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Sample records for stretch receptor neurone

  1. Inhibiting PTEN protects hippocampal neurons against stretch injury by decreasing membrane translocation of AMPA receptor GluR2 subunit.

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    Yuan Liu

    Full Text Available The AMPA type of glutamate receptors (AMPARs-mediated excitotoxicity is involved in the secondary neuronal death following traumatic brain injury (TBI. But the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, the role of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN in GluR2-lacking AMPARs mediated neuronal death was investigated through an in vitro stretch injury model of neurons. It was indicated that both the mRNA and protein levels of PTEN were increased in cultured hippocampal neurons after stretch injury, which was associated with the decreasing expression of GluR2 subunits on the surface of neuronal membrane. Inhibition of PTEN activity by its inhibitor can promote the survival of neurons through preventing reduction of GluR2 on membrane. Moreover, the effect of inhibiting GluR2-lacking AMPARs was similar to PTEN suppression-mediated neuroprotective effect in stretch injury-induced neuronal death. Further evidence identified that the total GluR2 protein of neurons was not changed in all groups. So inhibition of PTEN or blockage of GluR2-lacking AMPARs may attenuate the death of hippocampal neurons post injury through decreasing the translocation of GluR2 subunit on the membrane effectively.

  2. Effect of acute stretch injury on action potential and network activity of rat neocortical neurons in culture.

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    Magou, George C; Pfister, Bryan J; Berlin, Joshua R

    2015-10-22

    The basis for acute seizures following traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains unclear. Animal models of TBI have revealed acute hyperexcitablility in cortical neurons that could underlie seizure activity, but studying initiating events causing hyperexcitability is difficult in these models. In vitro models of stretch injury with cultured cortical neurons, a surrogate for TBI, allow facile investigation of cellular changes after injury but they have only demonstrated post-injury hypoexcitability. The goal of this study was to determine if neuronal hyperexcitability could be triggered by in vitro stretch injury. Controlled uniaxial stretch injury was delivered to a spatially delimited region of a spontaneously active network of cultured rat cortical neurons, yielding a region of stretch-injured neurons and adjacent regions of non-stretched neurons that did not directly experience stretch injury. Spontaneous electrical activity was measured in non-stretched and stretch-injured neurons, and in control neuronal networks not subjected to stretch injury. Non-stretched neurons in stretch-injured cultures displayed a three-fold increase in action potential firing rate and bursting activity 30-60 min post-injury. Stretch-injured neurons, however, displayed dramatically lower rates of action potential firing and bursting. These results demonstrate that acute hyperexcitability can be observed in non-stretched neurons located in regions adjacent to the site of stretch injury, consistent with reports that seizure activity can arise from regions surrounding the site of localized brain injury. Thus, this in vitro procedure for localized neuronal stretch injury may provide a model to study the earliest cellular changes in neuronal function associated with acute post-traumatic seizures. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. The Effects of Two Different Stretching Programs on Balance Control and Motor Neuron Excitability

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    Kaya, Fatih; Biçer, Bilal; Yüktasir, Bekir; Willems, Mark E. T.; Yildiz, Nebil

    2018-01-01

    We examined the effects of training (4d/wk for 6 wks) with static stretching (SS) or contract-relax proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on static balance time and motor neuron excitability. Static balance time, H[subscript max]/M[subscript max] ratios and H-reflex recovery curves (HRRC) were measured in 28 healthy subjects (SS: n = 10,…

  4. Characterization of astrocytic and neuronal benzodiazepine receptors

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    Bender, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Primary cultures of astrocytes and neurons express benzodiazepine receptors. Neuronal benzodiazepine receptors were of high-affinity, K{sub D} values were 7.5-43 nM and the densities of receptors (B{sub max}) were 924-4131 fmol/mg protein. Astrocytes posses a high-affinity benzodiazepine receptor, K{sub D} values were 6.6-13 nM. The B{sub max} values were 6,033-12,000 fmol/mg protein. The pharmacological profile of the neuronal benzodiazepine receptor was that of the central-type benzodiazepine receptor, where clonazepam has a high-affinity and Ro 5-4864 (4{prime}-chlorodiazepam) has a low-affinity. Whereas astrocytic benzoidazepine receptor was characteristic of the so called peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, which shows a high-affinity towards Ro 5-4863, and a low-affinity towards clonazepam. The astrocytic benzodiazepine receptors was functionally correlated with voltage dependent calcium channels, since dihydropyridines and benzodiazepines interacted with ({sup 3}H) diazepam and ({sup 3}H) nitrendipine receptors with the same rank order of potency, showing a statistically significant correlation. No such correlation was observed in neurons.

  5. Cyclic stretch induces human bladder smooth muscle cell proliferation in vitro through muscarinic receptors.

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    Dai, Yi; Tian, Ye; Luo, De-Yi; Wazir, Romel; Yue, Xuan; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2015-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether the cyclic stretch‑induced proliferation of human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs) is mediated by muscarinic (M) receptors, together with the signal transduction mechanisms involved in this process. HBSMCs seeded onto silicone membranes were subjected to different cyclic stretches (5, 10, 15 and 20%) for 6 and 12 h. As the effect of cyclic stretch on M2 and M3 mRNA expression levels was maximal at 6 h 10% stretch, all subsequent experiments were performed at this stretch. Western blot analysis was used to quantify M2, M3, protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphorylated (p)‑PKC protein expression levels, flow cytometry was employed to examine cell cycle distribution and a 5-bromo‑2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assay was used to assess cell proliferation at this stretch. Subsequently, HBSMCs were exposed to different acetylcholine concentrations and/or cyclic stretch, M receptor antagonists [AF-DX16, an M2 receptor antagonist; 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (4-DAMP), an M3 receptor antagonist and atropine, a non‑selective antagonist] and GF 109203X, a PKC antagonist, to assess the possible underlying signaling mechanisms. Cyclic stretch was found to increase the proliferation of HBSMCs and the expression levels of M2, M3, PKC and p‑PKC proteins. M receptor and PKC antagonists exerted no apparent effect on nonstretched cells, but reduced the incorporation of BrdU into stretched cells; the most pronounced effects were observed when non‑selective M receptor and PKC antagonists were applied. Notably, 4‑DAMP did not inhibit stretch‑induced PKC activation. These results indicate that the activation of the M3 receptor signaling pathway in stretch‑induced HBSMC proliferation occurs via PKC-independent mechanisms.

  6. Developmental Axon Stretch Stimulates Neuron Growth While Maintaining Normal Electrical Activity, Intracellular Calcium Flux, and Somatic Morphology

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    Joseph R Loverde

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Elongation of nerve fibers intuitively occurs throughout mammalian development, and is synchronized with expansion of the growing body. While most tissue systems enlarge through mitosis and differentiation, elongation of nerve fibers is remarkably unique. The emerging paradigm suggests that axons undergo stretch as contiguous tissues enlarge between the proximal and distal segments of spanning nerve fibers. While stretch is distinct from growth, tension is a known stimulus which regulates the growth of axons. Here, we hypothesized that the axon stretch-growth process may be a natural form of injury, whereby regenerative processes fortify elongating axons in order to prevent disconnection. Harnessing the live imaging capability of our axon stretch-growth bioreactors, we assessed neurons both during and following stretch for biomarkers associated with injury. Utilizing whole-cell patch clamp recording, we found no evidence of changes in spontaneous action potential activity or degradation of elicited action potentials during real-time axon stretch at strains of up to 18 % applied over 5 minutes. Unlike traumatic axonal injury, functional calcium imaging of the soma revealed no shifts in free intracellular calcium during axon stretch. Finally, the cross-sectional areas of nuclei and cytoplasms were normal, with no evidence of chromatolysis following week-long stretch-growth limited to the lower of 25 % strain or 3 mm total daily stretch. The neuronal growth cascade coupled to stretch was concluded to be independent of the changes in membrane potential, action potential generation, or calcium flux associated with traumatic injury. While axon stretch-growth is likely to share overlap with regenerative processes, we conclude that developmental stretch is a distinct stimulus from traumatic axon injury.

  7. Developmental axon stretch stimulates neuron growth while maintaining normal electrical activity, intracellular calcium flux, and somatic morphology.

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    Loverde, Joseph R; Pfister, Bryan J

    2015-01-01

    Elongation of nerve fibers intuitively occurs throughout mammalian development, and is synchronized with expansion of the growing body. While most tissue systems enlarge through mitosis and differentiation, elongation of nerve fibers is remarkably unique. The emerging paradigm suggests that axons undergo stretch as contiguous tissues enlarge between the proximal and distal segments of spanning nerve fibers. While stretch is distinct from growth, tension is a known stimulus which regulates the growth of axons. Here, we hypothesized that the axon stretch-growth process may be a natural form of injury, whereby regenerative processes fortify elongating axons in order to prevent disconnection. Harnessing the live imaging capability of our axon stretch-growth bioreactors, we assessed neurons both during and following stretch for biomarkers associated with injury. Utilizing whole-cell patch clamp recording, we found no evidence of changes in spontaneous action potential activity or degradation of elicited action potentials during real-time axon stretch at strains of up to 18% applied over 5 min. Unlike traumatic axonal injury, functional calcium imaging of the soma revealed no shifts in free intracellular calcium during axon stretch. Finally, the cross-sectional areas of nuclei and cytoplasms were normal, with no evidence of chromatolysis following week-long stretch-growth limited to the lower of 25% strain or 3 mm total daily stretch. The neuronal growth cascade coupled to stretch was concluded to be independent of the changes in membrane potential, action potential generation, or calcium flux associated with traumatic injury. While axon stretch-growth is likely to share overlap with regenerative processes, we conclude that developmental stretch is a distinct stimulus from traumatic axon injury.

  8. Probenecid and N-Acetylcysteine Prevent Loss of Intracellular Glutathione and Inhibit Neuronal Death after Mechanical Stretch Injury In Vitro.

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    Du, Lina; Empey, Philip E; Ji, Jing; Chao, Honglu; Kochanek, Patrick M; Bayır, Hülya; Clark, Robert S B

    2016-10-15

    Probenecid and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) can preserve intracellular levels of the vital antioxidant glutathione (GSH) via two distinct biochemical pathways. Probenecid inhibits transporter-mediated GSH efflux and NAC serves as a cysteine donor for GSH synthesis. We hypothesized that probenecid and NAC alone would maintain intracellular GSH concentrations and inhibit neuronal death after traumatic stretch injury, and that the drugs in combination would produce additive effects. Sex-segregated rat primary cortical neurons were treated with probenecid (100 μM) and NAC (50 μM), alone and in combination (Pro-NAC), then subjected to mechanical stretch (10s -1 strain rate, 50% membrane deformation). At 24 h, both probenecid and NAC inhibited trauma-induced intracellular GSH depletion, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and propidium iodide (PI) uptake in both XY- and XX-neurons. Combined Pro-NAC treatment was superior to probenecid or NAC alone in maintenance of intracellular GSH and neuronal death assessed by PI uptake. Interestingly, caspase 3 activity 24 h after mechanical trauma was more prominent in XX-neurons, and treatment effects (probenecid, NAC, and Pro-NAC) were observed in XX- but not XY-neurons; however, XY-neurons were ultimately more vulnerable to mechanical stretch-induced injury than their XX counterparts, as was evidenced by more neuronal death detected by LDH release and PI uptake. In addition, after stretch injury in HT22 hippocampal cells, both NAC and probenecid were highly effective at reducing oxidative stress detected by dichlorofluorescein fluorescence. These in vitro data support further testing of this drug combination in models of traumatic neuronal injury in vivo.

  9. GABAA receptor-expressing neurons promote consumption in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Cheung, Samantha K; Scott, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    Feeding decisions are highly plastic and bidirectionally regulated by neurons that either promote or inhibit feeding. In Drosophila melanogaster, recent studies have identified four GABAergic interneurons that act as critical brakes to prevent incessant feeding. These GABAergic neurons may inhibit target neurons that drive consumption. Here, we tested this hypothesis by examining GABA receptors and neurons that promote consumption. We find that Resistance to dieldrin (RDL), a GABAA type receptor, is required for proper control of ingestion. Knockdown of Rdl in a subset of neurons causes overconsumption of tastants. Acute activation of these neurons is sufficient to drive consumption of appetitive substances and non-appetitive substances and acute silencing of these neurons decreases consumption. Taken together, these studies identify GABAA receptor-expressing neurons that promote Drosophila ingestive behavior and provide insight into feeding regulation.

  10. Increased expression of endothelin B receptor in static stretch exposed porcine mitral valve leaflets

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    Pedersen, Lotte Gam; Zhao, J.; Yang, J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mechanical stretch on the expression of ET-1 and ETA- and ETB-receptors in porcine mitral valve leaflets. Leaflet segments from 10 porcine mitral valves were exposed to a static stretch load of 1.5 N for 3.5 h in buffer at 37oC together...... with matching control segments. Subsequently, the mRNA expression of ET-1, ETA-R and ETB-R was measured by real-time RT-PCR in the chordal insertion areas. The analyses showed an increased transcription of ETB-receptors in stretch-exposed leaflet segments compared to unstretched segments median 2.23 (quartiles...... 1.37 and 2.70) vs. median 1.56 (quartiles 1.38 and 2.17, P=0.03) whereas the mRNA expression of ETA-receptors (P=0.90) and ET-1 (P=0.51) remained unchanged. Stretch increased the expression of ETB-receptors in porcine mitral valve leaflets. The finding could lead to a better understanding...

  11. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor

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    Liu, Gang; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Hosomi, Naohisa; Lei, Bai; Nakano, Daisuke; Deguchi, Kazushi; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Ma, Hong; Griendling, Kathy K.; Nishiyama, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hypertension have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease; however, little is known about the roles of insulin and mechanical force in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) remodeling. We investigated the contribution of mechanical stretch to insulin-induced VSMC proliferation. Thymidine incorporation was stimulated by insulin in stretched VSMCs, but not in un-stretched VSMCs. Insulin increased 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation in both stretched and un-stretched VSMCs. Mechanical stretch augmented insulin-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt phosphorylation. Inhibitors of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase and Src attenuated insulin-induced ERK and Akt phosphorylation, as well as thymidine incorporation, whereas 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation was not affected by these inhibitors. Moreover, stretch augmented insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor expression, although it did not alter the expression of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1. Insulin-induced ERK and Akt activation, and thymidine incorporation were inhibited by siRNA for the IGF-1 receptor. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via upregulation of IGF-1 receptor, and downstream Src/EGF receptor-mediated ERK and Akt activation. Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor expression was also augmented in hypertensive rats. These results provide a basis for clarifying the molecular mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertensive patients with hyperinsulinemia. -- Highlights: → Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via IGF-1 receptor. → Src/EGFR-mediated ERK and Akt phosphorylation are augmented in stretched VSMCs. → Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor is increased in hypertensive rats. → Results provide possible mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertension with DM.

  12. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor

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    Liu, Gang [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Department of Anesthesiology, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Hitomi, Hirofumi, E-mail: hitomi@kms.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Hosomi, Naohisa [Department of Cardiorenal and Cerebrovascular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Lei, Bai; Nakano, Daisuke [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Deguchi, Kazushi; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu [Department of Gastroenterology and Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Ma, Hong [Department of Anesthesiology, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Griendling, Kathy K. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Nishiyama, Akira [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    Insulin resistance and hypertension have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease; however, little is known about the roles of insulin and mechanical force in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) remodeling. We investigated the contribution of mechanical stretch to insulin-induced VSMC proliferation. Thymidine incorporation was stimulated by insulin in stretched VSMCs, but not in un-stretched VSMCs. Insulin increased 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation in both stretched and un-stretched VSMCs. Mechanical stretch augmented insulin-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt phosphorylation. Inhibitors of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase and Src attenuated insulin-induced ERK and Akt phosphorylation, as well as thymidine incorporation, whereas 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation was not affected by these inhibitors. Moreover, stretch augmented insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor expression, although it did not alter the expression of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1. Insulin-induced ERK and Akt activation, and thymidine incorporation were inhibited by siRNA for the IGF-1 receptor. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via upregulation of IGF-1 receptor, and downstream Src/EGF receptor-mediated ERK and Akt activation. Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor expression was also augmented in hypertensive rats. These results provide a basis for clarifying the molecular mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertensive patients with hyperinsulinemia. -- Highlights: {yields} Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via IGF-1 receptor. {yields} Src/EGFR-mediated ERK and Akt phosphorylation are augmented in stretched VSMCs. {yields} Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor is increased in hypertensive rats. {yields} Results provide possible mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertension with DM.

  13. Aortic Valve Cyclic Stretch Causes Increased Remodeling Activity and Enhanced Serotonin Receptor Responsiveness

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    Balachandran, Kartik; Bakay, Marina A.; Connolly, Jeanne M.; Zhang, Xuemei; Yoganathan, Ajit P.; Levy, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased serotonin(5HT) receptor(5HTR) signaling has been associated with cardiac valvulopathy. Prior cell culture studies of 5HTR signaling in heart valve interstitial cells have provided mechanistic insights concerning only static conditions. We investigated the hypothesis that aortic valve biomechanics participate in the regulation of both 5HTR expression and inter-related extracellular matrix remodeling events. Methods The effects of cyclic-stretch on aortic valve 5HTR, expression, signaling and extracellular matrix remodeling were investigated using a tensile stretch bioreactor in studies which also compared the effects of adding 5HT and/or the 5HT-transporter inhibitor, Fluoxetine. Results Cyclic-stretch alone increased both proliferation and collagen in porcine aortic valve cusp samples. However, with cyclic-stretch, unlike static conditions, 5HT plus Fluoxetine caused the greatest increase in proliferation (p4.5 fold) for cyclic-stretch versus static (p<0.001), while expression of the 5HT transporter was not changed significantly. Extracellular matrix genes (eg. Collagen Types I,II,III, and proteoglycans) were also upregulated by cyclic-stretch. Conclusions Porcine aortic valve cusp samples subjected to cyclic stretch upregulate 5HTR2A and 2B, and also initiate remodeling activity characterized by increased proliferation and collagen production. Importantly, enhanced 5HTR responsiveness, due to increased 5HTR2A and 2B expression, results in a significantly greater response in remodeling endpoints (proliferation, collagen and GAG production) to 5HT in the presence of 5HT transporter blockade. PMID:21718840

  14. Desensitization of metabotropic glutamate receptors in neuronal cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catania, M. V.; Aronica, E.; Sortino, M. A.; Canonico, P. L.; Nicoletti, F.

    1991-01-01

    Preexposure of cultured cerebellar neurons to glutamate reduced the stimulation of polyphosphoinositide (PPI) hydrolysis induced by subsequent addition of glutamate without affecting the response to the muscarinic receptor agonist carbamylcholine. Desensitization of glutamate-stimulated PPI

  15. Neuronal release of cytokine IL-3 triggered by mechanosensitive autostimulation of the P2X7 receptor is neuroprotective

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    Jason C Lim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical strain due to increased pressure or swelling activates inflammatory responses in many neural systems. As cytokines and chemokine messengers lead to both pro-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions, understanding the signaling patterns triggered by mechanical stress may help improve overall outcomes. While cytokine signaling in neural systems is often associated with glial cells like astrocytes and microglia, the contribution of neurons themselves to the cytokine response is underappreciated and has bearing on any balanced response. Mechanical stretch of isolated neurons was previously shown to trigger ATP release through pannexin hemichannels and autostimulation of P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs on the neural membrane. Given that P2X7Rs are linked to cytokine activation in other cells, this study investigates the link between neuronal stretch and cytokine release through a P2X7-dependent pathway. Cytokine assays showed application of a 4% strain to isolated rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs released multiple cytokines. The P2X7R agonist BzATP also released multiple cytokines; IL-3, TNF-α, CXCL9, VEGF, L-selectin, IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-10, IL-1Rα, MIP and CCL20 were released by both stimuli, with the release of IL-3 greatest with either stimulus. Stretch-dependent IL-3 release was confirmed with ELISA and blocked by P2X7R antagonists A438079 and Brilliant Blue G (BBG, implicating autostimulation of the P2X7R in stretch-dependent IL-3 release. Neuronal IL-3 release triggered by BzATP required extracellular calcium. The IL-3Rα receptor was expressed on retinal ganglion cells but not astrocytes, and both IL-3Rα and IL-3 itself were predominantly expressed in the retinal ganglion cell layer of adult retinal sections, implying autostimulation of receptors by released IL-3. While the number of surviving ganglion cells decreased with time in culture, addition of IL-3 protected against this loss of neurons. Expression of mRNA for IL-3 and IL-3R

  16. Dopamine receptor gene expression by enkephalin neurons in rat forebrain

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    Le Moine, C.; Normand, E.; Guitteny, A.F.; Fouque, B.; Teoule, R.; Bloch, B. (Universite de Bordeaux II (France))

    1990-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed with brain sections from normal, control and haloperidol-treated rats to identify and map the cells expressing the D2 dopamine receptor gene. D2 receptor mRNA was detected with radioactive or biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. D2 receptor mRNA was present in glandular cells of the pituitary intermediate lobe and in neurons of the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, and forebrain, especially in caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and piriform cortex. Hybridization with D2 and preproenkephalin A probes in adjacent sections, as well as combined hybridization with the two probes in the same sections, demonstrated that all detectable enkephalin neurons in the striatum contained the D2 receptor mRNA. Large neurons in caudate putamen, which were unlabeled with the preproenkephalin A probe and which may have been cholinergic, also expressed the D2 receptor gene. Haloperidol treatment (14 or 21 days) provoked an increase in mRNA content for D2 receptor and preproenkephalin A in the striatum. This suggests that the increase in D2 receptor number observed after haloperidol treatment is due to increased activity of the D2 gene. These results indicate that in the striatum, the enkephalin neurons are direct targets for dopamine liberated from mesostriatal neurons.

  17. Acetylcholine excites neocortical pyramidal neurons via nicotinic receptors.

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    Hedrick, Tristan; Waters, Jack

    2015-04-01

    The neuromodulator acetylcholine (ACh) shapes neocortical function during sensory perception, motor control, arousal, attention, learning, and memory. Here we investigate the mechanisms by which ACh affects neocortical pyramidal neurons in adult mice. Stimulation of cholinergic axons activated muscarinic and nicotinic ACh receptors on pyramidal neurons in all cortical layers and in multiple cortical areas. Nicotinic receptor activation evoked short-latency, depolarizing postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) in many pyramidal neurons. Nicotinic receptor-mediated PSPs promoted spiking of pyramidal neurons. The duration of the increase in spiking was membrane potential dependent, with nicotinic receptor activation triggering persistent spiking lasting many seconds in neurons close to threshold. Persistent spiking was blocked by intracellular BAPTA, indicating that nicotinic ACh receptor activation evoked persistent spiking via a long-lasting calcium-activated depolarizing current. We compared nicotinic PSPs in primary motor cortex (M1), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and visual cortex. The laminar pattern of nicotinic excitation was not uniform but was broadly similar across areas, with stronger modulation in deep than superficial layers. Superimposed on this broad pattern were local differences, with nicotinic PSPs being particularly large and common in layer 5 of M1 but not layer 5 of PFC or primary visual cortex (V1). Hence, in addition to modulating the excitability of pyramidal neurons in all layers via muscarinic receptors, synaptically released ACh preferentially increases the activity of deep-layer neocortical pyramidal neurons via nicotinic receptors, thereby adding laminar selectivity to the widespread enhancement of excitability mediated by muscarinic ACh receptors. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Chemical labelling for visualizing native AMPA receptors in live neurons

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    Wakayama, Sho; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Arai, Itaru; Kakegawa, Wataru; Matsuda, Shinji; Ibata, Keiji; Nemoto, Yuri L.; Kusumi, Akihiro; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2017-04-01

    The location and number of neurotransmitter receptors are dynamically regulated at postsynaptic sites. However, currently available methods for visualizing receptor trafficking require the introduction of genetically engineered receptors into neurons, which can disrupt the normal functioning and processing of the original receptor. Here we report a powerful method for visualizing native α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) which are essential for cognitive functions without any genetic manipulation. This is based on a covalent chemical labelling strategy driven by selective ligand-protein recognition to tether small fluorophores to AMPARs using chemical AMPAR modification (CAM) reagents. The high penetrability of CAM reagents enables visualization of native AMPARs deep in brain tissues without affecting receptor function. Moreover, CAM reagents are used to characterize the diffusion dynamics of endogenous AMPARs in both cultured neurons and hippocampal slices. This method will help clarify the involvement of AMPAR trafficking in various neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders.

  19. Neuronal and glial purinergic receptors functions in neuron development and brain disease.

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    Ana edel Puerto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain development requires the interaction of complex signalling pathways, involving different cell types and molecules. For a long time, most attention has focused on neurons in a neuronocentric conceptualization of CNS development, these cells fulfilling an intrinsic programme that establishes the brain’s morphology and function. By contrast, glia have mainly been studied as support cells, offering guidance or as the cells that react to brain injury. However, new evidence is appearing that demonstrates a more fundamental role of glial cells in the control of different aspects of neuronal development and function, events in which the influence of neurons is at best weak. Moreover, it is becoming clear that the function and organization of the nervous system depends heavily on reciprocal neuron-glia interactions. During development, neurons are often generated far from their final destination and while intrinsic mechanisms are responsible for neuronal migration and growth, they need support and regulatory influences from glial cells in order to migrate correctly. Similarly, the axons emitted by neurons often have to reach faraway targets and in this sense, glia help define the way that axons grow. Moreover, oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells ultimately envelop axons, contributing to the generation of Nodes of Ranvier. Finally, recent publications show that astrocytes contribute to the modulation of synaptic transmission. In this sense, purinergic receptors are expressed widely by glial cells and neurons, and recent evidence points to multiple roles of purines and purinergic receptors in neuronal development and function, from neurogenesis to axon growth and functional axonal maturation, as well as in pathological conditions in the brain. This review will focus on the role of glial and neuronal secreted purines, and on the purinergic receptors, fundamentally in the control of neuronal development and function, as well as in diseases of the

  20. Frizzled-5 receptor is involved in neuronal polarity and morphogenesis of hippocampal neurons.

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    Paula G Slater

    Full Text Available The Wnt signaling pathway plays important roles during different stages of neuronal development, including neuronal polarization and dendritic and axonal outgrowth. However, little is known about the identity of the Frizzled receptors mediating these processes. In the present study, we investigated the role of Frizzled-5 (Fzd5 on neuronal development in cultured Sprague-Dawley rat hippocampal neurons. We found that Fzd5 is expressed early in cultured neurons on actin-rich structures localized at minor neurites and axonal growth cones. At 4 DIV, Fzd5 polarizes towards the axon, where its expression is detected mainly at the peripheral zone of axonal growth cones, with no obvious staining at dendrites; suggesting a role of Fzd5 in neuronal polarization. Overexpression of Fzd5 during the acquisition of neuronal polarity induces mislocalization of the receptor and a loss of polarized axonal markers. Fzd5 knock-down leads to loss of axonal proteins, suggesting an impaired neuronal polarity. In contrast, overexpression of Fzd5 in neurons that are already polarized did not alter polarity, but decreased the total length of axons and increased total dendrite length and arborization. Fzd5 activated JNK in HEK293 cells and the effects triggered by Fzd5 overexpression in neurons were partially prevented by inhibition of JNK, suggesting that a non-canonical Wnt signaling mechanism might be involved. Our results suggest that, Fzd5 has a role in the establishment of neuronal polarity, and in the morphogenesis of neuronal processes, in part through the activation of the non-canonical Wnt mechanism involving JNK.

  1. Activation of muscarinic receptors by non-neuronal acetylcholine.

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    Wessler, Ignaz Karl; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2012-01-01

    The biological role of acetylcholine and the cholinergic system is revisited based particularly on scientific research early and late in the last century. On the one hand, acetylcholine represents the classical neurotransmitter, whereas on the other hand, acetylcholine and the pivotal components of the cholinergic system (high-affinity choline uptake, choline acetyltransferase and its end product acetylcholine, muscarinic and nicotinic receptors and esterase) are expressed by more or less all mammalian cells, i.e. by the majority of cells not innervated by neurons at all. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that acetylcholine and "cholinergic receptors" are expressed in non-neuronal organisms such as plants and protists. Acetylcholine is even synthesized by bacteria and algae representing an extremely old signalling molecule on the evolutionary timescale. The following article summarizes examples, in which non-neuronal acetylcholine is released from primitive organisms as well as from mammalian non-neuronal cells and binds to muscarinic receptors to modulate/regulate phenotypic cell functions via auto-/paracrine pathways. The examples demonstrate that non-neuronal acetylcholine and the non-neuronal cholinergic system are vital for various types of cells such as epithelial, endothelial and immune cells.

  2. Reelin secreted by GABAergic neurons regulates glutamate receptor homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Gonzalez Campo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reelin is a large secreted protein of the extracellular matrix that has been proposed to participate to the etiology of schizophrenia. During development, reelin is crucial for the correct cytoarchitecture of laminated brain structures and is produced by a subset of neurons named Cajal-Retzius. After birth, most of these cells degenerate and reelin expression persists in postnatal and adult brain. The phenotype of neurons that bind secreted reelin and whether the continuous secretion of reelin is required for physiological functions at postnatal stages remain unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Combining immunocytochemical and pharmacological approaches, we first report that two distinct patterns of reelin expression are present in cultured hippocampal neurons. We show that in hippocampal cultures, reelin is secreted by GABAergic neurons displaying an intense reelin immunoreactivity (IR. We demonstrate that secreted reelin binds to receptors of the lipoprotein family on neurons with a punctate reelin IR. Secondly, using calcium imaging techniques, we examined the physiological consequences of reelin secretion blockade. Blocking protein secretion rapidly and reversibly changes the subunit composition of N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs to a predominance of NR2B-containing NMDARs. Addition of recombinant or endogenously secreted reelin rescues the effects of protein secretion blockade and reverts the fraction of NR2B-containing NMDARs to control levels. Therefore, the continuous secretion of reelin is necessary to control the subunit composition of NMDARs in hippocampal neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show that the heterogeneity of reelin immunoreactivity correlates with distinct functional populations: neurons synthesizing and secreting reelin and/or neurons binding reelin. Furthermore, we show that continuous reelin secretion is a strict requirement to maintain the composition of NMDARs. We propose

  3. Different effects of lobeline on neuronal and muscle nicotinic receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaniaková, Martina; Skřenková, Kristýna; Adámek, S.; Vyskočil, František; Krůšek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 738, Sep 5 (2014), s. 352-359 ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/09/0806; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110905; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : neuronal nicotinic receptor alpha3beta4 * lobeline * embryonic muscle nicotinic receptor Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.532, year: 2014

  4. Deletion of the huntingtin polyglutamine stretch enhances neuronal autophagy and longevity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuqiu Zheng

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Expansion of a stretch of polyglutamine in huntingtin (htt, the protein product of the IT15 gene, causes Huntington's disease (HD. Previous investigations into the role of the polyglutamine stretch (polyQ in htt function have suggested that its length may modulate a normal htt function involved in regulating energy homeostasis. Here we show that expression of full-length htt lacking its polyglutamine stretch (DeltaQ-htt in a knockin mouse model for HD (Hdh(140Q/DeltaQ, reduces significantly neuropil mutant htt aggregates, ameliorates motor/behavioral deficits, and extends lifespan in comparison to the HD model mice (Hdh(140Q/+. The rescue of HD model phenotypes is accompanied by the normalization of lipofuscin levels in the brain and an increase in the steady-state levels of the mammalian autophagy marker microtubule-associate protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II. We also find that DeltaQ-htt expression in vitro increases autophagosome synthesis and stimulates the Atg5-dependent clearance of truncated N-terminal htt aggregates. DeltaQ-htt's effect on autophagy most likely represents a gain-of-function, as overexpression of full-length wild-type htt in vitro does not increase autophagosome synthesis. Moreover, Hdh(DeltaQ/DeltaQ mice live significantly longer than wild-type mice, suggesting that autophagy upregulation may be beneficial both in diseases caused by toxic intracellular aggregate-prone proteins and also as a lifespan extender in normal mammals.

  5. Alcohol's actions on neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tiffany J; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2006-01-01

    Although it has been known for many years that alcoholism and tobacco addiction often co-occur, relatively little information is available on the biological factors that regulate the co-use and abuse of nicotine and alcohol. In the brain, nicotine acts at several different types of receptors collectively known as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Alcohol also acts on at least some of these receptors, enhancing the function of some nAChR subtypes and inhibiting the activity of others. Chronic alcohol and nicotine administration also lead to changes in the numbers of nAChRs. Natural variations (i.e., polymorphisms) in the genes encoding different nAChR subunits may be associated with individual differences in the sensitivity to some of alcohol's and nicotine's effects. Finally, at least one subtype of nAChR may help protect cells against alcohol-induced neurotoxicity.

  6. Secretory phospholipase A2-mediated neuronal cell death involves glutamate ionotropic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, Miriam; de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    2002-01-01

    To define the significance of glutamate ionotropic receptors in sPLA -mediated neuronal cell death we used the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 and the AMPA receptor antagonist PNQX. In primary neuronal cell cultures both MK-801 and PNQX inhibited sPLA - and glutamate-induced neuronal death. [ H...... neuronal cell death. We conclude that glutamatergic synaptic activity modulates sPLA -induced neuronal cell death....

  7. Effects of prolonged inflation on pulmonary stretch receptor discharge in turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, H A; Mitchell, G S; Milsom, W K

    1989-01-01

    The tonic and phasic discharge characteristics of single, slowly adapting pulmonary stretch receptors (SAR) were examined before and after 1 h periods of constant pressure inflation to normal resting (VLr, pressure = 0 cm H2O) and elevated (VLe, pressure = 10 cm H2O) lung volumes in turtles (Chrysemys sp.). Based on their discharge at VLr, SAR were classified as either low (n = 13) or high threshold (n = 4) receptors. Inflations were performed with both air and 5% CO2 in air. Lung gas composition and arterial PCO2 and pH were measured during the maintained inflations. In animals ventilated with air, low and high threshold receptors adapted by 57 and 30% respectively over the first 3 min at VLe. During the remainder of the 1 h period, the discharge of low threshold SAR fell an additional 20% while that of the high threshold SAR remained relatively constant. There were significant increases in both alveolar and arterial PCO2 during the maintained inflations. Ventilation with 5% CO2 reduced the static discharge levels of low and high threshold SAR by 10 and 25% respectively, suggesting that a part of the apparent adaptation of these receptors to maintained inflation for 1 h with air was due to the accumulation of metabolic CO2. Following 1 h of maintained inflation, the phasic responses to pump ventilation were decreased in low threshold SAR but remained unchanged in high threshold SAR. The static discharge associated with step inflation was unchanged in both receptor groups. The data suggest that increased SAR discharge is sustained indefinitely during increased lung volume and may account for persistent changes in breathing pattern previously observed during chronic changes in lung volume.

  8. A regulatory code for neuron-specific odor receptor expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anandasankar Ray

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs must select-from a large repertoire-which odor receptors to express. In Drosophila, most ORNs express one of 60 Or genes, and most Or genes are expressed in a single ORN class in a process that produces a stereotyped receptor-to-neuron map. The construction of this map poses a problem of receptor gene regulation that is remarkable in its dimension and about which little is known. By using a phylogenetic approach and the genome sequences of 12 Drosophila species, we systematically identified regulatory elements that are evolutionarily conserved and specific for individual Or genes of the maxillary palp. Genetic analysis of these elements supports a model in which each receptor gene contains a zip code, consisting of elements that act positively to promote expression in a subset of ORN classes, and elements that restrict expression to a single ORN class. We identified a transcription factor, Scalloped, that mediates repression. Some elements are used in other chemosensory organs, and some are conserved upstream of axon-guidance genes. Surprisingly, the odor response spectra and organization of maxillary palp ORNs have been extremely well-conserved for tens of millions of years, even though the amino acid sequences of the receptors are not highly conserved. These results, taken together, define the logic by which individual ORNs in the maxillary palp select which odor receptors to express.

  9. Optochemical control of genetically engineered neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitsky, Ivan; Banghart, Matthew R.; Mourot, Alexandre; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Gaub, Benjamin; Kramer, Richard H.; Trauner, Dirk

    2012-02-01

    Advances in synthetic chemistry, structural biology, molecular modelling and molecular cloning have enabled the systematic functional manipulation of transmembrane proteins. By combining genetically manipulated proteins with light-sensitive ligands, innately ‘blind’ neurobiological receptors can be converted into photoreceptors, which allows them to be photoregulated with high spatiotemporal precision. Here, we present the optochemical control of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with photoswitchable tethered agonists and antagonists. Using structure-based design, we produced heteromeric α3β4 and α4β2 nAChRs that can be activated or inhibited with deep-violet light, but respond normally to acetylcholine in the dark. The generation of these engineered receptors should facilitate investigation of the physiological and pathological functions of neuronal nAChRs and open a general pathway to photosensitizing pentameric ligand-gated ion channels.

  10. Characterization of ouabain receptor in neuronal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtstein, D.; Samuelov, S.

    1982-01-01

    This study shows that [ 3 H]ouabain binds specifically to a single, saturable binding site located on rat brain membranes with an affinity constant of 6.21 x 10 - 8 M. As expected from studies on the mechanics of the Na + , K + -ATPase, sodium increased while potassium and lithium decreased ouabain binding. The occupation of other neurotransmitter receptors did not affect [ 3 H]ouabain binding. Based on its ability to compete with [ 3 H]ouabain binding and to inhibit Na + , K + -ATPase, it is suggested that rat brain extract contains an endogeneous ouabain-like compound. The results are discussed with respect to the possibility that the ouabain receptor is a physiological regulatory site of the Na + , K + -ATPase activity. (author)

  11. Labeling of Neuronal Receptors and Transporters with Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jerry C.; Kovtun, Oleg; Blakely, Randy D.; Rosenthal, Sandra J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to efficiently visualize protein targets in cells is a fundamental goal in biological research. Recently, quantum dots (QDots) have emerged as a powerful class of fluorescent probes for labeling membrane proteins in living cells due to breakthrough advances in QDot surface chemistry and biofunctionalization strategies. This review discusses the increasing use of QDots for fluorescence imaging of neuronal receptors and transporters. The readers are briefly introduced to QDot structure, photophysical properties, and common synthetic routes towards the generation of water-soluble QDots. The next section highlights several reports of QDot application that seek to unravel molecular aspects of neuronal receptor and transporter regulation and trafficking. We close with a prospectus of the future of derivatized QDots in neurobiological and pharmacological research. PMID:22887823

  12. Dynamics of glycine receptor insertion in the neuronal plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M; Meier, J; Triller, A; Vannier, C

    2001-07-15

    The exocytosis site of newly synthesized glycine receptor was defined by means of a morphological assay to characterize its export from the trans-Golgi Network to the plasma membrane. This was achieved by expressing in transfected neurons an alpha1 subunit bearing an N-terminal tag selectively cleavable from outside the cell by thrombin. This was combined with a transient temperature-induced block of exocytic transport that creates a synchronized exocytic wave. Immunofluorescence microscopy analysis of the cell surface appearance of newly synthesized receptor revealed that exocytosis mainly occurred at nonsynaptic sites in the cell body and the initial portion of dendrites. At the time of cell surface insertion, the receptors existed as discrete clusters. Quantitative analysis showed that glycine receptor clusters are stable in size and subsequently appeared in more distal dendritic regions. This localization resulted from diffusion in the plasma membrane and not from exocytosis of transport vesicles directed to dendrites. Kinetic analysis established a direct substrate-product relationship between pools of somatic and dendritic receptors. This indicated that clusters represent intermediates between newly synthesized and synaptic receptors. These results support a diffusion-retention model for the formation of receptor-enriched postsynaptic domains and not that of a vectorial intracellular targeting to synapses.

  13. Neuronal and non-neuronal Trk neurotrophin receptor-like proteins in Eisenia foetida (Annelida Oligochaeta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucini, C; Castaldo, L; Lamanna, C; Maruccio, L; Vega, J A; Gargiulo, G

    1999-02-19

    The occurrence and distribution of Trk proteins, which are the high-affinity signal-transducing receptors for neurotrophins, have been investigated in earthworms (Eisenia foetida) using polyclonal antibodies which map within their catalytic domain. Western-blot analysis identified major protein bands whose estimated molecular masses were consistent with those of the full-length Trk proteins in vertebrates. Specific immunoreactivity for TrkA-, TrkB-, and TrkC-like was observed in neuronal populations of the dorsal cerebral, subpharyngeal and ventral cord ganglia. Furthermore, TrkA-like immunoreactivity was observed in subcutaneous neurons and nerve fibers between muscle layers in the peripheral nervous system. TrkB- and TrkC-like immunoreactivity was observed in the gut innervation. Non-neuronal expression of TrkB and TrkC proteins was found in epidermal cells, and TrkC-like immunoreactivity was detected in the gut epithelium.

  14. Vascular surgical stretch injury leads to activation of P2X7 receptors and impaired endothelial function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmini Komalavilas

    Full Text Available A viable vascular endothelial layer prevents vasomotor dysfunction, thrombosis, inflammation, and intimal hyperplasia. Injury to the endothelium occurs during harvest and "back table" preparation of human saphenous vein prior to implantation as an arterial bypass conduit. A subfailure overstretch model of rat aorta was used to show that subfailure stretch injury of vascular tissue leads to impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation. Stretch-induced impaired relaxation was mitigated by treatment with purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R inhibitors, brilliant blue FCF (FCF and A740003, or apyrase, an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ATP. Alternatively, treatment of rat aorta with exogenous ATP or 2'(3'-O-(4-Benzoyl benzoyl-ATP (BzATP also impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation. Treatment of human saphenous vein endothelial cells (HSVEC with exogenous ATP led to reduced nitric oxide production which was associated with increased phosphorylation of the stress activated protein kinase, p38 MAPK. ATP- stimulated p38 MAPK phosphorylation of HSVEC was inhibited by FCF and SB203580. Moreover, ATP inhibition of nitric oxide production in HSVEC was prevented by FCF, SB203580, L-arginine supplementation and arginase inhibition. Finally, L-arginine supplementation and arginase inhibition restored endothelial dependent relaxation after stretch injury of rat aorta. These results suggest that vascular stretch injury leads to ATP release, activation of P2X7R and p38 MAPK resulting in endothelial dysfunction due to arginase activation. Endothelial function can be restored in both ATP treated HSVEC and intact stretch injured rat aorta by P2X7 receptor inhibition with FCF or L-arginine supplementation, implicating straightforward therapeutic options for treatment of surgical vascular injury.

  15. Muscle and motor neuron ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor α together maintain adult motor neuron axons in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy; Serbinski, Carolyn R; Braunlin, Makayla R; Rasch, Matthew S; Rydyznski, Carolyn E; MacLennan, A John

    2016-12-01

    The molecular mechanisms maintaining adult motor innervation are comparatively unexplored relative to those involved during development. In addition to the fundamental neuroscience question, this area has important clinical ramifications given that loss of neuromuscular contact is thought to underlie several adult onset human neuromuscular diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Indirect evidence suggests that ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) receptors may contribute to adult motor neuron axon maintenance. To directly address this in vivo, we used adult onset mouse genetic disruption techniques to deplete motor neuron and muscle CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα), the essential ligand binding subunit of the receptor, and incorporated reporters labelling affected motor neuron axons and terminals. The combined depletion of motor neuron and muscle CNTFRα produced a large loss of motor neuron terminals and retrograde labelling of motor neurons with FluoroGold indicated axon die-back well beyond muscle, together revealing an essential role for CNTFRα in adult motor axon maintenance. In contrast, selective depletion of motor neuron CNTFRα did not affect motor innervation. These data, along with our previous work indicating no effect of muscle specific CNTFRα depletion on motor innervation, suggest that motor neuron and muscle CNTFRα function in concert to maintain motor neuron axons. The data also raise the possibility of motor neuron and/or muscle CNTFRα as therapeutic targets for adult neuromuscular denervating diseases. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Somatostatin receptors in rat hippocampus: localization to intrinsic neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, J.M.; Reubi, J.C.; Maurer, R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of neurotoxic chemical and electrolytical lesions on somatostatin (SS) receptor binding in the septo-hippocampal afferents, pyramidal and granule cells of the rat hippocampus was examined by autoradiography using the stable SS analogue 125 I-204-090 as radioligand. Electrolytical lesions of the septum did not result in modification of SS binding in the hippocampus. In contrast, both granule cell lesion with colchicine and pyramidal or pyramidal and granule cell lesions with increasing kainic acid doses did result in a specific decrease of binding in the dentate gyrus and hippocampus (CA 1 and CA 3 ). These results suggest that SS receptors in the hippocampus are probably associated with elements from intrinsic neurons. (Author)

  17. Severely impaired learning and altered neuronal morphology in mice lacking NMDA receptors in medium spiny neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa R Beutler

    Full Text Available The striatum is composed predominantly of medium spiny neurons (MSNs that integrate excitatory, glutamatergic inputs from the cortex and thalamus, and modulatory dopaminergic inputs from the ventral midbrain to influence behavior. Glutamatergic activation of AMPA, NMDA, and metabotropic receptors on MSNs is important for striatal development and function, but the roles of each of these receptor classes remain incompletely understood. Signaling through NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs in the striatum has been implicated in various motor and appetitive learning paradigms. In addition, signaling through NMDARs influences neuronal morphology, which could underlie their role in mediating learned behaviors. To study the role of NMDARs on MSNs in learning and in morphological development, we generated mice lacking the essential NR1 subunit, encoded by the Grin1 gene, selectively in MSNs. Although these knockout mice appear normal and display normal 24-hour locomotion, they have severe deficits in motor learning, operant conditioning and active avoidance. In addition, the MSNs from these knockout mice have smaller cell bodies and decreased dendritic length compared to littermate controls. We conclude that NMDAR signaling in MSNs is critical for normal MSN morphology and many forms of learning.

  18. Protease-activated receptor 1-dependent neuronal damage involves NMDA receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Cecily E; Mannaioni, Guido; Lyuboslavsky, Polina; Sastre, Aristide A; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2009-05-01

    Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is a G-protein coupled receptor that is expressed throughout the central nervous system. PAR1 activation by brain-derived as well as blood-derived proteases has been shown to have variable and complex effects in a variety of animal models of neuronal injury and inflammation. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of PAR1 on lesion volume in wild-type or PAR1-/- C57Bl/6 mice subjected to transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery or injected with NMDA in the striatum. We found that removal of PAR1 reduced infarct volume following transient focal ischemia to 57% of control. Removal of PAR1 or application of a PAR1 antagonist also reduced the neuronal injury associated with intrastriatal injection of NMDA to 60% of control. To explore whether NMDA receptor potentiation by PAR1 activation contributes to the harmful effects of PAR1, we investigated the effect of NMDA receptor antagonists on the neuroprotective phenotype of PAR1-/- mice. We found that MK801 reduced penumbral but not core neuronal injury in mice subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion or intrastriatal NMDA injection. Lesion volumes in both models were not significantly different between PAR1-/- mice treated with and without MK801. Use of the NMDA receptor antagonist and dissociative anesthetic ketamine also renders NMDA-induced lesion volumes identical in PAR1-/- mice and wild-type mice. These data suggest that the ability of PAR1 activation to potentiate NMDA receptor function may underlie its harmful actions during injury.

  19. Serotonin 2c receptors in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons regulate energy and glucose homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy and glucose homeostasis are regulated by central serotonin 2C receptors. These receptors are attractive pharmacological targets for the treatment of obesity; however, the identity of the serotonin 2C receptor-expressing neurons that mediate the effects of serotonin and serotonin 2C receptor a...

  20. Cultured neurons as model systems for biochemical and pharmacological studies on receptors for neurotransmitter amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, A; Drejer, J; Hansen, Gert Helge

    1985-01-01

    , which mediate an L-glutamate-induced transmitter release. The pharmacological properties of these glutamate receptors are, however, distinctly different for the 2 types of neurons. While cerebral cortex neurons express both quisqualate-, N-methyl-D-aspartate- and kainate-receptors, the cerebellar...

  1. Cultured neurons as model systems for biochemical and pharmacological studies on receptors for neurotransmitter amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, A; Drejer, J; Hansen, Gert Helge

    1985-01-01

    action of GABA on evoked release of glutamate, which is the neurotransmitter in cerebellar granule cells. Also glutamate receptors have been studied with regard to the 2 types of neurons. Both cerebral cortex neurons (GABAergic) and cerebellar granule cells (glutamatergic) possess glutamate receptors...

  2. Effects of prolonged lung inflation or deflation on pulmonary stretch receptor discharge in the alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschand, Rachel E; Wilson, Jenna L; Burleson, Mark L; Crossley, Dane A; Hedrick, Michael S

    2014-08-15

    The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is a semi-aquatic diving reptile that has a periodic breathing pattern. Previous work identified pulmonary stretch receptors, that are rapidly and slowly adapting, as well as intrapulmonary chemoreceptors (IPC), sensitive to CO2, that modulate breathing patterns in alligators. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the effects of prolonged lung inflation and deflation (simulated dives) on pulmonary stretch receptors (PSR) and/or IPC discharge characteristics. The effects of airway pressure (0-20 cm H2O), hypercapnia (7% CO2), and hypoxia (5% O2) on dynamic and static responses of PSR were studied in juvenile alligators (mean mass=246 g) at 24°C. Alligators were initially anesthetized with isoflurane, cranially pithed, tracheotomized and artificially ventilated. Vagal afferent tonic and phasic activity was recorded with platinum hook electrodes. Receptor activity was a mixture of slowly adapting PSR (SAR) and rapidly adapting PSR (RAR) with varying thresholds and degrees of adaptation, without CO2 sensitivity. Receptor activity before, during and after 1 min periods of lung inflation and deflation was quantified to examine the effect of simulated breath-hold dives. Some PSR showed a change in dynamic response, exhibiting inhibition for several breaths after prolonged lung inflation. Following 1 min deflation, RAR, but not SAR, exhibited a significant potentiation of burst frequency relative to control. For SAR, the post-inflation receptor inhibition was blocked by CO2 and hypoxia; for RAR, the post-inflation inhibition was potentiated by CO2 and blocked by hypoxia. These results suggest that changes in PSR firing following prolonged inflation and deflation may promote post-dive ventilation in alligators. We hypothesize that PSR in alligators may be involved in recovery of breathing patterns and lung volume during pre- and post-diving behavior and apneic periods in diving reptiles. Copyright © 2014

  3. Evaluation of PET Radioligands for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenbaechler, R.; Westera, G.; Nan-Horng Lin

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A-186253.1, a compound made by Abbott laboratories, was labelled with carbon-11 and evaluated as a PET ligand for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). The compound was labelled with C-11 by methylation with 11C-MeI of the desmethyl precursor A-183828.1. The affinity of A-186253.1 for the α4β2 and the α7 subtype of the nAChR was determined in displacement studies. PET-studies were performed in rats and pigs Inhibitory constants (K i ) versus cytsine were 461 ± 99 pM for A-186253.1 and versus α-Bungarotoxin >100 μM. which means a very high selectivity for the α4β2-receptor (>227,000). Highest uptake of [ 11 C]-A-186253.1 was observed in the thalamus where an increase in radiotracer uptake was seen until 45 min p.i.. Thereafter, the radiotracer concentration remained constant until the end of the scan indicating slow washout of [ 11 C]-A-186253.1. Application of cold A-186253.1 (0.5 mg/kg) 40 min p.i. resulted in a decrease in radiotracer concentration in the thalamus and the cortex indicating displacement of [ 11 C]-A-186253.1. Blockade studies with cytisine (0.5 mg/kg), a selective ligand for the α4β2 nicotinic receptor, showed just a slight reduction of the radioligand uptake in the thalamus and in the cortex whereas the blockade with cold A-186253.1 (1 mg/kg) resulted in a 50 % reduction. These results suggest, that 50 % of the [ 11 C]-A-186253.1 in the brain corresponds to specifically bound radioligand, but not to the α4β2 subtype of the nicotinic receptor. (author)

  4. Collagen organization regulates stretch-initiated pain-related neuronal signals in vitro: Implications for structure-function relationships in innervated ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sijia; Singh, Sagar; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2018-02-01

    Injury to the spinal facet capsule, an innervated ligament with heterogeneous collagen organization, produces pain. Although mechanical facet joint trauma activates embedded afferents, it is unclear if, and how, the varied extracellular microstructure of its ligament affects sensory transduction for pain from mechanical inputs. To investigate the effects of macroscopic deformations on afferents in collagen matrices with different organizations, an in vitro neuron-collagen construct (NCC) model was used. NCCs with either randomly organized or parallel aligned collagen fibers were used to mimic the varied microstructure in the facet capsular ligament. Embryonic rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were encapsulated in the NCCs; axonal outgrowth was uniform and in all directions in random NCCs, but parallel in aligned NCCs. NCCs underwent uniaxial stretch (0.25 ± 0.06 strain) corresponding to sub-failure facet capsule strains that induce pain. Macroscopic NCC mechanics were measured and axonal expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) and the neurotransmitter substance P (SP) was assayed at 1 day to assess neuronal activation and nociception. Stretch significantly upregulated pERK expression in both random and aligned gels (p organization. These findings suggest that collagen organization differentially modulates pain-related neuronal signaling and support structural heterogeneity of ligament tissue as mediating sensory function. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:770-777, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The Role of Rab Proteins in Neuronal Cells and in the Trafficking of Neurotrophin Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Bucci

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophins are a family of proteins that are important for neuronal development, neuronal survival and neuronal functions. Neurotrophins exert their role by binding to their receptors, the Trk family of receptor tyrosine kinases (TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC and p75NTR, a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor superfamily. Binding of neurotrophins to receptors triggers a complex series of signal transduction events, which are able to induce neuronal differentiation but are also responsible for neuronal maintenance and neuronal functions. Rab proteins are small GTPases localized to the cytosolic surface of specific intracellular compartments and are involved in controlling vesicular transport. Rab proteins, acting as master regulators of the membrane trafficking network, play a central role in both trafficking and signaling pathways of neurotrophin receptors. Axonal transport represents the Achilles' heel of neurons, due to the long-range distance that molecules, organelles and, in particular, neurotrophin-receptor complexes have to cover. Indeed, alterations of axonal transport and, specifically, of axonal trafficking of neurotrophin receptors are responsible for several human neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and some forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In this review, we will discuss the link between Rab proteins and neurotrophin receptor trafficking and their influence on downstream signaling pathways.

  6. Neuronal low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 binds and endocytoses prion fibrils via receptor cluster 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jen, Angela; Parkyn, Celia J; Mootoosamy, Roy C

    2010-01-01

    For infectious prion protein (designated PrP(Sc)) to act as a template to convert normal cellular protein (PrP(C)) to its distinctive pathogenic conformation, the two forms of prion protein (PrP) must interact closely. The neuronal receptor that rapidly endocytoses PrP(C) is the low......-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). We show here that on sensory neurons LRP1 is also the receptor that binds and rapidly endocytoses smaller oligomeric forms of infectious prion fibrils, and recombinant PrP fibrils. Although LRP1 binds two molecules of most ligands independently to its receptor...... both prion and LRP1 biology....

  7. Isolated dorsal root ganglion neurones inhibit receptor-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity in associated glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, KY; Yeung, BHS; Wong, YH; Wise, H

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hyper-nociceptive PGE2 EP4 receptors and prostacyclin (IP) receptors are present in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones and glial cells in culture. The present study has investigated the cell-specific expression of two other Gs-protein coupled hyper-nociceptive receptor systems: β-adrenoceptors and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors in isolated DRG cells and has examined the influence of neurone–glial cell interactions in regulating adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity. Experimental Approach Agonist-stimulated AC activity was determined in mixed DRG cell cultures from adult rats and compared with activity in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures and pure DRG glial cell cultures. Key Results Pharmacological analysis showed the presence of Gs-coupled β2-adrenoceptors and CGRP receptors, but not β1-adrenoceptors, in all three DRG cell preparations. Agonist-stimulated AC activity was weakest in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures. DRG neurones inhibited IP receptor-stimulated glial cell AC activity by a process dependent on both cell–cell contact and neurone-derived soluble factors, but this is unlikely to involve purine or glutamine receptor activation. Conclusions and Implications Gs-coupled hyper-nociceptive receptors are readily expressed on DRG glial cells in isolated cell cultures and the activity of CGRP, EP4 and IP receptors, but not β2-adrenoceptors, in glial cells is inhibited by DRG neurones. Studies using isolated DRG cells should be aware that hyper-nociceptive ligands may stimulate receptors on glial cells in addition to neurones, and that variable numbers of neurones and glial cells will influence absolute measures of AC activity and affect downstream functional responses. PMID:22924655

  8. The in vivo contribution of motor neuron TrkB receptors to mutant SOD1 motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jinbin; Zhou, Weiguo; Li, Jian; Hayworth, Christopher R; Zhang, Lei; Misawa, Hidemi; Klein, Rudiger; Scherer, Steven S; Balice-Gordon, Rita J; Kalb, Robert Gordon

    2011-11-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) are widely expressed in the vertebrate nervous system and play a central role in mature neuronal function. In vitro BDNF/TrkB signaling promotes neuronal survival and can help neurons resist toxic insults. Paradoxically, BDNF/TrkB signaling has also been shown, under certain in vitro circumstances, to render neurons vulnerable to insults. We show here that in vivo conditional deletion of TrkB from mature motor neurons attenuates mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) toxicity. Mutant SOD1 mice lacking motor neuron TrkB live a month longer than controls and retain motor function for a longer period, particularly in the early phase of the disease. These effects are subserved by slowed motor neuron loss, persistence of neuromuscular junction integrity and reduced astrocytic and microglial reactivity within the spinal cord. These results suggest that manipulation of BDNF/TrkB signaling might have therapeutic efficacy in motor neuron diseases.

  9. Activation of neuronal P2X7 receptor-pannexin-1 mediates death of enteric neurons during colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbransen, Brian D; Bashashati, Mohammad; Hirota, Simon A; Gui, Xianyong; Roberts, Jane A; MacDonald, Justin A; Muruve, Daniel A; McKay, Derek M; Beck, Paul L; Mawe, Gary M; Thompson, Roger J; Sharkey, Keith A

    2012-03-18

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic relapsing and remitting conditions associated with long-term gut dysfunction resulting from alterations to the enteric nervous system and a loss of enteric neurons. The mechanisms underlying inflammation-induced enteric neuron death are unknown. Here using in vivo models of experimental colitis we report that inflammation causes enteric neuron death by activating a neuronal signaling complex composed of P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs), pannexin-1 (Panx1) channels, the Asc adaptor protein and caspases. Inhibition of P2X7R, Panx1, Asc or caspase activity prevented inflammation-induced neuron cell death. Preservation of enteric neurons by inhibiting Panx1 in vivo prevented the onset of inflammation-induced colonic motor dysfunction. Panx1 expression was reduced in Crohn's disease but not ulcerative colitis. We conclude that activation of neuronal Panx1 underlies neuron death and the subsequent development of abnormal gut motility in IBD. Targeting Panx1 represents a new neuroprotective strategy to ameliorate the progression of IBD-associated dysmotility.

  10. Ablation of NMDA receptors enhances the excitability of hippocampal CA3 neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Fukushima

    Full Text Available Synchronized discharges in the hippocampal CA3 recurrent network are supposed to underlie network oscillations, memory formation and seizure generation. In the hippocampal CA3 network, NMDA receptors are abundant at the recurrent synapses but scarce at the mossy fiber synapses. We generated mutant mice in which NMDA receptors were abolished in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons by postnatal day 14. The histological and cytological organizations of the hippocampal CA3 region were indistinguishable between control and mutant mice. We found that mutant mice lacking NMDA receptors selectively in CA3 pyramidal neurons became more susceptible to kainate-induced seizures. Consistently, mutant mice showed characteristic large EEG spikes associated with multiple unit activities (MUA, suggesting enhanced synchronous firing of CA3 neurons. The electrophysiological balance between fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission was comparable between control and mutant pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA3 region, while the NMDA receptor-slow AHP coupling was diminished in the mutant neurons. In the adult brain, inducible ablation of NMDA receptors in the hippocampal CA3 region by the viral expression vector for Cre recombinase also induced similar large EEG spikes. Furthermore, pharmacological blockade of CA3 NMDA receptors enhanced the susceptibility to kainate-induced seizures. These results raise an intriguing possibility that hippocampal CA3 NMDA receptors may suppress the excitability of the recurrent network as a whole in vivo by restricting synchronous firing of CA3 neurons.

  11. Bicarbonate Contributes to GABAA Receptor-Mediated Neuronal Excitation in Surgically-Resected Human Hypothalamic Hamartomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do-Young, Kim; Fenoglio, Kristina A.; Kerrigan, John F.; Rho, Jong M.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The role of bicarbonate (HCO3-) in GABAA receptor-mediated depolarization of human hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) neurons was investigated using cellular electrophysiological and calcium imaging techniques. Activation of GABAA receptors with muscimol (30 μM) provoked neuronal excitation in over 70% of large (18-22 μM) HH neurons in HCO3- buffer. Subsequent perfusion of HCO3--free HEPES buffer produced partial suppression of muscimol-induced excitation. Additionally, 53% of large HH neurons under HCO3--free conditions exhibited reduced intracellular calcium accumulation by muscimol. These results suggest that HCO3- efflux through GABAA receptors on a subpopulation of large HH neurons may contribute to membrane depolarization and subsequent activation of L-type calcium channels. PMID:19022626

  12. Eph receptors and ephrins in neuron-astrocyte communication at synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Keith K; Pasquale, Elena B

    2011-11-01

    Neuron-glia communication is essential for regulating the properties of synaptic connections in the brain. Astrocytes, in particular, play a critical and complex role in synapse development, maintenance, and plasticity. Likewise, neurons reciprocally influence astrocyte physiology. However, the molecular signaling events that enable astrocytes and neurons to effectively communicate with each other are only partially defined. Recent findings have revealed that Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and ephrins play an important role in contact-dependent neuron-glia communication at synapses. Upon binding, these two families of cell surface-associated proteins trigger bidirectional signaling events that regulate the structural and physiological properties of both neurons and astrocytes. This review will focus on the emerging role of Eph receptors and ephrins in neuron-astrocyte interaction at synapses and discuss implications for synaptic plasticity, behavior, and disease. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Agonists of fibroblast growth factor receptor induce neurite outgrowth and survival of cerebellar granule neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shizhong; Christensen, Claus; Køhler, Lene B

    2009-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling is pivotal in the regulation of neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation and survival, and synaptic plasticity both during development and in adulthood. In order to develop low molecular weight agonists of FGFR, seven peptides, termed hexafins...

  14. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in attention circuitry: the role of layer VI neurons of prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, Eliane; Piva, Matthew; Tian, Michael K; Bailey, Craig D C; Lambe, Evelyn K

    2014-04-01

    Cholinergic modulation of prefrontal cortex is essential for attention. In essence, it focuses the mind on relevant, transient stimuli in support of goal-directed behavior. The excitation of prefrontal layer VI neurons through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors optimizes local and top-down control of attention. Layer VI of prefrontal cortex is the origin of a dense feedback projection to the thalamus and is one of only a handful of brain regions that express the α5 nicotinic receptor subunit, encoded by the gene chrna5. This accessory nicotinic receptor subunit alters the properties of high-affinity nicotinic receptors in layer VI pyramidal neurons in both development and adulthood. Studies investigating the consequences of genetic deletion of α5, as well as other disruptions to nicotinic receptors, find attention deficits together with altered cholinergic excitation of layer VI neurons and aberrant neuronal morphology. Nicotinic receptors in prefrontal layer VI neurons play an essential role in focusing attention under challenging circumstances. In this regard, they do not act in isolation, but rather in concert with cholinergic receptors in other parts of prefrontal circuitry. This review urges an intensification of focus on the cellular mechanisms and plasticity of prefrontal attention circuitry. Disruptions in attention are one of the greatest contributing factors to disease burden in psychiatric and neurological disorders, and enhancing attention may require different approaches in the normal and disordered prefrontal cortex.

  15. Altered Expression of Genes Encoding Neurotransmitter Receptors in GnRH Neurons of Proestrous Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Vastagh, Csaba; Rodolosse, Annie; Solymosi, Norbert; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons play a key role in the central regulation of reproduction. In proestrous female mice, estradiol triggers the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, however, its impact on the expression of neurotransmitter receptor genes in GnRH neurons has not been explored yet. We hypothesized that proestrus is accompanied by substantial changes in the expression profile of genes coding for neurotransmitter receptors in GnRH neurons. We compared the transcriptome of GnRH neu...

  16. Altered expression of genes encoding neurotransmitter receptors in GnRH neurons of proestrous mice

    OpenAIRE

    Csaba Vastagh; Annie Rodolosse; Norbert Solymosi; Zsolt Liposits; Zsolt Liposits

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons play a key role in the central regulation of reproduction. In proestrous female mice, estradiol triggers the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, however, its impact on the expression of neurotransmitter receptor genes in GnRH neurons has not been explored yet. We hypothesized that proestrus is accompanied by substantial changes in the expression profile of genes coding for neurotransmitter receptors in GnRH neurons. We compared the transcriptome of GnRH neu...

  17. A neuronal acetylcholine receptor regulates the balance of muscle excitation and inhibition in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maelle Jospin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, cholinergic motor neurons stimulate muscle contraction as well as activate GABAergic motor neurons that inhibit contraction of the contralateral muscles. Here, we describe the composition of an ionotropic acetylcholine receptor that is required to maintain excitation of the cholinergic motor neurons. We identified a gain-of-function mutation that leads to spontaneous muscle convulsions. The mutation is in the pore domain of the ACR-2 acetylcholine receptor subunit and is identical to a hyperactivating mutation in the muscle receptor of patients with myasthenia gravis. Screens for suppressors of the convulsion phenotype led to the identification of other receptor subunits. Cell-specific rescue experiments indicate that these subunits function in the cholinergic motor neurons. Expression of these subunits in Xenopus oocytes demonstrates that the functional receptor is comprised of three alpha-subunits, UNC-38, UNC-63 and ACR-12, and two non-alpha-subunits, ACR-2 and ACR-3. Although this receptor exhibits a partially overlapping subunit composition with the C. elegans muscle acetylcholine receptor, it shows distinct pharmacology. Recordings from intact animals demonstrate that loss-of-function mutations in acr-2 reduce the excitability of the cholinergic motor neurons. By contrast, the acr-2(gf mutation leads to a hyperactivation of cholinergic motor neurons and an inactivation of downstream GABAergic motor neurons in a calcium dependent manner. Presumably, this imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory input into muscles leads to convulsions. These data indicate that the ACR-2 receptor is important for the coordinated excitation and inhibition of body muscles underlying sinusoidal movement.

  18. Adenosine A2A Receptor Modulates the Activity of Globus Pallidus Neurons in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ling Diao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The globus pallidus is a central nucleus in the basal ganglia motor control circuit. Morphological studies have revealed the expression of adenosine A2A receptors in the globus pallidus. To determine the modulation of adenosine A2A receptors on the activity of pallidal neurons in both normal and parkinsonian rats, in vivo electrophysiological and behavioral tests were performed in the present study. The extracellular single unit recordings showed that micro-pressure administration of adenosine A2A receptor agonist, CGS21680, regulated the pallidal firing activity. GABAergic neurotransmission was involved in CGS21680-induced modulation of pallidal neurons via a PKA pathway. Furthermore, application of two adenosine A2A receptor antagonists, KW6002 or SCH442416, mainly increased the spontaneous firing of pallidal neurons, suggesting that endogenous adenosine system modulates the activity of pallidal neurons through adenosine A2A receptors. Finally, elevated body swing test (EBST showed that intrapallidal microinjection of adenosine A2A receptor agonist/antagonist induced ipsilateral/contralateral-biased swing, respectively. In addition, the electrophysiological and behavioral findings also revealed that activation of dopamine D2 receptors by quinpirole strengthened KW6002/SCH442416-induced excitation of pallidal activity. Co-application of quinpirole with KW6002 or SCH442416 alleviated biased swing in hemi-parkinsonian rats. Based on the present findings, we concluded that pallidal adenosine A2A receptors may be potentially useful in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  19. Forebrain mineralocorticoid receptor overexpression enhances memory, reduces anxiety and attenuates neuronal loss in cerebral ischaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, Maggie; Horsburgh, Karen; Bae, Sung-Eun; Carter, Roderick N.; Stenvers, Dirk J.; Fowler, Jill H.; Yau, Joyce L.; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.; Holmes, Megan C.; Kenyon, Christopher J.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Macleod, Malcolm R.

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a high-affinity receptor for glucocorticoids, is highly expressed in the hippocampus where it underpins cognitive, behavioural and neuroendocrine regulation. Increased neuronal MR expression occurs early in the response to cellular injury in vivo and in

  20. Or47b receptor neurons mediate sociosexual interactions in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Shahnaz Rahman; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2012-04-01

    In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, social interactions especially among heterosexual couples have been shown to have significant impact on the circadian timing system. Olfaction plays a major role in such interactions; however, we do not know yet specifically which receptor(s) are involved. Further, the role of circadian clock neurons in the rhythmic regulation of such sociosexual interactions (SSIs) is not fully understood. Here, we report the results of our study in which we assayed the locomotor activity and sleep-wake behaviors of male-male (MM), female-female (FF), and male-female (MF) couples from several wild-type and mutant strains of Drosophila with an aim to identify specific olfactory receptor(s) and circadian clock neurons involved in the rhythmic regulation of SSI. The results indicate that Or47b receptor neurons are necessary for SSI, as ablation or silencing of these neurons has a severe impact on SSI. Further, the neuropeptide pigment dispersing factor (PDF) and PDF-positive ventral lateral (LN(v)) clock neurons appear to be dispensable for the regulation of SSI; however, dorsal neurons may be involved.

  1. Loss of functional neuronal nicotinic receptors in dorsal root ganglion neurons in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Gilles R; Kohlhaas, Kathy L; Rueter, Lynne E; Surowy, Carol S; Meyer, Michael D; Briggs, Clark A

    2005-03-07

    Recent evidence has suggested that the anti-allodynic effect of neuronal acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists may have a peripheral component [L.E. Rueter, K.L. Kohlhaas, P. Curzon, C.S. Surowy, M.D. Meyer, Peripheral and central sites of action for A-85380 in the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain, Pain 103 (2003) 269-276]. In further studies of the peripheral anti-allodynic mechanisms of nAChR agonists, we investigated the function of nAChRs in acutely isolated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from allodynic [L5-L6 spinal nerve ligation (SNL)] and naive adult rats. Following determination of cell diameter and membrane capacitance, responses to rapid applications of nAChR agonists were recorded under whole cell patch clamp. nAChR inward currents were observed in approximately 60% of naive neurons, across small, medium, and large diameter cells. Evoked nAChR currents could be clustered into three broad classes: fast transient, biphasic, and slow desensitizing currents, consistent with multiple subtypes of nAChR expressed in DRG [J.R. Genzen, W. Van Cleve, D.S. McGehee, Dorsal root ganglion neurons express multiple nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes, J. Neurophysiol. 86 (2001) 1773-1782]. In contrast, in neurons from allodynic animals, the occurrence and amplitude of responses to nAChR agonists were significantly reduced. Reduced responsiveness to nAChR agonists covered the range of DRG neuron sizes. The decrease in the responsiveness to nAChR agonists was not seen in neighboring uninjured L4 neurons. The significant decrease in the number of cells with nAChR agonist responses, compounded with the significant decrease in response amplitude, indicates that there is a marked down regulation of functional nAChRs in DRG somata associated with SNL.

