development.

  3. Sleep fragmentation alters brain energy metabolism without modifying hippocampal electrophysiological response to novelty exposure

    KAUST Repository

    Baud, Maxime O.

    2016-05-03

    © 2016 European Sleep Research Society. Sleep is viewed as a fundamental restorative function of the brain, but its specific role in neural energy budget remains poorly understood. Sleep deprivation dampens brain energy metabolism and impairs cognitive functions. Intriguingly, sleep fragmentation, despite normal total sleep duration, has a similar cognitive impact, and in this paper we ask the question of whether it may also impair brain energy metabolism. To this end, we used a recently developed mouse model of 2 weeks of sleep fragmentation and measured 2-deoxy-glucose uptake and glycogen, glucose and lactate concentration in different brain regions. In order to homogenize mice behaviour during metabolic measurements, we exposed them to a novel environment for 1 h. Using an intra-hippocampal electrode, we first showed that hippocampal electroencephalograph (EEG) response to exploration was unaltered by 1 or 14 days of sleep fragmentation. However, after 14 days, sleep fragmented mice exhibited a lower uptake of 2-deoxy-glucose in cortex and hippocampus and lower cortical lactate levels than control mice. Our results suggest that long-term sleep fragmentation impaired brain metabolism to a similar extent as total sleep deprivation without affecting the neuronal responsiveness of hippocampus to a novel environment.

  4. Sleep fragmentation alters brain energy metabolism without modifying hippocampal electrophysiological response to novelty exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Maxime O; Parafita, Julia; Nguyen, Audrey; Magistretti, Pierre J; Petit, Jean-Marie

    2016-10-01

    Sleep is viewed as a fundamental restorative function of the brain, but its specific role in neural energy budget remains poorly understood. Sleep deprivation dampens brain energy metabolism and impairs cognitive functions. Intriguingly, sleep fragmentation, despite normal total sleep duration, has a similar cognitive impact, and in this paper we ask the question of whether it may also impair brain energy metabolism. To this end, we used a recently developed mouse model of 2 weeks of sleep fragmentation and measured 2-deoxy-glucose uptake and glycogen, glucose and lactate concentration in different brain regions. In order to homogenize mice behaviour during metabolic measurements, we exposed them to a novel environment for 1 h. Using an intra-hippocampal electrode, we first showed that hippocampal electroencephalograph (EEG) response to exploration was unaltered by 1 or 14 days of sleep fragmentation. However, after 14 days, sleep fragmented mice exhibited a lower uptake of 2-deoxy-glucose in cortex and hippocampus and lower cortical lactate levels than control mice. Our results suggest that long-term sleep fragmentation impaired brain metabolism to a similar extent as total sleep deprivation without affecting the neuronal responsiveness of hippocampus to a novel environment. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  5. Subthalamic stimulation: toward a simplification of the electrophysiological procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetter, Damien; Derrey, Stephane; Lefaucheur, Romain; Borden, Alaina; Wallon, David; Chastan, Nathalie; Maltete, David

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the consequences of a simplification of the electrophysiological procedure on the post-operative clinical outcome after subthalamic nucleus implantation in Parkinson disease. Microelectrode recordings were performed on 5 parallel trajectories in group 1 and less than 5 trajectories in group 2. Clinical evaluations were performed 1 month before and 6 months after surgery. After surgery, the UPDRS III score in the off-drug/on-stimulation and on-drug/on-stimulation conditions significantly improved by 66,9% and 82%, respectively in group 1, and by 65.8% and 82.3% in group 2 (P<0.05). Meanwhile, the total number of words (P<0.05) significantly decreased for fluency tasks in both groups. Motor disability improvement and medication reduction were similar in both groups. Our results suggest that the electrophysiological procedure should be simplified as the team's experience increases.

  6. Pants on fire: the electrophysiological signature of telling a lie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Roland; Foerster, Anna; Kunde, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Even though electroencephalography has played a prominent role for lie detection via personally relevant information, the electrophysiological signature of active lying is still elusive. We addressed this signature with two experiments in which participants helped a virtual police officer to locate a knife. Crucially, before this response, they announced whether they would lie or tell the truth about the knife's location. This design allowed us to study the signature of lie-telling in the absence of rare and personally significant oddball stimuli that are typically used for lie detection via electrophysiological markers, especially the P300 component. Our results indicate that active lying attenuated P300 amplitudes as well as N200 amplitudes for such non-oddball stimuli. These results support accounts that stress the high cognitive demand of lie-telling, including the need to suppress the truthful response and to generate a lie.

  7. Electrophysiological correlates of high-level perception during spatial navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidemann, Christoph T; Mollison, Matthew V; Kahana, Michael J

    2009-04-01

    We studied the electrophysiological basis of object recognition by recording scalp electroencephalograms while participants played a virtual-reality taxi driver game. Participants searched for passengers and stores during virtual navigation in simulated towns. We compared oscillatory brain activity in response to store views that were targets or nontargets (during store search) or neutral (during passenger search). Even though store category was solely defined by task context (rather than by sensory cues), frontal electrophysiological activity in the low frequency bands (primarily in the [4-8 Hz] band) reliably distinguished between the target, nontarget, and neutral store views. These results implicate low-frequency oscillatory brain activity in frontal regions as an important variable in the study of the cognitive processes involved in object recognition, categorization, and other forms of high-level perception.

  8. Research progress of electrophysiology for the diagnosis of metabolic myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei ZHAO

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic myopathies comprise a group of diverse disorders characterized by defects ofn energy metabolism in skeletal muscle cells, including glycogen storage disease (GSD, lipid storage myopathy (LSM and mitochondrial myopathy. The diagnosis of metabolic myopathies is often challenging due to the clinical and etiological heterogeneity between different metabolic myopathies. Generally, the diagnosis of metabolic myopathies is mainly based on the age of onset, family history, clinical manifestation, electrophysiological examinations, serological screening of metabolic markers, muscle biopsy and the DNA testing for specific mutations. The classical electrophysiological diagnostic methods and the corresponding manifestation of metabolic myopathies were reviewed and some new diagnostic techniques, including new motor unit potential (MUP parameters were introduced in this article. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.06.002

  9. Zebrafish heart as a model for human cardiac electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vornanen, Matti; Hassinen, Minna

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has become a popular model for human cardiac diseases and pharmacology including cardiac arrhythmias and its electrophysiological basis. Notably, the phenotype of zebrafish cardiac action potential is similar to the human cardiac action potential in that both have a long plateau phase. Also the major inward and outward current systems are qualitatively similar in zebrafish and human hearts. However, there are also significant differences in ionic current composition between human and zebrafish hearts, and the molecular basis and pharmacological properties of human and zebrafish cardiac ionic currents differ in several ways. Cardiac ionic currents may be produced by non-orthologous genes in zebrafish and humans, and paralogous gene products of some ion channels are expressed in the zebrafish heart. More research on molecular basis of cardiac ion channels, and regulation and drug sensitivity of the cardiac ionic currents are needed to enable rational use of the zebrafish heart as an electrophysiological model for the human heart.

  10. Electrophysiological Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, Cumhur

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic, neurodegenerative movement disorder that typically affects elderly patients. Swallowing disorders are highly prevalent in PD and can have grave consequences, including pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration and mortality. Neurogenic dysphagia in PD can manifest with both overt clinical symptoms or silent dysphagia. Regardless, early diagnosis and objective follow-up of dysphagia in PD is crucial for timely and appropriate care for these patients. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the electrophysiological methods that can be used to objectively evaluate dysphagia in PD. We discuss the electrophysiological abnormalities that can be observed in PD, their clinical correlates and the pathophysiology underlying these findings. PMID:25360228

  11. A Wireless Optogenetic Headstage with Multichannel Electrophysiological Recording Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Gagnon-Turcotte

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a small and lightweight fully wireless optogenetic headstage capable of optical neural stimulation and electrophysiological recording. The headstage is suitable for conducting experiments with small transgenic rodents, and features two implantable fiber-coupled light-emitting diode (LED and two electrophysiological recording channels. This system is powered by a small lithium-ion battery and is entirely built using low-cost commercial off-the-shelf components for better flexibility, reduced development time and lower cost. Light stimulation uses customizable stimulation patterns of varying frequency and duty cycle. The optical power that is sourced from the LED is delivered to target light-sensitive neurons using implantable optical fibers, which provide a measured optical power density of 70 mW/mm2 at the tip. The headstage is using a novel foldable rigid-flex printed circuit board design, which results into a lightweight and compact device. Recording experiments performed in the cerebral cortex of transgenic ChR2 mice under anesthetized conditions show that the proposed headstage can trigger neuronal activity using optical stimulation, while recording microvolt amplitude electrophysiological signals.

  12. A Wireless Optogenetic Headstage with Multichannel Electrophysiological Recording Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon-Turcotte, Gabriel; Kisomi, Alireza Avakh; Ameli, Reza; Camaro, Charles-Olivier Dufresne; LeChasseur, Yoan; Néron, Jean-Luc; Bareil, Paul Brule; Fortier, Paul; Bories, Cyril; de Koninck, Yves; Gosselin, Benoit

    2015-09-09

    We present a small and lightweight fully wireless optogenetic headstage capable of optical neural stimulation and electrophysiological recording. The headstage is suitable for conducting experiments with small transgenic rodents, and features two implantable fiber-coupled light-emitting diode (LED) and two electrophysiological recording channels. This system is powered by a small lithium-ion battery and is entirely built using low-cost commercial off-the-shelf components for better flexibility, reduced development time and lower cost. Light stimulation uses customizable stimulation patterns of varying frequency and duty cycle. The optical power that is sourced from the LED is delivered to target light-sensitive neurons using implantable optical fibers, which provide a measured optical power density of 70 mW/mm² at the tip. The headstage is using a novel foldable rigid-flex printed circuit board design, which results into a lightweight and compact device. Recording experiments performed in the cerebral cortex of transgenic ChR2 mice under anesthetized conditions show that the proposed headstage can trigger neuronal activity using optical stimulation, while recording microvolt amplitude electrophysiological signals.

  13. Combining Optogenetics and Electrophysiology to Analyze Projection Neuron Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamawaki, Naoki; Suter, Benjamin A; Wickersham, Ian R; Shepherd, Gordon M G

    2016-10-03

    A set of methods is described for channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-based synaptic circuit analysis that combines photostimulation of virally transfected presynaptic neurons' axons with whole-cell electrophysiological recordings from retrogradely labeled postsynaptic neurons. The approach exploits the preserved photoexcitability of ChR2-expressing axons in brain slices and can be used to assess either local or long-range functional connections. Stereotaxic injections are used both to express ChR2 selectively in presynaptic axons of interest (using rabies virus [RV] or adeno-associated virus [AAV]) and to label two types of postsynaptic projection neurons of interest with fluorescent retrograde tracers. In brain slices, tracer-labeled postsynaptic neurons are targeted for whole-cell electrophysiological recordings, and synaptic connections are assessed by sampling voltage or current responses to light-emitting diode (LED) photostimulation of ChR2-expressing axons. The data are analyzed to estimate the relative amplitude of synaptic input and other connectivity parameters. Pharmacological and electrophysiological manipulations extend the versatility of the basic approach, allowing the dissection of monosynaptic versus disynaptic responses, excitatory versus inhibitory responses, and more. The method enables rapid, quantitative characterization of synaptic connectivity between defined pre- and postsynaptic classes of neurons. © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  14. AV nodal dual pathway electrophysiology and Wenckebach periodicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youhua; Mazgalev, Todor N

    2011-11-01

    The precise mechanism(s) governing the phenomenon of AV nodal Wenckebach periodicity is not fully elucidated. Currently 2 hypotheses, the decremental conduction and the Rosenbluethian step-delay, are most frequently used. We have provided new evidence that, in addition, dual pathway (DPW) electrophysiology is directly involved in the manifestation of AV nodal Wenckebach phenomenon. AV nodal cellular action potentials (APs) were recorded from 6 rabbit AV node preparations during standard A1A2 and incremental pacing protocols. His electrogram alternans, a validated index of DPW electrophysiology, was used to monitor fast (FP) and slow (SP) pathway conduction. The data were collected in intact AV nodes, as well as after SP ablation. In all studied hearts the Wenckebach cycle started with FP propagation, followed by transition to SP until its ultimate block. During this process complex cellular APs were observed, with decremental foot formations reflecting the fading FP and second depolarizations produced by the SP. In addition, the AV node cells exhibited a progressive loss in maximal diastolic membrane potential (MDP) due to incomplete repolarization. The pause created with the blocked Wenckebach beat was associated with restoration of MDP and reinitiation of the conduction cycle via the FP wavefront. DPW electrophysiology is dynamically involved in the development of AV nodal Wenckebach periodicity. In the intact AV node, the cycle starts with FP that is progressively weakened and then replaced by SP propagation, until block occurs. AV nodal SP modification did not eliminate Wenckebach periodicity but strongly affected its paradigm. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Intracardiac Echocardiography for Structural Heart and Electrophysiological Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basman, Craig; Parmar, Yuvrajsinh J; Kronzon, Itzhak

    2017-09-06

    With an increasing number of interventional procedures performed for structural heart disease and cardiac arrhythmias each year, echocardiographic guidance is necessary for safe and efficient results. The purpose of this review article is to overview the principles of intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) and describes the peri-interventional role of ICE in a variety of structural heart disease and electrophysiological interventions. Both transthoracic (TTE) and transesophageal echocardiography have limitations. ICE provides the advantage of imaging from within the heart, providing shorter image distances and higher resolution. ICE may be performed without sedation and avoids esophageal intubation as with transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Limitations of ICE include the need for additional venous access with possibility of vascular complications, potentially higher costs, and a learning curve for new operators. Data supports the use of ICE in guiding device closure of interatrial shunts, transseptal puncture, and electrophysiologic procedures. This paper reviews the more recent reports that ICE may be used for primary guidance or as a supplement to TEE in patients undergoing left atrial appendage (LAA) closure, interatrial shunt closure, transaortic valve implantation (TAVI), percutaneous mitral valve repair (PMVR), paravalvular leak (PVL) closure, aortic interventions, transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement (tPVR), ventricular septal defect (VSD), and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) closure. ICE imaging technology will continue to expand and help improve structural heart and electrophysiology interventions.

  16. Wearable carbon nanotube based dry-electrodes for electrophysiological sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Ha, Tae-Jun

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate all-solution-processed carbon nanotube (CNT) dry-electrodes for the detection of electrophysiological signals such as electrocardiograms (ECG) and electromyograms (EMG). The key parameters of P, Q, R, S, and T peaks are successfully extracted by such CNT based dry-electrodes, which is comparable with conventional silver/chloride (Ag/AgCl) wet-electrodes with a conducting gel film for the ECG recording. Furthermore, the sensing performance of CNT based dry-electrodes is secured during the bending test of 200 cycles, which is essential for wearable electrophysiological sensors in a non-invasive method on human skin. We also investigate the application of wearable CNT based dry-electrodes directly attached to the human skins such as forearm for sensing the electrophysiological signals. The accurate and rapid sensing response can be achieved by CNT based dry-electrodes to supervise the health condition affected by excessive physical movements during the real-time measurements.

  17. Exploring the unknown: electrophysiological and behavioural measures of visuospatial learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlivan, Brendan; Butler, John S; Ridwan, Abdur Raquib; Beiser, Ines; Williams, Laura; McGovern, Eavan; O'Riordan, Sean; Hutchinson, Michael; Reilly, Richard B

    2016-05-01

    Visuospatial memory describes our ability to temporarily store and manipulate visual and spatial information and is employed for a wide variety of complex cognitive tasks. Here, a visuospatial learning task requiring fine motor control is employed to investigate visuospatial learning in a group of typically developing adults. Electrophysiological and behavioural data are collected during a target location task under two experimental conditions: Target Learning and Target Cued. Movement times (MTs) are employed as a behavioural metric of performance, while dynamic P3b amplitudes and power in the alpha band (approximately 10 Hz) are explored as electrophysiological metrics during visuospatial learning. Results demonstrate that task performance, as measured by MT, is highly correlated with P3b amplitude and alpha power at a consecutive trial level (trials 1-30). The current set of results, in conjunction with the existing literature, suggests that changes in P3b amplitude and alpha power could correspond to different aspects of the learning process. Here it is hypothesized that changes in P3b correspond to a diminishing inter-stimulus interval and reduced stimulus relevance, while the corresponding changes in alpha power represent an automation of response as habituation occurs in participants. The novel analysis presented in the current study demonstrates how gradual electrophysiological changes can be tracked during the visuospatial learning process under the current paradigm. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Alfaxalone Anaesthesia Facilitates Electrophysiological Recordings of Nociceptive Withdrawal Reflexes in Dogs (Canis familiaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Hunt

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring canine osteoarthritis represents a welfare issue for affected dogs (Canis familiaris, but is also considered very similar to human osteoarthritis and has therefore been proposed as a model of disease in humans. Central sensitisation is recognized in human osteoarthritis sufferers but identification in dogs is challenging. Electromyographic measurement of responses to nociceptive stimulation represents a potential means of investigating alterations in central nociceptive processing, and has been evaluated in conscious experimental dogs, but is likely to be aversive. Development of a suitable anaesthetic protocol in experimental dogs, which facilitated electrophysiological nociceptive withdrawal reflex assessment, may increase the acceptability of using the technique in owned dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis. Seven purpose bred male hound dogs underwent electromyographic recording sessions in each of three states: acepromazine sedation, alfaxalone sedation, and alfaxalone anaesthesia. Electromyographic responses to escalating mechanical and electrical, and repeated electrical, stimuli were recorded. Subsequently the integral of both early and late rectified responses was calculated. Natural logarithms of the integral values were analysed within and between the three states using multi level modeling. Alfaxalone increased nociceptive thresholds and decreased the magnitude of recorded responses, but characteristics of increasing responses with increasing stimulus magnitude were preserved. Behavioural signs of anxiety were noted in two out of seven dogs during recordings in the acepromazine sedated state. There were few significant differences in response magnitude or nociceptive threshold between the two alfaxalone states. Following acepromazine premedication, induction of anaesthesia with 1-2 mg kg-1 alfaxalone, followed by a continuous rate infusion in the range 0.075-0.1 mg kg-1 min-1 produced suitable conditions

  19. Alfaxalone Anaesthesia Facilitates Electrophysiological Recordings of Nociceptive Withdrawal Reflexes in Dogs (Canis familiaris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, James; Murrell, Jo; Knazovicky, David; Harris, John; Kelly, Sara; Knowles, Toby G.; Lascelles, B. Duncan X.

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring canine osteoarthritis represents a welfare issue for affected dogs (Canis familiaris), but is also considered very similar to human osteoarthritis and has therefore been proposed as a model of disease in humans. Central sensitisation is recognized in human osteoarthritis sufferers but identification in dogs is challenging. Electromyographic measurement of responses to nociceptive stimulation represents a potential means of investigating alterations in central nociceptive processing, and has been evaluated in conscious experimental dogs, but is likely to be aversive. Development of a suitable anaesthetic protocol in experimental dogs, which facilitated electrophysiological nociceptive withdrawal reflex assessment, may increase the acceptability of using the technique in owned dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis. Seven purpose bred male hound dogs underwent electromyographic recording sessions in each of three states: acepromazine sedation, alfaxalone sedation, and alfaxalone anaesthesia. Electromyographic responses to escalating mechanical and electrical, and repeated electrical, stimuli were recorded. Subsequently the integral of both early and late rectified responses was calculated. Natural logarithms of the integral values were analysed within and between the three states using multi level modeling. Alfaxalone increased nociceptive thresholds and decreased the magnitude of recorded responses, but characteristics of increasing responses with increasing stimulus magnitude were preserved. Behavioural signs of anxiety were noted in two out of seven dogs during recordings in the acepromazine sedated state. There were few significant differences in response magnitude or nociceptive threshold between the two alfaxalone states. Following acepromazine premedication, induction of anaesthesia with 1–2 mg kg-1 alfaxalone, followed by a continuous rate infusion in the range 0.075–0.1 mg kg-1 min-1 produced suitable conditions to enable

  20. Alfaxalone Anaesthesia Facilitates Electrophysiological Recordings of Nociceptive Withdrawal Reflexes in Dogs (Canis familiaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, James; Murrell, Jo; Knazovicky, David; Harris, John; Kelly, Sara; Knowles, Toby G; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring canine osteoarthritis represents a welfare issue for affected dogs (Canis familiaris), but is also considered very similar to human osteoarthritis and has therefore been proposed as a model of disease in humans. Central sensitisation is recognized in human osteoarthritis sufferers but identification in dogs is challenging. Electromyographic measurement of responses to nociceptive stimulation represents a potential means of investigating alterations in central nociceptive processing, and has been evaluated in conscious experimental dogs, but is likely to be aversive. Development of a suitable anaesthetic protocol in experimental dogs, which facilitated electrophysiological nociceptive withdrawal reflex assessment, may increase the acceptability of using the technique in owned dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis. Seven purpose bred male hound dogs underwent electromyographic recording sessions in each of three states: acepromazine sedation, alfaxalone sedation, and alfaxalone anaesthesia. Electromyographic responses to escalating mechanical and electrical, and repeated electrical, stimuli were recorded. Subsequently the integral of both early and late rectified responses was calculated. Natural logarithms of the integral values were analysed within and between the three states using multi level modeling. Alfaxalone increased nociceptive thresholds and decreased the magnitude of recorded responses, but characteristics of increasing responses with increasing stimulus magnitude were preserved. Behavioural signs of anxiety were noted in two out of seven dogs during recordings in the acepromazine sedated state. There were few significant differences in response magnitude or nociceptive threshold between the two alfaxalone states. Following acepromazine premedication, induction of anaesthesia with 1-2 mg kg-1 alfaxalone, followed by a continuous rate infusion in the range 0.075-0.1 mg kg-1 min-1 produced suitable conditions to enable assessment

  1. Electrophysiological Evaluation of People With Volatile Substance Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurten Uzun

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Scientific BACKGROUND: There is an increase in addiction of volatile substances in recent years. Miscellaneous electrophysiological pathological findings are determined in volatile substance abusers. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we aim to examine the neurologic effects of these substances by electrophysiologic methods. METHODS: Cases and METHOD: Twenty-three patients from Bakirkoy Psychiatry Hospital, Alcohol and Substance Addiction Research and Treatment Center were included in this study. Motor and sensory nerve conduction studies, somatosensorial, visual and auditory evoked potentials (SEP, VEP, BAEP as well as electroencephalography (EEG were studied in all 23 patients. The results were compared with the published data and the values of age matched 19 normal controls. RESULTS: RESULTS: In nerve conduction studies, there were pathological findings in 14 (60.9% cases, in three (13% mild sensorimotor polyneuropathy was determined. Tibial nerve motor distal latencies as well as median nerve sensorial and sural nerve distal latencies were longer in patients compared to controls (p<0.05. SEP findings were pathological in six (26.1% cases, VEP in two (8.7% cases and BAEP in eight (34.8% cases. Scalp SEP distal latency by tibial nerve stimulation as well as distal latencies of right and left V. wave, left III-V interpeak latency, right and left interpeak latencies and I-V interaural latency difference in BAEP were longer in abusers (p<0.05. Although it was not statistically significant, the ratio of pathological findings was higher if the exposure time was over 2 years. EEG was found to be normal in all patients. CONCLUSION: YORUM: Our results showed that toluene results in slowly progressive multifocal central nervous system damage and subclinical damage could be determined in early stages by electrophysiologic methods

  2. An electrophysiological investigation of skeletal muscles in polymyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. P. Sica

    1976-12-01

    Full Text Available An electrophysiological study has been made of the extensor digitorum brevis, thenar and hypothenar muscles in 25 patients with chronic and acute polymyositis. It was found a reduction of the number of functioning motor units in some patients with chronic polymyositis and only in one of those affected by acute polymyositis. The sizes of the surviving units suggested that the results could be explained in terms of a primary muscle involvement mainly in acute polymyositis, while in chronic polymyositis a combination of primary and neurogenic involvement of muscle fibers might take place.

  3. Fourier and electrophysiological analyses of acoustic communication in Acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, S A

    1976-01-01

    Waveform and spectral analysis were made on the call song of the cricket, Acheta domesticus.Sounds produced by unrestrained male crickets were led directly to a computer where discrete Fourier transforms were performed on selected segments of the call song. The findings revealed essentially pure tone carrier frequencies which result from the rate at which the individual teeth of the pars stridens are struck by the plectrum. An electrophysiologically determined audiogram showed good agreement with the dominant frequency of the call song, but was less sensitive and more broadly tuned than hearing curves of most field-crickets.

  4. Electrophysiological phenotype in the LQTS mutations Y111C and R518X in the KCNQ1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Ulla-Britt; Vahedi, Farzad; Winbo, Annika; Rydberg, Annika; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Jensen, Steen M; Bergfeldt, Lennart

    2013-11-01

    Long QT syndrome is the prototypical disorder of ventricular repolarization (VR), and a genotype-phenotype relation is postulated. Furthermore, although increased VR heterogeneity (dispersion) may be important in the arrhythmogenicity in long QT syndrome, this hypothesis has not been evaluated in humans and cannot be tested by conventional electrocardiography. In contrast, vectorcardiography allows assessment of VR heterogeneity and is more sensitive to VR alterations than electrocardiography. Therefore, vectorcardiography was used to compare the electrophysiological phenotypes of two mutations in the LQT1 gene with different in vitro biophysical properties, and with LQT2 mutation carriers and healthy control subjects. We included 99 LQT1 gene mutation carriers (57 Y111C, 42 R518X) and 19 LQT2 gene mutation carriers. Potassium channel function is in vitro most severely impaired in Y111C. The control group consisted of 121 healthy subjects. QRS, QT, and T-peak to T-end (Tp-e) intervals, measures of the QRS vector and T vector and their relationship, and T-loop morphology parameters were compared at rest. Apart from a longer heart rate-corrected QT interval (QT heart rate corrected according to Bazett) in Y111C mutation carriers, there were no significant differences between the two LQT1 mutations. No signs of increased VR heterogeneity were observed among the LQT1 and LQT2 mutation carriers. QT heart rate corrected according to Bazett and Tp-e were longer, and the Tp-e-to-QT ratio greater in LQT2 than in LQT1 and the control group. In conclusion, there was a marked discrepancy between in vitro potassium channel function and in vivo electrophysiological properties in these two LQT1 mutations. Together with previous observations of the relatively low risk for clinical events in Y111C mutation carriers, our results indicate need for cautiousness in predicting in vivo electrophysiological properties and the propensity for clinical events based on in vitro assessment of

  5. Whole-Retina Reduced Electrophysiological Activity in Mice Bearing Retina-Specific Deletion of Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake Bedore

    Full Text Available Despite rigorous characterization of the role of acetylcholine in retinal development, long-term effects of its absence as a neurotransmitter are unknown. One of the unanswered questions is how acetylcholine contributes to the functional capacity of mature retinal circuits. The current study investigates the effects of disrupting cholinergic signalling in mice, through deletion of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT in the developing retina, pigmented epithelium, optic nerve and optic stalk, on electrophysiology and structure of the mature retina.A combination of electroretinography, optical coherence tomography imaging and histological evaluation assessed retinal integrity in mice bearing retina- targeted (embryonic day 12.5 deletion of VAChT (VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox and littermate controls at 5 and 12 months of age. VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice did not show any gross changes in nuclear layer cellularity or synaptic layer thickness. However, VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice showed reduced electrophysiological response of the retina to light stimulus under scotopic conditions at 5 and 12 months of age, including reduced a-wave, b-wave, and oscillatory potential (OP amplitudes and decreased OP peak power and total energy. Reduced a-wave amplitude was proportional to the reduction in b-wave amplitude and not associated with altered a-wave 10%-90% rise time or inner and outer segment thicknesses.This study used a novel genetic model in the first examination of function and structure of the mature mouse retina with disruption of cholinergic signalling. Reduced amplitude across the electroretinogram wave form does not suggest dysfunction in specific retinal cell types and could reflect underlying changes in the retinal and/or extraretinal microenvironment. Our findings suggest that release of acetylcholine by VAChT is essential for the normal electrophysiological response of the mature mouse retina.

  6. Intermittent stretching induces fibrosis in denervated rat muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faturi, Fernanda M; Franco, Rúbia C; Gigo-Benato, Davilene; Turi, Andriette C; Silva-Couto, Marcela A; Messa, Sabrina P; Russo, Thiago L

    2016-01-01

    Stretching (St) has been used for treating denervated muscles. However, its effectiveness and safety claims require further study. Rats were divided into: (1) those with denervated (D) muscles, evaluated 7 or 15 days after sciatic nerve crush injury; (2) those with D muscles submitted to St during 7 or 15 days; and (3) those with normal muscles. Muscle fiber cross-sectional area, serial sarcomere number, sarcomere length, and connective tissue density were measured. MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TGF-β1, and myostatin mRNAs were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity was evaluated by zymography. Collagen I was localized using immunofluorescence. St did not prevent muscle atrophy due to denervation, but it increased fibrosis and collagen I deposition at day 15. St also upregulated MMP-9 and TGF-β1 gene expressions at day 7, and myostatin at day 15. Stretching denervated muscle does not prevent atrophy, but it increases fibrosis via temporal modulation of TGF-β1/myostatin and MMP-9 cascades. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. How do astrocytes shape synaptic transmission? Insights from electrophysiology

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    Glenn eDallérac

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A major breakthrough in neuroscience has been the realization in the last decades that the dogmatic view of astroglial cells as being merely fostering and buffering elements of the nervous system is simplistic. A wealth of investigations now shows that astrocytes actually participate in the control of synaptic transmission in an active manner. This was first hinted by the intimate contacts glial processes make with neurons, particularly at the synaptic level, and evidenced using electrophysiological and calcium imaging techniques. Calcium imaging has provided critical evidence demonstrating that astrocytic regulation of synaptic efficacy is not a passive phenomenon. However, given that cellular activation is not only represented by calcium signaling, it is also crucial to assess concomitant mechanisms. We and others have used electrophysiological techniques to simultaneously record neuronal and astrocytic activity, thus enabling the study of multiple ionic currents and in depth investigation of neuro-glial dialogues. In the current review, we focus on the input such approach has provided in the understanding of astrocyte-neuron interactions underlying control of synaptic efficacy.

  8. Simulation Methods and Validation Criteria for Modeling Cardiac Ventricular Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthi, Shankarjee; Perotti, Luigi E; Borgstrom, Nils P; Ajijola, Olujimi A; Frid, Anna; Ponnaluri, Aditya V; Weiss, James N; Qu, Zhilin; Klug, William S; Ennis, Daniel B; Garfinkel, Alan

    2014-01-01

    We describe a sequence of methods to produce a partial differential equation model of the electrical activation of the ventricles. In our framework, we incorporate the anatomy and cardiac microstructure obtained from magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging of a New Zealand White rabbit, the Purkinje structure and the Purkinje-muscle junctions, and an electrophysiologically accurate model of the ventricular myocytes and tissue, which includes transmural and apex-to-base gradients of action potential characteristics. We solve the electrophysiology governing equations using the finite element method and compute both a 6-lead precordial electrocardiogram (ECG) and the activation wavefronts over time. We are particularly concerned with the validation of the various methods used in our model and, in this regard, propose a series of validation criteria that we consider essential. These include producing a physiologically accurate ECG, a correct ventricular activation sequence, and the inducibility of ventricular fibrillation. Among other components, we conclude that a Purkinje geometry with a high density of Purkinje muscle junctions covering the right and left ventricular endocardial surfaces as well as transmural and apex-to-base gradients in action potential characteristics are necessary to produce ECGs and time activation plots that agree with physiological observations.

  9. Simulation Methods and Validation Criteria for Modeling Cardiac Ventricular Electrophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankarjee Krishnamoorthi

    Full Text Available We describe a sequence of methods to produce a partial differential equation model of the electrical activation of the ventricles. In our framework, we incorporate the anatomy and cardiac microstructure obtained from magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging of a New Zealand White rabbit, the Purkinje structure and the Purkinje-muscle junctions, and an electrophysiologically accurate model of the ventricular myocytes and tissue, which includes transmural and apex-to-base gradients of action potential characteristics. We solve the electrophysiology governing equations using the finite element method and compute both a 6-lead precordial electrocardiogram (ECG and the activation wavefronts over time. We are particularly concerned with the validation of the various methods used in our model and, in this regard, propose a series of validation criteria that we consider essential. These include producing a physiologically accurate ECG, a correct ventricular activation sequence, and the inducibility of ventricular fibrillation. Among other components, we conclude that a Purkinje geometry with a high density of Purkinje muscle junctions covering the right and left ventricular endocardial surfaces as well as transmural and apex-to-base gradients in action potential characteristics are necessary to produce ECGs and time activation plots that agree with physiological observations.

  10. Modern Electrophysiological Methods for Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Grave de Peralta Menendez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern electrophysiological studies in animals show that the spectrum of neural oscillations encoding relevant information is broader than previously thought and that many diverse areas are engaged for very simple tasks. However, EEG-based brain-computer interfaces (BCI still employ as control modality relatively slow brain rhythms or features derived from preselected frequencies and scalp locations. Here, we describe the strategy and the algorithms we have developed for the analysis of electrophysiological data and demonstrate their capacity to lead to faster accurate decisions based on linear classifiers. To illustrate this strategy, we analyzed two typical BCI tasks. (1 Mu-rhythm control of a cursor movement by a paraplegic patient. For this data, we show that although the patient received extensive training in mu-rhythm control, valuable information about movement imagination is present on the untrained high-frequency rhythms. This is the first demonstration of the importance of high-frequency rhythms in imagined limb movements. (2 Self-paced finger tapping task in three healthy subjects including the data set used in the BCI-2003 competition. We show that by selecting electrodes and frequency ranges based on their discriminative power, the classification rates can be systematically improved with respect to results published thus far.

  11. Electrophysiological Correlates of Reading the Single- and Interactive-Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Wen; Zheng, Yu-Wei; Lin, Chong-De; Wu, Jie; Shen, De-Li

    2011-01-01

    Understanding minds is the cognitive basis of successful social interaction. In everyday life, human mental activity often happens at the moment of social interaction among two or multiple persons instead of only one-person. Understanding the interactive mind of two- or multi-person is more complex and higher than understanding the single-person mind in the hierarchical structure of theory of mind. Understanding the interactive mind maybe differentiate from understanding the single mind. In order to examine the dissociative electrophysiological correlates of reading the single mind and reading the interactive mind, the 64 channels event-related potentials were recorded while 16 normal adults were observing three kinds of Chinese idioms depicted physical scenes, one-person with mental activity, and two- or multi-person with mental interaction. After the equivalent N400, in the 500- to 700-ms epoch, the mean amplitudes of late positive component (LPC) over frontal for reading the single mind and reading the interactive mind were significantly more positive than for physical representation, while there was no difference between the former two. In the 700- to 800-ms epoch, the mean amplitudes of LPC over frontal–central for reading the interactive mind were more positive than for reading the single mind and physical representation, while there was no difference between the latter two. The present study provides electrophysiological signature of the dissociations between reading the single mind and reading the interactive mind. PMID:21845178

  12. Electrophysiological characteristics according to activity level of myofascial trigger points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seong Hun; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the differences in electrophysiological characteristics of normal muscles versus muscles with latent or active myofascial trigger points, and identified the neuromuscular physiological characteristics of muscles with active myofascial trigger points, thereby providing a quantitative evaluation of myofascial pain syndrome and clinical foundational data for its diagnosis. [Subjects] Ninety adults in their 20s participated in this study. Subjects were equally divided into three groups: the active myofascial trigger point group, the latent myofascial trigger point group, and the control group. [Methods] Maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), endurance, median frequency (MDF), and muscle fatigue index were measured in all subjects. [Results] No significant differences in MVIC or endurance were revealed among the three groups. However, the active trigger point group had significantly different MDF and muscle fatigue index compared with the control group. [Conclusion] Given that muscles with active myofascial trigger points had an increased MDF and suffered muscle fatigue more easily, increased recruitment of motor unit action potential of type II fibers was evident. Therefore, electrophysiological analysis of these myofascial trigger points can be applied to evaluate the effect of physical therapy and provide a quantitative diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome.

  13. Electrophysiological correlates of reading the single- and interactive-mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Wen eWang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding minds is the cognitive basis of successful social interaction. In everyday life, human mental activity often happens at the moment of social interaction among two or multiple persons instead of only one person. Understanding the interactive mind of two- or multi-person is more complex and higher than understanding the single-person mind in the hierarchical structure of theory-of-mind. Understanding the interactive mind maybe differentiate from understanding the single mind. In order to examine the dissociative electrophysiological correlates of reading the single mind and reading the interactive mind, the 64 channels event-related potentials (ERP were recorded while 16 normal adults were observing three kinds of Chinese idioms depicted physical scenes, one-person with mental activity and two- or multi-person with mental interaction. After the equivalent N400, in the 500- to 700-ms epoch, the mean amplitudes of late positive component (LPC over frontal for reading the single mind and reading the interactive mind were significantly more positive than for physical representation, while there was no difference between the former two. In the 700-to 800-ms epoch, the mean amplitudes of LPC over frontal-central for reading the interactive mind were more positive than for reading the single mind and physical representation, while there was no difference between the latter two. The present study provides electrophysiological signature of the dissociations between reading the single mind and reading the interactive mind.

  14. [Thallium poisoning induced polyneuropathy--clinical and electrophysiological data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukács, Miklós

    2003-11-20

    The aim of the study was the electrophysiological investigation of thallium induced polyneuropathy. Beyond the rarity of the illness, the motivation of this work was the possibility of following up the pattern of neuronal damage. Thallium is one of the most toxic heavy metal and its wide use increases the chance of chronic or accidental acute poisoning. The entero-hepatic circulation makes the accumulation of this toxic agent in tissues possible, mostly in neurons, in the epithelial cells of the digestive tract, in the germinative cells of the skin and testicles. In addition to alopecia and digestive complaints, the clinical picture of thallium poisoning is dominated by neurological signs. Severe axonal polyneuropathy develops in almost all cases, with further damage to the retina and impairment of cognitive functions being not unusual. The diagnosis is confirmed by finding high levels of thallium in body fluids, especially in saliva and urine. Electrophysiological examination of our accidentally poisoned patient revealed severe, sensory-motor, predominant motor axonal polyneuropathy and pointed out some aspects of the pattern of neurotoxic process: the initially distal lesion, the dying-back course and the capacity for regeneration. Because thallium has the same molecular targets as potassium ion thus impairing the energetical supply of the nerve cell, the most effective treatment is carefully loading with potassium. If recognized and treated early, thallium poisoning has a favourable prognosis.

  15. Correlations of clinical, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological features in Hirayama disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ming-Feng; Chang, Hong-Shiu; Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Ro, Long-Sun; Chu, Chun-Che; Kuo, Hung-Chou; Lyu, Rong-Kuo

    2016-07-01

    Hirayama disease (HD) is characterized by development of asymmetric forearm muscle atrophy during adolescence with or without focal cervical spinal cord atrophy. The purpose of this study is to assess the correlation of clinical symptoms, disease progression, and electrophysiological findings with cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings.The medical records, cervical spine MRIs, and electrophysiological findings of 44 HD patients were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed.Denervation changes in any single C5 to C7 root-innervated muscle (deltoid, biceps, triceps, or extensor digitorum communis) occurred more frequently in the 25 patients with cord atrophy than the 19 patients without cord atrophy (88% vs 53%, P = 0.02). Onset age, duration of disease progression, neurological examinations, nerve conduction study, and electromyographic findings from individual muscles were similar between patient groups.Compared with HD patients without cord atrophy, HD patients with cord atrophy experience a more severe denervation change in C5 to C7 root-innervated muscles.

  16. Obesity, Cardiovascular Fitness, and Inhibition Function: An Electrophysiological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Fen Song

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine how obesity and cardiovascular fitness are associated with the inhibition aspect of executive function from behavioral and electrophysiological perspectives. One hundred college students, aged 18 to 25 years, were categorized into four groups of equal size on the basis of body mass index and cardiovascular fitness: a normal-weight and high-fitness (NH group, an obese-weight and high-fitness (OH group, a normal-weight and low-fitness (NL group, and an obese-weight and low-fitness (OL group. Behavioral measures of response time and number of errors, as well as event-related potential (ERP measures of P3 and N1, were assessed during the Stroop Task. The results revealed that, in general, the NH group exhibited shorter response times and larger P3 amplitudes relative to the OH, NL, and OL groups, wherein the OL group exhibited the longest response time in the incongruent condition. No group differences in N1 indices were also revealed. These findings suggest that the status of being both normal weight and having high cardiovascular fitness is associated with better behavioral and later stages of electrophysiological indices of inhibition. However, these benefits in inhibition function would be lost in an individual who is obese or has low cardiovascular fitness, reflecting the importance keeping both normal weight and having high cardiovascular fitness.

  17. Electrophysiological correlates of mental navigation in blind and sighted people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kober, Silvia Erika; Wood, Guilherme; Kampl, Christiane; Neuper, Christa; Ischebeck, Anja

    2014-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate functional reorganization of the occipital cortex for a mental navigation task in blind people. Eight completely blind adults and eight sighted matched controls performed a mental navigation task, in which they mentally imagined to walk along familiar routes of their hometown during a multi-channel EEG measurement. A motor imagery task was used as control condition. Furthermore, electrophysiological activation patterns during a resting measurement with open and closed eyes were compared between blind and sighted participants. During the resting measurement with open eyes, no differences in EEG power were observed between groups, whereas sighted participants showed higher alpha (8-12Hz) activity at occipital sites compared to blind participants during an eyes-closed resting condition. During the mental navigation task, blind participants showed a stronger event-related desynchronization in the alpha band over the visual cortex compared to sighted controls indicating a stronger activation in this brain region in the blind. Furthermore, groups showed differences in functional brain connectivity between fronto-central and parietal-occipital brain networks during mental navigation indicating stronger visuo-spatial processing in sighted than in blind people during mental navigation. Differences in electrophysiological parameters between groups were specific for mental navigation since no group differences were observed during motor imagery. These results indicate that in the absence of vision the visual cortex takes over other functions such as spatial navigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Automatic fitting of spiking neuron models to electrophysiological recordings

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    Cyrille Rossant

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Spiking models can accurately predict the spike trains produced by cortical neurons in response to somatically injected currents. Since the specific characteristics of the model depend on the neuron, a computational method is required to fit models to electrophysiological recordings. The fitting procedure can be very time consuming both in terms of computer simulations and in terms of code writing. We present algorithms to fit spiking models to electrophysiological data (time-varying input and spike trains that can run in parallel on graphics processing units (GPUs. The model fitting library is interfaced with Brian, a neural network simulator in Python. If a GPU is present it uses just-in-time compilation to translate model equations into optimized code. Arbitrary models can then be defined at script level and run on the graphics card. This tool can be used to obtain empirically validated spiking models of neurons in various systems. We demonstrate its use on public data from the INCF Quantitative Single-Neuron Modeling 2009 competition by comparing the performance of a number of neuron spiking models.

  19. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.M.

    1984-11-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  20. Convergence of circuit dysfunction in ASD: a common bridge between diverse genetic and environmental risk factors and common clinical electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Russell G.; Gandal, Michael J.; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Siegel, Steven J.; Carlson, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Most recent estimates indicate that 1 in 68 children are affected by an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Though decades of research have uncovered much about these disorders, the pathological mechanism remains unknown. Hampering efforts is the seeming inability to integrate findings over the micro to macro scales of study, from changes in molecular, synaptic and cellular function to large-scale brain dysfunction impacting sensory, communicative, motor and cognitive activity. In this review, we describe how studies focusing on neuronal circuit function provide unique context for identifying common neurobiological disease mechanisms of ASD. We discuss how recent EEG and MEG studies in subjects with ASD have repeatedly shown alterations in ensemble population recordings (both in simple evoked related potential latencies and specific frequency subcomponents). Because these disease-associated electrophysiological abnormalities have been recapitulated in rodent models, studying circuit differences in these models may provide access to abnormal circuit function found in ASD. We then identify emerging in vivo and ex vivo techniques, focusing on how these assays can characterize circuit level dysfunction and determine if these abnormalities underlie abnormal clinical electrophysiology. Such circuit level study in animal models may help us understand how diverse genetic and environmental risks can produce a common set of EEG, MEG and anatomical abnormalities found in ASD. PMID:25538564

  1. Conductive Hearing Loss during Infancy: Effects on Later Auditory Brain Stem Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarson, Adele D.; Finitzo, Terese

    1991-01-01

    Long-term effects on auditory electrophysiology from early fluctuating hearing loss were studied in 27 children, aged 5 to 7 years, who had been evaluated originally in infancy. Findings suggested that early fluctuating hearing loss disrupts later auditory brain stem electrophysiology. (Author/DB)

  2. The assessment of visually impaired persons working capacities using electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Razumovsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim was to analyze working capacities of visually impaired persons by means of complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics eye examination.Materials and methods. Standard clinical ophthalmologic examination (visual acuity measurement, refractometry, biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy as well as electrophysiological (electrooculography, electrical sensitivity of the eye, critical flicker fusion frequency and ophthalmic ergonomics tests (accommodation measurement, professional testing using automated system «Proftest-1» were performed.Results. Complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics tests were performed in 20 visually impaired persons. Their results revealed direct correlation between electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics indices.Conclusion. Working capacities of visually impaired persons can be assessed reliably using complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics eye examination only.

  3. The assessment of visually impaired persons working capacities using electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Razumovsky

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim was to analyze working capacities of visually impaired persons by means of complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics eye examination.Materials and methods. Standard clinical ophthalmologic examination (visual acuity measurement, refractometry, biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy as well as electrophysiological (electrooculography, electrical sensitivity of the eye, critical flicker fusion frequency and ophthalmic ergonomics tests (accommodation measurement, professional testing using automated system «Proftest-1» were performed.Results. Complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics tests were performed in 20 visually impaired persons. Their results revealed direct correlation between electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics indices.Conclusion. Working capacities of visually impaired persons can be assessed reliably using complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics eye examination only.

  4. Minimum Information about a Cardiac Electrophysiology Experiment (MICEE): standardised reporting for model reproducibility, interoperability, and data sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quinn, T. A.; Granite, S.; Allessie, M. A.; Antzelevitch, C.; Bollensdorff, C.; Bub, G.; Burton, R. A. B.; Cerbai, E.; Chen, P. S.; Delmar, M.; DiFrancesco, D.; Earm, Y. E.; Efimov, I. R.; Egger, M.; Entcheva, E.; Fink, M.; Fischmeister, R.; Franz, M. R.; Garny, A.; Giles, W. R.; Hannes, T.; Harding, S. E.; Hunter, P. J.; Iribe, G.; Jalife, J.; Johnson, C. R.; Kass, R. S.; Kodama, I.; Koren, G.; Lord, P.; Markhasin, V. S.; Matsuoka, S.; McCulloch, A. D.; Mirams, G. R.; Morley, G. E.; Nattel, S.; Noble, D.; Olesen, S. P.; Panfilov, A. V.; Trayanova, N. A.; Ravens, U.; Richard, S.; Rosenbaum, D. S.; Rudy, Y.; Sachs, F.; Sachse, F. B.; Saint, D. A.; Schotten, U.; Solovyova, O.; Taggart, P.; Tung, L.; Varró, A.; Volders, P. G.; Wang, K.; Weiss, J. N.; Wettwer, E.; White, E.; Wilders, R.; Winslow, R. L.; Kohl, P.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac experimental electrophysiology is in need of a well-defined Minimum Information Standard for recording, annotating, and reporting experimental data. As a step towards establishing this, we present a draft standard, called Minimum Information about a Cardiac Electrophysiology Experiment

  5. Effects of positive mood on probabilistic learning: behavioral and electrophysiological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakic, Jasmina; Jepma, Marieke; De Raedt, Rudi; Pourtois, Gilles

    2014-12-01

    Whether positive mood can change reinforcement learning or not remains an open question. In this study, we used a probabilistic learning task and explored whether positive mood could alter the way positive versus negative feedback was used to guide learning. This process was characterized both at the behavioral and electro-encephalographic levels. Thirty two participants were randomly allocated either to a positive or a neutral (control) mood condition. Behavioral results showed that while learning performance was balanced between the two groups, participants in the positive mood group had a higher learning rate than participants in the neutral mood group. At the electrophysiological level, we found that positive mood increased the error-related negativity when the stimulus-response associations were deterministic, selectively (as opposed to random or probabilistic). However, it did not influence the feedback-related negativity. These new findings are discussed in terms of an enhanced internal reward prediction error signal after the induction of positive mood when the probability of getting a reward is high. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Central Nervous System Underpinnings of Sensory Hypersensitivity in Migraine: Insights from Neuroimaging and Electrophysiological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarquay, Geneviève; Mauguière, François

    2016-10-01

    Whereas considerable data have been generated about the pathophysiology of pain processing during migraine attacks, relatively little is known about the neural basis of sensory hypersensitivity. In migraine, the term "hypersensitivity" encompasses different and probably distinct pathophysiological aspects of sensory sensitivity. During attacks, many patients have enhanced sensitivity to visual, auditory and/or olfactory stimuli, which can enhance headache while interictally, migraineurs often report abnormal sensitivity to environmental stimuli that can cause nonpainful discomfort. In addition, sensorial stimuli can influence and trigger the onset of migraine attacks. The pathophysiological mechanisms and the origin of such sensitivity (individual predisposition to develop migraine disease or consequence of repeated migraine attacks) are ill understood. Functional neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies allow for noninvasive measures of neuronal responses to external stimuli and have contributed to our understanding of mechanisms underlying sensory hypersensitivity in migraine. The purpose of this review is to present pivotal neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies that explored the basal state of brain responsiveness to sensory stimuli in migraineurs, the alterations in habituation and attention to sensory inputs, the fluctuations of responsiveness to sensory stimuli before and during migraine attacks, and the relations between sensory hypersensitivity and clinical sensory complaints. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  7. Neuroprotective effects of riluzole: an electrophysiological and histological analysis in an in vitro model of ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalchi, A; Zona, C; Sancesario, G; D'Angelo, E; Zeng, Y C; Mercuri, N B; Bernardi, G

    1999-06-01

    The protective effects of riluzole against the neuronal damage caused by O2 and glucose deprivation (ischemia) was investigated in rat cortical slices by recording electrophysiologically the cortico-cortical field potential and by evaluating histologically the severity of neuronal death. Five minutes of ischemia determined an irreversible depression of the amplitude of the field potential. In addition, this insult caused a clear enhancement of the number of death cells that were specifically colored with trypan blue (a vital colorant which stains altered cells). We found that riluzole, which by itself depressed the synaptic transmission, neuroprotected when perfused 15-20 min before and during ischemia. In fact, due to the treatment with riluzole, the ischemia-induced irreversible depression of the field potential recovered and less cells were stained with trypan blue. These findings demonstrate that riluzole prevents neuronal death in an in vitro model of ischemia and suggest a therapeutic use of this drug in order to reduce the pathophysiological outcomes of stroke.

  8. Clinical and electrophysiological aspects of tics in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safiullina, G I; Safiullina, A A

    2015-01-01

    Tics are diverse in nature inappropriate movements or vocalizations. They significantly degrade patients' quality of life, lead to social difficulties, and disturbance of learning especially during exacerbations. The prevalence of tics among children ranges from 4% to 24%, thus emphasizing the relevance of the problem. To study clinical and electrophysiological features of tics in children with development of new treatment methods. We conducted a comprehensive clinical and electrophysiological examination of 50 patients with tics, aged 5 to 15 years. The control group consisted of 20 healthy children. The research included a thorough study of the history, neurological examination, manual testing of skeletal muscles, psychological testing. Electrophysiological examination included a review of the functional state of corticospinal tract (CST) by the method of magnetic stimulation (MS), study of polysynaptic reflex excitability (PRE) according to a late component of the blink reflex (BR). Statistical analysis included parametric and nonparametric methods of data processing. All children of the study group showed signs of minimal brain dysfunction (MBD), they had complicated antenatal and postnatal history (trauma, disease, occurring with intoxication). There was a trend towards the increase of MBD signs with worsening of tics. Manual diagnosis in patients identified functional blockade at different levels of the vertebral column, sacroiliac joints, we identified latent myofascial trigger points (MFTP) mainly in the cervical-collar zone, in the area of the paravertebral muscles, periosteal triggers in the area of the sacroiliac joints.The research allowed determining decrease in propagation velocity of excitation (PVE) throughout CST in patients with tics. Correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between the severity of tics and PVE (r = -0.38; p tics: I - low and moderate type of reflex responses; and II - high type of reflex responses. Collation of data

  9. Early postnatal development of electrophysiological and histological properties of sensory sural nerves in male rats that were maternally deprived and artificially reared: Role of tactile stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempoalteca, Rene; Porras, Mercedes G; Moreno-Pérez, Suelem; Ramirez-Funez, Gabriela; Aguirre-Benítez, Elsa L; González Del Pliego, Margarita; Mariscal-Tovar, Silvia; Mendoza-Garrido, Maria E; Hoffman, Kurt Leroy; Jiménez-Estrada, Ismael; Melo, Angel I

    2018-04-01

    Early adverse experiences disrupt brain development and behavior, but little is known about how such experiences impact on the development of the peripheral nervous system. Recently, we found alterations in the electrophysiological and histological characteristics of the sensory sural (SU) nerve in maternally deprived, artificially reared (AR) adult male rats, as compared with maternally reared (MR) control rats. In the present study, our aim was to characterize the ontogeny of these alterations. Thus, male pups of four postnatal days (PND) were (1) AR group, (2) AR and received daily tactile stimulation to the body and anogenital region (AR-Tactile group); or (3) reared by their mother (MR group). At PND 7, 14, or 21, electrophysiological properties and histological characteristics of the SU nerves were assessed. At PND 7, the electrophysiological properties and most histological parameters of the SU nerve did not differ among MR, AR, and AR-Tactile groups. By contrast, at PND 14 and/or 21, the SU nerve of AR rats showed a lower CAP amplitude and area, and a significant reduction in myelin area and myelin thickness, which were accompanied by a reduction in axon area (day 21 only) compared to the nerves of MR rats. Tactile stimulation (AR-Tactile group) partially prevented most of these alterations. These results suggest that sensory cues from the mother and/or littermates during the first 7-14 PND are relevant for the proper development and function of the adult SU nerve. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 78: 351-362, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Low-energy x-ray irradiation for electrophysiological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauer, D.A.; Zeman, G.H.; Pellmar, T.C.

    1989-01-01

    High-dose-rate acute whole-body exposures have been the main focus of radiobiology research conducted at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) for many years. Extensive quantitative studies have been conducted analyzing behavioral effects, radiation-induced syndromes, and combined injury phenomena. Tolliver and Pellmar initiated a study to evaluate radiation damage to brain neurophysiology. A 50-kVp molybdenum target/filter x-ray tube was installed inside a lead-shielded Faraday cage. High-dose rates of up to 1.54 Gy/min (17.4-keV weighted average photons) were used to conduct local in vitro irradiations of the hippocampal region of guinea pig brains. Electrophysiological recordings of subtle changes in neuronal activity indicate this system is suitable for this application.

  11. Electrophysiological correlates of error processing in borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchsow, Martin; Walter, Henrik; Buchheim, Anna; Martius, Philipp; Spitzer, Manfred; Kächele, Horst; Grön, Georg; Kiefer, Markus

    2006-05-01

    The electrophysiological correlates of error processing were investigated in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) using event-related potentials (ERP). Twelve patients with BPD and 12 healthy controls were additionally rated with the Barratt impulsiveness scale (BIS-10). Participants performed a Go/Nogo task while a 64 channel EEG was recorded. Three ERP components were of special interest: error-related negativity (ERN)/error negativity (Ne), early error positivity (early Pe) reflecting automatic error processing, and the late Pe component which is thought to mirror the awareness of erroneous responses. We found smaller amplitudes of the ERN/Ne in patients with BPD compared to controls. Moreover, significant correlations with the BIS-10 non-planning sub-score could be demonstrated for both the entire group and the patient group. No between-group differences were observed for the early and late Pe components. ERP measures appear to be a suitable tool to study clinical time courses in BPD.

  12. Extracellular Electrophysiological Measurements of Cooperative Signals in Astrocytes Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Ana L. G.; Inácio, Pedro M. C.; Elamine, Youssef; Asgarifar, Sanaz; Lourenço, Ana S.; Cristiano, Maria L. S.; Aguiar, Paulo; Medeiros, Maria C. R.; Araújo, Inês M.; Ventura, João; Gomes, Henrique L.

