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Sample records for stress-induced depressive-like behavior

  1. Dynamic microglial alterations underlie stress-induced depressive-like behavior and suppressed neurogenesis.

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    Kreisel, T; Frank, M G; Licht, T; Reshef, R; Ben-Menachem-Zidon, O; Baratta, M V; Maier, S F; Yirmiya, R

    2014-06-01

    The limited success in understanding the pathophysiology of major depression may result from excessive focus on the dysfunctioning of neurons, as compared with other types of brain cells. Therefore, we examined the role of dynamic alterations in microglia activation status in the development of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS)-induced depressive-like condition in rodents. We report that following an initial period (2-3 days) of stress-induced microglial proliferation and activation, some microglia underwent apoptosis, leading to reductions in their numbers within the hippocampus, but not in other brain regions, following 5 weeks of CUS exposure. At that time, microglia displayed reduced expression of activation markers as well as dystrophic morphology. Blockade of the initial stress-induced microglial activation by minocycline or by transgenic interleukin-1 receptor antagonist overexpression rescued the subsequent microglial apoptosis and decline, as well as the CUS-induced depressive-like behavior and suppressed neurogenesis. Similarly, the antidepressant drug imipramine blocked the initial stress-induced microglial activation as well as the CUS-induced microglial decline and depressive-like behavior. Treatment of CUS-exposed mice with either endotoxin, macrophage colony-stimulating factor or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, all of which stimulated hippocampal microglial proliferation, partially or completely reversed the depressive-like behavior and dramatically increased hippocampal neurogenesis, whereas treatment with imipramine or minocycline had minimal or no anti-depressive effects, respectively, in these mice. These findings provide direct causal evidence that disturbances in microglial functioning has an etiological role in chronic stress-induced depression, suggesting that microglia stimulators could serve as fast-acting anti-depressants in some forms of depressive and stress-related conditions.

  2. TRH and TRH receptor system in the basolateral amygdala mediate stress-induced depression-like behaviors.

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    Choi, Juli; Kim, Ji-eun; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Park, Jin-Young; Lee, Jung-Eun; Kim, Hannah; Lee, Eun-Hwa; Han, Pyung-Lim

    2015-10-01

    Chronic stress is a potent risk factor for depression, but the mechanism by which stress causes depression is not fully understood. To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying stress-induced depression, C57BL/6 inbred mice were treated with repeated restraint to induce lasting depressive behavioral changes. Behavioral states of individual animals were evaluated using the forced swim test, which measures psychomotor withdrawals, and the U-field test, which measures sociability. From these behavioral analyses, individual mice that showed depression-like behaviors in both psychomotor withdrawal and sociability tests, and individuals that showed a resiliency to stress-induced depression in both tests were selected. Among the neuropeptides expressed in the amygdala, thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) was identified as being persistently up-regulated in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in individuals exhibiting severe depressive behaviors in the two behavior tests, but not in individuals displaying a stress resiliency. Activation of TRH receptors by local injection of TRH in the BLA in normal mice produced depressive behaviors, mimicking chronic stress effects, whereas siRNA-mediated suppression of either TRH or TRHR1 in the BLA completely blocked stress-induced depressive symptoms. The TRHR1 agonist, taltirelin, injection in the BLA increased the level of p-ERK, which mimicked the increased p-ERK level in the BLA that was induced by treatment with repeated stress. Stereotaxic injection of U0126, a potent inhibitor of the ERK pathway, within the BLA blocked stress-induced behavioral depression. These results suggest that repeated stress produces lasting depression-like behaviors via the up-regulation of TRH and TRH receptors in the BLA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Persistent Increase in Microglial RAGE Contributes to Chronic Stress-Induced Priming of Depressive-like Behavior.

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    Franklin, Tina C; Wohleb, Eric S; Zhang, Yi; Fogaça, Manoela; Hare, Brendan; Duman, Ronald S

    2018-01-01

    Chronic stress-induced inflammatory responses occur in part via danger-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules, such as high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), but the receptor(s) underlying DAMP signaling have not been identified. Microglia morphology and DAMP signaling in enriched rat hippocampal microglia were examined during the development and expression of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS)-induced behavioral deficits, including long-term, persistent changes after CUS. The results show that CUS promotes significant morphological changes and causes robust upregulation of HMGB1 messenger RNA in enriched hippocampal microglia, an effect that persists for up to 6 weeks after CUS exposure. This coincides with robust and persistent upregulation of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) messenger RNA, but not toll-like receptor 4 in hippocampal microglia. CUS also increased surface expression of RAGE protein on hippocampal microglia as determined by flow cytometry and returned to basal levels 5 weeks after CUS. Importantly, exposure to short-term stress was sufficient to increase RAGE surface expression as well as anhedonic behavior, reflecting a primed state that results from a persistent increase in RAGE messenger RNA expression. Further evidence for DAMP signaling in behavioral responses is provided by evidence that HMGB1 infusion into the hippocampus was sufficient to cause anhedonic behavior and by evidence that RAGE knockout mice were resilient to stress-induced anhedonia. Together, the results provide evidence of persistent microglial HMGB1-RAGE expression that increases vulnerability to depressive-like behaviors long after chronic stress exposure. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior by Upregulation of Sirt-1: Involvement in Suppression of Hippocampal Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

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    Liu, Shu-Yun; Li, Dan; Zeng, Hai-Ying; Kan, Li-Yuan; Zou, Wei; Zhang, Ping; Gu, Hong-Feng; Tang, Xiao-Qing

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a crucial signaling molecule with a wide range of physiological functions. Previously, we confirmed that stress-induced depression is accompanied with disturbance of H2S generation in hippocampus. The present work attempted to investigate the inhibitory effect of H2S on chronic unpredictable mild stress-induced depressive-like behaviors and the underlying mechanism. We established the rat model of chronic unpredictable mild stress to simulate depression. Open field test, forced swim test, and tail suspension test were used to assess depressive-like behaviors. The expression of Sirt-1 and three marked proteins related to endoplasmic reticulum stress (GRP-78, CHOP, and cleaved caspase-12) were detected by western blot. We found that chronic unpredictable mild stress-exposed rats exhibit depression-like behavior responses, including significantly increased immobility time in the forced swim test and tail suspension test, and decreased climbing time and swimming time in the forced swim test. In parallel, chronic unpredictable mild stress-exposed rats showed elevated levels of hippocampal endoplasmic reticulum stress and reduced levels of Sirt-1. However, NaHS (a donor of H2S) not only alleviated chronic unpredictable mild stress-induced depressive-like behaviors and hippocampal endoplasmic reticulum stress, but it also increased the expression of hippocampal Sirt-1 in chronic unpredictable mild stress-exposed rats. Furthermore, Sirtinol, an inhibitor of Sirt-1, reversed the protective effects of H2S against chronic unpredictable mild stress-induced depression-like behaviors and hippocampal endoplasmic reticulum stress. These results demonstrated that H2S has an antidepressant potential, and the underlying mechanism is involved in the inhibition of hippocampal endoplasmic reticulum stress by upregulation of Sirt-1 in hippocampus. These findings identify H2S as a novel therapeutic target for depression.

  5. β-Asarone Reverses Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress-Induced Depression-Like Behavior and Promotes Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Rats

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    Haiying Dong

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the influence of β-asarone, the major ingredient of Acorus tatarinowii Schott, on depressive-like behavior induced by the chronic unpredictable mild stresses (CUMS paradigm and to clarify the underlying mechanisms. The results show that β-asarone treatment partially reversed the CUMS-induced depression-like behaviors in both the forced swim and sucrose preference tests. The behavioral effects were associated with increased hippocampal neurogenesis indicated by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU immunoreactivity. β-Asarone treatment significantly increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF at levels of transcription and translation. Moreover, CUMS caused significant reduction in ERK1/2 and CREB phosphorylation, both of which were partially attenuated by β-asarone administration. It is important to note that β-asarone treatment had no effect on total levels or phosphorylation state of any of the proteins examined in ERK1/2-CREB pathway in no stress rats, suggesting that β-asarone acts in a stress-dependent manner to block ERK1/2-CREB signaling. We did not observe a complete reversal of depression-like behaviors to control levels by β-asarone. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that adult neurogenesis is involved in the antidepressant-like behavioral effects of β-asarone, suggesting that β-asarone is a promising candidate for the treatment of depression.

  6. Increased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL in the brain is associated with resilience to stress-induced depression-like behavior.

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    Dygalo, Nikolay N; Kalinina, Tatyana S; Bulygina, Veta V; Shishkina, Galina T

    2012-07-01

    Clinical observations and the results of animal studies have implicated changes in neuronal survival and plasticity in both the etiology of mood disorders, especially stress-induced depression, and anti-depressant drug action. Stress may predispose individuals toward depression through down-regulation of neurogenesis and an increase in apoptosis in the brain. Substantial individual differences in vulnerability to stress are evident in humans and were found in experimental animals. Recent studies revealed an association between the brain anti-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma like X, long variant (Bcl-xL) expression and individual differences in behavioral vulnerability to stress. The ability to increase Bcl-xL gene expression in the hippocampus in response to stress may be an important factor for determining the resistance to the development of stress-induced depression. Treatment with anti-depressant drugs may change Bcl-xL response properties. In the rat brainstem, expression of this anti-apoptotic gene becomes sensitive to swim stress during the long-term fluoxetine treatment, an effect that appeared concomitantly with the anti-depressant-like action of the drug in the forced swim test, suggesting that Bcl-xL may be a new target for depression therapy. The processes and pathways linking stress stimuli to behavior via intracellular anti-apoptotic protein are discussed here in the context of Bcl-xL functions in the mechanisms of individual differences in behavioral resilience to stress and anti-depressant-induced effects on the behavioral despair.

  7. Retracted: Umbelliferone reverses depression-like behavior in chronic unpredictable mild stress-induced mice via RIP140/NF-κB pathway.

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    Chunhua, Ma; Lingdong, Kong; Hongyan, Long; Zhangqiang, Ma

    2016-10-05

    The above article from IUBMB Life, published online on October 5th, 2016 in Wiley Online Library (http://wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the Journal Editors-in-Chief, Dr. Angelo Azzi and Dr. William Whelan, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed because the article was submitted and approved for publication by Chunhua Ma and Long Hongyan without consent in any form by the named Corresponding Author, Kong Lingdong. Chunhua, M., Lingdong, K., Hongyan, L. and Zhangqiang, M. (2016), Umbelliferone reverses depression-like behavior in chronic unpredictable mild stress-induced mice via RIP140/NF-κB pathway. IUBMB Life. doi:10.1002/iub.1570 © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(9):767-767, 2017. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  8. The ROCK Inhibitor Fasudil Prevents Chronic Restraint Stress-Induced Depressive-Like Behaviors and Dendritic Spine Loss in Rat Hippocampus.

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    García-Rojo, Gonzalo; Fresno, Cristóbal; Vilches, Natalia; Díaz-Véliz, Gabriela; Mora, Sergio; Aguayo, Felipe; Pacheco, Aníbal; Parra-Fiedler, Nicolás; Parra, Claudio S; Rojas, Paulina S; Tejos, Macarena; Aliaga, Esteban; Fiedler, Jenny L

    2017-04-01

    Dendritic arbor simplification and dendritic spine loss in the hippocampus, a limbic structure implicated in mood disorders, are assumed to contribute to symptoms of depression. These morphological changes imply modifications in dendritic cytoskeleton. Rho GTPases are regulators of actin dynamics through their effector Rho kinase. We have reported that chronic stress promotes depressive-like behaviors in rats along with dendritic spine loss in apical dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons, changes associated with Rho kinase activation. The present study proposes that the Rho kinase inhibitor Fasudil may prevent the stress-induced behavior and dendritic spine loss. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with saline or Fasudil (i.p., 10 mg/kg) starting 4 days prior to and maintained during the restraint stress procedure (2.5 h/d for 14 days). Nonstressed control animals were injected with saline or Fasudil for 18 days. At 24 hours after treatment, forced swimming test, Golgi-staining, and immuno-western blot were performed. Fasudil prevented stress-induced immobility observed in the forced swimming test. On the other hand, Fasudil-treated control animals showed behavioral patterns similar to those of saline-treated controls. Furthermore, we observed that stress induced an increase in the phosphorylation of MYPT1 in the hippocampus, an exclusive target of Rho kinase. This change was accompanied by dendritic spine loss of apical dendrites of pyramidal hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, increased pMYPT1 levels and spine loss were both prevented by Fasudil administration. Our findings suggest that Fasudil may prevent the development of abnormal behavior and spine loss induced by chronic stress by blocking Rho kinase activity.

  9. Prenatal stress induces depressive-like behavior in a sex-specific manner; impact of familiar versus novel environments

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    Sickmann, Helle Mark; Arentzen, Tine S; Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard

    plus maze, EPM), and sleep behavior (via EEG recordings) was assessed in male and female offspring. In addition, half of PS and control animals, respectively, were exposed to an acute stressor prior to the behavioral tests. Weight gain during the last part of the pregnancy was significantly reduced......Stress, including prenatal maternal stress, increases affective disorder morbidity. Furthermore, women appear twice as likely as men to develop stress- and depression-related disorders. Some of the behaviors associated with depression are also found in rat offspring following maternal prenatal...... stress (PS) incl. increased helplessness and altered anxiety response. Our purpose was to investigate behavioral depression indices following PS and potential differences between male and female offspring. To this end, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to repeated variable stress on days 13...

  10. Social defeat stress induces depression-like behavior and alters spine morphology in the hippocampus of adolescent male C57BL/6 mice

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    Sergio D. Iñiguez

    2016-12-01

    Hippocampi were then dissected and Western blots were conducted to quantify protein levels for various markers important for synaptic plasticity including protein kinase M zeta (PKMζ, protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ, the dopamine-1 (D1 receptor, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, and the dopamine transporter (DAT. Furthermore, we examined the presence of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA-receptor subunit GluA2 as well as colocalization with the post-synaptic density 95 (PSD95 protein, within different spine subtypes (filopodia, stubby, long-thin, mushroom using an immunohistochemistry and Golgi-Cox staining technique. The results revealed that social defeat induced a depression-like behavioral profile, as inferred from decreased social interaction levels, increased immobility on the tail suspension test, and decreases in body weight. Whole hippocampal immunoblots revealed decreases in GluA2, with a concomitant increase in DAT and TH levels in the stressed group. Spine morphology analyses further showed that defeated mice displayed a significant decrease in stubby spines, and an increase in long-thin spines within the CA1 stratum radiatum. Further evaluation of GluA2/PSD95 containing-spines demonstrated a decrease of these markers within long-thin and mushroom spine types. Together, these results indicate that juvenile social stress induces GluA2- and dopamine-associated dysregulation in the hippocampus – a neurobiological mechanism potentially underlying the development of mood-related syndromes as a consequence of adolescent bullying.

  11. Personality traits in rats predict vulnerability and resilience to developing stress-induced depression-like behaviors, HPA axis hyper-reactivity and brain changes in pERK1/2 activity.

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    Castro, Jorge E; Diessler, Shanaz; Varea, Emilio; Márquez, Cristina; Larsen, Marianne H; Cordero, M Isabel; Sandi, Carmen

    2012-08-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that certain behavioral traits, such as anxiety, are associated with the development of depression-like behaviors after exposure to chronic stress. However, single traits do not explain the wide variability in vulnerability to stress observed in outbred populations. We hypothesized that a combination of behavioral traits might provide a better characterization of an individual's vulnerability to prolonged stress. Here, we sought to determine whether the characterization of relevant behavioral traits in rats could aid in identifying individuals with different vulnerabilities to developing stress-induced depression-like behavioral alterations. We also investigated whether behavioral traits would be related to the development of alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and in brain activity - as measured through phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2)--in response to an acute stressor following either sub-chronic (2 weeks) or chronic (4 weeks) unpredictable stress (CUS). Sprague-Dawley rats were characterized using a battery of behavioral tasks, and three principal traits were identified: anxiety, exploration and activity. When combined, the first two traits were found to explain the variability in the stress responses. Our findings confirm the increased risk of animals with high anxiety developing certain depression-like behaviors (e.g., increased floating time in the forced swim test) when progressively exposed to stress. In contrast, the behavioral profile based on combined low anxiety and low exploration was resistant to alterations related to social behaviors, while the high anxiety and low exploration profile displayed a particularly vulnerable pattern of physiological and neurobiological responses after sub-chronic stress exposure. Our findings indicate important differences in animals' vulnerability and/or resilience to the effects of repeated stress, particularly during initial or

  12. Anti-depressant like effect of curcumin and its combination with piperine in unpredictable chronic stress-induced behavioral, biochemical and neurochemical changes.

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    Bhutani, Mohit Kumar; Bishnoi, Mahendra; Kulkarni, Shrinivas K

    2009-03-01

    Curcumin, a yellow pigment extracted from rhizomes of the plant Curcuma longa (turmeric), has been widely used as food additive and also as a herbal medicine throughout Asia. The present study was designed to study the pharmacological, biochemical and neurochemical effects of daily administration of curcumin to rats subjected to chronic unpredictable stress. Curcumin treatment (20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p., 21 days) significantly reversed the chronic unpredictable stress-induced behavioral (increase immobility period), biochemical (increase monoamine oxidase activity) and neurochemical (depletion of brain monoamine levels) alterations. The combination of piperine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p., 21 days), a bioavailability enhancer, with curcumin (20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p., 21 days) showed significant potentiation of its anti-immobility, neurotransmitter enhancing (serotonin and dopamine) and monoamine oxidase inhibitory (MAO-A) effects as compared to curcumin effect per se. This study provided a scientific rationale for the use of curcumin and its co-administration with piperine in the treatment of depressive disorders.

  13. Chronic Postnatal Stress Induces Depressive-like Behavior in Male Mice and Programs second-Hit Stress-Induced Gene Expression Patterns of OxtR and AvpR1a in Adulthood.

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    Lesse, Alexandra; Rether, Kathy; Gröger, Nicole; Braun, Katharina; Bock, Jörg

    2017-08-01

    Chronic stress (CS) during early life represents a major risk factor for the development of mental disorders, including depression. According to the Two/Multiple-Hit hypothesis, the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders usually involves multiple stressors experienced subsequently during different phases of life. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms modulating neuronal and behavioral changes induced by multiple stress experiences are just poorly understood. Since the oxytocinergic and vasopressinergic systems are neuroendocrine modulators involved in environmentally driven adaptations of stress sensitivity we hypothesized that postnatal CS programs oxytocinergic and vasopressinergic receptor expression changes in response to a second stress exposure in young adulthood. First we investigated if postnatal CS (maternal separation + social isolation) induces depressive-like behavior and alters oxytocin receptor (OxtR) and arginine vasopressin receptor type 1a (AvpR1a) gene expression in the hippocampus (HC) of male mice and (2) if a second single stressor (forced swimming, FS) in young adulthood affects gene expression of OxtR and AvpR1a at adulthood dependent on CS pre-experience. We found that postnatal CS induced depressive-like behavior and enhanced AvpR1a expression in HC at young adulthood. Moreover, in line with our hypothesis, only combined stress exposure (CS + FS), but not CS or FS alone, resulted in increased gene expression of OxtR in HC at adulthood. In contrast, AvpR1a expression was decreased in both adult FS and CS + FS animals. Overall, our results provide evidence that CS programs neuroendocrine systems and thereby influences stress responses in later life periods.

  14. Personality traits in rats predict vulnerability and resilience to developing stress-induced depression-like behaviors, HPA axis hyper-reactivity and brain changes in pERK1/2 activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro, Jorge E; Diessler, Shanaz; Varea, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    , the first two traits were found to explain the variability in the stress responses. Our findings confirm the increased risk of animals with high anxiety developing certain depression-like behaviors (e.g., increased floating time in the forced swim test) when progressively exposed to stress. In contrast...... findings indicate important differences in animals' vulnerability and/or resilience to the effects of repeated stress, particularly during initial or intermediate levels of stress exposure, and they highlight that the behavioral inhibition profile of an animal provides a particular susceptibility...

  15. 24-hour-restraint stress induces long-term depressive-like phenotypes in mice

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    Zhou, Ying; Hu, Zhiqiang; Lou, Jingyu; Song, Wei; Li, Jing; Liang, Xiao; Chen, Chen; Wang, Shuai; Yang, Beimeng; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Xu; Song, Jinjing; Dong, Yujie; Chen, Shiqing; He, Lin; Xie, Qingguo; Chen, Xiaoping; Li, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing risk of mental disorders, such as acute stress disorder (ASD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among survivors who were trapped in rubble during earthquake. Such long-term impaction of a single acute restraint stress has not been extensively explored. In this study, we subjected mice to 24-hour-restraint to simulate the trapping episode, and investigated the acute (2 days after the restraint) and long-term (35 days after the restraint) impacts. Surprisingly, we found that the mice displayed depression-like behaviors, decreased glucose uptake in brain and reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis 35 days after the restraint. Differential expression profiling based on microarrays suggested that genes and pathways related to depression and other mental disorders were differentially expressed in both PFC and hippocampus. Furthermore, the depression-like phenotypes induced by 24-hour-restraint could be reversed by fluoxetine, a type of antidepressant drug. These findings demonstrated that a single severe stressful event could produce long-term depressive-like phenotypes. Moreover, the 24-hour-restraint stress mice could also be used for further studies on mood disorders. PMID:27609090

  16. Effect of (4a) a novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist on chronic unpredictable mild stress induced depressive-like behavior in mice: an approach using behavioral tests battery.

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    Kurhe, Yeshwant; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Gupta, Deepali; Thangaraj, Devadoss

    2015-01-01

    The inconsistent therapeutic outcome necessitates designing and identifying novel therapeutic interventions for depression. Hence, the present study deals with the investigation of antidepressant-like effects of a novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist (4-phenylpiperazin-1-yl) (quinoxalin-2-yl) methanone (4a) on chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) induced behavioral and biochemical alterations. Animals were subjected to different stressors for a period of 28 days. On day 15 after the subsequent stress procedure, mice were administered with (4a) (2 and 4 mg/kg p.o.), escitalopram (10 mg/kg p.o.), or vehicle (10 mL/kg p.o.) until day 28 along with the CUMS. Thereafter, behavioral battery tests like locomotor score, sucrose preference test, forced swim test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), and elevated plus maze (EPM) were performed. Biochemical assays like lipid peroxidation, nitrite levels, reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were estimated in the mice brain homogenate. (4a) Dose dependently attenuated the behavioral alterations by increasing the sucrose consumption, reducing the immobility time in FST and TST, increasing the open arm number of entries and time in EPM. Furthermore, biochemical alterations were reversed by (4a) as examined by reduced lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels and elevated antioxidant enzyme levels like GSH, catalase and SOD. (4a) exhibits antidepressant potential by reversing the CUMS induced behavioral and biochemical changes in mice.

  17. Possible Involvement of µ Opioid Receptor in the Antidepressant-Like Effect of Shuyu Formula in Restraint Stress-Induced Depression-Like Rats

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    Fu-rong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently μ opioid receptor (MOR has been shown to be closely associated with depression. Here we investigated the action of Shuyu, a Chinese herbal prescription, on repeated restraint stress induced depression-like rats, with specific attention to the role of MOR and the related signal cascade. Our results showed that repeated restraint stress caused significant depressive-like behaviors, as evidenced by reduced body weight gain, prolonged duration of immobility in forced swimming test, and decreased number of square-crossings and rearings in open field test. The stress-induced depression-like behaviors were relieved by Shuyu, which was accompanied by decreased expression of MOR in hippocampus. Furthermore, Shuyu upregulated BDNF protein expression, restored the activity of CREB, and stimulated MEK and ERK phosphorylation in hippocampus of stressed rats. More importantly, MOR is involved in the effects of Shuyu on these depression-related signals, as they can be strengthened by MOR antagonist CTAP. Collectively, these data indicated that the antidepressant-like properties of Shuyu are associated with MOR and the corresponding CREB, BDNF, MEK, and ERK signal pathway. Our study supports clinical use of Shuyu as an effective treatment of depression and also suggests that MOR might be a target for treatment of depression and developing novel antidepressants.

  18. Interferon-alpha induced depressive-like behavior in rats

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    Fischer, C. W.; Liebenberg, N.; Elfving, B.

    2013-01-01

    -Dawley rats (n=40, mean weight 328.3 (plus or minus) 1.55 g) received daily subcutaneous injections with human recombinant IFN-(alpha) (1null106 U/kg/day) or vehicle (saline) for one week. After six days, animals were tested either 1h or 24 hours after injection for depressive-like behavior using...... the saccharin preference test (SPT) and Forced Swim test (FST), which respectively measure anhedonia and behavioral despair in rodents. Results: IFN-a did not induce sickness behavior, indicated by similar body weight, food and water intake, temperature measurement and locomotor activity between the groups....... However, daily injections with IFN- (alpha) for one week induced a depressive-like phenotype as measured both after 1h and 24h in the FST and SPT. Discussion and perspective: Peripherally injected IFN- (alpha) crosses the blood-brain-barrier and reaches the central nervous system where psychological side...

  19. Lowering barometric pressure aggravates depression-like behavior in rats.

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    Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Fukaya, Kanoko; Mori, Rarami; Itoh, Mariko; Funakubo, Megumi; Sato, Jun

    2011-03-17

    Weather change has been known to influence the condition of patients with mood disorder. However, no animal studies have tested the influence of climatic factor on emotional impairment. In this study, we examined the effect of lowering barometric pressure (LP) in a climate-controlled room on immobility time in the forced swim test in rats, which is considered to be an index of behavioral despair (helplessness). When the rats were exposed to daily repeated forced swim, the immobility time gradually increased. This increment was inhibited by repeated administration of the antidepressant imipramine, suggesting that the immobility is an anxiety/depression-like behavior. LP exposure (20 hPa below the natural atmospheric pressure) further increased immobility time in rats submitted to repeated forced swim. In another series of experiments, we examined the effect of daily repeated LP exposure on the maintenance of immobility after withdrawal from 6-day repeated forced swim. When the rats were challenged with forced swim under natural atmospheric pressure on day 14 after the withdrawal, immobility time was significantly longer than in non-conditioned rats. These findings demonstrated that LP in the range of natural weather change augmented the depression-like behavior in rats. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Agomelatine, venlafaxine, and running exercise effectively prevent anxiety- and depression-like behaviors and memory impairment in restraint stressed rats.

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    Lapmanee, Sarawut; Charoenphandhu, Jantarima; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2017-01-01

    Several severe stressful situations, e.g., natural disaster, infectious disease out break, and mass casualty, are known to cause anxiety, depression and cognitive impairment, and preventive intervention for these stress complications is worth exploring. We have previously reported that the serotonin-norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitor, venlafaxine, as well as voluntary wheel running are effective in the treatment of anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in stressed rats. But whether they are able to prevent deleterious consequences of restraint stress in rats, such as anxiety/depression-like behaviors and memory impairment that occur afterward, was not known. Herein, male Wistar rats were pre-treated for 4 weeks with anti-anxiety/anti-depressive drugs, agomelatine and venlafaxine, or voluntary wheel running, followed by 4 weeks of restraint-induced stress. During the stress period, rats received neither drug nor exercise intervention. Our results showed that restraint stress induced mixed anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, and memory impairment as determined by elevated plus-maze, elevated T-maze, open field test (OFT), forced swimming test (FST), and Morris water maze (MWM). Both pharmacological pre-treatments and running successfully prevented the anxiety-like behavior, especially learned fear, in stressed rats. MWM test suggested that agomelatine, venlafaxine, and running could prevent stress-induced memory impairment, but only pharmacological treatments led to better novel object recognition behavior and positive outcome in FST. Moreover, western blot analysis demonstrated that venlafaxine and running exercise upregulated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the hippocampus. In conclusion, agomelatine, venlafaxine as well as voluntary wheel running had beneficial effects, i.e., preventing the restraint stress-induced anxiety/depression-like behaviors and memory impairment.

  1. Agomelatine, venlafaxine, and running exercise effectively prevent anxiety- and depression-like behaviors and memory impairment in restraint stressed rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarawut Lapmanee

    Full Text Available Several severe stressful situations, e.g., natural disaster, infectious disease out break, and mass casualty, are known to cause anxiety, depression and cognitive impairment, and preventive intervention for these stress complications is worth exploring. We have previously reported that the serotonin-norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitor, venlafaxine, as well as voluntary wheel running are effective in the treatment of anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in stressed rats. But whether they are able to prevent deleterious consequences of restraint stress in rats, such as anxiety/depression-like behaviors and memory impairment that occur afterward, was not known. Herein, male Wistar rats were pre-treated for 4 weeks with anti-anxiety/anti-depressive drugs, agomelatine and venlafaxine, or voluntary wheel running, followed by 4 weeks of restraint-induced stress. During the stress period, rats received neither drug nor exercise intervention. Our results showed that restraint stress induced mixed anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, and memory impairment as determined by elevated plus-maze, elevated T-maze, open field test (OFT, forced swimming test (FST, and Morris water maze (MWM. Both pharmacological pre-treatments and running successfully prevented the anxiety-like behavior, especially learned fear, in stressed rats. MWM test suggested that agomelatine, venlafaxine, and running could prevent stress-induced memory impairment, but only pharmacological treatments led to better novel object recognition behavior and positive outcome in FST. Moreover, western blot analysis demonstrated that venlafaxine and running exercise upregulated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression in the hippocampus. In conclusion, agomelatine, venlafaxine as well as voluntary wheel running had beneficial effects, i.e., preventing the restraint stress-induced anxiety/depression-like behaviors and memory impairment.

  2. Inflammasome signaling affects anxiety- and depressive-like behavior and gut microbiome composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, M-L; Inserra, A; Lewis, M D; Mastronardi, C A; Leong, L; Choo, J; Kentish, S; Xie, P; Morrison, M; Wesselingh, S L; Rogers, G B; Licinio, J

    2016-06-01

    The inflammasome is hypothesized to be a key mediator of the response to physiological and psychological stressors, and its dysregulation may be implicated in major depressive disorder. Inflammasome activation causes the maturation of caspase-1 and activation of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18, two proinflammatory cytokines involved in neuroimmunomodulation, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. In this study, C57BL/6 mice with genetic deficiency or pharmacological inhibition of caspase-1 were screened for anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, and locomotion at baseline and after chronic stress. We found that genetic deficiency of caspase-1 decreased depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, and conversely increased locomotor activity and skills. Caspase-1 deficiency also prevented the exacerbation of depressive-like behaviors following chronic stress. Furthermore, pharmacological caspase-1 antagonism with minocycline ameliorated stress-induced depressive-like behavior in wild-type mice. Interestingly, chronic stress or pharmacological inhibition of caspase-1 per se altered the fecal microbiome in a very similar manner. When stressed mice were treated with minocycline, the observed gut microbiota changes included increase in relative abundance of Akkermansia spp. and Blautia spp., which are compatible with beneficial effects of attenuated inflammation and rebalance of gut microbiota, respectively, and the increment in Lachnospiracea abundance was consistent with microbiota changes of caspase-1 deficiency. Our results suggest that the protective effect of caspase-1 inhibition involves the modulation of the relationship between stress and gut microbiota composition, and establishes the basis for a gut microbiota-inflammasome-brain axis, whereby the gut microbiota via inflammasome signaling modulate pathways that will alter brain function, and affect depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors. Our data also suggest that further elucidation of the gut microbiota

  3. ProBDNF Signaling Regulates Depression-Like Behaviors in Rodents under Chronic Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yin-Yin; Ruan, Chun-Sheng; Yang, Chun-Rui; Li, Jia-Yi; Kang, Zhi-Long; Zhou, Li; Liu, Dennis; Zeng, Yue-Qing; Wang, Ting-Hua; Tian, Chang-Fu; Liao, Hong; Bobrovskaya, Larisa; Zhou, Xin-Fu

    2016-11-01

    Chronic exposure to stressful environment is a key risk factor contributing to the development of depression. However, the mechanisms involved in this process are still unclear. Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) has long been investigated for its positive role in regulation of mood, although the role of its precursor, proBDNF, in regulation of mood is not known. In this study, using an unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) paradigm we found that the protein levels of proBDNF were increased in the neocortex and hippocampus of stressed mice and this UCMS-induced upregulation of proBDNF was abolished by chronic administration of fluoxetine. We then established a rat model of UCMS and found that the expression of proBDNF/p75NTR/sortilin was upregulated, whereas the expression of mature BDNF and TrkB was downregulated in both neocortex and hippocampus of chronically stressed rats. Finally, we found that the injection of anti-proBDNF antibody via intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) approaches into the UCMS rats significantly reversed the stress-induced depression-like behavior and restored the exploratory activity and spine growth. Although intramuscular injection of AAV-proBDNF did not exacerbate the UCMS-elicited rat mood-related behavioral or pathological abnormalities, i.c.v. injection of AAV-proBDNF increased the depression-like behavior in naive rats. Our findings suggest that proBDNF plays a role in the development of chronic stress-induced mood disturbances in rodents. Central (i.c.v.) or peripheral (i.p.) inhibition of proBDNF by injecting specific anti-proBDNF antibodies may provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of stress-related mood disorders.

  4. Fluoxetine reverts chronic restraint stress-induced depression-like behaviour and increases neuropeptide Y and galanin expression in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Søren Hofman Oliveira; Olesen, Mikkel Vestergaard; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2011-01-01

    in the medial amygdala. Concomitant FLX treatment reverted depression-like effects of CRS and led to significant increases in levels of NPY and galanin mRNA in the dentate gyrus, amygdala, and piriform cortex. These findings suggest that effects on NPY and galanin gene expression could play a role...

  5. Honokiol abrogates chronic restraint stress-induced cognitive impairment and depressive-like behaviour by blocking endoplasmic reticulum stress in the hippocampus of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangra, Ashok; Dwivedi, Shubham; Sriram, Chandra Shaker; Gurjar, Satendra Singh; Kwatra, Mohit; Sulakhiya, Kunjbihari; Baruah, Chandana C; Lahkar, Mangala

    2016-01-05

    The primary objective of our study is to investigate the neuroprotective efficacy of honokiol and imipramine against restraint stress (RS)-induced cognitive impairment and depressive-like behaviour in mice. We examined whether the neuroprotective activity of honokiol and imipramine mediates through the inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Adult Swiss albino mice were restrained for 6h/day for 28 days. Honokiol (3 and 10mg/kg) and Imipramine (10 and 30mg/kg) were administered for last 7 days to the different groups. Cognitive function was assessed by Morris water maze and novel object recognition test. Forced swimming test and tail suspension test were performed to evaluate the restraint stress-induced depressive-like behaviour. Proinflammatory cytokines, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and ER stress markers i.e. 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) were quantified in the hippocampus. We observed cognitive impairment and depressive-like behaviour in RS-exposed animals. Honokiol (10mg/kg) treated group depicted marked reduction in cognitive impairment and depressive-like behaviour. However, imipramine (10 and 30mg/kg) prevented the depressive-like behaviour but failed to prevent RS-induced cognitive impairment. Moreover, proinflammatory cytokines, GRP78 and CHOP were elevated in the hippocampus of stressed mice as compared to unstressed mice. Honokiol (10mg/kg) significantly prevented the RS-induced elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines and endoplasmic reticulum stress markers. Our results clearly suggest the beneficial potential of honokiol in restraint stress through inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Honokiol could be an intriguing therapeutic approach in endoplasmic reticulum stress related neuro-pathophysiological conditions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Antidepressant-like Effect of l-perillaldehyde in Stress-induced Depression-like Model Mice through Regulation of the Olfactory Nervous System

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    N. Ito

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Perillae Herba (a leaf of Perilla frutescens has been prescribed as one of the component herbs in certain Kampo (Japanese herbal medicines that are used clinically for the improvement of depressive mood. l-Perillaldehyde (PAH is a major component in the essential oil containing in Perillae Herba, but its antidepressant-like effect has not been reported. To clarify the antidepressant-like effect of PAH, the inhaled effect of PAH on stress-induced depression-like model mice prepared by subjection to a combination of forced swimming and chronic mild stresses was investigated. The degree of the depression-like state was measured by the animal's duration of immobility using a forced swimming test. Inhalation of PAH (0.0965 and 0.965 mg/mouse/day, 9 days significantly shortened the duration of immobility of the depression-like model mice and did not affect locomotor activity. However, another odor substance, cinnamaldehyde containing in Cinnamomi Cortex, exhibited no reduction in the immobility. The reduction in the immobility induced by the inhalation of PAH was prevented on anosmia-induced mice prepared by intranasal irrigation with zinc sulfate. These results suggest that the inhalation of PAH shows antidepressant-like activity through the olfactory nervous function.

  7. Myricetin Attenuates Depressant-Like Behavior in Mice Subjected to Repeated Restraint Stress

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    Zegang Ma

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence has shown that oxidative stress may be implicated in chronic stress-induced depression. Several flavonoids with anti-oxidative effects have been proved to be anti-depressive. Myricetin is a well-defined flavonoid with the anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and neuroprotective properties. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possible effects of chronic administration of myricetin on depressant-like behaviors in mice subjected to repeated restraint (4 h/day for 21 days. Our results showed that myricetin administration specifically reduced the immobility time in mice exposed to chronic stress, as tested in both forced swimming test and tail suspension test. Myricetin treatment improved activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX in the hippocampus of stressed mice. In addition, myricetin treatment decreased plasma corticosterone levels of those mice subjected to repeated restraint stress. The effects of myricetin on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels in hippocampus were also investigated. The results revealed that myricetin normalized the decreased BDNF levels in mice subjected to repeated restraint stress. These findings provided more evidence that chronic administration of myricetin improves helpless behaviors. The protective effects of myricetin might be partially mediated by an influence on BDNF levels and might be attributed to myricetin-mediated anti-oxidative stress in the hippocampus.

  8. Folic acid prevents depressive-like behavior and hippocampal antioxidant imbalance induced by restraint stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budni, Josiane; Zomkowski, Andréa Dias; Engel, Daiane; Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; dos Santos, Alessandra Antunes; Moretti, Morgana; Valvassori, Samira S; Ornell, Felipe; Quevedo, João; Farina, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2013-02-01

    Experimental and epidemiological studies have shown the close relationship between stressful events, depression, and cognitive impairment. Folic acid has been reported to present antidepressant-like effects in both experimental and clinical approaches. However, the mechanisms mediating such effects are not understood. In the present study, we evaluated if folic acid administration to mice could protect against restraint stress-induced depressive-like behavior and cognitive deficit. Considering that oxidative stress has been pointed as a key event involved with depressive disorders, cerebrocortical and hippocampal oxidative stress-related parameters, such as the activities of antioxidant enzymes (mainly those related to the hydroperoxide-detoxifying system) and markers of lipid peroxidation, were also investigated. Restraint stress induced depressive-like behavior in the forced swimming test and memory impairment in the object recognition test, without altering locomotor activity of mice. Folic acid (50 mg/kg, p.o.) was able to prevent the stress-induced increase on immobility time in the forced swimming test, but did not prevent memory impairment. Moreover, restraint stress increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels, and catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and superoxide dismutase activity in the hippocampus. Folic acid treatment restored the activity of the antioxidant enzymes and reduced lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus. Glutathione, a non-enzymatic antioxidant, was not altered by stress and/or folic acid administration. Together, the results of the present work reinforce the notion that folic acid displays a specific antidepressant profile in the restraint stress paradigm that may be at least partly due to its antioxidant role. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tualang honey improves memory performance and decreases depressive-like behavior in rats exposed to loud noise stress

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    Khairunnuur Fairuz Azman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has exhibited dietary influence on the manifestation of different types of behavior induced by stressor tasks. The present study examined the effects of Tualang honey supplement administered with the goal of preventing or attenuating the occurrence of stress-related behaviors in male rats subjected to noise stress. Forty-eight adult male rats were randomly divided into the following four groups: i nonstressed with vehicle, ii nonstressed with Tualang honey, iii stressed with vehicle, and iv stressed with honey. The supplement was given once daily via oral gavage at 0.2 g/kg body weight. Two types of behavioral tests were performed, namely, the novel object recognition test to evaluate working memory and the forced swimming test to evaluate depressive-like behavior. Data were analyzed by a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA using IBM SPSS 18.0. It was observed that the rats subjected to noise stress expressed higher levels of depressive-like behavior and lower memory functions compared to the unexposed control rats. In addition, our results indicated that the supplementation regimen successfully counteracted the effects of noise stress. The forced swimming test indicated that climbing and swimming times were significantly increased and immobility times significantly decreased in honey-supplemented rats, thereby demonstrating an antidepressant-like effect. Furthermore, cognitive function was shown to be intensely affected by noise stress, but the effects were counteracted by the honey supplement. These findings suggest that subchronic exposure to noise stress induces depressive-like behavior and reduces cognitive functions, and that these effects can be attenuated by Tualang honey supplementation. This warrants further studies to examine the role of Tulang honey in mediating such effects.

  10. Tualang honey improves memory performance and decreases depressive-like behavior in rats exposed to loud noise stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azman, Khairunnuur Fairuz; Zakaria, Rahimah; AbdAziz, CheBadariah; Othman, Zahiruddin; Al-Rahbi, Badriya

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has exhibited dietary influence on the manifestation of different types of behavior induced by stressor tasks. The present study examined the effects of Tualang honey supplement administered with the goal of preventing or attenuating the occurrence of stress-related behaviors in male rats subjected to noise stress. Forty-eight adult male rats were randomly divided into the following four groups: i) nonstressed with vehicle, ii) nonstressed with Tualang honey, iii) stressed with vehicle, and iv) stressed with honey. The supplement was given once daily via oral gavage at 0.2 g/kg body weight. Two types of behavioral tests were performed, namely, the novel object recognition test to evaluate working memory and the forced swimming test to evaluate depressive-like behavior. Data were analyzed by a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) using IBM SPSS 18.0. It was observed that the rats subjected to noise stress expressed higher levels of depressive-like behavior and lower memory functions compared to the unexposed control rats. In addition, our results indicated that the supplementation regimen successfully counteracted the effects of noise stress. The forced swimming test indicated that climbing and swimming times were significantly increased and immobility times significantly decreased in honey-supplemented rats, thereby demonstrating an antidepressant-like effect. Furthermore, cognitive function was shown to be intensely affected by noise stress, but the effects were counteracted by the honey supplement. These findings suggest that subchronic exposure to noise stress induces depressive-like behavior and reduces cognitive functions, and that these effects can be attenuated by Tualang honey supplementation. This warrants further studies to examine the role of Tulang honey in mediating such effects.

  11. Sub-chronic exposure to noise affects locomotor activity and produces anxiogenic and depressive like behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Fizza; Haider, Saida; Batool, Zehra; Perveen, Tahira; Haleem, Darakhshan J

    2012-01-01

    Noise is defined as a displeasing and unwanted sound. It is one of the most encountered stressor to which mankind is exposed. Frustration, poor reading, impaired hearing and difficulty in problem solving activities are the common consequences of noise stress. It has been reported to produce atrophy of dendrites and alterations in neurotransmitter levels. Long term exposure to inescapable noise stress induces exhaustion, defeat, annoyance followed by decreased muscle movement, social contacts and mood changes. The present study was aimed to investigate the detrimental effects of noise exposure on behavior of rats and its association with altered neurochemistry. Changes in neurotransmitter levels in different brain regions including hippocampus have been reported following noise exposure and these changes in neurotransmitters levels have also been associated with altered behavior. In the present study, locomotor activity in rats was assessed by open field test (OFT) while anxiety and depressive behavior was monitored by elevated plus maze (EPM) and tail suspension (TST) tests. The results showed that 15 days sub-chronic exposure to noise stress induced anxiety and depression like behavior in male rats. These behavioral deficits observed in the present study suggest that an altered brain serotonergic and dopaminergic activity may be involved in the various psychological disorders following exposure to noise stress.

  12. Resveratrol Ameliorates the Depressive-Like Behaviors and Metabolic Abnormalities Induced by Chronic Corticosterone Injection

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    Yu-Cheng Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic glucocorticoid exposure is known to cause depression and metabolic disorders. It is critical to improve abnormal metabolic status as well as depressive-like behaviors in patients with long-term glucocorticoid therapy. This study aimed to investigate the effects of resveratrol on the depressive-like behaviors and metabolic abnormalities induced by chronic corticosterone injection. Male ICR mice were administrated corticosterone (40 mg/kg by subcutaneous injection for three weeks. Resveratrol (50 and 100 mg/kg, fluoxetine (20 mg/kg and pioglitazone (10 mg/kg were given by oral gavage 30 min prior to corticosterone administration. The behavioral tests showed that resveratrol significantly reversed the depressive-like behaviors induced by corticosterone, including the reduced sucrose preference and increased immobility time in the forced swimming test. Moreover, resveratrol also increased the secretion of insulin, reduced serum level of glucose and improved blood lipid profiles in corticosterone-treated mice without affecting normal mice. However, fluoxetine only reverse depressive-like behaviors, and pioglitazone only prevent the dyslipidemia induced by corticosterone. Furthermore, resveratrol and pioglitazone decreased serum level of glucagon and corticosterone. The present results indicated that resveratrol can ameliorate depressive-like behaviors and metabolic abnormalities induced by corticosterone, which suggested that the multiple effects of resveratrol could be beneficial for patients with depression and/or metabolic syndrome associated with long-term glucocorticoid therapy.

  13. Prolonged depression-like behavior caused by immune challenge: influence of mouse strain and social environment.

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    Evelin Painsipp

    Full Text Available Immune challenge by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS causes short-term behavioral changes indicative of depression. The present study sought to explore whether LPS is able to induce long-term changes in depression-related behavior and whether such an effect depends on mouse strain and social context. LPS (0.83 mg/kg or vehicle was administered intraperitoneally to female CD1 and C57BL/6 mice that were housed singly or in groups of 4. Depression-like behavior was assessed with the forced swim test (FST 1 and 28 days post-treatment. Group-housed CD1 mice exhibited depression-like behavior 1 day post-LPS, an effect that leveled off during the subsequent 28 days, while the behavior of singly housed CD1 mice was little affected. In contrast, singly housed C57BL/6 mice responded to LPS with an increase in depression-like behavior that was maintained for 4 weeks post-treatment and confirmed by the sucrose preference test. Group-housed C57BL/6 mice likewise displayed an increased depression-like behavior 4 weeks post-treatment. The behavioral changes induced by LPS in C57BL/6 mice were associated with a particularly pronounced rise of interleukin-6 in blood plasma within 1 day post-treatment and with changes in the dynamics of the corticosterone response to the FST. The current data demonstrate that immune challenge with LPS is able to induce prolonged depression-like behavior, an effect that depends on genetic background (strain. The discovery of an experimental model of long-term depression-like behavior after acute immune challenge is of relevance to the analysis of the epigenetic and pathophysiologic mechanisms of immune system-related affective disorders.

  14. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cell depletion modulates anxiety and depression-like behaviors in mice.

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    Soo-Jeong Kim

    Full Text Available Stress has been shown to suppress immune function and increase susceptibility to inflammatory disease and psychiatric disease. CD4(+CD25(+ regulatory T (Treg cells are prominent in immune regulation. This study was conducted to determine if anti-CD25 antibody (Ab mediated depletion of Treg cells in mice susceptibility to stress-induced development of depression-like behaviors, as well as immunological and neurochemical activity. To accomplish this, an elevated plus-maze test (EPM, tail suspension test (TST, and forced swim test (FST were used to examine depression-like behaviors upon chronic immobilization stress. Immune imbalance status was observed based on analysis of serum cytokines using a mouse cytometric bead array in conjunction with flow cytometry and changes in the levels of serotonin (5-HT and dopamine (DA in the brain were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The time spent in the open arms of the EPM decreased significantly and the immobility time in the FST increased significantly in the anti-CD25 Ab-treated group when compared with the non stressed wild-type group. In addition, interlukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-á (TNF-á, interlukin-2 (IL-2, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, interlukin-4 (IL-4 and interlukin-17A (IL-17A concentrations were significantly upregulated in the stressed anti-CD25 Ab-treated group when compared with the non stressed wild-type group. Furthermore, the non stressed anti-CD25 Ab-treated group displayed decreased 5-HT levels within the hippocampus when compared with the non stressed wild-type group. These results suggest that CD4(+CD25(+ Treg cell depletion modulated alterations in depressive behavior, cytokine and monoaminergic activity. Therefore, controlling CD4(+CD25(+ Treg cell function during stress may be a potent therapeutic strategy for the treatment of depression-like symptoms.

  15. Ginsenoside Rg1 reverses stress-induced depression-like behaviours and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression within the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiuzhi; Gao, Rui; Liu, Zhuxi; Cheng, Ziyi; Qi, Yihang; Fan, Cuiqin; Yu, Shu Yan

    2016-07-01

    Depression is a major neuropsychiatric disorder that exerts deleterious effects upon public health. However, the neuronal mechanisms of depression remain largely uncharacterized, which has retarded the identification and development of effective therapeutic tools for the treatment of this disorder. The aim of this study was to explore the neuronal mechanisms underlying the protective effects of ginsenoside Rg1, a natural steroidal saponin found in ginseng, against chronic stress-induced depression.The results showed that chronic administration of ginsenoside Rg1 (40 mg/kg, i.p., 5 weeks) significantly ameliorated depression-like behaviours in rats as assessed in the sucrose preference and forced swim tests. Furthermore, chronic stress decreased the phosphorylation levels of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and cAMP-response element-binding protein in the prefrontal cortex as well as producing a reduction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression. Of particular importance, all reductions in these parameters were significantly reversed by pre-treatment with ginsenoside Rg1. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that the antidepressant-like effect of ginsenoside Rg1 might be mediated, at least in part, by activating the cAMP-response element-binding protein-brain-derived neurotrophic factor system within the prefrontal cortex. These findings not only reveal some of the underlying neuronal mechanisms of depression, but also the therapeutic potential of ginsenoside Rg1 as a preventive agent in the treatment of depression. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Urtica dioica extract attenuates depressive like behavior and associative memory dysfunction in dexamethasone induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sita Sharan; Udayabanu, Malairaman

    2014-03-01

    Evidences suggest that glucocorticoids results in depression and is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Further diabetes induces oxidative stress and hippocampal dysfunction resulting in cognitive decline. Traditionally Urtica dioica has been used for diabetes mellitus and cognitive dysfunction. The present study investigated the effect of the hydroalcoholic extract of Urtica dioica leaves (50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) in dexamethasone (1 mg/kg, i.m.) induced diabetes and its associated complications such as depressive like behavior and cognitive dysfunction. We observed that mice administered with chronic dexamethasone resulted in hypercortisolemia, oxidative stress, depressive like behavior, cognitive impairment, hyperglycemia with reduced body weight, increased water intake and decreased hippocampal glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) mRNA expression. Urtica dioica significantly reduced hyperglycemia, plasma corticosterone, oxidative stress and depressive like behavior as well as improved associative memory and hippocampal GLUT4 mRNA expression comparable to rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg, p.o.). Further, Urtica dioica insignificantly improved spatial memory and serum insulin. In conclusion, Urtica dioica reversed dexamethasone induced hyperglycemia and its associated complications such as depressive like behavior and cognitive dysfunction.

  17. The bidirectional effects of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dafu; Zhou, Heng; Yang, Yuan; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Tianchao; Lv, Liang; Zhou, Qixin; Yang, Yuexiong; Dong, Xuexian; He, Jianfeng; Huang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jijun; Wu, Kunhua; Xu, Lin; Mao, Rongrong

    2015-03-01

    Thyroid hormone disorders have long been linked to depression, but the causal relationship between them remains controversial. To address this question, we established rat models of hypothyroidism using (131)iodine ((131)I) and hyperthyroidism using levothyroxine (LT4). Serum free thyroxine (FT4) and triiodothyronine (FT3) significantly decreased in the hypothyroid of rats with single injections of (131)I (5mCi/kg). These rats exhibited decreased depression-like behaviors in forced swimming test and sucrose preference tests, as well as decreased anxiety-like behaviors in an elevated plus maze. Diminished levels of brain serotonin (5-HT) and increased levels of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were found in the hypothyroid rats compared to the control saline-vehicle administered rats. LT4 treatment reversed the decrease in thyroid hormones and depression-like behaviors. In contrast, hyperthyroidism induced by weekly injections of LT4 (15μg/kg) caused a greater than 10-fold increase in serum FT4 and FT3 levels. The hyperthyroid rats exhibited higher anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, higher brain 5-HT level, and lower hippocampal BDNF levels than the controls. Treatment with the antidepressant imipramine (15mg/kg) diminished serum FT4 levels as well as anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in the hyperthyroid rats but led to a further increase in brain 5-HT levels, compared with the controls or the hypothyroid rats. Together, our results suggest that hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism have bidirectional effects on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in rats, possibly by modulating hippocampal BDNF levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Depressive-Like Behavioral Response of Adult Male Rhesus Monkeys during Routine Animal Husbandry Procedure

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    Michael B Hennessy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Social isolation is a major risk factor for the development of depressive illness; yet, no practical nonhuman primate model is available for studying processes involved in this effect. In a first study, we noted that adult male rhesus monkeys housed individually indoors occasionally exhibited a hunched, depressive-like posture. Therefore, Study 2 investigated the occurrence of a hunched posture by adult males brought from outdoor social groups to indoor individual housing. We also scored two other behaviors—lying on the substrate and day time sleeping—that convey an impression of depression. During the first week of observation following individual housing, 18 of 26 adult males exhibited the hunched posture and 21 of 26 displayed at least one depressive-like behavior. Over 2 weeks, 23 of 26 males showed depressive-like behavior during a total of only 20 min observation. Further, the behavior during the first week was positively related to the level of initial response to a maternal separation procedure experienced in infancy. In Study 3, more than half of 23 adult males of a new sample displayed depressive-like behavior during 10 min of observation each of Weeks 7 to 14 of individual housing. The surprisingly high frequency of depressive-like behavior in Studies 2 and 3 may have been due to recording behavior via camera with no human in the room to elicit competing responses. These results suggest that a common animal husbandry procedure might provide a practical means for examining effects of social isolation on depression-related endpoints in a nonhuman primate. The findings also suggest that trait-like differences in emotional responsiveness during separation in infancy may predict differences in responsiveness during social isolation in adulthood.

  19. The effects of curcumin on depressive-like behavior in mice after lipopolysaccharide administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Qingrui; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Shuanglian; Liu, Liwei; Yang, Xudong; Li, Gang; Liu, Dexiang

    2014-11-01

    Current evidence supports that inflammation and increased cytokine levels are associated with depression-like symptoms and neuropsychological disturbances in humans. Curcumin has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-depressant-like properties. Here, we examined the effects of curcumin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced depressive-like behavior and inflammation in male mice. A single administration of LPS (0.83mg/kg, i.p.) increased the immobility time in the forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), reduced sucrose consumption without affecting spontaneous locomotor activity. Pretreatment with curcumin (50mg/kg, i.p.) for 7 consecutive days reversed LPS-induced alterations in the FST, TST, and sucrose preference test. Moreover, pre-treatment with curcumin attenuated LPS-induced microglial activation and overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokine (interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α), as well as the levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). In addition, curcumin ameliorated LPS-induced NF-κB activation in the hippocampus and PFC. The results demonstrate that curcumin may be an effective therapeutic agent for LPS-induced depressive-like behavior, partially due to its anti-inflammatory aptitude. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental gastritis leads to anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in female but not male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Human and animals studies support the idea that there is a gender-related co-morbidity of pain-related and inflammatory gastrointestinal (GI) diseases with psychological disorders. This co-morbidity is the evidence for the existence of GI-brain axis which consists of immune (cytokines), neural (vagus nerve) and neuroendocrine (HPA axis) pathways. Psychological stress causes disturbances in GI physiology, such as altered GI barrier function, changes in motility and secretion, development of visceral hypersensitivity, and dysfunction of inflammatory responses. Whether GI inflammation would exert impact on psychological behavior is not well established. We examined the effect of experimental gastritis on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in male and female Sprague–Dawley rats, and evaluated potential mechanisms of action. Gastritis was induced by adding 0.1% (w/v) iodoacetamide (IAA) to the sterile drinking water for 7 days. Sucrose preference test assessed the depression-like behavior, open field test and elevated plus maze evaluated the anxiety-like behavior. IAA treatment induced gastric inflammation in rats of either gender. No behavioral abnormality or dysfunction of GI-brain axis was observed in male rats with IAA-induced gastritis. Anxiety- and depression-like behaviors were apparent and the HPA axis was hyperactive in female rats with IAA-induced gastritis. Our results show that gastric inflammation leads to anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in female but not male rats via the neuroendocrine (HPA axis) pathway, suggesting that the GI inflammation can impair normal brain function and induce changes in psychological behavior in a gender-related manner through the GI-to-brain signaling. PMID:24345032

  1. Effects of female gonadal hormones and LPS on depressive-like behavior in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considerable evidence shows an association of depression with the immune system and emphasizes the importance of gender in the etiology of the disease and the response to inflammatory stimuli. We examined the influence of immune-challenged systems on depressive-like behavior in female rats in the context of gonadal hormones. We used a neuroinflammatory model of depression elicited by lipopolysaccharide (LPS administration on naive and ovariectomized (OVX female rats, and examined the effects of estradiol (E2 and/or progesterone (P4 replacement therapy on animal behavior, as assessed by the forced swimming test (FST. We found that LPS and OVX increase immobility in the FST, while LPS also decreased body weight in naive female rats. Further, even though P4 application alone showed beneficial effects on the behavioral profile (it reduced immobility and increased climbing, supplementation of both hormones (E2 and P4 together to OVX rats failed to do so. When OVX rats were exposed to LPS-induced immune challenge, neither hormone individually nor their combination had any effect on immobility, however, their joint supplementation increased climbing behavior. In conclusion, our study confirmed that both LPS and OVX induced depressive-like behavior in female rats. Furthermore, our results potentiate P4 supplementation in relieving the depressive-like symptomatology in OVX rats, most likely through fine-tuning of different neurotransmitter systems. In the context of an activated immune system, the application of E2 and/or P4 does not provide any advantageous effects on depressive-like behavior.

  2. Emergence of anxiety-like behaviors in depressive-like Cpefat/fat mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Wilkins, John J.; Creson, Thomas K.; Biswas, Reeta; Berezniuk, Iryna; Fricker, Arun D.; Fricker, Lloyd D.; Wetsel, William C.

    2013-01-01

    Cpefat/fat mice have a point mutation in carboxypeptidase E (CPE), an exopeptidase that removes C-terminal basic amino acids from intermediates to produce bioactive peptides. The mutation renders the enzyme inactive and unstable. The absence of CPE activity in these mutants leads to abnormal processing of many peptides, with elevated levels of intermediates and greatly reduced levels of the mature peptides. Cpefat/fat mice develop obesity, diabetes, and infertility in adulthood. We examined whether anxiety- and/or depressive-like behaviors are also present. Anxiety-like responses are not evident in young Cpefat/fat mice (~60 days), but appear in older animals (>90 days). These behaviors are reversed by acute treatment with diazepam or fluoxetine. By contrast, increased immobilities in forced swim and tail suspension are evident in all age groups examined. These behaviors are reversed by acute administration of reboxetine. By comparison acute treatments with fluoxetine or bupropion are ineffective; however, immobility times are normalized with 2 wks of treatment. These data demonstrate that Cpefat/fat mice display depressive-like responses at ~60 days of age, whereas anxiety-like behaviors emerge ~1 month later. In tail suspension, the reboxetine findings show that noradrenergic actions of antidepressants are intact in Cpefat/fat mice. The ability of acute fluoxetine treatment to rescue anxiety-like while leaving depressive-like responses unaffected suggests that serotonin mechanisms underlying these behaviors are different. Since depressive-like responses in the Cpefat/fat mice are rescued by a 2 wk, but not acute, treatment with fluoxetine or buproprion, these mice may serve as a useful model that resembles human depression. PMID:23442571

  3. The Effect of Congenital and Postnatal Hypothyroidism on Depression-Like Behaviors in Juvenile Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgür, Erdoğan; Gürbüz Özgür, Börte; Aksu, Hatice; Cesur, Gökhan

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate depression-like behaviors of juvenile rats with congenital and postnatal hypothyroidism. Twenty-seven newborn rat pups were used. First, 6-month-old Wistar Albino female rats were impregnated. Methimazole (0.025% wt/vol) was given to dam rats from the first day of pregnancy until postnatal 21 days (P21) to generate pups with congenital hypothyroidism (n=8), whereas in the postnatal hypothyroidism group (n=10), methimazole was given from P0 to P21. In the control group (n=9), dam rats were fed ad libitum and normal tap water. Offspring were fed with breast milk from their mothers. The behavioral parameters were measured with the juvenile forced swimming test (JFST). The procedure of JFST consisted of two sessions in two consecutive days: the 15-minute pre-test on day 1 and the 5-minute test on day 2. Increased immobility and decreased climbing duration were observed in both congenital and postnatal hypothyroidism groups. Decreased swimming duration was detected in the postnatal hypothyroidism group. Both hypothyroidism groups had a lower body weight gain compared with the control group, while the congenital hypothyroidism group had the lowest body weight. Our results showed that hypothyroidism had negative effects on depression-like behavior as well as on growth and development. Both congenital and postnatal hypothyroidism caused an increase in immobility time in JFST. New studies are required to understand the differing results on depression-like behavior between congenital and postnatal hypothyroidism.

  4. Pycnogenol Ameliorates Depression-Like Behavior in Repeated Corticosterone-Induced Depression Mice Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lin; Mochizuki, Miyako

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to be a mechanism of major depression. Pycnogenol (PYC) is a natural plant extract from the bark of Pinus pinaster Aiton and has potent antioxidant activities. We studied the ameliorative effect of PYC on depression-like behavior in chronic corticosterone- (CORT-) treated mice for 20 days. After the end of the CORT treatment period, PYC (0.2 mg/mL) was orally administered in normal drinking water. Depression-like behavior was investigated by the forced swimming test. Immobility time was significantly longer by CORT exposure. When the CORT-treated mice were supplemented with PYC, immobility time was significantly shortened. Our results indicate that orally administered PYC may serve to reduce CORT-induced stress by radical scavenging activity. PMID:24901001

  5. Pycnogenol Ameliorates Depression-Like Behavior in Repeated Corticosterone-Induced Depression Mice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Mei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is considered to be a mechanism of major depression. Pycnogenol (PYC is a natural plant extract from the bark of Pinus pinaster Aiton and has potent antioxidant activities. We studied the ameliorative effect of PYC on depression-like behavior in chronic corticosterone- (CORT- treated mice for 20 days. After the end of the CORT treatment period, PYC (0.2 mg/mL was orally administered in normal drinking water. Depression-like behavior was investigated by the forced swimming test. Immobility time was significantly longer by CORT exposure. When the CORT-treated mice were supplemented with PYC, immobility time was significantly shortened. Our results indicate that orally administered PYC may serve to reduce CORT-induced stress by radical scavenging activity.