  2. Non-Neuronal Functions of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritva Tikkanen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine is an important neurotransmitter whose effects are mediated by two classes of receptors. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are ion channels, whereas the muscarinic receptors belong to the large family of G protein coupled seven transmembrane helix receptors. Beyond its function in neuronal systems, it has become evident that acetylcholine also plays an important role in non-neuronal cells such as epithelial and immune cells. Furthermore, many cell types in the periphery are capable of synthesizing acetylcholine and express at least some of the receptors. In this review, we summarize the non-neuronal functions of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, especially those of the M2 muscarinic receptor in epithelial cells. We will review the mechanisms of signaling by the M2 receptor but also the cellular trafficking and ARF6 mediated endocytosis of this receptor, which play an important role in the regulation of signaling events. In addition, we provide an overview of the M2 receptor in human pathological conditions such as autoimmune diseases and cancer.

  3. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 antagonist JTE-013 increases the excitability of sensory neurons independently of the receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Chi, Xian Xuan; Xie, Wenrui; Strong, J A; Zhang, J-M; Nicol, G D

    2012-09-01

    Previously we demonstrated that sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR(1)) played a prominent, but not exclusive, role in enhancing the excitability of small-diameter sensory neurons, suggesting that other S1PRs can modulate neuronal excitability. To examine the potential role of S1PR(2) in regulating neuronal excitability we used the established selective antagonist of S1PR(2), JTE-013. Here we report that exposure to JTE-013 alone produced a significant increase in excitability in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in 70-80% of recorded neurons. Internal perfusion of sensory neurons with guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP-β-S) via the recording pipette inhibited the sensitization produced by JTE-013 as well as prostaglandin E(2). Pretreatment with pertussis toxin or the selective S1PR(1) antagonist W146 blocked the sensitization produced by JTE-013. These results indicate that JTE-013 might act as an agonist at other G protein-coupled receptors. In neurons that were sensitized by JTE-013, single-cell RT-PCR studies demonstrated that these neurons did not express the mRNA for S1PR(2). In behavioral studies, injection of JTE-013 into the rat's hindpaw produced a significant increase in the mechanical sensitivity in the ipsilateral, but not contralateral, paw. Injection of JTE-013 did not affect the withdrawal latency to thermal stimulation. Thus JTE-013 augments neuronal excitability independently of S1PR(2) by unknown mechanisms that may involve activation of other G protein-coupled receptors such as S1PR(1). Clearly, further studies are warranted to establish the causal nature of this increased sensitivity, and future studies of neuronal function using JTE-013 should be interpreted with caution.

  4. Activation of synaptic and extrasynaptic glycine receptors by taurine in preoptic hypothalamic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Janardhan Prasad; Park, Soo Joung; Chun, Sang Woo; Cho, Dong Hyu; Han, Seong Kyu

    2015-11-03

    Taurine is an essential amino-sulfonic acid having a fundamental function in the brain, participating in both cell volume regulation and neurotransmission. Using a whole cell voltage patch clamp technique, the taurine-activated neurotransmitter receptors in the preoptic hypothalamic area (PHA) neurons were investigated. In the first set of experiments, different concentrations of taurine were applied on PHA neurons. Taurine-induced responses were concentration-dependent. Taurine-induced currents were action potential-independent and sensitive to strychnine, suggesting the involvement of glycine receptors. In addition, taurine activated not only α-homomeric, but also αβ-heteromeric glycine receptors in PHA neurons. Interestingly, a low concentration of taurine (0.5mM) activated glycine receptors, whereas a higher concentration (3mM) activated both glycine and gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors in PHA neurons. These results suggest that PHA neurons are influenced by taurine and respond via glycine and GABAA receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Causal Interrogation of Neuronal Networks and Behavior through Virally Transduced Ivermectin Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenhaus, Horst A; Rozov, Andrei; Bertocchi, Ilaria; Tang, Wannan; Kirsch, Joachim; Betz, Heinrich; Sprengel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The causal interrogation of neuronal networks involved in specific behaviors requires the spatially and temporally controlled modulation of neuronal activity. For long-term manipulation of neuronal activity, chemogenetic tools provide a reasonable alternative to short-term optogenetic approaches. Here we show that virus mediated gene transfer of the ivermectin (IVM) activated glycine receptor mutant GlyRα1 (AG) can be used for the selective and reversible silencing of specific neuronal networks in mice. In the striatum, dorsal hippocampus, and olfactory bulb, GlyRα1 (AG) promoted IVM dependent effects in representative behavioral assays. Moreover, GlyRα1 (AG) mediated silencing had a strong and reversible impact on neuronal ensemble activity and c-Fos activation in the olfactory bulb. Together our results demonstrate that long-term, reversible and re-inducible neuronal silencing via GlyRα1 (AG) is a promising tool for the interrogation of network mechanisms underlying the control of behavior and memory formation.

  6. Long-Term Plasticity of Astrocytic Metabotropic Neurotransmitter Receptors Driven by Changes in Neuronal Activity in Hippocampal Slices

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Xiaoqiao

    2011-01-01

    In addition to synaptic communication between neurons, there is now strong evidence for neuron-to-astrocyte receptor signaling in the brain. During trains of action potentials or repetitive stimulation, neurotransmitter spills out of the synapse to activate astrocytic Gq protein-coupled receptors (Gq GPCRs). To date, very little is known about the ability of astrocytic receptors to exhibit plasticity as a result of long-term changes in neuronal firing rates. Here we describe for the first tim...

  7. GABAA receptor-mediated input change on orexin neurons following sleep deprivation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuki, T; Takasu, M; Hirose, Y; Murakoshi, N; Sinton, C M; Motoike, T; Yanagisawa, M

    2015-01-22

    Orexins are bioactive peptides, which have been shown to play a pivotal role in vigilance state transitions: the loss of orexin-producing neurons (orexin neurons) leads to narcolepsy with cataplexy in the human. However, the effect of the need for sleep (i.e., sleep pressure) on orexin neurons remains largely unknown. Here, we found that immunostaining intensities of the α1 subunit of the GABAA receptor and neuroligin 2, which is involved in inhibitory synapse specialization, on orexin neurons of mouse brain were significantly increased by 6-h sleep deprivation. In contrast, we noted that immunostaining intensities of the α2, γ2, and β2/3 subunits of the GABAA receptor and Huntingtin-associated protein 1, which is involved in GABAAR trafficking, were not changed by 6-h sleep deprivation. Using a slice patch recording, orexin neurons demonstrated increased sensitivity to a GABAA receptor agonist together with synaptic plasticity changes after sleep deprivation when compared with an ad lib sleep condition. In summary, the GABAergic input property of orexin neurons responds rapidly to sleep deprivation. This molecular response of orexin neurons may thus play a role in the changes that accompany the need for sleep following prolonged wakefulness, in particular the decreased probability of a transition to wakefulness once recovery sleep has begun. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chromatin modification of Notch targets in olfactory receptor neuron diversification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Endo, K.; Karim, M. R.; Taniguchi, H.; Krejčí, Alena; Kinameri, E.; Siebert, M.; Ito, K.; Bray, S. J.; Moore, A. W.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 2 (2012), s. 224-233 ISSN 1097-6256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : neuron diversification Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 15.251, year: 2012

  9. Functional expression of the 5-HT1c receptor in neuronal and nonneuronal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julius, D.; MacDermott, A.B.; Jessel, T.M.; Huang, K.; Molineaux, S.; Schieren, I.; Axel, R.

    1988-01-01

    The isolation of the genes encoding the multiple serotonin receptor subtypes and the ability to express these receptors in new cellular environments will help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of action of serotonin in the mammalian brain. The cloning of most neurotransmitter receptors has required the purification of receptor, the determination of partial protein sequence, and the synthesis of oligonucleotide probes with which to obtain cDNA or genomic clones. However, the serotonin receptors have not been purified and antibodies have not been generated. The authors therefore designed a cDNA expression system that permits the identification of functional cDNA clones encoding serotonin receptors in the absence of protein sequence information. They have combined cloning in RNA expression vectors with an electrophysiological assay in oocytes to isolate a functional cDNA clone encoding the entire 5-HT 1c receptor. The sequence of this clone reveals that the 5-HT 1c receptor belongs to a family of G-protein-coupled receptors that are thought to traverse the membrane seven times. Mouse fibroblasts transformed with this clone bind serotonergic ligands and respond to serotonin with an elevation in intracellular calcium. Moreover, in situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis indicate that the 5-HT 1c receptor mRNA is expressed in a wide variety of neurons in the rat central nervous system, suggesting that this receptor plays a prominent role in neuronal function

  10. Local inflammation increases vanilloid receptor 1 expression within distinct subgroups of DRG neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Fumimasa; Oh-hashi, Kentaro; Naruse, Yoshihisa; Iijima, Norio; Ueda, Masashi; Shimosato, Goshun; Tominaga, Makoto; Tanaka, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Masaki

    2003-02-14

    Vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1) is essential to the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. We investigated whether inflammation can increase in VR1 positive neuronal profiles in rat DRG neurons using histochemical methods. We also used size frequency analysis and double staining with several neuronal markers to investigate whether or not inflammation alters VR1 expression. Inflammation induced a 1.5-fold increase in percentage of VR1-like immunoreactivity (LI) positive profiles per total neuronal profiles, suggesting that the number of heat and pH sensitive neurons increase during inflammation. Area frequency histograms showed that VR1 expression increased in small and medium-sized neurons after inflammation. Double labeling of VR1 with NF200 showed that VR1 positive neurons with NF200 positive profiles significantly increased, indicating that the medium-sized VR1 positive neurons were neurons with myelinated A-fibers. Local inflammation thus increases in VR1 protein level within distinct subgroups of DRG neurons that may participate in the development and maintenance of inflammatory hyperalgesia.

  11. Interferon-gamma potentiates NMDA receptor signaling in spinal dorsal horn neurons via microglia-neuron interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonekatsu, Mayumi; Taniguchi, Wataru; Yamanaka, Manabu; Nishio, Naoko; Tsutsui, Shunji; Yamada, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Munehito; Nakatsuka, Terumasa

    2016-01-01

    Glia-neuron interactions play an important role in the development of neuropathic pain. Expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokne →cytokine Interferon-gamma (IFNγ) is upregulated in the dorsal horn after peripheral nerve injury, and intrathecal IFNγ administration induces mechanical allodynia in rats. A growing body of evidence suggests that IFNγ might be involved in the mechanisms of neuropathic pain, but its effects on the spinal dorsal horn are unclear. We performed blind whole-cell patch-clamp recording to investigate the effect of IFNγ on postsynaptic glutamate-induced currents in the substantia gelatinosa neurons of spinal cord slices from adult male rats. IFNγ perfusion significantly enhanced the amplitude of NMDA-induced inward currents in substantia gelatinosa neurons, but did not affect AMPA-induced currents. The facilitation of NMDA-induced current by IFNγ was inhibited by bath application of an IFNγ receptor-selective antagonist. Adding the Janus activated kinase inhibitor tofacitinib to the pipette solution did not affect the IFNγ-induced facilitation of NMDA-induced currents. However, the facilitatory effect of IFNγ on NMDA-induced currents was inhibited by perfusion of the microglial inhibitor minocycline. These results suggest that IFNγ binds the microglial IFNγ receptor and enhances NMDA receptor activity in substantia gelatinosa neurons. Next, to identify the effector of signal transmission from microglia to dorsal horn neurons, we added an inhibitor of G proteins, GDP-β-S, to the pipette solution. In a GDP-β-S-containing pipette solution, IFNγ-induced potentiation of the NMDA current was significantly suppressed after 30 min. In addition, IFNγ-induced potentiation of NMDA currents was blocked by application of a selective antagonist of CCR2, and its ligand CCL2 increased NMDA-induced currents. Our findings suggest that IFNγ enhance the amplitude of NMDA-induced inward currents in substantia gelatinosa neurons via microglial

  12. Interferon-gamma potentiates NMDA receptor signaling in spinal dorsal horn neurons via microglia–neuron interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonekatsu, Mayumi; Yamanaka, Manabu; Nishio, Naoko; Tsutsui, Shunji; Yamada, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Munehito; Nakatsuka, Terumasa

    2016-01-01

    Background Glia–neuron interactions play an important role in the development of neuropathic pain. Expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokne →cytokine Interferon-gamma (IFNγ) is upregulated in the dorsal horn after peripheral nerve injury, and intrathecal IFNγ administration induces mechanical allodynia in rats. A growing body of evidence suggests that IFNγ might be involved in the mechanisms of neuropathic pain, but its effects on the spinal dorsal horn are unclear. We performed blind whole-cell patch-clamp recording to investigate the effect of IFNγ on postsynaptic glutamate-induced currents in the substantia gelatinosa neurons of spinal cord slices from adult male rats. Results IFNγ perfusion significantly enhanced the amplitude of NMDA-induced inward currents in substantia gelatinosa neurons, but did not affect AMPA-induced currents. The facilitation of NMDA-induced current by IFNγ was inhibited by bath application of an IFNγ receptor-selective antagonist. Adding the Janus activated kinase inhibitor tofacitinib to the pipette solution did not affect the IFNγ-induced facilitation of NMDA-induced currents. However, the facilitatory effect of IFNγ on NMDA-induced currents was inhibited by perfusion of the microglial inhibitor minocycline. These results suggest that IFNγ binds the microglial IFNγ receptor and enhances NMDA receptor activity in substantia gelatinosa neurons. Next, to identify the effector of signal transmission from microglia to dorsal horn neurons, we added an inhibitor of G proteins, GDP-β-S, to the pipette solution. In a GDP-β-S–containing pipette solution, IFNγ-induced potentiation of the NMDA current was significantly suppressed after 30 min. In addition, IFNγ-induced potentiation of NMDA currents was blocked by application of a selective antagonist of CCR2, and its ligand CCL2 increased NMDA-induced currents. Conclusion Our findings suggest that IFNγ enhance the amplitude of NMDA-induced inward currents in substantia

  13. Prolonged cannabinoid exposure alters GABAA receptor mediated synaptic function in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Laxmikant S.; Blair, Robert. E.; DeLorenzo, Robert. J.

    2011-01-01

    Developing cannabinoid based medication along with marijuana’s recreational use makes it important to investigate molecular adaptations the endocannabinoid system undergoes following prolonged use and withdrawal. Repeated cannabinoid administration results in development of tolerance and produces withdrawal symptoms that may include seizures. Here we employed electrophysiological and immunochemical techniques to investigate the effects of prolonged CB1 receptor agonist exposure on cultured hippocampal neurons. Approximately 60% of CB1 receptors colocalize to GABAergic terminals in hippocampal cultures. Prolonged treatment with the cannabinamimetic WIN 55,212-2 (+WIN, 1μM, 24-h) caused profound CB1 receptor downregulation accompanied by neuronal hyperexcitability. Furthermore, prolonged +WIN treatment resulted in increased GABA release as indicated by increased mIPSC frequency, a diminished GABAergic inhibition as indicated by reduction in mIPSC amplitude and a reduction in GABAA channel number. Additionally, surface staining for the GABAA β2/3 receptor subunits was decreased, while no changes in staining for the presynaptic vesicular GABA transporter were observed, indicating that GABAergic terminals remained intact. These findings demonstrate that agonist-induced downregulation of the CB1 receptor in hippocampal cultures results in neuronal hyperexcitability that may be attributed, in part, to alterations in both presynaptic GABA release mechanisms and postsynaptic GABAA receptor function demonstrating a novel role for cannabinoid-dependent presynaptic control of neuronal transmission. PMID:21324315

  14. Insulin receptor signaling in the development of neuronal structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cline Hollis T

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sensory experience plays a crucial role in regulating neuronal shape and in developing synaptic contacts during brain formation. These features are required for a neuron to receive, integrate, and transmit signals within the neuronal network so that animals can adapt to the constant changing environment. Insulin receptor signaling, which has been extensively studied in peripheral organ systems such as liver, muscle and adipocyte, has recently been shown to play important roles in the central nervous system. Here we review the current understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate structural and functional aspects of circuit development, particularly with respect to the role of insulin receptor signaling in synaptic function and the development of dendritic arbor morphology. The potential link between insulin receptor signaling malfunction and neurological disorders will also be discussed.

  15. AMPA receptor pHluorin-GluA2 reports NMDA receptor-induced intracellular acidification in hippocampal neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Rathje, Mette; Fang, Huaqiang; Bachman, Julia L.; Anggono, Victor; Gether, Ulrik; Huganir, Richard L.; Madsen, Kenneth L.

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptor activation promotes endocytosis of AMPA receptors, which is an important mechanism underlying long-term synaptic depression. The pH-sensitive GFP variant pHluorin fused to the N terminus of GluA2 (pH-GluA2) has been used to assay NMDA-mediated AMPA receptor endocytosis and recycling. Here, we demonstrate that in somatic and dendritic regions of hippocampal neurons a large fraction of the fluorescent signal originates from intracellular pH-GluA2, and that the decline in fluoresce...

  16. Octopaminergic agonists for the cockroach neuronal octopamine receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Hirashima

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The compounds 1-(2,6-diethylphenylimidazolidine-2-thione and 2-(2,6-diethylphenylimidazolidine showed the almost same activity as octopamine in stimulating adenylate cyclase of cockroach thoracic nervous system among 70 octopamine agonists, suggesting that only these compounds are full octopamine agonists and other compounds are partial octopamine agonists. The quantitative structure-activity relationship of a set of 22 octopamine agonists against receptor 2 in cockroach nervous tissue, was analyzed using receptor surface modeling. Three-dimensional energetics descriptors were calculated from receptor surface model/ligand interaction and these three-dimensional descriptors were used in quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis. A receptor surface model was generated using some subset of the most active structures and the results provided useful information in the characterization and differentiation of octopaminergic receptor.

  17. Activation of Strychnine-Sensitive Glycine Receptors by Shilajit on Preoptic Hypothalamic Neurons of Juvenile Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Janardhan Prasad; Cho, Dong Hyu; Han, Seong Kyu

    2016-02-29

    Shilajit, a mineral pitch, has been used in Ayurveda and Siddha system of medicine to treat many human ailments, and is reported to contain at least 85 minerals in ionic form. This study examined the possible mechanism of Shilajit action on preoptic hypothalamic neurons using juvenile mice. The hypothalamic neurons are the key regulator of many hormonal systems. In voltage clamp mode at a holding potential of -60 mV, and under a high chloride pipette solution, Shilajit induced dose-dependent inward current. Shilajit-induced inward currents were reproducible and persisted in the presence of 0.5 μM tetrodotoxin (TTX) suggesting a postsynaptic action of Shilajit on hypothalamic neurons. The currents induced by Shilajit were almost completely blocked by 2 μM strychnine (Stry), a glycine receptor antagonist. In addition, Shilajit-induced inward currents were partially blocked by bicuculline. Under a gramicidin-perforated patch clamp mode, Shilajit induced membrane depolarization on juvenile neurons. These results show that Shilajit affects hypothalamic neuronal activities by activating the Stry-sensitive glycine receptor with α₂/α₂β subunit. Taken together, these results suggest that Shilajit contains some ingredients with possible glycine mimetic activities and might influence hypothalamic neurophysiology through activation of Stry-sensitive glycine receptor-mediated responses on hypothalamic neurons postsynaptically.

  18. What do we really know about 5-HT1A receptor signaling in neuronal cells?

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    JENNY LUCY FIEDLER

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT is a neurotransmitter that plays an important role in neuronal plasticity. Variations in the levels of 5-HT at the synaptic cleft, expression or dysfunction of serotonin receptors may alter brain development and predispose to various mental diseases. Here, we review the transduction pathways described in various cell types transfected with recombinant 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1AR, specially contrasting with those findings obtained in neuronal cells. The 5-HT1AR is detected in early stages of neural development and is located in the soma, dendrites and spines of hippocampal neurons. The 5-HT1AR differs from other serotonin receptors because it is coupled to different pathways, depending on the targeted cell. The signaling pathway associated with this receptor is determined by Gα isoforms and some cascades involve βγ signaling. The activity of 5-HT1AR usually promotes a reduction in neuronal excitability and firing, provokes a variation in cAMP and Ca2+, levels which may be linked to specific types of behavior and cognition. Furthermore, evidence indicates that 5-HT1AR induces neuritogesis and synapse formation, probably by modulation of the neuronal cytoskeleton through MAPK and PI3K-Akt signaling pathways. Advances in understanding the actions of 5-HT1AR and its association with different signaling pathways in the central nervous system will reveal their pivotal role in health and disease.

  19. An improved ivermectin-activated chloride channel receptor for inhibiting electrical activity in defined neuronal populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynagh, Timothy Peter; Lynch, Joseph W

    2010-01-01

    The ability to silence the electrical activity of defined neuronal populations in vivo is dramatically advancing our understanding of brain function. This technology may eventually be useful clinically for treating a variety of neuropathological disorders caused by excessive neuronal activity...... conductance, homomeric expression, and human origin may render the F207A/A288G alpha1 glycine receptor an improved silencing receptor for neuroscientific and clinical purposes. As all known highly ivermectin-sensitive GluClRs contain an endogenous glycine residue at the corresponding location, this residue...

  20. Estradiol upregulates progesterone receptor and orphanin FQ colocalization in arcuate nucleus neurons and opioid receptor-like receptor-1 expression in proopiomelanocortin neurons that project to the medial preoptic nucleus in the female rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanathara, Nayna M.; Moreas, Justine; Mahavongtrakul, Matthew; Sinchak, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Background Ovarian steroids regulate sexual receptivity in the female rat by acting on neurons that converge on proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH) that project to the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN). Estradiol rapidly activates these neurons to release β-endorphin that activates MPN μ-opioid receptors (MOP) to inhibit lordosis. Lordosis is facilitated by the subsequent action of progesterone that deactivates the estradiol-induced MPN MOP activation. Orphanin FQ (OFQ/N; aka nociceptin) infusions into the ARH, like progesterone, deactivate MPN MOP and facilitate lordosis in estradiol-primed rats. OFQ/N reduces the activity of ARH β-endorphin neurons through post- and presynaptic mechanisms via its cognate receptor, ORL-1. Methods We tested the hypotheses that progesterone receptors (PR) are expressed in ARH OFQ/N neurons by immunohistochemistry and ORL-1 is expressed in POMC neurons that project to the MPN by combining Fluoro-Gold injection into the MPN and double-label fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). We also hypothesized that estradiol increases coexpression of PR-OFQ/N and ORL-1-POMC in ARH neurons of ovariectomized rats. Results The number of PR and OFQ/N immunopositive ARH neurons was increased as was their colocalization by estradiol treatment. FISH for ORL-1 and POMC mRNA revealed a subpopulation of ARH neurons that was triple-labeled indicating these neurons project to the MPN and coexpress ORL-1 and POMC mRNA. Estradiol was shown to upregulate ORL-1 and POMC expression in MPN-projecting ARH neurons. Conclusion Estradiol upregulates the ARH OFQ/N-ORL-1 system projecting to the MPN that regulates lordosis. PMID:24821192

  1. GABAB receptor deficiency causes failure of neuronal homeostasis in hippocampal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertkin, Irena; Styr, Boaz; Slomowitz, Edden; Ofir, Nir; Shapira, Ilana; Berner, David; Fedorova, Tatiana; Laviv, Tal; Barak-Broner, Noa; Greitzer-Antes, Dafna; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Lotan, Ilana; Slutsky, Inna

    2015-06-23

    Stabilization of neuronal activity by homeostatic control systems is fundamental for proper functioning of neural circuits. Failure in neuronal homeostasis has been hypothesized to underlie common pathophysiological mechanisms in a variety of brain disorders. However, the key molecules regulating homeostasis in central mammalian neural circuits remain obscure. Here, we show that selective inactivation of GABAB, but not GABA(A), receptors impairs firing rate homeostasis by disrupting synaptic homeostatic plasticity in hippocampal networks. Pharmacological GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R) blockade or genetic deletion of the GB(1a) receptor subunit disrupts homeostatic regulation of synaptic vesicle release. GABA(B)Rs mediate adaptive presynaptic enhancement to neuronal inactivity by two principle mechanisms: First, neuronal silencing promotes syntaxin-1 switch from a closed to an open conformation to accelerate soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex assembly, and second, it boosts spike-evoked presynaptic calcium flux. In both cases, neuronal inactivity removes tonic block imposed by the presynaptic, GB(1a)-containing receptors on syntaxin-1 opening and calcium entry to enhance probability of vesicle fusion. We identified the GB(1a) intracellular domain essential for the presynaptic homeostatic response by tuning intermolecular interactions among the receptor, syntaxin-1, and the Ca(V)2.2 channel. The presynaptic adaptations were accompanied by scaling of excitatory quantal amplitude via the postsynaptic, GB(1b)-containing receptors. Thus, GABA(B)Rs sense chronic perturbations in GABA levels and transduce it to homeostatic changes in synaptic strength. Our results reveal a novel role for GABA(B)R as a key regulator of population firing stability and propose that disruption of homeostatic synaptic plasticity may underlie seizure's persistence in the absence of functional GABA(B)Rs.

  2. Agonist-selective effects of opioid receptor ligands on cytosolic calcium concentration in rat striatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailoiu, G Cristina; Deliu, Elena; Hooper, Robert; Dun, Nae J; Undieh, Ashiwel S; Adler, Martin W; Benamar, Khalid; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2012-06-01

    Buprenorphine is an opioid receptor ligand whose mechanism of action is incompletely understood. Using Ca(2+) imaging, we assessed the effects of buprenorphine, β-endorphin, and morphine on cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)](i), in rat striatal neurons. Buprenorphine (0.01-1 μM) increased [Ca(2+)](i) in a dose-dependent manner in a subpopulation of rat striatal neurons. The effect of buprenorphine was largely reduced by naloxone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, but not by μ, κ, δ or NOP-selective antagonists. β-Endorphin (0.1 μM) increased [Ca(2+)](i) with a lower amplitude and slower time course than buprenorphine. Similar to buprenorphine, the effect of β-endorphin was markedly decreased by naloxone, but not by opioid-selective antagonists. Morphine (0.1-10 μM), did not affect [Ca(2+)](i) in striatal neurons. Our results suggest that buprenorphine and β-endorphin act on a distinct type/subtype of plasmalemmal opioid receptors or activate intracellular opioid-like receptor(s) in rat striatal neurons. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Frequent occurrence of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in GABAergic neurons of the chick visual system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Torrão

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Double-labeling immunohistochemical methods were used to investigate the occurrence of the alpha8 and alpha5 nicotinic receptor subunits in presumptive GABAergic neurons of the chick nervous system. Nicotinic receptor immunoreactivity was often found in cells exhibiting GABA-like immunoreactivity, especially in the visual system. The alpha8 subunit appeared to be present in presumptive GABAergic cells of the ventral lateral geniculate nucleus, nucleus of the basal optic root of the accessory optic system, and the optic tectum, among several other structures. The alpha5 subunit was also found in GABA-positive neurons, as observed in the lentiform nucleus of the mesencephalon and other pretectal nuclei. The numbers of alpha8- and alpha5-positive neurons that were also GABA-positive represented high percentages of the total number of neurons containing nicotinic receptor labeling in several brain areas, which indicates that most of the alpha8 and alpha5 nicotinic receptor subunits are present in GABAergic cells. Taken together with data from other studies, our results indicate an important role of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the functional organization of GABAergic circuits in the visual system.

  4. Activation of 5-HT2A/2C receptors reduces the excitability of cultured cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lingli; Liu, Chunhua; Dang, Minyan; Luo, Bin; Guo, Yiping; Wang, Haitao

    2016-10-06

    The abundant forebrain serotonergic projections are believed to modulate the activities of cortical neurons. 5-HT2 receptor among multiple subtypes of serotonin receptors contributes to the modulation of excitability, synaptic transmissions and plasticity. In the present study, whole-cell patch-clamp recording was adopted to examine whether activation of 5-HT2A/2C receptors would have any impact on the excitability of cultured cortical neurons. We found that 2,5-Dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), a selective 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist, rapidly and reversibly depressed spontaneous action potentials mimicking the effect of serotonin. The decreased excitability was also observed for current-evoked firing. Additionally DOI increased neuronal input resistance. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cationic channels (HCN) did not account for the inhibition of spontaneous firing. The synaptic contribution was ruled out in that DOI augmented excitation and attenuated inhibition to actually favor an increase in the excitability. Our findings revealed that activation of 5-HT2A/2C receptors reduces neuronal excitability, which would deepen our understanding of serotonergic modulation of cortical activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Epibatidine-derivatives: ligands for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westera, G.; Patt, J.T.; Jankowski, K.; Bertrand, D.; Spang, J.; Schubiger, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    Epibatidine, isolated from the Ecuadorian frog Epipedobates tricolar, has been synthesized. 11 C-N-methyl derivate is investigated as useful nicotinergic receptor ligand by electrophysiological methods and in vivo mice experiments. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs

  6. Reduced Mechanical Stretch Induces Enhanced Endothelin B Receptor-mediated Contractility via Activation of Focal Adhesion Kinase and Extra Cellular-regulated Kinase 1/2 in Cerebral Arteries from Rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spray, Stine; Rasmussen, Marianne N P; Skovsted, Gry F

    2016-01-01

    ETB receptor agonist sarafotoxin 6c. The involvement of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were studied by their specific inhibitors U0126 and PF-228, respectively. Compared to their stretched counterparts, un-stretched MCA segments showed a significantly...

  7. Regulated appearance of NMDA receptor subunits and channel functions during in vitro neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelitai, Márta; Schlett, Katalin; Varju, Patrícia; Eisel, Ulrich; Madarász, Emília

    2002-04-01

    The schedule of NMDA receptor subunit expression and the appearance of functional NMDA-gated ion channels were investigated during the retinoic acid (RA) induced neuronal differentiation of NE-4C, a p53-deficient mouse neuroectodermal progenitor cell line. NR2A, NR2B, and NR2D subunit transcripts were present in both nondifferentiated and neuronally differentiated cultures, while NR2C subunits were expressed only transiently, during the early period of neural differentiation. Several splice variants of NR1 were detected in noninduced progenitors and in RA-induced cells, except the N1 exon containing transcripts that appeared after the fourth day of induction, when neuronal processes were already formed. NR1 and NR2A subunit proteins were detected both in nondifferentiated progenitor cells and in neurons, while the mature form of NR2B subunit protein appeared only at the time of neuronal process elongation. Despite the early presence of NR1 and NR2A subunits, NMDA-evoked responses could be detected in NE-4C neurons only after the sixth day of induction, coinciding in time with the expression of the mature NR2B subunit. The formation of functional NMDA receptors also coincided with the appearance of synapsin I and synaptophysin. The lag period between the production of the subunits and the onset of channel function suggests that subunits capable of channel formation cannot form functional NMDA receptors until a certain stage of neuronal commitment. Thus, the in vitro neurogenesis by NE-4C cells provides a suitable tool to investigate some inherent regulatory processes involved in the initial maturation of NMDA receptor complexes. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Crambescidin 816 induces calcium influx though glutamate receptors in primary cultures of cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Martín Vázquez

    2014-06-01

    In summary, our data suggest that the cytotoxic effect of 10 μM Cramb816 in cortical neurons may be related to an increase in the cytosolic calcium concentration elicited by the toxin, which is shown to be mediated by glutamate receptor activation. Further studies analyzing the effect of glutamate receptor blockers on the cytotoxic effect of Cramb816 are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  9. Positive modulation of delta-subunit containing GABAA receptors in mouse neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vardya, Irina; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Nieto-Gonzalez, Jose Luis

    2012-01-01

    (A) receptors in mouse neurons in vitro and in vivo. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were carried out in the dentate gyrus in mouse brain slices. In granule cells, AA29504 (1 μM) caused a 4.2-fold potentiation of a tonic current induced by THIP (1 μM), while interneurons showed a potentiation of 2.6-fold......, and possibly recruits perisynaptic δ-containing receptors to participate in synaptic phasic inhibition in dentate gyrus....

  10. Prolactin mediates neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons via its receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Castañeda, E; Grattan, D R; Pasantes-Morales, H; Pérez-Domínguez, M; Cabrera-Reyes, E A; Morales, T; Cerbón, M

    2016-04-01

    Recently it has been reported that prolactin (PRL) exerts a neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity in hippocampus in the rat in vivo models. However, the exact mechanism by which PRL mediates this effect is not completely understood. The aim of our study was to assess whether prolactin exerts neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in an in vitro model using primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons, and to determine whether this effect is mediated via the prolactin receptor (PRLR). Primary cell cultures of rat hippocampal neurons were used in all experiments, gene expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR, and protein expression was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Cell viability was assessed by using the MTT method. The results demonstrated that PRL treatment of neurons from primary cultures did not modify cell viability, but that it exerted a neuroprotective effect, with cells treated with PRL showing a significant increase of viability after glutamate (Glu)--induced excitotoxicity as compared with neurons treated with Glu alone. Cultured neurons expressed mRNA for both PRL and its receptor (PRLR), and both PRL and PRLR expression levels changed after the excitotoxic insult. Interestingly, the PRLR protein was detected as two main isoforms of 100 and 40 kDa as compared with that expressed in hypothalamic cells, which was present only as a 30 kDa variant. On the other hand, PRL was not detected in neuron cultures, either by western blot or by immunohistochemistry. Neuroprotection induced by PRL was significantly blocked by specific oligonucleotides against PRLR, thus suggesting that the PRL role is mediated by its receptor expressed in these neurons. The overall results indicated that PRL induces neuroprotection in neurons from primary cell cultures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. NMDA receptors on non-dopaminergic neurons in the VTA support cocaine sensitization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Luo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The initiation of behavioral sensitization to cocaine and other psychomotor stimulants is thought to reflect N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR-mediated synaptic plasticity in the mesolimbic dopamine (DA circuitry. The importance of drug induced NMDAR mediated adaptations in ventral tegmental area (VTA DA neurons, and its association with drug seeking behaviors, has recently been evaluated in Cre-loxp mice lacking functional NMDARs in DA neurons expressing Cre recombinase under the control of the endogenous dopamine transporter gene (NR1(DATCre mice.Using an additional NR1(DATCre mouse transgenic model, we demonstrate that while the selective inactivation of NMDARs in DA neurons eliminates the induction of molecular changes leading to synaptic strengthening, behavioral measures such as cocaine induced locomotor sensitization and conditioned place preference remain intact in NR1(DATCre mice. Since VTA DA neurons projecting to the prefrontal cortex and amygdala express little or no detectable levels of the dopamine transporter, it has been speculated that NMDA receptors in DA neurons projecting to these brain areas may have been spared in NR1(DATCre mice. Here we demonstrate that the NMDA receptor gene is ablated in the majority of VTA DA neurons, including those exhibiting undetectable DAT expression levels in our NR1(DATCre transgenic model, and that application of an NMDAR antagonist within the VTA of NR1(DATCre animals still blocks sensitization to cocaine.These results eliminate the possibility of NMDAR mediated neuroplasticity in the different DA neuronal subpopulations in our NR1(DATCre mouse model and therefore suggest that NMDARs on non-DA neurons within the VTA must play a major role in cocaine-related addictive behavior.

  12. Grin1 receptor deletion within CRF neurons enhances fear memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgette Gafford

    Full Text Available Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF dysregulation is implicated in mood and anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. CRF is expressed in areas engaged in fear and anxiety processing including the central amygdala (CeA. Complicating our ability to study the contribution of CRF-containing neurons to fear and anxiety behavior is the wide variety of cell types in which CRF is expressed. To manipulate specific subpopulations of CRF containing neurons, our lab has developed a mouse with a Cre recombinase gene driven by a CRF promoter (CRFp3.0Cre (Martin et al., 2010. In these studies, mice that have the gene that encodes NR1 (Grin1 flanked by loxP sites (floxed were crossed with our previously developed CRFp3.0Cre mouse to selectively disrupt Grin1 within CRF containing neurons (Cre+/fGrin1+. We find that disruption of Grin1 in CRF neurons did not affect baseline levels of anxiety, locomotion, pain sensitivity or exploration of a novel object. However, baseline expression of Grin1 was decreased in Cre+/fGrin1+ mice as measured by RTPCR. Cre+/fGrin1+ mice showed enhanced auditory fear acquisition and retention without showing any significant effect on fear extinction. We measured Gria1, the gene that encodes AMPAR1 and the CREB activator Creb1 in the amygdala of Cre+/fGrin1+ mice after fear conditioning. Both Gria1 and Creb1 were enhanced in the amygdala after training. To determine if the Grin1-expressing CRF neurons within the CeA are responsible for the enhancement of fear memory in adults, we infused a lentivirus with Cre driven by a CRF promoter (LV pCRF-Cre/fGrin1+ into the CeA of floxed Grin1 mice. Cre driven deletion of Grin1 specifically within CRF expressing cells in the CeA also resulted in enhanced fear memory acquisition and retention. Altogether, these findings suggest that selective disruption of Grin1 within CeA CRF neurons strongly enhances fear memory.

  13. N-Methyl-d-Aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Blockade Prevents Neuronal Death Induced by Zika Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Vivian V; Del Sarto, Juliana L; Rocha, Rebeca F; Silva, Flavia R; Doria, Juliana G; Olmo, Isabella G; Marques, Rafael E; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Foureaux, Giselle; Araújo, Julia Maria S; Cramer, Allysson; Real, Ana Luíza C V; Ribeiro, Lucas S; Sardi, Silvia I; Ferreira, Anderson J; Machado, Fabiana S; de Oliveira, Antônio C; Teixeira, Antônio L; Nakaya, Helder I; Souza, Danielle G; Ribeiro, Fabiola M; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2017-04-25

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is a global health emergency that causes significant neurodegeneration. Neurodegenerative processes may be exacerbated by N -methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent neuronal excitoxicity. Here, we have exploited the hypothesis that ZIKV-induced neurodegeneration can be rescued by blocking NMDA overstimulation with memantine. Our results show that ZIKV actively replicates in primary neurons and that virus replication is directly associated with massive neuronal cell death. Interestingly, treatment with memantine or other NMDAR blockers, including dizocilpine (MK-801), agmatine sulfate, or ifenprodil, prevents neuronal death without interfering with the ability of ZIKV to replicate in these cells. Moreover, in vivo experiments demonstrate that therapeutic memantine treatment prevents the increase of intraocular pressure (IOP) induced by infection and massively reduces neurodegeneration and microgliosis in the brain of infected mice. Our results indicate that the blockade of NMDARs by memantine provides potent neuroprotective effects against ZIKV-induced neuronal damage, suggesting it could be a viable treatment for patients at risk for ZIKV infection-induced neurodegeneration. IMPORTANCE Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is a global health emergency associated with serious neurological complications, including microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Infection of experimental animals with ZIKV causes significant neuronal damage and microgliosis. Treatment with drugs that block NMDARs prevented neuronal damage both in vitro and in vivo These results suggest that overactivation of NMDARs contributes significantly to the neuronal damage induced by ZIKV infection, and this is amenable to inhibition by drug treatment. Copyright © 2017 Costa et al.

  14. GABAA receptor drugs and neuronal plasticity in reward and aversion: focus on the ventral tegmental area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eVashchinkina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available GABAA receptors are the main fast inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the mammalian brain, and targets for many clinically important drugs widely used in the treatment of anxiety disorders, insomnia and in anesthesia. Nonetheless, there are significant risks associated with the long-term use of these drugs particularly related to development of tolerance and addiction. Addictive mechanisms of GABAA receptor drugs are poorly known, but recent findings suggest that those drugs may induce aberrant neuroadaptations in the brain reward circuitry. Recently, benzodiazepines, acting on synaptic GABAA receptors, and modulators of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (THIP and neurosteroids have been found to induce plasticity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA dopamine neurons and their main target projections. Furthermore, depending whether synaptic or extrasynaptic GABAA receptor populations are activated, the behavioral outcome of repeated administration seems to correlate with rewarding or aversive behavioral responses, respectively. The VTA dopamine neurons project to forebrain centers such as the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex, and receive afferent projections from these brain regions and especially from the extended amygdala and lateral habenula, forming the major part of the reward and aversion circuitry. Both synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA drugs inhibit the VTA GABAergic interneurons, thus activating the VTA DA neurons by disinhibition and this way inducing glutamatergic synaptic plasticity. However, the GABAA drugs failed to alter synaptic spine numbers as studied from Golgi-Cox-stained VTA dendrites. Since the GABAergic drugs are known to depress the brain metabolism and gene expression, their likely way of inducing neuroplasticity in mature neurons is by disinhibiting the principal neurons, which remains to be rigorously tested for a number of clinically important anxiolytics, sedatives and anesthetics in different parts of

  15. Calcium-sensing receptor in rat vagal bronchopulmonary sensory neurons regulates the function of the capsaicin receptor TRPV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qihai; Vysotskaya, Zhanna V; Moss, Charles R; Kagira, Martin K; Gilbert, Carolyn A

    2013-11-01

    Extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has been known to play a critical role in the maintainance of systemic Ca(2+) homeostasis. Recent studies have shown that CaSR is also expressed in many tissues that are not directly related to plasma Ca(2+) regulation, such as the central and peripheral nervous system, where the function of this receptor remains to be defined. In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression of CaSR and its potential interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor type 1 (TRPV1) in rat vagal bronchopulmonary sensory neurons. Our immunohistochemical experiments demonstrated the expression of CaSR in these sensory neurons as well as in trachea and lung parenchyma. Results from our whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in isolated neurons showed that strong activation of CaSR with high concentrations of its agonists, including spermine, NPS R-568 and Ca(2+), inhibited the capsaicin-evoked whole-cell inward current. Blockade of CaSR with its antagonists NPS 2390 and NPS 2143 significantly enhanced the capsaicin-evoked TRPV1 current. These data suggest that CaSR is likely to be involved in the integration of primary bronchopulmonary sensory inputs in physiological and/or pathophysiological conditions.

  16. Olfaction in the Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni. I: Identification of olfactory receptor neuron types responding to environmental odors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, C D; Cribb, B W

    2001-05-01

    The electroantennogram method was used to investigate the number of distinct olfactory receptor neuron types responding to a range of behaviorally active volatile chemicals in gravid Queensland fruit flies, Bactrocera tryoni. Three receptor neuron types were identified. One type responds to methyl butyrate, 2-butanone, farnesene, and carbon dioxide; a second to ethanol; and a third to n-butyric acid and ammonia. The receptor neuron type responding to methyl butyrate, 2-butanone, farnesene, and carbon dioxide consists of three subtypes. The presence of a limited number of receptor neuron types responding to a diverse set of chemicals and the reception of carbon dioxide by a receptor neuron type that responds to other odorants are novel aspects of the peripheral olfactory discrimination process.

  17. Dorsal vagal preganglionic neurons: differential responses to CCK1 and 5-HT3 receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussa, Bashair M; Sartor, Daniela M; Verberne, Anthony J M

    2010-08-25

    The dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) is the main source of the vagal innervation of the pancreas. Several studies in vitro have demonstrated that the DMV consists of a heterogeneous population of preganglionic neurons but little is known about their electrophysiological characteristics in vivo. The aims of this study were to (i) identify DMV preganglionic neurons in vivo with axons in the pancreatic vagus and (ii) characterize their responses to stimulation of cholecystokinin (CCK(1)) and serotonin (5-HT(3)) receptors which are major regulators of pancreatic secretion. Male Sprague Dawley rats anaesthetised with isoflurane (1.5%/100% O(2)) were used throughout. Dorsal vagal preganglionic neurons were identified by antidromic activation in response to stimulation of the pancreatic vagus. Dorsal vagal preganglionic neurons had axonal conduction velocities in the C-fibre range (0.7+/-0.03 m/s). Forty-four neurons were identified within the rostral, intermediate and caudal DMV and thirty-eight were tested for responsiveness to CCK-8S (CCK(1) agonist) and phenylbiguanide (PBG; 5-HT(3) receptor agonist). CCK-8S and PBG (0.1-10 microg/kg, i.v.) produced three types of response: (i) preganglionic neurons in the intermediate DMV were inhibited by CCK-8S (n=18) and PBG (n=10), (ii) neurons in the caudal DMV were activated by CCK (n=5) and PBG (n=2) and (iii) CCK-8S (n=9) and PBG (n=7) had no effect on preganglionic neurons in the rostral DMV. CCK-8S and PBG have complex actions on preganglionic neurons in the DMV that may be related to their effects on pancreatic secretion. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Extrasynaptic glycine receptors of rodent dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons: a sensitive target for ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Edward P; Mitchell, Elizabeth A; Greig, Scott J; Corteen, Nicole; Balfour, David J K; Swinny, Jerome D; Lambert, Jeremy J; Belelli, Delia

    2014-04-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant medical and social problem. Several neurotransmitter systems are implicated in ethanol's actions, with certain receptors and ion channels emerging as putative targets. The dorsal raphe (DR) nucleus is associated with the behavioral actions of alcohol, but ethanol actions on these neurons are not well understood. Here, using immunohistochemistry and electrophysiology we characterize DR inhibitory transmission and its sensitivity to ethanol. DR neurons exhibit inhibitory 'phasic' post-synaptic currents mediated primarily by synaptic GABAA receptors (GABAAR) and, to a lesser extent, by synaptic glycine receptors (GlyR). In addition to such phasic transmission mediated by the vesicular release of neurotransmitter, the activity of certain neurons may be governed by a 'tonic' conductance resulting from ambient GABA activating extrasynaptic GABAARs. However, for DR neurons extrasynaptic GABAARs exert only a limited influence. By contrast, we report that unusually the GlyR antagonist strychnine reveals a large tonic conductance mediated by extrasynaptic GlyRs, which dominates DR inhibition. In agreement, for DR neurons strychnine increases their input resistance, induces membrane depolarization, and consequently augments their excitability. Importantly, this glycinergic conductance is greatly enhanced in a strychnine-sensitive fashion, by behaviorally relevant ethanol concentrations, by drugs used for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal, and by taurine, an ingredient of certain 'energy drinks' often imbibed with ethanol. These findings identify extrasynaptic GlyRs as critical regulators of DR excitability and a novel molecular target for ethanol.

  19. Acute 5-HT7 receptor activation increases NMDA-evoked currents and differentially alters NMDA receptor subunit phosphorylation and trafficking in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasefi, Maryam S; Yang, Kai; Li, Jerry; Kruk, Jeff S; Heikkila, John J; Jackson, Michael F; MacDonald, John F; Beazely, Michael A

    2013-05-14

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are regulated by several G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as well as receptor tyrosine kinases. Serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptors are expressed throughout the brain including the thalamus and hippocampus. Long-term (2-24 h) activation of 5-HT7 receptors promotes the expression of neuroprotective growth factor receptors, including the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptors which can protect neurons against NMDA-induced neurotoxicity. In contrast to long-term activation of 5-HT7 receptors, acute (5 min) treatment of isolated hippocampal neurons with the 5-HT7 receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) enhances NMDA-evoked peak currents and this increase in peak currents is blocked by the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, SB 269970. In hippocampal slices, acute 5-HT7 receptor activation increases NR1 NMDA receptor subunit phosphorylation and differentially alters the phosphorylation state of the NR2B and NR2A subunits. NMDA receptor subunit cell surface expression is also differentially altered by 5-HT7 receptor agonists: NR2B cell surface expression is decreased whereas NR1 and NR2A surface expression are not significantly altered. In contrast to the negative regulatory effects of long-term activation of 5-HT7 receptors on NMDA receptor signaling, acute activation of 5-HT7 receptors promotes NMDA receptor activity. These findings highlight the potential for temporally differential regulation of NMDA receptors by the 5-HT7 receptor.

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor action in metabolic and neuronal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabedian, Michael J; Harris, Charles A; Jeanneteau, Freddy

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoids via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) have effects on a variety of cell types, eliciting important physiological responses via changes in gene expression and signaling. Although decades of research have illuminated the mechanism of how this important steroid receptor controls gene expression using in vitro and cell culture-based approaches, how GR responds to changes in external signals in vivo under normal and pathological conditions remains elusive. The goal of this review is to highlight recent work on GR action in fat cells and liver to affect metabolism in vivo and the role GR ligands and receptor phosphorylation play in calibrating signaling outputs by GR in the brain in health and disease. We also suggest that both the brain and fat tissue communicate to affect physiology and behavior and that understanding this "brain-fat axis" will enable a more complete understanding of metabolic diseases and inform new ways to target them.

  1. Melanocortin 3 Receptor Signaling in Midbrain Dopamine Neurons Increases the Motivation for Food Reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Rahul; Omrani, Azar; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; de Vrind, Véronne A J; Van Rozen, Andrea J; Ophuis, Ralph J A Oude; Garner, Keith; Kallo, Imre; Ghanem, Alexander; Liposits, Zsolt; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; la Fleur, Susanne E; Adan, Roger A H

    2016-08-01

    The central melanocortin (MC) system mediates its effects on food intake via MC3 (MC3R) and MC4 receptors (MC4R). Although the role of MC4R in meal size determination, satiation, food preference, and motivation is well established, the involvement of MC3R in the modulation of food intake has been less explored. Here, we investigated the role of MC3R on the incentive motivation for food, which is a crucial component of feeding behavior. Dopaminergic neurons within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) have a crucial role in the motivation for food. We here report that MC3Rs are expressed on VTA dopaminergic neurons and that pro-opiomelanocortinergic (POMC) neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (Arc) innervate these VTA dopaminergic neurons. Our findings show that intracerebroventricular or intra-VTA infusion of the selective MC3R agonist γMSH increases responding for sucrose under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement, but not free sucrose consumption in rats. Furthermore, ex vivo electrophysiological recordings show increased VTA dopaminergic neuronal activity upon γMSH application. Consistent with a dopamine-mediated effect of γMSH, the increased motivation for sucrose after intra-VTA infusion of γMSH was blocked by pretreatment with the dopamine receptor antagonist α-flupenthixol. Taken together, we demonstrate an Arc POMC projection onto VTA dopaminergic neurons that modulates motivation for palatable food via activation of MC3R signaling.

  2. Glutamate mediates the function of melanocortin receptor 4 on sim1 neurons in body weight regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) is a well-established mediator of body weight homeostasis. However, the neurotransmitter(s) that mediate MC4R function remain largely unknown; as a result, little is known about the second-order neurons of the MC4R neural pathway. Single-minded 1 (Sim1)-expressing ...

  3. INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ON NEURONAL NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ON NEURONAL NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS. A.S. Bale*; P.J. Bushnell; C.A. Meacham; T.J. Shafer Neurotoxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA Toluene (TOL...

  4. Parvalbumin-Positive Neurons in Rat Dorsal Hippocampus Contain Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; de Jong, Giena; Strosberg, A.D.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1991-01-01

    The present study describes the colocalization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PARV) in nonpyramidal neurons of the rat dorsal hippocampus by means of dual-label immunocytochemistry. Fifty-two percent of all muscarinic cholinoceptive

  5. Coexistence of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Somatostatin in Nonpyramidal Neurons of the Rat Dorsal Hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Benoit, R.; Strosberg, A.D.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    This study describes the colocalization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and the neuropeptide somatostatin (SOM) in nonpyramidal neurons of the rat dorsal hippocampus. SOM and mAChRs were identified by immunocytochemistry employing antibody S309 and M35, respectively. Half of the

  6. Regulated appearance of NMDA receptor subunits and channel functions during in vitro neuronal differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelitai, Márta; Schlett, Katalin; Varju, Patrícia; Eisel, Ulrich; Madarász, Emília

    The schedule of NMDA receptor subunit expression and the appearance of functional NMDA-gated ion channels were investigated during the retinoic acid (RA) induced neuronal differentiation of NE-4C, a p53-deficient mouse neuroectodermal progenitor cell line. NR2A. NR2B, and NR2D subunit transcripts

  7. NMDA Receptors on Dopaminoceptive Neurons Are Essential for Drug-Induced Conditioned Place Preference123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarski, Krzysztof; Bobula, Bartosz; Zygmunt, Magdalena; Smutek, Magdalena; Kamińska, Katarzyna; Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Hess, Grzegorz; Przewlocki, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Plasticity of the brain’s dopamine system plays a crucial role in adaptive behavior by regulating appetitive motivation and the control of reinforcement learning. In this study, we investigated drug- and natural-reward conditioned behaviors in a mouse model in which the NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity of dopaminoceptive neurons was disrupted. We generated a transgenic mouse line with inducible selective inactivation of the NR1 subunit in neurons expressing dopamine D1 receptors (the NR1D1CreERT2 mice). Whole-cell recordings of spontaneous EPSCs on neurons in the nucleus accumbens confirmed that a population of neurons lacked the NMDA receptor-dependent component of the current. This effect was accompanied by impaired long-term potentiation in the nucleus accumbens and in the CA1 area of the ventral, but not the dorsal, hippocampus. Mutant mice did not differ from control animals when tested for pavlovian or instrumental conditioning. However, NR1D1CreERT2 mice acquired no preference for a context associated with administration of drugs of abuse. In the conditioned place preference paradigm, mutant mice did not spend more time in the context paired with cocaine, morphine, or ethanol, although these mice acquired a preference for sucrose jelly and an aversion to naloxone injections, as normal. Thus, we observed that the selective inducible ablation of the NMDA receptors specifically blocks drug-associated context memory with no effect on positive reinforcement in general. PMID:27294197

  8. Orexin-A increases the firing activity of hippocampal CA1 neurons through orexin-1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin-Yi; Chen, Lei; Du, Yi-Feng

    2017-07-01

    Orexins including two peptides, orexin-A and orexin-B, are produced in the posterior lateral hypothalamus. Much evidence has indicated that central orexinergic systems play numerous functions including energy metabolism, feeding behavior, sleep/wakefulness, and neuroendocrine and sympathetic activation. Morphological studies have shown that the hippocampal CA1 regions receive orexinergic innervation originating from the hypothalamus. Positive orexin-1 (OX 1 ) receptors are detected in the CA1 regions. Previous behavioral studies have shown that microinjection of OX 1 receptor antagonist into the hippocampus impairs acquisition and consolidation of spatial memory. However, up to now, little has been known about the direct electrophysiological effects of orexin-A on hippocampal CA1 neurons. Employing multibarrel single-unit extracellular recordings, the present study showed that micropressure administration of orexin-A significantly increased the spontaneous firing rate from 2.96 ± 0.85 to 8.45 ± 1.86 Hz (P orexin-A-induced excitation of hippocampal CA1 neurons. The PLC pathway may be involved in activation of OX 1 receptor-induced excitation of CA1 neurons. Taken together, the present study's results suggest that orexin-A produces excitatory effects on hippocampal neurons via OX 1 receptors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Dopamine control of pyramidal neuron activity in the primary motor cortex via D2 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément eVitrac

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The primary motor cortex (M1 is involved in fine voluntary movements control. Previous studies have shown the existence of a dopamine (DA innervation in M1 of rats and monkeys that could directly modulate M1 neuronal activity. However, none of these studies have described the precise distribution of DA terminals within M1 functional region nor have quantified the density of this innervation. Moreover, the precise role of DA on pyramidal neuron activity still remains unclear due to conflicting results from previous studies regarding D2 effects on M1 pyramidal neurons.In this study we assessed in mice the neuroanatomical characteristics of DA innervation in M1 using unbiased stereological quantification of dopamine transporter-immunostained fibers. We demonstrated for the first time in mice that DA innervates the deep layers of M1 targeting preferentially the forelimb representation area of M1. To address the functional role of the DA innervation on M1 neuronal activity, we performed electrophysiological recordings of single neurons activity in vivo and pharmacologically modulated D2 receptors activity. Local D2 receptors activation by quinpirole enhanced pyramidal neurons spike firing rate without changes in spike firing pattern. Altogether, these results indicate that DA innervation in M1 can increase neuronal activity through D2 receptors activation and suggest a potential contribution to the modulation of fine forelimb movement. Given the demonstrated role for DA in fine motor skill learning in M1, our results suggest that altered D2 modulation of M1 activity may be involved in the pathophysiology of movement disorders associated with disturbed DA homeostasis.

  10. Dopamine D1-like receptors depress excitatory synaptic transmissions in striatal neurons after transient forebrain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchun; Deng, Ping; Ruan, Yiwen; Xu, Zao C

    2008-08-01

    Spiny neurons in the neostriatum are highly vulnerable to ischemia. Despite an enormous body of research suggesting that dopamine is involved in ischemia-induced neuronal loss in the striatum, it remains unclear how dopamine interacts with the glutamatergic excitotoxicity that is widely accepted as a major cause of ischemic cell death. Our study was designed to investigate the effects of dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) activation on excitatory neurotransmission in postischemic striatal neurons. We used the 4-vessel occlusion ischemia model and brain slice preparations. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recording was performed on striatal neurons to measure excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Systemic administration of a D1R agonist after ischemia and hematoxylin/eosin staining were performed to evaluate the effects of D1R activation on ischemia-induced neuronal degeneration in the striatum. D1R activation depressed EPSCs in postischemic striatal neurons. The depression was attributable to inhibition of presynaptic release. An activator of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) mimicked the depressive effects of D1R activation. Bath application of a PKA inhibitor blocked the depression of EPSCs, whereas intracellular postsynaptic application of the PKA inhibitor had no effect. The D1R agonist failed to reduce EPSC amplitude in the presence of an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist. Systemic administration of a D1R agonist after ischemia significantly attenuated ischemia-induced cell death in the striatum. These results indicate that D1R activation presynaptically depresses excitatory synaptic transmission in striatal neurons after ischemia through activation of PKA and adenosine A1 receptors and thus demonstrate a novel mechanism of D1R-mediated protection against ischemia.

  11. Incremental conductance levels of GABAA receptors in dopaminergic neurones of the rat substantia nigra pars compacta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyon, A; Laurent, S; Paupardin-Tritsch, D; Rossier, J; Eugène, D

    1999-05-01

    1. Molecular and biophysical properties of GABAA receptors of dopaminergic (DA) neurones of the pars compacta of the rat substantia nigra were studied in slices and after acute dissociation. 2. Single-cell reverse transcriptase-multiplex polymerase chain reaction confirmed that DA neurones contained mRNAs encoding for the alpha3 subunit of the GABAA receptor, but further showed the presence of alpha4 subunit mRNAs. alpha2, beta1 and gamma1 subunit mRNAs were never detected. Overall, DA neurones present a pattern of expression of GABAA receptor subunit mRNAs containing mainly alpha3/4beta2/3gamma3. 3. Outside-out patches were excised from DA neurones and GABAA single-channel patch-clamp currents were recorded under low doses (1-5 microM) of GABA or isoguvacine, a selective GABAA agonist. Recordings presented several conductance levels which appeared to be integer multiples of an elementary conductance of 4-5 pS. This property was shared by GABAA receptors of cerebellar Purkinje neurones recorded in slices (however, with an elementary conductance of 3 pS). Only the 5-6 lowest levels were analysed. 4. A progressive change in the distribution of occupancy of these levels was observed when increasing the isoguvacine concentration (up to 10 microM) as well as when adding zolpidem (20-200 nM), a drug acting at the benzodiazepine binding site: both treatments enlarged the occupancy of the highest conductance levels, while decreasing that of the smallest ones. Conversely, Zn2+ (10 microM), a negative allosteric modulator of GABAA receptor channels, decreased the occupancy of the highest levels in favour of the lowest ones. 5. These properties of alpha3/4beta2/3gamma3-containing GABAA receptors would support the hypothesis of either single GABAA receptor channels with multiple open states or that of a synchronous recruitment of GABAA receptor channels that could involve their clustering in the membranes of DA neurones.

  12. Hypertension alters GABA receptor-mediated inhibition of neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lin; Zhang, Jing; Mifflin, Steve

    2003-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that microinjection of baclofen, a GABA(B) receptor agonist, into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) results in an enhanced pressor response in hypertensive (HT) rats compared with normotensive (NT) rats, suggesting a possible alteration in the responses of neurons in this area to activation of GABA(B) receptors. The following studies were designed to determine whether HT alters the sensitivity of neurons in the NTS to GABA receptor agonists. Sham-operated NT and unilateral nephrectomized, renal-wrap HT Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, and the responses of NTS neurons receiving aortic nerve (AN) afferent inputs to iontophoretic application of GABA, the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol, and the GABA(B) agonist baclofen were examined. The AN input was classified as monosynaptic (MSN) if the cell responded to each of two stimuli separated by 5 ms with an action potential. If the cell did not respond, the input was considered polysynaptic (PSN). In MSNs, inhibition of AN-evoked discharge by GABA was not altered in 1 wk of HT but was reduced in 4 wk of HT, whereas in PSNs, sensitivity to GABA was reduced at 1 and 4 wk of HT. In HT rats, inhibition of AN-evoked discharge by baclofen was enhanced in MSNs, but not in PSNs, after 1 and 4 wk of HT, whereas inhibition by muscimol was reduced in MSNs and PSNs at 1 and 4 wk of HT. Changes in sensitivity to muscimol and baclofen within MSNs were the same whether the MSN received a slowly or a rapidly conducted AN afferent input. The results demonstrate that early in HT the sensitivity of NTS neurons to inhibitory amino acids is altered and that these changes are maintained for > or =4 wk. The alterations are dependent on the subtype of GABA receptor being activated and whether the neuron receives a mono- or polysynaptic baroreceptor afferent input.

  13. Calyx and dimorphic neurons of mouse Scarpa's ganglion express histamine H3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritto, Simona; Botta, Laura; Zampini, Valeria; Zucca, Gianpiero; Valli, Paolo; Masetto, Sergio

    2009-06-29

    Histamine-related drugs are commonly used in the treatment of vertigo and related vestibular disorders. The site of action of these drugs however has not been elucidated yet. Recent works on amphibians showed that histamine H3 receptor antagonists, e.g. betahistine, inhibit the afferent discharge recorded from the vestibular nerve. To assess the expression of H3 histamine receptors in vestibular neurons, we performed mRNA RT-PCR and immunofluorescence experiments in mouse Scarpa's ganglia. RT-PCR analysis showed the presence of H3 receptor mRNA in mouse ganglia tissue. H3 protein expression was found in vestibular neurons characterized by large and roundish soma, which labeled for calretinin and calbindin. The present results are consistent with calyx and dimorphic, but not bouton, afferent vestibular neurons expressing H3 receptors. This study provides a molecular substrate for the effects of histamine-related antivertigo drugs acting on (or binding to) H3 receptors, and suggest a potential target for the treatment of vestibular disorders of peripheral origin.

  14. Calyx and dimorphic neurons of mouse Scarpa's ganglion express histamine H3 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zucca Gianpiero

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histamine-related drugs are commonly used in the treatment of vertigo and related vestibular disorders. The site of action of these drugs however has not been elucidated yet. Recent works on amphibians showed that histamine H3 receptor antagonists, e.g. betahistine, inhibit the afferent discharge recorded from the vestibular nerve. To assess the expression of H3 histamine receptors in vestibular neurons, we performed mRNA RT-PCR and immunofluorescence experiments in mouse Scarpa's ganglia. Results RT-PCR analysis showed the presence of H3 receptor mRNA in mouse ganglia tissue. H3 protein expression was found in vestibular neurons characterized by large and roundish soma, which labeled for calretinin and calbindin. Conclusion The present results are consistent with calyx and dimorphic, but not bouton, afferent vestibular neurons expressing H3 receptors. This study provides a molecular substrate for the effects of histamine-related antivertigo drugs acting on (or binding to H3 receptors, and suggest a potential target for the treatment of vestibular disorders of peripheral origin.

  15. GABAA receptor-mediated modulation of neuronal activity propagation upon tetanic stimulation in rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Takashi; Tominaga, Yoko

    2010-10-01

    Tetanic stimulation (100 Hz), which can induce long-term potentiation in synaptic connections in the hippocampal CA1 region, causes γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor-mediated long-lasting depolarization of postsynaptic neurons. However, it is not clear how this stimulation modulates neuronal activity propagation. We studied tetanic burst-induced neuronal responses in the hippocampal CA1 region by using optical-recording methods employing a voltage-sensitive dye and focused on GABA(A) receptor-mediated modulation. We observed that burst stimulation induced long-lasting depolarization and progressive decrease in individual excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). Both these effects were suppressed by picrotoxin, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist. Under whole-cell voltage-clamp conditions, we observed a long-lasting inhibitory current (IPSC) and a prominent progressive decrease in the amplitude of the excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC). Further, picrotoxin inhibited the IPSC and the progressive decrease in EPSC. The optically recorded long-lasting depolarization and progressive decrease of EPSPs were strongly dependent on the distance between the recording electrode and the stimulation site. Optical recordings performed across a wide swatch of CA1 revealed that the decrease in activity propagation was followed by facilitation of propagation after recovery and that this facilitation also depended on GABA(A) receptors. Intense activation of GABA(A) receptors is a key factor shaping the spatiotemporal patterns of high-frequency stimulation-induced responses in the CA1 region.

  16. Costimulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate and muscarinic neuronal receptors modulates gap junctional communication in striatal astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Rouach, N.; Tencé, M.; Glowinski, J.; Giaume, C.

    2002-01-01

    Cocultures of neurons and astrocytes from the rat striatum were used to determine whether the stimulation of neuronal receptors could affect the level of intercellular communication mediated by gap junctions in astrocytes. The costimulation of N-methyl-D-asparte (NMDA) and muscarinic receptors led to a prominent reduction of astrocyte gap junctional communication (GJC) in coculture. This treatment was not effective in astrocyte cultures, these cells being devoid of NMDA receptors. Both types ...

  17. From atomic structures to neuronal functions of g protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palczewski, Krzysztof; Orban, Tivadar

    2013-07-08

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are essential mediators of signal transduction, neurotransmission, ion channel regulation, and other cellular events. GPCRs are activated by diverse stimuli, including light, enzymatic processing of their N-termini, and binding of proteins, peptides, or small molecules such as neurotransmitters. GPCR dysfunction caused by receptor mutations and environmental challenges contributes to many neurological diseases. Moreover, modern genetic technology has helped identify a rich array of mono- and multigenic defects in humans and animal models that connect such receptor dysfunction with disease affecting neuronal function. The visual system is especially suited to investigate GPCR structure and function because advanced imaging techniques permit structural studies of photoreceptor neurons at both macro and molecular levels that, together with biochemical and physiological assessment in animal models, provide a more complete understanding of GPCR signaling.

  18. Multiple pathways of sigma(1) receptor ligand uptakes into primary cultured neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H; Karasawa, J; Sagi, N; Takahashi, S; Horikomi, K; Okuyama, S; Nukada, T; Sora, I; Yamamoto, T

    2001-08-03

    Although many antipsychotics have affinities for sigma receptors, the transportation pathway of exogenous sigma(1) receptor ligands to intracellular type-1 sigma receptors are not fully understood. In this study, sigma(1) receptor ligand uptakes were studied using primary cultured neuronal cells. [(3)H](+)-pentazocine and [(3)H](R)-(+)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolidinone L-tartrate (MS-377), used as a selective sigma(1) receptor ligands, were taken up in a time-, energy- and temperature-dependent manner, suggesting that active transport mechanisms were involved in their uptakes. sigma(1) receptor ligands taken up into primary cultured neuronal cells were not restricted to agonists, but also concerned antagonists. The uptakes of these ligands were mainly Na(+)-independent. Kinetic analysis of [(3)H](+)-pentazocine and [(3)H]MS-377 uptake showed K(m) values (microM) of 0.27 and 0.32, and V(max) values (pmol/mg protein/min) of 17.4 and 9.4, respectively. Although both ligands were incorporated, the pharmacological properties of these two ligands were different. Uptake of [(3)H](+)-pentazocine was inhibited in the range 0.4-7.1 microM by all the sigma(1) receptor ligands used, including N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]ethylamine monohydrochloride (NE-100), a selective sigma(1) receptor ligand. In contrast, the inhibition of [(3)H]MS-377 uptake was potently inhibited by haloperidol, characterized by supersensitivity (IC(50), approximately 2 nM) and was inhibited by NE-100 with low sensitivity (IC(50), 4.5 microM). Moreover, kinetic analysis revealed that NE-100 inhibited [(3)H]MS-377 uptake in a noncompetitive manner, suggesting that NE-100 acted at a site different from the uptake sites of [(3)H]MS-377. These findings suggest that there are at least two uptake pathways for sigma(1) receptor ligands in primary cultured neuronal cells (i.e. a haloperidol-sensitive pathway and another, unclear, pathway). In

  19. Multiple receptor subtypes mediate the effects of serotonin on rat subfornical organ neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrogin, K. E.; Johnson, A. K.; Schmid, H. A.

    1998-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) receives significant serotonergic innervation. However, few reports have examined the functional effects of serotonin on SFO neurons. This study characterized the effects of serotonin on spontaneously firing SFO neurons in the rat brain slice. Of 31 neurons tested, 80% responded to serotonin (1-100 microM) with either an increase (n = 15) or decrease (n = 10) in spontaneous activity. Responses to serotonin were dose dependent and persisted after synaptic blockade. Excitatory responses could also be mimicked by the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A/2C receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI; 1-10 microM) and could be blocked by the 5-HT2A/2C-receptor antagonist LY-53,857 (10 microM). LY-53,857 unmasked inhibitory responses to serotonin in 56% of serotonin-excited cells tested. Serotonin-inhibited cells were also inhibited by the 5-HT1A-receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT; 1-10 microM; n = 7). The data indicate that SFO neurons are responsive to serotonin via postsynaptic activation of multiple receptor subtypes. The results suggest that excitatory responses to serotonin are mediated by 5-HT2A or 5-HT2C receptors and that inhibitory responses may be mediated by 5-HT1A receptors. In addition, similar percentages of serotonin-excited and -inhibited cells were also sensitive to ANG II. As such the functional relationship between serotonin and ANG II in the SFO remains unclear.