    2017-01-01

    Astrocytes are neuroglial cells that exhibit functional electrical properties sensitive to neuronal activity and capable of modulating neurotransmission. Thus, electrophysiological recordings of astroglial activity are very attractive to study the dynamics of glial signaling. This contribution reports on the use of ultra-sensitive planar electrodes combined with low noise and low frequency amplifiers that enable the detection of extracellular signals produced by primary cultures of astrocytes isolated from mouse cerebral cortex. Recorded activity is characterized by spontaneous bursts comprised of discrete signals with pronounced changes on the signal rate and amplitude. Weak and sporadic signals become synchronized and evolve with time to higher amplitude signals with a quasi-periodic behavior, revealing a cooperative signaling process. The methodology presented herewith enables the study of ionic fluctuations of population of cells, complementing the single cells observation by calcium imaging as well as by patch-clamp techniques. PMID:29109679

  13. Electrophysiology of blunted emotional bias in psychopathic personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Patrick L; Jaspers-Fayer, Fern; Asmaro, Deyar T; Douglas, Kevin S; Liotti, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Diminished emotional capacity is a core characteristic of psychopathic personality. We examined behavioral and electrophysiological differences in attentional bias to emotional material in 34 healthy individuals rated high or low in psychopathic traits using the short form of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (18 high-trait, 16 low-trait). While performing an emotional Stroop task, high-trait participants displayed reduced emotional modulation of the late positive potential (LPP, 400-600 ms), and early anterior positivity (EAP, 200-300 ms) amplitudes. Results suggest blunted bias to affective content in psychopathic personality, characterized by diminished early capture to emotional salience (EAP) and dampened cognitive emotional processing (LPP). Copyright © 2013 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  14. An electrophysiological signature for proactive interference resolution in working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yingchun; Xiao, Zhuangwei; Song, Yan; Fan, Silu; Wu, Renhua; Zhang, John X

    2008-08-01

    We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to study the temporal dynamics of proactive interference in working memory. Participants performed a Sternberg item-recognition task to determine whether a probe was in a target memory set. Familiar negative probes were found to be more difficult to reject than less familiar ones. A fronto-central N2 component peaking around 300 ms post-probe-onset differentiated among target probes, familiar and less familiar non-target probes. The study identifies N2 as the ERP signature for proactive interference resolution. It also indicates that the resolution process occurs in the same time window as target/non-target discrimination and provides the first piece of electrophysiological evidence supporting a recent interference resolution model based on localization data [Jonides, J., Nee, D.E., 2006. Brain mechanisms of proactive interference in working memory. Neuroscience 139, 181-193].

  15. Alternans promotion in cardiac electrophysiology models by delay differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Johnny M.; dos Santos, Rodrigo Weber; Cherry, Elizabeth M.

    2017-09-01

    Cardiac electrical alternans is a state of alternation between long and short action potentials and is frequently associated with harmful cardiac conditions. Different dynamic mechanisms can give rise to alternans; however, many cardiac models based on ordinary differential equations are not able to reproduce this phenomenon. A previous study showed that alternans can be induced by the introduction of delay differential equations (DDEs) in the formulations of the ion channel gating variables of a canine myocyte model. The present work demonstrates that this technique is not model-specific by successfully promoting alternans using DDEs for five cardiac electrophysiology models that describe different types of myocytes, with varying degrees of complexity. By analyzing results across the different models, we observe two potential requirements for alternans promotion via DDEs for ionic gates: (i) the gate must have a significant influence on the action potential duration and (ii) a delay must significantly impair the gate's recovery between consecutive action potentials.

  16. Electrophysiological Techniques for Studying Synaptic Activity In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeggo, Ross; Zhao, Fei-Yue; Spanswick, David

    2014-03-03

    Understanding the physiology, pharmacology, and plasticity associated with synaptic function is a key goal of neuroscience research and is fundamental to identifying the processes involved in the development and manifestation of neurological disease. A diverse range of electrophysiological methodologies are used to study synaptic function. Described in this unit is a technique for recording electrical activity from a single component of the central nervous system that is used to investigate pre- and post-synaptic elements of synaptic function. A strength of this technique is that it can be used on live animals, although the effect of anesthesia must be taken into consideration when interpreting the results. This methodology can be employed not only in naïve animals for studying normal physiological synaptic function, but also in a variety of disease models, including transgenic animals, to examine dysfunctional synaptic plasticity associated with neurological pathologies. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Alternans promotion in cardiac electrophysiology models by delay differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Johnny M; Dos Santos, Rodrigo Weber; Cherry, Elizabeth M

    2017-09-01

    Cardiac electrical alternans is a state of alternation between long and short action potentials and is frequently associated with harmful cardiac conditions. Different dynamic mechanisms can give rise to alternans; however, many cardiac models based on ordinary differential equations are not able to reproduce this phenomenon. A previous study showed that alternans can be induced by the introduction of delay differential equations (DDEs) in the formulations of the ion channel gating variables of a canine myocyte model. The present work demonstrates that this technique is not model-specific by successfully promoting alternans using DDEs for five cardiac electrophysiology models that describe different types of myocytes, with varying degrees of complexity. By analyzing results across the different models, we observe two potential requirements for alternans promotion via DDEs for ionic gates: (i) the gate must have a significant influence on the action potential duration and (ii) a delay must significantly impair the gate's recovery between consecutive action potentials.

  18. Electrophysiologic studies of the thoracic limb of the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blythe, L L; Kitchell, R L

    1982-09-01

    The cutaneous innervation of the thoracic limb was investigated in 18 barbiturate-anesthetized horses, using electrophysiologic techniques. The cutaneous area (CA) innervated by each cutaneous nerve was delineated in at least 4 horses by stroking the hairs with a small watercolor brush while recording from the nerve. Mapping of adjacent CA revealed areas of considerable overlap. The part of a CA of a given nerve supplied only by that nerve is referred to as its autonomous zone (AZ). In contrast to the standard textbook illustrations cutaneous branches of the axillary, radial, musculocutaneous, and ulnar nerves overlapped extensively in the antebrachium. Clinically testable AZ were found in the antebrachium for the caudal cutaneous antebrachial nerve of the ulnar nerve and in the carpus and manus for the cutaneous branches of the median, ulnar, and musculocutaneous nerves; AZ were not found for the cutaneous branches of the radial and axillary nerves.

  19. Extracellular Electrophysiological Measurements of Cooperative Signals in Astrocytes Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L. G. Mestre

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are neuroglial cells that exhibit functional electrical properties sensitive to neuronal activity and capable of modulating neurotransmission. Thus, electrophysiological recordings of astroglial activity are very attractive to study the dynamics of glial signaling. This contribution reports on the use of ultra-sensitive planar electrodes combined with low noise and low frequency amplifiers that enable the detection of extracellular signals produced by primary cultures of astrocytes isolated from mouse cerebral cortex. Recorded activity is characterized by spontaneous bursts comprised of discrete signals with pronounced changes on the signal rate and amplitude. Weak and sporadic signals become synchronized and evolve with time to higher amplitude signals with a quasi-periodic behavior, revealing a cooperative signaling process. The methodology presented herewith enables the study of ionic fluctuations of population of cells, complementing the single cells observation by calcium imaging as well as by patch-clamp techniques.

  20. Toxicity of marine pollutants on the ascidian oocyte physiology: an electrophysiological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Alessandra

    2018-02-01

    In marine animals with external fertilization, gametes are released into seawater where fertilization and embryo development occur. Consequently, pollutants introduced into the marine environment by human activities may affect gametes and embryos. These xenobiotics can alter cell physiology with consequent reduction of fertilization success. Here the adverse effects on the reproductive processes of the marine invertebrate Ciona intestinalis (ascidian) of different xenobiotics: lead, zinc, an organic tin compound and a phenylurea herbicide were evaluated. By using the electrophysiological technique of whole-cell voltage clamping, the effects of these compounds on the mature oocyte plasma membrane electrical properties and the electrical events of fertilization were tested by calculating the concentration that induced 50% normal larval formation (EC50). The results demonstrated that sodium currents in mature oocytes were reduced in a concentration-dependent manner by all tested xenobiotics, with the lowest EC50 value for lead. In contrast, fertilization current frequencies were differently affected by zinc and organic tin compound. Toxicity tests on gametes demonstrated that sperm fertilizing capability and fertilization oocyte competence were not altered by xenobiotics, whereas fertilization was inhibited in zinc solution and underwent a reduction in organic tin compound solution (EC50 value of 1.7 µM). Furthermore, fertilized oocytes resulted in a low percentage of normal larvae with an EC50 value of 0.90 µM. This study shows that reproductive processes of ascidians are highly sensitive to xenobiotics suggesting that they may be considered a reliable biomarker and that ascidians are suitable model organisms to assess marine environmental quality.

  1. Waveform Integrity in Atrial Fibrillation: The Forgotten Issue of Cardiac Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Iniesta, Miguel; Ródenas, Juan; Alcaraz, Raúl; Rieta, José J

    2017-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in clinical practice with an increasing prevalence of about 15% in the elderly. Despite other alternatives, catheter ablation is currently considered as the first-line therapy for the treatment of AF. This strategy relies on cardiac electrophysiology systems, which use intracardiac electrograms (EGM) as the basis to determine the cardiac structures contributing to sustain the arrhythmia. However, the noise-free acquisition of these recordings is impossible and they are often contaminated by different perturbations. Although suppression of nuisance signals without affecting the original EGM pattern is essential for any other later analysis, not much attention has been paid to this issue, being frequently considered as trivial. The present work introduces the first thorough study on the significant fallout that regular filtering, aimed at reducing acquisition noise, provokes on EGM pattern morphology. This approach has been compared with more refined denoising strategies. Performance has been assessed both in time and frequency by well established parameters for EGM characterization. The study comprised synthesized and real EGMs with unipolar and bipolar recordings. Results reported that regular filtering altered substantially atrial waveform morphology and was unable to remove moderate amounts of noise, thus turning time and spectral characterization of the EGM notably inaccurate. Methods based on Wavelet transform provided the highest ability to preserve EGM morphology with improvements between 20 and beyond 40%, to minimize dominant atrial frequency estimation error with up to 25% reduction, as well as to reduce huge levels of noise with up to 10 dB better reduction. Consequently, these algorithms are recommended as a replacement of regular filtering to avoid significant alterations in the EGMs. This could lead to more accurate and truthful analyses of atrial activity dynamics aimed at understanding and

  2. Reentrant Information Flow in Electrophysiological Rat Default Mode Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Wei; Guo, Daqing; Zhang, Yunxiang; Guo, Fengru; Valdés-Sosa, Pedro A; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2017-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) studies have demonstrated that the rodent brain shows a default mode network (DMN) activity similar to that in humans, offering a potential preclinical model both for physiological and pathophysiological studies. However, the neuronal mechanism underlying rodent DMN remains poorly understood. Here, we used electrophysiological data to analyze the power spectrum and estimate the directed phase transfer entropy (dPTE) within rat DMN across three vigilance states: wakeful rest (WR), slow-wave sleep (SWS), and rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS). We observed decreased gamma powers during SWS compared with WR in most of the DMN regions. Increased gamma powers were found in prelimbic cortex, cingulate cortex, and hippocampus during REMS compared with WR, whereas retrosplenial cortex showed a reverse trend. These changed gamma powers are in line with the local metabolic variation of homologous brain regions in humans. In the analysis of directional interactions, we observed well-organized anterior-to-posterior patterns of information flow in the delta band, while opposite patterns of posterior-to-anterior flow were found in the theta band. These frequency-specific opposite patterns were only observed in WR and REMS. Additionally, most of the information senders in the delta band were also the receivers in the theta band, and vice versa. Our results provide electrophysiological evidence that rat DMN is similar to its human counterpart, and there is a frequency-dependent reentry loop of anterior-posterior information flow within rat DMN, which may offer a mechanism for functional integration, supporting conscious awareness.

  3. Electrophysiological assessment of sexual dysfunction in spinal cord injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, I; Yagiz On, A; Altay, B; Ozdedeli, K

    2007-04-01

    Survey. To determine associations between sexual dysfunctions and electrophysiological examinations of the genital system in spinal cord injured patients. Ege University Hospital, Izmir, Turkey. In total, 25 patients (17 men, eight women) who were out of the spinal shock period were examined. Neurological levels were determined according to the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale. Data about erection, ejaculation and vaginal lubrication were obtained via inquiry forms. Bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR), pudendal somatosensorial evoked potentials (pSEP) and perineal sympathetic skin responses (pSSR) were recorded by an electromyographer unaware of the sexual state or neurological level of the patient. BCRs could be obtained from all patients with lesion levels above the sacral centre. A significant association was found between reflex erection and BCR positivity, while psychogenic erection was shown to have a significant association with the preservation of pSSR in men. Despite the lack of statistical significance due to the small sample size of the women examined, a similar association with lubrication was observed. Ejaculation and orgasm were not shown to be significantly associated with any electrophysiological examination. However, ejaculation was preserved in all men with a lesion level below T12 and with positive pSSR. There was no significant relationship between pSEP and sexual functions. The relationship between the existence of sacral sensation and pSEP positivity was statistically significant. This study has proved that BCR and pSSR have an important role in the estimation of the remaining sexual function in spinal cord injured patients. STATEMENT ON ETHICS: We certify that all applicable institutional and governmental regulations concerning the ethical use of human volunteers were followed during the course of this research.

  4. Behavioral, Modeling, and Electrophysiological Evidence for Supramodality in Human Metacognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faivre, Nathan; Filevich, Elisa; Solovey, Guillermo; Kühn, Simone; Blanke, Olaf

    2018-01-10

    Human metacognition, or the capacity to introspect on one's own mental states, has been mostly characterized through confidence reports in visual tasks. A pressing question is to what extent results from visual studies generalize to other domains. Answering this question allows determining whether metacognition operates through shared, supramodal mechanisms or through idiosyncratic, modality-specific mechanisms. Here, we report three new lines of evidence for decisional and postdecisional mechanisms arguing for the supramodality of metacognition. First, metacognitive efficiency correlated among auditory, tactile, visual, and audiovisual tasks. Second, confidence in an audiovisual task was best modeled using supramodal formats based on integrated representations of auditory and visual signals. Third, confidence in correct responses involved similar electrophysiological markers for visual and audiovisual tasks that are associated with motor preparation preceding the perceptual judgment. We conclude that the supramodality of metacognition relies on supramodal confidence estimates and decisional signals that are shared across sensory modalities. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Metacognitive monitoring is the capacity to access, report, and regulate one's own mental states. In perception, this allows rating our confidence in what we have seen, heard, or touched. Although metacognitive monitoring can operate on different cognitive domains, we ignore whether it involves a single supramodal mechanism common to multiple cognitive domains or modality-specific mechanisms idiosyncratic to each domain. Here, we bring evidence in favor of the supramodality hypothesis by showing that participants with high metacognitive performance in one modality are likely to perform well in other modalities. Based on computational modeling and electrophysiology, we propose that supramodality can be explained by the existence of supramodal confidence estimates and by the influence of decisional cues on

  5. Incorporating inductances in tissue-scale models of cardiac electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Simone; Griffith, Boyce E.

    2017-09-01

    In standard models of cardiac electrophysiology, including the bidomain and monodomain models, local perturbations can propagate at infinite speed. We address this unrealistic property by developing a hyperbolic bidomain model that is based on a generalization of Ohm's law with a Cattaneo-type model for the fluxes. Further, we obtain a hyperbolic monodomain model in the case that the intracellular and extracellular conductivity tensors have the same anisotropy ratio. In one spatial dimension, the hyperbolic monodomain model is equivalent to a cable model that includes axial inductances, and the relaxation times of the Cattaneo fluxes are strictly related to these inductances. A purely linear analysis shows that the inductances are negligible, but models of cardiac electrophysiology are highly nonlinear, and linear predictions may not capture the fully nonlinear dynamics. In fact, contrary to the linear analysis, we show that for simple nonlinear ionic models, an increase in conduction velocity is obtained for small and moderate values of the relaxation time. A similar behavior is also demonstrated with biophysically detailed ionic models. Using the Fenton-Karma model along with a low-order finite element spatial discretization, we numerically analyze differences between the standard monodomain model and the hyperbolic monodomain model. In a simple benchmark test, we show that the propagation of the action potential is strongly influenced by the alignment of the fibers with respect to the mesh in both the parabolic and hyperbolic models when using relatively coarse spatial discretizations. Accurate predictions of the conduction velocity require computational mesh spacings on the order of a single cardiac cell. We also compare the two formulations in the case of spiral break up and atrial fibrillation in an anatomically detailed model of the left atrium, and we examine the effect of intracellular and extracellular inductances on the virtual electrode phenomenon.

  6. Novel electrophysiological approaches to clinical epilepsy. Diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Kyoko; Matsumoto, Riki; Ikeda, Akio; Kinoshita, Masako

    2011-01-01

    Seizure onset zone (SOZ) is currently defined by ictal epileptiform discharges, which are most commonly recorded as regional low-voltage fast waves or repetitive spikes. Interictal epileptiform discharges, on the other hand, are not specific enough for SOZ as they are recorded at zones other than the SOZ; they are also recorded from areas that do not generate the ictal pattern and from areas to which ictal discharges propagate. Besides spikes and sharp waves, a novel index of human epileptogenicity has been investigated in association with wide-band electroencephalography (EEG) analysis. We primarily noted the following during clinical neurophysiological analysis for clinical epilepsy. Recent development of digital EEG technology enabled us to record wide-band EEG in a clinical setting. Thus, high frequency (>200 Hz) and low frequency (<1 Hz) components can be reliably recorded using subdural electrodes. Direct current shift, slow shift, ripple, and fast ripple can be well delineated, and they will be potentially useful in the diagnosis and management of epileptic patients. Fiber tractography (morphological parameter) and cortico-cortical-evoked potentials with single cortical stimulation (electrophysiological parameter) elucidated cortico-cortical connections in human brain. The data thus obtained can help us understand the mechanism of seizure propagation and normal cortical functional connectivity. Non-invasive simultaneous recording of EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provided information on the roles of deep brain structures associated with scalp-recorded epileptiform discharges. Interventional neurophysiology can shed light on the non-pharmacological treatment of epilepsy. In this report, we discuss these novel electrophysiological approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of clinical epilepsy. (author)

  7. Motor Neuropathy in Hypothyroidism: Clinical and Electrophysiological Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Yeasmin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypothyroidism is a clinical condition associated with low levels of thyroid hormones with raised TSH. Peripheral neuropathy may be associated with hypothyroidism which usually develops insidiously over a long period of time due to irregular taking of drugs or lack of thyroid hormone replacement. Objectives: The present study was done to evaluate the clinical and electro-physiological findings in hypothyroid patients in order to evaluate the neuromuscular dysfunction as well as motor neuropathy. Method: In this study, 70 subjects with the age range from 20 to 50 years of both sexes were included of whom 40 hypothyroids were taken in study group (B with the duration of 6 months to 5 years and 30 healthy euthyroid subjects were taken as control (Group A. On the basis of their TSH level, group B was further divided into group B1 with TSH level <60 MIU /L (less severe and group B2 with TSH >60 MIU /L (severe group. The d latency and NCV for motor nerve function were measured by NCV machine in median and ulnar nerve for upper limb and in common peroneal nerve for lower limb. TT3, TT4 were measured by RIA and TSH by IRMA method. All these parameters were measured on the day 1 (one of their first visit. Data were analysed statistically by ANOVA and Z test. Result: Both TT3, TT4 levels were significantly (P<0.01 lower in hypothyroids in comparison to those of control. Diminished or absence of most of the deep tendon reflexes were found in all the hypothyroids. Most of the patients (67.5% showed significantly higher (P <0.01 motor distal latencies (MDL with lower (P> 0.001 conduction velocities (MNCV and all these changes were more marked in group B2. Conclusion: So, the study revealed that motor neuropathy may be a consequence of hypothyroidism.DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v1i1.3692 Key Words: Hypothyroidism; neuropathy; electrophysiology BSMMU J 2008; 1(1: 15-18

  8. Electrophysiologic characteristics of atria in patients without heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brembilla-Perrot, Béatrice; Beurrier, Daniel; Houriez, Pierre; Suty-Selton, Christine; Nippert, Marc; Claudon, Olivier; Andronache, Marius; Ernst, Yves; Khaldi, Emad; Belhakem, Hadj; Popovic, Batric; Terrier de la Chaise, Arnaud; Louis, Pierre

    2005-10-01

    The significance of atrial fibrillation or tachycardia (AF) induction remains debatable. Some believe that the presence of heart disease (HD) increases the sensitivity and decreases the specificity of programmed atrial stimulation (PAS). There are few data in patients without HD. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the results of PAS in asymptomatic patients without HD and in those with documented spontaneous AF, but without HD, to know the diagnosis value of the technique. A total of 4,900 PAS were consecutively performed. The control group (I, N=67) was defined by the absence of preexcitation syndrome, dizziness/syncope, hypertension, history of tachycardia, or other documented HD together with a normal 2D echocardiogram and 24-hour Holter monitoring. They were compared to a group (II) of 54 patients with documented paroxysmal AF and without HD. PAS used one and two extrastimuli, delivered during sinus rhythm and two drive rates (600, 400 ms). Atrial-effective refractory periods (ARP), their adaptation to cycle length, and conduction times were noted. AF induction was defined as the induction of AF lasting more than 1 minute. Group I patients (1.4% of 4,900) were younger than group II (51 +/- 17 vs 65 +/- 11 years, P < 0.001). A single extrastimulus never induced sustained AF in group I, but did so in 11 group II patients (20%); sustained AF was induced by two extrastimuli in 15 group I patients (22%) and in 31 group II patients (57%) (P < 0.001). There were no ARP and conduction time differences in group I patients with and without inducible AF, but there was a longer sinus cycle length in patients with inducible AF (977 +/- 164 vs 838 +/- 141 ms, P < 0.02). There were no electrophysiological differences in group II patients with and without inducible AF. No group I patient developed spontaneous AF (follow-up 4 +/- 2 years). The sensitivity of PAS with one extrastimulus was 20% and the specificity 100%; the sensitivity of PAS with two extrastimuli was 57

  9. Neuroplasticity of language in left-hemisphere stroke: Evidence linking subsecond electrophysiology and structural connections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piai, V.; Meyer, L.; Dronkers, N.F.; Knight, R.T.

    2017-01-01

    The understanding of neuroplasticity following stroke is predominantly based on neuroimaging measures that cannot address the subsecond neurodynamics of impaired language processing. We combined behavioral and electrophysiological measures and structural-connectivity estimates to characterize

  10. Audiological and electrophysiological assessment of professional pop/rock musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelli, Alessandra G; Matas, Carla G; Carvallo, Renata M M; Gomes, Raquel F; de Beija, Carolina S; Magliaro, Fernanda C L; Rabelo, Camila M

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated peripheral and central auditory pathways in professional musicians (with and without hearing loss) compared to non-musicians. The goal was to verify if music exposure could affect auditory pathways as a whole. This is a prospective study that compared the results obtained between three groups (musicians with and without hearing loss and non-musicians). Thirty-two male individuals participated and they were assessed by: Immittance measurements, pure-tone air conduction thresholds at all frequencies from 0.25 to 20 kHz, Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions, Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR), and Cognitive Potential. The musicians showed worse hearing thresholds in both conventional and high frequency audiometry when compared to the non-musicians; the mean amplitude of Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions was smaller in the musicians group, but the mean latencies of Auditory Brainstem Response and Cognitive Potential were diminished in the musicians when compared to the non-musicians. Our findings suggest that the population of musicians is at risk for developing music-induced hearing loss. However, the electrophysiological evaluation showed that latency waves of ABR and P300 were diminished in musicians, which may suggest that the auditory training to which these musicians are exposed acts as a facilitator of the acoustic signal transmission to the cortex.

  11. Audiological and electrophysiological assessment of professional pop/rock musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra G Samelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we evaluated peripheral and central auditory pathways in professional musicians (with and without hearing loss compared to non-musicians. The goal was to verify if music exposure could affect auditory pathways as a whole. This is a prospective study that compared the results obtained between three groups (musicians with and without hearing loss and non-musicians. Thirty-two male individuals participated and they were assessed by: Immittance measurements, pure-tone air conduction thresholds at all frequencies from 0.25 to 20 kHz, Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions, Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR, and Cognitive Potential. The musicians showed worse hearing thresholds in both conventional and high frequency audiometry when compared to the non-musicians; the mean amplitude of Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions was smaller in the musicians group, but the mean latencies of Auditory Brainstem Response and Cognitive Potential were diminished in the musicians when compared to the non-musicians. Our findings suggest that the population of musicians is at risk for developing music-induced hearing loss. However, the electrophysiological evaluation showed that latency waves of ABR and P300 were diminished in musicians, which may suggest that the auditory training to which these musicians are exposed acts as a facilitator of the acoustic signal transmission to the cortex.

  12. Electrophysiological correlates of cognition improve with nap during sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjwani, Usha; Ray, Koushik; Chatterjee, Abhirup; Bhaumik, Sangeet; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2010-02-01

    The efficacy of a 30-min nap as a countermeasure in the reduction of cognitive decline following 24 h of sleep deprivation (SD) on subjective sleepiness scales, event-related potential (ERP) P300, and contingent negative variation (CNV) was evaluated. The experiment was performed in three sessions on different days between 7 and 8 a.m. on nine normal, healthy males, of age 25-30 years: Session 1. Baseline recordings; Session 2, after one night's total sleep deprivation, and; Session 3, after 1 week of Session 1, following one night's sleep deprivation along with a 30-min nap opportunity between 1.00 and 3.00 a.m. Subjective sleepiness scores increased after SD as compared to baseline, but reduced significantly after nap (P effects on ERP N1, P1, N2 latencies, P2 and P3 amplitudes and CNV N1, P3, M2 peak latencies and M1, and M2 amplitudes were observed. It was concluded that a 30-min nap, between 1.00 and 3.00 a.m. during night SD, reduces the cognitive decline following 24 h of SD in terms of its electro-physiological correlates. The study is of applied value in optimization of cognitive performance in professions demanding night work schedules.

  13. Optical coherence tomography and electrophysiological findings in torpedo maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzonetti, Luca; Petroni, Sergio; Catena, Gino; Iarossi, Giancarlo

    2015-02-01

    To describe the morphofunctional findings in a 6-year-old child with a unilateral lesion of the temporal macula called "torpedo maculopathy" throughout a 1-year follow-up. Evaluation of retinal morphology and function was assessed by means of spectral-domain OCT scans, best-corrected visual acuity, full-field flash electroretinogram (ERG), multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) and pattern visual evoked potentials (VEP). Patient was examined every 4 months for a 1-year follow-up time. Torpedo maculopathy consisted in a sharply demarcated hypopigmented oval iuxta-macular lesion (1.5 DD wide × 0.7 DD high). The baseline visual acuity of the affected eye was 20/25. OCT showed a sensorial retinal detachment in correspondence with the torpedo lesion. Pattern VEPs revealed a reduced response in left eye, as compared to contralateral eye. Full-field flash ERGs amplitude was normal in both eyes. Multifocal ERG response was reduced at all sites, more significantly at the site of the lesion in the eye with torpedo maculopathy and normal in fellow eye. Visual acuity, fundoscopic evaluation, OCT scans and electrophysiological tests showed no changes from baseline throughout the follow-up time. Torpedo maculopathy, although known as benign, may affect visual function if macular involvement is associated with neuroretinal detachment.

  14. Exploring electrophysiological correlates of social cognition in subclinical schizotypy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Charlie Andrew; Kiat, John E; Tarasenko, Melissa; Ritchie, A Jocelyn; Molfese, Dennis; Spaulding, William D

    2018-03-30

    Impairments in social cognition and associated abnormalities in brain function are well documented in psychotic disorders. They may represent neurodevelopmental vulnerabilities and may therefore be present in less severe or even subclinical conditions of the schizophrenia spectrum, such as schizotypy. Schizotypy has features highly suggestive of social cognitive impairments, but little is known about possible related abnormalities of brain function. This exploratory pilot study examines electrophysiological event-related potentials (ERPs) implicated in schizophrenia, in 23 undergraduates with a range of subclinical schizotypal characteristics. ERPs were recorded in response to emotional face stimuli in an experimental paradigm designed to assess very early stages of social stimulus processing. Three ERPs were assessed, P100, N170 and P300. P100 and P300 were found to be related to multiple schizotypal features, but N170 was not. The results support occurrence of social cognitive impairments linked to abnormal brain function across the schizophrenia spectrum. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Multiplexed, high density electrophysiology with nanofabricated neural probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangang Du

    Full Text Available Extracellular electrode arrays can reveal the neuronal network correlates of behavior with single-cell, single-spike, and sub-millisecond resolution. However, implantable electrodes are inherently invasive, and efforts to scale up the number and density of recording sites must compromise on device size in order to connect the electrodes. Here, we report on silicon-based neural probes employing nanofabricated, high-density electrical leads. Furthermore, we address the challenge of reading out multichannel data with an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC performing signal amplification, band-pass filtering, and multiplexing functions. We demonstrate high spatial resolution extracellular measurements with a fully integrated, low noise 64-channel system weighing just 330 mg. The on-chip multiplexers make possible recordings with substantially fewer external wires than the number of input channels. By combining nanofabricated probes with ASICs we have implemented a system for performing large-scale, high-density electrophysiology in small, freely behaving animals that is both minimally invasive and highly scalable.

  16. An interspecies comparative study of invasive electrophysiological functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casimo, Kaitlyn; Levinson, Lila H; Zanos, Stavros; Gkogkidis, C Alexis; Ball, Tonio; Fetz, Eberhard; Weaver, Kurt E; Ojemann, Jeffrey G

    2017-12-01

    Resting-state connectivity patterns have been observed in humans and other mammal species, and can be recorded using a variety of different technologies. Functional connectivity has been previously compared between species using resting-state fMRI, but not in electrophysiological studies. We compared connectivity with implanted electrodes in humans (electrocorticography) to macaques and sheep (microelectrocorticography), which are capable of recording neural data at high frequencies with spatial precision. We specifically examined synchrony, implicated in functional integration between regions. We found that connectivity strength was overwhelmingly similar in humans and monkeys for pairs of two different brain regions (prefrontal, motor, premotor, parietal), but differed more often within single brain regions. The two connectivity measures, correlation and phase locking value, were similar in most comparisons. Connectivity strength agreed more often between the species at higher frequencies. Where the species differed, monkey synchrony was stronger than human in all but one case. In contrast, human and sheep connectivity within somatosensory cortex diverged in almost all frequencies, with human connectivity stronger than sheep. Our findings imply greater heterogeneity within regions in humans than in monkeys, but comparable functional interactions between regions in the two species. This suggests that monkeys may be effectively used to probe resting-state connectivity in humans, and that such findings can then be validated in humans. Although the discrepancy between humans and sheep is larger, we suggest that findings from sheep in highly invasive studies may be used to provide guidance for studies in other species.

  17. Electrophysiological measurement of interest during walking in a simulated environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Yuji; Okuma, Takashi; Kimura, Motohiro; Kurata, Takeshi; Takenaka, Takeshi; Iwaki, Sunao

    2014-09-01

    A reliable neuroscientific technique for objectively estimating the degree of interest in a real environment is currently required in the research fields of neuroergonomics and neuroeconomics. Toward the development of such a technique, the present study explored electrophysiological measures that reflect an observer's interest in a nearly-real visual environment. Participants were asked to walk through a simulated shopping mall and the attractiveness of the shopping mall was manipulated by opening and closing the shutters of stores. During the walking task, participants were exposed to task-irrelevant auditory probes (two-stimulus oddball sequence). The results showed a smaller P2/early P3a component of task-irrelevant auditory event-related potentials and a larger lambda response of eye-fixation-related potentials in an interesting environment (i.e., open-shutter condition) than in a boring environment (i.e., closed-shutter condition); these findings can be reasonably explained by supposing that participants allocated more attentional resources to visual information in an interesting environment than in a boring environment, and thus residual attentional resources that could be allocated to task-irrelevant auditory probes were reduced. The P2/early P3a component and the lambda response may be useful measures of interest in a real visual environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Electrophysiological CNS-processes related to associative learning in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Gert R J; Schachtman, Todd R

    2016-01-01

    The neurophysiology of human associative memory has been studied with electroencephalographic techniques since the 1930s. This research has revealed that different types of electrophysiological processes in the human brain can be modified by conditioning: sensory evoked potentials, sensory induced gamma-band activity, periods of frequency-specific waves (alpha and beta waves, the sensorimotor rhythm and the mu-rhythm) and slow cortical potentials. Conditioning of these processes has been studied in experiments that either use operant conditioning or repeated contingent pairings of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli (classical conditioning). In operant conditioning, the appearance of a specific brain process is paired with an external stimulus (neurofeedback) and the feedback enables subjects to obtain varying degrees of control of the CNS-process. Such acquired self-regulation of brain activity has found practical uses for instance in the amelioration of epileptic seizures, Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). It has also provided communicative means of assistance for tetraplegic patients through the use of brain computer interfaces. Both extra and intracortically recorded signals have been coupled with contingent external feedback. It is the aim for this review to summarize essential results on all types of electromagnetic brain processes that have been modified by classical or operant conditioning. The results are organized according to type of conditioned EEG-process, type of conditioning, and sensory modalities of the conditioning stimuli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cellular electrophysiological principles that modulate secretion from synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R B; Schmidt, T A; Sachse, F B; Boyle, D; Firestein, G S; Giles, W R

    2017-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a progressive disease that affects both pediatric and adult populations. The cellular basis for RA has been investigated extensively using animal models, human tissues and isolated cells in culture. However, many aspects of its aetiology and molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Some of the electrophysiological principles that regulate secretion of essential lubricants (hyaluronan and lubricin) and cytokines from synovial fibroblasts have been identified. Data sets describing the main types of ion channels that are expressed in human synovial fibroblast preparations have begun to provide important new insights into the interplay among: (i) ion fluxes, (ii) Ca 2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum, (iii) intercellular coupling, and (iv) both transient and longer duration changes in synovial fibroblast membrane potential. A combination of this information, knowledge of similar patterns of responses in cells that regulate the immune system, and the availability of adult human synovial fibroblasts are likely to provide new pathophysiological insights. © 2016 University of Calgary. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  20. Electrophysiological Correlates of Long-Term Soto Zen Meditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Adam Pasquini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to verify the electrophysiological correlates of the changes in long-term regular meditators. We use modern techniques of high-resolution electroencephalography applied to slow potentials, power spectra, and potencies related to the events. To obtain encephalographic records, we use an assembly of 128 channels in 31 subjects (17 Soto Zen Buddhist meditators. The motivation of this study was to determine whether the induced beta power would present an increase in meditators as well as a decrease in induced theta/beta ratio in absolute and relative values. However, opposite to what we expected, no significant change was found in the beta frequency. In contrast, the main findings of the study were correlations between the frequency of weekly meditation practice and the increased theta induced relative power, increase of induced power ratio (ratio theta/beta, and increase of the ratio of induced relative powers (theta/beta ratio during our task that featured an “adapted meditation,” suggesting that the meditative state of “mindfulness” is much more related to the permittivity of “distractions” by the meditators, with a deliberate reduction of attention.

  1. Three-dimensional echocardiography in the electrophysiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moukabary, Talal; Faletra, Francesco F; Kronzon, Itzhak; Thomas, Walker; Sorrell, Vincent L

    2012-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) during electrophysiology (EP) procedures is the end product of years of growth in two diverse cardiology subspecialties; namely, advanced cardiac imaging and the EP. During the past decade, progress in both fields has resulted in many important advances that have culminated in their union for a new area of growth and development. Imaging advances have provided the cardiovascular specialist with enhanced cardiac volume and function data, and more recently, 3DE capabilities with improved spatial and temporal resolution providing unprecedented spatial relationships. This latter development is valued by EP specialists in need of hitherto never required anatomic knowledge as they press forward with extraordinary expansion in their capabilities. It makes sense that by combining these two rapidly growing subspecialties, future capabilities in patient care may be achieved that would otherwise not be possible. This paper discusses the value of 3DE during EP procedures and offers the readers insight into this novel multispecialty hybrid arena. Using this model as a template, it is likely that the readers may identify other areas within their practices where periprocedural advanced imaging may afford significant dividends in patient outcomes. 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  2. Multiplexed, high density electrophysiology with nanofabricated neural probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiangang; Blanche, Timothy J; Harrison, Reid R; Lester, Henry A; Masmanidis, Sotiris C

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular electrode arrays can reveal the neuronal network correlates of behavior with single-cell, single-spike, and sub-millisecond resolution. However, implantable electrodes are inherently invasive, and efforts to scale up the number and density of recording sites must compromise on device size in order to connect the electrodes. Here, we report on silicon-based neural probes employing nanofabricated, high-density electrical leads. Furthermore, we address the challenge of reading out multichannel data with an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) performing signal amplification, band-pass filtering, and multiplexing functions. We demonstrate high spatial resolution extracellular measurements with a fully integrated, low noise 64-channel system weighing just 330 mg. The on-chip multiplexers make possible recordings with substantially fewer external wires than the number of input channels. By combining nanofabricated probes with ASICs we have implemented a system for performing large-scale, high-density electrophysiology in small, freely behaving animals that is both minimally invasive and highly scalable.

  3. Behavioral and electrophysiological correlates of sleep and sleep homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deboer, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The definition of what sleep is depends on the method that is applied to record sleep. Behavioral and (electro)-physiological measures of sleep clearly overlap in mammals and birds , but it is often unclear how these two relate in other vertebrates and invertebrates. Homeostatic regulation of sleep, where the amount of sleep depends on the amount of previous waking, can be observed in physiology and behavior in all animals this was tested in. In mammals and birds, sleep is generally subdivided into two states, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and REM sleep. In mammals the combination of behavioral sleep and the changes in the slow-wave range of the NREM sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) can explain and predict the occurrence and depth of sleep in great detail. For REM sleep this is far less clear. Finally, the discovery that slow-waves in the NREM sleep EEG are influenced locally on the cortex depending on prior waking behavior is an interesting new development that asks for an adaptation of the concept of homeostatic regulation of sleep. Incorporating local sleep into models of sleep regulation is needed to obtain a comprehensive picture.

  4. Spinocerebellar degeneration and slow saccades in three generations of a kinship: clinical and electrophysiologic findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enaytolah Niakan

    1984-09-01

    Full Text Available Four members of a family with spinocerebellar degeneration and slow saccadic eye movements are described. Detailed electrophysiological studies revealed abnormalities of neurological pathways not apparent clinically. The patients had slow saccades as mesasured electrophysiologically, as well as absence of rapid eye movements (REM despite REM stages of sleep. These studies suggest that although saccadic eye movement and REM are mediated through the pontine paramedian reticular formation, other characteristics of REM sleep are not necessarily mediated through the same neurons.

  5. Specific electrophysiological components disentangle affective sharing and empathic concern in psychopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decety, Jean; Lewis, Kimberly L; Cowell, Jason M

    2015-07-01

    Empathic impairment is one of the hallmarks of psychopathy, a personality dimension associated with poverty in affective reactions, lack of attachment to others, and a callous disregard for the feelings, rights, and welfare of others. Neuroscience research on the relation between empathy and psychopathy has predominately focused on the affective sharing and cognitive components of empathy in forensic populations, and much less on empathic concern. The current study used high-density electroencephalography in a community sample to examine the spatiotemporal neurodynamic responses when viewing people in physical distress under two subjective contexts: one evoking affective sharing, the other, empathic concern. Results indicate that early automatic (175-275 ms) and later controlled responses (LPP 400-1,000 ms) were differentially modulated by engagement in affective sharing or empathic concern. Importantly, the late event-related potentials (ERP) component was significantly impacted by dispositional empathy and psychopathy, but the early component was not. Individual differences in dispositional empathic concern directly predicted gamma coherence (25-40 Hz), whereas psychopathy was inversely modulatory. Interestingly, significant suppression in the mu/alpha band (8-13 Hz) when perceiving others in distress was positively associated with higher trait psychopathy, which argues against the assumption that sensorimotor resonance underpins empathy. Greater scores on trait psychopathy were inversely related to subjective ratings of both empathic concern and affective sharing. Overall, the study demonstrates that neural markers of affective sharing and empathic concern to the same cues of another's distress can be distinguished at an electrophysiological level, and that psychopathy alters later time-locked differentiations and spectral coherence associated with empathic concern. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Correlation between electrophysiological properties, morphological maturation, and olig gene changes during postnatal motor tract development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jun; Zhang, Yi Ping; Shields, Lisa B E; Zhang, Zoe Z; Liu, Naikui; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Feng, Shi-Qing; Shields, Christopher B

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated electrophysiological and histological changes as well as alterations of myelin relevant proteins of descending motor tracts in rat pups. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) represent descending conducting responses following stimulation of the motor cortex to responses being elicited from the lower extremities. MEP responses were recorded biweekly from postnatal (PN) week 1 to week 9 (adult). MEP latencies in PN week 1 rats averaged 23.7 ms and became shorter during early maturation, stabilizing at 6.6 ms at PN week 4. During maturation, the conduction velocity (CV) increased from 2.8 ± 0.2 at PN week 1 to 35.2 ± 3.1 mm/ms at PN week 8. Histology of the spinal cord and sciatic nerves revealed progressive axonal myelination. Expression of the oligodendrocyte precursor markers PDGFRα and NG2 were downregulated in spinal cords, and myelin-relevant proteins such as GalC, CNP, and MBP increased during maturation. Oligodendrocyte-lineage markers Olig2 and MOG, expressed in myelinated oligodendrocytes, peaked at PN week 3 and were downregulated thereafter. A similar expression pattern was observed in neurofilament M/H subunits that were extensively phosphorylated in adult spinal cords but not in neonatal spinal cords, suggesting an increase in axon diameter and myelin formation. Ultrastructural morphology in the ventrolateral funiculus (VLF) showed axon myelination of the VLF axons (99.3%) at PN week 2, while 44.6% were sheathed at PN week 1. Increased axon diameter and myelin thickness in the VLF and sciatic nerves were highly correlated to the CV (rs > 0.95). This suggests that MEPs could be a predicator of morphological maturity of myelinated axons in descending motor tracts. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Electrophysiological and microstructural features of sleep in children at high risk for depression: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesso, Gianluca; Bat-Pitault, Flora; Guyon, Aurore; Plancoulaine, Sabine; Banfi, Tommaso; Milioli, Giulia; Parrino, Liborio; Faraguna, Ugo; Franco, Patricia

    2017-08-01

    This preliminary study investigated electrophysiological and microstructural features of sleep in children and adolescents 4-18 years of age who were born to depressed mothers. A total of 31 healthy subjects (15 male and 16 female) participated in the study. In this sample, 20 children born to mothers diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) were designated as "high-risk"; 11 children born to mothers without a personal history of depression were designated as "low-risk." Polysomnography including three-channel electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded for one night at the Pediatric Sleep Unit of the University Hospital of Lyon, France. Clinical and demographic data were collected. Sleep architectural parameters were analyzed. Sleep microstructure was assessed with the scoring of cyclic alternating pattern (CAP) and CAP measures were calculated. Spectral analysis was performed, and mean EEG band power was computed for each sleep stage. Sleep electrophysiological features (slow waves and sleep spindles) were detected, and related parameters were analyzed. Data were compared between high- and low-risk groups using Student t tests. A reduction in low-frequency spindle activity and slow spindles spatio-temporal characteristics over frontal and central derivations, and an altered distribution of CAP phase A subtypes (reduction of A1 over A2-3 ratio) were observed in the high-risk group relative to the low-risk group. Limited spindles generation and increased non-rapid eye movement sleep instability, observed in children born to depressed mothers, might reflect functional anomalies in cortical plasticity that could represent a pathogenic factor or an epiphenomenon for MDD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dopaminergic modulation of mitral cell activity in the frog olfactory bulb: a combined radioligand binding-electrophysiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchamp, A.; Moyse, E.; Delaleu, J.-C.; Coronas, V.; Duchamp-Viret, P.

    1997-01-01

    Dopamine content in the amphibian olfactory bulb is supplied by interneurons scattered among mitral cells in the external plexiform/mitral cell layer. In mammals, dopamine has been found to be involved in various aspects of bulbar information processing by influencing mitral cell odour responsiveness. Dopamine action in the bulb depends directly on the localization of its receptor targets, found to be mainly of the D 2 type in mammals. The present study assessed, in the frog, both the anatomical localization of D 2 -like, radioligand-labelled receptors of dopamine and the in vivo action of dopamine on unitary mitral cell activity in response to odours delivered over a wide range of concentrations. The [ 125 I]iodosulpride-labelled D 2 binding sites were visualized on frozen sagittal sections of frog brains by film radioautography. The sites were found to be restricted to the external plexiform/mitral cell layer; other layers of the olfactory bulb were devoid of specific labelling. Electrophysiological recordings of mitral unit activity revealed that dopamine or its agonist apomorphine induced a drastic reduction of spontaneous firing rate of mitral cells in most cases without altering odour intensity coding properties of these cells. Moreover, pre-treatment with the D 2 antagonist eticlopride blocked the dopamine-induced reduction of mitral cell spontaneous activity.In the frog olfactory bulb, both anatomical localization of D 2 -like receptors and functional data on dopamine involvement in information processing differ from those reported in mammals. This suggests a phylogenetic evolution of dopamine action in the olfactory bulb. In the frog, anatomical data perfectly corroborate electrophysiological results, together strongly suggesting a direct action of dopamine on mitral cells. In a physiologically operating system, such an action would result in a global improvement of signal-to-noise ratio. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights

  9. Electrophysiological characterization of spinal neurons in different models of diabetes type 1- and type 2-induced neuropathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuelert, N; Gorodetskaya, N; Just, S; Doods, H; Corradini, L

    2015-04-16

    Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) is a devastating complication of diabetes. The underlying pathogenesis of DPN is still elusive and an effective treatment devoid of side effects presents a challenge. There is evidence that in type-1 and -2 diabetes, metabolic and morphological changes lead to peripheral nerve damage and altered central nociceptive transmission, which may contribute to neuropathic pain symptoms. We characterized the electrophysiological response properties of spinal wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons in three diabetic models. The streptozotocin (STZ) model was used as a drug-induced model of type-1 diabetes, and the BioBreeding/Worcester (BB/Wor) and Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat models were used for genetic DPN models. Data were compared to the respective control group (BB/Wor diabetic-resistant, Zucker lean (ZL) and saline-injected Wistar rat). Response properties of WDR neurons to mechanical stimulation and spontaneous activity were assessed. We found abnormal response properties of spinal WDR neurons in all diabetic rats but not controls. Profound differences between models were observed. In BB/Wor diabetic rats evoked responses were increased, while in ZDF rats spontaneous activity was increased and in STZ rats mainly after discharges were increased. The abnormal response properties of neurons might indicate differential pathological, diabetes-induced, changes in spinal neuronal transmission. This study shows for the first time that specific electrophysiological response properties are characteristic for certain models of DPN and that these might reflect the diverse and complex symptomatology of DPN in the clinic. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of rosiglitazone on cardiac electrophysiology, infarct size and mitochondrial function in ischaemia and reperfusion of swine and rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palee, Siripong; Weerateerangkul, Punate; Surinkeaw, Sirirat; Chattipakorn, Siriporn; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2011-08-01

    Rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist, has been used to treat type 2 diabetes. Despite debates regarding its cardioprotection, the effects of rosiglitazone on cardiac electrophysiology are still unclear. This study determined the effect of rosiglitazone on ventricular fibrillation (VF) incidence, VF threshold (VFT), defibrillation threshold (DFT) and mitochondrial function during ischaemia and reperfusion. Twenty-six pigs were used. In each pig, either rosiglitazone (1 mg kg(-1)) or normal saline solution was administered intravenously for 60 min. Then, the left anterior descending coronary artery was ligated for 60 min and released to promote reperfusion for 120 min. The cardiac electrophysiological parameters were determined at the beginning of the study and during the ischaemia and reperfusion periods. The heart was removed, and the area at risk and infarct size in each heart were determined. Cardiac mitochondria were isolated for determination of mitochondrial function. Rosiglitazone did not improve the DFT and VFT during the ischaemia-reperfusion period. In the rosiglitazone group, the VF incidence was increased (58 versus 10%) and the time to the first occurrence of VF was decreased (3 ± 2 versus 19 ± 1 min) in comparison to the vehicle group (P < 0.05). However, the infarct size related to the area at risk in the rosiglitazone group was significantly decreased (P < 0.05). In the cardiac mitochondria, rosiglitazone did not alter the level of production of reactive oxygen species and could not prevent mitochondrial membrane potential changes. Rosiglitazone increased the propensity for VF, and could neither increase defibrillation efficacy nor improve cardiac mitochondrial function.

  11. Multiscale electrophysiology format: an open-source electrophysiology format using data compression, encryption, and cyclic redundancy check.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Bower, Mark R; Stengel, Keith A; Worrell, Gregory A; Stead, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Continuous, long-term (up to 10 days) electrophysiological monitoring using hybrid intracranial electrodes is an emerging tool for presurgical epilepsy evaluation and fundamental investigations of seizure generation. Detection of high-frequency oscillations and microseizures could provide valuable insights into causes and therapies for the treatment of epilepsy, but requires high spatial and temporal resolution. Our group is currently using hybrid arrays composed of up to 320 micro- and clinical macroelectrode arrays sampled at 32 kHz per channel with 18-bits of A/D resolution. Such recordings produce approximately 3 terabytes of data per day. Existing file formats have limited data compression capabilities, and do not offer mechanisms for protecting patient identifying information or detecting data corruption during transmission or storage. We present a novel file format that employs range encoding to provide a high degree of data compression, a three-tiered 128-bit encryption system for patient information and data security, and a 32-bit cyclic redundancy check to verify the integrity of compressed data blocks. Open-source software to read, write, and process these files are provided.

  12. StimDuino: an Arduino-based electrophysiological stimulus isolator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinin, Anton; Lavi, Ayal; Michaelevski, Izhak

    2015-03-30

    Electrical stimulus isolator is a widely used device in electrophysiology. The timing of the stimulus application is usually automated and controlled by the external device or acquisition software; however, the intensity of the stimulus is adjusted manually. Inaccuracy, lack of reproducibility and no automation of the experimental protocol are disadvantages of the manual adjustment. To overcome these shortcomings, we developed StimDuino, an inexpensive Arduino-controlled stimulus isolator allowing highly accurate, reproducible automated setting of the stimulation current. The intensity of the stimulation current delivered by StimDuino is controlled by Arduino, an open-source microcontroller development platform. The automatic stimulation patterns are software-controlled and the parameters are set from Matlab-coded simple, intuitive and user-friendly graphical user interface. The software also allows remote control of the device over the network. Electrical current measurements showed that StimDuino produces the requested current output with high accuracy. In both hippocampal slice and in vivo recordings, the fEPSP measurements obtained with StimDuino and the commercial stimulus isolators showed high correlation. Commercial stimulus isolators are manually managed, while StimDuino generates automatic stimulation patterns with increasing current intensity. The pattern is utilized for the input-output relationship analysis, necessary for assessment of excitability. In contrast to StimuDuino, not all commercial devices are capable for remote control of the parameters and stimulation process. StimDuino-generated automation of the input-output relationship assessment eliminates need for the current intensity manually adjusting, improves stimulation reproducibility, accuracy and allows on-site and remote control of the stimulation parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Electrophysiological measurements on the ventral nerve photoreceptor of Limulus polyphemus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ClaBen-Linke, I.

    1982-03-01

    A set-up for intra- and extracellular electrophysiological measurements on the Limulus ventral nerve photoreceptor was built up. The time course of dark adaptation following light adaptation by a bright 1 or 5 s illumination was measured. The time course of dark adaptation was characterized by two different phases, a fast and a slow one. The influence of the extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/-concentration on the dark adaptation process was investigated. Only the first phase of dark adaptation was strongly dependent on the changed extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/-concentration while the second phase of dark adaptation was nearly Ca/sup 2 +/-independent. Calcium can only control the sensitivity of the cell when the intracellular concentration of Ca/sup 2 +/-ions exceeds a certain threshold. This is only true in the first relatively light-adapted phase (strong light intensity, short dark adaptation time). In the second relatively dark-adapted phase (weak light intensity, long dark adaptation time) other mechanisms such as the metabolism of the cell or action of enzymes control the sensitivity of the photoreceptor cell. The two adaptation processes are correlated to the appearance of the two components C/sub 1/ and C/sub 2/ of the receptor potential, which are influenced differently by the state of adaptation. Spike-like, regenerative signals were observed during the depolarization following the hyperpolarization which was caused by the strong light adaptation. A similar dependence of changed extracellular calcium concentration on the dark adaptation process could also be observed in those cells with regenerative events. Using the suction electrode, localization effects were investigated. Positive or negative signals could be recorded depending on the position of the suction electrode on the photoreceptor. This effect indicates that there are different membrane areas with different electrical properties.

  14. Electrophysiological and Anatomical Correlates of Spinal Cord Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardini, Mario E; Zippo, Antonio G; Valente, Maurizio; Krstajic, Nikola; Biella, Gabriele E M

    2016-01-01

    Despite the continuous improvement in medical imaging technology, visualizing the spinal cord poses severe problems due to structural or incidental causes, such as small access space and motion artifacts. In addition, positional guidance on the spinal cord is not commonly available during surgery, with the exception of neuronavigation techniques based on static pre-surgical data and of radiation-based methods, such as fluoroscopy. A fast, bedside, intraoperative real-time imaging, particularly necessary during the positioning of endoscopic probes or tools, is an unsolved issue. The objective of our work, performed on experimental rats, is to demonstrate potential intraoperative spinal cord imaging and probe guidance by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Concurrently, we aimed to demonstrate that the electromagnetic OCT irradiation exerted no particular effect at the neuronal and synaptic levels. OCT is a user-friendly, low-cost and endoscopy-compatible photonics-based imaging technique. In particular, by using a Fourier-domain OCT imager, operating at 850 nm wavelength and scanning transversally with respect to the spinal cord, we have been able to: 1) accurately image tissue structures in an animal model (muscle, spine bone, cerebro-spinal fluid, dura mater and spinal cord), and 2) identify the position of a recording microelectrode approaching and inserting into the cord tissue 3) check that the infrared radiation has no actual effect on the electrophysiological activity of spinal neurons. The technique, potentially extendable to full three-dimensional image reconstruction, shows prospective further application not only in endoscopic intraoperative analyses and for probe insertion guidance, but also in emergency and adverse situations (e.g. after trauma) for damage recognition, diagnosis and fast image-guided intervention.