  6. Tumor growth increases neuroinflammation, fatigue and depressive-like behavior prior to alterations in muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norden, Diana M; Bicer, Sabahattin; Clark, Yvonne; Jing, Runfeng; Henry, Christopher J; Wold, Loren E; Reiser, Peter J; Godbout, Jonathan P; McCarthy, Donna O

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients frequently suffer from fatigue, a complex syndrome associated with loss of muscle mass, weakness, and depressed mood. Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) can be present at the time of diagnosis, during treatment, and persists for years after treatment. CRF negatively influences quality of life, limits functional independence, and is associated with decreased survival in patients with incurable disease. Currently there are no effective treatments to reduce CRF. The aim of this study was to use a mouse model of tumor growth and discriminate between two main components of fatigue: loss of muscle mass/function and altered mood/motivation. Here we show that tumor growth increased fatigue- and depressive-like behaviors, and reduced body and muscle mass. Decreased voluntary wheel running activity (VWRA) and increased depressive-like behavior in the forced swim and sucrose preference tests were evident in tumor-bearing mice within the first two weeks of tumor growth and preceded the loss of body and muscle mass. At three weeks, tumor-bearing mice had reduced grip strength but this was not associated with altered expression of myosin isoforms or impaired contractile properties of muscles. These increases in fatigue and depressive-like behaviors were paralleled by increased expression of IL-1β mRNA in the cortex and hippocampus. Minocycline administration reduced tumor-induced expression of IL-1β in the brain, reduced depressive-like behavior, and improved grip strength without altering muscle mass. Taken together, these results indicate that neuroinflammation and depressed mood, rather than muscle wasting, contribute to decreased voluntary activity and precede major changes in muscle contractile properties with tumor growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of hydrogen-rich water on depressive-like behavior in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Su, Wen-Jun; Chen, Ying; Wu, Teng-Yun; Gong, Hong; Shen, Xiao-Liang; Wang, Yun-Xia; Sun, Xue-Jun; Jiang, Chun-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that neuroinflammation and oxidative stress may be major contributors to major depressive disorder (MDD). Patients or animal models of depression show significant increase of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and oxidative stress biomarkers in the periphery or central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies show that hydrogen selectively reduces cytotoxic oxygen radicals, and hydrogen-rich saline potentially suppresses the production of several proinflammatory mediators. Since current depression medications are accompanied by a wide spectrum of side effects, novel preventative or therapeutic measures with fewer side effects might have a promising future. We investigated the effects of drinking hydrogen-rich water on the depressive-like behavior in mice and its underlying mechanisms. Our study show that hydrogen-rich water treatment prevents chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) induced depressive-like behavior. CUMS induced elevation in IL-1β protein levels in the hippocampus, and the cortex was significantly attenuated after 4 weeks of feeding the mice hydrogen-rich water. Over-expression of caspase-1 (the IL-1β converting enzyme) and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) was successfully suppressed by hydrogen-rich water treatment. Our data suggest that the beneficial effects of hydrogen-rich water on depressive-like behavior may be mediated by suppression of the inflammasome activation resulting in attenuated protein IL-1β and ROS production. PMID:27026206

  8. Hippocampal neurogenesis dysfunction linked to depressive-like behaviors in a neuroinflammation induced model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming-Ming; Lin, Wen-Juan; Pan, Yu-Qin; Guan, Xi-Ting; Li, Ying-Cong

    2016-07-01

    Our previous work found that triple central lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration could induce depressive-like behaviors and increased central pro-inflammatory cytokines mRNA, hippocampal cytokine mRNA in particular. Since several neuroinflammation-associated conditions have been reported to impair neurogenesis, in this study, we further investigated whether the neuroinflammation induced depression would be associated with hippocampal neurogenesis dysfunction. An animal model of depression induced by triple central lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration was used. In the hippocampus, the neuroinflammatory state evoked by LPS was marked by an increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α. It was found that rats in the neuroinflammatory state exhibited depressive-like behaviors, including reduced saccharin preference and locomotor activity as well as increased immobility time in the tail suspension test and latency to feed in the novelty suppressed feeding test. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis was concomitantly inhibited, including decreased cell proliferation and newborn cell survival. We also demonstrated that the decreased hippocampal neurogenesis in cell proliferation was significantly correlated with the depressive-like phenotypes of decreased saccharine preference and distance travelled, the core and characteristic symptoms of depression, under neuro inflammation state. These findings provide the first evidence that hippocampal neurogenesis dysfunction is correlated with neuroinflammation-induced depression, which suggests that hippocampal neurogenesis might be one of biological mechanisms underlying depression induced by neruoinflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Agomelatine, venlafaxine, and running exercise effectively prevent anxiety- and depression-like behaviors and memory impairment in restraint stressed rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarawut Lapmanee; Jantarima Charoenphandhu; Jarinthorn Teerapornpuntakit; Nateetip Krishnamra; Narattaphol Charoenphandhu

    2017-01-01

    ...-like behaviors in stressed rats. But whether they are able to prevent deleterious consequences of restraint stress in rats, such as anxiety/depression-like behaviors and memory impairment that occur afterward, was not known...

  10. Role of the amygdala in antidepressant effects on hippocampal cell proliferation and survival and on depression-like behavior in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E Castro

    Full Text Available The stimulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis by antidepressants has been associated with multiple molecular pathways, but the potential influence exerted by other brain areas has received much less attention. The basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA, a region involved in anxiety and a site of action of antidepressants, has been implicated in both basal and stress-induced changes in neural plasticity in the dentate gyrus. We investigated here whether the BLA modulates the effects of the SSRI antidepressant fluoxetine on hippocampal cell proliferation and survival in relation to a behavioral index of depression-like behavior (forced swim test. We used a lesion approach targeting the BLA along with a chronic treatment with fluoxetine, and monitored basal anxiety levels given the important role of this behavioral trait in the progress of depression. Chronic fluoxetine treatment had a positive effect on hippocampal cell survival only when the BLA was lesioned. Anxiety was related to hippocampal cell survival in opposite ways in sham- and BLA-lesioned animals (i.e., negatively in sham- and positively in BLA-lesioned animals. Both BLA lesions and low anxiety were critical factors to enable a negative relationship between cell proliferation and depression-like behavior. Therefore, our study highlights a role for the amygdala on fluoxetine-stimulated cell survival and on the establishment of a link between cell proliferation and depression-like behavior. It also reveals an important modulatory role for anxiety on cell proliferation involving both BLA-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Our findings underscore the amygdala as a potential target to modulate antidepressants' action in hippocampal neurogenesis and in their link to depression-like behaviors.

  11. Effects of curcumin on chronic, unpredictable, mild, stress-induced depressive-like behaviour and structural plasticity in the lateral amygdala of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Luo, Junxia; Zhang, Minghua; Yao, Wei; Ma, Xuelian; Yu, Shu Yan

    2014-05-01

    Depression is a neuropsychiatric disease associated with wide ranging disruptions in neuronal plasticity throughout the brain. Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic compound of curcuma loga, has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of depressive-like disorders. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant-like effects of curcumin in a rat model of chronic, unpredictable, mild, stress (CUMS) -induced depression. The results showed that CUMS produced depressive-like behaviours in rats, which were associated with ultra-structural changes in neurons within the lateral amygdala (LA). In addition, the expression of synapse-associated proteins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), PSD-95 and synaptophysin were significantly decreased in the LA of CUMS-treated rats. Chronic administration of curcumin (40 mg/kg, i.p. 6 wk) before stress exposure significantly prevented these neuronal and biochemical alterations induced by CUMS, and suppressed depressive-like behaviours, suggesting that this neuronal dysregulation may be related to the depressive-like behaviours caused by CUMS. Together with our previous results, the current findings demonstrate that curcumin exhibits neuroprotection and antidepressant-like effects in the CUMS-induced depression model. Furthermore, this antidepressant-like action of curcumin appears to be mediated by modulating synapse-associated proteins within the LA. These findings provide new insights into the underlying mechanisms leading to neural dysfunction in depression and reveal the therapeutic potential for curcumin use in clinical trials.

  12. Meloxicam Blocks Neuroinflammation, but Not Depressive-Like Behaviors, in HIV-1 Transgenic Female Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Christina L.; Glasper, Erica R.; Harrell, Constance S.; Malviya, Sanjana A.; Otis, Jeffrey S.; Neigh, Gretchen N.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) comprise approximately 12% of the HIV-positive population worldwide. HIV-positive adolescents experience a higher rate of clinical depression, a greater risk of sexual and drug abuse behaviors, and a decreased adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART). Using adolescent HIV-1 transgenic rats (HIV-1 tg) that display related immune response alterations and pathologies, this study tested the hypothesis that developmental expression of HIV-1-related proteins induces a depressive-like phenotype that parallels a decrease in hippocampal cell proliferation and an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the hippocampus. Consistent with this hypothesis, adolescent HIV-1 tg rats demonstrated a depressive-like behavioral phenotype, had decreased levels of cell proliferation, and exhibited elevated expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (Mcp-1) in the hippocampus relative to controls. Subsequently, we tested the ability of meloxicam, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, to attenuate behavioral deficits via inflammatory mechanisms. Daily meloxicam treatments did not alter the behavioral profile despite effectively reducing hippocampal inflammatory gene expression. Together, these data support a biological basis for the co-morbid manifestation of depression in HIV-positive patients as early as in adolescence and suggest that modifications in behavior manifest independent of inflammatory activity in the hippocampus. PMID:25271421

  13. Regular moderate or intense exercise prevents depression-like behavior without change of hippocampal tryptophan content in chronically tryptophan-deficient and stressed mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosung Lee

    Full Text Available Regular exercise has an antidepressant effect in human subjects. Studies using animals have suggested that the antidepressant effect of exercise is attributable to an increase of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; however, the precise mechanism underlying the antidepressant action via exercise is unclear. In contrast, the effect of 5-HT on antidepressant activity has not been clarified, in part because the therapeutic response to antidepressant drugs has a time lag in spite of the rapid increase of brain 5-HT upon administration of these drugs. This study was designed to investigate the contribution of brain 5-HT to the antidepressant effect of exercise. Mice were fed a tryptophan-deficient diet and stressed using chronic unpredictable stress (CUS for 4 weeks with or without the performance of either moderate or intense exercise on a treadmill 3 days per week. The findings demonstrated that the onset of depression-like behavior is attributable not to chronic reduction of 5-HT but to chronic stress. Regular exercise, whether moderate or intense, prevents depression-like behavior with an improvement of adult hippocampal cell proliferation and survival and without the recovery of 5-HT. Concomitantly, the mice that exercised showed increased hippocampal noradrenaline. Regular exercise prevents the impairment of not long-term memory but short-term memory in a 5-HT-reduced state. Together, these findings suggest that: (1 chronic reduction of brain 5-HT may not contribute to the onset of depression-like behavior; (2 regular exercise, whether moderate or intense, prevents the onset of chronic stress-induced depression-like behavior independent of brain 5-HT and dependent on brain adrenaline; and (3 regular exercise prevents chronic tryptophan reduction-induced impairment of not long-term but short-term memory.

  14. The Effect of Congenital and Postnatal Hypothyroidism on Depression-Like Behaviors in Juvenile Rats

    OpenAIRE

    ?zg?r, Erdo?an; G?rb?z ?zg?r, B?rte; Aksu, Hatice; Cesur, G?khan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate depression-like behaviors of juvenile rats with congenital and postnatal hypothyroidism. Methods: Twenty-seven newborn rat pups were used. First, 6-month-old Wistar Albino female rats were impregnated. Methimazole (0.025% wt/vol) was given to dam rats from the first day of pregnancy until postnatal 21 days (P21) to generate pups with congenital hypothyroidism (n=8), whereas in the postnatal hypothyroidism group (n=10), methimazole was given ...

  15. Experimental heart failure causes depression-like behavior together with differential regulation of inflammatory and structural genes in the brain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frey, Anna; Popp, Sandy; Post, Antonia; Langer, Simon; Lehmann, Marc; Hofmann, Ulrich; Siren, Anna-Leena; Hommers, Leif; Schmitt, Angelika; Strekalova, Tatyana; Ertl, Georg; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Frantz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    ...). However, it is unclear whether CHF causes depression. Thus, we investigated whether mice develop anxiety- and depression-like behavior after induction of ischemic CHF by myocardial infarction (MI...

  16. Transglutaminase 2 overexpression induces depressive-like behavior and impaired TrkB signaling in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Chirayu D; Hoda, Nasrul; Crider, Amanda; Peter, Diya; Kutiyanawalla, Ammar; Kumar, Sanjiv; Ahmed, Anthony O; Turecki, Gustavo; Hernandez, Caterina M; Terry, Alvin V

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are two signaling molecules that play important regulatory roles in the development and plasticity of neural circuits that are known to be altered in depression. However, the mechanism by which 5-HT regulates BDNF signaling is unknown. In the present study, we found that 5-HT treatment increases BDNF receptor, TrkB (tropomyosin related kinase B) levels in mouse primary cortical neurons via a Rac1 (RAS-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1)-dependent mechanism. Significant increases in the levels of transglutaminase 2 (TG2, which is implicated in transamidation of 5-HT to Rac1) are observed in the mouse prefrontal cortex (PFC) following chronic exposure to stress. We also found that TG2 levels are increased in the postmortem PFC of depressed suicide subjects relative to matched controls. Moreover, in mice, neuronal overexpression of TG2 resulted in the atrophy of neurons and reduced levels of TrkB in the PFC as well as a depressive-like phenotype. Overexpression of TG2 in mouse cortical neurons reduced TrkB levels as a result of impaired endocytosis of TrkB. TG2 inhibition by either a viral particle or pharmacological approach attenuated behavioral deficits caused by chronic unpredictable stress. Moreover, the overexpression of TrkB in the mouse PFC ameliorated the depressive-like phenotype of TG2 overexpressed mice. Taken together, these postmortem and preclinical findings identify TG2 as a critical mediator of the altered TrkB expression and depressive-like behaviors associated with chronic exposure to stress and suggest that TG2 may represent a novel therapeutic target in depression. PMID:27620841

  17. Curcumin reverses the depressive-like behavior and insulin resistance induced by chronic mild stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ji-Duo; Wei, Yu; Li, Yu-Jie; Qiao, Jing-Yi; Li, Yu-Cheng

    2017-08-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that patients with depression have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance has been identified as the key mechanism linking depression and diabetes. The present study established a rat model of depression complicated by insulin resistance using a 12-week exposure to chronic mild stress (CMS) and investigated the therapeutic effects of curcumin. Sucrose intake tests were used to evaluate depressive-like behaviors, and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance tests (IPITT) were performed to evaluate insulin sensitivity. Serum parameters were detected using commercial kits. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to examine mRNA expression. CMS rats exhibited reduced sucrose consumption, increased serum glucose, insulin, triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA), glucagon, leptin, and corticosterone levels, as well as impaired insulin sensitivity. Curcumin upregulated the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and protein kinase B (Akt) in the liver, enhanced insulin sensitivity, and reversed the metabolic abnormalities and depressive-like behaviors mentioned above. Moreover, curcumin increased the hepatic glycogen content by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β and prevented gluconeogenesis by inhibiting phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase). These results suggest that curcumin not only exerted antidepressant-like effects, but also reversed the insulin resistance and metabolic abnormalities induced by CMS. These data may provide evidence to support the potential use of curcumin against depression and/or metabolic disorders.

  18. The Rodent Forced Swim Test Measures Stress-Coping Strategy, Not Depression-like Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commons, Kathryn G; Cholanians, Aram B; Babb, Jessica A; Ehlinger, Daniel G

    2017-05-17

    The forced swim test (FST) measures coping strategy to an acute inescapable stress and thus provides unique insight into the neural limb of the stress response. Stress, particularly chronic stress, is a contributing factor to depression in humans and depression is associated with altered response to stress. In addition, drugs that are effective antidepressants in humans typically promote active coping strategy in the FST. As a consequence, passive coping in the FST has become loosely equated with depression and is often referred to as "depression-like" behavior. This terminology oversimplifies complex biology and misrepresents both the utility and limitations of the FST. The FST provides little construct- or face-validity to support an interpretation as "depression-like" behavior. While stress coping and the FST are arguably relevant to depression, there are likely many factors that can influence stress coping strategy. Importantly, there are other neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by altered responses to stress and difficulty in adapting to change. One of these is autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and several mouse genetic models of ASD exhibit altered stress-coping strategies in the FST. Here we review evidence that argues a more thoughtful consideration of the FST, and more precise terminology, would benefit the study of stress and disorders characterized by altered response to stress, which include but are not limited to depression.

  19. Enriched environment experience overcomes learning deficits and depressive-like behavior induced by juvenile stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Ilin

    Full Text Available Mood disorders affect the lives and functioning of millions each year. Epidemiological studies indicate that childhood trauma is predominantly associated with higher rates of both mood and anxiety disorders. Exposure of rats to stress during juvenility (JS (27-29 days of age has comparable effects and was suggested as a model of induced predisposition for these disorders. The importance of the environment in the regulation of brain, behavior and physiology has long been recognized in biological, social and medical sciences. Here, we studied the effects of JS on emotional and cognitive aspects of depressive-like behavior in adulthood, on Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA axis reactivity and on the expression of cell adhesion molecule L1 (L1-CAM. Furthermore, we combined it with the examination of potential reversibility by enriched environment (EE of JS - induced disturbances of emotional and cognitive aspects of behavior in adulthood. Three groups were tested: Juvenile Stress -subjected to Juvenile stress; Enriched Environment--subjected to Juvenile stress and then, from day 30 on to EE; and Naïves. In adulthood, coping and stress responses were examined using the elevated plus-maze, open field, novel setting exploration and two way shuttle avoidance learning. We found that, JS rats showed anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in adulthood, altered HPA axis activity and altered L1-CAM expression. Increased expression of L1-CAM was evident among JS rats in the basolateral amygdala (BLA and Thalamus (TL. Furthermore, we found that EE could reverse most of the effects of Juvenile stress, both at the behavioral, endocrine and at the biochemical levels. The interaction between JS and EE resulted in an increased expression of L1-CAM in dorsal cornu ammonis (CA area 1 (dCA1.

  20. Norbin ablation results in defective adult hippocampal neurogenesis and depressive-like behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Warner-Schmidt, Jennifer; Varela, Santiago; Enikolopov, Grigori; Greengard, Paul; Flajolet, Marc

    2015-08-04

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus subgranular zone is associated with the etiology and treatment efficiency of depression. Factors that affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis have been shown to contribute to the neuropathology of depression. Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, plays a critical role in different aspects of neurogenesis. Of the eight metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), mGluR5 is the most highly expressed in neural stem cells. We previously identified Norbin as a positive regulator of mGluR5 and showed that its expression promotes neurite outgrowth. In this study, we investigated the role of Norbin in adult neurogenesis and depressive-like behaviors using Norbin-deficient mice. We found that Norbin deletion significantly reduced hippocampal neurogenesis; specifically, the loss of Norbin impaired the proliferation and maturation of newborn neurons without affecting cell-fate specification of neural stem cells/neural progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs). Norbin is highly expressed in the granular neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, but it is undetectable in NSCs/NPCs or immature neurons, suggesting that the effect of Norbin on neurogenesis is likely caused by a nonautonomous niche effect. In support of this hypothesis, we found that the expression of a cell-cell contact gene, Desmoplakin, is greatly reduced in Norbin-deletion mice. Moreover, Norbin-KO mice show an increased immobility in the forced-swim test and the tail-suspension test and reduced sucrose preference compared with wild-type controls. Taken together, these results show that Norbin is a regulator of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and that its deletion causes depressive-like behaviors.

  1. Decreased Prostaglandin D2 Levels in Major Depressive Disorder Are Associated with Depression-Like Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Cuilin; Wei, Hui; Zhu, Wanwan; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qi

    2017-09-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) D2 is the most abundant prostaglandin in the mammalian brain. The physiological and pharmacological actions of PGD2 in the central nervous system seem to be associated with some of the symptoms exhibited by patients with major depressive disorder. Previous studies have found that PGD2 synthase was decreased in the cerebrospinal fluid of major depressive disorder patients. We speculated that there may be a dysregulation of PGD2 levels in major depressive disorder. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with a stable isotopic-labeled internal standard was used to determine PGD2 levels in the plasma of major depressive disorder patients and in the brains of depressive mice. A total of 32 drug-free major depressive disorder patients and 30 healthy controls were recruited. An animal model of depression was constructed by exposing mice to 5 weeks of chronic unpredictable mild stress. To explore the role of PGD2 in major depressive disorder, selenium tetrachloride was administered to simulate the change in PGD2 levels in mice. Mice exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress exhibited depression-like behaviors, as indicated by reduced sucrose preference and increased immobility time in the forced swimming test. PGD2 levels in the plasma of major depressive disorder patients and in the brains of depressive mice were both decreased compared with their corresponding controls. Further inhibiting PGD2 production in mice resulted in an increased immobility time in the forced swimming test that could be reversed by imipramine. Decreased PGD2 levels in major depressive disorder are associated with depression-like behaviors.

  2. Prophylactic effects of sulforaphane on depression-like behavior and dendritic changes in mice after inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Chun; Yao, Wei; Dong, Chao; Yang, Chun; Ren, Qian; Ma, Min; Han, Mei; Wu, Jin; Ushida, Yusuke; Suganuma, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation plays a role in the pathophysiology of depression. Sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate compound derived from broccoli, is a potent activator of the NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), which plays a role in inflammation. In this study, we examined whether the prevention effects of SFN in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced depression-like behavior in mice. Pretreatment with SFN significantly blocked an increase in the serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) level and an increase in microglial activation of brain regions after a single administration of LPS (0.5 mg/kg). Furthermore, SFN significantly potentiated increased serum levels of IL-10 after LPS administration. In the tail-suspension test and forced swimming test, SFN significantly attenuated an increase of the immobility time after LPS administration. In addition, SFN significantly recovered to control levels for LPS-induced alterations in the proteins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, postsynaptic density protein 95 and AMPA receptor 1 (GluA1) and dendritic spine density in the brain regions. Finally, dietary intake of 0.1% glucoraphanin (a glucosinolate precursor of SFN) food during the juvenile and adolescence could prevent the onset of LPS-induced depression-like behaviors and dendritic spine changes in the brain regions at adulthood. In conclusion, these findings suggest that dietary intake of SFN-rich broccoli sprout has prophylactic effects on inflammation-related depressive symptoms. Therefore, supplementation of SFN-rich broccoli sprout could be prophylactic vegetable to prevent or minimize the relapse by inflammation in the remission state of depressed patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lithium Promotes Neuronal Repair and Ameliorates Depression-Like Behavior following Trimethyltin-Induced Neuronal Loss in the Dentate Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Masanori; Shiba, Tatsuo; Hasebe, Shigeru; Umeda, Kasumi; Yamaguchi, Taro; Ogita, Kiyokazu

    2014-01-01

    Lithium, a mood stabilizer, is known to ameliorate the stress-induced decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis seen in animal models of stress-related disorders. However, it is unclear whether lithium has beneficial effect on neuronal repair following neuronal damage in neuronal degenerative diseases. Here, we evaluated the effect of in vivo treatment with lithium on the hippocampal neuronal repair in a mouse model of trimethyltin (TMT)-induced neuronal loss/self-repair in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (such mice referred to as “impaired animals”) [Ogita et al. (2005) J Neurosci Res 82: 609–621]. The impaired animals had a dramatically increased number of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-incorporating cells in their dentate gyrus at the initial time window (days 3 to 5 post-TMT treatment) of the self-repair stage. A single treatment with lithium produced no significant change in the number of BrdU-incorporating cells in the dentate granule cell layer and subgranular zone on day 3 post-TMT treatment. On day 5 post-TMT treatment, however, BrdU-incorporating cells were significantly increased in number by lithium treatment for 3 days. Most interestingly, chronic treatment (15 days) with lithium increased the number of BrdU-incorporating cells positive for NeuN or doublecortin in the dentate granule cell layer of the impaired animals, but not in that of naïve animals. The results of a forced swimming test revealed that the chronic treatment with lithium improved the depression-like behavior seen in the impaired animals. Taken together, our data suggest that lithium had a beneficial effect on neuronal repair following neuronal loss in the dentate gyrus through promoted proliferation and survival/neuronal differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells in the subgranular zone. PMID:24504050

  4. Depression-like behaviors and heme oxygenase-1 are regulated by Lycopene in lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Fu, Yanyan; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Pan, Wei; Shi, Yue; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Xunbao; Qi, Dashi; Li, Lei; Ma, Kai; Tang, Renxian; Zheng, Kuiyang; Song, Yuanjian

    2016-09-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that lycopene possesses anti-inflammatory properties in the central nervous system. However, the potential role and the molecular mechanisms of lycopene in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenge inflammation and depression-like behaviors has not been clearly investigated. The present study aimed to assess the effects and the potential mechanisms of lycopene on LPS-induced depression-like behaviors. Lycopene was orally administered (60mg/kg) every day for seven days followed by intraperitoneal LPS injection (1mg/kg). The Forced swim test and tail suspension test were used to detect changes in the depression-like behaviors. ELISA was used to measure the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α) in the plasma. Immunoblotting was performed to measure the expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the hippocampus. The results showed that pretreatment with lycopene could ameliorate depression-like behaviors. Moreover, lycopene relieved neuronal cell injury in hippocampal CA1 regions. Furthermore, lycopene decreased LPS-induced expression of IL-1β and HO-1 in the hippocampus together with decreasing level of IL-6 and TNF-α in the plasma. Taken together, these results suggest that lycopene can attenuate LPS-induced inflammation and depression-like behaviors, which may be involved in regulating HO-1 in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Endogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor modulates anxiety and depressive-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruga, Isabella; Hartwig, Silvia; Merkler, Doron; Thöne, Jan; Hovemann, Bernhard; Juckel, Georg; Gold, Ralf; Linker, Ralf A

    2012-04-15

    On a molecular level, depression is characterized by an altered monoaminergic neurotransmission as well as a modulation of cytokines and other mediators in the central nervous system. In particular, neurotrophic factors may influence affective behavior including depression and anxiety. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) plays an important role in the regulation of neuronal development, neuroprotection and may also influence cognitive processes. Here we investigate the affective behavior in mice deficient for CNTF (CNTF -/- mice) at young age of 10-20 weeks. CNTF -/- mice displayed an increased anxiety-like behavior with a 30% reduction of the time spent in the bright compartment of the light/dark box as well as a significantly increased startle response. In the learned helplessness paradigm, CNTF -/- mice are more prone to depressive-like behavior. In the hippocampus of 20 weeks old, but not 10 weeks old, CNTF -/- mice, these changes correlated with a loss of parvalbumin immunoreactive GABAergic interneurons and a reduction of serotonin levels as well as 5-HT receptor 1A expression. Modulation of monoaminergic neurotransmitter levels via chronic application of the antidepressants amitriptyline and citalopram did not exert beneficial effects. These data imply that endogenous CNTF plays a pivotal role for the structural maintenance of hippocampal functions and thus has an important impact on the modulation of affective behavior in rodent models of anxiety and depression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Prenatal Stress Produces Sex Specific Changes in Depression-like Behavior in Rats: Implications for Increased Vulnerability in Females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle Mark; Arentzen, Tine S; Dyrby, Tim

    2015-01-01

    and measured anxiety- (elevated plus maze, EPM) and depression-like (forced swim test, FST) behaviors in the offspring at a young adult age. As a stressful event later in life (in addition to PS) may be needed to actually trigger an episode of clinical depression, half of the animals were exposed to an acute...... affected in control animals after acute stressor exposure, however, this response was blunted in PS offspring. Moreover, FST immobility, as an indicator of depressive-like behavior, was increased in female but not male PS rats. Altogether, our results identify both sex- and circadian phase-specific effects......Stress during rat gestation can elicit depression-like physiological and behavioral responses in the offspring. However, human clinical depression is more prevalent among females than males. Accordingly, we examined how repeated variable prenatal stress (PS) alters rat anxiety- and depression...

  7. Ziziphi spinosae lily powder suspension in the treatment of depression-like behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifang; Huang, Mei; Lu, Xinyi; Wei, Runze; Xu, Jinyong

    2017-04-28

    Depression is a chronic, recurring and potentially life-threatening illness. Current treatments for depression are characterized by a low success rate and associated with a wide variety of side effects. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the behavioral anti-depressant effect of a novel herbal compounds named ziziphi spinosae lily powder suspension, as well as to investigate its potential mechanisms. Except for body weight, depressive-like behaviors were also evaluated using forced swimming test, sucrose consumption test and open field test. In order to investigate the underlying potential mechanisms, serum 5-HT and brain 5-HIAA were measured using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Results showed that the herbal compounds ziziphi spinosae lily suspension could alleviate depressive symptoms in rat model of chronic depression. Biochemical analysis revealed that the herbal compounds elevated serum 5-HT and brain 5-HIAA. Ziziphi spinosae lily powder suspension could alleviate depressive behaviors in depression model animals. The underlying mechanisms may be related to the increase of serum 5-HT in peripheral blood and 5-HIAA in brain. The study provides important mechanistic insights into the protective effect of the herbal compounds against chronic depressive disorder and suggests that the herbal compounds may be a potential pharmacological agent for treatment of major depressive disorder.

  8. Maternal immune activation transgenerationally modulates maternal care and offspring depression-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronovsky, Marianne; Berger, Stefanie; Zambon, Alice; Reisinger, Sonali N; Horvath, Orsolya; Pollak, Arnold; Lindtner, Claudia; Berger, Angelika; Pollak, Daniela D

    2017-07-01

    Gestational infection is increasingly being recognized for its involvement as causative mechanism in severe developmental brain abnormalities and its contribution to the pathogenesis of psychopathologies later in life. First observations in the widely accepted maternal immune activation (MIA) model based upon the systemic administration of the viral mimetic Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) have recently suggested a transmission of behavioral and transcriptional traits across generations. Although maternal care behavior (MCB) is known as essential mediator of the transgenerational effects of environmental challenges on offspring brain function and behavior, the possible propagation of alterations of MCB resulting from MIA to following generations has not yet been examined. Here we show that poly(I:C) stimulation at embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) leads to aberrant MCB and that this effect is transmitted to the female F1 offspring. The transgenerational effects on MCB are paralleled by enhanced depression-like behavior in the second generation F2 offspring with contributions of both maternal and paternal heritages. Examination of offspring hippocampal expression of genes known as targets of MCB and relevant for ensuing non-genetic transmission of altered brain function and behavior revealed transgenerationally conserved and modified expressional patterns in the F1 and F2 generation. Collectively these data firstly demonstrate the transgenerational transmission of the impact of gestational immune activation on the reproductive care behavior of the mother. Behavioral and molecular characteristics of first and second generation offspring suggest transgenerationally imprinted consequences of gestational infection on psychopathological traits related to mood disorders which remain to be examined in future cross-fostering experiments. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The effects of curcumin on depressive-like behaviors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Ku, Bao-Shan; Yao, Hai-Yan; Lin, Yan-Hua; Ma, Xing; Zhang, Yong-He; Li, Xue-Jun

    2005-07-25

    Curcuma longa is a major constituent of Xiaoyao-san, the traditional Chinese medicinal formula, which has been used effectively to treat depression-related diseases in China. There is no information available about the antidepressant activity of curcumin, the active component of curcuma longa. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of curcumin on depressive-like behaviors in mice, using two animal models of depression. Our results showed that curcumin treatment at 5 and 10 mg/kg (p.o.) significantly reduced the duration of immobility in both the tail suspension and forced swimming tests. These doses that affected the immobile response did not affect locomotor activity. In addition, the neurochemical assays showed that curcumin produced a marked increase of serotonin and noradrenaline levels at 10 mg/kg in both the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Dopamine levels were also increased in the frontal cortex and the striatum. Moreover, curcumin was found to inhibit monoamine oxidase activity in the mouse brain. These findings suggest that the antidepressant-like effects of curcumin may involve the central monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems.

  10. Minocycline treatment ameliorates interferon-alpha-induced neurogenic defects and depression-like behaviors in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-Shun eZheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-alpha (IFN-α is a proinflammatory cytokine that is widely used for the treatment of chronic viral hepatitis and malignancy, because of its immune-activating, antiviral, and antiproliferative properties. However, long-term IFN-α treatment frequently causes depression, which limits its clinical utility. The precise molecular and cellular mechanisms of IFN-α-induced depression are not currently understood. Neural stem cells (NSCs in the hippocampus continuously generate new neurons, and some evidence suggests that decreased neurogenesis plays a role in the neuropathology of depression. We previously reported that IFN-α treatment suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis and induced depression-like behaviors via its receptors in the brain in adult mice. However, it is unclear how systemic IFN-α administration induces IFN-α signaling in the hippocampus. In this study, we analyzed the role of microglia, immune cells in the brain, in mediating the IFN-α-induced neurogenic defects and depressive behaviors. In vitro studies demonstrated that IFN-α treatment induced the secretion of endogenous IFN-α from microglia, which suppressed NSC proliferation. In vivo treatment of adult mice with IFN-α for five weeks increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines, including IFN-α, and reduced neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Both effects were prevented by simultaneous treatment with minocycline, an inhibitor of microglial activation. Furthermore, minocycline treatment significantly suppressed IFN-α-induced depressive behaviors in mice. These results suggest that microglial activation plays a critical role in the development of IFN-α-induced depression, and that minocycline is a promising drug for the treatment of IFN-α-induced depression in patients, especially those who are low responders to conventional antidepressant treatments.

  11. Chronic curcumin treatment normalizes depression-like behaviors in mice with mononeuropathy: involvement of supraspinal serotonergic system and GABAA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Wang, Chuang; Zhang, Jun-Fang; Liu, Li; Liu, Ai-Ming; Ma, Qing; Zhou, Wen-Hua; Xu, Ying

    2014-05-01

    Comorbid depression is commonly observed in individuals who suffer from neuropathic pain, which necessitates improved treatment. Curcumin, a phenolic compound derived from Curcuma longa, possesses both antinociceptive and antidepressant-like activities in animal studies, suggesting its possible usefulness in treating this comorbidity. We investigated the effect of curcumin on depressive-like behaviors in mice with mononeuropathy, and explored the mechanism(s). Chronic constriction injury (CCI) was produced by loosely ligating the sciatic nerves in mice. The nociceptive behaviors were examined using Hargreaves test, and the depressive-like behaviors were determined by forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST). After CCI injury, the neuropathic mice developed nociceptive and depressive-like behaviors, as shown by thermal hyperalgesia in Hargreaves test and protracted immobility time in FST and TST. Chronic treatment of neuropathic mice with curcumin (45 mg/kg, p.o., twice per day for 3 weeks) corrected their exacerbated nociceptive and depressive-like behaviors, which was abolished by chemical depletion of brain serotonin rather than noradrenaline. The paralleled antinociceptive and antidepressant-like actions of curcumin seem to be pharmacologically segregated, since intrathecal and intracerebroventricular injection of methysergide, a nonselective 5-HT receptor antagonist, separately counteracted the two actions of curcumin. Further, this antidepression was abrogated by repeated co-treatment with 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 and greatly attenuated by acute co-treatment with GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline. Curcumin can normalize the depressive-like behaviors of neuropathic mice, which may be independent of the concurrent analgesic action and possibly mediated via the supraspinal serotonergic system and downstream GABAA receptor.

  12. Neuroprotective effect of nebivolol against cisplatin-associated depressive-like behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkader, Noha F; Saad, Muhammed A; Abdelsalam, Rania M

    2017-05-01

    One-third of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment often display symptoms of depression leading to poor adherence and decreased quality of life. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the possible protective effect of nebivolol against cisplatin-associated depressive symptoms in adult male rats. Nebivolol is a highly cardioselective β-adrenergic receptor blocker that possesses endothelium-dependent vasodilator properties and antioxidant capacities. Animals were allocated into four groups. Group one was given aqueous solution of carboxymethyl cellulose and served as control, group two was given nebivolol (10 mg/kg p.o., daily), group three was given cisplatin (2 mg/kg i.p. once per week) for 10 consecutive weeks and group four was treated with cisplatin concomitantly with nebivolol as per above schedule. Cisplatin-treated rats showed an increase in both depressive-like behaviors in open-field and forced swimming tests. In addition, histopathological examination revealed cortical encephalomalacia along with hippocampal neuronal degeneration and kidney dysfunction. In parallel, cisplatin administration prominently reduced GABA and elevated glutamate levels in the cortical and hippocampal tissues. Furthermore, it resulted in a significant decline in cortical and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nitric oxide contents concomitantly with a marked decrease in endothelial- and an increase in inducible-nitric oxide synthase genes expression. On the other hand, treatment with nebivolol effectively mitigated the aforementioned cisplatin-associated behavioral, biochemical, and histopathological alterations without changing its antitumor activity as evidenced by sulforhodamine B cell survival assay. Taken together, our results suggest that nebivolol may offer a promising approach for alleviating depressive symptoms associated with the use of cisplatin. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Aging of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in nonhuman primates with depression-like and aggressive behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, Nadezhda D.; Marenin, Victor Y.; Oganyan, Tamara E.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated aging of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in female rhesus monkeys that differ in adaptive behavior. Plasma cortisol (F) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) concentrations under basal conditions and under acute psycho-emotional stress were evaluated in blood plasma of young (6-8 years) and old (20-27 years) female rhesus monkeys with various types of adaptive behavior (aggressive, depression-like, and average). We have found that the age-related changes in the HPA axis of monkeys with depression-like behavior were accompanied by the maximal absolute and relative hypercortisolemia under both basal conditions and stress. Moreover, young aggressive monkeys, in comparison with young monkeys of other behavior groups, demonstrated the highest plasma levels of DHEA-S and the lowest molar ratios between F and DHEA-S. Thus, age-related dysfunctions of the HPA axis are associated with adaptive behavior of animals. PMID:21098884

  14. Female Rats Exposed to Stress and Alcohol Show Impaired Memory and Increased Depressive-like Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, J.L.; Luine, V.N.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to daily life stressors is associated with increases in anxiety, depression, and overall negative affect. Alcohol or other psychoactive drugs are often used to alleviate stress effects. While females are more than twice as likely to develop mood disorders and are more susceptible to dependency than males, they are infrequently examined. In this study, female rats received no stress/no alcohol control (CON), alcohol alone (ALC), stress alone (STR), or stress plus alcohol (STR+ALC). Stress consisted of restraint for 6hr/day/7days, and alcohol was administered immediately following restraint via gastric gavage at a dose of 2.0 g/kg. Dependent measures included tests utilizing object recognition (OR), Y-maze, elevated plus maze (EPM), forced swim (FST), blood alcohol content, corticosterone levels, and body weights. ALC, STR+ALC, but not stress alone, impaired memory on OR. All treatments impaired spatial memory on the Y-maze. Anxiety was not affected on the EPM, but rats treated with alcohol or in combination with stress showed increased immobility on the FST, suggestive of alcohol-induced depression. Previously, we found alcohol reversed deleterious effects of stress on memory and mood in males, but current results show females reacted negatively when the two treatments were combined. Thus, responses to alcohol, stress and their combination suggest that sex specific treatments are needed for stress-induced behavioral changes and that self-medicating with alcohol to cope with stress maybe deleterious in females. PMID:24096191

  15. Drugs with antidepressant properties affect tryptophan metabolites differently in rodent models with depression-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelund, Amanda; Li, Yan; Budac, David P; Müller, Heidi K; Gulinello, Maria; Sanchez, Connie; Wegener, Gregers

    2017-07-01

    The metabolism of tryptophan through kynurenine and serotonin pathways is linked to depression. Here, effects of different drugs with antidepressant properties (vortioxetine, fluoxetine, and ketamine) on various tryptophan metabolites in different brain regions and plasma were examined using tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), in Flinders Sensitive Line rats, a genetic rat model of depression, and its controls: Flinders Sensitive Line and Sprague-Dawley rats. Protein levels of kynurenine pathway enzymes were measured in the brains and livers of these rat strains. Furthermore, effects of vortioxetine on tryptophan metabolites were assessed in the cortical regions of lupus mice (MRL/MpJ-FasIpr ), a murine model of increased depression-like behavior associated with inflammation. Sustained vortioxetine or fluoxetine (at doses aimed to fully occupy serotonin transporter via food or drinking water for at least 14 days) reduced levels of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QUIN) in various brain regions in all rats. Furthermore, chronic vortioxetine reduced levels of QUIN in MRL/MpJ-FasIpr mice. Acute i.p. administration of fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) or vortioxetine (10 mg/kg) led to reduced brain 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in Sprague-Dawley rats (2, 4, 6, and 8 h) and a similar trend was evident in Flinders Sensitive Line and Flinders Sensitive Line rats after 4 h. In contrast, single or repeated administration of ketamine (15 mg/kg i.p.) did not induce significant changes in metabolite levels. In conclusion, sustained vortioxetine and fluoxetine administration decreased QUIN independent of species, while ketamine was ineffective. These results support the hypothesis that modulating tryptophan metabolism may be part of the mechanism of action for some antidepressants. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. Effects of testosterone and estradiol on anxiety and depressive-like behavior via a non-genomic pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Filova, Barbora; Malinova, Maria; Babickova, Janka; Tothova, Lubomira; Ostatnikova, Daniela; Celec, Peter; Hodosy, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Besides their known slow genomic effects, testosterone and estradiol have rapid effects in the brain. However, their impact on mood-related behavior is not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the non-genomic pathway of testosterone and estradiol in the amygdala in relation to anxiety and depressive-like behavior. Sham-operated and gonadectomized male rats (GDX) supplemented with testosterone propionate, estradiol, or olive oil were used. Five minutes after administration, anxiety ...

  17. Social defeat stress causes depression-like behavior with metabolite changes in the prefrontal cortex of rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Yun Liu; Xin-Yu Zhou; Li-Ning Yang; Hai-Yang Wang; Yu-Qing Zhang; Jun-Cai Pu; Lan-Xiang Liu; Si-Wen Gui; Li Zeng; Jian-Jun Chen; Chan-Juan Zhou; Peng Xie

    2017-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is a serious mental disorder with high morbidity and mortality. The role of social stress in the development of depression remains unclear. Here, we used the social defeat stress paradigm to induce depression-like behavior in rats, then evaluated the behavior of the rats and measured metabolic changes in the prefrontal cortex using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Within the first week after the social defeat procedure, the sucrose preference test (SPT), open fi...

  18. NEUROPATHIC PAIN-INDUCED DEPRESSIVE-LIKE BEHAVIOR AND HIPPOCAMPAL NEUROGENESIS AND PLASTICITY ARE DEPENDENT ON TNFR1 SIGNALING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna, Dellarole; Paul, Morton; Roberta, Brambilla; Winston, Walters; Spencer, Summer; Danielle, Bernardes; Mariagrazia, Grilli; R, Bethea John

    2014-01-01

    Patients suffering from neuropathic pain have a higher incidence of mood disorders such as depression. Increased expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been reported in neuropathic pain and depressive-like conditions and most of the pro-inflammatory effects of TNF are mediated by the TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1). Here we sought to investigate: 1) the occurrence of depressive-like behavior in chronic neuropathic pain and the associated forms of hippocampal plasticity, and 2) the involvement of TNFR1-mediated TNF signaling as a possible regulator of such events. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and TNFR1−/− mice. Anhedonia, weight loss and physical state were measured as symptoms of depression. Hippocampal neurogenesis, neuroplasticity, myelin remodeling and TNF/TNFRs expression were analyzed by immunohistochemical analysis and western blot assay. We found that neuropathic pain resulted in the development of depressive symptoms in a time dependent manner and was associated with profound hippocampal alterations such as impaired neurogenesis, reduced expression of neuroplasticity markers and myelin proteins. The onset of depressive-like behavior also coincided with increased hippocampal levels of TNF, and decreased expression of TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2), which were all fully restored after mice spontaneously recovered from pain. Notably, TNFR1−/− mice did not develop depressive-like symptoms after injury, nor were there changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and plasticity. Our data show that neuropathic pain induces a cluster of depressive-like symptoms and profound hippocampal plasticity that are dependent on TNF signaling through TNFR1. PMID:24938671

  19. The Effects of Early-Life Predator Stress on Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behaviors of Adult Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-jing Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood emotional trauma contributes significantly to certain psychopathologies, such as post-traumatic stress disorder. In experimental animals, however, whether or not early-life stress results in behavioral abnormalities in adult animals still remains controversial. Here, we investigated both short-term and long-term changes of anxiety- and depression-like behaviors of Wistar rats after being exposed to chronic feral cat stress in juvenile ages. The 2-week predator stress decreased spontaneous activities immediately following stress but did not increase depression- or anxiety-like behaviors 4 weeks after the stimulation in adulthood. Instead, juvenile predator stress had some protective effects, though not very obvious, in adulthood. We also exposed genetic depression model rats, Wistar Kyoto (WKY rats, to the same predator stress. In WKY rats, the same early-life predator stress did not enhance anxiety- or depression-like behaviors in both the short-term and long-term. However, the stressed WKY rats showed slightly reduced depression-like behaviors in adulthood. These results indicate that in both normal Wistar rats and WKY rats, early-life predator stress led to protective, rather than negative, effects in adulthood.

  20. Ameliorative effect of Curcumin on seizure severity, depression like behavior, learning and memory deficit in post-pentylenetetrazole-kindled mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Kailash M; Mishra, Awanish; Poroikov, Vladimir V; Goel, Rajesh Kumar

    2013-03-15

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder and generally associated with certain psychiatric comorbidities. Among several comorbidities depressive behavior and cognitive impairment has been reported to be most debilitating comorbidity associated with epilepsy. This study was envisaged to evaluate the ameliorative effect of Curcumin on depression like behavior and cognitive impairment observed in pentylenetetrazole kindled animals. Male Swiss Albino mice were kindled with subconvulsive dose of pentylenetetrazole (35 mg/kg, i.p.). Successfully kindled animals were used in the study to observe the effect of different treatments. Treatment groups received phenytoin (30 mg/kg) and Curcumin (50, 100 and 200mg/kg) for 15 days. The animals were challenged with pentylenetetrazole (35 mg/kg, i.p.) on day 5, 10 and 15 and seizure severity score, immobility period, number of mistakes and step down latency were recorded. On 15th day, all the animals were sacrificed after behavioral evaluations and their brain was isolated and homogenized to estimate brain norepinephrine, serotonin, total nitrite level and acetylcholinesterase activity. Phenytoin treatment significantly improved the depressive like behavior along with its anticonvulsant effect, however was unable to improve memory impairment. Curcumin significantly attenuated seizure severity, depression like behavior and memory impairment in kindled animals, in dose dependent manner. These results were supported by the biochemical modulation of brain monoamine, nitrosative stress level and acetylcholinesterase activity. Thus present study concluded that Curcumin has the ameliorative effect on seizure severity, depression like behavior and memory impairment in pentylenetetrazole kindled mice, possibly via central monoaminergic modulation and inhibitory effect on nitrosative stress and acetylcholinesterase activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Strain-dependent effects of prenatal maternal immune activation on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babri, Shirin; Doosti, Mohammad-Hossein; Salari, Ali-Akbar

    2014-03-01

    There is converging evidence that prenatal maternal infection can increase the risk of occurrence of neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, autism, anxiety and depression in later life. Experimental studies have shown conflicting effects of prenatal maternal immune activation on anxiety-like behavior and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis development in offspring. We investigated the effects of maternal immune activation during pregnancy on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in pregnant mice and their offspring to determine whether these effects are dependent on strain. NMRI and C57BL/6 pregnant mice were treated with either saline or lipopolysaccharide on gestational day 17 and then interleukin (IL)-6 and corticosterone (COR) levels; anxiety or depression in the pregnant mice and their offspring were evaluated. The results indicate that maternal inflammation increased the levels of COR and anxiety-like behavior in NMRI pregnant mice, but not in C57BL/6 dams. Our data also demonstrate that maternal inflammation elevated the levels of anxiety-and depression-like behaviors in NMRI offspring on the elevated plus-maze, elevated zero-maze, tail suspension test and forced swimming test respectively, but not in the open field and light-dark box. In addition, we did not find any significant change in anxiety- and depression-like behaviors of adult C57BL/6 offspring. Our findings suggest that prenatal maternal immune activation can alter the HPA axis activity, anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in a strain- and task-dependent manner in offspring and further comprehensive studies are needed to prove the causal relationship between the findings found here and to validate their relevance to neuropsychiatric disorders in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Female rats exposed to stress and alcohol show impaired memory and increased depressive-like behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, J L; Luine, V N

    2014-01-17

    Exposure to daily life stressors is associated with increases in anxiety, depression, and overall negative affect. Alcohol or other psychoactive drugs are often used to alleviate stress effects. While females are more than twice as likely to develop mood disorders and are more susceptible to dependency than males, they are infrequently examined. In this study, female rats received no stress/no alcohol control (CON), alcohol alone (ALC), stress alone (STR), or stress plus alcohol (STR+ALC). Stress consisted of restraint for 6h/day/7days, and alcohol was administered immediately following restraint via gastric gavage at a dose of 2.0g/kg. Dependent measures included tests utilizing object recognition (OR), Y-maze, elevated plus maze (EPM), forced swim (FST), blood alcohol content, corticosterone levels, and body weights. ALC, STR+ALC, but not stress alone, impaired memory on OR. All treatments impaired spatial memory on the Y-maze. Anxiety was not affected on the EPM, but rats treated with alcohol or in combination with stress showed increased immobility on the FST, suggestive of alcohol-induced depression. Previously, we found alcohol reversed deleterious effects of stress on memory and mood in males, but current results show that females reacted negatively when the two treatments were combined. Thus, responses to alcohol, stress and their combination suggest that sex specific treatments are needed for stress-induced behavioral changes and that self-medicating with alcohol to cope with stress maybe deleterious in females. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Increased depression-like behaviors with dysfunctions in the stress axis and the reward center by free access to highly palatable food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, E; Kim, J Y; Lee, J-H; Jahng, J W

    2014-03-14

    This study was conducted to examine the behavioral consequences of unlimited consumption of highly palatable food (HPF) and investigate its underlying neural mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats had free access to chocolate cookie rich in fat (HPF) in addition to ad libitum chow and the control group received chow only. Rats were subjected to behavioral tests during the 2nd week of food condition; i.e. ambulatory activity test on the 8th, elevated plus maze test (EPM) on the 10th and forced swim test (FST) on the 14th day of food condition. After 8 days of food condition, another group of rats were placed in a restraint box and tail bloods were collected at 0, 20, 60, and 120 time points during 2h of restraint period, used for the plasma corticosterone assay. At the end of restraint session, rats were sacrificed and the tissue sections of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) were processed for c-Fos immunohistochemistry. Ambulatory activities and the scores of EPM were not significantly affected by unlimited cookie consumption. However, immobility duration during FST was increased, and swim decreased, in the rats received free cookie access compared with control rats. Stress-induced corticosterone increase was exaggerated in cookie-fed rats, while the stress-induced c-Fos expression in the NAc was blunted, compared to control rats. Results suggest that free access to HPF may lead to the development of depression-like behaviors in rats, likely in relation with dysfunctions in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the reward center. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Curcumin reverses corticosterone-induced depressive-like behavior and decrease in brain BDNF levels in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhen; Zhong, Xiao-Ming; Li, Zhao-Yi; Feng, Chun-Rong; Pan, Ai-Juan; Mao, Qing-Qiu

    2011-04-15

    A rat model of depression has been recently developed using exogenous corticosterone (CORT) administration. This study aimed to examine the antidepressant-like effect and the possible mechanisms of curcumin in a CORT-induced depression model in rats. The results showed that 3-week CORT injections caused depression-like behavior in rats, as indicated by the significant decrease in sucrose consumption and increase in immobility time in the forced swim test. Repeated CORT injections also significantly decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein levels in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of the rats. Treatment of the rats with curcumin significantly suppressed the depression-like behavior and the decrease in brain BDNF levels induced by the repeated CORT injections. The results suggest that curcumin produces an antidepressant-like effect in CORT-treated rats, which is possibly mediated by increasing BDNF expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hypothyroidism during neonatal and perinatal period induced by thyroidectomy of the mother causes depressive-like behavior in prepubertal rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz-Butron, Rocio

    2010-01-01

    Marisol Pineda-Reynoso, Edgar Cano-Europa, Vanessa Blas-Valdivia, Adelaida Hernandez-Garcia, Margarita Franco-Colin, Rocio Ortiz-ButronDepartamento de Fisiología ‘Mauricio Russek Berman,’ Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, IPN, Carpio y Plan de Ayala, MéxicoAbstract: The objective of this study was to see if neonatal and perinatal hypothyroidism caused anxiety and depressive-like behaviors. Twenty female Wistar rats were randomly divi...

  6. NLRP3 Inflammasome Contributes to Lipopolysaccharide-induced Depressive-Like Behaviors via Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seon-A; Lee, Eunju; Hwang, Inhwa; Han, Boyoung; Park, Sangjun; Son, Seunghwan; Yang, Jungmin; Hong, Sujeong; Kim, Chul Hoon; Son, Junghyun; Yu, Je-Wook

    2017-11-01

    Inflammation may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of depression, although the molecular target for the treatment of inflammation-mediated depressive symptoms remains to be elucidated. Recent studies have implicated the NLRP3 inflammasome in various psychiatric disorders, including depression. However, the underlying mechanism by which NLRP3 inflammasome activation mediates the progression of depressive-like behaviors remains poorly understood. We examined whether NLRP3 deficiency influenced depressive-like behaviors and cerebral inflammation following systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide in mice. To further assess the contribution of the NLRP3 inflammasome to the progression of depression, we evaluated the effects of NLRP3 signaling on levels of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Nlrp3-deficient mice exhibited significant attenuation of depressive-like behaviors and cerebral caspase-1 activation in a lipopolysaccharide-induced model of depression. Treatment with the antidepressant amitriptyline failed to block NLRP3-dependent activation of caspase-1, but inhibited lipopolysaccharide-promoted production of interleukin-1β mRNA via suppressing NF-κB signaling in mouse mixed glial cultures. Interestingly, lipopolysaccharide administration produced NLRP3-dependent increases in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and activity of mouse brain. Furthermore, inflammasome-activating stimulations, but not treatment with the inflammasome product interleukin-1β, triggered indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase mRNA induction in mixed glial cells. Our data indicate that the NLRP3 inflammasome is significantly implicated in the progression of systemic inflammation-induced depression. NLRP3-dependent caspase-1 activation produced significant increases in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase levels, which may play a significant role in lipopolysaccharide-induced depression. Collectively, our findings suggest that indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase is a potential downstream mediator of the

  7. Tamoxifen antagonizes the effects of ovarian hormones to induce anxiety and depression-like behavior in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Azizi-Malekabadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of tamoxifen (TAM on anxiety and depression-like behavior in ovariectomized (OVX and naïve female rats were investigated. The animals were divided into Sham-TAM, OVX-TAM, Sham and OVX groups. Tamoxifen (1 mg/kg was administered for 4 weeks. In the forced swimming test, the immobility times in the OVX and Sham-TAM groups were higher than in the Sham group. In the open field, the numbers of central crossings in the OVX and Sham-TAM groups were lower than the number in the Sham group, and the number of peripheral crossings in the OVX group was lower than the number in the Sham group. In the elevated plus maze, the numbers of entries to the open arm among the animals in the Sham-TAM and OVX groups were lower than the number in the Sham group, while the number of entries to the open arm in the OVX-TAM group was higher than the number in the OVX group. It was shown that deletion of ovarian hormones induced anxiety and depression-like behavior. Administration of tamoxifen in naïve rats led to anxiety and depression-like behavior that was comparable with the effects of ovarian hormone deletion. It can be suggested that tamoxifen antagonizes the effects of ovarian hormones. It also seems that tamoxifen has anxiolytic effects on ovariectomized rats.

  8. Depressive-like behavior is elevated among offspring of parents exposed to dim light at night prior to mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cissé, Yasmine M; Russart, Kathryn L G; Nelson, Randy J

    2017-09-01

    Rates of major depressive disorder (MDD) have steadily increased over the past 50 years. Many factors have been implicated in the etiology of depressive disorders and environmental influences are being increasingly recognized. The increase in depression rates has coincided with increased artificial nighttime lighting. Exposure to light at night (LAN) has been associated with increased depressive-like behavior in rodents and decreased mood in humans. However, relatively little is known on the multigenerational effects of dLAN on affect. In this study, we exposed adult male and female Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) to either DARK (0lx) or dim LAN (5lx) for 9 weeks, then paired animals in a full factorial design; all animals were thereafter housed in dark nights. Offspring were gestated and reared in dark nights, then tested in adulthood for depressive-like behaviors and hippocampal expression of glucocorticoid (GR) and melatonin (MT1) receptor expression. Maternal exposure to dLAN decreased sucrose preference, time to first float bout in the Porsolt swim test, and GR expression in the hippocampus. Paternal exposure to dLAN increased time spent floating, and increased hippocampal GR expression. Overall, our results suggest that chronic exposure of parents to light at night has multigenerational effects on offspring depressive-like behavior. If these results pertain to humans, then our data suggest that LAN may contribute to the rapidly rising rates of major depressive disorder in industrialized and developing countries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Chronic restraint stress causes anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, downregulates glucocorticoid receptor expression, and attenuates glutamate release induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Shuichi; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Ninomiya, Midori; Richards, Misty C; Wakabayashi, Chisato; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2012-10-01

    Stress and the resulting increase in glucocorticoid levels have been implicated in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders. We investigated the effects of chronic restraint stress (CRS: 6 hours × 28 days) on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in rats and on the possible changes in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent neural function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). We observed significant reductions in body weight gain, food intake and sucrose preference from 1 week after the onset of CRS. In the 5th week of CRS, we conducted open-field (OFT), elevated plus-maze (EPM) and forced swim tests (FST). We observed a decrease in the number of entries into open arms during the EPM (anxiety-like behavior) and increased immobility during the FST (depression-like behavior). When the PFC was removed after CRS and subject to western blot analysis, the GR expression reduced compared with control, while the levels of BDNF and its receptors remained unchanged. Basal glutamate concentrations in PFC acute slice which were measured by high performance liquid chromatography were not influenced by CRS. However, BDNF-induced glutamate release was attenuated after CRS. These results suggest that reduced GR expression and altered BDNF function may be involved in chronic stress-induced anxiety--and depression-like behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Experimental heart failure causes depression-like behavior together with differential regulation of inflammatory and structural genes in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eFrey

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background-Depression and anxiety are common and independent outcome predictors in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF. However, it is unclear whether CHF causes depression. Thus, we investigated whether mice develop anxiety- and depression-like behavior after induction of ischemic CHF by myocardial infarction (MI.Methods and Results- In order to assess depression-like behavior, anhedonia was investigated by repeatedly testing sucrose preference for 8 weeks after coronary artery ligation or sham operation. Mice with large MI and increased left ventricular dimensions on echocardiography (termed CHF mice showed reduced preference for sucrose, indicating depression-like behavior. 6 weeks after MI, mice were tested for exploratory activity, anxiety-like behavior and cognitive function using the elevated plus maze (EPM, light-dark box (LDB, open field (OF and object recognition (OR tests. In the EPM and OF, CHF mice exhibited diminished exploratory behavior and motivation despite similar movement capability. In the OR, CHF mice had reduced preference for novelty and impaired short-term memory. On histology, CHF mice had unaltered overall cerebral morphology. However, analysis of gene expression by RNA-sequencing in prefrontal cortical, hippocampal, and left ventricular tissue revealed changes in genes related to inflammation and cofactors of neuronal signal transduction in CHF mice, with Nr4a1 being dysregulated both in prefrontal cortex and myocardium after MI. Conclusions-After induction of ischemic CHF, mice exhibited anhedonic behavior, decreased exploratory activity and interest in novelty, and cognitive impairment. Thus, ischemic CHF leads to distinct behavioral changes in mice analogous to symptoms observed in humans with CHF and comorbid depression.

  11. Abnormal anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in mice lacking both central serotonergic neurons and pancreatic islet cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Fang eJia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction of central serotonin (5-HT system has been proposed to be one of the underlying mechanisms for anxiety and depression, and the association of diabetes mellitus and psychiatric disorders has been noticed by the high prevalence of anxiety/depression in patients with diabetes mellitus. This promoted us to examine these behaviors in central 5-HT-deficient mice and those also suffering with diabetes mellitus. Mice lacking either 5-HT or central serotonergic neurons were generated by conditional deletion of Tph2 or Lmx1b respectively. Simultaneous depletion of both central serotonergic neurons and pancreatic islet cells was achieved by administration of diphtheria toxin (DT in Pet1-Cre;Rosa26-DT receptor (DTR mice. The central 5-HT-deficient mice showed reduced anxiety-like behaviors as they spent more time in and entered more often into the light box in the light/dark box test compared with controls; similar results were observed in the elevated plus maze test. However, they displayed no differences in the immobility time of the forced swimming and tail suspension tests suggesting normal depression-like behaviors in central 5-HT-deficient mice. As expected, DT-treated Pet1-Cre;Rosa26-DTR mice lacking both central serotonergic neurons and pancreatic islet endocrine cells exhibited several classic diabetic symptoms. Interestingly, they displayed increased anxiety-like behaviors but reduced immobility time in the forced swimming and tail suspension tests. Furthermore, the hippocampal neurogenesis was dramatically enhanced in these mice. These results suggest that the deficiency of central 5-HT may not be sufficient to induce anxiety/depression-like behaviors in mice, and the enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis may contribute to the altered depression-like behaviors in the 5-HT-deficient mice with diabetes. Our current investigation provides a novel insight into understanding the relationship between diabetes mellitus and psychiatric disorders.

  12. Kinin B1 receptors mediate depression-like behavior response in stressed mice treated with systemic E. coli lipopolysaccharide

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    Campos Maria M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinin B1 receptors are inducible molecules up-regulated after inflammatory stimuli. This study evaluated the relevance of kinin B1 receptors in a mouse depression behavior model. Methods Mice were exposed to a 5-min swimming session, and 30 min later they were injected with E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Depression-like behavior was assessed by determining immobility time in a tail suspension test. Different brain structures were collected for molecular and immunohistochemical studies. Anhedonia was assessed by means of a sucrose intake test. Results Our protocol elicited an increase in depression-like behavior in CF1 mice, as assessed by the tail-suspension test, at 24 h. This behavior was significantly reduced by treatment with the selective B1 receptor antagonists R-715 and SSR240612. Administration of SSR240612 also prevented an increase in number of activated microglial cells in mouse hippocampus, but did not affect a reduction in expression of mRNA for brain-derived neurotrophic factor. The increased immobility time following LPS treatment was preceded by an enhancement of hippocampal and cortical B1 receptor mRNA expression (which were maximal at 1 h, and a marked production of TNFα in serum, brain and cerebrospinal fluid (between 1 and 6 h. The depression-like behavior was virtually abolished in TNFα p55 receptor-knockout mice, and increased B1 receptor mRNA expression was completely absent in this mouse strain. Furthermore, treatment with SSR240612 was also effective in preventing anhedonia in LPS-treated mice, as assessed using a sucrose preference test. Conclusion Our data show, for the first time, involvement of kinin B1 receptors in depressive behavioral responses, in a process likely associated with microglial activation and TNFα production. Thus, selective and orally active B1 receptor antagonists might well represent promising pharmacological tools for depression therapy.

  13. Chronic caffeine produces sexually dimorphic effects on amphetamine-induced behavior, anxiety and depressive-like behavior in adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Sarah M; Townsend, Shannon E; Dixon, Rushell S; Hickman, Emma T; Lee, Sabrina M

    2016-04-01

    Caffeine consumption has been increasing rapidly in adolescents; however, most research on the behavioral effects of caffeine has been conducted in adults. Two experiments were conducted in which adolescent male and female rats were treated with a moderate dose of caffeine (0.25 g/l) in their drinking water beginning on P26-28. In the first experiment, animals were maintained on caffeinated drinking water or normal tap water for 14 days and were then tested for behavioral and striatal c-Fos response to amphetamine (1.5 mg/kg). In the second experiment, rats were maintained on caffeinated drinking water or normal tap water beginning on P28 and were tested for novel object recognition, anxiety in the light/dark test (L/D) and elevated plus maze (EPM), and depressive like behavior in the forced swim test (FST) beginning on the 14th day of caffeine exposure. Caffeine decreased amphetamine-induced rearing in males, but had no effect in females; however, this behavioral effect was not accompanied by changes in striatal c-Fos, which was increased by amphetamine but not altered by caffeine. No effects of caffeine were observed on novel object recognition or elevated plus maze behavior. However, in the L/D test, there was a sex by caffeine interaction on time spent in the light driven by a caffeine-induced increase in light time in the males but not the females. On the pretest day of the FST, sex by caffeine interactions were observed for swimming and struggling; caffeine decreased struggling behavior and increased swimming behavior in males and caffeine-treated females demonstrated significantly more struggling and significantly less swimming than caffeine-treated males. A similar pattern was observed on the test day in which caffeine decreased immobility overall and increased swimming. These data reveal sex dependent effects of caffeine on behavior in adolescent rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Milnacipran affects mouse impulsive, aggressive, and depressive-like behaviors in a distinct dose-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Ohmura, Yu; Yoshida, Takayuki; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2017-07-01

    Serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are widely used for the treatment for major depressive disorder, but these drugs induce several side effects including increased aggression and impulsivity, which are risk factors for substance abuse, criminal involvement, and suicide. To address this issue, milnacipran (0, 3, 10, or 30 mg/kg), an SNRI and antidepressant, was intraperitoneally administered to mice prior to the 3-choice serial reaction time task, resident-intruder test, and forced swimming test to measure impulsive, aggressive, and depressive-like behaviors, respectively. A milnacipran dose of 10 mg/kg suppressed all behaviors, which was accompanied by increased dopamine and serotonin levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) but not in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Although the most effective dose for depressive-like behavior was 30 mg/kg, the highest dose increased aggressive behavior and unaffected impulsive behavior. Increased dopamine levels in the NAc could be responsible for the effects. In addition, the mice basal impulsivity was negatively correlated with the latency to the first agonistic behavior. Thus, the optimal dose range of milnacipran is narrower than previously thought. Finding drugs that increase serotonin and dopamine levels in the mPFC without affecting dopamine levels in the NAc is a potential strategy for developing novel antidepressants. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Peripheral Administration of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha Induces Neuroinflammation and Sickness but Not Depressive-Like Behavior in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Biesmans

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical observations indicate that activation of the TNF-α system may contribute to the development of inflammation-associated depression. Here, we tested the hypothesis that systemic upregulation of TNF-α induces neuroinflammation and behavioral changes relevant to depression. We report that a single intraperitoneal injection of TNF-α in mice increased serum and brain levels of the proinflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-6, and MCP-1, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but not IL-1β. Protein levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 increased in serum but not in the brain. The transient release of immune molecules was followed by glial cell activation as indicated by increased astrocyte activation in bioluminescent Gfap-luc mice and elevated immunoreactivity against the microglial marker Iba1 in the dentate gyrus of TNF-α-challenged mice. Additionally, TNF-α-injected mice were evaluated in a panel of behavioral tests commonly used to study sickness and depressive-like behavior in rodents. Our behavioral data imply that systemic administration of TNF-α induces a strong sickness response characterized by reduced locomotor activity, decreased fluid intake, and body weight loss. Depressive-like behavior could not be separated from sickness at any of the time points studied. Together, these results demonstrate that peripheral TNF-α affects the central nervous system at a neuroimmune and behavioral level.