  20. The sigma-1 receptor: roles in neuronal plasticity and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourrich, Saïd; Su, Tsung-Ping; Fujimoto, Michiko; Bonci, Antonello

    2012-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1Rs) have been implicated in many neurological and psychiatric conditions. The Sig-1R is an intracellular chaperone that resides specifically at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondrion interface referred to as the mitochondrion-associated ER membrane (MAM). Here, Sig-1Rs regulate ER-mitochondrion Ca2+ signaling. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of Sig-1R functions. Based on this, we suggest that the key cellular mechanism linking Sig-1Rs to neurological disorders involve the translocation of Sig-1Rs from the MAM to other parts of the cell, whereby Sig-1Rs bind and modulate the activities of various ion channels, receptors, or kinases. Thus, Sig-1Rs and their associated ligands may represent new avenues for treating some aspects of neurological and psychiatric diseases. PMID:23102998

  1. Histamine Excites Rat Superior Vestibular Nuclear Neurons via Postsynaptic H1 and H2 Receptors in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Xing Zhuang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The superior vestibular nucleus (SVN, which holds a key position in vestibulo-ocular reflexes and nystagmus, receives direct hypothalamic histaminergic innervations. By using rat brainstem slice preparations and extracellular unitary recordings, we investigated the effect of histamine on SVN neurons and the underlying receptor mechanisms. Bath application of histamine evoked an excitatory response of the SVN neurons, which was not blocked by the low-Ca2+/high-Mg2+ medium, indicating a direct postsynaptic effect of the amine. Selective histamine H1 receptor agonist 2-pyridylethylamine and H2 receptor agonist dimaprit, rather than VUF8430, a selective H4 receptor agonist, mimicked the excitation of histamine on SVN neurons. In addition, selective H1 receptor antagonist mepyramine and H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine, but not JNJ7777120, a selective H4 receptor antagonist, partially blocked the excitatory response of SVN neurons to histamine. Moreover, mepyramine together with ranitidine nearly totally blocked the histamine-induced excitation. Immunostainings further showed that histamine H1 and H2 instead of H4 receptors existed in the SVN. These results demonstrate that histamine excites the SVN neurons via postsynaptic histamine H1 and H2 receptors, and suggest that the central histaminergic innervation from the hypothalamus may actively bias the SVN neuronal activity and subsequently modulate the SVN-mediated vestibular functions and gaze control.

  2. Distribution and expression of non-neuronal transient receptor potential (TRPV) ion channels in rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulk, Mathias; Seeliger, Stephan; Aubert, Jerome; Schwab, Verena D; Cevikbas, Ferda; Rivier, Michel; Nowak, Pawel; Voegel, Johannes J; Buddenkotte, Jörg; Steinhoff, Martin

    2012-04-01

    Rosacea is a frequent chronic inflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology. Because early rosacea reveals all characteristics of neurogenic inflammation, a central role of sensory nerves in its pathophysiology has been discussed. Neuroinflammatory mediators and their receptors involved in rosacea are poorly defined. Good candidates may be transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels of vanilloid type (TRPV), which can be activated by many trigger factors of rosacea. Interestingly, TRPV2, TRPV3, and TRPV4 are expressed by both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Here, we analyzed the expression and distribution of TRPV receptors in the various subtypes of rosacea on non-neuronal cells using immunohistochemistry, morphometry, double immunoflourescence, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) as compared with healthy skin and lupus erythematosus. Our results show that dermal immunolabeling of TRPV2 and TRPV3 and gene expression of TRPV1 is significantly increased in erythematotelangiectatic rosacea (ETR). Papulopustular rosacea (PPR) displayed an enhanced immunoreactivity for TRPV2, TRPV4, and also of TRPV2 gene expression. In phymatous rosacea (PhR)-affected skin, dermal immunostaining of TRPV3 and TRPV4 and gene expression of TRPV1 and TRPV3 was enhanced, whereas epidermal TRPV2 staining was decreased. Thus, dysregulation of TRPV channels also expressed by non-neuronal cells may be critically involved in the initiation and/or development of rosacea. TRP ion channels may be targets for the treatment of rosacea.

  3. Neuropeptide FF receptors exhibit direct and anti-opioid effects on mice dorsal raphe nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhong; Zajac, Jean-Marie

    2014-10-05

    By using acutely dissociated dorsal raphe nucleus neurons (DRN) from young mice, direct and anti-opioid effects of Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors were measured. The NPFF analog 1 DMe (10 µM) had no effect on resting Ca2+ channels but reduced the magnitude of Ca2+ transients induced by depolarization in 83.3% neurons tested, of which the inhibition rate is 45.4±2.9%. Pertussis toxin treatment reduced to 18.9% the number of responding neurons and attenuated by 47% the response of 1 DMe. In contrast, cholera toxin treatment had no significant effect. Eighteen minute perfusion with 1 DMe at a very low 10 nM concentration, that did not directly inhibit Ca2+ transients triggered by depolarization in every neuron, attenuated by 78% the inhibitory effect of Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) on Ca2+ transients, but not that of by serotonin. These results demonstrated for the first time that NPFF receptors on mice DRN inhibit Ca2+ transients induced by depolarization via Gi/o protein and also exhibit a specific anti-opioid activity on nociceptin receptors, and that their specific anti-opioid activity is not a direct consequence of their activity on Ca2+ transients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Distribution and Expression of Non-Neuronal Transient Receptor Potential (TRPV) Ion Channels in Rosacea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulk, Mathias; Seeliger, Stephan; Aubert, Jerome; Schwab, Verena D.; Cevikbas, Ferda; Rivier, Michel; Nowak, Pawel; Voegel, Johannes J.; Buddenkotte, Jörg; Steinhoff, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Rosacea is a frequent chronic inflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology. Because early rosacea reveals all characteristics of neurogenic inflammation, a central role of sensory nerves in its pathophysiology has been discussed. Neuroinflammatory mediators and their receptors involved in rosacea are poorly defined. Good candidates may be transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels of vanilloid type (TRPV), which can be activated by many trigger factors of rosacea. Interestingly, TRPV2, TRPV3, and TRPV4 are expressed by both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Here, we analyzed the expression and distribution of TRPV receptors in the various subtypes of rosacea on non-neuronal cells using immunohistochemistry, morphometry, double immunoflourescence, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) as compared with healthy skin and lupus erythematosus. Our results show that dermal immunolabeling of TRPV2 and TRPV3 and gene expression of TRPV1 is significantly increased in erythematotelangiectatic rosacea (ETR). Papulopustular rosacea (PPR) displayed an enhanced immunoreactivity for TRPV2, TRPV4, and also of TRPV2 gene expression. In phymatous rosacea (PhR)-affected skin, dermal immunostaining of TRPV3 and TRPV4 and gene expression of TRPV1 and TRPV3 was enhanced, whereas epidermal TRPV2 staining was decreased. Thus, dysregulation of TRPV channels also expressed by non-neuronal cells may be critically involved in the initiation and/or development of rosacea. TRP ion channels may be targets for the treatment of rosacea. PMID:22189789

  5. Orexins excite neurons of the rat cerebellar nucleus interpositus via orexin 2 receptors in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Jing-Ning; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2010-03-01

    Orexins are newfound hypothalamic neuropeptides implicated in the regulation of feeding behavior, sleep-wakefulness cycle, nociception, addiction, emotions, as well as narcolepsy. However, little is known about roles of orexins in motor control. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the effect of orexins on neuronal activity in the cerebellum, an important subcortical center for motor control. In this study, perfusing slices with orexin A (100 nM-1 microM) or orexin B (100 nM-1 microM) both produced neurons in the rat cerebellar interpositus nucleus (IN) a concentration-dependent excitatory response (96/143, 67.1%). Furthermore, both of the excitations induced by orexin A and B were not blocked by the low-Ca(2+)/high-Mg(2+) medium (n = 8), supporting a direct postsynaptic action of the peptides. Highly selective orexin 1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 did not block the excitatory response of cerebellar IN neurons to orexins (n = 22), but [Ala(11), D-Leu(15)] orexin B, a highly selective orexin 2 receptor (OX(2)R) agonist, mimicked the excitatory effect of orexins on the cerebellar neurons (n = 18). These results demonstrate that orexins excite the cerebellar IN neurons through OX(2)R and suggest that the central orexinergic nervous system may actively participate in motor control through its modulation on one of the final outputs of the spinocerebellum.

  6. (-)-Germacrene D receptor neurones in three species of heliothine moths: structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranden, M; Liblikas, I; König, W A; Almaas, T J; Borg-Karlson, A-K; Mustaparta, H

    2003-07-01

    Specificity of olfactory receptor neurones plays an important role in food and host preferences of a species, and may have become conserved or changed in the evolution of polyphagy and oligophagy. We have identified a major type of plant odour receptor neurones responding to the sesquiterpene germacrene D in three species of heliothine moths, the polyphagous Heliothis virescens and Helicoverpa armigera and the oligophagous Helicoverpa assulta. The neurones respond with high sensitivity and selectivity to (-)-germacrene D, as demonstrated by screening via gas chromatography with numerous mixtures of plant volatiles. Germacrene D was present in both host and non-host plants, but only in half of the tested species. The specificity of the neurones was similar in the three species, as shown by the "secondary" responses to a few other sesquiterpenes. The effect of (-)-germacrene D was about ten times stronger than that of the (+)-enantiomer, which again was about ten times stronger than that of (-)-alpha-ylangene. Weaker effects were obtained for (+)-beta-ylangene, (+)-alpha-copaene, beta-copaene and two unidentified sesquiterpenes. The structure-activity relationship shows that the important properties of (-)-germacrene D in activating the neurones are the ten-membered ring system and the three double bonds acting as electron-rich centres, in addition to the direction of the isopropyl-group responsible for the different effects of the germacrene D enantiomers.

  7. Receptor neuron discrimination of the germacrene D enantiomers in the moth Helicoverpa armigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranden, M; Borg-Karlson, A-K; Mustaparta, H

    2002-02-01

    Plants release complex mixtures of volatiles, including chiral constituents. In the search for the biologically relevant plant odorants, gas chromatography linked to electrophysiological recordings from single receptor neurons has been employed. In heliothine moths, including the females of the Eurasian cotton bollworm moth Helicoverpa armigera, a major type of receptor neurons is identified, showing high sensitivity and selectivity for the sesquiterpene germacrene D. In the present study, gas chromatography with a chiral column linked to single cell recordings were performed. It was found that all germacrene D neurons belonged to one type; all responded to both enantiomers, but (-)-germacrene D had approximately 10 times stronger effect than (+)-germacrene D. Parallel dose-response curves for the two enantiomers were obtained by direct stimulations. The enantiomeric composition of germacrene D, which differed in six plant species and in different individuals of one species, was determined on the basis of the neuron responses. The results, showing the presence of one neuron type for receiving the information about germacrene D in the various plants, suggests that the two enantiomers mediate the same kind of information to the moth, but with different intensity.

  8. Substance P excites GABAergic neurons in the mouse central amygdala through neurokinin 1 receptor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosulina, L.; Strippel, C.; Romo-Parra, H.; Walter, A. L.; Kanyshkova, T.; Sartori, S. B.; Lange, M. D.; Singewald, N.

    2015-01-01

    Substance P (SP) is implicated in stress regulation and affective and anxiety-related behavior. Particularly high expression has been found in the main output region of the amygdala complex, the central amygdala (CE). Here we investigated the cellular mechanisms of SP in CE in vitro, taking advantage of glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein (GAD67-GFP) knockin mice that yield a reliable labeling of GABAergic neurons, which comprise 95% of the neuronal population in the lateral section of CE (CEl). In GFP-positive neurons within CEl, SP caused a membrane depolarization and increase in input resistance, associated with an increase in action potential firing frequency. Under voltage-clamp conditions, the SP-specific membrane current reversed at −101.5 ± 2.8 mV and displayed inwardly rectifying properties indicative of a membrane K+ conductance. Moreover, SP responses were blocked by the neurokinin type 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonist L-822429 and mimicked by the NK1R agonist [Sar9,Met(O2)11]-SP. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed localization of NK1R in GFP-positive neurons in CEl, predominantly in PKCδ-negative neurons (80%) and in few PKCδ-positive neurons (17%). Differences in SP responses were not observed between the major types of CEl neurons (late firing, regular spiking, low-threshold bursting). In addition, SP increased the frequency and amplitude of GABAergic synaptic events in CEl neurons depending on upstream spike activity. These data indicate a NK1R-mediated increase in excitability and GABAergic activity in CEl neurons, which seems to mostly involve the PKCδ-negative subpopulation. This influence can be assumed to increase reciprocal interactions between CElon and CEloff pathways, thereby boosting the medial CE (CEm) output pathway and contributing to the anxiogenic-like action of SP in the amygdala. PMID:26334021

  9. GABA and glutamate receptors have different effects on excitability and are differentially regulated by calcium in spider mechanosensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkkeli, Päivi H; Meisner, Shannon; Pfeiffer, Keram; French, Andrew S

    2012-12-01

    GABA and glutamate receptors belonging to the ligand-gated chloride-channel family are primary targets of insecticides and antiparasitics, so their molecular structure, pharmacology and biophysical properties have attracted significant attention. However, little is known about the physiological roles of these channels or how they regulate neuronal excitability and animal behavior. Mechanosensory neurons of VS-3 slit sensilla in the patella of the tropical wandering spider, Cupiennius salei, react to the GABA(A)-receptor agonists, GABA and muscimol, with depolarization and an increase in intracellular [Ca(2+)] and, during random noise stimulation, with a mixed inhibitory-excitatory response. We established that the GABA(A)-receptors in all VS-3 neurons are identical, but there are at least two types of glutamate receptors and some neurons do not respond to glutamate at all. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies against Drosophila inhibitory glutamate receptor (GluCls) α-subunit suggests that in addition to VS-3 neurons, these receptors may also be present in the efferent neurons surrounding the sensory neurons. Most VS-3 neurons were inhibited but not depolarized by glutamate during random stimulation, but some depolarized and had a similar excitatory-inhibitory response to glutamate as to muscimol. The membrane-permeable Ca(2+)-chelator BAPTA-AM abolished muscimol effects but potentiated glutamate effects, indicating that GABA and glutamate receptors are differentially modulated by Ca(2+), leading to diverse regulation of neuronal excitability. We hypothesize that this could be achieved by different Ca(2+)-triggered phosphorylation processes at each receptor type. These findings are important for understanding the significance of Ca(2+)-mediated regulation of transmitter receptor molecules and its role in controlling excitability. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Normal breathing requires preBötzinger complex neurokinin-1 receptor-expressing neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Paul A.; Janczewski, Wiktor A.; Mellen, Nicholas; McCrimmon, Donald R.; Feldman, Jack L.

    2001-01-01

    The normal breathing rhythm in mammals is hypothesized to be generated by neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R)-expressing neurons in the preBötzinger complex (preBötC), a medullary region proposed to contain the kernel of the circuits generating respiration. If this hypothesis is correct, then complete destruction of preBötC NK1R neurons should severely perturb and perhaps even fatally arrest breathing. Here we show that specific and near complete bilateral (but not unilateral) destruction of preBötC...

  11. Gustatory receptor neuron responds to DEET and other insect repellents in the yellow-fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Jillian L.; Shields, Vonnie D. C.; Dickens, Joseph C.

    2013-03-01

    Three gustatory receptor neurons were characterized for contact chemoreceptive sensilla on the labella of female yellow-fever mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti. The neuron with the smallest amplitude spike responded to the feeding deterrent, quinine, as well as N, N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide and other insect repellents. Two other neurons with differing spikes responded to salt (NaCl) and sucrose. This is the first report of a gustatory receptor neuron specific for insect repellents in mosquitoes and may provide a tool for screening chemicals to discover novel or improved feeding deterrents and repellents for use in the management of arthropod disease vectors.

  12. Orexins excite ventrolateral geniculate nucleus neurons predominantly via OX2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrobok, Lukasz; Palus, Katarzyna; Lewandowski, Marian Henryk

    2016-04-01

    Orexins/hypocretins are two neuropeptides that influence many behaviours, such as feeding, sleep or arousal. Orexin A/hypocretin-1 (OXA) and orexin B/hypocretin-2 (OXB) bind to two metabotropic receptors, named the OX1 and OX2 receptors. The lateral geniculate complex of the thalamus is one of the many targets of orexinergic fibres derived from the lateral hypothalamus, although the impact of orexins on the ventrolateral geniculate nucleus (VLG) is poorly understood. The VLG, an important relay station of the subcortical visual system, is implicated in visuomotor and/or circadian processes. Therefore, in this study we evaluated the effects of orexins on single VLG neurons using a patch-clamp technique in vitro. Surprisingly, orexins depolarised the majority of the recorded neurons regardless of their localisation in the borders of the VLG. In addition, data presented in this article show that neurons synthesising NO were also affected by OXA. Moreover, immunohistochemical staining of OXB revealed the moderate density of orexinergic fibbers in the VLG. Our study using specific orexin receptor antagonists suggests that the OX2 receptor has a dominant role in the observed effects of OXA. To our knowledge, this article is the first to show orexinergic modulation of the VLG. These findings strengthen the postulated link between orexins and the circadian system, and propose a new role of these neuropeptides in the modulation of visuomotor functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Plasticity of calcium-permeable AMPA glutamate receptors in Pro-opiomelanocortin neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Shigetomo; Ralevski, Alexandra; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Yada, Toshihiko; Simonds, Stephanie E; Cowley, Michael A; Gao, Xiao-Bing; Diano, Sabrina; Horvath, Tamas L

    2017-08-01

    POMC neurons integrate metabolic signals from the periphery. Here, we show in mice that food deprivation induces a linear current-voltage relationship of AMPAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in POMC neurons. Inhibition of EPSCs by IEM-1460, an antagonist of calcium-permeable (Cp) AMPARs, diminished EPSC amplitude in the fed but not in the fasted state, suggesting entry of GluR2 subunits into the AMPA receptor complex during food deprivation. Accordingly, removal of extracellular calcium from ACSF decreased the amplitude of mEPSCs in the fed but not the fasted state. Ten days of high-fat diet exposure, which was accompanied by elevated leptin levels and increased POMC neuronal activity, resulted in increased expression of Cp-AMPARs on POMC neurons. Altogether, our results show that entry of calcium via Cp-AMPARs is inherent to activation of POMC neurons, which may underlie a vulnerability of these neurons to calcium overload while activated in a sustained manner during over-nutrition.

  14. Presynaptic Glycine Receptors Increase GABAergic Neurotransmission in Rat Periaqueductal Gray Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwi-Hyung Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The periaqueductal gray (PAG is involved in the central regulation of nociceptive transmission by affecting the descending inhibitory pathway. In the present study, we have addressed the functional role of presynaptic glycine receptors in spontaneous glutamatergic transmission. Spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs were recorded in mechanically dissociated rat PAG neurons using a conventional whole-cell patch recording technique under voltage-clamp conditions. The application of glycine (100 µM significantly increased the frequency of sEPSCs, without affecting the amplitude of sEPSCs. The glycine-induced increase in sEPSC frequency was blocked by 1 µM strychnine, a specific glycine receptor antagonist. The results suggest that glycine acts on presynaptic glycine receptors to increase the probability of glutamate release from excitatory nerve terminals. The glycine-induced increase in sEPSC frequency completely disappeared either in the presence of tetrodotoxin or Cd2+, voltage-gated Na+, or Ca2+ channel blockers, suggesting that the activation of presynaptic glycine receptors might depolarize excitatory nerve terminals. The present results suggest that presynaptic glycine receptors can regulate the excitability of PAG neurons by enhancing glutamatergic transmission and therefore play an important role in the regulation of various physiological functions mediated by the PAG.

  15. SPARC and GluA1-Containing AMPA Receptors Promote Neuronal Health Following CNS Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma V. Jones

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The proper formation and maintenance of functional synapses in the central nervous system (CNS requires communication between neurons and astrocytes and the ability of astrocytes to release neuromodulatory molecules. Previously, we described a novel role for the astrocyte-secreted matricellular protein SPARC (Secreted Protein, Acidic and Rich in Cysteine in regulating α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs and plasticity at developing synapses. SPARC is highly expressed by astrocytes and microglia during CNS development but its level is reduced in adulthood. Interestingly, SPARC has been shown to be upregulated in CNS injury and disease. However, the role of SPARC upregulation in these contexts is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of chronic SPARC administration on glutamate receptors on mature hippocampal neuron cultures and following CNS injury. We found that SPARC treatment increased the number of GluA1-containing AMPARs at synapses and enhanced synaptic function. Furthermore, we determined that the increase in synaptic strength induced by SPARC could be inhibited by Philanthotoxin-433, a blocker of homomeric GluA1-containing AMPARs. We then investigated the effect of SPARC treatment on neuronal health in an injury context where SPARC expression is upregulated. We found that SPARC levels are increased in astrocytes and microglia following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in vivo and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD in vitro. Remarkably, chronic pre-treatment with SPARC prevented OGD-induced loss of synaptic GluA1. Furthermore, SPARC treatment reduced neuronal death through Philanthotoxin-433 sensitive GluA1 receptors. Taken together, this study suggests a novel role for SPARC and GluA1 in promoting neuronal health and recovery following CNS damage.

  16. Molecular dynamics in an optical trap of glutamate receptors labeled with quantum-dots on living neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Tatsunori; Maezawa, Yasuyo; Kudoh, Suguru N.; Taguchi, Takahisa; Hosokawa, Chie

    2017-04-01

    Molecular dynamics of glutamate receptor, which is major neurotransmitter receptor at excitatory synapse located on neuron, is essential for synaptic plasticity in the complex neuronal networks. Here we studied molecular dynamics in an optical trap of AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) labeled with quantum-dot (QD) on living neuronal cells with fluorescence imaging and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). When a 1064-nm laser beam for optical trapping was focused on QD-AMPARs located on neuronal cells, the fluorescence intensity of QD-AMPARs gradually increased at the focal spot. Using single-particle tracking of QD-AMPARs on neurons, the average diffusion coefficient decreased in an optical trap. Moreover, the decay time obtained from FCS analysis increased with the laser power and the initial assembling state of AMPARs depended on culturing day, suggesting that the motion of QD-AMPAR was constrained in an optical trap.

  17. Molecular Characterization of Native and Recom­binant Ionotrophic Glutamate Receptors Expressed in Neurons and Heterologous Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drasbek, Kim Ryun

    2005-01-01

    trafficking mediating the continuous replacement of synaptic receptors and is important for receptor tetramerization in the endoplasmatic reticulum. Given the many important properties of the GluR2 subunit, it was of great interest to investigate and compare synaptic properties in neuronal populations...... in synaptic currents of receptors from these neuronal preparations, miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) were recorded followed by single cell RT-PCR of the same neuron. Unfortunately, no population of GluR2 lacking neurons was detected by single cell RT-PCR, but a higher detection frequency...... expressing AMPARs with or without the GluR2 subunits. Earlier findings suggested that neurons cultured from spinal cord were devoid of GluR2 and expressed high amounts of GluR4. In contrast, GluR2 was detected in almost all cells from cortical cultures (Dai et al., 2001). To investigate differences...

  18. Impaired Chemosensitivity of Mouse Dorsal Raphe Serotonergic Neurons Overexpressing Serotonin 1A (Htr1a) Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Baccini, Gilda; Mlinar, Boris; Audero, Enrica; Gross, Cornelius Thilo; Corradetti, Renato

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serotonergic system participates in a wide range of physiological processes and behaviors, but its role is generally considered as modulatory and noncrucial, especially concerning life-sustaining functions. We recently created a transgenic mouse line in which a functional deficit in serotonin homeostasis due to excessive serotonin autoinhibition was produced by inducing serotonin 1A receptor (Htr1a) overexpression selectively in serotonergic neurons (Htr1a raphe-overexpressing or ...

  19. Steroid Receptor Isoform Expression in Drosophila Nociceptor Neurons Is Required for Normal Dendritic Arbor and Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidan L McParland

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones organize many aspects of development, including that of the nervous system. Steroids also play neuromodulatory and other activational roles, including regulation of sensitivity to painful stimuli in mammals. In Drosophila, ecdysteroids are the only steroid hormones, and therefore the fly represents a simplified model system in which to explore mechanisms of steroid neuromodulation of nociception. In this report, we present evidence that ecdysteroids, acting through two isoforms of their nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR, modulate sensitivity to noxious thermal and mechanical stimuli in the fly larva. We show that EcRA and EcRB1 are expressed by third instar larvae in the primary nociceptor neurons, known as the class IV multidendritic neurons. Suppression of EcRA by RNA interference in these cells leads to hyposensitivity to noxious stimulation. Suppression of EcRB1 leads to reduction of dendritic branching and length of nociceptor neurons. We show that specific isoforms of the ecdysone receptor play critical cell autonomous roles in modulating the sensitivity of nociceptor neurons and may indicate human orthologs that represent targets for novel analgesic drugs.

  20. Acid and stretch, but not capsaicin, are effective stimuli for ATP release in the porcine bladder mucosa: Are ASIC and TRPV1 receptors involved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadananda, Prajni; Kao, Felicity C L; Liu, Lu; Mansfield, Kylie J; Burcher, Elizabeth

    2012-05-15

    Stretch-evoked ATP release from the bladder mucosa is a key event in signaling bladder fullness. Our aim was to examine whether acid and capsaicin can also release ATP and to determine the receptors involved, using agonists and antagonists at TRPV1 and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). Strips of porcine bladder mucosa were exposed to acid, capsaicin or stretch. Strip tension was monitored. Bath fluid was collected for ATP measurement. Gene expression of ASICs and TRPV1 in porcine bladders was quantified using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Stretch stimulus (150% of original length) repeatedly and significantly increased ATP release to approximately 45 times basal release. Acid (pH 6.5, 6.0, 5.6) contracted mucosal strips and also increased ATP release up to 30-fold, without evidence of desensitization. Amiloride (0.3 μM) reduced the acid-evoked ATP release by approximately 70%, while capsazepine (10 μM) reduced acid-evoked ATP release at pH 6.0 and pH 5.6 (by 68% and 61%, respectively). Capsaicin (0.1-10 μM) was ineffective in causing ATP release, and also failed to contract porcine mucosal or detrusor strips. Gene expression for ASIC1, ASIC2, ASIC3 and TRPV1 was seen in the lateral wall, dome, trigone and neck of both detrusor and mucosa. In conclusion, stretch and acid induce ATP release in the porcine bladder mucosa, but capsaicin is ineffective. The pig bladder is a well-known model for the human bladder, however these data suggest that it should be used with caution, particularly for TRPV1 related studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Neuron to astrocyte communication via cannabinoid receptors is necessary for sustained epileptiform activity in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiret, Guyllaume; Ster, Jeanne; Grewe, Benjamin; Wendling, Fabrice; Helmchen, Fritjof; Gerber, Urs; Benquet, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are integral functional components of synapses, regulating transmission and plasticity. They have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of epilepsy, although their precise roles have not been comprehensively characterized. Astrocytes integrate activity from neighboring synapses by responding to neuronally released neurotransmitters such as glutamate and ATP. Strong activation of astrocytes mediated by these neurotransmitters can promote seizure-like activity by initiating a positive feedback loop that induces excessive neuronal discharge. Recent work has demonstrated that astrocytes express cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors, which are sensitive to endocannabinoids released by nearby pyramidal cells. In this study, we tested whether this mechanism also contributes to epileptiform activity. In a model of 4-aminopyridine induced epileptic-like activity in hippocampal slice cultures, we show that pharmacological blockade of astrocyte CB1 receptors did not modify the initiation, but significantly reduced the maintenance of epileptiform discharge. When communication in astrocytic networks was disrupted by chelating astrocytic calcium, this CB1 receptor-mediated modulation of epileptiform activity was no longer observed. Thus, endocannabinoid signaling from neurons to astrocytes represents an additional significant factor in the maintenance of epileptiform activity in the hippocampus.

  2. Neuron to astrocyte communication via cannabinoid receptors is necessary for sustained epileptiform activity in rat hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyllaume Coiret

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are integral functional components of synapses, regulating transmission and plasticity. They have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of epilepsy, although their precise roles have not been comprehensively characterized. Astrocytes integrate activity from neighboring synapses by responding to neuronally released neurotransmitters such as glutamate and ATP. Strong activation of astrocytes mediated by these neurotransmitters can promote seizure-like activity by initiating a positive feedback loop that induces excessive neuronal discharge. Recent work has demonstrated that astrocytes express cannabinoid 1 (CB1 receptors, which are sensitive to endocannabinoids released by nearby pyramidal cells. In this study, we tested whether this mechanism also contributes to epileptiform activity. In a model of 4-aminopyridine induced epileptic-like activity in hippocampal slice cultures, we show that pharmacological blockade of astrocyte CB1 receptors did not modify the initiation, but significantly reduced the maintenance of epileptiform discharge. When communication in astrocytic networks was disrupted by chelating astrocytic calcium, this CB1 receptor-mediated modulation of epileptiform activity was no longer observed. Thus, endocannabinoid signaling from neurons to astrocytes represents an additional significant factor in the maintenance of epileptiform activity in the hippocampus.

  3. Adult ciliary neurotrophic factor receptors help maintain facial motor neuron choline acetyltransferase expression in vivo following nerve crush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy; Rydyznski, Carolyn E; Rasch, Matthew S; Trinh, Dennis S; MacLennan, A John

    2017-04-01

    Exogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) administration promotes the survival of motor neurons in a wide range of models. It also increases the expression of the critical neurotransmitter enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) by in vitro motor neurons, likely independent of its effects on their survival. We have used the adult mouse facial nerve crush model and adult-onset conditional disruption of the CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) gene to directly examine the in vivo roles played by endogenous CNTF receptors in adult motor neuron survival and ChAT maintenance, independent of developmental functions. We have previously shown that adult activation of the CreER gene construct in floxed CNTFRα mice depletes this essential receptor subunit in a large subset of motor neurons (and all skeletal muscle, as shown in this study) but has no effect on the survival of intact or lesioned motor neurons, indicating that these adult CNTF receptors play no essential survival role in this model, in contrast to their essential role during embryonic development. Here we show that this same CNTFRα depletion does not affect ChAT labeling in nonlesioned motor neurons, but it significantly increases the loss of ChAT following nerve crush. The data suggest that, although neither motor neuron nor muscle CNTF receptors play a significant, nonredundant role in the maintenance of ChAT in intact adult motor neurons, the receptors become essential for ChAT maintenance when the motor neurons are challenged by nerve crush. Therefore, the data suggest that the receptors act as a critical component of an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1206-1215, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Differential Expression of Dopamine D5 Receptors across Neuronal Subtypes in Macaque Frontal Eye Field

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    Adrienne Mueller

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine signaling in the prefrontal cortex (PFC is important for cognitive functions, yet very little is known about the expression of the D5 class of dopamine receptors (D5Rs in this region. To address this, we co-stained for D5Rs, pyramidal neurons (neurogranin+, putative long-range projection pyramidal neurons (SMI-32+, and several classes of inhibitory interneuron (parvalbumin+, calbindin+, calretinin+, somatostatin+ within the frontal eye field (FEF: an area within the PFC involved in the control of visual spatial attention. We then quantified the co-expression of D5Rs with markers of different cell types across different layers of the FEF. We show that: (1 D5Rs are more prevalent on pyramidal neurons than on inhibitory interneurons. (2 D5Rs are disproportionately expressed on putative long-range projecting pyramidal neurons. The disproportionately high expression of D5Rs on long-range projecting pyramidals, compared to interneurons, was particularly pronounced in layers II–III. Together these results indicate that the engagement of D5R-dependent mechanisms in the FEF varies depending on cell type and cortical layer, and suggests that non-locally projecting neurons contribute disproportionately to functions involving the D5R subtype.

  5. Serotonin 2C receptor activates a distinct population of arcuate pro-opiomelanocortin neurons via TRPC channels

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    Serotonin 2C receptors (5-HT2CRs) expressed by pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus regulate food intake, energy homeostasis ,and glucose metabolism. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying the effects of 5-HT to regulate POMC neuronal activity via 5-HT2CRs have no...

  6. Gustatory receptor neuron responds to DEET and other insect repellents in the yellow fever mosquito, aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three gustatory receptor neurons were characterized for contact chemoreceptive sensilla on the labella of female yellow fever mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti. The neuron with the smallest amplitude spike responded to the feeding deterrent, quinine, as well as DEET and other insect repellents. Two other ...

  7. Insulin receptors mediate growth effects in cultured fetal neurons. I. Rapid stimulation of protein synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidenreich, K.A.; Toledo, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    In this study we have examined the effects of insulin on protein synthesis in cultured fetal chick neurons. Protein synthesis was monitored by measuring the incorporation of [3H]leucine (3H-leu) into trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-precipitable protein. Upon addition of 3H-leu, there was a 5-min lag before radioactivity occurred in protein. During this period cell-associated radioactivity reached equilibrium and was totally recovered in the TCA-soluble fraction. After 5 min, the incorporation of 3H-leu into protein was linear for 2 h and was inhibited (98%) by the inclusion of 10 micrograms/ml cycloheximide. After 24 h of serum deprivation, insulin increased 3H-leu incorporation into protein by approximately 2-fold. The stimulation of protein synthesis by insulin was dose dependent (ED50 = 70 pM) and seen within 30 min. Proinsulin was approximately 10-fold less potent than insulin on a molar basis in stimulating neuronal protein synthesis. Insulin had no effect on the TCA-soluble fraction of 3H-leu at any time and did not influence the uptake of [3H]aminoisobutyric acid into neurons. The isotope ratio of 3H-leu/14C-leu in the leucyl tRNA pool was the same in control and insulin-treated neurons. Analysis of newly synthesized proteins by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that insulin uniformly increased the incorporation of 14C-leu into all of the resolved neuronal proteins. We conclude from these data that (1) insulin rapidly stimulates overall protein synthesis in fetal neurons independent of amino acid uptake and aminoacyl tRNA precursor pools; (2) stimulation of protein synthesis is mediated by the brain subtype of insulin receptor; and (3) insulin is potentially an important in vivo growth factor for fetal central nervous system neurons

  8. Impaired chemosensitivity of mouse dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons overexpressing serotonin 1A (Htr1a) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccini, Gilda; Mlinar, Boris; Audero, Enrica; Gross, Cornelius Thilo; Corradetti, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Serotonergic system participates in a wide range of physiological processes and behaviors, but its role is generally considered as modulatory and noncrucial, especially concerning life-sustaining functions. We recently created a transgenic mouse line in which a functional deficit in serotonin homeostasis due to excessive serotonin autoinhibition was produced by inducing serotonin 1A receptor (Htr1a) overexpression selectively in serotonergic neurons (Htr1a raphe-overexpressing or Htr1a(RO) mice). Htr1a(RO) mice exhibit episodes of autonomic dysregulation, cardiovascular crises and death, resembling those of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and revealing a life-supporting role of serotonergic system in autonomic control. Since midbrain serotonergic neurons are chemosensitive and are implicated in arousal we hypothesized that their chemosensitivity might be impaired in Htr1a(RO) mice. Loose-seal cell-attached recordings in brainstem slices revealed that serotonergic neurons in dorsal raphe nucleus of Htr1a(RO) mice have dramatically reduced responses to hypercapnic challenge as compared with control littermates. In control mice, application of 9% CO(2) produced an increase in firing rate of serotonergic neurons (0.260 ± 0.041 Hz, n=20, p=0.0001) and application of 3% CO(2) decreased their firing rate (-0.142 ± 0.025 Hz, n=17, p=0.0008). In contrast, in Htr1a(RO) mice, firing rate of serotonergic neurons was not significantly changed by 9% CO(2) (0.021 ± 0.034 Hz, n=16, p=0.49) and by 3% CO(2) (0.012 ± 0.046 Hz, n=12, p=0.97). Our findings support the hypothesis that chemosensitivity of midbrain serotonergic neurons provides a physiological mechanism for arousal responses to life-threatening episodes of hypercapnia and that functional impairment, such as excessive autoinhibition, of midbrain serotonergic neuron responses to hypercapnia may contribute to sudden death.

  9. Altered Expression of Genes Encoding Neurotransmitter Receptors in GnRH Neurons of Proestrous Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastagh, Csaba; Rodolosse, Annie; Solymosi, Norbert; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons play a key role in the central regulation of reproduction. In proestrous female mice, estradiol triggers the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, however, its impact on the expression of neurotransmitter receptor genes in GnRH neurons has not been explored yet. We hypothesized that proestrus is accompanied by substantial changes in the expression profile of genes coding for neurotransmitter receptors in GnRH neurons. We compared the transcriptome of GnRH neurons obtained from intact, proestrous, and metestrous female GnRH-GFP transgenic mice, respectively. About 1500 individual GnRH neurons were sampled from both groups and their transcriptome was analyzed using microarray hybridization and real-time PCR. In this study, changes in mRNA expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter signaling were investigated. Differential gene expression was most apparent in GABA-ergic ( Gabbr1, Gabra3, Gabrb3, Gabrb2, Gabrg2 ), glutamatergic ( Gria1, Gria2, Grin1, Grin3a, Grm1, Slc17a6 ), cholinergic ( Chrnb2, Chrm4 ) and dopaminergic ( Drd3, Drd4 ), adrenergic ( Adra1b, Adra2a, Adra2c ), adenosinergic ( Adora2a, Adora2b ), glycinergic ( Glra ), purinergic ( P2rx7 ), and serotonergic ( Htr1b ) receptors. In concert with these events, expression of genes in the signaling pathways downstream to the receptors, i.e., G-proteins ( Gnai1, Gnai2, Gnas ), adenylate-cyclases ( Adcy3, Adcy5 ), protein kinase A ( Prkaca, Prkacb ) protein kinase C ( Prkca ) and certain transporters ( Slc1a4, Slc17a6, Slc6a17 ) were also changed. The marked differences found in the expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter signaling of GnRH neurons at pro- and metestrous stages of the ovarian cycle indicate the differential contribution of these neurotransmitter systems to the induction of the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, the known prerequisite of the subsequent hormonal cascade inducing ovulation.

  10. Altered expression of genes encoding neurotransmitter receptors in GnRH neurons of proestrous mice

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    Csaba Vastagh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons play a key role in the central regulation of reproduction. In proestrous female mice, estradiol triggers the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, however, its impact on the expression of neurotransmitter receptor genes in GnRH neurons has not been explored yet. We hypothesized that proestrus is accompanied by substantial changes in the expression profile of genes coding for neurotransmitter receptors in GnRH neurons. We compared the transcriptome of GnRH neurons obtained from intact, proestrous and metestrous female GnRH-GFP transgenic mice, respectively. About 1500 individual GnRH neurons were sampled from both groups and their transcriptome was analyzed using microarray hybridization and real-time PCR. In this study, changes in mRNA expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter signaling were investigated. Differential gene expression was most apparent in GABA-ergic (Gabbr1, Gabra3, Gabrb3, Gabrb2, Gabrg2, glutamatergic (Gria1, Gria2, Grin1, Grin3a, Grm1, Slc17a6, cholinergic (Chrnb2, Chrm4 and dopaminergic (Drd3, Drd4, adrenergic (Adra1b, Adra2a, Adra2c, adenosinergic (Adora2a, Adora2b, glycinergic (Glra, purinergic (P2rx7 and serotonergic (Htr1b receptors. In concert with these events, expression of genes in the signaling pathways downstream to the receptors, i.e. G-proteins (Gnai1, Gnai2, Gnas, adenylate-cyclases (Adcy3, Adcy5, protein kinase A (Prkaca, Prkacb protein kinase C (Prkca and certain transporters (Slc1a4, Slc17a6, Slc6a17 were also changed. The marked differences found in the expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter signaling of GnRH neurons at pro- and metestrous stages of the ovarian cycle indicate the differential contribution of these neurotransmitter systems to the induction of the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, the known prerequisite of the subsequent hormonal cascade inducing ovulation.

  11. Drosophila motor neuron retraction during metamorphosis is mediated by inputs from TGF-β/BMP signaling and orphan nuclear receptors.

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    Ana Boulanger

    Full Text Available Larval motor neurons remodel during Drosophila neuro-muscular junction dismantling at metamorphosis. In this study, we describe the motor neuron retraction as opposed to degeneration based on the early disappearance of β-Spectrin and the continuing presence of Tubulin. By blocking cell dynamics with a dominant-negative form of Dynamin, we show that phagocytes have a key role in this process. Importantly, we show the presence of peripheral glial cells close to the neuro-muscular junction that retracts before the motor neuron. We show also that in muscle, expression of EcR-B1 encoding the steroid hormone receptor required for postsynaptic dismantling, is under the control of the ftz-f1/Hr39 orphan nuclear receptor pathway but not the TGF-β signaling pathway. In the motor neuron, activation of EcR-B1 expression by the two parallel pathways (TGF-β signaling and nuclear receptor triggers axon retraction. We propose that a signal from a TGF-β family ligand is produced by the dismantling muscle (postsynapse compartment and received by the motor neuron (presynaptic compartment resulting in motor neuron retraction. The requirement of the two pathways in the motor neuron provides a molecular explanation for the instructive role of the postsynapse degradation on motor neuron retraction. This mechanism insures the temporality of the two processes and prevents motor neuron pruning before postsynaptic degradation.

  12. Activation of 5-HT2A/C receptor reduces glycine receptor-mediated currents in cultured auditory cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bin; Hu, Lingli; Liu, Chunhua; Guo, Yiping; Wang, Haitao

    2016-02-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) permeable to chloride only mediate tonic inhibition in the cerebral cortex where glycinergic projection is completely absent. The functional modulation of GlyRs was largely studied in subcortical brain regions with glycinergic transmissions, but the function of cortical GlyRs was rarely addressed. Serotonin could broadly modulate many ion channels through activating 5-HT2 receptor, but whether cortical GlyRs are subjected to serotonergic modulation remains unexplored. The present study adopted patch clamp recordings to examine functional regulation of strychnine-sensitive GlyRs currents in cultured cortical neurons by DOI (2,5-Dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine), a 5-HT2A/C receptor agonist. DOI caused a concentration-dependent reduction of GlyR currents with unchanged reversal potential. This reduction was blocked by the selective receptor antagonists (ritanserin and risperidone) and G protein inhibitor (GDP-β-s) demonstrated that the reducing effect of DOI on GlyR current required the activation of 5-HT2A/C receptors. Strychnine-sensitive tonic currents revealed the inhibitory tone mediated by nonsynaptic GlyRs, and DOI similarly reduced the tonic inhibition. The impaired microtube-dependent trafficking or clustering of GlyRs was thought to be involved in that nocodazole as a microtube depolymerizing drug largely blocked the inhibition mediated by 5-HT2A/C receptors. Our results suggested that activation of 5-HT2A/C receptors might suppress cortical tonic inhibition mediated by GlyRs, and the findings would provide important insight into serotonergic modulation of tonic inhibition mediated by GlyRs, and possibly facilitate to develop the therapeutic treatment of neurological diseases such as tinnitus through regulating cortical GlyRs.

  13. Enhanced NMDA receptor-mediated intracellular calcium signaling in magnocellular neurosecretory neurons in heart failure rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Javier E; Potapenko, Evgeniy S

    2013-08-15

    An enhanced glutamate excitatory function within the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricluar nuclei is known to contribute to increased neurosecretory and presympathetic neuronal activity, and hence, neurohumoral activation, during heart failure (HF). Still, the precise mechanisms underlying enhanced glutamate-driven neuronal activity in HF remain to be elucidated. Here, we performed simultaneous electrophysiology and fast confocal Ca²⁺ imaging to determine whether altered N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated changes in intracellular Ca²⁺ levels (NMDA-ΔCa²⁺) occurred in hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) in HF rats. We found that activation of NMDA receptors resulted in a larger ΔCa²⁺ in MNCs from HF when compared with sham rats. The enhanced NMDA-ΔCa²⁺ was neither dependent on the magnitude of the NMDA-mediated current (voltage clamp) nor on the degree of membrane depolarization or firing activity evoked by NMDA (current clamp). Differently from NMDA receptor activation, firing activity evoked by direct membrane depolarization resulted in similar changes in intracellular Ca²⁺ in sham and HF rats. Taken together, our results support a relatively selective alteration of intracellular Ca²⁺ homeostasis and signaling following activation of NMDA receptors in MNCs during HF. The downstream functional consequences of such altered ΔCa²⁺ signaling during HF are discussed.

  14. Monosodium glutamate alters the response properties of rat trigeminovascular neurons through activation of peripheral NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Melissa; Cairns, Brian E

    2016-10-15

    Ingestion of monosodium glutamate (MSG) has been shown to cause headaches in healthy individuals and trigger migraine-like headaches in migraine sufferers. We combined immunohistochemistry, in vivo electrophysiology, and laser Doppler recordings of dural vasculature to investigate the effect of systemic administration of MSG on the trigeminovascular pathway. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the expression of NMDA receptors on nerve fibers innervating dural blood vessels and excitatory amino acid transporter 2 on dural blood vessels. Systemic administration of MSG (50mg/kg) evoked an increase in ongoing discharge in 5/6 spinal trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (SpVc) neurons with dural input recorded from male and female rats, respectively, as well as lowering their mechanical activation threshold. There were no sex-related differences in these effects of MSG. Neuronal discharge and mechanical sensitization were significantly attenuated by co-injection with the peripherally restricted NMDA receptor antagonist (2R)-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) in both sexes. Systemic administration of MSG induced a 24.5% and 20.6% increase in dural flux in male and female rats, respectively. These results suggest that MSG-induced headache is mediated by the activation of peripheral NMDA receptors and subsequent dural vasodilation. Peripheral NMDA receptors are a potential target for the development of new drugs to treat headaches. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Communication between corneal epithelial cells and trigeminal neurons is facilitated by purinergic (P2 and glutamatergic receptors.

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    Duane J Oswald

    Full Text Available Previously, we demonstrated that nucleotides released upon mechanical injury to corneal epithelium activate purinergic (P2 receptors resulting in mobilization of a Ca(2+ wave. However, the tissue is extensively innervated and communication between epithelium and neurons is critical and not well understood. Therefore, we developed a co-culture of primary trigeminal neurons and human corneal limbal epithelial cells. We demonstrated that trigeminal neurons expressed a repertoire of P2Yand P2X receptor transcripts and responded to P2 agonists in a concentration-dependent manner. Mechanical injuries to epithelia in the co-cultures elicited a Ca(2+ wave that mobilized to neurons and was attenuated by Apyrase, an ectonucleotidase. To elucidate the role of factors released from each cell type, epithelial and neuronal cells were cultured, injured, and the wound media from one cell type was collected and added to the other cell type. Epithelial wound media generated a rapid Ca(2+ mobilization in neuronal cells that was abrogated in the presence of Apyrase, while neuronal wound media elicited a complex response in epithelial cells. The rapid Ca(2+ mobilization was detected, which was abrogated with Apyrase, but it was followed by Ca(2+ waves that occurred in cell clusters. When neuronal wound media was preincubated with a cocktail of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor inhibitors, the secondary response in epithelia was diminished. Glutamate was detected in the neuronal wound media and epithelial expression of NMDA receptor subunit transcripts was demonstrated. Our results indicate that corneal epithelia and neurons communicate via purinergic and NMDA receptors that mediate the wound response in a highly orchestrated manner.

  16. AMPA receptor pHluorin-GluA2 reports NMDA receptor-induced intracellular acidification in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathje, Mette; Fang, Huaqiang; Bachman, Julia L; Anggono, Victor; Gether, Ulrik; Huganir, Richard L; Madsen, Kenneth L

    2013-08-27

    NMDA receptor activation promotes endocytosis of AMPA receptors, which is an important mechanism underlying long-term synaptic depression. The pH-sensitive GFP variant pHluorin fused to the N terminus of GluA2 (pH-GluA2) has been used to assay NMDA-mediated AMPA receptor endocytosis and recycling. Here, we demonstrate that in somatic and dendritic regions of hippocampal neurons a large fraction of the fluorescent signal originates from intracellular pH-GluA2, and that the decline in fluorescence in response to NMDA and AMPA primarily describes an intracellular acidification, which quenches the pHluorin signal from intracellular receptor pools. Neurons expressing an endoplasmic reticulum-retained mutant of GluA2 (pH-GluA2 ΔC49) displayed a larger response to NMDA than neurons expressing wild-type pH-GluA2. A similar NMDA-elicited decline in pHluorin signal was observed by expressing cytosolic pHluorin alone without fusion to GluA2 (cyto-pHluorin). Intracellular acidification in response to NMDA was further confirmed by using the ratiometric pH indicator carboxy-SNARF-1. The NMDA-induced decline was followed by rapid recovery of the fluorescent signal from both cyto-pHluorin and pH-GluA2. The recovery was sodium-dependent and sensitive to Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger (NHE) inhibitors. Moreover, recovery was more rapid after shRNA-mediated knockdown of the GluA2 binding PDZ domain-containing protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1). Interestingly, the accelerating effect of PICK1 knockdown on the fluorescence recovery was eliminated in the presence of the NHE1 inhibitor zoniporide. Our results indicate that the pH-GluA2 recycling assay is an unreliable assay for studying AMPA receptor trafficking and also suggest a role for PICK1 in regulating intracellular pH via modulation of NHE activity.

  17. Interaction of NMDA receptor and pacemaking mechanisms in the midbrain dopaminergic neuron.

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    Joon Ha

    Full Text Available Dopamine neurotransmission has been found to play a role in addictive behavior and is altered in psychiatric disorders. Dopaminergic (DA neurons display two functionally distinct modes of electrophysiological activity: low- and high-frequency firing. A puzzling feature of the DA neuron is the following combination of its responses: N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR activation evokes high-frequency firing, whereas other tonic excitatory stimuli (α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptor (AMPAR activation or applied depolarization block firing instead. We suggest a new computational model that reproduces this combination of responses and explains recent experimental data. Namely, somatic NMDAR stimulation evokes high-frequency firing and is more effective than distal dendritic stimulation. We further reduce the model to a single compartment and analyze the mechanism of the distinct high-frequency response to NMDAR activation vs. other stimuli. Standard nullcline analysis shows that the mechanism is based on a decrease in the amplitude of calcium oscillations. The analysis confirms that the nonlinear voltage dependence provided by the magnesium block of the NMDAR determine its capacity to elevate the firing frequency. We further predict that the moderate slope of the voltage dependence plays the central role in the frequency elevation. Additionally, we suggest a repolarizing current that sustains calcium-independent firing or firing in the absence of calcium-dependent repolarizing currents. We predict that the ether-a-go-go current (ERG, which has been observed in the DA neuron, is the best fit for this critical role. We show that a calcium-dependent and a calcium-independent oscillatory mechanisms form a structure of interlocked negative feedback loops in the DA neuron. The structure connects research of DA neuron firing with circadian biology and determines common minimal models for investigation of robustness of oscillations

  18. Histamine influences body temperature by acting at H1 and H3 receptors on distinct populations of preoptic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundius, Ebba Gregorsson; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Ghochani, Yasmin; Klaus, Joseph; Tabarean, Iustin V

    2010-03-24

    The preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus, a region that contains neurons that control thermoregulation, is the main locus at which histamine affects body temperature. Here we report that histamine reduced the spontaneous firing rate of GABAergic preoptic neurons by activating H3 subtype histamine receptors. This effect involved a decrease in the level of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and was not dependent on synaptic activity. Furthermore, a population of non-GABAergic neurons was depolarized, and their firing rate was enhanced by histamine acting at H1 subtype receptors. In our experiments, activation of the H1R receptors was linked to the PLC pathway and Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. This depolarization persisted in TTX or when fast synaptic potentials were blocked, indicating that it represents a postsynaptic effect. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of H3 receptors in a population of GABAergic neurons, while H1 receptors were expressed in non-GABAergic cells. Histamine applied in the median preoptic nucleus induced a robust, long-lasting hyperthermia effect that was mimicked by either H1 or H3 histamine receptor subtype-specific agonists. Our data indicate that histamine modulates the core body temperature by acting at two distinct populations of preoptic neurons that express H1 and H3 receptor subtypes, respectively.

  19. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 and corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor-1 gene expression is differently regulated by BDNF in rat primary cortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christinna V; Klein, Anders B; El-Sayed, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is important for neuronal survival and plasticity. Incorporation of matured receptor proteins is an integral part of synapse formation. However, whether BDNF increases synthesis and integration of receptors in functional synapses directly is unclear. We...

  20. Humanin Inhibits Neuronal Cell Death by Interacting with a Cytokine Receptor Complex or Complexes Involving CNTF Receptor α/WSX-1/gp130

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yuichi; Kurita, Megumi; Aiso, Sadakazu; Nishimoto, Ikuo

    2009-01-01

    Humanin (HN) inhibits neuronal death induced by various Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related insults via an unknown receptor on cell membranes. Our earlier study indicated that the activation of STAT3 was essential for HN-induced neuroprotection, suggesting that the HN receptor may belong to the cytokine receptor family. In this study, a series of loss-of-function tests indicated that gp130, the common subunit of receptors belonging to the IL-6 receptor family, was essential for HN-induced neuroprotection. Overexpression of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor α (CNTFR) and/or the IL-27 receptor subunit, WSX-1, but not that of any other tested gp130-related receptor subunit, up-regulated HN binding to neuronal cells, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous CNTFR and/or WSX-1 reduced it. These results suggest that both CNTFR and WSX-1 may be also involved in HN binding to cells. Consistent with these results, loss-of-functions of CNTFR or WSX-1 in neuronal cells nullified their responsiveness to HN-mediated protection. In vitro–reconstituted binding assays showed that HN, but not the other control peptide, induced the hetero-oligomerization of CNTFR, WSX-1, and gp130. Together, these results indicate that HN protects neurons by binding to a complex or complexes involving CNTFR/WSX-1/gp130. PMID:19386761

  1. NMDA receptors mediate neuron-to-glia signaling in mouse cortical astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalo, Ulyana; Pankratov, Yuri; Kirchhoff, Frank; North, R Alan; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2006-03-08

    Chemical transmission between neurons and glial cells is an important element of integration in the CNS. Here, we describe currents activated by NMDA in cortical astrocytes, identified in transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein under control of the human glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter. Astrocytes were studied by whole-cell voltage clamp either in slices or after gentle nonenzymatic mechanical dissociation. Acutely isolated astrocytes showed a three-component response to glutamate. The initial rapid component was blocked by 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6-nitro-2,3-dioxo-benzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX), which is an antagonist of AMPA receptors (IC50, 2 microM), and the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP-5 blocked the later sustained component (IC50, 0.6 microM). The third component of glutamate application response was sensitive to D,L-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate, a glutamate transporter blocker. Fast application of NMDA evoked concentration-dependent inward currents (EC50, 0.3 microM); these showed use-dependent block by (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo [a,d] cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801). These NMDA-evoked currents were linearly dependent on membrane potential and were not affected by extracellular magnesium at concentrations up to 10 mM. Electrical stimulation of axons in layer IV-VI induced a complex inward current in astrocytes situated in the cortical layer II, part of which was sensitive to MK-801 at holding potential -80 mV and was not affected by the AMPA glutamate receptor antagonist NBQX. The fast miniature spontaneous currents were observed in cortical astrocytes in slices as well. These currents exhibited both AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated components. We conclude that cortical astrocytes express functional NMDA receptors that are devoid of Mg2+ block, and these receptors are involved in neuronal-glial signal transmission.

  2. Bispyridinium Compounds Inhibit Both Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Human Cell Lines.

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    Avi Ring

    Full Text Available Standard treatment of poisoning by organophosphorus anticholinesterases uses atropine to reduce the muscarinic effects of acetylcholine accumulation and oximes to reactivate acetylcholinesterase (the effectiveness of which depends on the specific anticholinesterase, but does not directly address the nicotinic effects of poisoning. Bispyridinium molecules which act as noncompetitive antagonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been identified as promising compounds and one has been shown to improve survival following organophosphorus poisoning in guinea-pigs. Here, we have investigated the structural requirements for antagonism and compared inhibitory potency of these compounds at muscle and neuronal nicotinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase. A series of compounds was synthesised, in which the length of the polymethylene linker between the two pyridinium moieties was increased sequentially from one to ten carbon atoms. Their effects on nicotinic receptor-mediated calcium responses were tested in muscle-derived (CN21 and neuronal (SH-SY5Y cells. Their ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity was tested using human erythrocyte ghosts. In both cell lines, the nicotinic response was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibitory potency of the compounds increased with greater linker length between the two pyridinium moieties, as did their inhibitory potency for human acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro. These results demonstrate that bispyridinium compounds inhibit both neuronal and muscle nicotinic receptors and that their potency depends on the length of the hydrocarbon chain linking the two pyridinium moieties. Knowledge of structure-activity relationships will aid the optimisation of molecular structures for therapeutic use against the nicotinic effects of organophosphorus poisoning.

  3. Autoradiographic localization of putative nicotinic receptors in the rat brain using 125I-neuronal bungarotoxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, D.W.; Loring, R.H.; Aizenman, E.; Zigmond, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Neuronal bungarotoxin (NBT), a snake venom neurotoxin, selectively blocks nicotinic receptors in many peripheral and central neuronal preparations. alpha-Bungarotoxin (alpha BT), on the other hand, a second toxin isolated from the venom of the same snake, is an ineffective nicotinic antagonist in most vertebrate neuronal preparations studied thus far. To examine central nicotinic receptors recognized by NBT, we have characterized the binding of 125I-labeled NBT (125I-NBT) to rat brain membranes and have mapped the distribution of 125I-NBT binding in brain sections using quantitative light microscopic autoradiography. The binding of 125I-NBT was found to be saturable, of high affinity, and heterogeneously distributed in the brain. Pharmacological studies suggested that more than one population of sites is labeled by 125I-NBT. For example, one component of 125I-NBT binding was also recognized by alpha BT, while a second component, not recognized by alpha BT, was recognized by the nicotinic agonist nicotine. The highest densities of these alpha BT-insensitive, nicotine-sensitive sites were found in the fasciculus retroflexus, the lateral geniculate nucleus, the medial terminal nucleus of the accessory optic tract, and the olivary pretectal nucleus. alpha BT-sensitive NBT binding sites were found in highest density in the lateral geniculate nucleus, the subthalamic nucleus, the dorsal tegmental nucleus, and the medial mammillary nucleus (lateral part). The number of brain regions with a high density of 125I-NBT binding sites, blocked either by alpha BT or by nicotine, is low when compared with results obtained using other approaches to studying the central distribution of nicotinic receptors, such as labeling with 3H-nicotine or labeling with cDNA probes to mRNAs coding for putative receptor subunits

  4. Dynamical modeling of the moth pheromone-sensitive olfactory receptor neuron within its sensillar environment.

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    Yuqiao Gu

    Full Text Available In insects, olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs, surrounded with auxiliary cells and protected by a cuticular wall, form small discrete sensory organs--the sensilla. The moth pheromone-sensitive sensillum is a well studied example of hair-like sensillum that is favorable to both experimental and modeling investigations. The model presented takes into account both the molecular processes of ORNs, i.e. the biochemical reactions and ionic currents giving rise to the receptor potential, and the cellular organization and compartmentalization of the organ represented by an electrical circuit. The number of isopotential compartments needed to describe the long dendrite bearing pheromone receptors was determined. The transduction parameters that must be modified when the number of compartments is increased were identified. This model reproduces the amplitude and time course of the experimentally recorded receptor potential. A first complete version of the model was analyzed in response to pheromone pulses of various strengths. It provided a quantitative description of the spatial and temporal evolution of the pheromone-dependent conductances, currents and potentials along the outer dendrite and served to determine the contribution of the various steps in the cascade to its global sensitivity. A second simplified version of the model, utilizing a single depolarizing conductance and leak conductances for repolarizing the ORN, was derived from the first version. It served to analyze the effects on the sensory properties of varying the electrical parameters and the size of the main sensillum parts. The consequences of the results obtained on the still uncertain mechanisms of olfactory transduction in moth ORNs--involvement or not of G-proteins, role of chloride and potassium currents--are discussed as well as the optimality of the sensillum organization, the dependence of biochemical parameters on the neuron spatial extension and the respective contributions

  5. Involvement of a subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the antipsychotic-like effects of the M1/M4 preferring muscarinic receptor agonist xanomeline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Wörtwein, Gitta; Weikop, Pia

    2011-01-01

    with D(1) dopamine receptors seems to be especially important in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors. Using mutant mice that lack the M(4) mAChR only in D(1) dopamine receptor-expressing cells (D1-M4-KO), we investigated the role of this neuronal population in the antipsychotic-like effects...... studies indicate that the M(4) muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtype (mAChR) modulates the activity of the dopaminergic system and that this specific mAChR subtype is involved in mediating the antipsychotic-like effects of xanomeline. A specific neuronal subpopulation that expresses M(4) mAChRs together...

  6. Metallothionein and a peptide modeled after metallothionein, EmtinB, induce neuronal differentiation and survival through binding to receptors of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Malene; Asmussen, Johanne W; Lindstam, Mats

    2007-01-01

    and EmtinB directly stimulated neurite outgrowth and promoted survival in vitro using primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons. In addition, expression and surface localization of megalin, a known MT receptor, and the related lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP) are demonstrated in cerebellar...... granule neurons. By means of surface plasmon resonance MT and EmtinB were found to bind to both megalin and LRP. The bindings were abrogated in the presence of receptor-associated protein-1, an antagonist of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, which also inhibited MT- and EmtinB-induced neurite...... to surface receptors belonging to the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, such as megalin and LRP, thereby activating signal transduction pathways resulting in neurite outgrowth and survival....

  7. Drug-driven AMPA receptor redistribution mimicked by selective dopamine neuron stimulation.

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    Matthew T C Brown

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Addictive drugs have in common that they cause surges in dopamine (DA concentration in the mesolimbic reward system and elicit synaptic plasticity in DA neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA. Cocaine for example drives insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors (AMPARs at glutamatergic synapes in DA neurons. However it remains elusive which molecular target of cocaine drives such AMPAR redistribution and whether other addictive drugs (morphine and nicotine cause similar changes through their effects on the mesolimbic DA system.We used in vitro electrophysiological techniques in wild-type and transgenic mice to observe the modulation of excitatory inputs onto DA neurons by addictive drugs. To observe AMPAR redistribution, post-embedding immunohistochemistry for GluA2 AMPAR subunit was combined with electron microscopy. We also used a double-floxed AAV virus expressing channelrhodopsin together with a DAT Cre mouse line to selectively express ChR2 in VTA DA neurons. We find that in mice where the effect of cocaine on the dopamine transporter (DAT is specifically blocked, AMPAR redistribution was absent following administration of the drug. Furthermore, addictive drugs known to increase dopamine levels cause a similar AMPAR redistribution. Finally, activating DA VTA neurons optogenetically is sufficient to drive insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPARs, mimicking the changes observed after a single injection of morphine, nicotine or cocaine.We propose the mesolimbic dopamine system as a point of convergence at which addictive drugs can alter neural circuits. We also show that direct activation of DA neurons is sufficient to drive AMPAR redistribution, which may be a mechanism associated with early steps of non-substance related addictions.

  8. Neurochemical characterization of neurons expressing melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 in the mouse hypothalamus1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Melissa J. S.; Pissios, Pavlos; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2013-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that acts via MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1) in the mouse. It promotes positive energy balance thus mice lacking MCH or MCHR1 are lean, hyperactive, and resistant to diet-induced obesity. Identifying the cellular targets of MCH is an important step to understanding the mechanisms underlying MCH actions. We generated the Mchr1-cre mouse that expressed cre recombinase driven by the MCHR1 promoter and crossed it with a tdTomato reporter mouse. The resulting Mchr1-cre/tdTomato progeny expressed easily detectable tdTomato fluorescence in MCHR1 neurons, which were found throughout the olfactory system, striatum, and hypothalamus. To chemically identify MCH-targeted cell populations that play a role in energy balance, MCHR1 hypothalamic neurons were characterized by colabeling select hypothalamic neuropeptides with tdTomato fluorescence. TdTomato fluorescence colocalized with dynorphin, oxytocin, vasopressin, enkephalin, thyrothropin-releasing hormone, and corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus. In the lateral hypothalamus, neurotensin but neither orexin nor MCH neurons expressed tdTomato. In the arcuate nucleus, both Neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin cells expressed tdTomato. We further demonstrated that some of these arcuate neurons were also targets of leptin action. Interestingly, MCHR1 was expressed in the vast majority of leptin-sensitive proopiomelanocortin neurons, highlighting their importance for the orexigenic actions of MCH. Taken together, this study supports the use of the Mchr1-cre mouse for outlining the neuroanatomical distribution and neurochemical phenotype of MCHR1 neurons. PMID:23605441

  9. Muscarinic receptor activation enables persistent firing in pyramidal neurons from superficial layers of dorsal perirhinal cortex.

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    Navaroli, Vicky L; Zhao, Yanjun; Boguszewski, Pawel; Brown, Thomas H

    2012-06-01

    Persistent-firing neurons in the entorhinal cortex (EC) and the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) continue to discharge long after the termination of the original, spike-initiating current. An emerging theory proposes that endogenous persistent firing helps support a transient memory system. This study demonstrated that persistent-firing neurons are also prevalent in rat perirhinal cortex (PR), which lies immediately adjacent to and is reciprocally connected with EC and LA. Several characteristics of persistent-firing neurons in PR were similar to those previously reported in LA and EC. Persistent firing in PR was enabled by the application of carbachol, a nonselective cholinergic agonist, and it was induced by injecting a suprathreshold current or by stimulating suprathreshold excitatory synaptic inputs to the neuron. Once induced, persistent firing lasted for seconds to minutes. Persistent firing could always be terminated by a sufficiently large and prolonged hyperpolarizing current; it was prevented by antagonists of muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChRs); and it was blocked by flufenamic acid. The latter has been suggested to inhibit a Ca(2+) -activated nonspecific cation conductance (G(CAN) ) that normally furnishes the sustained depolarization during persistent firing. In many PR neurons, the discharge rate during persistent firing was a graded function of depolarizing and/or hyperpolarizing inputs. Persistent firing was not prevented by blocking fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission, demonstrating that it can be generated endogenously. We suggest that persistent-firing neurons in PR, EC, LA, and certain other brain regions may cooperate in support of a transient-memory system. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Posttraumatic secondary brain insults exacerbates neuronal injury by altering Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

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    Li Xia

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous studies indicated that metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs are deeply involved in the secondary processes after diffuse brain injury (DBI. In the present study, we used a rodent DBI model to determine whether hypotension exacerbates neuronal injury as a secondary brain insult (SBI after traumatic brain injury (TBI by changing the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs in the cerebral cortex. Results Three hundred and eleven male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into five groups: normal control, sham-operated control, SBI alone, DBI alone, or DBI with SBI. DBI was produced in rats by Marmarou's methods and the SBI model was produced by hypotension. The alteration of neuronal expression of mGluRs after DBI and DBI coupled with SBI was observed by hybridization in situ at different time points in the experiment. We found a higher mortality and neurological severity score (NSS for rats in the DBI with SBI group compared with those in the DBI alone group. Although there was a significant rise in the expression of group I and group III mGluRs (except mGluR6 and a decrease in the expression of group II mGluRs after DBI (P Conclusion The results suggest posttraumatic SBI may exacerbate neuronal injury or brain injury by altering expression of mGluRs, and more emphasis should therefore be put on the prevention and treatment of SBI.

  11. Reciprocal Regulation of Very Low Density Lipoprotein Receptors (VLDLRs) in Neurons by Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Reelin

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    Do, Hai Thi; Bruelle, Céline; Tselykh, Timofey; Jalonen, Pilvi; Korhonen, Laura; Lindholm, Dan

    2013-01-01

    BDNF positively influences various aspects of neuronal migration, maturation, and survival in the developing brain. Reelin in turn mediates inhibitory signals to migrating neuroblasts, which is crucial for brain development. The interplay between BDNF and Reelin signaling in neurodevelopment is not fully understood. We show here that BDNF increased the levels of the Reelin receptor (VLDL receptor (VLDLR)) in hippocampal neurons by increasing gene expression. In contrast, Reelin decreased VLDLRs, which was accompanied by an increase in the levels of the E3 ligase Mylip/Idol in neurons. Down-regulation of Mylip/Idol using shRNAs abrogated the decrease in VLDLRs induced by Reelin. These results show that VLDLRs are tightly regulated in hippocampal neurons by both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. The regulation of VLDLR by BDNF and Reelin may affect the migration of neurons and contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders in the nervous system. PMID:23990472

  12. Noise and Synchronization Analysis of the Cold-Receptor Neuronal Network Model

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    Ying Du

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the dynamics of the cold receptor neural network model. First, it examines noise effects on neuronal stimulus in the model. From ISI plots, it is shown that there are considerable differences between purely deterministic simulations and noisy ones. The ISI-distance is used to measure the noise effects on spike trains quantitatively. It is found that spike trains observed in neural models can be more strongly affected by noise for different temperatures in some aspects; meanwhile, spike train has greater variability with the noise intensity increasing. The synchronization of neuronal network with different connectivity patterns is also studied. It is shown that chaotic and high period patterns are more difficult to get complete synchronization than the situation in single spike and low period patterns. The neuronal network will exhibit various patterns of firing synchronization by varying some key parameters such as the coupling strength. Different types of firing synchronization are diagnosed by a correlation coefficient and the ISI-distance method. The simulations show that the synchronization status of neurons is related to the network connectivity patterns.

  13. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

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    Samuel D Robinson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available NMDA receptors (NMDARs play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM but not high (50 μM concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-AP. Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and RAP, a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs.