  15. Electrophysiological correlates of melodic processing in congenital amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omigie, Diana; Pearce, Marcus T; Williamson, Victoria J; Stewart, Lauren

    2013-08-01

    Music listening involves using previously internalized regularities to process incoming musical structures. A condition known as congenital amusia is characterized by musical difficulties, notably in the detection of gross musical violations. However, there has been increasing evidence that individuals with the disorder show preserved musical ability when probed using implicit methods. To further characterize the degree to which amusic individuals show evidence of latent sensitivity to musical structure, particularly in the context of stimuli that are ecologically valid, electrophysiological recordings were taken from a sample of amusic and control participants as they listened to real melodies. To encourage them to pay attention to the music, participants were asked to detect occasional notes in a different timbre. Using a computational model of auditory expectation to identify points of varying levels of expectedness in these melodies (in units of information content (IC), a measure which has an inverse relationship with probability), ERP analysis investigated the extent to which the amusic brain differs from that of controls when processing notes of high IC (low probability) as compared to low IC ones (high probability). The data revealed a novel effect that was highly comparable in both groups: Notes with high IC reliably elicited a delayed P2 component relative to notes with low IC, suggesting that amusic individuals, like controls, found these notes more difficult to evaluate. However, notes with high IC were also characterized by an early frontal negativity in controls that was attenuated in amusic individuals. A correlation of this early negative effect with the ability to make accurate note expectedness judgments (previous data collected from a subset of the current sample) was shown to be present in typical individuals but compromised in individuals with amusia: a finding in line with evidence of a close relationship between the amplitude of such a

  16. A composite visualization method for electrophysiology-morphous merging of human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Weigang; Zhang, Yue; Zuo, Wangmeng; Wang, Kuanquan; Zhang, Henggui

    2017-06-08

    Electrophysiological behavior is of great importance for analyzing the cardiac functional mechanism under cardiac physiological and pathological condition. Due to the complexity of cardiac structure and biophysiological function, visualization of a cardiac electrophysiological model compositively is still a challenge. The lack of either modality of the whole organ structure or cardiac electrophysiological behaviors makes analysis of the intricate mechanisms of cardiac dynamic function a difficult task. This study aims at exploring 3D conduction of stimulus and electrical excitation reactivity on the level of organ with the authentic fine cardiac anatomy structure. In this paper, a cardiac electrical excitation propagation model is established based on the human cardiac cross-sectional data to explore detailed cardiac electrical activities. A novel biophysical merging visualization method is then presented for biophysical integration of cardiac anatomy and electrophysiological properties in the form of the merging optical model, which provides the corresponding position, spatial relationship and the whole process in 3D space with the context of anatomical structure for representing the biophysical detailed electrophysiological activity. The visualization result present the action potential propagation of the left ventricle within the excitation cycle with the authentic fine cardiac organ anatomy. In the visualized images, all vital organs are identified and distinguished without ambiguity. The three dimensional spatial position, relation and the process of cardiac excitation conduction and re-entry propagation in the anatomical structure during the phase of depolarization and repolarization is also shown in the result images, which exhibits the performance of a more detailed biophysical understanding of the electrophysiological kinetics of human heart in vivo. Results suggest that the proposed merging optical model can merge cardiac electrophysiological activity

  17. Comparison of Electrophysiological Outcomes of Tethered Cord Syndrome and Spinal Intradural Tumors: A Retrospective Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusat, Serhat; Kural, Cahit; Solmaz, Ilker; Temiz, Caglar; Kacar, Yunus; Tehli, Ozkan; Kutlay, Murat; Daneyemez, Mehmet; Izci, Yusuf

    2017-01-01

    Electrophysiological evaluation of the outcomes of spinal procedures is important for neurosurgeons. Somatosensorial evoked potentials (SSEPs) are used for electrophysiological evaluation of tethered cord syndrome (TCS) and spinal intradural tumors (SIT). The aim of this study was to document the electrophysiological outcomes of surgery for TCS and SIT and to compare the results based on the preoperative diagnosis. The data of 30 patients, who were operated for TCS and SIT between 2011 and 2013, were reviewed retrospectively. Surgical release of the spinal cord was performed for TCS and tumor removal was performed for SIT. Median and tibial nerve SSEPs at the left and right sides were measured at preoperative, early and late postoperative periods and compared statistically based on the diagnosis and the time of electrophysiological assessment. The diagnosis was TCS in 12 (40%) patients and SIT in 18 (60%) patients. There was a significant difference between preoperative, and early and late postoperative SSEPs values. Tibial nerve latencies were prolonged in the early postoperative, but shortened in the late postoperative period. In contrast, median nerve latencies were shortened in the early postoperative, but prolonged in the late postoperative period. There was no significant difference between the TCS and SIT groups based on the surgical intervention. Tibial nerve latency may be prolonged in the early postoperative period of TCS and SIT patients. However, electrophysiological changes were not predictive for these patients. Further studies with more patients are needed for other spinal lesions.

  18. Electrophysiological characterization of volume-activated chloride currents in mouse cholangiocyte cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biyi; Nicol, Grant; Cho, Won Kyoo

    2004-12-01

    Recent electrophysiological and radioisotope efflux studies have demonstrated various Cl(-) channels in cholangiocytes including volume-activated Cl(-) channels (VACC). Because VACCs play prominent roles in many vital cellular functions and physiology in cholangiocytes, we have examined their electrophysiological characteristics in mouse cholangiocytes to provide an important framework for studying in the future. The present study is to characterize VACCs expressed in the mouse bile duct cell (MBDC) line, conditionally immortalized by SV40 virus. Conventional whole cell patch-clamp techniques were used to study the electrophysiological characteristics of VACC in MBDC. When the MBDCs were exposed to hypotonic solution, they exhibited an outwardly rectified current, which was significantly inhibited by replacing chloride in the bath solution with gluconate or glutamate and by administration of classic chloride channel inhibitors 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate, glybenclamide, DIDS, and tamoxifen. These inhibitory effects were reversible with washing them out from the bath solution. Moreover, the ion selectivity of the volume-activated channel to different anions indicates that it is more permeable to SCN(-) > I(-) >/= Cl(-) > F(-) >/= acetate >/= glutamate >/= gluconate. These electrophysiological characteristics demonstrate that the volume-activated current observed is a VACC. In addition, the VACC in MBDC has electrophysiological characteristics similar to those of the VACC in human cholangiocarcinoma cell line. The present study is the first to characterize the VACC in mouse cholangiocyte and will provide an important framework for further studies to examine and understand the role of the VACC in biliary secretion and ion-transport physiology.

  19. Denervation syndromes of the shoulder girdle: MR imaging with electrophysiologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredella, M.A.; Wischer, T.K.; Stork, A.; Genant, H.K.; Tirman, P.F.J.; Fritz, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the use of MR imaging in the characterization of denervated muscle of the shoulder correlated with electrophysiologic studies.Design and patients. We studied with MR imaging five patients who presented with shoulder weakness and pain and who underwent electrophysiologic studies. On MR imaging the distribution of muscle edema and fatty infiltration was recorded, as was the presence of masses impinging on a regional nerve.Results. Acute/subacute denervation was best seen on T2-weighted fast spin-echo images with fat saturation, showing increased SI related to neurogenic edema. Chronic denervation was best seen on T1-weighted spin-echo images, demonstrating loss of muscle bulk and diffuse areas of increased signal intensity within the muscle. Three patients showed MR imaging and electrophysiologic findings of Parsonage Turner syndrome. One patient demonstrated an arteriovenous malformation within the spinoglenoid notch, impinging on the suprascapular nerve with associated atrophy of the infraspinatus muscle. The fifth patient demonstrated fatty atrophy of the teres minor muscle caused by compression by a cyst of the axillary nerve and electrophysiologic findings of an incomplete axillary nerve block.Conclusion. MR imaging is useful in detecting and characterizing denervation atrophy and neurogenic edema in shoulder muscles. MR imaging can provide additional information to electrophysiologic studies by estimating the age (acute/chronic) and identifying morphologic causes for shoulder pain and atrophy. (orig.)

  20. Alterations in neuronal activity in basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits in the parkinsonian state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Adriana; Devergnas, Annaelle; Wichmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In patients with Parkinson’s disease and in animal models of this disorder, neurons in the basal ganglia and related regions in thalamus and cortex show changes that can be recorded by using electrophysiologic single-cell recording techniques, including altered firing rates and patterns, pathologic oscillatory activity and increased inter-neuronal synchronization. In addition, changes in synaptic potentials or in the joint spiking activities of populations of neurons can be monitored as alterations in local field potentials (LFPs), electroencephalograms (EEGs) or electrocorticograms (ECoGs). Most of the mentioned electrophysiologic changes are probably related to the degeneration of diencephalic dopaminergic neurons, leading to dopamine loss in the striatum and other basal ganglia nuclei, although degeneration of non-dopaminergic cell groups may also have a role. The altered electrical activity of the basal ganglia and associated nuclei may contribute to some of the motor signs of the disease. We here review the current knowledge of the electrophysiologic changes at the single cell level, the level of local populations of neural elements, and the level of the entire basal ganglia-thalamocortical network in parkinsonism, and discuss the possible use of this information to optimize treatment approaches to Parkinson’s disease, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy. PMID:25698937

  1. Alterations in Neuronal Activity in Basal Ganglia-Thalamocortical Circuits in the Parkinsonian State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana eGalvan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In patients with Parkinson’s disease and in animal models of this disorder, neurons in the basal ganglia and related regions in thalamus and cortex show changes that can be recorded by using electrophysiologic single-cell recording techniques, including altered firing rates and patterns, pathologic oscillatory activity and increased inter-neuronal synchronization. In addition, changes in synaptic potentials or in the joint spiking activities of populations of neurons can be monitored as alterations in local field potentials, electroencephalograms or electrocorticograms. Most of the mentioned electrophysiologic changes are probably related to the degeneration of diencephalic dopaminergic neurons, leading to dopamine loss in the striatum and other basal ganglia nuclei, although degeneration of non-dopaminergic cell groups may also have a role. The altered electrical activity of the basal ganglia and associated nuclei may contribute to some of the motor signs of the disease. We here review the current knowledge of the electrophysiologic changes at the single cell level, the level of local populations of neural elements, and the level of the entire basal ganglia-thalamocortical network in parkinsonism, and discuss the possible use of this information to optimize treatment approaches to Parkinson’s disease, such as deep brain stimulation therapy.

  2. Electrophysiological properties and calcium handling of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Boum Youm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ESC-CMs hold great interest in many fields of research including clinical applications such as stem cell and gene therapy for cardiac repair or regeneration. ESC-CMs are also used as a platform tool for pharmacological tests or for investigations of cardiac remodeling. ESC-CMs have many different aspects of morphology, electrophysiology, calcium handling, and bioenergetics compared with adult cardiomyocytes. They are immature in morphology, similar to sinus nodal-like in the electrophysiology, higher contribution of trans-sarcolemmal Ca2+ influx to Ca2+ handling, and higher dependence on anaerobic glycolysis. Here, I review a detailed electrophysiology and Ca2+ handling features of ESC-CMs during differentiation into adult cardiomyocytes to gain insights into how all the developmental changes are related to each other to display cardinal features of developing cardiomyocytes.

  3. On the identification of multiple space dependent ionic parameters in cardiac electrophysiology modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Yassine; Bellassoued, Mourad; Mahjoub, Moncef; Zemzemi, Nejib

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we consider the inverse problem of space dependent multiple ionic parameters identification in cardiac electrophysiology modelling from a set of observations. We use the monodomain system known as a state-of-the-art model in cardiac electrophysiology and we consider a general Hodgkin-Huxley formalism to describe the ionic exchanges at the microscopic level. This formalism covers many physiological transmembrane potential models including those in cardiac electrophysiology. Our main result is the proof of the uniqueness and a Lipschitz stability estimate of ion channels conductance parameters based on some observations on an arbitrary subdomain. The key idea is a Carleman estimate for a parabolic operator with multiple coefficients and an ordinary differential equation system.

  4. Electrophysiologic Validation of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography during Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, V A; Jenkner, C; Honey, C R; Mädler, B

    2016-08-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging fiber tractography-assisted planning of deep brain stimulation is an emerging technology. We investigated its accuracy by using electrophysiology under clinical conditions. We hypothesized that a level of concordance between electrophysiology and DTI fiber tractography can be reached, comparable with published modeling approaches for deep brain stimulation surgery. Eleven patients underwent subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. DTI scans and high-resolution T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging was performed at 3T. Corticospinal tracts were traced. We studied electrode positions and current amplitudes that elicited corticospinal tract effects during the operation to determine relative corticospinal tract distance. Postoperatively, 3D deep brain stimulation electrode contact locations and stimulation patterns were applied for the same corticospinal tract distance estimation. Intraoperative electrophysiologic (n = 40) clinical effects in 11 patients were detected. The mean intraoperative electrophysiologic corticospinal tract distance was 3.0 ± 0.6 mm; the mean image-derived corticospinal tract distance (DTI fiber tractography) was 3.0 ± 1.3 mm. The 95% limits of agreement were ±2.4 mm. Postoperative electrophysiology (n = 44) corticospinal tract activation effects were encountered in 9 patients; 39 were further evaluated. Mean electrophysiologic corticospinal tract distance was 3.7 ± 0.7 mm; for DTI fiber tractography, it was 3.2 ± 1.9 mm. The 95% limits of agreement were ±2.5 mm. DTI fiber tractography depicted the medial corticospinal tract border with proved concordance. Although the overall range of measurements was relatively small and variance was high, we believe that further use of DTI fiber tractography to assist deep brain stimulation procedures is advisable if inherent limitations are respected. These results confirm our previously published electric field simulation studies. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  5. Distinct electrophysiological potentials for intention in action and prior intention for action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Mikkel C; Jensen, Mads; Overgaard, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The role of conscious intention in relation to motoric movements has become a major topic of investigation in neuroscience. Traditionally, reports of conscious intention have been compared to various features of the readiness-potential (RP) – an electrophysiological signal that appears before...... electrophysiological “intention potential” above the mid-frontal areas at the time participants formed a distal intention. This potential was only found when the distal intention was self-paced and not when the intention was formed in response to an external cue....

  6. Electrophysiological Data and the Biophysical Modelling of Local Cortical Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Pinotsis

    2014-03-01

    neuroscience, see e.g. [2] for a review. In summary, neural fields include horizontal intrinsic connections within layers or laminae of the cortical sheet and prescribe the time evolution of cell activity – such as mean depolarization or (average action potential density. These models characterize current fluxes as continuous processes on the cortical sheet, using partial differential equations (PDEs. The key advance that neural field models offer, over other population models (like neural masses, is that they embody spatial parameters (like the density and extent of lateral connections. This allows one to model responses not just in time but also over space. Conversely, these models are particularly useful for explaining observed cortical responses over different spatial scales; for example, with high-density recordings, at the epidural or intracortical level. However, the impact of spatially extensive dynamics is not restricted to expression over space but can also have profound effects on temporal (e.g., spectral responses at one point (or averaged locally over the cortical surface. This means that neural field models may also play a key role in the modelling of non-invasive electrophysiological data that does not resolve spatial activity directly. Our overview comprises two parts: in the first part, we use neural fields to simulate neural activity and distinguish the effects of post synaptic filtering on predicted responses in terms of synaptic rate constants that correspond to different timescales and distinct neurotransmitters. This application of neural fields follows the tradition of many studies, in which neural fields (and mean field models in general have been used to explain cortical activity based on qualitative changes of models activity induced by changes in model parameters, like synaptic efficacy and connection strengths, see e.g.[3–8] . We will focus on the links between neuronal oscillations – mediated by the lateral propagation of neuronal spiking

  7. Auditory conflict processing: behavioral and electrophysiologic manifestations of the stroop effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkin, Yael; Yaar-Soffer, Yifat; Gilat, Shlomo; Muchnik, Chava

    2010-01-01

    One of the most extensively studied phenomena in cognitive neuroscience is the Stroop effect. In an enormous corpus of literature, the Stroop task has been used to study conflict processing in the visual modality; however, scarce data exist in the auditory modality. The main goal of the present study was to investigate auditory conflict processing by means of behavioral and electrophysiologic measures elicited during standard and reversed Stroop tasks. A secondary goal was to examine practice-related effects. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from 16 adults during tasks requiring classification of word meaning or speaker's gender while ignoring the irrelevant (congruent or incongruent) speaker's gender or word meaning, respectively. The behavioral measures, reaction time and performance accuracy, were simultaneously obtained. Results indicated (1) a significant behavioral Stroop effect manifested by prolonged reaction time and reduced performance accuracy. In contrast, ERP latencies were unaffected by the processing of incongruent versus congruent stimuli, supporting postperceptual conflict processing associated with response selection and execution; (2) reduced N1 amplitude while processing incongruent versus congruent stimuli; (3) similar behavioral Stroop effects in both tasks together with nonsignificant task by stimulus type (incongruent, congruent) interactions for N1 and N4; (4) significantly prolonged N4 and reaction time together with reduced N1 amplitude in the speaker's gender task (to both congruent and incongruent stimuli) compared to those found in the word meaning task; and (5) practice-related improvement in processing efficacy based on enhanced N1 amplitude, as well as shorter N4 and reaction time. Auditory conflict processing was predominantly postperceptual and was located at the response selection and execution stages. Alterations in the N1 component, however, provided support for an auditory conflict-processing "signature" at the

  8. How to achieve ultrasound-guided femoral venous access: the new standard of care in the electrophysiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Benedict M; Child, Nicholas; Roberts, Paul R

    2017-06-01

    Bedside vascular ultrasound machines are increasingly available. They are used to facilitate safer vascular access across a number of different specialties. In the electrophysiology laboratory however, where patients are frequently anticoagulated and require the insertion of multiple venous sheaths, anatomical landmark techniques predominate. Despite the high number of vascular complications associated with electrophysiological procedures and the increasing evidence to support its use in electrophysiology, ultrasound remains underutilised. A new standard of care is required. A comprehensive technical report, providing a detailed explanation of this important technique, will provide other electrophysiology centres with the knowledge and justification for adopting ultrasound guidance as their standard practice. We review the increasing body of evidence which demonstrates that routine ultrasound usage can substantially improve the safety of femoral venous access in the electrophysiology laboratory. We offer a comprehensive technical report to guide operators through the process of ultrasound-guided venous access, with a specific focus on the electrophysiology laboratory. Additionally, we detail a novel technique which utilises real-time colour Doppler ultrasound to accurately identify needle tip location during venous puncture. The use of vascular ultrasound to guide femoral venous cannulation is rapid, inexpensive and easily learnt. Ultrasound is readily available and offers the potential to significantly reduce vascular complications in the unique setting of the electrophysiology laboratory. Ultrasound guidance to achieve femoral venous access should be the new standard of care in electrophysiology.

  9. A Review of Behavioural and Electrophysiological Studies on Auditory Processing and Speech Perception in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haesen, Birgitt; Boets, Bart; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    This literature review aims to interpret behavioural and electrophysiological studies addressing auditory processing in children and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Data have been organised according to the applied methodology (behavioural versus electrophysiological studies) and according to stimulus complexity (pure versus complex…

  10. The acute effects of intravenously administered mibefradil, a new calcium antagonist, on the electrophysiologic characteristics of the human heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenquist, M; BrembillaPerrot, B; Meinertz, T; Neugebauer, A; Crijns, HJMG; Smeets, JLRM; vanderVring, JAFM; Fromer, M; Kobrin, [No Value

    Objective: This multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study was designed to assess the acute effects of intravenous mibefradil on the electrophysiologic characteristics of the human heart. Methods: Seventy-one patients referred for routine electrophysiologic testing were

  11. Your Error’s Got me Feeling – How Empathy Relates to the Electrophysiological Correlates of Performance Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Patrizia; Bellebaum, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The error-related and feedback-related negativities (ERN and FRN) represent negative event-related potentials associated with the processing of errors and (negative) response outcomes. The neuronal source of these components is considered to be in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Monitoring one’s own behavior and the impact it may have on other people or observing other individuals perform and receive feedback for their actions may also engage empathy-related processes. Empathy is conceived of as a multifaceted construct involving both cognitive and affective components, partly also supported by the ACC. The present mini-review aims to summarize the sparse database linking the electrophysiological correlates of performance monitoring to empathy. While most studies so far provide largely indirect evidence for such an association – e.g., by pointing toward altered ERN/FRN signaling in populations characterized by deviations in empathic responding – fewer investigations establish more explicit links between the two concepts. The relationship between state and, less consistently, trait measures of empathy and action monitoring might be more pronounced for observational than for active participation. PMID:22629240

  12. Protective Effects of Proline-Rich Peptide in a Rat Model of Alzheimer Disease: An Electrophysiological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaji, Naser; Sarkissian, John; Chavushyan, Vergine; Sarkisian, Vaghinak

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly that slowly destroys memory and cognitive functions. The disease has no cure and leads to significant structural and functional brain abnormalities. To facilitate the treatment of this disease, we aimed to investigate proline-rich peptide (PRP-1) action of hypothalamus on hippocampal (HP) neurons and dynamics of their recovery, after intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of amyloid-β (Aβ). Experiments were carried out on 24 adult, male Albino rats (average weight: 230±30 g). The animals were randomly divided into 3 groups (control, Aβ, and Aβ plus PRP-1). Electrophysiological patterns of hippocampal neurons in response to stimulation of entorhinal cortex (EC) with high frequency stimulation (50 Hz) were studied. It was found that Aβ (25-35) suppresses the electrical activity of hippocampal neurons. The PRP-1 would return this activity to normal levels. In general, PRP-1 has protective effect against AD-related alterations induced by amyloid peptides. This protective effect is probably due to stimulation of the immune and glia system.

  13. Your error’s got me feeling - How empathy relates to the electrophysiological correlates of performance monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia eThoma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The error-related and feedback-related negativities (ERN and FRN represent negative event-related potentials associated with the processing of errors and (negative response outcomes. The neuronal source of these components is considered to be in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC. Monitoring one’s own behaviour and the impact it may have on other people or observing other individuals perform and receive feedback for their actions may also engage empathy-related processes. Empathy is conceived of as a multifaceted construct involving both cognitive and affective components, partly also supported by the ACC. The present mini-review aims to summarize the sparse database linking the electrophysiological correlates of performance monitoring to empathy. While most studies so far provide largely indirect evidence for such an association – e.g. by pointing towards altered ERN/ FRN signalling in populations characterized by deviations in empathic responding – fewer investigations establish more explicit links between the two concepts. The relationship between state and, less consistently, trait measures of empathy and action monitoring might be more pronounced for observational than for active participation.

  14. Non-identical smoothing operators for estimating time-frequency interdependence in electrophysiological recordings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrkanoon, S.; Breakspear, M.; Daffertshofer, A.; Boonstra, T.W.

    2013-01-01

    Synchronization of neural activity from distant parts of the brain is crucial for the coordination of cognitive activities. Because neural synchronization varies both in time and frequency, time-frequency (T-F) coherence is commonly employed to assess interdependences in electrophysiological

  15. Cardiac and electrophysiological responses to valid and invalid feedback in a time-estimation task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mies, G.W.; van der Veen, F.M.; Tulen, J.H.; Hengeveld, M.W.; van der Molen, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the cardiac and electrophysiological responses to feedback in a time-estimation task in which feedback-validity was manipulated. Participants across a wide age range had to produce 1 s intervals followed by positive and negative feedback that was valid or invalid (i.e.,

  16. Combining non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation with neuroimaging and electrophysiology: Current approaches and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Til Ole; Karabanov, Anke; Hartwigsen, Gesa; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-10-15

    Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial current stimulation (TCS) are important tools in human systems and cognitive neuroscience because they are able to reveal the relevance of certain brain structures or neuronal activity patterns for a given brain function. It is nowadays feasible to combine NTBS, either consecutively or concurrently, with a variety of neuroimaging and electrophysiological techniques. Here we discuss what kind of information can be gained from combined approaches, which often are technically demanding. We argue that the benefit from this combination is twofold. Firstly, neuroimaging and electrophysiology can inform subsequent NTBS, providing the required information to optimize where, when, and how to stimulate the brain. Information can be achieved both before and during the NTBS experiment, requiring consecutive and concurrent applications, respectively. Secondly, neuroimaging and electrophysiology can provide the readout for neural changes induced by NTBS. Again, using either concurrent or consecutive applications, both "online" NTBS effects immediately following the stimulation and "offline" NTBS effects outlasting plasticity-inducing NTBS protocols can be assessed. Finally, both strategies can be combined to close the loop between measuring and modulating brain activity by means of closed-loop brain state-dependent NTBS. In this paper, we will provide a conceptual framework, emphasizing principal strategies and highlighting promising future directions to exploit the benefits of combining NTBS with neuroimaging or electrophysiology. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantitative electrophysiological monitoring of anti-histamine drug effects on live cells via reusable sensor platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham Ba, Viet Anh; Cho, Dong-Guk; Kim, Daesan; Yoo, Haneul; Ta, Van-Thao; Hong, Seunghun

    2017-08-15

    We demonstrated the quantitative electrophysiological monitoring of histamine and anti-histamine drug effects on live cells via reusable sensor platforms based on carbon nanotube transistors. This method enabled us to monitor the real-time electrophysiological responses of a single HeLa cell to histamine with different concentrations. The measured electrophysiological responses were attributed to the activity of histamine type 1 receptors on a HeLa cell membrane by histamine. Furthermore, the effects of anti-histamine drugs such as cetirizine or chlorphenamine on the electrophysiological activities of HeLa cells were also evaluated quantitatively. Significantly, we utilized only a single device to monitor the responses of multiple HeLa cells to each drug, which allowed us to quantitatively analyze the antihistamine drug effects on live cells without errors from the device-to-device variation in device characteristics. Such quantitative evaluation capability of our method would promise versatile applications such as drug screening and nanoscale bio sensor researches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. FieldTrip: Open source software for advanced analysis of MEG, EEG, and invasive electrophysiological data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostenveld, R.; Fries, P.; Maris, E.G.G.; Schoffelen, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes FieldTrip, an open source software package that we developed for the analysis of MEG, EEG, and other electrophysiological data. The software is implemented as a MATLAB toolbox and includes a complete set of consistent and user-friendly high-level functions that allow

  19. Electrophysiologic consequences of KATP gain of function in the heart: Conduction abnormalities in Cantu syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Mark D; Zhang, Haixia; Uchida, Keita; Grange, Dorothy K; Singh, Gautam K; Nichols, Colin G

    2015-11-01

    Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in the KATP channel subunits Kir6.1 and SUR2 cause Cantu syndrome (CS), a disease characterized by multiple cardiovascular abnormalities. The purpose of this study was to better determine the electrophysiologic consequences of such GOF mutations in the heart. We generated transgenic mice (Kir6.1-GOF) expressing ATP-insensitive Kir6.1[G343D] subunits under α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) promoter control, to target gene expression specifically in cardiomyocytes, and performed patch-clamp experiments on isolated ventricular myocytes and invasive electrophysiology on anesthetized mice. In Kir6.1-GOF ventricular myocytes, KATP channels showed decreased ATP sensitivity but no significant change in current density. Ambulatory ECG recordings on Kir6.1-GOF mice revealed AV nodal conduction abnormalities and junctional rhythm. Invasive electrophysiologic analyses revealed slowing of conduction and conduction failure through the AV node but no increase in susceptibility to atrial or ventricular ectopic activity. Surface ECGs recorded from CS patients also demonstrated first-degree AV block and fascicular block. The primary electrophysiologic consequence of cardiac KATP GOF is on the conduction system, particularly the AV node, resulting in conduction abnormalities in CS patients who carry KATP GOF mutations. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Myocardial Infarct Segmentation From Magnetic Resonance Images for Personalized Modeling of Cardiac Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukwatta, Eranga; Arevalo, Hermenegild; Li, Kristina; Yuan, Jing; Qiu, Wu; Malamas, Peter; Wu, Katherine C; Trayanova, Natalia A; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy

    2016-06-01

    Accurate representation of myocardial infarct geometry is crucial to patient-specific computational modeling of the heart in ischemic cardiomyopathy. We have developed a methodology for segmentation of left ventricular (LV) infarct from clinically acquired, two-dimensional (2D), late-gadolinium enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) images, for personalized modeling of ventricular electrophysiology. The infarct segmentation was expressed as a continuous min-cut optimization problem, which was solved using its dual formulation, the continuous max-flow (CMF). The optimization objective comprised of a smoothness term, and a data term that quantified the similarity between image intensity histograms of segmented regions and those of a set of training images. A manual segmentation of the LV myocardium was used to initialize and constrain the developed method. The three-dimensional geometry of infarct was reconstructed from its segmentation using an implicit, shape-based interpolation method. The proposed methodology was extensively evaluated using metrics based on geometry, and outcomes of individualized electrophysiological simulations of cardiac dys(function). Several existing LV infarct segmentation approaches were implemented, and compared with the proposed method. Our results demonstrated that the CMF method was more accurate than the existing approaches in reproducing expert manual LV infarct segmentations, and in electrophysiological simulations. The infarct segmentation method we have developed and comprehensively evaluated in this study constitutes an important step in advancing clinical applications of personalized simulations of cardiac electrophysiology.

  1. Electrophysiological Evidence of Developmental Changes in the Duration of Auditory Sensory Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Hilary; And Others

    1999-01-01

    Investigated developmental change in duration of auditory sensory memory for tonal frequency by measuring mismatch negativity, an electrophysiological component of the auditory event-related potential that is relatively insensitive to attention and does not require a behavioral response. Findings among children and adults suggest that there are…

  2. [Clinical and electrophysiological characteristics and therapeutic analysis of 9 patients with Lewis-Sumner syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Aping; Zhang, Yingshuang; Liu, Xiangyi; Chen, Lu; Sun, Qingli; Zhang, Shuo; Fan, Dongsheng

    2016-03-22

    To investigate the clinical characteristics, electrophysiological findings and treatment response of Lewis-Sumner syndrome (LSS). Data of nine patients with LSS, who were diagnosed and treated from May 2008 to August 2014 in Department of Neurology, Peking University Third Hospital, were analyzed retrospectively, including clinical features, electrophysiological studies, pathological characteristics, therapy and follow up. The nine cases included seven males and two females, with the average age being 29 years old (18-64 years old). The follow-ups after treatment were between 6 months to 48 months. All 9 cases were asymmetrical onset, and the distal part of limbs was initially affected in 8 cases. Five cases presented with the initial symptom of sensorimotor, 3 cases with purely motor and only 1 case with sensory. The disease developed two forms: multifocal distribution and symmetrical distribution. Electrophysiological studies demonstrated conduction blocks on non-entrapment sites, involving mainly median nerve and ulnar nerve. Sural nerve biopsy presented mild demyelination without inflammatory infiltration. The symptoms of patients had some degrees of improvement after immunotherapy, and the prognosis was favorable. Lewis-Sumner syndrome presents the initial symptoms of asymmetrical sensorimotor neuropathy mostly affecting the upper extremities. Median nerve and ulnar nerve are the most common involvements. Electrophysiological studies demonstrate motor nerve conduction block. The major finding of pathology is mild demyelinated. The patients have a positive response to immunotherapy.

  3. Electrophysiological Evidence of Heterogeneity in Visual Statistical Learning in Young Children with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeste, Shafali S.; Kirkham, Natasha; Senturk, Damla; Hasenstab, Kyle; Sugar, Catherine; Kupelian, Chloe; Baker, Elizabeth; Sanders, Andrew J.; Shimizu, Christina; Norona, Amanda; Paparella, Tanya; Freeman, Stephanny F. N.; Johnson, Scott P.

    2015-01-01

    Statistical learning is characterized by detection of regularities in one's environment without an awareness or intention to learn, and it may play a critical role in language and social behavior. Accordingly, in this study we investigated the electrophysiological correlates of visual statistical learning in young children with autism…

  4. Multiplexed microfluidic device for parallel electrophysiological measurements on independent planar lipid bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prokofyev, A.V.; Schulze Greiving-Stimberg, Verena Carolin; Bomer, Johan G.; de Boer, Hans L.; van den Berg, Albert; le Gac, Severine

    2014-01-01

    Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) are excellent platforms to study ion channels in a functional environment, and for drug screening assays. However, conventional electrophysiological BLM approaches do not meet the requirements for high throughput experiments due to the large volumes utilized, and the

  5. Electrophysiological characterization of olfactory cell types in the antennae and palps of the housefly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelling, FJ; Biancaniello, G; den Otter, CJ

    2002-01-01

    A set of odours was presented to the housefly Musca domestica and the electrophysiological responses of single olfactory receptor cells in the antennae and palps were recorded. The olfactory cells in the antennae of the housefly showed a large variability of response profiles, but multidimensional

  6. NeuroElectro: a window to the world's neuron electrophysiology data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Shreejoy J; Savitskaya, Judith; Burton, Shawn D; Urban, Nathaniel N; Gerkin, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of neural circuits is determined largely by the electrophysiological properties of the neurons they contain. Understanding the relationships of these properties requires the ability to first identify and catalog each property. However, information about such properties is largely locked away in decades of closed-access journal articles with heterogeneous conventions for reporting results, making it difficult to utilize the underlying data. We solve this problem through the NeuroElectro project: a Python library, RESTful API, and web application (at http://neuroelectro.org) for the extraction, visualization, and summarization of published data on neurons' electrophysiological properties. Information is organized both by neuron type (using neuron definitions provided by NeuroLex) and by electrophysiological property (using a newly developed ontology). We describe the techniques and challenges associated with the automated extraction of tabular electrophysiological data and methodological metadata from journal articles. We further discuss strategies for how to best combine, normalize and organize data across these heterogeneous sources. NeuroElectro is a valuable resource for experimental physiologists attempting to supplement their own data, for computational modelers looking to constrain their model parameters, and for theoreticians searching for undiscovered relationships among neurons and their properties.

  7. Electrophysiological Indices of Abnormal Error-Processing in Adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Madeleine J.; Cahill, John D.; Bates, Alan T.; Jackson, Georgina M.; Calton, Timothy G.; Liddle, Peter F.; Hollis, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Background: Impaired cognitive control has been frequently observed in children and young people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and might underlie the excessive hyperactivity and impulsivity in this population. We investigated behavioural and electrophysiological indices relevant to one domain of cognitive control; namely…

  8. Electrophysiological evidence for enhanced representation of food stimuli in working memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutters, F.; Kumar, S.; Higgs, S.; Humphreys, G.W.

    2015-01-01

    Studies from our laboratory have shown that, relative to neutral objects, food-related objects kept in working memory (WM) are particularly effective in guiding attention to food stimuli (Higgs et al. in Appetite, 2012). Here, we used electrophysiological measurements to investigate the neural

  9. Electrophysiological safety of sertindole in dogs with normal and remodeled hearts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Volders, Paul G A; Stengl, Milan

    2003-01-01

    Inhibition of the potassium current IKr and QT prolongation are associated with drug-induced torsades de pointes arrhythmias (TdP) and sudden cardiac death. We investigated the cardiac electrophysiological effects of sertindole, an antipsychotic drug reported to prolong the QT interval in schizop...

  10. The key role of electrophysiology in the diagnosis of visually impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genderen, Maria; Riemslag, Frans; Jorritsma, Frank; Hoeben, Frank; Meire, Francoise; Stilma, Jan

    2006-12-01

    To describe the outcome of specialized electrophysiology in visually impaired children. We carried out a retrospective evaluation of 340 electrophysiological examinations performed in 298 children over a 3-year period (2001-2003), with regard to demographic data, referral pattern, degree of compliance, and diagnostic results. Electrophysiology was performed without sedation or anaesthesia. In electroretinograms, DTL electrodes were used in combination with online selection of responses. Visual evoked potentials testing was performed with seven active occipital electrodes. The mean age of the children was 7 +/- 5 years; 72 (24%) of the children were mentally as well as visually impaired. Main reasons for referral were suspected posterior segment disease, abnormal visual development, unexplained low vision, high myopia, and suspected albinism. Compliance was good in 302/340 (88%), partial in 24/340 (7%), and absent in 14/340 (4%) of the examinations. Of the 326 successful procedures, 215 (66%) showed abnormal results. Tapetoretinal dystrophy (22%), opticopathy (16%), congenital stationary night blindness (13%), and cone dystrophy (11%) were the most frequently established diagnoses. Albinism was confirmed in 14 of 24 suspected patients; additionally, unsuspected misrouting was found in six. In 26 (9%) of the patients, a previously established diagnosis was changed. In a specialized setting, electrophysiological examinations can be performed successfully in visually impaired children. The results are essential for the final ophthalmological diagnosis and have important consequences for rehabilitation.

  11. Electrophysiological and olfactometer responses of two histerid predators to three pine bark beetle pheromones

    Science.gov (United States)

    William P. Shepherd; Brian T. Sullivan; Richard A. Goyer; Kier D. Klepzig

    2005-01-01

    We measured electrophysiological responses in the antennae of two predaceous hister beetles, Platysoma parallelum and Plegaderus transversus, exposes to racemic mixtures of primary aggregation pheromones of scolytid bark beetle prey, ipsenol, ipsdienol, and frontalin. No significant differences were found for either histerid...

  12. NeuroElectro: A Window to the World's Neuron Electrophysiology Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreejoy J Tripathy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of neural circuits is determined largely by the electrophysiological properties of the neurons they contain. Understanding the relationships of these properties requires the ability to first identify and catalog each property. However, information about such properties is largely locked away in decades of closed-access journal articles with heterogeneous conventions for reporting results, making it difficult to utilize the underlying data. We solve this problem through the NeuroElectro project: a Python library, RESTful API, and web application (at http://neuroelectro.org for the extraction, visualization, and summarization of published data on neurons' electrophysiological properties. Information is organized both by neuron type (using neuron definitions provided by NeuroLex and by electrophysiological property (using a newly developed ontology. We describe the techniques and challenges associated with the automated extraction of tabular electrophysiological data and methodological metadata from journal articles. We further discuss strategies for how to best combine, normalize and organize data across these heterogeneous sources. NeuroElectro is a valuable resource for experimental physiologists looking to supplement their own data, for computational modelers looking to constrain their model parameters, and for theoreticians searching for undiscovered relationships among neurons and their properties.

  13. Serum cytokine contents in schizophrenia patient with metabolic syndrome and their correlation with nerve electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Yong Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze serum cytokine contents in schizophrenia patient with metabolic syndrome (MS and their correlation with nerve electrophysiology. Methods: A total of 90 chizophrenia patient with MS, including 41 cases with simple schizophrenia and 39 cases with simple metabolic syndrome were included for study. The values of nerve electrophysiology indexes and serum illness-related indexes were compared among included patients, and the correlation between the two was further analyzed. Results: Compared with simple schizophrenia group and simple MS group, P300 latency of schizophrenia with MS group was longer, and the amplitude was shorter; N2-P3 latency and amplitude were shorter (P<0.05; serum SOD, S100b, BDNF, ABAb, PAI-1, 毩-HBDH, AST, cystatin c, TG, FBG and 2hPG values of schizophrenia with MS group were higher, IGF1, HMW-APN and HDL-C levels were lower, and compared with simple schizophrenia group and simple MS group, differences were significant (P<0.05; P300 latency, P300 amplitude, N2-P3 latency and N2- P3 amplitude of schizophrenia with MS group were directly correlated with serum cytokine contents (P<0.05. Conclusions: There are significantly abnormal serum cytokines and nerve electrophysiology indexes in schizophrenia patient with MS, and nerve electrophysiology detection can be used as the means to judge disease and guide treatment.

  14. Evidence for Acute Electrophysiological and Cognitive Changes Following Routine Soccer Heading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Di Virgilio

    2016-11-01

    Discussion: Sub-concussive head impacts routine in soccer heading are associated with immediate, measurable electrophysiological and cognitive impairments. Although these changes in brain function were transient, these effects may signal direct consequences of routine soccer heading on (long-term brain health which requires further study.

  15. Selective heart rate reduction with ivabradine slows ischaemia-induced electrophysiological changes and reduces ischaemia–reperfusion-induced ventricular arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Fu Siong; Shadi, Iqbal T.; Peters, Nicholas S.; Lyon, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    Heart rates during ischaemia and reperfusion are possible determinants of reperfusion arrhythmias. We used ivabradine, a selective If current inhibitor, to assess the effects of heart rate reduction (HRR) during ischaemia–reperfusion on reperfusion ventricular arrhythmias and assessed potential anti-arrhythmic mechanisms by optical mapping. Five groups of rat hearts were subjected to regional ischaemia by left anterior descending artery occlusion for 8 min followed by 10 min of reperfusion: (1) Control n = 10; (2) 1 μM of ivabradine perfusion n = 10; (3) 1 μM of ivabradine + 5 Hz atrial pacing throughout ischaemia–reperfusion n = 5; (4) 1 μM of ivabradine + 5 Hz pacing only at reperfusion; (5) 100 μM of ivabradine was used as a 1 ml bolus upon reperfusion. For optical mapping, 10 hearts (ivabradine n = 5; 5 Hz pacing n = 5) were subjected to global ischaemia whilst transmembrane voltage transients were recorded. Epicardial activation was mapped, and the rate of development of ischaemia-induced electrophysiological changes was assessed. HRR observed in the ivabradine group during both ischaemia (195 ± 11 bpm vs. control 272 ± 14 bpm, p hearts (27.7 ± 4.3 min vs. 14.5 ± 0.6 min, p Heart rate during ischaemia is a major determinant of reperfusion arrhythmias. Heart rate at reperfusion alone was not a determinant of reperfusion VF, as neither a bolus of ivabradine nor pacing immediately prior to reperfusion significantly altered reperfusion VF incidence. This anti-arrhythmic effect of heart rate reduction during ischaemia may reflect slower development of ischaemia-induced electrophysiological changes. PMID:23402927

  16. Magnetic resonance-compatible model of isolated working heart from large animal for multimodal assessment of cardiac function, electrophysiology, and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillant, Fanny; Magat, Julie; Bour, Pierre; Naulin, Jérôme; Benoist, David; Loyer, Virginie; Vieillot, Delphine; Labrousse, Louis; Ritter, Philippe; Bernus, Olivier; Dos Santos, Pierre; Quesson, Bruno

    2016-05-15

    To provide a model close to the human heart, and to study intrinsic cardiac function at the same time as electromechanical coupling, we developed a magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible setup of isolated working perfused pig hearts. Hearts from pigs (40 kg, n = 20) and sheep (n = 1) were blood perfused ex vivo in the working mode with and without loaded right ventricle (RV), for 80 min. Cardiac function was assessed by measuring left intraventricular pressure and left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (LVEF), aortic and mitral valve dynamics, and native T1 mapping with MR imaging (1.5 Tesla). Potential myocardial alterations were assessed at the end of ex vivo perfusion from late-Gadolinium enhancement T1 mapping. The ex vivo cardiac function was stable across the 80 min of perfusion. Aortic flow and LV-dP/dtmin were significantly higher (P pressure, LV-dP/dtmax, LVEF, and kinetics of aortic and mitral valves. T1 mapping analysis showed a spatially homogeneous distribution over the LV. Simultaneous recording of hemodynamics, LVEF, and local cardiac electrophysiological signals were then successfully performed at baseline and during electrical pacing protocols without inducing alteration of MR images. Finally, (31)P nuclear MR spectroscopy (9.4 T) was also performed in two pig hearts, showing phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratio in accordance with data previously reported in vivo. We demonstrate the feasibility to perfuse isolated pig hearts in the working mode, inside an MR environment, allowing simultaneous assessment of cardiac structure, mechanics, and electrophysiology, illustrating examples of potential applications. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. The neurotoxic effects of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea on the electrophysiological property and visual signal transmission of rat's retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Ye; Chen, Tao; Liu, Bei; Yang, Guo Qing; Peng, Guanghua; Zhang, Hua; Huang, Yi Fei

    2015-01-01

    The neurotoxic effects of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) on the inner retinal neurons and related visual signal circuits have not been described in any animal models or human, despite ample morphological evidences about the MNU induced photoreceptor (PR) degeneration. With the helping of MEA (multielectrode array) recording system, we gained the opportunity to systemically explore the neural activities and visual signal pathways of MNU administrated rats. Our MEA research identified remarkable alterations in the electrophysiological properties and firstly provided instructive information about the neurotoxicity of MNU that affects the signal transmission in the inner retina. Moreover, the spatial electrophysiological functions of retina were monitored and found that the focal PRs had different vulnerabilities to the MNU. The MNU-induced PR dysfunction exhibited a distinct spatial- and time-dependent progression. In contrast, the spiking activities of both central and peripheral RGCs altered synchronously in response to the MNU administration. Pharmacological tests suggested that gap junctions played a pivotal role in this homogeneous response of RGCs. SNR analysis of MNU treated retina suggested that the signaling efficiency and fidelity of inner retinal circuits have been ruined by this toxicant, although the microstructure of the inner retina seemed relatively consolidated. The present study provided an appropriate example of MEA investigations on the toxicant induced pathological models and the effects of the pharmacological compounds on neuron activities. The positional MEA information would enrich our knowledge about the pathology of MNU induced RP models, and eventually be instrumental for elucidating the underlying mechanism of human RP. - Highlights: • We systemically explored the neural activities and visual signal pathways of MNU administrated retinas. • The focal photoreceptors had different vulnerabilities to the MNU administration.

  18. The neurotoxic effects of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea on the electrophysiological property and visual signal transmission of rat's retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Ye [Department of Ophthalmology, General Hospital of Chinese PLA, Beijing 100853 (China); Chen, Tao [Department of Clinical Aerospace Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Liu, Bei [Department of Neurosurgery and Institute for Functional Brain Disorders, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Yang, Guo Qing [Department of Clinical Aerospace Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Peng, Guanghua [Department of Ophthalmology, General Hospital of Chinese PLA, Beijing 100853 (China); Zhang, Hua [Department of Neurosurgery and Institute for Functional Brain Disorders, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Huang, Yi Fei [Department of Ophthalmology, General Hospital of Chinese PLA, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2015-07-01

    The neurotoxic effects of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) on the inner retinal neurons and related visual signal circuits have not been described in any animal models or human, despite ample morphological evidences about the MNU induced photoreceptor (PR) degeneration. With the helping of MEA (multielectrode array) recording system, we gained the opportunity to systemically explore the neural activities and visual signal pathways of MNU administrated rats. Our MEA research identified remarkable alterations in the electrophysiological properties and firstly provided instructive information about the neurotoxicity of MNU that affects the signal transmission in the inner retina. Moreover, the spatial electrophysiological functions of retina were monitored and found that the focal PRs had different vulnerabilities to the MNU. The MNU-induced PR dysfunction exhibited a distinct spatial- and time-dependent progression. In contrast, the spiking activities of both central and peripheral RGCs altered synchronously in response to the MNU administration. Pharmacological tests suggested that gap junctions played a pivotal role in this homogeneous response of RGCs. SNR analysis of MNU treated retina suggested that the signaling efficiency and fidelity of inner retinal circuits have been ruined by this toxicant, although the microstructure of the inner retina seemed relatively consolidated. The present study provided an appropriate example of MEA investigations on the toxicant induced pathological models and the effects of the pharmacological compounds on neuron activities. The positional MEA information would enrich our knowledge about the pathology of MNU induced RP models, and eventually be instrumental for elucidating the underlying mechanism of human RP. - Highlights: • We systemically explored the neural activities and visual signal pathways of MNU administrated retinas. • The focal photoreceptors had different vulnerabilities to the MNU administration.

  19. Subjective symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome correlate more with psychological factors than electrophysiological severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Firosh; Shehna, Abdulkhader; Ramesh, Sivaramakrishnan; Sandhya, Kakkassery Sankaran; Paul, Reji

    2017-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy and is one of the most common requests for electrodiagnosis. We aimed to note the relationship of subjective symptom severity of CTS, with objective electrophysiological severity and psychological status of patients. One hundred and forty-four consecutive patients of CTS referred to neurophysiology laboratory of a tertiary care hospital over 1 year were prospectively studied. Boston CTS Assessment Questionnaire (BCTSAQ) and visual analog scale (VAS) were used to assess subjective symptom severity. Psychological status was assessed by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Electrophysiological severity of CTS was estimated by median motor distal latency and median to ulnar peak sensory latency difference across the wrist. Each parameter in both hands was scored from 0 to 3 depending on the severity grade, and a composite electrophysiological severity score (CEPSS) was calculated for each patient by summing up the scores in both hands. Statistical analysis was done by Spearman's rank correlation test. There was significant correlation of BCTSAQ with VAS ( P = 0.001), HADS anxiety score ( P < 0.001), and HADS depression score ( P = 0.01). CEPSS had no significant correlation with VAS ( P = 0.103), HADS anxiety score ( P = 0.211), or HADS depression score ( P = 0.55). CEPSS had a borderline correlation with BCTSAQ ( P = 0.048). While the subjective symptoms of CTS are well correlated with psychological factors, their correlation with objective electrophysiological severity is weak. Hence, prompt treatment of psychological comorbidity is important in symptomatic management of CTS; decision about surgical intervention should be based on electrophysiological severity rather than symptom severity.

  20. Subjective symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome correlate more with psychological factors than electrophysiological severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firosh Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common entrapment neuropathy and is one of the most common requests for electrodiagnosis. We aimed to note the relationship of subjective symptom severity of CTS, with objective electrophysiological severity and psychological status of patients. Patients and Methods: One hundred and forty-four consecutive patients of CTS referred to neurophysiology laboratory of a tertiary care hospital over 1 year were prospectively studied. Boston CTS Assessment Questionnaire (BCTSAQ and visual analog scale (VAS were used to assess subjective symptom severity. Psychological status was assessed by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Electrophysiological severity of CTS was estimated by median motor distal latency and median to ulnar peak sensory latency difference across the wrist. Each parameter in both hands was scored from 0 to 3 depending on the severity grade, and a composite electrophysiological severity score (CEPSS was calculated for each patient by summing up the scores in both hands. Statistical analysis was done by Spearman's rank correlation test. Results: There was significant correlation of BCTSAQ with VAS (P = 0.001, HADS anxiety score (P < 0.001, and HADS depression score (P = 0.01. CEPSS had no significant correlation with VAS (P = 0.103, HADS anxiety score (P = 0.211, or HADS depression score (P = 0.55. CEPSS had a borderline correlation with BCTSAQ (P = 0.048. Conclusions: While the subjective symptoms of CTS are well correlated with psychological factors, their correlation with objective electrophysiological severity is weak. Hence, prompt treatment of psychological comorbidity is important in symptomatic management of CTS; decision about surgical intervention should be based on electrophysiological severity rather than symptom severity.

  1. Neuropathy in hepatic disorders. A clinical, electrophysiological and histopathological appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, V R; Katiyar, B C; Rastogi, B L; Bhattacharya, S K

    1977-01-01

    The present study deals with 30 patients with cirrhosis of the liver and 12 patients with infective hepatitis who were studied clinically, neurophysiologically and histopathologically for the presence of neuropathy. Simultaneously, 13 healthy individuals were evaluated as controls. Clinical evidence of neuropathy was found in 63.3% of the patients with hepatic cirrhosis and in 16.6% of the patients with infective hepatitis. In hepatic cirrhosis, the conduction velocities were abnormal in 33.3% and histopathological demyelination was found in 80% of the patients. In infective hepatitis, on the other hand, altered nerve conduction velocities were found in 41.6% and segmental demyelination in 75% of the patients. Our data reveal that peripheral nerve involvement is seen both in chronic and acute liver disorders. The neuropathy in hepatic cirrhosis is unrelated to diabetes, alchoholism or portacaval shunt and may be due to unknown metabolic abnormality or to toxins. In infective hepatitis, the neuropathy may either be due to some acute metabolic derangement or may be purely viral in origin.

  2. Intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: an electrophysiological reappraisal and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berciano, José; García, Antonio; Gallardo, Elena; Peeters, Kristien; Pelayo-Negro, Ana L; Álvarez-Paradelo, Silvia; Gazulla, José; Martínez-Tames, Miriam; Infante, Jon; Jordanova, Albena

    2017-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most frequent form of inherited neuropathy with great variety of phenotypes, inheritance patterns, and causative genes. According to median motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), CMT is divided into demyelinating (CMT1) with MNCV below 38 m/s, axonal (CMT2) with MNCV above 38 m/s, and intermediate CMT with MNCV between 25 and 45 m/s. In each category, transmission may be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked. The nosology of intermediate CMT is controversial because of concerns about electrophysiological delimitation. A systematic computer-based literature search was conducted on PubMed, using the following MeSH: (1) intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth; (2) X-linked intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth; and (3) X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth and electrophysiology. We retrieved 225 articles reporting X-linked CMT or intermediate CMT with electrophysiological information. After eligibility, 156 papers were used for this review. In assessing median MNCV, compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes were taken into account. In cases with attenuated CMAP and wherever possible, proximal median MNCV was used for accurate definition of conduction slowing in the intermediate range. In the vast majority of males with X-linked CMT associated with GJB1 mutation (CMTX1), median MNCV was intermediate. CMT associated with DRP2 mutation is another well-documented X-linked intermediate disorder. Autosomal dominant intermediate CMT (DI-CMT) encompasses 11 different types; six of them with assigned phenotype MIM number and the remaining five being unnumbered. Based on available electrophysiological information, we wonder if DI-CMTA should be reclassified within CMT2. Autosomal recessive intermediate CMT (RI-CMT) covers four numbered MIM phenotypes though, in accordance with reported electrophysiology, two of them (RI-CMTB and RI-CMTD) should probably be reclassified within AR-CMT2. We conclude that intermediate CMT is a complex

  3. Neuroinflammation alters voltage-dependent conductance in striatal astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpuk, Nikolay; Burkovetskaya, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Neuroinflammation has the capacity to alter normal central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis and function. The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of an inflammatory milieu on the electrophysiological properties of striatal astrocyte subpopulations with a mouse bacterial brain abscess model. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in striatal glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-green fluorescent protein (GFP)+ astrocytes neighboring abscesses at postinfection days 3 or 7 in adult mice. Cell input conductance (Gi) measurements spanning a membrane potential (Vm) surrounding resting membrane potential (RMP) revealed two prevalent astrocyte subsets. A1 and A2 astrocytes were identified by negative and positive Gi increments vs. Vm, respectively. A1 and A2 astrocytes displayed significantly different RMP, Gi, and cell membrane capacitance that were influenced by both time after bacterial exposure and astrocyte proximity to the inflammatory site. Specifically, the percentage of A1 astrocytes was decreased immediately surrounding the inflammatory lesion, whereas A2 cells were increased. These changes were particularly evident at postinfection day 7, revealing increased cell numbers with an outward current component. Furthermore, RMP was inversely modified in A1 and A2 astrocytes during neuroinflammation, and resting Gi was increased from 21 to 30 nS in the latter. In contrast, gap junction communication was significantly decreased in all astrocyte populations associated with inflamed tissues. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the heterogeneity of striatal astrocyte populations, which experience distinct electrophysiological modifications in response to CNS inflammation. PMID:22457466

  4. Optimizing the phenotyping of rodent ASD models: enrichment analysis of mouse and human neurobiological phenotypes associated with high-risk autism genes identifies morphological, electrophysiological, neurological, and behavioral features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buxbaum Joseph D

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is interest in defining mouse neurobiological phenotypes useful for studying autism spectrum disorders (ASD in both forward and reverse genetic approaches. A recurrent focus has been on high-order behavioral analyses, including learning and memory paradigms and social paradigms. However, well-studied mouse models, including for example Fmr1 knockout mice, do not show dramatic deficits in such high-order phenotypes, raising a question as to what constitutes useful phenotypes in ASD models. Methods To address this, we made use of a list of 112 disease genes etiologically involved in ASD to survey, on a large scale and with unbiased methods as well as expert review, phenotypes associated with a targeted disruption of these genes in mice, using the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology database. In addition, we compared the results with similar analyses for human phenotypes. Findings We observed four classes of neurobiological phenotypes associated with disruption of a large proportion of ASD genes, including: (1 Changes in brain and neuronal morphology; (2 electrophysiological changes; (3 neurological changes; and (4 higher-order behavioral changes. Alterations in brain and neuronal morphology represent quantitative measures that can be more widely adopted in models of ASD to understand cellular and network changes. Interestingly, the electrophysiological changes differed across different genes, indicating that excitation/inhibition imbalance hypotheses for ASD would either have to be so non-specific as to be not falsifiable, or, if specific, would not be supported by the data. Finally, it was significant that in analyses of both mouse and human databases, many of the behavioral alterations were neurological changes, encompassing sensory alterations, motor abnormalities, and seizures, as opposed to higher-order behavioral changes in learning and memory and social behavior paradigms. Conclusions The results indicated that mutations

  5. Predicting and Improving Recognition Memory Using Multiple Electrophysiological Signals in Real Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Keisuke; Woodman, Geoffrey F

    2015-07-01

    Although people are capable of storing a virtually infinite amount of information in memory, their ability to encode new information is far from perfect. The quality of encoding varies from moment to moment and renders some memories more accessible than others. Here, we were able to forecast the likelihood that a given item will be later recognized by monitoring two dissociable fluctuations of the electroencephalogram during encoding. Next, we identified individual items that were poorly encoded, using our electrophysiological measures in real time, and we successfully improved the efficacy of learning by having participants restudy these items. Thus, our memory forecasts using multiple electrophysiological signals demonstrate the feasibility and the effectiveness of using real-time monitoring of the moment-to-moment fluctuations of the quality of memory encoding to improve learning. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Effects of Cr3+ ions on electrophysiological parameters of isolated skin of toad Pleurodema thaul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Guzman Jofre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the toxicity of chromium (Cr3+ ions, it was explored the damaging effects that this ion could induce in cell membranes. The measurement of the effects induced by Cr3+ ions on electrophysiological parameters of short-circuit current and on the potential difference were investigated using the outer side (mucosal and the inner side (serosal of toad Pleurodema thaul skin. The results showed a decreased on electrophysiological parameters when it were administered concentrations of 33, 100 and 200 μM of Cr3+, the results also suggest that the administration of Cr3+ inhibits the ion transport in toad skin by the interaction of Cr3+ with lipid bilayers or protein constituents of membrane, and not by an inhibition of the active transport of ions across Na+ channels.