  16. Milnacipran affects mouse impulsive, aggressive, and depressive-like behaviors in a distinct dose-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iku Tsutsui-Kimura

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs are widely used for the treatment for major depressive disorder, but these drugs induce several side effects including increased aggression and impulsivity, which are risk factors for substance abuse, criminal involvement, and suicide. To address this issue, milnacipran (0, 3, 10, or 30 mg/kg, an SNRI and antidepressant, was intraperitoneally administered to mice prior to the 3-choice serial reaction time task, resident–intruder test, and forced swimming test to measure impulsive, aggressive, and depressive-like behaviors, respectively. A milnacipran dose of 10 mg/kg suppressed all behaviors, which was accompanied by increased dopamine and serotonin levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC but not in the nucleus accumbens (NAc. Although the most effective dose for depressive-like behavior was 30 mg/kg, the highest dose increased aggressive behavior and unaffected impulsive behavior. Increased dopamine levels in the NAc could be responsible for the effects. In addition, the mice basal impulsivity was negatively correlated with the latency to the first agonistic behavior. Thus, the optimal dose range of milnacipran is narrower than previously thought. Finding drugs that increase serotonin and dopamine levels in the mPFC without affecting dopamine levels in the NAc is a potential strategy for developing novel antidepressants.

  17. Effect of the fragrance inhalation of essential oil from Asarum heterotropoides on depression-like behaviors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Lim, Eun-Ju; Zhao, Rong Jie; Oh, Sa Rang; Jung, Ji Wook; Ahn, Eun-Mi; Lee, Eun Sook; Koo, Jin Suk; Kim, Hee Young; Chang, Suchan; Shim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Kwang Joong; Gwak, Young Seob; Yang, Chae Ha

    2015-03-06

    Psychological stressors may cause affective disorders, such as depression and anxiety, by altering expressions of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), serotonin (5-HT), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the brain. This study investigated the effects of essential oil from Asarum heterotropoides (EOAH) on depression-like behaviors and brain expressions of CRF, 5-HT, and TH in mice challenged with stress. Male ICR mice received fragrance inhalation of EOAH (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g) for 3 h in the special cage capped with a filter paper before start of the forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST). The duration of immobility was measured for the determination of depression-like behavior in the FST and TST. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine as positive control was administered at a dose of 15 mg/kg (i.p.) 30 min before start of behavioral testing. Immunoreactivities of CRF, 5-HT, and TH in the brain were also measured using separate groups of mice subjected to the FST. EOAH at higher doses (1.0 and 2.0 g) reduced immobility time in the FST and TST. In addition, EOAH at a dose of 1.0 g significantly reduced the expected increases in the expression of CRF positive neurons in the paraventricular nucleus and the expression of TH positive neurons in the locus coeruleus, and the expected decreases of the 5-HT positive neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus. These results provide strong evidence that EOAH effectively inhibits depression-like behavioral responses, brain CRF and TH expression increases, and brain 5-HT expression decreases in mice challenged with stress.

  18. Voluntary Wheel Running Does not Affect Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior in Young Adult and Aged Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephen A.; Dantzer, Robert; Kelley, Keith W.; Woods, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral stimulation of the innate immune system with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) causes prolonged depressive-like behavior in aged mice that is dependent on indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) activation. Regular moderate intensity exercise training has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects that might reduce depressive-like behavior in aged mice. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that voluntary wheel running would attenuate LPS-induced depressive-like behavior and brain IDO gene expression in 4-month-old and 22-month-old C57BL/6J mice. Mice were housed with a running wheel (Voluntary Wheel Running, VWR) or no wheel (Standard) for 30 days (young adult mice) or 70 days (aged mice), after which they were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (young adult mice: 0.83 mg/kg; aged mice: 0.33 mg/kg). Young adult VWR mice ran on average 6.9 km/day, while aged VWR mice ran on average 3.4 km/day. Both young adult and aged VWR mice increased their forced exercise tolerance compared to their respective Standard control groups. VWR had no effect on LPS-induced anorexia, weight-loss, increased immobility in the tail suspension test, and decreased sucrose preference in either young adult or aged mice. Four (young adult mice) and twenty-four (aged mice) hours after injection of LPS transcripts for TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IDO were upregulated in the whole brain independently of VWR. These results indicate that prolonged physical exercise has no effect on the neuroinflammatory response to LPS and its behavioral consequences. PMID:24281669

  19. Suppression of oxidative stress and 5-lipoxygenase activation by edaravone improves depressive-like behavior after concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Youichirou; Hoshijima, Michihiro; Yawata, Toshio; Nobumoto, Atsuya; Tsuda, Masayuki; Shimizu, Takahiro; Saito, Motoaki; Ueba, Tetuya

    2014-10-15

    Brain concussions are a serious public concern and are associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as depression. Patients with concussion who suffer from depression often experience distress. Nevertheless, few pre-clinical studies have examined concussion-induced depression, and there is little information regarding its pharmacological management. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, can exert neuroprotective effects in several animal models of neurological disorders. However, the effectiveness of edaravone in animal models of concussion-induced depression remains unclear. In this study, we examined whether edaravone could prevent concussion-induced depression. Mice were subjected to a weight-drop injury and intravenously administered edaravone (3.0 mg/kg) or vehicle immediately after impact. Serial magnetic resonance imaging showed no abnormalities of the cerebrum on diffusion T1- and T2-weighted images. We found that edaravone suppressed concussion-induced depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test, which was accompanied by inhibition of increased hippocampal and cortical oxidative stress (OS) and suppression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) translocation to the nuclear envelope in hippocampal astrocytes. Hippocampal OS in concussed mice was also prevented by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor, apocynin, and administration of BWB70C, a 5-LOX inhibitor, immediately and 24 h after injury prevented depressive-like behaviors in concussed mice. Further, antidepressant effects of edaravone were observed in mice receiving 1.0 or 3.0 mg/kg of edaravone immediately after impact, but not at a lower dose of 0.1 mg/kg. This antidepressant effect persisted up to 1 h after impact, whereas edaravone treatment at 3 h after impact had no effect on concussion-induced depressive-like behavior. These results suggest that edaravone protects against concussion-induced depression, and this protection is mediated by suppression of OS and 5

  20. Effects of testosterone and estradiol on anxiety and depressive-like behavior via a non-genomic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filova, Barbora; Malinova, Maria; Babickova, Janka; Tothova, Lubomira; Ostatnikova, Daniela; Celec, Peter; Hodosy, Julius

    2015-06-01

    Besides their known slow genomic effects, testosterone and estradiol have rapid effects in the brain. However, their impact on mood-related behavior is not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the non-genomic pathway of testosterone and estradiol in the amygdala in relation to anxiety and depressive-like behavior. Sham-operated and gonadectomized male rats (GDX) supplemented with testosterone propionate, estradiol, or olive oil were used. Five minutes after administration, anxiety and depression-like behavior were tested. Estradiol increased anxiolytic behavior in the open-field test compared to the GDX group, but administration of testosterone had no significant effect. Besides, c-Fos expression in the medial nucleus of the amygdala significantly increased after testosterone treatment compared to the GDX group, while no significant difference was observed in the central and the basolateral nuclei of the amygdala in the testosterone-treated group compared to the GDX group. In conclusion, estradiol had an anxiolytic effect via a rapid pathway, but no rapid effect of testosterone on anxiety was found. Further studies elucidating whether the rapid effect is mediated by a non-genomic pathway are needed.

  1. Neuropeptide s alters anxiety but not depression-like behaviors in the flinders sensitive line rats, a genetic animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathe, A.; Wegener, Gregers; Finger, B.

    2010-01-01

    . In selected animals effect of NPS on home cage activity was explored. Finally, brains from separate groups of naive animals were harvested; hippocampi, amygdalae and PVN punched out, and mRNA transcripts measured with the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (rt-qPCR). Results: The most salient......) In the home cage, NPS increased locomotion in a dose dependent fashion in the FSL; (4) rt-qPCR showed that NPSR expression was lower in amygdalae in the FSL; no other region or strain differences were found. Discussion: Baseline depression-like behavior was markedly higher in the FSL compared to FRL rats...

  2. Cotinine reduces depressive-like behavior, working memory deficits, and synaptic loss associated with chronic stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizzell, J Alex; Iarkov, Alexandre; Holmes, Rosalee; Mori, Takahashi; Echeverria, Valentina

    2014-07-15

    Chronic stress underlies and/or exacerbates many psychiatric conditions and often results in memory impairment as well as depressive symptoms. Such afflicted individuals use tobacco more than the general population and this has been suggested as a form of self-medication. Cotinine, the predominant metabolite of nicotine, may underlie such behavior as it has been shown to ameliorate anxiety and memory loss in animal models. In this study, we sought to investigate the effects of cotinine on working memory and depressive-like behavior in mice subjected to prolonged restraint. Cotinine-treated mice displayed better performance than vehicle-treated cohorts on the working memory task, the radial arm water maze test. In addition, with or without chronic stress exposure, cotinine-treated mice engaged in fewer depressive-like behaviors as assessed using the tail suspension and Porsolt's forced swim tests. These antidepressant and nootropic effects of cotinine were associated with an increase in the synaptophysin expression, a commonly used marker of synaptic density, in the hippocampus as well as the prefrontal and entorhinal cortices of restrained mice. The beneficial effects of cotinine in preventing various consequences of chronic stress were underscored by the inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase 3 β in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Taken together, our results show for the first time that cotinine reduces the negative effects of stress on mood, memory, and the synapse. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Amantadine preserves dopamine level and attenuates depression-like behavior induced by traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liang; Ge, Hongfei; Tang, Jun; Fu, Chuhua; Duanmu, Wangsheng; Chen, Yujie; Hu, Rong; Sui, Jianfeng; Liu, Xin; Feng, Hua

    2015-02-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often results in multiple neuropsychiatric sequelae, including cognitive, emotional, and behavioral problems. Among them, depression is a common psychiatric symptom, and links to poorer recovery. Amantadine, as an antiparkinsonian, increases dopamine release, and blocks dopamine reuptake, but has recently received attention for its effectiveness as an antidepressant. In the present study, we first induced a post-TBI depression rat model to probe the efficacy of amantadine therapy in reducing post-TBI depression. The DA concentration in the striatum of the injured rats, as well as the degeneration and apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN), were checked along with the depression-like behavior. The results showed that amantadine therapy could significantly ameliorate the depression-like behavior, improving the DA level in the striatum and decreasing the degeneration and apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons in the SN. The results indicated that the anti-depression effect may result from the increase of extracellular DA concentration in the striatum and/or the indirect neuroprotection on the dopaminergic neurons in the SN. We conclude that DA plays a critical role in post-TBI depression, and that amantadine shows its potential value in anti-depression treatment for TBI. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Depression-like behavior in rat: Involvement of galanin receptor subtype 1 in the ventral periaqueductal gray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Li, Hui; Barde, Swapnali; Zhang, Ming-Dong; Sun, Jing; Wang, Tong; Zhang, Pan; Luo, Hanjiang; Wang, Yongjun; Yang, Yutao; Wang, Chuanyue; Svenningsson, Per; Theodorsson, Elvar; Hökfelt, Tomas G M; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2016-08-09

    The neuropeptide galanin coexists in rat brain with serotonin in the dorsal raphe nucleus and with noradrenaline in the locus coeruleus (LC), and it has been suggested to be involved in depression. We studied rats exposed to chronic mild stress (CMS), a rodent model of depression. As expected, these rats showed several endophenotypes relevant to depression-like behavior compared with controls. All these endophenotypes were normalized after administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. The transcripts for galanin and two of its receptors, galanin receptor 1 (GALR1) and GALR2, were analyzed with quantitative real-time PCR using laser capture microdissection in the following brain regions: the hippocampal formation, LC, and ventral periaqueductal gray (vPAG). Only Galr1 mRNA levels were significantly increased, and only in the latter region. After knocking down Galr1 in the vPAG with an siRNA technique, all parameters of the depressive behavioral phenotype were similar to controls. Thus, the depression-like behavior in rats exposed to CMS is likely related to an elevated expression of Galr1 in the vPAG, suggesting that a GALR1 antagonist could have antidepressant effects.

  5. Adolescent voluntary exercise attenuated hippocampal innate immunity responses and depressive-like behaviors following maternal separation stress in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mahsa; Peeri, Maghsoud; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal

    2016-09-01

    Early life stressful events have detrimental effects on the brain and behavior, which are associated with the development of depression. Immune-inflammatory responses have been reported to contribute in the pathophysiology of depression. Many studies have reported on the beneficial effects of exercise against stress. However, underlying mechanisms through which exercise exerts its effects were poorly studied. Therefore, it applied maternal separation (MS), as a valid animal model of early-life adversity, in rats from postnatal day (PND) 2 to 14 for 180min per day. At PND 28, male Wistar albino rats were subjected to 5 experimental groups; 1) controls 2) MS rats 3) MS rats treated with fluoxetine 5mg/kg to PND 60, 4) MS rats that were subjected to voluntary running wheel (RW) exercise and 5) MS rats that were subjected to mandatory treadmill (TM) exercise until adulthood. At PND 60, depressive-like behaviors were assessed by using forced swimming test (FST), splash test, and sucrose preference test (SPT). Our results revealed that depressive-like behaviors following MS stress were associated with an increase in expression of toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr-4) and its main signaling protein, Myd88, in the hippocampal formation. Also, we found that voluntary (and not mandatory) physical exercise during adolescence is protected against depressant effects of early-life stress at least partly through mitigating the innate immune responses in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Effects of early life abuse differ across development: Infant social behavior deficits are followed by adolescent depressive-like behaviors mediated by the amygdala

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    Raineki, Charlis; Cortés, Millie Rincón; Belnoue, Laure; Sullivan, Regina M.

    2012-01-01

    Abuse during early life, especially from the caregiver, increases vulnerability to develop later life psychopathologies such as depression. Although signs of depression are typically not expressed until later life, signs of dysfunctional social behavior have been found earlier. How infant abuse alters the trajectory of brain development to produce pathways to pathology is not completely understood. Here we address this question using two different but complementary rat models of early-life abuse from postnatal days (PN) 8–12: a naturalistic paradigm, where the mother is provided with insufficient bedding for nest building and a more controlled paradigm, where infants undergo olfactory classical conditioning. Amygdala neural assessment (c-Fos), as well as social behavior and forced swim tests were performed at preweaning (PN20) and adolescence (PN45). Our results show that both models of early life abuse induce deficits in social behavior, even during the preweaning period; however, depressive-like behaviors were observed only during adolescence. Adolescent depressive-like behavior corresponds with an increase in amygdala neural activity in response to forced swim test. A causal relationship between the amygdala and depressive-like behavior was suggested through amygdala temporary deactivation (muscimol infusions), which rescued the depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test. Our results indicate that social behavior deficits in infancy could serve as an early marker for later psychopathology. Moreover, the implication of the amygdala in the ontogeny of depressive-like behaviors in infant abused animals is an important step toward understanding the underlying mechanisms of later life mental disease associated with early-life abuse. PMID:22649253

  7. Hypothyroidism during neonatal and perinatal period induced by thyroidectomy of the mother causes depressive-like behavior in prepubertal rats

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    Marisol Pineda-Reynoso

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Marisol Pineda-Reynoso, Edgar Cano-Europa, Vanessa Blas-Valdivia, Adelaida Hernandez-Garcia, Margarita Franco-Colin, Rocio Ortiz-ButronDepartamento de Fisiología ‘Mauricio Russek Berman,’ Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, IPN, Carpio y Plan de Ayala, MéxicoAbstract: The objective of this study was to see if neonatal and perinatal hypothyroidism caused anxiety and depressive-like behaviors. Twenty female Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: 1 thyroidectomy caused hypothyroidism, in which the thyroid gland had been removed and the parathyroid reimplanted; and 2 false thyroidectomy. The thyroidectomy was made on rats anesthetized with ketamine-xylazine. The rats were mated and one day after giving birth, eight pups were assigned to each group randomly and they were distributed into two groups: a hypothyroid group containing male pups of a hypothyroid mother with a hypothyroid wet nurse; and a euthyroid group of male pups of a euthyroid mother with a euthyroid wet nurse. We analyzed the behavioral test at a prepubertal age. The neonatal and perinatal hypothyroidism caused by the mother’s thyroidectomy caused a decrease in body weight and length. We found that the neonatal and perinatal hypothyroidism enhanced the total exploratory activity without affecting social contact and the time spent in the open and closed arms in an elevated plus-maze. The hypothyroidism caused immobility without altering the lower climbing duration in the swimming test. This study shows a novel model to cause neonatal and perinatal hypothyroidism without using pharmacological drugs. We demonstrated that hypothyroid animals had a reduction in body weight and length, a retardation of neurodevelopment, and they had depressive-like behavior.Keywords: perinatal hypothyroidism, thyroidectomy, thyroid hormone, behavior, metabolism

  8. Duloxetine prevents the effects of prenatal stress on depressive-like and anxiety-like behavior and hippocampal expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in adult male offspring rats.

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    Zhang, Xiaosong; Wang, Qi; Wang, Yan; Hu, Jingmin; Jiang, Han; Cheng, Wenwen; Ma, Yuchao; Liu, Mengxi; Sun, Anji; Zhang, Xinxin; Li, Xiaobai

    2016-12-01

    Stress during pregnancy may cause neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. However, the mechanisms are largely unknown. Currently, pro-inflammatory cytokines have been identified as a risk factor for depression and anxiety disorder. Unfortunately, there is very little research on the long-term effects of prenatal stress on the neuroinflammatory system of offspring. Moreover, the relationship between antidepressant treatment and cytokines in the central nervous system, especially in the hippocampus, an important emotion modulation center, is unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects of prenatal chronic mild stress during development on affective-like behaviors and hippocampal cytokines in adult offspring, and to verify whether antidepressant (duloxetine) administration from early adulthood could prevent the harmful consequences. To do so, prenatally stressed and non-stressed Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with either duloxetine (10mg/kg/day) or vehicle from postnatal day 60 for 21days. Adult offspring were divided into four groups: 1) prenatal stress+duloxetine treatment, 2) prenatal stress+vehicle, 3) duloxetine treatment alone, and 4) vehicle alone. Adult offspring were assessed for anxiety-like behavior using the open field test and depression-like behavior using the forced swim test. Brains were analyzed for pro-inflammatory cytokine markers in the hippocampus via real-time PCR. Results demonstrate that prenatal stress-induced anxiety- and depression-like behaviors are associated with an increase in hippocampal inflammatory mediators, and duloxetine administration prevents the increased hippocampal pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 and anxiety- and depression-like behavior in prenatally stressed adult offspring. This research provides important evidence on the long-term effect of PNS exposure during development in a model of maternal adversity to study the pathogenesis of depression and its therapeutic interventions

  9. Early Life Stress Increases Metabolic Risk, HPA Axis Reactivity, and Depressive-Like Behavior When Combined with Postweaning Social Isolation in Rats.

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    Vargas, Javier; Junco, Mariana; Gomez, Carlos; Lajud, Naima

    2016-01-01

    Early-life stress is associated with depression and metabolic abnormalities that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Such associations could be due to increased glucocorticoid levels. Periodic maternal separation in the neonate and rearing in social isolation are potent stressors that increase hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. Moreover, social isolation promotes feed intake and body weight gain in rats subjected to periodic maternal separation; however, its effects on metabolic risks have not been described. In the present study, we evaluated whether periodic maternal separation, social isolation rearing, and a combination of these two stressors (periodic maternal separation + social isolation rearing) impair glucose homeostasis and its relation to the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and depressive-like behavior. Periodic maternal separation increased basal corticosterone levels, induced a passive coping strategy in the forced swimming test, and was associated with a mild (24%) increase in fasting glucose, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. Rearing in social isolation increased stress reactivity in comparison to both controls and in combination with periodic maternal separation, without affecting the coping strategy associated with the forced swimming test. However, social isolation also increased body weight gain, fasting glucose (120%), and insulin levels in rats subjected to periodic maternal separation. Correlation analyses showed that stress-induced effects on coping strategy on the forced swimming test (but not on metabolic risk markers) are associated with basal corticosterone levels. These findings suggest that maternal separation and postweaning social isolation affect stress and metabolic vulnerability differentially and that early-life stress-related effects on metabolism are not directly dependent on glucocorticoid levels. In conclusion, our study supports the cumulative stress hypothesis, which suggests that

  10. Neonatal tactile stimulation decreases depression-like and anxiety-like behaviors and potentiates sertraline action in young rats.

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    Freitas, Daniele; Antoniazzi, Caren T D; Segat, Hecson J; Metz, Vinícia Garzella; Vey, Luciana Taschetto; Barcelos, Raquel C S; Duarte, Thiago; Duarte, Marta M M F; Burger, Marilise Escobar

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that events which occur in early life exert a significant influence on brain development, what can be reflected throughout adulthood. This study was carried out in order to assess the influence of neonatal tactile stimulation (TS) on behavioral and morphological responses related to depression-like and anxiety-like behaviors, assessed following the administration of sertraline (SERT), a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI). Male pups were submitted to daily TS, from postnatal day 8 (PND8) to postnatal day 14 (PND14), for 10 min every day. On PND50, adult animals were submitted to forced swimming training (15 min). On PND51, half of each experimental group (UH and TS) received a single sub-therapeutic dose of sertraline (SER, 0.3mg/kg body weight, i.p.) or its vehicle (C, control group). Thirty minutes after injection, depression-like behaviors were quantified in forced swimming test (FST, for 5 min). On the following day, anxiety-like behaviors were assessed in elevated plus maze (EPM), followed by biochemical assessments. TS per se increased swimming time, decreasing immobility time in FST. Besides, TS per se was able to increase frequency of head dipping and time spent in the open arms of EPM, resulting in decreased anxiety index. In addition, groups exposed to TS showed decreased plasma levels of corticosterone per se. Interestingly, while TS exposure significantly potentiated the antidepressant activity of a subtherapeutic dose of SERT, this drug was able to exacerbate TS-induced anxiolytic activity, as observed in FST and EPM, respectively. Decreased plasma levels of both corticosterone and cortisol in animals exposed to TS and treated with SERT are able to confirm the interesting interaction between this neonatal handling and the antidepressant drug. From our results, we conclude that neonatal TS is able to exert beneficial influence on the ability to cope with stressful situations in adulthood, preventing depression and favorably

  11. Vitis vinifera juice ameliorates depression-like behavior in mice by modulating biogenic amine neurotransmitters

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    Muhammad Aslam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The advantageous effects of Vitis vinifera juice on depressive model mice were examined utilizing a blend of behavioral evaluations and biogenic amine neurotransmitter estimations. During the behavioral evaluations, immobility time on the forced swimming test and tail suspension test were measured in unstressed and immobilization-induced stressed mice. V. vinifera juice (4 mL/kg and 8 mL/kg and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg produced a significant decrease in immobility time of both unstressed and stressed mice when compared with their respective saline-treated control groups in both paradigms. Neurotransmitters were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detector. V. vinifera juice raised the levels of both serotonin (p<0.001 and noradrenalin (p<0.001 in brain tissue. These outcomes give significant mechanistic insights into the protective effect of V. vinifera juice against depressive disorders. Our results showed that V. vinifera juice could relieve depressive manifestations in the rodent model of depression.

  12. Dietary DHA during development affects depression-like behaviors and biomarkers that emerge after puberty in adolescent rats

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    Weiser, Michael J.; Wynalda, Kelly; Salem, Norman; Butt, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    DHA is an important omega-3 PUFA that confers neurodevelopmental benefits. Sufficient omega-3 PUFA intake has been associated with improved mood-associated measures in adult humans and rodents, but it is unknown whether DHA specifically influences these benefits. Furthermore, the extent to which development and puberty interact with the maternal diet and the offspring diet to affect mood-related behaviors in adolescence is poorly understood. We sought to address these questions by 1) feeding pregnant rats with diets sufficient or deficient in DHA during gestation and lactation; 2) weaning their male offspring to diets that were sufficient or deficient in DHA; and 3) assessing depression-related behaviors (forced swim test), plasma biomarkers [brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), serotonin, and melatonin], and brain biomarkers (BDNF) in the offspring before and after puberty. No dietary effects were detected when the offspring were evaluated before puberty. In contrast, after puberty depressive-like behavior and its associated biomarkers were worse in DHA-deficient offspring compared with animals with sufficient levels of DHA. The findings reported here suggest that maintaining sufficient DHA levels throughout development (both pre- and postweaning) may increase resiliency to emotional stressors and decrease susceptibility to mood disorders that commonly arise during adolescence. PMID:25411442

  13. Dietary DHA during development affects depression-like behaviors and biomarkers that emerge after puberty in adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Michael J; Wynalda, Kelly; Salem, Norman; Butt, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    DHA is an important omega-3 PUFA that confers neurodevelopmental benefits. Sufficient omega-3 PUFA intake has been associated with improved mood-associated measures in adult humans and rodents, but it is unknown whether DHA specifically influences these benefits. Furthermore, the extent to which development and puberty interact with the maternal diet and the offspring diet to affect mood-related behaviors in adolescence is poorly understood. We sought to address these questions by 1) feeding pregnant rats with diets sufficient or deficient in DHA during gestation and lactation; 2) weaning their male offspring to diets that were sufficient or deficient in DHA; and 3) assessing depression-related behaviors (forced swim test), plasma biomarkers [brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), serotonin, and melatonin], and brain biomarkers (BDNF) in the offspring before and after puberty. No dietary effects were detected when the offspring were evaluated before puberty. In contrast, after puberty depressive-like behavior and its associated biomarkers were worse in DHA-deficient offspring compared with animals with sufficient levels of DHA. The findings reported here suggest that maintaining sufficient DHA levels throughout development (both pre- and postweaning) may increase resiliency to emotional stressors and decrease susceptibility to mood disorders that commonly arise during adolescence. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Monosodium glutamate, a food additive, induces depressive-like and anxiogenic-like behaviors in young rats.

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    Quines, Caroline B; Rosa, Suzan G; Da Rocha, Juliana T; Gai, Bibiana M; Bortolatto, Cristiani F; Duarte, Marta Maria M F; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2014-06-27

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has been the target of research due to its toxicological effects. We investigated the depressive- and anxiogenic-like behaviors in rats exposed to neonatal subcutaneous injection of MSG. The involvement of the serotonergic system, by measuring [(3)H] serotonin (5-HT) uptake in cerebral cortices, and the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis, by determining serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone levels, was also examined. Male and female newborn Wistar rats were divided into control and MSG groups, which received, respectively, a daily subcutaneous injection of saline (0.9%) or MSG (4 g/kg/day) from the 1st to 5th postnatal day. The behavioral tests [spontaneous locomotor activity, contextual fear conditioning, and forced swimming test (FST)] were performed from the 60th to 64th postnatal day. MSG-treated animals showed alteration in the spontaneous locomotor activity, an increase in the number of fecal pellets and the number of animal's vocalizations and urine occurrence, and a decrease in the grooming time. The MSG exposure increased the immobility time in the FST and the freezing reaction in the contextual fear conditioning. Additionally, MSG treatment increased the [(3)H]5-HT uptake in the cerebral cortices of rats and induced a deregulation of HPA axis function (by increasing serum ACTH and corticosterone levels). In conclusion MSG-treated rats are more susceptible to develop anxiogenic- and depressive-like behaviors, which could be related to a dysfunction in the serotonergic system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Startle response memory and hippocampal changes in adult zebrafish pharmacologically-induced to exhibit anxiety/depression-like behaviors.

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    Pittman, Julian T; Lott, Chad S

    2014-01-17

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are rapidly becoming a popular animal model for neurobehavioral and psychopharmacological research. While startle testing is a well-established assay to investigate anxiety-like behaviors in different species, screening of the startle response and its habituation in zebrafish is a new direction of translational biomedical research. This study focuses on a novel behavioral protocol to assess a tapping-induced startle response and its habituation in adult zebrafish that have been pharmacologically-induced to exhibit anxiety/depression-like behaviors. We demonstrated that zebrafish exhibit robust learning performance in a task adapted from the mammalian literature, a modified plus maze, and showed that ethanol and fluoxetine impair memory performance in this maze when administered after training at a dose that does not impair motor function, however, leads to significant upregulation of hippocampal serotoninergic neurons. These results suggest that the maze associative learning paradigm has face and construct validity and that zebrafish may become a translationally relevant study species for the analysis of the mechanisms of learning and memory changes associated with psychopharmacological treatment of anxiety/depression. © 2013.

  16. Sodium Phenylbutyrate and Edaravone Abrogate Chronic Restraint Stress-Induced Behavioral Deficits: Implication of Oxido-Nitrosative, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Cascade, and Neuroinflammation.

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    Jangra, Ashok; Sriram, Chandra Shaker; Dwivedi, Shubham; Gurjar, Satendra Singh; Hussain, Md Iftikar; Borah, Probodh; Lahkar, Mangala

    2017-01-01

    Chronic stress exposure can produce deleterious effects on the hippocampus (HC) which eventually leads to cognitive impairment and depression. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been reported as one of the major culprits in the development of stress-induced cognitive impairment and depression. We investigated the neuroprotective efficacy of sodium phenylbutyrate (SPB), an ER stress inhibitor, and edaravone, a free radical scavenger, against chronic restraint stress (CRS)-induced cognitive deficits and anxiety- and depressive-like behavior in mice. Adult male Swiss albino mice were restrained for 6 h/day for 28 days and injected (i.p.) with SPB (40 and 120 mg/kg) or edaravone (3 and 10 mg/kg) for the last seven days. After stress cessation, the anxiety- and depressive-like behavior along with spatial learning and memory were examined. Furthermore, oxido-nitrosative stress, proinflammatory cytokines, and gene expression level of ER stress-related genes were assessed in HC and prefrontal cortex (PFC). CRS-exposed mice showed anxiety- and depressive-like behavior, which was significantly improved by SPB and edaravone treatment. In addition, SPB and edaravone treatment significantly alleviated CRS-induced spatial learning and memory impairment. Furthermore, CRS-evoked oxido-nitrosative stress, neuroinflammation, and depletion of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor were significantly ameliorated by SPB and edaravone treatment. We found significant up-regulation of ER stress-related genes in both HC and PFC regions, which were suppressed by SPB and edaravone treatment in CRS mice. Our study provides evidence that SPB and edaravone exerted neuroprotective effects on CRS-induced cognitive deficits and anxiety- and depressive-like behavior, which is possibly coupled with inhibition of oxido-nitrosative stress, neuroinflammation, and ER stress cascade.

  17. Dysfunction in fatty acid amide hydrolase is associated with depressive-like behavior in Wistar Kyoto rats.

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    K Yaragudri Vinod

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While the etiology of depression is not clearly understood at the present time, this mental disorder is thought be a complex and multifactorial trait with important genetic and environmental contributing factors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The role of the endocannabinoid (eCB system in depressive behavior was examined in Wistar Kyoto (WKY rat strain, a genetic model of depression. Our findings revealed selective abnormalities in the eCB system in the brains of WKY rats compared to Wistar (WIS rats. Immunoblot analysis indicated significantly higher levels of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH in frontal cortex and hippocampus of WKY rats with no alteration in the level of N-arachidonyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine specific phospholipase-D (NAPE-PLD. Significantly higher levels of CB1 receptor-mediated G-protein coupling and lower levels of anandamide (AEA were found in frontal cortex and hippocampus of WKY rats. While the levels of brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF were significantly lower in frontal cortex and hippocampus of WKY rats compared to WIS rats, pharmacological inhibition of FAAH elevated BDNF levels in WKY rats. Inhibition of FAAH enzyme also significantly increased sucrose consumption and decreased immobility in the forced swim test in WKY rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest a critical role for the eCB system and BDNF in the genetic predisposition to depressive-like behavior in WKY rats and point to the potential therapeutic utility of eCB enhancing agents in depressive disorder.

  18. Cerebellar Fastigial Nucleus Electrical Stimulation Alleviates Depressive-Like Behaviors in Post-Stroke Depression Rat Model and Potential Mechanisms

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    Lei Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the molecular mechanism of post-stroke depression (PSD, and observe the therapeutic effects of cerebellar fastigial nucleus electrical stimulation (FNS on the behaviors and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF in a PSD rat model. Methods: Healthy SD rats were randomly divided into four groups (sham, stroke, post-stroke depress and FNS group. Sham group (n = 6 underwent sham operation. The other three groups (n = 6*3 underwent MCAO. Rats were examined twice a week in open filed test. Moreover, neuroprotective effect on cerebellar Purkinje cells and expression of cytokines in hippocampal tissue were examined. Results: The PSD group showed a significant weight loss, decreased consumption of sucrose water, reduced rearing and locomotor activities. The FNS significantly alleviates the body weight loss and sucrose preference, locomotor and rearing activities. The bilateral rCBF was also restored after FNS treatment. Moreover, FNS improved the neuroprotection via suppressing apoptosis of cerebellar Purkinje cells. And the inflammatory cytokines mRNA level in hippocampus was significantly decreased. Conclusion: FNS treatment alleviates depressive-like behaviors and rCBF in PSD rats model, which could be attributed to its ability to protect cerebellar Purkinje cells and decrease the mRNA level of inflammatory cytokines.

  19. Chronic FAAH inhibition during nicotine abstinence alters habenular CB1 receptor activity and precipitates depressive-like behaviors.

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    Simonnet, A; Zamberletti, E; Cador, M; Rubino, T; Caillé, S

    2017-02-01

    The role of the endocannabinoid system in nicotine addiction is being increasingly acknowledged. Acute inhibition of anandamide (AEA) degradation efficiently reduces nicotine withdrawal-induced affective symptoms in rats and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the degradation enzyme of AEA, has been proposed as a possible treatment against nicotine addiction. However, it is unclear whether chronic inhibition of AEA during nicotine abstinence will have beneficial or deleterious affective side-effects. Using a rat model of nicotine addiction, we found that, during abstinence, rats injected daily with a FAAH inhibitor (URB597) developed a depressive-like phenotype. Our results show that in the nicotine abstinent rats, URB597 induced low saccharin consumption, persistent immobility in the forced swim test and increased corticosterone levels in response to stress. In addition, URB597decreased CB1 receptor binding and activity in the habenula, a key structure in the control of nicotine-related emotional states. In contrast, non-treated abstinent rats showed increased CB1 receptor activity and behaviors comparable to controls. No FAAH inhibition-induced alterations were observed in animals that had a previous history of saline self-administration. Taken together, our results suggest that chronic FAAH inhibition prevents the homeostatic adaptations of habenular CB1 receptor function that are necessary for the recovery from nicotine dependence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Adolescent chronic restraint stress (aCRS) elicits robust depressive-like behavior in freely cycling, adult female rats without increasing anxiety-like behaviors.

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    Hibicke, Meghan; Graham, Martha A; Hayslett, Renée L

    2017-04-01

    Stress during times of rapid development is a risk factor for Major Depressive Disorder, a mood disorder that disproportionately affects women. We developed an adolescent chronic restraint stress (aCRS) protocol using female rats to address the impact of adolescent stress on female adult depressive-like behavior. Animals were divided into 4 treatment groups: not restrained:saline (NRSAL), not restrained:desipramine (NRDES), restrained:saline (RSAL), and restrained:desipramine (RDES). NRSAL and NRDES rats were housed in a separate colony room from RSAL and RDES rats. All animals were weighed and handled daily. Beginning postnatal day (PND) 34(±1), RSAL and RDES rats were restrained for 1 hour daily for 14 consecutive days. Beginning PND 55(±1), NRDES and RDES rats were given subcutaneous desipramine (5 mg/kg), which served as a positive control, daily for 14 consecutive days. During that same time period, NRSAL and RSAL rats were given subcutaneous saline daily. aCRS (RSAL and RDES) rats showed significantly attenuated weight gain compared with nonrestrained (NRSAL and NRDES) rats during the restraint period. Weight gain normalized after the final restraint session. Behavioral testing took place PND 68-69(±1), and included open field testing, the elevated plus maze, locomotor activity, and the forced swim test (FST). RSAL rats showed significantly more immobility in the FST versus all other groups, indicating depressive-like behavior. No differences between groups were observed in the other behavioral measures. These results indicate that aCRS elicits depressive-like behavioral characteristics in adult female rats without increasing anxiety-like behaviors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Insulin-like growth factor-I peptides act centrally to decrease depression-like behavior of mice treated intraperitoneally with lipopolysaccharide

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    Park Sook-Eun

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Centrally administered insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I has anti-depressant activity in several rodent models, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced depression. In this study we tested the ability of IGF-I and GPE (the N-terminal tri-peptide derived from IGF-I to alter depression-like behavior induced by intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of LPS in a preventive and curative manner. In the first case, IGF-I (1 μg or GPE (5 μg was administered i.c.v. to CD-1 mice followed 30 min later by 330 μg/kg body weight i.p. LPS. In the second case, 830 μg/kg body weight LPS was given 24 h prior to either IGF-I or GPE. When administered i.p., LPS induced full-blown sickness assessed as a loss of body weight, decrease in food intake and sickness behavior. None of these indices were affected by IGF-I or GPE. LPS also induced depression-like behavior; assessed as an increased duration of immobility in the tail suspension and forced swim tests. When administered before or after LPS, IGF-I and GPE abrogated the LPS response; attenuating induction of depression-like behaviors and blocking preexistent depression-like behaviors. Similar to previous work with IGF-I, GPE decreased brain expression of cytokines in response to LPS although unlike IGF-I, GPE did not induce the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. LPS induced expression of tryptophan dioxygenases, IDO1, IDO2 and TDO2, but expression of these enzymes was not altered by GPE. Thus, both IGF-I and GPE elicit specific improvement in depression-like behavior independent of sickness, an action that could be due to their anti-inflammatory properties.

  2. Cross Talk Between Brain Innate Immunity and Serotonin Signaling Underlies Depressive-Like Behavior Induced by Alzheimer's Amyloid-β Oligomers in Mice.

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    Ledo, Jose Henrique; Azevedo, Estefania P; Beckman, Danielle; Ribeiro, Felipe C; Santos, Luis E; Razolli, Daniela S; Kincheski, Grasielle C; Melo, Helen M; Bellio, Maria; Teixeira, Antonio L; Velloso, Licio A; Foguel, Debora; De Felice, Fernanda G; Ferreira, Sergio T

    2016-11-30

    Considerable clinical and epidemiological evidence links Alzheimer's disease (AD) and depression. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this connection are largely unknown. We reported recently that soluble Aβ oligomers (AβOs), toxins that accumulate in AD brains and are thought to instigate synapse damage and memory loss, induce depressive-like behavior in mice. Here, we report that the mechanism underlying this action involves AβO-induced microglial activation, aberrant TNF-α signaling, and decreased brain serotonin levels. Inactivation or ablation of microglia blocked the increase in brain TNF-α and abolished depressive-like behavior induced by AβOs. Significantly, we identified serotonin as a negative regulator of microglial activation. Finally, AβOs failed to induce depressive-like behavior in Toll-like receptor 4-deficient mice and in mice harboring a nonfunctional TLR4 variant in myeloid cells. Results establish that AβOs trigger depressive-like behavior via a double impact on brain serotonin levels and microglial activation, unveiling a cross talk between brain innate immunity and serotonergic signaling as a key player in mood alterations in AD. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the main cause of dementia in the world. Brain accumulation of amyloid-β oligomers (AβOs) is a major feature in the pathogenesis of AD. Although clinical and epidemiological data suggest a strong connection between AD and depression, the underlying mechanisms linking these two disorders remain largely unknown. Here, we report that aberrant activation of the brain innate immunity and decreased serotonergic tonus in the brain are key players in AβO-induced depressive-like behavior in mice. Our findings may open up new possibilities for the development of effective therapeutics for AD and depression aimed at modulating microglial function. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/3612106-11$15.00/0.

  3. Cotinine halts the advance of Alzheimer’s disease-like pathology and associated depressive-like behavior in Tg6799 mice

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    Sagar ePatel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is associated with cognitive and non-cognitive symptoms for which there are currently no effective therapies. We have previously reported that cotinine, a natural product obtained from tobacco leaves, prevented memory loss and diminished amyloid-β (Aβ plaque pathology in the transgenic 6799 mice (Tg6799 mice when treated prior to the development of the pathology. We have also shown that cotinine reduces depressive-like behavior in normal and chronically stressed C57BL/6 mice. Here, we extend our previous studies by investigating the effects of cotinine on the progression of AD-like pathology, depressive-like behavior, and the mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects in the Tg6799 mice when left untreated until after a more advanced stage of the disease’s development. The results show that vehicle-treated Tg6799 mice displayed an accentuated loss of working memory and an abundant Aβ plaque pathology that were accompanied by higher levels of depressive-like behavior as compared to control littermates. By contrast, prolonged daily cotinine treatment, withheld until after a mid-level progression of AD-like pathology, reduced Aβ levels, Aβ plaques, and depressive-like behavior as well as dramatically improved working memory in Tg6799 mice to levels no different from control littermates. The beneficial effects of cotinine were accompanied by an increase in the expression of the active form of protein kinase B (Akt and the postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95 in the hippocampi and frontal cortices of Tg6799 mice. This suggests that cotinine halts the progression of AD-like pathology while reducing depressive-like behavior by stimulating signaling pathways supporting synaptic plasticity in Tg6799 mice. The potential use of cotinine to treat cognitive and non-cognitive symptoms of AD is discussed.

  4. Fish oil supplementation attenuates neuroinflammation and alleviates depressive-like behavior in rats submitted to repeated lipopolysaccharide.

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    Dang, Ruili; Zhou, Xueyuan; Tang, Mimi; Xu, Pengfei; Gong, Xiaoxue; Liu, Yuanyuan; Jiao, Hongxiao; Jiang, Pei

    2017-01-05

    Depression is frequently associated with inflammation, whereas omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) primarily found in fish oil possess anti-inflammatory properties. Although converging studies suggest an antidepressant effect of PUFAs, there is limited evidence directly linking the neuro-immune modulating features of PUFAs to the antidepressant actions. Therefore, we assessed the effects of fish oil (FO) supplementation on behavioral changes, inflammatory cytokine expression and oxidative reactions in frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats following repeated peripheral immune challenge by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 2 weeks (500 μg/kg every other day). Repeated LPS administration induced the rats to a depressive-like state and increased mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including 1L-1β, 1L-6 and TNF-α, in frontal cortex and hippocampus. FO supplementation attenuated the LPS-induced abnormal behavior and brain inflammatory response. Concurrent with the antidepressant action, FO also reduced LPS-induced oxidative reactions and neural apoptosis in the rat brain, as evidenced by decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) production, increased catalase activities and inhibited pro-apoptotic protein Bax mRNA expression. In addition, FO inhibited activation of NF-κB and iNOS induced by LPS. Interestingly, we found FO suppressed the activation of the inflammasome NLRP3 and ionotropic purinergic receptor P2X7R evoked by LPS, suggesting a potential anti-inflammatory mechanism for PUFAs. Besides, FO also restored the LPS-induced neurochemical disturbance, especially the balance between serotonin and kynurenine branches of tryptophan metabolism, which is tightly associated with depression. These findings provide novel insights into the antidepressant action of PUFAs and further strengthen the link between inflammation and depression.

  5. Dim light at night provokes depression-like behaviors and reduces CA1 dendritic spine density in female hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Fonken, Laura K; Walton, James C; Haim, Abraham; Nelson, Randy J

    2011-08-01

    The prevalence of major depression has increased in recent decades; however, the underlying causes of this phenomenon remain unspecified. One environmental change that has coincided with elevated rates of depression is increased exposure to artificial light at night. Shift workers and others chronically exposed to light at night are at increased risk of mood disorders, suggesting that nighttime illumination may influence brain mechanisms mediating affect. We tested the hypothesis that exposure to dim light at night may impact affective responses and alter morphology of hippocampal neurons. Ovariectomized adult female Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) were housed for 8 weeks in either a light/dark cycle (LD) or a light/dim light cycle (DM), and then behavior was assayed. DM-hamsters displayed more depression-like responses in the forced swim and the sucrose anhedonia tests compared with LD-hamsters. Conversely, in the elevated plus maze DM-hamsters reduced anxiety-like behaviors. Brains from the same animals were processed using the Golgi-Cox method and hippocampal neurons within CA1, CA3, and the dentate gyrus were analyzed for morphological characteristics. In CA1, DM-hamsters significantly reduced dendritic spine density on both apical and basilar dendrites, an effect which was not mediated by baseline cortisol, as concentrations were equivalent between groups. These results demonstrate dim light at night is sufficient to reduce synaptic spine connections to CA1. Importantly, the present results suggest that night-time low level illumination, comparable to levels that are pervasive in North America and Europe, may contribute to the increasing prevalence of mood disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ghrelin mediates stress-induced food-reward behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Perello, Mario; Sakata, Ichiro; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Savitt, Joseph M; Lutter, Michael; Zigman, Jeffrey M

    2011-07-01

    The popular media and personal anecdotes are rich with examples of stress-induced eating of calorically dense "comfort foods." Such behavioral reactions likely contribute to the increased prevalence of obesity in humans experiencing chronic stress or atypical depression. However, the molecular substrates and neurocircuits controlling the complex behaviors responsible for stress-based eating remain mostly unknown, and few animal models have been described for probing the mechanisms orchestrating this response. Here, we describe a system in which food-reward behavior, assessed using a conditioned place preference (CPP) task, is monitored in mice after exposure to chronic social defeat stress (CSDS), a model of prolonged psychosocial stress, featuring aspects of major depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. Under this regime, CSDS increased both CPP for and intake of high-fat diet, and stress-induced food-reward behavior was dependent on signaling by the peptide hormone ghrelin. Also, signaling specifically in catecholaminergic neurons mediated not only ghrelin's orexigenic, antidepressant-like, and food-reward behavioral effects, but also was sufficient to mediate stress-induced food-reward behavior. Thus, this mouse model has allowed us to ascribe a role for ghrelin-engaged catecholaminergic neurons in stress-induced eating.

  7. Depressive-like behavior, its sensitization, social buffering, and altered cytokine responses in rhesus macaques moved from outdoor social groups to indoor housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Michael B; Chun, Katie; Capitanio, John P

    2017-02-01

    Psychosocial stressors appear to promote the onset of depressive illness through activation and sensitization of inflammatory mechanisms. Here, adult male rhesus monkeys brought from large outdoor social groups to indoor housing for 8 days reliably exhibited a hunched, depressive-like posture. When rehoused indoors a second 8 days about 2 weeks later, monkeys housed alone, but not those with an affiliative partner, showed sensitization of the depressive-like hunched posture. Housing indoors also affected circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines: IL-1β showed increased responsiveness to immune challenge, and IL-1β and TNF-α showed reduced suppression by dexamethasone. Sensitivity of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 to immune challenge exhibited a relative increase from the first to the second round of indoor housing in animals housed in pairs, and a relative decrease in animals housed alone. Cytokine levels during indoor housing were positively correlated with duration of depressive-like behavior. Plasma cortisol levels increased but did not differentiate housing conditions or rounds. Results demonstrate a rapid induction and sensitization of depressive-like behavior to indoor individual housing, social buffering of sensitization, and associated inflammatory responses. This paradigm may provide a practical nonhuman primate model for examining inflammatory-mediated consequences of psychosocial stressors on depression and possible social buffering of these effects.

  8. Highly palatable food access during adolescence increased anxiety-/depression-like behaviors in male, but not in female, rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Doyun; Park, Kyungpyo; Lee, Jong-Ho; Jahng, Jeong Won

    2017-04-11

    This study was conducted to examine the sexual dimorphic effects of highly palatable food (HPF) access during adolescence on the neurochemistry and depression-/anxiety-like behaviors of rats. Male and female Sprague-Dawley pups had free access to chocolate cookie rich in fat (HPF) from postnatal day 28 in addition to ad libitum chow, and the control groups received only chow. The food conditions were continued throughout the entire experimental period, and the neurochemical and behavioral measurements were performed during young adulthood. Rats were subjected to the ambulatory activity, elevated plus maze, and forced swim tests. Corticosterone levels during 2 h of restraint stress were analyzed with radioimmunoassay, and ΔFosB and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) with Western blot analysis. Cookie access did not affect body weight gain and total caloric intake in both sexes; however, it increased retroperitoneal fat depot only in males. The time spent in open arms during elevated plus maze test was decreased and immobility during forced swim test was increased in cookie-fed males, but not in cookie-fed females. Main effect of food condition on the stress-induced corticosterone increase was observed in males, but not in females, and cookie access increased BDNF expression in the NAc only in males. Increased BDNF expression in the NAc and fat depot, in addition to the stress axis dysfunction, may play roles in the pathophysiology of depression- and/or anxiety-like behaviors induced by cookie access.

  9. Fluoxetine and diazepam acutely modulate stress induced-behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomini, Ana Cristina V V; Abreu, Murilo S; Giacomini, Luidia V; Siebel, Anna M; Zimerman, Fernanda F; Rambo, Cassiano L; Mocelin, Ricieri; Bonan, Carla D; Piato, Angelo L; Barcellos, Leonardo J G

    2016-01-01

    Drug residue contamination in aquatic ecosystems has been studied extensively, but the behavioral effects exerted by the presence of these drugs are not well known. Here, we investigated the effects of acute stress on anxiety, memory, social interaction, and aggressiveness in zebrafish exposed to fluoxetine and diazepam at concentrations that disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis. Stress increased the locomotor activity and time spent in the bottom area of the tank (novel tank). Fluoxetine and diazepam prevented these behaviors. We also observed that stress and fluoxetine and diazepam exposures decreased social interaction. Stress also increased aggressive behavior, which was not reversed by fluoxetine or diazepam. These data suggest that the presence of these drugs in aquatic ecosystems causes significant behavioral alterations in fish. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. TrkB overexpression in mice buffers against memory deficits and depression-like behavior but not all anxiety- and stress-related symptoms induced by developmental exposure to methylmercury

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    Nina N Karpova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Developmental exposure to low dose of methylmercury (MeHg has a long-lasting effect on memory and attention deficits in humans, as well as cognitive performance, depression-like behavior and the hippocampal levels of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnfin mice. The Bdnf receptor TrkB is a key player of Bdnf signaling. Using transgenic animals, here we analyzed the effect of the full-length TrkB overexpression (TK+ on behavior impairments induced by perinatal MeHg. TK overexpression in the MeHg-exposed mice enhanced generalized anxiety and cue memory in the fear conditioning test. Early exposure to MeHg induced deficits in reversal spatial memory in the Morris water maze test and depression-like behavior in the forced swim test in only wild-type mice but did not affect these parameters in TK+ mice. These changes were associated with TK+ effect on the increase in Bdnf 2, 3, 4 and 6 transcription in the hippocampus as well as with interaction of TK+ and MeHg factors for Bdnf 1, 9a and truncated TrkB.T1 transcripts in the prefrontal cortex. However, the MeHg-induced anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze and open field tests was ameliorated by TK+ background only in the open field test. Moreover, TK overexpression in the MeHg mice did not prevent significant stress-induced weight loss during the period of adaptation to individual housing in metabolic cages. These TK genotype-independent changes were primarily accompanied by the MeHg-induced hippocampal deficits in the activity-dependent Bdnf 1, 4 and 9a variants, TrkB.T1, and transcripts for important antioxidant enzymes glyoxalases Glo1 and Glo2 and glutathione reductase Gsr. Our data suggest a role of full-length TrkB in buffering against memory deficits and depression-like behavior in the MeHg mice but propose the involvement of additional pathways, such as the antioxidant system or TrkB.T1 signaling, in stress- or anxiety-related responses induced by developmental MeHg exposure.

  11. Effects of formaldehyde exposure on anxiety-like and depression-like behavior, cognition, central levels of glucocorticoid receptor and tyrosine hydroxylase in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yani; Song, Zhuoyi; Ding, Yujuan; Xin, Ye; Wu, Tong; Su, Tao; He, Rongqiao; Tai, Fadao; Lian, Zhenmin

    2016-02-01

    Formaldehyde exposure is toxic to the brains of mammals, but the mechanism remains unclear. We investigated the effects of inhaled formaldehyde on anxiety, depression, cognitive capacity and central levels of glucocorticoid receptor and tyrosine hydroxylase in mice. After exposure to 0, 1 or 2 ppm gaseous formaldehyde for one week, we measured anxiety-like behavior using open field and elevated plus-maze tests, depression-like behavior using a forced swimming test, learning and memory using novel object recognition tests, levels of glucocorticoid receptors in the hippocampus and tyrosine hydroxylase in the Arc, MPOA, ZI and VTA using immuhistochemistry. We found that inhalation of 1 ppm formaldehyde reduced levels of anxiety-like behavior. Inhalation of 2 ppm formaldehyde reduced body weight, but increased levels of depression-like behavior, impaired novel object recognition, and lowered the numbers of glucocorticoid receptor immonureactive neurons in the hippocampus and tyrosine hydroxylase immonureactive neurons in the ventral tegmental area and the zona incerta, medial preoptic area. Different concentrations of gaseous formaldehyde result in different effects on anxiety, depression-like behavior and cognition ability which may be associated with alterations in hippocampal glucocorticoid receptors and brain tyrosine hydroxylase levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. GPR39 (zinc receptor) knockout mice exhibit depression-like behavior and CREB/BDNF down-regulation in the hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Młyniec, Katarzyna; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Holst, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    Background: Zinc may act as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system by activation of the GPR39 metabotropic receptors. Methods: In the present study, we investigated whether GPR39 knockout would cause depressive-like and/or anxiety-like behavior, as measured by the forced swim test, tail...... suspension test, and light/dark test. We also investigated whether lack of GPR39 would change levels of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB),brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin related kinase B (TrkB) protein in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of GPR39 knockout mice subjected...... to the forced swim test, as measured by Western-blot analysis. Results: In this study, GPR39 knockout mice showed an increased immobility time in both the forced swim test and tail suspension test, indicating depressive-like behavior and displayed anxiety-like phenotype. GPR39 knockout mice had lower CREB...

  13. The role of the AMPA receptor and 5-HT(3) receptor on aggressive behavior and depressive-like symptoms in chronic social isolation-reared mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Koh; Kurosawa, Natsuki; Seki, Kenjiro

    2016-01-01

    Chronic social isolation (SI)-reared mice exhibit aggressive and depressive-like behaviors. However, the pathophysiological changes caused by chronic SI remain unclear. The hypothalamus and amygdala have been suggested to be associated with the stress of SI. In addition to serotonin 3 (5-HT3) receptors, AMPA receptors have also been suggested to be involved in aggressive behavior and depressive-like symptoms in animals. Therefore, we examined whether chronic SI affects AMPA and 5-HT3 receptor expression levels in these regions. A Western blot analysis revealed that after four weeks of SI, mice exhibited up-regulated AMPA receptor subunit (GluR1, GluR2) protein levels in the amygdala and down-regulated hypothalamic 5-HT3 receptor protein levels. The AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist NBQX (10 mg/kg; i.p.) attenuated SI-induced depressive-like symptoms but not aggressive behavior. Intra-amygdalar infusions of the selective AMPA receptor agonist (S)-AMPA (10 μM) induced despair-like behavior, but not sucrose preference or aggressive behavior, in mice not reared in SI (naïve mice). Alternatively, treatment with the 5-HT3 receptor agonist SR57227A (3.0 mg/kg; i.p.) decreased aggression levels. In addition, intra-hypothalamic infusions of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron (3 μM) did not trigger aggressive behavior in naïve mice; however, the administration of ondansetron (0.3 mg/kg; i.p.) increased aggression levels in two-week SI mice, which rarely exhibited the aggressive behavior. Moreover, ondansetron did not affect the depressive-like symptoms of the SI mice. These results suggest that SI-induced up-regulation of GluR1 and GluR2 subunits protein levels in the amygdalar region and down-regulation of 5-HT3 receptor proteins level in the hypothalamic region are associated with the effect of AMPA receptor agonist and 5-HT3 receptor antagonist -induced aggressive behavior and depressive-like symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Depression-like Behavior Induced by Nesfatin-1 in Rats: Involvement of Increased Immune Activation and Imbalance of Synaptic Vesicle Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Ge eJinfang; Xu eYa-Yun; Qin eGan; Peng eYao-Nan; Chao-Feng eZhang; Xing-Rui eLiu; Li-Chuan eLiang; Zhong-Zheng eWang; Chen eFei-Hu

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a multicausal disorder and has been associated with metabolism regulation and immuno-inflammatory reaction. The anorectic molecule nesfatin-1 has recently been characterized as a potential mood regulator, but its precise effect on depression and the possible mechanisms remain unknown, especially when given peripherally. In the present study, nesfatin-1 was intraperitoneally injected to the rats and the depression-like behavior and activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (...

  15. Xiao Yao San Improves Depressive-Like Behavior in Rats through Modulation of β-Arrestin 2-Mediated Pathways in Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Xiao Yao San (XYS is a classical Chinese medicine formula that has been widely used to treat mood disorders for hundreds of years. To confirm the effect of XYS and better understand its underlying mechanism, high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis-based quality control of XYS extracts and proteomics-based identification of differential proteins in the hippocampus were adopted in social isolation and chronic unpredictable mild stress- (CUMS- treated rats. The depressive-like behavior of rats induced by CUMS resembled the manifestation of human depression. The upregulated corticosterone (CORT and urocortin 2 (UCN2 levels demonstrated the existence of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis hyperactivity. XYS was effective in ameliorating the depressive-like behavior and downregulating UCN2 and CORT. XYS decreased the expression of serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 2A subunit B and increased the expression of β-arrestin 2. The expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR were also elevated by XYS. In conclusion, XYS improves social isolation and CUMS-induced depressive-like behavior and ameliorates HPA hyperactivation through the downregulation of corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH receptor 2. The upregulation of BDNF/TrkB and the phosphorylation of mTOR require β-arrestin 2 as a scaffold to regulate stress signaling.

  16. Central Administration of Lipopolysaccharide Induces Depressive-like Behavior in Vivo and Activates Brain Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase In Murine Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures

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    Kavelaars Annemieke

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient stimulation of the innate immune system by an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS activates peripheral and central expression of the tryptophan degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO which mediates depressive-like behavior. It is unknown whether direct activation of the brain with LPS is sufficient to activate IDO and induce depressive-like behavior. Methods Sickness and depressive-like behavior in C57BL/6J mice were assessed by social exploration and the forced swim test, respectively. Expression of cytokines and IDO mRNA was measured by real-time RT-PCR and cytokine protein was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs. Enzymatic activity of IDO was estimated as the amount of kynurenine produced from tryptophan as determined by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC with electrochemical detection. Results Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. administration of LPS (100 ng increased steady-state transcripts of TNFα, IL-6 and the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in the hippocampus in the absence of any change in IFNγ mRNA. LPS also increased IDO expression and induced depressive-like behavior, as measured by increased duration of immobility in the forced swim test. The regulation of IDO expression was investigated using in situ organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs derived from brains of newborn C57BL/6J mice. In accordance with the in vivo data, addition of LPS (10 ng/ml to the medium of OHSCs induced steady-state expression of mRNA transcripts for IDO that peaked at 6 h and translated into increased IDO enzymatic activity within 8 h post-LPS. This activation of IDO by direct application of LPS was preceded by synthesis and secretion of TNFα and IL-6 protein and activation of iNOS while IFNγ expression was undetectable. Conclusion These data establish that activation of the innate immune system in the brain is sufficient to activate IDO and induce

  17. Repetitive concussive traumatic brain injury interacts with post-injury foot shock stress to worsen social and depression-like behavior in mice.

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    Kristen C Klemenhagen

    Full Text Available The debilitating effects of repetitive concussive traumatic brain injury (rcTBI have been increasingly recognized in both military and civilian populations. rcTBI may result in significant neurological, cognitive, and affective sequelae, and is often followed by physical and/or psychological post-injury stressors that may exacerbate the effects of the injury and prolong the recovery period for injured patients. However, the consequences of post-injury stressors and their subsequent effects on social and emotional behavior in the context of rcTBI have been relatively little studied in animal models. Here, we use a mouse model of rcTBI with two closed-skull blunt impacts 24 hours apart and social and emotional behavior testing to examine the consequences of a stressor (foot shock fear conditioning following brain injury (rcTBI. rcTBI alone did not affect cued or contextual fear conditioning or extinction compared to uninjured sham animals. In the sucrose preference test, rcTBI animals had decreased preference for sucrose, an anhedonia-like behavior, regardless of whether they experienced foot shock stress or were non-shocked controls. However, rcTBI and post-injury foot shock stress had synergistic effects in tests of social recognition and depression-like behavior. In the social recognition test, animals with both injury and shock were more impaired than either non-shocked injured mice or shocked but uninjured mice. In the tail suspension test, injured mice had increased depression-like behavior compared with uninjured mice, and shock stress worsened the depression-like behavior only in the injured mice with no effect in the uninjured mice. These results provide a model of subtle emotional behavioral deficits after combined concussive brain injury and stress, and may provide a platform for testing treatment and prevention strategies for social behavior deficits and mood disorders that are tailored to patients with traumatic brain injury.

  18. Repetitive concussive traumatic brain injury interacts with post-injury foot shock stress to worsen social and depression-like behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemenhagen, Kristen C; O'Brien, Scott P; Brody, David L

    2013-01-01

    The debilitating effects of repetitive concussive traumatic brain injury (rcTBI) have been increasingly recognized in both military and civilian populations. rcTBI may result in significant neurological, cognitive, and affective sequelae, and is often followed by physical and/or psychological post-injury stressors that may exacerbate the effects of the injury and prolong the recovery period for injured patients. However, the consequences of post-injury stressors and their subsequent effects on social and emotional behavior in the context of rcTBI have been relatively little studied in animal models. Here, we use a mouse model of rcTBI with two closed-skull blunt impacts 24 hours apart and social and emotional behavior testing to examine the consequences of a stressor (foot shock fear conditioning) following brain injury (rcTBI). rcTBI alone did not affect cued or contextual fear conditioning or extinction compared to uninjured sham animals. In the sucrose preference test, rcTBI animals had decreased preference for sucrose, an anhedonia-like behavior, regardless of whether they experienced foot shock stress or were non-shocked controls. However, rcTBI and post-injury foot shock stress had synergistic effects in tests of social recognition and depression-like behavior. In the social recognition test, animals with both injury and shock were more impaired than either non-shocked injured mice or shocked but uninjured mice. In the tail suspension test, injured mice had increased depression-like behavior compared with uninjured mice, and shock stress worsened the depression-like behavior only in the injured mice with no effect in the uninjured mice. These results provide a model of subtle emotional behavioral deficits after combined concussive brain injury and stress, and may provide a platform for testing treatment and prevention strategies for social behavior deficits and mood disorders that are tailored to patients with traumatic brain injury.