  14. Up-regulation of the Neuronal Nicotinic Receptor α7 by HIV Glycoprotein 120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Leomar Y.; Capó-Vélez, Coral M.; García-Beltrán, Wilfredo F.; Ramos, Félix M.; Vázquez-Rosa, Edwin; Ríos, Raymond; Mercado, José R.; Meléndez, Roberto I.; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 30–50% of the >30 million HIV-infected subjects develop neurological complications ranging from mild symptoms to dementia. HIV does not infect neurons, and the molecular mechanisms behind HIV-associated neurocognitive decline are not understood. There are several hypotheses to explain the development of dementia in HIV+ individuals, including neuroinflammation mediated by infected microglia and neuronal toxicity by HIV proteins. A key protein associated with the neurological complications of HIV, gp120, forms part of the viral envelope and can be found in the CSF of infected individuals. HIV-1-gp120 interacts with several receptors including CD4, CCR5, CXCR4, and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). However, the role of nAChRs in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder has not been investigated. We studied the effects of gp120IIIB on the expression and function of the nicotinic receptor α7 (α7-nAChR). Our results show that gp120, through activation of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor, induces a functional up-regulation of α7-nAChRs. Because α7-nAChRs have a high permeability to Ca2+, we performed TUNEL staining to investigate the effects of receptor up-regulation on cell viability. Our data revealed an increase in cell death, which was blocked by the selective antagonist α-bungarotoxin. The in vitro data are supported by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, confirming a remarkable up-regulation of the α7-nAChR in gp120-transgenic mice brains. Specifically, α7-nAChR up-regulation is observed in mouse striatum, a region severely affected in HIV+ patients. In summary, CXCR4 activation induces up-regulation of α7-nAChR, causing cell death, suggesting that α7-nAChR is a previously unrecognized contributor to the neurotoxicity associated with HIV infection. PMID:22084248

  15. Insulin-like growth factor-1 inhibits adult supraoptic neurons via complementary modulation of mechanoreceptors and glycine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ster, Jeanne; Colomer, Claude; Monzo, Cécile; Duvoid-Guillou, Anne; Moos, Françoise; Alonso, Gérard; Hussy, Nicolas

    2005-03-02

    In the CNS, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is mainly known for its trophic effect both during development and in adulthood. Here, we show than in adult rat supraoptic nucleus (SON), IGF-1 receptor immunoreactivity is present in neurons, whereas IGF-1 immunoreactivity is found principally in astrocytes and more moderately in neurons. In vivo application of IGF-1 within the SON acutely inhibits the activity of both vasopressin and oxytocin neurons, the two populations of SON neuroendocrine cells. Recordings of acutely isolated SON neurons showed that this inhibition occurs through two rapid and reversible mechanisms, both involving the neuronal IGF-1 receptor but different intracellular messengers. IGF-1 inhibits Gd3+-sensitive and osmosensitive mechanoreceptor cation current via phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI3) kinase activation. IGF-1 also potentiates taurine-activated glycine receptor (GlyR) Cl- currents by increasing the agonist sensitivity through a extremely rapid (within a second) PI3 kinase-independent mechanism. Both mechanoreceptor channels and GlyR, which form the excitatory and inhibitory components of SON neuron osmosensitivity, are active at rest, and their respective inhibition and potentiation will both be inhibitory, leading to strong decrease in neuronal activity. It will be of interest to determine whether IGF-1 is released by neurons, thus participating in an inhibitory autocontrol, or astrocytes, then joining the growing family of glia-to-neuron transmitters that modulate neuronal and synaptic activity. Through the opposite and complementary acute regulation of mechanoreceptors and GlyR, IGF-1 appears as a new important neuromodulator in the adult CNS, participating in the complex integration of neural messages that regulates the level of neuronal excitability.

  16. The expression of Toll-like receptor 4, 7 and co-receptors in neurochemical sub-populations of rat trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helley, M P; Abate, W; Jackson, S K; Bennett, J H; Thompson, S W N

    2015-12-03

    The recent discovery that mammalian nociceptors express Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has raised the possibility that these cells directly detect and respond to pathogens with implications for either direct nociceptor activation or sensitization. A range of neuronal TLRs have been identified, however a detailed description regarding the distribution of expression of these receptors within sub-populations of sensory neurons is lacking. There is also some debate as to the composition of the TLR4 receptor complex on sensory neurons. Here we use a range of techniques to quantify the expression of TLR4, TLR7 and some associated molecules within neurochemically-identified sub-populations of trigeminal (TG) and dorsal root (DRG) ganglion sensory neurons. We also detail the pattern of expression and co-expression of two isoforms of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT), a phospholipid remodeling enzyme previously shown to be involved in the lipopolysaccharide-dependent TLR4 response in monocytes, within sensory ganglia. Immunohistochemistry shows that both TLR4 and TLR7 preferentially co-localize with transient receptor potential vallinoid 1 (TRPV1) and purinergic receptor P2X ligand-gated ion channel 3 (P2X3), markers of nociceptor populations, within both TG and DRG. A gene expression profile shows that TG sensory neurons express a range of TLR-associated molecules. LPCAT1 is expressed by a proportion of both nociceptors and non-nociceptive neurons. LPCAT2 immunostaining is absent from neuronal profiles within both TG and DRG and is confined to non-neuronal cell types under naïve conditions. Together, our results show that nociceptors express the molecular machinery required to directly respond to pathogenic challenge independently from the innate immune system. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neural stem cells express melatonin receptors and neurotrophic factors: colocalization of the MT1 receptor with neuronal and glial markers

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    McMillan Catherine R

    2004-10-01

    a heterogeneous population of NSCs including both neural and glial progenitors, as observed under the cell culture conditions used in this study. These NSCs have an intrinsic ability to express neurotrophic factors, with an apparent suppression of GDNF expression after several days in culture. The detection of melatonin receptors in neural stem/progenitor cells suggests involvement of this pleiotropic hormone in mammalian neurodevelopment. Moreover, the ability of melatonin to induce GDNF expression in C17.2 cells supports a functional role for the MT1 receptor expressed in these NSCs. In view of the potency of GDNF in promoting the survival of dopaminergic neurons, these novel findings have implications for the utilization of melatonin in neuroprotective strategies, especially in Parkinson's disease.

  18. Differential actions of orexin receptors in brainstem cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons revealed by receptor knockouts: implications for orexinergic signaling in arousal and narcolepsy

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    Kristi A Kohlmeier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Orexin neuropeptides influence multiple homeostatic functions and play an essential role in the expression of normal sleep-wake behavior. While their two known receptors (OX1 and OX2 are targets for novel pharmacotherapeutics, the actions mediated by each receptor remain largely unexplored. Using brain slices from mice constitutively lacking either receptor, we used whole-cell and Ca2+ imaging methods to delineate the cellular actions of each receptor within cholinergic (laterodorsal tegmental nucleus; LDT and monoaminergic (dorsal raphe; DR and locus coeruleus; LC brainstem nuclei – where orexins promote arousal and suppress REM sleep. In slices from OX2-/- mice, orexin-A (300 nM elicited wild-type responses in LDT, DR and LC neurons consisting of a depolarizing current and augmented voltage-dependent Ca2+ transients. In slices from OX1-/- mice, the depolarizing current was absent in LDT and LC neurons and was attenuated in DR neurons, although Ca2+-transients were still augmented. Since orexin-A produced neither of these actions in slices lacking both receptors, our findings suggest that orexin-mediated depolarization is mediated by both receptors in DR, but is exclusively mediated by OX1 in LDT and LC neurons, even though OX2 is present and OX2 mRNA appears elevated in brainstems from OX1-/- mice. Considering published behavioral data, these findings support a model in which orexin-mediated excitation of mesopontine cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons contributes little to stabilizing spontaneous waking and sleep bouts, but functions in context-dependent arousal and helps restrict muscle atonia to REM sleep. The augmented Ca2± transients mediated by both receptors appeared mediated by influx via L-type Ca2+ channels, which is often linked to transcriptional signaling. This could provide an adaptive signal to compensate for receptor loss or prolonged antagonism and may contribute to the reduced severity of narcolepsy in single receptor

  19. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are important targets for alcohol reward and dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Gao, Ming; Taylor, Devin H

    2014-03-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are important targets for alcohol reward and dependence. Alcoholism is a serious public health problem and has been identified as the third major cause of preventable mortality in the world. Worldwide, about 2 billion people consume alcohol, with 76.3 million having diagnosable alcohol use disorders. Alcohol is currently responsible for the death of 4% of adults worldwide (about 2.5 million deaths each year), and this number will be significantly increased by 2020 unless effective action is taken. Alcohol is the most commonly abused substance by humans. Ethanol (EtOH) is the intoxicating agent in alcoholic drinks that can lead to abuse and dependence. Although it has been extensively studied, the mechanisms of alcohol reward and dependence are still poorly understood. The major reason is that, unlike other addictive drugs (eg, morphine, cocaine or nicotine) that have specific molecular targets, EtOH affects much wider neuronal functions. These functions include phospholipid membranes, various ion channels and receptors, synaptic and network functions, and intracellular signaling molecules. The major targets in the brain that mediate EtOH's effects remain unclear. This knowledge gap results in a therapeutic barrier in the treatment of alcoholism. Interestingly, alcohol and nicotine are often co-abused, which suggests that neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), the molecular targets for nicotine, may also contribute to alcohol's abusive properties. Here, we briefly summarize recent lines of evidence showing how EtOH modulates nAChRs in the mesolimbic pathway, which provides a perspective that nAChRs are important targets mediating alcohol abuse.

  20. Nanostructured materials detect epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase and carcinoembryonic antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; Surdu-Bob, Carmen Cristina; Badulescu, Marius

    2015-09-01

    New nanostructured materials based on thin films of Cu and Ni deposited on textile material (veil), as well as gold nanostructured microspheres were used for the design of new stochastic sensors. The stochastic sensors were able to detect simultaneously a panel of biomarkers comprising epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase, and carcinoembryonic antigen from whole blood samples with high reliabilities - recovery tests higher than 97.00%, with a RSD (%) lower than 0.1%. The stochastic sensors had shown high sensitivities and low determination levels for the detection of the proposed panel of biomarkers making early detection of lung cancer possible by fast screening of whole blood.

  1. Cell surface estrogen receptor alpha is upregulated during subchronic metabolic stress and inhibits neuronal cell degeneration.

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    Cristiana Barbati

    Full Text Available In addition to the classical nuclear estrogen receptor, the expression of non-nuclear estrogen receptors localized to the cell surface membrane (mER has recently been demonstrated. Estrogen and its receptors have been implicated in the development or progression of numerous neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, the pathogenesis of these diseases has been associated with disturbances of two key cellular programs: apoptosis and autophagy. An excess of apoptosis or a defect in autophagy has been implicated in neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to clarify the role of ER in determining neuronal cell fate and the possible implication of these receptors in regulating either apoptosis or autophagy. The human neuronal cell line SH-SY5Y and mouse neuronal cells in primary culture were thus exposed to chronic minimal peroxide treatment (CMP, a form of subcytotoxic minimal chronic stress previously that mimics multiple aspects of long-term cell stress and represents a limited molecular proxy for neurodegenerative processes. We actually found that either E2 or E2-bovine serum albumin construct (E2BSA, i.e. a non-permeant form of E2 was capable of modulating intracellular cell signals and regulating cell survival and death. In particular, under CMP, the up-regulation of mERα, but not mERβ, was associated with functional signals (ERK phosphorylation and p38 dephosphorylation compatible with autophagic cytoprotection triggering and leading to cell survival. The mERα trafficking appeared to be independent of the microfilament system cytoskeletal network but was seemingly associated with microtubular apparatus network, i.e., to MAP2 molecular chaperone. Importantly, antioxidant treatments, administration of siRNA to ERα, or the presence of antagonist of ERα hindered these events. These results support that the surface expression of mERα plays a pivotal role in determining cell fate, and that ligand-induced activation of mER signalling exerts a

  2. Acetylcholine elongates neuronal growth cone filopodia via activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Lei Ray; Estes, Stephen; Artinian, Liana; Rehder, Vincent

    2013-07-01

    In addition to acting as a classical neurotransmitter in synaptic transmission, acetylcholine (ACh) has been shown to play a role in axonal growth and growth cone guidance. What is not well understood is how ACh acts on growth cones to affect growth cone filopodia, structures known to be important for neuronal pathfinding. We addressed this question using an identified neuron (B5) from the buccal ganglion of the pond snail Helisoma trivolvis in cell culture. ACh treatment caused pronounced filopodial elongation within minutes, an effect that required calcium influx and resulted in the elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca]i ). Whole-cell patch clamp recordings showed that ACh caused a reduction in input resistance, a depolarization of the membrane potential, and an increase in firing frequency in B5 neurons. These effects were mediated via the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), as the nAChR agonist dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) mimicked the effects of ACh on filopodial elongation, [Ca]i elevation, and changes in electrical activity. Moreover, the nAChR antagonist tubucurarine blocked all DMPP-induced effects. Lastly, ACh acted locally at the growth cone, because growth cones that were physically isolated from their parent neuron responded to ACh by filopodial elongation with a similar time course as growth cones that remained connected to their parent neuron. Our data revealed a critical role for ACh as a modulator of growth cone filopodial dynamics. ACh signaling was mediated via nAChRs and resulted in Ca influx, which, in turn, caused filopodial elongation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. AVPV neurons containing estrogen receptor-beta in adult male rats are influenced by soy isoflavones

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    Bu Lihong

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isoflavones, the most abundant phytoestrogens in soy foods, are structurally similar to 17beta-estradiol. It is known that 17beta-estradiol induces apoptosis in anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV in rat brain. Also, there is evidence that consumption of soy isoflavones reduces the volume of AVPV in male rats. Therefore, in this study, we examined the influence of dietary soy isoflavones on apoptosis in AVPV of 150 day-old male rats fed either a soy isoflavone-free diet (Phyto-free or a soy isoflavone-rich diet (Phyto-600. Results The occurrence of apoptosis in AVPV was examined by TUNEL staining. The incidence of apoptosis was about 10 times higher in the Phyto-600 group (33.1 ± 1.7% than in the Phyto-free group (3.6 ± 1.0%. Furthermore, these apoptotic cells were identified as neurons by dual immunofluorescent staining of GFAP and NeuN as markers of astrocytes and neurons, respectively. Then the dopaminergic neurons in AVPV were detected by immunohistochemistry staining of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH. No significant difference in the number of TH neurons was observed between the diet treatment groups. When estrogen receptor (ER alpha and beta were examined by immunohistochemistry, we observed a 22% reduction of ERbeta-positive cell numbers in AVPV with consumption of soy isoflavones, whereas no significant change in ERalpha-positive cell numbers was detected. Furthermore, almost all the apoptotic cells were ERbeta-immunoreactive (ir, but not ERalpha-ir. Last, subcutaneous injections of equol (a major isoflavone metabolite that accounts for approximately 70–90% of the total circulating plasma isoflavone levels did not alter the volume of AVPV in adult male rats. Conclusion In summary, these findings provide direct evidence that consumption of soy isoflavones, but not the exposure to equol, influences the loss of ERbeta-containing neurons in male AVPV.

  4. Alpha7 neuronal nicotinic receptor: a pluripotent target for diseases of the central nervous system.

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    Bencherif, Merouane; Narla, Sridhar T; Stachowiak, Michal S

    2014-01-01

    Twenty years ago the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) was thought to be vestigial with little biological relevance, but in recent years it has emerged as a functional target with ubiquitous localization and biological roles. In the last decade more than two thousand manuscripts have been published unraveling the multi-dimensional complexity of this target, the heterogeneity of its genetic variants, the spectrum of transducing signals, and the critical roles it plays in pivotal biological functions in the protection and maturation of neurons and stems cells, immune and inflammatory responses, sensory gating, mnemonic and attentional processes. In addition research and development of novel drugs has also promoted an intense debate on the role of activation, desensitization, β -amyloid oligomers, glutamate, and alpha7 nAChR, in cognition, neuronal survival, and neurodegeneration. The initial alpha7 nAChRs transducing enzyme, aptly named after Janus the two-faced roman deity for crossroads and gateways, reflects the dichotomy of reports on alpha7 nAChRs in promoting neuronal survival and cognitive processes, or as the target of β- amyloid oligomers to destabilize neuronal homeostasis leading to an irreversible neurochemical demise and dementia. It is therefore important to understand the functional neural bases of alpha7 nAChRs-mediated improvement of biological functions. The promise of alpha7 nAChR-directed drugs has already recently translated into proof-of-concept in controlled clinical trials but the full promise of this target(s) will be fully unraveled when its impact on neuronal health and survival is tested in controlled long-term clinical trials of disease progression.

  5. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 activation enhances tyrosine phosphorylation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and NMDA-induced cell death in hippocampal cultured neurons.

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    Takagi, Norio; Besshoh, Shintaro; Marunouchi, Tetsuro; Takeo, Satoshi; Tanonaka, Kouichi

    2012-01-01

    The activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which are coupled with Gq-protein, initiates a variety physiological responses in different types of cells. While Gq-protein-coupled receptors can upregulate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor function, group I mGluR-mediated regulations of NMDA receptor function are not fully understood. To determine biochemical roles of group I mGluRs in the regulation of the NMDA receptor, we have investigated changes in tyrosine phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B induced by a selective mGluR5 agonist, (RS)-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG) in hippocampal neuronal cultures. Activation of mGluR5 by CHPG increased active-forms of Src. CHPG also enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2A and NR2B in hippocampal neuronal cultures. In addition, NMDA-induced cell death was enhanced by CHPG-induced mGluR5 stimulation at the concentration, which increased tyrosine phosphorylation of Src and NR2A/2B but did not induce cell death. This effect was inhibited by selective mGluR5 antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP). The results suggest that in hippocampal neurons, mGluR5 may regulate NMDA receptor activity, involving tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2A and NR2B and may be involved in NMDA receptor-mediated cell injury.

  6. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elevates intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in accessory lobe neurons of the chick.

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    Takahashi, Keita; Kitamura, Naoki; Suzuki, Yuki; Yamanaka, Yuko; Shinohara, Hikaru; Shibuya, Izumi

    2015-04-01

    Accessory lobes are protrusions located at the lateral sides of the spinal cord of chicks and it has been proposed that they play a role as a sensory organ for equilibrium during walking. We have reported that functional neurons exist in the accessory lobe. As there is histological evidence that synaptic terminals of cholinergic nerves exist near the somata of accessory lobe neurons, we examined the effects of acetylcholine on changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i), as an index of cellular activities. Acetylcholine (0.1-100 µM) caused a transient rise in the [Ca2+]i. Acetylcholine-evoked [Ca2+]i rises were observed in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, and they were abolished in the presence of cyclopiazonic acid, an inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase of intracellular Ca2+ stores or atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist. mRNAs coding M3 and M5 isoforms of the muscarinic receptors were detected in accessory lobes by the RT-PCR. These results indicate that chick accessory lobe neurons express functional muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, and that acetylcholine stimulates Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular Ca2+ stores, which elevates the [Ca2+]i in the somata of accessory lobe neurons, through activation of these receptors. Cholinergic synaptic transmission to the accessory lobe neurons may regulate some cellular functions through muscarinic receptors.

  7. Anatomical and molecular consequences of Unilateral Naris Closure on two populations of olfactory sensory neurons expressing defined odorant receptors.

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    Molinas, Adrien; Aoudé, Imad; Soubeyre, Vanessa; Tazir, Bassim; Cadiou, Hervé; Grosmaitre, Xavier

    2016-07-28

    Mammalian olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), the primary elements of the olfactory system, are located in the olfactory epithelium lining the nasal cavity. Exposed to the environment, their lifespan is short. Consequently, OSNs are regularly regenerated and several reports show that activity strongly modulates their development and regeneration: the peripheral olfactory system can adjust to the amount of stimulus through compensatory mechanisms. Unilateral naris occlusion (UNO) was frequently used to investigate this mechanism at the entire epithelium level. However, there is little data regarding the effects of UNO at the cellular level, especially on individual neuronal populations expressing a defined odorant receptor. Here, using UNO during the first three postnatal weeks, we analyzed the anatomical and molecular consequences of sensory deprivation in OSNs populations expressing the MOR23 and M71 receptors. The density of MOR23-expressing neurons is decreased in the closed side while UNO does not affect the density of M71-expressing neurons. Using Real Time qPCR on isolated neurons, we observed that UNO modulates the transcript levels for transduction pathway proteins (odorant receptors, CNGA2, PDE1c). The transcripts modulated by UNO will differ between populations depending on the receptor expressed. These results suggest that sensory deprivation will have different effects on different OSNs' populations. As a consequence, early experience will shape the functional properties of OSNs differently depending on the type of odorant receptor they express. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Fas/Fas ligand death receptor pathway contributes to phenylalanine-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons.

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    Xiaodong Huang

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria (PKU, an autosomal recessive disorder of amino acid metabolism caused by mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH gene, leads to childhood mental retardation by exposing neurons to cytotoxic levels of phenylalanine (Phe. A recent study showed that the mitochondria-mediated (intrinsic apoptotic pathway is involved in Phe-induced apoptosis in cultured cortical neurons, but it is not known if the death receptor (extrinsic apoptotic pathway and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-associated apoptosis also contribute to neurodegeneration in PKU. To answer this question, we used specific inhibitors to block each apoptotic pathway in cortical neurons under neurotoxic levels of Phe. The caspase-8 inhibitor Z-IETD-FMK strongly attenuated apoptosis in Phe-treated neurons (0.9 mM, 18 h, suggesting involvement of the Fas receptor (FasR-mediated cell death receptor pathway in Phe toxicity. In addition, Phe significantly increased cell surface Fas expression and formation of the Fas/FasL complex. Blocking Fas/FasL signaling using an anti-Fas antibody markedly inhibited apoptosis caused by Phe. In contrast, blocking the ER stress-induced cell death pathway with salubrinal had no effect on apoptosis in Phe-treated cortical neurons. These experiments demonstrate that the Fas death receptor pathway contributes to Phe-induced apoptosis and suggest that inhibition of the death receptor pathway may be a novel target for neuroprotection in PKU patients.

  9. Definition of estrogen receptor pathway critical for estrogen positive feedback to gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons and fertility.

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    Wintermantel, Tim M; Campbell, Rebecca E; Porteous, Robert; Bock, Dagmar; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Todman, Martin G; Korach, Kenneth S; Greiner, Erich; Pérez, Cristian A; Schütz, Günther; Herbison, Allan E

    2006-10-19

    The mechanisms through which estrogen regulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to control mammalian ovulation are unknown. We found that estrogen positive feedback to generate the preovulatory gonadotropin surge was normal in estrogen receptor beta knockout (ERbeta) mutant mice, but absent in ERalpha mutant mice. An ERalpha-selective compound was sufficient to generate positive feedback in wild-type mice. As GnRH neurons do not express ERalpha, estrogen positive feedback upon GnRH neurons must be indirect in nature. To establish the cell type responsible, we generated a neuron-specific ERalpha mutant mouse line. These mice failed to exhibit estrogen positive feedback, demonstrating that neurons expressing ERalpha are critical. We then used a GnRH neuron-specific Pseudorabies virus (PRV) tracing approach to show that the ERalpha-expressing neurons innervating GnRH neurons are located within rostral periventricular regions of the hypothalamus. These studies demonstrate that ovulation is driven by estrogen actions upon ERalpha-expressing neuronal afferents to GnRH neurons.

  10. Antagonist pharmacology of desensitizing and non-desensitizing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in cockroach neurons.

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    Salgado, Vincent L

    2016-09-01

    Two α-bungarotoxin-sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor subtypes in neurons of the American cockroach have been identified as desensitizing (nAChD) and selectively inhibitable with 100nM imidacloprid, and non-desensitizing (nAChN) and selectively inhibitable with 100pM methyllycaconitine. In this paper, the single-electrode voltage-clamp technique was used to measure concentration-response relations for the action of ACh and five antagonists on pharmacologically separated nAChD and nAChN receptors of acutely dissociated neurons from thoracic ganglia of the American cockroach. A dual bath and U-tube perfusion system was used to achieve rapid application of ACh in the continued presence of antagonists, which was essential to accurately measure inhibition by rapidly-reversible antagonists. ACh activated both receptors with an EC 50 of 7μM and the antagonist potencies were (nAChD/nAChN in nM): dihydro-β-erythroidine: 1.0/5.6, d-tubocurarine: 1000/34, condelphine: 0.39/0.65, phencyclidine: 74/980 and mecamylamine 47/1150. While each of these antagonists displayed some subtype selectivity, none are selective enough to be used as subtype-selective tools. These results bring to a total of 16 the number of nicotinic compounds that have been measured on nAChD and nAChN currents. Characterization of these receptors is important for understanding the role of nAChRs in the insect nervous system and the mechanism of action of insecticides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Impaired chemosensitivity of mouse dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons overexpressing serotonin 1A (Htr1a receptors.

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    Gilda Baccini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serotonergic system participates in a wide range of physiological processes and behaviors, but its role is generally considered as modulatory and noncrucial, especially concerning life-sustaining functions. We recently created a transgenic mouse line in which a functional deficit in serotonin homeostasis due to excessive serotonin autoinhibition was produced by inducing serotonin 1A receptor (Htr1a overexpression selectively in serotonergic neurons (Htr1a raphe-overexpressing or Htr1a(RO mice. Htr1a(RO mice exhibit episodes of autonomic dysregulation, cardiovascular crises and death, resembling those of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS and revealing a life-supporting role of serotonergic system in autonomic control. Since midbrain serotonergic neurons are chemosensitive and are implicated in arousal we hypothesized that their chemosensitivity might be impaired in Htr1a(RO mice. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Loose-seal cell-attached recordings in brainstem slices revealed that serotonergic neurons in dorsal raphe nucleus of Htr1a(RO mice have dramatically reduced responses to hypercapnic challenge as compared with control littermates. In control mice, application of 9% CO(2 produced an increase in firing rate of serotonergic neurons (0.260 ± 0.041 Hz, n=20, p=0.0001 and application of 3% CO(2 decreased their firing rate (-0.142 ± 0.025 Hz, n=17, p=0.0008. In contrast, in Htr1a(RO mice, firing rate of serotonergic neurons was not significantly changed by 9% CO(2 (0.021 ± 0.034 Hz, n=16, p=0.49 and by 3% CO(2 (0.012 ± 0.046 Hz, n=12, p=0.97. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the hypothesis that chemosensitivity of midbrain serotonergic neurons provides a physiological mechanism for arousal responses to life-threatening episodes of hypercapnia and that functional impairment, such as excessive autoinhibition, of midbrain serotonergic neuron responses to hypercapnia may contribute to sudden death.

  12. Vascular Kinin B1 and B2 Receptors Determine Endothelial Dysfunction through Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase

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    Luciano Dos Santos A. Capettini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available B1- and B2-kinin receptors are G protein-coupled receptors that play an important role in the vascular function. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the participation of kinin receptors in the acetylcholine (ACh-induced vascular relaxation, focusing on the protein-protein interaction involving kinin receptors with endothelial and neuronal nitric oxide synthases (eNOS and nNOS. Vascular reactivity, nitric oxide (NO· and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, co-immunoprecipitation were assessed in thoracic aorta from male wild-type (WT, B1- (B1R−/−, B2- (B2R−/− knockout mice. Some vascular reactivity experiments were also performed in a double kinin receptors knockout mice (B1B2R−/−. For pharmacological studies, selective B1- and B2-kinin receptors antagonists, NOS inhibitors and superoxide dismutase (SOD mimetic were used. First, we show that B1- and B2-kinin receptors form heteromers with nNOS and eNOS in thoracic aorta. To investigate the functionality of these protein-protein interactions, we took advantage of pharmacological tools and knockout mice. Importantly, our results show that kinin receptors regulate ACh-induced relaxation via nNOS signaling in thoracic aorta with no changes in NO· donor-induced relaxation. Interestingly, B1B2R−/− presented similar level of vascular dysfunction as found in B1R−/− or B2R−/− mice. In accordance, aortic rings from B1R−/− or B2R−/− mice exhibit decreased NO· bioavailability and increased superoxide generation compared to WT mice, suggesting the involvement of excessive ROS generation in the endothelial dysfunction of B1R−/− and B2R−/− mice. Alongside, we show that impaired endothelial vasorelaxation induced by ACh in B1R−/− or B2R−/− mice was rescued by the SOD mimetic compound. Taken together, our findings show that B1- and B2-kinin receptors regulate the endothelium-dependent vasodilation of ACh through nNOS activity and indicate

  13. Inhibition of motor neuron death in vitro and in vivo by a p75 neurotrophin receptor intracellular domain fragment.

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    Matusica, Dusan; Alfonsi, Fabienne; Turner, Bradley J; Butler, Tim J; Shepheard, Stephanie R; Rogers, Mary-Louise; Skeldal, Sune; Underwood, Clare K; Mangelsdorf, Marie; Coulson, Elizabeth J

    2016-02-01

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR); also known as NGFR) can mediate neuronal apoptosis in disease or following trauma, and facilitate survival through interactions with Trk receptors. Here we tested the ability of a p75(NTR)-derived trophic cell-permeable peptide, c29, to inhibit p75(NTR)-mediated motor neuron death. Acute c29 application to axotomized motor neuron axons decreased cell death, and systemic c29 treatment of SOD1(G93A) mice, a common model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, resulted in increased spinal motor neuron survival mid-disease as well as delayed disease onset. Coincident with this, c29 treatment of these mice reduced the production of p75(NTR) cleavage products. Although c29 treatment inhibited mature- and pro-nerve-growth-factor-induced death of cultured motor neurons, and these ligands induced the cleavage of p75(NTR) in motor-neuron-like NSC-34 cells, there was no direct effect of c29 on p75(NTR) cleavage. Rather, c29 promoted motor neuron survival in vitro by enhancing the activation of TrkB-dependent signaling pathways, provided that low levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were present, an effect that was replicated in vivo in SOD1(G93A) mice. We conclude that the c29 peptide facilitates BDNF-dependent survival of motor neurons in vitro and in vivo. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Activity of D1/2 Receptor Expressing Neurons in the Nucleus Accumbens Regulates Running, Locomotion, and Food Intake

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    Xianglong eZhu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available While weight gain is clearly promoted by excessive energy intake and reduced expenditure, the underlying neural mechanisms of energy balance remain unclear. The NAc is one brain region that has received attention for its role in the regulation of energy balance; its D1 and D2 receptor containing neurons have distinct functions in regulating reward behavior and require further examination. The goal of the present study is to investigate how activation and inhibition of D1 and D2 neurons in the NAc influences behaviors related to energy intake and expenditure. Specific manipulation of D1 vs D2 neurons was done in both low expenditure and high expenditure (wheel running conditions to assess behavioral effects in these different states. Direct control of neural activity was achieved using a DREADD (Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs strategy. Activation of NAc D1 neurons increased food intake, wheel running and locomotor activity. In contrast, activation of D2 neurons in the NAc reduced running and locomotion while D2 neuron inhibition had opposite effects. These results highlight the importance of considering both intake and expenditure in the analysis of D1 and D2 neuronal manipulations. Moreover, the behavioral outcomes from D1 NAc neuronal manipulations depend upon the activity state of the animals (wheel running vs non-running. The data support and complement the hypothesis of specific NAc dopamine pathways facilitating energy expenditure and suggest a potential strategy for human weight control.

  15. Combined autoradiographic-immunocytochemical analysis of opioid receptors and opioid peptide neuronal systems in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M.E.; Khachaturian, H.; Watson, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Using adjacent section autoradiography-immunocytochemistry, the distribution of (TH)naloxone binding sites was studied in relation to neuronal systems containing (Leu)enkephalin, dynorphin A, or beta-endorphin immunoreactivity in rat brain. Brain sections from formaldehyde-perfused rats show robust specific binding of (TH)naloxone, the pharmacological (mu-like) properties of which appear unaltered. In contrast, specific binding of the delta ligand (TH)D-Ala2,D-Leu5-enkephalin was virtually totally eliminated as a result of formaldehyde perfusion. Using adjacent section analysis, the authors have noted associations between (TH)naloxone binding sites and one, two, or all three opioid systems in different brain regions; however, in some areas, no apparent relationship could be observed. Within regions, the relationship was complex. The complexity of the association between (TH)naloxone binding sites and the multiple opioid systems, and previous reports of co-localization of mu and kappa receptors in rat brain, are inconsistent with a simple-one-to-one relationship between a given opioid precursor and opioid receptor subtype. Instead, since differential processing of the three precursors gives rise to peptides of varying receptor subtype potencies and selectivities, the multiple peptide-receptor relationships may point to a key role of post-translational processing in determining the physiological consequences of opioid neurotransmission.

  16. The anthelmintic levamisole is an allosteric modulator of human neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levandoski, Mark M; Piket, Barbara; Chang, Jane

    2003-06-13

    L-[-]-2,3,5,6-Tetrahydro-6-phenylimidazo[2,1b]-thiazole hydrochloride (levamisole) is an anthelmintic that targets the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of parasitic nematodes. We report here the effects of levamisole on human neuronal alpha 3 beta 2 and alpha 3 beta 4 nicotinic receptors, heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes and studied with the voltage clamp method. Applied alone, levamisole was a very weak partial agonist for the two subunit combinations. When co-applied with acetylcholine, micromolar concentrations of levamisole potentiated responses, while millimolar concentrations inhibited them; these effects were complex functions of both acetylcholine and levamisole concentrations. The differences in the levamisole effects on the two receptor combinations suggest that the effects are mediated by the beta subunit. Several combinations of agonist and anthelmintic gave the dual potentiation/inhibition behavior, suggesting that the modulatory effects are general. Levamisole inhibition showed macroscopic characteristics of open channel block. Several results led us to conclude that levamisole potentiation occurs through noncompetitive binding to the receptor. We propose pseudo-site binding for noncompetitive potentiation by levamisole.

  17. μ-Opioid receptor activation and noradrenaline transport inhibition by tapentadol in rat single locus coeruleus neurons.

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    Sadeghi, Mahsa; Tzschentke, Thomas M; Christie, MacDonald J

    2015-01-01

    Tapentadol is a novel analgesic that combines moderate μ-opioid receptor agonism and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition in a single molecule. Both mechanisms of action are involved in producing analgesia; however, the potency and efficacy of tapentadol in individual neurons has not been characterized. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) (KIR 3.x) currents were made from rat locus coeruleus neurons in brain slices to investigate the potency and relative efficacy of tapentadol and compare its intrinsic activity with other clinically used opioids. Tapentadol showed agonist activity at μ receptors and was approximately six times less potent than morphine with respect to KIR 3.x current modulation. The intrinsic activity of tapentadol was lower than [Met]enkephalin, morphine and oxycodone, but higher than buprenorphine and pentazocine. Tapentadol inhibited the noradrenaline transporter (NAT) with potency similar to that at μ receptors. The interaction between these two mechanisms of action was additive in individual LC neurons. Tapentadol displays similar potency for both µ receptor activation and NAT inhibition in functioning neurons. The intrinsic activity of tapentadol at the μ receptor lies between that of buprenorphine and oxycodone, potentially explaining the favourable profile of side effects, related to μ receptors. This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. Methamphetamine-evoked depression of GABAB receptor signaling in GABA neurons of the VTA

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    Padgett, CL; Lalive, AL; Tan, KR; Terunuma, M; Munoz, MB; Pangalos, MN; Martínez-Hernández, J; Watanabe, M; Moss, SJ; Luján, R; Lüscher, C; Slesinger, PA

    2012-01-01

    Psychostimulants induce neuroadaptations in excitatory and fast inhibitory transmission in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Mechanisms underlying drug-evoked synaptic plasticity of slow inhibitory transmission mediated by GABAB receptors and G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK/Kir3) channels, however, are poorly understood. Here, we show that one day after methamphetamine (METH) or cocaine exposure, both synaptically-evoked and baclofen-activated GABABR-GIRK currents were significantly depressed in VTA GABA neurons, and remained depressed for 7 days. Presynaptic inhibition mediated by GABABRs on GABA terminals was also weakened. Quantitative immunoelectron microscopy revealed internalization of GABAB1R and GIRK2, which occurred coincident with dephosphorylation of Ser783 in GABAB2R, a site implicated in regulating GABABR surface expression. Inhibition of protein phosphatases recovered GABABR-GIRK currents in VTA GABA neurons of METH-injected mice. This psychostimulant-evoked impairment in GABABR signaling removes an intrinsic brake on GABA neuron spiking, which may augment GABA transmission in the mesocorticolimbic system. PMID:22405207

  19. Humanin rescues cultured rat cortical neurons from NMDA-induced toxicity not by NMDA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ai-Ling; Li, Jian-Zhong; Feng, Zhi-Bo; Ma, Guo-Lin; Gong, Liang; Li, Chun-Ling; Zhang, Ce; Li, Kefeng

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory neurotoxicity has been implicated in many pathological situations and there is no effective treatment available. Humanin is a 24-aa peptide cloned from the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, excitatory toxicity was induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in primarily cultured rat cortical neurons. MTT assessment, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and calcein staining were employed to evaluate the protective activity of humanin on NMDA induced toxicity. The results suggested that NMDA (100 μmol/L, 2.5 hr) triggered neuronal morphological changes, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release (166% of the control), reduction of cell viability (about 50% of the control), and the decrease of living cell density (about 50% of the control). When pretreated with humanin, the toxicity was suppressed. The living cells' density of humanin treated group was similar to that of control. The cell viability was attenuated dose-dependently (IC50 = 0.132 nmol/L). The LDH release was also neutralized in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the intracellular Ca(2+) overloading triggered by NMDA reverted quickly and humanin could not inhibit it. These findings indicate that humanin can rescue cortical neurons from NMDA-induced toxicity in rat but not through interfering with NMDA receptor directly.

  20. Humanin Rescues Cultured Rat Cortical Neurons from NMDA-Induced Toxicity Not by NMDA Receptor

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    Ai-Ling Cui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Excitatory neurotoxicity has been implicated in many pathological situations and there is no effective treatment available. Humanin is a 24-aa peptide cloned from the brain of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD. In the present study, excitatory toxicity was induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA in primarily cultured rat cortical neurons. MTT assessment, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release, and calcein staining were employed to evaluate the protective activity of humanin on NMDA induced toxicity. The results suggested that NMDA (100 μmol/L, 2.5 hr triggered neuronal morphological changes, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release (166% of the control, reduction of cell viability (about 50% of the control, and the decrease of living cell density (about 50% of the control. When pretreated with humanin, the toxicity was suppressed. The living cells’ density of humanin treated group was similar to that of control. The cell viability was attenuated dose-dependently (IC50 = 0.132 nmol/L. The LDH release was also neutralized in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the intracellular Ca2+ overloading triggered by NMDA reverted quickly and humanin could not inhibit it. These findings indicate that humanin can rescue cortical neurons from NMDA-induced toxicity in rat but not through interfering with NMDA receptor directly.

  1. Synaptic NMDA Receptor-Dependent Ca2+ Entry Drives Membrane Potential and Ca2+ Oscillations in Spinal Ventral Horn Neurons

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    Alpert, Michael H.; Alford, Simon

    2013-01-01

    During vertebrate locomotion, spinal neurons act as oscillators when initiated by glutamate release from descending systems. Activation of NMDA receptors initiates Ca2+-mediated intrinsic membrane potential oscillations in central pattern generator (CPG) neurons. NMDA receptor-dependent intrinsic oscillations require Ca2+-dependent K+ (KCa2) channels for burst termination. However, the location of Ca2+ entry mediating KCa2 channel activation, and type of Ca2+ channel – which includes NMDA receptors and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) – remains elusive. NMDA receptor-dependent Ca2+ entry necessitates presynaptic release of glutamate, implying a location at active synapses within dendrites, whereas VGCC-dependent Ca2+ entry is not similarly constrained. Where Ca2+ enters relative to KCa2 channels is crucial to information processing of synaptic inputs necessary to coordinate locomotion. We demonstrate that Ca2+ permeating NMDA receptors is the dominant source of Ca2+ during NMDA-dependent oscillations in lamprey spinal neurons. This Ca2+ entry is synaptically located, NMDA receptor-dependent, and sufficient to activate KCa2 channels at excitatory interneuron synapses onto other CPG neurons. Selective blockade of VGCCs reduces whole-cell Ca2+ entry but leaves membrane potential and Ca2+ oscillations unaffected. Furthermore, repetitive oscillations are prevented by fast, but not slow, Ca2+ chelation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that KCa2 channels are closely located to NMDA receptor-dependent Ca2+ entry. The close spatial relationship between NMDA receptors and KCa2 channels provides an intrinsic mechanism whereby synaptic excitation both excites and subsequently inhibits ventral horn neurons of the spinal motor system. This places the components necessary for oscillation generation, and hence locomotion, at glutamatergic synapses. PMID:23646190

  2. Histamine induces microglia activation and dopaminergic neuronal toxicity via H1 receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Sandra M; Saraiva, Tatiana; Cristóvão, Ana C; Ferreira, Raquel; Santos, Tiago; Esteves, Marta; Saraiva, Cláudia; Je, Goun; Cortes, Luísa; Valero, Jorge; Alves, Gilberto; Klibanov, Alexander; Kim, Yoon-Seong; Bernardino, Liliana

    2016-06-04

    Histamine is an amine widely known as a peripheral inflammatory mediator and as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Recently, it has been suggested that histamine acts as an innate modulator of microglial activity. Herein, we aimed to disclose the role of histamine in microglial phagocytic activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and to explore the consequences of histamine-induced neuroinflammation in dopaminergic (DA) neuronal survival. The effect of histamine on phagocytosis was assessed both in vitro by using a murine N9 microglial cell line and primary microglial cell cultures and in vivo. Cells were exposed to IgG-opsonized latex beads or phosphatidylserine (PS) liposomes to evaluate Fcγ or PS receptor-mediated microglial phagocytosis, respectively. ROS production and protein levels of NADPH oxidases and Rac1 were assessed as a measure of oxidative stress. DA neuronal survival was evaluated in vivo by counting the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) of mice. We found that histamine triggers microglial phagocytosis via histamine receptor 1 (H1R) activation and ROS production via H1R and H4R activation. By using apocynin, a broad NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor, and Nox1 knockout mice, we found that the Nox1 signaling pathway is involved in both phagocytosis and ROS production induced by histamine in vitro. Interestingly, both apocynin and annexin V (used as inhibitor of PS-induced phagocytosis) fully abolished the DA neurotoxicity induced by the injection of histamine in the SN of adult mice in vivo. Blockade of H1R protected against histamine-induced Nox1 expression and death of DA neurons in vivo. Overall, our results highlight the relevance of histamine in the modulation of microglial activity that ultimately may interfere with neuronal survival in the context of Parkinson's disease (PD) and, eventually, other neurodegenerative diseases which are accompanied by microglia

  3. A General Odorant Background Affects the Coding of Pheromone Stimulus Intermittency in Specialist Olfactory Receptor Neurones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouyar, Angela; Party, Virginie; Prešern, Janez; Blejec, Andrej; Renou, Michel

    2011-01-01

    In nature the aerial trace of pheromone used by male moths to find a female appears as a train of discontinuous pulses separated by gaps among a complex odorant background constituted of plant volatiles. We investigated the effect of such background odor on behavior and coding of temporal parameters of pheromone pulse trains in the pheromone olfactory receptor neurons of Spodoptera littoralis. Effects of linalool background were tested by measuring walking behavior towards a source of pheromone. While velocity and orientation index did drop when linalool was turned on, both parameters recovered back to pre-background values after 40 s with linalool still present. Photo-ionization detector was used to characterize pulse delivery by our stimulator. The photo-ionization detector signal reached 71% of maximum amplitude at 50 ms pulses and followed the stimulus period at repetition rates up to 10 pulses/s. However, at high pulse rates the concentration of the odorant did not return to base level during inter-pulse intervals. Linalool decreased the intensity and shortened the response of receptor neurons to pulses. High contrast (>10 dB) in firing rate between pulses and inter-pulse intervals was observed for 1 and 4 pulses/s, both with and without background. Significantly more neurons followed the 4 pulses/s pattern when delivered over linalool; at the same time the information content was preserved almost to the control values. Rapid recovery of behavior shows that change of perceived intensity is more important than absolute stimulus intensity. While decreasing the response intensity, background odor preserved the temporal parameters of the specific signal. PMID:22028879

  4. Effect of Estradiol on Neurotrophin Receptors in Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons: Relevance for Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Andrea Kwakowsky

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The basal forebrain is home to the largest population of cholinergic neurons in the brain. These neurons are involved in a number of cognitive functions including attention, learning and memory. Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs are particularly vulnerable in a number of neurological diseases with the most notable being Alzheimer’s disease, with evidence for a link between decreasing cholinergic markers and the degree of cognitive impairment. The neurotrophin growth factor system is present on these BFCNs and has been shown to promote survival and differentiation on these neurons. Clinical and animal model studies have demonstrated the neuroprotective effects of 17β-estradiol (E2 on neurodegeneration in BFCNs. It is believed that E2 interacts with neurotrophin signaling on cholinergic neurons to mediate these beneficial effects. Evidence presented in our recent study confirms that altering the levels of circulating E2 levels via ovariectomy and E2 replacement significantly affects the expression of the neurotrophin receptors on BFCN. However, we also showed that E2 differentially regulates neurotrophin receptor expression on BFCNs with effects depending on neurotrophin receptor type and neuroanatomical location. In this review, we aim to survey the current literature to understand the influence of E2 on the neurotrophin system, and the receptors and signaling pathways it mediates on BFCN. In addition, we summarize the physiological and pathophysiological significance of E2 actions on the neurotrophin system in BFCN, especially focusing on changes related to Alzheimer’s disease.

  5. Binding characteristics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to its receptors on neurons from the chick embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Tebar, A.; Barde, Y.A.

    1988-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein known to support the survival of embryonic sensory neurons and retinal ganglion cells, was derivatized with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and obtained in a biologically active, radioactive form (125I-BDNF). Using dorsal root ganglion neurons from chick embryos at 9 d of development, the basic physicochemical parameters of the binding of 125I-BDNF with its receptors were established. Two different classes of receptors were found, with dissociation constants of 1.7 x 10(-11) M (high-affinity receptors) and 1.3 x 10(-9) M (low-affinity receptors). Unlabeled BDNF competed with 125I-BDNF for binding to the high-affinity receptors with an inhibition constant essentially identical to the dissociation constant of the labeled protein: 1.2 x 10(-11) M. The association and dissociation rates from both types of receptors were also determined, and the dissociation constants calculated from these kinetic experiments were found to correspond to the results obtained from steady-state binding. The number of high-affinity receptors (a few hundred per cell soma) was 15 times lower than that of low-affinity receptors. No high-affinity receptors were found on sympathetic neurons, known not to respond to BDNF, although specific binding of 125I-BDNF to these cells was detected at a high concentration of the radioligand. These results are discussed and compared with those obtained with nerve growth factor on the same neuronal populations

  6. Astrocytes protect neurons against methylmercury via ATP/P2Y(1) receptor-mediated pathways in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Yusuke; Shinozaki, Youichi; Fujishita, Kayoko; Shibata, Keisuke; Imura, Yoshio; Morizawa, Yosuke; Gachet, Christian; Koizumi, Schuichi

    2013-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a well known environmental pollutant that induces serious neuronal damage. Although MeHg readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, and should affect both neurons and glial cells, how it affects glia or neuron-to-glia interactions has received only limited attention. Here, we report that MeHg triggers ATP/P2Y1 receptor signals in astrocytes, thereby protecting neurons against MeHg via interleukin-6 (IL-6)-mediated pathways. MeHg increased several mRNAs in astrocytes, among which IL-6 was the highest. For this, ATP/P2Y1 receptor-mediated mechanisms were required because the IL-6 production was (i) inhibited by a P2Y1 receptor antagonist, MRS2179, (ii) abolished in astrocytes obtained from P2Y1 receptor-knockout mice, and (iii) mimicked by exogenously applied ATP. In addition, (iv) MeHg released ATP by exocytosis from astrocytes. As for the intracellular mechanisms responsible for IL-6 production, p38 MAP kinase was involved. MeHg-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM) showed neuro-protective effects against MeHg, which was blocked by anti-IL-6 antibody and was mimicked by the application of recombinant IL-6. As for the mechanism of neuro-protection by IL-6, an adenosine A1 receptor-mediated pathway in neurons seems to be involved. Taken together, when astrocytes sense MeHg, they release ATP that autostimulates P2Y1 receptors to upregulate IL-6, thereby leading to A1 receptor-mediated neuro-protection against MeHg.

  7. Altered NMDA receptor function in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons from mice lacking the Homer2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smothers, C Thetford; Szumlinski, Karen K; Worley, Paul F; Woodward, John J

    2016-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptors are inhibited during acute exposure to ethanol and are involved in changes in neuronal plasticity following repeated ethanol exposure. The postsynaptic scaffolding protein Homer2 can regulate the cell surface expression of NMDA receptors in vivo, and mice with a null mutation of the Homer2 gene exhibit an alcohol-avoiding and -intolerant phenotype that is accompanied by a lack of ethanol-induced glutamate sensitization. Thus, Homer2 deletion may perturb the function or acute ethanol sensitivity of the NMDA receptor. In this study, the function and ethanol sensitivity of glutamate receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons from wild-type (WT) and Homer2 knock-out (KO) mice were examined at 7 and 14 days in vitro (DIV) using standard whole-cell voltage-clamp electrophysiology. As compared with wild-type controls, NMDA receptor current density was reduced in cultured hippocampal neurons from Homer2 KO mice at 14 DIV, but not at 7 DIV. There were no genotype-dependent changes in whole-cell capacitance or in currents evoked by kainic acid. The GluN2B-selective antagonist ifenprodil inhibited NMDA-evoked currents to a similar extent in both wild-type and Homer2 KO neurons and inhibition was greater at 7 versus 14 DIV. NMDA receptor currents from both WT and KO mice were inhibited by ethanol (10-100 mM) and the degree of inhibition did not differ as a function of genotype. In conclusion, NMDA receptor function, but not ethanol sensitivity, is reduced in hippocampal neurons lacking the Homer2 gene. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Activation-Dependent Rapid Postsynaptic Clustering of Glycine Receptors in Mature Spinal Cord Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eto, Kei; Murakoshi, Hideji; Watanabe, Miho; Hirata, Hiromi; Moorhouse, Andrew J.; Ishibashi, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Inhibitory synapses are established during development but continue to be generated and modulated in strength in the mature nervous system. In the spinal cord and brainstem, presynaptically released inhibitory neurotransmitter dominantly switches from GABA to glycine during normal development in vivo. While presynaptic mechanisms of the shift of inhibitory neurotransmission are well investigated, the contribution of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors to this shift is not fully elucidated. Synaptic clustering of glycine receptors (GlyRs) is regulated by activation-dependent depolarization in early development. However, GlyR activation induces hyperpolarization after the first postnatal week, and little is known whether and how presynaptically released glycine regulates postsynaptic receptors in a depolarization-independent manner in mature developmental stage. Here we developed spinal cord neuronal culture of rodents using chronic strychnine application to investigate whether initial activation of GlyRs in mature stage could change postsynaptic localization of GlyRs. Immunocytochemical analyses demonstrate that chronic blockade of GlyR activation until mature developmental stage resulted in smaller clusters of postsynaptic GlyRs that could be enlarged upon receptor activation for 1 h in the mature stage. Furthermore, live cell-imaging techniques show that GlyR activation decreases its lateral diffusion at synapses, and this phenomenon is dependent on PKC, but neither Ca2+ nor CaMKII activity. These results suggest that the GlyR activation can regulate receptor diffusion and cluster size at inhibitory synapses in mature stage, providing not only new insights into the postsynaptic mechanism of shifting inhibitory neurotransmission but also the inhibitory synaptic plasticity in mature nervous system. PMID:28197549

  9. Expression of ionotropic receptors in terrestrial hermit crab’s olfactory sensory neurons

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    Katrin Christine Groh-Lunow

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Coenobitidae are one out of at least five crustacean lineages which independently succeeded in the transition from water to land. This change in lifestyle required adaptation of the peripheral olfactory organs, the antennules, in order to sense chemical cues in the new terrestrial habitat. Hermit crab olfactory aesthetascs are arranged in a field on the distal segment of the antennular flagellum. Aesthetascs house approximately 300 dendrites with their cell bodies arranged in spindle-like complexes of ca. 150 cell bodies each. While the aesthetascs of aquatic crustaceans have been shown to be the place of odor uptake and previous studies identified ionotropic receptors (IRs as the putative chemosensory receptors expressed in decapod antennules, the expression of IRs besides the IR co-receptors IR25a and IR93a in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs has not been documented yet. Our goal was to reveal the expression and distribution pattern of non-co-receptor IRs in OSNs of Coenobita clypeatus, a terrestrial hermit crab, with RNA in situ hybridization. We expanded our previously published RNAseq dataset, and revealed 22 novel IR candidates in the Coenobita antennules. We then used RNA probes directed against three different IRs to visualize their expression within the OSN cell body complexes. Furthermore we aimed to characterize ligand spectra of single aesthetascs by recording local field potentials and responses from individual dendrites. This also allowed comparison to functional data from insect OSNs expressing antennal IRs. We show that this orphan receptor subgroup with presumably non-olfactory function in insects is likely the basis of olfaction in terrestrial hermit crabs.

  10. Acute Cocaine Induces Fast Activation of D1 Receptor and Progressive Deactivation of D2 Receptor Strial Neurons: In Vivo Optical Microprobe [Ca2+]i Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, C.; Luo, Z.; Volkow, N.D.; Heintz, N.; Pan, Y.; Du, C.

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine induces fast dopamine increases in brain striatal regions, which are recognized to underlie its rewarding effects. Both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are involved in cocaine's reward but the dynamic downstream consequences of cocaine effects in striatum are not fully understood. Here we used transgenic mice expressing EGFP under the control of either the D1 receptor (D1R) or the D2 receptor (D2R) gene and microprobe optical imaging to assess the dynamic changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca 2+ ] i ) responses (used as marker of neuronal activation) to acute cocaine in vivo separately for D1R- versus D2R-expressing neurons in striatum. Acute cocaine (8 mg/kg, i.p.) rapidly increased [Ca 2+ ] i in D1R-expressing neurons (10.6 ± 3.2%) in striatum within 8.3 ± 2.3 min after cocaine administration after which the increases plateaued; these fast [Ca 2+ ] i increases were blocked by pretreatment with a D1R antagonist (SCH23390). In contrast, cocaine induced progressive decreases in [Ca 2+ ] i in D2R-expressing neurons (10.4 ± 5.8%) continuously throughout the 30 min that followed cocaine administration; these slower [Ca 2+ ] i decreases were blocked by pretreatment with a D2R antagonist (raclopride). Since activation of striatal D1R-expressing neurons (direct-pathway) enhances cocaine reward, whereas activation of D2R expressing neurons suppresses it (indirect-pathway) (Lobo et al., 2010), this suggests that cocaine's rewarding effects entail both its fast stimulation ofD1R (resulting in abrupt activation of direct-pathway neurons) and a slower stimulation of D2R (resulting in longer-lasting deactivation of indirect-pathway neurons). We also provide direct in vivo evidence of D2R and D1R interactions in the striatal responses to acute cocaine administration.

  11. Angiotensin Type-2 Receptors Influence the Activity of Vasopressin Neurons in the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus in Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, Annette D; Pitra, Soledad; Wang, Lei; Hiller, Helmut; Pioquinto, David J; Smith, Justin A; Sumners, Colin; Stern, Javier E; Krause, Eric G

    2016-08-01

    It is known that angiotensin-II acts at its type-1 receptor to stimulate vasopressin (AVP) secretion, which may contribute to angiotensin-II-induced hypertension. Less well known is the impact of angiotensin type-2 receptor (AT2R) activation on these processes. Studies conducted in a transgenic AT2R enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter mouse revealed that although AT2R are not themselves localized to AVP neurons within the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), they are localized to neurons that extend processes into the PVN. In the present set of studies, we set out to characterize the origin, phenotype, and function of nerve terminals within the PVN that arise from AT2R-enhanced green fluorescent protein-positive neurons and synapse onto AVP neurons. Initial experiments combined genetic and neuroanatomical techniques to determine that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons derived from the peri-PVN area containing AT2R make appositions onto AVP neurons within the PVN, thereby positioning AT2R to negatively regulate neuroendocrine secretion. Subsequent patch-clamp electrophysiological experiments revealed that selective activation of AT2R in the peri-PVN area using compound 21 facilitates inhibitory (ie, GABAergic) neurotransmission and leads to reduced activity of AVP neurons within the PVN. Final experiments determined the functional impact of AT2R activation by testing the effects of compound 21 on plasma AVP levels. Collectively, these experiments revealed that AT2R expressing neurons make GABAergic synapses onto AVP neurons that inhibit AVP neuronal activity and suppress baseline systemic AVP levels. These findings have direct implications in the targeting of AT2R for disorders of AVP secretion and also for the alleviation of high blood pressure.

  12. Sigma-1 receptor enhances neurite elongation of cerebellar granule neurons via TrkB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuriko; Fujita, Yuki; Shibata, Kumi; Mori, Megumi; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2013-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an integral membrane protein predominantly expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Sig-1R demonstrates a high affinity to various synthetic compounds including well-known psychotherapeutic drugs in the central nervous system (CNS). For that, it is considered as an alternative target for psychotherapeutic drugs. On the cellular level, when Sig-1R is activated, it is known to play a role in neuroprotection and neurite elongation. These effects are suggested to be mediated by its ligand-operated molecular chaperone activity, and/or upregulation of various Ca(2+) signaling. In addition, recent studies show that Sig-1R activation induces neurite outgrowth via neurotrophin signaling. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Sig-1R activation promotes neurite elongation through activation of tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk), a family of neurotrophin receptors. We found that 2-(4-morpholinethyl)1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate (PRE-084), a selective Sig-1R agonist, significantly promoted neurite outgrowth, and K252a, a Trk inhibitor, attenuated Sig-1R-mediated neurite elongation in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Moreover, we revealed that Sig-1R interacts with TrkB, and PRE-084 treatment enhances phosphorylation of Y515, but not Y706. Thus, our results indicate that Sig-1R activation promotes neurite outgrowth in CGNs through Y515 phosphorylation of TrkB.

  13. Medial parabrachial nucleus neurons modulate d-fenfluramine-induced anorexia through 5HT2C receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifunovic, Radmila; Reilly, Steve

    2006-01-05

    We previously reported that lesions of the medial parabrachial nucleus (PBN) enhanced d-fenfluramine (DFEN)-induced anorexia; a finding that suggests these lesions may potentiate the release of serotonin (5HT) or increase the postsynaptic action of 5HT. In the present study, we used SB 206553 (a 5HT2B/2C receptor antagonist) or m-CPP (a 5HT2C/1B receptor agonist) in a standard behavioral procedure (deprivation-induced feeding) to further explore the role of the medial PBN in drug-induced anorexia. In Experiment 1, DFEN (0 or 1.0 mg/kg) was given alone or in combination with SB 206553 (2.0 or 5.0 mg/kg). In Experiment 2, we investigated the food-suppressive effects of m-CPP (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg). The results of Experiment 1 show that SB 206553, while having no influence on the performance of control subjects, attenuated (2.0 mg/kg) or abolished (5 mg/kg) the potentiating effect of the lesions on DFEN-induced anorexia. In Experiment 2, m-CPP induced a suppression of food intake in nonlesioned animals that was significantly potentiated in rats with medial PBN lesions. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that medial PBN neurons mediate anorexia through 5HT2C receptors.

  14. Expression of Sex Steroid Hormone Receptors in Vagal Motor Neurons Innervating the Trachea and Esophagus in Mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukudai, Shigeyuki; Ichi Matsuda, Ken; Bando, Hideki; Takanami, Keiko; Nishio, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Yoichiro; Hisa, Yasuo; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The medullary vagal motor nuclei, the nucleus ambiguus (NA) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV), innervate the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. We conducted immunohistochemical analysis of expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor α (ERα), in relation to innervation of the trachea and esophagus via vagal motor nuclei in mice. AR and ERα were expressed in the rostral NA and in part of the DMV. Tracing experiments using cholera toxin B subunit demonstrated that neurons of vagal motor nuclei that innervate the trachea and esophagus express AR and ERα. There was no difference in expression of sex steroid hormone receptors between trachea- and esophagus-innervating neurons. These results suggest that sex steroid hormones may act on vagal motor nuclei via their receptors, thereby regulating functions of the trachea and esophagus

  15. GABAergic Neurons in the Rat Medial Septal Complex Express Relaxin-3 Receptor (RXFP3 mRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Albert-Gascó

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The medial septum (MS complex modulates hippocampal function and related behaviors. Septohippocampal projections promote and control different forms of hippocampal synchronization. Specifically, GABAergic and cholinergic projections targeting the hippocampal formation from the MS provide bursting discharges to promote theta rhythm, or tonic activity to promote gamma oscillations. In turn, the MS is targeted by ascending projections from the hypothalamus and brainstem. One of these projections arises from the nucleus incertus in the pontine tegmentum, which contains GABA neurons that co-express the neuropeptide relaxin-3 (Rln3. Both stimulation of the nucleus incertus and septal infusion of Rln3 receptor agonist peptides promotes hippocampal theta rhythm. The Gi/o-protein-coupled receptor, relaxin-family peptide receptor 3 (RXFP3, is the cognate receptor for Rln3 and identification of the transmitter phenotype of neurons expressing RXFP3 in the septohippocampal system can provide further insights into the role of Rln3 transmission in the promotion of septohippocampal theta rhythm. Therefore, we used RNAscope multiplex in situ hybridization to characterize the septal neurons expressing Rxfp3 mRNA in the rat. Our results demonstrate that Rxfp3 mRNA is abundantly expressed in vesicular GABA transporter (vGAT mRNA- and parvalbumin (PV mRNA-positive GABA neurons in MS, whereas ChAT mRNA-positive acetylcholine neurons lack Rxfp3 mRNA. Approximately 75% of Rxfp3 mRNA-positive neurons expressed vGAT mRNA (and 22% were PV mRNA-positive, while the remaining 25% expressed Rxfp3 mRNA only, consistent with a potential glutamatergic phenotype. Similar proportions were observed in the posterior septum. The occurrence of RXFP3 in PV-positive GABAergic neurons gives support to a role for the Rln3-RXFP3 system in septohippocampal theta rhythm.

  16. 5-HT2A receptor-mediated excitation on cerebellar fastigial nucleus neurons and promotion of motor behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chang-Zheng; Zhuang, Qian-Xing; He, Ye-Cheng; Li, Guang-Ying; Zhu, Jing-Ning; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2014-07-01

    It has long been known that serotonergic afferent inputs are the third largest afferent population in the cerebellum after mossy fibers and climbing fibers. However, the role of serotonergic inputs in cerebellar-mediated motor behaviors is still largely unknown. Here, we show that only 5-HT2A receptors among the 5-HT2 receptor subfamily are expressed and localized in the rat cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN), one of the ultimate outputs of the spinocerebellum precisely regulating trunk and limb movements. Remarkably, selective activation of 5-HT2A receptors evokes a postsynaptic excitatory effect on FN neurons in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro, which is in accord with the 5-HT-elicited excitation on the same tested neurons. Furthermore, selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist M100907 concentration-dependently blocks the excitatory effects of 5-HT and TCB-2, a 5-HT2A receptor agonist, on FN neurons. Consequently, microinjection of 5-HT into bilateral FNs significantly promotes rat motor performances on accelerating rota-rod and balance beam and narrows stride width rather than stride length in locomotion gait. All these motor behavioral effects are highly consistent with those of selective activation of 5-HT2A receptors in FNs, and blockage of the component of 5-HT2A receptor-mediated endogenous serotonergic inputs in FNs markedly attenuates these motor performances. All these results demonstrate that postsynaptic 5-HT2A receptors greatly contribute to the 5-HT-mediated excitatory effect on cerebellar FN neurons and promotion of the FN-related motor behaviors, suggesting that serotonergic afferent inputs may actively participate in cerebellar motor control through their direct modulation on the final output of the spinocerebellum.

  17. Control of sensory neuron excitability by serotonin involves 5HT2C receptors and Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Isabella; Gantumur, Enkhbileg; Yousuf, Arsalan; Boehm, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Serotonin (5HT) is a constituent of the so-called "inflammatory soup" that sensitizes nociceptors during inflammation. Nevertheless, receptors and signaling mechanisms that mediate an excitation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by 5HT remained controversial. Therefore, capsaicin-sensitive nociceptive neurons dissociated from rat DRGs were used to investigate effects of 5HT on membrane excitability and currents through ligand- as well as voltage-gated ion channels. In 58% of the neurons tested, 5HT increased action potential firing, an effect that was abolished by the 5HT2 receptor antagonist ritanserin, but not by the 5HT3 antagonist tropisetron. Unlike other algogenic mediators, such as PGE2 and bradykinin, 5HT did not affect currents through TTX-resistant Na(+) channels or Kv7 K(+) channels. In all neurons investigated, 5HT potentiated capsaicin-evoked currents through TRPV1 channels, an effect that was attenuated by antagonists at 5HT2A (4 F 4 PP), 5HT2B (SB 204741), as well as 5HT2C (RS 102221) receptors. 5HT triggered slowly arising inward Cl(-) currents in 53% of the neurons. This effect was antagonized by the 5HT2C receptor blocker only, and the current was prevented by an inhibitor of Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels (CaCC). The 5HT-induced increase in action potential firing was also abolished by this CaCC blocker and by the TRPV1 inhibitor capsazepine. Amongst the subtype selective 5HT2 antagonists, only RS 102221 (5HT2C-selectively) counteracted the rise in action potential firing elicited by 5HT. These results show that 5HT excites DRG neurons mainly via 5HT2C receptors which concomitantly mediate a sensitization of TRPV1 channels and an opening of CaCCs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Raphe serotonin neuron-specific oxytocin receptor knockout reduces aggression without affecting anxiety-like behavior in male mice only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Jerome H.; Williams Avram, Sarah K.; Cui, Zhenzhong; Song, June; Mezey, Éva; Senerth, Julia M.; Baumann, Michael H.; Young, W. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin and oxytocin influence aggressive and anxiety-like behaviors, though it is unclear how the two may interact. That the oxytocin receptor is expressed in the serotonergic raphe nuclei suggests a mechanism by which the two neurotransmitters may cooperatively influence behavior. We hypothesized that oxytocin acts on raphe neurons to influence serotonergically-mediated anxiety-like, aggressive and parental care behaviors. We eliminated expression of the oxytocin receptor in raphe neurons by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of the serotonin transporter promoter (Slc6a4) with our conditional oxytocin receptor knockout line. The knockout mice generated by this cross are normal across a range of behavioral measures: there are no effects for either sex on locomotion in an open-field, olfactory habituation/dishabituation or, surprisingly, anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated O and plus mazes. There was a profound deficit in male aggression: only one of 11 raphe oxytocin receptor knockouts showed any aggressive behavior, compared to eight of 11 wildtypes. In contrast, female knockouts displayed no deficits in maternal behavior or aggression. Our results show that oxytocin, via its effects on raphe neurons, is a key regulator of resident-intruder aggression in males but not maternal aggression. Furthermore, this reduction in male aggression is quite different from the effects reported previously after forebrain or total elimination of oxytocin receptors. Finally, we conclude that when constitutively eliminated, oxytocin receptors expressed by serotonin cells do not contribute to baseline anxiety-like behaviors or maternal care. PMID:25677455

  19. Characterization of GABAA receptor ligands with automated patch-clamp using human neurons derived from pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Nina Y; Poe, Michael M; Witzigmann, Christopher; Cook, James M; Stafford, Douglas; Arnold, Leggy A

    Automated patch clamp is a recent but widely used technology to assess pre-clinical drug safety. With the availability of human neurons derived from pluripotent stem cells, this technology can be extended to determine CNS effects of drug candidates, especially those acting on the GABA A receptor. iCell Neurons (Cellular Dynamics International, A Fujifilm Company) were cultured for ten days and analyzed by patch clamp in the presence of agonist GABA or in combination with positive allosteric GABA A receptor modulators. Both efficacy and affinity were determined. In addition, mRNA of GABA A receptor subunits were quantified by qRT-PCR. We have shown that iCell Neurons are compatible with the IonFlux microfluidic system of the automated patch clamp instrument. Resistance ranging from 15 to 25MΩ was achieved for each trap channel of patch clamped cells in a 96-well plate format. GABA induced a robust change of current with an EC 50 of 0.43μM. Positive GABA A receptor modulators diazepam, HZ-166, and CW-04-020 exhibited EC 50 values of 0.42μM, 1.56μM, and 0.23μM, respectively. The α2/α3/α5 selective compound HZ-166-induced the highest potentiation (efficacy) of 810% of the current induced by 100nM GABA. Quantification of GABA A receptor mRNA in iCell Neurons revealed high levels of α5 and β3 subunits and low levels of α1, which is similar to the configuration in human neonatal brain. iCell Neurons represent a new cellular model to characterize GABAergic compounds using automated patch clamp. These cells have excellent representation of cellular GABA A receptor distribution that enable determination of total small molecule efficacy and affinity as measured by cell membrane current change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Intra-subunit flexibility underlies activation and allosteric modulation of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisman, Paul A; Podair, Julie I; Jobe, Emily M; Levandoski, Mark M

    2014-04-01

    Allosteric modulation is a general feature of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, yet the structural components and movements important for conversions among functional states are not well understood. In this study, we examine the communication between the binding sites for agonist and the modulator morantel (Mor) of neuronal α3β2 receptors, measuring evoked currents of receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes with the two-electrode voltage-clamp method. We hypothesized that movement along an interface of β sheets connecting the agonist and modulator sites is necessary for allosteric modulation. To address this, we created pairs of substituted cysteines that span the cleft formed where the outer β sheet meets the β sheet constituting the (-)-face of the α3 subunit; the three pairs were L158C-A179C, L158C-G181C and L158C-K183C. Employing a disulfide trapping approach in which bonds are formed between neighboring cysteines under oxidation conditions, we found that oxidation treatments decreased the amplitude of currents evoked by either the agonist (ACh) or co-applied agonist and modulator (ACh + Mor), by as much as 51%, consistent with the introduced bond decreasing channel efficacy. Reduction treatment increased evoked currents up to 89%. The magnitude of the oxidation effects depended on whether agonists were present during oxidation and on the cysteine pair. Additionally, the cysteine mutations themselves decreased Mor potentiation, implicating these residues in modulation. Our findings suggest that these β sheets in the α3 subunit move with respect to each other during activation and modulation, and the residues studied highlight the contribution of this intramolecular allosteric pathway to receptor function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel crosstalk between ERK MAPK and p38 MAPK leads to homocysteine-NMDA receptor mediated neuronal cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Ranjana; Paul, Surojit

    2012-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for both acute and chronic neurological disorders but little is known about the underlying mechanisms by which elevated homocysteine can promote neuronal cell death. We recently established a role for NMDA receptor mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-mitogen activated protein kinase (ERK-MAPK) in homocysteine-induced neuronal cell death. In the present study we examined the involvement of the stress-induced MAPK, p38 in homocysteine-induced neuronal cell death and further explored the relationship between the two MAPKs, ERK and p38, in triggering cell death. Homocysteine mediated NMDA receptor stimulation and subsequent Ca2+ influx led to a biphasic activation of p38 MAPK characterized by an initial rapid but transient activation followed by a delayed and more prolonged response. Selective inhibition of the delayed p38 MAPK activity was sufficient to attenuate homocysteine-induced neuronal cell death. Using pharmacological and RNAi approaches we further demonstrated that both the initial and delayed activation of p38 MAPK is downstream of, and dependent on activation of ERK MAPK. Our findings highlight a novel interplay between ERK and p38 MAPK in homocysteine-NMDA receptor induced neuronal cell death. PMID:23176034

  2. Citral sensing by Transient [corrected] receptor potential channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie C Stotz

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential (TRP ion channels mediate key aspects of taste, smell, pain, temperature sensation, and pheromone detection. To deepen our understanding of TRP channel physiology, we require more diverse pharmacological tools. Citral, a bioactive component of lemongrass, is commonly used as a taste enhancer, as an odorant in perfumes, and as an insect repellent. Here we report that citral activates TRP channels found in sensory neurons (TRPV1 and TRPV3, TRPM8, and TRPA1, and produces long-lasting inhibition of TRPV1-3 and TRPM8, while transiently blocking TRPV4 and TRPA1. Sustained citral inhibition is independent of internal calcium concentration, but is state-dependent, developing only after TRP channel opening. Citral's actions as a partial agonist are not due to cysteine modification of the channels nor are they a consequence of citral's stereoisoforms. The isolated aldehyde and alcohol cis and trans enantiomers (neral, nerol, geranial, and geraniol each reproduce citral's actions. In juvenile rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, prolonged citral inhibition of native TRPV1 channels enabled the separation of TRPV2 and TRPV3 currents. We find that TRPV2 and TRPV3 channels are present in a high proportion of these neurons (94% respond to 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate, consistent with our immunolabeling experiments and previous in situ hybridization studies. The TRPV1 activation requires residues in transmembrane segments two through four of the voltage-sensor domain, a region previously implicated in capsaicin activation of TRPV1 and analogous menthol activation of TRPM8. Citral's broad spectrum and prolonged sensory inhibition may prove more useful than capsaicin for allodynia, itch, or other types of pain involving superficial sensory nerves and skin.