  7. Solid-state NMR, electrophysiology and molecular dynamics characterization of human VDAC2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gattin, Zrinka; Schneider, Robert; Laukat, Yvonne; Giller, Karin; Maier, Elke; Zweckstetter, Markus; Griesinger, Christian; Benz, Roland; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the most abundant protein of the outer mitochondrial membrane and constitutes the major pathway for the transport of ADP, ATP, and other metabolites. In this multidisciplinary study we combined solid-state NMR, electrophysiology, and molecular dynamics simulations, to study the structure of the human VDAC isoform 2 in a lipid bilayer environment. We find that the structure of hVDAC2 is similar to the structure of hVDAC1, in line with recent investigations on zfVDAC2. However, hVDAC2 appears to exhibit an increased conformational heterogeneity compared to hVDAC1 which is reflected in broader solid-state NMR spectra and less defined electrophysiological profiles

  8. Solid-state NMR, electrophysiology and molecular dynamics characterization of human VDAC2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gattin, Zrinka; Schneider, Robert; Laukat, Yvonne; Giller, Karin [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Maier, Elke [Theodor-Boveri-Institut (Biozentrum) der Universität Würzburg, Lehrstuhl für Biotechnologie (Germany); Zweckstetter, Markus; Griesinger, Christian [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Benz, Roland [Theodor-Boveri-Institut (Biozentrum) der Universität Würzburg, Lehrstuhl für Biotechnologie (Germany); Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam, E-mail: alange@fmp-berlin.de [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the most abundant protein of the outer mitochondrial membrane and constitutes the major pathway for the transport of ADP, ATP, and other metabolites. In this multidisciplinary study we combined solid-state NMR, electrophysiology, and molecular dynamics simulations, to study the structure of the human VDAC isoform 2 in a lipid bilayer environment. We find that the structure of hVDAC2 is similar to the structure of hVDAC1, in line with recent investigations on zfVDAC2. However, hVDAC2 appears to exhibit an increased conformational heterogeneity compared to hVDAC1 which is reflected in broader solid-state NMR spectra and less defined electrophysiological profiles.

  9. GIRK channel activation via adenosine or muscarinic receptors has similar effects on rat atrial electrophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Liang, Bo; Skibsbye, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K+ channels (GIRK) are important in the regulation of heart rate and atrial electrophysiology. GIRK channels are activated by G protein-coupled receptors, including muscarinic M2 receptors and adenosine A1 receptors. The aim of this study was to characterize....... The coapplication of TTQ reversed the CPA and ACh-induced effects. When TTQ was applied without exogenous receptor activator, both APD90 and ERP were prolonged and RMP was depolarized, confirming a basal activity of the GIRK current. The results reveal that activation of A1 and M2 receptors has a profound and equal...... effect on the electrophysiology in rat atrium. This effect is to a major extent mediated through GIRK channels. Furthermore, these results support the notion that atrial GIRK currents from healthy hearts have a basal component and additional activation can be mediated via at least 2 different receptor...

  10. Female preponderance in atrioventricular node reentrant tachycardia, but no sex related electrophysiological differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claes Williamsson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism behind the female preponderance for atrio-ventricular node reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT is not clear. We compared baseline electrophysiological measurements and clinical data in 141 consecutive patients (96 women who underwent successful AVNRT ablation at their fi rst therapeutic procedure. Women had on average 9% higher resting heart rate than men (p<0.05, but were similar in all measures of AV node function. Isoproterenol infusion was required for AVNRT induction in 69 cases (49%, and the need for isoproterenol was associated with lower resting heart rate and longer anterograde and retrograde AV node refractory periods (p<0.05 for comparisons, but not with sex. We conclude that the spectrum of baseline AV node physiology in AVNRT patients is wide, and is similar in men and women. The female preponderance for AVNRT cannot be explained from comparisons of baseline AV node electrophysiological properties.

  11. Idiopathic polyradiculoneuropathy in a Bengal cat: electrophysiological findings and 1 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Nicolas; Stalin, Catherine E; Brown, Thomas B Harcourt; Jeffery, Nick D

    2008-12-01

    This report describes a rapidly progressive loss of motor function in a 16-month-old male neutered Bengal cat, beginning in the pelvic limbs and progressing to involve all limbs and rendering the cat non-ambulatory. The neurological examination revealed flaccid tetraparesis with decreased spinal reflexes but preserved conscious proprioception and skin sensation. Extensive electrophysiological tests were conducted including electromyography, motor and sensory peripheral nerves potential recordings and 'late' potentials, defining the electrodiagnostic characteristics of this disease. Based on the electrophysiological findings, a generalised proximal and predominantly axonal neuropathy affecting the ventral (motor) nerve roots was suspected. As no aetiology was identified, this disease was classified as idiopathic polyradiculoneuropathy. Over a year, the cat presented three separate episodes of tetraparesis, each with a spontaneous complete recovery, consistent with the reportedly good prognosis for this disease.

  12. Radiation dose electrophysiology procedures; Dosis de radiacion debidas a procedimientos de electrofisiologia cardiaca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Armas, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Catalan, A.; Hernandez Armas, O.; Luque Japon, L.; Moral, S.; Barroso, L.; Rfuez-Hdez, R.

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this paper has been to measure and analyse some of the parameters which are directly related with the doses given to patients in two electrophysiology procedures: diagnosis and ablation with radiofrequency. 16 patients were considered in this study. 13 them had an ablation with radiofrequency at the Unit of Electrophysiology at the University Hospital of the Canaries, La Laguna., Tenerife. The results of skin doses, in the ablation cases, were higher than 2 Gy (threshold of some deterministic effects). The average value was 1.1 Gy. The personal doses, measured under the lead apron, for physician and nurses were 4 and 3 micro Sievert. These results emphasised the necessity of radiation protection measures in order to reduce, ad much as possible, the doses to patients. (Author)

  13. Electrophysiological characterization of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lih-Wen Huang

    2012-05-01

    Conclusion: This study provides basic electrophysiological knowledge about CMT1A in Taiwan. The findings also suggest that the electrophysiological variability in the CMT1A cohort may be at least partially attributable to unknown genetic factors. These data emphasize the role of MNCV in the clinical assessment of CMT1A. A median or ulnar MNCV below 38 m/s can be a sensitive criterion for supporting the diagnosis of CMT1A. A median MNCV can sometimes help to distinguish CMT1A from CMT1B, and CMT1A should be considered in patients with median MNCVs near or above 24 m/s. Moreover, the MNCV may to some degree reflect the severity of CMT1A.

  14. Heterogeneity of Monosymptomatic Resting Tremor in a Prospective Study: Clinical Features, Electrophysiological Test, and Dopamine Transporter Positron Emission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Guang Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: mRT is heterogeneous in presynaptic nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration, which can be determined by DAT-PET brain imaging. Clinical and electrophysiological features may provide clues to distinguish PD from SWEDDs.

  15. Minimum Information about a Cardiac Electrophysiology Experiment (MICEE): Standardised Reporting for Model Reproducibility, Interoperability, and Data Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, TA; Granite, S; Allessie, MA; Antzelevitch, C; Bollensdorff, C; Bub, G; Burton, RAB; Cerbai, E; Chen, PS; Delmar, M; DiFrancesco, D; Earm, YE; Efimov, IR; Egger, M; Entcheva, E; Fink, M; Fischmeister, R; Franz, MR; Garny, A; Giles, WR; Hannes, T; Harding, SE; Hunter, PJ; Iribe, G; Jalife, J; Johnson, CR; Kass, RS; Kodama, I; Koren, G; Lord, P; Markhasin, VS; Matsuoka, S; McCulloch, AD; Mirams, GR; Morley, GE; Nattel, S; Noble, D; Olesen, SP; Panfilov, AV; Trayanova, NA; Ravens, U; Richard, S; Rosenbaum, DS; Rudy, Y; Sachs, F; Sachse, FB; Saint, DA; Schotten, U; Solovyova, O; Taggart, P; Tung, L; Varró, A; Volders, PG; Wang, K; Weiss, JN; Wettwer, E; White, E; Wilders, R; Winslow, RL; Kohl, P

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac experimental electrophysiology is in need of a well-defined Minimum Information Standard for recording, annotating, and reporting experimental data. As a step toward establishing this, we present a draft standard, called Minimum Information about a Cardiac Electrophysiology Experiment (MICEE). The ultimate goal is to develop a useful tool for cardiac electrophysiologists which facilitates and improves dissemination of the minimum information necessary for reproduction of cardiac electrophysiology research, allowing for easier comparison and utilisation of findings by others. It is hoped that this will enhance the integration of individual results into experimental, computational, and conceptual models. In its present form, this draft is intended for assessment and development by the research community. We invite the reader to join this effort, and, if deemed productive, implement the Minimum Information about a Cardiac Electrophysiology Experiment standard in their own work. PMID:21745496

  16. Pediatric Electrophysiology in India: A Sub-speciality Come of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiology started in India in the early 70's with the earliest published diagnostic His bundle studies coming from the All India Institute of Medical Sciences by Bhatia ML et al and the GB Pant Hospital by Khalilullah et al . That era was remarkable with the first indigenously made temporary pacemaker being used to treat complete heart block as early as in 1970

  17. The diagnostic efficacy of clinical findings and electrophysiological studies in carpal tunnel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Buyukkoyuncu Pekel, Nilufer; Nar Senol, Pelin; Yildiz, Demet; Kilic, Ahmet Kasim; Kamaci Sener, Deniz; Seferoglu, Meral; Gunes, Aygul

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to examine the relation between clinical findings, neurological examination and electrophysiological studies in diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and share our institutional experience in patients with CTS. Methods. Patients presenting with complaints of pain, paresthesia, and weakness in hands who diagnosed CTS between 2014 and 2015 were examined retrospectively. Demographic characteristics, clinical and neurological examination findings and electrod...

  18. Quantum dot-based multiphoton fluorescent pipettes for targeted neuronal electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrásfalvy, Bertalan K; Galiñanes, Gregorio L; Huber, Daniel; Barbic, Mladen; Macklin, John J; Susumu, Kimihiro; Delehanty, James B; Huston, Alan L; Makara, Judit K; Medintz, Igor L

    2014-12-01

    Targeting visually identified neurons for electrophysiological recording is a fundamental neuroscience technique; however, its potential is hampered by poor visualization of pipette tips in deep brain tissue. We describe quantum dot-coated glass pipettes that provide strong two-photon contrast at deeper penetration depths than those achievable with current methods. We demonstrated the pipettes' utility in targeted patch-clamp recording experiments and single-cell electroporation of identified rat and mouse neurons in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Concurrent electrophysiology and TPM/OCT imaging of long-term implanted electrodes (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Gao, Yu-Rong; Ye, Meijun; Welle, Cristin G.

    2017-02-01

    Microelectrodes implanted in the brain cause mechanical damage to the tissue that mediate neuroinflammation and eventual encapsulation by microglia and astrocytes. Electrophysiological signals recorded from implants used in brain-computer interfaces (BCI) degrade over time, limiting their usefulness, but the precise causes and progression are not fully understood. We are investigating the dynamics of brain morphological changes and neuroinflammation with a multimodal approach to better understand the potential causes of implant failure. We performed weekly optical coherence tomography (OCT)-guided two-photon microscopy (TPM) in the region around microelectrodes inserted under a cranial window concurrent with electrophysiological recordings. Transgenic mouse cohorts studied include Thy1-YFP, Cx3cr1, and GFAP-GFP to image neurons, microglia, and astrocytes, respectively. Single-shank, 16-channel, Michigan-style microelectrodes were inserted under the window at a 15-20° angle with an insertion depth up to cortical layer 5. Single-unit and local field potential (LFP) recordings were collected for 15 minutes while the animals moved freely in their home cages. Cellular and vascular morphology were monitored using TPM and OCT at timepoints matched to the recordings. In preliminary data, we observed a decay of neural firing rates in most of the channels after implantation. The relationship between electrophysiological measures (e.g., neural firing rate, LFP power) and neural/vascular morphological measurements (e.g., cell density, glial migration, blood flow changes) will be quantified. The multimodal approach combining electrophysiology and optical imaging provides a broader picture of the multifactorial nature of the response to implanted electrodes. Understanding and accounting for the response may lead to better BCI designs and approaches.

  20. Trigeminal nerve electrophysiological assessment in sickle cell anemia: correlation with disease severity and radiological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naglaa Gadallah

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion Subclinical trigeminal neuropathy may be associated with SCA. The trigeminal nerve could be affected along its peripheral or the central pathway. Central affection may occur as a result of lesions in its nuclei or at the somatosensory cortex. Electrophysiological assessment is recommended in SCA patients to diagnose trigeminal neuropathy and detect the level of its affection. This will provide new insights into its prevention and treatment.

  1. Basic Electrophysiologic Mechanisms of Sudden Cardiac Death Caused by Acute Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wit, Andrew L

    2017-12-01

    Sudden cardiac death caused by acute ischemia results from electrophysiologic changes in myocardium deprived of its blood supply. These changes include a reduction in resting potential and phase 0 depolarization and an increase in intercellular resistivity that slow conduction, cause conduction block, and lead to reentrant excitation and ventricular fibrillation. Reperfusion of a coronary artery after a short period of occlusion leads to similar changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. NeoAnalysis: a Python-based toolbox for quick electrophysiological data processing and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Dai, Ji; Zhang, Tao

    2017-11-13

    In a typical electrophysiological experiment, especially one that includes studying animal behavior, the data collected normally contain spikes, local field potentials, behavioral responses and other associated data. In order to obtain informative results, the data must be analyzed simultaneously with the experimental settings. However, most open-source toolboxes currently available for data analysis were developed to handle only a portion of the data and did not take into account the sorting of experimental conditions. Additionally, these toolboxes require that the input data be in a specific format, which can be inconvenient to users. Therefore, the development of a highly integrated toolbox that can process multiple types of data regardless of input data format and perform basic analysis for general electrophysiological experiments is incredibly useful. Here, we report the development of a Python based open-source toolbox, referred to as NeoAnalysis, to be used for quick electrophysiological data processing and analysis. The toolbox can import data from different data acquisition systems regardless of their formats and automatically combine different types of data into a single file with a standardized format. In cases where additional spike sorting is needed, NeoAnalysis provides a module to perform efficient offline sorting with a user-friendly interface. Then, NeoAnalysis can perform regular analog signal processing, spike train, and local field potentials analysis, behavioral response (e.g. saccade) detection and extraction, with several options available for data plotting and statistics. Particularly, it can automatically generate sorted results without requiring users to manually sort data beforehand. In addition, NeoAnalysis can organize all of the relevant data into an informative table on a trial-by-trial basis for data visualization. Finally, NeoAnalysis supports analysis at the population level. With the multitude of general-purpose functions provided

  3. Mechanisms of electrical activation and conduction in the gastrointestinal system: lessons from cardiac electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eTse

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI tract is an electrically excitable organ system containing multiple cell types, which coordinate electrical activity propagating through this tract. Disruption in its normal electrophysiology is observed in a number of GI motility disorders. However, this is not well characterized and the field of GI electrophysiology is much less developed compared to the cardiac field. The aim of this article is to use the established knowledge of cardiac electrophysiology to shed light on the mechanisms of electrical activation and propagation along the GI tract, and how abnormalities in these processes lead to motility disorders and suggest better treatment options based on this improved understanding. In the first part of the article, the ionic contributions to the generation of GI slow wave and the cardiac action potential (AP are reviewed. Propagation of these electrical signals can be described by the core conductor theory in both systems. However, specifically for the GI tract, the following unique properties are observed: changes in slow wave frequency along its length, periods of quiescence, synchronization in short distances and desynchronization over long distances. These are best described by a coupled oscillator theory. Other differences include the diminished role of gap junctions in mediating this conduction in the GI tract compared to the heart. The electrophysiology of conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease and gastroparesis, and functional problems such as irritable bowel syndrome are discussed in detail, with reference to ion channel abnormalities and potential therapeutic targets. A deeper understanding of the molecular basis and physiological mechanisms underlying GI motility disorders will enable the development of better diagnostic and therapeutic tools and the advancement of this field.

  4. Scalable Electrophysiology in Intact Small Animals with Nanoscale Suspended Electrode Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzales, Daniel L.; Badhiwala, Krishna N.; Vercosa, Daniel G.; Avants, Ben W.; Liu, Zheng; Zhong, Weiwei; Robinson, Jacob T.

    2017-01-01

    Electrical measurements from large populations of animals would help reveal fundamental properties of the nervous system and neurological diseases. Small invertebrates are ideal for these large-scale studies; however, patch-clamp electrophysiology in microscopic animals typically requires low-throughput and invasive dissections. To overcome these limitations, we present nano-SPEARs: suspended electrodes integrated into a scalable microfluidic device. Using this technology, we have made the fi...

  5. A strategy to measure electrophysiological changes with photoacoustic imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepela, Rebecka J.; Sherlock, Benjamin E.; Tian, Lin; Marcu, Laura; Sack, Jon

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging technology capable of both functional and structural biological imaging. Absorption and scattering in tissue limit the penetration depth of conventional microscopy techniques to live cell imaging. This technology could permit photoacoustic imaging of electrophysiological dynamics in deep tissue, such as the brain. Further optimization of this technology could lead to concurrent imaging of neural activity and hemodynamic responses, a crucial step towards understanding neurovascular coupling in the brain.

  6. Modelling the effect of gap junctions on tissue-level cardiac electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug Bruce

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available When modelling tissue-level cardiac electrophysiology, continuum approximations to the discrete cell-level equations are used to maintain computational tractability. One of the most commonly used models is represented by the bidomain equations, the derivation of which relies on a homogenisation technique to construct a suitable approximation to the discrete model. This derivation does not explicitly account for the presence of gap junctions connecting one cell to another. It has been seen experimentally [Rohr, Cardiovasc. Res. 2004] that these gap junctions have a marked effect on the propagation of the action potential, specifically as the upstroke of the wave passes through the gap junction. In this paper we explicitly include gap junctions in a both a 2D discrete model of cardiac electrophysiology, and the corresponding continuum model, on a simplified cell geometry. Using these models we compare the results of simulations using both continuum and discrete systems. We see that the form of the action potential as it passes through gap junctions cannot be replicated using a continuum model, and that the underlying propagation speed of the action potential ceases to match up between models when gap junctions are introduced. In addition, the results of the discrete simulations match the characteristics of those shown in Rohr 2004. From this, we suggest that a hybrid model — a discrete system following the upstroke of the action potential, and a continuum system elsewhere — may give a more accurate description of cardiac electrophysiology.

  7. Validation of Algorithms to Identify Invasive Electrophysiology Procedures Using Administrative Data in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sheldon M; Webster, Lauren; Calzavara, Andrew; Wijeysundera, Harindra C

    2017-06-01

    Administrative database research can provide insight into the real-world effectiveness of invasive electrophysiology procedures. However, no validated algorithm to identify these procedures within administrative data currently exists. To develop and validate algorithms to identify atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) catheter ablation procedures, and diagnostic electrophysiology studies (EPS) within administrative data. Algorithms consisting of physician procedural billing codes and their associated most responsible hospital diagnosis codes were used to identify potential AF, AFL, SVT catheter ablation procedures and diagnostic EPS within large administrative databases in Ontario, Canada. The potential procedures were then limited to those performed between October 1, 2011 and March 31, 2013 at a single large regional cardiac center (Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center) in Ontario, Canada. These procedures were compared with a gold-standard cohort of patients known to have undergone invasive electrophysiology procedures during the same time period at the same institution. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of each algorithm was determined. Algorithms specific to each of AF, AFL, and SVT ablation were associated with a moderate sensitivity (75%-86%), high specificity (95%-98%), positive (95%-98%), and negative (99%) predictive values. The best algorithm to identify diagnostic EPS was less optimal with a sensitivity of 61% and positive predictive value of 88%. Algorithms using a combination of physician procedural billing codes and accompanying most responsible hospital diagnosis may identify catheter ablation procedures within administrative data with a high degree of accuracy. Diagnostic EPS may be identified with reduced accuracy.

  8. Review: electrophysiology of basal ganglia and cortex in models of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellens, Damien J; Leventhal, Daniel K

    2013-01-01

    Incomplete understanding of the systems-level pathophysiology of Parkinson Disease (PD) remains a significant barrier to improving its treatment. Substantial progress has been made, however, due to the availability of neurotoxins that selectively target monoaminergic (in particular, dopaminergic) neurons. This review discusses the in vivo electrophysiology of basal ganglia (BG), thalamic, and cortical regions after dopamine-depleting lesions. These include firing rate changes, neuronal burst-firing, neuronal oscillations, and neuronal synchrony that result from a combination of local microanatomic changes and network-level interactions. While much is known of the clinical and electrophysiological phenomenology of dopamine loss, a critical gap in our conception of PD pathophysiology is the link between them. We discuss potential mechanisms by which these systems-level electrophysiological changes may emerge, as well as how they may relate to clinical parkinsonism. Proposals for an updated understanding of BG function are reviewed, with an emphasis on how emerging frameworks will guide future research into the pathophysiology and treatment of PD.

  9. The effect of morphology upon electrophysiological responses of retinal ganglion cells: simulation results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, Matias I; Kameneva, Tatiana; Burkitt, Anthony N; Meffin, Hamish; Grayden, David B

    2014-04-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) display differences in their morphology and intrinsic electrophysiology. The goal of this study is to characterize the ionic currents that explain the behavior of ON and OFF RGCs and to explore if all morphological types of RGCs exhibit the phenomena described in electrophysiological data. We extend our previous single compartment cell models of ON and OFF RGCs to more biophysically realistic multicompartment cell models and investigate the effect of cell morphology on intrinsic electrophysiological properties. The membrane dynamics are described using the Hodgkin - Huxley type formalism. A subset of published patch-clamp data from isolated intact mouse retina is used to constrain the model and another subset is used to validate the model. Two hundred morphologically distinct ON and OFF RGCs are simulated with various densities of ionic currents in different morphological neuron compartments. Our model predicts that the differences between ON and OFF cells are explained by the presence of the low voltage activated calcium current in OFF cells and absence of such in ON cells. Our study shows through simulation that particular morphological types of RGCs are capable of exhibiting the full range of phenomena described in recent experiments. Comparisons of outputs from different cells indicate that the RGC morphologies that best describe recent experimental results are ones that have a larger ratio of soma to total surface area.

  10. History of Bioelectrical Study and the Electrophysiology of the Primo Vascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hyun Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Primo vascular system is a new anatomical structure whose research results have reported the possibility of a new circulatory system similar to the blood vascular system and cells. Electrophysiology, which measures and analyzes bioelectrical signals tissues and cells, is an important research area for investigating the function of tissues and cells. The bioelectrical study of the primo vascular system has been reported by using modern techniques since the early 1960s by Bonghan Kim. This paper reviews the research result of the electrophysiological study of the primo vascular system for the discussion of the circulatory function. We hope it would help to study the electrophysiology of the primo vascular system for researchers. This paper will use the following exchangeable expressions: Kyungrak system = Bonghan system = Bonghan circulatory system = primo vascular system = primo system; Bonghan corpuscle = primo node; Bonghan duct = primo vessel. We think that objective descriptions of reviewed papers are more important than unified expressions when citing the papers. That said, this paper will unify the expressions of the primo vascular system.

  11. Toward a new application of real-time electrophysiology: online optimization of cognitive neurosciences hypothesis testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Gaëtan; Daunizeau, Jean; Maby, Emmanuel; Bertrand, Olivier; Bompas, Aline; Mattout, Jérémie

    2014-01-23

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) mostly rely on electrophysiological brain signals. Methodological and technical progress has largely solved the challenge of processing these signals online. The main issue that remains, however, is the identification of a reliable mapping between electrophysiological measures and relevant states of mind. This is why BCIs are highly dependent upon advances in cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging research. Recently, psychological theories became more biologically plausible, leading to more realistic generative models of psychophysiological observations. Such complex interpretations of empirical data call for efficient and robust computational approaches that can deal with statistical model comparison, such as approximate Bayesian inference schemes. Importantly, the latter enable the optimization of a model selection error rate with respect to experimental control variables, yielding maximally powerful designs. In this paper, we use a Bayesian decision theoretic approach to cast model comparison in an online adaptive design optimization procedure. We show how to maximize design efficiency for individual healthy subjects or patients. Using simulated data, we demonstrate the face- and construct-validity of this approach and illustrate its extension to electrophysiology and multiple hypothesis testing based on recent psychophysiological models of perception. Finally, we discuss its implications for basic neuroscience and BCI itself.

  12. The Cardiac Fibroblast: Functional and Electrophysiological Considerations in Healthy and Diseased Hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Carolina; Benamer, Najate; Morley, Gregory E.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis occurs in a number of cardiovascular diseases associated with a high incidence of arrhythmias. A critical event in the development of fibrosis is the transformation of fibroblasts into an active phenotype or myofibroblast. This transformation results in functional changes including increased proliferation and changes in the release of signaling molecules and extracellular matrix deposition. Traditionally fibroblasts have been considered to affect cardiac electrophysiology indirectly by physically isolating myocytes and creating conduction barriers. There is now increasing evidence that cardiac fibroblasts may play a direct role in modulating the electrophysiological substrate in diseased hearts. The purpose of this review is to summarize the functional changes associated with fibroblast activation, the membrane currents that have been identified in adult cardiac fibroblasts and describe recent studies of fibroblast-myocyte electrical interactions with emphasis on the changes that occur with cardiac injury. Further analysis of fibroblast membrane electrophysiology and their interactions with myocytes will lead to a more complete understanding of the arrhythmic substrate. These studies have the potential to generate new therapeutic approaches for the prevention of arrhythmias associated with cardiac fibrosis. PMID:21242811

  13. Electrophysiological evidence for enhanced representation of food stimuli in working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutters, Femke; Kumar, Sanjay; Higgs, Suzanne; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2015-02-01

    Studies from our laboratory have shown that, relative to neutral objects, food-related objects kept in working memory (WM) are particularly effective in guiding attention to food stimuli (Higgs et al. in Appetite, 2012). Here, we used electrophysiological measurements to investigate the neural representation of food versus non-food items in WM. Subjects were presented with a cue (food or non-food item) to either attend to or hold in WM. Subsequently, they had to search for a target, while the target and distractor were each flanked by a picture of a food or non-food item. Behavioural data showed that a food cue held in WM modulated the deployment of visual attention to a search target more than a non-food cue, even though the cue was irrelevant for target selection. Electrophysiological measures of attention, memory and retention of memory (the P3, LPP and SPCN components) were larger when food was kept in WM, compared to non-food items. No such effect was observed in a priming task, when the initial cue was merely identified. Overall, our electrophysiological data are consistent with the suggestion that food stimuli are particularly strongly represented in the WM system.

  14. Scalable electrophysiology in intact small animals with nanoscale suspended electrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Daniel L.; Badhiwala, Krishna N.; Vercosa, Daniel G.; Avants, Benjamin W.; Liu, Zheng; Zhong, Weiwei; Robinson, Jacob T.

    2017-07-01

    Electrical measurements from large populations of animals would help reveal fundamental properties of the nervous system and neurological diseases. Small invertebrates are ideal for these large-scale studies; however, patch-clamp electrophysiology in microscopic animals typically requires invasive dissections and is low-throughput. To overcome these limitations, we present nano-SPEARs: suspended electrodes integrated into a scalable microfluidic device. Using this technology, we have made the first extracellular recordings of body-wall muscle electrophysiology inside an intact roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans. We can also use nano-SPEARs to record from multiple animals in parallel and even from other species, such as Hydra littoralis. Furthermore, we use nano-SPEARs to establish the first electrophysiological phenotypes for C. elegans models for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease, and show a partial rescue of the Parkinson's phenotype through drug treatment. These results demonstrate that nano-SPEARs provide the core technology for microchips that enable scalable, in vivo studies of neurobiology and neurological diseases.

  15. Clinical neurological, electrophysiological, and cerebral CT scan findings in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omdal, R; Selseth, B; Kløw, N E; Husby, G; Mellgren, S I

    1989-01-01

    Thirty SLE patients underwent clinical neurological examination, electrophysiological studies, cerebral computer tomographic (CT) scans, and blood sampling. Nineteen patients (63%) had clinical neuropsychiatric and 10 patients (33%) had clinical neuromuscular manifestations. Migrainous headache affecting 11 patients (37%) was the most prevalent clinical manifestation. Electrophysiological testing revealed abnormal electroencephalography in 10 patients (33%). Abnormal electromyography and nerve conduction velocity were found in 13 (43%) and 7 (24%) patients respectively. Abnormal visual evoked response was detected in 2 patients. Cerebral CT scans displayed cerebral atrophy in 20 patients (71%), while 6 patients (21%) had cerebral infractions. Disease activity assessed by two different tests revealed a higher prevalence of cerebral infarctions, classical migraine, muscular weakness, and pathological electromyography and nerve conduction velocity in the higher disease activity groups. Cerebral infarctions were only found among anti-Ro negative patients, but apart from this, no significant association could be found between coagulopathy, circulating immune complexes, cryoglobulins, routine immunological tests, medication, and any clinical, electrophysiological or cerebral CT pathology.

  16. 3D stereotaxis for epileptic foci through integrating MR imaging with neurological electrophysiology data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Min; Peng Chenglin; Wang Kang; Lei Wenyong; Luo Song; Wang Xiaolin; Wang Xuejian; Wu Ruoqiu; Wu Guofeng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To improve the accuracy of the epilepsy diagnoses by integrating MR image from PACS with data from neurological electrophysiology. The integration is also very important for transmiting diagnostic information to 3D TPS of radiotherapy. Methods: The electroencephalogram was redisplayed by EEG workstation, while MR image was reconstructed by Brainvoyager software. 3D model of patient brain was built up by combining reconstructed images with electroencephalogram data in Base 2000. 30 epileptic patients (18 males and 12 females) with their age ranged from 12 to 54 years were confirmed by using the integrated MR images and the data from neurological electrophysiology and their 3D stereolocating. Results: The corresponding data in 3D model could show the real situation of patients' brain and visually locate the precise position of the focus. The suddessful rate of 3D guided operation was greatly improved, and the number of epileptic onset was markedly decreased. The epilepsy was stopped for 6 months in 8 of the 30 patients. Conclusion: The integration of MR image and information of neurological electrophysiology can improve the diagnostic level for epilepsy, and it is crucial for imp roving the successful rate of manipulations and the epilepsy analysis. (authors)

  17. Effects of heavy ions on visual function and electrophysiology of rodents: the ALTEA-MICE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannita, W. G.; Acquaviva, M.; Ball, S. L.; Belli, F.; Bisti, S.; Bidoli, V.; Carozzo, S.; Casolino, M.; Cucinotta, F.; De Pascale, M. P.; Di Fino, L.; Di Marco, S.; Maccarone, R.; Martello, C.; Miller, J.; Narici, L.; Peachey, N. S.; Picozza, P.; Rinaldi, A.; Ruggieri, D.; Saturno, M.; Schardt, D.; Vazquez, M.

    2004-01-01

    ALTEA-MICE will supplement the ALTEA project on astronauts and provide information on the functional visual impairment possibly induced by heavy ions during prolonged operations in microgravity. Goals of ALTEA-MICE are: (1) to investigate the effects of heavy ions on the visual system of normal and mutant mice with retinal defects; (2) to define reliable experimental conditions for space research; and (3) to develop animal models to study the physiological consequences of space travels on humans. Remotely controlled mouse setup, applied electrophysiological recording methods, remote particle monitoring, and experimental procedures were developed and tested. The project has proved feasible under laboratory-controlled conditions comparable in important aspects to those of astronauts' exposure to particle in space. Experiments are performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratories [BNL] (Upton, NY, USA) and the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung mbH [GSI]/Biophysik (Darmstadt, FRG) to identify possible electrophysiological changes and/or activation of protective mechanisms in response to pulsed radiation. Offline data analyses are in progress and observations are still anecdotal. Electrophysiological changes after pulsed radiation are within the limits of spontaneous variability under anesthesia, with only indirect evidence of possible retinal/cortical responses. Immunostaining showed changes (e.g increased expression of FGF2 protein in the outer nuclear layer) suggesting a retinal stress reaction to high-energy particles of potential relevance in space.

  18. Toward a New Application of Real-Time Electrophysiology: Online Optimization of Cognitive Neurosciences Hypothesis Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëtan Sanchez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs mostly rely on electrophysiological brain signals. Methodological and technical progress has largely solved the challenge of processing these signals online. The main issue that remains, however, is the identification of a reliable mapping between electrophysiological measures and relevant states of mind. This is why BCIs are highly dependent upon advances in cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging research. Recently, psychological theories became more biologically plausible, leading to more realistic generative models of psychophysiological observations. Such complex interpretations of empirical data call for efficient and robust computational approaches that can deal with statistical model comparison, such as approximate Bayesian inference schemes. Importantly, the latter enable the optimization of a model selection error rate with respect to experimental control variables, yielding maximally powerful designs. In this paper, we use a Bayesian decision theoretic approach to cast model comparison in an online adaptive design optimization procedure. We show how to maximize design efficiency for individual healthy subjects or patients. Using simulated data, we demonstrate the face- and construct-validity of this approach and illustrate its extension to electrophysiology and multiple hypothesis testing based on recent psychophysiological models of perception. Finally, we discuss its implications for basic neuroscience and BCI itself.

  19. A pilot study of cardiac electrophysiology catheters to map and pace bladder electrical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Robert S; Vardy, Michael D; Simons, Grant R; Chen, Henry; Ascher-Walsh, Charles; Brodman, Michael

    2017-04-01

    This is a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of using diagnostic cardiac electrophysiology catheters for recording intrinsic urinary bladder electrical activity and for electrical pacing capture of bladder tissue. During cystoscopy, a curved quadripolar catheter was introduced and contact was made with the right and left halves of the dome and trigone in adult female patients undergoing cystoscopy. Electrical activity was recorded, using a commercially available cardiac electrophysiologic recording system, before and during pacing at 0.5-3.0 Hz. Apparent spontaneous electrical depolarizations were detected in both the trigone and the dome. The amplitude of these depolarizations was in the microVolt range. During pacing, local electrical capture was noted in the trigone, but not in the dome. Spontaneous low-amplitude electrical activity was detected in the bladder through the use of commercially available cardiac electrophysiology equipment. While these low-level signals could represent noise, the voltage, and morphology resemble detrusor muscle action potentials previously seen in animal studies. Pacing induced local electrical capture in the trigone but not the dome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Regional and genotypic differences in intrinsic electrophysiological properties of cerebellar Purkinje neurons from wild-type and dystrophin-deficient mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Wanda M; Anderson, Judy E; Fry, Mark

    2014-01-01

    demonstrate the presence of differential electrophysiological properties between Purkinje neurons from different regions of the WT mouse cerebellum and altered intrinsic membrane properties in the absence of dystrophin. These findings provide a possible mechanism for the observations that absence of cerebellar dystrophin contributes to deficits in mental function observed in humans and mouse models of muscular dystrophy. Moreover, these results highlight the importance of distinguishing functional zones of the cerebellum in future work characterizing Purkinje neuron electrophysiology and studies using the model of dissociated Purkinje neurons from mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Parent-delivered early intervention in infants at risk for ASD: Effects on electrophysiological and habituation measures of social attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emily J H; Dawson, Geraldine; Kelly, Jean; Estes, Annette; Jane Webb, Sara

    2017-05-01

    Prospective longitudinal studies of infants with older siblings with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have indicated that differences in the neurocognitive systems underlying social attention may emerge prior to the child meeting ASD diagnostic criteria. Thus, targeting social attention with early intervention might have the potential to alter developmental trajectories for infants at high risk for ASD. Electrophysiological and habituation measures of social attention were collected at 6, 12, and 18 months in a group of high-risk infant siblings of children with ASD (N = 33). Between 9 and 11 months of age, infant siblings received a parent-delivered intervention, promoting first relationships (PFR), (n = 19) or on-going assessment without intervention (n = 14). PFR has been previously shown to increase parental responsivity to infant social communicative cues and infant contingent responding. Compared to infants who only received assessment and monitoring, infants who received the intervention showed improvements in neurocognitive metrics of social attention, as reflected in a greater reduction in habituation times to face versus object stimuli between 6 and 12 months, maintained at 18 months; a greater increase in frontal EEG theta power between 6 and 12 months; and a more comparable P400 response to faces and objects at 12 months. The high-risk infants who received the intervention showed a pattern of responses that appeared closer to the normative responses of two groups of age-matched low-risk control participants. Though replication is necessary, these results suggest that early parent-mediated intervention has the potential to impact the brain systems underpinning social attention in infants at familial risk for ASD. Autism Res 2017, 10: 961-972. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Premature Ventricular Contraction Coupling Interval Variability Destabilizes Cardiac Neuronal and Electrophysiological Control: Insights from Simultaneous Cardio-Neural Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamon, David; Rajendran, Pradeep S.; Chui, Ray W.; Ajijola, Olujimi A.; Irie, Tadanobu; Talebi, Ramin; Salavatian, Siamak; Vaseghi, Marmar; Bradfield, Jason S.; Armour, J. Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2017-01-01

    Background Variability in premature ventricular contraction (PVC) coupling interval (CI) increases the risk of cardiomyopathy and sudden death. The autonomic nervous system regulates cardiac electrical and mechanical indices, and its dysregulation plays an important role in cardiac disease pathogenesis. The impact of PVCs on the intrinsic cardiac nervous system (ICNS), a neural network on the heart, remains unknown. The objective was to determine the effect of PVCs and CI on ICNS function in generating cardiac neuronal and electrical instability using a novel cardio-neural mapping approach. Methods and Results In a porcine model (n=8) neuronal activity was recorded from a ventricular ganglion using a microelectrode array, and cardiac electrophysiological mapping was performed. Neurons were functionally classified based on their response to afferent and efferent cardiovascular stimuli, with neurons that responded to both defined as convergent (local reflex processors). Dynamic changes in neuronal activity were then evaluated in response to right ventricular outflow tract PVCs with fixed short, fixed long, and variable CI. PVC delivery elicited a greater neuronal response than all other stimuli (P<0.001). Compared to fixed short and long CI, PVCs with variable CI had a greater impact on neuronal response (P<0.05 versus short CI), particularly on convergent neurons (P<0.05), as well as neurons receiving sympathetic (P<0.05) and parasympathetic input (P<0.05). The greatest cardiac electrical instability was also observed following variable (short) CI PVCs. Conclusions Variable CI PVCs affect critical populations of ICNS neurons and alter cardiac repolarization. These changes may be critical for arrhythmogenesis and remodeling leading to cardiomyopathy. PMID:28408652

  3. Premature Ventricular Contraction Coupling Interval Variability Destabilizes Cardiac Neuronal and Electrophysiological Control: Insights From Simultaneous Cardioneural Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamon, David; Rajendran, Pradeep S; Chui, Ray W; Ajijola, Olujimi A; Irie, Tadanobu; Talebi, Ramin; Salavatian, Siamak; Vaseghi, Marmar; Bradfield, Jason S; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2017-04-01

    Variability in premature ventricular contraction (PVC) coupling interval (CI) increases the risk of cardiomyopathy and sudden death. The autonomic nervous system regulates cardiac electrical and mechanical indices, and its dysregulation plays an important role in cardiac disease pathogenesis. The impact of PVCs on the intrinsic cardiac nervous system, a neural network on the heart, remains unknown. The objective was to determine the effect of PVCs and CI on intrinsic cardiac nervous system function in generating cardiac neuronal and electric instability using a novel cardioneural mapping approach. In a porcine model (n=8), neuronal activity was recorded from a ventricular ganglion using a microelectrode array, and cardiac electrophysiological mapping was performed. Neurons were functionally classified based on their response to afferent and efferent cardiovascular stimuli, with neurons that responded to both defined as convergent (local reflex processors). Dynamic changes in neuronal activity were then evaluated in response to right ventricular outflow tract PVCs with fixed short, fixed long, and variable CI. PVC delivery elicited a greater neuronal response than all other stimuli ( P <0.001). Compared with fixed short and long CI, PVCs with variable CI had a greater impact on neuronal response ( P <0.05 versus short CI), particularly on convergent neurons ( P <0.05), as well as neurons receiving sympathetic ( P <0.05) and parasympathetic input ( P <0.05). The greatest cardiac electric instability was also observed after variable (short) CI PVCs. Variable CI PVCs affect critical populations of intrinsic cardiac nervous system neurons and alter cardiac repolarization. These changes may be critical for arrhythmogenesis and remodeling, leading to cardiomyopathy. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Difference of acute dissociation and 1-day culture on the electrophysiological properties of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuanlong; Zhang, Miaomiao; Tao, Xiaoqing; Xu, Zifen; Zheng, Yunjie; Zhu, Minjie; Zhang, Liangpin; Qiao, Jinhan; Gao, Linlin

    2018-01-19

    The dissociated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with or without culture were widely used for investigation of their electrophysiological properties. The culture procedures, however, may alter the properties of these neurons and the effects are not clear. In the present study, we recorded the action potentials (AP) and the voltage-gated Na + , K + , and Ca 2+ currents with patch clamp technique and measured the mRNA of Nav1.6-1.9 and Cav2.1-2.2 with real-time PCR technique from acutely dissociated and 1-day (1-d) cultured DRG neurons. The effects of the nerve growth factor (NGF) on the expression of Nav1.6-1.9 and Cav2.1-2.2 were evaluated. The neurons were classified as small (DRG-S), medium (DRG-M), and large (DRG-L), according to their size frequency distribution pattern. We found 1-d culture increased the AP size but reduced the excitability, and reduced the voltage-gated Na + and Ca 2+ currents and their corresponding mRNA expression in all types of neurons. The lack of NGF in the culture medium may contribute to the reduced Na + and Ca 2+ current, as the application of NGF recovered some of the reduced transcripts (Nav1.9, Cav2.1, and Cav2.2). 1-d culture showed neuron-type specific effects on some of the AP properties: it increased the maximum AP depolarizing rate (MDR) and hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential (RP) in DRG-M and DRG-L neurons, but slowed the maximum AP repolarizing rate (MRR) in DRG-S neurons. In conclusion, the 1-d cultured neurons had different properties with those of the acutely dissociated neurons, and lack of NGF may contribute to some of these differences.

  5. Social stress reactivity alters reward and punishment learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, James F; Frank, Michael J; Allen, John J B

    2011-06-01

    To examine how stress affects cognitive functioning, individual differences in trait vulnerability (punishment sensitivity) and state reactivity (negative affect) to social evaluative threat were examined during concurrent reinforcement learning. Lower trait-level punishment sensitivity predicted better reward learning and poorer punishment learning; the opposite pattern was found in more punishment sensitive individuals. Increasing state-level negative affect was directly related to punishment learning accuracy in highly punishment sensitive individuals, but these measures were inversely related in less sensitive individuals. Combined electrophysiological measurement, performance accuracy and computational estimations of learning parameters suggest that trait and state vulnerability to stress alter cortico-striatal functioning during reinforcement learning, possibly mediated via medio-frontal cortical systems.

  6. Radiation protection philosophy alters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firmin, G.

    1977-01-01

    Two significant events that have taken place this year in the field of radiation protection are reported. New SI units have been proposed (and effectively adopted), and the ICRP has revised its recommendations. Changes of emphasis in the latest recommendations (ICRP Publication 26) imply an altered radiation protection philosophy, in particular the relation of dose limits to estimates of average risk, an altered view of the critical organ approach and a new attitude to genetic dose to the population. (author)

  7. Music and Alterity Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Martí

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of alterity constitutes an important issue in anthropological research and, therefore, in the study of musical practices, as well. Without it, we could hardly understand other kinds of music situated in different spaces and time from the observer. In order to effectively approach these musical practices, we have to develop strategies to help us reduce as much as possible that which distorts the vision of the other. However, beyond the strictly epistemological and methodological issues, the study of music cannot ignore the ethical question related to the manner in which Western thought has understood and treated the other: through a hierarchical and stereotypical type of thinking based on the condition of otherness. Throughout the article, different alterity procedures are presented and discussed, such as synecdochization, exoticization, undervaluation, overvaluation, misunderstanding and exclusion. Taking these different alterity strategies into account may help us to better understand how the musical other is constructed, used and ultimately instrumentalized.

  8. Comparison of electrophysiological findings in axonal and demyelinating Guillain-Barre syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadegari, Samira; Nafissi, Shahriar; Kazemi, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Incidence and predominant subtype of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) differs geographically. Electrophysiology has an important role in early diagnosis and prediction of prognosis. This study is conducted to determine the frequent subtype of GBS in a large group of patients in Iran and compare nerve conduction studies in axonal and demyelinating forms of GBS. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the medical records and electrodiagnostic study (EDS) of 121 GBS patients who were managed in our hospital during 11 years. After regarding the exclusion criteria, patients classified as three groups: acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP), acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), and acute motor sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN). The most frequent subtype and then electrophysiological characteristic based on the time of EDS and their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile were assessed. Results: Among 70 patients finally included in the study, 67% were men. About 63%, 23%, and 14% had AIDP, AMAN, and AMSAN, respectively. AIDP patients represented a wider range of ages compared with other groups. Higher levels of CSF protein, abnormal late responses and sural sparing were more frequent in AIDP subtype. Five AMSAN patients also revealed sural sparing. Conduction block (CB) was observed in one AMAN patient. Prolonged F-wave latency was observed only in AIDP cases. CB and inexcitable sensory nerves were more frequent after 2 weeks, but reduced F-wave persistency was more prominent in the early phase. Conclusion: AIDP was the most frequent subtype. Although the electrophysiology and CSF are important diagnostic tools, classification should not be made based on a distinct finding. PMID:25422732

  9. A simplified protocol for differentiation of electrophysiologically mature neuronal networks from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunhanlar, N; Shpak, G; van der Kroeg, M; Gouty-Colomer, L A; Munshi, S T; Lendemeijer, B; Ghazvini, M; Dupont, C; Hoogendijk, W J G; Gribnau, J; de Vrij, F M S; Kushner, S A

    2017-04-18

    Progress in elucidating the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders has been hindered by the limited availability of living human brain tissue. The emergence of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has offered a unique alternative strategy using patient-derived functional neuronal networks. However, methods for reliably generating iPSC-derived neurons with mature electrophysiological characteristics have been difficult to develop. Here, we report a simplified differentiation protocol that yields electrophysiologically mature iPSC-derived cortical lineage neuronal networks without the need for astrocyte co-culture or specialized media. This protocol generates a consistent 60:40 ratio of neurons and astrocytes that arise from a common forebrain neural progenitor. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of 114 neurons derived from three independent iPSC lines confirmed their electrophysiological maturity, including resting membrane potential (-58.2±1.0 mV), capacitance (49.1±2.9 pF), action potential (AP) threshold (-50.9±0.5 mV) and AP amplitude (66.5±1.3 mV). Nearly 100% of neurons were capable of firing APs, of which 79% had sustained trains of mature APs with minimal accommodation (peak AP frequency: 11.9±0.5 Hz) and 74% exhibited spontaneous synaptic activity (amplitude, 16.03±0.82 pA; frequency, 1.09±0.17 Hz). We expect this protocol to be of broad applicability for implementing iPSC-based neuronal network models of neuropsychiatric disorders.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 18 April 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.56.

  10. Electrophysiological assessment of water stress in fruit-bearing woody plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Rojas, Liliana; Tapia, Franco; Gurovich, Luis A

    2014-06-15

    Development and evaluation of a real-time plant water stress sensor, based on the electrophysiological behavior of fruit-bearing woody plants is presented. Continuous electric potentials are measured in tree trunks for different irrigation schedules, inducing variable water stress conditions; results are discussed in relation to soil water content and micro-atmospheric evaporative demand, determined continuously by conventional sensors, correlating this information with tree electric potential measurements. Systematic and differentiable patterns of electric potentials for water-stressed and no-stressed trees in 2 fruit species are presented. Early detection and recovery dynamics of water stress conditions can also be monitored with these electrophysiology sensors, which enable continuous and non-destructive measurements for efficient irrigation scheduling throughout the year. The experiment is developed under controlled conditions, in Faraday cages located at a greenhouse area, both in Persea americana and Prunus domestica plants. Soil moisture evolution is controlled using capacitance sensors and solar radiation, temperature, relative humidity, wind intensity and direction are continuously registered with accurate weather sensors, in a micro-agrometeorological automatic station located at the experimental site. The electrophysiological sensor has two stainless steel electrodes (measuring/reference), inserted on the stem; a high precision Keithley 2701 digital multimeter is used to measure plant electrical signals; an algorithm written in MatLab(®), allows correlating the signal to environmental variables. An electric cyclic behavior is observed (circadian cycle) in the experimental plants. For non-irrigated plants, the electrical signal shows a time positive slope and then, a negative slope after restarting irrigation throughout a rather extended recovery process, before reaching a stable electrical signal with zero slope. Well-watered plants presented a

  11. Right Atrial Dual-loop Reentry Tachycardia after Cardiac Surgery: Prevalence, Electrophysiologic Characteristics and Ablation Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-du; Sun, Qi; Guo, Xiao-Gang; Zhou, Gong-Bu; Liu, Xu; Luo, Bin; Wei, Hui-Qiang; Santangeli, Pasquale; Liang, Jackson J; Ma, Jian

    2018-04-03

    Right atrial dual-loop reentry tachycardia has been described in patients with open-heart surgery. However, the prevalence, electrophysiologic substrate and ablation outcomes have been poorly characterized. We aimed to investigate the prevalence, electrophysiologic substrate and ablation outcomes for RA dual-loop reentry tachycardia following cardiac surgery. We identified all patients with atrial tachycardia after cardiac surgery. We compared electrophysiologic findings and outcomes of those with RA dual-loop reentry tachycardia versus a control group of patients with RA macro-reentrant arrhythmias in the setting of linear RA free wall (FW) scar. Out of 127 patients with 152 post-surgical atrial tachycardias (ATs), 28 (18.4%) had diagnosis of RA dual-loop reentry and 24/28 (85.7%) had tricuspid annular (TA) reentry combined with FW incisional reentry. An incision length > 51.5mm along the FW predicted the substrate for a second loop. In 22/23 patients (95.7%) with initial ablation in the cavo-tricuspid isthmus, a change in the interval between Halo d to CS p could be recorded, while 15/23 patients (65.2%) had CS activation pattern change. Complete success was achieved in 25/28 (89.3%) and 64/69 (92.8%) in the dual-loop reentry and control groups, respectively. After mean follow-up of 33.9±24.2 months, 24/28 (85.7%) and 60/69 (86.95%) were free of arrhythmias after initial procedure in two groups. The prevalence of RA dual-loop reentry is 18.4% among ATs with prior atriotomy scar. A long incision should alert physician the possibility of the second loop at the FW. Halo and CS activation pattern are important clues for circuit transformation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Neo: an object model for handling electrophysiology data in multiple formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel eGarcia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuroscientists use many different software tools to acquire, analyse and visualise electrophysiological signals. However, incompatible data models and file formats make it difficult to exchange data between these tools. This reduces scientific productivity, renders potentially useful analysis methods inaccessible and impedes collaboration between labs.A common representation of the core data would improve interoperability and facilitate data-sharing.To that end, we propose here a language-independent object model, named Neo, suitable for representing data acquired from electroencephalographic, intracellular, or extracellular recordings, or generated from simulations. As a concrete instantiation of this object model we have developed an open source implementation in the Python programming language.In addition to representing electrophysiology data in memory for the purposes of analysis and visualisation, the Python implementation provides a set of input/output (IO modules for reading/writing the data from/to a variety of commonly used file formats.Support is included for formats produced by most of the major manufacturers of electrophysiology recording equipment and also for more generic formats such as MATLAB.Data representation and data analysis are conceptually separate: it is easier to write robust analysis code if it is focused on analysis and relies on an underlying package to handle data representation.For that reason, and also to be as lightweight as possible, the Neo object model and the associated Python package are deliberately limited to representation of data, with no functions for data analysis or visualisation.Software for neurophysiology data analysis and visualisation built on top of Neo automatically gains the benefits of interoperability, easier data sharing and automatic format conversion; there is already a burgeoning ecosystem of such tools. We intend that Neo should become the standard basis for Python tools in

  13. Evidence-based medicine evaluation of electrophysiological studies of the anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C Richard; Galletly, Cherrie A; Ash, David J; Moores, Kathryn A; Penrose, Rebecca A; McFarlane, Alexander C

    2009-04-01

    We provide a systematic, evidence-based medicine (EBM) review of the field of electrophysiology in the anxiety disorders. Presently, electrophysiological studies of anxiety focus primarily on etiological aspects of brain dysfunction. The review highlights many functional similarities across studies, but also identifies patterns that clearly differentiate disorder classifications. Such measures offer clinical utility as reliable and objective indicators of brain dysfunction in individuals and indicate potential as biomarkers for the improvement of diagnostic specificity and for informing treatment decisions and prognostic assessments. Common to most of the anxiety disorders is basal instability in cortical arousal, as reflected in measures of quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG). Resting electroencephalographic (EEG) measures tend to correlate with symptom sub-patterns and be exacerbated by condition-specific stimulation. Also common to most of the anxiety disorders are condition-specific difficulties with sensory gating and the allocation and deployment of attention. These are clearly evident from evoked potential (EP) and event-related potential (ERP) electrical measures of information processing in obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), panic disorder (PD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and the phobias. Other'ERP measures clearly differentiate the disorders. However, there is considerable variation across studies, with inclusion and exclusion criteria, medication status and control group selection not standardized within condition or across studies. Study numbers generally preclude analysis for confound removal or for the derivation of diagnostic biomarker patterns at this time. The current trend towards development of databases of brain and cognitive function is likely to obviate these difficulties. In particular, electrophysiological measures of function are likely to play a significant role in the development and

  14. Evaluation of serum indexes and electrophysiological characteristics after ziprasidone combined with modified electroconvulsive therapy for schizophrenian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Bo Cao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of ziprasidone combined with modified electroconvulsive therapy (MECT on serum indexes and electrophysiological characteristics of schizophrenia. Methods: A total of 44 patients with schizophrenia treated in our hospital between May 2014 and July 2016 were selected and randomly divided into MECT group and control group, MECT group received ziprasidone combined with MECT therapy and control group received ziprasidone therapy. Before treatment as well as 1 month, 2 months and 3 months after treatment, serum nerve cytokine levels and inflammatory factor levels as well as nerve electrophysiology parameters were detected. Results: 1 month, 2 months and 3 months after treatment, serum BDNF, GDNF and NGF levels of both groups were significantly higher than those before treatment, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α levels were significantly lower than those before treatment, P300 and N2-P3 latency were significantly shorter than those before treatment, and P300 and N2-P3 amplitude were significantly higher than those before treatment; serum BDNF, GDNF and NGF levels of MECT group were significantly higher than those of control group, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α levels were significantly lower than those of control group, P300 and N2-P3 latency were significantly shorter than those of control group, and P300 and N2-P3 amplitude were significantly higher than those of control group. Conclusion: Ziprasidone combined with modified electroconvulsive therapy can improve neuron function, reduce neuron damage and adjust nerve electrophysiology function.

  15. Electrophysiological changes in patients with liver cirrhosis in a tertiary care hospital in karachi, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkash, O.; Mohyuddin, G.R.; Ayub, A.; Nazir, I.

    2017-01-01

    Electrophysiological changes in cirrhosis are well known but least investigated especially in our country hence we wanted to see electrophysiological changes especially QT interval in cirrhotic patients. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital Karachi (AKUH) in which medical records (duration 2008-2010) of cirrhotic patients were reviewed. Results: Three hundred and eighty cirrhotic patients' charts were studied, 227 (59.7 percent) were male and mean age of this cohort was 52.8+-12.6 years. The most common cause for CLD was Hepatitis C (CHC) in 260 (68.4 percent), NBNC in 56(14.7 percent) and HBV in 51 (13.4 percent). Only 225 had complete ECG workup, the mean corrected QT interval was 0.44+-0.067 sec. Among the electrophysiological abnormalities, 79 (35 percent) had a prolonged corrected QT interval, 7 (3.1 percent) had a prolonged PR interval (>0.22s) and prolonged QRS duration was seen in 23 (10.4 percent) patients. QT prolongation was seen in 1 of the 5 patients with Child Class A (20 percent), 22 of the 73 patients with Child Class B (30.1 percent), and 25 of the 61 patients with Child Class C (41 percent). However, this difference however was not statistically significant. (p value=.331). Conclusion: We conclude that QT prolongation is more frequent in patients with liver cirrhosis especially when the disease is more advanced like in Child C hence these patients are more prone to sudden cardiac death. Moreover, this study shows that the risk associated with QT prolongation is present through all classes of liver cirrhosis. We recommend that routine cardiac screening with ECG of all cirrhotic patients be performed. (author)

  16. Electrophysiological Properties of Melanin-Concentrating Hormone and Orexin Neurons in Adolescent Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Linehan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Orexin and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH neurons have complementary roles in various physiological functions including energy balance and the sleep/wake cycle. in vitro electrophysiological studies investigating these cells typically use post-weaning rodents, corresponding to adolescence. However, it is unclear whether these neurons are functionally mature at this period and whether these studies can be generalized to adult cells. Therefore, we examined the electrophysiological properties of orexin and MCH neurons in brain slices from post-weaning rats and found that MCH neurons undergo an age-dependent reduction in excitability, but not orexin neurons. Specifically, MCH neurons displayed an age-dependent hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential (RMP, depolarizing shift of the threshold, and decrease in excitatory transmission, which reach the adult level by 7 weeks of age. In contrast, basic properties of orexin neurons were stable from 4 weeks to 14 weeks of age. Furthermore, a robust short-term facilitation of excitatory synapses was found in MCH neurons, which showed age-dependent changes during the post-weaning period. On the other hand, a strong short-term depression was observed in orexin neurons, which was similar throughout the same period. These differences in synaptic responses and age dependence likely differentially affect the network activity within the lateral hypothalamus where these cells co-exist. In summary, our study suggests that orexin neurons are electrophysiologically mature before adolescence whereas MCH neurons continue to develop until late adolescence. These changes in MCH neurons may contribute to growth spurts or consolidation of adult sleep patterns associated with adolescence. Furthermore, these results highlight the importance of considering the age of animals in studies involving MCH neurons.