  19. Antidepressant-Like Activity of 10-Hydroxy-Trans-2-Decenoic Acid, a Unique Unsaturated Fatty Acid of Royal Jelly, in Stress-Inducible Depression-Like Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Satoru; Nitta, Yuji; Fukumitsu, Hidefumi; Soumiya, Hitomi; Ikeno, Kumiko; Nakamura, Tadashi; Furukawa, Shoei

    2012-01-01

    Symptoms of depression and anxiety appeared in mice after they had been subjected to a combination of forced swimming for 15 min followed by being kept in cages that were sequentially subjected to leaning, drenching, and rotation within 1-2 days for a total of 3 weeks. The animals were then evaluated by the tail-suspension test, elevated plus-maze test, and open-field test at 1 day after the end of stress exposure. Using these experimental systems, we found that 10-hydroxy-trans-2-decenoic acid (HDEA), an unsaturated fatty acid unique to royal jelly (RJ), protected against the depression and anxiety when intraperitoneally administered once a day for 3 weeks simultaneously with the stress loading. Intraperitoneally administered RJ, a rich source of HDEA, was also protective against the depression, but RJ given by the oral route was less effective. Our present results demonstrate that HDEA and RJ, a natural source of it, were effective in ameliorating the stress-inducible symptoms of depression and anxiety. PMID:21799699

  20. Antidepressant-Like Activity of 10-Hydroxy-Trans-2-Decenoic Acid, a Unique Unsaturated Fatty Acid of Royal Jelly, in Stress-Inducible Depression-Like Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Ito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptoms of depression and anxiety appeared in mice after they had been subjected to a combination of forced swimming for 15 min followed by being kept in cages that were sequentially subjected to leaning, drenching, and rotation within 1-2 days for a total of 3 weeks. The animals were then evaluated by the tail-suspension test, elevated plus-maze test, and open-field test at 1 day after the end of stress exposure. Using these experimental systems, we found that 10-hydroxy-trans-2-decenoic acid (HDEA, an unsaturated fatty acid unique to royal jelly (RJ, protected against the depression and anxiety when intraperitoneally administered once a day for 3 weeks simultaneously with the stress loading. Intraperitoneally administered RJ, a rich source of HDEA, was also protective against the depression, but RJ given by the oral route was less effective. Our present results demonstrate that HDEA and RJ, a natural source of it, were effective in ameliorating the stress-inducible symptoms of depression and anxiety.

  1. Abrogated Freud-1/CC2D1A repression of 5-HT1A autoreceptors induces fluoxetine-resistant anxiety/depression-like behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahid-Ansari, Faranak; Daigle, Mireille; Manzini, M. Chiara; Tanaka, Kenji F.; Hen, René; Geddes, Sean D.; Béïque, Jean-Claude; James, Jonathan; Merali, Zul; Albert, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    Freud-1/CC2D1A represses the gene transcription of serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptors, which negatively regulate 5-HT tone. To test the role of Freud-1 in vivo, we generated mice with adulthood conditional knockout of Freud-1 in 5-HT neurons (cF1ko). In cF1ko mice, 5-HT1A autoreceptor protein, binding and hypothermia response were increased, with reduced 5-HT content and neuronal activity in the dorsal raphe. The cF1ko mice displayed increased anxiety- and depression-like behavior that was resistant to chronic antidepressant (fluoxetine) treatment. Using conditional Freud-1/5-HT1A double knockout (cF1/1A dko) to disrupt both Freud-1 and 5-HT1A genes in 5-HT neurons, no increase in anxiety- or depression-like behaviour was seen upon knockout of Freud-1 on the 5-HT1A autoreceptor-negative background, rather a reduction in depression-like behaviour emerged. These studies implicate transcriptional dys-regulation of 5-HT1A autoreceptors by the repressor Freud-1 in anxiety and depression and provide a clinically relevant genetic model of antidepressant resistance. Targeting specific transcription factors like Freud-1 to restore transcriptional balance may augment response to antidepressant treatment. PMID:29101244

  2. Enhanced long-term fear memory and increased anxiety and depression-like behavior after exposure to an aversive event in mice lacking TIP39 signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutellier, Laurence; Usdin, Ted B.

    2011-01-01

    Exaggerated recall for fear-provoking events leads to abnormal behaviors. We hypothesized that tuberoinfundibular-peptide-of-39-residues (TIP39) modulates fear memory by limiting long-term consequences of aversive experiences. We now show that mice lacking TIP39 signaling display enhanced fear-recall, anxiety and depression-like behavior two weeks after a traumatic event. We suggest that TIP39 modulates long-term fear recall and that mice lacking TIP39 or its receptor are tools for investigating fear-related psychopathologies. PMID:21382418

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi-induced depressive-like behavior is independent of meningoencephalitis but responsive to parasiticide and TNF-targeted therapeutic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Silva, Andrea Alice da; Pereira, Isabela Resende; Silva, Rafael Rodrigues; Moreira, Otacílio Cruz; de Almeida, Luciana Rodrigues; de Souza, Amanda Santos; Rocha, Monica Santos; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2012-10-01

    Inflammatory cytokines and microbe-borne immunostimulators have emerged as triggers of depressive behavior. Behavioral alterations affect patients chronically infected by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. We have previously shown that C3H/He mice present acute phase-restricted meningoencephalitis with persistent central nervous system (CNS) parasitism, whereas C57BL/6 mice are resistant to T. cruzi-induced CNS inflammation. In the present study, we investigated whether depression is a long-term consequence of acute CNS inflammation and a contribution of the parasite strain that infects the host. C3H/He and C57BL/6 mice were infected with the Colombian (type I) and Y (type II) T. cruzi strains. Forced-swim and tail-suspension tests were used to assess depressive-like behavior. Independent of the mouse lineage, the Colombian-infected mice showed significant increases in immobility times during the acute and chronic phases of infection. Therefore, T. cruzi-induced depression is independent of active or prior CNS inflammation. Furthermore, chronic depressive-like behavior was triggered only by the type I Colombian T. cruzi strain. Acute and chronic T. cruzi infection increased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) expression in the CNS. Treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine abrogated the T. cruzi-induced depressive-like behavior. Moreover, treatment with the parasiticide drug benznidazole abrogated depression. Chronic T. cruzi infection of C57BL/6 mice increased tumor necrosis factor (TNF) expression systemically but not in the CNS. Importantly, TNF modulators (anti-TNF and pentoxifylline) reduced immobility. Therefore, direct or indirect parasite-induced immune dysregulation may contribute to chronic depressive disorder in T. cruzi infection, which opens a new therapeutic pathway to be explored. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug piroxicam reverses the onset of depressive-like behavior in 6-OHDA animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, R M; Tonin, F S; Barbiero, J; Zaminelli, T; Boschen, S L; Andreatini, R; Da Cunha, C; Lima, M M S; Vital, M A B F

    2015-08-06

    Depression is one of the most common psychiatric symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Some authors have reported that depression is characterized by activation of the inflammatory response. Animal models of PD also present with depressive-like behavior, such as increased immobility time in the modified forced swim test and anhedonia-like behavior in the sucrose preference test. Considering the potential neuroprotective effect of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in neurodegenerative diseases, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of piroxicam on depressive-like behavior in male Wistar rats lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the substantia nigra (SN). Antidepressant-like effects were observed after prolonged administration of piroxicam for 21days. In the forced swim test, the 6-OHDA+saline group exhibited significant reductions in swimming time and increased immobility time compared with the sham+saline. In the sucrose preference test, the 6-OHDA+piroxicam group exhibited no reduction of sucrose preference compared with the sham+saline, with significant effects of treatment and time and a significant treatment×time interaction. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels significantly decreased in the hippocampus in the 6-OHDA+saline group and not changed in the 6-OHDA+piroxicam group when compared with the sham+saline on day 21. In conclusion, 21-day treatment with piroxicam reversed the onset of depressive-like behavior and prevented the reduction of hippocampal 5-HT levels. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Abnormal hippocampal BDNF and miR-16 expression is associated with depression-like behaviors induced by stress during early life.

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    Mei Bai

    Full Text Available Some environmental stressors lead to the onset of depression via inhibiting hippocampal BDNF expression, but other environmental stressors-induced depression exhibits no change in BDNF expression. The underlying mechanisms behind the divergence remain unknown. In this study, depression-like behaviors were induced in rats by maternal deprivation (MD and chronic unpredictable stress (CUPS. Depression-like behaviors were tested by open field test, forced swimming test, and sucrose consumption test. BDNF and miR-16 expressions in the hippocampus were examined by real-time PCR. MD and CUPS rats crawled less distance, exhibited decreased vertical activity, and produced more fecal pellets than control rats in the open field test. However, MD rats crawled less distance and produced significantly less fecal pellets than CUPS rats. In the forced swimming and sucrose consumption tests, CUPS and MD rats exhibited longer floating time and consumed less sucrose than control rats, but MD rats exhibited shorter floating time and consumed less sucrose than CUPS rats. MD but not CUPS rats showed lower BDNF mRNA and higher miR-16 expression than control rats. In MD rats, BDNF mRNA expression negatively correlated with the expression of miR-16. BDNF expression positively correlated with the total distance rats crawled and vertical activity in the open field test while miR-16 expression negatively correlated the two behaviors. BDNF positively correlated with sucrose preference rate while miR-16 negatively correlated with sucrose preference rate of the sucrose consumption test. Our study suggests that MD and CUPS induced different depression-like behaviors in rats. Depression induced by MD but not CUPS was significantly associated with upregulation of miR-16 and possibly subsequent downregulation of BDNF in hippocampus.

  6. Depression-like behavior and mechanical allodynia are reduced by bis selenide treatment in mice with chronic constriction injury: a comparison with fluoxetine, amitriptyline, and bupropion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Cristiano R; Wilhelm, Ethel A; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2010-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is associated with significant co-morbidities, including depression, which impact considerably on the overall patient experience. Pain co-morbidity symptoms are rarely assessed in animal models of neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is characterized by hyperexcitability within nociceptive pathways and remains difficult to treat with standard analgesics. The present study determined the effect of bis selenide and conventional antidepressants (fluoxetine, amitriptyline, and bupropion) on neuropathic pain using mechanical allodynic and on depressive-like behavior. Male mice were subjected to chronic constriction injury (CCI) or sham surgery and were assessed on day 14 after operation. Mice received oral treatment with bis selenide (1-5 mg/kg), fluoxetine, amitriptyline, or bupropion (10-30 mg/kg). The response frequency to mechanical allodynia in mice was measured with von Frey hairs. Mice were evaluated in the forced swimming test (FST) test for depression-like behavior. The CCI procedure produced mechanical allodynia and increased depressive-like behavior in the FST. All of the drugs produced antiallodynic effects in CCI mice and produced antidepressant effects in control mice without altering locomotor activity. In CCI animals, however, only the amitriptyline and bis selenide treatments significantly reduced immobility in the FST. These data demonstrate an important dissociation between the antiallodynic and antidepressant effects in mice when tested in a model of neuropathic pain. Depressive behavior in CCI mice was reversed by bis selenide and amitriptyline but not by the conventional antidepressants fluoxetine and buproprion. Bis selenide was more potent than the other drugs tested for antidepressant-like and antiallodynic effects in mice.

  7. Developmental minocycline treatment reverses the effects of neonatal immune activation on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, hippocampal inflammation, and HPA axis activity in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Jafar; Kosari-Nasab, Morteza; Salari, Ali-Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal infection is associated with increased lifetime risk for neuropsychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression, with evidence showing that dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-(HPA)-axis system may be partly responsible. Preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate that minocycline exhibits antidepressant effects through inhibition of microglial activation and anti-inflammatory actions, and of interest is that recent studies suggest that minocycline alleviates the behavioral abnormalities induced by early-life insults. The current study was designed to determine if developmental minocycline treatment attenuates the neonatal immune activation-induced anxiety- and depression-like symptoms and HPA-axis-dysregulation later in life. To this end, neonatal mice were treated to either lipopolysaccharide or saline on postnatal days (PND) 3-5, then dams during lactation (PND 6-20) and male offspring during adolescence (PND 21-40) received oral administration of minocycline or water via regular drinking bottles. Anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, HPA-axis-reactivity (corticosterone), and hippocampal inflammation (TNF-α and IL-1β) after exposure to stress were evaluated. The results indicated that neonatal immune activation resulted in increased anxiety and depression-like symptoms, HPA-axis-hyperactivity, and elevated the levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in the hippocampus in response to stress in adulthood. Interestingly, developmental minocycline treatment significantly reduced the abnormalities induced by neonatal inflammation in adult mice. In addition, minocycline, regardless of postnatal inflammation, did not have any detrimental effects on the above measured parameters. Considering that minocycline is currently under exploration as an alternative or adjunctive therapy for reducing the symptoms of neurological disorders, our findings suggest that minocycline during development can decrease the behavioral abnormalities induced by early

  8. Cysteamine attenuates the decreases in TrkB protein levels and the anxiety/depression-like behaviors in mice induced by corticosterone treatment.

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    Ammar Kutiyanawalla

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Stress and glucocorticoid hormones, which are released into the circulation following stressful experiences, have been shown to contribute significantly to the manifestation of anxiety-like behaviors observed in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF signaling through its receptor TrkB plays an important role in stress-mediated changes in structural as well as functional neuroplasticity. Studies designed to elucidate the mechanisms whereby TrkB signaling is regulated in chronic stress might provide valuable information for the development of new therapeutic strategies for several stress-related psychiatric disorders. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the potential of cysteamine, a neuroprotective compound to attenuate anxiety and depression like behaviors in a mouse model of anxiety/depression induced by chronic corticosterone exposure. RESULTS: Cysteamine administration (150 mg/kg/day, through drinking water for 21 days significantly ameliorated chronic corticosterone-induced decreases in TrkB protein levels in frontal cortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, cysteamine treatment reversed the anxiety and depression like behavioral abnormalities induced by chronic corticosterone treatment. Finally, mice deficient in TrkB, showed a reduced response to cysteamine in behavioral tests, suggesting that TrkB signaling plays an important role in the antidepressant effects of cysteamine. CONCLUSIONS: The animal studies described here highlight the potential use of cysteamine as a novel therapeutic strategy for glucocorticoid-related symptoms of psychiatric disorders.

  9. Fetal brain 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 selectively determines programming of adult depressive-like behaviors and cognitive function, but not anxiety behaviors in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrwoll, Caitlin; Keith, Marianne; Noble, June; Stevenson, Paula L; Bombail, Vincent; Crombie, Sandra; Evans, Louise C; Bailey, Matthew A; Wood, Emma; Seckl, Jonathan R; Holmes, Megan C

    2015-09-01

    Stress or elevated glucocorticoids during sensitive windows of fetal development increase the risk of neuropsychiatric disorders in adult rodents and humans, a phenomenon known as glucocorticoid programming. 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2), which catalyses rapid inactivation of glucocorticoids in the placenta, controls access of maternal glucocorticoids to the fetal compartment, placing it in a key position to modulate glucocorticoid programming of behavior. However, the importance of the high expression of 11β-HSD2 within the midgestational fetal brain is unknown. To examine this, a brain-specific knockout of 11β-HSD2 (HSD2BKO) was generated and compared to wild-type littermates. HSD2BKO have markedly diminished fetal brain 11β-HSD2, but intact fetal body and placental 11β-HSD2 and normal fetal and placental growth. Despite normal fetal plasma corticosterone, HSD2BKO exhibit elevated fetal brain corticosterone levels at midgestation. As adults, HSD2BKO show depressive-like behavior and have cognitive impairments. However, unlike complete feto-placental deficiency, HSD2BKO show no anxiety-like behavioral deficits. The clear mechanistic separation of the programmed components of depression and cognition from anxiety implies distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis, affording potential opportunities for stratified interventions. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prenatal Stress and Acute Stress Later in Life Impacts the Responses in Tests for Depressive-Like Behavior in a Sex-Specific Manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle Mark; Skoven, Christian; Arentzen, Tina S.

    in locomotor activity, depressive- and anxiety-like behavior as well as sleep architecture. Some animals were analyzed for CNS microstructural changes based on diffusion MRI. Subsets of PS and control rats were exposed to an acute stressor prior to the behavioral tests. Rearing/climbing activity in a familiar...... environment (housing cage) increased at the end of the light and beginning of the dark phases in PS offspring compared to controls. PS per se did not appear to change anxiety-like behavior in either sex.However, exposure to an acute stressor increased exploratory behavior in control animals and, interestingly......, PS blunted this effect. Relative and absolute numbers of rapid eye movement sleep bouts were higher in PS offspring. Moreover, exposure to an acute stressor induced a REM rebound effect in control animals but this compensatory mechanism was blunted in PS animals. Finally, depression-like behavioral...

  11. Abrogated Freud-1/Cc2d1a Repression of 5-HT1A Autoreceptors Induces Fluoxetine-Resistant Anxiety/Depression-Like Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahid-Ansari, Faranak; Daigle, Mireille; Manzini, M Chiara; Tanaka, Kenji F; Hen, René; Geddes, Sean D; Béïque, Jean-Claude; James, Jonathan; Merali, Zul; Albert, Paul R

    2017-12-06

    Freud-1/Cc2d1a represses the gene transcription of serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptors, which negatively regulate 5-HT tone. To test the role of Freud-1 in vivo, we generated mice with adulthood conditional knock-out of Freud-1 in 5-HT neurons (cF1ko). In cF1ko mice, 5-HT1A autoreceptor protein, binding and hypothermia response were increased, with reduced 5-HT content and neuronal activity in the dorsal raphe. The cF1ko mice displayed increased anxiety- and depression-like behavior that was resistant to chronic antidepressant (fluoxetine) treatment. Using conditional Freud-1/5-HT1A double knock-out (cF1/1A dko) to disrupt both Freud-1 and 5-HT1A genes in 5-HT neurons, no increase in anxiety- or depression-like behavior was seen upon knock-out of Freud-1 on the 5-HT1A autoreceptor-negative background; rather, a reduction in depression-like behavior emerged. These studies implicate transcriptional dysregulation of 5-HT1A autoreceptors by the repressor Freud-1 in anxiety and depression and provide a clinically relevant genetic model of antidepressant resistance. Targeting specific transcription factors, such as Freud-1, to restore transcriptional balance may augment response to antidepressant treatment.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Altered regulation of the 5-HT1A autoreceptor has been implicated in human anxiety, major depression, suicide, and resistance to antidepressants. This study uniquely identifies a single transcription factor, Freud-1, as crucial for 5-HT1A autoreceptor expression in vivo Disruption of Freud-1 in serotonin neurons in mice links upregulation of 5-HT1A autoreceptors to anxiety/depression-like behavior and provides a new model of antidepressant resistance. Treatment strategies to reestablish transcriptional regulation of 5-HT1A autoreceptors could provide a more robust and sustained antidepressant response. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/3711967-12$15.00/0.

  12. HIV antiretroviral drug Efavirenz induces anxiety-like and depression-like behavior in rats: evaluation of neurotransmitter alterations in the striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Giuliana Ignácio Teixeira; Chaves Filho, Adriano José Maia; Linhares, Maria Isabel; de Carvalho Lima, Camila Nayane; Venâncio, Edith Teles; Rios, Emiliano Ricardo Vasconcelos; de Souza, Francisca Cléa Florenço; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes; Macêdo, Danielle; de França Fonteles, Marta Maria

    2017-03-15

    Efavirenz (EFV) is an effective antiretroviral drug with a favorable pharmacokinetic profile and widely used in combination regimens to treat HIV infection. However, there are major concerns about the safety of this drug. Patients treated with EFV often experience neuropsychiatric adverse effects, which frequently lead to switching to alternative EFV-free regimens. The mechanisms involved in the central action of EFV are intrinsically unclear. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the effects of acute and subchronic (2 weeks) EFV administration in a series of behavioral tests for anxiety-like and depression-like behavior in healthy rats. We also evaluated the effect of EFV treatment in striatal concentrations of monoamine neurotransmitters (serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline) and their metabolites and the amino acid neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Our results showed that acute treatment with EFV induced an anxiogenic-like effect, while sub-chronic treatment induced both anxiogenic-like and depressive-like behavior which was dose related.. Additionally, EFV treatment caused marked alterations in the striatal concentrations of monoamines and their metabolites (and turnover rates) and the amino acid neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. These changes were influenced by treatment duration and dose. These findings add more evidence about the neuropsychiatric adverse effects of EFV and propose potential new mechanisms for the toxic action of this drug in the central nervous system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Persistent sensitization of depressive-like behavior and thermogenic response during maternal separation in pre- and post-weaning guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Randi L; Schiml, Patricia A; Deak, Terrence; Hennessy, Michael B

    2012-07-01

    Early attachment disruption is thought to promote later onset of depressive illness through a process involving sensitization. Maternal separation in guinea pig pups produces depressive-like behavior and core body temperature fluctuations that appear to be mediated by proinflammatory activity. In pups near the age of weaning (~20 days of age), these responses are increased during repeated separations occurring over several days. Here, enhanced depressive-like behavior and core body temperature responses were observed during repeated separations in guinea pigs from ~10 to 30 days of age. The sensitization lasted for more than a week, with the greatest temperature response occurring during the final separation. These results demonstrate persisting sensitization of behavioral and thermogenic responses to maternal separation over the age range in which these responses are known to occur. The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that proinflammatory activity contributes to the sensitization response and provide further suggestion that the impact of early attachment disruption on susceptibility to depression may involve proinflammatory processes. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The effect of ethanolic extract of Thymus kotschyanus on cancer cell growth in vitro and depression-like behavior in the mouse

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    Mohammad-Hossein Doosti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer and depression are known as two of the most debilitating disease and disorder increasing evidence suggest an urgent need for new therapeutic agents with lower toxicity and high efficacy. Some Thyme species extracts have remarkably been shown to positively affect depression and cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Thymus kotschyanus on depression and cancer cells. To this end, in experiment 1, NMRI mice were treated orally with the ethanolic extract of T. kotschyanus (50, 150 and 250 mg/ml for seven days and then depression-like behavior was measured by Forced Swim Test (FST and Tail Suspension Test (TST. In experiment 2, the pharmacological effect of the extract on the lung (A549 and cervical (Hela cancer cell lines was also evaluated by MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-Yl-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide in various concentration_(10, 5, 2.5, 1.25, 0.63, 0.31, 0.15 and 0.08 mg/ml. The results indicated that T. kotschyanus extract treatment (150 and 250 mg/kg decreased depression-like behavior in the FST and TST tests in adult mice. Moreover, the treatment inhibited cancer cell growth and viability in a dose and time-dependent manner. Collectively these findings suggest that T. kotschyanus have antidepressant and anticancer effects.

  15. Long-term postpartum anxiety and depression-like behavior in mother rats subjected to maternal separation are ameliorated by palatable high fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniam, Jayanthi; Morris, Margaret J

    2010-03-17

    While the effects of maternal separation on pups are well studied, the impact on dams has attracted little attention. The consumption of palatable food is known to dampen stress responses in animals, and emotions influence food choice in humans. Here we examined the early- and long-term impacts of maternal separation on behavioral profile of the dams, and the effects of palatable cafeteria high-fat diet (HFD). After littering, Sprague-Dawley female rats were subjected to prolonged separation, S180 (180 min) or brief separation, S15 (15 min/day) from postnatal days (PND) 2-14. At 4 weeks postpartum, half the dams were assigned to HFD. Anxiety and depression-like behaviors were assessed pre- and post-diet. Compared to S15 dams, S180 dams consuming chow demonstrated increased anxiety and depression-like behaviors assessed by elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swim (FST) tests, respectively. These behavioral deficits were observed at 4 weeks, and persisted until 17 weeks postpartum. The S180 dams also had increased plasma corticosterone concentration compared to S15 dams, which coincided with increased hypothalamic CRH mRNA and reduced hippocampal GR mRNA expression, suggesting possible dysregulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. Interestingly, continuous provision of HFD improved the behavioral deficits observed in S180 dams with significant reduction of hypothalamic CRH mRNA expression. These data are the first to describe long-term detrimental behavioral impacts of separation in dams, suggesting this may provide a model of postpartum depression. Moreover, they support the notion of long-term beneficial effects of 'comfort food' on stress responses. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Embryonic GABA(B receptor blockade alters cell migration, adult hypothalamic structure, and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors sex specifically in mice.

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    Matthew S Stratton

    Full Text Available Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABA(B receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABA(B receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11-E17 during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABA(B receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABA(B receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABA(B receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABA(B receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABA(B receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABA(B receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity.

  17. Moderate treadmill exercise rescues anxiety and depression-like behavior as well as memory impairment in a rat model of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Gaurav; Li, Lumeng; Allam, Farida; Solanki, Naimesh; Dao, An T; Alkadhi, Karim; Salim, Samina

    2014-05-10

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a condition which can develop from exposure to a severe traumatic event such as those occurring during wars or natural disasters. Benzodiazepines and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are considered the gold standard for PTSD treatment, but their side effects pose a serious problem. While regular physical exercise is regarded as a mood elevator and known to enhance cognitive function, its direct role in rescuing core symptoms of PTSD including anxiety and depression-like behaviors and cognitive impairment is unclear. In the present study using the single-prolonged stress (SPS) rat model of PTSD (2h restrain, 20 min forced swimming, 15 min rest, and 1-2 min diethyl ether exposure), we examined the beneficial effect of moderate treadmill exercise on SPS-induced behavioral deficits including anxiety and depression-like behaviors and memory impairment. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into four groups: control (sedentary), exercised, SPS (no exercise), or SPS-exercised. Rats were exercised on a rodent treadmill for 14 consecutive days. Rats in all groups were tested for anxiety-like behaviors using open field (OF), light-dark and elevated-plus maze tests. All rats were tested for short-term and long-term memory in the radial arm water maze test. Rats were then sacrificed, blood was collected (for corticosterone levels), and individual organs (spleen, adrenals, and thymus) harvested. Results suggest that moderate physical exercise ameliorates SPS-induced behavioral deficits in rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mice Lacking the β4 Subunit of the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Show Memory Deficits, Altered Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behavior, and Diminished Nicotine-Induced Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, Svetlana; Contet, Candice; Roberts, Amanda J.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: The role of β4-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in cognition, anxiety, depression, and analgesia in the absence of nicotine is unclear. Methods: Wild-type (β4+/+) and knockout (β4−/−) mice for the nAChR β4 subunit were tested in behavioral tests assessing cognitive function, affective behaviors, and nociception. Results: There were no learning and memory deficits in β4−/− mice compared with β4+/+ mice during the acquisition of the Barnes maze, contextual fear conditioning, and Y maze tasks. In the Barnes maze memory retention test, male β4−/− mice showed reduced use of the spatial search strategy, indicating small spatial memory deficits compared with β4+/+ mice. In the cue-induced fear conditioning memory retention test, β4−/− mice exhibited reduced freezing time compared with β4+/+ mice. Compared with β4+/+ mice, β4−/− mice exhibited decreased anxiety-like behavior in the light–dark box. Depression-like behavior in β4−/− mice was decreased in the tail suspension test and increased in the forced swim test compared with β4+/+ mice. β4−/− mice did not differ from β4+/+ mice in basal nociception but were less sensitive to the antinociceptive effect of nicotine in 2 tests of acute thermal pain. Conclusions: Lack of β4-containing nAChRs resulted in small deficits in hippocampus- and amygdala-dependent memory retention functions. β4-containing nAChRs are involved in anxiety- and depression-like behaviors and contribute to the analgesic effects of nicotine. PMID:22573727

  19. Central administration of insulin-like growth factor-I decreases depressive-like behavior and brain cytokine expression in mice

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    Dantzer Robert

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Exogenous administration of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I has anti-depressant properties in rodent models of depression. However, nothing is known about the anti-depressant properties of IGF-I during inflammation, nor have mechanisms by which IGF-I alters behavior following activation of the innate immune system been clarified. We hypothesized that central IGF-I would diminish depressive-like behavior on a background of an inflammatory response and that it would do so by inducing expression of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF while decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the brain. IGF-I (1,000 ng was administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v. to CD-1 mice. Mice were subsequently given lipopolysaccharide i.c.v. (LPS, 10 ng. Sickness and depressive-like behaviors were assessed followed by analysis of brain steady state mRNA expression. Central LPS elicited typical transient signs of sickness of mice, including body weight loss, reduced feed intake and decreased social exploration toward a novel juvenile. Similarly, LPS increased time of immobility in the tail suspension test (TST. Pretreatment with IGF-I or antidepressants significantly decreased duration of immobility in the TST in both the absence and presence of LPS. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the anti-depressant action of IGF-I, we quantified steady-state mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators in whole brain using real-time RT-PCR. LPS increased, whereas IGF-I decreased, expression of inflammatory markers interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß, tumor necrosis factor-(TNFα, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Moreover, IGF-I increased expression of BDNF. These results indicate that IGF-I down regulates glial activation and induces expression of an endogenous growth factor that shares anti-depressant activity. These actions of IGF-I parallel its ability to diminish depressive-like behavior.

  20. Depression-like behavior induced by nesfatin-1 in rats: involvement of increased immune activation and imbalance of synaptic vesicle proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge eJinfang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a multicausal disorder and has been associated with metabolism regulation and immuno-inflammatory reaction. The anorectic molecule nesfatin-1 has recently been characterized as a potential mood regulator, but its precise effect on depression and the possible mechanisms remain unknown, especially when given peripherally. In the present study, nesfatin-1 was intraperitoneally injected to the rats and the depression-like behavior and activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis were evaluated. The plasma concentrations of nesfatin-1, interleukin 6 (IL-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP; and the hypothalamic expression levels of nesfatin-1, synapsinⅠ, and synaptotagminⅠmRNA were evaluated in nesfatin-1 chronically treated rats. The results showed that both acute and chronic administration of nesfatin-1 increased immobility in the forced swimming test (FST, and resulted in the hyperactivity of HPA axis, as indicated by the increase of plasma corticosterone concentration and hypothalamic expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH mRNA. Moreover, after chronic nesfatin-1 administration, the rats exhibited decreased activity and exploratory behavior in the open field test (OFT and increased mRNA expression of synapsinⅠand synaptotagminⅠin the hypothalamus. Furthermore, chronic administration of nesfatin-1 elevated plasma concentrations of IL-6 and CRP, which were positively correlated with despair behavior, plasma corticosterone level, and the hypothalamic mRNA expression of synapsinⅠ and synaptotagminⅠ. These results indicated that exogenous nesfatin-1 could induce the immune-inflammatory activation,which might be a central hug linking the depression-like behavior and the imbalanced mRNA expression of synaptic vesicle proteins in the hypothalamus.

  1. Effects of acute treadmill running at different intensities on activities of serotonin and corticotropin-releasing factor neurons, and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Tomomi; Nishii, Ayu; Amemiya, Seiichiro; Kubota, Natsuko; Nishijima, Takeshi; Kita, Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that physical exercise can reduce and prevent the incidence of stress-related psychiatric disorders, including depression and anxiety. Activation of serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is implicated in antidepressant/anxiolytic properties. In addition, the incidence and symptoms of these disorders may involve dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that is initiated by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Thus, it is possible that physical exercise produces its antidepressant/anxiolytic effects by affecting these neuronal activities. However, the effects of acute physical exercise at different intensities on these neuronal activation and behavioral changes are still unclear. Here, we examined the activities of 5-HT neurons in the DRN and CRF neurons in the PVN during 30 min of treadmill running at different speeds (high speed, 25 m/min; low speed, 15m/min; control, only sitting on the treadmill) in male Wistar rats, using c-Fos/5-HT or CRF immunohistochemistry. We also performed the elevated plus maze test and the forced swim test to assess anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, respectively. Acute treadmill running at low speed, but not high speed, significantly increased c-Fos expression in 5-HT neurons in the DRN compared to the control, whereas high-speed running significantly enhanced c-Fos expression in CRF neurons in the PVN compared with the control and low-speed running. Furthermore, low-speed running resulted in decreased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors compared with high-speed running. These results suggest that acute physical exercise with mild and low stress can efficiently induce optimal neuronal activation that is involved in the antidepressant/anxiolytic effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The HDAC inhibitor SAHA improves depressive-like behavior of CRTC1-deficient mice: possible relevance for treatment-resistant depression

    KAUST Repository

    Meylan, Elsa M.

    2016-03-09

    Major depression is a highly complex disabling psychiatric disorder affecting millions of people worldwide. Despite the availability of several classes of antidepressants, a substantial percentage of patients are unresponsive to these medications. A better understanding of the neurobiology of depression and the mechanisms underlying antidepressant response is thus critically needed. We previously reported that mice lacking CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) exhibit a depressive-like phenotype and a blunted antidepressant response to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. In this study, we similarly show that Crtc1‒/‒ mice are resistant to the antidepressant effect of chronic desipramine in a behavioral despair paradigm. Supporting the blunted response to this tricyclic antidepressant, we found that desipramine does not significantly increase the expression of Bdnf and Nr4a1-3 in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of Crtc1‒/‒ mice. Epigenetic regulation of neuroplasticity gene expression has been associated with depression and antidepressant response, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been shown to have antidepressant-like properties. Here, we show that unlike conventional antidepressants, chronic systemic administration of the HDAC inhibitor SAHA partially rescues the depressive-like behavior of Crtc1‒/‒ mice. This behavioral effect is accompanied by an increased expression of Bdnf, but not Nr4a1-3, in the prefrontal cortex of these mice, suggesting that this epigenetic intervention restores the expression of a subset of genes by acting downstream of CRTC1. These findings suggest that CRTC1 alterations may be associated with treatment-resistant depression, and support the interesting possibility that targeting HDACs may be a useful therapeutic strategy in antidepressant development.

  3. Social isolation-induced aggression potentiates anxiety and depressive-like behavior in male mice subjected to unpredictable chronic mild stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-cang Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accumulating epidemiological evidence shows that life event stressors are major vulnerability factors for psychiatric diseases such as major depression. It is also well known that social isolation in male mice results in aggressive behavior. However, it is not known how social isolation-induced aggression affects anxiety and depressive-like behavior in isolated male mice subjected to unpredictable chronic mild stress (CMS, an animal model of depression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: C57/B6 male mice were divided into 3 groups; non-stressed controls, in Group I; isolated mice subjected to the CMS protocol in Group II and aggression by physical contact in socially isolated mice subjected to the CMS protocol in Group III. In the sucrose intake test, ingestion of a 1% sucrose solution by mice in Groups II and III was significantly lower than in Group I. Furthermore, intake of this solution in Group III mice was significantly lower than in Group II mice. In the open field test, mice in Group III, showed reduced locomotor activity and reduced entry and retention time in the central zone, compared to Groups I and II mice. Moreover, the distances moved in 1 hour by Group III mice did not differ between night and morning. In the light/black box test, Groups II and III animals spent significantly less time in the light box compared to Group I animals. In the tail suspension test (TST and forced swimming test (FST, the immobility times of Group II and Group III mice were significantly longer than in Group I mice. In addition, immobility times in the FST were significantly longer in Group III than in Group II mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings show that social isolation-induced aggression could potentiate anxiety and depressive-like behaviors in isolated male mice subjected to CMS.

  4. Young-Adult Male Rats’ Vulnerability to Chronic Mild Stress Is Reflected by Anxious-Like instead of Depressive-Like Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera-Pérez José Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we found that chronic mild stress (CMS paradigm did not induce anhedonia in young-adult male rats but it reduced their body weight gain. These contrasting results encouraged us to explore other indicators of animal’s vulnerability to stress such as anxious-like behaviors, since stress is an etiologic factor also for anxiety. Thus, in this study, we evaluated the vulnerability of these animals to CMS using behavioral tests of depression or anxiety and measuring serum corticosterone. Male Wistar rats were exposed to four weeks of CMS; the animals’ body weight and sucrose preference (indicator of anhedonia were assessed after three weeks, and, after the fourth week, some animals were evaluated in a behavioral battery (elevated plus maze, defensive burying behavior, and forced swimming tests; meanwhile, others were used to measure serum corticosterone. We found that CMS (1 did not affect sucrose preference, immobility behavior in the forced swimming test, or serum corticosterone; (2 decreased body weight gain; and (3 increased the rat’s entries into closed arms of the plus maze and the cumulative burying behavior. These data indicate that young male rats’ vulnerability to CMS is reflected as poor body weight gain and anxious-like instead of depressive-like behaviors.

  5. Activation and blockade of serotonin7 receptors in the prelimbic cortex regulate depressive-like behaviors in a 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q J; Du, C X; Tan, H H; Zhang, L; Li, L B; Zhang, J; Niu, X L; Liu, J

    2015-12-17

    The role of serotonin7 (5-HT7) receptors in the regulation of depression is poorly understood, particularly in Parkinson's disease-associated depression. Here we examined whether 5-HT7 receptors in the prelimbic (PrL) sub-region of the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) involve in the regulation of depressive-like behaviors in sham-operated rats and rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle. The lesion induced depressive-like responses as measured by the sucrose preference and forced swim tests when compared to sham-operated rats. Intra-PrL injection of 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS19 (0.5, 1 and 2 μg/rat) increased sucrose consumption, and decreased immobility time in sham-operated and the lesioned rats, indicating the induction of antidepressant-like effects. Further, intra-PrL injection of 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB269970 (1.5, 3 and 6 μg/rat) decreased sucrose consumption, and increased immobility time, indicating the induction of depressive-like responses. However, the doses producing these effects in the lesioned rats were higher than those in sham-operated rats. Neurochemical results showed that intra-PrL injection of AS19 (2 μg/rat) increased dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA) levels in the mPFC, habenula and ventral hippocampus (vHip) in sham-operated and the lesioned rats; whereas SB269970 (6 μg/rat) decreased 5-HT levels in the habenula and vHip, and the levels of NA in the mPFC, habenula and vHip in the two groups of rats. The results suggest that 5-HT7 receptors in the PrL play an important role in the regulation of these behaviors, which attribute to changes in monoamine levels in the limbic and limbic-related brain regions after activation and blockade of 5-HT7 receptors. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Altered microglia morphology and higher resilience to stress-induced depression-like behavior in CX3CR1-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellwig, Sabine; Brioschi, Simone; Dieni, Sandra; Frings, Lars; Masuch, Annette; Blank, Thomas; Biber, Knut

    Microglia are suggested to be involved in several neuropsychiatric diseases. Indeed changes in microglia morphology have been reported in different mouse models of depression. A crucial regulatory system for microglia function is the well-defined CX3C axis. Thus, we aimed to clarify the role of

  7. Surgical stress induced depressive and anxiety like behavior are improved by dapsone via modulating NADPH oxidase level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Tian, Xiaosheng; Wang, Qiudian; Tong, Yawei; Wang, Hecheng; Li, Zhengqian; Li, Lunxu; Zhou, Ting; Zhan, Rui; Zhao, Lei; Sun, Yang; Fan, Dongsheng; Lu, Lin; Zhang, Jing; Jin, Yinglan; Xiao, Weizhong; Guo, Xiangyang; Chui, Dehua

    2015-01-12

    Surgical stress induced depression and anxiety like behavior are common complications among aged individuals suffering from surgery. Recent studies proposed that accumulation of oxidative stress is involved in the etiology of stress induced depression and anxiety. Dapsone possesses antioxidant properties, however, whether dapsone is effective in modulating surgical stress induced brain oxidative damage remains uncertain. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of dapsone on surgical stress induced depressive and anxiety like behavior, and brain oxidative stress in a well-established surgical stress model. Depressive and anxiety like behavior accompanied by elevated brain oxidative stress were observed in aged mice underwent abdominal surgery. Pretreatment with 5 mg/kg dapsone significantly improved the behavioral disorder and ameliorated brain oxidative stress in this model. Further investigation, revealed that surgical stress increased brain NADPH oxidase level, while pretreatment with dapsone abrogated the elevation of NADPH oxidase triggered by surgical stress. These findings suggest that dapsone is effective in improving surgical stress induced brain oxidative damage via down-regulating NADPH oxidase level in aged mice. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. CSF miR-16 is decreased in major depression patients and its neutralization in rats induces depression-like behaviors via a serotonin transmitter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ming-Fen; Dong, Jie-Zheng; Wang, Yu-Wen; He, Jun; Ju, Xuan; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Yong-Hua; Shi, Jian-Fei; Lv, Ya-Ying

    2015-06-01

    Animal and cell line studies demonstrated that miR-16 may be associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) via regulation of the expression of serotonin transporter (SERT) gene. However, human studies about miR-16 of patients with MDD are still lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible involvement of miR-16 in the mechanism of MDD in humans. Thirty-six drug-free patients with MDD and 30 healthy controls aged between 18 and 45 years old were recruited. 24-item Hamilton depression scale test was performed for each subject. MiR-16 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood, as well as serotonin in CSF were assayed by the qRT-PCR or ELISA method. To confirm the role of CSF miR-16 in MDD, animal study about intracerebroventricular injection of anti-miR-16 was also performed. Depression-like behaviors, CSF miR-16 and serotonin, blood miR-16, and raphe SERT protein of rats were also tested. CSF miR-16 in MDD patients was significantly lower than that in controls. It was negatively correlated with Hamilton scores and positively associated with CSF serotonin. However, blood miR-16 was not significantly different between two groups and it was not statistically correlated with CSF miR-16. In animal study, anti-miR-16-treated rats were evaluated to exhibit depression-like behaviors, extremely lower CSF miR-16, significantly higher CSF serotonin, and obviously higher raphe SERT protein than control rats. We did not detect SERT protein in human brain due to the impossibility of sample collection. Our study suggested that CSF miR-16 participated in the physiopathology of MDD via the modulation of serotonin transmitter system in brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Modulating Oxidative Stress Relieves Stress-Induced Behavioral and Cognitive Impairments in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Naimesh; Salvi, Ankita; Patki, Gaurav; Salim, Samina

    2017-07-01

    Persistent psychological stress often leads to anxiety disorders and depression. Benzodiazepines and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are popular treatment options but have limited efficacy, supporting the need for alternative treatment. Based on our recent preclinical work suggesting a causal link between neurobehavioral deficits and elevated oxidative stress, we hypothesized that interventions that mitigate oxidative stress can attenuate/overcome neurobehavioral deficits. Here, we employed the rat social defeat model of psychological stress to determine whether increasing antioxidant levels using grape powder would prevent and/or reverse social defeat-induced behavioral and cognitive deficits. Furthermore, a hippocampal-derived HT22 cell culture model of oxidative stress was employed to identify the individual beneficial constituent(s) of grape powder and the underlying mechanism(s) of action. Grape powder treatment prevented and reversed social defeat-induced behavioral and cognitive deficits and also decreased social defeat-induced increase in plasma corticosterone and 8-isoprostane (systemic and oxidative stress markers, respectively). And grape powder treatment replenished social defeat-induced depleted pool of key antioxidant enzymes glyoxalase-1, glutathione reducatse-1, and superoxide dismutase. Grape powder constituents, quercetin and resveratrol, were most effective in preventing oxidative stress-induced decreased cellular antioxidant capacity. Grape powder protected oxidative stress-induced cell death by preventing calcium influx, mitochondrial dysfunction, and release of cytochrome c. Grape powder treatment by increasing antioxidant pool and preventing cell damage and death prevented and reversed social defeat-induced behavioral and cognitive deficits in rats. Quercetin and resveratrol are the major contributors towards beneficial effects of grape powder.

  10. Raloxifene and/or estradiol decrease anxiety-like and depressive-like behavior, whereas only estradiol increases carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis and uterine proliferation among ovariectomized rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walf, Alicia A.; Frye, Cheryl A.

    2010-01-01

    Controversy surrounds the efficacy and safety of 17β-estradiol (E2)-mimetic therapies to women for treatment of menopausal symptoms. An important question is the nature of the trophic actions of E2-mimetics in the brain for behavioral processes versus in the periphery for beneficial effects related to osteoporosis, or unwanted proliferative effects in reproductive tissues, such as mammary glands and uterus. Of recent interest are the effects of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), which can have tissue specific actions, for these processes. In the present study, the effects was determined of E2 alone, or co-administered with a SERM, raloxifene, for anxiety-like, depression-like and trophic peripheral effects in ovariectomized rats that were exposed to a chemical carcinogen (7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene; DMBA), or not. Once per week, rats were administered vehicle, E2 (0.09 mg/kg) and/or raloxifene (1 mg/kg) s.c. 44–48 hours before testing in a positive control, E2-dependent behavior (lordosis), depression (forced swim test), and anxiety (elevated plus maze) behavioral assays. In addition to behavioral endpoints, incidence and number of tumors, and tumor, pituitary gland, and uterine weight 14 weeks after carcinogen-exposure, and weekly hormone treatments, were analyzed. Rats administered DMBA had increased number and size of tumors, compared to vehicle treatment. E2+raloxifene increased the number of tumors. Administration of E2 or E2+raloxifene, but not raloxifene alone, increased pituitary and uterine weight, compared to vehicle administration. E2 or E2+raloxifene, but not raloxifene alone, also increased incidence of lordosis and reduced depression-like behavior in the forced swim test (i.e. decreased time spent immobile) compared to vehicle administration. However, administration of E2 or raloxifene reduced anxiety behavior in the elevated plus maze (i.e. increased time spent on the open arms of the maze), compared to vehicle. Together these

  11. Magnesium deficiency induces anxiety-and depression-like behavior and metabolic dysfunction in C57Bl/6J mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, G.; Wang, T.; Singewald, N.

    2012-01-01

    investigated the involvement of Mg in regulating depression-and anxiety-like behaviour and metabolism, by using mice that have been deprived of dietary Mg and studying several behavioral and metabolic markers. Methods: We examined the behavioral effects of Mg deficiency (deprival of dietary Mg for 6 weeks......) in mice through depression-and anxiety phenotyping experiments, namely the forced swim test and light-dark box respectively. We determined the behavioural effects 30 minutes after treatment with imipramine (20 mg/kg), diazepam (2 mg/kg) and ketamine (3 mg/kg). The glucose tolerance test was used to assess...

  12. Early-life Exposure to the SSRI Paroxetine Exacerbates Depression-like Behavior in Anxiety/Depression-prone rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Matthew E.; Pugh, Phyllis C.; Jackson, Nateka L.; Cohen, Joshua L.; Fant, Andrew D.; Akil, Huda; Clinton, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants are the mainstay treatment for the 10–20% of pregnant and postpartum women who suffer major depression, but the effects of SSRIs on their children’s developing brain and later emotional health are poorly understood. SSRI use during pregnancy can elicit antidepressant withdrawal in newborns and increase toddlers’ anxiety and social avoidance. In rodents, perinatal SSRI exposure increases adult depression- and anxiety-like behavior, although certain individuals are more vulnerable to these effects than others. Our study establishes a rodent model of individual differences in susceptibility to perinatal SSRI exposure, utilizing selectively-bred Low Responder (bLR) and High Responder (bHR) rats that were previously bred for high versus low behavioral response to novelty. Pregnant bHR/bLR females were chronically treated with the SSRI paroxetine (10 mg/kg/day p.o.) to examine its effects on offspring’s emotional behavior and gene expression in the developing brain. Paroxetine treatment had minimal effect on bHR/bLR dams’ pregnancy outcomes or maternal behavior. We found that bLR offspring, naturally prone to an inhibited/anxious temperament, were susceptible to behavioral abnormalities associated with perinatal SSRI exposure (which exacerbated their Forced Swim test immobility), while high risk-taking bHR offspring were resistant. Microarray studies revealed robust perinatal SSRI-induced gene expression changes in the developing bLR hippocampus and amygdala (postnatal days 7–21), including transcripts involved in neurogenesis, synaptic vesicle components, and energy metabolism. These results highlight the bLR/bHR model as a useful tool to explore the neurobiology of individual differences in susceptibility to perinatal SSRI exposure. PMID:25451292

  13. Viral vector mediated expression of mutant huntingtin in the dorsal raphe produces disease-related neuropathology but not depressive-like behaviors in wildtype mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzer, Mark; Lueras, Jordan; Warden, Anna; Weber, Sydney; McBride, Jodi

    2015-05-22

    depressive-like behaviors. Wildtype mice were injected with an adeno-associated virus (AAV2/1) encoding HTT containing either a pathogenic (N171-82Q) or control (N171-16Q) CAG repeat length into the ventral DRN and depressive-like behaviors and motor behaviors were assessed for 12 weeks post-surgery. Quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) verified positive transduction in the ventral aspects of the DRN, including the ventral sub-nucleus (DRv) and interfascicular sub-nucleus (DRif). IHC demonstrated microgliosis in and around the injection site and mHTT-positive inclusions in serotonin-producing neurons and a small percentage of astrocytes in animals injected with N171-82Q compared to controls. Moreover, N171-82Q injected mice showed a 75% reduction in cells that stained positive for the serotonin synthesis enzyme, tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2) compared to controls (p<0.05). Despite mHTT-mediated pathology in the DRv and DRif, no significant changes in depressive-like behavior were detected. Consequently, we conclude that 12 weeks of N171-82Q expression in the ventral sub-nuclei of the DRN of wildtype mice causes characteristic disease-related cellular neuropathology but is not sufficient to elicit depressive-like behaviors. Ongoing studies are investigating whether a larger injection volume that transfects a larger percentage of the DRN and/or a longer time course of mHTT expression might elicit depressive-like behaviors. Moreover, mHTT expression in other regions of the brain, such as the hippocampal dentate gyrus and/or the frontal cortex might be necessary to elicit HD depression. Together, these results may prove helpful in addressing which therapeutic and/or pharmacological strategies might be most efficacious when treating depressive symptomology in patients suffering from HD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of Gladiolus dalenii on the Stress-Induced Behavioral, Neurochemical, and Reproductive Changes in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fotsing

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gladiolus dalenii is a plant commonly used in many regions of Cameroon as a cure for various diseases like headaches, epilepsy, schizophrenia, and mood disorders. Recent studies have revealed that the aqueous extract of G. dalenii (AEGD exhibited antidepressant-like properties in rats. Therefore, we hypothesized that the AEGD could protect from the stress-induced behavioral, neurochemical, and reproductive changes in rats. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the effect of the AEGD on behavioral, neurochemical, and reproductive characteristics, using female rats subjected to chronic immobilization stress. The chronic immobilization stress (3 h per day for 28 days was applied to induce female reproductive and behavioral impairments in rats. The immobilization stress was provoked in rats by putting them separately inside cylindrical restrainers with ventilated doors at ambient temperature. The plant extract was given to rats orally everyday during 28 days, 5 min before induction of stress. On a daily basis, a vaginal smear was made to assess the duration of the different phases of the estrous cycle and at the end of the 28 days of chronic immobilization stress, the rat’s behavior was assessed in the elevated plus maze. They were sacrificed by cervical disruption. The organs were weighed, the ovary histology done, and the biochemical parameters assessed. The findings of this research revealed that G. dalenii increased the entries and the time of open arm exploration in the elevated plus maze. Evaluation of the biochemical parameters levels indicated that there was a significant reduction in the corticosterone, progesterone, and prolactin levels in the G. dalenii aqueous extract treated rats compared to stressed rats whereas the levels of serotonin, triglycerides, adrenaline, cholesterol, glucose estradiol, follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone were significantly increased in the stressed rats treated with, G. dalenii

  15. Ophiocordyceps formosana improves hyperglycemia and depression-like behavior in an STZ-induced diabetic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao-Wei; Hong, Tzu-Wen; Wang, Ying-Jing; Chen, Ko-Chien; Pei, Ju-Chun; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Lai, Wen-Sung; Tsai, Sheng-Hong; Chu, Richard; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Sheen, Lee-Yan; Takahashi, Satoru; Ding, Shih-Torng; Shen, Tang-Long

    2016-08-24

    A newly defined Cordyceps species, Ophiocordyceps formosana (O. formosana) has been implicated in multitudinous bioactivities, including lowering glucose and cholesterol levels and modulating the immune system. However, few literatures demonstrate sufficient evidence to support these proposed functions. Although the use of Cordyceps spp. has been previously addressed to improve insulin insensitivity and improve the detrimental symptoms of depression; its mechanistic nature remains unsettled. Herein, we reveal the effects of O. formosana in ameliorating hyperglycemia accompanied with depression. Diabetes was induced in mice by employing streptozotocin(STZ), a chemical that is toxic to insulin-producing β cells of the pancreas. These streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice showed combined symptoms of hyperglycemia and depressive behaviors. Twenty-four STZ-induced mice were randomly divided into 3 groups subjected to oral gavage with 100 μL solution of either PBS or 25 mg/mL Ophiocordyceps formosana extract (OFE) or 2 mg/mL rosiglitazone (Rosi, positive control group). Treatments were administered once per day for 28 days. An additional 6 mice without STZ induction were treated with PBS to serve as the control group. Insulin sensitivity was measured by a glucose tolerance test and levels of adiponectin in plasma and adipose tissue were also quantified. Behavioral tests were conducted and levels of monoamines in various brain regions relating to depression were evaluated. HPLC analysis uncovered three major constituents, adenosine, D-mannitol and cordycepin, within O. formosana similar to other prestigious medicinal Cordyceps spp.. STZ-induced diabetic mice demonstrated decreased body weight and subcutaneous adipose tissue, while these symptoms were recovered in mice receiving OFE treatment. Moreover, the OFE group displayed improved insulin sensitivity and elevated adiponectin within the plasma and adipose tissue. The anti-depressive effect of OFE was

  16. Neuropeptide Trefoil Factor 3 Reverses Depressive-Like Behaviors by Activation of BDNF-ERK-CREB Signaling in Olfactory Bulbectomized Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The trefoil factors (TFFs are a family of three polypeptides, among which TFF1 and TFF3 are widely distributed in the central nervous system. Our previous study indicated that TFF3 was a potential rapid-onset antidepressant as it reversed the depressive-like behaviors induced by acute or chronic mild stress. In order to further identify the antidepressant-like effect of TFF3, we applied an olfactory bulbectomy (OB, a classic animal model of depression, in the present study. To elucidate the mechanism underlying the antidepressant-like activity of TFF3, we tested the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF-extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK-cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB signaling in the hippocampus in the process. Chronic systemic administration of TFF3 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p. for seven days not only produced a significant antidepressant-like efficacy in the OB paradigm, but also restored the expression of BDNF, pERK, and pCREB in the hippocampal CA3. Inhibition of BDNF or extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK signaling in CA3 blocked the antidepressant-like activity of TFF3 in OB rats. Our findings further confirmed the therapeutic effect of TFF3 against depression and suggested that the normalization of the BDNF-ERK-CREB pathway was involved in the behavioral response of TFF3 for the treatment of depression.

  17. Xiao Yao San Improves Depressive-Like Behaviors in Rats with Chronic Immobilization Stress through Modulation of Locus Coeruleus-Norepinephrine System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Fang Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most research focuses on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPGA axis systems of abnormalities of emotions and behaviors induced by stress, while no studies of Chinese herbal medicine such as Xiao Yao San (XYS on the mechanisms of locus coeruleus-norepinephrine (LC-NE system have been reported. Therefore, experiments were carried out to observe mechanism of LC-NE system in response to chronic immobilization stress (CIS and explore the antidepressant effect of XYS. Rat model was established by CIS. LC morphology in rat was conducted. The serum norepinephrine (NE concentrations and NE biosynthesis such as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH, and corticotrophin-releasing-factor (CRF in LC were determined. Results showed that there were no discernible alterations in LC in rats. The serum NE concentrations, positive neurons, mean optical density (MOD, and protein levels of TH, DBH, and CRF in model group were significantly increased compared to the control group. But XYS-treated group displayed a significantly decreased in NE levels and expressions of TH, DBH, and CRF compared to the model group. In conclusion, CIS can activate LC-NE system to release NE and then result in a significant decrease in rats. XYS treatment can effectively improve depressive-like behaviors in rats through inhibition of LC-NE neurons activity.

  18. Depressive-like behavior induced by tumor necrosis factor-α is attenuated by m-trifluoromethyl-diphenyl diselenide in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüning, César Augusto; Martini, Franciele; Soares, Suelen Mendonça; Savegnago, Lucielli; Sampaio, Tuane Bazanella; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence associates activation of immune system with depressive symptoms. Accordingly, pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), have been shown to play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of acute and subchronic treatments with (m-CF3-PhSe)2 to prevent the depressive-like behavior induced by intracerebroventricular injection of TNF-α in mice. TNF-α induced depressive-like behavior in the forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) (0.1 and 0.001 ƒg/5 μL/site, respectively) without changing locomotor activity, performed in the locomotor activity monitor (LAM). Acute (0.01-50 mg/kg; intragastric (i.g.); 30 min) and subchronic (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg; i.g.; 14 days) treatments with (m-CF3-PhSe)2 at low doses were effective against the effect of TNF-α in the FST and TST. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), important proteins in TNF-activated signaling, were determined in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of mouse. TNF-α (0.1 ƒg/5 μL/site) increased NF-κB levels and p38 MAPK activation in both brain areas and acute (10 mg/kg; i.g.) and subchronic (0.01 mg/kg; i.g.) treatments with (m-CF3-PhSe)2 were effective in attenuating this increase. Although more studies are necessary to indicate this compound as a therapeutic alternative to depression, the antidepressant-like and anti-inflammatory effects of (m-CF3-PhSe)2 demonstrated herein may support it as an interesting molecule in the search for new drugs to treat depressive disorders that have been largely linked to immune process and inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A novel herbal treatment reduces depressive-like behaviors and increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in the brain of type 2 diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo C

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chun Luo,1,* Yuting Ke,1,* Yanyan Yuan,1 Ming Zhao,1 Fuyan Wang,1 Yisheng Zhang,2 Shizhong Bu1 1Runliang Diabetes Laboratory, Diabetes Research Center, Ningbo University, 2Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Ningbo Medical Center, Li Huili Eastern Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Radix Puerariae and hawthorn fruit have been demonstrated to treat diabetes. They offer potential benefits for preventing depression in diabetes. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the combination of Radix Puerariae and hawthorn fruit (CRPHF could prevent depression in a diabetic rat model generated by feeding the rats with a high-fat diet and a low-dose streptozotocin (STZ. Methods: The CRPHF was provided by the Shanghai Chinese Traditional Medical University. Twenty-four rats were randomly divided into four groups: normal control, normal-given-CRPHF (NC, diabetic control, and diabetic-given-CRPHF (DC groups. The type 2 diabetic model was created by feeding the rats with a high-fat diet for 4 weeks followed by injection of 25 mg/kg STZ. CRPHF was given at 2 g/kg/d to the rats of NC and DC groups by intragastric gavage daily for 4 weeks after the type 2 diabetic model was successfully created. Body weight, random blood glucose (RBG, oral glucose tolerance test, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C were measured during the study. Depressive-like behavior was evaluated at the end of the treatment by using the open field test (OFT, the elevated plus-maze test (EPMT, locomotor activity test (LAT, and forced swimming test (FST. Levels of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the prefrontal cortex were evaluated by using Western blot. Results: 1 CRPHF reduced RBG and improved glucose tolerance in diabetic rats

  20. Genetic deletion of P-glycoprotein alters stress responsivity and increases depression-like behavior, social withdrawal and microglial activation in the hippocampus of female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowska, Natalia I; Smith, Kristie L; Zhou, Cilla; Waters, Peter M; Cavalcante, Ligia Menezes; Abelev, Sarah V; Kuligowski, Michael; Clarke, David J; Todd, Stephanie M; Arnold, Jonathon C

    2017-10-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ABC transporter expressed at the blood brain barrier and regulates the brain uptake of various xenobiotics and endogenous mediators including glucocorticoid hormones which are critically important to the stress response. Moreover, P-gp is expressed on microglia, the brain's immune cells, which are activated by stressors and have an emerging role in psychiatric disorders. We therefore hypothesised that germline P-gp deletion in mice might alter the behavioral and microglial response to stressors. Female P-gp knockout mice displayed an unusual, frantic anxiety response to intraperitoneal injection stress in the light-dark test. They also tended to display reduced conditioned fear responses compared to wild-type (WT) mice in a paradigm where a single electric foot-shock stressor was paired to a context. Foot-shock stress reduced social interaction and decreased microglia cell density in the amygdala which was not varied by P-gp genotype. Independently of stressor exposure, female P-gp deficient mice displayed increased depression-like behavior, idiosyncratic darting behavior, age-related social withdrawal and hyperactivity, facilitated sensorimotor gating and altered startle reactivity. In addition, P-gp deletion increased microglia cell density in the CA3 region of the hippocampus, and the microglial cells exhibited a reactive, hypo-ramified morphology. Further, female P-gp KO mice displayed increased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression in the hippocampus. In conclusion, this research shows that germline P-gp deletion affected various behaviors of relevance to psychiatric conditions, and that altered microglial cell activity and enhanced GR expression in the hippocampus may play a role in mediating these behaviors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of loading speed on the stress-induced magnetic behavior of ferromagnetic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Sheng, E-mail: longtubao@zju.edu.cn; Gu, Yibin; Fu, Meili; Zhang, Da; Hu, Shengnan

    2017-02-01

    The primary goal of this research is to investigate the effect of loading speed on the stress-induced magnetic behavior of a ferromagnetic steel. Uniaxial tension tests on Q235 steel were carried out with various stress levels under different loading speeds. The variation of the magnetic signals surrounding the tested specimen was detected by a fluxgate magnetometer. The results indicated that the magnetic signal variations depended not only on the tensile load level but on the loading speed during the test. The magnetic field amplitude seemed to decrease gradually with the increase in loading speed at the same tensile load level. Furthermore, the evolution of the magnetic reversals is also related to the loading speed. Accordingly, the loading speed should be considered as one of the influencing variables in the Jies-Atherton model theory of the magnetomechanical effect. - Highlights: • Magnetic behaviors induced by different loading speeds were investigated. • Loading speed imposes strong impact on the variation of the magnetic field signals. • The magnetic field amplitude reduces gradually with the increasing loading speed. • The Jies-Atherton model theory should consider the effect of loading speed.

  2. Long Chain Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Supplementation Alleviates Doxorubicin-Induced Depressive-Like Behaviors and Neurotoxicity in Rats: Involvement of Oxidative Stress and Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Qin Wu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin (DOX is a chemotherapeutic agent widely used in human malignancies. Its long-term use can cause neurobiological side-effects associated with depression. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs, the essential fatty acids found in fish oil, possess neuroprotecitve and antidepressant activities. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the potential protective effects of ω-3 PUFAs against DOX-induced behavioral changes and neurotoxicity. ω-3 PUFAs were given daily by gavage (1.5 g/kg over three weeks starting seven days before DOX administration (2.5 mg/kg. Open-field test (OFT and forced swimming test (FST were conducted to assess exploratory activity and despair behavior, respectively. Our data showed that ω-3 PUFAs supplementation significantly mitigated the behavioral changes induced by DOX. ω-3 PUFAs pretreatment also alleviated the DOX-induced neural apoptosis. Meanwhile, ω-3 PUFAs treatment ameliorated DOX-induced oxidative stress in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Additionally, gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, and the protein levels of NF-κB and iNOS were significantly increased in brain tissues of DOX-treated group, whereas ω-3 PUFAs supplementation significantly attenuated DOX-induced neuroinflammation. In conclusion, ω-3 PUFAs can effectively protect against DOX-induced depressive-like behaviors, and the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect are potentially associated with its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic properties.

  3. Melatonin produces a rapid onset and prolonged efficacy in reducing depression-like behaviors in adult rats exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress.

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    Sun, Xiaoran; Wang, Mengting; Wang, Yiqiang; Lian, Bo; Sun, Hongwei; Wang, Gang; Li, Qi; Sun, Lin

    2017-03-06

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the rapidity and duration of melatonin as an antidepressant in a rat model of depression. The rats were subjected to a six-week period of unpredictable mild stress followed by melatonin treatment. Three groups of rats were included in this study: Controls (CON - no stress exposure), Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress (CUS) and CUS followed by melatonin (MT). Stressors consisted of exposure to rotation on a shaker, placement in a chamber maintained at 4°C, lights off for 3h, lights on overnight, exposure to an aversive odor, 45° tilted cages, food and water deprivation and crowding and isolated housing. Subsequently, the saline vehicle (CUS) or melatonin was administered at a dose of 10mg/kg for 14days period. Body weight and behavioral tests were used to evaluate depression-like behavior and its recovery following melatonin treatment. While body weight increases were significantly lower in rats exposed to CUS versus CON, body weights of the MT group increased significantly following melatonin treatment as compared with the CUS group. With regard to results obtained with behavioral assays indicative of depression, rapid and long-term functional recoveries in depression were observed in the MT as compared to the CUS group. The results indicate that not only does melatonin induce an antidepressant-like action within this rat model of depression, but does so with a rapid onset and prolonged efficacy. As most current treatments for depression require an extended period of administration, our current results suggest that melatonin may prove to be a particularly effect agent to promote a rapid onset and prolonged behavioral benefits in the treatment of depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of environmental stress on the depression-like behaviors and the diurnal rhythm of corticosterone and melatonin in male rats.

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    Yuan, Ming; Liu, Li-Jing; Xu, Ling-Zhi; Guo, Tian-You; Yue, Xiao-Dong; Li, Su-Xia

    2016-06-25

    Environmental stress (ES) is commonly used in producing chronic unpredictable mild stress to study pathogenesis of depression, including the regulatory role of circadian system on depression. However, the direct effect of ES on the circadian system has been rarely explored. The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of ES on depression-like behaviors and diurnal rhythm of plasma hormone/peptide levels in male rats. Rats were allocated into control group (CON group), low frequency ES group (LF group) and high frequency ES group (HF group). Sucrose preference test (SPT), open field test (OFT), weight gain, food and water intake were conducted to assess depression- and anxiety-like behaviors. A total of 7 times of the tail venous blood was collected with an interval of 4 h during 24 h from other rats who subjected to the same procedures of ES but not the behavioral tests. The alterations of diurnal rhythm of peripheral plasma corticosterone (CORT) and melatonin, and changes of the cholecystokinin (CCK), neuropeptide Y and leptin levels at zeitgeber time (ZT) 0 were detected by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that ES led to a disturbance of diurnal rhythm of CORT and melatonin in the plasma. Besides, it also increased plasma leptin level and decreased body weight gain, but it did not produce depression- and anxiety-like behaviors compared with those rats in the control group. In short, our findings indicated that the ES could induce a disturbance of diurnal rhythm of plasma CORT and melatonin in male rats.