  3. Glucocorticoid receptor represses brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in neuron-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Lombès, Marc; Le Menuet, Damien

    2017-04-12

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in many functions such as neuronal growth, survival, synaptic plasticity and memorization. Altered expression levels are associated with many pathological situations such as depression, epilepsy, Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is also crucial for neuron functions, via binding of glucocorticoid hormones (GCs). GR actions largely overlap those of BDNF. It has been proposed that GR could be a regulator of BDNF expression, however the molecular mechanisms involved have not been clearly defined yet. Herein, we analyzed the effect of a GC agonist dexamethasone (DEX) on BDNF expression in mouse neuronal primary cultures and in the newly characterized, mouse hippocampal BZ cell line established by targeted oncogenesis. Mouse Bdnf gene exhibits a complex genomic structure with 8 untranslated exons (I to VIII) splicing onto one common and unique coding exon IX. We found that DEX significantly downregulated total BDNF mRNA expression by around 30%. Expression of the highly expressed exon IV and VI containing transcripts was also reduced by DEX. The GR antagonist RU486 abolished this effect, which is consistent with specific GR-mediated action. Transient transfection assays allowed us to define a short 275 bp region within exon IV promoter responsible for GR-mediated Bdnf repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated GR recruitment onto this fragment, through unidentified transcription factor tethering. Altogether, GR downregulates Bdnf expression through direct binding to Bdnf regulatory sequences. These findings bring new insights into the crosstalk between GR and BDNF signaling pathways both playing a major role in physiology and pathology of the central nervous system.

  4. κ-Opioid Receptor Inhibition of Calcium Oscillations in Spinal Cord Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelamangalath, Lakshmi; Dravid, Shashank M.; George, Joju; Aldrich, Jane V.

    2011-01-01

    Mouse embryonic spinal cord neurons in culture exhibit spontaneous calcium oscillations from day in vitro (DIV) 6 through DIV 10. Such spontaneous activity in developing spinal cord contributes to maturation of synapses and development of pattern-generating circuits. Here we demonstrate that these calcium oscillations are regulated by κ opioid receptors (KORs). The κ opioid agonist dynorphin (Dyn)-A (1–13) suppressed calcium oscillations in a concentration-dependent manner, and both the nonselective opioid antagonist naloxone and the κ-selective blocker norbinaltorphimine eliminated this effect. The KOR-selective agonist (+)-(5α,7α,8β)-N-methyl-N-[7-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-1-oxaspiro[4.5]dec-8-yl]-benzeneacetamide (U69593) mimicked the effect of Dyn-A (1–13) on calcium oscillations. A κ-specific peptide antagonist, zyklophin, was also able to prevent the suppression of calcium oscillations caused by Dyn-A (1–13). These spontaneous calcium oscillations were blocked by 1 μM tetrodotoxin, indicating that they are action potential-dependent. Although the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel blocker nifedipine did not suppress calcium oscillations, the N-type calcium channel blocker ω-conotoxin inhibited this spontaneous response. Blockers of ionotropic glutamate receptors, 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo(f)quinoxaline and dizocilpine maleate (MK-801), also suppressed calcium oscillations, revealing a dependence on glutamate-mediated signaling. Finally, we have demonstrated expression of KORs in glutamatergic spinal neurons and localization in a presynaptic compartment, consistent with previous reports of KOR-mediated inhibition of glutamate release. The KOR-mediated inhibition of spontaneous calcium oscillations may therefore be a consequence of presynaptic inhibition of glutamate release. PMID:21422300

  5. Diazepam improves aspects of social behaviour and neuron activation in NMDA receptor-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielnik, C. A.; Horsfall, W.; Ramsey, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    NR1 knockdown (NR1KD) mice are genetically modified to express low levels of the NR1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and show deficits in affiliative social behaviour. In this study, we determined which brain regions were selectively activated in response to social stimulation and asked whether differences in neuronal activation could be observed in mice with reduced sociability. Furthermore, we aimed to determine whether brain activation patterns correlated with the amelioration of social deficits through pharmacological intervention. The cingulate cortex, lateral septal nuclei, hypothalamus, thalamus and amygdala showed an increase in c-Fos immunoreactivity that was selective for exposure to social stimuli. NR1KD mice displayed a reduction in social behaviour and a reduction in c-Fos immunoreactivity in the cingulate cortex and septal nuclei. Acute clozapine did not significantly alter sociability; however, diazepam treatment did increase sociability and neuronal activation in the lateral septal region. This study has identified the lateral septal region as a neural substrate of social behaviour and the GABA system as a potential therapeutic target for social dysfunction. PMID:25040071

  6. Transient receptor potential V2 expressed in sensory neurons is activated by probenecid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Sangsu; Kim, Kyung Yoon; Yoo, Sungjae; Lee, Sang-Heon; Hwang, Sun Wook

    2007-09-25

    Temperature-activated transient receptor potential ion channels (thermoTRPs) are known to function as ambient temperature sensors and are also involved in peripheral pain sensation. The thermoTRPs are activated by a variety of chemicals, of which specific activators have been utilized to explore the physiology of particular channels and sensory nerve subtypes. The use of capsaicin for TRPV1 is an exemplary case for nociceptor studies. In contrast, specific agents for another vanilloid subtype channel, TRPV2 have been lacking. Here, we show that probenecid is able to activate TRPV2 using electrophysiological and calcium imaging techniques with TRPV2-expressing HEK293T cells. Five other sensory thermoTRPs-TRPV1, TRPV3, TRPV4, TRPM8 and TRPA1-failed to show a response to this drug in the same heterologous expression system, suggesting that probenecid is a specific activator for TRPV2. Probenecid-evoked responses were also reproduced in a distinct subset of cultured trigeminal neurons that were responsive to 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, a TRPV1-3 activator. The probenecid-sensitive neurons were mainly distributed in a medium to large-diameter population, in agreement with previous observations with TRPV2 immunolocalization. Under inflammation, probenecid elicited nociceptive behaviors in in vivo assays. These results suggest that TRPV2 is specifically activated by probenecid and that this chemical might be useful for investigation of pain-related TRPV2 function.

  7. Apolipoprotein E4 Impairs Neuronal Insulin Signaling by Trapping Insulin Receptor in the Endosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na; Liu, Chia-Chen; Van Ingelgom, Alexandra J; Martens, Yuka A; Linares, Cynthia; Knight, Joshua A; Painter, Meghan M; Sullivan, Patrick M; Bu, Guojun

    2017-09-27

    Diabetes and impaired brain insulin signaling are linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The association between diabetes and AD-associated amyloid pathology is stronger among carriers of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 gene allele, the strongest genetic risk factor for late-onset AD. Here we report that apoE4 impairs neuronal insulin signaling in human apoE-targeted replacement (TR) mice in an age-dependent manner. High-fat diet (HFD) accelerates these effects in apoE4-TR mice at middle age. In primary neurons, apoE4 interacts with insulin receptor and impairs its trafficking by trapping it in the endosomes, leading to impaired insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis. In aging brains, the increased apoE4 aggregation and compromised endosomal function further exacerbate the inhibitory effects of apoE4 on insulin signaling and related functions. Together, our study provides novel mechanistic insights into the pathogenic mechanisms of apoE4 and insulin resistance in AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Olfactory neurons expressing transient receptor potential channel M5 (TRPM5) are involved in sensing semiochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Weihong; Margolskee, Robert; Donnert, Gerald; Hell, Stefan W; Restrepo, Diego

    2007-02-13

    Olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the main olfactory epithelium respond to environmental odorants. Recent studies reveal that these OSNs also respond to semiochemicals such as pheromones and that main olfactory input modulates animal reproduction, but the transduction mechanism for these chemosignals is not fully understood. Previously, we determined that responses to putative pheromones in the main olfactory system were reduced but not eliminated in mice defective for the canonical cAMP transduction pathway, and we suggested, on the basis of pharmacology, an involvement of phospholipase C. In the present study, we find that a downstream signaling component of the phospholipase C pathway, the transient receptor potential channel M5 (TRPM5), is coexpressed with the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel subunit A2 in a subset of mature OSNs. These neurons project axons primarily to the ventral olfactory bulb, where information from urine and other socially relevant signals is processed. We find that these chemosignals activate a subset of glomeruli targeted by TRPM5-expressing OSNs. Our data indicate that TRPM5-expressing OSNs that project axons to glomeruli in the ventral area of the main olfactory bulb are involved in processing of information from semiochemicals.

  9. Positive reinforcement mediated by midbrain dopamine neurons requires D1 and D2 receptor activation in the nucleus accumbens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth E Steinberg

    Full Text Available The neural basis of positive reinforcement is often studied in the laboratory using intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS, a simple behavioral model in which subjects perform an action in order to obtain exogenous stimulation of a specific brain area. Recently we showed that activation of ventral tegmental area (VTA dopamine neurons supports ICSS behavior, consistent with proposed roles of this neural population in reinforcement learning. However, VTA dopamine neurons make connections with diverse brain regions, and the specific efferent target(s that mediate the ability of dopamine neuron activation to support ICSS have not been definitively demonstrated. Here, we examine in transgenic rats whether dopamine neuron-specific ICSS relies on the connection between the VTA and the nucleus accumbens (NAc, a brain region also implicated in positive reinforcement. We find that optogenetic activation of dopaminergic terminals innervating the NAc is sufficient to drive ICSS, and that ICSS driven by optical activation of dopamine neuron somata in the VTA is significantly attenuated by intra-NAc injections of D1 or D2 receptor antagonists. These data demonstrate that the NAc is a critical efferent target sustaining dopamine neuron-specific ICSS, identify receptor subtypes through which dopamine acts to promote this behavior, and ultimately help to refine our understanding of the neural circuitry mediating positive reinforcement.

  10. Positive Reinforcement Mediated by Midbrain Dopamine Neurons Requires D1 and D2 Receptor Activation in the Nucleus Accumbens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Elizabeth E.; Boivin, Josiah R.; Saunders, Benjamin T.; Witten, Ilana B.; Deisseroth, Karl; Janak, Patricia H.

    2014-01-01

    The neural basis of positive reinforcement is often studied in the laboratory using intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS), a simple behavioral model in which subjects perform an action in order to obtain exogenous stimulation of a specific brain area. Recently we showed that activation of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons supports ICSS behavior, consistent with proposed roles of this neural population in reinforcement learning. However, VTA dopamine neurons make connections with diverse brain regions, and the specific efferent target(s) that mediate the ability of dopamine neuron activation to support ICSS have not been definitively demonstrated. Here, we examine in transgenic rats whether dopamine neuron-specific ICSS relies on the connection between the VTA and the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a brain region also implicated in positive reinforcement. We find that optogenetic activation of dopaminergic terminals innervating the NAc is sufficient to drive ICSS, and that ICSS driven by optical activation of dopamine neuron somata in the VTA is significantly attenuated by intra-NAc injections of D1 or D2 receptor antagonists. These data demonstrate that the NAc is a critical efferent target sustaining dopamine neuron-specific ICSS, identify receptor subtypes through which dopamine acts to promote this behavior, and ultimately help to refine our understanding of the neural circuitry mediating positive reinforcement. PMID:24733061

  11. Induction of CB1 cannabinoid receptor by inflammation in primary afferent neurons facilitates antihyperalgesic effect of peripheral CB1 agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Fumimasa; Shimosato, Goshun; Kawasaki, Yasuhiko; Hashimoto, Satoru; Tanaka, Yoshifumi; Ji, Ru-Rong; Tanaka, Masaki

    2006-09-01

    Cannabinoids act on various regions in the nervous system to modulate neuronal activity including nociception. Here, we investigated CB1 receptor expression in primary afferent neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and the efficacy of a local (intraplantar) application of the selective CB1 agonist, 2-arachidonyl-2-chloroethylamide (ACEA), on inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia. In situ hybridization showed normal CB1 mRNA expression in 28% of DRG neurons. Peripheral inflammation by CFA (complete Freund's adjuvant) significantly increased the ratio of CB1 mRNA-positive neurons to 43%, primarily with increase in NF200-negative C-fiber nociceptors. Furthermore, CB1 and TRPV1 (transient potential receptor vanilloid subtype-1) co-localization was increased from 41% before inflammation to 67% two days after inflammation. Inflammation also increased CB1 immunoreactivity in DRG neurons and in nerve fibers of the hindpaw dermis, indicating increased CB1 transport from the cell body to the peripheral nerve. The intraplantar application of ACEA attenuated CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia. The antinociceptive properties of ACEA became more prominent at 2 days after inflammation, compared with those in non-inflamed and inflamed animals at 8 h. These results suggest that CB1 expression in primary afferent neurons is increased by inflammation and that the subsequent increase in CB1 transport to peripheral axons contributes to the increased antihyperalgesic efficacy of locally administered CB1 agonist.

  12. Functional characteristics of a tiny but specialized olfactory system: olfactory receptor neurons of carrot psyllids (Homoptera: Triozidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Lina; Larsson, Mattias C; Anderbrant, Olle

    2008-11-01

    With only approximately 50 olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), the carrot psyllid Trioza apicalis (Homoptera: Psylloidea) may have the smallest olfactory system described in adult Neopteran insects. Using single sensillum recordings (SSR) and gas chromatograph-linked SSR, we characterized 4 olfactory sensilla forming a distinct morphological type, which together house approximately 25% of all ORNs. We recorded responses to extracts and single constituents from Daucus carota ssp. sativus, from the conifers Picea abies, Pinus sylvestris, and Juniperus communis, as well as from male and female T. apicalis. Receptor neurons were highly selective; only 9 compounds in total elicited repeatable responses, and each neuron responded to at most 3 individual compounds. Chemical profiles of carrot and conifers showed significant overlap, with 4 out of 9 electrophysiologically active compounds occurring in more than one type of extract, but a carrot-specific compound elicited the most repeated responses. We identified 4 tentative neuron classes and found a rather high degree of neuronal redundancy, with 1 neuron class present in 3 and another present in all 4 of the sensilla, respectively.

  13. Patterns of spontaneous activity in single rat olfactory receptor neurons are different in normally breathing and tracheotomized animals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Duchamp-Viret, P.; Košťál, Lubomír; Chaput, M.; Lánský, Petr; Rospars, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 2 (2005), s. 97-114 ISSN 0022-3034 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET400110401 Grant - others:Barrande(FR) 9146 QL Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : olfactory neurons * unit activity * receptors Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.170, year: 2005

  14. NK-3 receptor activation depolarizes and induces an after-depolarization in pyramidal neurons in gerbil cingulate cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, Jens C

    2004-01-01

    The involvement of tachykinins in cortical function is poorly understood. To study the actions of neurokinin-3 (NK3) receptor activation in frontal cortex, whole cell patch clamp recordings were performed from pyramidal neurons in slices of cingulate cortex from juvenile gerbils. Senktide (500n...

  15. Functional characterization of the octenol receptor neuron on the maxillary palps of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    1-Octen-3-ol (octenol) is a common attractant released by vertebrates which in combination with carbon dioxide attracts haematophagous arthropods including mosquitoes. A receptor neuron contained within basiconic sensilla on the maxillary palps of adult mosquitoes responds selectively to 1-octen-3-o...

  16. Estrogen receptor-immunoreactive neurons in the lumbosacral cord projecting to the periaqueductal gray in the ovariectomized female cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderHorst, Veronique G.J.M.; Meijer, Ellie; Schasfoor, Fabienne C.; Leeuwen, Fred W. van; Holstege, Gert

    1997-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (FAG) plays a crucial role in reproductive behavior. The present study investigates whether lumbosacral FAG-projecting neurons contain estrogen receptors. In four ovariectomized adult female cats, injections with cholera toxin subunit (CTb) were made into the FAG to

  17. Somato-dendritic localization and signaling by leptin receptors in hypothalamic POMC and AgRP neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangdeuk Ha

    Full Text Available Leptin acts via neuronal leptin receptors to control energy balance. Hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC and agouti-related peptide (AgRP/Neuropeptide Y (NPY/GABA neurons produce anorexigenic and orexigenic neuropeptides and neurotransmitters, and express the long signaling form of the leptin receptor (LepRb. Despite progress in the understanding of LepRb signaling and function, the sub-cellular localization of LepRb in target neurons has not been determined, primarily due to lack of sensitive anti-LepRb antibodies. Here we applied light microscopy (LM, confocal-laser scanning microscopy (CLSM, and electron microscopy (EM to investigate LepRb localization and signaling in mice expressing a HA-tagged LepRb selectively in POMC or AgRP/NPY/GABA neurons. We report that LepRb receptors exhibit a somato-dendritic expression pattern. We further show that LepRb activates STAT3 phosphorylation in neuronal fibers within several hypothalamic and hindbrain nuclei of wild-type mice and rats, and specifically in dendrites of arcuate POMC and AgRP/NPY/GABA neurons of Leprb (+/+ mice and in Leprb (db/db mice expressing HA-LepRb in a neuron specific manner. We did not find evidence of LepRb localization or STAT3-signaling in axon-fibers or nerve-terminals of POMC and AgRP/NPY/GABA neurons. Three-dimensional serial EM-reconstruction of dendritic segments from POMC and AgRP/NPY/GABA neurons indicates a high density of shaft synapses. In addition, we found that the leptin activates STAT3 signaling in proximity to synapses on POMC and AgRP/NPY/GABA dendritic shafts. Taken together, these data suggest that the signaling-form of the leptin receptor exhibits a somato-dendritic expression pattern in POMC and AgRP/NPY/GABA neurons. Dendritic LepRb signaling may therefore play an important role in leptin's central effects on energy balance, possibly through modulation of synaptic activity via post-synaptic mechanisms.

  18. The leukotriene B4 receptors BLT1 and BLT2 form an antagonistic sensitizing system in peripheral sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, Sebastian; Sisignano, Marco; Kern, Katharina; Pierre, Sandra; Tunaru, Sorin; Jordan, Holger; Suo, Jing; Treutlein, Elsa-Marie; Angioni, Carlo; Ferreiros, Nerea; Leffler, Andreas; DeBruin, Natasja; Offermanns, Stefan; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus

    2017-04-14

    Sensitization of the heat-activated ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) through lipids is a fundamental mechanism during inflammation-induced peripheral sensitization. Leukotriene B4 is a proinflammatory lipid mediator whose role in peripheral nociceptive sensitization is not well understood to date. Two major G-protein-coupled receptors for leukotriene B4 have been identified: the high-affinity receptor BLT1 and the low-affinity receptor BLT2. Transcriptional screening for the expression G-protein-coupled receptors in murine dorsal root ganglia showed that both receptors were among the highest expressed in dorsal root ganglia. Calcium imaging revealed a sensitization of TRPV1-mediated calcium increases in a relative narrow concentration range for leukotriene B4 (100-200 nm). Selective antagonists and neurons from knock-out mice demonstrated a BLT1-dependent sensitization of TRPV1-mediated calcium increases. Accordingly, leukotriene B4-induced thermal hyperalgesia was mediated through BLT1 and TRPV1 as shown using the respective knock-out mice. Importantly, higher leukotriene B4 concentrations (>0.5 μm) and BLT2 agonists abolished sensitization of the TRPV1-mediated calcium increases. Also, BLT2 activation inhibited protein kinase C- and protein kinase A-mediated sensitization processes through the phosphatase calcineurin. Consequently, a selective BLT2-receptor agonist increased thermal and mechanical withdrawal thresholds during zymosan-induced inflammation. In accordance with these data, immunohistochemical analysis showed that both leukotriene B4 receptors were expressed in peripheral sensory neurons. Thus, the data show that the two leukotriene B4 receptors have opposing roles in the sensitization of peripheral sensory neurons forming a self-restricting system. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Co-administration of ciliary neurotrophic factor with its soluble receptor protects against neuronal death and enhances neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozog, Mark A; Modha, Geetanjalee; Church, John; Reilly, Rayne; Naus, Christian C

    2008-03-07

    Attempts to promote neuronal survival and repair with ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) have met with limited success. The variability of results obtained with CNTF may, in part, reflect the fact that some of the biological actions of the cytokine are mediated by a complex formed between CNTF and its specific receptor, CNTFRalpha, which exists in both membrane-bound and soluble forms. In this study, we compared the actions of CNTF alone and CNTF complexed with soluble CNTFRalpha (hereafter termed "Complex") on neuronal survival and growth. Although CNTF alone produced limited effects, Complex protected against glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity via gap junction-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Further examination revealed that only Complex promoted neurite outgrowth. Differential gene expression analysis revealed that, compared with CNTF alone, Complex differentially regulates several neuroprotective and neurotrophic genes. Collectively, these findings indicate that CNTF exerts more robust effects on neuronal survival and growth when applied in combination with its soluble receptor.

  20. Control of energy balance by hypothalamic gene circuitry involving two nuclear receptors, neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 and glucocorticoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Gyun; Lee, Bora; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Kim, Juhee; Lee, Seunghee; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Jae W

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) regulate diverse physiological processes, including the central nervous system control of energy balance. However, the molecular mechanisms for the central actions of NRs in energy balance remain relatively poorly defined. Here we report a hypothalamic gene network involving two NRs, neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 (NOR1) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which directs the regulated expression of orexigenic neuropeptides agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in response to peripheral signals. Our results suggest that the anorexigenic signal leptin induces NOR1 expression likely via the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), while the orexigenic signal glucocorticoid mobilizes GR to inhibit NOR1 expression by antagonizing the action of CREB. Also, NOR1 suppresses glucocorticoid-dependent expression of AgRP and NPY. Consistently, relative to wild-type mice, NOR1-null mice showed significantly higher levels of AgRP and NPY and were less responsive to leptin in decreasing the expression of AgRP and NPY. These results identify mutual antagonism between NOR1 and GR to be a key rheostat for peripheral metabolic signals to centrally control energy balance.

  1. Orexin A/Hypocretin Modulates Leptin Receptor-Mediated Signaling by Allosteric Modulations Mediated by the Ghrelin GHS-R1A Receptor in Hypothalamic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Mireia; Aguinaga, David; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Canela, Enric I; Mallol, Josefa; Navarro, Gemma; Franco, Rafael

    2017-07-17

    The hypothalamus is a key integrator of nutrient-seeking signals in the form of hormones and metabolites originated in both the central nervous system and the periphery. The main autocrine and paracrine target of orexinergic-related hormones such as leptin, orexin/hypocretin, and ghrelin are neuropeptide Y neurons located in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and the molecular and functional relationships between leptin, orexin/hypocretin and ghrelin receptors. Biophysical studies in a heterologous system showed physical interactions between them, with potential formation of heterotrimeric complexes. Functional assays showed robust allosteric interactions particularly different when the three receptors are expressed together. Further biochemical and pharmacological assays provided evidence of heterotrimer functional expression in primary cultures of hypothalamic neurons. These findings constitute evidence of close relationships in the action of the three hormones already starting at the receptor level in hypothalamic cells.

  2. A Subpopulation of Neuronal M4 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Plays a Critical Role in Modulating Dopamine-Dependent Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Jongrye; Dencker, Ditte; Wortwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P. D.; Cui, Yinghong; Davis, Albert A.; Levey, Allan I.; Schütz, Günther; Sager, Thomas; Mørk, Arne; Li, Cuiling; Deng, Chu-Xia; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Wess, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M1–M5 mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M4 mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M4 mAChRs are coexpressed with D1 dopamine receptors in a specific subset of striatal projection neurons. To investigate the physiological relevance of this M4 mAChR subpopulation in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors, we use...

  3. PAR1-activated astrocytes in the nucleus of the solitary tract stimulate adjacent neurons via NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Katie M; Rogers, Richard C; Hermann, Gerlinda E

    2015-01-14

    Severe autonomic dysfunction, including the loss of control of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems, is a common comorbidity of stroke and other bleeding head injuries. Previous studies suggest that this collapse of autonomic control may be caused by thrombin acting on astrocytic protease-activated receptors (PAR1) in the hindbrain. Using calcium imaging and electrophysiological techniques, we evaluated the mechanisms by which astrocytic PAR1s modulate the activity of presynaptic vagal afferent terminals and postsynaptic neurons in the rat nucleus of the solitary tract (NST). Our calcium-imaging data show that astrocytic and neuronal calcium levels increase after brain slices are treated with the PAR1 agonist SFLLRN-NH2. This increase in activity is blocked by pretreating the slices with the glial metabolic blocker fluorocitrate. In addition, PAR1-activated astrocytes communicate directly with NST neurons by releasing glutamate. Calcium responses to SFLLRN-NH2 in the astrocytes and neurons significantly increase after bath application of the excitatory amino acid transporter blocker DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA) and significantly decrease after bath application of the NMDA receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (DL-AP5). Furthermore, astrocytic glutamate activates neuronal GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors. Voltage-clamp recordings of miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) from NST neurons show that astrocytes control presynaptic vagal afferent excitability directly under resting and activated conditions. Fluorocitrate significantly decreases mEPSC frequency and SFLLRN-NH2 significantly increases mEPSC frequency. These data show that astrocytes act within a tripartite synapse in the NST, controlling the excitability of both postsynaptic NST neurons and presynaptic vagal afferent terminals. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/350776-10$15.00/0.

  4. Modulation of firing and synaptic transmission of serotonergic neurons by intrinsic G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eMaejima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Serotonergic neurons project to virtually all regions of the CNS and are consequently involved in many critical physiological functions such as mood, sexual behavior, feeding, sleep/wake cycle, memory, cognition, blood pressure regulation, breathing and reproductive success. Therefore serotonin release and serotonergic neuronal activity have to be precisely controlled and modulated by interacting brain circuits to adapt to specific emotional and environmental states. We will review the current knowledge about G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels involved in the regulation of serotonergic system, how their regulation is modulating the intrinsic activity of serotonergic neurons and its transmitter release and will discuss the latest methods for controlling the modulation of serotonin release and intracellular signaling in serotonergic neurons in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Transient receptor potential (TRP) A1 activated currents in TRPV1 and cholecystokinin-sensitive cranial visceral afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Myung-Jin; Jin, Zhenhua; Park, Yong Seek; Rhee, Young Kyoung; Jin, Young-Ho

    2011-04-06

    Culinary use of the pungent spices has potential health benefits including a reduction in food intake. Pungent spices often contain ingredients that activate members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family A1 and evoke pain from capsaicin-sensitive somatosensory neurons. TRPA1 channel have also been identified on cranial visceral afferent neurons but their distribution and functional contributions are poorly understood. Visceral vagal neurons transduce mechanical and chemical signals from peripheral organs to the nucleus tractus solitarii. Many capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents participate in peripheral satiety signaling that includes cholecystokinin (CCK) sensitive neurons. To assess signaling, the TRPA1 selective agonist allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) was tested together with CCK and capsaicin (200nM), a TRPV1 specific agonist. In isolated nodose neurons, AITC (0.05-0.2mM) evoked concentration-dependent inward currents in 38% of the tested neurons. The TRPA1 specific antagonist HC-030031 (10μM) blocked AITC responses. TRPA1 responses were mixed across neurons that were capsaicin-sensitive and -insensitive. However CCK evoked inward currents only on capsaicin-sensitive neurons and 28% of the CCK-sensitive neurons expressed TRPA1. Our results indicate that TRPA1 is co-expressed with TRPV1 in CCK-sensitive nodose neurons. The findings indicate a potential mechanism by which spices can act within cranial visceral afferent pathways mediating satiety and contribute to the reduction of the food intake associated with spiced diets. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Estrogen receptor beta-selective agonists stimulate calcium oscillations in human and mouse embryonic stem cell-derived neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Zhang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Estrogens are used extensively to treat hot flashes in menopausal women. Some of the beneficial effects of estrogens in hormone therapy on the brain might be due to nongenomic effects in neurons such as the rapid stimulation of calcium oscillations. Most studies have examined the nongenomic effects of estrogen receptors (ER in primary neurons or brain slices from the rodent brain. However, these cells can not be maintained continuously in culture because neurons are post-mitotic. Neurons derived from embryonic stem cells could be a potential continuous, cell-based model to study nongenomic actions of estrogens in neurons if they are responsive to estrogens after differentiation. In this study ER-subtype specific estrogens were used to examine the role of ERalpha and ERbeta on calcium oscillations in neurons derived from human (hES and mouse embryonic stem cells. Unlike the undifferentiated hES cells the differentiated cells expressed neuronal markers, ERbeta, but not ERalpha. The non-selective ER agonist 17beta-estradiol (E(2 rapidly increased [Ca2+]i oscillations and synchronizations within a few minutes. No change in calcium oscillations was observed with the selective ERalpha agonist 4,4',4''-(4-Propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyltrisphenol (PPT. In contrast, the selective ERbeta agonists, 2,3-bis(4-Hydroxyphenyl-propionitrile (DPN, MF101, and 2-(3-fluoro-4-hydroxyphenyl-7-vinyl-1,3 benzoxazol-5-ol (ERB-041; WAY-202041 stimulated calcium oscillations similar to E(2. The ERbeta agonists also increased calcium oscillations and phosphorylated PKC, AKT and ERK1/2 in neurons derived from mouse ES cells, which was inhibited by nifedipine demonstrating that ERbeta activates L-type voltage gated calcium channels to regulate neuronal activity. Our results demonstrate that ERbeta signaling regulates nongenomic pathways in neurons derived from ES cells, and suggest that these cells might be useful to study the nongenomic mechanisms of estrogenic compounds.

  7. Maintained inspiratory activity during proportional assist ventilation in surfactant-depleted cats early after surfactant instillation: phrenic nerve and pulmonary stretch receptor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaller Peter

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inspiratory activity is a prerequisite for successful application of patient triggered ventilation such as proportional assist ventilation (PAV. It has recently been reported that surfactant instillation increases the activity of slowly adapting pulmonary stretch receptors (PSRs followed by a shorter inspiratory time (Sindelar et al, J Appl Physiol, 2005 [Epub ahead of print]. Changes in lung mechanics, as observed in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome and after surfactant treatment, might therefore influence the inspiratory activity when applying PAV early after surfactant treatment. Objective To investigate the regulation of breathing and ventilatory response in surfactant-depleted young cats during PAV and during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP early after surfactant instillation in relation to phrenic nerve activity (PNA and the activity of PSRs. Methods Seven anesthetized, endotracheally intubated young cats were exposed to periods of CPAP and PAV with the same end-expiratory pressure (0.2–0.5 kPa before and after lung lavage and after surfactant instillation. PAV was set to compensate for 75% of the lung elastic recoil. Results Tidal volume and respiratory rate were higher with lower PaCO2 and higher PaO2 during PAV than during CPAP both before and after surfactant instillation (p Conclusion PSR activity and the control of breathing are maintained during PAV in surfactant-depleted cats early after surfactant instillation, with a higher ventilatory response and a lower breathing effort than during CPAP.

  8. Stretch induced endothelin-1 secretion by adult rat astrocytes involves calcium influx via stretch-activated ion channels (SACs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrow, Lyle W.; Suchyna, Thomas M.; Sachs, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Endothelin-1 expression by adult rat astrocytes correlates with cell proliferation. → Stretch-induced ET-1 is inhibited by GsMtx-4, a specific inhibitor of Ca 2+ permeant SACs. → The less specific SAC inhibitor streptomycin also inhibits ET-1 secretion. → Stretch-induced ET-1 production depends on a calcium influx. → SAC pharmacology may provide a new class of therapeutic agents for CNS pathology. -- Abstract: The expression of endothelins (ETs) and ET-receptors is often upregulated in brain pathology. ET-1, a potent vasoconstrictor, also inhibits the expression of astrocyte glutamate transporters and is mitogenic for astrocytes, glioma cells, neurons, and brain capillary endothelia. We have previously shown that mechanical stress stimulates ET-1 production by adult rat astrocytes. We now show in adult astrocytes that ET-1 production is driven by calcium influx through stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the ET-1 production correlates with cell proliferation. Mechanical stimulation using biaxial stretch ( 2+ threshold. This coupling of mechanical stress to the astrocyte endothelin system through SACs has treatment implications, since all pathology deforms the surrounding parenchyma.

  9. Different populations of prostaglandin EP3 receptor-expressing preoptic neurons project to two fever-mediating sympathoexcitatory brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Y; Nakamura, K; Morrison, S F

    2009-06-30

    The central mechanism of fever induction is triggered by an action of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) on neurons in the preoptic area (POA) through the EP3 subtype of prostaglandin E receptor. EP3 receptor (EP3R)-expressing POA neurons project directly to the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) and to the rostral raphe pallidus nucleus (rRPa), key sites for the control of thermoregulatory effectors. Based on physiological findings, we hypothesize that the febrile responses in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and those in cutaneous vasoconstrictors are controlled independently by separate neuronal pathways: PGE(2) pyrogenic signaling is transmitted from EP3R-expressing POA neurons via a projection to the DMH to activate BAT thermogenesis and via another projection to the rRPa to increase cutaneous vasoconstriction. In this case, DMH-projecting and rRPa-projecting neurons would constitute segregated populations within the EP3R-expressing neuronal group in the POA. Here, we sought direct anatomical evidence to test this hypothesis with a double-tracing experiment in which two types of the retrograde tracer, cholera toxin b-subunit (CTb), conjugated with different fluorophores were injected into the DMH and the rRPa of rats and the resulting retrogradely labeled populations of EP3R-immunoreactive neurons in the POA were identified with confocal microscopy. We found substantial numbers of EP3R-immunoreactive neurons in both the DMH-projecting and the rRPa-projecting populations. However, very few EP3R-immunoreactive POA neurons were labeled with both the CTb from the DMH and that from the rRPa, although a substantial number of neurons that were not immunoreactive for EP3R were double-labeled with both CTbs. The paucity of the EP3R-expressing neurons that send collaterals to both the DMH and the rRPa suggests that pyrogenic signals are sent independently to these caudal brain regions from the POA and that such pyrogenic outputs from the POA reflect different control mechanisms for BAT

  10. Orexins depolarize rostral ventrolateral medulla neurons and increase arterial pressure and heart rate in rats mainly via orexin 2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shang-Cheng; Dai, Yu-Wen E; Lee, Yen-Hsien; Chiou, Lih-Chu; Hwang, Ling-Ling

    2010-08-01

    An injection of orexin A or B into the cisterna magna or the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), where bulbospinal vasomotor neurons are located, elevated arterial pressure (AP) and heart rate (HR). We examined how orexins affected RVLM neurons to regulate cardiovascular functions by using in vitro recordings of neuronal activity of the RVLM and in vivo measurement of cardiovascular functions in rats. Orexin A and B concentration-dependently depolarized RVLM neurons. At 100 nM, both peptides excited 42% of RVLM neurons. Tetrodotoxin failed to block orexin-induced depolarization. In the presence of N-(2-methyl-6-benzoxazolyl)-N'-1, 5-naphthyridin-4-yl urea (SB-334867), an orexin 1 receptor (OX(1)R) antagonist, orexin A depolarized 42% of RVLM neurons with a smaller, but not significantly different, amplitude (4.9 +/- 0.8 versus 7.2 +/- 1.1 mV). In the presence of (2S)-1- (3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxy-2(1H)-isoquinolinyl)-3,3-dimethyl-2-[(4-pyridinylmethyl)amino]-1-butanone hydrochloride (TCS OX2 29), an orexin 2 receptor (OX(2)R) antagonist, orexin A depolarized 25% of RVLM neurons with a significantly smaller amplitude (1.7 +/- 0.5 mV). Coapplication of both antagonists completely eliminated orexin A-induced depolarization. An OX(2)R agonist, [Ala(11),D-Leu(15)]-orexin B, concentration-dependently depolarized RVLM neurons. Regarding neuronal phenotypes, orexins depolarized 88% of adrenergic, 43% of nonadrenergic, and 36 to 41% of rhythmically firing RVLM neurons. Intracisternal TCS OX2 29 (3 and 10 nmol) suppressed intracisternal orexin A-induced increases of AP and HR, whereas intracisternal SB-334867 (3 and 10 nmol) had no effect on the orexin A-induced increase of HR but suppressed the orexin A-induced pressor response at 10 nmol. We concluded that orexins directly excite RVLM neurons, which include bulbospinal vasomotor neurons, and regulate cardiovascular function mainly via the OX(2)R, with a smaller contribution from the OX(1)R.

  11. Developing a Stretching Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, J E

    1981-11-01

    In brief: Although stretching exercises can prevent muscle injuries and enhance athletic performance, they can also cause injury. The author explains the four most common types of stretching exercises and explains why he considers static stretching the safest. He also sets up a stretching routine for runners. In setting up a safe stretching program, one should (1) precede stretching exercises with a mild warm-up; (2) use static stretching; (3) stretch before and after a workout; (4) begin with mild and proceed to moderate exercises; (5) alternate exercises for muscle groups; (6) stretch gently and slowly until tightness, not pain, is felt; and (7) hold the position for 30 to 60 seconds.

  12. Muscarinic M4 Receptors on Cholinergic and Dopamine D1 Receptor-Expressing Neurons Have Opposing Functionality for Positive Reinforcement and Influence Impulsivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Klawonn

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The neurotransmitter acetylcholine has been implicated in reward learning and drug addiction. However, the roles of the various cholinergic receptor subtypes on different neuron populations remain elusive. Here we study the function of muscarinic M4 receptors (M4Rs in dopamine D1 receptor (D1R expressing neurons and cholinergic neurons (expressing choline acetyltransferase; ChAT, during various reward-enforced behaviors and in a “waiting”-impulsivity test. We applied cell-type-specific gene deletions targeting M4Rs in D1RCre or ChATCre mice. Mice lacking M4Rs in D1R-neurons displayed greater cocaine seeking and drug-primed reinstatement than their littermate controls in a Pavlovian conditioned place preference (CPP paradigm. Furthermore, the M4R-D1RCre mice initiated significantly more premature responses (PRs in the 5-choice-serial-reaction-time-task (5CSRTT than their littermate controls, indicating impaired waiting impulse control. In contrast, mice lacking M4Rs in cholinergic neurons did not acquire cocaine Pavlovian conditioning. The M4R-ChATCre mice were also unable to learn positive reinforcement to either natural reward or cocaine in an operant runway paradigm. Immediate early gene (IEG expression (cFos and FosB induced by repeated cocaine injections was significantly increased in the forebrain of M4R-D1RCre mice, whereas it remained normal in the M4R-ChATCre mice. Our study illustrates that muscarinic M4Rs on specific neural populations, either cholinergic or D1R-expressing, are pivotal for learning processes related to both natural reward and drugs of abuse, with opposing functionality. Furthermore, we found that neurons expressing both M4Rs and D1Rs are important for signaling impulse control.

  13. Cannabinoid receptor CB1 mediates baseline and activity-induced survival of new neurons in adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Anke

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult neurogenesis is a particular example of brain plasticity that is partially modulated by the endocannabinoid system. Whereas the impact of synthetic cannabinoids on the neuronal progenitor cells has been described, there has been lack of information about the action of plant-derived extracts on neurogenesis. Therefore we here focused on the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and Cannabidiol (CBD fed to female C57Bl/6 and Nestin-GFP-reporter mice on proliferation and maturation of neuronal progenitor cells and spatial learning performance. In addition we used cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 deficient mice and treatment with CB1 antagonist AM251 in Nestin-GFP-reporter mice to investigate the role of the CB1 receptor in adult neurogenesis in detail. Results THC and CBD differed in their effects on spatial learning and adult neurogenesis. CBD did not impair learning but increased adult neurogenesis, whereas THC reduced learning without affecting adult neurogenesis. We found the neurogenic effect of CBD to be dependent on the CB1 receptor, which is expressed over the whole dentate gyrus. Similarly, the neurogenic effect of environmental enrichment and voluntary wheel running depends on the presence of the CB1 receptor. We found that in the absence of CB1 receptors, cell proliferation was increased and neuronal differentiation reduced, which could be related to CB1 receptor mediated signaling in Doublecortin (DCX-expressing intermediate progenitor cells. Conclusion CB1 affected the stages of adult neurogenesis that involve intermediate highly proliferative progenitor cells and the survival and maturation of new neurons. The pro-neurogenic effects of CBD might explain some of the positive therapeutic features of CBD-based compounds.

  14. PCB 136 Atropselectively Alters Morphometric and Functional Parameters of Neuronal Connectivity in Cultured Rat Hippocampal Neurons via Ryanodine Receptor-Dependent Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongren; Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Ghogha, Atefeh; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Bose, Diptiman D.; Pessah, Isaac N.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Lein, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners with multiple ortho chlorine substitutions sensitize ryanodine receptors (RyRs), and this activity promotes Ca2+-dependent dendritic growth in cultured neurons. Many ortho-substituted congeners display axial chirality, and we previously reported that the chiral congener PCB 136 (2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-hexachlorobiphenyl) atropselectively sensitizes RyRs. Here, we test the hypothesis that PCB 136 atropisomers differentially alter dendritic growth and other parameters of neuronal connectivity influenced by RyR activity. (−)-PCB 136, which potently sensitizes RyRs, enhances dendritic growth in primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, whereas (+)-PCB 136, which lacks RyR activity, has no effect on dendritic growth. The dendrite-promoting activity of (−)-PCB 136 is observed at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100nM and is blocked by pharmacologic RyR antagonism. Neither atropisomer alters axonal growth or cell viability. Quantification of PCB 136 atropisomers in hippocampal cultures indicates that atropselective effects on dendritic growth are not due to differential partitioning of atropisomers into cultured cells. Imaging of hippocampal neurons loaded with Ca2+-sensitive dye demonstrates that (−)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations. Similarly, (−)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the activity of hippocampal neurons plated on microelectrode arrays. These data support the hypothesis that atropselective effects on RyR activity translate into atropselective effects of PCB 136 atropisomers on neuronal connectivity, and suggest that the variable atropisomeric enrichment of chiral PCBs observed in the human population may be a significant determinant of individual susceptibility for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes following PCB exposure. PMID:24385416

  15. Activation of CRH receptor type 1 expressed on glutamatergic neurons increases excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons by the modulation of voltage-gated ion channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan eKratzer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH plays an important role in a substantial number of patients with stress-related mental disorders, such as anxiety disorders and depression. CRH has been shown to increase neuronal excitability in the hippocampus, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The effects of CRH on neuronal excitability were investigated in acute hippocampal brain slices. Population spikes (PS and field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP were evoked by stimulating Schaffer-collaterals and recorded simultaneously from the somatic and dendritic region of CA1 pyramidal neurons. CRH was found to increase PS amplitudes (mean  Standard error of the mean; 231.8  31.2% of control; n=10 while neither affecting fEPSPs (104.3 ± 4.2%; n=10 nor long-term potentiation (LTP. However, when Schaffer-collaterals were excited via action potentials (APs generated by stimulation of CA3 pyramidal neurons, CRH increased fEPSP amplitudes (119.8 ± 3.6%; n=8 and the magnitude of LTP in the CA1 region. Experiments in slices from transgenic mice revealed that the effect on PS amplitude is mediated exclusively by CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1 expressed on glutamatergic neurons. The effects of CRH on PS were dependent on phosphatase-2B, L- and T-type calcium channels and voltage-gated potassium channels but independent on intracellular Ca2+-elevation. In patch-clamp experiments, CRH increased the frequency and decay times of APs and decreased currents through A-type and delayed-rectifier potassium channels. These results suggest that CRH does not affect synaptic transmission per se, but modulates voltage-gated ion currents important for the generation of APs and hence elevates by this route overall neuronal activity.

  16. Stretch Sensor Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for determining stretch values and movement of body parts, e.g. a foot, by analysing stretch data from a stretch sensor. By analysing data from the stretch sensor it is possible to determine stretch samples which are associated with particular motion phases...

  17. The GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Exendin-4 and Diazepam Differentially Regulate GABAA Receptor-Mediated Tonic Currents in Rat Hippocampal CA3 Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, Sergiy V.; Jin, Zhe; Birnir, Bryndis

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a metabolic hormone that is secreted in a glucose-dependent manner and enhances insulin secretion. GLP-1 receptors are also found in the brain where their signalling affects neuronal activity. We have previously shown that the GLP-1 receptor agonists, GLP-1 and exendin-4 enhanced GABA-activated synaptic and tonic currents in rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons. The hippocampus is the centre for memory and learning and is important for cognition. Here we examined if exendin-4 similarly enhanced the GABA-activated currents in the presence of the benzodiazepine diazepam. In whole-cell recordings in rat brain slices, diazepam (1 μM), an allosteric positive modulator of GABAA receptors, alone enhanced the spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current (sIPSC) amplitude and frequency by a factor of 1.3 and 1.6, respectively, and doubled the tonic GABAA current normally recorded in the CA3 pyramidal cells. Importantly, in the presence of exendin-4 (10 nM) plus diazepam (1 μM), only the tonic but not the sIPSC currents transiently increased as compared to currents recorded in the presence of diazepam alone. The results suggest that exendin-4 potentiates a subpopulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in the CA3 pyramidal neurons. PMID:25927918

  18. The GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Exendin-4 and Diazepam Differentially Regulate GABAA Receptor-Mediated Tonic Currents in Rat Hippocampal CA3 Pyramidal Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiy V Korol

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 is a metabolic hormone that is secreted in a glucose-dependent manner and enhances insulin secretion. GLP-1 receptors are also found in the brain where their signalling affects neuronal activity. We have previously shown that the GLP-1 receptor agonists, GLP-1 and exendin-4 enhanced GABA-activated synaptic and tonic currents in rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons. The hippocampus is the centre for memory and learning and is important for cognition. Here we examined if exendin-4 similarly enhanced the GABA-activated currents in the presence of the benzodiazepine diazepam. In whole-cell recordings in rat brain slices, diazepam (1 μM, an allosteric positive modulator of GABAA receptors, alone enhanced the spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current (sIPSC amplitude and frequency by a factor of 1.3 and 1.6, respectively, and doubled the tonic GABAA current normally recorded in the CA3 pyramidal cells. Importantly, in the presence of exendin-4 (10 nM plus diazepam (1 μM, only the tonic but not the sIPSC currents transiently increased as compared to currents recorded in the presence of diazepam alone. The results suggest that exendin-4 potentiates a subpopulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in the CA3 pyramidal neurons.

  19. The contribution of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptors to adult motor neuron survival in vivo is specific to insult type and distinct from that for embryonic motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy; Rydyznski, Carolyn E; Spearry, Rachel P; Robitz, Rachel; Maclennan, A John

    2013-10-01

    Exogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes motor neuron (MN) survival following trauma and in genetic models of MN disease. Unconditional disruption of the mouse CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) gene leads to MN loss, demonstrating a developmental role for endogenous CNTF receptor signaling. These data also suggest that CNTF receptors may promote adult MN survival and that appropriately manipulating the receptors could effectively treat adult MN disorders. This effort would greatly benefit from a better understanding of the roles played by CNTF receptors in adult MNs. We have previously found that adult onset disruption of CNTFRα in facial MNs of "floxed CNTFRα" mice by AAV-Cre vector injection leads to significantly more MN loss than in identically treated controls. While indicating that CNTF receptors can promote adult MN survival, the data did not distinguish between potential roles in MN maintenance versus roles in protecting MNs from the injection associated trauma or the toxicity of the chronic Cre recombinase (Cre) produced by the AAV-Cre. Here we used an inducible Cre gene construct to produce adult-onset CNTFRα disruption in facial MNs without the traumatic and toxic effects of the AAV-Cre procedure. The MNs survive without CNTFRα, even when challenged by facial nerve crush or the injection-associated trauma, thereby suggesting, in conjunction with our previous study, that endogenous CNTF receptor signaling can protect MNs against toxic insult, such as that produced by chronic Cre. The data also indicate that in vivo CNTF receptors play very different roles in adult and embryonic MNs. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis reduces ASIC channel but enhances TRPV1 receptor function in rat bladder sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Khoa; Bielefeldt, Klaus; Gebhart, G F

    2013-07-01

    Using patch-clamp techniques, we studied the plasticity of acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC) and transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) channel function in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons retrogradely labeled from the bladder. Saline (control) or cyclophosphamide (CYP) was given intraperitoneally on days 1, 3, and 5. On day 6, lumbosacral (LS, L6-S2) or thoracolumbar (TL, T13-L2) DRG were removed and dissociated. Bladders and bladder DRG neurons from CYP-treated rats showed signs of inflammation (greater myeloperoxidase activity; lower intramuscular wall pH) and increased size (whole cell capacitance), respectively, compared with controls. Most bladder neurons (>90%) responded to protons and capsaicin. Protons produced multiphasic currents with distinct kinetics, whereas capsaicin always triggered a sustained response. The TRPV1 receptor antagonist A-425619 abolished capsaicin-triggered currents and raised the threshold of heat-activated currents. Prolonged exposure to an acidic environment (pH range: 7.2 to 6.6) inhibited proton-evoked currents, potentiated the capsaicin-evoked current, and reduced the threshold of heat-activated currents in LS and TL bladder neurons. CYP treatment reduced density but not kinetics of all current components triggered by pH 5. In contrast, CYP-treatment was associated with an increased current density in response to capsaicin in LS and TL bladder neurons. Correspondingly, heat triggered current at a significantly lower temperature in bladder neurons from CYP-treated rats compared with controls. These results reveal that cystitis differentially affects TRPV1- and ASIC-mediated currents in both bladder sensory pathways. Acidification of the bladder wall during inflammation may contribute to changes in nociceptive transmission mediated through the TRPV1 receptor, suggesting a role for TRPV1 in hypersensitivity associated with cystitis.

  1. Serotonin (5-HT) activation of immortalized hypothalamic neuronal cells through the 5-HT1B serotonin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Stephanie; Hardy, Alexandre B; Wheeler, Michael B; Belsham, Denise D

    2012-10-01

    Serotonin [or 5-hydroxytryptamine or (5-HT)] has been implicated as a key modulator in energy homeostasis and a primary focus in the treatment of obesity. There is growing evidence that 5-HT, acting through the 5-HT 1B receptor (5-HT(1B)R) in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), is important to this regulation. However, there is some contention as to whether 5-HT(1B)R action occurs directly on PVN neurons or indirectly via inhibitory inputs into the PVN. To address these questions, we used a novel clonal, hypothalamic neuronal cell model, adult mouse hypothalamic-2/30 (mHypoA-2/30), expressing a PVN-specific marker, single-minded homolog 1, as well as a complement of PVN neuropeptides, including TRH, vasopressin, ghrelin, nucleobindin-2, and galanin. Adult mouse hypothalamic-2/30 neurons were also found to express the 5-HT(1B)R and 5-HT 6 receptor, but not 2C, all previously linked to feeding regulation. Direct serotonergic stimulation (100 nm to 10 μm) of these neurons resulted in dose-dependent cFos activation. 5-HT (10 μm) suppressed forskolin-induced cAMP levels and induced a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) through ER Ca(2+) release, effects that were mimicked by the 5-HT(1B)R agonists, CGS12066B and CP93129, and that were attenuated in the presence of the 5-HT(1B)R-specific inhibitors, GR55562 and isamoltane hemifumarate. Modest transcriptional changes in ghrelin and nucleobindin-2 were also observed in response to 100 nm and 10 μm 5-HT, respectively. These findings support the model wherein 5-HT action through the 1B receptor subtype occurs directly on PVN neurons, leading to potential modification of neuronal transcriptional and secretory machinery.

  2. Both neurons and astrocytes exhibited tetrodotoxin-resistant metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent spontaneous slow Ca2+ oscillations in striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Tamura

    Full Text Available The striatum plays an important role in linking cortical activity to basal ganglia outputs. Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs are densely expressed in the medium spiny projection neurons and may be a therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease. The group I mGluRs are known to modulate the intracellular Ca(2+ signaling. To characterize Ca(2+ signaling in striatal cells, spontaneous cytoplasmic Ca(2+ transients were examined in acute slice preparations from transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP in the astrocytes. In both the GFP-negative cells (putative-neurons and astrocytes of the striatum, spontaneous slow and long-lasting intracellular Ca(2+ transients (referred to as slow Ca(2+ oscillations, which lasted up to approximately 200 s, were found. Neither the inhibition of action potentials nor ionotropic glutamate receptors blocked the slow Ca(2+ oscillation. Depletion of the intracellular Ca(2+ store and the blockade of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors greatly reduced the transient rate of the slow Ca(2+ oscillation, and the application of an antagonist against mGluR5 also blocked the slow Ca(2+ oscillation in both putative-neurons and astrocytes. Thus, the mGluR5-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate signal cascade is the primary contributor to the slow Ca(2+ oscillation in both putative-neurons and astrocytes. The slow Ca(2+ oscillation features multicellular synchrony, and both putative-neurons and astrocytes participate in the synchronous activity. Therefore, the mGluR5-dependent slow Ca(2+ oscillation may involve in the neuron-glia interaction in the striatum.

  3. Primary sensory neurons regulate Toll-like receptor-4-dependent activity of glial cells in dorsal root ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, K-H; Chow, K B S; Leung, W K; Wong, Y H; Wise, H

    2014-10-24

    Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) has been identified in primary sensory neurons, both in vivo and in vitro, but is reportedly absent from satellite glial cells (SGCs). Herein we reveal that, in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG), SGCs do express TLR4 but this expression is inhibited by direct contact with neurons. Thus, TLR4 mRNA and protein is strongly up-regulated in isolated DRG glial cells in the absence of neurons. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) mRNA expression with greater efficacy in DRG glial cell cultures than in mixed DRG cell cultures containing TLR4-positive neurons. Using an insert co-culture system, we have shown that neuronal inhibition of glial cell TLR4 is likely to be dependent on cell-cell contact rather than diffusible factors from neurons. LPS stimulated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production from DRG glial cells in a TLR4- and COX-2-dependent manner. In addition, exogenous PGE2 potentiated LPS-stimulated COX-2 mRNA while inhibiting TNFα mRNA expression by DRG cells, suggestive of a complex regulatory system to control inflammation within the DRG. In addition to LPS, conditioned medium from heat-shocked DRG neurons also increased COX-2 mRNA expression in DRG glial cells in a partially TLR4-dependent manner. We therefore hypothesize that neuronal suppression of glial TLR4 activity is a protective mechanism to prevent uncontrolled inflammation within the DRG. Under conditions where DRG neuronal viability is compromised, DRG glial cells become responsive to PAMPs (pathogen-associated molecular patterns) and DAMPs (danger-associated molecular patterns) and generate a range of classical inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nicotinic receptor blockade decreases fos immunoreactivity within orexin/hypocretin-expressing neurons of nicotine-exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Steven J; Gentile, Taylor A; Mo, Lili; Tran, Fionya H; Ma, Sisi; Muschamp, John W

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Nicotine is the principal psychoactive ingredient in tobacco that causes addiction. The structures governing nicotine addiction, including those underlying withdrawal, are still being explored. Nicotine withdrawal is characterized by negative affective and cognitive symptoms that enhance relapse susceptibility, and suppressed dopaminergic transmission from ventral tegmental area (VTA) to target structures underlies behavioral symptoms of nicotine withdrawal. Agonist and partial agonist therapies help 1 in 4 treatment-seeking smokers at one-year post-cessation, and new targets are needed to more effectively aid smokers attempting to quit. Hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin neurons send excitatory projections to dopamine (DA)-producing neurons of VTA and modulate mesoaccumbal DA release. The effects of nicotinic receptor blockade, which is commonly used to precipitate withdrawal, on orexin neurons remain poorly investigated and present an attractive target for intervention. The present study sought to investigate the effects of nicotinic receptor blockade on hypothalamic orexin neurons using mecamylamine to precipitate withdrawal in rats. Separate groups of rats were treated with either chronic nicotine or saline for 7-days at which point effects of mecamylamine or saline on somatic signs and anxiety-like behavior were assessed. Finally, tissue from rats was harvested for immunofluorescent analysis of Fos within orexin neurons. Results demonstrate that nicotinic receptor blockade leads to reduced orexin cell activity, as indicated by lowered Fos-immunoreactivity, and suggest that this underlying cellular activity may be associated with symptoms of nicotine withdrawal as effects were most prominently observed in rats given chronic nicotine. We conclude from this study that orexin transmission becomes suppressed in rats upon nicotinic receptor blockade, and that behavioral symptoms associated

  5. Y2 receptor signalling in NPY neurons controls bone formation and fasting induced feeding but not spontaneous feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yue; Fu, Melissa; Herzog, Herbert

    2016-02-01

    Y2 receptors have been implicated in the development of obesity and are a potential target for obesity treatment due to their known role of inhibiting neuropeptide Y (NPY) induced feeding responses. However, the precise neuronal population on which Y2 receptors act to fulfil this role is less clear. Here we utilise a novel inducible, postnatal onset NPY neurons specific deletion model to investigate the functional consequences of loss of Y2 signalling in this population of neurons on feeding and energy homeostasis regulation. While the consequences of lack of Y2 signalling in NPY neurons are confirmed in terms of the uncoupling of suppression/increasing of NPY and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA expression in the arcuate nuclei (Arc), respectively, this lack of Y2 signalling surprisingly does not have any significant effect on spontaneous food intake. Fasting induced food intake, however, is strongly increased but only in the first 1h after re-feeding. Consequently no significant changes in body weight are being observed although body weight gain is increased in male mice after postnatal onset Y2 deletion. Importantly, another known function of central Y2 receptor signalling, the suppression of bone formation is conserved in this conditional model with whole body bone mineral content being decreased. Taken together this model confirms the critical role of Y2 signalling to control NPY and associated POMC expression in the Arc, but also highlights the possibility that others, non-NPY neuronal Y2 receptors, are also involved in controlling feeding and energy homeostasis regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. L-type Ca2+ channel blockers promote Ca2+ accumulation when dopamine receptors are activated in striatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Molly E; Macías, Wendy; Youngs, Rachael M; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali; Dudman, Joshua T; Konradi, Christine

    2004-11-24

    Dopamine (DA) receptor-mediated signal transduction and gene expression play a central role in many brain disorders from schizophrenia to Parkinson's disease to addiction. While trying to evaluate the role of L-type Ca2+ channels in dopamine D1 receptor-mediated phosphorylation of the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), we found that activation of dopamine D1 receptors alters the properties of L-type Ca2+ channel inhibitors and turns them into facilitators of Ca2+ influx. In D1 receptor-stimulated neurons, L-type Ca2+ channel blockers promote cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation. This leads to the activation of a molecular signal transduction pathway and CREB phosphorylation. In the absence of dopamine receptor stimulation, L-type Ca2+ channel blockers inhibit CREB phosphorylation. The effect of dopamine on L-type Ca2+ channel blockers is dependent on protein kinase A (PKA), suggesting that protein phosphorylation plays a role in this phenomenon. Because of the adverse effect of activated dopamine receptors on L-type Ca2+ channel blocker action, the role of L-type Ca2+ channels in the dopamine D1 receptor signal transduction pathway cannot be assessed with pharmacological tools. However, with antisense technology, we demonstrate that L-type Ca2+ channels contribute to D1 receptor-mediated CREB phosphorylation. We conclude that the D1 receptor signal transduction pathway depends on L-type Ca2+ channels to mediate CREB phosphorylation.

  7. ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-alpha IMMUNOREACTIVE NEURONS IN THE BRAINSTEM AND SPINAL CORD OF THE FEMALE RHESUS MONKEY : SPECIES-SPECIFIC CHARACTERISTICS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderhorst, V. G. J. M.; Terasawa, E.; Ralston, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    The distribution pattern of estrogen receptors in the rodent CNS has been reported extensively, but mapping of estrogen receptors in primates is incomplete. In this study we describe the distribution of estrogen receptor alpha immunoreactive (ER-alpha 1R) neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord of

  8. Amphetamine and Dopamine-Induced Immediate Early Gene Expression in Striatal Neurons Depends on Postsynaptic NMDA Receptors and Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konradi, Christine; Leveque, Jean-Christophe; Hyman, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Amphetamine and cocaine induce the expression of both immediate early genes (IEGs) and neuropeptide genes in rat striatum. Despite the demonstrated dependence of these effects on D1 dopamine receptors, which activate the cyclic AMP pathway, there are several reports that amphetamine and cocaine-induced IEG expression can be inhibited in striatum in vivo by NMDA receptor antagonists. We find that in vivo, the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 inhibits amphetamine induction of c-fos acutely and also prevents downregulation of IEG expression with chronic amphetamine administration. Such observations raise the question of whether dopamine/glutamate interactions occur at the level of corticostriatal and mesostriatal circuitry or within striatal neurons. Therefore, we studied dissociated striatal cultures in which midbrain and cortical presynaptic inputs are removed. In these cultures, we find that dopamine- or forskolin-mediated IEG induction requires Ca2+ entry via NMDA receptors but not via L-type Ca2+ channels. Moreover, blockade of NMDA receptors diminishes the ability of dopamine to induce phosphorylation of the cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein CREB. Although these results do not rule out a role for circuit-level dopamine/glutamate interactions, they demonstrate a requirement at the cellular level for interactions between the cyclic AMP and NMDA receptor pathways in dopamine-regulated gene expression in striatal neurons. PMID:8753884

  9. Central sensitization of nociceptive neurons in rat medullary dorsal horn involves purinergic P2X7 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, K; Chiang, C-Y; Li, Z; Lee, J-C; Dostrovsky, J O; Sessle, B J

    2011-09-29

    Central sensitization is a crucial process underlying the increased neuronal excitability of nociceptive pathways following peripheral tissue injury and inflammation. Our previous findings have suggested that extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) molecules acting at purinergic receptors located on presynaptic terminals (e.g., P2X2/3, P2X3 subunits) and glial cells are involved in the glutamatergic-dependent central sensitization induced in medullary dorsal horn (MDH) nociceptive neurons by application to the tooth pulp of the inflammatory irritant mustard oil (MO). Since growing evidence indicates that activation of P2X7 receptors located on glia is involved in chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain, the aim of the present study was to test in vivo for P2X7 receptor involvement in this acute inflammatory pain model. Experiments were carried out in anesthetized Sprague-Dawley male rats. Single unit recordings were made in MDH functionally identified nociceptive neurons for which mechanoreceptive field, mechanical activation threshold and responses to noxious stimuli were tested. We found that continuous intrathecal (i.t.) superfusion over MDH of the potent P2X7 receptor antagonists brilliant blue G and periodated oxidized ATP could each significantly attenuate the MO-induced MDH central sensitization. MDH central sensitization could also be produced by i.t. superfusion of ATP and even more effectively by the P2X7 receptor agonist benzoylbenzoyl ATP. Superfusion of the microglial blocker minocycline abolished the MO-induced MDH central sensitization, consistent with reports that dorsal horn P2X7 receptors are mostly expressed on microglia. In control experiments, superfusion over MDH of vehicle did not produce any significant changes. These novel findings suggest that activation of P2X7 receptors in vivo may be involved in the development of central sensitization in an acute inflammatory pain model. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. All rights reserved.

  10. A kainate receptor subunit promotes the recycling of the neuron-specific K+-Cl-co-transporter KCC2 in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressey, Jessica C; Mahadevan, Vivek; Khademullah, C Sahara; Dargaei, Zahra; Chevrier, Jonah; Ye, Wenqing; Huang, Michelle; Chauhan, Alamjeet K; Meas, Steven J; Uvarov, Pavel; Airaksinen, Matti S; Woodin, Melanie A

    2017-04-14

    Synaptic inhibition depends on a transmembrane gradient of chloride, which is set by the neuron-specific K + -Cl - co-transporter KCC2. Reduced KCC2 levels in the neuronal membrane contribute to the generation of epilepsy, neuropathic pain, and autism spectrum disorders; thus, it is important to characterize the mechanisms regulating KCC2 expression. In the present study, we determined the role of KCC2-protein interactions in regulating total and surface membrane KCC2 expression. Using quantitative immunofluorescence in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, we discovered that the kainate receptor subunit GluK2 and the auxiliary subunit Neto2 significantly increase the total KCC2 abundance in neurons but that GluK2 exclusively increases the abundance of KCC2 in the surface membrane. Using a live cell imaging assay, we further determined that KCC2 recycling primarily occurs within 1-2 h and that GluK2 produces an ∼40% increase in the amount of KCC2 recycled to the membrane during this time period. This GluK2-mediated increase in surface recycling translated to a significant increase in KCC2 expression in the surface membrane. Moreover, we found that KCC2 recycling is enhanced by protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation of the GluK2 C-terminal residues Ser-846 and Ser-868. Lastly, using gramicidin-perforated patch clamp recordings, we found that the GluK2-mediated increase in KCC2 recycling to the surface membrane translates to a hyperpolarization of the reversal potential for GABA (E GABA ). In conclusion, our results have revealed a mechanism by which kainate receptors regulate KCC2 expression in the hippocampus. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. CREB activity in dopamine D1 receptor expressing neurons regulates cocaine-induced behavioral effects

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    Ainhoa eBilbao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available IIt is suggested that striatal cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB regulates sensitivity to psychostimulants. To test the cell-specificity of this hypothesis we examined the effects of a dominant-negative CREB protein variant expressed in dopamine receptor D1 (D1R neurons on cocaine-induced behaviors. A transgenic mouse strain was generated by pronuclear injection of a BAC-derived transgene harboring the A-CREB sequence under the control of the D1R gene promoter. Compared to wild-type, drug-naïve mutants showed moderate alterations in gene expression, especially a reduction in basal levels of activity-regulated transcripts such as Arc and Egr2. Drug-naïve mutants showed moderate alterations in gene expression, most prominently a reduction in basal levels of activity-regulated transcripts such as Arc and Egr2, when compared to wild-type controls. The behavioral responses to cocaine were elevated in mutant mice. Locomotor activity after acute treatment, psychomotor sensitization after intermittent drug injections and the conditioned locomotion after saline treatment were increased compared to wild-type littermates. Transgenic mice had significantly higher cocaine conditioned place preference, displayed normal extinction of the conditioned preference, but showed an augmented cocaine-seeking response following priming-induced reinstatement. This enhanced cocaine-seeking response was associated with increased levels of activity-regulated transcripts and prodynorphin. The primary reinforcing effects of cocaine were not altered in the mutant mice as they did not differ from wild-type in cocaine self-administration under a fixed ratio schedule at the training dose. Collectively, our data indicate that expression of a dominant-negative CREB variant exclusively in neurons expressing D1R is sufficient to recapitulate the previously reported behavioral phenotypes associated with virally expressed dominant-negative CREB.

  12. GABAA Receptor Activity Shapes the Formation of Inhibitory Synapses between Developing Medium Spiny Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eArama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Basal ganglia play an essential role in motor coordination and cognitive functions. The GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs account for ~95 % of all the neurons in this brain region. Central to the normal functioning of MSNs is integration of synaptic activity arriving from the glutamatergic corticostriatal and thalamostriatal afferents, with synaptic inhibition mediated by local interneurons and MSN axon collaterals. In this study we have investigated how the specific types of GABAergic synapses between the MSNs develop over time, and how the activity of GABAA receptors (GABAARs influences this development. Isolated embryonic (E17 MSNs form a homogenous population in vitro and display spontaneous synaptic activity and functional properties similar to their in vivo counterparts. In dual whole-cell recordings of synaptically connected pairs of MSNs, action potential-activated synaptic events were detected between 7 and 14 days in vitro (DIV, which coincided with the shift in GABAAR operation from depolarization to hyperpolarization, as detected indirectly by intracellular calcium imaging. In parallel, the predominant subtypes of inhibitory synapses, which innervate dendrites of MSNs and contain GABAAR α1 or α2 subunits, underwent distinct changes in the size of postsynaptic clusters, with α1 becoming smaller and α2 larger over time, while both the percentage and the size of mixed α1/α2-postsynaptic clusters were increased. When activity of GABAARs was under chronic blockade between 4-7 DIV, the structural properties of these synapses remained unchanged. In contrast, chronic inhibition of GABAARs between7-14 DIV led to reduction in size of α1- and α1/α2-postsynaptic clusters and a concomitant increase in number and size of α2-postsynaptic clusters. Thus, the main subtypes of GABAergic synapses formed by MSNs are regulated by GABAAR activity, but in opposite directions, and thus appear to be driven by different molecular mechanisms.

  13. Circadian Clock Proteins and Melatonin Receptors in Neurons and Glia of the Sapajus apella Cerebellum

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    Leila M. Guissoni Campos

    2018-02-01

    was confirmed by the S100β-IR of these cells. The highest expression of PER seen in the daytime analysis coincided with the highest expression of melatonin receptors. CaBPs showed day/night morphological and density changes in the cerebellar cortex. The presence of the same temporal variations in the expression of PER in the Pj neurons and in MT1 and MT2 receptors in Bergmann cells indicates a possible relation between these cells during the rhythmic processing of the cerebellum, in addition to the CaBP temporal morphological and density changes.