  17. A behavioural and electrophysiological investigation of the effect of bilingualism on aging and cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousaie, Shanna; Phillips, Natalie A

    2017-01-08

    Given previous, but inconsistent, findings of language group differences on cognitive control tasks the current investigation examined whether such differences could be demonstrated in a sample of older bilingual adults. Monolingual and bilingual older adults performed three cognitive control tasks that have previously been used in the literature (i.e., Stroop, Simon and flanker tasks) while brain electrophysiological recordings took place. Both behavioural (response time and accuracy) and event-related brain potentials (ERPs; N2 and P3 amplitude and latency) were compared across the two language groups. Processing differences between monolinguals and bilinguals were identified for each task, although the locus differed across the tasks. Language group differences were most clear in the Stroop task, with bilinguals showing superior performance both behaviourally and electrophysiologically. In contrast, for the Simon and flanker tasks there were electrophysiological differences indicating language group processing differences at the level of conflict monitoring (Simon task only) and stimulus categorization (Simon and flanker tasks), but no behavioural differences. These findings support suggestions that these three tasks that are often used to examine executive control processes show little convergent validity; however, there are clear language group differences for each task that are suggestive of superior performance for bilinguals, with behavioural differences emerging only in the linguistic Stroop task. Furthermore, it is clear that behavioural measures alone do not capture the language group effects in their entirety, and perhaps processing differences between language groups are more marked in a sample of older adults who are experiencing age-related cognitive changes than in younger adults who are at the peak of their cognitive capacity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Automated Electrophysiology Makes the Pace for Cardiac Ion Channel Safety Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens eMoeller

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The field of automated patch-clamp electrophysiology has emerged from the tension between the pharmaceutical industry’s need for high-throughput compound screening versus its need to be conservative due to regulatory requirements. On the one hand, hERG channel screening was increasingly requested for new chemical entities, as the correlation between blockade of the ion channel coded by hERG and Torsades de Pointes cardiac arrhythmia gained increasing attention. On the other hand, manual patch-clamping, typically quoted as the gold-standard for understanding ion channel function and modulation, was far too slow (and, consequently, too expensive for keeping pace with the numbers of compounds submitted for hERG channel investigations from pharmaceutical R&D departments. In consequence it became more common for some pharmaceutical companies to outsource safety pharmacological investigations, with a focus on hERG channel interactions. This outsourcing has allowed those pharmaceutical companies to build up operational flexibility and greater independence from internal resources, and allowed them to obtain access to the latest technological developments that emerged in automated patch-clamp electrophysiology – much of which arose in specialized biotech companies. Assays for nearly all major cardiac ion channels are now available by automated patch-clamping using heterologous expression systems, and recently, automated action potential recordings from stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes have been demonstrated. Today, most of the large pharmaceutical companies have acquired automated electrophysiology robots and have established various automated cardiac ion channel safety screening assays on these, in addition to outsourcing parts of their needs for safety screening.

  19. Prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial of electrophysiologically guided femoral nerve block in total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youm YS

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Yoon Seok Youm,1 Sung Do Cho,1 Chang Ho Hwang21Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan, Republic of KoreaBackground: The purpose of this study was to compare electrophysiologically guided and traditional nerve stimulator analgesia femoral nerve block after total knee arthroplasty.Methods: Patients scheduled for unilateral total knee arthroplasty were randomized to electrophysiologically guided or traditional nerve stimulator analgesia by pre-emptive single injection femoral nerve block with corresponding assistance. We assessed pain scores using a visual analog scale (VAS, 0 = no pain, 100 = the worst pain and the volumes of morphine consumed at 4, 24, 48, and 72 hours after total knee arthroplasty.Results: Of the 60 patients enrolled, eight withdrew from the study. The remaining 52 patients were randomized to the electrophysiologically guided group (n = 27 or traditional nerve stimulator analgesia (n = 25 group. Four hours after total knee arthroplasty, VAS scores were significantly lower in the electrophysiologically guided group than in the traditional nerve stimulator group at rest (4.8 ± 1.4 versus 5.9 ± 0.8, P < 0.01 and while moving (6.2 ± 1.1 versus 6.9 ± 0.9, P < 0.01. The total volumes of morphine injected at 24, 48, and 72 hours were significantly decreased in the electrophysiologically guided group (P < 0.05 each. Variable × time interaction of VAS was significant in the electrophysiologically guided group (P < 0.05, with each VAS score at 24, 48, and 72 hours being significantly lower than the baseline score (P < 0.05. VAS scores at every time point were significantly lower in the electrophysiologically group guided than in the traditional nerve stimulator group (P < 0.05.Conclusion: Electrophysiologically guided single injection femoral nerve block may provide better postoperative analgesia and a greater

  20. A SUBSTRATE AND A METHOD FOR DETERMINING AND/OR MONITORING ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF ION CHANNELS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to a substrate and a method for obtaining an electrophysiological measuring configuration in which a cell forms a high resistive seal (giga-seal) around a measuring electrode making it suitable for determining and monitoring a current flow through the cell membrane...... and reference electrodes formed by wafer processing technology. The electrodes are adapted to conduct a current between them by delivery of ions by one electrode and receipt of ions by the other electrode and are typically silver/silver halide electrodes. This allows for effective and fast measuring of cells...

  1. ISPMER: Integrated system for combined PET, MRI, and electrophysiological recording in somatosensory studies in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Y.-Y. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y.-Y. [Department of Electrical and Control Engineering, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chen, J.-C. [Faculty of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Education and Research, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang Chen [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jaw, F.-S. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jaw@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2007-10-01

    The present study developed an integrated system for use in combined PET, MRI, and electrophysiological recording in somatosensory studies in rats, called ISPMER. A stereotaxic frame was designed for animal positioning that could be used in all three measurement modalities, and its dimensions complied with the gold standard of the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas. A graphical user interface was developed for analyzing the data using several signal processing algorithms. This integrated system provides a novel interface for the recording and processing of three-dimensional neuronal signals in three modalities.

  2. Effects of radiographic contrast media on cellular electrophysiology in the beating heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolpers, H.G.; Baller, D.; Ensink, F.B.M.; Hoeft, A.; Korb, H.; Hellige, G.

    1982-01-01

    Electrophysiological effects of intracoronarily administered contrast media have been documented in 12 thoracotomized dogs at the cellular level by use of a modified microelectrode technique. Injections (n = 63) of 4 different contrast media uniformly led to a temporary cellular hyperpolarisation of the resting potential and prolongation of the action potential. Additional experiments with intracoronary injections of several electrolyte concentrations, mainly by a local deficiency of potassium ions and an excess of sodium ions. The significance of the findings for mechanisms underlying ECG-changes and ventricular arrhythmia by radiographic contrasts media will be discussed.

  3. A 4+1 ARCHITECTURE FOR IN VIVO ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY VISUAL PROSTHESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Barriga-Rivera

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Researchers around the globe are working towards restoring vision to the blind through the development of a visual neuroprosthesis. Overcoming physical, technical and biological limitations represents one of the main challenges for the scientific community and will eventually benefit the wellbeing of the recipients of these devices. Thus, understanding the physiological mechanisms of prosthetic vision plays a key role. In this context, in vivo electrophysiological studies are aiming to shed light on new stimulation paradigms that can potentially lead to improved visual perception. This paper describes a multi-viewpoint architecture of an experimental setup for the investigation of electrically evoked potentials in a retinal neuroprosthesis.

  4. Electrophysiological Evaluation of Dysphagia in the Mild or Moderate Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Concept of Subclinical Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Yesim; Gürgör, Nevin; Çakır, Ahmet; Arıcı, Şehnaz; İncesu, Tülay Kurt; Seçil, Yaprak; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2015-06-01

    Swallowing mechanism and neurogenic dysphagia in MS have been rarely studied by electromyographical (EMG) methods. This study aims to evaluate the presence of subclinical dysphagia in patients with mild multiple sclerosis (MS) using electrophysiological methods. A prospective study of 51 patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis and 18 age-matched healthy adults was investigated. We used electromyography to measure the activity of the submental muscles during swallowing. Electrophysiological recordings of patients were obtained during relapse, after relapse, and at any time in remission period. Clinical dysphagia was found in 12% of MS patients, while electrophysiological swallowing abnormalities were encountered in 33% of patients. Subclinical dysphagia was determined in 35% of patients during an MS relapse, in 20% of patients after a relapse, and in 25% of all 51 patients in the remission period based on EMG findings. Duration of swallowing signal of submental muscles in all MS patients was found to be longer than in normal subjects (p = 0.001). During swallowing of 50 ml of sequential water, the compensatory respiratory cycles occurred more often in MS patients than normal subjects, especially during a relapse (p = 0.005). This is the first study investigating swallowing abnormalities and subclinical dysphagia from the electrophysiological aspect in MS patients with mild disability. The electrophysiological tests described in this study are useful to uncover subclinical dysphagia since they have the advantage of being rapid, easy to apply, non-invasive, and without risk for the patients.

  5. 4 cases of 'ataxic hemiparesis'. A comparative study of computed tomography and electrophysiological findings

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    Eguchi, Kiyoshi; Kamei, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Eiko; Komatsuzaki, Satoshi; Yamane, Kiyomi; Takemiya, Toshiko; Kobayashi, Itsuro; Maruyama, Shoichi

    1984-10-01

    Ataxic hemiparesis is described as a syndrome in which pyramidal and cerebellar signs occur ipsilaterally. Fisher who suggested the designation ''ataxic hemiparesis'' for this syndrome confirmed by pathological study that causative lesion was in the basis pontis at the level of the junction of the upper one third and lower two thirds on the opposite side of the neurological deficit and he also reported that CT might fail to show the lesion. We observed 4 patients with ataxic hemiparesis and examined them in auditory brainstem response (ABR), somatosensory evoked potential (SEP), and blink reflex as electrophysiological study. Their CT and electrophysiological findings were compared with each others to define the responsible lesion more clearly. Essentially, these abnormal electrophysiological findings were recognized only in the case of pontine hemorrhage, and these findings recovered to normal as clinical and CT findings were improved. In the other cases, the electrophysiological findings were not prominent and CT revealed the lesions in deep frontal region, internal capsule and cerebellar hemispheres respectively. These results might show that many cases of extra-pontine lesions could develop the syndrome of ataxic hemiparesis. However, the relation between responsible lesions for ataxic hemiparesis and electrophysiological findings are still uncertain. Further evidences including clinicopathological studies will be required to clarify this relation and to get the more accurate anatomical interpretation of ataxic hemiparesis from lesions besides the pontine region. (author).

  6. Acoustic experience alters the aged auditory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jeremy G; Parrish, Jennifer L; Zuiderveld, Loren; Darr, Stacy; Hughes, Larry F; Caspary, Donald M; Idrezbegovic, Esma; Canlon, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Presbyacusis, one of the most common ailments of the elderly, is often treated with hearing aids, which serve to reintroduce some or all of those sounds lost to peripheral hearing loss. However, little is known about the underlying changes to the ear and brain as a result of such experience with sound late in life. The present study attempts to model this process by rearing aged CBA mice in an augmented acoustic environment (AAE). Aged (22-23 months) male (n = 12) and female (n = 9) CBA/CaJ mice were reared in either 6 weeks of low-level (70 dB SPL) broadband noise stimulation (AAE) or normal vivarium conditions. Changes as a function of the treatment were measured for behavior, auditory brainstem response thresholds, hair cell cochleograms, and gamma aminobutyric acid neurochemistry in the key central auditory structures of the inferior colliculus and primary auditory cortex. The AAE-exposed group was associated with sex-specific changes in cochlear pathology, auditory brainstem response thresholds, and gamma aminobutyric acid neurochemistry. Males exhibited significantly better thresholds and reduced hair cell loss (relative to controls) whereas females exhibited the opposite effect. AAE was associated with increased glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) levels in the inferior colliculus of both male and female mice. However, in primary auditory cortex AAE exposure was associated with increased GAD67 labeling in females and decreased GAD67 in males. These findings suggest that exposing aged mice to a low-level AAE alters both peripheral and central properties of the auditory system and these changes partially interact with sex or the degree of hearing loss before AAE. Although direct application of these findings to hearing aid use or auditory training in aged humans would be premature, the results do begin to provide direct evidence for the underlying changes that might be occurring as a result of hearing aid use late in life. These results suggest the aged brain

  7. Electrophysiology-based detection of emergency braking intention in real-world driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haufe, Stefan; Kim, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Il-Hwa; Sonnleitner, Andreas; Schrauf, Michael; Curio, Gabriel; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2014-10-01

    The fact that all human action is preceded by brain processes partially observable through neuroimaging devices such as electroencephalography (EEG) is currently being explored in a number of applications. A recent study by Haufe et al (2011 J. Neural Eng. 8 056001) demonstrates the possibility of performing fast detection of forced emergency brakings during driving based on EEG and electromyography, and discusses the use of such neurotechnology for braking assistance systems. Since the study was conducted in a driving simulator, its significance regarding real-world applicability needs to be assessed. Here, we replicate that experimental paradigm in a real car on a non-public test track. Our results resemble those of the simulator study, both qualitatively (in terms of the neurophysiological phenomena observed and utilized) and quantitatively (in terms of the predictive improvement achievable using electrophysiology in addition to behavioral measures). Moreover, our findings are robust with respect to a temporary secondary auditory task mimicking verbal input from a fellow passenger. Our study serves as a real-world verification of the feasibility of electrophysiology-based detection of emergency braking intention as proposed in Haufe et al (2011 J. Neural Eng. 8 056001).

  8. Frequency-specific electrophysiologic correlates of resting state fMRI networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Carl D; Snyder, Abraham Z; Pahwa, Mrinal; Corbetta, Maurizio; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2017-04-01

    Resting state functional MRI (R-fMRI) studies have shown that slow (visual, auditory, and sensorimotor (SMN) networks as well as the dorsal attention network (DAN), which controls spatial attention. The other system includes the default mode network (DMN) and the fronto-parietal control system (FPC), RSNs that instantiate episodic memory and executive control, respectively. Here, we test the hypothesis, based on the spectral specificity of electrophysiologic responses to perceptual vs. memory tasks (Klimesch, 1999; Pfurtscheller and Lopes da Silva, 1999), that these two large-scale neural systems also manifest frequency specificity in the resting state. We measured the spatial correspondence between electrocorticographic (ECoG) band-limited power (BLP) and R-fMRI correlation patterns in awake, resting, human subjects. Our results show that, while gamma BLP correspondence was common throughout the brain, theta (4-8Hz) BLP correspondence was stronger in the DMN and FPC, whereas alpha (8-12Hz) correspondence was stronger in the SMN and DAN. Thus, the human brain, at rest, exhibits frequency specific electrophysiology, respecting both the spectral structure of task responses and the hierarchical organization of RSNs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrophysiological and amperometric evidence that modafinil blocks the dopamine uptake transporter to induce behavioral activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, M; Latagliata, E C; Rizzo, F R; Ledonne, A; Gu, H H; Romigi, A; Nisticò, R; Puglisi-Allegra, S; Mercuri, N B

    2013-11-12

    Although the wake-promoting drug modafinil has been shown to bind quite exclusively to the dopamine transporter (DAT), its action in the brain has been thought to be partially independent from the facilitation of the dopaminergic signals. Here we used electrophysiological and amperometric techniques to investigate the effects of modafinil on the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and on the synaptic overflow of dopamine in the dorsal striatum from the sliced tissue of wild-type and cocaine-insensitive genetically modified mice (DAT-CI). Moreover, we examined the consequences of modafinil administration on the locomotor behavior of wild-type and DAT-CI mice. In in vitro experiments, modafinil inhibited the spontaneous firing discharge of the dopaminergic neurons. More consistently, it potentiated firing inhibition and the membrane responses caused by exogenously applied dopamine on these cells. Furthermore, it augmented the stimulus-evoked outflow of DA in the striatum. Noteworthy, modafinil caused locomotor activation in wild-type mice. On the other hand, neither the electrophysiological nor the behavioral effects of modafinil were detected in DAT-CI animals. These results demonstrate that modafinil potentiates brain dopaminergic signals via DAT inhibition by acting at the same binding site of cocaine. Therefore, this mechanism of action explains most of the pharmacological properties of this compound in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. All rights reserved.

  10. Electrophysiological predictors of sudden cardiac death on physical exercise test in young athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balykova, L. A.; Kotlyarov, A. A.; Ivyanskiy, S. A.; Shirokova, A. A.; Miheeva, K. A.; Makarov, L. M.

    2017-01-01

    The problem of sudden death of young athletes continues to be actual. Among its reasons, primary electric myocardium diseases along with organic heart troubles (cardiomyopathies, cordites, anomalies of coronary arteries) take an important place. The most frequent variant of channelopathesis long QT syndrome (LQTS). Both inherited and acquired LQTS may be the reason of sudden cardiac death during physical activity and have to be revealed prior to sports admission. LQTS diagnostics in young athletes become problematic due to secondary exercise-related QT prolongation. Physical load test may reveal myocardium electric instability and enhance LQTS diagnostics accuracy without genetic testing. The aim was to study electrophysiological parameters of myocardium repolarization and reveal the signs of electrical instability as predictors of the life-threatening arrhythmias in young athletes during physical exercise test. In conclusion, electrophysiological myocardium parameters during physical exercise test noted to be markers of electrical myocardial instability and in combination with the other Schwartz criteria, was evidenced the inherited or acquired LQTS. QTc prolongation in athletes at the peak of exercise as well as in early recovery period were noted to be additional predictor life-threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in young athletes

  11. Electrophysiologic characteristics of tremor in Parkinson?s disease and essential tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ederson Cichaczewski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Tremor in essential tremor (ET and Parkinson’s disease (PD usually present specific electrophysiologic profiles, however amplitude and frequency may have wide variations. Objective: To present the electrophysiologic findings in PD and ET. Method: Patients were assessed at rest, with posture and action. Seventeen patients with ET and 62 with PD were included. PD cases were clustered into three groups: predominant rest tremor; tremor with similar intensity at rest, posture and during kinetic task; and predominant kinetic tremor. Results: Patients with PD presented tremors with average frequency of 5.29±1.18 Hz at rest, 5.79±1.39 Hz with posture and 6.48±1.34 Hz with the kinetic task. Tremor in ET presented with an average frequency of 5.97±1.1 Hz at rest, 6.18±1 Hz with posture and 6.53±1.2 Hz with kinetic task. Seven (41.2% also showed rest tremor. Conclusion: The tremor analysis alone using the methodology described here, is not sufficient to differentiate tremor in ET and PD.

  12. Electrophysiological and behavioral responses of Dendroctonus valens (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) to four bark beetle pheromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Longwa; Clarke, Stephen R; Sun, Jianghua

    2009-04-01

    The red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), has caused extensive mortality of Pinus tabuliformis Carrière in north central China. The electrophysiological and behavioral activities of the four bark beetle pheromones, frontalin, exo-brevicomin, trans-verbenol, and cis-verbenol, singly or in combination with host-produced kairomones, were tested on red turpentine beetles. Both sexes showed a consistent electrophysiological response to the four test compounds. In Y-tube olfactometer bioassays, walking red turpentine beetles selected the host compound (+)-3-carene over any of the test compounds, but significantly higher numbers chose each tested pheromone over a blank control. The four compounds, tested singly or in combination, were not attractive to red turpentine beetles in field trapping studies in 2006 and 2007 and also did not significantly increase trap catch when combined with (+)-3-carene. Frontalin, alone or in combination with exo-brevicomin and trans-verbenol, significantly reduced the attractiveness of (+)-3-carene in 2006 but not in 2007. The possible roles of the pheromones in host and mate finding and selection are discussed.

  13. Combination of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Electrophysiological Studies in Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wenxiang; Wang, Jichao; Zhang, Wenchuan; Liu, Pengfei; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Li, Shi-Ting

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aimed to study the clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electrophysiological studies in the diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation and in the evaluation of the therapeutic effect of discectomy. Methods In this study, 265 patients with LDH were treated with discectomy after assessment by the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, MRI, and electrophysiological studies. All the patients were followed-up for 6 years. The effects of the operation were assessed by determining the angle between the nerve root canal and disc protrusion (AN value), the stenotic ratio of the spinal canal, the width of the lateral recess, motor conduction velocity (MCV), sensory conduction velocity (SCV), and nerve action potential (NAP) before and after operation. Results The AN value, stenotic ratio of the spinal canal, and the width of the lateral recess of protruding intervertebral discs showed significant differences from these values for the patients' unaffected intervertebral discs (P disc herniation, and in the evaluation of the effect of surgery.

  14. Cloudwave: distributed processing of "big data" from electrophysiological recordings for epilepsy clinical research using Hadoop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayapandian, Catherine P; Chen, Chien-Hung; Bozorgi, Alireza; Lhatoo, Samden D; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Sahoo, Satya S

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is the most common serious neurological disorder affecting 50-60 million persons worldwide. Multi-modal electrophysiological data, such as electroencephalography (EEG) and electrocardiography (EKG), are central to effective patient care and clinical research in epilepsy. Electrophysiological data is an example of clinical "big data" consisting of more than 100 multi-channel signals with recordings from each patient generating 5-10GB of data. Current approaches to store and analyze signal data using standalone tools, such as Nihon Kohden neurology software, are inadequate to meet the growing volume of data and the need for supporting multi-center collaborative studies with real time and interactive access. We introduce the Cloudwave platform in this paper that features a Web-based intuitive signal analysis interface integrated with a Hadoop-based data processing module implemented on clinical data stored in a "private cloud". Cloudwave has been developed as part of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Strokes (NINDS) funded multi-center Prevention and Risk Identification of SUDEP Mortality (PRISM) project. The Cloudwave visualization interface provides real-time rendering of multi-modal signals with "montages" for EEG feature characterization over 2TB of patient data generated at the Case University Hospital Epilepsy Monitoring Unit. Results from performance evaluation of the Cloudwave Hadoop data processing module demonstrate one order of magnitude improvement in performance over 77GB of patient data. (Cloudwave project: http://prism.case.edu/prism/index.php/Cloudwave).

  15. Relationships of Behavioral Measures of Frontal Lobe Dysfunction with Underlying Electrophysiology in Cocaine-Dependent Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjini, Klevest; Qazi, Aisha; Greenwald, Mark K.; Sandhu, Ravinder; Gooding, Diane C.; Boutros, Nash N.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Despite evidence that frontal lobe functioning is impaired in cocaine-dependent individuals, relationships between behavioral measures of frontal dysfunction and electrophysiological measures of inhibition in cocaine use have not been explored. Methods Using the Frontal System Behavior Scale (FrSBe), frontal dysfunction was assessed in a group of abstinent cocaine-dependent subjects (N=49) and healthy controls (N=32). Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and evoked potential (EP)-based electrophysiological measures of inhibition, we assessed associations between these measures and FrSBe estimates of frontal dysfunction. Results Patients had significantly higher FrSBe scores for executive dysfunction, disinhibition and apathy than controls. Lower TMS-based resting motor thresholds (i.e., hyperexcitability) were significantly associated with higher Executive Dysfunction scores in the patients. Conclusions and Scientific Significance Relationships between FrSBe scores and TMS-based measures highlight neurophysiological aberrations underlying frontal lobe dysfunction in cocaine abusers. TMS and EP measures may be useful probes of the intermediary steps between frontal lobe dysfunction and addictive behavior. PMID:24724884

  16. Thalamic stimulation to improve level of consciousness after seizures: evaluation of electrophysiology and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Motelow, Joshua E; Smith, Nicholas; Zhan, Qiong; Schiff, Nicholas D; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the neural mechanisms that support human consciousness is an important frontier in neuroscience and medicine. We previously developed a rodent model of temporal lobe seizures that recapitulates the human electroencephalography (EEG) signature of ictal and postictal neocortical slow waves associated with behavioral impairments in level of consciousness. The mechanism of slow-wave production in epilepsy may involve suppression of the subcortical arousal systems including the brainstem and intralaminar thalamic nuclei. We hypothesized that intralaminar thalamic stimulation may lead to electrophysiologic and functional rescue from postictal slow waves and behavioral arrest. We electrically stimulated the central lateral thalamic nucleus (a member of the intralaminar nuclei) under anesthesia and after electrically induced hippocampal seizures in anesthetized and in awake-behaving animal model preparations. We demonstrated a proof-of-principle restoration of electrophysiologic and behavioral measures of consciousness by stimulating the intralaminar thalamic nuclei after seizures. We measured decreased cortical slow waves and increased desynchronization and multiunit activity in the cortex with thalamic stimulation following seizures. Functionally, thalamic stimulation produced resumption of exploratory behaviors in the postictal state. Targeting of nodes in the neural circuitry of consciousness has important medical implications. Impaired consciousness with epilepsy has dangerous consequences including decreased school/work performance, social stigmatization, and impaired airway protection. These data suggest a novel therapeutic approach for restoring consciousness after seizures. If paired with responsive neurostimulation, this may allow rapid implementation to improve level of consciousness in patients with epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Effect of Cold Application and Tizanidine on Clonus: Clinical and Electrophysiological Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyraz, Ismail; Oktay, Fugen; Celik, Canan; Akyuz, Mufit; Uysal, Hilmi

    2009-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Clonus is an involuntary rhythmic muscle contraction after sudden muscle stretch that occurs as a result of a lesion in the upper motor neurons. The real mechanism behind clonus remains obscure. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of central-acting tizanidine treatment and peripheral extremity cooling on clonus. Participants: Thirty-eight patients with upper motor neuron involvement and sustained clonus. Methods: The 38 patients were divided into 3 groups: cold group (n = 19), tizanidine group (n = 13), and patient control group (n = 6). A separate group of 21 able-bodied volunteers served as controls for the cold group. The physiologic effects of cold application were measured in the able-bodied group and compared with the effects in the patients in the cold group. All participants were evaluated by clinical and electrophysiologic measurements. Results: Changes in clinical and electrophysiologic measurements in the cold group were statistically significant compared with those of the tizanidine and patient control groups. Conclusions: Subsequent and long-term cold application induced prolonged inhibitory effects on clonus. Tizanidine had no significant effect on clonus. Suppression of clonus by cold highlights the importance of peripheral input in relation to central mechanisms. PMID:19569460

  18. Behavioral and electrophysiological analysis of general anesthesia in 3 background strains of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalucki, Oressia; Day, Rebecca; Kottler, Benjamin; Karunanithi, Shanker; van Swinderen, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    General anesthetics achieve behavioral unresponsiveness via a mechanism that is incompletely understood. The study of genetic model systems such as the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is crucial to advancing our understanding of how anesthetic drugs render animals unresponsive. Previous studies have shown that wild-type control strains differ significantly in their sensitivity to general anesthetics, which potentially introduces confounding factors for comparing genetic mutations placed on these wild-type backgrounds. Here, we examined a variety of behavioral and electrophysiological endpoints in Drosophila, in both adult and larval animals. We characterized these endpoints in 3 commonly used fly strains: wild-type Canton Special (CS), and 2 commonly used white-eyed strains, isoCJ1 and w(1118). We found that CS and isoCJ1 show remarkably similar sensitivity to isoflurane across a variety of behavioral and electrophysiological endpoints. In contrast, w(1118) is resistant to isoflurane compared to the other 2 strains at both the adult and larval stages. This resistance is however not reflected at the level of neurotransmitter release at the larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). This suggests that the w(1118) strain harbors another mutation that produces isoflurane resistance, by acting on an arousal pathway that is most likely preserved between larval and adult brains. This mutation probably also affects sleep, as marked differences between isoCJ1 and w(1118) have also recently been found for behavioral responsiveness and sleep intensity measures.

  19. Microspectrophotometric and electrophysiological measurements of the visual pigment reaction in Astacus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaube, H.; Gerhards-Doett, C.; Schlecht, P.; Stieve, H.; Wilms, M.

    1981-07-01

    Microspectrophotometric measurements of the spectral absorption of single rhabdoms of Astacus leptodactylus were carried out under various conditions of light adaptation and at different pH. The results were compared with electrophysiological measurements in Astacus leptodactylus and two other crayfish species (Astacus fluviatilis and Procambarus (ortmannicus) acutus), obtained with selective adaptation by colored light. A bistable visual pigment system was found in the microspectrophotometric measurements. The absorption spectra for rhodopsin (..gamma../sub max/ ca. 553 nm), and metarhodopsin (..gamma../sub max/ ca. 495 nm) were calculated, on the basis of Ebrey-Honig nomograms, from typical difference spectra. In the electrophysiological measurements the maximal spectral sensitivity was recorded at 565 nm. No indication for a basic metarhodopsin could be found in the pH range from 4.5 to 10.5. After 2% glutaraldehyde treatment the bleaching product of rhodopsin was no longer photoreversible, probably due to decomposition of metarhodopsin into retinal and opsin. Our results do not indicate two different types of photoreceptor pigments in Astacus as have been demonstrated by Wald (1968) for Orconectes and Procambarus.

  20. The autonomic dysfunction in patients with lupus disease: An electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighat, Shila; Fatemi, Alimohammad; Andalib, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate autonomic nervous system (ANS) function by using electrophysiological tests in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This descriptive analytical study was done on 28 individuals with a history of lupus and ten age- and sex-matched healthy objects were being selected randomly. The autonomy questionnaire has been used to determine clinical symptom of ANS involvement. The electrophysiological assessments of ANS function were performed by sympathetic skin response (SSR). The mean values of sympathetic (SSR latency and amplitude) parameters were compared to determine any correlations between SSR parameters and clinical characteristics of ANS. 28 SLE patients (3 males, 25 females) with a mean age of 34.6 ± 9.74 years and 10 control subjects (4 males, 6 females) with a mean age of 36.8 ± 6.43 years were included in the study. Among patients 17 (60.7%) exhibited autonomic symptoms. Headache was the most common issue with the highest percentage rate (41.17%). The mean latency and amplitude of SSR were increased (1.52 ± 0.16 vs. 1.39 ± 0.16 and 107 ± 15.6 vs. 110 ± 15.6, respectively), compared to control. A significant difference was observed between the SSR test results of patients with lupus compared to normal healthy objects (P autonomy questionnaire scores and SSR (P system assessment.

  1. Electrophysiological, histochemical, and hormonal adaptation of rat muscle after prolonged hindlimb suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtidou-Papadeli, Chrysoula; Kyparos, Antonios; Albani, Maria; Frossinis, Athanasios; Papadelis, Christos L; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Vivas, Ana; Guiba-Tziampiri, Olympia

    2004-05-01

    The perspective of long-duration flights for future exploration, imply more research in the field of human adaptation. Previous studies in rat muscles hindlimb suspension (HLS), indicated muscle atrophy and a change of fibre composition from slow-to-fast twitch types. However, the contractile responses to long-term unloading is still unclear. Fifteen adult Wistar rats were studied in 45 and 70 days of muscle unweighting and soleus (SOL) muscle as well as extensor digitorum longus (EDL) were prepared for electrophysiological recordings (single, twitch, tetanic contraction and fatigue) and histochemical stainings. The loss of muscle mass observed was greater in the soleus muscle. The analysis of electrophysiological properties of both EDL and SOL showed significant main effects of group, of number of unweighting days and fatigue properties. Single contraction for soleus muscle remained unchanged but there was statistically significant difference for tetanic contraction and fatigue. Fatigue index showed a decrease for the control rats, but increase for the HLS rats. According to the histochemical findings there was a shift from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism during HLS. The data suggested that muscles atrophied, but they presented an adaptation pattern, while their endurance in fatigue was decreased. c2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic cranial window with access port for repeated cellular manipulations, drug application, and electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roome, Christopher J; Kuhn, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Chronic cranial windows have been instrumental in advancing optical studies in vivo, permitting long-term, high-resolution imaging in various brain regions. However, once a window is attached it is difficult to regain access to the brain under the window for cellular manipulations. Here we describe a simple device that combines long term in vivo optical imaging with direct brain access via glass or quartz pipettes and metal, glass, or quartz electrodes for cellular manipulations like dye or drug injections and electrophysiological stimulations or recordings while keeping the craniotomy sterile. Our device comprises a regular cranial window glass coverslip with a drilled access hole later sealed with biocompatible silicone. This chronic cranial window with access port is cheap, easy to manufacture, can be mounted just as the regular chronic cranial window, and is self-sealing after retraction of the pipette or electrode. We demonstrate that multiple injections can be performed through the silicone port by repetitively bolus loading calcium sensitive dye into mouse barrel cortex and recording spontaneous cellular activity over a period of weeks. As an example to the extent of its utility for electrophysiological recording, we describe how simple removal of the silicone seal can permit patch pipette access for whole-cell patch clamp recordings in vivo. During these chronic experiments we do not observe any infections under the window or impairment of animal health.

  3. An integrated domain specific language for post-processing and visualizing electrophysiological signals in Java.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, T; Peters, T; Jagle, H; Zrenner, E; Wilke, R

    2010-01-01

    Electrophysiology of vision - especially the electroretinogram (ERG) - is used as a non-invasive way for functional testing of the visual system. The ERG is a combined electrical response generated by neural and non-neuronal cells in the retina in response to light stimulation. This response can be recorded and used for diagnosis of numerous disorders. For both clinical practice and clinical trials it is important to process those signals in an accurate and fast way and to provide the results as structured, consistent reports. Therefore, we developed a freely available and open-source framework in Java (http://www.eye.uni-tuebingen.de/project/idsI4sigproc). The framework is focused on an easy integration with existing applications. By leveraging well-established software patterns like pipes-and-filters and fluent interfaces as well as by designing the application programming interfaces (API) as an integrated domain specific language (DSL) the overall framework provides a smooth learning curve. Additionally, it already contains several processing methods and visualization features and can be extended easily by implementing the provided interfaces. In this way, not only can new processing methods be added but the framework can also be adopted for other areas of signal processing. This article describes in detail the structure and implementation of the framework and demonstrate its application through the software package used in clinical practice and clinical trials at the University Eye Hospital Tuebingen one of the largest departments in the field of visual electrophysiology in Europe.

  4. Electrophysiological and behavioral measures of visuo-motor learning for application in movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlivan, Brendan T; Butler, John S; Hutchinson, Michael K; O'Riordan, Sean; Ridwan, Raquib A; Reilly, Richard B

    2014-01-01

    Dystonia is the third most common movement disorder worldwide and drastically reduces the quality of life of those who are affected. Despite its prevalence, very little is known about the underlying pathology of the disorder. Recent literature has suggested that abnormal processing in the superior colliculus (SC) may play a role in Dystonia. The SC is known to be an important hub in the neural network that is used when learning a novel movement and therefore we would postulate that a disorder of SC should result in abnormal movement learning. Here 9 participants completed learning and non-learning movement tasks while behavioural and electrophysiological data were acquired. The results of this study show that there is a significant relationship between the behavioural and electrophysiological data (R(2) = 0.19, F(1, 46) =10.88, p learning task but not in the non-learning task (p > 0.05). The developed paradigm is ideally suited for probing the underlying pathology of Dystonia via movement learning.

  5. Neural ensemble communities: Open-source approaches to hardware for large-scale electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegle, Joshua H.; Hale, Gregory J.; Newman, Jonathan P.; Voigts, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    One often-overlooked factor when selecting a platform for large-scale electrophysiology is whether or not a particular data acquisition system is “open” or “closed”: that is, whether or not the system’s schematics and source code are available to end users. Open systems have a reputation for being difficult to acquire, poorly documented, and hard to maintain. With the arrival of more powerful and compact integrated circuits, rapid prototyping services, and web-based tools for collaborative development, these stereotypes must be reconsidered. We discuss some of the reasons why multichannel extracellular electrophysiology could benefit from open-source approaches and describe examples of successful community-driven tool development within this field. In order to promote the adoption of open-source hardware and to reduce the need for redundant development efforts, we advocate a move toward standardized interfaces that connect each element of the data processing pipeline. This will give researchers the flexibility to modify their tools when necessary, while allowing them to continue to benefit from the high-quality products and expertise provided by commercial vendors. PMID:25528614

  6. Open Ephys: an open-source, plugin-based platform for multichannel electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegle, Joshua H; López, Aarón Cuevas; Patel, Yogi A; Abramov, Kirill; Ohayon, Shay; Voigts, Jakob

    2017-08-01

    Closed-loop experiments, in which causal interventions are conditioned on the state of the system under investigation, have become increasingly common in neuroscience. Such experiments can have a high degree of explanatory power, but they require a precise implementation that can be difficult to replicate across laboratories. We sought to overcome this limitation by building open-source software that makes it easier to develop and share algorithms for closed-loop control. We created the Open Ephys GUI, an open-source platform for multichannel electrophysiology experiments. In addition to the standard 'open-loop' visualization and recording functionality, the GUI also includes modules for delivering feedback in response to events detected in the incoming data stream. Importantly, these modules can be built and shared as plugins, which makes it possible for users to extend the functionality of the GUI through a simple API, without having to understand the inner workings of the entire application. In combination with low-cost, open-source hardware for amplifying and digitizing neural signals, the GUI has been used for closed-loop experiments that perturb the hippocampal theta rhythm in a phase-specific manner. The Open Ephys GUI is the first widely used application for multichannel electrophysiology that leverages a plugin-based workflow. We hope that it will lower the barrier to entry for electrophysiologists who wish to incorporate real-time feedback into their research.

  7. Clinical and electrophysiological signs of diabetic polyneuropathy -- effect of glycemia and duration of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Biserka; Kovac, Branislav; Marusić-Emedi, Slavica; Svalina, Sanja; Demarin, Vida

    2011-06-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy occurs in around 50% of diabetic patients. Its pathophysiological mechanism is not completely clarified and major occurrences boil down to the change in neural phenotype and vasa nervorum. As glucose neurotoxicity has been suggested by plenty of evidence, the aim of the study was to assess the effect of glycemia on the severity of diabetic polyneuropathy. Considering that some practical experiences point to serious complications in patients suffering from diabetes of shorter duration, another aim was to assess the effect of diabetes duration on the severity of related neuropathy. Clinical and electromyoneurographic examinations were performed in 100 patients with diabetic polyneuropathy free from any laboratory signs of renal failure. The effect of HbA1c value and duration of disease on clinical symptoms, signs and electrophysiological indicators of polyneuropathy was analyzed. Study results indicated that 78% of patients with diabetic polyneuropathy did not have well-regulated glycemia. Diabetes duration was associated with a growing number of sensory symptoms, among which the sensation of pain similar to electric shock was present in 63% of patients. In addition, it also had negative impact on the sensory and motor nerve conduction velocity. HbA1c influenced the whole range of electrophysiological indicators of diabetic polyneuropathy.

  8. A Rare Case of Painful Trigeminal Neuropathy Secondary to Lateral Medullary Infarct: Neuroimaging and Electrophysiological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Tang; Lo, Chung-Ping; Chen, Ying-Chu; Tu, Min-Chien

    2015-06-01

    To report a rare case of painful trigeminal neuropathy after lateral medullary infarct and probe its underlying pathogenesis on the basis of neuroimaging and electrophysiological study. A 45-year-old man presented acute onset of unsteady gait followed by paroxysmal and electric shock-like headache in the distribution of ophthalmic branch of left trigeminal nerve in 2 days. Neurological examinations showed hypoesthesia in the distribution of mandibular branch of left trigeminal nerve and left appendicular ataxia. Muscle powers and deep tendon reflexes were normal. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed infarct within the left cerebellum and middle portion of dorsolateral medulla. Vascular compression at the root entry zone of trigeminal nerve was excluded. Painful trigeminal neuropathy secondary to lateral medullary infarct was diagnosed. Ancillary blink reflex study 3 days after the stroke event showed abnormal late responses (R2), either ipsilateral or contralateral, after stimulation of left supraorbital nerve, suggesting left medullary lesion. Followup study 3 weeks later demonstrated normalization in absolute latencies of bilateral late responses, in line with remission of pain paroxysms on low-dose gabapentin treatment. Painful trigeminal neuropathy attributed to lateral medullary infarct is a unique disease entity. Ophthalmic branch involvement, coexisting sensory deficits, absence of triggers, and rapid evolvement and remission are its characteristics. Our neuroimaging study delineated ischemic stroke pathology within descending tract and spinal nucleus of trigeminal nerve. Serial electrophysiological studies provide evidences supporting ephaptic transmission as the main pathogenesis concordant with dynamics of neuropathic pain and therapeutic implications.

  9. Dose-dependent electrophysiologic effects of amiodarone in the immature canine heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickoff, A S; Singh, S; Flinn, C J; Torres, E; Ezrin, A M; Gelband, H

    1983-09-01

    The electrophysiologic effects of incremental doses of intravenous amiodarone were studied in the intact neonatal canine heart and were compared with the responses observed in the adult. Seven neonatal puppies aged 5 to 14 days, and 6 adult dogs were studied. Assessment of sinus and atrioventricular (AV) nodal function and atrial and ventricular refractory periods was performed using standard His bundle recording techniques and programmed extrastimulation before and after doses of 2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg of intravenous amiodarone. Amiodarone depressed sinus node cycle length, sinus node recovery time and AV nodal conduction in both groups. Atrial and ventricular refractory periods were also prolonged in a dose-dependent fashion in both the neonatal and adult dogs. Although similar responses to amiodarone were observed in both groups, the immature dogs were more sensitive to amiodarone in prolongation of atrial refractory periods and depression of sinus node recovery time. The neonatal group, however, demonstrated more resistance to amiodarone-induced depression of AV nodal conduction. Thus, intravenous amiodarone produces dose-dependent electrophysiologic changes in the neonate similar to those in the adult, although the significant differences in drug sensitivity may be clinically important.

  10. Wearable Multi-Channel Microelectrode Membranes for Elucidating Electrophysiological Phenotypes of Injured Myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hung; Yu, Fei; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Tai, Joyce; Lee, Juhyun; Darehzereshki, Ali; Bersohn, Malcolm; Lien, Ching-Ling; Chi, Neil C.; Tai, Yu-Chong; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the regenerative capacity of small vertebrate models has provided new insights into the plasticity of injured myocardium. Here, we demonstrated the application of flexible microelectrode arrays (MEAs) in elucidating electrophysiological phenotypes of zebrafish and neonatal mouse models of heart regeneration. The 4-electrode MEA membranes were designed to detect electrical signals in the aquatic environment. They were micro-fabricated to adhere to the non-planar body surface of zebrafish and neonatal mice. The acquired signals were processed to display electrocardiogram (ECG) with high signal-to-noise-ratios, and were validated via the use of conventional micro-needle electrodes. The 4-channel MEA provided signal stability and spatial resolution, revealing the site-specific electrical injury currents such as ST-depression in response to ventricular cryo-injury. Thus, our polymer-based and wearable MEA membranes provided electrophysiological insights in long-term conduction phenotypes for small vertebral models of heart injury and regeneration with a translational implication for monitoring cardiac patients. PMID:24945366

  11. Immunohistochemistry and electrophysiological findings in swine abattoir workers with immune-mediated polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muley, Suraj A; Holzbauer, Stacy; Clark, Brent; Sejvar, James; Lynfield, Ruth; Parry, Gareth; DeVries, Aaron S

    2018-02-15

    Workers exposed to aerosolized brain in a swine-processing plant developed immune-mediated polyradiculoneuropathy (IP) possibly triggered by an immune response. Immunohistochemistry results were correlated with electrophysiological variables to examine the immunopathogenesis of this disorder. Laboratory studies used normal nerve tissue that was exposed to sera from 12 IP patients; 10 exposed controls; and 10 unexposed controls. Clinical and electrophysiological data from IP patients were obtained from medical record reviews. Analysis included electromyography results of IP patients and nerve conduction studies examining CMAP amplitude, distal motor latency, motor conduction velocity, F-wave latency, sensory nerve action potential amplitude, and sensory nerve conduction velocity. Case and control results were compared relative to distance from exposure. Electrodiagnostic findings revealed prolongation of the distal and f-wave latencies suggestive of demyelination at the level of the nerve root and distal nerve terminals. Immunohistochemical results identified an antibody to the peripheral nerve, with staining at the level of the axolemma. Thus, IP may be a primary axonopathy with secondary paranodal demyelination causing the conduction changes. Staining of the distal and proximal portions of the nerve appears consistent with easier access through the blood-nerve barrier. IP is an immune-mediated neuropathy related to antibodies to an axon-based antigen on peripheral nerves. Secondary paranodal demyelination is likely. Further studies to identify the primary axonal antigenic target would be useful. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. An Association between Auditory-Visual Synchrony Processing and Reading Comprehension: Behavioral and Electrophysiological Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossbridge, Julia; Zweig, Jacob; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2017-03-01

    The perceptual system integrates synchronized auditory-visual signals in part to promote individuation of objects in cluttered environments. The processing of auditory-visual synchrony may more generally contribute to cognition by synchronizing internally generated multimodal signals. Reading is a prime example because the ability to synchronize internal phonological and/or lexical processing with visual orthographic processing may facilitate encoding of words and meanings. Consistent with this possibility, developmental and clinical research has suggested a link between reading performance and the ability to compare visual spatial/temporal patterns with auditory temporal patterns. Here, we provide converging behavioral and electrophysiological evidence suggesting that greater behavioral ability to judge auditory-visual synchrony (Experiment 1) and greater sensitivity of an electrophysiological marker of auditory-visual synchrony processing (Experiment 2) both predict superior reading comprehension performance, accounting for 16% and 25% of the variance, respectively. These results support the idea that the mechanisms that detect auditory-visual synchrony contribute to reading comprehension.

  13. Identifying Treatment Response of Sertraline in a Teenager with Selective Mutism using Electrophysiological Neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugene, Andy R; Masiak, Jolanta

    2016-06-01

    Selective Mutism is described as the inability to verbally express oneself in anxiety provoking social situations and may result in awkward social interactions in school-aged children. In this case-report we present the baseline electrophysiological neuroimaging results and after treatment with Sertraline for 6-weeks. A 20-channel EEG event-related potential recording was acquired during an internal voice task at baseline prior to the initiation of 50mg of Sertraline and then repeated 6-weeks after treatment with Sertraline. EEG signals were processed for movement, eye-blink, and muscle artifacts and ERP signal averaging was completed. ERPs were analyzed using Standard Low Resolution Brain Electromagnetic Tomography (sLORETA). At baseline, Sertraline increased the neuronal activation in the middle temporal gyrus and the anterior cingulate gyrus from baseline in the patient following 6-weeks of treatment. Our findings suggest that electrophysiological neuroimaging may provide a creative approach for personalizing medicine by providing insight to the pharmacodynamics of antidepressants.

  14. Castration modulates singing patterns and electrophysiological properties of RA projection neurons in adult male zebra finches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songhua Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Castration can change levels of plasma testosterone. Androgens such as testosterone play an important role in stabilizing birdsong. The robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA is an important premotor nucleus critical for singing. In this study, we investigated the effect of castration on singing patterns and electrophysiological properties of projection neurons (PNs in the RA of adult male zebra finches. Adult male zebra finches were castrated and the changes in bird song assessed. We also recorded the electrophysiological changes from RA PNs using patch clamp recording. We found that the plasma levels of testosterone were significantly decreased, song syllable’s entropy was increased and the similarity of motif was decreased after castration. Spontaneous and evoked firing rates, membrane time constants, and membrane capacitance of RA PNs in the castration group were lower than those of the control and the sham groups. Afterhyperpolarization AHP time to peak of spontaneous action potential (AP was prolonged after castration.These findings suggest that castration decreases song stereotypy and excitability of RA PNs in male zebra finches.

  15. Processing graded feedback: electrophysiological correlates of learning from small and large errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Caroline Di Bernardi; Takase, Emilio; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2014-05-01

    Feedback processing is important for learning and therefore may affect the consolidation of skills. Considerable research demonstrates electrophysiological differences between correct and incorrect feedback, but how we learn from small versus large errors is usually overlooked. This study investigated electrophysiological differences when processing small or large error feedback during a time estimation task. Data from high-learners and low-learners were analyzed separately. In both high- and low-learners, large error feedback was associated with higher feedback-related negativity (FRN) and small error feedback was associated with a larger P300 and increased amplitude over the motor related areas of the left hemisphere. In addition, small error feedback induced larger desynchronization in the alpha and beta bands with distinctly different topographies between the two learning groups: The high-learners showed a more localized decrease in beta power over the left frontocentral areas, and the low-learners showed a widespread reduction in the alpha power following small error feedback. Furthermore, only the high-learners showed an increase in phase synchronization between the midfrontal and left central areas. Importantly, this synchronization was correlated to how well the participants consolidated the estimation of the time interval. Thus, although large errors were associated with higher FRN, small errors were associated with larger oscillatory responses, which was more evident in the high-learners. Altogether, our results suggest an important role of the motor areas in the processing of error feedback for skill consolidation.

  16. Neuroinflammation alters voltage-dependent conductance in striatal astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpuk, Nikolay; Burkovetskaya, Maria; Kielian, Tammy

    2012-07-01

    Neuroinflammation has the capacity to alter normal central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis and function. The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of an inflammatory milieu on the electrophysiological properties of striatal astrocyte subpopulations with a mouse bacterial brain abscess model. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in striatal glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-green fluorescent protein (GFP)(+) astrocytes neighboring abscesses at postinfection days 3 or 7 in adult mice. Cell input conductance (G(i)) measurements spanning a membrane potential (V(m)) surrounding resting membrane potential (RMP) revealed two prevalent astrocyte subsets. A1 and A2 astrocytes were identified by negative and positive G(i) increments vs. V(m), respectively. A1 and A2 astrocytes displayed significantly different RMP, G(i), and cell membrane capacitance that were influenced by both time after bacterial exposure and astrocyte proximity to the inflammatory site. Specifically, the percentage of A1 astrocytes was decreased immediately surrounding the inflammatory lesion, whereas A2 cells were increased. These changes were particularly evident at postinfection day 7, revealing increased cell numbers with an outward current component. Furthermore, RMP was inversely modified in A1 and A2 astrocytes during neuroinflammation, and resting G(i) was increased from 21 to 30 nS in the latter. In contrast, gap junction communication was significantly decreased in all astrocyte populations associated with inflamed tissues. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the heterogeneity of striatal astrocyte populations, which experience distinct electrophysiological modifications in response to CNS inflammation.

  17. The implications of non-linear biological oscillations on human electrophysiology for electrohypersensitivity (EHS) and multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    The 'informational content' of Earth's electromagnetic signaling is like a set of operating instructions for human life. These environmental cues are dynamic and involve exquisitely low inputs (intensities) of critical frequencies with which all life on Earth evolved. Circadian and other temporal biological rhythms depend on these fluctuating electromagnetic inputs to direct gene expression, cell communication and metabolism, neural development, brainwave activity, neural synchrony, a diversity of immune functions, sleep and wake cycles, behavior and cognition. Oscillation is also a universal phenomenon, and biological systems of the heart, brain and gut are dependent on the cooperative actions of cells that function according to principles of non-linear, coupled biological oscillations for their synchrony. They are dependent on exquisitely timed cues from the environment at vanishingly small levels. Altered 'informational content' of environmental cues can swamp natural electromagnetic cues and result in dysregulation of normal biological rhythms that direct growth, development, metabolism and repair mechanisms. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) and radiofrequency radiation (RFR) can have the devastating biological effects of disrupting homeostasis and desynchronizing normal biological rhythms that maintain health. Non-linear, weak field biological oscillations govern body electrophysiology, organize cell and tissue functions and maintain organ systems. Artificial bioelectrical interference can give false information (disruptive signaling) sufficient to affect critical pacemaker cells (of the heart, gut and brain) and desynchronize functions of these important cells that orchestrate function and maintain health. Chronic physiological stress undermines homeostasis whether it is chemically induced or electromagnetically induced (or both exposures are simultaneous contributors). This can eventually break down adaptive biological responses critical to health

  18. Long latency auditory evoked potentials and central auditory processing in children with reading and writing alterations: Preliminary data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares, Aparecido José Couto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Presently, it is admitted that individuals with reading and writing alterations may present delay in the development of listening skills, which may interfere in the learning process. The assessment of the listening skills can occur in a behavioral way, through central auditory processing (CAP tests, or by electrophysiological assessment highlighting the long latency auditory evoked potentials (LLAEP. The use of the LLAEP as a means of complementary assessment of individuals with reading and writing alterations can become an important data both for further characterization of the alterations, as for the therapeutic guidance of this population. Objective: Characterize the CAP and the LLAEP in children with reading and writing alterations. Method: Research approved by the Institution's Ethic Commission under nº 305/10. The assessment of CAP and LLAEP was performed in 12 children aged between 8 and 12 years old (average of 10,6 years, with reading and writing alterations confirmed in specific evaluation. Results: The most altered CAP skills were temporal ordination and figure-ground for linguistic sounds. There were found altered results in P300 and in MMN. Conclusion: The individuals with reading and writing alterations performed below the expected on CAP tests. The MMN allowed a better characterization of the auditory function of this population. There was evidence of association between the CAP results and the alteration of the LLAEP.

  19. Effects of intraoperative irradiation and intraoperative hyperthermia on canine sciatic nerve: neurologic and electrophysiologic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Gillette, Sharon M.; Powers, Barbara E.; Stukel, Therese A.; LaRue, Susan M.; Gillette, Edward L.; Borak, Thomas B.; Scott, Robert J.; Weiss, Julia; Colacchio, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Late radiation injury to peripheral nerve may be the limiting factor in the clinical application of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). The combination of IORT with intraoperative hyperthermia (IOHT) raises specific concerns regarding the effects on certain normal tissues such as peripheral nerve, which might be included in the treatment field. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of IORT alone to the effect of IORT combined with IOHT on peripheral nerve in normal beagle dogs. Methods and Materials: Young adult beagle dogs were randomized into five groups of three to five dogs each to receive IORT doses of 16, 20, 24, 28, or 32 Gy to 5 cm of surgically exposed right sciatic nerve using 6 MeV electrons and six groups of four to five dogs each received IORT doses of 0, 12, 16, 20, 24, or 28 Gy simultaneously with 44 deg. C of IOHT for 60 min. IOHT was performed using a water circulating hyperthermia device with a multichannel thermometry system on the surgically exposed sciatic nerve. Neurologic and electrophysiologic examinations were done before and monthly after treatment for 24 months. Electrophysiologic studies included electromyographic (EMG) examinations of motor function, as well as motor nerve conduction velocities studies. Results: Two years after treatment, the effective dose for 50% complication (ED 50 ) for limb paresis in dogs exposed to IORT only was 22 Gy. The ED 50 for paresis in dogs exposed to IORT combined with IOHT was 15 Gy. The thermal enhancement ratio (TER) was 1.5. Electrophysiologic studies showed more prominent changes such as EMG abnormalities, decrease in conduction velocity and amplitude of the action potential, and complete conduction block in dogs that received the combination of IORT and IOHT. The latency to development of peripheral neuropathies was shorter for dogs exposed to the combined treatment. Conclusion: The probability of developing peripheral neuropathies in a large animal model was higher

  20. Electrophysiological and Morphological Properties of α and γ Motoneurons in the Rat Trigeminal Motor Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo Nishimura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The muscle contraction during voluntary movement is regulated by activities of α- and γ-motoneurons (αMNs and γMNs, respectively. The tension of jaw-closing muscles can be finely tuned over a wide range. This excellent function is likely to be achieved by the specific populations of αMNs innervating jaw-closing muscles. Indeed, we have recently demonstrated that in the rat dorsolateral trigeminal motor nucleus (dl-TMN, the size distribution of αMNs was bimodal and the population of smaller αMNs showed a size distribution similar to that of γMNs, by immunohistochemically identifying αMNs and γMNs based on the expressions of estrogen-related receptor gamma (Err3 and neuronal DNA binding protein NeuN together with ChAT. This finding suggests the presence of αMNs as small as γMNs. However, differences in the electrophysiological membrane properties between αMNs and γMNs remain unknown also in the dl-TMN. Therefore, in the present study, we studied the electrophysiological membrane properties of MNs in the dl-TMN of infant rats at postnatal days 7–12 together with their morphological properties using whole-cell current-clamp recordings followed by immunohistochemical staining with an anti-NeuN and anti-ChAT antibodies. We found that the ChAT-positive and NeuN-positive αMNs were divided into two subclasses: the first one had a larger cell body and displayed a 4-aminopyridine (4-AP-sensitive current while the second one had a smaller cell body and displayed a less prominent 4-AP-sensitive current and a low-threshold spike, suitable for their orderly recruitment. We finally found that γMNs showing ChAT-positive and NeuN-negative immunoreactivities had smaller cell bodies and displayed an afterdepolarization mediated by flufenamate-sensitive cation current. It is suggested that these electrophysiological and morphological features of MNs in the dl-TMN are well correlated with the precise control of occlusion.