  5. Reduced hippocampal IL-10 expression, altered monoaminergic activity and anxiety and depressive-like behavior in female mice subjected to chronic social instability stress.

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    Labaka, Ainitze; Gómez-Lázaro, Eneritz; Vegas, Oscar; Pérez-Tejada, Joana; Arregi, Amaia; Garmendia, Larraitz

    2017-09-29

    Evidence indicates that release of pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by social stress contributes to affective disorders. Additionally, there are known sex differences in both the stress response and the stressors that can elicit this response. In this regard, the chronic social instability (CSI) rodent model of stress appears to be the best fit for the social nature of females. This study analyzed the effects of CSI on female mouse behavior, hippocampal cytokine expression, tryptophan metabolism and monoaminergic activity. The activity of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes were also measured. Results showed a decrease in sucrose consumption in stressed subjects, indicative of anhedonic behavior and an increase in climbing activity in the forced swimming test (FST) and in whisking behavior, which have been associated with anxiety. Decreased interleukin-10 (IL-10) expression was found in the hippocampus of the stressed mice, while no differences in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and tryptophan (TRYP), kynurenine (KYN) or 3-hydroxy kynurenine (3-HK) levels were found. Increased hippocampal serotoninergic and noradrenergic activity was observed in stressed mice. The higher plasma corticosterone and lower hypothalamic glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression levels showed an increase in HPA activity after CSI. No differences were found in the plasma estradiol levels or the central estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) expression levels. These data indicate that the CSI stress-induced behavioral and physiological changes associated with anxiety and depressive disorders. Although additional studies are warranted, the results suggest an involvement of anti-inflammatory cytokines in the biobehavioral effects of social stress in female mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of the total flavonoid extract of Xiaobuxin-Tang on depression-like behavior induced by lipopolysaccharide and proinflammatory cytokine levels in mice.

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    An, Lei; Li, Jing; Yu, Song-Tao; Xue, Rui; Yu, Neng-Jiang; Chen, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Li-Ming; Zhao, Nan; Li, Yun-Feng; Zhang, You-Zhi

    2015-04-02

    Xiaobuxin-Tang (XBXT), a traditional Chinese herbal decoction, has been used for the treatment of depressive disorders from ancient clinic. The aim of the study was to explore the involvement of inflammation or inflammatory markers in the antidepressant-like effects of XBXT-2. Depression-like behavior was induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.2mg/kg, i.p) in tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST) in mice. The effects of the total flavonoids (XBXT-2) extracted from XBXT (25, 50, and 100mg/kg, p.o.) and duloxetine (DLX, 10mg/kg, p.o.) on the immobility time in TST and FST were determined 24h after LPS pretreatment. The locomotor activity was also determined to eliminate the false-positive activity. Additionally, in order to further evaluate the effect of XBXT-2 on inflammation, the levels of brain proinflammatory cytokines including IL-1β and TNF-α were assessed by ELISA. The pretreatment with LPS significantly increased the immobility time in TST and FST in mice, as well as the brain levels of IL-1β and TNF-α. XBXT-2 (25, 50, and 100mg/kg, p.o.) administration decreased the duration of immobility in TST and FST, and normalized the cytokines levels. The positive control DLX (10mg/kg, p.o.) exerted similar effects. Meanwhile, neither LPS pretreatment nor drugs treatment had any effect on mouse locomotor activity. These results suggest that inflammation and inflammatory cytokines may be involved in the antidepressant-like effects of XBXT-2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Striatal N-Acetylaspartate Synthetase Shati/Nat8l Regulates Depression-Like Behaviors via mGluR3-Mediated Serotonergic Suppression in Mice

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    Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Iegaki, Noriyuki; Fu, Kequan; Ishikawa, Yudai; Sumi, Kazuyuki; Azuma, Sota; Uno, Kyosuke; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Several clinical studies have suggested that N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartylglutamate levels in the human brain are associated with various psychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder. We have previously identified Shati/Nat8l, an N-acetyltransferase, in the brain using an animal model of psychosis. Shati/Nat8l synthesizes N-acetylaspartate from L-aspartate and acetyl-coenzyme A. Further, N-acetylaspartate is converted into N-acetylaspartylglutamate, a neurotransmitter for metabotropic glutamate receptor 3. Methods Because Shati/Nat8l mRNA levels were increased in the dorsal striatum of mice following the exposure to forced swimming stress, Shati/Nat8l was overexpressed in mice by the microinjection of adeno-associated virus vectors containing Shati/Nat8l gene into the dorsal striatum (dS-Shati/Nat8l mice). The dS-Shati/Nat8l mice were further assessed using behavioral and neurochemical tests. Results The dS-Shati/Nat8l mice exhibited behavioral despair in the forced swimming and tail suspension tests and social withdrawal in the 3-chamber social interaction test. These depression-like behaviors were attenuated by the administration of a metabotropic glutamate receptor 2/3 antagonist and a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Furthermore, the metabolism of N-acetylaspartate to N-acetylaspartylglutamate was decreased in the dorsal striatum of the dS-Shati/Nat8l mice. This finding corresponded with the increased expression of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, an enzyme that metabolizes N-acetylaspartylglutamate present in the extracellular space. Extracellular serotonin levels were lower in the dorsal striatum of the dS-Shati/Nat8l and normal mice that were repeatedly administered a selective glutamate carboxypeptidase II inhibitor. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the striatal expression of N-acetylaspartate synthetase Shati/Nat8l plays a role in major depressive disorder via the metabotropic glutamate receptor 3

  8. Effects of Refined Xiaoyaosan on Depressive-Like Behaviors in Rats with Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress through Neurosteroids, Their Synthesis and Metabolic Enzymes

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    Xiaoling Guo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: To observe the effects of refined Xiaoyaosan (XYS on the depressive-like behaviors in rats with chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS, and to explore the relationship between the changes of neurosteroids and mRNA expressions of their synthesis and metabolic enzymes, and the mechanism of XYS in the treatment of depression. Methods: Eighty-four healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into normal group, model group, XYS group and fluoxetine group. The latter three groups were subjected to 21 days of CUMS to prepare the stress depression model. Rats in the XYS group, and fluoxetine group were given intragastric administration with refined XYS and fluoxetine, respectively. The behavioral changes of the rats were observed after 21 days. The contents of pregnenolone (PREG, progesterone (PROG and alloprognanolone (ALLO in the plasma of rats were measured by ELISA. The levels of PREG, PROG and ALLO in the hippocampus and amygdala tissues were measured by LC-MS/MS. The mRNA expressions of 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD, cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc and 5α-reductase (5a-R in the hippocampus and amygdala were detected by RT-qPCR methods. Results: There were changes in the model rats. The contents of PREG, PROG and ALLO changed similarly, which reflected in the decrease of PROG and ALLO, and the increase of PREG. The mRNA expression of P450scc was increased, and the mRNA expressions of 3α-HSD, 3β-HSD and 5a-R were decreased. Refined XYS could improve the behaviors of rats and the biological indicators. Conclusions: There is a neurosteroid dysfunction in the brain region of depression rat model animals, and the mechanism of refined XYS depression treatment may be related to the regulation of the control of mRNA expression of related synthesis and metabolic enzymes in the hippocampus and amygdala, further affecting the contents of neurosteroids.

  9. Resveratrol ameliorates the anxiety- and depression-like behavior of subclinical hypothyroidism rat: possible involvement of the HPT axis, HPA axis, and Wnt/β-catenin pathway

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    Jinfang eGe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disease subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH is closely associated with depression-like behavior both in human and animal studies, and our previous studies have identified the antidepressant effect of resveratrol (RES in stressed rat model. The aim of this study was to investigate whether RES would manifest an antidepressant effect in SCH rat model and explore the possible mechanism. A SCH rat model was induced by hemi-thyroid electrocauterization, after which the model rats in the RES and LT4 groups received a daily intragastric injection of RES at the dose of 15 mg/kg or LT4 at the dose of 60 μg/kg for 16 days, respectively. The rats’ plasma concentrations of thyroid hormones were measured. Behavioral performance and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA activity were evaluated. The protein expression levels of the Wnt/β-catenin in the hippocampus were detected by western blot. The results showed that RES treatment down-regulated the elevated plasma thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH concentration and the hypothalamic mRNA expression of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH in the SCH rats. RES-treated rats showed increased rearing frequency and distance in the OFT, increased sucrose preference in the SPT, and decreased immobility in the FST compared with SCH rats. The ratio of the adrenal gland weight to body weight, the plasma corticosterone levels and the hypothalamic CRH mRNA expression were reduced in the RES-treated rats. Moreover, RES treatment up-regulated the relative ratio of phosphorylated-GSK3β (p-GSK3β/GSK3β and protein levels of p-GSK3β, cyclinD1 and c-myc, while down-regulating the relative ratio of phosphorylated-β-catenin (p-β-catenin/β-catenin and expression of GSK3β in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that RES exerts anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effect in SCH rats by down-regulating hyperactivity of the HPA axis and regulating both the HPT axis and the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  10. Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase 4 by FCPR03 Alleviates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Depressive-Like Behaviors in Mice: Involvement of p38 and JNK Signaling Pathways

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    Hui Yu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory responses induced by peripheral administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS triggers depressive-like behavioral syndrome in rodents. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4 produces a robust anti-inflammatory effect in inflammatory cells. Unfortunately, archetypal PDE4 inhibitors cause intolerable gastrointestinal side-effects, such as vomiting and nausea. N-isopropyl-3-(cyclopropylmethoxy-4-difluoromethoxy benzamide (FCPR03 is a novel, selective PDE4 inhibitor with little, or no, emetic potency. Our previous studies show that FCPR03 is effective in attenuating neuroinflammation in mice treated with LPS. However, whether FCPR03 could exert antidepressant-like effect induced by LPS is largely unknown. In the present study, mice injected intraperitoneally (i.p. with LPS was established as an in vivo animal model of depression. The antidepressant-like activities of FCPR03 were evaluated using a tail suspension test, forced swimming test, and sucrose preference test. We demonstrated that administration of FCPR03 (1 mg/kg produced antidepressant-like effects in mice challenged by LPS, as evidenced by decreases in the duration of immobility in the forced swim and tail suspension tests, while no significant changes in locomotor activity were observed. FCPR03 also increased sucrose preference in mice treated with LPS. In addition, treatment with FCPR03 abolished the downregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor induced by LPS and decreased the level of corticosterone in plasma. Meanwhile, periphery immune challenge by LPS induced enhanced phosphorylation of p38-mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK in both the cerebral cortex and hippocampus in mice. Interestingly, treatment with FCPR03 significantly blocked the role of LPS and reduced the levels of phosphorylated p38 and JNK. Collectively, these results indicate that FCPR03 shows antidepressant-like effects in mice challenged by LPS, and the p38/JNK

  11. 3,5,6,7,8,3′,4′-Heptamethoxyflavone Ameliorates Depressive-Like Behavior and Hippocampal Neurochemical Changes in Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stressed Mice by Regulating the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor: Requirement for ERK Activation

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    Sawamoto, Atsushi; Okuyama, Satoshi; Amakura, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Morio; Yamada, Takashi; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko; Nakajima, Mitsunari

    2017-01-01

    We previously reported that the subcutaneous administration of 3,5,6,7,8,3′,4′-heptamethoxyflavone (HMF), a citrus polymethoxyflavone, attenuated depressive-like behavior and increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of a corticosterone-induced depression-like mouse model. We herein demonstrated that (1) HMF was detectable in the brain 10 and 30 min after its oral administration, (2) orally administered HMF improved chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS)-induced pathological conditions, including body weight loss and depressive-like behavior, and CUMS-induced neurochemical changes, such as reduction in BDNF expression, decrease in neurogenesis, and decreased level of phosphorylated calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the hippocampus, and (3) these effects of HMF were inhibited by the pre-administration of U0126, a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitor. These results suggest that orally administered HMF is beneficial for the upregulation of BDNF in the hippocampus via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2)/MAP system, which may account for its antidepression effects. PMID:29023414

  12. 3,5,6,7,8,3′,4′-Heptamethoxyflavone Ameliorates Depressive-Like Behavior and Hippocampal Neurochemical Changes in Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stressed Mice by Regulating the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor: Requirement for ERK Activation

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    Atsushi Sawamoto

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the subcutaneous administration of 3,5,6,7,8,3′,4′-heptamethoxyflavone (HMF, a citrus polymethoxyflavone, attenuated depressive-like behavior and increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the hippocampus of a corticosterone-induced depression-like mouse model. We herein demonstrated that (1 HMF was detectable in the brain 10 and 30 min after its oral administration, (2 orally administered HMF improved chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS-induced pathological conditions, including body weight loss and depressive-like behavior, and CUMS-induced neurochemical changes, such as reduction in BDNF expression, decrease in neurogenesis, and decreased level of phosphorylated calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the hippocampus, and (3 these effects of HMF were inhibited by the pre-administration of U0126, a mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase inhibitor. These results suggest that orally administered HMF is beneficial for the upregulation of BDNF in the hippocampus via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2/MAP system, which may account for its antidepression effects.

  13. The development of depression-like behavior is consolidated by IL-6-induced activation of locus coeruleus neurons and IL-1β-induced elevated leptin levels in mice.

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    Kurosawa, Natsuki; Shimizu, Koh; Seki, Kenjiro

    2016-05-01

    Many studies have supported the cytokine hypothesis as the underlying pathophysiology of depressive disorder. We previously reported that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced depression-like behavior is abrogated by the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin. Since cytokines are involved in LPS effects on the brain, we investigated the effects of cytokines on noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) and whether central α1-adrenoceptors can cause the development of depression-like behavior. Adult male CD1 mice were treated with LPS (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline and sacrificed 2 h later for immunofluorescence studies of c-fos and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in LC neurons. Serum cytokines were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Another group of mice were implanted with intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) cannulae and given artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (control), interleukin (IL)-1β (0.5 μg), IL-6 (1 μg), or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (1 μg), and sacrificed 2 h later for c-fos and TH immunofluorescence analysis. Serum samples were analyzed for leptin levels. In addition, tail suspension test (TST), forced swimming test (FST), and sucrose preference (SP) test were conducted in a separate group of mice treated i.c.v. with cytokines, recombinant mouse leptin (5 μg) or phenylephrine (40 μg). These effects were countered by i.c.v. administration of prazosin and a leptin antagonist. LPS increased c-fos expression in TH-positive neurons. Central administration of IL-6 and IL-1β increased c-fos immunoreactivity and serum leptin levels. Phenylephrine, an α1-adrenoceptor agonist, given i.c.v., increased the immobility time during FST and decreased SP, but had no effect on TST. Central leptin administration increased immobility time during FST but did not affect TST or SP. The combination of phenylephrine and leptin increased immobility time during FST and TST, and decreased SP. Induction of depression-like behavior by co

  14. Chewing Prevents Stress-Induced Hippocampal LTD Formation and Anxiety-Related Behaviors: A Possible Role of the Dopaminergic System

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    Yumie Ono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the effects of chewing on stress-induced long-term depression (LTD and anxiogenic behavior. Experiments were performed in adult male rats under three conditions: restraint stress condition, voluntary chewing condition during stress, and control condition without any treatments except handling. Chewing ameliorated LTD development in the hippocampal CA1 region. It also counteracted the stress-suppressed number of entries to the center region of the open field when they were tested immediately, 30 min, or 60 min after restraint. At the latter two poststress time periods, chewing during restraint significantly increased the number of times of open arm entries in the elevated plus maze, when compared with those without chewing. The in vivo microdialysis further revealed that extracellular dopamine concentration in the ventral hippocampus, which is involved in anxiety-related behavior, was significantly greater in chewing rats than in those without chewing from 30 to 105 min after stress exposure. Development of LTD and anxiolytic effects ameliorated by chewing were counteracted by administering the D1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390, which suggested that chewing may activate the dopaminergic system in the ventral hippocampus to suppress stress-induced anxiogenic behavior.

  15. Female vulnerability to the development of depression-like behavior in a rat model of intimate partner violence is related to anxious temperament, coping responses and amygdala vasopressin receptor 1a expression.

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    Guillaume L Poirier

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to violence is traumatic and an important source of mental health disturbance, yet the factors associated with victimization remain incompletely understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate factors related to vulnerability to depression-like behaviors in females. An animal model of intimate partner violence, which was previously shown to produce long-lasting behavioral effects in females as a result of male partner aggression, was used. The associations among the degree of partner aggression, the long-term consequences on depressive-like behavior, and the impact of the anxious temperament of the female were examined. In a separate group, pre-selected neural markers were evaluated in the amygdala and the lateral septum of females. Expression was examined by analyses of targeted candidate genes, serotonin transporter (slc6a4, vasopressin receptor 1a, (avpr1a, and oxytocin receptor (oxtr. Structural equation modeling revealed that the female’s temperament moderated depressive-like behavior that was induced by cohabitation aggression from the male partner. More specifically, increased floating in the forced swim test following male aggression was most apparent in females exhibiting more anxiety-like behavior (i.e., less open arm exploration in an elevated plus-maze prior to the cohabitation. Aggression reduced slc6a4 levels in the lateral septum. However, the interaction between partner aggression and the anxious temperament of the female affected the expression of avpr1a in the amygdala. Although aggression reduced levels of this marker in females with high anxiety, no such pattern was observed in females with low anxiety. These results identify important characteristics in females that moderate the impact of male aggression. Furthermore, these results provide potential therapeutic targets of interest in the amygdala and the lateral septum to help improve post-stress behavioral pathology and increase resilience to social

  16. Evaluating the protective effect of etazolate on memory impairment, anxiety- and depression-like behaviors induced by post traumatic stress disorder.

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    Alzoubi, Karem H; Al Subeh, Zeinab Y; Khabour, Omar F

    2017-10-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder that develops after an individual experiences severe life-threatening traumatic stress. Etazolate is a selective phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor that is specific for cAMP. Etazolate showed anxiolytic and antidepressant activity, and could be useful in managing PTSD co-morbidities. The current study was done to evaluate the role of etazolate in preventing PTSD induced memory impairment, anxiety and depression-like symptoms. PTSD was induced in rats using single prolonged stress model. Etazolate was administered via oral gavage at a dose of 1mg/kg/day. The radial arm water maze was used to assess learning and memory. The elevated plus maze, open field, and tail suspension tests were conducted to test anxiety- and depression-like symptoms. The PTSD was associated with short- and long-term memory impairment, which was prevented by etazolate administration. Moreover, PTSD was associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression. Etazolate administration prevented these symptoms. In conclusion, our data suggests that memory impairment, anxiety, and depression symptoms that are induced by PTSD can be prevented using etazolate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Repeated exposure of adult rats to transient oxidative stress induces various long-lasting alterations in cognitive and behavioral functions.

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    Yoshio Iguchi

    Full Text Available Exposure of neonates to oxidative stress may increase the risk of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia in adulthood. However, the effects of moderate oxidative stress on the adult brain are not completely understood. To address this issue, we systemically administrated 2-cyclohexen-1-one (CHX to adult rats to transiently reduce glutathione levels. Repeated administration of CHX did not affect the acquisition or motivation of an appetitive instrumental behavior (lever pressing rewarded by a food outcome under a progressive ratio schedule. In addition, response discrimination and reversal learning were not affected. However, acute CHX administration blunted the sensitivity of the instrumental performance to outcome devaluation, and this effect was prolonged in rats with a history of repeated CHX exposure, representing pro-depression-like phenotypes. On the other hand, repeated CHX administration reduced immobility in forced swimming tests and blunted acute cocaine-induced behaviors, implicating antidepressant-like effects. Multivariate analyses segregated a characteristic group of behavioral variables influenced by repeated CHX administration. Taken together, these findings suggest that repeated administration of CHX to adult rats did not cause a specific mental disorder, but it induced long-term alterations in behavioral and cognitive functions, possibly related to specific neural correlates.

  18. Depression-like behaviors in mice subjected to co-treatment of high-fat diet and corticosterone are ameliorated by AICAR and exercise.

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    Liu, Weina; Zhai, Xiaofeng; Li, Haipeng; Ji, Liu

    2014-03-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are highly co-morbid, and there may be a bi-directional connection between the two. Herein, we have described a mouse model of a depression-like and insulin-resistant (DIR) state induced by the co-treatment of high-fat diet (HFD) and corticosterone (CORT). 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d- ribofuranoside (AICAR), a pharmacological activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), was originally used to improve insulin resistance (IR). Interestingly, our results show a clear potential for AICAR as a putative antidepressant with a chronic action on the DIR mice. In contrast to the traditional antidepressants, AICAR as a promising antidepressant avoids reducing insulin actions of skeletal muscle in the context of long-term HFD. Exercise also produced antidepressant effects. Our data suggest that the effects of AICAR and exercise on DIR may further increase our understanding on the link between depression and diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Stress-Induced Elevation of Oxytocin in Maltreated Children: Evolution, Neurodevelopment, and Social Behavior

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    Seltzer, Leslie J.; Ziegler, Toni; Connolly, Michael J.; Prososki, Ashley R.; Pollak, Seth D.

    2014-01-01

    Child maltreatment often has a negative impact on the development of social behavior and health. The biobehavioral mechanisms through which these adverse outcomes emerge, however, are not clear. To better understand the ways in which early life adversity affects subsequent social behavior, changes in the neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) in children…

  20. Microbiota alteration is associated with the development of stress-induced despair behavior.

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    Marin, Ioana A; Goertz, Jennifer E; Ren, Tiantian; Rich, Stephen S; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Farber, Emily; Wu, Martin; Overall, Christopher C; Kipnis, Jonathan; Gaultier, Alban

    2017-03-07

    Depressive disorders often run in families, which, in addition to the genetic component, may point to the microbiome as a causative agent. Here, we employed a combination of behavioral, molecular and computational techniques to test the role of the microbiota in mediating despair behavior. In chronically stressed mice displaying despair behavior, we found that the microbiota composition and the metabolic signature dramatically change. Specifically, we observed reduced Lactobacillus and increased circulating kynurenine levels as the most prominent changes in stressed mice. Restoring intestinal Lactobacillus levels was sufficient to improve the metabolic alterations and behavioral abnormalities. Mechanistically, we identified that Lactobacillus-derived reactive oxygen species may suppress host kynurenine metabolism, by inhibiting the expression of the metabolizing enzyme, IDO1, in the intestine. Moreover, maintaining elevated kynurenine levels during Lactobacillus supplementation diminished the treatment benefits. Collectively, our data provide a mechanistic scenario for how a microbiota player (Lactobacillus) may contribute to regulating metabolism and resilience during stress.

  1. Inhibition of corticotropin releasing factor expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala attenuates stress-induced behavioral and endocrine responses

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    Leah B. Callahan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF is a primary mediator of endocrine, autonomic and behavioral stress responses. Studies in both humans and animal models have implicated CRF in a wide-variety of psychiatric conditions including anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, depression, sleep disorders and addiction among others. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA, a key limbic structure with one of the highest concentrations of CRF-producing cells outside of the hypothalamus, has been implicated in anxiety-like behavior and a number of stress-induced disorders. This study investigated the specific role of CRF in the CeA on both endocrine and behavioral responses to stress. We used RNA Interference (RNAi techniques to locally and specifically knockdown CRF expression in CeA. Behavior was assessed using the elevated plus maze (EPM and open field test (OF. Knocking down CRF expression in the CeA had no significant effect on measures of anxiety-like behavior in these tests. However, it did have an effect on grooming behavior, a CRF-induced behavior. Prior exposure to a stressor sensitized an amygdalar CRF effect on stress-induced HPA activation. In these stress-challenged animals silencing CRF in the CeA significantly attenuated corticosterone responses to a subsequent behavioral stressor. Thus, it appears that while CRF projecting from the CeA does not play a significant role in the expression stress-induced anxiety-like behaviors on the EPM and OF it does play a critical role in stress-induced HPA activation.

  2. Lentivirus-mediated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) knock-down in the hippocampus alleviates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced memory deficits and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengmeng; Li, Chenli; Yu, Hanjie; Cai, Xiongxiong; Shen, Xinbei; Sun, Xin; Wang, Jinting; Zhang, Yanhua; Wang, Chuang

    2017-09-20

    Recent evidence has suggested that peripheral inflammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) play an important role in neuropsychiatric dysfunction in rodents. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, has been proposed to be a key mediator in a variety of behavioral dysfunction induced by LPS in mice. Thus, inhibition of IL-1β may have a therapeutic benefit in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the precise underlying mechanism of knock-down of IL-1β in repairing behavioral changes by LPS remains unclear. The mice were treated with either IL-1β shRNA lentivirus or non-silencing shRNA control (NS shRNA) lentivirus by microinjection into the dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampus. After 7 days of recovery, LPS (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline was administered. The behavioral task for memory deficits was conducted in mice by the novel object recognition test (NORT), the anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated by the elevated zero maze (EZM), and the depression-like behaviors were examined by the sucrose preference test (SPT) and the forced swimming test (FST). Furthermore, the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2), heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), neuropeptide VGF (non-acronymic), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were assayed. Our results demonstrated that IL-1β knock-down in the hippocampus significantly attenuated the memory deficits and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors induced by LPS in mice. In addition, IL-1β knock-down ameliorated the oxidative and neuroinflammatory responses and abolished the downregulation of VGF and BDNF induced by LPS. Collectively, our findings suggest that IL-1β is necessary for the oxidative and neuroinflammatory responses produced by LPS and offers a novel drug target in the IL-1β/oxidative/neuroinflammatory/neurotrophic pathway for treating neuropsychiatric disorders

  3. Rosmarinus officinalis L. hydroalcoholic extract, similar to fluoxetine, reverses depressive-like behavior without altering learning deficit in olfactory bulbectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Daniele G; Cunha, Mauricio P; Neis, Vivian B; Balen, Grasiela O; Colla, André R; Grando, Jaine; Brocardo, Patricia S; Bettio, Luis E B; Dalmarco, Juliana B; Rial, Daniel; Prediger, Rui D; Pizzolatti, Moacir G; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2012-08-30

    Rosemary, Rosmarinus officinalis L., has several therapeutic applications in folk medicine for the treatment of a wide range of diseases, including depression. To evaluate the ability of Rosmarinus officinalis hydroalcoholic extract (ROHE), as compared to the positive control fluoxetine, to reverse behavioral (hyperactivity, anhedonic behavior and learning deficit in water maze) and biochemical alterations (serum glucose level and acetylcholinesterase, AChE, activity) induced by an animal model of depression, the olfactory bulbectomy (OB) in mice. Locomotor and exploratory behavior was assessed in the open-field, novel object and novel cage tests, anhedonic behavior was assessed in the splash test; cognitive deficits were evaluated in the water maze task. For the first set of experiments, ROHE (10-300 mg/kg) or fluoxetine (10mg/kg) was administered once daily (p.o.) for 14 days after OB and the behavioral tests were performed. For the second set of experiments, serum glucose and hippocampal and cerebrocortical AChE activity were determined in OB and SHAM-operated mice treated orally with ROHE (10mg/kg), fluoxetine (10mg/kg) or vehicle. ROHE (10-300 mg/kg), similar to fluoxetine, reversed OB-induced hyperactivity, increased exploratory and anhedonic behavior. OB needed significantly more trials in the training session to acquire the spatial information, but they displayed a similar profile to that of SHAM mice in the test session (24h later), demonstrating a selective deficit in spatial learning, which was not reversed by ROHE or fluoxetine. A reduced serum glucose level and an increased hippocampal AChE activity were observed in bulbectomized mice; only the latter effect was reversed by fluoxetine, while both effects were reversed by ROHE. ROHE exerted an antidepressant-like effect in bulbectomized mice and was able to abolish AchE alterations and hypoglycemia, but not spatial learning deficit induced by OB. Overall, results suggest the potential of Rosmarinus

  4. Ameliorating effects of aripiprazole on cognitive functions and depressive-like behavior in a genetic rat model of absence epilepsy and mild-depression comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Emilio; Citraro, Rita; Davoli, Alessandro; Gallelli, Luca; Di Paola, Eugenio Donato; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2013-01-01

    Aripiprazole (APZ) is regarded as a first-line atypical antipsychotic used for the treatment of first and multiple episodes of schizophrenia to improve positive- and negative-symptoms. Its therapeutic indications were extended to acute manic and mixed episodes associated with bipolar disorder. In addition, APZ was approved as an adjunct therapy for major depressive disorder in 2007. Compared to other antipsychotic drugs, APZ has a unique pharmacological profile. It is a partial agonist at D₂ dopamine receptors and serotonin 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT₇ receptors, whereas it is an antagonist at serotonin 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT₆ receptors. Since epilepsy is often accompanied with neurological comorbidities such as depression, anxiety and cognitive deficits caused by both the disease and/or drug treatment, we wished to examine the effects of a sub-chronic treatment (>14 consecutive days) with APZ (0.3, 1 and 3 mg/kg; i.p.) on both absence seizures and WAG/Rij rat's behavior using different standard paradigms: Open field (OF) test, elevated plus maze (EPM) test, forced swimming (FS) test, sucrose consumption (SC) test and Morris water maze (MWM). WAG/Rij rats represent a validated genetic animal model of absence epilepsy with mild-depression comorbidity, also including other behavioral alterations. APZ treatment showed some anti-absence properties and regarding the behavioral comorbidity in this rat strain, we observed that APZ possesses clear antidepressant effects in the FS and SC tests also increasing memory/learning function in the Morris water maze test. In the two anxiety models used, APZ showed only minor effects. In conclusion, our results indicate that APZ might actually have a potential in treating absence seizures or as add-on therapy but more interestingly, these effect might be accompanied by positive modulatory actions on depression, anxiety and memory which might be also beneficial in other epileptic syndromes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled

  5. Selegiline Ameliorates Depression-Like Behavior in Mice Lacking the CD157/BST1 Gene, a Risk Factor for Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Satoka; Yoshihara, Toru; Lopatina, Olga; Ishihara, Katsuhiko; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2017-01-01

    selegiline nonsignificantly ameliorated anxiety-like behaviors in CD157 KO mice. In the social interaction and preference tests, repeated mirtazapine ameliorated the high anxiety and low sociability of CD157 KO mice, whereas selegiline did not. These results indicate that selegiline has antidepressant and mild anxiolytic effects in CD157 KO mice, and suggest that it is an effective antiparkinsonian drug for depressive and anxiety symptoms in PD patients with a CD157 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP).

  6. Selegiline Ameliorates Depression-Like Behavior in Mice Lacking the CD157/BST1 Gene, a Risk Factor for Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Satoka; Yoshihara, Toru; Lopatina, Olga; Ishihara, Katsuhiko; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2017-01-01

    selegiline nonsignificantly ameliorated anxiety-like behaviors in CD157 KO mice. In the social interaction and preference tests, repeated mirtazapine ameliorated the high anxiety and low sociability of CD157 KO mice, whereas selegiline did not. These results indicate that selegiline has antidepressant and mild anxiolytic effects in CD157 KO mice, and suggest that it is an effective antiparkinsonian drug for depressive and anxiety symptoms in PD patients with a CD157 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). PMID:28515684

  7. Selegiline Ameliorates Depression-Like Behavior in Mice Lacking the CD157/BST1 Gene, a Risk Factor for Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoka Kasai

    2017-05-01

    , and selegiline nonsignificantly ameliorated anxiety-like behaviors in CD157 KO mice. In the social interaction and preference tests, repeated mirtazapine ameliorated the high anxiety and low sociability of CD157 KO mice, whereas selegiline did not. These results indicate that selegiline has antidepressant and mild anxiolytic effects in CD157 KO mice, and suggest that it is an effective antiparkinsonian drug for depressive and anxiety symptoms in PD patients with a CD157 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP.

  8. Sesquiterpenoids from the Root of Panax ginseng Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior through the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor/Tropomyosin-Related Kinase B and Sirtuin Type 1/Nuclear Factor-κB Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weidong; Liu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Jinping; Cai, Enbo; Zhao, Yan; Li, Haijun; Zhang, Lianxue; Li, Pingya; Gao, Yugang

    2018-01-10

    The previous study indicated sesquiterpenoids from the root of Panax ginseng (SPG) exhibited a significant antidepressant-like effect, which might be mediated by the modification of the dopaminergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic systems. This study was to investigate antidepressant effects and mechanisms on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced depression-like behavior of SPG. In the tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST), SPG (0.25 and 1 mg/kg, i.g.) and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg, i.p.) effectively reduced the immobility time. SPG treatment significantly reduced serum levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and increased suppressed superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the hippocampus. In addition, SPG effectively upregulated the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), and sirtuin type 1 (Sirt 1) expression in the hippocampus and downregulated the inhibitor of κB-α (IκB-α) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) phosphorylation. These results suggested that SPG exhibited an antidepressant-like effect through the BDNF/TrkB and Sirt 1/NF-κB signaling pathways.

  9. 3,5,6,7,8,3′,4′-Heptamethoxyflavone, a Citrus Flavonoid, Ameliorates Corticosterone-Induced Depression-like Behavior and Restores Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression, Neurogenesis, and Neuroplasticity in the Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Sawamoto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the citrus flavonoid 3,5,6,7,8,3′,4′-heptamethoxyflavone (HMF increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the hippocampus of a transient global ischemia mouse model. Since the BDNF hypothesis of depression postulates that a reduction in BDNF is directly involved in the pathophysiology of depression, we evaluated the anti-depressive effects of HMF in mice with subcutaneously administered corticosterone at a dose of 20 mg/kg/day for 25 days. We demonstrated that the HMF treatment ameliorated (1 corticosterone-induced body weight loss, (2 corticosterone-induced depression-like behavior, and (3 corticosterone-induced reductions in BDNF production in the hippocampus. We also showed that the HMF treatment restored (4 corticosterone-induced reductions in neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus subgranular zone and (5 corticosterone-induced reductions in the expression levels of phosphorylated calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2. These results suggest that HMF exerts its effects as an anti-depressant drug by inducing the expression of BDNF.

  10. Neuropeptide VGF C-Terminal Peptide TLQP-62 Alleviates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Memory Deficits and Anxiety-like and Depression-like Behaviors in Mice: The Role of BDNF/TrkB Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenli; Li, Mengmeng; Yu, Hanjie; Shen, Xinbei; Wang, Jinting; Sun, Xin; Wang, Qinwen; Wang, Chuang

    2017-09-20

    Peripheral inflammatory responses affect central nervous system (CNS) function, manifesting in symptoms of memory deficits, depression, and anxiety. Previous studies have revealed that neuropeptide VGF (nonacronymic) C-terminal peptide TLQP-62 rapidly reinforces brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) signaling, regulating memory consolidation and antidepressant-like action. However, whether it is beneficial for lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuropsychiatric dysfunction in mice is unknown. Herein, we explored the involvement of BDNF/TrkB signaling and biochemical alterations in inflammatory or oxidative stress markers in the alleviating effects of TLQP-62 on LPS-induced neuropsychiatric dysfunction. The mice were treated with TLQP-62 (2 μg/side) via intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection 1 h before LPS (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) administration. Our results showed that a single treatment with LPS (0.5 mg/kg, i.p) is sufficient to produce recognition memory deficits (in the novel object recognition test), depression-like behavior (in the forced swim test and sucrose preference test), and anxiety-like behavior (in the elevated zero maze). However, pretreatment with TLQP-62 prevented LPS-induced behavioral dysfunction, neuroinflammatory, and oxidative responses. In addition, our results further demonstrated that a reduction in BDNF expression mediated by BDNF-shRNA lentivirus significantly blocked the effects of TLQP-62, suggesting the critical role of BDNF/TrkB signaling in the neuroprotective effects of TLQP-62 in the mice. In conclusion, TLQP-62 could be a therapeutic approach for neuropsychiatric disorders, which are closely associated with neuroinflammation and oxidative stress.

  11. Rosemary tea consumption results to anxiolytic- and anti-depressant-like behavior of adult male mice and inhibits all cerebral area and liver cholinesterase activity; phytochemical investigation and in silico studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlemi, Anastasia-Varvara; Katsikoudi, Antigoni; Kontogianni, Vassiliki G; Kellici, Tahsin F; Iatrou, Grigoris; Lamari, Fotini N; Tzakos, Andreas G; Margarity, Marigoula

    2015-07-25

    Our aim was to investigate the possible effects of regular drinking of Rosmarinus officinalis L. leaf infusion on behavior and on AChE activity of mice. Rosemary tea (2% w/w) phytochemical profile was investigated through LC/DAD/ESI-MS(n). Adult male mice were randomly divided into two groups: "Rosemary-treated" that received orally the rosemary tea for 4weeks and "control" that received drinking water. The effects of regular drinking of rosemary tea on behavioral parameters were assessed by passive avoidance, elevated plus maze and forced swimming tests. Moreover, its effects on cerebral and liver cholinesterase (ChE) isoforms activity were examined colorimetricaly. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of diterpenes, flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic derivatives in rosemary tea; the major compounds were quantitatively determined. Its consumption rigorously affected anxiety/fear and depression-like behavior of mice, though memory/learning was unaffected. ChE isoforms activity was significantly decreased in brain and liver of "rosemary treated" mice. In order to explain the tissue ChE inhibition, principal component analysis, pharmacophore alignment and molecular docking were used to explore a possible relationship between main identified compounds of rosemary tea, i.e. rosmarinic acid, luteolin-7-O-glucuronide, caffeic acid and known AChE inhibitors. Results revealed potential common pharmacophores of the phenolic components with the inhibitors. Our findings suggest that rosemary tea administration exerts anxiolytic and antidepressant effects on mice and inhibits ChE activity; its main phytochemicals may function in a similar way as inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Stress induces behavioral sensitization, increases nicotine-seeking behavior and leads to a decrease of CREB in the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Rodrigo Molini; Cruz, Fábio Cardoso; Marin, Marcelo Tadeu; Planeta, Cleopatra da Silva

    2012-05-01

    Experimental evidence shows that exposure to stress engenders behavioral sensitization and increases drug-seeking and leads to intense drug taking. However the molecular mechanisms involved in these processes is not well known yet. The present experiments examined the effects of exposure to variable stress on nicotine-induced locomotor activation, cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity and nicotine intravenous self-administration in rats. Male Wistar rats were exposed to variable stress that consisted of the exposure to different stressors twice a day in random order for 10 days. During this period the control group was left undisturbed except for cage cleaning. Ten days after the last stress episode, rats were challenged with either saline or nicotine (0.4 mg/kgs.c.) and the locomotor activity was recorded for 20 min. Immediately after behavioral recordings rats were sacrificed and their brains were removed to posterior western blotting analysis of CREB, phosphoCREB, ERK and phosphoERK in the nucleus accumbens. An independent set of control and stressed animals were subjected to an intravenous nicotine self-administration protocol. The break point during a progressive ratio schedule and nicotine intake patterns during a 24-hour binge was analyzed. Repeated variable stress caused a sensitized motor response to a single challenge of nicotine and decreased CREB in the nucleus accumbens. Furthermore, in the self-administration experiments previous stress exposure caused an increase in the break point and nicotine intake. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute effects of nicotine on restraint stress-induced anxiety-like behavior, c-Fos expression, and corticosterone release in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hui-Ru; Chen, Tsung-Yen; Chan, Ming-Huan; Chen, Hwei-Hsien

    2007-07-02

    Clinical evidence suggests that nicotine reduces anxiety in stressful situations. In the present study, we investigated the effect of nicotine on restraint-enhanced anxiety-like behavior, c-Fos expression, an index of neuronal activation in the brain, and plasma corticosterone. Two-hour restraint stress-enhanced anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and nicotine hydrogen tartrate (0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated the stress-induced changes. Pretreatment with the centrally acting nicotinic antagonist, mecamylamine (2 mg/kg), blocked nicotine's effects. In addition, restraint led to significant increases of c-Fos expression in several brain regions related to stress or anxiety including paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN), lateral hypothalamic area (LH), central amygdaloid nucleus (CeA), medial amygdaloid nucleus (MeA) and cingulate and retrosplenial cortices (Cg/RS), paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT), and basolateral amygdaloid nucleus (BLA). Nicotine attenuated the restraint-induced expression of c-Fos in the PVN, LH, CeA, MeA, and Cg/RS, while leaving the BLA and PVT unaffected. In contrast, nicotine did not reverse the increased levels of plasma corticosterone induced by restraint. These findings suggest that nicotine may modify the stress-induced behavioral changes via regulating the neuronal activation in selected brain regions rather than affecting hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis hormone responses.

  14. Chronic subordination stress induces hyperphagia and disrupts eating behavior in mice modeling binge-eating-like disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eRazzoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eating disorders are associated with physical morbidity and appear to have causal factors like stressful life events and negative affect. Binge eating disorder (BED is characterized by eating in a discrete period of time a larger than normal amount of food, a sense of lack of control over eating, and marked distress. There are still unmet needs for the identification of mechanisms regulating excessive eating, which is in part due to the lack of appropriate animal models. We developed a naturalistic murine model of subordination stress induced hyperphagia associated with the development of obesity. Here we tested the hypotheses that the eating responses of subordinate mice recapitulate the BED and that limiting hyperphagia could prevent stress-associated metabolic changes. Methods: Adult male mice were exposed to a model of chronic subordination stress associated with the automated acquisition of food intake and we performed a detailed meal pattern analysis. Additionally, using a pair-feeding protocol was test the hypothesis that the manifestation of obesity and the metabolic syndrome could be prevented by limiting hyperphagia. Results: The architecture of feeding of subordinate mice was disrupted during the stress protocol due to disproportionate amount of food ingested at higher rate and with shorter satiety ratio than control mice. Subordinate mice hyperphagia was further exacerbated in response to either hunger or to the acute application of a social defeat. Notably, the obese phenotype but not the fasting hyperglycemia of subordinate mice was abrogated by preventing hyperphagia in a pair feeding paradigm. Conclusion: Overall these results support the validity of our chronic subordination stress to model binge eating disorder allowing for the determination of the underlying molecular mechanisms and the generation of testable predictions for innovative therapies, based on the understanding of the regulation and the control of food

  15. Chronic Subordination Stress Induces Hyperphagia and Disrupts Eating Behavior in Mice Modeling Binge-Eating-Like Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzoli, Maria; Sanghez, Valentina; Bartolomucci, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background: Eating disorders are associated with physical morbidity and appear to have causal factors like stressful life events and negative affect. Binge-eating disorder (BED) is characterized by eating in a discrete period of time a larger than normal amount of food, a sense of lack of control over eating, and marked distress. There are still unmet needs for the identification of mechanisms regulating excessive eating, which is in part due to the lack of appropriate animal models. We developed a naturalistic murine model of subordination stress-induced hyperphagia associated with the development of obesity. Here, we tested the hypotheses that the eating responses of subordinate mice recapitulate the BED and that limiting hyperphagia could prevent stress-associated metabolic changes. Methods: Adult male mice were exposed to a model of chronic subordination stress (CSS) associated with the automated acquisition of food intake and we performed a detailed meal pattern analysis. Additionally, using a pair-feeding protocol we tested the hypothesis that the manifestation of obesity and the metabolic syndrome could be prevented by limiting hyperphagia. Results: The architecture of feeding of subordinate mice was disrupted during the stress protocol due to disproportionate amount of food ingested at higher rate and with shorter satiety ratio than control mice. Subordinate mice hyperphagia was further exacerbated in response to either hunger or to the acute application of a social defeat. Notably, the obese phenotype but not the fasting hyperglycemia of subordinate mice was abrogated by preventing hyperphagia in a pair-feeding paradigm. Conclusion: Overall, these results support the validity of our CSS to model BED allowing for the determination of the underlying molecular mechanisms and the generation of testable predictions for innovative therapies, based on the understanding of the regulation and the control of food intake. PMID:25621284

  16. Chronic subordination stress induces hyperphagia and disrupts eating behavior in mice modeling binge-eating-like disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzoli, Maria; Sanghez, Valentina; Bartolomucci, Alessandro

    Eating disorders are associated with physical morbidity and appear to have causal factors like stressful life events and negative affect. Binge eating disorder (BED) is characterized by eating in a discrete period of time a larger than normal amount of food, a sense of lack of control over eating, and marked distress. There are still unmet needs for the identification of mechanisms regulating excessive eating, which is in part due to the lack of appropriate animal models. We developed a naturalistic murine model of subordination stress induced hyperphagia associated with the development of obesity. Here we tested the hypotheses that the eating responses of subordinate mice recapitulate the BED and that limiting hyperphagia could prevent stress-associated metabolic changes. Adult male mice were exposed to a model of chronic subordination stress associated with the automated acquisition of food intake and we performed a detailed meal pattern analysis. Additionally, using a pair-feeding protocol was test the hypothesis that the manifestation of obesity and the metabolic syndrome could be prevented by limiting hyperphagia. The architecture of feeding of subordinate mice was disrupted during the stress protocol due to disproportionate amount of food ingested at higher rate and with shorter satiety ratio than control mice. Subordinate mice hyperphagia was further exacerbated in response to either hunger or to the acute application of a social defeat. Notably, the obese phenotype but not the fasting hyperglycemia of subordinate mice was abrogated by preventing hyperphagia in a pair feeding paradigm. Overall these results support the validity of our chronic subordination stress to model binge eating disorder allowing for the determination of the underlying molecular mechanisms and the generation of testable predictions for innovative therapies, based on the understanding of the regulation and the control of food intake.

  17. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Torrey A; Lee, Vivien H; Bleck, Thomas P

    2015-03-01

    Reversible stress-induced cardiac dysfunction is frequently seen as a complication of a multitude of acute stress states, in particular neurologic injuries. This dysfunction may be difficult to distinguish between that caused by myocardial ischemia and may impact both the treatment strategies and prognosis of the underlying condition. Critical care practitioners should have an understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical characteristics, precipitating conditions, differential diagnosis, and proposed treatments for stress-induced cardiomyopathy. MEDLINE database search conducted from inception to August 2014, including the search terms "tako-tsubo," "stress-induced cardiomyopathy," "neurogenic cardiomyopathy," "neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy," and "transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome". In addition, references from pertinent articles were used for a secondary search. After review of peer-reviewed original scientific articles, guidelines, and reviews resulting from the literature search described above, we made final selections for included references and data based on relevance and author consensus. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy occurs most commonly in postmenopausal women. It can be precipitated by emotional stress, neurologic injury, and numerous other stress states. Patients may present with symptoms indistinguishable from acute coronary syndrome or with electrocardiogram changes and wall motion abnormalities on echocardiogram following neurologic injury. Nearly all patients will have an elevated cardiac troponin. The underlying etiology is likely related to release of catecholamines, both locally in the myocardium and in the circulation. Differential diagnosis includes myocardial infarction, myocarditis, neurogenic pulmonary edema, and nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Although the natural course of stress-induced cardiomyopathy is resolution, treatment strategies include sympathetic blockade and supportive care. Stress-induced

  18. Persistent effect of incubation temperature on stress-induced behavior in the Yucatan banded gecko (Coleonyx elegans)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnik, M.; Albrechtová, Jana; Kratochvíl, L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 125, č. 1 (2011), s. 22-30 ISSN 0735-7036 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : behavior al syndrome * open-field test * antipredator behavior * personality * phenotypic plasticity Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.725, year: 2011

  19. Anti-inflammatory agents attenuate the passive responses of guinea pig pups: evidence for stress-induced sickness behavior during maternal separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Michael B; Schiml-Webb, Patricia A; Miller, Emily E; Maken, Deborah S; Bullinger, Katie L; Deak, Terrence

    2007-06-01

    A previous study found that intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of 25 microg of alpha-MSH reduced the passive responses (crouched stance, eye-closing, piloerection) of guinea pig pups during a 3-h isolation in a novel environment. Because alpha-MSH has broad anti-inflammatory properties, the results suggested that proinflammatory factors play a role in mediating the behavior of isolated infants. The present study further investigated this possibility. In Experiment 1, injection of lipopolysacchride (LPS) increased the number of 60-s intervals in which pups expressed the same three responses during a 1-h test, and ICV infusion of alpha-MSH significantly reduced the effect of LPS on crouching and piloerection. In Experiment 2, the prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor indomethacin (10 mg/kg) reduced the number of 60-s intervals in which pups exhibited both crouching and the full suite of passive responses during a 3-h isolation in a novel environment. Together these results provide further support for the hypothesis that the passive behaviors exhibited during prolonged isolation are "stress-induced sickness behaviors" mediated by proinflammatory factors.

  20. Vaccinium myrtillus ameliorates unpredictable chronic mild stress induced depression: possible involvement of nitric oxide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Baldeep; Arora, Vipin; Kuhad, Anurag; Chopra, Kanwaljit

    2012-04-01

    Chronic unpredictable stressors can produce a situation similar to clinical depression and such animal models can be used for the preclinical evaluation of antidepressants. Nitric oxide, a secondary messenger molecule, has been implicated in neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity, learning, aggression and depression. Vaccinium myrtillus (bilberry) extract is a potent inhibitor of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and cytokine production. The present study investigated the role of nitric oxide in the antidepressant action of Vaccinium myrtillus in unpredictable chronic mild stress-induced depression in mice. Animals were subjected to different stress paradigms daily for a period of 21 days to induce depressive-like behavior. Pretreatment with L-arginine significantly reversed the protective effect of bilberry (500 mg/kg) on chronic stress-induced behavioral (immobility period, sucrose preference) and biochemical (lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels; endogenous antioxidant activities) in stressed mice. Furthermore, L-NAME (10 mg/kg) pretreatment with a sub-effective dose of bilberry (250 mg/kg) significantly potentiated the protective effect of bilberry extract. The study revealed that modulation of the nitric oxide pathway might be involved in antidepressant-like effects of Vaccinium myrtillus in stressed mice. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Estrogen and voluntary exercise interact to attenuate stress-induced corticosterone release but not anxiety-like behaviors in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alexis B; Gupton, Rebecca; Curtis, Kathleen S

    2016-09-15

    The beneficial effects of physical exercise to reduce anxiety and depression and to alleviate stress are increasingly supported in research studies. The role of ovarian hormones in interactions between exercise and anxiety/stress has important implications for women's health, given that women are at increased risk of developing anxiety-related disorders, particularly during and after the menopausal transition. In these experiments, we tested the hypothesis that estrogen enhances the positive impact of exercise on stress responses by investigating the combined effects of exercise and estrogen on anxiety-like behaviors and stress hormone levels in female rats after an acute stressor. Ovariectomized female rats with or without estrogen were given access to running wheels for one or three days of voluntary running immediately after or two days prior to being subjected to restraint stress. We found that voluntary running was not effective at reducing anxiety-like behaviors, whether or not rats were subjected to restraint stress. In contrast, stress-induced elevations of stress hormone levels were attenuated by exercise experience in estrogen-treated rats, but were increased in rats without estrogen. These results suggest that voluntary exercise may be more effective at reducing stress hormone levels if estrogen is present. Additionally, exercise experience, or the distance run, may be important in reducing stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Surface stress-induced change in overall elastic behavior and self-bending of ultrathin cantilever plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadeghian, H.; Goosen, J.F.L.; Bossche, A.; Van Keulen, F.

    2009-01-01

    In this letter, the dominant role of surface stress and surface elasticity on the overall elastic behavior of ultrathin cantilever plates is studied. A general framework based on two-dimensional plane-stress analysis is presented. Because of either surface reconstruction or molecular adsorption,

  3. Ficus sycomorus extract reversed behavioral impairment and brain oxidative stress induced by unpredictable chronic mild stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyet, Harquin Simplice; Tchinda Deffo, Serge; Koagne Yewo, Pascaline; Antioch, Iulia; Zingue, Stéphane; Asongalem, Emmanuel Acha; Kamtchouing, Pierre; Ciobica, Alin

    2017-11-28

    Stress, regardless of its nature is nowadays recognized as one of the major risk factors for neuropsychiatric diseases, such as mood and anxiety disorders. The brain compared with other organs is more vulnerable to oxidative damage mainly due to its high rate of oxygen consumption, abundant lipid content, and relative insufficiency of antioxidant enzymes. Thus, the identification of neural mechanisms underlying resistance and vulnerability to stress is of crucial importance in understanding the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders and in developing new treatments, since the existing ones are for several reasons subject to increasing limitations. This study was aimed to assess the effects of hydromethanolic extract of Ficus sycomorus stem bark on depression, anxiety and memory impairment induced by unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) in rats. These effects were studied using anxiety-related behavior, depression-related behavior, anhedonia-like behavior and the Y maze task. Sucrose test was performed twice (before and after UCMS) to assess anhedonia in rats. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the extract were performed. The antioxidant activities of the extract were assessed using total glutathione (GSH) content and malondialdehyde (MDA) level (lipid peroxidation) in the rat temporal lobe homogenates. The extract of F. sycomorus in a dose of 100 mg/kg significantly increased the sucrose consumption and the swimming time which had been reduced by the unpredictable chronic mild stress (p extract also significantly reduced (p extract (100 and 200 mg/kg) significantly reduced (p extracts also significantly increased alternation in the Y-maze (p extract significantly increased the total GSH content and reduced MDA level in rat temporal lobe. For the LC-MS analysis, the major compound in the extract was a flavonoid with formula C22H28O14. F. sycomorus reversed the harmful effects of UCMS on mood and behaviors in rats and it

  4. Benefits of Hormone Therapy Estrogens Depend on Estrogen Type: 17β-Estradiol and Conjugated Equine Estrogens Have Differential Effects on Cognitive, Anxiety-Like, and Depressive-Like Behaviors and Increase Tryptophan Hydroxylase-2 mRNA Levels in Dorsal Raphe Nucleus Subregions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroi, Ryoko; Weyrich, Giulia; Koebele, Stephanie V; Mennenga, Sarah E; Talboom, Joshua S; Hewitt, Lauren T; Lavery, Courtney N; Mendoza, Perla; Jordan, Ambra; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A

    2016-01-01

    Decreased serotonin (5-HT) function is associated with numerous cognitive and affective disorders. Women are more vulnerable to these disorders and have a lower rate of 5-HT synthesis than men. Serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) are a major source of 5-HT in the forebrain and play a critical role in regulation of stress-related disorders. In particular, polymorphisms of tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TpH2, the brain-specific, rate-limiting enzyme for 5-HT biosynthesis) are implicated in cognitive and affective disorders. Administration of 17β-estradiol (E2), the most potent naturally circulating estrogen in women and rats, can have beneficial effects on cognitive, anxiety-like, and depressive-like behaviors. Moreover, E2 increases TpH2 mRNA in specific subregions of the DRN. Although conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) are a commonly prescribed estrogen component of hormone therapy in menopausal women, there is a marked gap in knowledge regarding how CEE affects these behaviors and the brain 5-HT system. Therefore, we compared the effects of CEE and E2 treatments on behavior and TpH2 mRNA. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized, administered either vehicle, CEE, or E2 and tested on a battery of cognitive, anxiety-like, and depressive-like behaviors. The brains of these animals were subsequently analyzed for TpH2 mRNA. Both CEE and E2 exerted beneficial behavioral effects, although efficacy depended on the distinct behavior and for cognition, on the task difficulty. Compared to CEE, E2 generally had more robust anxiolytic and antidepressant effects. E2 increased TpH2 mRNA in the caudal and mid DRN, corroborating previous findings. However, CEE increased TpH2 mRNA in the caudal and rostral, but not the mid, DRN, suggesting that distinct estrogens can have subregion-specific effects on TpH2 gene expression. We also found differential correlations between the level of TpH2 mRNA in specific DRN subregions and behavior, depending on the type of

  5. Benefits of Hormone Therapy Estrogens Depend on Estrogen Type: 17β-Estradiol and Conjugated Equine Estrogens Have Differential Effects on Cognitive, Anxiety-Like, and Depressive-Like Behaviors and Increase Tryptophan Hydroxylase-2 mRNA Levels in Dorsal Raphe Nucleus Subregions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroi, Ryoko; Weyrich, Giulia; Koebele, Stephanie V.; Mennenga, Sarah E.; Talboom, Joshua S.; Hewitt, Lauren T.; Lavery, Courtney N.; Mendoza, Perla; Jordan, Ambra; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Decreased serotonin (5-HT) function is associated with numerous cognitive and affective disorders. Women are more vulnerable to these disorders and have a lower rate of 5-HT synthesis than men. Serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) are a major source of 5-HT in the forebrain and play a critical role in regulation of stress-related disorders. In particular, polymorphisms of tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TpH2, the brain-specific, rate-limiting enzyme for 5-HT biosynthesis) are implicated in cognitive and affective disorders. Administration of 17β-estradiol (E2), the most potent naturally circulating estrogen in women and rats, can have beneficial effects on cognitive, anxiety-like, and depressive-like behaviors. Moreover, E2 increases TpH2 mRNA in specific subregions of the DRN. Although conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) are a commonly prescribed estrogen component of hormone therapy in menopausal women, there is a marked gap in knowledge regarding how CEE affects these behaviors and the brain 5-HT system. Therefore, we compared the effects of CEE and E2 treatments on behavior and TpH2 mRNA. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized, administered either vehicle, CEE, or E2 and tested on a battery of cognitive, anxiety-like, and depressive-like behaviors. The brains of these animals were subsequently analyzed for TpH2 mRNA. Both CEE and E2 exerted beneficial behavioral effects, although efficacy depended on the distinct behavior and for cognition, on the task difficulty. Compared to CEE, E2 generally had more robust anxiolytic and antidepressant effects. E2 increased TpH2 mRNA in the caudal and mid DRN, corroborating previous findings. However, CEE increased TpH2 mRNA in the caudal and rostral, but not the mid, DRN, suggesting that distinct estrogens can have subregion-specific effects on TpH2 gene expression. We also found differential correlations between the level of TpH2 mRNA in specific DRN subregions and behavior, depending on the type of

  6. Surface stress-induced change in overall elastic behavior and self-bending of ultrathin cantilever plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghian, H.; Goosen, J. F. L.; Bossche, A.; van Keulen, F.

    2009-06-01

    In this letter, the dominant role of surface stress and surface elasticity on the overall elastic behavior of ultrathin cantilever plates is studied. A general framework based on two-dimensional plane-stress analysis is presented. Because of either surface reconstruction or molecular adsorption, there exists a surface stress and a surface elasticity imbalance between top and bottom surface of the cantilever. The surface elasticity imbalance creates an extra bending-extensional coupling which has not been taken into account previously. This leads to a modified extensional stiffness, bending stiffness and bending-extensional coupling stiffness. Due to the surface stress imbalance, an extended Stoney's formula for self-bending of ultrathin cantilevers is derived.

  7. Enhancing Endocannabinoid Neurotransmission Augments The Efficacy of Extinction Training and Ameliorates Traumatic Stress-Induced Behavioral Alterations in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morena, Maria; Berardi, Andrea; Colucci, Paola; Palmery, Maura; Trezza, Viviana; Hill, Matthew N; Campolongo, Patrizia

    2017-12-21

    Exposure to a traumatic event may result in the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Endocannabinoids are crucial modulators of the stress response, interfere with excessive retrieval and facilitate the extinction of traumatic memories. Exposure therapy, combined with pharmacotherapy, represents a promising tool for PTSD treatment. We investigated whether pharmacological manipulations of the endocannabinoid system during extinction learning ameliorates the behavioral changes induced by trauma exposure. Rats were exposed to inescapable footshocks paired with social isolation, a risk factor for PTSD. One week after trauma, rats were subjected to three spaced extinction sessions, mimicking human exposure therapy. The anandamide hydrolysis inhibitor URB597, the 2-arachidonoylglycerol hydrolysis inhibitor JZL184 or the cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 were administered before or after the extinction sessions. Rats were tested for extinction retention 16 or 36 days after trauma and 24-h later for social interaction. Extinction training alone reduced fear of the trauma-associated context but did not restore normal social interaction. Traumatized animals not exposed to extinction sessions exhibited reductions in hippocampal anandamide content with respect to home-cage controls. Noteworthy, all drugs exerted beneficial effects, but URB597 (0.1 mg/kg) induced the best improvements by enhancing extinction consolidation and restoring normal social behavior in traumatized rats through indirect activation of CB1 receptors. The ameliorating effects remained stable long after treatment and trauma exposure. Our findings suggest that drugs potentiating endocannabinoid neurotransmission may represent promising tools when combined to exposure-based psychotherapies in the treatment of PTSD.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 24 January 2018; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.305.

  8. Neonatal stress-induced affective changes in adolescent Wistar rats: early signs of schizophrenia-like behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Neves Girardi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders are multifactorial diseases with etiology that may involve genetic factors, early life environment and stressful life events. The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia is based on a wealth of data on increased vulnerability in individuals exposed to insults during the perinatal period. Maternal deprivation disinhibits the adrenocortical response to stress in neonatal rats and has been used as an animal model of schizophrenia. To test if long-term affective consequences of early life stress were influenced by maternal presence, we submitted 10-day old rats, either deprived (for 22 h or not from their dams, to a stress challenge (i.p. saline injection. Corticosterone plasma levels were measured 2 h after the challenge, whereas another subgroup was assessed for behavior in the open field, elevated plus maze, social investigation and the negative contrast sucrose consumption test in adolescence (postnatal day 45. Maternally deprived rats exhibited increased plasma corticosterone levels which were higher in maternally deprived and stress challenged pups. Social investigation was impaired in maternally deprived rats only, while saline injection, independently of maternal deprivation, was associated with increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze and an impaired intake decrement in the negative sucrose contrast. In the open field, center exploration was reduced in all maternally-deprived adolescents and in control rats challenged with saline injection. The most striking finding was that exposure to a stressful stimulus per se, regardless of maternal deprivation, was linked to differential emotional consequences. We therefore propose that besides being a well-known and validated model of schizophrenia in adult rats, the maternal deprivation paradigm could be extended to model early signs of psychiatric dysfunction, and would particularly be a useful tool to detect early signs that resemble schizophrenia.

  9. GAD65 haplodeficiency conveys resilience in animal models of stress-induced psychopathology

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    Iris eMüller

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic mechanisms are critically involved in the control of fear and anxiety, but their role in the development of stress-induced psychopathologies, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and mood disorders is not sufficiently understood. We studied these functions in two established mouse models of risk factors for stress-induced psychopathologies employing variable juvenile stress and/or social isolation. A battery of emotional tests in adulthood revealed the induction of contextually generalized fear, anxiety, hyperarousal and depression-like symptoms in these paradigms. These reflect the multitude and complexity of stress effects in human PTSD patients. With factor analysis we were able to identify parameters that reflect these different behavioral domains in stressed animals and thus provide a basis for an integrated scoring of affectedness more closely resembling the clinical situation than isolated parameters. To test the applicability of these models to genetic approaches we further tested the role of GABA using heterozygous mice with targeted mutation of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD65 (GAD65+/- mice, which show a delayed postnatal increase in tissue GABA content in limbic and cortical brain areas. Unexpectedly, GAD65(+/- mice did not show changes in exploratory activity regardless of the stressor type and were after the variable juvenile stress procedure protected from the development of contextual generalization in an auditory fear conditioning experiment. Our data demonstrate the complex nature of behavioral alterations in rodent models of stress-related psychopathologies and suggest that GAD65 haplodeficiency, likely through its effect on the postnatal maturation of GABAergic transmission, conveys resilience to some of these stress-induced effects.

  10. Quercetin reduces manic-like behavior and brain oxidative stress induced by paradoxical sleep deprivation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Luiz K S; Vecchia, Débora D; Wendler, Etiéli M; Hocayen, Palloma de A S; Dos Reis Lívero, Francislaine A; Stipp, Maria Carolina; Barcaro, Inara M R; Acco, Alexandra; Andreatini, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Quercetin is a known antioxidant and protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor. Previous studies have shown that mania involves oxidative stress and an increase in PKC activity. We hypothesized that quercetin affects manic symptoms. In the present study, manic-like behavior (hyperlocomotion) and oxidative stress were induced by 24h paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) in male Swiss mice. Both 10 and 40mg/kg quercetin prevented PSD-induced hyperlocomotion. Quercetin reversed the PSD-induced decrease in glutathione (GSH) levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum. Quercetin also reversed the PSD-induced increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the PFC, hippocampus, and striatum. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between locomotor activity and GSH in the PFC in sleep-deprived mice and a positive correlation between locomotor activity and LPO in the PFC and striatum in sleep-deprived mice. These results suggest that quercetin exerts an antimanic-like effect at doses that do not impair spontaneous locomotor activity, and the antioxidant action of quercetin might contribute to its antimanic-like effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Depression-like responses induced by daytime light deficiency in the diurnal grass rat (Arvicanthis niloticus.