  14. Calcium-sensing receptor antagonist NPS2390 attenuates neuronal apoptosis though intrinsic pathway following traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhaoliang; Song, Zhengfei; Wan, Yingfeng; Wang, Kun; Mo, Lianjie; Wang, Yirong

    2017-04-29

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) initiates a complex cascade of neurochemical and signaling changes that leads to neuronal apoptosis, which contributes to poor outcomes for patients with TBI. Previous study indicates that calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) activation contributes to neuron death in focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion mice, however, its role in neuronal apoptosis after TBI is not well-established. Using a controlled cortical impact model in rats, the present study was designed to determine the effect of CaSR inhibitor NPS2390 upon neuronal apoptosis after TBI. Rats were randomly distributed into three groups undergoing the sham surgery or TBI procedure, and NPS2390 (1.5 mg/kg) was infused subcutaneously at 30 min and 120 min after TBI. All rats were sacrificed at 24 h after TBI. Our data indicated that NPS2390 significantly reduced the brain edema and improved the neurological function after TBI. In addition, NPS2390 decreased caspase-3 levels and the number of apoptotic neurons. Furthermore, NPS2390 up-regulated anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 expression and down-regulated pro-apoptotic protein Bax, and reduced subsequent release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. In summary, this study indicated that inhibition of CaSR by NPS2390 attenuates neuronal apoptosis after TBI, in part, through modulating intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Techniques for studying inverse agonist activity of antidepressants at recombinant nonedited 5-HT(₂C-INI) receptor and native neuronal 5-HT(₂C) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seimandi, Mathieu; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT)(₂C) receptors play a major role in the regulation of mood, and alteration of their functional status has been implicated in the etiology of affect disorders. Correspondingly, they represent an important target for various antidepressant categories, including tricyclics, tetracyclics, mCPP derivatives, specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and agomelatine, which exhibit medium to high affinities for 5-HT(₂C) receptors and behave as antagonists. Antidepressant effects of 5-HT(₂C) antagonists have been attributed to a disinhibition of mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic pathways, which exert a beneficial influence upon mood and cognitive functions altered in depression. However, recent experimental evidence revealed a prominent role of constitutive activity in the tonic inhibitory control of dopaminergic transmission exerted by 5-HT(₂C) receptors in specific brain areas such as the nucleus accumbens. Accordingly, alteration in the constitutive activity of 5-HT(₂C) receptors might participate in the induction of depressed states and drugs with inverse agonist properties should themselves be effective antidepressant agents and, possibly, more active than neutral antagonists. This highlights the relevance of systematically evaluating inverse agonist versus neutral antagonist activities of antidepressants acting at 5-HT(₂C) receptors. Here, we provide a detailed description of a palette of cellular assays exploiting constitutive activity of 5-HT(₂C) receptor expressed in heterologous cells (such as HEK-293 cells) toward Gq-operated signaling or their constitutive association with β-arrestins to evaluate inverse agonist activity of antidepressants. We also describe an approach allowing discrimination between inverse agonist and neutral antagonist activities of antidepressants at native constitutively active receptors expressed in cultured cortical neurons, based on previous findings indicating that prolonged treatments with inverse agonists

  16. Zebrafish GDNF and its co-receptor GFRα1 activate the human RET receptor and promote the survival of dopaminergic neurons in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuulia Saarenpää

    Full Text Available Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF is a ligand that activates, through co-receptor GDNF family receptor alpha-1 (GFRα1 and receptor tyrosine kinase "RET", several signaling pathways crucial in the development and sustainment of multiple neuronal populations. We decided to study whether non-mammalian orthologs of these three proteins have conserved their function: can they activate the human counterparts? Using the baculovirus expression system, we expressed and purified Danio rerio RET, and its binding partners GFRα1 and GDNF, and Drosophila melanogaster RET and two isoforms of co-receptor GDNF receptor-like. Our results report high-level insect cell expression of post-translationally modified and dimerized zebrafish RET and its binding partners. We also found that zebrafish GFRα1 and GDNF are comparably active as mammalian cell-produced ones. We also report the first measurements of the affinity of the complex to RET in solution: at least for zebrafish, the Kd for GFRα1-GDNF binding RET is 5.9 μM. Surprisingly, we also found that zebrafish GDNF as well as zebrafish GFRα1 robustly activated human RET signaling and promoted the survival of cultured mouse dopaminergic neurons with comparable efficiency to mammalian GDNF, unlike E. coli-produced human proteins. These results contradict previous studies suggesting that mammalian GFRα1 and GDNF cannot bind and activate non-mammalian RET and vice versa.

  17. Mu-opioid receptor and delta-opioid receptor differentially regulate microglial inflammatory response to control proopiomelanocortin neuronal apoptosis in the hypothalamus: effects of neonatal alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Pallavi; Cabrera, Miguel A; Chastain, Lucy G; Boyadjieva, Nadka I; Jabbar, Shaima; Franklin, Tina; Sarkar, Dipak K

    2017-04-14

    Opioid receptors are known to control neurotransmission of various peptidergic neurons, but their potential role in regulation of microglia and neuronal cell communications is unknown. We investigated the role of mu-opioid receptors (MOR) and delta-opioid receptors (DOR) on microglia in the regulation of apoptosis in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons induced by neonatal ethanol in the hypothalamus. Neonatal rat pups were fed a milk formula containing ethanol or control diets between postnatal days 2-6. Some of the alcohol-fed rats additionally received pretreatment of a microglia activation blocker minocycline. Two hours after the last feeding, some of the pups were sacrificed and processed for histochemical detection of microglial cell functions or confocal microscopy for detection of cellular physical interaction or used for gene and protein expression analysis. The rest of the pups were dissected for microglia separation by differential gradient centrifugation and characterization by measuring production of various activation markers and cytokines. In addition, primary cultures of microglial cells were prepared using hypothalamic tissues of neonatal rats and used for determination of cytokine production/secretion and apoptotic activity of neurons. In the hypothalamus, neonatal alcohol feeding elevated cytokine receptor levels, increased the number of microglial cells with amoeboid-type circularity, enhanced POMC and microglial cell physical interaction, and decreased POMC cell numbers. Minocycline reversed these cellular effects of alcohol. Alcohol feeding also increased levels of microglia MOR protein and pro-inflammatory signaling molecules in the hypothalamus, and MOR receptor antagonist naltrexone prevented these effects of alcohol. In primary cultures of hypothalamic microglia, both MOR agonist [D-Ala 2, N-MePhe 4, Gly-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) and ethanol increased microglial cellular levels and secretion of pro-inflammatory cell signaling proteins. However

  18. Leptin receptor expressing neurons express phosphodiesterase-3B (PDE3B) and leptin induces STAT3 activation in PDE3B neurons in the mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Maitrayee; Sahu, Abhiram

    2015-11-01

    Leptin signaling in the hypothalamus is critical for normal food intake and body weight regulation. Cumulative evidence suggests that besides the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) pathway, several non-STAT3 pathways including the phosphodiesterase-3B (PDE3B) pathway mediate leptin signaling in the hypothalamus. We have shown that PDE3B is localized in various hypothalamic sites implicated in the regulation of energy homeostasis and that the anorectic and body weight reducing effects of leptin are mediated by the activation of PDE3B. It is still unknown if PDE3B is expressed in the long form of the leptin-receptor (ObRb)-expressing neurons in the hypothalamus and whether leptin induces STAT3 activation in PDE3B-expressing neurons. In this study, we examined co-localization of PDE3B with ObRb neurons in various hypothalamic nuclei in ObRb-GFP mice that were treated with leptin (5mg/kg, ip) for 2h. Results showed that most of the ObRb neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARC, 93%), ventromedial nucleus (VMN, 94%), dorsomedial nucleus (DMN, 95%), ventral premammillary nucleus (PMv, 97%) and lateral hypothalamus (LH, 97%) co-expressed PDE3B. We next examined co-localization of p-STAT3 and PDE3B in the hypothalamus in C57BL6 mice that were treated with leptin (5mg/kg, ip) for 1h. The results showed that almost all p-STAT3 positive neurons in different hypothalamic nuclei including ARC, VMN, DMN, LH and PMv areas expressed PDE3B. These results suggest the possibility for a direct role for the PDE3B pathway in mediating leptin action in the hypothalamus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Treating the cognitive deficits of schizophrenia with alpha4beta2 neuronal nicotinic receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radek, Richard J; Kohlhaas, Kathy L; Rueter, Lynne E; Mohler, Eric G

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenic patients exhibit debilitating impairments of intellectual function. Typical and atypical antipsychotic medications are largely ineffective at treating the cognitive deficits of schizophrenia (CDS), and efforts to discover compounds that treat these symptoms are ongoing. Considerable tobacco use in schizophrenic patients, genetic linkage, and receptor binding studies suggest the involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in schizophrenia. Neuronal alpha4beta2 nAChRs are widely distributed in the mammalian brain, and are implicated in normal cognitive functioning in animal models. Ligands of various selectivity and potency have been used to study the role of the alpha4beta2 subtype in schizophrenia. For instance, studies in rodents show that alpha4beta2 agonists improve sensory gating, an information processing function that is deficient in schizophrenia. Pharmacological studies in animals also suggest that alpha4beta2 nAChRs are involved in other cognitive domains that are impaired in schizophrenia, including speed of processing, working memory, visual learning and memory, and social cognition. The non-selective nAChR agonist nicotine has been shown to improve CDS in several human clinical studies, and recent trials have been undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of more alpha4beta2 selective compounds. It remains to be determined whether alpha4beta2 agonists will provide greater efficacy than nicotine for CDS or reducing tobacco use in patients. Pre-clinical evidence to date suggests that agonists of the nicotinic alpha4beta2 subtype could be useful in improving cognitive function in schizophrenic patients.

  20. Dioxin modulates expression of receptor for activated C kinase (RACK-1) in developing neurons

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    Yang, J.H.; Kim, S.Y.; Lee, H.G.; Kim, M.Y.; Lee, J.H.; Chae, W.G. [Catholic Univ. of Daegu, Dept. of Pharmacology/Toxicology, Daegu (Korea)

    2004-09-15

    TCDD is sensitive to the central nerve system of the developing brain. The TCDD-induced neurodevelopmental deficits include the cognitive disability and motor dysfunction. While TCDD may lead to neurodevelopmental and neurobehavioral deficit, it is not known which molecular substances are intracellular targets for TCDD. Since TCDD accumulates in brain and the brain contains the Ah receptor, it is possible that TCDD may act at the target site such as cerebellum, which is responsible for cognitive abilities and motor function. A recent in vitro studies using cerebellar granule cells demonstrated a translocation of PKC-{alpha} and {epsilon} following the TCDD or PCB exposure. One of the most pivotal second messenger molecules involved in neuronal function and development is protein kinase C (PKC). PKC signaling pathways have been implicated as an important factor in learning and memory processes. PKC signaling events are optimized by the adaptor proteins, which organize PKCs near their selective substrates and away from others. RACK-1(receptor for activated C-kinase) is one of adaptor proteins that anchor the activated PKC at the site of translocation 6. RACKs bind PKC only in the presence of PKC activators. RACKs are 30- and 36-kDa proteins located in cytoskeletal compartment and play a key role in PKC activation and in membrane amchoring. Since different PKC isoforms translocate to distinct subcellular sites on activation, it is suggested that isoform-specific RACK may be present. Activation of certain PKC isoforms (PKC-a and {beta}II) is preferentially associated with RACK-1. While TCDD modulates PKC signaling pathway, role of RACK-1 on TCDD-mediated signaling pathway is not known. To identify the intracellular target for TCDD and understand a mechanism of signaling pathway in the developing brain, the present study attempted to analyze effects of RACK-1 in the cerebellar granule cells following TCDD exposure.

  1. Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Increases NMDA-Activated Current in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Qu, Weijun; Zhou, Libin; Lu, Zihong; Jie, Pinghui; Chen, Lei; Chen, Ling

    2013-01-01

    The glutamate excitotoxicity, mediated through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), plays an important role in cerebral ischemia injury. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) can be activated by multiple stimuli that may happen during stroke. The present study evaluated the effect of TRPV4 activation on NMDA-activated current (INMDA) and that of blocking TRPV4 on brain injury after focal cerebral ischemia in mice. We herein report that activation of TRPV4 by 4α-PDD and hypotonic stimulation increased INMDA in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was sensitive to TRPV4 antagonist 10 μ M/2 μ 1/mouse [DOSAGE ERROR CORRECTED] and NMDAR antagonist AP-5, indicating that TRPV4 activation potentiates NMDAR response. In addition, the increase in INMDA by hypotonicity was sensitive to the antagonist of NMDAR NR2B subunit, but not of NR2A subunit. Furthermore, antagonists of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) significantly attenuated hypotonicity-induced increase in INMDA, while antagonists of protein kinase C or casein kinase II had no such effect, indicating that phosphorylation of NR2B subunit by CaMKII is responsible for TRPV4-potentiated NMDAR response. Finally, we found that intracerebroventricular injection of 10 μ m/2 μ 1/mouse [DOSAGE ERROR CORRECTED] after 60 min middle cerebral artery occlusion reduced the cerebral infarction with at least a 12 h efficacious time-window. These findings indicate that activation of TRPV4 increases NMDAR function, which may facilitate glutamate excitotoxicity. Closing TRPV4 may exert potent neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia injury through many mechanisms at least including the prevention of NMDAR-mediated glutamate excitotoxicity.

  2. Sweet Taste Receptor Serves to Activate Glucose- and Leptin-Responsive Neurons in the Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus and Participates in Glucose Responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Daisuke; Koike, Miho; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Kojima, Itaru; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamic feeding center plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In the feeding center, whole-body energy signals including hormones and nutrients are sensed, processed, and integrated. As a result, food intake and energy expenditure are regulated. Two types of glucose-sensing neurons exist in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC): glucose-excited neurons and glucose-inhibited neurons. While some molecules are known to be related to glucose sensing in the hypothalamus, the mechanisms underlying glucose sensing in the hypothalamus are not fully understood. The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of taste type 1 receptor 2 (T1R2) and taste type 1 receptor 3 (T1R3) and senses sweet tastes. T1R2 and T1R3 are distributed in multiple organs including the tongue, pancreas, adipose tissue, and hypothalamus. However, the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC remains to be clarified. To examine the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC, cytosolic Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ) in isolated single ARC neurons were measured using Fura-2 fluorescent imaging. An artificial sweetener, sucralose at 10 -5 -10 -2 M dose dependently increased [Ca 2+ ] i in 12-16% of ARC neurons. The sucralose-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increase was suppressed by a sweet taste receptor inhibitor, gurmarin. The sucralose-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increase was inhibited under an extracellular Ca 2+ -free condition and in the presence of an L-type Ca 2+ channel blocker, nitrendipine. Sucralose-responding neurons were activated by high-concentration of glucose. This response to glucose was markedly suppressed by gurmarin. More than half of sucralose-responding neurons were activated by leptin but not ghrelin. Percentages of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons among sucralose-responding neurons and sweet taste receptor expressing neurons were low, suggesting that majority of sucralose-responding neurons are non-POMC neurons. These data suggest that sweet taste receptor-mediated cellular activation

  3. Raphe serotonin neuron-specific oxytocin receptor knockout reduces aggression without affecting anxiety-like behavior in male mice only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, J H; Williams Avram, S K; Cui, Z; Song, J; Mezey, É; Senerth, J M; Baumann, M H; Young, W S

    2015-02-01

    Serotonin and oxytocin influence aggressive and anxiety-like behaviors, though it is unclear how the two may interact. That the oxytocin receptor is expressed in the serotonergic raphe nuclei suggests a mechanism by which the two neurotransmitters may cooperatively influence behavior. We hypothesized that oxytocin acts on raphe neurons to influence serotonergically mediated anxiety-like, aggressive and parental care behaviors. We eliminated expression of the oxytocin receptor in raphe neurons by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of the serotonin transporter promoter (Slc6a4) with our conditional oxytocin receptor knockout line. The knockout mice generated by this cross are normal across a range of behavioral measures: there are no effects for either sex on locomotion in an open-field, olfactory habituation/dishabituation or, surprisingly, anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated O and plus mazes. There was a profound deficit in male aggression: only one of 11 raphe oxytocin receptor knockouts showed any aggressive behavior, compared to 8 of 11 wildtypes. In contrast, female knockouts displayed no deficits in maternal behavior or aggression. Our results show that oxytocin, via its effects on raphe neurons, is a key regulator of resident-intruder aggression in males but not maternal aggression. Furthermore, this reduction in male aggression is quite different from the effects reported previously after forebrain or total elimination of oxytocin receptors. Finally, we conclude that when constitutively eliminated, oxytocin receptors expressed by serotonin cells do not contribute to baseline anxiety-like behaviors or maternal care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  4. Attenuating GABA(A) receptor signaling in dopamine neurons selectively enhances reward learning and alters risk preference in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jones G; Wanat, Matthew J; Soden, Marta E; Ahmad, Kinza; Zweifel, Larry S; Bamford, Nigel S; Palmiter, Richard D

    2011-11-23

    Phasic dopamine (DA) transmission encodes the value of reward-predictive stimuli and influences both learning and decision-making. Altered DA signaling is associated with psychiatric conditions characterized by risky choices such as pathological gambling. These observations highlight the importance of understanding how DA neuron activity is modulated. While excitatory drive onto DA neurons is critical for generating phasic DA responses, emerging evidence suggests that inhibitory signaling also modulates these responses. To address the functional importance of inhibitory signaling in DA neurons, we generated mice lacking the β3 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor specifically in DA neurons (β3-KO mice) and examined their behavior in tasks that assessed appetitive learning, aversive learning, and risk preference. DA neurons in midbrain slices from β3-KO mice exhibited attenuated GABA-evoked IPSCs. Furthermore, electrical stimulation of excitatory afferents to DA neurons elicited more DA release in the nucleus accumbens of β3-KO mice as measured by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. β3-KO mice were more active than controls when given morphine, which correlated with potential compensatory upregulation of GABAergic tone onto DA neurons. β3-KO mice learned faster in two food-reinforced learning paradigms, but extinguished their learned behavior normally. Enhanced learning was specific for appetitive tasks, as aversive learning was unaffected in β3-KO mice. Finally, we found that β3-KO mice had enhanced risk preference in a probabilistic selection task that required mice to choose between a small certain reward and a larger uncertain reward. Collectively, these findings identify a selective role for GABA(A) signaling in DA neurons in appetitive learning and decision-making.

  5. Neural androgen receptors affect the number of surviving new neurones in the adult dentate gyrus of male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift-Gallant, A; Duarte-Guterman, P; Hamson, D K; Ibrahim, M; Monks, D A; Galea, L A M

    2018-04-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis occurs in many mammalian species. In rats, the survival of new neurones within the hippocampus is modulated by the action of androgen via the androgen receptor (AR); however, it is not known whether this holds true in mice. Furthermore, the evidence is mixed regarding whether androgens act in neural tissue or via peripheral non-neural targets to promote new neurone survival in the hippocampus. We evaluated whether the action of androgen via AR underlies the survival of new neurones in mice, and investigated whether increasing AR selectively in neural tissue would increase new neurone survival in the hippocampus. We used the cre-loxP system to overexpress AR only in neural tissues (Nestin-AR). These males were compared with wild-type males, as well as control males with 1 of the 2 mutations required for overexpression. Mice were gonadectomised and injected with the DNA synthesis marker, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and for 37 days (following BrdU injection), mice were treated with oil or dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Using immunohistochemistry, proliferation (Ki67) and survival (BrdU) of new neurones were both evaluated in the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus. Dihydrotestosterone treatment increased the survival of new neurones in the entire hippocampus in wild-type mice and control mice that only have 1 of 2 necessary mutations for transgenic expression. However, DHT treatment did not increase the survival of new neurones in mice that overexpressed AR in neural tissue. Cell proliferation (Ki67) and cell death (pyknotic cells) were not affected by DHT treatment in wild-type or transgenic males. These results suggest that androgens act via neural AR to affect hippocampal neurogenesis by promoting cell survival; however, the relationship between androgen dose and new neurone survival is nonlinear. © 2018 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  6. A subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors plays a critical role in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jongrye; Dencker, Ditte; Wörtwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P D; Cui, Yinghong; Davis, Albert A; Levey, Allan I; Schütz, Günther; Sager, Thomas N; Mørk, Arne; Li, Cuiling; Deng, Chu-Xia; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Wess, Jürgen

    2010-02-10

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M(1)-M(5) mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M(4) mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M(4) mAChRs are coexpressed with D(1) dopamine receptors in a specific subset of striatal projection neurons. To investigate the physiological relevance of this M(4) mAChR subpopulation in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors, we used Cre/loxP technology to generate mutant mice that lack M(4) mAChRs only in D(1) dopamine receptor-expressing cells. The newly generated mutant mice displayed several striking behavioral phenotypes, including enhanced hyperlocomotor activity and increased behavioral sensitization following treatment with psychostimulants. These behavioral changes were accompanied by a lack of muscarinic inhibition of D(1) dopamine receptor-mediated cAMP stimulation in the striatum and an increase in dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens. These novel findings demonstrate that a distinct subpopulation of neuronal M(4) mAChRs plays a critical role in modulating several important dopamine-dependent behaviors. Since enhanced central dopaminergic neurotransmission is a hallmark of several severe disorders of the CNS, including schizophrenia and drug addiction, our findings have substantial clinical relevance.

  7. Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: Neuroplastic Changes underlying Alcohol and Nicotine Addictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Anne Feduccia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Addictive drugs can activate systems involved in normal reward-related learning, creating long-lasting memories of the drug’s reinforcing effects and the environmental cues surrounding the experience. These memories significantly contribute to the maintenance of compulsive drug use as well as cue-induced relapse which can occur even after long periods of abstinence. Synaptic plasticity is thought to be a prominent molecular mechanism underlying drug-induced learning and memories. Ethanol and nicotine are both widely abused drugs that share a common molecular target in the brain, the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. The nAChRs are ligand-gated ion channels that are vastly distributed throughout the brain and play a key role in synaptic neurotransmission. In this review, we will delineate the role of nAChRs in the development of ethanol and nicotine addiction. We will characterize both ethanol and nicotine’s effects on nAChR-mediated synaptic transmission and plasticity in several key brain areas that are important for addiction. Finally, we will discuss some of the behavioral outcomes of drug-induced synaptic plasticity in animal models. An understanding of the molecular and cellular changes that occur following administration of ethanol and nicotine will lead to better therapeutic strategies.

  8. Dopamine receptor activation reorganizes neuronal ensembles during hippocampal sharp waves in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeyuki Miyawaki

    Full Text Available Hippocampal sharp wave (SW/ripple complexes are thought to contribute to memory consolidation. Previous studies suggest that behavioral rewards facilitate SW occurrence in vivo. However, little is known about the precise mechanism underlying this enhancement. Here, we examined the effect of dopaminergic neuromodulation on spontaneously occurring SWs in acute hippocampal slices. Local field potentials were recorded from the CA1 region. A brief (1 min treatment with dopamine led to a persistent increase in the event frequency and the magnitude of SWs. This effect lasted at least for our recording period of 45 min and did not occur in the presence of a dopamine D1/D5 receptor antagonist. Functional multineuron calcium imaging revealed that dopamine-induced SW augmentation was associated with an enriched repertoire of the firing patterns in SW events, whereas the overall tendency of individual neurons to participate in SWs and the mean number of cells participating in a single SW were maintained. Therefore, dopaminergic activation is likely to reorganize cell assemblies during SWs.

  9. Light and hydrogen peroxide inhibit C. elegans feeding through gustatory receptor orthologs and pharyngeal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatla, Nikhil; Horvitz, H. Robert

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY While gustatory sensing of the five primary flavors (sweet, salty, sour, bitter, and savory) has been extensively studied, pathways that detect non-canonical taste stimuli remain relatively unexplored. In particular, while reactive oxygen species cause generalized damage to biological systems, no gustatory mechanism to prevent ingestion of such material has been identified in any organism. We observed that light inhibits C. elegans feeding and used light as a tool to uncover molecular and neural mechanisms for gustation. Light can generate hydrogen peroxide, and we discovered that hydrogen peroxide similarly inhibits feeding. The gustatory receptor family members LITE-1 and GUR-3 are required for the inhibition of feeding by light and hydrogen peroxide. The I2 pharyngeal neurons increase calcium in response to light and hydrogen peroxide, and these responses require GUR-3 and a conserved antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin PRDX-2. Our results demonstrate a gustatory mechanism that mediates the detection and blocks ingestion of a non-canonical taste stimulus, hydrogen peroxide. PMID:25640076

  10. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha is essential for hippocampal neuronal migration and long-term potentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrone, Angiola; Battaglia, Fortunato; Wang, Cheng

    2003-01-01

    neuronal migration. The migratory abnormality likely results from a radial glial dysfunction rather than from a neuron-autonomous defect. In spite of this aberrant development, basic synaptic transmission from the Schaffer collateral pathway to CA1 pyramidal neurons remains intact in Ptpra(-/-) mice....... However, these synapses are unable to undergo long-term potentiation. Mice lacking RPTPalpha also underperform in the radial-arm water-maze test. These studies identify RPTPalpha as a key mediator of neuronal migration and synaptic plasticity....

  11. Effect of galantamine on the human α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and spontaneous cholinergic synaptic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texidó, Laura; Ros, Esteve; Martín-Satué, Mireia; López, Susana; Aleu, Jordi; Marsal, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2005-01-01

    Various types of anticholinesterasic agents have been used to improve the daily activities of Alzheimer's disease patients. It was recently demonstrated that Galantamine, described as a molecule with anticholinesterasic properties, is also an allosteric enhancer of human α4β2 neuronal nicotinic receptor activity. We explored its effect on the human α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Galantamine, at a concentration of 0.1 μM, increased the amplitude of acetylcholine (ACh)-induced ion currents in the human α7 nAChR expressed in Xenopus oocytes, but caused inhibition at higher concentrations. The maximum effect of galantamine, an increase of 22% in the amplitude of ACh-induced currents, was observed at a concentration of 250 μM Ach. The same enhancing effect was obtained in oocytes transplanted with Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) isolated from the electric organ, but in this case the optimal concentration of galantamine was 1 μM. In this case, the maximum effect of galantamine, an increase of 35% in the amplitude of ACh-induced currents, occurred at a concentration of 50 μM ACh. Galantamine affects not only the activity of post-synaptic receptors but also the activity of nerve terminals. At a concentration of 1 μM, quantal spontaneous events, recorded in a cholinergic synapse, increased their amplitude, an effect which was independent of the anticholinesterasic activity associated with this compound. The anticholinesterasic effect was recorded in preparations treated with a galantamine concentration of 10 μM. In conclusion, our results show that galantamine enhances human α7 neuronal nicotinic ACh receptor activity. It also enhances muscular AChRs and the size of spontaneous cholinergic synaptic events. However, only a very narrow range of galantamine concentrations can be used for enhancing effects. PMID:15834443

  12. Ghrelin receptors mediate ghrelin-induced excitation of agouti-related protein/neuropeptide Y but not pro-opiomelanocortin neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Rui; Chen, Hong; Zhou, Jing-Jing; Pradhan, Geetali; Sun, Yuxiang; Pan, Hui-Lin; Li, De-Pei

    2017-08-01

    Ghrelin increases food intake and body weight by stimulating orexigenic agouti-related protein (AgRP)/neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons and inhibiting anorexic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the hypothalamus. Growth hormone secretagogue receptor (Ghsr) mediates the effect of ghrelin on feeding behavior and energy homeostasis. However, the role of Ghsr in the ghrelin effect on these two populations of neurons is unclear. We hypothesized that Ghsr mediates the effect of ghrelin on AgRP and POMC neurons. In this study, we determined whether Ghsr similarly mediates the effects of ghrelin on AgRP/NPY and POMC neurons using cell type-specific Ghsr-knockout mice. Perforated whole-cell recordings were performed on green fluorescent protein-tagged AgRP/NPY and POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus in hypothalamic slices. In Ghsr +/+ mice, ghrelin (100 nM) significantly increased the firing activity of AgRP/NPY neurons but inhibited the firing activity of POMC neurons. In Ghsr -/- mice, the excitatory effect of ghrelin on AgRP/NPY neurons was abolished. Ablation of Ghsr also eliminated ghrelin-induced increases in the frequency of GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents of POMC neurons. Strikingly, ablation of Ghsr converted the ghrelin effect on POMC neurons from inhibition to excitation. Des-acylated ghrelin had no such effect on POMC neurons in Ghsr -/- mice. In both Ghsr +/+ and Ghsr -/- mice, blocking GABA A receptors with gabazine increased the basal firing activity of POMC neurons, and ghrelin further increased the firing activity of POMC neurons in the presence of gabazine. Our findings provide unequivocal evidence that Ghsr is essential for ghrelin-induced excitation of AgRP/NPY neurons. However, ghrelin excites POMC neurons through an unidentified mechanism that is distinct from conventional Ghsr. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Roles for the pro-neurotrophin receptor sortilin in neuronal development, aging and brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Pernille; Giehl, Klaus; Nyengaard, Jens R

    2007-01-01

    apoptosis of sympathetic neurons, it did prevent their age-dependent degeneration. Furthermore, in an injury protocol, lesioned corticospinal neurons in Sort1(-/-) mice were protected from death. Thus, the sortilin pathway has distinct roles in pro-neurotrophin-induced apoptotic signaling in pathological...... conditions, but also in specific stages of neuronal development and aging. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Nov...

  14. Expression of m1-m4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor immunoreactivity in septohippocampal neurons and other identified hippocampal afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, S T; Levey, A I

    1996-11-18

    Muscarinic cholinergic transmission plays an important role in modulating hippocampal activity and many higher brain functions. Many of the modulatory effects of acetylcholine on hippocampal function result from direct effects in the hippocampus or from actions on the hippocampal afferent neurons. At each site, the differential expression of a family of five distinct but related receptor subtypes governs the nature of the response. The aim of the present study was to identify the subtypes expressed in the hippocampal afferent neurons by combining retrograde tracing with immunocytochemistry. The retrograde tracer, wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase, was injected into the hippocampus unilaterally to label afferent neurons, and was combined with muscarinic (m) acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (mAChRs) with immunocytochemistry to identify the m1-m4 subtypes expressed. The retrogradely labeled cells in the basal forebrain that contribute to the septohippocampal pathway were found to express m2, m3, and, to a lesser extent, m1. Commissural/associational pathway neurons, which were identified by retrogradely labeled cells in the ipsi- and contralateral dentate gyrus, expressed m1, m3, and m4. The retrogradely labeled cells in the entorhinal cortex of the perforant pathway expressed predominantly m1 and m3, with fewer neurons expressing m2 and m4. Raphe-hippocampal cells were found to express m1. Thus, this study provides evidence for the diversity of mAChR subtypes expressed in neurons that project to the hippocampus. The complex modulation by acetylcholine of hippocampal function, therefore, is governed not only by the variety of mAChRs expressed in the hippocampus but also by their differential expression in extrinsic hippocampal afferents.

  15. Iptakalim inhibits nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated currents in dopamine neurons acutely dissociated from rat substantia nigra pars compacta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J; DeChon, J; Yan, K C; Liu, Q; Hu, G; Wu, J

    2006-07-31

    Iptakalim hydrochloride, a novel cardiovascular ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channel opener, has shown remarkable antihypertensive and neuroprotective effects in a variety of studies using in vivo and in vitro preparations. We recently found that iptakalim blocked human alpha4-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) heterologously expressed in the human SH-EP1 cell line. In the present study, we examined the effects of iptakalim on several neurotransmitter-induced current responses in single DA neurons freshly dissociated from rat substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), using perforated patch-clamp recordings combined with a U-tube rapid drug application. In identified DA neurons under voltage-clamp configuration, glutamate-, NMDA-, and GABA-induced currents were insensitive to co-application with iptakalim (100 microM), while whole-cell currents induced by ACh (1 mM+1 microM atropine) or an alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors relatively selective agonist, RJR-2403 (300 microM), were eliminated by iptakalim. Iptakalim inhibited RJR-2403-induced current in a concentration-dependent manner, and reduced maximal RJR-2403-induced currents at the highest agonist concentration, suggesting a non-competitive block. In current-clamp mode, iptakalim failed to affect resting membrane potential and spontaneous action potential firing, but abolished RJR-2403-induced neuronal firing acceleration. Together, these results indicate that in dissociated SNc DA neurons, alpha4-containing nAChRs, rather than ionotropic glutamate receptors, GABA(A) receptors or perhaps K-ATP channels are the sensitive targets to mediate iptakalim's pharmacological roles.

  16. Activation of glucocorticoid receptors in Müller glia is protective to retinal neurons and suppresses microglial reactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Gallina, Donika; Zelinka, Christopher Paul; Cebulla, Colleen; Fischer, Andy J.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive microglia and macrophages are prevalent in damaged retinas. Glucocorticoid signaling is known to suppress inflammation and the reactivity of microglia and macrophages. In the vertebrate retina, the glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) is known to be activated and localized to the nuclei of Müller glia (Gallina et al., 2014). Accordingly, we investigated how signaling through GCR influences the survival of neurons using the chick retina in vivo as a model system. We applied intraocular injec...

  17. Histamine upregulates Nav1.8 expression in primary afferent neurons via H2 receptors: involvement in neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Wang, Ran-Ran; Yu, Jie; Tang, Ying-Ying; Hou, Wei-Wei; Lou, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Shi-Hong; Chen, Zhong

    2014-10-01

    The upregulation of Nav1.8 in primary afferents plays a critical role in the development and persistence of neuropathic pain. The mechanisms underlying the upregulation are not fully understood. The present study aims to investigate the regulatory effect of histamine on the expression of Nav1.8 in primary afferent neurons and its involvement in neuropathic pain. Histamine at 10(-8) M increased the expression of Nav1.8 in cultured DRG neurons. This effect could be blocked by H2 receptor antagonist cimetidine or famotidine, but not by H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine or dual H3 /H4 antagonist thioperamide. Peri-sciatic administration of histamine increased Nav1.8 expression in the sciatic nerve and L4/L5 DRG neurons in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied with remarkable mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral hindpaw. Famotidine but not pyrilamine or thioperamide inhibited Nav1.8 upregulation and pain hypersensitivity. In addition, famotidine (40 mg/kg, i.p.) not only suppressed autotomy behavior in the rat neuroma model of neuropathic pain but also attenuated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia following partial sciatic nerve ligation. Moreover, famotidine inhibited Nav1.8 upregulation in the neuroma and ligated sciatic nerve. Our findings indicate that histamine increases Nav1.8 expression in primary afferent neurons via H2 receptor-mediated pathway and thereby contributes to neuropathic pain. H2 receptor antagonists may potentially be used as analgesics for patients with neuropathic pain. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. P2X7 receptors in satellite glial cells mediate high functional expression of P2X3 receptors in immature dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yong

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purinergic P2X3 receptor (P2X3R expressed in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG sensory neuron and the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R expressed in the surrounding satellite glial cell (SGC are two major receptors participating in neuron-SGC communication in adult DRGs. Activation of P2X7Rs was found to tonically reduce the expression of P2X3Rs in DRGs, thus inhibiting the abnormal pain behaviors in adult rats. P2X receptors are also actively involved in sensory signaling in developing rodents. However, very little is known about the developmental change of P2X7Rs in DRGs and the interaction between P2X7Rs and P2X3Rs in those animals. We therefore examined the expression of P2X3Rs and P2X7Rs in postnatal rats and determined if P2X7R-P2X3R control exists in developing rats. Findings We immunostained DRGs of immature rats and found that P2X3Rs were expressed only in neurons and P2X7Rs were expressed only in SGCs. Western blot analyses indicated that P2X3R expression decreased while P2X7R expression increased with the age of rats. Electrophysiological studies showed that the number of DRG neurons responding to the stimulation of the P2XR agonist, α,β-meATP, was higher and the amplitudes of α,β-meATP-induced depolarizations were larger in immature DRG neurons. As a result, P2X3R-mediated flinching responses were much more pronounced in immature rats than those found in adult rats. When we reduced P2X7R expression with P2X7R-siRNA in postnatal and adult rats, P2X3R-mediated flinch responses were greatly enhanced in both rat populations. Conclusions These results show that the P2X7R expression increases as rats age. In addition, P2X7Rs in SGCs exert inhibitory control on the P2X3R expression and function in sensory neurons of immature rats, just as observed in adult rats. Regulation of P2X7R expression is likely an effective way to control P2X3R activity and manage pain relief in infants.

  19. Dopamine D1-histamine H3 Receptor Heteromers Provide a Selective Link to MAPK Signaling in GABAergic Neurons of the Direct Striatal Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Estefanía; Hoffmann, Hanne; Gonzalez-Sepúlveda, Marta; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó, Vicent; Cortés, Antoni; Mallol, Josefa; Vignes, Michel; McCormick, Peter J.; Canela, Enric I.; Lluís, Carme; Moratalla, Rosario; Ferré, Sergi; Ortiz, Jordi; Franco, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Previously, using artificial cell systems, we identified receptor heteromers between the dopamine D1 or D2 receptors and the histamine H3 receptor. In addition, we demonstrated two biochemical characteristics of the dopamine D1 receptor-histamine H3 receptor heteromer. We have now extended this work to show the dopamine D1 receptor-histamine H3 receptor heteromer exists in the brain and serves to provide a novel link between the MAPK pathway and the GABAergic neurons in the direct striatal efferent pathway. Using the biochemical characteristics identified previously, we found that the ability of H3 receptor activation to stimulate p44 and p42 extracellular signal-regulated MAPK (ERK 1/2) phosphorylation was only observed in striatal slices of mice expressing D1 receptors but not in D1 receptor-deficient mice. On the other hand, the ability of both D1 and H3 receptor antagonists to block MAPK activation induced by either D1 or H3 receptor agonists was also found in striatal slices. Taken together, these data indicate the occurrence of D1-H3 receptor complexes in the striatum and, more importantly, that H3 receptor agonist-induced ERK 1/2 phosphorylation in striatal slices is mediated by D1-H3 receptor heteromers. Moreover, H3 receptor-mediated phospho-ERK 1/2 labeling co-distributed with D1 receptor-containing but not with D2 receptor-containing striatal neurons. These results indicate that D1-H3 receptor heteromers work as processors integrating dopamine- and histamine-related signals involved in controlling the function of striatal neurons of the direct striatal pathway. PMID:21173143

  20. Activation of Glycine and Extrasynaptic GABAA Receptors by Taurine on the Substantia Gelatinosa Neurons of the Trigeminal Subnucleus Caudalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Thanh Hoang Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The substantia gelatinosa (SG of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc has been known for the processing and transmission of orofacial nociceptive information. Taurine, one of the most plentiful free amino-acids in humans, has proved to be involved in pain modulation. In this study, using whole-cell patch clamp technique, we investigated the direct membrane effects of taurine and the action mechanism behind taurine-mediated responses on the SG neurons of the Vc. Taurine showed non-desensitizing and repeatable membrane depolarizations and inward currents which remained in the presence of amino-acid receptors blocking cocktail (AARBC with tetrodotoxin, indicating that taurine acts directly on the postsynaptic SG neurons. Further, application of taurine at different doses (10 μM to 3 mM showed a concentration dependent depolarizations and inward currents with the EC50 of 84.3 μM and 723 μM, respectively. Taurine-mediated responses were partially blocked by picrotoxin (50 μM and almost completely blocked by strychnine (2 μM, suggesting that taurine-mediated responses are via glycine receptor (GlyR activation. In addition, taurine (1 mM activated extrasynaptic GABAA receptor (GABAAR-mediated currents. Taken together, our results indicate that taurine can be a target molecule for orofacial pain modulation through the activation of GlyRs and/or extrasynaptic GABAARs on the SG neurons.

  1. Arctigenin reduces neuronal responses in the somatosensory cortex via the inhibition of non-NMDA glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbély, Sándor; Jócsák, Gergely; Moldován, Kinga; Sedlák, Éva; Preininger, Éva; Boldizsár, Imre; Tóth, Attila; Atlason, Palmi T; Molnár, Elek; Világi, Ildikó

    2016-07-01

    Lignans are biologically active phenolic compounds related to lignin, produced in different plants. Arctigenin, a dibenzylbutyrolactone-type lignan, has been used as a neuroprotective agent for the treatment of encephalitis. Previous studies of cultured rat cerebral cortical neurones raised the possibility that arctigenin inhibits kainate-induced excitotoxicity. The aims of the present study were: 1) to analyse the effect of arctigenin on normal synaptic activity in ex vivo brain slices, 2) to determine its receptor binding properties and test the effect of arctigenin on AMPA/kainate receptor activation and 3) to establish its effects on neuronal activity in vivo. Arctigenin inhibited glutamatergic transmission and reduced the evoked field responses. The inhibitory effect of arctigenin on the evoked field responses proved to be substantially dose dependent. Our results indicate that arctigenin exerts its effects under physiological conditions and not only on hyper-excited neurons. Furthermore, arctigenin can cross the blood-brain barrier and in the brain it interacts with kainate sensitive ionotropic glutamate receptors. These results indicate that arctigenin is a potentially useful new pharmacological tool for the inhibition of glutamate-evoked responses in the central nervous system in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Activation of Glycine and Extrasynaptic GABAA Receptors by Taurine on the Substantia Gelatinosa Neurons of the Trigeminal Subnucleus Caudalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Janardhan Prasad; Park, Soo Joung; Han, Seong Kyu

    2013-01-01

    The substantia gelatinosa (SG) of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) has been known for the processing and transmission of orofacial nociceptive information. Taurine, one of the most plentiful free amino-acids in humans, has proved to be involved in pain modulation. In this study, using whole-cell patch clamp technique, we investigated the direct membrane effects of taurine and the action mechanism behind taurine-mediated responses on the SG neurons of the Vc. Taurine showed non-desensitizing and repeatable membrane depolarizations and inward currents which remained in the presence of amino-acid receptors blocking cocktail (AARBC) with tetrodotoxin, indicating that taurine acts directly on the postsynaptic SG neurons. Further, application of taurine at different doses (10 μM to 3 mM) showed a concentration dependent depolarizations and inward currents with the EC50 of 84.3 μM and 723 μM, respectively. Taurine-mediated responses were partially blocked by picrotoxin (50 μM) and almost completely blocked by strychnine (2 μM), suggesting that taurine-mediated responses are via glycine receptor (GlyR) activation. In addition, taurine (1 mM) activated extrasynaptic GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated currents. Taken together, our results indicate that taurine can be a target molecule for orofacial pain modulation through the activation of GlyRs and/or extrasynaptic GABAARs on the SG neurons. PMID:24379976

  3. The p75 neurotrophin receptor evades the endolysosomal route in neuronal cells, favouring multivesicular bodies specialised for exosomal release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Claudia A.; Lazo, Oscal M.; Galleguillos, Carolina; Parraguez, Jose I.; Lopez-Verrilli, Maria A.; Cabeza, Carolina; Leon, Luisa; Saeed, Uzma; Retamal, Claudio; Gonzalez, Alfonso; Marzolo, Maria-Paz; Carter, Bruce D.; Court, Felipe A.; Bronfman, Francisca C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75, also known as NGFR) is a multifaceted signalling receptor that regulates neuronal physiology, including neurite outgrowth, and survival and death decisions. A key cellular aspect regulating neurotrophin signalling is the intracellular trafficking of their receptors; however, the post-endocytic trafficking of p75 is poorly defined. We used sympathetic neurons and rat PC12 cells to study the mechanism of internalisation and post-endocytic trafficking of p75. We found that p75 internalisation depended on the clathrin adaptor protein AP2 and on dynamin. More surprisingly, p75 evaded the lysosomal route at the level of the early endosome, instead accumulating in two different types of endosomes, Rab11-positive endosomes and multivesicular bodies (MVBs) positive for CD63, a marker of the exosomal pathway. Consistently, depolarisation by KCl induced the liberation of previously endocytosed full-length p75 into the extracellular medium in exosomes. Thus, p75 defines a subpopulation of MVBs that does not mature to lysosomes and is available for exosomal release by neuronal cells. PMID:24569882

  4. Comparison of P2X and TRPV1 receptors in ganglia or primary culture of trigeminal neurons and their modulation by NGF or serotonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giniatullin Rashid

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultured sensory neurons are a common experimental model to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of pain transduction typically involving activation of ATP-sensitive P2X or capsaicin-sensitive TRPV1 receptors. This applies also to trigeminal ganglion neurons that convey pain inputs from head tissues. Little is, however, known about the plasticity of these receptors on trigeminal neurons in culture, grown without adding the neurotrophin NGF which per se is a powerful algogen. The characteristics of such receptors after short-term culture were compared with those of ganglia. Furthermore, their modulation by chronically-applied serotonin or NGF was investigated. Results Rat or mouse neurons in culture mainly belonged to small and medium diameter neurons as observed in sections of trigeminal ganglia. Real time RT-PCR, Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry showed upregulation of P2X3 and TRPV1 receptors after 1–4 days in culture (together with their more frequent co-localization, while P2X2 ones were unchanged. TRPV1 immunoreactivity was, however, lower in mouse ganglia and cultures. Intracellular Ca2+ imaging and whole-cell patch clamping showed functional P2X and TRPV1 receptors. Neurons exhibited a range of responses to the P2X agonist α, β-methylene-adenosine-5'-triphosphate indicating the presence of homomeric P2X3 receptors (selectively antagonized by A-317491 and heteromeric P2X2/3 receptors. The latter were observed in 16 % mouse neurons only. Despite upregulation of receptors in culture, neurons retained the potential for further enhancement of P2X3 receptors by 24 h NGF treatment. At this time point TRPV1 receptors had lost the facilitation observed after acute NGF application. Conversely, chronically-applied serotonin selectively upregulated TRPV1 receptors rather than P2X3 receptors. Conclusion Comparing ganglia and cultures offered the advantage of understanding early adaptive changes of nociception

  5. The neuronal Ca(2+) -binding protein 2 (NECAB2) interacts with the adenosine A(2A) receptor and modulates the cell surface expression and function of the receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Laia; Luján, Rafael; Lluís, Carme; Burgueño, Javier; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Franco, Rafael; Ciruela, Francisco

    2007-09-01

    Heptaspanning membrane also known as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) do interact with a variety of intracellular proteins whose function is regulate receptor traffic and/or signaling. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, NECAB2, a neuronal calcium binding protein, was identified as a binding partner for the adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) interacting with its C-terminal domain. Co-localization, co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments showed a close and specific interaction between A(2A)R and NECAB2 in both transfected HEK-293 cells and also in rat striatum. Immunoelectron microscopy detection of NECAB2 and A(2A)R in the rat striatopallidal structures indicated that both proteins are co-distributed in the same glutamatergic nerve terminals. The interaction of NECAB2 with A(2A)R modulated the cell surface expression, the ligand-dependent internalization and the receptor-mediated activation of the MAPK pathway. Overall, these results show that A(2A)R interacts with NECAB2 in striatal neurones co-expressing the two proteins and that the interaction is relevant for A(2A)R function.

  6. How microelectrode array-based chick forebrain neuron biosensors respond to glutamate NMDA receptor antagonist AP5 and GABAA receptor antagonist musimol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Y. Kuang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have established a long-term, stable primary chick forebrain neuron (FBN culture on a microelectrode array platform as a biosensor system for neurotoxicant screening and for neuroelectrophysiological studies for multiple purposes. This paper reports some of our results, which characterize the biosensor pharmacologically. Dose-response experiments were conducted using NMDA receptor antagonist AP5 and GABAA receptor agonist musimol (MUS. The chick FBN biosensor (C-FBN-biosensor responds to the two agents in a pattern similar to that of rodent counterparts; the estimated EC50s (the effective concentration that causes 50% inhibition of the maximal effect are 2.3 μM and 0.25 μM, respectively. Intercultural and intracultural reproducibility and long-term reusability of the C-FBN-biosensor are addressed and discussed. A phenomenon of sensitization of the biosensor that accompanies intracultural reproducibility in paired dose-response experiments for the same agent (AP5 or MUS is reported. The potential application of the C-FBN-biosensor as an alternative to rodent biosensors in shared sensing domains (NMDA receptor and GABAA receptor is suggested. Keywords: Biosensor, Microelectrode array, Neurotoxicity, Chick forebrain neuron, AP5, Musimol

  7. Pharmacological and kinetic properties of alpha 4 beta 2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnet, P; Labarca, C; Cohen, B N; Davidson, N; Lester, H A; Pilar, G

    1992-01-01

    1. Co-injection of RNA synthesized from cloned neuronal acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits (alpha 4 and beta 2) in Xenopus oocytes produced functional receptors. In macroscopic voltage-clamp experiments, the agonist-induced current exhibited a strong inward rectification. 2. Voltage jumps from +50 mV to more negative potentials produced relaxations of the agonist-induced current with a single exponential time course. The relaxation rate constant was only weakly voltage dependent. 3. At the single-channel level, three conductances were recorded of 12, 22 and 34 pS. Their burst durations were similar and varied only weakly with voltage (e-fold for 120 to 370 mV), consistent with the poorly voltage-dependent relaxation rate constants. However, the burst durations were less than 10 ms, or less than 1/5 the value expected from voltage-jump relaxations. 4. Hexamethonium (Hex, 0.5 to 8 microM) inhibited the agonist-induced current and produced voltage-jump relaxations characterized by a rapid conductance increase and a slower conductance decrease. Analysis of these relaxations suggested that the Hex-receptor interaction is open-channel blockade characterized by a forward binding rate of 1 x 10(7) M-1 s-1 and a dissociation rate constant of about 25 s-1. 5. For the relaxations produced by QX222, the slowest phase was a conductance increase, suggesting that the dissociation rate constant for QX222 is 10-30-fold greater than for Hex. 6. Hex but not QX222 produced an additional use-dependent blockade that was manifest during repetitive hyperpolarizing pulses. 7. With mouse muscle ACh receptors expressed in oocytes, the blockade by Hex did not depend strongly on voltage. Neither Hex nor QX222 produced appreciable use-dependent block on muscle ACh receptors. 8. Of the four conditions studied (neuronal and muscle receptors, Hex and QX222), only the blockade of the neuronal AChR by Hex is characterized by a residence time longer than the normal open time. 9. It is concluded

  8. Gene regulation by NMDA receptor activation in the SDN-POA neurons of male rats during sexual development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hseng-Kuang; Shao, Pei-Lin; Tsai, Ke-Li; Shih, Huei-Chuan; Lee, Tzu-Ying; Hsu, Chin

    2005-04-01

    The present study was designed to identify possible signaling pathways, which may play a role in prevention of neuronal apoptosis in the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) after physiological activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. Gene response to the blockage of the NMDA receptor by an antagonist (dizocilpine hydrogen maleate; MK-801) was screened after suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). The results showed that differential screening after SSH detected the presence of some neurotrophic genes (RNA binding motif protein 3 (RBM3), alpha-tubulin) as well as apoptosis-related genes (Bcl-2, cytochrome oxidase subunit II, cytochrome oxidase subunit III) in the SDN-POA of male rats, which were down-regulated by blocking the NMDA receptor. The RT-PCR products of the aforementioned genes in MK-801-treated males were significantly less than that in untreated males. In particular, the expression of Bcl-2 mRNA, including Bcl-2 protein, in male rats were significantly suppressed by MK-801 treatment. Moreover, the binding activity of nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) was significantly higher in male rats than in females, but significantly diminished by blocking the NMDA receptor with MK-801 in male rats. No significant difference in cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) binding activity was observed among untreated male, MK-801-treated male, untreated female and MK-801-treated female groups. These results suggest that genes regulated by NMDA receptor activation might participate in neuronal growth and/or anti-apoptosis, and support an important signaling pathway of NFkappaB activation and its target gene, Bcl-2, in preventing neuronal apoptosis in the SDN-POA of male rats during sexual development.

  9. Visualization of cholinoceptive neurons in the rat neocortex : colocalization of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Streefland, C.; Strosberg, A.D.; Schröder, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of

  10. sigma receptor ligands attenuate N-methyl-D-aspartate cytotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons of mesencephalic slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, S; Katsuki, H; Takenaka, C; Tomita, M; Kume, T; Kaneko, S; Akaike, A

    2000-01-28

    We investigated the potential neuroprotective effects of several sigma receptor ligands in organotypic midbrain slice cultures as an excitotoxicity model system. When challenged with 100-microM N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) for 24 h, dopaminergic neurons in midbrain slice cultures degenerated, and this was prevented by (5R, 10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,b]-cyclohepten-5, 10-imine (MK-801; 1-10 microM). Concomitant application of ifenprodil (1-10 microM) or haloperidol (1-10 microM), both of which are high-affinity sigma receptor ligands, significantly attenuated the neurotoxicity of 100 microM NMDA. The sigma(1) receptor-selective ligand (+)-N-allylnormetazocine ((+)-SKF 10047; 1-10 microM) was also effective in attenuating the toxicity of NMDA. The effect of R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane hydrochloride ((-)-PPAP), a sigma receptor ligand with negligible affinity for the phencyclidine site of NMDA receptors, was also examined. (-)-PPAP (3-100 microM) caused a concentration-dependent reduction of NMDA cytotoxicity, with significant protection at concentrations of 30 and 100 microM. In contrast, (+)-SKF 10047 (10 microM) and (-)-PPAP (100 microM) showed no protective effects against cell death induced by the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin (1-3 microM). These results indicate that sigma receptor ligands attenuate the cytotoxic effects of NMDA on midbrain dopaminergic neurons, possibly via inhibition of NMDA receptor functions.

  11. Nucleus Accumbens Dopamine D2-Receptor Expressing Neurons Control Behavioral Flexibility in a Place Discrimination Task in the IntelliCage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Tom; Morita, Makiko; Wang, Yanyan; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Sawa, Akira; Hikida, Takatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Considerable evidence has demonstrated a critical role for the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the acquisition and flexibility of behavioral strategies. These processes are guided by the activity of two discrete neuron types, dopamine D1- or D2-receptor expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-/D2-MSNs). Here we used the IntelliCage, an automated…

  12. Strychnine activates neuronal α7 nicotinic receptors after mutations in the leucine ring and transmitter binding site domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Eleonora; Fucile, Sergio; Barabino, Benedetta; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    1999-01-01

    Recent work has shown that strychnine, the potent and selective antagonist of glycine receptors, is also an antagonist of nicotinic acetylcholine (AcCho) receptors including neuronal homomeric α7 receptors, and that mutating Leu-247 of the α7 nicotinic AcCho receptor-channel domain (L247Tα7; mut1) converts some nicotinic antagonists into agonists. Therefore, a study was made of the effects of strychnine on Xenopus oocytes expressing the chick wild-type α7 or L247Tα7 receptors. In these oocytes, strychnine itself did not elicit appreciable membrane currents but reduced the currents elicited by AcCho in a reversible and dose-dependent manner. In sharp contrast, in oocytes expressing L247Tα7 receptors with additional mutations at Cys-189 and Cys-190, in the extracellular N-terminal domain (L247T/C189–190Sα7; mut2), micromolar concentrations of strychnine elicited inward currents that were reversibly inhibited by the nicotinic receptor blocker α-bungarotoxin. Single-channel recordings showed that strychnine gated mut2-channels with two conductance levels, 56 pS and 42 pS, and with kinetic properties similar to AcCho-activated channels. We conclude that strychnine is a modulator, as well as an activator, of some homomeric nicotinic α7 receptors. After injecting oocytes with mixtures of cDNAs encoding mut1 and mut2 subunits, the expressed hybrid receptors were activated by strychnine, similar to the mut2, and had a high affinity to AcCho like the mut1. A pentameric symmetrical model yields the striking conclusion that two identical α7 subunits may be sufficient to determine the functional properties of α7 receptors. PMID:10557336

  13. 5HT2 receptor activation facilitates P2X receptor mediated excitatory neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons in the nucleus ambiguus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dergacheva, Olga; Wang, Xin; Kamendi, Harriet; Cheng, Qi; Pinol, Ramon Manchon; Jameson, Heather; Gorini, Christopher; Mendelowitz, David

    2008-06-01

    Parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) which dominate the control of heart rate are located within the nucleus ambiguus (NA). Serotonin (5HT), and in particular 5HT2 receptors, play an important role in cardiovascular function in the brainstem. However, there is a lack of information on the mechanisms of action of 5HT2 receptors in modulating parasympathetic cardiac activity. This study tests whether activation of 5HT2 receptors alters excitatory glutamatergic and purinergic neurotransmission to CVNs. Application of alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine (alpha-Me-5HT), a 5HT2 agonist, reversibly increased both the frequency and amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in CVNs. Similar responses were obtained with alpha-methyl-5-(2-thienylmethoxy)-1H-indole-3-ethanamine hydrochloride (BW723C86), and m-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP), 5HT2B and 5HT2B/C receptor agonists, respectively. The facilitation evoked by alpha-Me-5HT was prevented by the 5HT2B/C receptor antagonist SB206553 hydrochloride (SB206553). Interestingly, the blockage of both NMDA and non-NMDA glutamatergic receptors did not prevent alpha-Me-5HT-evoked facilitation of mEPSCs, however, the responses were blocked by the P2 receptor antagonist pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS). The responses evoked by alpha-Me-5HT were mimicked by application of alpha,beta-methylene ATP (alpha,beta-Me-ATP), a P2X receptor agonist, which were also blocked by PPADS. In summary, these results indicate activation of 5HT2 receptors facilitates excitatory purinergic, but not glutamatergic, neurotransmission to CVNs.

  14. Prolactin receptors in Rip-cre cells, but not in AgRP neurones, are involved in energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladyman, S R; MacLeod, M A; Khant Aung, Z; Knowles, P; Phillipps, H R; Brown, R S E; Grattan, D R

    2017-10-01

    Among its many functions, prolactin has been implicated in energy homeostasis, particularly during pregnancy and lactation. The arcuate nucleus is a key site in the regulation of energy balance. The present study aimed to examine whether arcuate nucleus neuronal populations involved in energy homeostasis are prolactin responsive and whether they can mediate the effects of prolactin on energy homeostasis. To determine whether Agrp neurones or Rip-Cre neurones are prolactin responsive, transgenic mice expressing the reporter td-tomato in Agrp neurones (td-tomato/Agrp-Cre) or Rip-Cre neurones (td-tomato/Rip-Cre) were treated with prolactin and perfused 45 minutes later. Brains were processed for double-labelled immunohistochemistry for pSTAT5, a marker of prolactin-induced intracellular signalling, and td-tomato. In addition, Agrp-Cre mice and Rip-Cre mice were crossed with mice in which the prolactin receptor gene (Prlr) was flanked with LoxP sites (Prlr lox/lox mice). The Prlr lox/lox construct was designed such that Cre-mediated recombination resulted in deletion of the Prlr and expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in its place. In td-tomato/Rip-Cre mice, prolactin-induced pSTAT5 was co-localised with td-tomato, indicating that there is a subpopulation of Rip-Cre neurones in the arcuate nucleus that respond to prolactin. Furthermore, mice with a specific deletion of Prlr in Rip-Cre neurones had lower body weights, increased oxygen consumption, increased running wheel activity and numerous cells in the arcuate nucleus had positive GFP staining indicating deletion of Prlr from Rip-Cre neurones. By contrast, no co-localisation of td-tomato and pSTAT5 was observed in td-tomato/Agrp-Cre mice after prolactin treatment. Moreover, Prlr lox/lox /Agrp-Cre mice had no positive GFP staining in the arcuate nucleus and did not differ in body weight compared to littermate controls. Overall, these results indicate that Rip-Cre neurones in the arcuate nucleus are

  15. Selective down-regulation of α4β2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain of uremic rats with cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesta, Juan J; del Pozo, Carlos; Castelló-Banyuls, Juan; Faura, Clara C

    2012-07-01

    Cognitive impairment is common in patients with chronic kidney disease. Brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors modulate cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. Pharmacological cholinergic enhancement is useful in patients with cognitive dysfunction. The major nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the brain are heteromeric α4β2 and homomeric α7 receptors. To study the involvement of neuronal acetylcholine receptors in cognitive impairment in uremic rats, bilateral nephrectomy was performed. 24 weeks after nephrectomy, memory was assessed using the one trial step-down inhibitory avoidance test. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain were studied by radioligand binding, immunoprecipitation, Western blot and sucrose gradient experiments. We demonstrated that rats with severe renal failure show disorders of short term memory. Long term memory was not altered in these rats. The number of functional α4β2 heteromeric neuronal nicotinic receptors was decreased in the brains of rats with severe renal failure. There was a significant correlation between the degree of renal impairment and the number of heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain. The down-regulation of functional α4β2 receptors in the brains of rats with severe renal failure was not due to a reduction of α4 or β2 subunit proteins. The number of α7 homomeric neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors was not altered. These findings may have important clinical significance for the management of cognitive impairment in patients with chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative assessment of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 expression in neurons and glia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisha Choubey

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs and their receptors (FGFRs have numerous functions in the developing and adult central nervous system (CNS. For example, the FGFR1 receptor is important for proliferation and fate specification of radial glial cells in the cortex and hippocampus, oligodendrocyte proliferation and regeneration, midline glia morphology and soma translocation, Bergmann glia morphology, and cerebellar morphogenesis. In addition, FGFR1 signaling in astrocytes is required for postnatal maturation of interneurons expressing parvalbumin (PV. FGFR1 is implicated in synapse formation in the hippocampus, and alterations in the expression of Fgfr1 and its ligand, Fgf2 accompany major depression. Understanding which cell types express Fgfr1 during development may elucidate its roles in normal development of the brain as well as illuminate possible causes of certain neuropsychiatric disorders. Methods Here, we used a BAC transgenic reporter line to trace Fgfr1 expression in the developing postnatal murine CNS. The specific transgenic line employed was created by the GENSAT project, tgFGFR1-EGFPGP338Gsat, and includes a gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP under the regulation of the Fgfr1 promoter, to trace Fgfr1 expression in the developing CNS. Unbiased stereological counts were performed for several cell types in the cortex and hippocampus. Results This model reveals that Fgfr1 is primarily expressed in glial cells, in both astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, along with some neurons. Dual labeling experiments indicate that the proportion of GFP+ (Fgfr1+ cells that are also GFAP+ increases from postnatal day 7 (P7 to 1 month, illuminating dynamic changes in Fgfr1 expression during postnatal development of the cortex. In postnatal neurogenic areas, GFP expression was also observed in SOX2, doublecortin (DCX, and brain lipid-binding protein (BLBP expressing cells. Fgfr1 is also highly expressed in DCX positive cells of

  17. Toll-like receptor 3 activation impairs excitability and synaptic activity via TRIF signalling in immature rat and human neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Louise; Tate, Rothwell; Chamberlain, Luke H; Robertson, Graham; Zagnoni, Michele; Sposito, Teresa; Wray, Selina; Wright, John A; Bryant, Clare E; Gay, Nicholas J; Bushell, Trevor J

    2018-03-02

    Toll like receptor 3 (TLR3) belongs to a family of pattern recognition receptors that recognise molecules found on pathogens referred to as pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Its involvement in innate immunity is well known but despite its presence in the central nervous system (CNS), our knowledge of its function is limited. Here, we have investigated whether TLR3 activation modulates synaptic activity in primary hippocampal cultures and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons. Synaptically driven spontaneous action potential (AP) firing was significantly reduced by the TLR3 specific activator, poly I:C, in a concentration-dependent manner following both short (5 min) and long exposures (1h) in rat hippocampal cultures. Notably, the consequence of TLR3 activation on neuronal function was reproduced in iPSC-derived cortical neurons, with poly I:C (25 μg/ml, 1h) significantly inhibiting sAP firing. We examined the mechanisms underlying these effects, with poly I:C significantly reducing peak sodium current, an effect dependent on the MyD88-independent TRIF dependent pathway. Furthermore, poly I:C (25 μg/ml, 1h) resulted in a significant reduction in miniature excitatory postsynaptic potential (mEPSC) frequency and amplitude and significantly reduced surface AMPAR expression. These novel findings reveal that TLR3 activation inhibits neuronal excitability and synaptic activity through multiple mechanisms, with this being observed in both rat and human iPSC-derived neurons. These data might provide further insight into how TLR3 activation may contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders following maternal infection and in patients with increased susceptibility to herpes simplex encephalitis. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Muscarinic receptor control of pyramidal neuron membrane potential in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowski, P; Gawlak, M; Szulczyk, P

    2015-09-10

    Damage to the cholinergic input to the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. Cholinergic endings release acetylcholine, which activates nicotinic and/or G-protein-coupled muscarinic receptors. Muscarinic receptors activate transduction systems, which control cellular effectors that regulate the membrane potential in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neurons. The mechanisms responsible for the cholinergic-dependent depolarization of mPFC layer V pyramidal neurons in slices obtained from young rats were elucidated in this study. Glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission as well as tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Na(+) and voltage-dependent Ca(++) currents were eliminated. Cholinergic receptor stimulation by carbamoylcholine chloride (CCh; 100 μM) evoked depolarization (10.0 ± 1.3 mV), which was blocked by M1/M4 (pirenzepine dihydrochloride, 2 μM) and M1 (VU 0255035, 5 μM) muscarinic receptor antagonists and was not affected by a nicotinic receptor antagonist (mecamylamine hydrochloride, 10 μM). CCh-dependent depolarization was attenuated by extra- (20 μM) or intracellular (50 μM) application of an inhibitor of the βγ-subunit-dependent transduction system (gallein). It was also inhibited by intracellular application of a βγ-subunit-binding peptide (GRK2i, 10μM). mPFC pyramidal neurons express Nav1.9 channels. CCh-dependent depolarization was abolished in the presence of antibodies against Nav1.9 channels in the intracellular solution and augmented by the presence of ProTx-I toxin (100 nM) in the extracellular solution. CCh-induced depolarization was not affected by the following reagents: intracellular transduction system blockers, including U-73122 (10 μM), chelerythrine chloride (5 μM), SQ 22536 (100 μM) and H-89 (2 μM); channel blockers, including Ba(++) ions (200 μM), apamin (100 nM), flufenamic acid (200 μM), 2-APB (200 μM), SKF 96365 (50 μM), and ZD 7288 (50 μM); and a Na(+)/Ca(++) exchanger blocker, benzamil (20

  19. Brain neuronal CB2 cannabinoid receptors in drug abuse and depression: from mice to human subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel S Onaivi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Addiction and major depression are mental health problems associated with stressful events in life with high relapse and reoccurrence even after treatment. Many laboratories were not able to detect the presence of cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2-Rs in healthy brains, but there has been demonstration of CB2-R expression in rat microglial cells and other brain associated cells during inflammation. Therefore, neuronal expression of CB2-Rs had been ambiguous and controversial and its role in depression and substance abuse is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we tested the hypothesis that genetic variants of CB2 gene might be associated with depression in a human population and that alteration in CB2 gene expression may be involved in the effects of abused substances including opiates, cocaine and ethanol in rodents. Here we demonstrate that a high incidence of (Q63R but not (H316Y polymorphism in the CB2 gene was found in Japanese depressed subjects. CB2-Rs and their gene transcripts are expressed in the brains of naïve mice and are modulated following exposure to stressors and administration of abused drugs. Mice that developed alcohol preference had reduced CB2 gene expression and chronic treatment with JWH015 a putative CB2-R agonist, enhanced alcohol consumption in stressed but not in control mice. The direct intracerebroventricular microinjection of CB2 anti-sense oligonucleotide into the mouse brain reduced mouse aversions in the plus-maze test, indicating the functional presence of CB2-Rs in the brain that modifies behavior. We report for the using electron microscopy the sub cellular localization of CB2-Rs that are mainly on post-synaptic elements in rodent brain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate the functional expression of CB2-Rs in brain that may provide novel targets for the effects of cannabinoids in depression and substance abuse disorders beyond neuro-immunocannabinoid activity.

  20. Neuronal nicotinic receptor agonists improve gait and balance in olivocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wecker, L; Engberg, M E; Philpot, R M; Lambert, C S; Kang, C W; Antilla, J C; Bickford, P C; Hudson, C E; Zesiewicz, T A; Rowell, Peter P

    2013-10-01

    Clinical studies have reported that the nicotinic receptor agonist varenicline improves balance and coordination in patients with several types of ataxia, but confirmation in an animal model has not been demonstrated. This study investigated whether varenicline and nicotine could attenuate the ataxia induced in rats following destruction of the olivocerebellar pathway by the neurotoxin 3-acetylpyridine (3-AP). The administration of 3-AP (70 mg/kg followed by 300 mg niacinamide/kg; i.p.) led to an 85% loss of inferior olivary neurons within one week without evidence of recovery, and was accompanied by a 72% decrease in rotorod activity, a 3-fold increase in the time to traverse a stationary beam, a 19% decrease in velocity and 31% decrease in distance moved in the open field, and alterations in gait parameters, with a 19% increase in hindpaw stride width. The daily administration of nicotine (0.33 mg free base/kg) for one week improved rotorod performance by 50% and normalized the increased hindpaw stride width, effects that were prevented by the daily preadministration of the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (0.8 mg free base/kg). Varenicline (1 and 3 mg free base/kg daily) also improved rotorod performance by approximately 50% following one week of administration, and although it did not alter the time to traverse the beam, it did improve the ability to maintain balance on the beam. Neither varenicline nor nicotine, at doses that improved balance, affected impaired locomotor activity in the open field. Results provide evidence that nicotinic agonists are of benefit for alleviating some of the behavioral deficits in olivocerebellar ataxia and warrant further studies to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) involved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, protects spinal motor neurons in a murine model of alphavirus encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prow, Natalie A.; Irani, David N.

    2007-01-01

    Spread of neuroadapted Sindbis virus (NSV) to motor neurons (MN) of the spinal cord (SC) causes severe hind limb weakness in C57BL/6 mice and models the paralysis that can accompany alphavirus and flavivirus encephalomyelitis in humans. The fate of spinal MN dictates the severity of NSV-induced paralysis, and recent data suggest that MN damage can occur indirectly via the actions of activated microglial cells. Because the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone (NAL), blocks microglial-mediated neurodegeneration in other models, we examined its effects during NSV infection. Drug treatment prevented paralysis and enhanced the survival of MN without altering NSV tropism, replication, or clearance from SC tissue. Further studies showed that NAL most effectively inhibited paralysis in a 72-hour window after NSV challenge, suggesting that the drug inhibits an early event in SC pathogenesis. Histochemical studies demonstrated that NAL blocked early microglial activation in SC tissue sections, and protein assays showed that the early induction of pathogenic IL-1β was blunted in SC homogenates. Finally, loss of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) expression in SC, an astrocyte glutamate reuptake protein responsible for lowering toxic extracellular levels of glutamate and preventing MN damage, was reversed by NAL treatment. This GLT-1 loss proved to be highly IL-1β-dependent. Taken together, these data suggest that NAL is neuroprotective in the SC by inhibiting microglial activation that, in turn, maintains normal astrocyte glutamate homeostasis. We propose that drugs targeting such microglial responses may have therapeutic benefit in humans with related viral infections. PMID:17459376

  2. The somatostatin 2A receptor is enriched in migrating neurons during rat and human brain development and stimulates migration and axonal outgrowth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Le Verche

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide somatostatin has been suggested to play an important role during neuronal development in addition to its established modulatory impact on neuroendocrine, motor and cognitive functions in adults. Although six somatostatin G protein-coupled receptors have been discovered, little is known about their distribution and function in the developing mammalian brain. In this study, we have first characterized the developmental expression of the somatostatin receptor sst2A, the subtype found most prominently in the adult rat and human nervous system. In the rat, the sst2A receptor expression appears as early as E12 and is restricted to post-mitotic neuronal populations leaving the ventricular zone. From E12 on, migrating neuronal populations immunopositive for the receptor were observed in numerous developing regions including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and ganglionic eminences. Intense but transient immunoreactive signals were detected in the deep part of the external granular layer of the cerebellum, the rostral migratory stream and in tyrosine hydroxylase- and serotonin- positive neurons and axons. Activation of the sst2A receptor in vitro in rat cerebellar microexplants and primary hippocampal neurons revealed stimulatory effects on neuronal migration and axonal growth, respectively. In the human cortex, receptor immunoreactivity was located in the preplate at early development stages (8 gestational weeks and was enriched to the outer part of the germinal zone at later stages. In the cerebellum, the deep part of the external granular layer was strongly immunoreactive at 19 gestational weeks, similar to the finding in rodents. In addition, migrating granule cells in the internal granular layer were also receptor-positive. Together, theses results strongly suggest that the somatostatin sst2A receptor participates in the development and maturation of specific neuronal populations during rat and human brain ontogenesis.