  1. Using Electrophysiological Measures to Assess the Consumer Acceptability of Smokeless Tobacco Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzell, George A; Das, Babita; Cruz-Cano, Raul; Nkongho, Lizette E; Kidanu, Azieb W; Kim, Hyoshin; Clark, Pamela I; McDonald, Craig G

    2016-09-01

    Adequate evaluation of novel tobacco products must include investigation of consumers' psychological response to such products. Traditionally, subjective scales of product liking have been used to assess consumer acceptability of tobacco products. However, subjective scales may miss cognitive changes that can only be captured by direct neurophysiological assessment. The present investigation explored the viability of using electroencephalography (EEG), in combination with traditional subjective measures, to assess consumer acceptability of five smokeless tobacco products. Given previous work linking product liking to arousal/attentional (executive function) enhancement, we focused on EEG measures of attention/arousal to objectively characterize cognitive changes associated with tobacco product use. During five separate laboratory visits, smokeless tobacco users used Verve discs, Ariva dissolvables, Skoal snuff, Camel snus, or Nicorette lozenges. The N2 and P3b event-related potential components elicited by an oddball task were used to index attentional changes before/after product usage. Additionally, resting state alpha band EEG activity was analyzed before/after product usage to index cortical arousal. Although analyses of the subjective results provided limited inference, analyses of the electrophysiological measures, particularly the alpha suppression measure, revealed robust differences between products. Skoal elicited significantly enhanced alpha suppression compared to all four other products tested. Additionally, alpha suppression was found to correlate positively with subjective measures of satisfaction and psychological reward, but was unrelated to perceived aversion. The present results provide evidence that electrophysiological measures can yield important insights into consumer acceptability of novel tobacco products and are a valuable complement to subjective measures. This study is the first to employ a combination of electrophysiological measures

  2. Altered metabolism in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Locasale Jason W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer cells have different metabolic requirements from their normal counterparts. Understanding the consequences of this differential metabolism requires a detailed understanding of glucose metabolism and its relation to energy production in cancer cells. A recent study in BMC Systems Biology by Vasquez et al. developed a mathematical model to assess some features of this altered metabolism. Here, we take a broader look at the regulation of energy metabolism in cancer cells, considering their anabolic as well as catabolic needs. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1752-0509/4/58/

  3. An infrared optical pacing system for high-throughput screening of cardiac electrophysiology in human cardiomyocytes (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPheeters, Matt T.; Wang, Yves T.; Laurita, Kenneth R.; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2017-02-01

    Cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS-HCM) have the potential to provide individualized therapies for patients and to test drug candidates for cardiac toxicity. In order for hiPS-CM to be useful for such applications, there is a need for high-throughput technology to rapidly assess cardiac electrophysiology parameters. Here, we designed and tested a fully contactless optical mapping (OM) and optical pacing (OP) system capable of imaging and point stimulation of hiPS-CM in small wells. OM allowed us to characterize cardiac electrophysiological parameters (conduction velocity, action potential duration, etc.) using voltage-sensitive dyes with high temporal and spatial resolution over the entire well. To improve OM signal-to-noise ratio, we tested a new voltage-sensitive dye (Fluovolt) for accuracy and phototoxicity. Stimulation is essential because most electrophysiological parameters are rate dependent; however, traditional methods utilizing electrical stimulation is difficult in small wells. To overcome this limitation, we utilized OP (λ = 1464 nm) to precisely control heart rate with spatial precision without the addition of exogenous agents. We optimized OP parameters (e.g., well size, pulse width, spot size) to achieve robust pacing and minimize the threshold radiant exposure. Finally, we tested system sensitivity using Flecainide, a drug with well described action on multiple electrophysiological properties.

  4. Toward cardiac electrophysiological mapping based on micro-Tesla NMR: a novel modality for localizing the cardiac reentry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiwoong Kim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Matching the proton magnetic resonance frequency to the frequency of a periodic electrophysiological excitation of myocardium enables direct localization of the cardiac reentry by magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The feasibility of this new idea has been demonstrated by conducting a numerical simulation based on a realistic heart model and experimental parameters in SQUID-based micro-Tesla NMR.

  5. Microfluidic platform for electrophysiological recordings from host-stage hookworm Ascaris suum larvae: a new tool for anthelmenthic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The screening of candidate compounds and natural products for anthelmintic activity is a key component of discovering new drugs against human and animal parasites. We previously validated in Caenorhabditis elegans a microfluidic device (‘chip’) that records non-invasively the tiny electrophysiologic...

  6. Integrated microfluidic biosensing platform for simultaneous confocal microscopy and electrophysiological measurements on bilayer lipid membranes and ion channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulze Greiving-Stimberg, Verena Carolin; Bomer, Johan G.; de Boer, Hans L.; van den Berg, Albert; le Gac, Severine

    2018-01-01

    Combining high-resolution imaging and electrophysiological recordings is key for various types of experimentation on lipid bilayers and ion channels. Here, we propose an integrated biosensing platform consisting of a microfluidic cartridge and a dedicated chip-holder to conduct such dual

  7. Distribution of extracellular potassium and electrophysiologic changes during two-stage coronary ligation in the isolated, perfused canine heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coronel, R.; Fiolet, J. W.; Wilms-Schopman, J. G.; Opthof, T.; Schaapherder, A. F.; Janse, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    We studied the relation between [K+]o and the electrophysiologic changes during a "Harris two-stage ligation," which is an occlusion of a coronary artery, preceded by a 30-minute period of 50% reduction of flow through the artery. This two-stage ligation has been reported to be antiarrhythmic. Local

  8. [Patterns of action potential firing in cortical neurons of neonatal mice and their electrophysiological property].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furong, Liu; Shengtian, L I

    2016-05-25

    To investigate patterns of action potential firing in cortical heurons of neonatal mice and their electrophysiological properties. The passive and active membrane properties of cortical neurons from 3-d neonatal mice were observed by whole-cell patch clamp with different voltage and current mode. Three patterns of action potential firing were identified in response to depolarized current injection. The effects of action potential firing patterns on voltage-dependent inward and outward current were found. Neurons with three different firing patterns had different thresholds of depolarized current. In the morphology analysis of action potential, the three type neurons were different in rise time, duration, amplitude and threshold of the first action potential evoked by 80 pA current injection. The passive properties were similar in three patterns of action potential firing. These results indicate that newborn cortical neurons exhibit different patterns of action potential firing with different action potential parameters such as shape and threshold.

  9. Electrophysiological evidence for executive control and efficient categorization involved in implicit self-evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lili; Gu, Ruolei; Cai, Huajian; Zhang, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Self-esteem affects human life. A thorough examination of the cognitive processes and neural activations of implicit self-evaluation should aid our understanding of self-esteem. The current study examined electrophysiological correlates of implicit self-evaluation among 19 healthy participants using event-related potentials (ERPs) recorded during an Implicit Association Test (IAT). Behavioral results showed that participants responded faster in the compatible condition (compared to the incompatible condition) in which "self" was paired with "positive" traits and "others" was paired with "negative" traits, reflecting positive nature of implicit self-evaluation. ERP results showed that the incompatible condition elicited a larger N200 and a smaller P3 compared to the compatible condition. These findings indicated that both executive control and stimulus categorization were involved in implicit self-evaluation, reflected by N200 and P3, respectively. We accordingly suggested that implicit self-evaluation manifests in multiple cognitive processes.

  10. Radiation exposure of an anaesthesiologist in catheterisation and electrophysiological cardiac procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreoli, Stefano; Moretti, Renzo; Lorini, Ferdinando Luca; Lagrotta, Mariavittoria

    2016-01-01

    Sometimes, cardiac catheterisation and electrophysiological procedures, diagnostic and interventional, require an anaesthesiological support. The anaesthesiologist receives radiation doses depending on various factors, such as type of procedure and exposure modality, anaesthesiological technique, individual protective devices and operator experience. The aim of this study was to investigate the dose per procedure, the exposure inhomogeneity and the effective dose, E, of a senior anaesthesiologist in the haemodynamic laboratory of Ospedali Riuniti, Bergamo. The dose monitoring was routinely performed with sets of several thermoluminescent dosemeters and an electronic personal dosemeter. The study covered 300 consecutive procedures over 1 y. The anaesthesiologist wore a protective apron, a thyroid collar and glasses (0.5 mm lead-equivalent). (authors)

  11. OpenElectrophy: an electrophysiological data- and analysis-sharing framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Garcia

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Progress in experimental tools and design is allowing the acquisition of increasingly large datasets. Storage, manipulation and efficient analyses of such large amounts of data is now a primary issue. We present OpenElectrophy, an electrophysiological data and analysis sharing framework developed to fill this niche. It stores all experiment data and meta-data in a single central MySQL database, and provides a graphic user interface to visualize and explore the data, and a library of functions for user analysis scripting in Python. It implements multiple spike sorting methods, and oscillation detection based on the ridge extraction methods due to Roux et. al., 2007. OpenElectrophy is open-source and is freely available for download at http://neuralensemble.org/trac/OpenElectrophy.

  12. FieldTrip: Open Source Software for Advanced Analysis of MEG, EEG, and Invasive Electrophysiological Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Oostenveld

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes FieldTrip, an open source software package that we developed for the analysis of MEG, EEG, and other electrophysiological data. The software is implemented as a MATLAB toolbox and includes a complete set of consistent and user-friendly high-level functions that allow experimental neuroscientists to analyze experimental data. It includes algorithms for simple and advanced analysis, such as time-frequency analysis using multitapers, source reconstruction using dipoles, distributed sources and beamformers, connectivity analysis, and nonparametric statistical permutation tests at the channel and source level. The implementation as toolbox allows the user to perform elaborate and structured analyses of large data sets using the MATLAB command line and batch scripting. Furthermore, users and developers can easily extend the functionality and implement new algorithms. The modular design facilitates the reuse in other software packages.

  13. Visualization and neuronal cell targeting during electrophysiological recordings facilitated by quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Lauren D.; Andrásfalvy, Bertalan K.; Galiñanes, Gregorio L.; Huber, Daniel; Barbic, Mladen; Macklin, John J.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Delehanty, James B.; Huston, Alan L.; Makara, Judit K.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2015-03-01

    The simultaneous visualization, identification and targeting of neurons during patch clamp-mediated electrophysiological recordings is a basic technique in neuroscience, yet it is often complicated by the inability to visualize the pipette tip, particularly in deep brain tissue. Here we demonstrate a novel approach in which fluorescent quantum dot probes are used to coat pipettes prior to their use. The strong two-photon absorption cross sections of the quantum dots afford robust contrast at significantly deeper penetration depths than current methods allow. We demonstrate the utility of this technique in multiple recording formats both in vitro and in vivo where imaging of the pipettes is achieved at remarkable depths (up to 800 microns). Notably, minimal perturbation of cellular physiology is observed over the hours-long time course of neuronal recordings. We discuss our results within the context of the role that quantum dot nanoprobes may play in understanding neuronal cell physiology.

  14. Dual Atrioventricular Nodal Pathways Physiology: A Review of Relevant Anatomy, Electrophysiology, and Electrocardiographic Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalaghuru Chokkalingam Mani, MD

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available More than half a century has passed since the concept of dual atrioventricular (AV nodal pathways physiology was conceived. Dual AV nodal pathways have been shown to be responsible for many clinical arrhythmia syndromes, most notably AV nodal reentrant tachycardia. Although there has been a considerable amount of research on this topic, the subject of dual AV nodal pathways physiology remains heavily debated and discussed. Despite advances in understanding arrhythmia mechanisms and the widespread use of invasive electrophysiologic studies, there is still disagreement on the anatomy and physiology of the AV node that is the basis of discontinuous antegrade AV conduction. The purpose of this paper is to review the concept of dual AV nodal pathways physiology and its varied electrocardiographic manifestations.

  15. Stability results for the parameter identification inverse problem in cardiac electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassoued, Jamila; Mahjoub, Moncef; Zemzemi, Néjib

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we prove a stability estimate of the parameter identification problem in cardiac electrophysiology modeling. We use the monodomain model which is a reaction diffusion parabolic equation where the reaction term is obtained by solving an ordinary differential equation (ODE). We are interested in proving the stability of the identification of the parameter {τ }{in}, which is the parameter that multiplies the cubic term in the reaction term. The proof of the result is based on a new Carleman-type estimate for both partial differential equation (PDE) and ODE problems. As a consequence of the stability result we prove the uniqueness of the parameter {τ }{in} giving some observations of both state variables at a given time t 0 in the whole domain and in the PDE variable in a non empty open subset w 0 of the domain.

  16. Direct electrophysiological evidence for the maintenance of retrieval orientations and the role of cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Jane E

    2018-02-02

    Retrieval orientations are memory states that bias retrieval towards specific memory contents. Many neuroimaging studies have examined the influence of retrieval orientations on stimulus processing, but very little direct evidence exists regarding the ongoing maintenance of orientations themselves. Participants completed two memory tasks with different retrieval goals. ERPs were time-locked to a pre-stimulus fixation asterisk and contrasted according to retrieval goals. Pre-stimulus ERPs elicited during the two retrieval tasks diverged at frontal electrode sites. These differences onset early and were sustained throughout the fixation-stimulus interval. The functional and spatiotemporal characteristics of this ERP effect comprise the first direct electrophysiological evidence of the ongoing maintenance of retrieval orientations throughout a task. Moreover, this effect was eliminated in participants who performed a stroop task prior to the memory tests, indicating that reserves of cognitive control play an important role in the maintenance of retrieval orientations throughout memory tasks. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Electrophysiology for biomedical engineering students: a practical and theoretical course in animal electrocorticography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracín, Ana L; Farfán, Fernando D; Coletti, Marcos A; Teruya, Pablo Y; Felice, Carmelo J

    2016-09-01

    The major challenge in laboratory teaching is the application of abstract concepts in simple and direct practical lessons. However, students rarely have the opportunity to participate in a laboratory that combines practical learning with a realistic research experience. In the Biomedical Engineering career, we offer short and optional courses to complement studies for students as they initiate their Graduation Project. The objective of these theoretical and practical courses is to introduce students to the topics of their projects. The present work describes an experience in electrophysiology to teach undergraduate students how to extract cortical information using electrocorticographic techniques. Students actively participate in some parts of the experience and then process and analyze the data obtained with different signal processing tools. In postlaboratory evaluations, students described the course as an exceptional opportunity for students interested in following a postgraduate science program and fully appreciated their contents. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  18. Spinal Cord Preparation from Adult Red-eared Turtles for Electrophysiological Recordings during Motor Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Peter Christian Hvidberg; Berg, Rune W.

    2017-01-01

    Although it is known that the generation of movements is performed to a large extent in neuronal circuits located in the spinal cord, the involved mechanisms are still unclear. The turtle as a model system for investigating spinal motor activity has advantages, which far exceeds those of model...... systems using other animals. The high resistance to anoxia allows for investigation of the fully developed and adult spinal circuitry, as opposed to mammals, which are sensitive to anoxia and where using neonates are often required to remedy the problems. The turtle is mechanically stable and natural...... sensory inputs can induce multiple complex motor behaviors, without the need for application of neurochemicals. Here, we provide a detailed protocol of how to make the adult turtle preparation, also known as the integrated preparation for electrophysiological investigation. Here, the hind-limb scratch...

  19. Drosophila KCNQ channel displays evolutionarily conserved electrophysiology and pharmacology with mammalian KCNQ channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Cavaliere

    Full Text Available Of the five human KCNQ (Kv7 channels, KCNQ1 with auxiliary subunit KCNE1 mediates the native cardiac I(Ks current with mutations causing short and long QT cardiac arrhythmias. KCNQ4 mutations cause deafness. KCNQ2/3 channels form the native M-current controlling excitability of most neurons, with mutations causing benign neonatal febrile convulsions. Drosophila contains a single KCNQ (dKCNQ that appears to serve alone the functions of all the duplicated mammalian neuronal and cardiac KCNQ channels sharing roughly 50-60% amino acid identity therefore offering a route to investigate these channels. Current information about the functional properties of dKCNQ is lacking therefore we have investigated these properties here. Using whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology we compare the biophysical and pharmacological properties of dKCNQ with the mammalian neuronal and cardiac KCNQ channels expressed in HEK cells. We show that Drosophila KCNQ (dKCNQ is a slowly activating and slowly-deactivating K(+ current open at sub-threshold potentials that has similar properties to neuronal KCNQ2/3 with some features of the cardiac KCNQ1/KCNE1 accompanied by conserved sensitivity to a number of clinically relevant KCNQ blockers (chromanol 293B, XE991, linopirdine and opener (zinc pyrithione. We also investigate the molecular basis of the differential selectivity of KCNQ channels to the opener retigabine and show a single amino acid substitution (M217W can confer sensitivity to dKCNQ. We show dKCNQ has similar electrophysiological and pharmacological properties as the mammalian KCNQ channels, allowing future study of physiological and pathological roles of KCNQ in Drosophila and whole organism screening for new modulators of KCNQ channelopathies.

  20. Inhibitory effects of Urtica dioica L. root on electrophysiological properties of isolated rabbit atrioventricular node

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Enayati

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The ideal drug for treatment of a wide range of supraventricular arrhythmia hasn't yet been developed. Previous studies have shown antihypertensive and negative inotropic effects of the Urtica dioica L. (nettle. Therefore, the aim of present study is to determine the rate dependent inhibitory effects of ethanol extract of nettle root and investigate the role of adrenoceptors in the anti-arrhythmic mechanism of nettle on the isolated rabbit atrio-ventricular node. Methods: Urtica dioica roots were collected from Gorgan (Golestan, Iran. Male New Zealand rabbits (n=7 were used in all of the experiments. Experimental stimulation protocols (WBCL; Recovery, Facilitation, Fatigue were applied to assess electrophysiological properties of Node. All protocols were repeated in the presence and absence (control of different concentration (0.25-0.5 w/v % of nettle and 1 μM nadolol. Data were shown as Mean±SE, difference between groups statistically were assessed by SPSS software. Results: Nettle (0.5 w/v significantly decreased basic and functional properties of node as WBCL, ERP, FRP, AVCT and magnitude of fatigue (∆AH significantly increased but ∆FRP significantly decreased. In the presence of nadolol (1μM as a nonselective β-blocker, nettle (0.3 mg/L could not repeat its effects on electrophysiological properties of AV-node. Conclusion: The results showed the modifying properties of Urtica dioica root extract. It may be considered as a candidate for the treatment of supraventicular arrhythmias.

  1. Generation of electrophysiologically functional cardiomyocytes from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongran Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells can efficiently differentiate into the three germ layers similar to those formed by differentiated embryonic stem (ES cells. This provides a new source of cells in which to establish preclinical allogeneic transplantation models. Our iPS cells were generated from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs transfected with the Yamanaka factors, the four transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc, without antibiotic selection or MEF feeders. After the formation of embryoid bodies (EBs, iPS cells spontaneously differentiated into Flk1-positive cardiac progenitors and cardiomyocytes expressing cardiac-specific markers such as alpha sarcomeric actinin (α-actinin, cardiac alpha myosin heavy chain (α-MHC, cardiac troponin T (cTnT, and connexin 43 (CX43, as well as cardiac transcription factors Nk2 homebox 5 (Nkx2.5 and gata binding protein 4 (gata4. The electrophysiological activity of iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPS-CMs was detected in beating cell clusters with optical mapping and RH237 a voltage-sensitive dye, and in single contracting cells with patch-clamp technology. Incompletely differentiated iPS cells formed teratomas when transplanted into a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse model of myocardial infarction. Our results show that somatic cells can be reprogrammed into pluripotent stem cells, which in turn spontaneously differentiate into electrophysiologically functional mature cardiomyocytes expressing cardiac-specific makers, and that these cells can potentially be used to repair myocardial infarction (MI in the future.

  2. Transesophageal electrophysiological evaluation of children with a history of supraventricular tachycardia in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaufox, Andrew D; Warsy, Irfan; D'Souza, Marise; Kanter, Ronald

    2011-12-01

    Supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) presenting in the neonatal period may resolve by 1 year of age. Predicting which patients require therapy beyond 1 year of age is desirable. Pediatric electrophysiology databases from two institutions were reviewed for patients with a history of infant SVT who underwent transesophageal electrophysiology study (TEEPS) after initial SVT and before 2 years of age. All patients were tested off medications and followed for clinical recurrence. Forty-two patients presented with SVT at median age of 4 days (0-300 days). Initial control was achieved with one drug in 31 patients and multiple drugs in 11 patients. Prior to TEEPS, nine patients had clinical recurrence in the first year of life after initial control had been previously achieved. For all patients, TEEPS was performed, without complications, at median 13 months (9-22 months) of age and at median of 13 months (6-22 months) following the initial SVT episode. SVT was inducible in 27/42: 8 atrio-ventricular nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT) and 19 atrio-ventricular reciprocating tachycardia (AVRT). Inducibility was not associated with age at presentation, age at TEEPS, ventricular dysfunction at presentation, presence of structural congenital heart disease, number of drugs required to initially control SVT, or SVT recurrence after initial control. Of 15 not inducible at TEEPS, none had known SVT recurrence off medications at median follow-up of 27 months (6-37 months). In conclusion, among patients having SVT in early infancy, (1) TEEPS results are not associated with clinical variables, (2) non-inducibility is a good indicator of lack of clinical recurrence at intermediate follow-up, and (3) AVNRT may be more prevalent in infancy than previously reported.

  3. Electrophysiological and histological changes in extrinsic muscles proximal to post burn contractures of hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, V; Purwar, Shammi; Joshi, D; Kumar, M; Mandal, S; Chaudhuri, G R; Bhattacharya, S

    2011-06-01

    Burn scar hand contractures of variable degree are frequently encountered. Although the forearm is apparently spared, it was clinically observed that there was disuse atrophy in the unburnt extrinsic forearm muscles. Usually the clinicians do not give much importance to this fact. The girth at the midforearm was significantly reduced as compared to normal side. The flexion of the hand joints are governed by two components (a) intrinsic and (b) extrinsic muscles. The intrinsic muscles are directly involved in the contracted tissue. Therefore it was thought essential to evaluate the extrinsic group of muscles for their contribution in the final functional recovery following corrective surgery. Thirty patients having unilateral post thermal burn contracture sparing forearm were studied. A detailed clinical evaluation was made including grade of contracture and reduction in the forearm girth. The forearm unburnt muscles were evaluated by preoperative electrophysiological studies. Intraoperative biopsies were taken from these muscles for histopathological examination. On histopathological examination, there were significant abnormal changes in the form of muscle fiber atrophy, fibrolipomatous tissue replacement of atrophic muscle fibers and sarcolemmal changes. These changes were directly proportional to the severity of contractures. The electrophysiological studies showed proportionate changes in the form of reduction in amplitude, duration and interference. This study suggests that if these changes are mild and in reversible stage, they will favourably affect the functional recovery following surgery. However if these changes are of severe grade and irreversible, in spite of adequate surgery, splinting and physiotherapy, the functional recovery may not be complete. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. Ion Channel ElectroPhysiology Ontology (ICEPO) - a case study of text mining assisted ontology development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elayavilli, Ravikumar Komandur; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of biological cascades is of great interest to quantitative biologists. Biomedical text has been a rich source for quantitative information. Gathering quantitative parameters and values from biomedical text is one significant challenge in the early steps of computational modeling as it involves huge manual effort. While automatically extracting such quantitative information from bio-medical text may offer some relief, lack of ontological representation for a subdomain serves as impedance in normalizing textual extractions to a standard representation. This may render textual extractions less meaningful to the domain experts. In this work, we propose a rule-based approach to automatically extract relations involving quantitative data from biomedical text describing ion channel electrophysiology. We further translated the quantitative assertions extracted through text mining to a formal representation that may help in constructing ontology for ion channel events using a rule based approach. We have developed Ion Channel ElectroPhysiology Ontology (ICEPO) by integrating the information represented in closely related ontologies such as, Cell Physiology Ontology (CPO), and Cardiac Electro Physiology Ontology (CPEO) and the knowledge provided by domain experts. The rule-based system achieved an overall F-measure of 68.93% in extracting the quantitative data assertions system on an independently annotated blind data set. We further made an initial attempt in formalizing the quantitative data assertions extracted from the biomedical text into a formal representation that offers potential to facilitate the integration of text mining into ontological workflow, a novel aspect of this study. This work is a case study where we created a platform that provides formal interaction between ontology development and text mining. We have achieved partial success in extracting quantitative assertions from the biomedical text and formalizing them in ontological

  5. Electrophysiological Correlates of Semantic Dissimilarity Reflect the Comprehension of Natural, Narrative Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Michael P; Anderson, Andrew J; Di Liberto, Giovanni M; Crosse, Michael J; Lalor, Edmund C

    2018-03-05

    People routinely hear and understand speech at rates of 120-200 words per minute [1, 2]. Thus, speech comprehension must involve rapid, online neural mechanisms that process words' meanings in an approximately time-locked fashion. However, electrophysiological evidence for such time-locked processing has been lacking for continuous speech. Although valuable insights into semantic processing have been provided by the "N400 component" of the event-related potential [3-6], this literature has been dominated by paradigms using incongruous words within specially constructed sentences, with less emphasis on natural, narrative speech comprehension. Building on the discovery that cortical activity "tracks" the dynamics of running speech [7-9] and psycholinguistic work demonstrating [10-12] and modeling [13-15] how context impacts on word processing, we describe a new approach for deriving an electrophysiological correlate of natural speech comprehension. We used a computational model [16] to quantify the meaning carried by words based on how semantically dissimilar they were to their preceding context and then regressed this measure against electroencephalographic (EEG) data recorded from subjects as they listened to narrative speech. This produced a prominent negativity at a time lag of 200-600 ms on centro-parietal EEG channels, characteristics common to the N400. Applying this approach to EEG datasets involving time-reversed speech, cocktail party attention, and audiovisual speech-in-noise demonstrated that this response was very sensitive to whether or not subjects understood the speech they heard. These findings demonstrate that, when successfully comprehending natural speech, the human brain responds to the contextual semantic content of each word in a relatively time-locked fashion. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Language effects in second-language learners: A longitudinal electrophysiological study of spanish classroom learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soskey, Laura; Holcomb, Phillip J; Midgley, Katherine J

    2016-09-01

    How do the neural mechanisms involved in word recognition evolve over the course of word learning in adult learners of a new second language? The current study sought to closely track language effects, which are differences in electrophysiological indices of word processing between one's native and second languages, in beginning university learners over the course of a single semester of learning. Monolingual L1 English-speakers enrolled in introductory Spanish were first trained on a list of 228 Spanish words chosen from the vocabulary to be learned in class. Behavioral data from the training session and the following experimental sessions spaced over the course of the semester showed expected learning effects. In the three laboratory sessions participants read words in three lists (English, Spanish and mixed) while performing a go/no-go lexical decision task in which event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. As observed in previous studies there were ERP language effects with larger N400s to native than second language words. Importantly, this difference declined over the course of L2 learning with N400 amplitude increasing for new second language words. These results suggest that even over a single semester of learning that new second language words are rapidly incorporated into the word recognition system and begin to take on lexical and semantic properties similar to native language words. Moreover, the results suggest that electrophysiological measures can be used as sensitive measures for tracking the acquisition of new linguistic knowledge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Adult human heart slices are a multicellular system suitable for electrophysiological and pharmacological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelliti, Patrizia; Al-Saud, Sara Abou; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Al-Ayoubi, Samha; Bussek, Alexandra; Wettwer, Erich; Banner, Nicholas R; Bowles, Christopher T; Yacoub, Magdi H; Terracciano, Cesare M

    2011-09-01

    Electrophysiological and pharmacological data from the human heart are limited due to the absence of simple but representative experimental model systems of human myocardium. The aim of this study was to establish and characterise adult human myocardial slices from small patients' heart biopsies as a simple, reproducible and relevant preparation suitable for the study of human cardiac tissue at the multicellular level. Vibratome-cut myocardial slices were prepared from left ventricular biopsies obtained from end-stage heart failure patients undergoing heart transplant or ventricular assist device implantation, and from hearts of normal dogs. Multiple slices were prepared from each biopsy. Regular contractility was observed at a range of stimulation frequencies (0.1-2 Hz), and stable electrical activity, monitored using multi-electrode arrays (MEA), was maintained for at least 8 h from slice preparation. ATP/ADP and phosphocreatine/creatine ratios were comparable to intact organ values, and morphology and gap junction distribution were representative of native myocardium. MEA recordings showed that field potential duration (FPD) and conduction velocity (CV) in human and dog slices were similar to the values previously reported for papillary muscles, ventricular wedges and whole hearts. Longitudinal CV was significantly faster than transversal CV, with an anisotropic ratio of 3:1 for human and 2.3:1 for dog slices. Importantly, slices responded to the application of E-4031, chromanol and 4-aminopyridine, three potassium channel blockers known to affect action potential duration, with an increase in FPD. We conclude that viable myocardial slices with preserved structural, biochemical and electrophysiological properties can be prepared from adult human and canine heart biopsies and offer a novel preparation suitable for the study of heart failure and drug screening. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The amygdala as a neurobiological target for ghrelin in rats: neuroanatomical, electrophysiological and behavioral evidence.

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    Mayte Alvarez-Crespo

    Full Text Available Here, we sought to demonstrate that the orexigenic circulating hormone, ghrelin, is able to exert neurobiological effects (including those linked to feeding control at the level of the amygdala, involving neuroanatomical, electrophysiological and behavioural studies. We found that ghrelin receptors (GHS-R are densely expressed in several subnuclei of the amygdala, notably in ventrolateral (LaVL and ventromedial (LaVM parts of the lateral amygdaloid nucleus. Using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology to record from cells in the lateral amygdaloid nucleus, we found that ghrelin reduced the frequency of mEPSCs recorded from large pyramidal-like neurons, an effect that could be blocked by co-application of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. In ad libitum fed rats, intra-amygdala administration of ghrelin produced a large orexigenic response that lasted throughout the 4 hr of testing. Conversely, in hungry, fasted rats ghrelin receptor blockade in the amygdala significantly reduced food intake. Finally, we investigated a possible interaction between ghrelin's effects on feeding control and emotional reactivity exerted at the level of the amygdala. In rats allowed to feed during a 1-hour period between ghrelin injection and anxiety testing (elevated plus maze and open field, intra-amygdala ghrelin had no effect on anxiety-like behavior. By contrast, if the rats were not given access to food during this 1-hour period, a decrease in anxiety-like behavior was observed in both tests. Collectively, these data indicate that the amygdala is a valid target brain area for ghrelin where its neurobiological effects are important for food intake and for the suppression of emotional (anxiety-like behaviors if food is not available.

  9. Electrophysiological Characteristics of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes are Cell Line-Dependent

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    Tobias Hannes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Modelling of cardiac development, physiology and pharmacology by differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs requires comparability of cardiac differentiation between different ESC lines. To investigate whether the outcome of cardiac differentiation is consistent between different ESC lines, we compared electrophysiological properties of ESC-derived cardiomyocytes (ESC-CMs of different murine ESC lines. Methods: Two wild-type (D3 and R1 and two transgenic ESC lines (D3/aPIG44 and CGR8/AMPIGX-7 were differentiated under identical culture conditions. The transgenic cell lines expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP and puromycin-N-acetyltransferase under control of the cardiac specific α-myosin heavy chain (αMHC promoter. Action potentials (APs were recorded using sharp electrodes and multielectrode arrays in beating clusters of ESC-CMs. Results: Spontaneous AP frequency and AP duration (APD as well as maximal upstroke velocity differed markedly between unpurified CMs of the four ESC lines. APD heterogeneity was negligible in D3/aPIG44, moderate in D3 and R1 and extensive in CGR8/AMPIGX-7. Interspike intervals calculated from long-term recordings showed a high degree of variability within and between recordings in CGR8/AMPIGX-7, but not in D3/aPIG44. Purification of the αMHC+ population by puromycin treatment posed only minor changes to APD in D3/aPIG44, but significantly shortened APD in CGR8/AMPIGX-7. Conclusion: Electrophysiological properties of ESC-CMs are strongly cell line-dependent and can be influenced by purification of cardiomyocytes by antibiotic selection. Thus, conclusions on cardiac development, physiology and pharmacology derived from single stem cell lines have to be interpreted carefully.

  10. [Comparison of electrophysiological properties of vascular smooth muscle cells in different arterioles in guinea pig].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ke-Tao; Li, Xin-Zhi; Li, Li; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Zhao, Lei; Zhu, He; Si, Jun-Qiang

    2010-10-25

    Arterioles are major contributors to the control of systemic blood pressure and local blood flow. In this study, we compared electrophysiological properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), mesenteric artery (MA) and spiral modiolar artery (SMA) by intracellular microelectrode recording and whole-cell patch clamp recording techniques. Results were shown as below: (1) Intracellular microelectrode recordings were made from VSMCs in AICA, MA and SMA with resting potentials of (-68±1.8) (n=65), (-71±2.4) (n=80) and (-66±2.9) mV (n=58), respectively. There was no significant difference in resting potentials among arterioles. (2) The membrane capacitance and membrane conductance in situ cells were much larger than those in dispersed smooth muscle cells by whole-cell recording techniques, and there was significant difference among arterioles, which were in the order: MA>AICA>SMA. After application of gap junction blocker 2-APB (100 μmol/L), the membrane capacitance and membrane conductance in situ cells were very close with those in single smooth muscle cells. (3) The I/V relation of whole-cell current of dissociated smooth muscle cells (AICA, MA and SMA) showed a prominent outward rectification, and the currents were substantially inhibited by 1 mmol/L 4-AP or 10 mmol/L TEA. When the command voltage was +40 mV, the current densities of VSMCs in AICA, MA and SMA were (26±2.0), (24±1.7) and (18±1.3) pA/pF respectively. SMA showed significant difference in the current density from AICA and MA respectively. These results suggest that the electrophysiological properties of coupling strength of gap junction and current density of smooth muscle cells are different among arterioles in the guinea pig.

  11. Program Code Generator for Cardiac Electrophysiology Simulation with Automatic PDE Boundary Condition Handling.

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    Florencio Rusty Punzalan

    Full Text Available Clinical and experimental studies involving human hearts can have certain limitations. Methods such as computer simulations can be an important alternative or supplemental tool. Physiological simulation at the tissue or organ level typically involves the handling of partial differential equations (PDEs. Boundary conditions and distributed parameters, such as those used in pharmacokinetics simulation, add to the complexity of the PDE solution. These factors can tailor PDE solutions and their corresponding program code to specific problems. Boundary condition and parameter changes in the customized code are usually prone to errors and time-consuming. We propose a general approach for handling PDEs and boundary conditions in computational models using a replacement scheme for discretization. This study is an extension of a program generator that we introduced in a previous publication. The program generator can generate code for multi-cell simulations of cardiac electrophysiology. Improvements to the system allow it to handle simultaneous equations in the biological function model as well as implicit PDE numerical schemes. The replacement scheme involves substituting all partial differential terms with numerical solution equations. Once the model and boundary equations are discretized with the numerical solution scheme, instances of the equations are generated to undergo dependency analysis. The result of the dependency analysis is then used to generate the program code. The resulting program code are in Java or C programming language. To validate the automatic handling of boundary conditions in the program code generator, we generated simulation code using the FHN, Luo-Rudy 1, and Hund-Rudy cell models and run cell-to-cell coupling and action potential propagation simulations. One of the simulations is based on a published experiment and simulation results are compared with the experimental data. We conclude that the proposed program code

  12. Electrophysiological Monitoring of Injury ProgressionIn the Rat Cerebellar Cortex

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    Gokhan eOrdek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The changes of excitability in affected neural networks can be used as a marker to study the temporal course of traumatic brain injury (TBI. The cerebellum is an ideal platform to study brain injury mechanisms at the network level using the electrophysiological methods. Within its crystalline morphology, the cerebellar cortex contains highly organized topographical subunits that are defined by two main inputs, the climbing and mossy fibers. Here we demonstrate the use of cerebellar evoked potentials (EPs mediated through these afferent systems for monitoring the injury progression in a rat model of fluid percussion injury (FPI. A mechanical tap on the dorsal hand was used as a stimulus, and EPs were recorded from the paramedian lobule (PML of the posterior cerebellum via multi-electrode arrays (MEA. Post-injury evoked response amplitudes (EPAs were analyzed on a daily basis for one week and compared with pre-injury values. We found a trend of consistently decreasing EPAs in all nine animals, losing as much as 72±4% of baseline amplitudes measured before the injury. Notably, our results highlighted two particular time windows; the first 24 hours of injury in the acute period and day-3 to day-7 in the delayed period where the largest drops (~50% and 24% were observed in the EPAs. In addition, cross-correlations of spontaneous signals between electrode pairs declined (from 0.47±0.1 to 0.35±0.04, p<0.001 along with the EPAs throughout the week of injury. In support of the electrophysiological findings, immunohistochemical analysis at day-7 post-injury showed detectable Purkinje cell loss at low FPI pressures and more with the largest pressures used. Our results suggest that sensory evoked potentials recorded from the cerebellar surface can be a useful technique to monitor the course of cerebellar injury and identify the phases of injury progression even at mild levels.

  13. ElVisML: an open data format for the exchange and storage of electrophysiological data in ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Torsten; Peters, Tobias; Jägle, Herbert; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2018-02-01

    The ISCEV standards and recommendations for electrophysiological recordings in ophthalmology define a set of protocols with stimulus parameters, acquisition settings, and recording conditions, to unify the data and enable comparability of results across centers. Up to now, however, there are no standards to define the storage and exchange of such electrophysiological recordings. The aim of this study was to develop an open standard data format for the exchange and storage of visual electrophysiological data (ElVisML). We first surveyed existing data formats for biomedical signals and examined their suitability for electrophysiological data in ophthalmology. We then compared the suitability of text-based and binary formats, as well as encoding in Extensible Markup Language (XML) and character/comma-separated values. The results of the methodological consideration led to the development of ElVisML with an XML-encoded text-based format. This allows referential integrity, extensibility, the storing of accompanying units, as well as ensuring confidentiality and integrity of the data. A visualization of ElVisML documents (ElVisWeb) has additionally been developed, which facilitates the exchange of recordings on mailing lists and allows open access to data along with published articles. The open data format ElVisML ensures the quality, validity, and integrity of electrophysiological data transmission and storage as well as providing manufacturer-independent access and long-term archiving in a future-proof format. Standardization of the format of such neurophysiology data would promote the development of new techniques and open software for the use of neurophysiological data in both clinic and research.

  14. Stretch-induced intussuceptive and sprouting angiogenesis in the chick chorioallantoic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Janeil; Ysasi, Alexandra; Bennett, Robert D; Filipovic, Nenad; Nejad, Mohammad Imani; Trumper, David L; Ackermann, Maximilian; Wagner, Willi; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A; Mentzer, Steven J

    2014-09-01

    Vascular systems grow and remodel in response to not only metabolic needs, but also mechanical influences as well. Here, we investigated the influence of tissue-level mechanical forces on the patterning and structure of the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) microcirculation. A dipole stretch field was applied to the CAM using custom computer-controlled servomotors. The topography of the stretch field was mapped using finite element models. After 3days of stretch, Sholl analysis of the CAM demonstrated a 7-fold increase in conducting vessel intersections within the stretch field (p0.05). In contrast, corrosion casting and SEM of the stretch field capillary meshwork demonstrated intense sprouting and intussusceptive angiogenesis. Both planar surface area (p<0.05) and pillar density (p<0.01) were significantly increased relative to control regions of the CAM. We conclude that a uniaxial stretch field stimulates the axial growth and realignment of conducting vessels as well as intussusceptive and sprouting angiogenesis within the gas exchange capillaries of the ex ovo CAM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Stretch-induced intussuceptive and sprouting angiogenesis in the chick chorioallantoic membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Belle, Janeil; Ysasi, Alexandra; Bennett, Robert D.; Filipovic, Nenad; Imani Nejad, Mohammad; Trumper, David L.; Ackermann, Maximilian; Wagner, Willi; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A.; Mentzer, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular systems grow and remodel in response to not only metabolic needs, but also mechanical influences as well. Here, we investigated the influence of tissue-level mechanical forces on the patterning and structure of the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) microcirculation. A dipole stretch field was applied to the CAM using custom computer-controlled servomotors. The topography of the stretch field was mapped using finite element models. After 3 days of stretch, Sholl analysis of the CAM...

  16. Stretch-induced Intussuceptive and Sprouting Angiogenesis in the Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Janeil; Ysasi, Alexandra; Bennett, Robert; Filipovic, Nenad; Nejad, Mohammad Imani; Trumper, David L.; Ackermann, Max; Wagner, Willi; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A.; Mentzer, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular systems grow and remodel in response to not only metabolic needs, but mechanical influences as well. Here, we investigated the influence of tissue-level mechanical forces on the patterning and structure of the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) microcirculation. A dipole stretch field was applied to the CAM using custom computer-controlled servomotors. The topography of the stretch field was mapped using finite element models. After 3 days of stretch, Sholl analysis of the CAM demonstrated a 7-fold increase in conducting vessel intersections within the stretch field (p0.05). In contrast, corrosion casting and SEM of the stretch field capillary meshwork demonstrated intense sprouting and intussusceptive angiogenesis. Both planar surface area (p<0.05) and pillar density (p<0.01) were significantly increased relative to control regions of the CAM. We conclude that a uniaxial stretch field stimulates the axial growth and realignment of conducting vessels as well as intussusceptive and sprouting angiogenesis within the gas exchange capillaries of the ex ovo CAM. PMID:24984292

  17. Stretching-induced crystallinity and orientation to improve the mechanical properties of electrospun PAN nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Liqun; Waclawik, E.; Wu, Sizhu

    2010-01-01

    Polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibers, embedded with single-walled carbon nanotubes have been prepared by the electrospinning technique. The as-spun nanofibers were hot-stretched in an oven to enhance the orientation and crystallinity which has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction and DSC etc. With the hot-stretched process and the introduction of SWNTs, the mechanical properties of PAN nanofibers such as the modulus and tensile strength will be enhanced correspondingly. In addition, the electrical conductivities of the PAN/SWNTs nanofiber composites were also enhanced. It was concluded that the hot-stretched nanofibers and the PAN/SWNTs nanofiber composites can be used as a potential precursor to produce high-performance carbon nanocomposites.

  18. Stretch-induced biodegradation of polyelectrolyte multilayer films for drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthes, Julien; Mertz, Damien; Bach, Charlotte; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Hélène; Senger, Bernard; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Schaaf, Pierre; Lavalle, Philippe

    2012-09-25

    The design of stimuli-responsive polymer assemblies for the controlled release of bioactive molecules has raised considerable interest these two last decades. Herein, we report the design of mechanically responsive drug-releasing films made of polyelectrolyte multilayers. A layer-by-layer (LbL) reservoir containing biodegradable polyelectrolytes is capped with a mechanosensitive LbL barrier and responds to stretching by a total enzymatic degradation of the film. This strategy is successfully applied for the release in solution of an anticancer drug initially loaded within the architecture.

  19. Stretch-induced force deficits in murine extensor digitorum longus muscles after cardiotoxin injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markert, Chad; Petroski, Gregory F; Childers, Charles K; McDonald, Kerry S; Childers, Martin K

    2006-10-01

    A leftward shift in a muscle's length-tension relationship is thought to impair myofilament overlap. We hypothesized that left-shifted muscles would incur greater eccentric contraction-induced damage compared to controls. We evaluated contractile properties and force deficits in regenerating murine extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles 7, 14, and 21 days after cardiotoxin (CTX) injection. Specific tension recovered to control values by 21 days. CTX-injected muscles demonstrated left-shifted length-tension curves and incurred greater contraction-induced force deficits than controls (P < 0.001) on day 7. We speculate that increased contraction-induced damage in 7-day CTX-injected muscles results from changes in myofilament overlap that occurs during early regeneration.

  20. Prolonged passive static stretching-induced innervation zone shift in biceps brachii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin; Beck, Travis W; Wages, Nathan P

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of a bout of repeated and prolonged passive static stretching on the innervation zone (IZ) location of the human biceps brachii muscle. Eleven men performed 12 sets of 100-s passive stretches on their biceps brachii. Before (Pre) and immediately after (Post) the stretching intervention, isometric strength was tested during the maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) of the forearm flexors. The subjects also performed several separate isometric forearm flexion muscle actions at 30%, 50%, and 70% of their predetermined MVCs for examining the locations of the IZ at different contraction intensities. The IZ was identified through multi-channel surface electromyographic (EMG) recordings from a linear electrode array. The stretching intervention induced an average of 10% isometric strength loss for the forearm flexors (mean±SD: Pre-MVC vs. Post-MVC=332.12±59.40 N vs. 299.53±70.51 N; p<0.001). In addition, the average IZ shift was nearly 4.5 mm in average in the proximal direction. However, this shift was not specific to the contraction intensity. We believe that the IZ shift was caused by the elongation of the entire muscle-tendon unit in the proximal direction. Therefore, caution should be taken when using surface EMG technique to examine possible changes in the EMG variables after a stretching protocol, as these variables can be contaminated by the shift of the IZ.

  1. Protein phosphatase 2A in stretch-induced endothelial cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, K.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    We previously proposed that activation of protein kinase C is a key mechanism for control of cell growth enhanced by cyclic strain [Rosales and Sumpio (1992): Surgery 112:459-466]. Here we examined protein phosphatase 1 and 2A activity in bovine aortic endothelial cells exposed to cyclic stain. Protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cytosol was decreased by 36.1% in response to cyclic strain for 60 min, whereas the activity in the membrane did not change. Treatment with low concentration (0.1 nM) of okadaic acid enhanced proliferation of both static and stretched endothelial cells in 10% fetal bovine serum. These data suggest that protein phosphatase 2A acts as a growth suppressor and cyclic strain may enhance cellular proliferation by inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A as well as stimulating protein kinase C.

  2. Mechanical stretch induces MMP-2 release and activation in lung endothelium: role of EMMPRIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseneen, Nadia A; Vaday, Gayle G; Zucker, Stanley; Foda, Hussein D

    2003-03-01

    High-volume mechanical ventilation leads to ventilator-induced lung injury. This type of lung injury is accompanied by an increased release and activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). To investigate the mechanism leading to the increased MMP release, we systematically studied the effect of mechanical stretch on human microvascular endothelial cells isolated from the lung. We exposed cells grown on collagen 1 BioFlex plates to sinusoidal cyclic stretch at 0.5 Hz using the Flexercell system with 17-18% elongation of cells. After 4 days of cell stretching, conditioned media and cell lysate were collected and analyzed by gelatin, casein, and reverse zymograms as well as Western blotting. RT-PCR of mRNA extracted from stretched cells was performed. Our results show that 1) cyclic stretch led to increased release and activation of MMP-2 and MMP-1; 2) the activation of MMP-2 was accompanied by an increase in membrane type-1 MMP (MT1-MMP) and inhibited by a hydroxamic acid-derived inhibitor of MMPs (Prinomastat, AG3340); and 3) the MMP-2 release and activation were preceded by an increase in production of extracellular MMP inducer (EMMPRIN). These results suggest that cyclic mechanical stretch leads to MMP-2 activation through an MT1-MMP mechanism. EMMPRIN may play an important role in the release and activation of MMPs during lung injury.

  3. Cyclic stretch induces human bladder smooth muscle cell proliferation in vitro through muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yi; Tian, Ye; Luo, De-Yi; Wazir, Romel; Yue, Xuan; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2015-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether the cyclic stretch‑induced proliferation of human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs) is mediated by muscarinic (M) receptors, together with the signal transduction mechanisms involved in this process. HBSMCs seeded onto silicone membranes were subjected to different cyclic stretches (5, 10, 15 and 20%) for 6 and 12 h. As the effect of cyclic stretch on M2 and M3 mRNA expression levels was maximal at 6 h 10% stretch, all subsequent experiments were performed at this stretch. Western blot analysis was used to quantify M2, M3, protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphorylated (p)‑PKC protein expression levels, flow cytometry was employed to examine cell cycle distribution and a 5-bromo‑2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assay was used to assess cell proliferation at this stretch. Subsequently, HBSMCs were exposed to different acetylcholine concentrations and/or cyclic stretch, M receptor antagonists [AF-DX16, an M2 receptor antagonist; 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (4-DAMP), an M3 receptor antagonist and atropine, a non‑selective antagonist] and GF 109203X, a PKC antagonist, to assess the possible underlying signaling mechanisms. Cyclic stretch was found to increase the proliferation of HBSMCs and the expression levels of M2, M3, PKC and p‑PKC proteins. M receptor and PKC antagonists exerted no apparent effect on nonstretched cells, but reduced the incorporation of BrdU into stretched cells; the most pronounced effects were observed when non‑selective M receptor and PKC antagonists were applied. Notably, 4‑DAMP did not inhibit stretch‑induced PKC activation. These results indicate that the activation of the M3 receptor signaling pathway in stretch‑induced HBSMC proliferation occurs via PKC-independent mechanisms.

  4. Cyclic stretch induces cell reorientation on substrates by destabilizing catch bonds in focal adhesions.

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    Bin Chen

    Full Text Available A minimal model of cellular mechanosensing system that consists of a single stress fiber adhering on a substrate via two focal adhesions made of catch bonds is adopted to investigate the phenomena of cell reorientation on substrates induced by an applied uniaxial cyclic stretch. The model indicates that the catch bonds in the focal adhesions experience a periodically oscillating internal force with amplitude and frequency controlled by two intrinsic clocks of the stress fiber, one associated with localized activation and the other with homogeneous activation of sarcomere units along the stress fiber. It is shown that this oscillating force due to cyclic stretch tends to destabilize focal adhesions by reducing the lifetime of catch bonds. The resulting slide or relocation of focal adhesions then causes the associated stress fiber to shorten and rotate to configurations nearly perpendicular to the stretching direction. These predicted behaviors from our model are consistent with a wide range of experimental observations.

  5. Co film stretching induced by lattice mismatch and annealing: The role of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, I.; Drnec, J.; Vlaic, S.; Vinogadrov, N.; Carlà, F.; Isern, H.; Meneghini, C.; Felici, R.

    2018-02-01

    Thin Co films intercalated between a Graphene capping layer and the Ir(111) surface are of interest for spintronics applications due to their peculiar magnetic properties and to their chemical stability. The structure, and then the magnetic properties, of the Co films depend on the intercalation process which is strongly influenced by the temperature, total amount of Cobalt and quality of the capping Graphene layer. In order to identify and disentangle the effects of these contributions, we report on the structural characterisation of four Co films as a function of thickness, annealing temperature, and Graphene capping. From the structural point of view, the deposition of Co on a hot Ir substrate mimics quite well the intercalation process proving the validity of the colander model describing the Graphene role during the process.

  6. Altering the trajectory of early postnatal cortical development can lead to structural and behavioural features of autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chomiak Taylor

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism is a behaviourally defined neurodevelopmental disorder with unknown etiology. Recent studies in autistic children consistently point to neuropathological and functional abnormalities in the temporal association cortex (TeA and its associated structures. It has been proposed that the trajectory of postnatal development in these regions may undergo accelerated maturational alterations that predominantly affect sensory recognition and social interaction. Indeed, the temporal association regions that are important for sensory recognition and social interaction are one of the last regions to mature suggesting a potential vulnerability to early maturation. However, direct evaluation of the emerging hypothesis that an altered time course of early postnatal development can lead to an ASD phenotype remains lacking. Results We used electrophysiological, histological, and behavioural techniques to investigate if the known neuronal maturational promoter valproate, similar to that in culture systems, can influence the normal developmental trajectory of TeA in vivo. Brain sections obtained from postnatal rat pups treated with VPA in vivo revealed that almost 40% of cortical cells in TeA prematurely exhibited adult-like intrinsic electrophysiological properties and that this was often associated with gross cortical hypertrophy and a reduced predisposition for social play behaviour. Conclusions The co-manifestation of these functional, structural and behavioural features suggests that alteration of the developmental time course in certain high-order cortical networks may play an important role in the neurophysiological basis of autism.

  7. Altered Perspectives: Immersive Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, J. S.; Webley, P. W.

    2016-12-01

    Immersive environments provide an exciting experiential technology to visualize the natural world. Given the increasing accessibility of 360o cameras and virtual reality headsets we are now able to visualize artistic principles and scientific concepts in a fully immersive environment. The technology has become popular for photographers as well as designers, industry, educational groups, and museums. Here we show a sci-art perspective on the use of optics and light in the capture and manipulation of 360o images and video of geologic phenomena and cultural heritage sites in Alaska, England, and France. Additionally, we will generate intentionally altered perspectives to lend a surrealistic quality to the landscapes. Locations include the Catacombs of Paris, the Palace of Versailles, and the Northern Lights over Fairbanks, Alaska. Some 360o view cameras now use small portable dual lens technology extending beyond the 180o fish eye lens previously used, providing better coverage and image quality. Virtual reality headsets range in level of sophistication and cost, with the most affordable versions using smart phones and Google Cardboard viewers. The equipment used in this presentation includes a Ricoh Theta S spherical imaging camera. Here we will demonstrate the use of 360o imaging with attendees being able to be part of the immersive environment and experience our locations as if they were visiting themselves.

  8. Music alters visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolij, Jacob; Meurs, Maaike

    2011-04-21

    Visual perception is not a passive process: in order to efficiently process visual input, the brain actively uses previous knowledge (e.g., memory) and expectations about what the world should look like. However, perception is not only influenced by previous knowledge. Especially the perception of emotional stimuli is influenced by the emotional state of the observer. In other words, how we perceive the world does not only depend on what we know of the world, but also by how we feel. In this study, we further investigated the relation between mood and perception. We let observers do a difficult stimulus detection task, in which they had to detect schematic happy and sad faces embedded in noise. Mood was manipulated by means of music. We found that observers were more accurate in detecting faces congruent with their mood, corroborating earlier research. However, in trials in which no actual face was presented, observers made a significant number of false alarms. The content of these false alarms, or illusory percepts, was strongly influenced by the observers' mood. As illusory percepts are believed to reflect the content of internal representations that are employed by the brain during top-down processing of visual input, we conclude that top-down modulation of visual processing is not purely predictive in nature: mood, in this case manipulated by music, may also directly alter the way we perceive the world.

  9. Music alters visual perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Jolij

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual perception is not a passive process: in order to efficiently process visual input, the brain actively uses previous knowledge (e.g., memory and expectations about what the world should look like. However, perception is not only influenced by previous knowledge. Especially the perception of emotional stimuli is influenced by the emotional state of the observer. In other words, how we perceive the world does not only depend on what we know of the world, but also by how we feel. In this study, we further investigated the relation between mood and perception. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We let observers do a difficult stimulus detection task, in which they had to detect schematic happy and sad faces embedded in noise. Mood was manipulated by means of music. We found that observers were more accurate in detecting faces congruent with their mood, corroborating earlier research. However, in trials in which no actual face was presented, observers made a significant number of false alarms. The content of these false alarms, or illusory percepts, was strongly influenced by the observers' mood. CONCLUSIONS: As illusory percepts are believed to reflect the content of internal representations that are employed by the brain during top-down processing of visual input, we conclude that top-down modulation of visual processing is not purely predictive in nature: mood, in this case manipulated by music, may also directly alter the way we perceive the world.