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    Greg Leach

    Full Text Available Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD is one of the most common mood disorders with depressive symptoms recurring in winter when there is less sunlight. The fact that light is the most salient factor entraining circadian rhythms leads to the phase-shifting hypothesis, which suggests that the depressive episodes of SAD are caused by misalignments between the circadian rhythms and the habitual sleep times. However, how changes in environmental lighting conditions lead to the fluctuations in mood is largely unknown. The objective of this study is to develop an animal model for some of the features/symptoms of SAD using the diurnal grass rats Arvichantis niloticus and to explore the neural mechanisms underlying the light associated mood changes. Animals were housed in either a 12∶12 hr bright light∶dark (1000lux, BLD or dim light∶dark (50lux, DLD condition. The depression-like behaviors were assessed by sweet-taste Saccharin solution preference (SSP and forced swimming test (FST. Animals in the DLD group showed higher levels of depression-like behaviors compared to those in BLD. The anxiety-like behaviors were assessed in open field and light/dark box test, however no significant differences were observed between the two groups. The involvement of the circadian system on depression-like behaviors was investigated as well. Analysis of locomotor activity revealed no major differences in daily rhythms that could possibly contribute to the depression-like behaviors. To explore the neural substrates associated with the depression-like behaviors, the brain tissues from these animals were analyzed using immunocytochemistry. Attenuated indices of 5-HT signaling were observed in DLD compared to the BLD group. The results lay the groundwork for establishing a novel animal model and a novel experimental paradigm for SAD. The results also provide insights into the neural mechanisms underlying light-dependent mood changes.

  12. Basal and stress-induced corticosterone levels in olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) in relation to their mass nesting behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, R A; Owens, D W; MacKenzie, D S; Amoss, M S

    1999-11-01

    Adrenocortical responsiveness to turning stress was examined in wild, reproductively-active olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) in relation to their mass nesting (arribada) behavior. We hypothesized that the high sensitivity threshold (HST) observed in ovipositing sea turtles is associated with a diminished sensitivity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to stressful stimuli in arribada females. We tested this hypothesis by determining whether arribada females exhibited an increased activation threshold of the HPA axis to an imposed stressor (turning stress). Mean basal corticosterone (B) and glucose levels were below 1.0 ng/ml and 60 mg/dl, respectively. Basal B remained unchanged throughout a 24-hr period in basking females. Most animals responded to turning stress with elevated mean B levels (up to 6.5 ng/ml after 6 hr) and no increase in circulating glucose. Nearly 50% of females (and none of the males) were refractory to the stimulation. Males exhibited the most rapid response, with B levels significantly elevated by 20 min over basal levels. Among females, arribada and solitary nesters exhibited a slower rate of response than basking, non-nesting animals. These results demonstrate that olive ridleys exhibit stress-induced changes in circulating B which are slower than those observed in most reptilian and in mammalian, avian, and piscine species. Furthermore, the presence of refractory females and the relatively slower increase in B in arribada and solitary nesters indicate a hyporesponsiveness of the HPA axis to turning stress in nesting olive ridleys. The hyporesponsiveness may be part of a mechanism to facilitate arribada nesting. J. Exp. Zool. 284:652-662, 1999. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Evaluation of light/dark cycle in anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors after regular treatment with methylphenidate hydrochloride in rats of different ages Avaliação do ciclo claro e escuro no comportamento relacionado à ansiedade e à depressão em ratos de diferentes idades após tratamento crônico com hidrocloridrato de metilfenidato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin M. Gomes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Methylphenidate hydrochloride is the most widely used medication for treatment and management of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. However, the chronic effects of methylphenidate hydrochloride on anxiety- and depressive-like rat behaviors remain poorly investigated. In this context, the present study evaluated the effects of treatment with methylphenidate hydrochloride on anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors using young and adult rats during the light and the dark cycle. METHOD: Male Wistar rats (25 or 60 days old received a once-daily (in either the light or dark cycle methylphenidate hydrochloride (2mg/kg or saline intraperitoneal injection for 28 days. We performed elevated plus maze and forced swimming test two hours after the last injection. RESULTS: The light/dark cycle was a significant factor in the anxiety-like behaviors; however, no significant interaction between all three factors (cycle, age and methylphenidate hydrochloride was found. Nevertheless, we observed a nominally significant interaction between the light/ dark cycle and age in the forced swimming test. CONCLUSION: Our results have shown that age and the light/dark cycle are more significant modulators of anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors than methylphenidate hydrochloride treatment.OBJETIVO: Hidrocloridrato de metilfenidato é a medicação preferida para o tratamento e manutenção do transtorno de atenção e hiperatividade. No entanto, os efeitos do tratamento crônico com hidrocloridrato de metilfenidato em diferentes idades e ciclos sobre o comportamento relacionado à ansiedade e à depressão ainda não está claro. Neste contexto, o presente estudo teve como objetivo avaliar os efeitos do tratamento com hidrocloridrato de metilfenidato sobre o comportamento relacionado à ansiedade e à depressão em diferentes idades e no ciclo claro e escuro. MÉTODO: Foram utilizados ratos Wistar machos jovens e adultos que receberam uma vez ao dia

  14. Inflammatory Factors Mediate Vulnerability to a Social Stress-Induced Depressive-like Phenotype in Passive Coping Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Susan K; Wood, Christopher S; Lombard, Calliandra M; Lee, Catherine S; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Finnell, Julie E; Valentino, Rita J

    2015-07-01

    Coping strategy impacts susceptibility to psychosocial stress. The locus coeruleus (LC) and dorsal raphe (DR) are monoamine nuclei implicated in stress-related disorders. Our goal was to identify genes in these nuclei that distinguish active and passive coping strategies in response to social stress. Rats were exposed to repeated resident-intruder stress and coping strategy determined. Gene and protein expression in the LC and DR were determined by polymerase chain reaction array and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and compared between active and passive stress-coping and unstressed rats. The effect of daily interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist before stress on anhedonia was also determined. Rats exhibited passive or active coping strategies based on a short latency (SL) or longer latency (LL) to assume a defeat posture, respectively. Stress differentially regulated 19 and 26 genes in the LC and DR of SL and LL rats, respectively, many of which encoded for inflammatory factors. Notably, Il-1β was increased in SL and decreased in LL rats in both the LC and DR. Protein changes were generally consistent with a proinflammatory response to stress in SL rats selectively. Stress produced anhedonia selectively in SL rats and this was prevented by IL-1 receptor antagonist, consistent with a role for IL-1β in stress vulnerability. This study highlighted distinctions in gene expression related to coping strategy in response to social stress. Passive coping was associated with a bias toward proinflammatory processes, particularly IL-1β, whereas active coping and resistance to stress-related pathology was associated with suppression of inflammatory processes. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of intra-nucleus accumbens administration of allopregnanolone on δ and γ2 GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNA expression in the hippocampus and on depressive-like and grooming behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nin, Maurício S; Ferri, Marcelo K; Couto-Pereira, Natividade S; Souza, Marilise F; Azeredo, Lucas A; Agnes, Grasiela; Gomez, Rosane; Barros, Helena M T

    2012-12-01

    Alterations in GABA(A) receptor expression have been associated with the allopregnanolone (3α-hydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one; 3α,5α-THP) antidepressant-like effect in rats. The present study aimed to verify the effect of bilateral, intra-nucleus accumbens core (intra-AcbC) administration of the neurosteroid allopregnanolone on behaviors in the forced swim and grooming microstructure tests and in the δ and γ2 GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNA expression in right and left hippocampus of rats. The results of this study showed that bilateral, intra-AcbC allopregnanolone administration (5μg/rat) presented antidepressant-like activity in the forced swim test concomitant with an increase in climbing. Allopregnanolone at doses of 1.25 and 5μg/rat also decreased the percentage of correct transitions in the grooming microstructure test. Both δ and γ2 GABA(A) subunit expressions increased in the rat hippocampus after allopregnanolone intra-AcbC treatment. Our findings point to asymmetrical GABA(A) receptor expression changes in the hippocampus of animals treated with allopregnanolone. Further investigation should evaluate the antidepressant-like effect of allopregnanolone not only in other directly infused regions but also with respect to changes in other brain areas of the limbic system to understand allopregnanolone's mechanism of action. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Icariin reverses corticosterone-induced depression-like behavior, decrease in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and metabolic network disturbances revealed by NMR-based metabonomics in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Meng-Juan; Han, Bin; Wang, Shu-mei; Liang, Sheng-wang; Zou, Zhong-jie

    2016-05-10

    Previously published reports have revealed the antidepressant-like effects of icariin in a chronic mild stress model of depression and in a social defeat stress model in mice. However, the therapeutic effect of icariin in an animal model of glucocorticoid-induced depression remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate antidepressant-like effect and the possible mechanisms of icariin in a rat model of corticosterone (CORT)-induced depression by using a combination of behavioral and biochemical assessments and NMR-based metabonomics. The depression model was established by subcutaneous injections of CORT for 21 consecutive days in rats, as evidenced by reduced sucrose intake and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, together with an increase in immobility time in a forced swim test (FST). Icariin significantly increased sucrose intake and hippocampal BDNF level and decreased the immobility time in FST in CORT-induced depressive rats, suggesting its potent antidepressant activity. Moreover, metabonomic analysis identified eight, five and three potential biomarkers associated with depression in serum, urine and brain tissue extract, respectively. These biomarkers are primarily involved in energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism and gut microbe metabolism. Icariin reversed the pathological process of CORT-induced depression, partially via regulation of the disturbed metabolic pathways. These results provide important mechanistic insights into the protective effects of icariin against CORT-induced depression and metabolic dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Anti-depressant-like effect of curculigoside isolated from Curculigo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    depressant-like activity on mice, the mechanism of which involves increase in the levels of DA, NE, 5-HT, and up-regulation of BDNF expression. Thus, curculigoside can be considered a potential drug candidate for the treatment of depressive ...

  18. Depression-Like Effect of Prenatal Buprenorphine Exposure in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chih-Jen; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Wen-Ying; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Pan, Hung-Chuan; Liao, Su-Lan; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Studies indicate that perinatal opioid exposure produces a variety of short- and long-term neurobehavioral consequences. However, the precise modes of action are incompletely understood. Buprenorphine, a mixed agonist/antagonist at the opioid receptors, is currently being used in clinical trials for managing pregnant opioid addicts. This study provides evidence of depression-like consequence following prenatal exposure to supra-therapeutic dose of buprenorphine and sheds light on potential mechanisms of action in a rat model involving administration of intraperitoneal injection to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats starting from gestation day 7 and lasting for 14 days. Results showed that pups at postnatal day 21 but not the dams had worse parameters of depression-like neurobehaviors using a forced swimming test and tail suspension test, independent of gender. Neurobehavioral changes were accompanied by elevation of oxidative stress, reduction of plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and serotonin, and attenuation of tropomyosin-related kinase receptor type B (TrkB) phosphorylation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, protein kinase A activity, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, and CREB DNA-binding activity. Since BDNF/serotonin and CREB signaling could orchestrate a positive feedback loop, our findings suggest that the induction of oxidative stress, reduction of BDNF and serotonin expression, and attenuation of CREB signaling induced by prenatal exposure to supra-therapeutic dose of buprenorphine provide evidence of potential mechanism for the development of depression-like neurobehavior. PMID:24367510

  19. Depression-like effect of prenatal buprenorphine exposure in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Jen Hung

    Full Text Available Studies indicate that perinatal opioid exposure produces a variety of short- and long-term neurobehavioral consequences. However, the precise modes of action are incompletely understood. Buprenorphine, a mixed agonist/antagonist at the opioid receptors, is currently being used in clinical trials for managing pregnant opioid addicts. This study provides evidence of depression-like consequence following prenatal exposure to supra-therapeutic dose of buprenorphine and sheds light on potential mechanisms of action in a rat model involving administration of intraperitoneal injection to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats starting from gestation day 7 and lasting for 14 days. Results showed that pups at postnatal day 21 but not the dams had worse parameters of depression-like neurobehaviors using a forced swimming test and tail suspension test, independent of gender. Neurobehavioral changes were accompanied by elevation of oxidative stress, reduction of plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and serotonin, and attenuation of tropomyosin-related kinase receptor type B (TrkB phosphorylation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation, protein kinase A activity, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB phosphorylation, and CREB DNA-binding activity. Since BDNF/serotonin and CREB signaling could orchestrate a positive feedback loop, our findings suggest that the induction of oxidative stress, reduction of BDNF and serotonin expression, and attenuation of CREB signaling induced by prenatal exposure to supra-therapeutic dose of buprenorphine provide evidence of potential mechanism for the development of depression-like neurobehavior.

  20. Conditional Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transactivator of Transcription Protein Expression Induces Depression-like Effects and Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Jay P; Paris, Jason J; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Hymel, Kristen A; Kim, Jae K; Cirino, Thomas J; Gillis, Timothy E; Eans, Shainnel O; Vitaliano, Gordana D; Medina, Jessica M; Krapf, Richard C; Stacy, Heather M; Kaufman, Marc J

    2017-10-01

    The prevalence of major depression in those with HIV/AIDS is substantially higher than in the general population. Mechanisms underlying this comorbidity are poorly understood. HIV-transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein, produced and excreted by HIV, could be involved. We determined whether conditional Tat protein expression in mice is sufficient to induce depression-like behaviors and oxidative stress. Further, as oxidative stress is associated with depression, we determined whether decreasing or increasing oxidative stress by administering methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) or diethylmaleate (DEM), respectively, altered depression-like behavior. GT-tg bigenic mice received intraperitoneal saline or doxycycline (Dox, 25-100 mg/kg/day) to induce Tat expression. G-tg mice, which do not express Tat protein, also received Dox. Depression-like behavior was assessed with the tail suspension test (TST) and the two-bottle saccharin/water consumption task. Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) were assessed ex vivo. Medial frontal cortex (MFC) oxidative stress and temperature were measured in vivo with 9.4-Tesla proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Tat expression increased TST immobility time in an exposure-dependent manner and reduced saccharin consumption. MSM decreased immobility time while DEM increased it in saline-treated GT-tg mice. Tat and MSM behavioral effects persisted for 28 days. Tat and DEM increased while MSM decreased ROS/RNS levels. Tat expression increased MFC glutathione levels and temperature. Tat expression induced rapid and enduring depression-like behaviors and oxidative stress. Increasing/decreasing oxidative stress increased/decreased, respectively, depression-like behavior. Thus, Tat produced by HIV may contribute to the high depression prevalence among those with HIV. Further, mitigation of oxidative stress could reduce depression severity.

  1. Role of Nitric Oxide in Stress-Induced Anxiety: From Pathophysiology to Therapeutic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A; Chanana, P

    2017-01-01

    Stress is often marked by a state of hyperarousal to aid the initiation of necessary stress response for the successful management of stressful stimuli. It can be manifested as a challenge (stimulus) that requires behavioral, psychological, and physiological adaptations for the maintenance of a state of homeostasis in response to stressful stimuli. In an organism, miscellaneous stressors trigger a wide spectrum of alterations in hormonal and neuronal physiologies, resulting in behavioral (anxiety and depression disorders, diminished food intake and gastrointestinal dysfunctions, decline in sexual behavior, diabetes, and loss of cognitive function) and other physiological responses. Stress serves as a potent etiological link to development of several neuropsychiatric diseases such as depression, anxiety, and cognitive impairments. Exposure to stressful stimuli has been found to be associated with activation of nitric oxide synthase and generation of NO which reacts with spontaneous oxygen species to aid formation of active nitrogen radicals. High concentrations of reactive nitrogen radicals may cause damage to intracellular proteins, in addition to causing impairment to components of the mitochondrial transport chain, leading to cellular energy deficiency. This may further serve as an etiological link to the development of secondary neurological diseases associated with chronic stress. Also, during stress exposure, pharmacological inhibition of nitric oxide production displays reduction in indicators of anxiety- and depressive-like behavior in animal models. Therefore, the purpose of this chapter is to present an overview on the role of NO in stress-evoked emergence of secondary neurological disorders like anxiety as well as citing examples where NO has been used as a therapeutic target for the management of stress-induced anxiety-like behavior. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic dim light at night provokes reversible depression-like phenotype: possible role for TNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrosian, T A; Weil, Z M; Nelson, R J

    2013-08-01

    The prevalence of major depression has increased in recent decades and women are twice as likely as men to develop the disorder. Recent environmental changes almost certainly have a role in this phenomenon, but a complete set of contributors remains unspecified. Exposure to artificial light at night (LAN) has surged in prevalence during the past 50 years, coinciding with rising rates of depression. Chronic exposure to LAN is linked to increased risk of breast cancer, obesity and mood disorders, although the relationship to mood is not well characterized. In this study, we investigated the effects of chronic exposure to 5 lux LAN on depression-like behaviors in female hamsters. Using this model, we also characterized hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and hippocampal dendritic morphology, and investigated the reversibility of these changes 1, 2 or 4 weeks following elimination of LAN. Furthermore, we explored the mechanism of action, focusing on hippocampal proinflammatory cytokines given their dual role in synaptic plasticity and the pathogenesis of depression. Using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR, we identified a reversible increase in hippocampal tumor necrosis factor (TNF), but not interleukin-1β, mRNA expression in hamsters exposed to LAN. Direct intracerebroventricular infusion of a dominant-negative inhibitor of soluble TNF, XPro1595, prevented the development of depression-like behavior under LAN, but had no effect on dendritic spine density in the hippocampus. These results indicate a partial role for TNF in the reversible depression-like phenotype observed under chronic dim LAN. Recent environmental changes, such as LAN exposure, may warrant more attention as possible contributors to rising rates of mood disorders.

  3. Opposite effects of alcohol in regulating stress-induced changes in body weight between the two mouse lines with enhanced or low opioid system activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacharczuk, Mariusz; Sadowski, Bogdan; Jaszczak, Kazimierz; Lipkowski, Andrzej W; Swiergiel, Artur H

    2010-04-19

    Considering the involvement of the opioid system in alcoholism, depression and metabolism - known risk factors in human obesity, we studied the effects of chronic mild stress (CMS) and alcohol intake on body weight in two mouse lines selected for high (HA-high analgesia) or low (LA-low analgesia) swim stress-induced analgesia. In comparison to LA mice, HA mice exhibit an upregulation of opioid receptor system function, different depression-like behavior and reduced energy expenditure in stress. LA animals showed enhanced basal and CMS-induced alcohol drinking versus HA. Now we report different effects of alcohol under no stress (control) and CMS conditions on food intake and body weight between the lines. CMS in animals with no access to alcohol increased body weight in both HA and LA mice, with no effect of CMS on food intake in either line and without differences between the lines. In LA mice alcohol reduced body weight under both conditions although significantly more under the control than CMS conditions. In contrast, in HA mice alcohol increased body weight more under the CMS than under control conditions. The results suggest that opioid system may modulate effects of alcohol on stress -induced changes in body weight. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Early life stress induces attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-like behavioral and brain metabolic dysfunctions: functional imaging of methylphenidate treatment in a novel rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, J; Breuer, S; Poeggel, G; Braun, K

    2017-03-01

    In a novel animal model Octodon degus we tested the hypothesis that, in addition to genetic predisposition, early life stress (ELS) contributes to the etiology of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder-like behavioral symptoms and the associated brain functional deficits. Since previous neurochemical observations revealed that early life stress impairs dopaminergic functions, we predicted that these symptoms can be normalized by treatment with methylphenidate. In line with our hypothesis, the behavioral analysis revealed that repeated ELS induced locomotor hyperactivity and reduced attention towards an emotionally relevant acoustic stimulus. Functional imaging using ( 14 C)-2-fluoro-deoxyglucose-autoradiography revealed that the behavioral symptoms are paralleled by metabolic hypoactivity of prefrontal, mesolimbic and subcortical brain areas. Finally, the pharmacological intervention provided further evidence that the behavioral and metabolic dysfunctions are due to impaired dopaminergic neurotransmission. Elevating dopamine in ELS animals by methylphenidate normalized locomotor hyperactivity and attention-deficit and ameliorated brain metabolic hypoactivity in a dose-dependent manner.

  5. Corticotropin (ACTH)-reactive immunoglobulins in adolescents in relation to antisocial behavior and stress-induced cortisol response. The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Schäfer (Johanna); S.O. Fetissov (Serguei); R. Legrand (Romain); S. Claeyssens (Sophie); P.J. Hoekstra (Pieter); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); F.V.A. van Oort (Floor)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractElevated levels of corticotropin (ACTH)-reactive immunoglobulins (ACTH IgG) were found in males with conduct disorder, suggesting their involvement in the biology of antisocial behavior. We first aimed to confirm these findings in a large general population sample of adolescents.

  6. Apigenin ameliorates chronic mild stress-induced depressive behavior by inhibiting interleukin-1β production and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruipeng; Wang, Xiangxiang; Qin, Tingting; Qu, Rong; Ma, Shiping

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation and oxidative stress may contribute to the development of major depressive disorder (MDD). Apigenin, a type of bioflavonoid widely found in citrus fruits, has a number of biological actions including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Although apigenin has potential antidepressant activity, the mechanisms of this effect remain unclear. The present study aims to investigate the effects of apigenin on behavioral changes and inflammatory responses induced by chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) in rats. GW9662, a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) inhibitor, was administered 30 min before apigenin. We found that treatment with apigenin (20mg/kg, intragastrically) for three weeks remarkably ameliorated CUMS-induced behavioral abnormalities, such as decreased locomotor activity and reduced sucrose consumption. In response to oxidative stress, the NLRP3 inflammasome was activated and IL-1β secretion increased in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of CUMS rats. However, apigenin treatment upregulated PPARγ expression and downregulated the expression of NLRP3, which subsequently downregulated the production of IL-1β. In addition, GW9662 diminished the inhibitory effects of apigenin on the NLRP3 inflammasome. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that apigenin exhibits antidepressant-like effects in CUMS rats, possibly by inhibiting IL-1β production and NLRP3 inflammasome expression via the up-regulation of PPARγ expression. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Salubrious effects of oxytocin on social stress-induced deficits

    OpenAIRE

    Adam S. Smith; Wang, Zuoxin

    2011-01-01

    Social relationships are a fundamental aspect of life, affecting social, psychological, physiological, and behavioral functions. While social interactions can attenuate stress and promote health, disruption, confrontations, isolation, or neglect in the social environment can each be major stressors. Social stress can impair the basal function and stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, impairing function of multiple biological systems and posing a risk to m...

  8. Salubrious effects of oxytocin on social stress-induced deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam S; Wang, Zuoxin

    2012-03-01

    Social relationships are a fundamental aspect of life, affecting social, psychological, physiological, and behavioral functions. While positive social interactions can attenuate stress and promote health, the social environment can also be a major source of stress when it includes social disruption, confrontation, isolation, or neglect. Social stress can impair the basal function and stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, impairing function of multiple biological systems and posing a risk to mental and physical health. In contrast, social support can ameliorate stress-induced physiological and immunological deficits, reducing the risk of subsequent psychological distress and improving an individual's overall well-being. For better clinical treatment of these physiological and mental pathologies, it is necessary to understand the regulatory mechanisms of stress-induced pathologies as well as determine the underlying biological mechanisms that regulate social buffering of the stress system. A number of ethologically relevant animal models of social stress and species that form strong adult social bonds have been utilized to study the etiology, treatment, and prevention of stress-related disorders. While undoubtedly a number of biological pathways contribute to the social buffering of the stress response, the convergence of evidence denotes the regulatory effects of oxytocin in facilitating social bond-promoting behaviors and their effect on the stress response. Thus, oxytocin may be perceived as a common regulatory element of the social environment, stress response, and stress-induced risks on mental and physical health. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin, Vasopressin, and Social Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Involvement of the agmatinergic system in the depressive-like phenotype of the Crtc1 knockout mouse model of depression

    KAUST Repository

    Meylan, E M

    2016-07-12

    Recent studies implicate the arginine-decarboxylation product agmatine in mood regulation. Agmatine has antidepressant properties in rodent models of depression, and agmatinase (Agmat), the agmatine-degrading enzyme, is upregulated in the brains of mood disorder patients. We have previously shown that mice lacking CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) associate behavioral and molecular depressive-like endophenotypes, as well as blunted responses to classical antidepressants. Here, the molecular basis of the behavioral phenotype of Crtc1−/− mice was further examined using microarray gene expression profiling that revealed an upregulation of Agmat in the cortex of Crtc1−/− mice. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses confirmed Agmat upregulation in the Crtc1−/− prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus, which were further demonstrated by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy to comprise an increased number of Agmat-expressing cells, notably parvalbumin- and somatostatin-positive interneurons. Acute agmatine and ketamine treatments comparably improved the depressive-like behavior of male and female Crtc1−/− mice in the forced swim test, suggesting that exogenous agmatine has a rapid antidepressant effect through the compensation of agmatine deficit because of upregulated Agmat. Agmatine rapidly increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels only in the PFC of wild-type (WT) females, and decreased eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) phosphorylation in the PFC of male and female WT mice, indicating that agmatine might be a fast-acting antidepressant with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist properties. Collectively, these findings implicate Agmat in the depressive-like phenotype of Crtc1−/− mice, refine current understanding of the agmatinergic system in the brain and highlight its putative role in major depression.

  10. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure during adolescence: Effects on stress-induced social alterations and social drinking in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlinskaya, Elena I; Kim, Esther U; Spear, Linda P

    2017-01-01

    We previously observed lasting and sex-specific detrimental consequences of early adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure (AIE), with male, but not female, rats showing social anxiety-like alterations when tested as adults. The present study used Sprague Dawley rats to assess whether social alterations induced by AIE (3.5g/kg, intragastrically, every other day, between postnatal days [P] 25-45) are further exacerbated by stressors later in life. Another aim was to determine whether AIE alone or in combination with stress influenced intake of a sweetened ethanol solution (Experiment 1) or a sweetened solution ("supersac") alone (Experiment 2) under social circumstances. Animals were exposed to restraint on P66-P70 (90min/day) or left nonstressed, with corticosterone (CORT) levels assessed on day 1 and day 5 in Experiment 2. Social anxiety-like behavior emerged after AIE in non-stressed males, but not females, whereas stress-induced social anxiety was evident only in water-exposed males and females. Adult-typical habituation of the CORT response to repeated restraint was not evident in adult animals after AIE, a lack of habituation reminiscent of that normally evident in adolescents. Neither AIE nor stress affected ethanol intake under social circumstances, although AIE and restraint independently increased adolescent-typical play fighting in males during social drinking. Among males, the combination of AIE and restraint suppressed "supersac" intake; this index of depression-like behavior was not seen in females. The results provide experimental evidence associating adolescent alcohol exposure, later stress, anxiety, and depression, with young adolescent males being particularly vulnerable to long-lasting adverse effects of repeated ethanol. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Adolescent plasticity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antidepressant-like Effect of l-perillaldehyde in Stress-induced Depression-like Model Mice through Regulation of the Olfactory Nervous System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ito, N; Nagai, T; Oikawa, T; Yamada, H; Hanawa, T

    2011-01-01

    ...) medicines that are used clinically for the improvement of depressive mood. l-Perillaldehyde (PAH) is a major component in the essential oil containing in Perillae Herba, but its antidepressant-like effect has not been reported...

  12. Cholinergic Modulation of Restraint Stress Induced Neurobehavioral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The involvement of the cholinergic system in restraint stress induced neurobehavioral alterations was investigated in rodents using the hole board, elevated plus maze, the open field and the light and dark box tests. Restraint stress (3h) reduced significantly (p<0.05) the number of entries and time spent in the open arm, ...

  13. Stress-Induced Reinstatement of Drug Seeking: 20 Years of Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantsch, John R; Baker, David A; Funk, Douglas; Lê, Anh D; Shaham, Yavin

    2016-01-01

    In human addicts, drug relapse and craving are often provoked by stress. Since 1995, this clinical scenario has been studied using a rat model of stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking. Here, we first discuss the generality of stress-induced reinstatement to different drugs of abuse, different stressors, and different behavioral procedures. We also discuss neuropharmacological mechanisms, and brain areas and circuits controlling stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking. We conclude by discussing results from translational human laboratory studies and clinical trials that were inspired by results from rat studies on stress-induced reinstatement. Our main conclusions are (1) The phenomenon of stress-induced reinstatement, first shown with an intermittent footshock stressor in rats trained to self-administer heroin, generalizes to other abused drugs, including cocaine, methamphetamine, nicotine, and alcohol, and is also observed in the conditioned place preference model in rats and mice. This phenomenon, however, is stressor specific and not all stressors induce reinstatement of drug seeking. (2) Neuropharmacological studies indicate the involvement of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), noradrenaline, dopamine, glutamate, kappa/dynorphin, and several other peptide and neurotransmitter systems in stress-induced reinstatement. Neuropharmacology and circuitry studies indicate the involvement of CRF and noradrenaline transmission in bed nucleus of stria terminalis and central amygdala, and dopamine, CRF, kappa/dynorphin, and glutamate transmission in other components of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system (ventral tegmental area, medial prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and nucleus accumbens). (3) Translational human laboratory studies and a recent clinical trial study show the efficacy of alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonists in decreasing stress-induced drug craving and stress-induced initial heroin lapse.

  14. Neuromodulator and Emotion Biomarker for Stress Induced Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeng Gu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Affective disorders are a leading cause of disabilities worldwide, and the etiology of these many affective disorders such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder is due to hormone changes, which includes hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in the peripheral nervous system and neuromodulators in the central nervous system. Consistent with pharmacological studies indicating that medical treatment acts by increasing the concentration of catecholamine, the locus coeruleus (LC/norepinephrine (NE system is regarded as a critical part of the central “stress circuitry,” whose major function is to induce “fight or flight” behavior and fear and anger emotion. Despite the intensive studies, there is still controversy about NE with fear and anger. For example, the rats with LC ablation were more reluctant to leave a familiar place and took longer to consume the food pellets in an unfamiliar place (neophobia, i.e., fear in response to novelty. The reason for this discrepancy might be that NE is not only for flight (fear, but also for fight (anger. Here, we try to review recent literatures about NE with stress induced emotions and their relations with mental disorders. We propose that stress induced NE release can induce both fear and anger. “Adrenaline rush or norepinephrine rush” and fear and anger emotion might act as biomarkers for mental disorders.

  15. TNF-α-induced depressive-like phenotype and p38(MAPK) activation are abolished by ascorbic acid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Morgana; Budni, Josiane; Freitas, Andiara Espíndola; Neis, Vivian Binder; Ribeiro, Camille Mertins; de Oliveira Balen, Grasiela; Rieger, Débora Kurrle; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the effects of ascorbic acid on depressive-like behavior induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) in mice. Additionally, we examined the effects of combined administration of ascorbic acid and antidepressants, MK-801 and 7-nitroindazole in mice exposed or not to TNF-α and the capacity of TNF-α and ascorbic acid to modulate hippocampal and cerebrocortical phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38(MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). In control animals, ascorbic acid reduced the immobility time in the tail suspension test (TST). Unilateral intracerebroventricular administration of TNF-α produced a depressive-like behavior in the TST, and the treatment with ascorbic acid prevented this effect. Sub-effective dose of ascorbic acid combined with sub-effective doses of fluoxetine, imipramine, bupropion, MK-801 or 7-nitroindazole produced a synergistic antidepressant-like effect in mice exposed or not to TNF-α. No treatment caused significant alterations in the locomotor activity of mice. Administration of TNF-α increased the phosphorylation of p38(MAPK) in hippocampus and cerebral cortex, and the treatment with ascorbic acid prevented this effect. Ascorbic acid increased phosphorylation of ERK1 in the hippocampus of saline- and TNF-α-treated animals, however it did not produce alterations in the cerebral cortex. No effects on phosphorylation of ERK2 or JNK were found. The observed effect of ascorbic acid seems to be associated, at least partially, with a reduced p38(MAPK) phosphorylation, activation of the monoaminergic systems as well as inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  16. Depressive-like phenotype induced by AAV-mediated overexpression of human α-synuclein in midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudal, D; Alvarsson, A; Björklund, A; Svenningsson, P

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and by the presence of aggregates containing α-synuclein called Lewy bodies. Viral vector-induced overexpression of α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons represents a model of PD which recapitulates disease progression better than commonly used neurotoxin models. Previous studies using this model have reported motor and cognitive impairments, whereas depression, mood and anxiety phenotypes are less described. To investigate these psychiatric phenotypes, Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral injections of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing human α-synuclein or GFP into the substantia nigra pars compacta. Behavior was assessed at two timepoints: 3 and 8 weeks post-injection. We report that nigral α-synuclein overexpression led to a pronounced nigral dopaminergic cell loss accompanied by a smaller cell loss in the ventral tegmental area, and to a decreased striatal density of dopaminergic fibers. The AAV-α-synuclein group exhibited modest, but significant motor impairments 8 weeks after vector administration. The AAV-α-synuclein group displayed depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test after 3 weeks, and reduced sucrose preference at week 8. At both timepoints, overexpression of α-synuclein was linked to a hyperactive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation of corticosterone. The depressive-like phenotype was also correlated with decreased nigral brain-derived neurotrophic factor and spinophilin levels, and with decreased striatal levels of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein. This study demonstrates that AAV-mediated α-synuclein overexpression in dopamine neurons is not only useful to model motor impairments of PD, but also depression. This study also provides evidence that depression in experimental Parkinsonism is correlated to dysregulation of the HPA axis and to

  17. Long-term corticosterone exposure decreases insulin sensitivity and induces depressive-like behaviour in the C57BL/6NCrl mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva L van Donkelaar

    Full Text Available Chronic stress or long-term administration of glucocorticoids disrupts the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal system leading to continuous high levels of glucocorticoids and insulin resistance (IR. This pre-diabetic state can eventually develop into type 2 diabetes mellitus and has been associated with a higher risk to develop depressive disorders. The mechanisms underlying the link between chronic stress, IR and depression remains unclear. The present study aimed to establish a stress-depression model in mice to further study the effects of stress-induced changes upon insulin sensitivity and behavioural consequences. A pilot study was conducted to establish the optimal administration route and a pragmatic measurement of IR. Subsequently, 6-month-old C57BL/6NCrl mice were exposed to long-term oral corticosterone treatment via the drinking water. To evaluate insulin sensitivity changes, blood glucose and plasma insulin levels were measured at different time-points throughout treatment and mice were behaviourally assessed in the elevated zero maze (EZM, forced swimming test (FST and open field test to reveal behavioural changes. Long-term corticosterone treatment increased body weight and decreased insulin sensitivity. The latter was revealed by a higher IR index and increased insulin in the plasma, whereas blood glucose levels remained unchanged. Corticosterone treatment induced longer immobility times in the FST, reflecting depressive-like behaviour. No effects were observed upon anxiety as measured in the EZM. The effect of the higher body weight of the CORT treated animals at time of testing did not influence behaviour in the EZM or FST, as no differences were found in general locomotor activity. Long-term corticosterone treatment via the drinking water reduces insulin sensitivity and induces depressive-like behaviour in the C57BL/6 mouse. This mouse model could thus be used to further explore the underlying mechanisms of chronic stress-induced T2

  18. Bidirectional crosstalk between stress-induced gastric ulcer and depression under chronic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Zhang

    Full Text Available Stress contributes to a variety of diseases and disorders such as depression and peptic ulcer. The present study aimed to investigate the correlation between stress ulcer and depression in pathogenesis and treatment by using chronic stress depression (CSD, chronic psychological stress ulcer (CPSU and water immersion restrain stress models in rats. Our data showed that the ulcer index of the animals after CSD exposure was significantly higher than that of controls. Depression-like behaviors were observed in rat after CPSU exposure. Fluoxetine hydrochloride significantly reduced the ulcer index of rats exposed to CPSU stress, while ranitidine inhibited depression-like behavior of the animals in CSD group. The ulcer index of rats administered with mifepristone after CPSU stress was markedly reduced compared to CPSU group, although there was no significant difference in the depression-like behavior between mifepristone-treated CSD group and naive controls. We also found that the rats exposed to CPSU or CSD stress displayed a lower level of corticosterone than naive controls, however, the acute stress (AS group showed an opposite result. Additionally, in order to study the relevance of H(2 receptors and depression, we treated the CSD group with cimetidine and famotidine respectively. The data showed that cimetidine inhibited depression-like behavior in CSD rats, and famotidine had no impact on depression. Overall our data suggested that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis dysfunction may be the key role in triggering depression and stress ulcer. Acid-suppressing drugs and antidepressants could be used for treatment of depression and stress ulcer respectively. The occurrence of depression might be inhibited by blocking the central H(2 receptors.

  19. Transient gastric irritation in the neonatal rats leads to changes in hypothalamic CRF expression, depression- and anxiety-like behavior as adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liansheng Liu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A disturbance of the brain-gut axis is a prominent feature in functional bowel disorders (such as irritable bowel syndrome and functional dyspepsia and psychological abnormalities are often implicated in their pathogenesis. We hypothesized that psychological morbidity in these conditions may result from gastrointestinal problems, rather than causing them.Functional dyspepsia was induced by neonatal gastric irritation in male rats. 10-day old male Sprague-Dawley rats received 0.1% iodoacetamide (IA or vehicle by oral gavage for 6 days. At 8-10 weeks of age, rats were tested with sucrose preference and forced-swimming tests to examine depression-like behavior. Elevated plus maze, open field and light-dark box tests were used to test anxiety-like behaviors. ACTH and corticosterone responses to a minor stressor, saline injection, and hypothalamic CRF expression were also measured.Behavioral tests revealed changes of anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in IA-treated, but not control rats. As compared with controls, hypothalamic and amygdaloid CRF immunoreactivity, basal levels of plasma corticosterone and stress-induced ACTH were significantly higher in IA-treated rats. Gastric sensory ablation with resiniferatoxin had no effect on behaviors but treatment with CRF type 1 receptor antagonist, antalarmin, reversed the depression-like behavior in IA-treated ratsThe present results suggest that transient gastric irritation in the neonatal period can induce a long lasting increase in depression- and anxiety-like behaviors, increased expression of CRF in the hypothalamus, and an increased sensitivity of HPA axis to stress. The depression-like behavior may be mediated by the CRF1 receptor. These findings have significant implications for the pathogenesis of psychological co-morbidity in patients with functional bowel disorders.

  20. Inflammation is increased with anxiety- and depression-like signs in a rat model of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Bouchard, Sioui; Peters, Kelsey; Woller, Sarah A; Madahian, Behrouz; Faghihi, Usef; Patel, Shivani; Bake, Shameena; Hook, Michelle A

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to increased anxiety and depression in as many as 60% of patients. Yet, despite extensive clinical research focused on understanding the variables influencing psychological well-being following SCI, risk factors that decrease it remain unclear. We hypothesized that excitation of the immune system, inherent to SCI, may contribute to the decrease in psychological well-being. To test this hypothesis, we used a battery of established behavioral tests to assess depression and anxiety in spinally contused rats. The behavioral tests, and subsequent statistical analyses, revealed three cohorts of subjects that displayed behavioral characteristics of (1) depression, (2) depression and anxiety, or (3) no signs of decreased psychological well-being. Subsequent molecular analyses demonstrated that the psychological cohorts differed not only in behavioral symptoms, but also in peripheral (serum) and central (hippocampi and spinal cord) levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Subjects exhibiting a purely depression-like profile showed higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines peripherally, whereas subjects exhibiting a depression- and anxiety-like profile showed higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines centrally (hippocampi and spinal cord). These changes in inflammation were not associated with injury severity; suggesting that the association between inflammation and the expression of behaviors characteristic of decreased psychological well-being was not confounded by differential impairments in motor ability. These data support the hypothesis that inflammatory changes are associated with decreased psychological well-being following SCI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Placebo-Controlled Trial of Prazosin vs. Paroxetine in Combat Stress-Induced PTSD Nightmares and Sleep Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    vs. Paroxetine in Combat Stress-Induced PTSD Nightmares and Sleep Disturbance PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Murray Raskind, M.D. Elaine...CONTRACT NUMBER A Placebo-Controlled Trial of Prazosin vs. Paroxetine in Combat Stress-Induced PTSD Nightmares and Sleep Disturbance 5b. GRANT NUMBER...the SSRI paroxetine on behavioral symptoms and overall function in this population. Specific hypotheses (described below) will be tested in a three

  2. Mild Concussion, but Not Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury, Is Associated with Long-Term Depression-Like Phenotype in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita M Bajwa

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injuries can lead to long-lasting cognitive and motor deficits, increasing the risk of future behavioral, neurological, and affective disorders. Our study focused on long-term behavioral deficits after repeated injury in which mice received either a single mild CHI (mCHI, a repeated mild CHI (rmCHI consisting of one impact to each hemisphere separated by 3 days, or a moderate controlled cortical impact injury (CCI. Shams received only anesthesia. Behavioral tests were administered at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 90 days post-injury (dpi. CCI animals showed significant motor and sensory deficits in the early (1-7 dpi and long-term (90 dpi stages of testing. Interestingly, sensory and subtle motor deficits in rmCHI animals were found at 90 dpi. Most importantly, depression-like behaviors and social passiveness were observed in rmCHI animals at 90 dpi. These data suggest that mild concussive injuries lead to motor and sensory deficits and affective disorders that are not observed after moderate TBI.

  3. Emergence of anxiety-like behaviours in depressive-like Cpe(fat/fat) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Wilkins, John J; Creson, Thomas K; Biswas, Reeta; Berezniuk, Iryna; Fricker, Arun D; Fricker, Lloyd D; Wetsel, William C

    2013-08-01

    Cpe(fat/fat) mice have a point mutation in carboxypeptidase E (Cpe), an exopeptidase that removes C-terminal basic amino acids from intermediates to produce bioactive peptides. The mutation renders the enzyme inactive and unstable. The absence of Cpe activity in these mutants leads to abnormal processing of many peptides, with elevated levels of intermediates and greatly reduced levels of the mature peptides. Cpe(fat/fat) mice develop obesity, diabetes and infertility in adulthood. We examined whether anxiety- and/or depressive-like behaviours are also present. Anxiety-like responses are not evident in young Cpe(fat/fat) mice (∼60 d), but appear in older animals (>90 d). These behaviours are reversed by acute treatment with diazepam or fluoxetine. In contrast, increased immobilities in forced swim and tail suspension are evident in all age groups examined. These behaviours are reversed by acute administration of reboxetine. In comparison acute treatments with fluoxetine or bupropion are ineffective; however, immobility times are normalized with 2 wk treatment. These data demonstrate that Cpe(fat/fat) mice display depressive-like responses aged ∼60 d, whereas anxiety-like behaviours emerge ∼1 month later. In tail suspension, the reboxetine findings show that noradrenergic actions of antidepressants are intact in Cpe(fat/fat) mice. The ability of acute fluoxetine treatment to rescue anxiety-like while leaving depressive-like responses unaffected suggests that serotonin mechanisms underlying these behaviours are different. Since depressive-like responses in the Cpe(fat/fat) mice are rescued by 2 wk, but not acute, treatment with fluoxetine or bupropion, these mice may serve as a useful model that resembles human depression.

  4. Depressive-like symptoms in a reserpine-induced model of fibromyalgia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco-Serra, Arantxa; Escrihuela-Vidal, Francesc; González-Soler, Eva M; Martínez-Expósito, Fernando; Blasco-Ausina, M Carmen; Martínez-Bellver, Sergio; Cervera-Ferri, Ana; Teruel-Martí, Vicent; Valverde-Navarro, Alfonso A

    2015-11-01

    Since the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia is unknown, treatment options are limited, ineffective and in fact based on symptom relief. A recently proposed rat model of fibromyalgia is based on central depletion of monamines caused by reserpine administration. This model showed widespread musculoskeletal pain and depressive-like symptoms, but the methodology used to measure such symptoms has been criticized. Evidence relates the high prevalence of pain and depression in fibromyalgia to common pathogenic pathways, most probably focused on the monoaminergic system. The present study aims at a validation of the reserpine model of fibromyalgia. For this purpose, rats undergoing this model have been tested for depressive-like symptoms with a Novelty-Suppressed Feeding Test adaptation. Animals administered with reserpine and subjected to forced food deprivation performed a smaller number of incursions to the center of the open field, evidenced by a decrease in the per-minute rate of the rats' approaching, smelling or touching the food. They also took more time to eat from the central food than control rats. These NSFT findings suggest the presence of depressive-like disorders in this animal model of fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The diagnosis and treatment of stress-induced anovulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berga, S L; Loucks, T L

    2005-02-01

    Behaviors that activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis or suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroidal (HPT) axis can disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in women and men. Individuals with functional hypothalamic hypogonadism typically engage in a combination of behaviors that serve as psychogenic stressors and present metabolic challenges. Complete recovery of gonadal function depends upon restoration of the HPA and HPT axes. Hormone replacement strategies have limited benefit because they do not promote recovery from these allostatic endocrine adjustments in the HPA and HPT axes. Indeed, the rationale for the use of sex steroid replacement is based on the erroneous assumption that functional forms of hypothalamic hypogonadism represent only an alteration in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis. Further, use of sex hormones masks deficits that accrue from altered HPA and HPT function. Long-term deleterious consequences of stress-induced anovulation may include an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, depression, other psychiatric conditions, and dementia. Although fertility can be restored with exogenous administration of gonadotropins or pulsatile GnRH, fertility management alone will not permit recovery of the HPA and HPT axes. Failure to reverse the hormonal milieu induced by stress may increase the likelihood of poor obstetrical, fetal, or neonatal outcomes. In contrast, behavioral and psychological interventions that address problematic behaviors and attitudes have the potential to permit resumption of ovarian function along with recovery of the HPT and HPA axes. Full endocrine recovery offers better individual, maternal, and child health.

  6. STRESS INDUCED OBESITY: LESSONS FROM RODENT MODELS OF STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Robert Patterson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Stress is defined as the behavioral and physiological responses generated in the face of, or in anticipation of, a perceived threat. The stress response involves activation of the sympathetic nervous system and recruitment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis. When an organism encounters a stressor (social, physical, etc., these endogenous stress systems are stimulated in order to generate a fight-or-flight response, and manage the stressful situation. As such, an organism is forced to liberate energy resources in attempt to meet the energetic demands posed by the stressor. A change in the energy homeostatic balance is thus required to exploit an appropriate resource and deliver useable energy to the target muscles and tissues involved in the stress response. Acutely, this change in energy homeostasis and the liberation of energy is considered advantageous, as it is required for the survival of the organism. However, when an organism is subjected to a prolonged stressor, as is the case during chronic stress, a continuous irregularity in energy homeostasis is considered detrimental and may lead to the development of metabolic disturbances such as cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes mellitus and obesity. This concept has been studied extensively using animal models, and the neurobiological underpinnings of stress induced metabolic disorders are beginning to surface. However, different animal models of stress continue to produce divergent metabolic phenotypes wherein some animals become anorexic and loose body mass while others increase food intake and body mass and become vulnerable to the development of metabolic disturbances. It remains unclear exactly what factors associated with stress models can be used to predict the metabolic outcome of the organism. This review will explore a variety of rodent stress models and discuss the elements that influence the metabolic outcome in order to further our understanding of stress-induced

  7. Stress induced obesity: lessons from rodent models of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Zachary R; Abizaid, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Stress was once defined as the non-specific result of the body to any demand or challenge to homeostasis. A more current view of stress is the behavioral and physiological responses generated in the face of, or in anticipation of, a perceived threat. The stress response involves activation of the sympathetic nervous system and recruitment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. When an organism encounters a stressor (social, physical, etc.), these endogenous stress systems are stimulated in order to generate a fight-or-flight response, and manage the stressful situation. As such, an organism is forced to liberate energy resources in attempt to meet the energetic demands posed by the stressor. A change in the energy homeostatic balance is thus required to exploit an appropriate resource and deliver useable energy to the target muscles and tissues involved in the stress response. Acutely, this change in energy homeostasis and the liberation of energy is considered advantageous, as it is required for the survival of the organism. However, when an organism is subjected to a prolonged stressor, as is the case during chronic stress, a continuous irregularity in energy homeostasis is considered detrimental and may lead to the development of metabolic disturbances such as cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes mellitus and obesity. This concept has been studied extensively using animal models, and the neurobiological underpinnings of stress induced metabolic disorders are beginning to surface. However, different animal models of stress continue to produce divergent metabolic phenotypes wherein some animals become anorexic and lose body mass while others increase food intake and body mass and become vulnerable to the development of metabolic disturbances. It remains unclear exactly what factors associated with stress models can be used to predict the metabolic outcome of the organism. This review will explore a variety of rodent stress models and discuss the

  8. 5-(4-hydroxy-3-dimethoxybenzylidene)-rhodanine (RD-1)-improved mitochondrial function prevents anxiety- and depressive-like states induced by chronic corticosterone injections in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nan; Ren, Zhili; Zheng, Ji; Feng, Lu; Li, Dongmei; Gao, Kai; Zhang, Lianfeng; Liu, Yanyong; Zuo, Pingping

    2016-06-01

    Most current pharmacologic antidepressant treatments target monoaminergic systems confronts some problems such as low rate of remission and high risk for relapse indicating new therapeutic strategy is urgently need. Evidences showed that impairments in mitochondrial function were associated with the pathogenesis of mood disorders and improvement in its function may be a novel therapeutic choice. In the present study, effects of 5-(4-hydroxy-3-dimethoxybenzylidene)-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone (RD-1) were investigated in mice model of depression/anxiety induced by corticosterone (20 mg/kg) subcutaneously repeated injections in 5-week male BALB/c mice. Our results showed that five weeks of corticosterone administration induced anxiety/depressive-like behavioral changes, including decreased central activities in open field test, increased the immobility time in forced swimming test and the latency in the novelty-suppressed feeding test, as well as reduced bodyweight. Results showed that oral administration with RD-1 at the doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg for five weeks significantly improved the anxiety/depressive-like behavioral changes induced by corticosterone. In glucose metabolism analysis by photon emission computed tomography/-computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging, corticosterone significantly deactivated the prefrontal cortex (PFC), temporal lobe and hippocampus. RD-1 treatment obviously improved the energy metabolism in the involved brain regions. In primary cultured hippocampal neuron, corticosterone reduced speed of anterograde transport, yet speed of retrograde transport was increased. Furthermore, RD-1 enhanced the mitochondrial anterograde transport to supply energy for the neurotransmitter release. In conclusion, RD-1 prevents anxiety/depressive-like behavior of mice induced by corticosterone repeated injections with novel mechanism of improvement in the mitochondrial function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of lobeline and reboxetine, fluoxetine, or bupropion combination on depression-like behaviors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roni, Monzurul Amin; Rahman, Shafiqur

    2015-12-01

    Evidence suggests that lobeline, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligand, has antidepressant-like properties in mice. The present study investigated the possible additive or synergistic effects of lobeline in combination with commonly used antidepressants, such as reboxetine, fluoxetine, or bupropion, using the tail suspension test (TST) and the forced swim test (FST) in C57BL/6J mice. Reboxetine (5 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.), fluoxetine (5 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.), or bupropion (2 or 4 mg/kg, i.p.) were administered 30 min before TST or FST. A fixed dose of lobeline (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 15 min prior to tests. Co-administration of lobeline and reboxetine, fluoxetine, or bupropion significantly reduced immobility time in the TST and FST in comparison to the antidepressants used alone. The results suggest that lobeline enhanced the effects of reboxetine, fluoxetine, or bupropion in mice. Therefore, lobeline or similar nicotinic receptor ligand may have therapeutic potential as an adjunct for the treatment of major depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chronic retinoic acid treatment suppresses adult hippocampal neurogenesis, in close correlation with depressive-like behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Pu; Wang, Yu; Liu, Ji; Meng, Fan-Tao; Qi, Xin-Rui; Chen, Lin; van Dam, Anne-Marie; Joëls, Marian; Lucassen, Paul J; Zhou, Jiang-Ning

    Clinical studies have highlighted an association between retinoid treatment and depressive symptoms. As we had shown before that chronic application of all-trans retinoic acid (RA) potently activated the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis, we here questioned whether RA also induced

  11. Chronic retinoic acid treatment suppresses adult hippocampal neurogenesis, in close correlation with depressive-like behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, P.; Wang, Y.; Liu, J.; Meng, F.T; Qi, X.R.; Chen, L.; van Dam, A.M.; Joëls, M.; Lucassen, P.J.; Zhou, J.N.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies have highlighted an association between retinoid treatment and depressive symptoms. As we had shown before that chronic application of all-trans retinoic acid (RA) potently activated the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis, we here questioned whether RA also induced

  12. Voluntary exercise and depression-like behavior in rodents - are we running in the right direction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mul, Joram D.

    2018-01-01

    Acute or chronic exposure to stress can increase the risk to develop major depressive disorder, a severe, recurrent and common psychiatric condition. Depression places an enormous social and financial burden on modern society. Although many depressed patients are treated with antidepressants, their

  13. Impaired retention of depression-like behavior in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianwen Luo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available By using a 5-day forced swimming test (FS that we previously developed, swim immobility was induced in 3xTg Alzheimer's model mice and wild-type (WT mice. After the initial 5-day FS, the next and last swimming session was performed at a 4-week interval, during which the immobility was reduced in 3xTg mice, but was maintained fully in WT mice. After FS, context-dependent fear learning was normally induced in WT mice, but was impaired in 3xTg mice, suggesting that FS may exaggerate cognitive deficits typical to 3xTg mice. Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses was suppressed by FS in WT mice, but not in 3xTg mice, indicating that FS modifies LTP in the WT mouse hippocampus, but not in 3xTg tissue. FS increased excitability of cingulate cortex pyramidal cells similarly in WT and 3xTg mice. Agreeing with our previous finding that expression of Homer1a protein is decreased in the cingulate cortex in harmony with FS-induced immobility, western blot showed that Homer1a expression is reduced by FS in the WT mice. In 3xTg mice, by contrast, FS failed to reduce Homer1a expression. The disrupted endurance of FS-induced immobility in 3xTg mice appears to be attributable to impaired cognition typical to this genotype. Failure of FS to alter LTP magnitude might be related to unaltered Homer1a expression after FS in 3xTg mice.

  14. Effects of pre-germinated brown rice on depression-like behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamiya, Takayoshi; Kise, Mitsuo; Morikawa, Keiko; Aoto, Hiromichi; Ukai, Makoto; Noda, Yukihiro

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the antidepressant-like effects of pre-germinated brown rice (PGBR) and polished rice (PR) pellets, respectively, in comparison with control (AIN-93G) pellets in the forced swimming test and the learned helplessness paradigm in mice. Mice were fed respective pellets for 30 days. The immobility time on the 2nd day of the forced swimming test was shorter in mice fed with PR or PGBR pellets than in mice fed with control pellets. In the learned helplessness paradigm, the number of escape failures in mice fed with PGBR pellets was significantly smaller than that in mice fed with control pellets. Compared to the control group, an increase in serotonin (5-HT) levels, but not in 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels, and a decrease in the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio were observed in the frontal cortex of the PGBR group. There were no differences among the three groups in terms of 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels and their ratios in the hippocampus and striatum. The levels of noradrenaline and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol were not affected by the food pellets in all the brain regions tested. Additionally, we could not detect any differences in the expression of the 5-HT1A receptor and the 5-HT transporter in the frontal cortex of the three groups. These results suggest that the increase of 5-HT levels in the mouse frontal cortex contributes to the antidepressant-like effects of PGBR pellets.

  15. Role of CRF and other neuropeptides in stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Uri; Erb, Suzanne; Shaham, Yavin

    2010-02-16

    A central problem in the treatment of drug addiction is high rates of relapse to drug use after periods of forced or self-imposed abstinence. This relapse is often provoked by exposure to stress. Stress-induced relapse to drug seeking can be modeled in laboratory animals using a reinstatement procedure. In this procedure, drug-taking behaviors are extinguished and then reinstated by acute exposure to stressors like intermittent unpredictable footshock, restraint, food deprivation, and systemic injections of yohimbine, an alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist that induces stress-like responses in humans and nonhumans. For this special issue entitled "The role of neuropeptides in stress and addiction", we review results from studies on the role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and several other peptides in stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking in laboratory animals. The results of the studies reviewed indicate that extrahypothalamic CRF plays a critical role in stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking; this role is largely independent of drug class, experimental procedure, and type of stressor. There is also limited evidence for the role of dynorphins, hypocretins (orexins), nociceptin (orphanin FQ), and leptin in stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Probiotic treatment protects against the pro-depressant-like effect of high-fat diet in Flinders Sensitive Line rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abildgaard, Anders; Elfving, Betina; Hokland, Marianne; Lund, Sten; Wegener, Gregers

    2017-10-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is highly associated with dysmetabolic conditions, such as obesity and diabetes mellitus type 2, and the gut microbiota may interact with both disease entities. We have previously shown that a high-fat diet (HFD) exacerbated depressive-like behaviour uniquely in Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats that inherently present with an increased level of depressive-like behaviour compared with Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) rats. We therefore investigated whether multispecies probiotics possessed anti-depressant-like effect in FSL rats or protected against the pro-depressant-like effect of HFD. We also examined blood and cerebral T cell subsets as well as plasma cytokines. Lastly, we investigated the effect of HFD in outbred Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats to substantiate the association between depressive-like behaviour and any immunological measures affected by HFD. HFD exacerbated the depressive-like behaviour in FSL rats in the forced swim test, whereas SD rats remained unaffected. Probiotic treatment completely precluded the pro-depressant-like effect of HFD, but it did not affect FSL rats on control diet. Cerebral T lymphocyte CD4/8 ratios closely mirrored the behavioural changes, whereas the proportions of Treg and Th17 subsets were unaltered. No association between blood and brain CD4/8 ratios were evident; nor did plasma cytokine levels change as a consequence of HFD of probiotic treatment. Our findings suggest that MDD may hold a dysmetabolic component that responds to probiotic treatment. This finding has wide implications owing to the high metabolic comorbidity in MDD. Furthermore, the close association between depressive-like behaviour and cerebral T cell populations demonstrate lymphocyte-brain interactions as a promising future research area in the field of psychoneuroimmunology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Depressive-like effect of prenatal exposure to DDT involves global DNA hypomethylation and impairment of GPER1/ESR1 protein levels but not ESR2 and AHR/ARNT signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajta, Malgorzata; Wnuk, Agnieszka; Rzemieniec, Joanna; Litwa, Ewa; Lason, Wladyslaw; Zelek-Molik, Agnieszka; Nalepa, Irena; Rogóż, Zofia; Grochowalski, Adam; Wojtowicz, Anna K

    2017-07-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that exposures to Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) such as pesticides increase the risks of neuropsychiatric disorders. Despite extended residual persistence of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in the environment, the mechanisms of perinatal actions of DDT that could account for adult-onset of depression are largely unknown. This study demonstrated the isomer-specific induction of depressive-like behavior and impairment of Htr1a/serotonin signaling in one-month-old mice that were prenatally exposed to DDT. The effects were reversed by the antidepressant citalopram as evidenced in the forced swimming (FST) and tail suspension (TST) tests in the male and female mice. Prenatally administered DDT accumulated in mouse brain as determined with gas chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry, led to global DNA hypomethylation, and altered the levels of methylated DNA in specific genes. The induction of depressive-like behavior and impairment of Htr1a/serotonin signaling were accompanied by p,p'-DDT-specific decrease in the levels of estrogen receptors i.e. ESR1 and/or GPER1 depending on sex. In contrast, o,p'-DDT did not induce depressive-like effects and exhibited quite distinct pattern of biochemical alterations that was related to aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), its nuclear translocator ARNT, and ESR2. Exposure to o,p'-DDT increased AHR expression in male and female brains, and reduced expression levels of ARNT and ESR2 in the female brains. The evolution of p,p'-DDT-induced depressive-like behavior was preceded by attenuation of Htr1a and Gper1/GPER1 expression as observed in the 7-day-old mouse pups. Because p,p'-DDT caused sex- and age-independent attenuation of GPER1, we suggest that impairment of GPER1 signaling plays a key role in the propagation of DDT-induced depressive-like symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The stress-induced surface wave velocity variations in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvier, Agustin; Bittner, James; Evani, Sai Kalyan; Popovics, John S.

    2017-02-01

    This investigation studies the behavior of surface wave velocity in concrete specimens subjected to low levels of compressive and tensile stress in beams from applied flexural loads. Beam specimen is loaded in a 4-point-load bending configuration, generating uniaxial compression and tension stress fields at the top and bottom surfaces of the beam, respectively. Surface waves are generated through contactless air-coupled transducers and received through contact accelerometers. Results show a clear distinction in responses from compression and tension zones, where velocity increases in the former and decreases in the latter, with increasing load levels. These trends agree with existing acoustoelastic literature. Surface wave velocity tends to decrease more under tension than it tends to increase under compression, for equal load levels. It is observed that even at low stress levels, surface wave velocity is affected by acoustoelastic effects, coupled with plastic effects (stress-induced damage). The acoustoelastic effect is isolated by means of considering the Kaiser effect and by experimentally mitigating the viscoelastic effects of concrete. Results of this ongoing investigation contribute to the overall knowledge of the acoustoelastic behavior of concrete. Applications of this knowledge may include structural health monitoring of members under flexural loads, improved high order modelling of materials, and validation of results seen in dynamic acoustoelasticity testing.

  19. Anxiety- and Depression-Like States Lead to Pronounced Olfactory Deficits and Impaired Adult Neurogenesis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siopi, Eleni; Denizet, Marie; Gabellec, Marie-Madeleine; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Guilloux, Jean-Philippe; Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Lazarini, Françoise

    2016-01-13

    Numerous clinical reports underscore the frequency of olfactory impairments in patients suffering from major depressive disorders (MDDs), yet the underlying physiopathological mechanisms remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that one key link between olfactory deficits and MDD lies in hypercortisolemia, a cardinal symptom of MDD. Corticosterone (CORT) is known to negatively correlate with hippocampal neurogenesis, yet its effects on olfactory neurogenesis and olfaction remain unknown. Here we used a rodent model of anxiety/depression-like states, which is based on chronic CORT administration and studied the effects of the antidepressant fluoxetine (FLX) on behavior, olfaction, and adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG), olfactory bulb (OB), and the olfactory epithelium (OE). Chronic CORT had no effect on cell proliferation in the OE or on olfactory sensory neurons projecting to the OB, but induced pronounced deficits in olfactory acuity, fine discrimination of odorants and olfactory memory. These alterations were accompanied by a significant decrease in the number of adult-born neurons in both the DG and OB. Remarkably, FLX not only reversed depression-like states as expected, but also improved olfactory acuity, memory, and restored impaired adult neurogenesis. However, fine olfactory discrimination was not restored. Morphological analysis of adult-born neurons in both the DG and the OB showed that dendritic complexity was not significantly affected by CORT, but was increased by FLX. These findings demonstrate an essential role for glucocorticoids in triggering olfactory impairments in MDD and highlight a novel therapeutic effect of FLX. Increasing clinical reports show that major depression is characterized by pronounced olfactory deficits, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this work, we used an endocrine model of depression to study whether hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis perturbation could be sufficient to provoke olfactory

  20. Maternal separation increases later immobility during forced swim in guinea pig pups: evidence for sensitization of a depressive-like state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Michael B; Schreibeis, Amanda D; Schiml, Patricia A; Deak, Terrence

    2017-01-01

    Early-life stress is thought to increase later vulnerability for developing depressive illness by sensitizing underlying stress-responsive systems. Guinea pig pups separated from their mother and isolated in a novel cage for 3 hr exhibit a sensitized depressive-like behavioral response when separated again the following day as well as weeks later. The behavioral response and its sensitization appear to be mediated by inflammatory factors. To determine if this sensitization is specific to the separation response or if it reflects a broader underlying depressive-like state, guinea pig pups that had either been separated for 3 hr or remained with their mothers were observed in the forced swim test the following 3 days. Earlier separation was found to increase the duration of immobility, a measure sensitive to antidepressant treatment. These results support the use of the guinea pig as a model for examining mechanisms of inflammatory-mediated sensitization of depression following stress in early life. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The acute social defeat stress and nest-building test paradigm: A potential new method to screen drugs for depressive-like symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otabi, Hikari; Goto, Tatsuhiko; Okayama, Tsuyoshi; Kohari, Daisuke; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2017-02-01

    Psychosocial stress can cause mental conditions such as depression in humans. To develop drug therapies for the treatment of depression, it is necessary to use animal models of depression to screen drug candidates that exhibit anti-depressive effects. Unfortunately, the present methods of drug screening for antidepressants, the forced-swim test and tail-suspension test, are limiting factors in drug discovery because they are not based on the constructive validity of objective phenotypes in depression. Previously, we discovered that the onset of nest building is severely delayed in mice exposed to subchronic mild social defeat stress (sCSDS). Therefore, a novel paradigm combining acute social defeat stress (ASDS) and the nest-building test (SNB) were established for the efficient screening of drugs for depressive-like symptoms. Since ASDS severely delayed the nest-building process as shown in chronically social defeated mice, we sought to rescue the delayed nest-building behavior in ASDS mice. Injecting a specific serotonin 2a receptor antagonist (SR-46349B), the nest-building deficit exhibited by ASDS mice was partially rescued. On the other hand, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine) did not rescue the nest-building deficit in ASDS mice. Therefore, we conclude that the SNB paradigm is an another potential behavioral method for screening drugs for depressive-like symptoms including attention deficit, anxiety, low locomotion, and decreased motivation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prenatal exposure to urban air nanoparticles in mice causes altered neuronal differentiation and depression-like responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Davis

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that excessive exposure to traffic-derived air pollution during pregnancy may increase the vulnerability to neurodevelopmental alterations that underlie a broad array of neuropsychiatric disorders. We present a mouse model for prenatal exposure to urban freeway nanoparticulate matter (nPM. In prior studies, we developed a model for adult rodent exposure to re-aerosolized urban nPM which caused inflammatory brain responses with altered neuronal glutamatergic functions. nPMs are collected continuously for one month from a local freeway and stored as an aqueous suspension, prior to re-aerosolization for exposure of mice under controlled dose and duration. This paradigm was used for a pilot study of prenatal nPM impact on neonatal neurons and adult behaviors. Adult C57BL/6J female mice were exposed to re-aerosolized nPM (350 µg/m(3 or control filtered ambient air for 10 weeks (3×5 hour exposures per week, encompassing gestation and oocyte maturation prior to mating. Prenatal nPM did not alter litter size, pup weight, or postnatal growth. Neonatal cerebral cortex neurons at 24 hours in vitro showed impaired differentiation, with 50% reduction of stage 3 neurons with long neurites and correspondingly more undifferentiated neurons at Stages 0 and 1. Neuron number after 24 hours of culture was not altered by prenatal nPM exposure. Addition of exogenous nPM (2 µg/ml to the cultures impaired pyramidal neuron Stage 3 differentiation by 60%. Adult males showed increased depression-like responses in the tail-suspension test, but not anxiety-related behaviors. These pilot data suggest that prenatal exposure to nPM can alter neuronal differentiation with gender-specific behavioral sequelae that may be relevant to human prenatal exposure to urban vehicular aerosols.