  3. AMPA receptor pHluorin-GluA2 reports NMDA receptor-induced intracellular acidification in hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathje, Mette; Fang, Huaqiang; Bachman, Julia L

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptor activation promotes endocytosis of AMPA receptors, which is an important mechanism underlying long-term synaptic depression. The pH-sensitive GFP variant pHluorin fused to the N terminus of GluA2 (pH-GluA2) has been used to assay NMDA-mediated AMPA receptor endocytosis and recycling...... recovery was eliminated in the presence of the NHE1 inhibitor zoniporide. Our results indicate that the pH-GluA2 recycling assay is an unreliable assay for studying AMPA receptor trafficking and also suggest a role for PICK1 in regulating intracellular pH via modulation of NHE activity....

  4. The association of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 with the neuronal Ca2+-binding protein 2 modulates receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Laia; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Albergaria, Catarina; Watanabe, Masahiko; Lluís, Carme; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Franco, Rafael; Luján, Rafael; Ciruela, Francisco

    2009-10-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors mediate in part the CNS effects of glutamate. These receptors interact with a large array of intracellular proteins in which the final role is to regulate receptor function. Here, using co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments we showed a close and specific interaction between mGlu(5) receptor and NECAB2 in both transfected human embryonic kidney cells and rat hippocampus. Interestingly, in pull-down experiments increasing concentrations of calcium drastically reduced the ability of these two proteins to interact, suggesting that NECAB2 binds to mGlu(5) receptor in a calcium-regulated manner. Immunoelectron microscopy detection of NECAB2 and mGlu(5) receptor in the rat hippocampal formation indicated that both proteins are codistributed in the same subcellular compartment of pyramidal cells. In addition, the NECAB2/mGlu(5) receptor interaction regulated mGlu(5b)-mediated activation of both inositol phosphate accumulation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Overall, these findings indicate that NECAB2 by its physical interaction with mGlu(5b) receptor modulates receptor function.

  5. CRF receptor type 2 neurons in the posterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis critically contribute to stress recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henckens, M J A G; Printz, Y; Shamgar, U; Dine, J; Lebow, M; Drori, Y; Kuehne, C; Kolarz, A; Eder, M; Deussing, J M; Justice, N J; Yizhar, O; Chen, A

    2017-12-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is critical in mediating states of anxiety, and its dysfunction has been linked to stress-related mental disease. Although the anxiety-related role of distinct subregions of the anterior BNST was recently reported, little is known about the contribution of the posterior BNST (pBNST) to the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stress. Previously, we observed abnormal expression of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2 (CRFR2) to be associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-like symptoms. Here, we found that CRFR2-expressing neurons within the pBNST send dense inhibitory projections to other stress-related brain regions (for example, the locus coeruleus, medial amygdala and paraventricular nucleus), implicating a prominent role of these neurons in orchestrating the neuroendocrine, autonomic and behavioral response to stressful situations. Local CRFR2 activation by urocortin 3 depolarized the cells, increased the neuronal input resistance and increased firing of action potentials, indicating an enhanced excitability. Furthermore, we showed that CRFR2-expressing neurons within the pBNST are critically involved in the modulation of the behavioral and neuroendocrine response to stress. Optogenetic activation of CRFR2 neurons in the pBNST decreased anxiety, attenuated the neuroendocrine stress response, ameliorated stress-induced anxiety and impaired the fear memory for the stressful event. Moreover, activation following trauma exposure reduced the susceptibility for PTSD-like symptoms. Optogenetic inhibition of pBNST CRFR2 neurons yielded opposite effects. These data indicate the relevance of pBNST activity for adaptive stress recovery.

  6. Corticosterone rapidly increases thorns of CA3 neurons via synaptic/extranuclear glucocorticoid receptor in rat hippocampus

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    Yoshiya, Miyuki; Komatsuzaki, Yoshimasa; Hojo, Yasushi; Ikeda, Muneki; Mukai, Hideo; Hatanaka, Yusuke; Murakami, Gen; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Kimoto, Tetsuya; Kawato, Suguru

    2013-01-01

    Modulation of synapses under acute stress is attracting much attention. Exposure to acute stress induces corticosterone (CORT) secretion from the adrenal cortex, resulting in rapid increase of CORT levels in plasma and the hippocampus. We tried to test whether rapid CORT effects involve activation of essential kinases as non-genomic processes. We demonstrated rapid effects (~1 h) of CORT on the density of thorns, by imaging Lucifer Yellow-injected neurons in adult male rat hippocampal slices. Thorns of thorny excrescences of CA3 hippocampal neurons are post-synaptic regions whose presynaptic partners are mossy fiber terminals. The application of CORT at 100, 500, and 1000 nM induced a rapid increase in the density of thorns in the stratum lucidum of CA3 pyramidal neurons. Co-administration of RU486, an antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), abolished the effect of CORT. Blocking a single kinase, including MAPK, PKA, or PKC, suppressed CORT-induced enhancement of thorn-genesis. On the other hand, GSK-3β was not involved in the signaling of thorn-genesis. Blocking AMPA receptors suppressed the CORT effect. Expression of CA3 synaptic/extranuclear GR was demonstrated by immunogold electron microscopic analysis. From these results, stress levels of CORT (100–1000 nM) might drive the rapid thorn-genesis via synaptic/extranuclear GR and multiple kinase pathways, although a role of nuclear GRs cannot be completely excluded. PMID:24348341

  7. Corticosterone rapidly increases thorns of CA3 neurons via synaptic/extranuclear glucocorticoid receptor in rat hippocampus

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    Miyuki eYoshiya

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of synapses under acute stress is attracting much attention. Exposure to acute stress induces corticosterone (CORT secretion from the adrenal cortex, resulting in rapid increase of CORT levels in plasma and the hippocampus. We tried to test whether rapid CORT effects involve activation of essential kinases as non-genomic processes.We demonstrated rapid effects (~ 1 h of CORT on the density of thorns, by imaging Lucifer Yellow-injected neurons in adult male rat hippocampal slices. Thorns of thorny excrescences of CA3 hippocampal neurons are post-synaptic regions whose presynaptic partners are mossy fiber terminals. The application of CORT at 100, 500 and 1000 nM induced a rapid increase in the density of thorns in the stratum lucidum of CA3 pyramidal neurons. Co-administration of RU486, an antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (GR, abolished the effect of CORT. Blocking a single kinase, including MAPK, PKA or PKC, suppressed CORT-induced enhancement of thorn-genesis. On the other hand, GSK-3β was not involved in the signaling of thorn-genesis. Blocking AMPA receptors suppressed the CORT effect. Expression of CA3 synaptic/extranuclear GR was demonstrated by immunogold electron microscopic analysis. From these results, stress levels of CORT (100-1000 nM might drive the rapid thorn-genesis via synaptic/extranuclear GR and multiple kinase pathways, although a role of nuclear GRs cannot be completely excluded.

  8. ATP induces NO production in hippocampal neurons by P2X(7 receptor activation independent of glutamate signaling.

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    Juan Francisco Codocedo

    Full Text Available To assess the putative role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP upon nitric oxide (NO production in the hippocampus, we used as a model both rat hippocampal slices and isolated hippocampal neurons in culture, lacking glial cells. In hippocampal slices, additions of exogenous ATP or 2'(3'-O-(4-Benzoylbenzoyl ATP (Bz-ATP elicited concentration-dependent NO production, which increased linearly within the first 15 min and plateaued thereafter; agonist EC50 values were 50 and 15 µM, respectively. The NO increase evoked by ATP was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by Coomassie brilliant blue G (BBG or by N(ω-propyl-L-arginine, suggesting the involvement of P2X7Rs and neuronal NOS, respectively. The ATP induced NO production was independent of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptor activity as effects were not alleviated by DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV, but antagonized by BBG. In sum, exogenous ATP elicited NO production in hippocampal neurons independently of NMDA receptor activity.

  9. Post-lesion administration of 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT protects cholinergic nucleus basalis neurons against NMDA excitotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterink, BJ; Harkany, T; Luiten, PGM; Oosterink, Bart J.

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that serotonin (5-HT)(1A) receptor agonists may abrogate excitotoxic brain damage. We investigated whether a single i.p. injection of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg, protects cholinergic neurons of the

  10. The plant sesquiterpene germacrene D specifically activates a major type of antennal receptor neuron of the tobacco budworm moth Heliothis virescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røstelien, T; Borg-Karlson, A K; Fäldt, J; Jacobsson, U; Mustaparta, H

    2000-04-01

    Plants release hundreds of volatiles that are important in interactions with insects or other organisms. However, knowledge is scarce as to which of the compounds are detected by the organism's olfactory receptor neurons. In the present study, single receptor neurons on the antennae of the tobacco budworm moth, Heliothis virescens, were screened for their sensitivities to naturally produced plant volatiles by the use of gas chromatography linked to electrophysiological recordings from single cells (GC-SCR). Plant volatiles, collected by aeration of host and non-host plants, were tested on each receptor neuron via parallel GC-columns. Thus, simultaneous recordings of the gas chromatogram and the neuron responses to each component were obtained. One type of receptor neuron, appearing in 80% of all experiments, responded with high sensitivity and selectivity to one particular component, present in host as well as non-host mixtures. The component, identified as a sesquiterpene hydrocarbon by linked gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, was isolated from a sesquiterpene fraction of cubebe oil and identified by NMR as germacrene D. The purified compound was then re-tested via gas chromatography on the same receptor neuron type, verifying the identification. A weaker response to another sesquiterpene hydrocarbon was also recorded.

  11. Investigating the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors in trigeminal ganglion neurons and satellite glial cells: implications for craniofacial pain.

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    Boye Larsen, Dennis; Ingemann Kristensen, Gunda; Panchalingam, Vinodenee; Laursen, Jens Christian; Nørgaard Poulsen, Jeppe; Skallerup Andersen, Maria; Kandiah, Aginsha; Gazerani, Parisa

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that various subtypes of the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are expressed in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), implicating that glutamate potentially contributes to sensory transmission through these receptors. While mGluR expression has been investigated largely in the DRG, the present study focused on mGluR expression on neurons and satellite glial cells (SGCs) of the trigeminal ganglion (TG). To address the presence of mGluRs in rat TG neurons and their corresponding SGCs, the trigeminal ganglia from six adult male Wistar rats were isolated and immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry were performed. The expression of mGluR1α-, mGluR2/3- and mGluR8 on TG neurons and SGCs was investigated in tissue slices and isolated cells. 35.1 ± 6.0% of the TG neurons were positive for mGluR1α, whereas 39.9 ± 7.7% and 55.5 ± 6.3% were positive for mGluR2/3 and mGluR8, respectively. Immunoreactive neurons expressing mGluRs were mainly medium- to large sized, with a smaller population of small-sized neurons showing immunoreactivity. The SGCs showed immunoreactivity toward mGluR1α and mGluR8, but not mGluR2/3, both in the tissue and in isolated cells. Findings from the present study showed that trigeminal neurons express mGluR1α, mGluR2/3 and mGluR8, while SGCs only express mGluR1α and mGluR8. This novel evidence may advance investigations on a possible role of mGluRs in relation to trigeminal pain transmission within the craniofacial region.

  12. HIV-1 Tat activates neuronal ryanodine receptors with rapid induction of the unfolded protein response and mitochondrial hyperpolarization.

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    John P Norman

    Full Text Available Neurologic disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is ultimately refractory to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART because of failure of complete virus eradication in the central nervous system (CNS, and disruption of normal neural signaling events by virally induced chronic neuroinflammation. We have previously reported that HIV-1 Tat can induce mitochondrial hyperpolarization in cortical neurons, thus compromising the ability of the neuron to buffer calcium and sustain energy production for normal synaptic communication. In this report, we demonstrate that Tat induces rapid loss of ER calcium mediated by the ryanodine receptor (RyR, followed by the unfolded protein response (UPR and pathologic dilatation of the ER in cortical neurons in vitro. RyR antagonism attenuated both Tat-mediated mitochondrial hyperpolarization and UPR induction. Delivery of Tat to murine CNS in vivo also leads to long-lasting pathologic ER dilatation and mitochondrial morphologic abnormalities. Finally, we performed ultrastructural studies that demonstrated mitochondria with abnormal morphology and dilated endoplasmic reticulum (ER in brain tissue of patients with HIV-1 inflammation and neurodegeneration. Collectively, these data suggest that abnormal RyR signaling mediates the neuronal UPR with failure of mitochondrial energy metabolism, and is a critical locus for the neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 in the CNS.

  13. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in neurons of trigeminal ganglion contributes to nociception induced by acute pulpitis in rats.

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    Lin, Jia-Ji; Du, Yi; Cai, Wen-Ke; Kuang, Rong; Chang, Ting; Zhang, Zhuo; Yang, Yong-Xiang; Sun, Chao; Li, Zhu-Yi; Kuang, Fang

    2015-07-30

    Pain caused by acute pulpitis (AP) is a common symptom in clinical settings. However, its underlying mechanisms have largely remained unknown. Using AP model, we demonstrated that dental injury caused severe pulp inflammation with up-regulated serum IL-1β. Assessment from head-withdrawal reflex thresholds (HWTs) and open-field test demonstrated nociceptive response at 1 day post injury. A consistent up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) ipsilateral to the injured pulp was found; and downstream signaling components of TLR4, including MyD88, TRIF and NF-κB, and cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β, were also increased. Retrograde labeling indicated that most TLR4 positve neuron in the TG innnervated the pulp and TLR4 immunoreactivity was mainly in the medium and small neurons. Double labeling showed that the TLR4 expressing neurons in the ipsilateral TG were TRPV1 and CGRP positive, but IB4 negative. Furthermore, blocking TLR4 by eritoran (TLR4 antagonist) in TGs of the AP model significantly down-regulated MyD88, TRIF, NF-κB, TNF-α and IL-1β production and behavior of nociceptive response. Our findings suggest that TLR4 signaling in TG cells, particularly the peptidergic TRPV1 neurons, plays a key role in AP-induced nociception, and indicate that TLR4 signaling could be a potential therapeutic target for orofacial pain.

  14. Deletion of the NMDA receptor GluN2A subunit significantly decreases dendritic growth in maturing dentate granule neurons.

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    Timal S Kannangara

    Full Text Available It is known that NMDA receptors can modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis, but the contribution of specific regulatory GluN2 subunits has been difficult to determine. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking GluN2A (formerly NR2A do not show altered cell proliferation or neuronal differentiation, but present significant changes in neuronal morphology in dentate granule cells. Specifically, GluN2A deletion significantly decreased total dendritic length and dendritic complexity in DG neurons located in the inner granular zone. Furthermore, the absence of GluN2A also resulted in a localized increase in spine density in the middle molecular layer, a region innervated by the medial perforant path. Interestingly, alterations in dendritic morphology and spine density were never seen in dentate granule cells located in the outer granular zone, a region that has been hypothesized to contain older, more mature, neurons. These results indicate that although the GluN2A subunit is not critical for the cell proliferation and differentiation stages of the neurogenic process, it does appear to play a role in establishing synaptic and dendritic morphology in maturing dentate granule cells localized in the inner granular zone.

  15. Expression of the transient receptor potential channels TRPV1, TRPA1 and TRPM8 in mouse trigeminal primary afferent neurons innervating the dura

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Migraine and other headache disorders affect a large percentage of the population and cause debilitating pain. Activation and sensitization of the trigeminal primary afferent neurons innervating the dura and cerebral vessels is a crucial step in the “headache circuit”. Many dural afferent neurons respond to algesic and inflammatory agents. Given the clear role of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of channels in both sensing chemical stimulants and mediating inflammatory pain, we investigated the expression of TRP channels in dural afferent neurons. Methods We used two fluorescent tracers to retrogradely label dural afferent neurons in adult mice and quantified the abundance of peptidergic and non-peptidergic neuron populations using calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity (CGRP-ir) and isolectin B4 (IB4) binding as markers, respectively. Using immunohistochemistry, we compared the expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels in dural afferent neurons with the expression in total trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. To examine the distribution of TRPM8 channels, we labeled dural afferent neurons in mice expressing farnesylated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFPf) from a TRPM8 locus. We used nearest-neighbor measurement to predict the spatial association between dural afferent neurons and neurons expressing TRPA1 or TRPM8 channels in the TG. Results and conclusions We report that the size of dural afferent neurons is significantly larger than that of total TG neurons and facial skin afferents. Approximately 40% of dural afferent neurons exhibit IB4 binding. Surprisingly, the percentage of dural afferent neurons containing CGRP-ir is significantly lower than those of total TG neurons and facial skin afferents. Both TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels are expressed in dural afferent neurons. Furthermore, nearest-neighbor measurement indicates that TRPA1-expressing neurons are clustered around a subset of dural afferent neurons. Interestingly, TRPM

  16. Characterisation of the interaction of the C-terminus of the dopamine D2 receptor with neuronal calcium sensor-1.

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    Lu-Yun Lian

    Full Text Available NCS-1 is a member of the neuronal calcium sensor (NCS family of EF-hand Ca(2+ binding proteins which has been implicated in several physiological functions including regulation of neurotransmitter release, membrane traffic, voltage gated Ca(2+ channels, neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, and learning. NCS-1 binds to the dopamine D2 receptor, potentially affecting its internalisation and controlling dopamine D2 receptor surface expression. The D2 receptor binds NCS-1 via a short 16-residue cytoplasmic C-terminal tail. We have used NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy to characterise the interactions between the NCS-1/Ca(2+ and D2 peptide. The data show that NCS-1 binds D2 peptide with a K(d of ∼14.3 µM and stoichiometry of peptide binding to NCS-1 of 2:1. NMR chemical shift mapping confirms that D2 peptide binds to the large, solvent-exposed hydrophobic groove, on one face of the NCS-1 molecule, with residues affected by the presence of the peptide spanning both the N and C-terminal portions of the protein. The NMR and mutagenesis data further show that movement of the C-terminal helix 11 of NCS-1 to fully expose the hydrophobic groove is important for D2 peptide binding. Molecular docking using restraints derived from the NMR chemical shift data, together with the experimentally-derived stoichiometry, produced a model of the complex between NCS-1 and the dopamine receptor, in which two molecules of the receptor are able to simultaneously bind to the NCS-1 monomer.

  17. Chronic morphine selectively sensitizes the effect of D1 receptor agonist on presynaptic glutamate release in basolateral amygdala neurons that project to prelimbic cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiaojiao; Chen, Ming; Dong, Yi; Lai, Bin; Zheng, Ping

    2018-05-01

    Drug addiction is a brain disorder characterized by chronic, compulsive use of drugs. Previous studies have found a number of chronic morphine-induced changes in the brain at molecular levels. A study from our lab showed that chronic morphine-induced increase in the expression of presynaptic D1 receptors in basolateral amygdala (BLA) neurons played an important role in environmental cue-induced retrieval of morphine withdrawal memory. However, the downstream neurocircuitry of chronic morphine-induced increase presynaptic D1 receptors in the BLA remains to be elucidated. Using retrogradely labelling technique combined with whole-cell patch-clamp methods, our results showed that (1) chronic morphine sensitized the effect of D1 receptor agonist on presynaptic glutamate release in BLA neurons that projected to the prelimbic cortex (PrL), but had no influence on that in BLA neurons that projected to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) or the CA1 of the hippocampus; (2) chronic morphine sensitized the effect of D1 receptor agonist on action potential firing in BLA neurons that projected to the PrL, but without affecting the intrinsic excitability and the sensitivity of postsynaptic glutamate receptors to glutamate in BLA neurons that projected to the PrL. These results suggest that chronic morphine selectively sensitizes the effect of D1 receptor agonist on presynaptic glutamate release in BLA neurons that project to PrL and induces a sensitization of the effect of D1 receptor agonist on action potential firing in BLA neurons that project to the PrL. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Modulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels by G protein-coupled receptors in celiac-mesenteric ganglion neurons of septic rats.

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    Mohamed Farrag

    Full Text Available Septic shock, the most severe complication associated with sepsis, is manifested by tissue hypoperfusion due, in part, to cardiovascular and autonomic dysfunction. In many cases, the splanchnic circulation becomes vasoplegic. The celiac-superior mesenteric ganglion (CSMG sympathetic neurons provide the main autonomic input to these vessels. We used the cecal ligation puncture (CLP model, which closely mimics the hemodynamic and metabolic disturbances observed in septic patients, to examine the properties and modulation of Ca2+ channels by G protein-coupled receptors in acutely dissociated rat CSMG neurons. Voltage-clamp studies 48 hr post-sepsis revealed that the Ca2+ current density in CMSG neurons from septic rats was significantly lower than those isolated from sham control rats. This reduction coincided with a significant increase in membrane surface area and a negligible increase in Ca2+ current amplitude. Possible explanations for these findings include either cell swelling or neurite outgrowth enhancement of CSMG neurons from septic rats. Additionally, a significant rightward shift of the concentration-response relationship for the norepinephrine (NE-mediated Ca2+ current inhibition was observed in CSMG neurons from septic rats. Testing for the presence of opioid receptor subtypes in CSMG neurons, showed that mu opioid receptors were present in ~70% of CSMG, while NOP opioid receptors were found in all CSMG neurons tested. The pharmacological profile for both opioid receptor subtypes was not significantly affected by sepsis. Further, the Ca2+ current modulation by propionate, an agonist for the free fatty acid receptors GPR41 and GPR43, was not altered by sepsis. Overall, our findings suggest that CSMG function is affected by sepsis via changes in cell size and α2-adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca2+ channel modulation.

  19. Stretching Safely and Effectively

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    ... of stretching before or after hitting the trail, ballet floor or soccer field. Before you plunge into ... ballistic stretching on strength and muscular fatigue of ballet dancers and resistance-trained women. Journal of Strength ...

  20. Firing characteristics of deep dorsal horn neurons after acute spinal transection during administration of agonists for 5-HT1B/1D and NMDA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaweerattanasinp, Theeradej; Heckman, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in a loss of serotonin (5-HT) to the spinal cord and a loss of inhibition to deep dorsal horn (DDH) neurons, which produces an exaggerated excitatory drive to motoneurons. The mechanism of this excitatory drive could involve the DDH neurons triggering long excitatory postsynaptic potentials in motoneurons, which may ultimately drive muscle spasms. Modifying the activity of DDH neurons with drugs such as NMDA or the 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonist zolmitriptan could have a large effect on motoneuron activity and, therefore, on muscle spasms. In this study, we characterize the firing properties of DDH neurons after acute spinal transection in adult mice during administration of zolmitriptan and NMDA, using the in vitro sacral cord preparation and extracellular electrophysiology. DDH neurons can be categorized into three major types with distinct evoked and spontaneous firing characteristics: burst (bursting), simple (single spiking), and tonic (spontaneously tonic firing) neurons. The burst neurons likely contribute to muscle spasm mechanisms because of their bursting behavior. Only the burst neurons show significant changes in their firing characteristics during zolmitriptan and NMDA administration. Zolmitriptan suppresses the burst neurons by reducing their evoked spikes, burst duration, and spontaneous firing rate. Conversely, NMDA facilitates them by enhancing their burst duration and spontaneous firing rate. These results suggest that zolmitriptan may exert its antispastic effect on the burst neurons via activation of 5-HT1B/1D receptors, whereas activation of NMDA receptors may facilitate the burst neurons in contributing to muscle spasm mechanisms following SCI. PMID:27486104

  1. Firing characteristics of deep dorsal horn neurons after acute spinal transection during administration of agonists for 5-HT1B/1D and NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaweerattanasinp, Theeradej; Heckman, Charles J; Tysseling, Vicki M

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in a loss of serotonin (5-HT) to the spinal cord and a loss of inhibition to deep dorsal horn (DDH) neurons, which produces an exaggerated excitatory drive to motoneurons. The mechanism of this excitatory drive could involve the DDH neurons triggering long excitatory postsynaptic potentials in motoneurons, which may ultimately drive muscle spasms. Modifying the activity of DDH neurons with drugs such as NMDA or the 5-HT 1B/1D receptor agonist zolmitriptan could have a large effect on motoneuron activity and, therefore, on muscle spasms. In this study, we characterize the firing properties of DDH neurons after acute spinal transection in adult mice during administration of zolmitriptan and NMDA, using the in vitro sacral cord preparation and extracellular electrophysiology. DDH neurons can be categorized into three major types with distinct evoked and spontaneous firing characteristics: burst (bursting), simple (single spiking), and tonic (spontaneously tonic firing) neurons. The burst neurons likely contribute to muscle spasm mechanisms because of their bursting behavior. Only the burst neurons show significant changes in their firing characteristics during zolmitriptan and NMDA administration. Zolmitriptan suppresses the burst neurons by reducing their evoked spikes, burst duration, and spontaneous firing rate. Conversely, NMDA facilitates them by enhancing their burst duration and spontaneous firing rate. These results suggest that zolmitriptan may exert its antispastic effect on the burst neurons via activation of 5-HT 1B/1D receptors, whereas activation of NMDA receptors may facilitate the burst neurons in contributing to muscle spasm mechanisms following SCI. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Mechanism Governing Human Kappa-Opioid Receptor Expression under Desferrioxamine-Induced Hypoxic Mimic Condition in Neuronal NMB Cells

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    Jennifer Babcock

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular adaptation to hypoxia is a protective mechanism for neurons and relevant to cancer. Treatment with desferrioxamine (DFO to induce hypoxia reduced the viability of human neuronal NMB cells. Surviving/attached cells exhibited profound increases of expression of the human kappa-opioid receptor (hKOR and hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α. The functional relationship between hKOR and HIF-1α was investigated using RT-PCR, Western blot, luciferase reporter, mutagenesis, siRNA and receptor-ligand binding assays. In surviving neurons, DFO increased HIF-1α expression and its amount in the nucleus. DFO also dramatically increased hKOR expression. Two (designated as HIFC and D out of four potential HIF response elements of the hKOR gene (HIFA–D synergistically mediated the DFO response. Mutation of both elements completely abolished the DFO-induced effect. The CD11 plasmid (containing HIFC and D with an 11 bp spacing produced greater augmentation than that of the CD17 plasmid (HIFC and D with a 17 bp-spacing, suggesting that a proper topological interaction of these elements synergistically enhanced the promoter activity. HIF-1α siRNA knocked down the increase of endogenous HIF-1α messages and diminished the DFO-induced increase of hKOR expression. Increased hKOR expression resulted in the up-regulation of hKOR protein. In conclusion, the adaptation of neuronal hKOR under hypoxia was governed by HIF-1, revealing a new mechanism of hKOR regulation.

  3. Nicotine signals through muscle-type and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in both human bronchial epithelial cells and airway fibroblasts

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    Luketich James D

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-neuronal cells, including those derived from lung, are reported to express nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR. We examined nAChR subunit expression in short-term cultures of human airway cells derived from a series of never smokers, ex-smokers, and active smokers. Methods and Results At the mRNA level, human bronchial epithelial (HBE cells and airway fibroblasts expressed a range of nAChR subunits. In multiple cultures of both cell types, mRNA was detected for subunits that constitute functional muscle-type and neuronal-type pentomeric receptors. Two immortalized cell lines derived from HBE cells also expressed muscle-type and neuronal-type nAChR subunits. Airway fibroblasts expressed mRNA for three muscle-type subunits (α1, δ, and ε significantly more often than HBE cells. Immunoblotting of HBE cell and airway fibroblast extracts confirmed that mRNA for many nAChR subunits is translated into detectable levels of protein, and evidence of glycosylation of nAChRs was observed. Some minor differences in nAChR expression were found based on smoking status in fibroblasts or HBE cells. Nicotine triggered calcium influx in the immortalized HBE cell line BEAS2B, which was blocked by α-bungarotoxin and to a lesser extent by hexamethonium. Activation of PKC and MAPK p38, but not MAPK p42/44, was observed in BEAS2B cells exposed to nicotine. In contrast, nicotine could activate p42/44 in airway fibroblasts within five minutes of exposure. Conclusions These results suggest that muscle-type and neuronal-type nAChRs are functional in airway fibroblasts and HBE cells, that prior tobacco exposure does not appear to be an important variable in nAChR expression, and that distinct signaling pathways are observed in response to nicotine.

  4. Prolactin-sensitive neurons express estrogen receptor-α and depend on sex hormones for normal responsiveness to prolactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furigo, Isadora C; Kim, Ki Woo; Nagaishi, Vanessa S; Ramos-Lobo, Angela M; de Alencar, Amanda; Pedroso, João A B; Metzger, Martin; Donato, Jose

    2014-05-30

    Estrogens and prolactin share important target tissues, including the gonads, brain, liver, kidneys and some types of cancer cells. Herein, we sought anatomical and functional evidence of possible crosstalk between prolactin and estrogens in the mouse brain. First, we determined the distribution of prolactin-responsive neurons that express the estrogen receptor α (ERα). A large number of prolactin-induced pSTAT5-immunoreactive neurons expressing ERα mRNA were observed in several brain areas, including the anteroventral periventricular nucleus, medial preoptic nucleus, arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, ventrolateral subdivision of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH), medial nucleus of the amygdala and nucleus of the solitary tract. However, although the medial preoptic area, periventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, retrochiasmatic area, dorsomedial subdivision of the VMH, lateral hypothalamic area, dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus and ventral premammillary nucleus contained significant numbers of prolactin-responsive neurons, these areas showed very few pSTAT5-immunoreactive cells expressing ERα mRNA. Second, we evaluated prolactin sensitivity in ovariectomized mice and observed that sex hormones are required for a normal responsiveness to prolactin as ovariectomized mice showed a lower number of prolactin-induced pSTAT5 immunoreactive neurons in all analyzed brain nuclei compared to gonad-intact females. In addition, we performed hypothalamic gene expression analyses to determine possible post-ovariectomy changes in components of prolactin signaling. We observed no significant changes in the mRNA expression of prolactin receptor, STAT5a or STAT5b. In summary, sex hormones exert a permissive role in maintaining the brain's prolactin sensitivity, most likely through post-transcriptional mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuronal P2X7 receptor-induced reactive oxygen species production contributes to nociceptive behavior in mice.

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    Munoz, Frances M; Gao, Ruby; Tian, Yuzhen; Henstenburg, Brian A; Barrett, James E; Hu, Huijuan

    2017-06-14

    ATP can activate a variety of pathways through P2 purinoreceptors, leading to neuroprotection and pathology in the CNS. Among all P2X receptors, the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is a well-defined therapeutic target for inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Activation of P2X7R can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in macrophages and microglia. However, the role of ROS in P2X7R-induced pain remains unexplored. Here, we investigated the downstream effects of neuronal P2X7R activation in the spinal cord. We found that ATP induces ROS production in spinal cord dorsal horn neurons, an effect eliminated by ROS scavenger N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN) and P2X7R antagonist A438079. A similar effect was observed with a P2X7R agonist, BzATP, and was attenuated by a NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. Intrathecal administration of BzATP resulted in ROS production in the spinal cord and oxidative DNA damage in dorsal horn neurons. BzATP also induced robust biphasic spontaneous nociceptive behavior. Pre-treatment with A438079 abolished all BzATP-induced nociceptive behaviors, while ROS scavengers dose-dependently attenuated the secondary response. Here, we provide evidence that neuronal P2X7R activation leads to ROS production and subsequent nociceptive pain in mice. Together, the data indicate that P2X7R-induced ROS play a critical role in the P2X7R signaling pathway of the CNS.

  6. Neuronal nicotinic receptor agonists ameliorate spontaneous motor asymmetries and motor discoordination in a unilateral mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucinski, Aaron; Wersinger, Scott; Stachowiak, Ewa K; Corso, Thomas D; Parry, Matthew J; Zhang, Jenny; Jordan, Kristen; Letchworth, Sharon; Bencherif, Merouane; Stachowiak, Michal K

    2013-10-01

    The degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system underlies the motor deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD). In recent years, epidemiological reports that smokers have lower incidences of PD have brought attention to the nicotinic acetylcholine system as a potential target for novel therapeutics. Nicotine, an agonist of neuronal nicotinic receptors (NNRs), modulates functions relevant to PD via stimulation of dopaminergic transmission in the nigrostriatal pathway, particularly via activation of α6β2* and α4β2* NNRs. Recently, reduced support of DA neurons by neurotrophic growth factors has been described in PD. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) is critical for the development and protection of adult DA neurons. In FGF-2 knockout mice and the related th-fgfr1(tk-) mouse model there is heightened sensitivity to DA neuronal oxidative neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). In the present study, FGF-deficient transgenic mice th-fgfr1(tk-) were used to analyze the effects of novel full (TC-8831) and partial (TC-8581) agonists of β2-containing nicotinic receptors on impaired motor behavior following unilateral 6-OHDA lesions. The lesions generated spontaneous (drug-naïve) turning asymmetries that correlated exponentially with the depletion of DA biomarkers in the lesioned striata. These mice also exhibited a reduced capacity to remain on the accelerating rotarod. Oral administration of TC-8831, an NNR agonist with high specificity for β2 subunits and a full agonist at producing DA release from striatal synaptosomes, attenuated unidirectional turning and improved motor coordination. In contrast, partial β2 NNR agonist TC-8581 had no effect on behaviors in this model. This study demonstrates the potential of NNR targeting-compounds to facilitate motor function in PD. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Adenosine A₂A receptors in striatal glutamatergic terminals and GABAergic neurons oppositely modulate psychostimulant action and DARPP-32 phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Ying Shen

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR are located postsynaptically in striatopallidal GABAergic neurons, antagonizing dopamine D2 receptor functions, and are also located presynaptically at corticostriatal terminals, facilitating glutamate release. To address the hypothesis that these two A2AR populations differently control the action of psychostimulants, we characterized A2AR modulation of cocaine-induced effects at the level of DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and Thr-75, c-Fos expression, and psychomotor activity using two lines of cell-type selective A2AR knockout (KO mice with selective A2AR deletion in GABAergic neurons (striatum-A2AR-KO mice, or with A2AR deletion in both striatal GABAergic neurons and projecting cortical glutamatergic neurons (forebrain-A2AR-KO mice. We demonstrated that striatum-A2AR KO mice lacked A2ARs exclusively in striatal GABAergic terminals whereas forebrain-A2AR KO mice lacked A2ARs in both striatal GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals leading to a blunted A2AR-mediated facilitation of synaptosomal glutamate release. The inactivation of A2ARs in GABAergic neurons reduced striatal DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and increased its phosphorylation at Thr-75. Conversely, the additional deletion of corticostriatal glutamatergic A2ARs produced opposite effects on DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and Thr-75. This distinct modulation of DARPP-32 phosphorylation was associated with opposite responses to cocaine-induced striatal c-Fos expression and psychomotor activity in striatum-A2AR KO (enhanced and forebrain-A2AR KO mice (reduced. Thus, A2ARs in glutamatergic corticostriatal terminals and in GABAergic striatal neurons modulate the action of psychostimulants and DARPP-32 phosphorylation in opposite ways. We conclude that A2ARs in glutamatergic terminals prominently control the action of psychostimulants and define a novel mechanism by which A2ARs fine-tune striatal activity by integrating GABAergic, dopaminergic and

  8. The First Alcohol Drink Triggers mTORC1-Dependent Synaptic Plasticity in Nucleus Accumbens Dopamine D1 Receptor Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, Jacob T; Laguesse, Sophie; Phamluong, Khanhky; Morisot, Nadege; Wegner, Scott A; Ron, Dorit

    2016-01-20

    Early binge-like alcohol drinking may promote the development of hazardous intake. However, the enduring cellular alterations following the first experience with alcohol consumption are not fully understood. We found that the first binge-drinking alcohol session produced enduring enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission onto dopamine D1 receptor-expressing neurons (D1+ neurons) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell but not the core in mice, which required D1 receptors (D1Rs) and mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Furthermore, inhibition of mTORC1 activity during the first alcohol drinking session reduced alcohol consumption and preference of a subsequent drinking session. mTORC1 is critically involved in RNA-to-protein translation, and we found that the first alcohol session rapidly activated mTORC1 in NAc shell D1+ neurons and increased synaptic expression of the AMPAR subunit GluA1 and the scaffolding protein Homer. Finally, D1R stimulation alone was sufficient to activate mTORC1 in the NAc to promote mTORC1-dependent translation of the synaptic proteins GluA1 and Homer. Together, our results indicate that the first alcohol drinking session induces synaptic plasticity in NAc D1+ neurons via enhanced mTORC1-dependent translation of proteins involved in excitatory synaptic transmission that in turn drives the reinforcement learning associated with the first alcohol experience. Thus, the alcohol-dependent D1R/mTORC1-mediated increase in synaptic function in the NAc may reflect a neural imprint of alcohol's reinforcing properties, which could promote subsequent alcohol intake. Significance statement: Consuming alcohol for the first time is a learning event that drives further drinking. Here, we identified a mechanism that may underlie the reinforcing learning associated with the initial alcohol experience. We show that the first alcohol experience induces a persistent enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission on NAc shell D1+ neurons

  9. Promoted neuronal differentiation after activation of alpha4/beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in undifferentiated neural progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Takarada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural progenitor is a generic term used for undifferentiated cell populations of neural stem, neuronal progenitor and glial progenitor cells with abilities for proliferation and differentiation. We have shown functional expression of ionotropic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA and gamma-aminobutyrate type-A receptors endowed to positively and negatively regulate subsequent neuronal differentiation in undifferentiated neural progenitors, respectively. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the possible functional expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR by undifferentiated neural progenitors prepared from neocortex of embryonic rodent brains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed mRNA expression of particular nAChR subunits in undifferentiated rat and mouse progenitors prepared before and after the culture with epidermal growth factor under floating conditions. Sustained exposure to nicotine significantly inhibited the formation of neurospheres composed of clustered proliferating cells and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction activity at a concentration range of 1 µM to 1 mM without affecting cell survival. In these rodent progenitors previously exposed to nicotine, marked promotion was invariably seen for subsequent differentiation into cells immunoreactive for a neuronal marker protein following the culture of dispersed cells under adherent conditions. Both effects of nicotine were significantly prevented by the heteromeric α4β2 nAChR subtype antagonists dihydro-β-erythroidine and 4-(5-ethoxy-3-pyridinyl-N-methyl-(3E-3-buten-1-amine, but not by the homomeric α7 nAChR subtype antagonist methyllycaconitine, in murine progenitors. Sustained exposure to nicotine preferentially increased the expression of Math1 among different basic helix-loop-helix proneural genes examined. In undifferentiated progenitors from embryonic mice

  10. A subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors plays a critical role in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeon, Jongrye; Dencker, Ditte; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2010-01-01

    AChRs are coexpressed with D(1) dopamine receptors in a specific subset of striatal projection neurons. To investigate the physiological relevance of this M(4) mAChR subpopulation in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors, we used Cre/loxP technology to generate mutant mice that lack M(4) mAChRs only in D(1) dopamine....... Since enhanced central dopaminergic neurotransmission is a hallmark of several severe disorders of the CNS, including schizophrenia and drug addiction, our findings have substantial clinical relevance....

  11. Expression of COUP-TFII Nuclear Receptor in Restricted GABAergic Neuronal Populations in the Adult Rat Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentealba, Pablo; Klausberger, Thomas; Karayannis, Theofanis; Suen, Wai Yee; Huck, Jojanneke; Tomioka, Ryohei; Rockland, Kathleen; Capogna, Marco; Studer, Michèle; Morales, Marisela; Somogyi, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The COUP-TFII nuclear receptor, also known as NR2F2, is expressed in the developing ventral telencephalon and modulates the tangential migration of a set of subpallial neuronal progenitors during forebrain development. Little information is available about its expression patterns in the adult brain. We have identified the cell populations expressing COUP-TFII and the contribution of some of them to network activity in vivo. Expression of COUP-TFII by hippocampal pyramidal and dentate granule cells, as well as neurons in the neocortex, formed a gradient increasing from undetectable in the dorsal to very strong in the ventral sectors. In the dorsal hippocampal CA1 area, COUP-TFII was restricted to GABAergic interneurons and expressed in several, largely nonoverlapping neuronal populations. Immunoreactivity was present in calretinin-, neuronal nitric oxide synthase-, and reelin-expressing cells, as well as in subsets of cholecystokinin- or calbindin-expressing or radiatum-retrohippocampally projecting GABAergic cells, but not in parvalbumin-and/or somatostatin-expressing interneurons. In vivo recording and juxtacellular labeling of COUP-TFII-expressing cells revealed neurogliaform cells, basket cells in stratum radiatum and tachykinin-expressing radiatum dentate innervating interneurons, identified by their axodendritic distributions. They showed cell type-selective phase-locked firing to the theta rhythm but no activation during sharp wave/ripple oscillations. These basket cells in stratum radiatum and neurogliaform cells fired at the peak of theta oscillations detected extracellularly in stratum pyramidale, unlike previously reported ivy cells, which fired at the trough. The characterization of COUP-TFII-expressing neurons suggests that this developmentally important transcription factor plays cell type-specific role(s)in the adult hippocampus. PMID:20130170

  12. Increased GABA(A receptor ε-subunit expression on ventral respiratory column neurons protects breathing during pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith B Hengen

    Full Text Available GABAergic signaling is essential for proper respiratory function. Potentiation of this signaling with allosteric modulators such as anesthetics, barbiturates, and neurosteroids can lead to respiratory arrest. Paradoxically, pregnant animals continue to breathe normally despite nearly 100-fold increases in circulating neurosteroids. ε subunit-containing GABA(ARs are insensitive to positive allosteric modulation, thus we hypothesized that pregnant rats increase ε subunit-containing GABA(AR expression on brainstem neurons of the ventral respiratory column (VRC. In vivo, pregnancy rendered respiratory motor output insensitive to otherwise lethal doses of pentobarbital, a barbiturate previously used to categorize the ε subunit. Using electrode array recordings in vitro, we demonstrated that putative respiratory neurons of the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC were also rendered insensitive to the effects of pentobarbital during pregnancy, but unit activity in the VRC was rapidly inhibited by the GABA(AR agonist, muscimol. VRC unit activity from virgin and post-partum females was potently inhibited by both pentobarbital and muscimol. Brainstem ε subunit mRNA and protein levels were increased in pregnant rats, and GABA(AR ε subunit expression co-localized with a marker of rhythm generating neurons (neurokinin 1 receptors in the preBötC. These data support the hypothesis that pregnancy renders respiratory motor output and respiratory neuron activity insensitive to barbiturates, most likely via increased ε subunit-containing GABA(AR expression on respiratory rhythm-generating neurons. Increased ε subunit expression may be critical to preserve respiratory function (and life despite increased neurosteroid levels during pregnancy.

  13. Mu Opioid Receptors in Gamma-Aminobutyric Acidergic Forebrain Neurons Moderate Motivation for Heroin and Palatable Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbogne, Pauline; Gardon, Olivier; Martín-García, Elena; Keyworth, Helen L; Matsui, Aya; Mechling, Anna E; Bienert, Thomas; Nasseef, Taufiq; Robé, Anne; Moquin, Luc; Darcq, Emmanuel; Ben Hamida, Sami; Robledo, Patricia; Matifas, Audrey; Befort, Katia; Gavériaux-Ruff, Claire; Harsan, Laura-Adela; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Hennig, Jurgen; Gratton, Alain; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis; Alvarez, Veronica A; Maldonado, Rafael; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2017-05-01

    Mu opioid receptors (MORs) are central to pain control, drug reward, and addictive behaviors, but underlying circuit mechanisms have been poorly explored by genetic approaches. Here we investigate the contribution of MORs expressed in gamma-aminobutyric acidergic forebrain neurons to major biological effects of opiates, and also challenge the canonical disinhibition model of opiate reward. We used Dlx5/6-mediated recombination to create conditional Oprm1 mice in gamma-aminobutyric acidergic forebrain neurons. We characterized the genetic deletion by histology, electrophysiology, and microdialysis; probed neuronal activation by c-Fos immunohistochemistry and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging; and investigated main behavioral responses to opiates, including motivation to obtain heroin and palatable food. Mutant mice showed MOR transcript deletion mainly in the striatum. In the ventral tegmental area, local MOR activity was intact, and reduced activity was only observed at the level of striatonigral afferents. Heroin-induced neuronal activation was modified at both sites, and whole-brain functional networks were altered in live animals. Morphine analgesia was not altered, and neither was physical dependence to chronic morphine. In contrast, locomotor effects of heroin were abolished, and heroin-induced catalepsy was increased. Place preference to heroin was not modified, but remarkably, motivation to obtain heroin and palatable food was enhanced in operant self-administration procedures. Our study reveals dissociable MOR functions across mesocorticolimbic networks. Thus, beyond a well-established role in reward processing, operating at the level of local ventral tegmental area neurons, MORs also moderate motivation for appetitive stimuli within forebrain circuits that drive motivated behaviors. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Regulation of neuromodulator receptor efficacy--implications for whole-neuron and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Gabriele

    2004-04-01

    Membrane receptors for neuromodulators (NM) are highly regulated in their distribution and efficacy-a phenomenon which influences the individual cell's response to central signals of NM release. Even though NM receptor regulation is implicated in the pharmacological action of many drugs, and is also known to be influenced by various environmental factors, its functional consequences and modes of action are not well understood. In this paper we summarize relevant experimental evidence on NM receptor regulation (specifically dopamine D1 and D2 receptors) in order to explore its significance for neural and synaptic plasticity. We identify the relevant components of NM receptor regulation (receptor phosphorylation, receptor trafficking and sensitization of second-messenger pathways) gained from studies on cultured cells. Key principles in the regulation and control of short-term plasticity (sensitization) are identified, and a model is presented which employs direct and indirect feedback regulation of receptor efficacy. We also discuss long-term plasticity which involves shifts in receptor sensitivity and loss of responsivity to NM signals. Finally, we discuss the implications of NM receptor regulation for models of brain plasticity and memorization. We emphasize that a realistic model of brain plasticity will have to go beyond Hebbian models of long-term potentiation and depression. Plasticity in the distribution and efficacy of NM receptors may provide another important source of functional plasticity with implications for learning and memory.

  15. Nerve growth factor (NGF) induces neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma cells transfected with the NGF receptor cDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, H.; Bogenmann, E.

    1990-01-01

    Human nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor (NGFR) cDNA was transfected into a neuroblastoma cell line (HTLA 230) which does not express a functional NGF-NGFR signal transduction cascade. Short-term treatment of stably transfected cells (98-3) expressing membrane-bound NGF receptor molecules resulted in a cell cycle-dependent, transient expression of the c-fos gene upon treatment with NGF, suggesting the presence of functional high-affinity NGFR. Extensive outgrowth of neurites and cessation of DNA synthesis occurred in transfectants grown on an extracellular matrix after long-term treatment with NGF, suggesting terminal differentiation. Our data support the idea that introduction of a constitutively expressed NGFR cDNA into cells with neuronal background results in the assembly of a functional NGF-NGFR signal cascade in a permissive extracellular environment

  16. Chaperones in Polyglutamine Aggregation : Beyond the Q-Stretch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, E. F. E.; de Mattos, Eduardo P.; Jardim, Laura B.; Kampinga, Harm H.; Bergink, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) stretches in at least nine unrelated proteins lead to inherited neuronal dysfunction and degeneration. The expansion size in all diseases correlates with age at onset (AO) of disease and with polyQ protein aggregation, indicating that the expanded polyQ stretch is the

  17. Prenatal exposure of testosterone prevents SDN-POA neurons of postnatal male rats from apoptosis through NMDA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H K; Yang, R C; Shih, H C; Hsieh, Y L; Chen, U Y; Hsu, C

    2001-11-01

    The role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in mediating the effect of testosterone exposure prenatally on neuronal apoptosis in the sexual dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) of rats was studied. The endogenous testosterone was diminished by prenatal stress (PNS) or simulated by testosterone exposure (TE) to understand the effect of testosterone on NR(1) (a functional subunit protein of NMDA receptor) expression and neuronal apoptosis. To further study whether the testosterone, after being converted into estradiol, modulates NR(1) expression, 4-androstein-4-ol-3,17-dione (ATD; an aromatase inhibitor) was used to block the conversion of estradiol from testosterone. The expressions of the NR(1) mRNA and NR(1) subunit protein were quantified by RT-PCR and western blotting analysis, respectively. In addition, a noncompetitive antagonist of NMDA receptor, MK-801, was used to find out whether blockage of NMDA receptor affects the naturally occurring apoptosis in SDN-POA. The results showed the following. 1) Expression of perinatal NR(1) subunit protein in the central part of the medial preoptic area of male rats was significantly higher than that of females, especially on postnatal days 1 and 3. 2) The testosterone level of male fetuses on embryonic day 18 was significantly higher than that of females, while the testosterone level of TE females or PNS males was similar to that of intact males or intact females, respectively. 3) The apoptotic incidence of intact male rats was significantly less than that of females, and the apoptosis was stimulated by PNS in male or inhibited by TE in female. 4) The expression of NR(1) subunit protein could be inhibited by PNS or ATD-treatment in male, while stimulated by TE in female. 5) NR(1) mRNA showed no significant difference among intact male, PNS male, ATD-treated male, TE female and intact female rats. 6) The low apoptotic incidence of male rats was significantly increased when NMDA receptor was blocked by MK

  18. Melatonin modulation of presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors located on short noradrenergic neurons of the rat vas deferens: a pharmacological characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zago W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, the pineal hormone produced during the dark phase of the light-dark cycle, modulates neuronal acetylcholine receptors located presynaptically on nerve terminals of the rat vas deferens. Recently we showed the presence of high affinity nicotine-binding sites during the light phase, and low and high affinity binding sites during the dark phase. The appearance of the low affinity binding sites was due to the nocturnal melatonin surge and could be mimicked by exposure to melatonin in vitro. The aim of the present research was to identify the receptor subtypes responsible for the functional response during the light and the dark phase. The rank order of potency of agonists was dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP = cytisine > nicotine > carbachol and DMPP = nicotine = cytisine > carbachol, during the light and dark phase, respectively, due to an increase in apparent affinity for nicotine. Mecamylamine similarly blocked the DMPP response during the light and the dark phase, while the response to nicotine was more efficiently blocked during the light phase. In contrast, methyllycaconitine inhibited the nicotine-induced response only at 21:00 h. Since a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs have low affinity for nicotine in binding assays, we suggest that a mixed population composed of a3ß4 - plus a7-bearing nAChR subtypes is present at night. This plasticity in receptor subtypes is probably driven by melatonin since nicotine-induced contraction in organs from animals sacrificed at 15:00 h and incubated with melatonin (100 pg/ml, 4 h is not totally blocked by mecamylamine. Thus melatonin, by acting directly on the short adrenergic neurons that innervate the rat vas deferens, induces the appearance of the low affinity binding site, probably an a7 nAChR subtype.

  19. Dynamics of GnRH Neuron Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Synaptic Receptors Are Unchanged during Estrogen Positive and Negative Feedback in Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinhuai; Porteous, Robert; Herbison, Allan E

    2017-01-01

    Inputs from GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons are suspected to play an important role in regulating the activity of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. The GnRH neurons exhibit marked plasticity to control the ovarian cycle with circulating estradiol concentrations having profound "feedback" effects on their activity. This includes "negative feedback" responsible for suppressing GnRH neuron activity and "positive feedback" that occurs at mid-cycle to activate the GnRH neurons to generate the preovulatory luteinizing hormone surge. In the present study, we employed brain slice electrophysiology to question whether synaptic ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor signaling at the GnRH neuron changed at times of negative and positive feedback. We used a well characterized estradiol (E)-treated ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model to replicate negative and positive feedback. Miniature and spontaneous postsynaptic currents (mPSCs and sPSCs) attributable to GABA A and glutamatergic receptor signaling were recorded from GnRH neurons obtained from intact diestrous, OVX, OVX + E (negative feedback), and OVX + E+E (positive feedback) female mice. Approximately 90% of GnRH neurons exhibited spontaneous GABA A -mPSCs in all groups but no significant differences in the frequency or kinetics of mPSCs were found at the times of negative or positive feedback. Approximately 50% of GnRH neurons exhibited spontaneous glutamate mPSCs but again no differences were detected. The same was true for spontaneous PSCs in all cases. These observations indicate that the kinetics of ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor synaptic transmission to GnRH neurons remain stable across the different estrogen feedback states.

  20. CB1 Receptor Activation on VgluT2-Expressing Glutamatergic Neurons Underlies Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC)-Induced Aversive Effects in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; He, Yi; Bi, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Song, Rui; Liu, Qing-Rong; Egan, Josephine M; Gardner, Eliot L; Li, Jing; Xi, Zheng-Xiong

    2017-09-26

    Cannabis can be rewarding or aversive. Cannabis reward is believed to be mediated by activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) on GABAergic neurons that disinhibit dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying cannabis aversion in rodents. In the present study, CB1Rs are found not only on VTA GABAergic neurons, but also on VTA glutamatergic neurons that express vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VgluT2). We then used Cre-Loxp transgenic technology to selectively delete CB1Rs in VgluT2-expressing glutamatergic neurons (VgluT2-CB1 -/- ) and Cre-dependent viral vector to express light-sensitive channelrhodopsin-2 into VTA glutamatergic neurons. We found that photoactivation of VTA glutamatergic neurons produced robust intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) behavior, which was dose-dependently blocked by DA receptor antagonists, but enhanced by cocaine. In contrast, Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ 9 -THC), the major psychoactive component of cannabis, produced dose-dependent conditioned place aversion and a reduction in the above optical ICSS in VgluT2-cre control mice, but not in VgluT2-CB1 -/- mice. These findings suggest that activation of CB1Rs in VgluT2-expressing glutamate neurons produces aversive effects that might explain why cannabinoid is not rewarding in rodents and might also account for individual differences in the hedonic effects of cannabis in humans.

  1. Epigenetic regulation of death of crayfish glial cells but not neurons induced by photodynamic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifulina, S A; Komandirov, M A; Uzdensky, A B

    2014-03-01

    Epigenetic processes are involved in regulation of cell functions and survival, but their role in responses of neurons and glial cells to oxidative injury is insufficiently explored. Here, we studied the role of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation in reactions of neurons and surrounding glial cells to photodynamic treatment that induces oxidative stress and cell death. Isolated crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single mechanoreceptor neuron surrounded by glial cells was photosensitized with aluminum phthalocyanine Photosens that induced neuron inactivation, necrosis of the neuron and glia, and glial apoptosis. Inhibitors of DNA methylation 5-azacytidine and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine) reduced the level of PDT-induced necrosis of glial cells but not neurons by 1.3 and 2.0 times, respectively, and did not significantly influence apoptosis of glial cells. Histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid and trichostatin A inhibited PDT-induced both necrosis and apoptosis of satellite glial cells but not neurons by 1.6-2.7 times. Thus, in the crayfish stretch receptor DNA methylation and histone deacetylation are involved in epigenetic control of glial but not neuronal necrosis. Histone deacetylation also participates in glial apoptosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Layer- and column-specific knockout of NMDA receptors in pyramidal neurons of the mouse barrel cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Aronoff

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Viral vectors injected into the mouse brain offer the possibility for localized genetic modifications in a highly controlled manner. Lentivector injection into mouse neocortex transduces cells within a diameter of approximately 200µm, which closely matches the lateral scale of a column in barrel cortex. The depth and volume of the injection determines which cortical layer is transduced. Furthermore, transduced gene expression from the lentivector can be limited to predominantly pyramidal neurons by using a 1.3kb fragment of the αCaMKII promoter. This technique therefore allows genetic manipulation of a specific cell type in defined columns and layers of the neocortex. By expressing Cre recombinase from such a lentivector in gene-targeted mice carrying a floxed gene, highly specific genetic lesions can be induced. Here, we demonstrate the utility of this approach by specifically knocking out NMDA receptors (NMDARs in pyramidal neurons in the somatosensory barrel cortex of gene-targeted mice carrying floxed NMDAR 1 genes. Neurons transduced with lentivector encoding GFP and Cre recombinase exhibit not only reductions in NMDAR 1 mRNA levels, but reduced NMDAR-dependent currents and pairing-induced synaptic potentiation. This technique for knockout of NMDARs in a cell type, column- and layer-specific manner in the mouse somatosensory cortex may help further our understanding of the functional roles of NMDARs in vivo during sensory perception and learning.

  3. Functional Characterization of Acetylcholine Receptors Expressed in Human Neurons Differentiated from Hippocampal Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kazuyuki; Yamazaki, Kazuto; Miyamoto, Norimasa; Sawada, Kohei

    2016-12-01

    Neurotransmission mediated by acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) plays an important role in learning and memory functions in the hippocampus. Impairment of the cholinergic system contributes to Alzheimer's disease (AD), indicating the importance of AChRs as drug targets for AD. To improve the success rates for AD drug development, human cell models that mimic the target brain region are important. Therefore, we characterized the functional expression of nicotinic and muscarinic AChRs (nAChRs and mAChRs, respectively) in human hippocampal neurons differentiated from hippocampal neural stem/progenitor cells (HIP-009 cells). Intracellular calcium flux in 4-week differentiated HIP-009 cells demonstrated that the cells responded to acetylcholine, nicotine, and muscarine in a concentration-dependent manner (EC 50 = 13.4 ± 0.5, 6.0 ± 0.4, and 35.0 ± 2.5 µM, respectively). In addition, assays using subtype-selective compounds revealed that major AD therapeutic target AChR subtypes-α7 and α4β2 nAChRs, as well as M 1 and M 3 mAChRs-were expressed in the cells. Furthermore, neuronal network analysis demonstrated that potentiation of M 3 mAChRs inhibits the spontaneous firing of HIP-009 neurons. These results indicate that HIP-009 cells are physiologically relevant for AD drug screening and hence are loadstars for the establishment of in vitro AD models.

  4. Src family kinase inhibitors blunt PACAP-induced PAC1 receptor endocytosis, phosphorylation of ERK, and the increase in cardiac neuron excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, John D; Clason, Todd A; Buttolph, Thomas R; Girard, Beatrice M; Linden, Anne K; Hardwick, Jean C; Merriam, Laura A; May, Victor; Parsons, Rodney L

    2018-02-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP, Adcyap1) activation of PAC1 receptors ( Adcyap1r1) significantly increases excitability of guinea pig cardiac neurons. This modulation of excitability is mediated in part by plasma membrane G protein-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase and downstream signaling cascades. However, additional mechanisms responsible for the enhanced excitability are activated following internalization of the PAC1 receptor and endosomal signaling. Src family kinases play critical roles mediating endocytosis of many trophic factor and G protein-coupled receptors. The present study investigated whether Src family kinases also support the PACAP-induced PAC1 receptor internalization, phosphorylation of ERK, and enhanced neuronal excitability. Using human embryonic kidney cells stably expressing a green fluorescent protein-tagged PAC1 receptor, treatment with the Src family kinase inhibitor PP2 (10 µM) markedly reduced the PACAP-induced PAC1 receptor internalization, and in parallel, both PP2 and Src inhibitor 1 (Src-1, 2 µM) reduced ERK activation determined by Western blot analysis. In contrast, Src family kinase inhibitors did not eliminate a PACAP-induced rise in global calcium generated by inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate-induced release of calcium from endoplasmic reticulum stores. From confocal analysis of phosphorylated ERK immunostaining, PP2 treatment significantly attenuated PACAP activation of ERK in neurons within cardiac ganglia whole mount preparations. Intracellular recordings demonstrated that PP2 also significantly blunted a PACAP-induced increase in cardiac neuron excitability. These studies demonstrate Src-related kinase activity in PAC1 receptor internalization, activation of MEK/ERK signaling, and regulation of neuronal excitability. The present results provide further support for the importance of PAC1 receptor endosomal signaling as a key mechanism regulating cellular function.

  5. Nicotinic α4β2 Cholinergic Receptor Influences on Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortical Neuronal Firing during a Working Memory Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongan; Yang, Yang; Galvin, Veronica C; Yang, Shengtao; Arnsten, Amy F; Wang, Min

    2017-05-24

    The primate dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) subserves top-down regulation of attention and working memory abilities. Depletion studies show that the neuromodulator acetylcholine (ACh) is essential to dlPFC working memory functions, but the receptor and cellular bases for cholinergic actions are just beginning to be understood. The current study found that nicotinic receptors comprised of α4 and β2 subunits (α4β2-nAChR) enhance the task-related firing of delay and fixation cells in the dlPFC of monkeys performing a working memory task. Iontophoresis of α4β2-nAChR agonists increased the neuronal firing and enhanced the spatial tuning of delay cells, neurons that represent visual space in the absence of sensory stimulation. These enhancing effects were reversed by coapplication of a α4β2-nAChR antagonist, consistent with actions at α4β2-nAChR. Delay cell firing was reduced when distractors were presented during the delay epoch, whereas stimulation of α4β2-nAChR protected delay cells from these deleterious effects. Iontophoresis of α4β2-nAChR agonists also enhanced the firing of fixation cells, neurons that increase firing when the monkey initiates a trial, and maintain firing until the trial is completed. These neurons are thought to contribute to sustained attention and top-down motor control and have never before been the subject of pharmacological inquiry. These findings begin to build a picture of the cellular actions underlying the beneficial effects of ACh on attention and working memory. The data may also help to explain why genetic insults to α4 subunits are associated with working memory and attentional deficits and why α4β2-nAChR agonists may have therapeutic potential. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The acetylcholine (ACh) arousal system in the brain is needed for robust attention and working memory functions, but the receptor and cellular bases for its beneficial effects are poorly understood in the newly evolved primate brain. The current

  6. Potentiation of the glutamatergic synaptic input to rat locus coeruleus neurons by P2X7 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakpay, Roghayeh; Polster, Daniel; Köles, Laszlo; Skorinkin, Andrey; Szabo, Bela; Wirkner, Kerstin; Illes, Peter

    2010-09-01

    Locus coeruleus (LC) neurons in a rat brain slice preparation were superfused with a Mg(2+)-free and bicuculline-containing external medium. Under these conditions, glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) were recorded by means of the whole-cell patch-clamp method. ATP, as well as its structural analogue 2-methylthio ATP (2-MeSATP), both caused transient inward currents, which were outlasted by an increase in the frequency but not the amplitude of the sEPSCs. PPADS, but not suramin or reactive blue 2 counteracted both effects of 2-MeSATP. By contrast, α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-meATP), UTP and BzATP did not cause an inward current response. Of these latter agonists, only BzATP slightly facilitated the sEPSC amplitude and strongly potentiated its frequency. PPADS and Brilliant Blue G, as well as fluorocitric acid and aminoadipic acid prevented the activity of BzATP. Furthermore, BzATP caused a similar facilitation of the miniature (m)EPSC (recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin) and sEPSC frequencies (recorded in its absence). Eventually, capsaicin augmented the frequency of the sEPSCs in a capsazepine-, but not PPADS-antagonizable, manner. In conclusion, the stimulation of astrocytic P2X7 receptors appears to lead to the outflow of a signalling molecule, which presynaptically increases the spontaneous release of glutamate onto LC neurons from their afferent fibre tracts. It is suggested, that the two algogenic compounds ATP and capsaicin utilise separate receptor systems to potentiate the release of glutamate and in consequence to increase the excitability of LC neurons.

  7. Nurr1 protein is required for N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor-mediated neuronal survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barneda-Zahonero, Bruna; Servitja, Joan-Marc; Badiola, Nahuai; Miñano-Molina, Alfredo J; Fadó, Rut; Saura, Carlos A; Rodríguez-Alvarez, José

    2012-03-30

    NMDA receptor (NMDAR) stimulation promotes neuronal survival during brain development. Cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) need NMDAR stimulation to survive and develop. These neurons differentiate and mature during its migration from the external granular layer to the internal granular layer, and lack of excitatory inputs triggers their apoptotic death. It is possible to mimic this process in vitro by culturing CGCs in low KCl concentrations (5 mm) in the presence or absence of NMDA. Using this experimental approach, we have obtained whole genome expression profiles after 3 and 8 h of NMDA addition to identify genes involved in NMDA-mediated survival of CGCs. One of the identified genes was Nurr1, a member of the orphan nuclear receptor subfamily Nr4a. Our results report a direct regulation of Nurr1 by CREB after NMDAR stimulation. ChIP assay confirmed CREB binding to Nurr1 promoter, whereas CREB shRNA blocked NMDA-mediated increase in Nurr1 expression. Moreover, we show that Nurr1 is important for NMDAR survival effect. We show that Nurr1 binds to Bdnf promoter IV and that silencing Nurr1 by shRNA leads to a decrease in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein levels and a reduction of NMDA neuroprotective effect. Also, we report that Nurr1 and BDNF show a similar expression pattern during postnatal cerebellar development. Thus, we conclude that Nurr1 is a downstream target of CREB and that it is responsible for the NMDA-mediated increase in BDNF, which is necessary for the NMDA-mediated prosurvival effect on neurons.

  8. Ablation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 3 impairs hippocampal neuron excitability in vitro and spatial working memory in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Weth-Malsch

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the role of the bioactive lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P within the central nervous system has recently gained more and more attention, as it has been connected to major diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Even though much data about the functions of the five S1P receptors has been collected for other organ systems, we still lack a complete understanding for their specific roles, in particular within the brain. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to further elucidate the role of S1P receptor subtype 3 (S1P3 in vivo and in vitro with a special focus on the hippocampus. Using an S1P3 knock-out mouse model we applied a range of behavioral tests, performed expression studies and whole cell patch clamp recordings in acute hippocampal slices. We were able to show that S1P3 deficient mice display a significant spatial working memory deficit within the T-maze test, but not in anxiety related tests. Furthermore, S1p3 mRNA was expressed throughout the hippocampal formation. Principal neurons in area CA3 lacking S1P3 showed significantly increased interspike intervals and a significantly decreased input resistance. Upon stimulation with S1P CA3 principal neurons from both wildtype and S1P3-/- mice displayed significantly increased evoked EPSC amplitudes and decay times, whereas rise times remained unchanged. These results suggest a specific involvement of S1P3 for the establishment of spatial working memory and neuronal excitability within the hippocampus.

  9. FLP-4 neuropeptide and its receptor in a neuronal circuit regulate preference choice through functions of ASH-2 trithorax complex in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yonglin; Zhi, Lingtong; Guan, Xiangmin; Wang, Daoyong; Wang, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Preference choice on food is an important response strategy for animals living in the environment. Using assay system of preference choice on bacterial foods, OP50 and PA14, we identified the involvement of ADL sensory neurons in the control of preference choice in Caenorhabditis elegans. Both genetically silencing and ChR2-mediated activation of ADL sensory neurons significantly affected preference choice. ADL regulated preference choice by inhibiting function of G protein-coupled receptor (...

  10. Effects of Nigella sativa on apoptosis and GABAA receptor density in cerebral cortical and hippocampal neurons in pentylenetetrazol induced kindling in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meral, I; Esrefoglu, M; Dar, K A; Ustunova, S; Aydin, M S; Demirtas, M; Arifoglu, Y

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the effects of Nigella sativa on apoptosis and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA A ) receptor density in cerebral cortical and hippocampal neurons in a pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced kindling model in rats. The PTZ kindling model was produced by injecting PTZ in subconvulsive doses to rats on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12, 15, 17, 19, 22 and 24 of the study into animals of PTZ treated (PTZ) and PTZ + N. sativa treated (PTZ + NS) groups. Clonic and tonic seizures were induced by injecting a convulsive dose of PTZ on day 26 of the study. Rats in the PTZ + NS group were treated also with a 10 mg/kg methanolic extract of N. sativa 2 h before each PTZ injection. Rats in the control group were treated with 4 ml/kg saline. The number of neurons that expressed GABA A receptors in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of rats in the PTZ and PTZ + NS groups increased significantly. There was no significant difference in the number of GABA A receptors between the PTZ and PTZ + NS groups. GABA A receptor density of the neurons in the cerebral cortex, but not hippocampus, was increased in PTZ group compared to controls. We observed a significant increase in the number of apoptotic neurons in the cerebral cortex of rats of both the PTZ and PTZ + NS groups compared to controls. We observed a significant decrease in the number of the apoptotic neurons in the cerebral cortex of rats in the PTZ + NS group compared to the PTZ group. N. sativa treatment ameliorated the PTZ induced neurodegeneration in the cerebral cortex as reflected by neuronal apoptosis and neuronal GABA A receptor frequency.