  10. Localization of electrophysiological responses to semantic and syntactic anomalies in language comprehension with MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielar, Aneta; Panamsky, Lilia; Links, Kira A; Meltzer, Jed A

    2015-01-15

    Syntactically and semantically anomalous words encountered during sentence comprehension are known to elicit dissociable electrophysiological responses, which are thought to reflect distinct aspects of language processing. However, the sources of these responses have not been well characterized. We used beamforming analysis of magnetoencephalography (MEG) data to map generators of electrophysiological responses to linguistic anomalies. Anomalous words occurred in the context of a sentence acceptability judgement task conducted in both visual and auditory modalities. Time-frequency analysis revealed that both kinds of violations elicited event-related synchronization (ERS) in the delta-theta frequency range (1-5 Hz), and desynchronization (ERD) in the alpha-beta range (8-30 Hz). In addition, these responses were differentially modulated by violation type and presentation modality. 1-5 Hz responses were consistently localized within medial prefrontal cortex and did not vary significantly across violation types, but were stronger for visual presentation. In contrast, 8-30 Hz ERD occurred in different regions for different violation types. For semantic violations the distribution was predominantly in the bilateral occipital cortex and left temporal and inferior frontal regions, and these effects did not differ for visual and auditory presentation. In contrast, syntactic responses were strongly affected by presentation modality. Under visual presentation, syntactic violations elicited bilateral 8-30 Hz ERD extending into dorsal parietal and frontal regions, whereas effects were much weaker and mostly statistically insignificant in the auditory modality. These results suggest that delta-theta ERS reflects generalized increases in working memory demands related to linguistic anomaly detection, while alpha-beta ERD reflects specific activation of cortical regions involved in distinct aspects of linguistic processing, such as semantic vs. phonological short-term memory

  11. Electrophysiology and Perception of Speech in Noise in Older Listeners: Effects of Hearing Impairment and Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Curtis J; Penman, Tina M; McMillan, Garnett P; Ellis, Emily M

    2015-01-01

    and cortical electrophysiological testing, with smaller and sometimes significant contributions from signal level. A mismatch between behavioral and electrophysiological results was found (hearing impairment effects were primarily only seen for behavioral data), illustrating the possible contributions of higher order cognitive processes on behavior. It is interesting that the hearing impairment effect size was more than five times larger than the aging effect size for CAEPs and perception. Sentence-level perception can be predicted well in normal-hearing individuals; however, additional research is needed to explore improved prediction methods for older individuals with hearing impairment.

  12. Biophysical characterisation of electrofused giant HEK293-cells as a novel electrophysiological expression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, D.; Terpitz, U.; Zhou, A.; Reuss, R.; Mueller, K.; Sukhorukov, V.L.; Gessner, P.; Nagel, G.; Zimmermann, U.; Bamberg, E.

    2006-01-01

    Giant HEK293 cells of 30-65 μm in diameter were produced by three-dimensional multi-cell electrofusion in 75 mOsm sorbitol media. These strong hypotonic conditions facilitated fusion because of the spherical shape and smooth membrane surface of the swollen cells. A regulatory volume decrease (RVD), as observed at higher osmolalities, did not occur at 75 mOsm. In contrast to field-treated, but unfused cells, the increase in volume induced by hypotonic shock was only partly reversible in the case of fused giant cells after their transfer into isotonic medium. The large size of the electrofused cells allowed the study of their electrophysiological properties by application of both whole-cell and giant excised patch-clamp techniques. Recordings on giant cells yielded a value of 1.1 ± 0.1 μF/cm 2 for the area-specific membrane capacitance. This value was consistent with that of the parental cells. The area-specific conductivity of giant cells (diameter > 50 μm) was found to be between 12.8 and 16.1 μS/cm 2 , which is in the range of that of the parental cells. Measurements with patch-pipettes containing fluorescein showed uniform dye uptake in the whole-cell configuration, but not in the cell-attached configuration. The diffusion-controlled uniform uptake of the dye into the cell interior excludes internal compartmentalisation. The finding of a homogeneous fusion was also supported by expression of the yellow fluorescent protein YFP (as part of the fusion-protein ChR2-YFP) in giant cells since no plasma-membrane bound YFP-mediated fluorescence was detected in the interior of the electrofused cells. Functional expression and the electrophysiological characterisation of the light-activated cation channel Channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2) yielded similar results as for parental cells. Most importantly, the giant cells exhibited a comparable expression density of the channel protein in the plasma membrane as observed in parental cells. This demonstrates that electrofused cells

  13. Effect of oral photochemotherapy (8-methoxypsoralen + UVA) on the electrophysiologic function of retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoeibi, Nasser; Taheri, Ahmadreza; Nikandish, Maliheh; Omidtabrizi, Arash; Khosravi, Nasim; Kadkhoda, Maryam; Moghaddam, Somayeh Ghassemi

    2016-01-01

    Since we had observed electroretinographic (ERG) abnormalities in some patients undergoing photochemotherapy with normal eye examination, we decided to investigate the effects of this therapy on retinal function. To investigate the effects of oral photochemotherapy (8-methoxypsoralen + Ultraviolet-A) on electrophysiologic function of retina. Patients with vitiligo, psoriasis or eczema were enrolled. Patients with any abnormal eye exam or a positive drug or family history for retinal disease were excluded. Baseline standard ERG was provided with the RETIport32 device. The second ERG was performed 6 months after the first and at least 1 week after the last photochemotherapy session (mean number of sessions: 45 ± 11). The outcome measures were changes in rod response, standard combined response, single-flash cone response, 30-Hz flicker (N1-P1) and oscillatory potentials amplitudes. Forty patients were enrolled; 20 of them (mean age: 31.1 ± 12 years) completed the study. The mean rod response b-wave amplitude decreased from 88.9 ± 47.5 to 86.4 ± 36.6 and standard combined response b-wave amplitude decreased from 266.52 to 261.85 µV (p = 0.422 and p = 0.968, respectively) and the standard combined response a-wave amplitude increased from 155.4 ± 40.0 at baseline to 165.1 ± 48.4 in the follow-up ERG (p = 0.092). The mean single-flash cone response a-wave amplitude decreased insignificantly in the follow-up ERG trace (34.5 ± 13.7 and 29 ± 15.4, respectively, p = 0.242). The mean single-flash cone response b-wave amplitude showed an insignificant increase (p = 0.087). The amplitudes of 30-Hz flicker wave and oscillatory potentials did not change significantly in the follow-up ERG (p = 0.551 and p = 0.739, respectively). Since no significant change in ERG traces was observed, oral photochemotherapy seems safe for retinal electrophysiologic function.

  14. Electrophysiology of the mammillary complex in vitro. I. Tuberomammillary and lateral mammillary neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llinas, R. R.; Alonso, A.

    1992-01-01

    1. The electrophysiological properties of the tuberomammillary and lateral mammillary neurons in the guinea pig mammillary body were studied using an in vitro brain slice preparation. 2. Tuberomammillary (n = 79) neurons were recorded mainly ventral to the lateral mammillary body as well as ventromedially to the fornix within the rostral part of the medial mammillary nucleus. Intracellular staining with horseradish peroxidase (n = 9) and Lucifer yellow (n = 3) revealed that these cells have several thick, long, spiny dendrites emerging from large (20-35 microns) fusiform somata. 3. Most tuberomammillary neurons (66%) fired spontaneously at a relatively low frequency (0.5-10 Hz) at the resting membrane potential. The action potentials were broad (2.3 ms) with a prominent Ca(2+)-dependent shoulder on the falling phase. Deep (17.8 mV), long-lasting spike afterhyperpolarizations were largely Ca(2+)-independent. 4. All tuberomammillary neurons recorded displayed pronounced delayed firing when the cells were activated from a potential negative to the resting level. The cells also displayed a delayed return to the baseline at the break of hyperpolarizing pulses applied from a membrane potential level close to firing threshold. Analysis of the voltage- and time dependence of this delayed rectification suggested the presence of a transient outward current similar to the A current (IA). These were not completely blocked by high concentrations of 4-aminopyridine, whereas the delayed onset of firing was always abolished when voltage-dependent Ca2+ conductances were blocked by superfusion with Cd2+. 5. Tuberomammillary neurons also displayed inward rectification in the hyperpolarizing and, primarily, depolarizing range. Block of voltage-gated Na(+)-dependent conductances with tetrodotoxin (TTX) selectively abolished inward rectification in the depolarizing range, indicating the presence of a persistent low-threshold sodium-dependent conductance (gNap). In fact, persistent TTX

  15. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type B and left bundle-branch block: electrophysiologic and radionuclide study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakovec, P.; Kranjec, I.; Fettich, J.J.; Jakopin, J.; Fidler, V.; Turk, J.

    1985-01-01

    Coinciding left bundle-branch block and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type B, a very rare electrocardiographic occurrence, was found in a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy. Electrophysiologic study revealed eccentric retrograde atrial activation during ventricular pacing, suggesting right-sided accessory pathway. At programmed atrial pacing, effective refractory period of the accessory pathway was 310 ms; at shorter pacing coupling intervals, normal atrioventricular conduction with left bundle-branch block was seen. Left bundle-branch block was seen also with His bundle pacing. Radionuclide phase imaging demonstrated right ventricular phase advance and left ventricular phase delay; both right and left ventricular phase images revealed broad phase distribution histograms. Combined electrophysiologic and radionuclide investigations are useful to disclose complex conduction abnormalities and their mechanical correlates

  16. Correlation between the CAG repeat size and electrophysiological findings in patients with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjin; Lim, Young-Min; Lee, Eun-Jae; Oh, Yeo Jin; Kim, Kwang-Kuk

    2018-04-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat in the androgen receptor gene. The relationship between the CAG repeat size and electrophysiological findings is not completely understood. We retrospectively analyzed 62 SBMA patients to assess the correlation between their CAG repeat size and electrophysiological findings. In multiple regression analysis including age at examination and disease duration, we identified a negative correlation between the CAG repeat size and the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude. No significant correlation was found between the CAG repeat size and sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitude. Contrary to previous reports of motor- and sensory-dominant phenotypes correlating with CAG repeat sizes, the CAG repeat size was negatively correlated only with CMAP amplitude, and not with SNAP amplitude. Muscle Nerve 57: 683-686, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Evaluation of stress response using psychological, biological, and electrophysiological markers during immersive simulation of life threatening events in multidisciplinary teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, D A; Darmian-Rafei, I; Nadolny, J; Sosner, P; Ragot, S; Oriot, D

    2017-07-27

    Stress might impair clinical performance in real life and in simulation-based education (SBE). Subjective or objective measures can be used to assess stress during SBE. This monocentric study aimed to evaluate the effects of simulation of life-threatening events on measurements of various stress parameters (psychological, biological, and electrophysiological parameters) in multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) during SBE. The effect of gender and status of participants on stress response was also investigated. Twelve emergency MDTs of 4 individuals were recruited for an immersive simulation session. Stress was assessed by: (1) self-reported stress; (2) Holter analysis, including heart rate and heart rate variability in the temporal and spectral domain (autonomic nervous system); (3) salivary cortisol (hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis). Forty-eight participants (54.2% men, psychological, biological and electrophysiological parameters. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mapping of electrophysiological response to transcranial infrared laser stimulation on the human brain in vivo measured by electroencephalography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinlong; Reddy, Divya Dhandapani; Gonzalez-Lima, F.; Liu, Hanli

    2017-02-01

    Transcranial infrared laser stimulation (TILS) is a non-destructive and non-thermal photobiomodulation therapy or process on the human brain; TILS uses infrared light from lasers or LEDs and has gained increased recognition for its beneficial effects on a variety of neurological and psychological conditions. While the mechanism of TILS has been assumed to stem from cytochrome-c-oxidase (CCO), which is the last enzyme in the electron transportation chain and is the primary photoacceptor, no literature is found to report electrophysiological response to TILS. In this study, a 64-channel electroencephalography (EEG) system was employed to monitor electrophysiological activities from 15 healthy human participants before, during and after TILS. A placebo experimental protocol was also applied for rigorous comparison. After recording a 3-minute baseline, we applied a 1064-nm laser with a power of 3.5W on the right forehead of each human participant for 8 minutes, followed by a 5-minute recovery period. In 64-channel EEG data analysis, we utilized several methods (root mean square, principal component analysis followed by independent component analysis, permutation conditional mutual information, and time-frequency wavelet analysis) to reveal differences in electrophysiological response to TILS between the stimulated versus placebo group. The analyzed results were further investigated using general linear model and paired t-test to reveal statistically meaningful responses induced by TILS. Moreover, this study will provide spatial mapping of human electrophysiological and possibly neural network responses to TILS for first time, indicating the potential of EEG to be an effective method for monitoring neurological improvement induced by TILS.

  19. Electrophysiological and Behavioral Evaluation of C-LTMR Plasticity Induced by Spinal Cord Injury: Transformation from Pleasure to Pain Afferents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    were done in adult transgenic TH-Cre mice. During the year 1 funding period, we made significant progress with the proposed experiments. Using the ex...tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Therefore, using transgenic TH-Cre mice, the proposal which comprises a series of electrophysiological, behavioral and cellular...studies were undertaken in TH::CHR-YFP [TH-Cre transgenic mice (JAX#008601) mice crossed with the Ai32D-ChR2- YFP mice to express the light-gated

  20. Use of escin as a perforating agent on the IonWorks quattro automated electrophysiology platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Michael J; Main, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    The automated electrophysiology platform IonWorks has facilitated the medium-throughput study of ion channel biology and pharmacology. Electrical and chemical access to the cell is by perforated patch, afforded by amphotericin. Permeation of the amphotericin pore is limited to monovalent cations. We describe here the use of the saponin escin as an alternative perforating agent. With respect to the number and robustness of seals formed across a variety of cell and ion channel types, the performance of escin is equal to that of amphotericin. Escin also permits the permeation of larger molecules through its pore. These include nucleotides, important intracellular modulators of ion channel activity that can be used to prevent ion channel rundown of, for instance, Ca(V)1.2. Furthermore, pharmacologic agents such as QX314 can also permeate and be used for mechanistic studies. Escin, in combination with IonWorks, increases the scope of ion channel screening and can facilitate the assay of previously difficult-to-assay targets.

  1. Attachment affects social information processing: Specific electrophysiological effects of maternal stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lili; Gu, Ruolei; Zhang, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Attachment is critical to each individual. It affects the cognitive-affective processing of social information. The present study examines how attachment affects the processing of social information, specifically maternal information. We assessed the behavioral and electrophysiological responses to maternal information (compared to non-specific others) in a Go/No-go Association Task (GNAT) with 22 participants. The results illustrated that attachment affected maternal information processing during three sequential stages of information processing. First, attachment affected visual perception, reflected by enhanced P100 and N170 elicited by maternal information as compared to others information. Second, compared to others, mother obtained more attentional resources, reflected by faster behavioral response to maternal information and larger P200 and P300. Finally, mother was evaluated positively, reflected by shorter P300 latency in a mother + good condition as compared to a mother + bad condition. These findings indicated that the processing of attachment-relevant information is neurologically differentiated from other types of social information from an early stage of perceptual processing to late high-level processing.

  2. Electrophysiological correlates of word recognition memory process in patients with ischemic left ventricular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannelli, Fabio; Simoni, David; Gavazzi, Gioele; Giganti, Fiorenza; Olivotto, Iacopo; Cincotta, Massimo; Pratesi, Alessandra; Baldasseroni, Samuele; Viggiano, Maria Pia

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and cognitive performance in patients with coronary artery disease without overt heart failure is still under debate. In this study we combine behavioral measures and event-related potentials (ERPs) to verify whether electrophysiological correlates of recognition memory (old/new effect) are modulated differently as a function of LVEF. Twenty-three male patients (12 without [LVEF>55%] and 11 with [LVEF25 were enrolled. ERPs were recorded while participants performed an old/new visual word recognition task. A late positive ERP component between 350 and 550ms was differentially modulated in the two groups: a clear old/new effect (enhanced mean amplitude for old respect to new items) was observed in patients without LVEF dysfunction; whereas patients with overt LVEF dysfunction did not show such effect. In contrast, no significant differences emerged for behavioral performance and neuropsychological evaluations. These data suggest that ERPs may reveal functional brain abnormalities that are not observed at behavioral level. Detecting sub-clinical measures of cognitive decline may contribute to set appropriate treatments and to monitor asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients with LVEF dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Multiple Electrophysiological Markers of Visual-Attentional Processing in a Novel Task Directed toward Clinical Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Bolduc-Teasdale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals who have sustained a mild brain injury (e.g., mild traumatic brain injury or mild cerebrovascular stroke are at risk to show persistent cognitive symptoms (attention and memory after the acute postinjury phase. Although studies have shown that those patients perform normally on neuropsychological tests, cognitive symptoms remain present, and there is a need for more precise diagnostic tools. The aim of this study was to develop precise and sensitive markers for the diagnosis of post brain injury deficits in visual and attentional functions which could be easily translated in a clinical setting. Using electrophysiology, we have developed a task that allows the tracking of the processes involved in the deployment of visual spatial attention from early stages of visual treatment (N1, P1, N2, and P2 to higher levels of cognitive processing (no-go N2, P3a, P3b, N2pc, SPCN. This study presents a description of this protocol and its validation in 19 normal participants. Results indicated the statistically significant presence of all ERPs aimed to be elicited by this novel task. This task could allow clinicians to track the recovery of the mechanisms involved in the deployment of visual-attentional processing, contributing to better diagnosis and treatment management for persons who suffer a brain injury.

  4. Sex differences in memory of emotional images: a behavioral and electrophysiological investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Emma; Mendrek, Adrianna; Germain, Martine; Lakis, Nadia; Lavoie, Marc E

    2012-07-01

    Current research suggests that emotional responses differ between men and women. Sex differences regarding emotional effects on memory have been recently studied through brain imaging techniques. However, the majority of investigations have often neglected to balance the variable of emotional intensity (arousal) across pleasant and unpleasant pictures. Additionally, men and women were often mixed or studied separately. The current study aims at comparing men and women's electrophysiological responses related to emotional memory of photographic material. These responses were measured using Event Related brain Potentials (ERP) in response to a task of episodic memory of emotional images. The frontal N200, the parietal P300 and the central LPC were compared in 17 men and 17 women matched for age, social economic status, education and intelligence. Behavioral results showed that, in men, reaction times were modulated by valence, whereas for women, reaction times were mainly modulated by arousal. Accuracy was affected by both emotional valence and arousal, but only in women. ERP analyses revealed that emotional valence influenced earlier time components (frontal N200 and parietal P300), whereas arousal influenced memory in the later time component (central LPC). Moreover, sex differences, mediated by valence and arousal, were found in ERP responses at different times in the processing stream. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Electrophysiological and behavioral responses of Spodoptera littoralis caterpillars to attractive and repellent plant volatiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kacem eRharrabe

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In Lepidoptera, the behavior of caterpillars to plant odors is poorly known. However, caterpillars are equipped with a reduced number of olfactory sensilla (3 on the antenna and 4-5 on the maxillary palps which they can use to make fine discrimination between complex plant odors. In this work, we characterized behavioral responses of Spodoptera littoralis larvae to 11 odorants found in plants using binary choices in a Petri dish assay. In this assay, 1-hexanol, hexanal and cis-jasmone elicited a dose-dependent attraction, camphene and eugenol were repellent, while the response to other odorants were less marked. We recorded the electrophysiological responses to 5 of these odors from olfactory neurons of sensillum B2 of the antenna. Several neurons from this sensillum responded to each of the chemicals tested by an increase of their firing activity on top of a high background activity, suggesting that olfactory neurons of caterpillars is broadly tuned to a range of odorants rather than being specialized to a few molecules.

  6. Effects of caffeine on the electrophysiological, cognitive and motor responses of the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deslandes A.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is the most consumed psychoactive substance in the world. The effects of caffeine have been studied using cognitive and motor measures, quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG and event-related potentials. However, these methods are not usually employed in combination, a fact that impairs the interpretation of the results. The objective of the present study was to analyze changes in electrophysiological, cognitive and motor variables with the ingestion of caffeine, and to relate central to peripheral responses. For this purpose we recorded event-related potentials and eyes-closed, resting EEG, applied the Stroop test, and measured reaction time. Fifteen volunteers took caffeine (400 mg or placebo in a randomized, crossover, double-blind design. A significant reduction of alpha absolute power over the entire scalp and of P300 latency at the Fz electrode were observed after caffeine ingestion. These results are consistent with a stimulatory effect of caffeine, although there was no change in the attention (Stroop test or in reaction time. The qEEG seems to be the most sensitive index of the changes produced by caffeine in the central nervous system since it proved to be capable of detecting changes that were not evident in the tests of cognitive or motor performance.

  7. An electrophysiological and behavioral study of sleep in emperor penguins under natural ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchet, C; Dewasmes, G; Le Maho, Y

    1986-01-01

    In two pairs of emperor penguins surgically implanted for chronic recordings of EEG, EOG and EMG, four arousal stages were characterized on the basis of behavioral and electrophysiological criteria: wakefulness (W), drowsiness (D), slow-wave sleep (SWS) and paradoxical sleep (PS). The general patterns of electrographic correlates observed for each arousal stage resemble those reported in other birds. Sleep patterns were examined with these two pairs placed under natural ambient conditions of light and air temperature, the first pair being exposed to moderate cold under alternate conditions of day and night, and the second studied when daylight was total at thermoneutrality. The time spent in sleep (TST) by each group was 41.3% and 45.1% of the 24 hr period respectively, the difference not being significant. As in other birds, PS occurred in very brief episodes lasting, on average, 8 to 10 seconds and occupying only 5 to 6% of the 24 hr period. Whatever the external conditions, the PS to TST ratio appeared to remain unchanged (12 to 14%). Its relatively high value is discussed in relation to predation susceptibility.

  8. Recording electrophysiological data on video tape: a superior and less costly alternative to conventional tape recorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, R G; Knobloch, C A; Singleton, D M; Steel, C G; Davey, K G

    1985-10-01

    Electrical potentials recorded extracellularly from the sinus gland of the isopod, Oniscus asellus, were stored on video tape with the aid of a digital-audio (DA) processor and a video cassette recorder (VCR). The DA processor transforms the analog signal to digital pulses of equal amplitude and converts these pulses into a television signal for recording on video tape. In playback, the DA processor reconverts the pulses to an analog signal with negligible distortion. When viewed on the oscilloscope screen, electrical potentials reproduced by this method were indistinguishable from electrical potentials recorded 'live' from the sinus gland. However, electrical potentials recorded from the same sinus gland and reproduced by a conventional FM tape recorder were easily differentiated from the 'live' recording. The special effects inherent in the VCR (e.g. stop action, frame advance) also permitted detailed analysis of spontaneously occurring electrical potentials. Special effects were not possible with the FM tape recorder. The price, ease of operation and ability to produce extremely high quality recordings, makes the DA processor and VCR an exceptional system for storing electrophysiological data.

  9. Effects of caffeine on the electrophysiological, cognitive and motor responses of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslandes, A C; Veiga, H; Cagy, M; Piedade, R; Pompeu, F; Ribeiro, P

    2005-07-01

    Caffeine is the most consumed psychoactive substance in the world. The effects of caffeine have been studied using cognitive and motor measures, quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) and event-related potentials. However, these methods are not usually employed in combination, a fact that impairs the interpretation of the results. The objective of the present study was to analyze changes in electrophysiological, cognitive and motor variables with the ingestion of caffeine, and to relate central to peripheral responses. For this purpose we recorded event-related potentials and eyes-closed, resting EEG, applied the Stroop test, and measured reaction time. Fifteen volunteers took caffeine (400 mg) or placebo in a randomized, crossover, double-blind design. A significant reduction of alpha absolute power over the entire scalp and of P300 latency at the Fz electrode were observed after caffeine ingestion. These results are consistent with a stimulatory effect of caffeine, although there was no change in the attention (Stroop) test or in reaction time. The qEEG seems to be the most sensitive index of the changes produced by caffeine in the central nervous system since it proved to be capable of detecting changes that were not evident in the tests of cognitive or motor performance.

  10. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: electrophysiology, molecular genetics and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Greg T; England, John D; Chance, Phillip F

    2004-02-01

    Over the past decade there has been a huge increase in the understanding of the molecular basis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). Additionally there has been a better delineation of the neurophysiological deficits and clinical problems associated with CMT. This paper reviews the current molecular basis of CMT and the electrophysiological, clinical and phenotypical characteristics of the various subtypes, followed by a discussion of novel and promising therapeutic interventions that potentially could be used as part of a treatment regimen for CMT. These interventions may involve attempts to slow down or stop neurodegenerative processes through nerve growth factors, limiting oxidative stress by using antioxidants, or normalizing gene expression through genetic manipulation. Other potential therapeutic target areas include the progesterone receptor on myelin-forming Schwann cells, the immune system via modulation of nerve inflammation, and enhancing glutathione transferase activity. While ongoing molecular research continues to identify more of the mutant genes and proteins that cause the various disease subtypes, the focus of clinical research should continue to be on developing pharmaceutical and rehabilitative therapies to reverse nerve degeneration and ultimately improve the functioning of people with CMT.

  11. Electrophysiological Explorations of the Bilingual Advantage: Evidence from a Stroop Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coderre, Emily L.; van Heuven, Walter J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Bilinguals have been shown to exhibit a performance advantage on executive control tasks, outperforming their monolingual counterparts. Although a wealth of research has investigated this ‘bilingual advantage’ behaviourally, electrophysiological correlates are lacking. Using EEG with a Stroop task that manipulated the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) of word and colour presentation, the current study addressed two facets of the bilingual advantage. The possibility that bilinguals experience superior conflict processing relative to monolinguals (a ‘conflict-specific advantage’) was investigated by comparing behavioural interference effects as well as the amplitude of the Ninc, a conflict-related ERP component occurring from approximately 300–500 ms after the onset of conflict. In contrast, the hypothesis that bilinguals experience domain-general, conflict-independent enhancements in executive processing (a ‘non-conflict-specific advantage’) was evaluated by comparing the control condition (symbol strings) between groups. There was some significant, but inconsistent, evidence for a conflict-specific bilingual advantage. In contrast, strong evidence emerged for a non-conflict-specific advantage, with bilinguals demonstrating faster RTs and reduced ERP amplitudes on control trials compared to monolinguals. Importantly, when the control stimulus was presented before the colour, ERPs to control trials revealed group differences before the onset of conflict, suggesting differences in the ability to ignore or suppress distracting irrelevant information. This indicates that bilinguals experience superior executive processing even in the absence of conflict and semantic salience, and suggests that the advantage extends to more efficient proactive management of the environment. PMID:25068723

  12. An organic transistor-based system for reference-less electrophysiological monitoring of excitable cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanu, A.; Lai, S.; Cosseddu, P.; Tedesco, M.; Martinoia, S.; Bonfiglio, A.

    2015-01-01

    In the last four decades, substantial advances have been done in the understanding of the electrical behavior of excitable cells. From the introduction in the early 70's of the Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistor (ISFET), a lot of effort has been put in the development of more and more performing transistor-based devices to reliably interface electrogenic cells such as, for example, cardiac myocytes and neurons. However, depending on the type of application, the electronic devices used to this aim face several problems like the intrinsic rigidity of the materials (associated with foreign body rejection reactions), lack of transparency and the presence of a reference electrode. Here, an innovative system based on a novel kind of organic thin film transistor (OTFT), called organic charge modulated FET (OCMFET), is proposed as a flexible, transparent, reference-less transducer of the electrical activity of electrogenic cells. The exploitation of organic electronics in interfacing the living matters will open up new perspectives in the electrophysiological field allowing us to head toward a modern era of flexible, reference-less, and low cost probes with high-spatial and high-temporal resolution for a new generation of in-vitro and in-vivo monitoring platforms. PMID:25744085

  13. Wireless Ultrasound Guidance for Femoral Venous Cannulation in Electrophysiology: Impact on Safety, Efficacy, and Procedural Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Muñoz, Daniel; Franco Díez, Eduardo; Moreno, Javier; Lumia, Giuseppe; Carbonell San Román, Alejandra; Segura De La Cal, Teresa; Matía Francés, Roberto; Hernández Madrid, Antonio; Zamorano Gómez, José Luis

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound (US) guidance increases safety and efficacy in vascular cannulation and is considered the standard of care. However, barriers including workflow interference and the need to be assisted by a second operator limit its adoption in clinical routine. The use of wireless US (WUS) may overcome these barriers. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a novel WUS probe during its initial implantation in an electrophysiology (EP) laboratory. Thirty-six patients requiring femoral venous cannulation for EP procedures were included in this single center, prospective, observational study, comparing WUS guidance with the anatomical landmark approach. The primary endpoint was time to successful cannulation. Secondary endpoints included rate of unsuccessful punctures, accidental arterial punctures, and workflow interference. Compared with anatomical landmark approach, WUS guidance significantly reduced mean time to successful cannulation (87.3 ± 94.3 vs 238.1 ± 294.7 seconds, P application of wireless technology in this setting contributed to overcoming some of the barriers preventing a more widespread clinical use of US guidance. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Electrophysiological evidence for the role of shared space in online comprehension of spatial demonstratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, David; Hagoort, Peter; Özyürek, Aslı

    2015-03-01

    A fundamental property of language is that it can be used to refer to entities in the extra-linguistic physical context of a conversation in order to establish a joint focus of attention on a referent. Typological and psycholinguistic work across a wide range of languages has put forward at least two different theoretical views on demonstrative reference. Here we contrasted and tested these two accounts by investigating the electrophysiological brain activity underlying the construction of indexical meaning in comprehension. In two EEG experiments, participants watched pictures of a speaker who referred to one of two objects using speech and an index-finger pointing gesture. In contrast with separately collected native speakers' linguistic intuitions, N400 effects showed a preference for a proximal demonstrative when speaker and addressee were in a face-to-face orientation and all possible referents were located in the shared space between them, irrespective of the physical proximity of the referent to the speaker. These findings reject egocentric proximity-based accounts of demonstrative reference, support a sociocentric approach to deixis, suggest that interlocutors construe a shared space during conversation, and imply that the psychological proximity of a referent may be more important than its physical proximity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Language specificity of lexical-phonological therapy in bilingual aphasia: A clinical and electrophysiological study.

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    Radman, Narges; Spierer, Lucas; Laganaro, Marina; Annoni, Jean-Marie; Colombo, Françoise

    2016-08-01

    Based on findings for overlapping representations of bilingual people's first (L1) and second (L2) languages, unilingual therapies of bilingual aphasia have been proposed to benefit the untrained language. However, the generalisation patterns of intra- and cross-language and phonological therapy and their neural bases remain unclear. We tested whether the effects of an intensive lexical-phonological training (LPT) in L2 transferred to L1 word production in a Persian-French bilingual stroke patient with Broca's aphasia. Language performance was assessed using the Bilingual Aphasia Test, a 144-item picture naming (PN) task and a word-picture verification (WPV) task. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded during PN and WPV in both languages before and after an LPT in French on a wordlist from the PN task. After the therapy, naming improved only for the treated L2 items. The naming performance improved neither in the untrained L2 items nor in the corresponding items in L1. EEG analyses revealed a Language x Session topographic interaction at 540 ms post-stimulus, driven by a modification of the electrophysiological response to the treated L2 but not L1 items. These results indicate that LPT modified the brain networks engaged in the phonological-phonetic processing during naming only in the trained language for the trained items.

  16. Distinct electrophysiological indices of maintenance in auditory and visual short-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Christine; Vachon, François; Grimault, Stephan; Thibault, Jennifer; Guimond, Synthia; Peretz, Isabelle; Zatorre, Robert J; Jolicœur, Pierre

    2013-11-01

    We compared the electrophysiological correlates for the maintenance of non-musical tones sequences in auditory short-term memory (ASTM) to those for the short-term maintenance of sequences of coloured disks held in visual short-term memory (VSTM). The visual stimuli yielded a sustained posterior contralateral negativity (SPCN), suggesting that the maintenance of sequences of coloured stimuli engaged structures similar to those involved in the maintenance of simultaneous visual displays. On the other hand, maintenance of acoustic sequences produced a sustained negativity at fronto-central sites. This component is named the Sustained Anterior Negativity (SAN). The amplitude of the SAN increased with increasing load in ASTM and predicted individual differences in the performance. There was no SAN in a control condition with the same auditory stimuli but no memory task, nor one associated with visual memory. These results suggest that the SAN is an index of brain activity related to the maintenance of representations in ASTM that is distinct from the maintenance of representations in VSTM. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Auditory deficit as a consequence rather than endophenotype of specific language impairment: electrophysiological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, D V M; Hardiman, Mervyn J; Barry, Johanna G

    2012-01-01

    Are developmental language disorders caused by poor auditory discrimination? This is a popular theory, but behavioural evidence has been inconclusive. Here we studied children with specific language impairment, measuring the brain's electrophysiological response to sounds in a passive paradigm. We focused on the T-complex, an event-related peak that has different origins and developmental course from the well-known vertex response. We analysed auditory event-related potentials to tones and syllables from 16 children and 16 adolescents with specific language impairment who were compared with 32 typically-developing controls, matched for gender, IQ and age. We replicated prior findings of significant reduction in Ta amplitude for both children and adolescents with specific language impairment, which was particularly marked for syllables. The topography of the T-complex to syllables indicated a less focal response in those with language impairments. To distinguish causal models, we considered correlations between size of the Ta response and measures of language and literacy in parents as well as children. The best-fitting model was one in which auditory deficit was a consequence rather than a cause of difficulties in phonological processing. The T-complex to syllables has abnormal size and topography in children with specific language impairment, but this is more likely to be a consequence rather than a cause of difficulties in phonological processing.

  18. Auditory deficit as a consequence rather than endophenotype of specific language impairment: electrophysiological evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D V M Bishop

    Full Text Available Are developmental language disorders caused by poor auditory discrimination? This is a popular theory, but behavioural evidence has been inconclusive. Here we studied children with specific language impairment, measuring the brain's electrophysiological response to sounds in a passive paradigm. We focused on the T-complex, an event-related peak that has different origins and developmental course from the well-known vertex response.We analysed auditory event-related potentials to tones and syllables from 16 children and 16 adolescents with specific language impairment who were compared with 32 typically-developing controls, matched for gender, IQ and age.We replicated prior findings of significant reduction in Ta amplitude for both children and adolescents with specific language impairment, which was particularly marked for syllables. The topography of the T-complex to syllables indicated a less focal response in those with language impairments. To distinguish causal models, we considered correlations between size of the Ta response and measures of language and literacy in parents as well as children. The best-fitting model was one in which auditory deficit was a consequence rather than a cause of difficulties in phonological processing.The T-complex to syllables has abnormal size and topography in children with specific language impairment, but this is more likely to be a consequence rather than a cause of difficulties in phonological processing.

  19. Site of anticonvulsant action on sodium channels: autoradiographic and electrophysiological studies in rat brain

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    Worley, P.F.; Baraban, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    The anticonvulsants phenytoin and carbamazepine interact allosterically with the batrachotoxin binding site of sodium channels. In the present study, we demonstrate an autoradiographic technique to localize the batrachotoxin binding site on sodium channels in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxinin-A 20-alpha-benzoate (BTX-B). Binding of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B to brain sections is dependent on potentiating allosteric interactions with scorpion venom and is displaced by BTX-B (Kd approximately 200 nM), aconitine, veratridine, and phenytoin with the same rank order of potencies as described in brain synaptosomes. The maximum number of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B binding sites in forebrain sections also agrees with biochemical determinations. Autoradiographic localizations indicate that (/sup 3/H)BTX-B binding sites are not restricted to cell bodies and axons but are present in synaptic zones throughout the brain. For example, a particularly dense concentration of these sites in the substantia nigra is associated with afferent terminals of the striatonigral projection. By contrast, myelinated structures possess much lower densities of binding sites. In addition, we present electrophysiological evidence that synaptic transmission, as opposed to axonal conduction, is preferentially sensitive to the action of aconitine and veratridine. Finally, the synaptic block produced by these sodium channel activators is inhibited by phenytoin and carbamazepine at therapeutic anticonvulsant concentrations.

  20. Mechanism of the formation of x-ray-induced phosphenes. I. Electrophysiological investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doly, M.; Isabelle, D.B.; Vincent, P.; Gaillard, G.; Meyniel, G.

    1980-01-01

    To explore one possible mechanism of the formation of phosphenes detected by astronauts during space flights, the x-ray stimulation of the photoreceptor cells of the eye was investigated. The albino rat's retina, maintained in culture by perfusion, was used for this study. The electrophysiological response (ERG) induced by x rays was found to be identical to the one produced by a visible light stimulation. Under our experimental procedure, only a direct interaction between incident radiation and retina induced such as ERG. Irrespective of whether the experiment was performed using the isolated retina or the whole animal, we found that the ERG amplitude was proportional to the logarithm of the exposure on the retina. A comparative study indicated that, to obtain the same ERG amplitude, the incident energy on the retina must be about 5 x 10 6 times larger for x rays (E = 40 keV) than for visible light (lambda = 489 nm). The analysis of these results leads us to assume that the x rays act on the rod's photosensitive molecule, rhodopsin

  1. Grammatical markers switch roles and elicit different electrophysiological responses under shallow and deep semantic requirements

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    Takahiro Soshi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Static knowledge about the grammar of a natural language is represented in the cortico-subcortical system. However, the differences in dynamic verbal processing under different cognitive conditions are unclear. To clarify this, we conducted an electrophysiological experiment involving a semantic priming paradigm in which semantically congruent or incongruent word sequences (prime nouns–target verbs were randomly presented. We examined the event-related brain potentials that occurred in response to congruent and incongruent target words that were preceded by primes with or without grammatical case markers. The two participant groups performed either the shallow (lexical judgment or deep (direct semantic judgment semantic tasks. We hypothesized that, irrespective of the case markers, the congruent targets would reduce centro-posterior N400 activities under the deep semantic condition, which induces selective attention to the semantic relatedness of content words. However, the same congruent targets with correct case markers would reduce lateralized negativity under the shallow semantic condition because grammatical case markers are related to automatic structural integration under semantically unattended conditions. We observed that congruent targets (e.g., ‘open' that were preceded by primes with congruent case markers (e.g., ‘shutter-object case' reduced lateralized negativity under the shallow semantic condition. In contrast, congruent targets, irrespective of case markers, consistently yielded N400 reductions under the deep semantic condition. To summarize, human neural verbal processing differed in response to the same grammatical markers in the same verbal expressions under semantically attended or unattended conditions.

  2. Closed-loop, multichannel experimentation using the open-source NeuroRighter electrophysiology platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Paul Newman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Single neuron feedback control techniques, such as voltage clamp and dynamic clamp, have enabled numerous advances in our understanding of ion channels, electrochemical signaling, and neural dynamics. Although commercially available multichannel recording and stimulation systems are commonly used for studying neural processing at the network level, they provide little native support for real-time feedback. We developed the open-source NeuroRighter multichannel electrophysiology hardware and software platform for closed-loop multichannel control with a focus on accessibility and low cost. NeuroRighter allows 64 channels of stimulation and recording for around US $10,000, along with the ability to integrate with other software and hardware. Here, we present substantial enhancements to the NeuroRighter platform, including a redesigned desktop application, a new stimulation subsystem allowing arbitrary stimulation patterns, low-latency data servers for accessing data streams, and a new application programming interface (API for creating closed-loop protocols that can be inserted into NeuroRighter as plugin programs. This greatly simplifies the design of sophisticated real-time experiments without sacrificing the power and speed of a compiled programming language. Here we present a detailed description of NeuroRighter as a stand alone application, its plugin API, and an extensive set of case studies that highlight the system's abilities for conducting closed-loop, multichannel interfacing experiments.

  3. The influence of object and background color manipulations on the electrophysiological indices of recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Ullrich K H; Zimmer, Hubert D; Groh-Bordin, Christian

    2007-12-14

    In a recognition memory experiment, the claim was tested that intrinsic object features contribute to familiarity, whereas extrinsic context features do not. We used the study-test manipulation of color to investigate the perceptual specificity of ERP old-new effects associated with familiarity and recollection. Color was either an intrinsic surface feature of the object or a feature of the surrounding context (a frame encasing the object); thus, the same feature was manipulated across intrinsic/extrinsic conditions. Subjects performed a threefold (same color/different color/new object) decision, making feature information task-relevant. Results suggest that the intrinsic manipulation of color affected the mid-frontal old-new effect associated with familiarity, while this effect was not influenced by extrinsic manipulation. This ERP pattern could not be explained by basic behavioral performance differences. It is concluded that familiarity can be perceptually specific with regard to intrinsic information belonging to the object. The putative electrophysiological signature of recollection - a late parietal old-new effect - was not present in the data, and reasons for this null effect are discussed.

  4. Electrophysiologic and Behavioral Assessment of Hearing Status in Children with Spastic Diplegia

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    Mohammad Kamali

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: High incidence of speech disorders in children with cerebral palsy could be related to a deficiency in processing of auditory stimuli. So it is vital to check out any peripheral or central disorders in auditory system using behavioral and electrophysiological auditory tests.Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 15 children with spastic diplegia, mean age 5.77, SD 2.26 years, and 15 normal children, mean age 5.33, SD 1.80 years, were tested using pure tone audiometry, immittance and auditory brainstem responses. The results were compared between the two groups.Results: Hearing thresholds and middle ear status were in normal range in all participants; however, contralateral acoustic reflex thresholds were mostly elevated. Comparing absolute latency and interpeak latency intervals of auditory brainstem responses between the two groups, absolute latency interval of later waves, and in specific the V wave, was significantly longer in diplegic children (p=0.04 resulting in a longer III-V interpeak latency intervals (p=0.02.Conclusion: Neurological disorders in ponto-reticulo-spinal pathway, pontine reticular nuclei and upper pons which are adjacent to auditory nuclei of lateral leminiscus and inferior colliculus result in auditory dys-synchrony and increased latency intervals in latter waves of auditory brainstem responses. This could also attributed to functional disorders in wave-generating sites in these patients.

  5. Association of Atrial Fibrillation with Morphological and Electrophysiological Changes of the Atrial Myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matějková, Adéla; Šteiner, Ivo

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. For long time it was considered as pure functional disorder, but in recent years, there were identified atrial locations, which are involved in the initiation and maintenance of this arrhythmia. These structural changes, so called remodelation, start at electric level and later they affect contractility and morphology. In this study we attempted to find a possible relation between morphological (scarring, amyloidosis, left atrial (LA) enlargement) and electrophysiological (ECG features) changes in patients with AF. We examined grossly and histologically 100 hearts of necropsy patients - 54 with a history of AF and 46 without AF. Premortem ECGs were evaluated. The patients with AF had significantly heavier heart, larger LA, more severely scarred myocardium of the LA and atrial septum, and more severe amyloidosis in both atria. Severity of amyloidosis was higher in LAs vs. right atria (RAs). Distribution of both fibrosis and amyloidosis was irregular. The most affected area was in the LA anterior wall. Patients with a history of AF and with most severe amyloidosis have more often abnormally long P waves. Finding of long P wave may contribute to diagnosis of a hitherto undisclosed atrial fibrillation.

  6. Acute progression of electrophysiologically affected fellow eye in unilaterally symptomatic acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iriyama A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Kayo Kure, Ryo Obata, Yuji Inoue, Aya Iriyama, Yasuo YanagiDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Some patients with acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR show symptomatic acute visual impairment in one eye only, but electrophysiological abnormalities in both eyes. A 46-year-old female who had noticed paracentral scotoma of her right eye six months previously was referred to our hospital. At initial examination, her best-corrected visual acuity was 0.7 in the right eye and 1.2 in the left. Whereas the full-field rod electroretinogram (ERG was normal in both eyes, the cone response was nonrecordable in the right eye and showed a significant decrease in amplitude in the left eye. The 30 Hz flicker ERG showed similar results. Multifocal ERG was nonrecordable in the right eye and showed a residual response in only the central part of the left. Fourteen months after the first visit, the patient presented complaining of acute visual acuity loss in the left eye. Visual acuity in her left eye had decreased to 0.01. The multifocal ERG was nonrecordable. Although the patient chose oral prednisolone therapy, only limited recovery was observed in the patient. Even if only the ERG shows changes and there are no other symptoms, ophthalmologists should continue observation in view of the possibility of an acute exacerbation.Keywords: acute zonal occult outer retinopathy, electroretinogram, scotoma

  7. High-frequency ultrasound as an adjunct to neural electrophysiology: Evaluation and prognosis of Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuo; Guo, Rui-Jun; Liang, Xiao-Ning; Wu, Yue; Cao, Wen; Zhang, Zhen-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Liang, Hai-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Bell's palsy is a form of temporary facial nerve paralysis that occurs primarily in young adults. Previously, various methods were used to assess outcomes in facial nerve disease. The aim of the present study was to characterize the main branches of the normal and abnormal facial nerve using high-frequency ultrasonography (HFUS). A total of 104 healthy volunteers, 40 patients with acute onset of Bell's palsy and 30 patients who underwent 3-month routine therapy for Bell's palsy disease were included in the study. The healthy volunteers and patients were selected for HFUS examination and VII nerve conduction. The results showed significant differences in nerve diameter, echogenicity, delitescence and amplitude in different groups. Statistically significant correlations were identified for severity grading in one of the experimental groups during HFUS examinations. In conclusion, HFUS as a complementary technique paired with neural electrophysiology may establish the normal values of facial nerve. Additionally, HFUS was beneficial in the process of evaluation and prognosis of Bell's palsy disease.

  8. Auditory Cortical Maturation in a Child with Cochlear Implant: Analysis of Electrophysiological and Behavioral Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Liliane Aparecida Fagundes; Couto, Maria Inês Vieira; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; de Carvalho, Ana Claudia Martinho; Matas, Carla Gentile

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to longitudinally assess the behavioral and electrophysiological hearing changes of a girl inserted in a CI program, who had bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss and underwent surgery of cochlear implantation with electrode activation at 21 months of age. She was evaluated using the P1 component of Long Latency Auditory Evoked Potential (LLAEP); speech perception tests of the Glendonald Auditory Screening Procedure (GASP); Infant Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS); and Meaningful Use of Speech Scales (MUSS). The study was conducted prior to activation and after three, nine, and 18 months of cochlear implant activation. The results of the LLAEP were compared with data from a hearing child matched by gender and chronological age. The results of the LLAEP of the child with cochlear implant showed gradual decrease in latency of the P1 component after auditory stimulation (172 ms–134 ms). In the GASP, IT-MAIS, and MUSS, gradual development of listening skills and oral language was observed. The values of the LLAEP of the hearing child were expected for chronological age (132 ms–128 ms). The use of different clinical instruments allow a better understanding of the auditory habilitation and rehabilitation process via CI. PMID:26881163

  9. Closed-Loop, Multichannel Experimentation Using the Open-Source NeuroRighter Electrophysiology Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Jonathan P; Zeller-Townson, Riley; Fong, Ming-Fai; Arcot Desai, Sharanya; Gross, Robert E; Potter, Steve M

    2012-01-01

    Single neuron feedback control techniques, such as voltage clamp and dynamic clamp, have enabled numerous advances in our understanding of ion channels, electrochemical signaling, and neural dynamics. Although commercially available multichannel recording and stimulation systems are commonly used for studying neural processing at the network level, they provide little native support for real-time feedback. We developed the open-source NeuroRighter multichannel electrophysiology hardware and software platform for closed-loop multichannel control with a focus on accessibility and low cost. NeuroRighter allows 64 channels of stimulation and recording for around US $10,000, along with the ability to integrate with other software and hardware. Here, we present substantial enhancements to the NeuroRighter platform, including a redesigned desktop application, a new stimulation subsystem allowing arbitrary stimulation patterns, low-latency data servers for accessing data streams, and a new application programming interface (API) for creating closed-loop protocols that can be inserted into NeuroRighter as plugin programs. This greatly simplifies the design of sophisticated real-time experiments without sacrificing the power and speed of a compiled programming language. Here we present a detailed description of NeuroRighter as a stand-alone application, its plugin API, and an extensive set of case studies that highlight the system's abilities for conducting closed-loop, multichannel interfacing experiments.

  10. Electrophysiological assessment of the effects of obstructive sleep apnea on cognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethem Gelir

    Full Text Available We used electrophysiological measures to investigate the effects of obstructive sleep apnea on attention, learning, and memory. Thirty subjects (OSA group, n = 15, control group n = 15 participated in n-back tests, accompanied by P300 recordings, to investigate working memory and attention. The mirror-drawing test was used to study procedural memory, and the trail-making test (TMT was used to evaluate divided attention and executive function. No significant group difference in reaction time was found in the 0-back and 1-back tests. In the 2-back test, reaction times of patients were longer than those of the control group. No P300 wave was obtained in the OSA group in any (0-, 1-, or 2-back n-back test. In contrast, in the control group, significant P300 waves were recorded except for the 2-back test. The mirror-drawing scores were unaffected by sleep apnea. There was no difference between groups in the TMT-A test on any of the trials. Although no group difference was found in the first or second trials of the TMT-B test, OSA patients were less successful in learning on the third trial. According to our study results, OSA affects attention and executive function adversely however, we could not detect a significant effect on working or procedural memory.

  11. The influence of cardiorespiratory fitness on strategic, behavioral, & electrophysiological indices of arithmetic cognition in preadolescent children

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    Robert D Moore

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated the influence of cardiorespiratory fitness on arithmetic cognition in forty 9-10 year old children. Measures included a standardized mathematics achievement test to assess conceptual and computational knowledge, self-reported strategy selection, and an experimental arithmetic verification task (including small and large addition problems, which afforded the measurement of event-related brain potentials (ERPs. No differences in math achievement were observed as a function of fitness level, but all children performed better on math concepts relative to math computation. Higher fit children reported using retrieval more often to solve large arithmetic problems, relative to lower fit children. During the arithmetic verification task, higher fit children exhibited superior performance for large problems, as evidenced by greater d’ scores, while all children exhibited decreased accuracy and longer reaction time for large relative to small problems, and incorrect relative to correct solutions. On the electrophysiological level, modulations of early (P1, N170 and late ERP components (P3, N400 were observed as a function of problem size and solution correctness. Higher fit children exhibited selective modulations for N170, P3 and N400 amplitude relative to lower fit children, suggesting that fitness influences symbolic encoding, attentional resource allocation and semantic processing during arithmetic tasks. The current study contributes to the fitness-cognition literature by demonstrating that the benefits of cardiorespiratory fitness extend to arithmetic cognition, which has important implications for the educational environment and the context of learning.

  12. Using delay differential equations to induce alternans in a model of cardiac electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Justin; Sass, Julian; Gomes, Johnny M; Dos Santos, Rodrigo Weber; Cherry, Elizabeth M

    2016-09-07

    Cardiac electrical alternans is a period-2 dynamical behavior with alternating long and short action potential durations (APD) that often precedes dangerous arrhythmias associated with cardiac arrest. Despite the importance of alternans, many current ordinary differential equations models of cardiac electrophysiology do not produce alternans, thereby limiting the use of these models for studying the mechanisms that underlie this condition. Because delay differential equations (DDEs) commonly induce complex dynamics in other biological systems, we investigate whether incorporating DDEs can lead to alternans development in cardiac models by studying the Fox et al. canine ventricular action potential model. After suppressing the alternans in the original model, we show that alternans can be obtained by introducing DDEs in the model gating variables, and we quantitatively compare the DDE-induced alternans with the alternans present in the original model. We analyze the behavior of the voltage, currents, and gating variables of the model to study the effects of the delays and to determine how alternans develops in that setting, and we discuss the mathematical and physiological implications of our findings. In future work, we aim to apply our approach to induce alternans in models that do not naturally exhibit such dynamics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Electrophysiological correlates of the autobiographical Implicit Association Test (aIAT: response conflict and conflict resolution.

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    Maddalena Marini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The autobiographical IAT (aIAT is an implicit behavioral instrument that can detect autobiographical memories encoded in an individual’s mind by measuring how quickly this person can categorize and associate sentences related to a specific event with the logical dimensions true and false. Faster categorization when an event (e.g., I went to Paris is associated with the dimension true than false indicates that that specific event is encoded as true in the individual’s mind. The aim of this study is to investigate the electrophysiological correlates of the aIAT, used as a memory-detection technique (i.e., to identify which of two events is true. To this end, we recorded ERPs while participants performed an aIAT assessing which of two playing cards they had previously selected. We found an increased N200 and a decreased LPC (or P300 at the fronto-central sites when participants associated the selected playing card with the dimension false than true. Notably, both components have been previously and consistently reported in studies investigating deception. These results suggest that associating a true autobiographical event with the concept of false may involve the same cognitive processes associated with deception.

  14. Cognitive training and selective attention in the aging brain: an electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jennifer L; Edwards, Jerri D; Maxfield, Nathan D; Peronto, Carol L; Williams, Victoria A; Lister, Jennifer J

    2013-11-01

    Age-related deficits in selective attention are hypothesized to result from decrements in inhibition of task-irrelevant information. Speed of processing (SOP) training is an adaptive cognitive intervention designed to enhance processing speed for attention tasks. The effectiveness of SOP training to improve cognitive and everyday functional performance is well documented. However, underlying mechanisms of these training benefits are unknown. Participants completed a visual search task evaluated using event-related potentials (ERPs) before and after 10 weeks of SOP training or no contact. N2pc and P3b components were evaluated to determine SOP training effects on attentional resource allocation and capacity. Selective attention to a target was enhanced after SOP training compared to no training. N2pc and P3b amplitudes increased after training, reflecting attentional allocation and capacity enhancement, consistent with previous studies demonstrating behavioral improvements in selective attention following SOP training. Changes in ERPs related to attention allocation and capacity following SOP training support the idea that training leads to cognitive enhancement. Specifically, we provide electrophysiological evidence that SOP training may be successful in counteracting age-related declines in selective attention. This study provides important evidence of the underlying mechanisms by which SOP training improves cognitive function in older adults. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Morphological variations of hippocampal formation in epilepsy: image, clinical and electrophysiological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Ana Paula Andrade; Carrete, Henrique; Bianchin, Marino Muxfeldt; Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Lin, Katia; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas; Vilanova, Luiz Celso Pereira; Garzon, Eliana; Caboclo, Luís Otávio; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki

    2013-01-01

    Morphological variations of hippocampal formation (MVHF) are observed in patients with epilepsy but also in asymptomatic individuals. The precise role of these findings in epilepsy is not yet fully understood. This study analyzes the hippocampal formation (HF) morphology of asymptomatic individuals (n = 30) and of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) (n = 68), patients with malformations of cortical development (MCD) (n = 34), or patients with pure morphological variations of hippocampal formation (pure MVHF) (n = 12). Main clinical and electrophysiological data of patients with MVHF were also analyzed. Morphological variations of hippocampal formation are more frequently observed in patients with MCD than in patients with MTLE-HS or in asymptomatic individuals. Patients with pure morphological variations of hippocampal formation showed higher incidence of extratemporal seizure onset. Refractoriness seems to be more associated with other abnormalities, like HS or MCD, than with the HF variation itself. Thus, although morphological HF abnormalities might play a role in epileptogenicity, they seem to contribute less to refractoriness. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A scalable neuroinformatics data flow for electrophysiological signals using MapReduce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayapandian, Catherine; Wei, Annan; Ramesh, Priya; Zonjy, Bilal; Lhatoo, Samden D.; Loparo, Kenneth; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Sahoo, Satya S.