  3. Programming stress-induced altruistic death in engineered bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanouchi, Yu; Pai, Anand; Buchler, Nicolas E; You, Lingchong

    2012-01-01

    Programmed death is often associated with a bacterial stress response. This behavior appears paradoxical, as it offers no benefit to the individual. This paradox can be explained if the death is ‘altruistic': the killing of some cells can benefit the survivors through release of ‘public goods'. However, the conditions where bacterial programmed death becomes advantageous have not been unambiguously demonstrated experimentally. Here, we determined such conditions by engineering tunable, stress-induced altruistic death in the bacterium Escherichia coli. Using a mathematical model, we predicted the existence of an optimal programmed death rate that maximizes population growth under stress. We further predicted that altruistic death could generate the ‘Eagle effect', a counter-intuitive phenomenon where bacteria appear to grow better when treated with higher antibiotic concentrations. In support of these modeling insights, we experimentally demonstrated both the optimality in programmed death rate and the Eagle effect using our engineered system. Our findings fill a critical conceptual gap in the analysis of the evolution of bacterial programmed death, and have implications for a design of antibiotic treatment. PMID:23169002

  4. Stress-induced alterations in estradiol sensitivity increase risk for obesity in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michopoulos, Vasiliki

    2016-11-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the United States continues to rise, increasing individual vulnerability to an array of adverse health outcomes. One factor that has been implicated causally in the increased accumulation of fat and excess food intake is the activity of the limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (LHPA) axis in the face of relentless stressor exposure. However, translational and clinical research continues to understudy the effects sex and gonadal hormones and LHPA axis dysfunction in the etiology of obesity even though women continue to be at greater risk than men for stress-induced disorders, including depression, emotional feeding and obesity. The current review will emphasize the need for sex-specific evaluation of the relationship between stress exposure and LHPA axis activity on individual risk for obesity by summarizing data generated by animal models currently being leveraged to determine the etiology of stress-induced alterations in feeding behavior and metabolism. There exists a clear lack of translational models that have been used to study female-specific risk. One translational model of psychosocial stress exposure that has proven fruitful in elucidating potential mechanisms by which females are at increased risk for stress-induced adverse health outcomes is that of social subordination in socially housed female macaque monkeys. Data from subordinate female monkeys suggest that increased risk for emotional eating and the development of obesity in females may be due to LHPA axis-induced changes in the behavioral and physiological sensitivity of estradiol. The lack in understanding of the mechanisms underlying these alterations necessitate the need to account for the effects of sex and gonadal hormones in the rationale, design, implementation, analysis and interpretation of results in our studies of stress axis function in obesity. Doing so may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets with which to combat stress-induced obesity

  5. Possible Biomarkers of Chronic Stress Induced Exhaustion - A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallensten, Johanna; Åsberg, Marie; Nygren, Åke; Szulkin, Robert; Wallén, Håkan; Mobarrez, Fariborz; Nager, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) have previously been suggested to be potential biomarkers for chronic stress induced exhaustion. The knowledge about VEGF has increased during the last decades and supports the contention that VEGF plays an important role in stress and depression. There is scarce knowledge on the possible relationship of EGF and MCP-1 in chronic stress and depression. This study further examines the role of VEGF, EGF and MCP-1 in women with chronic stress induced exhaustion and healthy women during a follow-up period of two years. Blood samples were collected from 105 women with chronic stress induced exhaustion on at least 50% sick leave for at least three months, at inclusion (T0), after 12 months (T12) and after 24 months (T24). Blood samples were collected at inclusion (T0) in 116 physically and psychiatrically healthy women. The plasma levels of VEGF, EGF and MCP-1 were analyzed using Biochip Array Technology. Women with chronic stress induced exhaustion had significantly higher plasma levels of VEGF and EGF compared to healthy women at baseline, T12 and at T24. There was no significant difference in plasma levels of MCP-1. Plasma levels of VEGF and EGF decreased significantly in women with chronic stress induced exhaustion during the two years follow-up. The replicated findings of elevated levels of VEGF and EGF in women with chronic stress induced exhaustion and decreasing plasma levels of VEGF and EGF during the two years follow-up add important knowledge to the pathophysiology of chronic stress induced exhaustion.

  6. CD4+ T cells confer anxiolytic and anti-depressant like effects, but enhance fear memory processes in Rag2−/− mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Sarah M.; Soroka, Jennifer A; Song, Chang; Li, Xin; Tonelli, Leonardo H

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports a role for T cells in behavioral stress responsiveness. Our laboratory previously reported that lymphocyte deficient Rag2−/− mice on a BALB/c background display resilience to maladaptive stress responses when compared with immune competent mice in the predator odor exposure (POE) paradigm while exhibiting similar behavior in a cued fear-conditioning (FC) paradigm. In the present study Rag2−/− mice on a C57BL/6 background were assessed in the same behavioral paradigms, as well additional tests of anxiety and depressive-like behavior. Furthermore, the effects of naïve CD4+ T cells were evaluated by adoptive transfer of functional cells from non-stressed, wild-type donors to Rag2−/− mice. Consistent with our prior results, Rag2−/− mice displayed an attenuated startle response after POE. Nevertheless, reconstitution of Rag2−/− mice with CD4+ T cells did not modify startle reactivity. Additionally, in contrast with our previous findings, Rag2−/− mice showed attenuated fear responses in the FC paradigm compared to wild type mice and reconstitution with CD4+ T cells promoted fear learning and memory. Notably, reconstitution with CD4+ T cells had anxiolytic and anti-depressant like effects in Rag2−/− mice that had not been previously stressed, but had no effect after POE. Taken together, our results support a role for CD4+ T cells in emotionality, but also indicate that they may promote fear responses by enhancing learning and memory processes. PMID:27295202

  7. Anti-anxiety and Anti-depressant Like Effects of Murraya koenigii in Experimental Models of Anxiety and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Snigdha; Handu, Shailendra; Dubey, Ashok Kumar; Sharma, Prashant; Mediratta, Pramod; Ahmed, Qazi Mushtaq

    2017-01-01

    Background: Presence of free radical scavenging activity in Murraya koenigii, commonly known as Curry leaves, has been shown in previous studies. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of various neurobehavioral disorders including anxiety and depression. Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of Murraya koenigii in animal models of depression and anxiety. Materials and Methods: The effect of incremental doses of Murraya koenigii aqueous leaf extract was evaluated on spontaneous motor activity (SMA), open arm incursions in elevated plus maze, and despair behaviour in forced swim (FST) and tail suspension (TST) tests as compared to control groups in Swiss albino mice. Results: Murraya koenigii 300 mg/kg, p.o. (MK300) and 400 mg/kg, p.o. (MK400) reduced the SMA count from 754 ± 64.9 to 540 ± 29 and 295 ± 34 respectively, which was statistically significant. MK300 and MK400 reduced significantly the open arm count from 29 ± 8.6 to 16 ± 7 and 10 ± 3.9, respectively. On FST, MK400 reduced the duration of immobility from 145.5 ± 29 to 91 ± 17.3, which was statistically significant. On TST, MK produced a dose-dependent decrease in the duration of immobility; however, it was statistically significant only with MK400. Conclusion: Murraya koenigii aqueous leaf extract reduced the despair behavior in experimental animal models, suggesting an anti-depressant like activity. Murraya koenigii extract also reduced spontaneous locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner suggesting a sedative and/or anxiolytic effect though there wasn’t any anxiolytic effect in the elevated plus maze test. PMID:29269974

  8. Anti-anxiety and Anti-depressant Like Effects ofMurraya koenigiiin Experimental Models of Anxiety and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Snigdha; Handu, Shailendra; Dubey, Ashok Kumar; Sharma, Prashant; Mediratta, Pramod; Ahmed, Qazi Mushtaq

    2017-01-01

    Presence of free radical scavenging activity in Murraya koenigii , commonly known as Curry leaves, has been shown in previous studies. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of various neurobehavioral disorders including anxiety and depression. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of Murraya koenigii in animal models of depression and anxiety. The effect of incremental doses of Murraya koenigii aqueous leaf extract was evaluated on spontaneous motor activity (SMA), open arm incursions in elevated plus maze, and despair behaviour in forced swim (FST) and tail suspension (TST) tests as compared to control groups in Swiss albino mice. Murraya koenigii 300 mg/kg, p.o. (MK300) and 400 mg/kg, p.o. (MK400) reduced the SMA count from 754 ± 64.9 to 540 ± 29 and 295 ± 34 respectively, which was statistically significant. MK300 and MK400 reduced significantly the open arm count from 29 ± 8.6 to 16 ± 7 and 10 ± 3.9, respectively. On FST, MK400 reduced the duration of immobility from 145.5 ± 29 to 91 ± 17.3, which was statistically significant. On TST, MK produced a dose-dependent decrease in the duration of immobility; however, it was statistically significant only with MK400. Murraya koenigii aqueous leaf extract reduced the despair behavior in experimental animal models, suggesting an anti-depressant like activity. Murraya koenigii extract also reduced spontaneous locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner suggesting a sedative and/or anxiolytic effect though there wasn't any anxiolytic effect in the elevated plus maze test.

  9. Anti-anxiety and anti-depressant like effects of murraya koenigii in experimental models of anxiety and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snigdha Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Presence of free radical scavenging activity in Murraya koenigii, commonly known as Curry leaves, has been shown in previous studies. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of various neurobehavioral disorders including anxiety and depression. Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of Murraya koenigii in animal models of depression and anxiety. Materials and Methods: The effect of incremental doses of Murraya koenigii aqueous leaf extract was evaluated on spontaneous motor activity (SMA, open arm incursions in elevated plus maze, and despair behaviour in forced swim (FST and tail suspension (TST tests as compared to control groups in Swiss albino mice. Results: Murraya koenigii 300 mg/kg, p.o. (MK300 and 400 mg/kg, p.o. (MK400 reduced the SMA count from 754 ± 64.9 to 540 ± 29 and 295 ± 34 respectively, which was statistically significant. MK300 and MK400 reduced significantly the open arm count from 29 ± 8.6 to 16 ± 7 and 10 ± 3.9, respectively. On FST, MK400 reduced the duration of immobility from 145.5 ± 29 to 91 ± 17.3, which was statistically significant. On TST, MK produced a dose-dependent decrease in the duration of immobility; however, it was statistically significant only with MK400. Conclusion: Murraya koenigii aqueous leaf extract reduced the despair behavior in experimental animal models, suggesting an anti-depressant like activity. Murraya koenigii extract also reduced spontaneous locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner suggesting a sedative and/or anxiolytic effect though there wasn't any anxiolytic effect in the elevated plus maze test.

  10. Quantification of stress-induced damage and post-fire response of 5083 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y., E-mail: yanyun@vt.edu [Department of Engineering Science & Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Puplampu, S.B. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Summers, P.T.; Lattimer, B.Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Penumadu, D. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Case, S.W. [Department of Engineering Science & Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2015-08-12

    One of the major concerns regarding the use of lightweight materials in ship construction is the response of those materials to fire scenarios, including the residual structural performance after a fire event. This paper presents a study on creep damage evolution in 5083 marine-grade aluminum alloy and its impact on residual mechanical behavior. Tests conducted at 400 °C and pre-selected tensile stress levels were interrupted at target amplitudes of accumulated engineering creep strains to investigate the stress-induced damage using ex-situ characterization. Two-dimensional optical and electron microscopy and three-dimensional X-ray tomography were utilized on samples extracted from these test specimens to characterize the external and internal creep damage. The stress-induced damage is primarily manifested as cavitation and dynamic microstructural evolution. Cavitation morphology, orientation and grain structure evolution were investigated on three perpendicular sample surfaces. A 3D examination of the damage state provided consistent damage information to that obtained from the 2D analysis. The post-fire mechanical properties were also evaluated and linked to the microstructural change. The competing processes of cavitation and grain structure evolution were investigated to develop an understanding of the stress-induced damage associated with high temperature creep.

  11. Synthetic cathinones and stereochemistry: S enantiomer of mephedrone reduces anxiety- and depressant-like effects in cocaine- or MDPV-abstinent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philogene-Khalid, Helene L; Hicks, Callum; Reitz, Allen B; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Rawls, Scott M

    2017-09-01

    The neuropharmacological profile of the synthetic cathinone mephedrone (MEPH) is influenced by stereochemistry. Both MEPH enantiomers are monoamine transporter substrates, but R-MEPH is primarily responsible for rewarding effects of MEPH as it produces greater locomotor activation and intracranial self-stimulation than S-MEPH. S-MEPH is a 50-fold more potent 5-HT releaser than R-MEPH and does not place preference in rats. MEPH is also structurally similar to the cathinone derivative bupropion, an antidepressant and smoking cessation medication, suggesting MEPH has therapeutic and addictive properties. We tested the hypothesis that S-MEPH reduces anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in rats withdrawn from chronic cocaine or methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) using the elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swim test (FST), respectively. Rats were tested 48-h after a binge-like paradigm (3×/day for 10days in 1-h intervals) of cocaine (10mg/kg), MDPV (1mg/kg) or saline. In vitro studies assessed the receptor binding and activity of S-MEPH. Rats withdrawn from chronic cocaine or MDPV displayed an increase in anxiety- and depression-like behaviors that was antagonized by treatment with S-MEPH (10, 30mg/kg). S-MEPH displayed affinity, but not agonist activity, for 5-HT 2 receptors (2A-2C) and showed negligible affinity for dopaminergic, adrenergic and nicotinic receptors. S-MEPH attenuated withdrawal behaviors following chronic cocaine or MDPV, perhaps through 5-HT release and/or 5-HT 2 receptor interactions. The present data suggest S-MEPH may be a possible structural and pharmacological template to develop maintenance therapy for acute anxiety and depression during early withdrawal from psychostimulant abuse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Npas4 deficiency on anxiety, depression-like, cognition and sociability behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaehne, Emily J; Klarić, Thomas S; Koblar, Simon A; Baune, Bernhard T; Lewis, Martin D

    2015-03-15

    The transcription factor neuronal PAS domain-containing protein 4 (Npas4), which regulates the formation of inhibitory synapses on excitatory neurons, has been suggested as a candidate gene for neurological and psychiatric conditions such as bipolar depression, autism spectrum and cognitive disorders. A mouse model of Npas4 deficiency has been developed to investigate any role in these disorders. Behavioural characterisation of Npas4(-/-), Npas4(+/-) and Npas4(+/+) mice has been conducted using the open field, elevated zero maze (EZM), Y-maze, sociability test and forced swim test (FST) to investigate a range of behaviours. Npas4(-/-) mice spent more time in the open arm of the EZM than other genotypes, suggesting decreased anxiety-like behaviour. Npas4(+/-) mice, however, were more immobile in the FST than other genotypes, suggesting increased depression-like behaviour, and also showed impaired spatial recognition memory in the Y-maze. There were no differences between genotype in social behaviour. These results suggest that differential levels of Npas4 expression in the brain may regulate anxiety, depression and cognition related disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen mediate stress-induced decline of neuronal and cognitive functions in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Robert; Rao, B S Shankaranarayana; Melchor, Jerry P; Chattarji, Sumantra; McEwen, Bruce; Strickland, Sidney

    2005-12-13

    Repeated stress can impair function in the hippocampus, a brain structure essential for learning and memory. Although behavioral evidence suggests that severe stress triggers cognitive impairment, as seen in major depression or posttraumatic stress disorder, little is known about the molecular mediators of these functional deficits in the hippocampus. We report here both pre- and postsynaptic effects of chronic stress, manifested as a reduction in the number of NMDA receptors, dendritic spines, and expression of growth-associated protein-43 in the cornu ammonis 1 region. Strikingly, the stress-induced decrease in NMDA receptors coincides spatially with sites of plasminogen activation, thereby predicting a role for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in this form of stress-induced plasticity. Consistent with this possibility, tPA-/- and plasminogen-/- mice are protected from stress-induced decrease in NMDA receptors and reduction in dendritic spines. At the behavioral level, these synaptic and molecular signatures of stress-induced plasticity are accompanied by impaired acquisition, but not retrieval, of hippocampal-dependent spatial learning, a deficit that is not exhibited by the tPA-/- and plasminogen-/- mice. These findings establish the tPA/plasmin system as an important mediator of the debilitating effects of prolonged stress on hippocampal function at multiple levels of neural organization.

  14. Effects of the chronic restraint stress induced depression on reward-related learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pan; Wang, Kezhu; Lu, Cong; Dong, Liming; Chen, Yixi; Wang, Qiong; Shi, Zhe; Yang, Yanyan; Chen, Shanguang; Liu, Xinmin

    2017-03-15

    Chronic mild or unpredictability stress produces a persistent depressive-like state. The main symptoms of depression include weight loss, despair, anhedonia, diminished motivation and mild cognition impairment, which could influence the ability of reward-related learning. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of chronic restraint stress on the performance of reward-related learning of rats. We used the exposure of repeated restraint stress (6h/day, for 28days) to induce depression-like behavior in rats. Then designed tasks including Pavlovian conditioning (magazine head entries), acquisition and maintenance of instrumental conditioning (lever pressing) and goal directed learning (higher fixed ratio schedule of reinforcement) to study the effects of chronic restraint stress. The results indicated that chronic restraint stress influenced rats in those aspects including the acquisition of a Pavlovian stimulus-outcome (S-O) association, the formation and maintenance of action-outcome (A-O) causal relation and the ability of learning in higher fixed ratio schedule. In conclusion, depression could influence the performances in reward-related learning obviously and the series of instrumental learning tasks may have potential as a method to evaluate cognitive changes in depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Water stress induced changes in antioxidant enzymes, membrane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... Water stress induced changes in antioxidant enzymes membrane stablity index and seed protein profiling of four different wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) accessions (011251, 011417, 011320 and 011393) were determined in a pot study under natural condition during the wheat-growing season 2005 and.

  16. Serotonergic involvement in stress-induced vasopressin and oxytocin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjaer, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the involvement of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine - 5-HT) receptors in mediation of stress-induced arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) secretion in male rats. DESIGN: Experiments on laboratory rats with control groups. METHODS: Different stress paradigms were...

  17. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by alcoholic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by alcoholic extract and oil of Lepidium Sativum seeds in human liver cell line HepG2. ... The results show that LSA and LSO reduced cell viability, and altered the cellular morphology in dose dependent manner. Concentrations (100 to 1000 μg/ml) of LSA and LSO were ...

  18. Stress-induced senescence and plant tolerance to abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Nir; Del Mar Rubio-Wilhelmi, María; Umnajkitikorn, Kamolchanok; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2017-07-26

    Senescence is an age-dependent process, ultimately leading to plant death, that in annual crop plants overlaps with the reproductive stage of development. Research on the molecular and biochemical mechanisms of leaf senescence has revealed a multi-layered regulatory network operating to control age-dependent processes. Abiotic stress-induced senescence challenges source-sink relationships and results in significant reduction in crop yields. Although processes associated with plant senescence are well studied, the mechanisms regulating stress-induced senescence are not well known. Here, we discuss the effects of abiotic stress on crop productivity, mechanisms associated with stress-induced senescence, and the possible use of these mechanisms for the generation of plant stress tolerance. We emphasize the involvement of source strength and stability of the photosynthetic apparatus in this process, and suggest a possible role of a perennial plant life strategy for the amelioration of stress-induced senescence. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Serotonergic involvement in stress-induced vasopressin and oxytocin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjaer, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the involvement of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine - 5-HT) receptors in mediation of stress-induced arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) secretion in male rats. DESIGN: Experiments on laboratory rats with control groups. METHODS: Different stress paradigms were ap...

  20. Implication of Snail in Metabolic Stress-Induced Necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Min Kyung; Moon, Ji Young; Park, Hye Gyeong; Yoo, Mi-Ae; Choi, Byung Tae; Yook, Jong In; Lim, Sung-Chul; Han, Song Iy; Kang, Ho Sung

    2011-01-01

    Background Necrosis, a type of cell death accompanied by the rupture of the plasma membrane, promotes tumor progression and aggressiveness by releasing the pro-inflammatory and angiogenic cytokine high mobility group box 1. It is commonly found in the core region of solid tumors due to hypoxia and glucose depletion (GD) resulting from insufficient vascularization. Thus, metabolic stress-induced necrosis has important clinical implications for tumor development; however, its regulatory mechanisms have been poorly investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we show that the transcription factor Snail, a key regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is induced in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent manner in both two-dimensional culture of cancer cells, including A549, HepG2, and MDA-MB-231, in response to GD and the inner regions of a multicellular tumor spheroid system, an in vitro model of solid tumors and of human tumors. Snail short hairpin (sh) RNA inhibited metabolic stress-induced necrosis in two-dimensional cell culture and in multicellular tumor spheroid system. Snail shRNA-mediated necrosis inhibition appeared to be linked to its ability to suppress metabolic stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial permeability transition, which are the primary events that trigger necrosis. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Snail is implicated in metabolic stress-induced necrosis, providing a new function for Snail in tumor progression. PMID:21448462

  1. Severity of Stress Induced Factors Among Students in Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... stress induced factors were ranked as highly experienced-while physical and health, personal psychological, administrative, future Concerns and moral and religious stressors were ranked as lowly experienced. It was therefore suggested that counselling centers be established in Nigerian institutions of higher learning to ...

  2. Effect of stress-induced grain growth during room temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Effect of stress-induced grain growth during room temperature tensile deformation on ductility in nanocrystalline metals. WEICHANG XU, PINQIANG DAI* and XIAOLEI WU. †. College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108, China. †. State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute ...

  3. Effect of stress-induced grain growth during room temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    -induced grain ... The TEM observations reveal that stress-induced grain growth during tensile deformation is significantly suppressed for the nc Ni–Co alloys rich in Co in sharp contrast to those poor in Co. We believe that sufficient solutes ...

  4. Impaired Functional Connectivity in the Prefrontal Cortex: A Mechanism for Chronic Stress-Induced Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Negrón-Oyarzo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress-related psychiatric diseases, such as major depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and schizophrenia, are characterized by a maladaptive organization of behavioral responses that strongly affect the well-being of patients. Current evidence suggests that a functional impairment of the prefrontal cortex (PFC is implicated in the pathophysiology of these diseases. Therefore, chronic stress may impair PFC functions required for the adaptive orchestration of behavioral responses. In the present review, we integrate evidence obtained from cognitive neuroscience with neurophysiological research with animal models, to put forward a hypothesis that addresses stress-induced behavioral dysfunctions observed in stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. We propose that chronic stress impairs mechanisms involved in neuronal functional connectivity in the PFC that are required for the formation of adaptive representations for the execution of adaptive behavioral responses. These considerations could be particularly relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of chronic stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders.

  5. Stress-induced premature senescence or stress-induced senescence-like phenotype: one in vivo reality, two possible definitions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Olivier; Dumont, Patrick; Remacle, José; Dierick, Jean-François; Pascal, Thierry; Frippiat, Christophe; Magalhaes, Joao Pedro; Zdanov, Stéphanie; Chainiaux, Florence

    2002-01-29

    No consensus exists so far on the definition of cellular senescence. The narrowest definition of senescence is irreversible growth arrest triggered by telomere shortening counting cell generations (definition 1). Other authors gave an enlarged functional definition encompassing any kind of irreversible arrest of proliferative cell types induced by damaging agents or cell cycle deregulations after overexpression of proto-oncogenes (definition 2). As stress increases, the proportion of cells in "stress-induced premature senescence-like phenotype" according to definition 1 or "stress-induced premature senescence," according to definition 2, should increase when a culture reaches growth arrest, and the proportion of cells that reached telomere-dependent replicative senescence due to the end-replication problem should decrease. Stress-induced premature senescence-like phenotype and telomere-dependent replicatively senescent cells share basic similarities such as irreversible growth arrest and resistance to apoptosis, which may appear through different pathways. Irreversible growth arrest after exposure to oxidative stress and generation of DNA damage could be as efficient in avoiding immortalisation as "telomere-dependent" replicative senescence. Probabilities are higher that the senescent cells (according to definition 2) appearing in vivo are in stress-induced premature senescence rather than in telomere-dependent replicative senescence. Examples are given suggesting these cells affect in vivo tissue (patho)physiology and aging.

  6. Control of stress-induced persistent anxiety by an extra-amygdala septohypothalamic circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Todd E; Dee, Nick; Bernard, Amy; Lerchner, Walter; Heintz, Nathaniel; Anderson, David J

    2014-01-30

    The extended amygdala has dominated research on the neural circuitry of fear and anxiety, but the septohippocampal axis also plays an important role. The lateral septum (LS) is thought to suppress fear and anxiety through its outputs to the hypothalamus. However, this structure has not yet been dissected using modern tools. The type 2 CRF receptor (Crfr2) marks a subset of LS neurons whose functional connectivity we have investigated using optogenetics. Crfr2(+) cells include GABAergic projection neurons that connect with the anterior hypothalamus. Surprisingly, we find that these LS outputs enhance stress-induced behavioral measures of anxiety. Furthermore, transient activation of Crfr2(+) neurons promotes, while inhibition suppresses, persistent anxious behaviors. LS Crfr2(+) outputs also positively regulate circulating corticosteroid levels. These data identify a subset of LS projection neurons that promote, rather than suppress, stress-induced behavioral and endocrinological dimensions of persistent anxiety states and provide a cellular point of entry to LS circuitry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dissociating the effects of alternative early-life feeding schedules on the development of adult depression-like phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Vikki; Andrews, Clare; Nettle, Daniel; Bateson, Melissa

    2017-11-01

    Early-life adversity is associated with increased vulnerability to depression in humans, and depression-like phenotypes in animals. However, different types of adverse experience may leave different signatures in adulthood. We experimentally manipulated the Amount of food delivered to European starling nestlings and the begging Effort required to obtain food during early development. Here, we report behavioural data in adulthood from a task that assessed sensitivity to shifts in reward magnitude characteristic of depression-like low mood. Birds that had experienced Hard Effort were more food motivated than birds that had experienced Easy Effort. Both Effort and Amount affected sensitivity to shifts in reward magnitude: Hard Effort birds showed an enhanced negative contrast effect following loss of reward ('disappointment'), and Lean Amount birds failed to show a normal positive contrast effect following gain in reward (a lack of 'elation'). Therefore, the feeding schedule experienced for just 10 days in early life caused enduring effects on feeding motivation and sensitivity to reward loss/gain consistent with human depression. Furthermore, the contrast effects were specific to different types of adversity. These results highlight the importance of early-life feeding schedules in the development of depression-like phenotypes.

  8. A single neurotoxic dose of methamphetamine induces a long-lasting depressive-like behaviour in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carlos D; Neves, Ana F; Dias, Ana I; Freitas, Hugo J; Mendes, Sheena M; Pita, Inês; Viana, Sofia D; de Oliveira, Paulo A; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Fontes Ribeiro, Carlos A; Prediger, Rui D; Pereira, Frederico C

    2014-04-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) triggers a disruption of the monoaminergic system and METH abuse leads to negative emotional states including depressive symptoms during drug withdrawal. However, it is currently unknown if the acute toxic dosage of METH also causes a long-lasting depressive phenotype and persistent monoaminergic deficits. Thus, we now assessed the depressive-like behaviour in mice at early and long-term periods following a single high METH dose (30 mg/kg, i.p.). METH did not alter the motor function and procedural memory of mice as assessed by swimming speed and escape latency to find the platform in a cued version of the water maze task. However, METH significantly increased the immobility time in the tail suspension test at 3 and 49 days post-administration. This depressive-like profile induced by METH was accompanied by a marked depletion of frontostriatal dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmission, indicated by a reduction in the levels of dopamine, DOPAC and HVA, tyrosine hydroxylase and serotonin, observed at both 3 and 49 days post-administration. In parallel, another neurochemical feature of depression--astroglial dysfunction--was unaffected in the cortex and the striatal levels of the astrocytic protein marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein, were only transiently increased at 3 days. These findings demonstrate for the first time that a single high dose of METH induces long-lasting depressive-like behaviour in mice associated with a persistent disruption of frontostriatal dopaminergic and serotonergic homoeostasis.

  9. Thermal Stress-Induced Depolarization Loss in Conventional and Panda-Shaped Photonic Crystal Fiber Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Seyedeh Laleh; Sabaeian, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    We report on the modeling of the depolarization loss in the conventional and panda-shaped photonic crystal fiber lasers (PCFLs) due to the self-heating of the fiber, which we call it thermal stress-induced depolarization loss (TSIDL). We first calculated the temperature distribution over the fiber cross sections and then calculated the thermal stresses/strains as a function of heat load per meter. Thermal stress-induced birefringence (TSIB), which is defined as | n x - n y |, in the core and cladding regions was calculated. Finally, TSIDL was calculated for the conventional and panda-shaped PCFLs as a function of fiber length and, respectively, saturated values of 22 and 25 % were obtained which were independent of heat load per meter. For panda-shaped PCFLs, prior to being saturated, an oscillating and damping behavior against the fiber length was seen where in some lengths reached 35 %. The results are close to an experimental value of 30 % reported for a pulsed PCFL (Limpert et al., Opt Express 12:1313-1319, 2004) where the authors reported a degree of polarization of 70 % (i.e., a depolarization of 30 %). The most important result of this work is a saturation behavior of TSIDL at long-enough lengths of the fiber laser which is independent of heat load per meter. To our knowledge, this the first report of TSIBL for PCFLs.

  10. Thermodynamics of stress-induced ferroelastic transitions: Influence of anisotropy and disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloveras, Pol; Castán, Teresa; Porta, Marcel; Planes, Antoni; Saxena, Avadh

    2010-06-01

    Stress-induced stress-strain constitutive behavior has been studied in detail in ferroelastic martensites. It has been found that the weights of the long-range anisotropic interactions and of the disorder are important to determine the fine structure of the stress-strain curves. As experiments show, a wide variety of behaviors has been observed. A decrease of anisotropy and/or increase in the disorder results in changes in the temperature range where pseudoplastic and superelastic regimes are observed. Also, a smoothing of the stress-induced ferroelastic transition, accompanied with a decrease in the transition stress and the hysteresis area, is found. However, Clausius-Clapeyron slope has been observed not to depend on the specific values of anisotropy and disorder. This is in general agreement with experimental results in different alloy families, although some particular features differ from those in experiments. Elastocaloric effect has been studied as well. Varying the anisotropy slightly modifies the shape of the entropy change-temperature curve but the magnitude of the entropy change remains essentially constant.

  11. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98% on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility.

  12. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg-1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility.

  13. Environmental stress induces trinucleotide repeat mutagenesis in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Santillan, Beatriz A.; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic mutability of microsatellite repeats is implicated in the modification of gene function and disease phenotype. Studies of the enhanced instability of long trinucleotide repeats (TNRs)—the cause of multiple human diseases—have revealed a remarkable complexity of mutagenic mechanisms. Here, we show that cold, heat, hypoxic, and oxidative stresses induce mutagenesis of a long CAG repeat tract in human cells. We show that stress-response factors mediate the stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM) of CAG repeats. We show further that SIM of CAG repeats does not involve mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, or transcription, processes that are known to promote TNR mutagenesis in other pathways of instability. Instead, we find that these stresses stimulate DNA rereplication, increasing the proportion of cells with >4 C-value (C) DNA content. Knockdown of the replication origin-licensing factor CDT1 eliminates both stress-induced rereplication and CAG repeat mutagenesis. In addition, direct induction of rereplication in the absence of stress also increases the proportion of cells with >4C DNA content and promotes repeat mutagenesis. Thus, environmental stress triggers a unique pathway for TNR mutagenesis that likely is mediated by DNA rereplication. This pathway may impact normal cells as they encounter stresses in their environment or during development or abnormal cells as they evolve metastatic potential. PMID:25775519

  14. Selective Inhibition of Orexin-2 Receptors Prevents Stress-Induced ACTH Release in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Yun

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Orexins peptides exert a prominent role in arousal-related processes including stress responding, by activating orexin-1 (OX1R and orexin-2 (OX2R receptors located widely throughout the brain. Stress or orexin administration stimulates hyperarousal, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH and corticosterone release, and selective OX1R blockade can attenuate several stress-induced behavioral and cardiovascular responses but not the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis activation. As opposed to OX1R, OX2R are preferentially expressed in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus which is involved in the HPA axis regulation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a psychological stress elicited by cage exchange (CE on ACTH release in two murine models (genetic and pharmacological of selective OX2R inhibition. CE-induced stress produced a significant increase in ACTH serum levels. Mice lacking the OX2R exhibited a blunted stress response. Stress-induced ACTH release was absent in mice pre-treated with the selective OX2R antagonist JNJ-42847922 (30 mg/kg po, whereas pre-treatment with the dual OX1/2R antagonist SB-649868 (30 mg/kg po only partially attenuated the increase of ACTH. To assess whether the intrinsic and distinct sleep-promoting properties of each antagonist could account for the differential stress response, a separate group of mice implanted with electrodes for standard sleep recording were orally dosed with JNJ-42847922 or SB-649868 during the light phase. While both compounds reduced the latency to non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep without affecting its duration, a prevalent REM-sleep promoting effect was observed only in mice treated with the dual OX1/2R antagonist. These data indicate that in a psychological stress model, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of OX2R markedly attenuated stress-induced ACTH secretion, as a separately mediated effect from the NREM sleep induction of OX2R antagonism.

  15. Cocaine- or stress-induced metaplasticity of LTP in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keralapurath, Madhusudhanan M; Clark, Jason K; Hammond, Sherri; Wagner, John J

    2014-05-01

    Despite the well documented role of the hippocampus in various modes of drug reinstatement behavior, the persisting effects of in vivo cocaine exposure on hippocampal synaptic plasticity are not sufficiently understood. In this report we investigated the effects of cocaine conditioning on long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of hippocampus along its septotemporal axis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats experienced a behavioral protocol, in which locomotor activity was monitored in response to various conditioning treatments. LTP was measured in ex vivo slice preparations taken 1-2 weeks after the last behavioral session from the ventral (vH) and dorsal (dH) sectors of hippocampus. Unexpectedly, experiencing the minor intermittent stimuli of the behavioral protocol caused stress-induced metaplastic changes in both vH (increased LTP) and dH (decreased LTP) in the saline conditioned rats relative to behaviorally naïve controls. These stress effects in the vH and dH were blocked by conditioning with either mineralocorticoid (spironolactone) or glucocorticoid (mifepristone) antagonists, respectively. Stress-induced metaplasticity in the vH was also prevented by prior administration of the kappa opioid antagonist nor-binaltorphimine. Cocaine conditioning induced locomotor sensitization and significantly increased LTP in the vH without causing significant change in LTP in the dH. Cocaine-induced metaplasticity in the vH was prevented by co-administration of the dopamine D2-like antagonist eticlopride during cocaine conditioning, but not by co-administration of the D1/5 antagonist SCH 23390. Our results suggest that the functional connectivity of hippocampus is altered by metaplastic triggers such as exposure to drugs of abuse and/or stressors, thereby shifting the efferent output of hippocampus from dH (cortical) toward vH (limbic) influenced circuits. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Stress-induced eating in women with binge-eating disorder and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatzkin, Rebecca R; Gaffney, Sierra; Cyrus, Kathryn; Bigus, Elizabeth; Brownley, Kimberly A

    2016-11-09

    measuring the motivational versus hedonic aspects of stress-induced eating may expose nuanced eating behaviors that differentiate BED and obesity. If confirmed, our findings would support prevention and treatment strategies that target subsets of women based on obesity and BED status. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Stress-Induced Fracturing of Reservoir Rocks: Acoustic Monitoring and μCT Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Srutarshi; Stroisz, Anna M.; Fjær, Erling; Stenebråten, Jørn F.; Lund, Hans K.; Sønstebø, Eyvind F.

    2015-11-01

    Stress-induced fracturing in reservoir rocks is an important issue for the petroleum industry. While productivity can be enhanced by a controlled fracturing operation, it can trigger borehole instability problems by reactivating existing fractures/faults in a reservoir. However, safe fracturing can improve the quality of operations during CO2 storage, geothermal installation and gas production at and from the reservoir rocks. Therefore, understanding the fracturing behavior of different types of reservoir rocks is a basic need for planning field operations toward these activities. In our study, stress-induced fracturing of rock samples has been monitored by acoustic emission (AE) and post-experiment computer tomography (CT) scans. We have used hollow cylinder cores of sandstones and chalks, which are representatives of reservoir rocks. The fracture-triggering stress has been measured for different rocks and compared with theoretical estimates. The population of AE events shows the location of main fracture arms which is in a good agreement with post-test CT image analysis, and the fracture patterns inside the samples are visualized through 3D image reconstructions. The amplitudes and energies of acoustic events clearly indicate initiation and propagation of the main fractures. Time evolution of the radial strain measured in the fracturing tests will later be compared to model predictions of fracture size.

  18. Susceptibility to stress-induced visceral sensitivity: a bad legacy for next generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Théodorou, V

    2013-12-01

    Despite high prevalence, the precise irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) pathophysiology remains poorly understood likely due to the heterogeneity of IBS populations and the multifactorial etiology of this disorder. Among risk factors, genetic predisposition and early life trauma have been reported. In this context, the debate on genetic or environmental influences in the IBS pathogenesis is still open. The study by van der Wijngaard et al., reporting for the first time that susceptibility to stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity in maternally separated rats can be transferred to the next generation without any further exposure of F2 individuals to maternal separation, supports the importance of environmental influence in the IBS phenotype. Epigenetic mechanisms such as hypermethylation in the promoter region of the glucocorticoid receptor gene mediating the long-term and transgenerational behavioral effects of maternal care on the development have been shown in some but not in all studies. Van der Wijngaard et al. incriminated maternal care in the transmitted susceptibility to stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity, but not changes in glucocorticoid receptor protein expression in the brain. This finding opens a broad field of future directions aimed at evaluating the mechanisms involved in the transmission across generations of the digestive features of IBS, including, for example, on the role of gut microbiota changes in vertical transmission or epigenetic modifications of intestinal mast cells and the junctional region of intestinal epithelial cells in vertical transfer. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Anxiety- and depressive-like profiles during early- and mid-adolescence in the female Wistar Kyoto rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Deepthi; Sadananda, Monika

    2017-02-01

    Approaches for the development of preclinical models of depression extensively use adult and male animals owing to the discrepancies arising out of the hormonal flux in adult females and adolescents during attainment of puberty. Thus the increased vulnerability of females towards clinical depression and anxiety-related disorders remains incompletely understood. Development of clinical models of depression in adolescent females is essential in order to evolve effective treatment strategies for adolescent depression. In the present study, we have examined the anxiety and depressive-like profiles in a putative animal model of childhood depression, the Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat, during early adolescence (∼postnatal day 30) and mid-adolescence (∼postnatal day 40). Female adolescent WKY rats, tested on a series of behavioural tests modelling anxiety- and depressive-like behaviours with age-matched Wistars as controls, demonstrated marked differences during early adolescence in a strain- and age-specific manner. Anxiety indices were obtained from exposure to the elevated plus maze, where social communication vide 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations was also assessed, while immobility and other parameters in the forced swim test were screened for depressive-like profiles. Sucrose preference, used as a measure of anhedonia in animals, was lower in WKYs at both ages tested and decreased with age. Anxiety-related behaviours were prominent in WKY rats only during early adolescence. WKY female rats are anxious during early adolescence and exhibit anhedonia as a core symptom of depression during early- and mid-adolescence, thus indicating that inclusion of female animals in preclinical trials is essential and will contribute to gender-based approaches to diagnosis and treatment of adolescent depression in females. Copyright © 2016 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Minocycline reduces mechanical allodynia and depressive-like behaviour in type-1 diabetes mellitus in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Diana; Puga, Sónia; Bragança, Rui; Braga, António; Pertovaara, Antti; Almeida, Armando; Pinto-Ribeiro, Filipa

    2017-06-01

    A common and devastating complication of diabetes mellitus is painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) that can be accompanied by emotional disorders such as depression. A few studies have suggested that minocycline that inhibits microglia may attenuate pain hypersensitivity in PDN. Moreover, a recent study reported that minocycline has an acute antidepressive-like effect in diabetic animals. Here we studied whether (i) prolonged minocycline treatment suppresses pain behaviour in PDN, (ii) the minocycline effect varies with submodality of pain, and (iii) the suppression of pain behaviour by prolonged minocycline treatment is associated with antidepressive-like effect. The experiments were performed in streptozotocin-induced rat model of type-1 diabetes. Pain behaviour was evoked by innocuous (monofilaments) and noxious (paw pressure) mechanical stimulation, innocuous cold (acetone drops) and noxious heat (radiant heat). Depression-like behaviour was assessed using forced swimming test. Minocycline treatment (daily 80mg/kg per os) of three-week duration started four weeks after induction of diabetes. Diabetes induced mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, heat hypoalgesia, and depression-like behaviour. Minocycline treatment significantly attenuated mechanical allodynia and depression-like behaviour, while it failed to produce significant changes in mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia or heat hypoalgesia. The results indicate that prolonged per oral treatment with minocycline has a sustained mechanical antiallodynic and antidepressive-like effect in PDN. These results support the proposal that minocycline might provide a treatment option for attenuating sensory and comorbid emotional symptoms in chronic PDN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Antioxidant treatment ameliorates experimental diabetes-induced depressive-like behaviour and reduces oxidative stress in brain and pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; Abelaira, Helena M; Titus, Stephanie E; Carlessi, Anelise S; Matias, Beatriz I; Bruchchen, Livia; Florentino, Drielly; Vieira, Andriele; Petronilho, Fabricia; Ceretta, Luciane B; Zugno, Alexandra I; Quevedo, João

    2016-03-01

    Studies have shown a relationship between diabetes mellitus (DM) and the development of major depressive disorder. Alterations in oxidative stress are associated with the pathophysiology of both diabetes mellitus and major depressive disorder. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and deferoxamine on behaviour and oxidative stress parameters in diabetic rats. To this aim, after induction of diabetes by a single dose of alloxan, Wistar rats were treated with N-acetylcysteine or deferoxamine for 14 days, and then depressive-like behaviour was evaluated. Oxidative stress parameters were assessed in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, nucleus accumbens and pancreas. Diabetic rats displayed depressive-like behaviour, and treatment with N-acetylcysteine reversed this alteration. Carbonyl protein levels were increased in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and pancreas of diabetic rats, and both N-acetylcysteine and deferoxamine reversed these alterations. Lipid damage was increased in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and pancreas; however, treatment with N-acetylcysteine or deferoxamine reversed lipid damage only in the hippocampus and pancreas. Superoxide dismutase activity was decreased in the amygdala, nucleus accumbens and pancreas of diabetic rats. In diabetic rats, there was a decrease in catalase enzyme activity in the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, nucleus accumbens and pancreas, but an increase in the hippocampus. Treatment with antioxidants did not have an effect on the activity of antioxidant enzymes. In conclusion, animal model of diabetes produced depressive-like behaviour and oxidative stress in the brain and periphery. Treatment with antioxidants could be a viable alternative to treat behavioural and biochemical alterations induced by diabetes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Stress-Induced Chronic Visceral Pain of Gastrointestinal Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverley Greenwood-Van Meerveld

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Visceral pain is generally poorly localized and characterized by hypersensitivity to a stimulus such as organ distension. In concert with chronic visceral pain, there is a high comorbidity with stress-related psychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression. The mechanisms linking visceral pain with these overlapping comorbidities remain to be elucidated. Evidence suggests that long term stress facilitates pain perception and sensitizes pain pathways, leading to a feed-forward cycle promoting chronic visceral pain disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. Early life stress (ELS is a risk-factor for the development of IBS, however the mechanisms responsible for the persistent effects of ELS on visceral perception in adulthood remain incompletely understood. In rodent models, stress in adult animals induced by restraint and water avoidance has been employed to investigate the mechanisms of stress-induce pain. ELS models such as maternal separation, limited nesting, or odor-shock conditioning, which attempt to model early childhood experiences such as neglect, poverty, or an abusive caregiver, can produce chronic, sexually dimorphic increases in visceral sensitivity in adulthood. Chronic visceral pain is a classic example of gene × environment interaction which results from maladaptive changes in neuronal circuitry leading to neuroplasticity and aberrant neuronal activity-induced signaling. One potential mechanism underlying the persistent effects of stress on visceral sensitivity could be epigenetic modulation of gene expression. While there are relatively few studies examining epigenetically mediated mechanisms involved in visceral nociception, stress-induced visceral pain has been linked to alterations in DNA methylation and histone acetylation patterns within the brain, leading to increased expression of pro-nociceptive neurotransmitters. This review will discuss the potential neuronal pathways and mechanisms responsible for

  3. Stress-Induced Chronic Visceral Pain of Gastrointestinal Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Johnson, Anthony C.

    2017-01-01

    Visceral pain is generally poorly localized and characterized by hypersensitivity to a stimulus such as organ distension. In concert with chronic visceral pain, there is a high comorbidity with stress-related psychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression. The mechanisms linking visceral pain with these overlapping comorbidities remain to be elucidated. Evidence suggests that long term stress facilitates pain perception and sensitizes pain pathways, leading to a feed-forward cycle promoting chronic visceral pain disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Early life stress (ELS) is a risk-factor for the development of IBS, however the mechanisms responsible for the persistent effects of ELS on visceral perception in adulthood remain incompletely understood. In rodent models, stress in adult animals induced by restraint and water avoidance has been employed to investigate the mechanisms of stress-induce pain. ELS models such as maternal separation, limited nesting, or odor-shock conditioning, which attempt to model early childhood experiences such as neglect, poverty, or an abusive caregiver, can produce chronic, sexually dimorphic increases in visceral sensitivity in adulthood. Chronic visceral pain is a classic example of gene × environment interaction which results from maladaptive changes in neuronal circuitry leading to neuroplasticity and aberrant neuronal activity-induced signaling. One potential mechanism underlying the persistent effects of stress on visceral sensitivity could be epigenetic modulation of gene expression. While there are relatively few studies examining epigenetically mediated mechanisms involved in visceral nociception, stress-induced visceral pain has been linked to alterations in DNA methylation and histone acetylation patterns within the brain, leading to increased expression of pro-nociceptive neurotransmitters. This review will discuss the potential neuronal pathways and mechanisms responsible for stress-induced

  4. Serotonergic involvement in stress-induced vasopressin and oxytocin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjaer, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the involvement of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine - 5-HT) receptors in mediation of stress-induced arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) secretion in male rats. DESIGN: Experiments on laboratory rats with control groups. METHODS: Different stress paradigms were...... applied after pretreatment with intracerebroventricular infusion of saline or different 5-HT antagonists. RESULTS: Restraint stress (5 min), hypotensive hemorrhage or dehydration for 24 h increased AVP secretion fivefold and OT secretion threefold. Swim stress for 3 min had no effect on AVP secretion...

  5. Having your cake and eating it too: A habit of comfort food may link chronic social stress exposure and acute stress-induced cortisol hyporesponsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress has been tied to changes in eating behavior and food choice. Previous studies in rodents have shown that chronic stress increases palatable food intake which, in turn, increases mesenteric fat and inhibits acute stress-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. The effect of...

  6. Stress-induced cross-sensitization to amphetamine is related to changes in the dopaminergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Fábio C; Marin, Marcelo Tadeu; Leão, Rodrigo Molini; Planeta, Cleopatra S

    2012-04-01

    Repeated stress engenders behavioral sensitization. The mesolimbic dopamine system is critically involved in drug-induced behavioral sensitization. In the present study we examined the differences between adolescent and adult rats in stress-induced behavioral sensitization to amphetamine and changes in dopamine (DA) and its metabolite levels in the mesolimbic system. Adolescent or adult rats were restrained for 2 h, once a day, for 7 days. Three days after the last exposure to stress, the animals were challenged with saline or amphetamine (1.0 mg/kg i.p.) and amphetamine-induced locomotion was recorded for 40 min. Immediately after the behavioral tests, rats were decapitated and the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), ventral tegmental area (VTA) and amygdala (AM) were removed to measure tissue levels of DA and its metabolites by HPLC. Exposure to repeated restraint stress promoted behavioral sensitization to amphetamine in both adult and adolescent rats. In adult rats, amphetamine administration increased DA levels in both the stress and control groups in the NAcc and VTA. In adolescent rats, amphetamine increased DA levels in the NAcc in rats exposed to stress. Furthermore, in the AM of adolescent rats in the control group, amphetamine increased the DA levels; however, amphetamine reduced this neurotransmitter in the rats that were exposed to stress. No alteration was observed in the dopamine metabolite levels. Therefore, stress promoted behavioral sensitization to amphetamine and this may be related to changes in DA levels in the mesolimbic system. These changes appear to be dependent on ontogeny.

  7. (+)-Catechin protects dermal fibroblasts against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress has been suggested as a mechanism underlying skin aging, as it triggers apoptosis in various cell types, including fibroblasts, which play important roles in the preservation of healthy, youthful skin. Catechins, which are antioxidants contained in green tea, exert various actions such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-cancer actions. In this study, we investigated the effect of (+)-catechin on apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in fibroblasts. Methods Fibroblasts (NIH3T3) under oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (0.1 mM) were treated with either vehicle or (+)-catechin (0–100 μM). The effect of (+)-catechin on cell viability, apoptosis, phosphorylation of c-Jun terminal kinases (JNK) and p38, and activation of caspase-3 in fibroblasts under oxidative stress were evaluated. Results Hydrogen peroxide induced apoptotic cell death in fibroblasts, accompanied by induction of phosphorylation of JNK and p38 and activation of caspase-3. Pretreatment of the fibroblasts with (+)-catechin inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and reduced phosphorylation of JNK and p38 and activation of caspase-3. Conclusion (+)-Catechin protects against oxidative stress-induced cell death in fibroblasts, possibly by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38 and JNK. These results suggest that (+)-catechin has potential as a therapeutic agent for the prevention of skin aging. PMID:24712558

  8. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefevre, Sophie [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); ED515 UPMC, 4 place Jussieu 75005 Paris (France); Sliwa, Dominika [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Rustin, Pierre [Inserm, U676, Physiopathology and Therapy of Mitochondrial Disease Laboratory, 75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris-Diderot, Faculte de Medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France); Camadro, Jean-Michel [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Santos, Renata, E-mail: santos.renata@ijm.univ-paris-diderot.fr [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in {Delta}yfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin ({Delta}yfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  9. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (Takotsubo – broken heart and mind?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redfors B

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Björn Redfors, Yangzhen Shao, Elmir Omerovic Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Abstract: Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC, also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, is characterized by severe but potentially reversible regional left ventricular wall motion abnormalities, ie, akinesia, in the absence of explanatory angiographic evidence of a coronary occlusion. The typical pattern is that of an akinetic apex with preserved contractions in the base, but other variants are also common, including basal or midmyocardial akinesia with preserved apical function. The pathophysiology of SIC remains largely unknown but catecholamines are believed to play a pivotal role. The diverse array of triggering events that have been linked to SIC are arbitrarily categorized as either emotional or somatic stressors. These categories can be considered as different elements of a continuous spectrum, linked through the interface of neurology and psychiatry. This paper reviews our current knowledge of SIC, with focus on the intimate relationship between the brain and the heart. Keywords: stress-induced cardiomyopathy, takotsubo cardiomyopathy, catecholamine, cerebral injury, emotional stress, somatic stress

  10. [Practicing subnarcotic xenon dose inhalation in spa treatment of posttraumatic stress-induced disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshina, T V; Kotrovskaya, T I; Bubeev, Yu A; Schastlivtseva, D V; Potapov, A V

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the investigation was to compare and contrast effectiveness of xenon therapy of stress-induced neurotic disorders and traditional spa-based therapy. Patients of the experimental and control groups were people of risky professions who received drug therapy, psychotherapy and physiotherapy. The experimental group was additionally treated by inhalation therapeutic doses of medical xenon. Comparative analysis of qualitative and quantitative parameters of electroencephalogram (EEG), blood oxygen level, heart rate and blood pressure were compared in the groups before and after treatment. Recovery of the central nervous system functions, activation of parasympathetic involvement, abatement of main psychopathological and somatovegetative disorders in the experimental group were considered as signs of psychic improvement and return to the gestalt behavior.

  11. TrkB in the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens differentially modulates depression-like behavior in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vry, Jochen; Vanmierlo, Tim; Martínez-Martínez, Pilar; Losen, Mario; Temel, Yasin; Boere, Janneke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371593050; Kenis, Gunter; Steckler, Thomas; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Baets, Marc De; Prickaerts, Jos

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) exerts antidepressant-like effects in the hippocampus and pro-depressant effects in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). It is thought that downstream signaling of the BDNF receptor TrkB mediates the effects of BDNF in these brain structures. Here, we evaluate how

  12. Ophiocordyceps formosana improves hyperglycemia and depression-like behavior in an STZ-induced diabetic mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Chao-Wei; Hong, Tzu-Wen; Wang, Ying-Jing; Chen, Ko-Chien; Pei, Ju-Chun; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Lai, Wen-Sung; Tsai, Sheng-Hong; Chu, Richard; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Sheen, Lee-Yan; Takahashi, Satoru; Ding, Shih-Torng; Shen, Tang-Long

    2016-01-01

    Background A newly defined Cordyceps species, Ophiocordyceps formosana (O. formosana) has been implicated in multitudinous bioactivities, including lowering glucose and cholesterol levels and modulating the immune system. However, few literatures demonstrate sufficient evidence to support these proposed functions. Although the use of Cordyceps spp. has been previously addressed to improve insulin insensitivity and improve the detrimental symptoms of depression; its mechanistic nature remains ...

  13. An Elongin-Cullin-SOCS Box Complex Regulates Stress-Induced Serotonergic Neuromodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xicotencatl Gracida

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuromodulatory cells transduce environmental information into long-lasting behavioral responses. However, the mechanisms governing how neuronal cells influence behavioral plasticity are difficult to characterize. Here, we adapted the translating ribosome affinity purification (TRAP approach in C. elegans to profile ribosome-associated mRNAs from three major tissues and the neuromodulatory dopaminergic and serotonergic cells. We identified elc-2, an Elongin C ortholog, specifically expressed in stress-sensing amphid neuron dual ciliated sensory ending (ADF serotonergic sensory neurons, and we found that it plays a role in mediating a long-lasting change in serotonin-dependent feeding behavior induced by heat stress. We demonstrate that ELC-2 and the von Hippel-Lindau protein VHL-1, components of an Elongin-Cullin-SOCS box (ECS E3 ubiquitin ligase, modulate this behavior after experiencing stress. Also, heat stress induces a transient redistribution of ELC-2, becoming more nuclearly enriched. Together, our results demonstrate dynamic regulation of an E3 ligase and a role for an ECS complex in neuromodulation and control of lasting behavioral states.

  14. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism regulates glucocorticoid-induced corticohippocampal remodeling and behavioral despair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notaras, M; Du, X; Gogos, J; van den Buuse, M; Hill, R A

    2017-09-19

    The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism has been associated with sensitivity to stress and affective disorders. We therefore sought to model the inter-causality of these relationships under controlled laboratory conditions. We subjected humanized BDNF Val66Met (hBDNF(Val66Met)) transgenic mice to a history of stress, modeled by chronic late-adolescent corticosterone (CORT) exposure, before evaluating affective-related behavior using the forced-swim test (FST) in adulthood. While hBDNF(Met/Met) mice had a depression-like phenotype in the FST irrespective of CORT, hBDNF(Val/Val) wildtype mice had a resilient phenotype but developed an equally robust depressive-like phenotype following CORT. A range of stress-sensitive molecules were studied across the corticohippocampal axis, and where genotype differences occurred following CORT they tended to inversely coincide with the behavior of the hBDNF(Val/Val) group. Notably, tyrosine hydroxylase was markedly down-regulated in the mPFC of hBDNF(Val/Val) mice as a result of CORT treatment, which mimicked expression levels of hBDNF(Met/Met) mice and the FST behavior of both groups. The expression of calretinin, PSD-95, and truncated TrkB were also concomitantly reduced in the mPFC of hBDNF(Val/Val) mice by CORT. This work establishes BDNF(Val66Met) genotype as a regulator of behavioral despair, and identifies new biological targets of BDNF genetic variation relevant to stress-inducible disorders such as depression.

  15. Changed Synaptic Plasticity in Neural Circuits of Depressive-Like and Escitalopram-Treated Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Li; Yuan, Yong-Gui; Xu, Hua; Wu, Di; Gong, Wei-Gang; Geng, Lei-Yu; Wu, Fang-Fang; Tang, Hao; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2015-04-21

    Although progress has been made in the detection and characterization of neural plasticity in depression, it has not been fully understood in individual synaptic changes in the neural circuits under chronic stress and antidepressant treatment. Using electron microscopy and Western-blot analyses, the present study quantitatively examined the changes in the Gray's Type I synaptic ultrastructures and the expression of synapse-associated proteins in the key brain regions of rats' depressive-related neural circuit after chronic unpredicted mild stress and/or escitalopram administration. Meanwhile, their depressive behaviors were also determined by several tests. The Type I synapses underwent considerable remodeling after chronic unpredicted mild stress, which resulted in the changed width of the synaptic cleft, length of the active zone, postsynaptic density thickness, and/or synaptic curvature in the subregions of medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, as well as the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus of the amygdala, accompanied by changed expression of several synapse-associated proteins. Chronic escitalopram administration significantly changed the above alternations in the chronic unpredicted mild stress rats but had little effect on normal controls. Also, there was a positive correlation between the locomotor activity and the maximal synaptic postsynaptic density thickness in the stratum radiatum of the Cornu Ammonis 1 region and a negative correlation between the sucrose preference and the length of the active zone in the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus region in chronic unpredicted mild stress rats. These findings strongly indicate that chronic stress and escitalopram can alter synaptic plasticity in the neural circuits, and the remodeled synaptic ultrastructure was correlated with the rats' depressive behaviors, suggesting a therapeutic target for further exploration. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  16. Changed Synaptic Plasticity in Neural Circuits of Depressive-Like and Escitalopram-Treated Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Li; Yuan, Yong-Gui; Xu, Hua; Wu, Di; Gong, Wei-Gang; Geng, Lei-Yu; Wu, Fang-Fang; Tang, Hao; Xu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although progress has been made in the detection and characterization of neural plasticity in depression, it has not been fully understood in individual synaptic changes in the neural circuits under chronic stress and antidepressant treatment. Methods: Using electron microscopy and Western-blot analyses, the present study quantitatively examined the changes in the Gray’s Type I synaptic ultrastructures and the expression of synapse-associated proteins in the key brain regions of rats’ depressive-related neural circuit after chronic unpredicted mild stress and/or escitalopram administration. Meanwhile, their depressive behaviors were also determined by several tests. Results: The Type I synapses underwent considerable remodeling after chronic unpredicted mild stress, which resulted in the changed width of the synaptic cleft, length of the active zone, postsynaptic density thickness, and/or synaptic curvature in the subregions of medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, as well as the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus of the amygdala, accompanied by changed expression of several synapse-associated proteins. Chronic escitalopram administration significantly changed the above alternations in the chronic unpredicted mild stress rats but had little effect on normal controls. Also, there was a positive correlation between the locomotor activity and the maximal synaptic postsynaptic density thickness in the stratum radiatum of the Cornu Ammonis 1 region and a negative correlation between the sucrose preference and the length of the active zone in the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus region in chronic unpredicted mild stress rats. Conclusion: These findings strongly indicate that chronic stress and escitalopram can alter synaptic plasticity in the neural circuits, and the remodeled synaptic ultrastructure was correlated with the rats’ depressive behaviors, suggesting a therapeutic target for further exploration. PMID:25899067

  17. Identification of 30 protein species involved in replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierick, Jean François; Kalume, Dário E; Wenders, Frédéric

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of human proliferative cells to subcytotoxic stress triggers stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) which is characterized by many biomarkers of replicative senescence. Proteomic comparison of replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence indicates that, at the level...... of protein expression, stress-induced premature senescence and replicative senescence are different phenotypes sharing however similarities. In this study, we identified 30 proteins showing changes of expression level specific or common to replicative senescence and/or stress-induced premature senescence....... These changes affect different cell functions, including energy metabolism, defense systems, maintenance of the redox potential, cell morphology and transduction pathways....

  18. Anticonvulsant and depressant-like activity of ursolic acid stearoyl glucoside isolated from Lantana camara L. (verbanaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Kazmi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ursolic acid stearoyl glucoside (UASG, a new terpenoid -isolated from Lantana camara L. was evaluated for its anticonvulsant and depressant activity of was in Wistar albino rats and Swiss mice. Methods: Column chromatography was used to isolate UASG. The intraperitonial administration of UASG (25 and 50 mg/kg produced a significant depressant effect on CNS. Anticonvulsant potential was experimentally proved and demonstrated through Maximal electroshock (MES induced seizure, Isoniazid (INH induced seizure and Assessment of locomotor activity test. Results: Administration of drug reduced spontaneous motor activity (P<0.05, the number and lethality (P<0.01 and P<0.001 of Isoniazid (INH-induced seizures and inhibition of hind limb extension in (P<0.05 and P<0.001 in Maximal Electroshock (MES-induced seizures. Conclusions: Research finding suggests that ursolic acid stearoyl glucoside possess anticonvulsant and depressant like effect.

  19. Antioxidant therapy for management of oxidative stress induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Khalil Ali; Yuan Yuan, Dai; Nawaz, Waqas; Ze, Hong; Zhuo, Chen Xue; Talal, Bashar; Taleb, Abdoh; Mais, Enos; Qilong, Ding

    2017-04-01

    Hypertension is considered as the most common risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, also is regarded as a leading cause of the mortality and morbidity worldwide. The mechanisms underlying the pathological process of hypertension are not completely explained. However, there is growing evidence that increased oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of hypertension. Several preclinical studies and clinical trials have indicated that antioxidant therapy is important for management of hypertension, using antioxidants compounds such as alpha tocopherol (Vit E) and ascorbic acid (Vit C), polyphenols with others and some antihypertensive drugs that are now in clinical use (e.g. ACEIs, ARBs, novel B-blockers, dihydropyridine CCBs) which have antioxidative pleiotropic effects. The purpose of this review is to highlight the importance of antioxidant therapy for management of oxidative stress induced hypertension. Furthermore, we review the current knowledge in the oxidative stress and its significance in hypertension.