  11. A Significant Role of the Truncated Ghrelin Receptor GHS-R1b in Ghrelin-induced Signaling in Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Gemma; Aguinaga, David; Angelats, Edgar; Medrano, Mireia; Moreno, Estefanía; Mallol, Josefa; Cortés, Antonio; Canela, Enric I; Casadó, Vicent; McCormick, Peter J; Lluís, Carme; Ferré, Sergi

    2016-06-17

    The truncated non-signaling ghrelin receptor growth hormone secretagogue R1b (GHS-R1b) has been suggested to simply exert a dominant negative role in the trafficking and signaling of the full and functional ghrelin receptor GHS-R1a. Here we reveal a more complex modulatory role of GHS-R1b. Differential co-expression of GHS-R1a and GHS-R1b, both in HEK-293T cells and in striatal and hippocampal neurons in culture, demonstrates that GHS-R1b acts as a dual modulator of GHS-R1a function: low relative GHS-R1b expression potentiates and high relative GHS-R1b expression inhibits GHS-R1a function by facilitating GHS-R1a trafficking to the plasma membrane and by exerting a negative allosteric effect on GHS-R1a signaling, respectively. We found a preferential Gi/o coupling of the GHS-R1a-GHS-R1b complex in HEK-293T cells and, unexpectedly, a preferential Gs/olf coupling in both striatal and hippocampal neurons in culture. A dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) antagonist blocked ghrelin-induced cAMP accumulation in striatal but not hippocampal neurons, indicating the involvement of D1R in the striatal GHS-R1a-Gs/olf coupling. Experiments in HEK-293T cells demonstrated that D1R co-expression promotes a switch in GHS-R1a-G protein coupling from Gi/o to Gs/olf, but only upon co-expression of GHS-R1b. Furthermore, resonance energy transfer experiments showed that D1R interacts with GHS-R1a, but only in the presence of GHS-R1b. Therefore, GHS-R1b not only determines the efficacy of ghrelin-induced GHS-R1a-mediated signaling but also determines the ability of GHS-R1a to form oligomeric complexes with other receptors, promoting profound qualitative changes in ghrelin-induced signaling. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. A Significant Role of the Truncated Ghrelin Receptor GHS-R1b in Ghrelin-induced Signaling in Neurons*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Gemma; Aguinaga, David; Angelats, Edgar; Medrano, Mireia; Moreno, Estefanía; Mallol, Josefa; Cortés, Antonio; Canela, Enric I.; Casadó, Vicent; McCormick, Peter J.; Lluís, Carme; Ferré, Sergi

    2016-01-01

    The truncated non-signaling ghrelin receptor growth hormone secretagogue R1b (GHS-R1b) has been suggested to simply exert a dominant negative role in the trafficking and signaling of the full and functional ghrelin receptor GHS-R1a. Here we reveal a more complex modulatory role of GHS-R1b. Differential co-expression of GHS-R1a and GHS-R1b, both in HEK-293T cells and in striatal and hippocampal neurons in culture, demonstrates that GHS-R1b acts as a dual modulator of GHS-R1a function: low relative GHS-R1b expression potentiates and high relative GHS-R1b expression inhibits GHS-R1a function by facilitating GHS-R1a trafficking to the plasma membrane and by exerting a negative allosteric effect on GHS-R1a signaling, respectively. We found a preferential Gi/o coupling of the GHS-R1a-GHS-R1b complex in HEK-293T cells and, unexpectedly, a preferential Gs/olf coupling in both striatal and hippocampal neurons in culture. A dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) antagonist blocked ghrelin-induced cAMP accumulation in striatal but not hippocampal neurons, indicating the involvement of D1R in the striatal GHS-R1a-Gs/olf coupling. Experiments in HEK-293T cells demonstrated that D1R co-expression promotes a switch in GHS-R1a-G protein coupling from Gi/o to Gs/olf, but only upon co-expression of GHS-R1b. Furthermore, resonance energy transfer experiments showed that D1R interacts with GHS-R1a, but only in the presence of GHS-R1b. Therefore, GHS-R1b not only determines the efficacy of ghrelin-induced GHS-R1a-mediated signaling but also determines the ability of GHS-R1a to form oligomeric complexes with other receptors, promoting profound qualitative changes in ghrelin-induced signaling. PMID:27129257

  13. Neuronal deletion of ghrelin receptor almost completely prevents diet-induced obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrelin signaling has major effects on energy- and glucose-homeostasis, but it is unknown whether ghrelin's functions are centrally and/or peripherally mediated. The ghrelin receptor, Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor (GHS-R), is highly expressed in brain and detectable in some peripheral tissues...

  14. A new agonist of the erythropoietin receptor, Epobis, induces neurite outgrowth and promotes neuronal survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pankratova, Stanislava; Gu, Bing; Kiryushko, Darya

    2012-01-01

    Apart from its hematopoietic activity, erythropoietin (EPO) is also known as a tissue-protective cytokine. In the brain, EPO and its receptor are up-regulated in response to insult and exert pro-survival effects. EPO binds to its receptor (EPOR) via high- and low-affinity binding sites (Sites 1 a...

  15. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Izzo

    Full Text Available Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in

  16. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD models

  17. Alzheimer's Therapeutics Targeting Amyloid Beta 1–42 Oligomers I: Abeta 42 Oligomer Binding to Specific Neuronal Receptors Is Displaced by Drug Candidates That Improve Cognitive Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J.; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F.; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1–42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors - i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD

  18. Long-term activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors increases functional TRPV1-expressing neurons in mouse dorsal root ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayoshi eMasuoka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Damaged tissues release glutamate and other chemical mediators for several hours. These chemical mediators contribute to modulation of pruritus and pain. Herein, we investigated the effects of long-term activation of excitatory glutamate receptors on functional expression of transient receptor potential vaniloid type 1 (TRPV1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons and then on thermal pain behavior. In order to detect the TRPV1-mediated responses in cultured DRG neurons, we monitored intracellular calcium responses to capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, with Fura-2. Long-term (4 h treatment with glutamate receptor agonists (glutamate, quisqualate or DHPG increased the proportion of neurons responding to capsaicin through activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1, and only partially through the activation of mGluR5; engagement of these receptors was evident in neurons responding to allylisothiocyanate (AITC, a transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1 agonist. Increase in the proportion was suppressed by phospholipase C, protein kinase C, mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or transcription inhibitors. Whole-cell recording was performed to record TRPV1-mediated membrane current; TRPV1 current density significantly increased in the AITC-sensitive neurons after the quisqualate treatment. To elucidate the physiological significance of this phenomenon, a hot plate test was performed. Intraplantar injection of quisqualate or DHPG induced heat hyperalgesia that lasted for 4 h post injection. This chronic hyperalgesia was attenuated by treatment with either mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists. These results suggest that long-term activation of mGluR1/5 by peripherally released glutamate may increase the number of neurons expressing functional TRPV1 in DRG, which may be strongly associated with chronic hyperalgesia.

  19. AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation and Synaptic Colocalization on Motor Neurons Drive Maladaptive Plasticity below Complete Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huie, J Russell; Stuck, Ellen D; Lee, Kuan H; Irvine, Karen-Amanda; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Grau, James W; Ferguson, Adam R

    2015-01-01

    Clinical spinal cord injury (SCI) is accompanied by comorbid peripheral injury in 47% of patients. Human and animal modeling data have shown that painful peripheral injuries undermine long-term recovery of locomotion through unknown mechanisms. Peripheral nociceptive stimuli induce maladaptive synaptic plasticity in dorsal horn sensory systems through AMPA receptor (AMPAR) phosphorylation and trafficking to synapses. Here we test whether ventral horn motor neurons in rats demonstrate similar experience-dependent maladaptive plasticity below a complete SCI in vivo. Quantitative biochemistry demonstrated that intermittent nociceptive stimulation (INS) rapidly and selectively increases AMPAR subunit GluA1 serine 831 phosphorylation and localization to synapses in the injured spinal cord, while reducing synaptic GluA2. These changes predict motor dysfunction in the absence of cell death signaling, suggesting an opportunity for therapeutic reversal. Automated confocal time-course analysis of lumbar ventral horn motor neurons confirmed a time-dependent increase in synaptic GluA1 with concurrent decrease in synaptic GluA2. Optical fractionation of neuronal plasma membranes revealed GluA2 removal from extrasynaptic sites on motor neurons early after INS followed by removal from synapses 2 h later. As GluA2-lacking AMPARs are canonical calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs), their stimulus- and time-dependent insertion provides a therapeutic target for limiting calcium-dependent dynamic maladaptive plasticity after SCI. Confirming this, a selective CP-AMPAR antagonist protected against INS-induced maladaptive spinal plasticity, restoring adaptive motor responses on a sensorimotor spinal training task. These findings highlight the critical involvement of AMPARs in experience-dependent spinal cord plasticity after injury and provide a pharmacologically targetable synaptic mechanism by which early postinjury experience shapes motor plasticity.

  20. GLP-1 and Exendin-4 Transiently Enhance GABA(A) Receptor-Mediated Synaptic and Tonic Currents in Rat Hippocampal CA3 Pyramidal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Korol, Sergiy V.; Jin, Zhe; Babateen, Omar; Birnir, Bryndis

    2015-01-01

    GLP-1 is a hormone that stimulates insulin secretion. Receptors for GLP-1 are also found in the brain, including the hippocampus, the centre for memory and learning. Diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for decreased memory functions. We studied effects of GLP-1 and exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons. GABA is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter and decreases neuronal excitability. GLP-1 (0.01 – 1 nmol/L) transiently...

  1. Cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on primary neuronal cells of the forebrain: the involvement of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors and apoptotic cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomiyama, Ken-ichi; Funada, Masahiko, E-mail: mfunada@ncnp.go.jp

    2014-01-01

    The abuse of herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids has become an issue of public concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the acute cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on mouse brain neuronal cells. Cytotoxicity induced by synthetic cannabinoid (CP-55,940, CP-47,497, CP-47,497-C8, HU-210, JWH-018, JWH-210, AM-2201, and MAM-2201) was examined using forebrain neuronal cultures. These synthetic cannabinoids induced cytotoxicity in the forebrain cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity was suppressed by preincubation with the selective CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist AM251, but not with the selective CB{sub 2} receptor antagonist AM630. Furthermore, annexin-V-positive cells were found among the treated forebrain cells. Synthetic cannabinoid treatment induced the activation of caspase-3, and preincubation with a caspase-3 inhibitor significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity. These synthetic cannabinoids induced apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism in the forebrain cultures. Our results indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards primary neuronal cells is mediated by the CB{sub 1} receptor, but not by the CB{sub 2} receptor, and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the apoptosis induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, excessive synthetic cannabinoid abuse may present a serious acute health concern due to neuronal damage or deficits in the brain. - Highlights: • Synthetic cannabinoids (classical cannabinoids, non-classical cannabinoids, and aminoalkylindole derivatives) induce cytotoxicity in mouse forebrain cultures. • Synthetic cannabinoid-induced cytotoxicity towards forebrain cultures is mediated by the CB{sub 1} receptor, but not by the CB{sub 2} receptor, and involves caspase-dependent apoptosis. • A high concentration of synthetic cannabinoids may be toxic to neuronal cells that express CB{sub 1} receptors.

  2. Cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on primary neuronal cells of the forebrain: the involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors and apoptotic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiyama, Ken-ichi; Funada, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    The abuse of herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids has become an issue of public concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the acute cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on mouse brain neuronal cells. Cytotoxicity induced by synthetic cannabinoid (CP-55,940, CP-47,497, CP-47,497-C8, HU-210, JWH-018, JWH-210, AM-2201, and MAM-2201) was examined using forebrain neuronal cultures. These synthetic cannabinoids induced cytotoxicity in the forebrain cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity was suppressed by preincubation with the selective CB 1 receptor antagonist AM251, but not with the selective CB 2 receptor antagonist AM630. Furthermore, annexin-V-positive cells were found among the treated forebrain cells. Synthetic cannabinoid treatment induced the activation of caspase-3, and preincubation with a caspase-3 inhibitor significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity. These synthetic cannabinoids induced apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism in the forebrain cultures. Our results indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards primary neuronal cells is mediated by the CB 1 receptor, but not by the CB 2 receptor, and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the apoptosis induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, excessive synthetic cannabinoid abuse may present a serious acute health concern due to neuronal damage or deficits in the brain. - Highlights: • Synthetic cannabinoids (classical cannabinoids, non-classical cannabinoids, and aminoalkylindole derivatives) induce cytotoxicity in mouse forebrain cultures. • Synthetic cannabinoid-induced cytotoxicity towards forebrain cultures is mediated by the CB 1 receptor, but not by the CB 2 receptor, and involves caspase-dependent apoptosis. • A high concentration of synthetic cannabinoids may be toxic to neuronal cells that express CB 1 receptors

  3. Estrogen receptor-a in medial amygdala neurons regulates body weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrogen receptor–a (ERa) activity in the brain prevents obesity in both males and females. However, the ERa-expressing neural populations that regulate body weight remain to be fully elucidated. Here we showed that single-minded–1 (SIM1) neurons in the medial amygdala (MeA) express abundant levels ...

  4. NMDA receptors induce somatodendritic secretion in hypothalamic neurones of lactating female rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kock, C.P.J.; Burnashev, N.; Lodder, J.C.; Mansvelder, H.D.; Brussaard, A.B.

    2004-01-01

    Many neurones in the mammalian brain are known to release the content of their vesicles from somatodendritic locations. These vesicles usually contain retrograde messengers that modulate network properties. The back-propagating action potential is thought to be the principal physiological stimulus

  5. Neuron to astrocyte communication via cannabinoid receptors is necessary for sustained epileptiform activity in rat hippocampus.

    OpenAIRE

    Coiret Guyllaume; Ster Jeanne; Grewe Benjamin; Wendling Fabrice; Helmchen Fritjof; Gerber Urs; Benquet Pascal

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Astrocytes are integral functional components of synapses, regulating transmission and plasticity. They have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of epilepsy, although their precise roles have not been comprehensively characterized. Astrocytes integrate activity from neighboring synapses by responding to neuronally released neurotransmitters such as glutamate and ATP. Strong activation of astrocytes mediated by these neurotransmitters can promote seizure-like activ...

  6. Stretched Wire Mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowden, Gordon; /SLAC

    2005-09-06

    Stretched wires are beginning to play an important role in the alignment of accelerators and synchrotron light sources. Stretched wires are proposed for the alignment of the 130 meter long LCLS undulator. Wire position technology has reached sub-micron resolution yet analyses of perturbations to wire straightness are hard to find. This paper considers possible deviations of stretched wire from the simple 2-dimensional catenary form.

  7. Transient receptor potential channels encode volatile chemicals sensed by rat trigeminal ganglion neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Lübbert

    Full Text Available Primary sensory afferents of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia constantly transmit sensory information depicting the individual's physical and chemical environment to higher brain regions. Beyond the typical trigeminal stimuli (e.g. irritants, environmental stimuli comprise a plethora of volatile chemicals with olfactory components (odorants. In spite of a complete loss of their sense of smell, anosmic patients may retain the ability to roughly discriminate between different volatile compounds. While the detailed mechanisms remain elusive, sensory structures belonging to the trigeminal system seem to be responsible for this phenomenon. In order to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the activation of the trigeminal system by volatile chemicals, we investigated odorant-induced membrane potential changes in cultured rat trigeminal neurons induced by the odorants vanillin, heliotropyl acetone, helional, and geraniol. We observed the dose-dependent depolarization of trigeminal neurons upon application of these substances occurring in a stimulus-specific manner and could show that distinct neuronal populations respond to different odorants. Using specific antagonists, we found evidence that TRPA1, TRPM8, and/or TRPV1 contribute to the activation. In order to further test this hypothesis, we used recombinantly expressed rat and human variants of these channels to investigate whether they are indeed activated by the odorants tested. We additionally found that the odorants dose-dependently inhibit two-pore potassium channels TASK1 and TASK3 heterologously expressed In Xenopus laevis oocytes. We suggest that the capability of various odorants to activate different TRP channels and to inhibit potassium channels causes neuronal depolarization and activation of distinct subpopulations of trigeminal sensory neurons, forming the basis for a specific representation of volatile chemicals in the trigeminal ganglia.

  8. The anorexigenic cytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor stimulates POMC gene expression via receptors localized in the nucleus of arcuate neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvreur, Odile; Aubourg, Alain; Crépin, Delphine; Degrouard, Jéril; Gertler, Arieh; Taouis, Mohammed; Vacher, Claire-Marie

    2012-02-15

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a neural cytokine that reduces appetite and body weight when administrated to rodents or humans. We have demonstrated recently that the level of CNTF in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), a key hypothalamic region involved in food intake regulation, is positively correlated with protection against diet-induced obesity. However, the comprehension of the physiological significance of neural CNTF action was still incomplete because CNTF lacks a signal peptide and thus may not be secreted by the classical exocytosis pathways. Knowing that CNTF distribution shares similarities with that of its receptor subunits in the rat ARC, we hypothesized that CNTF could exert a direct intracrine effect in ARC cells. Here, we demonstrate that CNTF, together with its receptor subunits, translocates to the cell nucleus of anorexigenic POMC neurons in the rat ARC. Furthermore, the stimulation of hypothalamic nuclear fractions with CNTF induces the phosphorylation of several signaling proteins, including Akt, as well as the transcription of the POMC gene. These data strongly suggest that intracellular CNTF may directly modulate POMC gene expression via the activation of receptors localized in the cell nucleus, providing a novel plausible mechanism of CNTF action in regulating energy homeostasis.

  9. CRF1 receptor activation increases the response of neurons in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala to afferent stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The basolateral nucleus (BLA of the amygdala contributes to the consolidation of memories for emotional or stressful events. The nucleus contains a high density of CRF1 receptors that are activated by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF. Modulation of the excitability of neurons in the BLA by CRF may regulate the immediate response to stressful events and the formation of associated memories. In the present study, CRF was found to increase the amplitude of field potentials recorded in the BLA following excitatory afferent stimulation, in vitro. The increase was mediated by CRF1 receptors, since it could be blocked by the selective, non-peptide antagonists, NBI30775 and NBI35583, but not by the CRF2-selective antagonist, astressin 2B. Furthermore, the CRF2-selective agonist, urocortin II had no effect on field potential amplitude. The increase induced by CRF was long-lasting, could not be reversed by subsequent administration of NBI35583, and required the activation of protein kinase C. This effect of CRF in the BLA may be important for increasing the salience of aversive stimuli under stressful conditions, and for enhancing the consolidation of associated memories. The results provide further justification for studying the efficacy of selective antagonists of the CRF1 receptor to reduce memory formation linked to emotional or traumatic events, and suggest that these compounds might be useful as prophylactic treatment for stress-related illness such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

  10. The role of NO synthase isoforms in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important second messenger, involved in the implementation of various cell functions. It regulates various physiological and pathological processes such as neurotransmission, cell responses to stress, and neurodegeneration. NO synthase is a family of enzymes that synthesize NO from L-arginine. The activity of different NOS isoforms depends both on endogenous and exogenous factors. In particular, it is modulated by oxidative stress, induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT). We have studied the possible role of NOS in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Antinecrotic and proapoptotic effects of NO on the glial cells were found using inhibitory analysis. We have shown the role of inducible NO synthase in photoinduced apoptosis and involvement of neuronal NO synthase in photoinduced necrosis of glial cells in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. The activation of NO synthase was evaluated using NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry, a marker of neurons expressing the enzyme. The activation of NO synthase in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor was evaluated as a function of time after PDT. Photodynamic treatment induced transient increase in NO synthase activity and then slowly inhibited this enzyme.

  11. Macrophage-to-sensory neuron crosstalk mediated by Angiotensin II type-2 receptor elicits neuropathic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Eric; Shepherd, Andrew; Mickle, Aaron; Copits, Bryan; Karlsson, Pall; Kadunganattil, Suraj; Golden, Judith; Tadinada, Satya; Mack, Madison; Haroutounian, Simon; De Kloet, Annette; Samineni, Vijay; Valtcheva, Manouela; Mcilvried, Lisa; Sheahan, Tayler

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral nerve damage initiates a complex series of cellular and structural processes that culminate in chronic neuropathic pain. Our study defines local angiotensin signaling via activation of the Angiotensin II (Ang II) type-2 receptor (AT2R) on macrophages as the critical trigger of neuropathic pain. An AT2R-selective antagonist attenuates neuropathic, but not inflammatory pain hypersensitivity in mice, and requires the cell damage-sensing ion channel transient receptor potential family-...

  12. Relationship between ketamine-induced developmental neurotoxicity and NMDA receptor-mediated calcium influx in neural stem cell-derived neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Liu, Fang; Patterson, Tucker A; Paule, Merle G; Slikker, William

    2017-05-01

    Ketamine, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, is used as a general anesthetic and recent data suggest that general anesthetics can cause neuronal damage when exposure occurs during early brain development. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms associated with ketamine-induced neurotoxicity, stem cell-derived models, such as rodent neural stem cells harvested from rat fetuses and/or neural stem cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) can be utilized. Prolonged exposure of rodent neural stem cells to clinically-relevant concentrations of ketamine resulted in elevated NMDA receptor levels as indicated by NR1subunit over-expression in neurons. This was associated with enhanced damage in neurons. In contrast, the viability and proliferation rate of undifferentiated neural stem cells were not significantly affected after ketamine exposure. Calcium imaging data indicated that 50μM NMDA did not cause a significant influx of calcium in typical undifferentiated neural stem cells; however, it did produce an immediate elevation of intracellular free Ca 2+ [Ca 2+ ] i in differentiated neurons derived from the same neural stem cells. This paper reviews the literature on this subject and previous findings suggest that prolonged exposure of developing neurons to ketamine produces an increase in NMDA receptor expression (compensatory up-regulation) which allows for a higher/toxic influx of calcium into neurons once ketamine is removed from the system, leading to neuronal cell death likely due to elevated reactive oxygen species generation. The absence of functional NMDA receptors in cultured neural stem cells likely explains why clinically-relevant concentrations of ketamine did not affect undifferentiated neural stem cell viability. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Dual orexin receptor antagonist 12 inhibits expression of proteins in neurons and glia implicated in peripheral and central sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, R J; Denson, J E; Sullivan, L Q; Durham, P L

    2014-06-06

    Sensitization and activation of trigeminal nociceptors is implicated in prevalent and debilitating orofacial pain conditions including temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. Orexins are excitatory neuropeptides that function to regulate many physiological processes and are reported to modulate nociception. To determine the role of orexins in an inflammatory model of trigeminal activation, the effects of a dual orexin receptor antagonist (DORA-12) on levels of proteins that promote peripheral and central sensitization and changes in nocifensive responses were investigated. In adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, mRNA for orexin receptor 1 (OX₁R) and receptor 2 (OX₂R) were detected in trigeminal ganglia and spinal trigeminal nucleus (STN). OX₁R immunoreactivity was localized primarily in neuronal cell bodies in the V3 region of the ganglion and in laminas I-II of the STN. Animals injected bilaterally with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the TMJ capsule exhibited increased expression of P-p38, P-ERK, and lba1 in trigeminal ganglia and P-ERK and lba1 in the STN at 2 days post injection. However, levels of each of these proteins in rats receiving daily oral DORA-12 were inhibited to near basal levels. Similarly, administration of DORA-12 on days 3 and 4 post CFA injection in the TMJ effectively inhibited the prolonged stimulated expression of protein kinase A, NFkB, and Iba1 in the STN on day 5 post injection. While injection of CFA mediated a nocifensive response to mechanical stimulation of the orofacial region at 2h and 3 and 5 days post injection, treatment with DORA-12 suppressed the nocifensive response on day 5. Somewhat surprisingly, nocifensive responses were again observed on day 10 post CFA stimulation in the absence of daily DORA-12 administration. Our results provide evidence that DORA-12 can inhibit CFA-induced stimulation of trigeminal sensory neurons by inhibiting expression of proteins associated with sensitization of peripheral and central

  14. Guanylpirenzepine distinguishes between neuronal ml and m4 muscarinic receptor subtypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monferini, E.; Cereda, E.; Ladinsky, H.; Donetti, A.; Giraldo, E.

    1990-01-01

    Guanylpirenzepine, a polar, non-quaternary analog of pirenzepine, exhibited a novel binding behavior in rat brain regions: in competition binding experiments against [3H]pirenzepine labeling the M1 receptor in membranes from cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum, the compound, differently from pirenzepine, displayed heterogeneous binding curves. Computer assisted analysis of these curves, evidenced the existence of two populations of binding sites: a large proportion (84-89%) of high affinity receptors (KH = 64-92 nM) and a remainder with very low affinity (KL = 19-28 microM). Like pirenzepine, guanylpirenzepine showed low affinity for the glandular M3 and the cardiac M2 receptors when [3H]N-methylscopolamine was used to label the receptors in membranes from these two tissues; affinity values for guanylpirenzepine were 1336 and 5790 nM respectively, vs 323 and 683 nM for pirenzepine. We conclude that guanylpirenzepine is able to discriminate between m1 and m4 receptor subtypes and may represent a new tool for deeper studies on muscarinic receptors classification

  15. Cadmium induced ROS alters M1 and M3 receptors, leading to SN56 cholinergic neuronal loss, through AChE variants disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano, Paula; de Frias, Mariano; Lobo, Margarita; Anadon, María José; Sola, Emma; Pelayo, Adela; Díaz, María Jesús; Frejo, María Teresa; Del Pino, Javier

    2018-02-01

    Cadmium, an environmental neurotoxic compound, produces cognitive disorders, although the mechanism remains unknown. Previously, we described that cadmium induces a more pronounced cell death on cholinergic neurons from basal forebrain (BF). This effect, partially mediated by M1 receptor blockade, triggering it through AChE splices variants alteration, may explain cadmium effects on learning and memory processes. Cadmium has been also reported to induce oxidative stress generation leading to M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors alteration, in hippocampus and frontal cortex, which are necessary to maintain cell viability and cognitive regulation, so their alteration in BF could also mediate this effect. Moreover, it has been reported that antioxidant treatment could reverse cognitive disorders, muscarinic receptor and AChE variants alterations induced by cadmium. Thus, we hypothesized that cadmium induced cell death of BF cholinergic neurons is mediated by oxidative stress generation and this mechanism could produce this effect, in part, through AChE variants altered by muscarinic receptors disruption. To prove this, we evaluated in BF SN56 cholinergic neurons, whether cadmium induces oxidative stress and alters muscarinic receptors, and their involvement in the induction of cell death through alteration of AChE variants. Our results show that cadmium induces oxidative stress, which mediates partially the alteration of AChE variants and M2 to M4 muscarinic receptors expression and blockage of M1 receptor. In addition, cadmium induced oxidative stress generation by M1 and M3 receptors alteration through AChE variants disruption, leading to cell death. These results provide new understanding of the mechanisms contributing to cadmium harmful effects on cholinergic neurons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tetrahydrocannabinol-induced neurotoxicity depends on CB1 receptor-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation in cultured cortical neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downer, Eric J; Fogarty, Marie P; Campbell, Veronica A

    2003-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive ingredient of marijuana, induces apoptosis in cultured cortical neurons. THC exerts its apoptotic effects in cortical neurons by binding to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor. The CB1 receptor has been shown to couple to the stress-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). However, the involvement of specific JNK isoforms in the neurotoxic properties of THC remains to be established. The present study involved treatment of rat cultured cortical neurons with THC (0.005–50 μM), and combinations of THC with the CB1 receptor antagonist, AM 251 (10 μM) and pertussis toxin (PTX; 200 ng ml−1). Antisense oligonucleotides (AS) were used to deplete neurons of JNK1 and JNK2 in order to elucidate their respective roles in THC signalling. Here we report that THC induces the activation of JNK via the CB1 receptor and its associated G-protein, Gi/o. Treatment of cultured cortical neurons with THC resulted in a differential timeframe of activation of the JNK1 and JNK2 isoforms. Use of specific JNK1 and JNK2 AS identified activation of caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation as downstream consequences of JNK1 and JNK2 activation. The results from this study demonstrate that activation of the CB1 receptor induces JNK and caspase-3 activation, an increase in Bax expression and DNA fragmentation. The data demonstrate that the activation of both JNK1 and JNK2 isoforms is central to the THC-induced activation of the apoptotic pathway in cortical neurons. PMID:14522843

  17. Orexins/hypocretins modulate the activity of NPY-positive and -negative neurons in the rat intergeniculate leaflet via OX1 and OX2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palus, K; Chrobok, L; Lewandowski, M H

    2015-08-06

    Orexins/hypocretins (OXA and OXB) are two hypothalamic peptides involved in the regulation of many physiological processes including the sleep-wake cycle, food intake and arousal. The orexinergic system of the lateral hypothalamus is considered a non-specific peptidergic system, and its nerve fibers innervate numerous brain areas. Among many targets of orexinergic neurons is the intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) of the thalamus - a small but important structure of the mammalian biological clock. In rats, the IGL consists of GABAergic cells which also synthesize different neuropeptides. One group of neurons produces neuropeptide Y (NPY) and sends its axons to the master biological clock known as the suprachiasmatic nuclei. Another neuronal group produces enkephalin and is known to connect contralateral IGLs. This study evaluated the effects of orexins on identified IGL neurons revealing that 58% of the recorded neurons were sensitive to OXA (200nM) and OXB (200nM) administration. Both NPY-positive and -negative neurons were depolarized by these neuropeptides. Experiments using selective orexin receptor antagonists (SB-334867, 10μM and TCS-OX2-29, 10μM) suggested that both orexin receptors participate in the recorded OXA effects. In addition, IGL neurons were either directly depolarized by OXA or their activity was altered by changes in presynaptic inputs. We observed an increase of GABA release onto the investigated IGL neuron after OXA application, consistent with a presynaptic localization of the orexin receptors. An increase in miniature excitatory postsynaptic current frequency was not observed within the IGL. Our findings reinforce the connection between circadian clock physiology and the orexinergic system. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Conditional inactivation of neuropeptide Y Y1 receptors unravels the role of Y1 and Y5 receptors coexpressing neurons in anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Angela; Mele, Paolo; Bertocchi, Ilaria; Oberto, Alessandra; Bachmann, Alessia; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Palanza, Paola; Sprengel, Rolf; Eva, Carola

    2014-12-01

    The Y1 receptor (Y1R) and Y5 receptor (Y5R) for neuropeptide Y share similar actions in the regulation of anxiety. Previously demonstrated that conditional removal of the Y1R during postnatal development in the forebrain excitatory neurons leads to higher anxiety, increased hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical axis activity, and decreased body growth rate in male mice raised by foster mothers that exhibit high levels of maternal care. In the present study, we used the same conditional system to analyze the specific contribution to emotional behavior and stress response of the Y1R coexpressed with the Y5R. Using the Cre-loxP recombination system, we investigated anxious behavior, spatial memory, and metabolic functions of conditional knockout mice in which the inactivation of the Npy1r gene was induced in the Y5Rs expressing neurons of juvenile mice (Npy1r(Y5R-/-) ). Npy1r(Y5R-/-) mice show increased anxiety-related behavior but no changes in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical axis activity or in body weight growth, independently of gender and mouse strain used as foster mothers. Also, Npy1r(Y5R-/-) mice of both genders display increased spatial reference memory in the Morris water maze test. The results suggest that neuropeptide Y Y1R differentially expressed in the limbic system regulates anxiety and stress responses via distinct neurochemical circuits. In addition, we provide the first experimental genetic evidence that the Y1Rs coexpressed with the Y5R are involved in retention of spatial memory in male and female mice. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pathophysiological role of prostaglandin E2-induced up-regulation of the EP2 receptor in motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells and lumbar motor neurons in ALS model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosuge, Yasuhiro; Miyagishi, Hiroko; Yoneoka, Yuki; Yoneda, Keiko; Nango, Hiroshi; Ishige, Kumiko; Ito, Yoshihisa

    2017-07-04

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective degeneration of motor neurons. The primary triggers for motor neuronal death are still unknown, but inflammation is considered to be an important factor contributing to the pathophysiology of ALS both clinically and in ALS models. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and its corresponding four E-prostanoid receptors play a pivotal role in the degeneration of motor neurons in human and transgenic models of ALS. It has also been shown that PGE2-EP2 signaling in glial cells (astrocytes or microglia) promotes motor neuronal death in G93A mice. The present study was designed to investigate the levels of expression of EP receptors in the spinal motor neurons of ALS model mice and to examine whether PGE2 alters the expression of EP receptors in differentiated NSC-34 cells, a motor neuron-like cell line. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that EP2 and EP3 immunoreactivity was localized in NeuN-positive large cells showing the typical morphology of motor neurons in mice. Semi-quantitative analysis showed that the immunoreactivity of EP2 in motor neurons was significantly increased in the early symptomatic stage in ALS model mice. In contrast, the level of EP3 expression remained constant, irrespective of age. In differentiated NSC-34 cells, bath application of PGE2 resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease of MTT reduction. Although PGE2 had no effect on cell survival at concentrations of less than 10 μM, pretreatment with 10 μM PGE2 significantly up-regulated EP2 and concomitantly potentiated cell death induced by 30 μM PGE2. These results suggest that PGE2 is an important effector for induction of the EP2 subtype in differentiated NSC-34 cells, and that not only EP2 up-regulation in glial cells but also EP2 up-regulation in motor neurons plays a pivotal role in the vulnerability of motor neurons in ALS model mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  20. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and pro-NGF increase low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors in neuronal cells partly by different mechanisms: role of LDL in neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Hai Thi; Bruelle, Céline; Pham, Dan Duc; Jauhiainen, Matti; Eriksson, Ove; Korhonen, Laura T; Lindholm, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) mediate the uptake of lipoprotein particles into cells, as studied mainly in peripheral tissues. Here, we show that nerve growth factor (NGF) increases LDLR levels in PC6.3 cells and in cultured septal neurons from embryonic rat brain. Study of the mechanisms showed that NGF enhanced transcription of the LDLR gene, acting mainly via Tropomyosin receptor kinase A receptors. Simvastatin, a cholesterol-lowering drug, also increased the LDLR expression in PC6.3 cells. In addition, pro-NGF and pro-brain-derived neurotrophic factor, acting via the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) also increased LDLRs. We further observed that Myosin Regulatory Light Chain-Interacting Protein/Inducible Degrader of the LDLR (Mylip/Idol) was down-regulated by pro-NGF, whereas the other LDLR regulator, proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9) was not significantly changed. On the functional side, NGF and pro-NGF increased lipoprotein uptake by neuronal cells as shown using diacetyl-labeled LDL. The addition of serum-derived lipoprotein particles in conjunction with NGF or simvastatin enhanced neurite outgrowth. Collectively, these results show that NGF and simvastatin are able to stimulate lipoprotein uptake by neurons with a positive effect on neurite outgrowth. Increases in LDLRs and lipoprotein particles in neurons could play a functional role during brain development, in neuroregeneration and after brain injuries. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and pro-NGF induce the expression of low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) in neuronal cells leading to increased LDLR levels. Pro-NGF also down-regulated myosin regulatory light chain-interacting protein/inducible degrader of the LDLR (Mylip/Idol) that is involved in the degradation of LDLRs. NGF acts mainly via Tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) receptors, whereas pro-NGF stimulates p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). Elevated LDLRs upon NGF and pro-NGF treatments enhanced lipoprotein uptake

  1. Neuronal Fibers and Neurotransmitter Receptor Expression in the Human Endolymphatic Sac

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Kirkeby, Svend; Vikeså, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    in intracranial pressure homeostasis. The anatomical location towards the sigmoid sinus would suggest a possible endo- and/or paracrine signaling. However, neuronal connections may also apply, but it remains very scarcely explored in the human ES. STUDY DESIGN: DNA micro-arrays and immunohistochemistry were used...... for analyses of fresh human ES tissue samples. METHODS: A total of 30 tissue samples from the human ES were obtained during translabyrinthine surgery for vestibular schwannoma. Microarray technology was used to investigate tissue sample gene expression, using adjacent dura mater as control. The expression...... of genes specific for neuronal signaling was determined and results for selected key molecules verified by immunohistochemistry. Transmission electron microscopy was used for ultrastructural analysis. RESULTS: For the transmission electron microscopy analysis, a direct innervation of the ES was observed...

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist 15d-prostaglandin J2 mediates neuronal autophagy after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xu

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ has recently emerged as potential therapeutic agents for cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury because of anti-neuronal apoptotic actions. However, whether PPAR-γ activation mediates neuronal autophagy in such conditions remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the role of PPAR-γ agonist 15-PGJ(2 on neuronal autophagy induced by I/R. The expression of autophagic-related protein in ischemic cortex such as LC3-II, Beclin 1, cathepsin-B and LAMP1 increased significantly after cerebral I/R injury. Furthermore, increased punctate LC3 labeling and cathepsin-B staining occurred in neurons. Treatment with PPAR-γ agonist 15d-PGJ(2 decreased not only autophagic-related protein expression in ischemic cortex, but also immunoreactivity of LC3 and cathepsin-B in neurons. Autophagic inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA decreased LC3-II levels, reduced the infarct volume, and mimicked some protective effect of 15d-PGJ(2 against cerebral I/R injury. These results indicate that PPAR-γ agonist 15d-PGJ(2 exerts neuroprotection by inhibiting neuronal autophagy after cerebral I/R injury. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying PPAR-γ agonist in mediating neuronal autophagy remain to be determined, neuronal autophagy may be a new target for PPAR-γ agonist treatment in cerebral I/R injury.

  3. DPP4-inhibitor improves neuronal insulin receptor function, brain mitochondrial function and cognitive function in rats with insulin resistance induced by high-fat diet consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipatpiboon, Noppamas; Pintana, Hiranya; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2013-03-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) consumption has been demonstrated to cause peripheral and neuronal insulin resistance, and brain mitochondrial dysfunction in rats. Although the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin, is known to improve peripheral insulin sensitivity, its effects on neuronal insulin resistance and brain mitochondrial dysfunction caused by a HFD are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that vildagliptin prevents neuronal insulin resistance, brain mitochondrial dysfunction, learning and memory deficit caused by HFD. Male rats were divided into two groups to receive either a HFD or normal diet (ND) for 12 weeks, after which rats in each group were fed with either vildagliptin (3 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 21 days. The cognitive function was tested by the Morris Water Maze prior to brain removal for studying neuronal insulin receptor (IR) and brain mitochondrial function. In HFD rats, neuronal insulin resistance and brain mitochondrial dysfunction were demonstrated, with impaired learning and memory. Vildagliptin prevented neuronal insulin resistance by restoring insulin-induced long-term depression and neuronal IR phosphorylation, IRS-1 phosphorylation and Akt/PKB-ser phosphorylation. It also improved brain mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive function. Vildagliptin effectively restored neuronal IR function, increased glucagon-like-peptide 1 levels and prevented brain mitochondrial dysfunction, thus attenuating the impaired cognitive function caused by HFD. © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Cognitive Decline in Neuronal Aging and Alzheimer's Disease: Role of NMDA Receptors and Associated Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Avila

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular changes associated with neuronal aging lead to a decrease in cognitive capacity. Here we discuss these alterations at the level of brain regions, brain cells, and brain membrane and cytoskeletal proteins with an special focus in NMDA molecular changes through aging and its effect in cognitive decline and Alzheimer disease. Here, we propose that some neurodegenerative disorders, like Alzheimer's disease (AD, are characterized by an increase and acceleration of some of these changes.

  5. GLP-2 receptor in POMC neurons suppresses feeding behavior and gastric motility

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Xinfu; Shi, Xuemei; Li, Xiaojie; Chang, Benny; Wang, Yi; Li, Depei; Chan, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1/2) are cosecreted from endocrine L cells in the gut and preproglucagonergic neurons in the brain. Peripheral GLP-2 action is essential for maintaining intestinal homeostasis, improving absorption efficiency and blood flow, promoting immune defense, and producing efficacy in treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. However, it is unknown if CNS GLP-2 plays a physiological role in the control of energy homeostasis. Since GLP-1/2 are cotranslated from preproglucagong...

  6. Dual effect of 17β-estradiol on NMDA-induced neuronal death: involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spampinato, Simona Federica; Merlo, Sara; Molinaro, Gemma; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Bruno, Valeria; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Sortino, Maria Angela

    2012-12-01

    Pretreatment with 10 nm 17β-estradiol (17βE2) or 100 μm of the metabotropic glutamate 1 receptor (mGlu1R) agonist, dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), protected neurons against N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) toxicity. This effect was sensitive to blockade of both estrogen receptors and mGlu1R by their respective antagonists. In contrast, 17βE2 and/or DHPG, added after a low-concentration NMDA pulse (45 μm), produced an opposite effect, i.e. an exacerbation of NMDA toxicity. Again this effect was prevented by both receptor antagonists. In support of an interaction of estrogen receptors and mGlu1R in mediating a neurotoxic response, exacerbation of NMDA toxicity by 17βE2 disappeared when cultures were treated with DHPG prior to NMDA challenge, and conversely, potentiation of NMDA-induced cell death by DHPG was prevented by pretreatment with 17βE2. Addition of calpain III inhibitor (10 μm), 2 h before NMDA, prevented the increased damage induced by the two agonists, an affect that can be secondary to cleavage of mGlu1R by calpain. Accordingly, NMDA stimulation reduced expression of the full-length (140 kDa) mGluR1, an effect partially reversed by calpain inhibitor. Finally, in the presence of NMDA, the ability of 17βE2 to stimulate phosphorylation of AKT and ERK was impaired. Pretreatment with calpain inhibitor prevented the reduction of phosphorylated ERK but had no significant effect on phosphorylated AKT. Accordingly, the inhibition of ERK signaling by U0126 (1 μm) counteracted the effect of calpain inhibition on 17βE2-induced exacerbation of NMDA toxicity. The present data confirm the dual role of estrogens in neurotoxicity/neuroprotection and highlight the role of the timing of exposure to estrogens.

  7. Different forms of glycine- and GABAA-receptor mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission in mouse superficial and deep dorsal horn neurons

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    Brichta Alan M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurons in superficial (SDH and deep (DDH laminae of the spinal cord dorsal horn receive sensory information from skin, muscle, joints and viscera. In both regions, glycine- (GlyR and GABAA-receptors (GABAARs contribute to fast synaptic inhibition. For rat, several types of GABAAR coexist in the two regions and each receptor type provides different contributions to inhibitory tone. Recent work in mouse has discovered an additional type of GlyR, (containing alpha 3 subunits in the SDH. The contribution of differing forms of the GlyR to sensory processing in SDH and DDH is not understood. Methods and Results Here we compare fast inhibitory synaptic transmission in mouse (P17-37 SDH and DDH using patch-clamp electrophysiology in transverse spinal cord slices (L3-L5 segments, 23°C. GlyR-mediated mIPSCs were detected in 74% (25/34 and 94% (25/27 of SDH and DDH neurons, respectively. In contrast, GABAAR-mediated mIPSCs were detected in virtually all neurons in both regions (93%, 14/15 and 100%, 18/18. Several Gly- and GABAAR properties also differed in SDH vs. DDH. GlyR-mediated mIPSC amplitude was smaller (37.1 ± 3.9 vs. 64.7 ± 5.0 pA; n = 25 each, decay time was slower (8.5 ± 0.8 vs. 5.5 ± 0.3 ms, and frequency was lower (0.15 ± 0.03 vs. 0.72 ± 0.13 Hz in SDH vs. DDH neurons. In contrast, GABAAR-mediated mIPSCs had similar amplitudes (25.6 ± 2.4, n = 14 vs. 25. ± 2.0 pA, n = 18 and frequencies (0.21 ± 0.08 vs. 0.18 ± 0.04 Hz in both regions; however, decay times were slower (23.0 ± 3.2 vs. 18.9 ± 1.8 ms in SDH neurons. Mean single channel conductance underlying mIPSCs was identical for GlyRs (54.3 ± 1.6 pS, n = 11 vs. 55.7 ± 1.8, n = 8 and GABAARs (22.7 ± 1.7 pS, n = 10 vs. 22.4 ± 2.0 pS, n = 11 in both regions. We also tested whether the synthetic endocanabinoid, methandamide (methAEA, had direct effects on Gly- and GABAARs in each spinal cord region. MethAEA (5 μM reduced GlyR-mediated mIPSC frequency in SDH

  8. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Activation-Induced Increase in Glycine-Activated Current in Mouse Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

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    Mengwen Qi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Glycine plays an important role in regulating hippocampal inhibitory/ excitatory neurotransmission through activating glycine receptors (GlyRs and acting as a co-agonist of N-methyl-d-aspartate-type glutamate receptors. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4 is reported to inhibit hippocampal A-type γ-aminobutyric acid receptor, a ligand-gated chloride ion channel. GlyRs are also ligand-gated chloride ion channels and this paper aimed to explore whether activation of TRPV4 could modulate GlyRs. Methods: Whole-cell patch clamp recording was employed to record glycine-activated current (IGly and Western blot was conducted to assess GlyRs subunits protein expression. Results: Application of TRPV4 agonist (GSK1016790A or 5,6-EET increased IGly in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. This action was blocked by specific antagonists of TRPV4 (RN-1734 or HC-067047 and GlyR (strychnine, indicating that activation of TRPV4 increases strychnine-sensitive GlyR function in mouse hippocampal pyramidal neurons. GSK1016790A-induced increase in IGly was significantly attenuated by protein kinase C (PKC (BIM II or D-sphingosine or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII (KN-62 or KN-93 antagonists but was unaffected by protein kinase A or protein tyrosine kinase antagonists. Finally, hippocampal protein levels of GlyR α1 α2, α3 and β subunits were not changed by treatment with GSK1016790A for 30 min or 1 h, but GlyR α2, α3 and β subunits protein levels increased in mice that were intracerebroventricularly (icv. injected with GSK1016790A for 5 d. Conclusion: Activation of TRPV4 increases GlyR function and expression, and PKC and CaMKII signaling pathways are involved in TRPV4 activation-induced increase in IGly. This study indicates that GlyRs may be effective targets for TRPV4-induced modulation of hippocampal inhibitory neurotransmission.

  9. Stretching: Does It Help?

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    Vardiman, Phillip; Carrand, David; Gallagher, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Stretching prior to activity is universally accepted as an important way to improve performance and help prevent injury. Likewise, limited flexibility has been shown to decrease functional ability and predispose a person to injuries. Although this is commonly accepted, appropriate stretching for children and adolescents involved with sports and…

  10. Neuropeptide S facilitates mice olfactory function through activation of cognate receptor-expressing neurons in the olfactory cortex.

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    Yu-Feng Shao

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide S (NPS is a newly identified neuromodulator located in the brainstem and regulates various biological functions by selectively activating the NPS receptors (NPSR. High level expression of NPSR mRNA in the olfactory cortex suggests that NPS-NPSR system might be involved in the regulation of olfactory function. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. injection of NPS or co-injection of NPSR antagonist on the olfactory behaviors, food intake, and c-Fos expression in olfactory cortex in mice. In addition, dual-immunofluorescence was employed to identify NPS-induced Fos immunereactive (-ir neurons that also bear NPSR. NPS (0.1-1 nmol i.c.v. injection significantly reduced the latency to find the buried food, and increased olfactory differentiation of different odors and the total sniffing time spent in olfactory habituation/dishabituation tasks. NPS facilitated olfactory ability most at the dose of 0.5 nmol, which could be blocked by co-injection of 40 nmol NPSR antagonist [D-Val(5]NPS. NPS administration dose-dependently inhibited food intake in fasted mice. Ex-vivo c-Fos and NPSR immunohistochemistry in the olfactory cortex revealed that, as compared with vehicle-treated mice, NPS markedly enhanced c-Fos expression in the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON, piriform cortex (Pir, ventral tenia tecta (VTT, the anterior cortical amygdaloid nucleus (ACo and lateral entorhinal cortex (LEnt. The percentage of Fos-ir neurons that also express NPSR were 88.5% and 98.1% in the AON and Pir, respectively. The present findings demonstrated that NPS, via selective activation of the neurons bearing NPSR in the olfactory cortex, facilitates olfactory function in mice.

  11. Sigma-1 receptor agonist increases axon outgrowth of hippocampal neurons via voltage-gated calcium ions channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Zhang, Shu-Zhuo; Yao, Yu-Hong; Xiang, Yun; Ma, Xiao-Yun; Wei, Xiao-Li; Yan, Hai-Tao; Liu, Xiao-Yan

    2017-12-01

    Sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1Rs) are unique endoplasmic reticulum proteins that have been implicated in both neurodegenerative and ischemic diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Accumulating evidence has suggested that Sig-1R plays a role in neuroprotection and axon outgrowth. The underlying mechanisms of Sig-1R-mediated neuroprotection have been well elucidated. However, the mechanisms underlying the effects of Sig-1R on axon outgrowth are not fully understood. To clarify this issue, we utilized immunofluorescence to compare the axon lengths of cultured naïve hippocampal neurons before and after the application of the Sig-1R agonist, SA4503. Then, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence were used to examine voltage-gated calcium ion channel (VGCCs) currents in the cell membranes and growth cones. We found that Sig-1R activation dramatically enhanced the axonal length of the naïve hippocampal neurons. Application of the Sig-1R antagonist NE100 and gene knockdown techniques both demonstrated the effects of Sig-1R. The growth-promoting effect of SA4503 was accompanied by the inhibition of voltage-gated Ca 2+ influx and was recapitulated by incubating the neurons with the L-type, N-type, and P/Q-type VGCC blockers, nimodipine, MVIIA and ω-agatoxin IVA, respectively. This effect was unrelated to glial cells. The application of SA4503 transformed the growth cone morphologies from complicated to simple, which favored axon outgrowth. Sig-1R activation can enhance axon outgrowth and may have a substantial influence on neurogenesis and neurodegenerative diseases. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Activation of glucocorticoid receptors in Müller glia is protective to retinal neurons and suppresses microglial reactivity.

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    Gallina, Donika; Zelinka, Christopher Paul; Cebulla, Colleen M; Fischer, Andy J

    2015-11-01

    Reactive microglia and macrophages are prevalent in damaged retinas. Glucocorticoid signaling is known to suppress inflammation and the reactivity of microglia and macrophages. In the vertebrate retina, the glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) is known to be activated and localized to the nuclei of Müller glia (Gallina et al., 2014). Accordingly, we investigated how signaling through GCR influences the survival of neurons using the chick retina in vivo as a model system. We applied intraocular injections of GCR agonist or antagonist, assessed microglial reactivity, and the survival of retinal neurons following different damage paradigms. Microglial reactivity was increased in retinas from eyes that were injected with vehicle, and this reactivity was decreased by GCR-agonist dexamethasone (Dex) and increased by GCR-antagonist RU486. We found that activation of GCR suppresses the reactivity of microglia and inhibited the loss of retinal neurons resulting from excitotoxicity. We provide evidence that the protection-promoting effects of Dex were maintained when the microglia were selectively ablated. Similarly, intraocular injections of Dex protected ganglion cells from colchicine-treatment and protected photoreceptors from damage caused by retinal detachment. We conclude that activation of GCR promotes the survival of ganglion cells in colchicine-damaged retinas, promotes the survival of amacrine and bipolar cells in excitotoxin-damaged retinas, and promotes the survival of photoreceptors in detached retinas. We propose that suppression of microglial reactivity is secondary to activation of GCR in Müller glia, and this mode of signaling is an effective means to lessen the damage and vision loss resulting from different types of retinal damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamic Regulation of Delta-Opioid Receptor in Rat Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons by Lipopolysaccharide-induced Acute Pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin; Lv, Yiheng; Fu, Yunjie; Ren, Lili; Wang, Pan; Liu, Baozhu; Huang, Keqiang; Bi, Jing

    2015-12-01

    Delta-opioid receptor (DOR) and its endogenous ligands distribute in trigeminal system and play a very important role in modulating peripheral inflammatory pain. DOR activation can trigger p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2) and Akt signaling pathways, which participate in anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. In this study, our purpose was to determine the dynamic changes of DOR in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons during the process of acute dental pulp inflammation and elucidate its possible mechanism. Forty rats were used to generate lipopolysaccharide-induced acute pulpitis animal models at 6, 12, and 24 hours and sham-operated groups. Acute pulpitis was confirmed by hematoxylin-eosin staining, and TG neuron activation was determined by anti-c-Fos immunohistochemistry. DOR protein and gene expression in TG was investigated by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and real-time polymerase chain reaction, and DOR expression in trigeminal nerves and dental pulp was also determined by immunohistochemistry. To further investigate the mechanism of DOR modulating acute inflammation, the change of pErk1/2 and pAkt in TG was examined by immunohistochemistry. Lipopolysaccharide could successfully induce acute pulpitis and activated TG neurons. Acute pulpitis could dynamically increase DOR protein and gene expression at 6, 12, and 24 hours in TG, and DOR dimerization was significantly increased at 12 and 24 hours. Acute pulpitis also induced the dynamic change of DOR protein in trigeminal nerve and dental pulp. Furthermore, ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways were inhibited in TG after acute pulpitis. Increased DOR expression and dimerization may play important roles in peripheral acute inflammatory pain. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Selective androgen receptor modulator RAD140 is neuroprotective in cultured neurons and kainate-lesioned male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Anusha; Christensen, Amy; Moser, V Alexandra; Vest, Rebekah S; Miller, Chris P; Hattersley, Gary; Pike, Christian J

    2014-04-01

    The decline in testosterone levels in men during normal aging increases risks of dysfunction and disease in androgen-responsive tissues, including brain. The use of testosterone therapy has the potential to increase the risks for developing prostate cancer and or accelerating its progression. To overcome this limitation, novel compounds termed "selective androgen receptor modulators" (SARMs) have been developed that lack significant androgen action in prostate but exert agonist effects in select androgen-responsive tissues. The efficacy of SARMs in brain is largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the SARM RAD140 in cultured rat neurons and male rat brain for its ability to provide neuroprotection, an important neural action of endogenous androgens that is relevant to neural health and resilience to neurodegenerative diseases. In cultured hippocampal neurons, RAD140 was as effective as testosterone in reducing cell death induced by apoptotic insults. Mechanistically, RAD140 neuroprotection was dependent upon MAPK signaling, as evidenced by elevation of ERK phosphorylation and inhibition of protection by the MAPK kinase inhibitor U0126. Importantly, RAD140 was also neuroprotective in vivo using the rat kainate lesion model. In experiments with gonadectomized, adult male rats, RAD140 was shown to exhibit peripheral tissue-specific androgen action that largely spared prostate, neural efficacy as demonstrated by activation of androgenic gene regulation effects, and neuroprotection of hippocampal neurons against cell death caused by systemic administration of the excitotoxin kainate. These novel findings demonstrate initial preclinical efficacy of a SARM in neuroprotective actions relevant to Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Differential impact of Met receptor gene interaction with early-life stress on neuronal morphology and behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heun-Johnson, Hanke; Levitt, Pat

    2018-02-01

    Early adversity in childhood increases the risk of anxiety, mood, and post-traumatic stress disorders in adulthood, and specific gene-by-environment interactions may increase risk further. A common functional variant in the promoter region of the gene encoding the human MET receptor tyrosine kinase (rs1858830 ' C' allele) reduces expression of MET and is associated with altered cortical circuit function and structural connectivity. Mice with reduced Met expression exhibit changes in anxiety-like and conditioned fear behavior, precocious synaptic maturation in the hippocampus, and reduced neuronal arbor complexity and synaptogenesis. These phenotypes also can be produced independently by early adversity in wild-type mice. The present study addresses the outcome of combining early-life stress and genetic influences that alter timing of maturation on enduring functional and structural phenotypes. Using a model of reduced Met expression ( Met +/- ) and early-life stress from postnatal day 2-9, social, anxiety-like, and contextual fear behaviors in later life were measured. Mice that experienced early-life stress exhibited impairments in social interaction, whereas alterations in anxiety-like behavior and fear learning were driven by Met haploinsufficiency, independent of rearing condition. Early-life stress or reduced Met expression decreased arbor complexity of ventral hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons projecting to basolateral amygdala. Paradoxically, arbor complexity in Met +/- mice was increased following early-life stress, and thus not different from arbors in wild-type mice raised in control conditions. The changes in dendritic morphology are consistent with the hypothesis that the physiological state of maturation of CA1 neurons in Met +/- mice influences their responsiveness to early-life stress. The dissociation of behavioral and structural changes suggests that there may be phenotype-specific sensitivities to early-life stress.

  16. Melanocortin 4 receptor ligands modulate energy homeostasis through urocortin 1 neurons of the centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füredi, Nóra; Nagy, Ákos; Mikó, Alexandra; Berta, Gergely; Kozicz, Tamás; Pétervári, Erika; Balaskó, Márta; Gaszner, Balázs

    2017-05-15

    The role of the urocortin 1 (Ucn1) expressing centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal (EWcp) nucleus in energy homeostasis and stress adaptation response has previously been investigated. Morphological and functional studies have proven that orexigenic and anorexigenic peptidergic afferents and receptors for endocrine messengers involved in the energy homeostasis are found in the EWcp. The central role of the hypothalamic melanocortin system in energy homeostasis is well known, however, no data have been published so far on possible crosstalk between melanocortins and EWcp-Ucn1. First, we hypothesized that members of the melanocortin system [i.e. alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), agouti-related peptide (AgRP), melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R)] would be expressed in the EWcp. Second, we put forward, that alpha-MSH and AgRP contents as well as neuronal activity and Ucn1 peptide content of the EWcp would be affected by fasting. Third, we assumed that the intra-EWcp injections of exogenous MC4R agonists and antagonist would cause food intake-related and metabolic changes. Ucn1 neurons were found to carry MC4Rs, and they were contacted both by alpha-MSH and AgRP immunoreactive nerve fibers in the rat. The alpha-MSH immunosignal was reduced, while that of AgRP was increased upon starvation. These were associated with the elevation of FosB and Ucn1 expression. The intra-EWcp administration of MC4R blocker (i.e. HS024) had a similar, but enhanced effect on FosB and Ucn1. Furthermore, alpha-MSH injected into the EWcp had anorexigenic effect, increased oxygen consumption and caused peripheral vasodilation. We conclude that the melanocortin system influences the EWcp that contributes to energy-homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Amino acid- vs. peptide-odorants: responses of individual olfactory receptor neurons in an aquatic species.

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    Thomas Hassenklöver

    Full Text Available Amino acids are widely used waterborne olfactory stimuli proposed to serve as cues in the search for food. In natural waters the main source of amino acids is the decomposition of proteins. But this process also produces a variety of small peptides as intermediate cleavage products. In the present study we tested whether amino acids actually are the natural and adequate stimuli for the olfactory receptors they bind to. Alternatively, these olfactory receptors could be peptide receptors which also bind amino acids though at lower affinity. Employing calcium imaging in acute slices of the main olfactory epithelium of the fully aquatic larvae of Xenopus laevis we show that amino acids, and not peptides, are more effective waterborne odorants.

  18. Glucocorticoid receptor action in metabolic and neuronal function [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Garabedian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR have effects on a variety of cell types, eliciting important physiological responses via changes in gene expression and signaling. Although decades of research have illuminated the mechanism of how this important steroid receptor controls gene expression using in vitro and cell culture–based approaches, how GR responds to changes in external signals in vivo under normal and pathological conditions remains elusive. The goal of this review is to highlight recent work on GR action in fat cells and liver to affect metabolism in vivo and the role GR ligands and receptor phosphorylation play in calibrating signaling outputs by GR in the brain in health and disease. We also suggest that both the brain and fat tissue communicate to affect physiology and behavior and that understanding this “brain-fat axis” will enable a more complete understanding of metabolic diseases and inform new ways to target them.

  19. Immunoglobulin Fc gamma receptor promotes immunoglobulin uptake, immunoglobulin-mediated calcium increase, and neurotransmitter release in motor neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Habib A.; Mosier, Dennis R.; Zou, Ling L.; Siklos, Laszlo; Alexianu, Maria E.; Engelhardt, Jozsef I.; Beers, David R.; Le, Wei-dong; Appel, Stanley H.

    2002-01-01

    Receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG; FcgammaRs) facilitate IgG uptake by effector cells as well as cellular responses initiated by IgG binding. In earlier studies, we demonstrated that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient IgG can be taken up by motor neuron terminals and transported retrogradely to the cell body and can alter the function of neuromuscular synapses, such as increasing intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release from motor axon terminals after passive transfer. In the present study, we examined whether FcgammaR-mediated processes can contribute to these effects of ALS patient immunoglobulins. F(ab')(2) fragments (which lack the Fc portion) of ALS patient IgG were not taken up by motor axon terminals and were not retrogradely transported. Furthermore, in a genetically modified mouse lacking the gamma subunit of the FcR, the uptake of whole ALS IgG and its ability to enhance intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release were markedly attenuated. These data suggest that FcgammaRs appear to participate in IgG uptake into motor neurons as well as IgG-mediated increases in intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release from motor axon terminals. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Bitter-sensitive gustatory receptor neuron responds to chemically diverse insect repellents in the common malaria mosquito Anopheles quadrimaculatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Jackson T.; Dickens, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    Female mosquitoes feed on blood from animal hosts to obtain nutritional resources used for egg production. These contacts facilitate the spread of harmful human diseases. Chemical repellents are used to disrupt mosquito host-seeking and blood-feeding behaviors; however, little is known about the gustatory sensitivity of mosquitoes to known repellents. Here, we recorded electrical responses from gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs) housed within the labellar sensilla of female Anopheles quadrimaculatus to N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET), picaridin, IR3535, 2-undecanone, p-menthane-3,8-diol, geraniol, trans-2-hexen-1-ol, quinine, and quinidine. A bitter-sensitive GRN responded to all tested repellents and quinine, a known feeding deterrent. Responses of the bitter-sensitive neuron to quinine and an isomer, quinidine, did not differ. Delayed bursts of electrical activity were observed in response to continuous stimulation with synthetic repellents at high concentrations. Electrophysiological recordings from bitter-sensitive GRNs associated with mosquito gustatory sensilla represent a convenient model to evaluate candidate repellents.

  1. Muscle expression of mutant androgen receptor accounts for systemic and motor neuron disease phenotypes in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Constanza J; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Guo, Ling T; Hung, Gene; Tsunemi, Taiji; Ly, Linda; Tokunaga, Seiya; Lopez, Edith; Sopher, Bryce L; Bennett, C Frank; Shelton, G Diane; Cleveland, Don W; La Spada, Albert R

    2014-04-16

    X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by adult-onset muscle weakness and lower motor neuron degeneration. SBMA is caused by CAG-polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat expansions in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Pathological findings include motor neuron loss, with polyQ-AR accumulation in intranuclear inclusions. SBMA patients exhibit myopathic features, suggesting a role for muscle in disease pathogenesis. To determine the contribution of muscle, we developed a BAC mouse model featuring a floxed first exon to permit cell-type-specific excision of human AR121Q. BAC fxAR121 mice develop systemic and neuromuscular phenotypes, including shortened survival. After validating termination of AR121 expression and full rescue with ubiquitous Cre, we crossed BAC fxAR121 mice with Human Skeletal Actin-Cre mice. Muscle-specific excision prevented weight loss, motor phenotypes, muscle pathology, and motor neuronopathy and dramatically extended survival. Our results reveal a crucial role for muscle expression of polyQ-AR in SBMA and suggest muscle-directed therapies as effective treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurotrophic-priming of glucocorticoid receptor signaling is essential for neuronal plasticity to stress and antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango-Lievano, Margarita; Lambert, W Marcus; Bath, Kevin G; Garabedian, Michael J; Chao, Moses V; Jeanneteau, Freddy

    2015-12-22

    Neurotrophins and glucocorticoids are robust synaptic modifiers, and deregulation of their activities is a risk factor for developing stress-related disorders. Low levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) increase the desensitization of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) and vulnerability to stress, whereas higher levels of BDNF facilitate GR-mediated signaling and the response to antidepressants. However, the molecular mechanism underlying neurotrophic-priming of GR function is poorly understood. Here we provide evidence that activation of a TrkB-MAPK pathway, when paired with the deactivation of a GR-protein phosphatase 5 pathway, resulted in sustained GR phosphorylation at BDNF-sensitive sites that is essential for the transcription of neuronal plasticity genes. Genetic strategies that disrupted GR phosphorylation or TrkB signaling in vivo impaired the neuroplasticity to chronic stress and the effects of the antidepressant fluoxetine. Our findings reveal that the coordinated actions of BDNF and glucocorticoids promote neuronal plasticity and that disruption in either pathway could set the stage for the development of stress-induced psychiatric diseases.

  3. Requirement of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subunit β2 in the Maintenance of Spiral Ganglion Neurons during Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jianxin; Lei, Debin; Du, Yafei; Ohlemiller, Kevin K.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Role, Lorna W.

    2008-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) is a major health concern for the elderly. Loss of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), the primary sensory relay of the auditory system, is associated consistently with presbycusis. The causative molecular events responsible for age-related loss of SGNs are unknown. Recent reports directly link age-related neuronal loss in cerebral cortex with the loss of high-affinity nicotine acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). In cochlea, cholinergic synapses are made by olivocochlear efferent fibers on the outer hair cells that express α9 nAChR subunits and on the peripheral projections of SGNs that express α2, α4 –7, and β2–3 nAChR subunits. A significantly decreased expression of the β2 nAChR subunit in SGNs was found specifically in mice susceptible to presbycusis. Furthermore, mice lacking the β2 nAChR subunit (β2−/−), but not mice lacking the α5 nAChR subunit (α5−/−), have dramatic hearing loss and significant reduction in the number of SGNs. Our findings clearly established a requirement for β2 nAChR subunit in the maintenance of SGNs during aging. PMID:15788760

  4. FLP-4 neuropeptide and its receptor in a neuronal circuit regulate preference choice through functions of ASH-2 trithorax complex in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yonglin; Zhi, Lingtong; Guan, Xiangmin; Wang, Daoyong; Wang, Dayong

    2016-02-18

    Preference choice on food is an important response strategy for animals living in the environment. Using assay system of preference choice on bacterial foods, OP50 and PA14, we identified the involvement of ADL sensory neurons in the control of preference choice in Caenorhabditis elegans. Both genetically silencing and ChR2-mediated activation of ADL sensory neurons significantly affected preference choice. ADL regulated preference choice by inhibiting function of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)/SRH-220. ADL sensory neurons might regulate preference choice through peptidergic signals of FLP-4 and NLP-10, and function of FLP-4 or NLP-10 in regulating preference choice was regulated by SRH-220. FLP-4 released from ADL sensory neurons further regulated preference choice through its receptor of NPR-4 in AIB interneurons. In AIB interneurons, NPR-4 was involved in the control of preference choice by activating the functions of ASH-2 trithorax complex consisting of SET-2, ASH-2, and WDR-5, implying the crucial role of molecular machinery of trimethylation of histone H3K4 in the preference choice control. The identified novel neuronal circuit and the underlying molecular mechanisms will strengthen our understanding neuronal basis of preference choice in animals.

  5. Fibronectin type III (FN3) modules of the neuronal cell adhesion molecule L1 interact directly with the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Li, Shizhong; Hinsby, Anders Mørkeberg

    2008-01-01

    The neuronal cell adhesion molecule (CAM) L1 promotes axonal outgrowth, presumably through an interaction with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). The present study demonstrates a direct interaction between L1 fibronectin type III (FN3) modules I-V and FGFR1 immunoglobulin (Ig) modules II...

  6. Modulation of gene expression of adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors in rat's neuronal cells exposed to L-glutamate and [60]fullerene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giust, Davide; Da Ros, Tatiana; Martín, Mairena; Albasanz, José Luis

    2014-08-01

    L-Glutamate (L-Glu) has been often associated not only to fundamental physiological roles, as learning and memory, but also to neuronal cell death and the genesis and development of important neurodegenerative diseases. Herein we studied the variation in the adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors expression induced by L-Glu treatment in rat's cortical neurons. The possibility to have structural alteration of the cells induced by L-Glu (100 nM, 1 and 10 microM) has been addressed, studying the modulation of microtubule associated protein-2 (MAP-2) and neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH), natively associated proteins to the dendritic shape maintenance. Results showed that the proposed treatments were not destabilizing the cells, so the L-Glu concentrations were acceptable to investigate fluctuation in receptors expression, which were studied by RT-PCR. Interestingly, C60 fullerene derivative t3ss elicited a protective effect against glutamate toxicity, as demonstrated by MTT assay. In addition, t3ss compound exerted a different effect on the adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors analyzed. Interestingly, A(2A) and mGlu1 mRNAs were significantly decreased in conditions were t3ss neuroprotected cortical neurons from L-Glu toxicity. In summary, t3ss protects neurons from glutamate toxicity in a process that appears to be associated with the modulation of the gene expression of adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors.

  7. Activation of Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Increases Proliferation but does not Influence Neuronal Differentiation of a Human Neural Stem Cell Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Anne; Blaabjerg, Morten; Kamand, Morad

    2018-01-01

    -positive immature neurons and glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes. Stimulation of mGluR2/3 receptors during cell propagation using the agonist (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl) glycine (DCG-IV) increased total cell numbers significantly (60% compared to untreated controls). This effect...

  8. Prior Activation of Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptors Suppresses the Subsequent Induction of Long-Term Potentiation in Hippocampal CA1 Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Goto, Jun-Ichi; Fujiwara, Hiroki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) activated by preconditioning low-frequency afferent stimulation (LFS) in the subsequent induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in CA1 neurons in hippocampal slices from mature guinea pigs. Induction of LTP in the field excitatory postsynaptic potential or the population…

  9. A peptide derived from the CD loop-D helix region of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces neuronal differentiation and survival by binding to the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor and common cytokine receptor chain gp130

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathje, Mette; Pankratova, Stanislava; Nielsen, Janne

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces neuronal differentiation and promotes the survival of various neuronal cell types by binding to a receptor complex formed by CNTF receptor a (CNTFRa), gp130, and the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor (LIFR). The CD loop-D helix region of CNTF has...... that these receptors are involved in the effects of cintrofin. The C-terminal part of the peptide, corresponding to the D helix region of CNTF, was shown to be essential for the neuritogenic action of the peptide. CNTF and LIF induced neurite outgrowth in CGNs plated on laminin-coated slides. On uncoated slides, CNTF...... similar to those induced by CNTF and may be a valuable survival agent with possible therapeutic potential....

  10. Rapid glucocorticoid-induced activation of TRP and CB1 receptors causes biphasic modulation of glutamate release in gastric-related hypothalamic preautonomic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carie R. Boychuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids rapidly regulate synaptic input to neuroendocrine cells in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN by inducing the retrograde release of endogenous messengers. Here we investigated the rapid effects of dexamethasone (DEX on excitatory synaptic input to feeding-related, preautonomic PVN neurons using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. In ~50% of identified gastric-related preautonomic PVN neurons, DEX elicited a biphasic synaptic response characterized by an initial rapid and transient increase in the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs, followed by a decrease in mEPSC frequency within 9 min; remaining cells displayed only a decrease in mEPSC frequency. The late-phase decrease in mEPSC frequency was mimicked by the cannabinoid receptor agonists anandamide and WIN 55,212-2, and it was blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251. The biphasic DEX effect was mimicked by anandamide (AEA. The early increase in mEPSCs was mimicked by activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1 receptors with capsaicin and by activation of TRPV4 receptors with 4-α-PDD. The increase was reduced, but not blocked, by selective TRPV1 antagonists and in TRPV1-knockout mice; it was blocked completely by the broad-spectrum TRPV antagonist ruthenium red and by combined application of selective TRPV1 and TRPV4 antagonists. The DEX effects were prevented entirely by intracellular infusion of the G-protein inhibitor, GDPβS. Thus, DEX biphasically modulates synaptic glutamate onto a subset of gastric-related PVN neurons, which is likely mediated by induction of a retrograde messenger. The effect includes a TRPV1/4 receptor-mediated transient increase and subsequent CB1 receptor-mediated suppression of glutamate release. Multiphasic modulation of glutamate input to PVN neurons represents a previously unappreciated complexity of control of autonomic output by glucocorticoids and eCBs.

  11. Water-soluble LYNX1 Residues Important for Interaction with Muscle-type and/or Neuronal Nicotinic Receptors*