    2015-01-01

    Data-driven neuroscience research is providing new insights in progression of neurological disorders and supporting the development of improved treatment approaches. However, the volume, velocity, and variety of neuroscience data generated from sophisticated recording instruments and acquisition methods have exacerbated the limited scalability of existing neuroinformatics tools. This makes it difficult for neuroscience researchers to effectively leverage the growing multi-modal neuroscience data to advance research in serious neurological disorders, such as epilepsy. We describe the development of the Cloudwave data flow that uses new data partitioning techniques to store and analyze electrophysiological signal in distributed computing infrastructure. The Cloudwave data flow uses MapReduce parallel programming algorithm to implement an integrated signal data processing pipeline that scales with large volume of data generated at high velocity. Using an epilepsy domain ontology together with an epilepsy focused extensible data representation format called Cloudwave Signal Format (CSF), the data flow addresses the challenge of data heterogeneity and is interoperable with existing neuroinformatics data representation formats, such as HDF5. The scalability of the Cloudwave data flow is evaluated using a 30-node cluster installed with the open source Hadoop software stack. The results demonstrate that the Cloudwave data flow can process increasing volume of signal data by leveraging Hadoop Data Nodes to reduce the total data processing time. The Cloudwave data flow is a template for developing highly scalable neuroscience data processing pipelines using MapReduce algorithms to support a variety of user applications. PMID:25852536

  17. Electrophysiological study of nerves in type-II reaction in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous infection primarily affecting the peripheral nervous system, skin and reticuloendothelial system. Cutaneous nerves are severely affected in lepra reaction and this leads to morbidity. Objective: To study electrophysiological pattern of different nerves involved in Type-II reactions in leprosy. Method: The present study was undertaken in 21 leprosy patients with Type-II reactions attending in and out-patient department of Dermatology & Venereology, B.R.D. Medical College, Gorakhpur from July 2005 to October 2006. This was a prospective case control study in which 20 healthy, age and sex matched people with no evidence of any disease (particularly nerve involvement were included. Limitation: Lesser number of cases were studied. Result: The proximal motor conduction latency was significantly prolonged in both ulnar and common peroneal nerve and proximal motor conduction velocity was also significantly reduced. On examining the values beyond 2S.D. of the control value, distal latency was not affected and only proximal conduction was affected in ulnar nerve. Conclusion: In Type II lepra reaction the motor conduction abnormalities are not prominent. Abnormalities are relatively more marked in the proximal segment.

  18. Anatomical localization of electrophysiological recording sites by co-ordinate transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinex, D G

    1997-07-18

    A method for estimating the anatomical locations of the units recorded in electrophysiological mapping experiments is described. A total of three locations must be marked by dye injections or electrolytic lesions and identified in tissue sections. From those locations, equations are derived to translate, scale, and rotate the three-dimensional co-ordinates of the recording sites, so that they are correct for a second, three-dimensional co-ordinate system based on the anatomy of the mapped structure. There is no limit to the number of recording sites that can be localized. This differs from methods that require a dye injection or lesion to be made at the exact location at which a particular unit was recorded. The accuracy of the transformed co-ordinates is limited by the accuracy with which the co-ordinates can be measured: in test measurements and in the experiments for which this algorithm was developed, the computed co-ordinates were typically accurate to within 100 microns or less.

  19. Electrophysiological correlates of implicit valenced self-processing in high vs. low self-esteem individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, John G; Benarroch, Miriam F F; Lebarr, A Nicole; Shedden, Judith M

    2015-01-01

    We provide the first high-temporal resolution account of the self-esteem implicit association test (IAT; Greenwald & Farnham, 2000) to highlight important similarities and differences between the cognitive processes corresponding to implicit valenced self-processing in high vs. low self-esteem individuals. We divided individuals into high and low self-esteem groups based on the Rosenberg self-esteem scale (Rosenberg, 1965) and administered the self-esteem IAT while recording electroencephalographic data. We show that the P2 captured group (high vs. low self-esteem) differences, the N250 and the late parietal positivity (LPP) captured differences corresponding to category pairing (self/positive vs. self/negative pairing), and the N1, P2, and P300-400 components captured interactions between self-esteem groups and whether the self was paired with positive or negative categories in the IAT. Overall, both high and low self-esteem groups were sensitive to the distinction between positive and negative information in relation to the self (me/negative generally displayed larger event-related potential amplitudes than me/positive), but for high self-esteem individuals, this difference was generally larger, earlier, and most pronounced over left-hemisphere electrodes. These electrophysiological differences may reflect differences in attentional resources devoted to teasing apart these two oppositely valenced associations. High self-esteem individuals appear to devote more automatic (early) attentional resources to strengthen the distinction between positively or negatively valenced information in relation to the self.

  20. RIVETS: a mechanical system for in vivo and in vitro electrophysiology and imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason E Osborne

    Full Text Available A number of recent studies have provided compelling demonstrations that both mice and rats can be trained to perform a variety of behavioral tasks while restrained by mechanical elements mounted to the skull. The independent development of this technique by a number of laboratories has led to diverse solutions. We found that these solutions often used expensive materials and impeded future development and modification in the absence of engineering support. In order to address these issues, here we report on the development of a flexible single hardware design for electrophysiology and imaging both in brain tissue in vitro. Our hardware facilitates the rapid conversion of a single preparation between physiology and imaging system and the conversion of a given system between preparations. In addition, our use of rapid prototyping machines ("3D printers" allows for the deployment of new designs within a day. Here, we present specifications for design and manufacturing as well as some data from our lab demonstrating the suitability of the design for physiology in behaving animals and imaging in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Source analysis of electrophysiological correlates of beat induction as sensory-guided action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Philip Todd

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a reanalysis of electrophysiological data originally collected to test a sensory-motor theory of beat induction (Todd et al. 2002; Todd and Seiss 2004; Todd and Lee 2015. The reanalysis is conducted in the light of more recent findings and in particular the demonstration that auditory evoked potentials contain a vestibular dependency. At the core of the analysis is a model which predicts brain dipole source current activity over time in temporal and frontal lobe areas during passive listening to a rhythm, or active synchronization, where it dissociates the frontal activity into distinct sources which can be identified as respectively pre-motor and motor in origin. The model successfully captures the main features of the rhythm in showing that the metrical structure is manifest in an increase in source current activity during strong compared to weak beats. In addition the outcomes of modeling suggest that: (1 activity in both temporal and frontal areas contribute to the metrical percept and that this activity is distributed over time; (2 transient, time-locked activity associated with anticipated beats is increased when a temporal expectation is confirmed following a previous violation, such as a syncopation; (3 two distinct processes are involved in auditory cortex, corresponding to tangential and radial (possibly vestibular dependent current sources. We discuss the implications of these outcomes for the insights they give into the origin of metrical structure and the power of syncopation to induce movement and create a sense of groove.

  2. Electrophysiological correlates of adult age differences in attentional control of auditory processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, Susanne; Westerhausen, René; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Wartenburger, Isabell; Heekeren, Hauke R; Lindenberger, Ulman; Li, Shu-Chen

    2014-01-01

    In addition to sensory decline, age-related losses in auditory perception also reflect impairments in attentional modulation of perceptual saliency. Using an attention and intensity-modulated dichotic listening paradigm, we investigated electrophysiological correlates of processing conflicts between attentional focus and perceptual saliency in 25 younger and 26 older adults. Participants were instructed to attend to the right or left ear, and perceptual saliency was manipulated by varying the intensities of both ears. Attentional control demand was higher in conditions when attentional focus and perceptual saliency favored opposing ears than in conditions without such conflicts. Relative to younger adults, older adults modulated their attention less flexibly and were more influenced by perceptual saliency. Our results show, for the first time, that in younger adults a late negativity in the event-related potential (ERP) at fronto-central and parietal electrodes was sensitive to perceptual-attentional conflicts during auditory processing (N450 modulation effect). Crucially, the magnitude of the N450 modulation effect correlated positively with task performance. In line with lower attentional flexibility, the ERP waveforms of older adults showed absence of the late negativity and the modulation effect. This suggests that aging compromises the activation of the fronto-parietal attentional network when processing the competing and conflicting auditory information.

  3. A possible common basis for MDD, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia: Lessons from electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goded eShahaf

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There is ample electrophysiological evidence of attention dysfunction in the EEG/ERP signal of various psychopathologies such as major depressive disorder (MDD, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. The reduced attention-related ERP waves show much similarity between MDD, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, raising the question whether there are similarities in the neurophysiologic process that underlies attention dysfunction in these pathologies. The present work suggests that there is such a unified underlying neurophysiologic process, which results in reduced attention in the three pathologies. Naturally, as these pathologies involve different clinical manifestations, we expect differences in their underlying neurophysiology. These differences and their subtle manifestation in the ERP marker for attention are also discussed.MDD, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are just three of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, which involve changes in the EEG/ERP manifestations of attention. Further work should expand the basic model presented here to offer comprehensive modeling of these multiple disorders and to emphasize similarities and dissimilarities of the underlying neurophysiologic processes.

  4. An electrophysiological study of sound sensitive neurons in the 'primitive ear' of acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, S A

    1976-01-01

    Crickets have two types of mechanisms for the reception of environmental sounds: (1)the tympanal organs in the two forelegs and (2) the freely articulated setal receptors on the abdominal ceri. The cereal setal receptors have hitherto received much less experimental attention as decoders of biologically significant sounds than have the tympano-receptors. In the present study the cereal auditory system of Acheta domesticus was examined electrophysiologically to determine its auditory frequency sensitivity, the tuning characteristics of individual units, and the synchronization between nerve impulses and stimulus frequency. Both pre- and postsynaptic units were examined in the fifth abdominal ganglion; several of the observed response patterns were compared with those of homologous cereal sensory neurons in Periplaneta americana. The results show that (1) A. domesticus possesses an elaborate array of cereal receptors which are highly sensitive to sounds, (2) the cereal setal receptors are more sensitive and numerous in the cricket than in the cockroach, and (3) the cereal auditory system can decode stimulus information by narrow tuning in individual cells and by synchronous discharge patterns; firing frequencies range up to 300 Hz in presynaptic sensory units and 60 Hz in the postsynaptic giants. The response patterns were related to the structure of the receptor and the behavioural adaptations of the insect.

  5. Simulatedin vivoElectrophysiology Experiments Provide Previously Inaccessible Insights into Visual Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Maria; Price, Nicholas SC

    2016-01-01

    Lecture content and practical laboratory classes are ideally complementary. However, the types of experiments that have led to our detailed understanding of sensory neuroscience are often not amenable to classroom experimentation as they require expensive equipment, time-consuming surgeries, specialized experimental techniques, and the use of animals. While sometimes feasible in small group teaching, these experiments are not suitable for large cohorts of students. Previous attempts to expose students to sensory neuroscience experiments include: the use of electrophysiology preparations in invertebrates, data-driven simulations that do not replicate the experience of conducting an experiment, or simply observing an experiment in a research laboratory. We developed an online simulation of a visual neuroscience experiment in which extracellular recordings are made from a motion sensitive neuron. Students have control over stimulation parameters (direction and contrast) and can see and hear the action potential responses to stimuli as they are presented. The simulation provides an intuitive way for students to gain insight into neurophysiology, including experimental design, data collection and data analysis. Our simulation allows large cohorts of students to cost-effectively "experience" the results of animal research without ethical concerns, to be exposed to realistic data variability, and to develop their understanding of how sensory neuroscience experiments are conducted.

  6. Electrophysiological changes in 12-year-old children born MLP: reduced VEP amplitude in MLP children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Lina H; Nilsson, Josefin; Dahlgren, Jovanna; Grönlund, Marita Andersson

    2017-09-01

    To study the electrophysiological changes in relation to fundus morphology in moderate-to-late preterm (MLP) children with no previous history of retinopathy of prematurity. Visual acuity (VA), refraction and fundus variables measured by optical coherence tomography, pattern reversal visual evoked potentials and full-field electroretinography (ff-ERG) were obtained from 22 twelve-year-old MLP children (11 male, 11 female) and 21 full-term controls. There were no significant differences between the MLP and control groups in VA, refraction or optic disc parameters. There was a trend for thinner papillary retinal nerve fibre layer in the MLP group. Visual evoked potential amplitudes (P100) were lower in the MLP group than in controls, that is, right eye p=0.0027, left eye p=0.0037. No differences in latencies were found. After Bonferroni adjustment for multiple testing, no ff-ERG differences were noted between MLP and controls. Lower gestational age was correlated with smaller light-adapted 3.0 b-wave amplitudes (p=0.0076, r=0.565). Our results indicate that moderate premature birth may affect visual evoked potential amplitudes without clear retinal structural changes in MLP children at 12 years of age. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Electrophysiological Evidences of Organization of Cortical Motor Information in the Basal Ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Iwamuro

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available During the last two decades, the many developments in the treatment of movement disorders such as Parkinson disease and dystonia have enhanced our understanding on organization of the basal ganglia, and this knowledge has led to other advances in the field. According to many electrophysiological and anatomical findings, it is considered that motor information from different cortical areas is processed through several cortico-basal ganglia loops principally in a parallel fashion and somatotopy from each cortical area is also well preserved in each loop. Moreover, recent studies suggest that not only the parallel processing but also some convergence of information occur through the basal ganglia. Information from cortical areas whose functions are close to each other tends to converge in the basal ganglia. The cortico-basal ganglia loops should be comprehended more as a network rather than as separated subdivisions. However, the functions of this convergence still remain unknown. It is important even for clinical doctors to be well informed about this kind of current knowledge because some symptoms of movement disorders may be explained by disorganization of the information network in the basal ganglia.

  8. Electrophysiologic studies of cutaneous nerves of the forelimb of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchell, R L; Canton, D D; Johnson, R D; Maxwell, S A

    1982-10-01

    The cutaneous innervation of the forelimb was investigated in 20 barbiturate-anesthetized cats by using electrophysiological techniques. The cutaneous area (CA) innervated by each cutaneous nerve was delineated in at least six cats by brushing the hair in the CA with a small watercolor brush while recording from the nerve. Mapping of adjacent CA revealed larger overlap zones (OZ) than were noted in the dog. Remarkable findings were that the brachiocephalic nerve arose from the axillary nerve and the CA comparable to that supplied by the cutaneous branch of the brachiocephalic nerve in the dog was supplied by a cutaneous branch of the suprascapular nerve. The CA supplied by the communicating branch from the musculocutaneous to the median nerve was similar in both species except that the communicating branch arose proximal to any other branches of the musculocutaneous nerve in the cat, whereas it was a terminal branch in the dog. The superficial branch of the radial nerve gave off cutaneous brachial branches in the cat proximal to the lateral cutaneous antebrachial nerve. The CA of the palmar branches of the ulnar nerve did not completely overlap the CA of the palmar branches of the median nerve as occurred in the dog; thus an autonomous zone (AZ) for the CA of the palmar branches of the median nerve is present in the cat, whereas no AZ existed for the CA of this nerve in the dog.

  9. Electrophysiologic studies of cutaneous nerves of the thoracic limb of the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchell, R L; Whalen, L R; Bailey, C S; Lohse, C L

    1980-01-01

    The cutaneous innervation of the thoracic limb was investigated in 36 barbiturate-anesthetized dogs, using electrophysiologic techniques. The cutaneous area (CA) innervated by each cutaneous nerve was delineated in at least five dogs by stroking the hair in the area with a small watercolor brush while recording from the nerve. Mapping of adjacent CA revealed areas of considerable overlapping. The part of the CA of a given nerve supplied by only that nerve is referred to as its autonomous zone. Of all nerves arising from the brachial plexus, only the suprascapular, subscapular, lateral thoracic, thoracodorsal, and cranial and caudal pectoral nerves lacked cutaneous afferents. The dorsal cutaneous branch of C6 had a CA, but no grossly demonstrable dorsal cutaneous branches for C7 C8, or T1 were found. The cervical nerves had ventral cutaneous branches, but no lateral cutaneous branches. Thoracic nerves T2-T4 had dorsal, ventral, and lateral cutaneous branches. The cutaneous branches of the brachiocephalic, axillary, musculocutaneous, radial, median, and ulnar nerves all had CA which were overlapped by adjacent CA, thus their autonomous zones were much smaller than the cutaneous areas usually depicted for these nerves in anatomy and neurology textbooks.

  10. Effects of indocyanine green videoangiography and electrophysiological monitoring on surgery for intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Yoshikazu; Kitai, Ryuhei; Awara, Kosuke

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the outcome of 62 consecutive patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysm treated by surgical clipping. Thirty-one cases were operated without intraoperative monitoring, 17 cases with indocyanine green videoangiography (ICGA), and 14 cases with electrophysiological monitoring (EPM) in addition to ICGA. Complete obliteration of the aneurysm was confirmed in all 62 cases. Diffusion-weighted imaging of MRI disclosed no ischemic lesions after surgery in any of the cases. Asymptomatic venous infarction was detected by CT study in 2 cases. Cranial nerve palsy occurred in 4 cases but EPM could not detect it. There was no difference among the group without monitoring, the group with ICGA and the group with ICGA and EPM. The mortality and morbidity of all cases was calculated as 0% and 6.5%, respectively. ICGA appeared to be useful in surgery for aneurysms encasing perforators or for repair of problems such as premature rupture. eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) seemed effective in surgery for anterior choroidal artery aneurysms or aneurysms requiring trapping before clipping. However, monitoring would not have been effective without extensive dissection of aneurysms, suggesting that basic microsurgical techniques are crucial for successful surgery. (author)

  11. A microelectrode array electrodeposited with reduced graphene oxide and Pt nanoparticles for norepinephrine and electrophysiological recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Song, Yilin; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Shengwei; Xu, Huiren; Wang, Mixia; Wang, Yang; Cai, Xinxia

    2017-11-01

    Norepinephrine (NE), a common neurotransmitter released by locus coeruleus neurons, plays an essential role in the communication mechanism of the mammalian nervous system. In this work, a microelectrode array (MEA) was fabricated by micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technology to provide a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for the direct determination in NE dynamic secretion. To improve the electrical performance, the MEA was electrodeposited with the reduced graphene oxide and Pt nanoparticles (rGOPNps). rGOPNps-MEA was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, differential pulse voltammetry exhibited remarkably electrocatalytic properties towards NE. Calibration results showed a sensitivity of 1.03 nA µM-1 to NE with a detection limit of 0.08 µM. In Particular, the MEA was successfully used for measuring dynamic extracellular NE secretion from the locus coeruleus brain slice, as well as monitoring spike firing from the hippocampal brain slice. This fabricated device has potential in studies of spatially resolved delivery of trace neurochemicals and electrophysiological activities of a variety of biological tissues in vitro.

  12. Nouns and verbs in the brain: a review of behavioural, electrophysiological, neuropsychological and imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigliocco, Gabriella; Vinson, David P; Druks, Judit; Barber, Horacio; Cappa, Stefano F

    2011-01-01

    In the past 30 years there has been a growing body of research using different methods (behavioural, electrophysiological, neuropsychological, TMS and imaging studies) asking whether processing words from different grammatical classes (especially nouns and verbs) engage different neural systems. To date, however, each line of investigation has provided conflicting results. Here we present a review of this literature, showing that once we take into account the confounding in most studies between semantic distinctions (objects vs. actions) and grammatical distinction (nouns vs. verbs), and the conflation between studies concerned with mechanisms of single word processing and those studies concerned with sentence integration, the emerging picture is relatively clear-cut: clear neural separability is observed between the processing of object words (nouns) and action words (typically verbs), grammatical class effects emerge or become stronger for tasks and languages imposing greater processing demands. These findings indicate that grammatical class per se is not an organisational principle of knowledge in the brain; rather, all the findings we review are compatible with two general principles described by typological linguistics as underlying grammatical class membership across languages: semantic/pragmatic, and distributional cues in language that distinguish nouns from verbs. These two general principles are incorporated within an emergentist view which takes these constraints into account. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fiberoptic Contact-Force Sensing Electrophysiological Catheters: How Precise Is the Technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourier, Felix; Gianni, Carola; Dare, Matthew; Deisenhofer, Isabel; Hessling, Gabriele; Reents, Tilko; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Trivedi, Chintan; Natale, Andrea; Al-Ahmad, Amin

    2017-01-01

    Contact-force (CF) sensing catheters are increasingly used in electrophysiological procedures due to their efficacy and safety profile. As data about the accuracy of fiberoptic CF technology are scarce, we sought to quantify it using in vitro experiments. A force sensor was built with a flexible membrane to allow exact reference force measurements for each set of experiments. A TactiCath Quartz (TCQ) ablation catheter was brought in contact with the force sensor membrane in order to compare the TCQ force measurements to sensor reference force measurements. Measurements were performed at different tip angles (0°/perpendicular contact, 45°, 90°/parallel contact), with fluid irrigation, different degrees of catheter deflection, and using a sheath. The accuracy of the TCQ force measurements was 0.9 ± 0.9 g (0°), 0.8 ± 0.8 g (45°) and 1.2 ± 1.3 g (90°), 0.8 ± 0.7 g (irrigation), 0.8 ± 0.8 g (deflection), and 0.8 ± 0.9 g (sheath); this was not significantly different among all experimental conditions. The precision was ≤3.8%. CF measurements using a fiberoptic sensing technology show a high level of accuracy and precision, without being significantly influenced by tip angle, fluid irrigation, catheter deflection or use of a sheath. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Nucleus accumbens is involved in human action monitoring: evidence from invasive electrophysiological recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F Münte

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The Nucleus accumbens (Nacc has been proposed to act as a limbic-motor interface. Here, using invasive intraoperative recordings in an awake patient suffering from obsessive-compulsive disease (OCD, we demonstrate that its activity is modulated by the quality of performance of the subject in a choice reaction time task designed to tap action monitoring processes. Action monitoring, that is, error detection and correction, is thought to be supported by a system involving the dopaminergic midbrain, the basal ganglia, and the medial prefrontal cortex. In surface electrophysiological recordings, action monitoring is indexed by an error-related negativity (ERN appearing time-locked to the erroneous responses and emanating from the medial frontal cortex. In preoperative scalp recordings the patient's ERN was found to be signifi cantly increased compared to a large (n= 83 normal sample, suggesting enhanced action monitoring processes. Intraoperatively, error-related modulations were obtained from the Nacc but not from a site 5 mm above. Importantly, crosscorrelation analysis showed that error-related activity in the Nacc preceded surface activity by 40 ms. We propose that the Nacc is involved in action monitoring, possibly by using error signals from the dopaminergic midbrain to adjust the relative impact of limbic and prefrontal inputs on frontal control systems in order to optimize goal-directed behavior.

  15. Electrophysiological analysis of synaptic distribution in CA1 of rat hippocampus after chronic ethanol exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, W C; Manis, P B; Hunter, B E; Zornetzer, S F; Walker, D W

    1982-04-08

    This study investigated the long-lasting effects of chronic ethanol consumption on the distribution of Schaffer collateral-commissural (SCH/COM) afferents within stratum radiatum of rat hippocampal CA1. Experimental animals were fed an ethanol-containing liquid diet for 20 weeks but were withdrawn from the special diet for at least 8 weeks prior to acute electrophysiological recordings. Field potential laminar analyses were performed by stepping the recording electrode in 25 microns increments through CA1 and sampling evoked potentials at each point. One-dimensional current-source density (CSD) was calculated from the field potential laminar profiles to enhance spatial resolution of current sources and sinks. Stimulation of the SCH/COM afferents elicits short-latency, negative field potentials throughout the synaptic terminal zone (stratum radiatum). CSD analysis in normal animals revealed that the synaptic currents generated in stratum radiatum concentrate into bimodal yet overlapping components, peaking 71.3 microns and 228.3 microns from the pyramidal cell layer. Chronic ethanol treatment produced: (1) a 13.2% shrinkage of the overall extent of current sinks in stratum radiatum; (2) a 37.4% reduction in the spatial extent of the sink proximal to the cell layer; and (3) an increase in the amplitude of the more distal sink. We tentatively propose the proximal and distal sinks to reflect a separation of the COM and SCH afferents, respectively. Chronic ethanol thus appeared to have selectively produced persistent damage to the COM-CA1 pathway.

  16. The Use of Isoproterenol in Electrophysiologic Drug Testing in Patients with Sustained Ventricular Tachycardia : The Mechanism and Clinical Significance of Isoproterenol

    OpenAIRE

    Satoh, Masahito

    1992-01-01

    Isoproterenol has been used in electrophysiologic studies to facilitate the induction of ventricular tachycardia (VT) as well as in drug testing. However, the mechanism of the induction of VT and the clinical significance of the VT induced with isoproterenol have yet to be determined. The present study assessed the effects of isoproterenol in the induction of VT during drug testing in 23 patients (34 drug testings), and analyzed the patients' characteristics and electrophysiologic parameters....

  17. Transient denervation of viable myocardium after myocardial infarction does not alter arrhythmia susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Diana C; Francis Stuart, Samantha D; Olivas, Antoinette; Wang, Lianguo; Nykjaer, Anders; Ripplinger, Crystal M; Habecker, Beth A

    2018-03-01

    Cardiac sympathetic nerves stimulate heart rate and force of contraction. Myocardial infarction (MI) leads to the loss of sympathetic nerves within the heart, and clinical studies have indicated that sympathetic denervation is a risk factor for arrhythmias and cardiac arrest. Two distinct types of denervation have been identified in the mouse heart after MI caused by ischemia-reperfusion: transient denervation of peri-infarct myocardium and sustained denervation of the infarct. Sustained denervation is linked to increased arrhythmia risk, but it is not known whether acute nerve loss in peri-infarct myocardium also contributes to arrhythmia risk. Peri-infarct sympathetic denervation requires the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), but removal of p75NTR alters the pattern of sympathetic innervation in the heart and increases spontaneous arrhythmias. Therefore, we targeted the p75NTR coreceptor sortilin and the p75NTR-induced protease tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme/A disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 17 (TACE/ADAM17) to selectively block peri-infarct denervation. Sympathetic nerve density was quantified using immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase. Genetic deletion of sortilin had no effect on the timing or extent of axon degeneration, but inhibition of TACE/ADAM17 with the protease inhibitor marimastat prevented the loss of axons from viable myocardium. We then asked whether retention of nerves in peri-infarct myocardium had an impact on cardiac electrophysiology 3 days after MI using ex vivo optical mapping of transmembrane potential and intracellular Ca 2+ . Preventing acute denervation of viable myocardium after MI did not significantly alter cardiac electrophysiology or Ca 2+ handling, suggesting that transient denervation at this early time point has minimal impact on arrhythmia risk. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Sympathetic denervation after myocardial infarction is a risk factor for arrhythmias. We asked whether transient loss of nerves in viable

  18. Electrophysiological and neurochemical changes in the rat hippocampus after in vitro and in vivo treatments with cocaine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo effects of cocaine in the noradrenergic pathway in the rat hippocampus were examined. Although the blockade of [ 3 H]-norepinephrine-uptake by cocaine has been well-characterized in both the central and peripheral nervous systems, investigations characterizing the electrophysiological effects of cocaine in the central nervous system have been limited. The first part of this thesis examines the relationship between the ability of cocaine to potentiate the electrophysiological response to norepinephrine (NE) and the ability of cocaine to block noradrenergic high affinity uptake in rat hippocampal slices. The second part of this thesis examines the effects of the repeated administration of cocaine on noradrenergic pre- and postsynaptic function and receptors of the rat hippocampus. These studies demonstrate that after repeated administration of cocaine (10 mg/kg/day) for 8 and 14 days there is a 50% decrease in NE high affinity uptake in the rat hippocampus. This was accompanied by a 40% increase in a binding site for NE uptake inhibitors at 14 days. In contrast to these effects, there was no effect on β-adrenergic receptor number or the isoproterenol induced electrophysiological responsiveness in the rat hippocampus. The conclusion of these studies is that the repeated administration of cocaine has a greater effect on presynaptic targets in the noradrenergic system than on postsynaptic neurons

  19. Hard real-time closed-loop electrophysiology with the Real-Time eXperiment Interface (RTXI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Yogi A; George, Ansel; Dorval, Alan D; White, John A; Christini, David J; Butera, Robert J

    2017-05-01

    The ability to experimentally perturb biological systems has traditionally been limited to static pre-programmed or operator-controlled protocols. In contrast, real-time control allows dynamic probing of biological systems with perturbations that are computed on-the-fly during experimentation. Real-time control applications for biological research are available; however, these systems are costly and often restrict the flexibility and customization of experimental protocols. The Real-Time eXperiment Interface (RTXI) is an open source software platform for achieving hard real-time data acquisition and closed-loop control in biological experiments while retaining the flexibility needed for experimental settings. RTXI has enabled users to implement complex custom closed-loop protocols in single cell, cell network, animal, and human electrophysiology studies. RTXI is also used as a free and open source, customizable electrophysiology platform in open-loop studies requiring online data acquisition, processing, and visualization. RTXI is easy to install, can be used with an extensive range of external experimentation and data acquisition hardware, and includes standard modules for implementing common electrophysiology protocols.

  20. The clinical, electrophysiologic, and surgical characteristics of peripheral nerve injuries caused by gunshot wounds in adults: a 40-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secer, Halil Ibrahim; Daneyemez, Mehmet; Tehli, Ozkan; Gonul, Engin; Izci, Yusuf

    2008-02-01

    There are few large-volume studies on the repair of peripheral nerve lesions caused by gunshot wounds. In this study, the results of peripheral nerve repair are analyzed, and the factors influencing the outcome are investigated. During a 40-year period, 2210 peripheral nerve lesions in 2106 patients who sustained gunshot injury were treated surgically in the Department of Neurosurgery. One thousand thirty-four patients had shrapnel injury, and 1072 patients had missile injury. Twelve peripheral nerves were included in this study, and all of them were repaired by direct suture, using nerve graft, or neurolysis. All patients underwent neurologic and electrophysiologic evaluations in the preoperative period and postoperatively at the end of the follow-up period. The mean time of follow-up was 2.6 years. Final outcome was based on the motor, sensory, and electrophysiologic recoveries, and a patient judgment scale. Using the muscle grading scale, sensory grading scale, EMNG, and patient judgments, the maximal recovery was achieved in the subscapular nerve, but there were only 4 subscapular nerve lesions, which is not sufficient for a statistically significant outcome. Furthermore, the tibial, median, and femoral nerve lesions showed the best recovery rate, whereas the peroneal nerve, ulnar nerve, and brachial plexus lesions had the worst. Type of the peripheral nerve, injury (repair) level, associated injuries, electrophysiologic findings, operation time, intraoperative findings, surgical techniques, and postoperative physical rehabilitation are the prognostic factors for peripheral nerve lesions due to gunshot wounds.

  1. Hard real-time closed-loop electrophysiology with the Real-Time eXperiment Interface (RTXI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogi A Patel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to experimentally perturb biological systems has traditionally been limited to static pre-programmed or operator-controlled protocols. In contrast, real-time control allows dynamic probing of biological systems with perturbations that are computed on-the-fly during experimentation. Real-time control applications for biological research are available; however, these systems are costly and often restrict the flexibility and customization of experimental protocols. The Real-Time eXperiment Interface (RTXI is an open source software platform for achieving hard real-time data acquisition and closed-loop control in biological experiments while retaining the flexibility needed for experimental settings. RTXI has enabled users to implement complex custom closed-loop protocols in single cell, cell network, animal, and human electrophysiology studies. RTXI is also used as a free and open source, customizable electrophysiology platform in open-loop studies requiring online data acquisition, processing, and visualization. RTXI is easy to install, can be used with an extensive range of external experimentation and data acquisition hardware, and includes standard modules for implementing common electrophysiology protocols.

  2. Predicting the functional states of human iPSC-derived neurons with single-cell RNA-seq and electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardy, C; van den Hurk, M; Kakaradov, B; Erwin, J A; Jaeger, B N; Hernandez, R V; Eames, T; Paucar, A A; Gorris, M; Marchand, C; Jappelli, R; Barron, J; Bryant, A K; Kellogg, M; Lasken, R S; Rutten, B P F; Steinbusch, H W M; Yeo, G W; Gage, F H

    2016-11-01

    Human neural progenitors derived from pluripotent stem cells develop into electrophysiologically active neurons at heterogeneous rates, which can confound disease-relevant discoveries in neurology and psychiatry. By combining patch clamping, morphological and transcriptome analysis on single-human neurons in vitro, we defined a continuum of poor to highly functional electrophysiological states of differentiated neurons. The strong correlations between action potentials, synaptic activity, dendritic complexity and gene expression highlight the importance of methods for isolating functionally comparable neurons for in vitro investigations of brain disorders. Although whole-cell electrophysiology is the gold standard for functional evaluation, it often lacks the scalability required for disease modeling studies. Here, we demonstrate a multimodal machine-learning strategy to identify new molecular features that predict the physiological states of single neurons, independently of the time spent in vitro. As further proof of concept, we selected one of the potential neurophysiological biomarkers identified in this study-GDAP1L1-to isolate highly functional live human neurons in vitro.

  3. Cholinergic Synaptic Transmissions Were Altered after Single Sevoflurane Exposure in Drosophila Pupa

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    Rongfa Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Sevoflurane, one of the most used general anesthetics, is widely used in clinical practice all over the world. Previous studies indicated that sevoflurane could induce neuron apoptosis and neural deficit causing query in the safety of anesthesia using sevoflurane. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of sevoflurane on electrophysiology in Drosophila pupa whose excitatory neurotransmitter is acetylcholine early after sevoflurane exposure using whole brain recording technique. Methods. Wide types of Drosophila (canton-s flies were allocated to control and sevoflurane groups randomly. Sevoflurane groups (1% sevoflurane; 2% sevoflurane; 3% sevoflurane were exposed to sevoflurane and the exposure lasted 5 hours, respectively. All flies were subjected to electrophysiology experiment using patch clamp 24 hours after exposure. Results. The results showed that, 24 hours after sevoflurane exposure, frequency but not the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs was significantly reduced P<0.05. Furthermore, we explored the underlying mechanism and found that calcium currents density, which partially regulated the frequency of mEPSCs, was significantly reduced after sevoflurane exposure P<0.05. Conclusions. All these suggested that sevoflurane could alter the mEPSCs that are related to synaptic plasticity partially through modulating calcium channel early after sevoflurane exposure.

  4. Cholinergic synaptic transmissions were altered after single sevoflurane exposure in Drosophila pupa.

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    Chen, Rongfa; Zhang, Tao; Kuang, Liting; Chen, Zhen; Ran, Dongzhi; Niu, Yang; Xu, Kangqing; Gu, Huaiyu

    2015-01-01

    . Sevoflurane, one of the most used general anesthetics, is widely used in clinical practice all over the world. Previous studies indicated that sevoflurane could induce neuron apoptosis and neural deficit causing query in the safety of anesthesia using sevoflurane. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of sevoflurane on electrophysiology in Drosophila pupa whose excitatory neurotransmitter is acetylcholine early after sevoflurane exposure using whole brain recording technique. Wide types of Drosophila (canton-s flies) were allocated to control and sevoflurane groups randomly. Sevoflurane groups (1% sevoflurane; 2% sevoflurane; 3% sevoflurane) were exposed to sevoflurane and the exposure lasted 5 hours, respectively. All flies were subjected to electrophysiology experiment using patch clamp 24 hours after exposure. The results showed that, 24 hours after sevoflurane exposure, frequency but not the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) was significantly reduced (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we explored the underlying mechanism and found that calcium currents density, which partially regulated the frequency of mEPSCs, was significantly reduced after sevoflurane exposure (P < 0.05). All these suggested that sevoflurane could alter the mEPSCs that are related to synaptic plasticity partially through modulating calcium channel early after sevoflurane exposure.

  5. Multi-Scale Characean Experimental System: From Electrophysiology of Membrane Transporters to Cell-to-Cell Connectivity, Cytoplasmic Streaming and Auxin Metabolism

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    Beilby, Mary J.

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of characean algae could be mistaken for a higher plant: stem-like axes with leaf-like branchlets anchored in the soil by root-like rhizoids. However, all of these structures are made up of giant multinucleate cells separated by multicellular nodal complexes. The excised internodal cells survive long enough for the nodes to give rise to new thallus. The size of the internodes and their thick cytoplasmic layer minimize impalement injury and allow specific micro-electrode placement. The cell structure can be manipulated by centrifugation, perfusion of cell contents or creation of cytoplasmic droplets, allowing access to both vacuolar and cytoplasmic compartments and both sides of the cell membranes. Thousands of electrical measurements on intact or altered cells and cytoplasmic droplets laid down basis to modern plant electrophysiology. Furthermore, the giant internodal cells and whole thalli facilitate research into many other plant properties. As nutrients have to be transported from rhizoids to growing parts of the thallus and hormonal signals need to pass from cell to cell, Characeae possess very fast cytoplasmic streaming. The mechanism was resolved in the characean model. Plasmodesmata between the internodal cells and nodal complexes facilitate transport of ions, nutrients and photosynthates across the nodes. The internal structure was found to be similar to those of higher plants. Recent experiments suggest a strong circadian influence on metabolic pathways producing indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and serotonin/melatonin. The review will discuss the impact of the characean models arising from fragments of cells, single cells, cell-to-cell transport or whole thalli on understanding of plant evolution and physiology. PMID:27504112

  6. ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF PARAVENTRICULAR THALAMIC (PVT NEURONS IN RESPONSE TO CHRONIC COCAINE EXPOSURE: EFFECTS OF COCAINE- AND AMPHETAMINE-REGULATED TRANSCRIPT (CART

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    Jiann Wei eYeoh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has established that the paraventricular thalamus (PVT is a central node in the brain reward-seeking pathway. This role is likely mediated in part through the dense projections to the PVT from hypothalamic peptide transmitter systems such as orexin, and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART, both of which play key roles in drug-seeking behaviour. Consistent with this proposition, we previously found that inactivation of the PVT or infusions of CART into the PVT suppressed drug-seeking behaviour in an animal model of contingent cocaine self-administration. Despite this work, very few studies have assessed the basic physiological properties of PVT neurons and how these parameters are altered by exposure to drugs such as cocaine. We set out to address these questions by employing an electrophysiological approach to record from anterior PVT (aPVT neurons from cocaine-treated and control animals. First, we determined the excitability of aPVT neurons by injecting a series of depolarizing current steps and characterizing the resulting action potential (AP discharge properties. Second, we investigated the effects of CART on excitatory synaptic inputs to aPVT neurons. We found that the majority of aPVT neurons exhibited tonic firing (TF, and initial bursting (IB consistent with previous studies. However, we also identified PVT neurons that exhibited delayed firing (DF, single spiking (SS and reluctant firing (RF. Interestingly, cocaine exposure shifted the proportion of aPVT neurons that exhibited TF. Further, application of CART suppressed excitatory synaptic drive to PVT. This finding is consistent with our previous behavioural data, which showed that CART signaling in the PVT negatively regulates drug-seeking behaviour. Together, these studies support previous anatomical evidence that the PVT can integrate reward-relevant information and provides a putative mechanism through which drugs of abuse can dysregulate this system in

  7. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the carboxy terminus of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein induces alterations in the ionic permeability of Xenopus laevis oocytes.

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    Comardelle, A M; Norris, C H; Plymale, D R; Gatti, P J; Choi, B; Fermin, C D; Haislip, A M; Tencza, S B; Mietzner, T A; Montelaro, R C; Garry, R F

    1997-11-20

    The carboxy-terminal 29 amino acids of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein (HIV-1 TM) are referred to as lentivirus lytic peptide 1 (LLP-1). Synthetic peptides corresponding to LLP-1 have been shown to induce cytolysis and to alter the permeability of cultured cells to various small molecules. To address the mechanisms by which LLP-1 induces cytolysis and membrane permeability changes, various concentrations of LLP-1 were incubated with Xenopus laevis oocytes, and two-electrode, voltage-clamp recording measurements were performed. LLP-1 at concentrations of 75 nM and above induced dramatic alterations in the resting membrane potential and ionic permeability of Xenopus oocytes. These concentrations of LLP-1 appeared to induce a major disruption of plasma membrane electrophysiological integrity. In contrast, concentrations of LLP-1 of 20-50 nM induced changes in membrane ionic permeability that mimic changes induced by compounds, such as the bee venom peptide melittin, that are known to form channel-like structures in biological membranes at sublytic concentrations. An analog of LLP-1 with greatly reduced cytolytic activity failed to alter the electrophysiological properties of Xenopus oocytes. Thus, by altering plasma membrane ionic permeability, the carboxy terminus of TM may contribute to cytolysis of HIV-1-infected CD4+ cells.

  8. Pseudorabies virus infection alters neuronal activity and connectivity in vitro.

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    Kelly M McCarthy

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-herpesviruses, including human herpes simplex virus 1 & 2, varicella zoster virus and the swine pseudorabies virus (PRV, infect the peripheral nervous system of their hosts. Symptoms of infection often include itching, numbness, or pain indicative of altered neurological function. To determine if there is an in vitro electrophysiological correlate to these characteristic in vivo symptoms, we infected cultured rat sympathetic neurons with well-characterized strains of PRV known to produce virulent or attenuated symptoms in animals. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made at various times after infection. By 8 hours of infection with virulent PRV, action potential (AP firing rates increased substantially and were accompanied by hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials and spikelet-like events. Coincident with the increase in AP firing rate, adjacent neurons exhibited coupled firing events, first with AP-spikelets and later with near identical resting membrane potentials and AP firing. Small fusion pores between adjacent cell bodies formed early after infection as demonstrated by transfer of the low molecular weight dye, Lucifer Yellow. Later, larger pores formed as demonstrated by transfer of high molecular weight Texas red-dextran conjugates between infected cells. Further evidence for viral-induced fusion pores was obtained by infecting neurons with a viral mutant defective for glycoprotein B, a component of the viral membrane fusion complex. These infected neurons were essentially identical to mock infected neurons: no increased AP firing, no spikelet-like events, and no electrical or dye transfer. Infection with PRV Bartha, an attenuated circuit-tracing strain delayed, but did not eliminate the increased neuronal activity and coupling events. We suggest that formation of fusion pores between infected neurons results in electrical coupling and elevated firing rates, and that these processes may contribute to the altered neural

  9. Selective blockade of TRPA1 channel attenuates pathological pain without altering noxious cold sensation or body temperature regulation.

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    Chen, Jun; Joshi, Shailen K; DiDomenico, Stanley; Perner, Richard J; Mikusa, Joe P; Gauvin, Donna M; Segreti, Jason A; Han, Ping; Zhang, Xu-Feng; Niforatos, Wende; Bianchi, Bruce R; Baker, Scott J; Zhong, Chengmin; Simler, Gricelda H; McDonald, Heath A; Schmidt, Robert G; McGaraughty, Steve P; Chu, Katharine L; Faltynek, Connie R; Kort, Michael E; Reilly, Regina M; Kym, Philip R

    2011-05-01

    Despite the increasing interest in TRPA1 channel as a pain target, its role in cold sensation and body temperature regulation is not clear; the efficacy and particularly side effects resulting from channel blockade remain poorly understood. Here we use a potent, selective, and bioavailable antagonist to address these issues. A-967079 potently blocks human (IC(50): 51 nmol/L, electrophysiology, 67 nmol/L, Ca(2+) assay) and rat TRPA1 (IC(50): 101 nmol/L, electrophysiology, 289 nmol/L, Ca(2+) assay). It is >1000-fold selective over other TRP channels, and is >150-fold selective over 75 other ion channels, enzymes, and G-protein-coupled receptors. Oral dosing of A-967079 produces robust drug exposure in rodents, and exhibits analgesic efficacy in allyl isothiocyanate-induced nocifensive response and osteoarthritic pain in rats (ED(50): 23.2 mg/kg, p.o.). A-967079 attenuates cold allodynia produced by nerve injury but does not alter noxious cold sensation in naive animals, suggesting distinct roles of TRPA1 in physiological and pathological states. Unlike TRPV1 antagonists, A-967079 does not alter body temperature. It also does not produce locomotor or cardiovascular side effects. Collectively, these data provide novel insights into TRPA1 function and suggest that the selective TRPA1 blockade may present a viable strategy for alleviating pain without untoward side effects. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A theoretical formulation of the electrophysiological inverse problem on the sphere.

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    Riera, Jorge J; Valdés, Pedro A; Tanabe, Kunio; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2006-04-07

    The construction of three-dimensional images of the primary current density (PCD) produced by neuronal activity is a problem of great current interest in the neuroimaging community, though being initially formulated in the 1970s. There exist even now enthusiastic debates about the authenticity of most of the inverse solutions proposed in the literature, in which low resolution electrical tomography (LORETA) is a focus of attention. However, in our opinion, the capabilities and limitations of the electro and magneto encephalographic techniques to determine PCD configurations have not been extensively explored from a theoretical framework, even for simple volume conductor models of the head. In this paper, the electrophysiological inverse problem for the spherical head model is cast in terms of reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHS) formalism, which allows us to identify the null spaces of the implicated linear integral operators and also to define their representers. The PCD are described in terms of a continuous basis for the RKHS, which explicitly separates the harmonic and non-harmonic components. The RKHS concept permits us to bring LORETA into the scope of the general smoothing splines theory. A particular way of calculating the general smoothing splines is illustrated, avoiding a brute force discretization prematurely. The Bayes information criterion is used to handle dissimilarities in the signal/noise ratios and physical dimensions of the measurement modalities, which could affect the estimation of the amount of smoothness required for that class of inverse solution to be well specified. In order to validate the proposed method, we have estimated the 3D spherical smoothing splines from two data sets: electric potentials obtained from a skull phantom and magnetic fields recorded from subjects performing an experiment of human faces recognition.

  11. Emotional graphic cigarette warning labels reduce the electrophysiological brain response to smoking cues.

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    Wang, An-Li; Romer, Dan; Elman, Igor; Turetsky, Bruce I; Gur, Ruben C; Langleben, Daniel D

    2015-03-01

    There is an ongoing public debate about the new graphic warning labels (GWLs) that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposes to place on cigarette packs. Tobacco companies argued that the strongly emotional images FDA proposed to include in the GWLs encroached on their constitutional rights. The court ruled that FDA did not provide sufficient scientific evidence of compelling public interest in such encroachment. This study's objectives were to examine the effects of the GWLs on the electrophysiological and behavioral correlates of smoking addiction and to determine whether labels rated higher on the emotional reaction (ER) scale are associated with greater effects. We studied 25 non-treatment-seeking smokers. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants viewed a random sequence of paired images, in which visual smoking (Cues) or non-smoking (non-Cues) images were preceded by GWLs or neutral images. Participants reported their cigarette craving after viewing each pair. Dependent variables were magnitude of P300 ERPs and self-reported cigarette craving in response to Cues. We found that subjective craving response to Cues was significantly reduced by preceding GWLs, whereas the P300 amplitude response to Cues was reduced only by preceding GWLs rated high on the ER scale. In conclusion, our study provides experimental neuroscience evidence that weighs in on the ongoing public and legal debate about how to balance the constitutional and public health aspects of the FDA-proposed GWLs. The high toll of smoking-related illness and death adds urgency to the debate and prompts consideration of our findings while longitudinal studies of GWLs are underway. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEAS) and emotional processing - A behavioral and electrophysiological approach.

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    do Vale, Sónia; Selinger, Lenka; Martins, João Martin; Bicho, Manuel; do Carmo, Isabel; Escera, Carles

    2015-07-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEAS) may have mood enhancement effects: higher DHEAS concentrations and DHEA/cortisol ratio have been related to lower depression scores and controlled trials of DHEA administration have reported significant antidepressant effects. The balance between DHEAS and DHEA has been suggested to influence brain functioning. We explored DHEAS, DHEA, cortisol, DHEA/cortisol and DHEAS/DHEA ratios relations to the processing of negative emotional stimuli at behavioral and brain levels by recording the electroencephalogram of 21 young women while performing a visual task with implicit neutral or negative emotional content in an audio-visual oddball paradigm. For each condition, salivary DHEA, DHEAS and cortisol were measured before performing the task and at 30 and 60min intervals. DHEA increased after task performance, independent of the implicit emotional content. With implicit negative emotion, higher DHEAS/DHEA and DHEA/cortisol ratios before task performance were related to shorter visual P300 latencies suggesting faster brain processing under a negative emotional context. In addition, higher DHEAS/DHEA ratios were related to reduced visual P300 amplitudes, indicating less processing of the negative emotional stimuli. With this study, we could show that at the electrophysiological level, higher DHEAS/DHEA and DHEA/cortisol ratios were related to shorter stimulus evaluation times suggesting less interference of the implicit negative content of the stimuli with the task. Furthermore, higher DHEAS/DHEA ratios were related to reduced processing of negative emotional stimuli which may eventually constitute a protective mechanism against negative information overload. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Motor learning processes: an electrophysiologic perspective Processos de aprendizagem motora: uma perspectiva eletrofisiológica

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    Bruna Velasques

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study was to investigate electrophysiologic, qEEG, changes when individuals were exposed to a motor task. Subjects’ brain electrical activity was analyzed before and after the typewriting training task. For the neurophysiological variable asymmetry, a paired t-test was performed to compare each moment, pre and post-task, in the beta bands. The findings showed a change for the qEEG variable in each scalp site, F3/F4; C3/C4 and P3/P4. These results suggest an adaptation of pre-frontal, sensory-motor and parietal cortex, as a consequence of the typewriting training.O objetivo do presente estudo foi investigar mudanças eletrofisiológicas através do EEGq quando indivíduos são expostos a uma tarefa motora. A atividade elétrica no córtex dos sujeitos foi analisada antes e após o treinamento da tarefa motora. Para a variável neurofisiológica assimetria, um teste t foi implementado para comparar cada momento, pré e pós-tarefa, na banda beta. Os achados demonstraram mudança em assimetria para as seguintes regiões no escalpo: F3/F4, C3/C4 e P3/P4. Estes resultados sugerem uma adaptação das regiões pré-frontal, somatosensorial e parietal como conseqüência do treinamento de datilografia.

  14. Electrophysiological correlates of changes in reaction time based on stimulus intensity.

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    Bimal Lakhani

    Full Text Available Although reaction time is commonly used as an indicator of central nervous system integrity, little is currently understood about the mechanisms that determine processing time. In the current study, we are interested in determining the differences in electrophysiological events associated with significant changes in reaction time that could be elicited by changes in stimulus intensity. The primary objective is to assess the effect of increasing stimulus intensity on the latency and amplitude of afferent inputs to the somatosensory cortex, and their relation to reaction time.Median nerve stimulation was applied to the non-dominant hand of 12 healthy young adults at two different stimulus intensities (HIGH & LOW. Participants were asked to either press a button as fast as possible with their dominant hand or remain quiet following the stimulus. Electroencephalography was used to measure somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs and event related potentials (ERPs. Electromyography from the flexor digitorum superficialis of the button-pressing hand was used to assess reaction time. Response time was the time of button press.Reaction time and response time were significantly shorter following the HIGH intensity stimulus compared to the LOW intensity stimulus. There were no differences in SEP (N20 & P24 peak latencies and peak-to-peak amplitude for the two stimulus intensities. ERPs, locked to response time, demonstrated a significantly larger pre-movement negativity to positivity following the HIGH intensity stimulus over the Cz electrode.This work demonstrates that rapid reaction times are not attributable to the latency of afferent processing from the stimulated site to the somatosensory cortex, and those latency reductions occur further along the sensorimotor transformation pathway. Evidence from ERPs indicates that frontal planning areas such as the supplementary motor area may play a role in transforming the elevated sensory volley from the

  15. Electrophysiological signals associated with fluency of different levels of processing reveal multiple contributions to recognition memory.

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    Li, Bingbing; Taylor, Jason R; Wang, Wei; Gao, Chuanji; Guo, Chunyan

    2017-08-01

    Processing fluency appears to influence recognition memory judgements, and the manipulation of fluency, if misattributed to an effect of prior exposure, can result in illusory memory. Although it is well established that fluency induced by masked repetition priming leads to increased familiarity, manipulations of conceptual fluency have produced conflicting results, variously affecting familiarity or recollection. Some recent studies have found that masked conceptual priming increases correct recollection (Taylor & Henson, 2012), and the magnitude of this behavioural effect correlates with analogous fMRI BOLD priming effects in brain regions associated with recollection (Taylor, Buratto, & Henson, 2013). However, the neural correlates and time-courses of masked repetition and conceptual priming were not compared directly in previous studies. The present study used event-related potentials (ERPs) to identify and compare the electrophysiological correlates of masked repetition and conceptual priming and investigate how they contribute to recognition memory. Behavioural results were consistent with previous studies: Repetition primes increased familiarity, whereas conceptual primes increased correct recollection. Masked repetition and conceptual priming also decreased the latency of late parietal component (LPC). Masked repetition priming was associated with an early P200 effect and a later parietal maximum N400 effect, whereas masked conceptual priming was only associated with a central-parietal maximum N400 effect. In addition, the topographic distributions of the N400 repetition priming and conceptual priming effects were different. These results suggest that fluency at different levels of processing is associated with different ERP components, and contributes differentially to subjective recognition memory experiences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Electrophysiological measurement of binaural beats: effects of primary tone frequency and observer age.

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    Grose, John H; Mamo, Sara K

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the electrophysiological binaural beat steady state response as a gauge of temporal fine structure coding, particularly as it relates to the aging auditory system. The hypothesis was that the response would be more robust in a lower, than in a higher, frequency region and in younger, than in older, adults. Two experiments were undertaken. The first measured the 40 Hz binaural beat steady state response elicited by tone pairs in two frequency regions: lower (390 and 430 Hz tone pair) and higher (810 and 850 Hz tone pair). Frequency following responses (FFRs) evoked by the tones were also recorded. Ten young adults with normal hearing participated. The second experiment measured the binaural beat and FFRs in older adults but only in the lower frequency region. Fourteen older adults with relatively normal hearing participated. Response metrics in both experiments included response component signal-to-noise ratio (F statistic) and magnitude-squared coherence. Experiment 1 showed that FFRs were elicited in both frequency regions but were more robust in the lower frequency region. Binaural beat responses elicited by the lower frequency pair of tones showed greater amplitude fluctuation within a participant than the respective FFRs. Experiment 2 showed that older adults exhibited similar FFRs to younger adults, but proportionally fewer older participants showed binaural beat responses. Age differences in onset responses were also observed. The lower prevalence of the binaural beat response in older adults, despite the presence of FFRs, provides tentative support for the sensitivity of this measure to age-related deficits in temporal processing. However, the lability of the binaural beat response advocates caution in its use as an objective measure of fine structure coding.

  17. Electrophysiological Anomalies in Face–Name Memory Encoding in Young Binge Drinkers

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    Rocío Folgueira-Ares

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence indicates that the intake of large amounts of alcohol during one session may have structural and functional effects on the still-maturing brains of young people. These effects are particularly pronounced in prefrontal and hippocampal regions, which appear to be especially sensitive to the neurotoxic effects of alcohol. However, to date, few studies have used the event-related potentials (ERPs technique to analyze the relationship between binge drinking (BD and associative memory. The objective of this study was to examine brain activity during memory encoding using the Subsequent memory paradigm in subjects who have followed a BD pattern of alcohol consumption for at least 2 years. A total of 50 undergraduate students (mean age = 20.6 years, i.e., 25 controls (12 females and 25 binge drinkers (BDs; 11 females, with no personal or family history of alcoholism or psychopathological disorders, performed a visual face–name association memory task. The task used enables assessment of the Difference due to memory effect (Dm, a measure of memory encoding based on comparison of the neural activity associated with subsequent successful and unsuccessful retrieval. In ERP studies, study items that are subsequently remembered elicit larger positive amplitudes at midline parieto-frontal sites than those items that are subsequently forgotten. The Dm effect generally appears in the latency range of about 300–800 ms. The results showed a Dm effect in posterior regions in the 350–650 ms latency range in the Control group. However, in the BD group, no significant differences were observed in the electrophysiological brain activity between remembered and forgotten items during the encoding process. No differences between groups were found in behavioral performance. These findings show that young BDs display abnormal pattern of ERP brain activity during the encoding phase of a visual face–name association task

  18. Decoding speech perception by native and non-native speakers using single-trial electrophysiological data.

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    Alex Brandmeyer

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs are systems that use real-time analysis of neuroimaging data to determine the mental state of their user for purposes such as providing neurofeedback. Here, we investigate the feasibility of a BCI based on speech perception. Multivariate pattern classification methods were applied to single-trial EEG data collected during speech perception by native and non-native speakers. Two principal questions were asked: 1 Can differences in the perceived categories of pairs of phonemes be decoded at the single-trial level? 2 Can these same categorical differences be decoded across participants, within or between native-language groups? Results indicated that classification performance progressively increased with respect to the categorical status (within, boundary or across of the stimulus contrast, and was also influenced by the native language of individual participants. Classifier performance showed strong relationships with traditional event-related potential measures and behavioral responses. The results of the cross-participant analysis indicated an overall increase in average classifier performance when trained on data from all participants (native and non-native. A second cross-participant classifier trained only on data from native speakers led to an overall improvement in performance for native speakers, but a reduction in performance for non-native speakers. We also found that the native language of a given participant could be decoded on the basis of EEG data with accuracy above 80%. These results indicate that electrophysiological responses underlying speech perception can be decoded at the single-trial level, and that decoding performance systematically reflects graded changes in the responses related to the phonological status of the stimuli. This approach could be used in extensions of the BCI paradigm to support perceptual learning during second language acquisition.

  19. Comparison of Nigella sativa- and exercise-induced models of cardiac hypertrophy: structural and electrophysiological features.

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    Al-Asoom, Lubna Ibrahim; Al-Shaikh, Basil Abdulrahman; Bamosa, Abdullah Omar; El-Bahai, Mohammad Nabil

    2014-09-01

    Exercise training is employed as supplementary t