  20. The Role of Stress-Induced Ligands in Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Seyda Seydel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells which are a component of the immune system are capable of killing tumor cells and virally infected cells. The activation of NK cells is regulated by the balance of activating and inhibitory surface receptors. NKG2D is one of the these activating receptors. The ligands of NKG2D are the human class I like molecules MICA and MICB which are encoded within the human MHC. MICA and MICB are not expressed on normal cells but up-regulated under condition of stress such as heat schock and viral infection. Therefore, NKG2D ligands are defined as stress-induced antigens. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2011; 20(1.000: 1-19

  1. Environmental enrichment reduces innate anxiety with no effect on depression-like behaviour in mice lacking the serotonin transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jake; Li, Shanshan; Lanfumey, Laurence; Hannan, Anthony J; Renoir, Thibault

    2017-08-14

    Along with being the main target of many antidepressant medications, the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is known to be involved in the pathophysiology of depression and anxiety disorders. In line with this, mice with varying 5-HTT genotypes are invaluable tools to study depression- and anxiety-like behaviours as well as the mechanisms mediating potential therapeutics. There is clear evidence that both genetic and environmental factors play a role in the aetiology of psychiatric disorders. In that regard, housing paradigms which seek to enhance cognitive stimulation and physical activity have been shown to exert beneficial effects in animal models of neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present study, we examined the effects of environmental enrichment on affective-like behaviours and sensorimotor gating function of 5-HTT knock-out (KO) mice. Using the elevated-plus maze and the light-dark box, we found that environmental enrichment ameliorated the abnormal innate anxiety of 5-HTT KO mice on both tests. In contrast, environmental enrichment did not rescue the depression-like behaviour displayed by 5-HTT KO mice in the forced-swim test. Finally, measuring pre-pulse inhibition, we found no effect of genotype or treatment on sensorimotor gating. In conclusion, our data suggest that environmental enrichment specifically reduces innate anxiety of 5-HTT KO mice with no amelioration of the depression-like behaviour. This has implications for the current use of clinical interventions for patients with symptoms of both anxiety and depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Stress-state effects on the stress-induced martensitic transformation of carburized 4320 steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, I.; Balzer, M.; Sehitoglu, Huseyin; Maier, H. J.

    1998-02-01

    The effect of different stress states on the stress-induced martensitic transformation of retained austenite was investigated in carburized 4320 steels with an initial retained austenite content of 15 pct. Experiments were conducted utilizing a specialized pressure rig and comparison between stress-strain behaviors of specimens with different austenitization and tempering histories was performed under these stress states. Experimental results indicated considerable asymmetry between tension and compression, with triaxial stress states resulting in the highest strength levels for the untempered material. Fine carbide precipitates due to low-temperature tempering increased the strength and ductility of the specimens and also changed the austenite-to-martensite transformation behavior. Numerical simulations of stress-strain behaviors under different stress states were obtained, with an existing micromechanical self-consistent framework utilizing the crystallographic theory of austenite/martensite transformation and the minimum complementary free-energy principle. The model was modified for carburized steels upon microstructural investigation and predicted the same trends in effective stress-effective strain behavior as observed experimentally.

  3. Stress-induced variation in evolution: from behavioural plasticity to genetic assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badyaev, Alexander V

    2005-01-01

    Extreme environments are closely associated with phenotypic evolution, yet the mechanisms behind this relationship are poorly understood. Several themes and approaches in recent studies significantly further our understanding of the importance that stress-induced variation plays in evolution. First, stressful environments modify (and often reduce) the integration of neuroendocrinological, morphological and behavioural regulatory systems. Second, such reduced integration and subsequent accommodation of stress-induced variation by developmental systems enables organismal ‘memory’ of a stressful event as well as phenotypic and genetic assimilation of the response to a stressor. Third, in complex functional systems, a stress-induced increase in phenotypic and genetic variance is often directional, channelled by existing ontogenetic pathways. This accounts for similarity among individuals in stress-induced changes and thus significantly facilitates the rate of adaptive evolution. Fourth, accumulation of phenotypically neutral genetic variation might be a common property of locally adapted and complex organismal systems, and extreme environments facilitate the phenotypic expression of this variance. Finally, stress-induced effects and stress-resistance strategies often persist for several generations through maternal, ecological and cultural inheritance. These transgenerational effects, along with both the complexity of developmental systems and stressor recurrence, might facilitate genetic assimilation of stress-induced effects. Accumulation of phenotypically neutral genetic variance by developmental systems and phenotypic accommodation of stress-induced effects, together with the inheritance of stress-induced modifications, ensure the evolutionary persistence of stress–response strategies and provide a link between individual adaptability and evolutionary adaptation. PMID:16024341

  4. Short-term exposure to enriched environment rescues chronic stress-induced impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity, anxiety, and memory deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagya, Venkanna Rao; Srikumar, Bettadapura N; Veena, Jayagopalan; Shankaranarayana Rao, Byrathnahalli S

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to prolonged stress results in structural and functional alterations in the hippocampus including reduced long-term potentiation (LTP), neurogenesis, spatial learning and working memory impairments, and enhanced anxiety-like behavior. On the other hand, enriched environment (EE) has beneficial effects on hippocampal structure and function, such as improved memory, increased hippocampal neurogenesis, and progressive synaptic plasticity. It is unclear whether exposure to short-term EE for 10 days can overcome restraint stress-induced cognitive deficits and impaired hippocampal plasticity. Consequently, the present study explored the beneficial effects of short-term EE on chronic stress-induced impaired LTP, working memory, and anxiety-like behavior. Male Wistar rats were subjected to chronic restraint stress (6 hr/day) over a period of 21 days, and then they were exposed to EE (6 hr/day) for 10 days. Restraint stress reduced hippocampal CA1-LTP, increased anxiety-like symptoms in elevated plus maze, and impaired working memory in T-maze task. Remarkably, EE facilitated hippocampal LTP, improved working memory performance, and completely overcame the effect of chronic stress on anxiety behavior. In conclusion, exposure to EE can bring out positive effects on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus and thereby elicit its beneficial effects on cognitive functions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Nicotine Significantly Improves Chronic Stress-Induced Impairments of Cognition and Synaptic Plasticity in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xueliang; Shang, Yingchun; Fu, Jingxuan; Zhang, Tao

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if nicotine was able to improve cognition deficits in a mouse model of chronic mild stress. Twenty-four male C57BL/6 mice were divided into three groups: control, stress, and stress with nicotine treatment. The animal model was established by combining chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) and isolated feeding. Mice were exposed to CUMS continued for 28 days, while nicotine (0.2 mg/kg) was also administrated for 28 days. Weight and sucrose consumption were measured during model establishing period. The anxiety and behavioral despair were analyzed using the forced swim test (FST) and open-field test (OFT). Spatial cognition was evaluated using Morris water maze (MWM) test. Following behavioral assessment, both long-term potentiation (LTP) and depotentiation (DEP) were recorded in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) region. Both synaptic and Notch1 proteins were measured by Western. Nicotine increased stressed mouse's sucrose consumption. The MWM test showed that spatial learning and reversal learning in stressed animals were remarkably affected relative to controls, whereas nicotine partially rescued cognitive functions. Additionally, nicotine considerably alleviated the level of anxiety and the degree of behavioral despair in stressed mice. It effectively mitigated the depression-induced impairment of hippocampal synaptic plasticity, in which both the LTP and DEP were significantly inhibited in stressed mice. Moreover, nicotine enhanced the expression of synaptic and Notch1 proteins in stressed animals. The results suggest that nicotine ameliorates the depression-like symptoms and improves the hippocampal synaptic plasticity closely associated with activating transmembrane ion channel receptors and Notch signaling components. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  6. Effects of Kombucha on oxidative stress induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Ola Ali

    2009-11-27

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) may induce oxidative stress which generates free radicals and alters antioxidants or oxygen-free radical scavenging enzymes. Twenty male albino rats were divided into four groups: (1) the control group treated with vehicle, (2) Kombucha (KT)-treated group, (3) TCE-treated group and (4) KT/TCE-treated group. Kidney lipid peroxidation, glutathione content, nitric oxide (NO) and total blood free radical concentrations were evaluated. Serum urea, creatinine level, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were also measured. TCE administration increased the malondiahyde (MDA) and NO contents in kidney, urea and creatinine concentrations in serum, total free radical level in blood and GGT and LDH activities in serum, whereas it decreased the glutathione (GSH) level in kidney homogenate. KT administration significantly improved lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress induced by TCE. The present study indicates that Kombucha may repair damage caused by environmental pollutants such as TCE and may be beneficial to patient suffering from renal impairment.

  7. Effects of Kombucha on oxidative stress induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gharib Ola

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trichloroethylene (TCE may induce oxidative stress which generates free radicals and alters antioxidants or oxygen-free radical scavenging enzymes. Methods Twenty male albino rats were divided into four groups: (1 the control group treated with vehicle, (2 Kombucha (KT-treated group, (3 TCE-treated group and (4 KT/TCE-treated group. Kidney lipid peroxidation, glutathione content, nitric oxide (NO and total blood free radical concentrations were evaluated. Serum urea, creatinine level, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activities were also measured. Results TCE administration increased the malondiahyde (MDA and NO contents in kidney, urea and creatinine concentrations in serum, total free radical level in blood and GGT and LDH activities in serum, whereas it decreased the glutathione (GSH level in kidney homogenate. KT administration significantly improved lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress induced by TCE. Conclusion The present study indicates that Kombucha may repair damage caused by environmental pollutants such as TCE and may be beneficial to patient suffering from renal impairment.

  8. Stress-induced Ageing of Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Marcel; Sennhauser, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are well established for use in portable consumer products and are increasingly used in high power electro-mobility and photovoltaic storage applications. In hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles degradation and useful lifetime at standard operation conditions are critical parameters in addition to performance and safety. Here stress-induced ageing of commercially available high power battery cells of the type A123 AHR32113M1 Ultra-B, consisting of a LiFePO(4) cathode and a graphite anode have been investigated. A usually accepted capacity loss for electric vehicles of 20% was reached after 8560 stress profiles corresponding to a driving distance of almost 200'000 km. Cycling with a stress profile applying constant power corresponding to the average power and energy of a full stress profile and starting at 60% state of charge showed a much faster capacity loss. Electric impedance measurements show the dependence of the capacity loss and constant phase element at low frequency, indicating Li-ion diffusion blocking in the cathode. Microscopic analysis of anode, separator, and cathode, shows defect formation in bulk material and at interfaces.

  9. Predicting Stress-induced Anisotropy around a Borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, X.; Fehler, M.; Zhu, Z.; Toksoz, M. N.; Earth Resources Laboratory

    2010-12-01

    The knowledge of the in situ stress state around a borehole is of primary importance for investigating the stability of the borehole, when estimating the likely orientations of open fractures, and for designing hydraulic fracture operations. Two major steps may be used to estimate the in situ stress: first, we measure the near-wellbore anisotropy from acoustic logs, which can be done using a relatively well-developed technique; second, we use some inversion scheme to estimate the in situ stress state by assuming that all near-wellbore anisotropy is caused by the anisotropic near-wellbore stress field that has been altered by the presence of the borehole. In order to develop an accurate and efficient inversion scheme, the relation between the stress and formation anisotropy needs to be quantitatively determined. Because the stress field near the wellbore is strongly influenced by the presence of the borehole, in this paper, we propose an iterative numerical approach to estimate the stress-induced anisotropy around a borehole for any given stress state by applying Mavko’s model (1995) and a finite-element method. The accuracy of our approach is validated through laboratory measurements of the stress-strain relation of Berea sandstone under uniaxial loading. Our numerical studies show that this approach can be applied to calculate the formation anisotropy around a borehole for a wide stress range. This approach could potentially provide a good forward model for the in situ stress inversion.

  10. Preliminary evidence of apathetic-like behavior in aged vesicular monoamine transporter 2 deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron Baumann

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Apathy is considered to be a core feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD and has been associated with a variety of states and symptoms of the disease, such as increased severity of motor symptoms, impaired cognition, executive dysfunction, and dementia. Apart from the high prevalence of apathy in PD, which is estimated to be about 40%, the underlying pathophysiology remains poorly understood and current treatment approaches are unspecific and proved to be only partially effective. In animal models, apathy has been sub-optimally modeled, mostly by means of pharmacological and stress-induced methods, whereby concomitant depressive-like symptoms could not be ruled out. In the context of PD only a few studies on toxin-based models (i.e. 6-OHDA or MPTP claimed to have determined apathetic symptoms in animals. The assessment of apathetic symptoms in more elaborated and multifaceted genetic animal models of PD could help to understand the pathophysiological development of apathy in PD and eventually advance specific treatments for afflicted patients. Here we report the presence of behavioral signs of apathy in 12 months old mice that express only ~5% of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2. Apathetic-like behavior in VMAT2 deficient (LO mice was evidenced by impaired burrowing and nest building skills, and a reduced preference for sweet solution in the saccharin preference test, while the performance in the forced swimming test was normal. Our preliminary results suggest that VMAT2 deficient mice show an apathetic-like phenotype that might be independent of depressive-like symptoms. Therefore VMAT2 LO mice could be a useful tool to study of the pathophysiological substrates of apathy and to test novel treatment strategies for apathy in the context of PD.

  11. Stress-induced endocrine response and anxiety: the effects of comfort food in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortolani, Daniela; Garcia, Márcia Carvalho; Melo-Thomas, Liana; Spadari-Bratfisch, Regina Celia

    2014-05-01

    The long-term effects of comfort food in an anxiogenic model of stress have yet to be analyzed. Here, we evaluated behavioral, endocrine and metabolic parameters in rats submitted or not to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), with access to commercial chow alone or to commercial chow and comfort food. Stress did not alter the preference for comfort food but decreased food intake. In the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test, stressed rats were less likely to enter/remain in the open arms, as well as being more likely to enter/remain in the closed arms, than were control rats, both conditions being more pronounced in the rats given access to comfort food. In the open field test, stress decreased the time spent in the centre, independent of diet; neither stress nor diet affected the number of crossing, rearing or grooming episodes. The stress-induced increase in serum corticosterone was attenuated in rats given access to comfort food. Serum concentration of triglycerides were unaffected by stress or diet, although access to comfort food increased total cholesterol and glucose. It is concluded that CUMS has an anorexigenic effect. Chronic stress and comfort food ingestion induced an anxiogenic profile although comfort food attenuated the endocrine stress response. The present data indicate that the combination of stress and access to comfort food, common aspects of modern life, may constitute a link among stress, feeding behavior and anxiety.

  12. Short-term social isolation induces depressive-like behaviour and reinstates the retrieval of an aversive task: mood-congruent memory in male mice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsu-Coleman, André L; Patti, Camilla L; Zanin, Karina A; Zager, Adriano; Carvalho, Rita C; Borçoi, Aline R; Ceccon, Liliane M B; Berro, Laís F; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica L; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2013-07-01

    Although mood-congruent memory (MCM), or the tendency to recall information consistent with one's mood, is a robust phenomenon in human depression, to our knowledge, it has never been demonstrated in animals. Mice were subjected to social isolation (SI) or crowding for 12 hours and had their depressive-like behaviour (evaluated by the forced swim, tail suspension, sucrose preference and splash tests) or their serum corticosterone concentrations evaluated. In addition, we determined the temporal forgetting curve of the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (PM-DAT) and examined the effects of SI or crowding on memory retrieval in the PM-DAT. Finally, we verified the effects of metyrapone pretreatment on reinstatement of memory retrieval or on the increase of corticosterone levels induced by SI. Twelve hours of SI produced depressive-like behaviour, enhanced corticosterone concentration and reinstated retrieval of a forgotten discriminative aversive (i.e., negatively valenced) task. Depressive-like behaviour was critical for this facilitative effect of SI because 12 hours of crowding neither induced depressive-like behaviour nor enhanced retrieval, although it increased corticosterone levels at the same magnitude as SI. However, corticosterone increase was a necessary condition for MCM in mice, in that the corticosterone synthesis inhibitor metyrapone abolished SI-induced retrieval reinstatement. Our study did not investigate the effects of the social manipulations proposed here in a positively valenced task. To our knowledge, the present paper provides the first evidence of MCM in animal models.

  13. Depression-like behaviour in neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-deficient mice and its reversal by an NCAM-derived peptide, FGL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aonurm-Helm, Anu; Jurgenson, Monika; Zharkovsky, Tamara

    2008-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a pivotal role in brain plasticity. Brain plasticity itself has a crucial role in the development of depression. The aim of this study was to analyze whether NCAM-deficient (NCAM(-/-)) mice exhibit depression-like behaviour and whether a peptide termed...

  14. Curcumin reverses the effects of chronic stress on behavior, the HPA axis, BDNF expression and phosphorylation of CREB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Ku, Baoshan; Tie, Lu; Yao, Haiyan; Jiang, Wengao; Ma, Xing; Li, Xuejun

    2006-11-29

    Curcuma longa is a major constituent of the traditional Chinese medicine Xiaoyao-san, which has been used to effectively manage stress and depression-related disorders in China. Curcumin is the active component of curcuma longa, and its antidepressant effects were described in our prior studies in mouse models of behavioral despair. We hypothesized that curcumin may also alleviate stress-induced depressive-like behaviors and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction. Thus in present study we assessed whether curcumin treatment (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.) affects behavior in a chronic unpredictable stress model of depression in rats and examined what its molecular targets may be. We found that subjecting animals to the chronic stress protocol for 20days resulted in performance deficits in the shuttle-box task and several physiological effects, such as an abnormal adrenal gland weight to body weight (AG/B) ratio and increased thickness of the adrenal cortex as well as elevated serum corticosterone levels and reduced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA expression. These changes were reversed by chronic curcumin administration (5 or 10 mg/kg, p.o.). In addition, we also found that the chronic stress procedure induced a down-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein levels and reduced the ratio of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) to CREB levels (pCREB/CREB) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of stressed rats. Furthermore, these stress-induced decreases in BDNF and pCREB/CREB were also blocked by chronic curcumin administration (5 or 10 mg/kg, p.o.). These results provide compelling evidence that the behavioral effects of curcumin in chronically stressed animals, and by extension humans, may be related to their modulating effects on the HPA axis and neurotrophin factor expressions.

  15. Metformin attenuates ER stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qun; Thompson, Jeremy; Hu, Ying; Das, Anindita; Lesnefsky, Edward J

    2017-12-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, a disturbance of the ER function, contributes to cardiac injury. ER and mitochondria are closely connected organelles within cells. ER stress contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction, which is a key factor to increase cardiac injury. Metformin, a traditional anti-diabetic drug, decreases cardiac injury during ischemia-reperfusion. Metformin also inhibits ER stress in cultured cells. We hypothesized that metformin can attenuate the ER stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent cardiac injury. Thapsigargin (THAP, 3 mg/kg) was used to induce ER stress in C57BL/6 mice. Cell injury and mitochondrial function were evaluated in the mouse heart 48 hours after 1-time THAP treatment. Metformin was dissolved in drinking water (0.5 g/250 ml) and fed to mice for 7 days before THAP injection. Metformin feeding continued after THAP treatment. THAP treatment increased apoptosis in mouse myocardium compared to control. THAP also led to decreased oxidative phosphorylation in heart mitochondria-oxidizing complex I substrates. THAP decreased the calcium retention capacity, indicating that ER stress sensitizes mitochondria to mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening. The cytosolic C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) content was markedly increased in THAP-treated hearts compared to control, particularly in the nucleus. Metformin prevented the THAP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced CHOP content in cytosol and nucleus. Thus, metformin reduces cardiac injury during ER stress through the protection of cardiac mitochondria and attenuation of CHOP expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Chest Pain and Mental Stress Induced Myocardial Ischemia: Sex Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimple, Pratik; Hammadah, Muhammad; Wilmot, Kobina; Ramadan, Ronnie; Mheid, Ibhar Al; Levantsevych, Oleksiy; Sullivan, Samaah; Garcia, Ernest V; Nye, Jonathon; Shah, Amit J; Ward, Laura; Mehta, Puja; Raggi, Paolo; Bremner, J Douglas; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Vaccarino, Viola

    2017-12-07

    Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI) is a frequent phenomenon in patients with coronary artery disease. Women with coronary artery disease tend to have more MSIMI and more chest pain/anginal symptoms than men, but whether the association between MSIMI and angina burden differs in women and men, is unknown. This was a cross-sectional study with experimental manipulation of 950 individuals with stable coronary artery disease. Chest pain/angina frequency in the previous 4 weeks was assessed with the Seattle Angina Questionnaire's angina-frequency subscale. MSIMI was assessed with myocardial perfusion imaging during mental stress (standardized public speaking task). Presence of MSIMI was based on expert readers and established criteria. A conventional (exercise or pharmacological) stress test was used as a control condition. Overall, 338 individuals (37%) reported angina; 112 (12%) developed MSIMI, and 256 (29%) developed conventional stress ischemia. Women who reported angina had almost double the probability to develop MSIMI (19% vs. 10%), adjusted prevalence rate ratio (PRR)= 1.90, 95% CI: 1.04-3.46), while there was no such difference in men (11% vs. 11%, adjusted PRR= 1.09, 95% CI: 0.66-1.82). No association was found between angina symptoms and conventional stress ischemia for either women or men. Results for ischemia as a continuous variable were similar. In women, but not in men, anginal symptoms may be a marker of vulnerability towards ischemia induced by psychological stress. These results highlight the psychosocial origins of angina in women, and may have important implications for the management and prognosis of women with angina. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Stress induced premature senescence : a new culprit in ovarian tumorigenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorantla Venkata Raghuram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress induced premature senescence (SIPS is a relative extension to the concept of exogenous cellular insult. Besides persistent double strand (ds DNA breaks and increased β-galactosidase activity, biological significance of telomeric attrition in conjunction with senescence associated secretory phenotype (SASP has been highlighted in SIPS. To gain insight on the potential role of this unique phenomenon invoked upon environmental stress, we sequentially validated the molecular repercussions of this event in ovarian epithelial cells after exposure to methyl isocyanate, an elegant regulator of cellular biotransformation. Persistent accumulation of DNA damage response factors phospho-ATM/γ-H2AX, morphological changes with increased cell size and early yet incremental β-gal staining, imply the inception of premature senescence. Advent of SASP is attributed by prolonged secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines along with untimely but significant G1/S cell cycle arrest. Telomeric dysfunction associated with premature senescence is indicative of early loss of TRF2 (telomeric repeat binding factor 2 protein and resultant multiple translocations. Induction of senescence-associated heterochromatic foci formation showcases the chromatin alterations in form of trimethylated H3K9me3 in conjunction with H4 hypoacetylation and altered miRNA expression. Anchorage-independent neoplastic growth observed in treated cells reaffirms the oncogenic transformation following the exposure. Collectively, we infer the possible role of SIPS, as a central phenomenon, to perturbed genomic integrity in ovarian surface epithelium, orchestrated through SASP and chromatin level alterations, a hitherto unknown molecular paradigm. Although translational utility of SIPS as a biomarker for estimating ovarian cancer risk seems evident, further investigations will be imperative to provide a tangible way for its precise validation in clinical settings.

  18. Maternal chewing during prenatal stress ameliorates stress-induced hypomyelination, synaptic alterations, and learning impairment in mouse offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ayumi; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Hayashi, Sakurako; Sato, Yuichi; Azuma, Kagaku; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2016-11-15

    Maternal chewing during prenatal stress attenuates both the development of stress-induced learning deficits and decreased cell proliferation in mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus. Hippocampal myelination affects spatial memory and the synaptic structure is a key mediator of neuronal communication. We investigated whether maternal chewing during prenatal stress ameliorates stress-induced alterations of hippocampal myelin and synapses, and impaired development of spatial memory in adult offspring. Pregnant mice were divided into control, stress, and stress/chewing groups. Stress was induced by placing mice in a ventilated restraint tube, and was initiated on day 12 of pregnancy and continued until delivery. Mice in the stress/chewing group were given a wooden stick to chew during restraint. In 1-month-old pups, spatial memory was assessed in the Morris water maze, and hippocampal oligodendrocytes and synapses in CA1 were assayed by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Prenatal stress led to impaired learning ability, and decreased immunoreactivity of myelin basic protein (MBP) and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) in the hippocampal CA1 in adult offspring. Numerous myelin sheath abnormalities were observed. The G-ratio [axonal diameter to axonal fiber diameter (axon plus myelin sheath)] was increased and postsynaptic density length was decreased in the hippocampal CA1 region. Maternal chewing during stress attenuated the prenatal stress-induced impairment of spatial memory, and the decreased MBP and CNPase immunoreactivity, increased G-ratios, and decreased postsynaptic-density length in the hippocampal CA1 region. These findings suggest that chewing during prenatal stress in dams could be an effective coping strategy to prevent hippocampal behavioral and morphologic impairments in their offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of relaxin-3/RXFP3 system in stress-induced binge-like eating in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvez, Juliane; de Ávila, Camila; Matte, Louis-Olivier; Guèvremont, Geneviève; Gundlach, Andrew L; Timofeeva, Elena

    2016-03-01

    Binge eating is frequently stimulated by stress. The neuropeptide relaxin-3 (RLN3) and its native receptor RXFP3 are implicated in stress and appetitive behaviors. We investigated the dynamics of the central RLN3/RXFP3 system in a newly established model of stress-induced binge eating. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to unpredictable intermittent 1-h access to 10% sucrose. When sucrose intake stabilized, rats were assessed for consistency of higher or lower sucrose intake in response to three unpredictable episodes of foot-shock stress; and assigned as binge-like eating prone (BEP) or binge-like eating resistant (BER). BEP rats displayed elevated consumption of sucrose under non-stressful conditions (30% > BER) and an additional marked increase in sucrose intake (60% > BER) in response to stress. Conversely, sucrose intake in BER rats was unaltered by stress. Chow intake was similar in both phenotypes on 'non-stress' days, but was significantly reduced by stress in BER, but not BEP, rats. After stress, BEP, but not BER, rats displayed a significant increase in RLN3 mRNA levels in the nucleus incertus. In addition, in response to stress, BEP, but not BER, rats had increased RXFP3 mRNA levels in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus. Intracerebroventricular administration of a selective RXFP3 antagonist, R3(B1-22)R, blocked the stress-induced increase in sucrose intake in BEP rats and had no effect on sucrose intake in BER rats. These results provide important evidence for a role of the central RLN3/RXFP3 system in the regulation of stress-induced binge eating in rats, and have therapeutic implications for eating disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Early life experience contributes to the developmental programming of depressive-like behaviour, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Fernandes, Gabrielly C; de Moura, Airam B; Silva, Ritele H; Darabas, Ana Caroline; de Souza, Thays G; Abelaira, Helena M; Carneiro, Celso; Wendhausen, Diogo; Michels, Monique; Pescador, Bruna; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Macêdo, Danielle S; Quevedo, João

    2017-12-01

    This study used an animal model of depression induced by maternal care deprivation (MCD) to investigate whether depressive behaviour, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress were underlying factors in developmental programming after early life stress. At postnatal days (PND) 20, 30, 40, and 60, individual subsets of animals were evaluated in behavioural tests and then euthanized to assess cytokine levels and oxidative stress parameters in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus and serum. The results showed that MCD did not induce behavioural changes at PND 30 and 40. However, at PND 20 and 60, the rats displayed a depressive-like behaviour in the forced swimming test, without changes in locomotor spontaneous activity. In the brain and serum, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)) were increased, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine (interleukin-10) level was reduced throughout developmental programming (PND 20, 30, 40 and 60). Protein carbonyl levels increased in the brain at PND 30, 40 and 60. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was decreased during all developmental programming phases evaluated in the brain. Catalase (CAT) activity was decreased at PND 20, 40 and 60 in the brain. Our results revealed that "critical episodes" in early life stressful events are able to induce behavioural alterations that persist into adulthood and can stimulate inflammation and oxidative damage in both central and peripheral systems, which are required for distinct patterns of resilience against psychiatric disorders later in life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcutaneous trigeminal nerve stimulation induces a long-term depression-like plasticity of the human blink reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilurzi, Giovanna; Mercante, Beniamina; Ginatempo, Francesca; Follesa, Paolo; Tolu, Eusebio; Deriu, Franca

    2016-02-01

    The beneficial effects of trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) on several neurological disorders are increasingly acknowledged. Hypothesized mechanisms include the modulation of excitability in networks involved by the disease, and its main site of action has been recently reported at brain stem level. Aim of this work was to test whether acute TNS modulates brain stem plasticity using the blink reflex (BR) as a model. The BR was recorded from 20 healthy volunteers before and after 20 min of cyclic transcutaneous TNS delivered bilaterally to the infraorbital nerve. Eleven subjects underwent sham-TNS administration and were compared to the real-TNS group. In 12 subjects, effects of unilateral TNS were tested. The areas of the R1 and R2 components of the BR were recorded before and after 0 (T0), 15 (T15), 30 (T30), and 45 (T45) min from TNS. In three subjects, T60 and T90 time points were also evaluated. Ipsi- and contralateral R2 areas were significantly suppressed after bilateral real-TNS at T15 (p = 0.013), T30 (p = 0.002), and T45 (p = 0.001), while R1 response appeared unaffected. The TNS-induced inhibitory effect on R2 responses lasted up to 60 min. Real- and sham-TNS protocols produced significantly different effects (p = 0.005), with sham-TNS being ineffective at any time point tested. Bilateral TNS was more effective (p = 0.009) than unilateral TNS. Acute TNS induced a bilateral long-lasting inhibition of the R2 component of the BR, which resembles a long-term depression-like effect, providing evidence of brain stem plasticity produced by transcutaneous TNS. These findings add new insight into mechanisms of TNS neuromodulation and into physiopathology of those neurological disorders where clinical benefits of TNS are recognized.

  2. Evaluation of Cassia tora Linn. against oxidative stress-induced DNA and cell membrane damage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    R Kumar; Ramesh Narasingappa; Chandrashekar Joshi; Talakatta Girish; Ummiti Prasada Rao; Ananda Danagoudar

    2017-01-01

    .... against oxidative stress-induced DNA and cell membrane damage. Materials and Methods: The total and profiles of flavonoids were identified and quantified through reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography...

  3. Physiological correlates of stress-induced decrements in human perceptual performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Stress-induced changes in human performance have been thought to result from alterations in the "multidimensional arousal state" of the individual, as indexed by alterations in the physiological and psychological mechanisms controlling performance. I...

  4. Catalase activity as a biomarker for mild-stress-induced robustness in Bacillus weihenstephanensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besten, den H.M.W.; Effraimidou, S.; Abee, T.

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are able to survive and grow in changing environments by activating stress adaptation mechanisms which may enhance bacterial robustness. Stress-induced enhanced robustness complicates the predictability of microbial inactivation. Using psychrotolerant Bacillus weihenstephanensis

  5. Fluid shear stress induces the phosphorylation of small heat shock proteins in vascular endothelial cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, S; Piotrowicz, R S; Levin, E G; Shyy, Y J; Chien, S

    1996-01-01

    .... In bovine aortic endothelial cells stably transfected with the wild-type human HSP27 gene, shear stress induced the phosphorylation of both the exogenous human HSP27 and the endogenous bovine HSP25...

  6. stress-induced release of prolactin in cycling and anoestrous ewes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STRESS-INDUCED RELEASE OF PROLACTIN IN CYCLING AND ANOESTROUS EWES,. AND IN WETHERS. OPSOMMING: VRYSTELLING VAN PROLAKTIEN ONDER SPANNINGSTOESTANDE BY OOIE IN VERSKILLENDE STADIUMS VAN. REPRODUKSIE, EN BY HAMELS. Aangesien dit bekend is dat spanning die ...

  7. Activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channel by iptakalim normalizes stress-induced HPA axis disorder and depressive behaviour by alleviating inflammation and oxidative stress in mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-Jie; Zhao, Zhan; Yang, Dan-Dan; Cao, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Ling; Ji, Juan; Gu, Jun; Huang, Ji-Ye; Sun, Xiu-Lan

    2017-04-01

    Stress-induced disturbance of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is strongly implicated in incidence of mood disorders. A heightened neuroinflammatory response and oxidative stress play a fundamental role in the dysfunction of the HPA axis. We have previously demonstrated that iptakalim (Ipt), a new ATP-sensitive potassium (K-ATP) channel opener, could prevent oxidative injury and neuroinflammation against multiple stimuli-induced brain injury. The present study was to demonstrate the impacts of Ipt in stress-induced HPA axis disorder and depressive behavior. We employed 2 stress paradigms: 8 weeks of continuous restraint stress (chronic restraint stress, CRS) and 2h of restraint stress (acute restraint stress, ARS), to mimic both chronic stress and severe acute stress. Prolonged (4 weeks) and short-term (a single injection) Ipt treatment was administered 30min before each stress paradigm. We found that HPA axis was altered after stress, with different responses to CRS (lower ACTH and CORT, higher AVP, but normal CRH) and ARS (higher CRH, ACTH and CORT, but normal AVP). Both prolonged and short-term Ipt treatment normalized stress-induced HPA axis disorders and abnormal behaviors in mice. CRS and ARS up-regulated mRNA levels of inflammation-related molecules (TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and TLR4) and oxidative stress molecules (gp91phox, iNOS and Nrf2) in the mouse hypothalamus. Double immunofluorescence showed CRS and ARS increased microglia activation (CD11b and TNFα) and oxidative stress in neurons (NeuN and gp91phox), which were alleviated by Ipt. Therefore, the present study reveals that Ipt could prevent against stress-induced HPA axis disorders and depressive behavior by alleviating inflammation and oxidative stress in the hypothalamus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ancient genes establish stress-induced mutation as a hallmark of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Luis; Bussey, Kimberly J; Orr, Adam J; Miočević, Milica; Lineweaver, Charles H; Davies, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is sometimes depicted as a reversion to single cell behavior in cells adapted to live in a multicellular assembly. If this is the case, one would expect that mutation in cancer disrupts functional mechanisms that suppress cell-level traits detrimental to multicellularity. Such mechanisms should have evolved with or after the emergence of multicellularity. This leads to two related, but distinct hypotheses: 1) Somatic mutations in cancer will occur in genes that are younger than the emergence of multicellularity (1000 million years [MY]); and 2) genes that are frequently mutated in cancer and whose mutations are functionally important for the emergence of the cancer phenotype evolved within the past 1000 million years, and thus would exhibit an age distribution that is skewed to younger genes. In order to investigate these hypotheses we estimated the evolutionary ages of all human genes and then studied the probability of mutation and their biological function in relation to their age and genomic location for both normal germline and cancer contexts. We observed that under a model of uniform random mutation across the genome, controlled for gene size, genes less than 500 MY were more frequently mutated in both cases. Paradoxically, causal genes, defined in the COSMIC Cancer Gene Census, were depleted in this age group. When we used functional enrichment analysis to explain this unexpected result we discovered that COSMIC genes with recessive disease phenotypes were enriched for DNA repair and cell cycle control. The non-mutated genes in these pathways are orthologous to those underlying stress-induced mutation in bacteria, which results in the clustering of single nucleotide variations. COSMIC genes were less common in regions where the probability of observing mutational clusters is high, although they are approximately 2-fold more likely to harbor mutational clusters compared to other human genes. Our results suggest this ancient mutational response to

  9. Ancient genes establish stress-induced mutation as a hallmark of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Cisneros

    Full Text Available Cancer is sometimes depicted as a reversion to single cell behavior in cells adapted to live in a multicellular assembly. If this is the case, one would expect that mutation in cancer disrupts functional mechanisms that suppress cell-level traits detrimental to multicellularity. Such mechanisms should have evolved with or after the emergence of multicellularity. This leads to two related, but distinct hypotheses: 1 Somatic mutations in cancer will occur in genes that are younger than the emergence of multicellularity (1000 million years [MY]; and 2 genes that are frequently mutated in cancer and whose mutations are functionally important for the emergence of the cancer phenotype evolved within the past 1000 million years, and thus would exhibit an age distribution that is skewed to younger genes. In order to investigate these hypotheses we estimated the evolutionary ages of all human genes and then studied the probability of mutation and their biological function in relation to their age and genomic location for both normal germline and cancer contexts. We observed that under a model of uniform random mutation across the genome, controlled for gene size, genes less than 500 MY were more frequently mutated in both cases. Paradoxically, causal genes, defined in the COSMIC Cancer Gene Census, were depleted in this age group. When we used functional enrichment analysis to explain this unexpected result we discovered that COSMIC genes with recessive disease phenotypes were enriched for DNA repair and cell cycle control. The non-mutated genes in these pathways are orthologous to those underlying stress-induced mutation in bacteria, which results in the clustering of single nucleotide variations. COSMIC genes were less common in regions where the probability of observing mutational clusters is high, although they are approximately 2-fold more likely to harbor mutational clusters compared to other human genes. Our results suggest this ancient mutational

  10. Estrogen prevents norepinephrine alpha-2a receptor reversal of stress-induced working memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shansky, Rebecca M; Bender, Genevieve; Arnsten, A F T

    2009-09-01

    Understanding effects of estrogen on the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) may help to elucidate the increased prevalence of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in women of ovarian cycling age. Estrogen replacement in ovariectomized (OVX) young rats amplifies the detrimental effects of stress on working memory (a PFC-mediated task), but the mechanisms by which this occurs have yet to be identified. In male rats, stimulation of norepinephrine alpha-2 adrenoceptors protects working memory from stress-induced impairments. However, this effect has not been studied in females, and has not been examined for sensitivity to estrogen. The current study asked whether OVX females with estrogen replacement (OVX+Est) and without replacement (OVX+Veh) responded differently to stimulation of alpha-2 adrenoceptors after administration of the benzodiazepine inverse agonist FG7142, a pharmacological stressor. The alpha-2 agonist, guanfacine, protected working memory from the impairing effects of FG7142 in OVX+Veh, but not in OVX+Est rats. Western Blot analysis for alpha-2 receptors was performed on PFC tissue from each group, but no changes in expression were found, indicating that the behavioral effects observed were likely not due to changes in receptor expression. These findings point to possible mechanisms by which estrogen may enhance the stress response, and hold implications for the gender discrepancy in the prevalence of stress-related mental illness.

  11. Gene × cognition interaction on stress-induced eating: effect of rumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Robbie; Markus, C Rob

    2015-04-01

    People often crave for high-caloric sweet foods when facing stress and this 'emotional eating' is a most important cause for weight gain and obesity. Eating under stress contrasts with the normally expected response of a loss of appetite, yet in spite of intensive research from neurobiological and cognitive disciplines we still do not know why stress or negative affect triggers overeating in so many of us. Since the prevalence of overweight and obesity still rises, the discovery of crucial risk factors is a most desirable goal of today's research on sub-optimal eating habits. This paper summarizes the most relevant current knowledge from the (human) literature regarding cognitive and biological vulnerabilities for stress-induced emotional eating. A (non-systematic) review of the most relevant studies reveals that most studies contemplate a rather one-directional way of focusing on either cognitive or biological factors, showing inconsistent results. The current paper elaborates and/or integrates these findings into a biological-cognitive interaction model in which a specific combination of genetic and cognitive vulnerabilities are thought to increase our bio-behavioral response to stress, critically increasing the rewarding value of pleasant foods and, hence, emotional eating. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Micromechanical modeling of stress-induced strain in polycrystalline Ni–Mn–Ga by directional solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuping, E-mail: zhuyuping@126.com [Seismic Observation and Geophysical Imaging Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration, Beijing 100081 (China); Shi, Tao; Teng, Yao [Faculty of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A micromechanical model of directional solidification Ni–Mn–Ga is developed. • The stress–strain curves in different directions are tested. • The martensite Young’s moduli in different directions are predicted. • The macro reorientation strains in different directions are investigated. - Abstract: Polycrystalline ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni–Mn–Ga produced by directional solidification possess unique properties. Its compressive stress–strain behaviors in loading–unloading cycle show nonlinear and anisotropic. Based on the self-consistent theory and thermodynamics principle, a micromechanical constitutive model of polycrystalline Ni–Mn–Ga by directional solidification is developed considering the generating mechanism of the macroscopic strain and anisotropy. Then, the stress induced strains at different angles to solidification direction are calculated, and the results agree well with the experimental data. The predictive curves of martensite Young’s modulus and macro reorientation strain in different directions are investigated. It may provide theoretical guidance for the design and use of ferromagnetic shape memory alloy.

  13. Stress potentiates decision biases: A stress induced deliberation-to-intuition (SIDI model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjun Yu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Humans often make decisions in stressful situations, for example when the stakes are high and the potential consequences severe, or when the clock is ticking and the task demand is overwhelming. In response, a whole train of biological responses to stress has evolved to allow organisms to make a fight-or-flight response. When under stress, fast and effortless heuristics may dominate over slow and demanding deliberation in making decisions under uncertainty. Here, I review evidence from behavioral studies and neuroimaging research on decision making under stress and propose that stress elicits a switch from an analytic reasoning system to intuitive processes, and predict that this switch is associated with diminished activity in the prefrontal executive control regions and exaggerated activity in subcortical reactive emotion brain areas. Previous studies have shown that when stressed, individuals tend to make more habitual responses than goal-directed choices, be less likely to adjust their initial judgment, and rely more on gut feelings in social situations. It is possible that stress influences the arbitration between the emotion responses in subcortical regions and deliberative processes in the prefrontal cortex, so that final decisions are based on unexamined innate responses. Future research may further test this ‘stress induced deliberation-to-intuition’ (SIDI model and examine its underlying neural mechanisms.

  14. A Study on Stress-induced Hydrogen Diffusion in Zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jin-Ho; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Yong-Soo [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This study was conducted to confirm whether the hydrogen can diffuse induced by stress gradient in the isothermal conditions. So far the following conclusions were drawn: Hydrogen can be diffused by stress gradient in the isothermal conditions and Certain threshold condition may exist on hydrogen diffusion. The absorbed hydrogen precipitates into a hydride platelet which is considered as one of the limiting factor threatening the integrity of spent nuclear fuel during dry storage. Thus, it is important to understand thoroughly the behavior of hydrogen in the zirconium. In particular, hydrogen diffusion is known to be affected by gradient of temperature, hydrogen, and stress. The influence of temperature and concentration is well known as Soret effect and Fick's law, respectively. However, the effect of stress gradient on hydrogen diffusion is unclear so far. For this reason, understanding of delayed hydride cracking (DHC), which is a time-dependent crack growth mechanism, continues to be a controversial issue. Currently, there are two major models to explain the process of DHC. Puls claims it is driven by diffusion of hydrogen towards crack tip due to chemical potential difference which is generated by stress gradient between the crack tip and bulk region. In contrast, Kim explains that the first step of DHC is stress-induced precipitation of supersaturated hydrogen at the crack tip. Then hydrogen migrates towards crack tip due to concentration gradient between the two regions.

  15. Neighborhood matters: divergent patterns of stress-induced plasticity across the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattarji, Sumantra; Tomar, Anupratap; Suvrathan, Aparna; Ghosh, Supriya; Rahman, Mohammed Mostafizur

    2015-10-01

    The fact that exposure to severe stress leads to the development of psychiatric disorders serves as the basic rationale for animal models of stress disorders. Clinical and neuroimaging studies have shown that three brain areas involved in learning and memory--the hippocampus, amygdala and prefrontal cortex--undergo distinct structural and functional changes in individuals with stress disorders. These findings from patient studies pose several challenges for animal models of stress disorders. For instance, why does stress impair cognitive function, yet enhance fear and anxiety? Can the same stressful experience elicit contrasting patterns of plasticity in the hippocampus, amygdala and prefrontal cortex? How does even a brief exposure to traumatic stress lead to long-lasting behavioral abnormalities? Thus, animal models of stress disorders must not only capture the unique spatio-temporal features of structural and functional alterations in these brain areas, but must also provide insights into the underlying neuronal plasticity mechanisms. This Review will address some of these key questions by describing findings from animal models on how stress-induced plasticity varies across different brain regions and thereby gives rise to the debilitating emotional and cognitive symptoms of stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  16. Alarm pheromone that aggravates stress-induced hyperthermia is soluble in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Kikusui, Takefumi; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2005-07-01

    We previously reported that stressed male Wistar rats released alarm pheromone from the perianal region, which aggravated stress-induced hyperthermia and increased Fos expression in the mitral/tufted cell layer of the accessory olfactory bulb in recipient rats. In this study, we attempted to obtain this pheromone in water using these responses as bioassay parameters. Water droplets were collected from the ceiling of a box in which no animal was placed, or from a box in which an anesthetized donor rat was given electrical stimulation to either the neck or perianal regions in order to induce neck odor or alarm pheromone release, respectively. Then we placed one of the three kinds of water-containing filter papers on the wall of a recipient's home cage and observed heart rate, body temperature and behavioral responses, as well as Fos expression in the main and accessory olfactory bulbs of the recipient. The water collected from the box containing the alarm pheromone was found to generate a reproduction of all of the responses seen in the animal that had been directly exposed to alarm pheromone in our previous studies. These results suggest that the alarm pheromone is soluble in water.

  17. Post-training reward partially restores chronic stress induced effects in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Dalm

    Full Text Available Reduced responsiveness to positive stimuli is a core symptom of depression, known as anhedonia. In the present study, we assessed the expression of anhedonia in our chronic stress mouse model using a subset of read-out parameters. In line with this, we investigated in how far chronic stress would affect the facilitating effect of post-training self-administration of sugar, as we previously observed in naïve mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were repeatedly and at unpredictable times exposed to rats (no physical contact over the course of two weeks. Following novelty exploration, (non- spatial learning and memory processes with and without post-training sugar acting as reinforcer, emotionality, reward sensitivity and corticosterone levels were determined. We found that (1 the effects of chronic stress persisted beyond the period of the actual rat exposure. (2 Post-training self-administration of sugar as reinforcer improved spatial performance in naïve mice, whereas (3 in stressed mice sugar partially "normalized" the impaired performance to the level of controls without sugar. Chronic stress (4 increased behavioral inhibition in response to novelty; (5 induced dynamic changes in the pattern of circadian corticosterone secretion during the first week after rat stress and (6 increased the intake of sucrose and water. (7 Chronic stress and sugar consumed during spatial training facilitated the memory for the location of the sucrose bottle weeks later. Concluding, our chronic stress paradigm induces the expression of anhedonia in mice, at different levels of behavior. The behavioral inhibition appears to be long lasting in stressed mice. Interestingly, sugar consumed in close context with spatial learning partially rescued the stress-induced emotional and cognitive impairments. This suggests that reward can ameliorate part of the negative consequences of chronic stress on memory.

  18. Inhibition of telomerase causes vulnerability to endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Toru; Nakatsu, Kanako; Shimamoto, Akira; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-08-26

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in several diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we investigated the possible involvement of telomerase in ER stress-induced cell death. ER stress-induced cell death was ameliorated in telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) over-expressing MCF7 cells (MCF7-TERT cell). Telomerase specific inhibitor, BIBR1532, reversed the inhibitory effect of TERT on ER stress-induced cell death in MCF7-TERT cells. These findings suggest that BIBR1532 may specifically inhibit telomerase activity, thereby inducing cell death in ER stress-exposed cells. TERT was expressed in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. To analyze the possible involvement of telomerase in ER stress-induced neuronal cell death, we treated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with BIBR1532 and analyzed ER stress-induced cell death. We found that BIBR1532 significantly enhanced the ER stress-induced neuronal cell death. These findings suggest that inhibition of telomerase activity may enhance vulnerability to neuronal cell death caused by ER stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Having your cake and eating it too: a habit of comfort food may link chronic social stress exposure and acute stress-induced cortisol hyporesponsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryon, M S; DeCant, Rashel; Laugero, K D

    2013-04-10

    Stress has been tied to changes in eating behavior and food choice. Previous studies in rodents have shown that chronic stress increases palatable food intake which, in turn, increases visceral fat and inhibits acute stress-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. The effect of chronic stress on eating behavior in humans is less understood, but it may be linked to HPA responsivity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of chronic social stress and acute stress reactivity on food choice and food intake. Forty-one women (BMI=25.9±5.1 kg/m(2), age range=41 to 52 years) were subjected to the Trier Social Stress Test or a control task (nature movie) to examine HPA responses to an acute laboratory stressor and then invited to eat from a buffet containing low- and high-calorie snacks. Women were also categorized as high chronic stress or low chronic stress based on Wheaton Chronic Stress Inventory scores. Women reporting higher chronic stress and exhibiting low cortisol reactivity to the acute stress task consumed significantly more calories from chocolate cake on both stress and control visits. Chronic stress in the low cortisol reactor group was also positively related to total fat mass, body fat percentage, and stress-induced negative mood. Further, women reporting high chronic stress consumed significantly less vegetables, but only in those aged 45 years and older. Chronic stress in women within the higher age category was positively related to total calories consumed at the buffet, stress-induced negative mood and food craving. Our results suggest an increased risk for stress eating in persons with a specific chronic stress signature and imply that a habit of comfort food may link chronic social stress and acute stress-induced cortisol hyporesponsiveness. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Prenatal SSRI alters the hormonal and behavioral responses to stress in female mice: Possible role for glucocorticoid resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitsur, Ronit; Grinshpahet, Rachel; Goren, Naama; Weinstein, Ido; Kirshenboim, Or; Chlebowski, Noa

    2016-08-01

    Life time prevalence of major depression disorder (MDD) is higher in women compared to men especially during the period surrounding childbirth. Women suffering from MDD during pregnancy use antidepressant medications, particularly Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI). These drugs readily cross the placental barrier and impact the developing fetal brain. The present study assessed the effects of prenatal exposure to fluoxetine (FLX), an SSRI antidepressant drug, on corticosterone and behavioral responses to stress in female mice. In young females, prenatal FLX significantly elevated corticosterone response to continuous stress. In adults, prenatal FLX augmented corticosterone response to acute stress and suppressed the response to continuous stress. Additionally, prenatal FLX significantly augmented stress-induced increase in locomotion and reduced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in adult, but not young mice. The dexamethasone suppression test revealed that prenatal FLX induced a state of glucocorticoid resistance in adult females, indicating that the negative feedback control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to stress was disrupted. These findings provide the first indication of altered hormonal and behavioral responses to continuous stress and suggest a role for the development of glucocorticoid resistance in these effects. According to these findings, prenatal environment may have implications for stress sensitivity and responsiveness to life challenges. Furthermore, this study may assist in understanding the limitations and precautions that should be taken in the use of SSRIs during pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Stereotypic behaviour in standard non-enriched cages is an alternative to depression-like responses in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fureix, Carole; Walker, Michael; Harper, Laura; Reynolds, Kathryn; Saldivia-Woo, Amanda; Mason, Georgia

    2016-05-15

    Depressive-like forms of waking inactivity have been recently observed in laboratory primates and horses. We tested the hypotheses that being awake but motionless within the home-cage is a depression-like symptom in mice, and that in impoverished housing, it represents an alternative response to stereotypic behaviour. We raised C57BL/6 ('C57') and DBA/2 ('DBA') females to adulthood in non-enriched (n=62 mice) or enriched (n=60 mice) cages, observing home-cage behaviour during the active (dark) phases. We predicted that being still but awake would be reduced by environmental enrichment; more pronounced in C57s, as the strain most prone to learned helplessness; negatively related to stereotypic behaviour; and positively related to immobility in Forced Swim Tests (FST). Compared to enriched mice, non-enriched subjects did spend more time spent being inactive but awake, especially if they displayed relatively little stereotypic behaviour. C57 mice also spent more time awake but motionless than DBAs. Furthermore, even after statistically controlling for housing type and strain, this behaviour very strongly tended to predict increased immobility in the FST, while high levels of stereotypic behaviours in contrast predicted low immobility in the FST. Being awake but motionless is thus a reaction to non-enriched housing that seems to be an alternative to stereotypic behaviour, and could reflect depression-like states. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Heat stress induced, ligand-independent MET and EGFR signalling in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Scott M; Jondal, Danielle E; Butters, Kim A; Knudsen, Bruce E; Anderson, Jill L; Stokes, Matthew P; Jia, Xiaoying; Grande, Joseph P; Roberts, Lewis R; Callstrom, Matthew R; Woodrum, David A

    2017-11-06

    The aims of the present study were 2-fold: first, to test the hypothesis that heat stress induces MET and EGFR signalling in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and inhibition of this signalling decreases HCC clonogenic survival; and second, to identify signalling pathways associated with heat stress induced MET signalling. MET(+) and EGFR(+) HCC cells were pre-treated with inhibitors to MET, EGFR, PI3K/mTOR or vehicle and subjected to heat stress or control ± HGF or EGF growth factors and assessed by colony formation assay, Western blotting and/or quantitative mass spectrometry. IACUC approved partial laser thermal or sham ablation was performed on orthotopic N1S1 and AS30D HCC tumours and liver/tumour assessed for phospho-MET and phospho-EGFR immunostaining. Heat-stress induced rapid MET and EGFR phosphorylation that is distinct from HGF or EGF in HCC cells and thermal ablation induced MET but not EGFR phosphorylation at the HCC tumour ablation margin. Inhibition of the MET and EGFR blocked both heat stress and growth factor induced MET and EGFR phosphorylation and inhibition of MET decreased HCC clonogenic survival following heat stress. Pathway analysis of quantitative phosphoproteomic data identified downstream pathways associated with heat stress induced MET signalling including AKT, ERK, Stat3 and JNK. However, inhibition of heat stress induced MET signalling did not block AKT signalling. Heat-stress induced MET and EGFR signalling is distinct from growth factor mediated signalling in HCC cells and MET inhibition enhances heat stress induced HCC cell killing via a PI3K/AKT/mTOR-independent mechanism.

  3. Structural, electronic transport and magnetoresistance of a 142nm lead telluride nanowire synthesized using stress-induced growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, structurally uniform single crystalline PbTe nanowires (NWs were synthesized using a stress-induced growth. Selected-area electron diffraction patterns show that the PbTe NWs were grown along the [100] direction. The electrical conductivity σ of a NW with 142 nm in diameter exhibited a semiconducting behavior at 50–300 K. An enhancement of electrical conductivity σ up to 2383 S m−1 at 300 K is much higher than σ [0.44–1526 S m−1, Chen et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, p023115, (2013] in previous studies. The room temperature magnetoresistance of the 142 nm NW was ∼0.8% at B = 2 T, which is considerably higher than that [0.2% at B = 2 T, Ovsyannikov et al., Sol. State Comm. 126, 373, (2003] of the PbTe bulk reported.

  4. Wheel running improves REM sleep and attenuates stress-induced flattening of diurnal rhythms in F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert S; Roller, Rachel; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Fleshner, Monika

    2016-05-01

    Regular physical activity produces resistance to the negative health consequences of stressor exposure. One way that exercise may confer stress resistance is by reducing the impact of stress on diurnal rhythms and sleep; disruptions of which contribute to stress-related disease including mood disorders. Given the link between diurnal rhythm disruptions and stress-related disorders and that exercise both promotes stress resistance and is a powerful non-photic biological entrainment cue, we tested if wheel running could reduce stress-induced disruptions of sleep/wake behavior and diurnal rhythms. Adult, male F344 rats with or without access to running wheels were instrumented for biotelemetric recording of diurnal rhythms of locomotor activity, heart rate, core body temperature (CBT), and sleep (i.e. REM, NREM, and WAKE) in the presence of a 12 h light/dark cycle. Following 6 weeks of sedentary or exercise conditions, rats were exposed to an acute stressor known to disrupt diurnal rhythms and produce behaviors associated with mood disorders. Prior to stressor exposure, exercise rats had higher CBT, more locomotor activity during the dark cycle, and greater %REM during the light cycle relative to sedentary rats. NREM and REM sleep were consolidated immediately following peak running to a greater extent in exercise, compared to sedentary rats. In response to stressor exposure, exercise rats expressed higher stress-induced hyperthermia than sedentary rats. Stressor exposure disrupted diurnal rhythms in sedentary rats; and wheel running reduced these effects. Improvements in sleep and reduced diurnal rhythm disruptions following stress could contribute to the health promoting and stress protective effects of exercise.

  5. A Haplotype Associated with Enhanced Mineralocorticoid Receptor Expression Facilitates the Stress-Induced Shift from “Cognitive” to “Habit” Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Martin; Wacker, Jan; Felten, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Stress induces a shift from hippocampus-dependent “cognitive” toward dorsal striatum-dependent “habit” memory. However, not all individuals are susceptible to this shift under stress. Based on pharmacological studies indicating a critical role of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the stress-induced bias toward dorsal striatal learning, we hypothesized that MR gene variants contribute to these individual differences. In two experiments, healthy participants were genotyped, exposed to a stressor or control manipulation and performed a learning task that can be solved using hippocampal or dorsal striatal systems, while electroencephalography (EEG; Experiment I) or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI; Experiment II) measurements were taken. Stress led to a shift from hippocampal to dorsal striatal learning which was more pronounced in homo- and heterozygous carriers of a six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)-comprising haplotype containing the alleles of two MR SNPs associated with increased MR expression and transactivational activity (MR-2G/C C [rs2070951], MR-I180V A [rs5522]). This stress-induced shift toward habit memory was paralleled by an increased feedback-related negativity (FRN), which may reflect striatal processing, and increased caudate activation. Carriers of the MR haplotype showed a reduced P3a, an event-related potential thought to indicate cognitive processing, and reduced hippocampal activity after stress. Moreover, stress resulted in reduced amygdala-hippocampus connectivity and the decrease in amygdala connectivity to the parahippocampal cortex was particularly pronounced in MR haplotype carriers. Our findings indicate that genetic variants associated with enhanced MR expression facilitate a stress-induced shift from hippocampal toward dorsal striatal learning, most likely via impaired hippocampal processing and reduced amygdala-hippocampus cross talk, allowing the dorsal striatum to guide behavior under stress

  6. Environmental Stress Induces Trinucleotide Repeat Mutagenesis in Human Cells by Alt-Nonhomologous End Joining Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H

    2016-07-31

    Multiple pathways modulate the dynamic mutability of trinucleotide repeats (TNRs), which are implicated in neurodegenerative disease and evolution. Recently, we reported that environmental stresses induce TNR mutagenesis via stress responses and rereplication, with more than 50% of mutants carrying deletions or insertions-molecular signatures of DNA double-strand break repair. We now show that knockdown of alt-nonhomologous end joining (alt-NHEJ) components-XRCC1, LIG3, and PARP1-suppresses stress-induced TNR mutagenesis, in contrast to the components of homologous recombination and NHEJ, which have no effect. Thus, alt-NHEJ, which contributes to genetic mutability in cancer cells, also plays a novel role in environmental stress-induced TNR mutagenesis. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. RHEB1 insufficiency in aged male mice is associated with stress-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qi; Gromov, Pavel; Clement, Joachim H; Wang, Yingming; Riemann, Marc; Weih, Falk; Sun, Xiao-Xin; Dai, Mu-Shui; Fedorov, Lev M

    2017-12-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), a protein kinase, is a central regulator of mammalian metabolism and physiology. Protein mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) functions as a major sensor for the nutrient, energy, and redox state of a cell and is activated by ras homolog enriched in brain (RHEB1), a GTP-binding protein. Increased activation of mTORC1 pathway has been associated with developmental abnormalities, certain form of epilepsy (tuberous sclerosis), and cancer. Clinically, those mTOR-related disorders are treated with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and its rapalogs. Because the effects of chronic interference with mTOR signaling in the aged brain are yet unknown, we used a genetic strategy to interfere with mTORC1 signaling selectively by introducing mutations of Rheb1 into the mouse. We created conventional knockout (Rheb1 +/- ) and gene trap (Rheb1 Δ/+ ) mutant mouse lines. Rheb1-insufficient mice with different combinations of mutant alleles were monitored over a time span of 2 years. The mice did not show any behavioral/neurological changes during the first 18 months of age. However, after aging (> 18 months of age), both the Rheb1 +/- and Rheb1 Δ /- hybrid males developed rare stress-induced seizures, whereas Rheb1 +/- and Rheb1 Δ /- females and Rheb1 Δ/+ and Rheb1 Δ/Δ mice of both genders did not show any abnormality. Our findings suggest that chronic intervention with mTORC1 signaling in the aged brain might be associated with major adverse events.

  8. Restraint stress-induced morphological changes at the blood-brain barrier in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra eSántha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is well known to contribute to the development of both neurological and psychiatric diseases. While the role of the blood-brain barrier is increasingly recognised in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier has been linked to stress-related psychiatric diseases only recently. In the present study the effects of restraint stress with different duration (1, 3 and 21 days were investigated on the morphology of the blood-brain barrier in male adult Wistar rats. Frontal cortex and hippocampus sections were immunostained for markers of brain endothelial cells (claudin-5, occludin and glucose transporter-1 and astroglia (GFAP. Staining pattern and intensity were visualized by confocal microscopy and evaluated by several types of image analysis. The ultrastructure of brain capillaries was investigated by electron microscopy. Morphological changes and intensity alterations in brain endothelial tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin were induced by stress. Following restraint stress significant increases in the fluorescence intensity of glucose transporter-1 were detected in brain endothelial cells in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Significant reductions in GFAP fluorescence intensity were observed in the frontal cortex in all stress groups. As observed by electron microscopy, one-day acute stress induced morphological changes indicating damage in capillary endothelial cells in both brain regions. After 21 days of stress thicker and irregular capillary basal membranes in the hippocampus and edema in astrocytes in both regions were seen. These findings indicate that stress exerts time-dependent changes in the staining pattern of tight junction proteins occludin, claudin-5 and glucose transporter-1 at the level of brain capillaries and in the ultrastructure of brain endothelial cells and astroglial endfeet, which may contribute to neurodegenerative processes

  9. Stress induced obesity: lessons from rodent models of stress

    OpenAIRE

    Zachary Robert Patterson; Alfonso Bucio Abizaid

    2013-01-01

    Stress was once defined as the non-specific result of the body to any demand or challenge to homeostasis. A more current view of stress is the behavioral and physiological responses generated in the face of, or in anticipation of, a perceived threat. The stress response involves activation of the sympathetic nervous system and recruitment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. When an organism encounters a stressor (social, physical, etc.), these endogenous stress systems are stimu...

  10. Cardioprotective effect of amlodipine in oxidative stress induced by experimental myocardial infarction in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhira Begum

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether the administration of amlodipine ameliorates oxidative stress induced by experimental myocardial infarction in rats. Adrenaline was administered and myocardial damage was evaluated biochemically [significantly increased serum aspertate aminotransferase (AST, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and malondialdehyde (MDA levels of myocardial tissue] and histologically (morphological changes of myocardium. Amlodipine was administered as pretreatment for 14 days in adrenaline treated rats. Statistically significant amelioration in all the biochemical parameters supported by significantly improved myocardial morphology was observed in amlodipine pretreatment. It was concluded that amlodipine afforded cardioprotection by reducing oxidative stress induced in experimental myocardial infarction of catecholamine assault.

  11. Antioxidant effect of phycocyanin on oxidative stress induced with monosodium glutamate in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Elita Bertolin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the antioxidant effect of phycocyanin on the oxidative stress induced by monosodium glutamate in the rats. The tests were performed with 32 rats of Wistar breed, divided into four groups, which were administered saline solution of phycocyanin, monosodium glutamate and monosodium glutamate plus phycocyanin. Sulfhydryl groups and the secondary substances derived from lipid oxidation were determined through the level of TBA. The evaluation of these values and the level of sulfhydryl showed that the administration of phycocyanin presented significant antioxidant effect (p < 0.05 reducing the oxidative stress induced by the monosodium glutamate in vivo.

  12. Combination of Neurofeedback Technique with Music Therapy for Effective Correction of Stress-Induced Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Fedotchev A.I.; Oh S.J.; Semikin G.I.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to evaluate the applicability and efficacy of music presentations controlled by feedback signals from the narrow-band electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillators of a patient to correct functional stress-induced disturbances. Materials and Methods. We revealed dominant narrow-band (0.4–0.6 Hz) oscillators in the theta (4–8 Hz) and alpha (8–13 Hz) EEG bands in 18 volunteers suffering from stress-induced disorders. During two examinations the subjects were pre...

  13. Proteome oxidative carbonylation during oxidative stress-induced premature senescence of WI-38 human fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Boulch, Marine; Ahmed, Emad K; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidatively damaged proteins is a hallmark of cellular and organismal ageing, and is also a phenotypic feature shared by both replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence of human fibroblasts. Moreover, proteins that are building up as oxidized (i.e. the "Oxi......-proteome") during ageing and age-related diseases represent a restricted set of cellular proteins, indicating that certain proteins are more prone to oxidative carbonylation and subsequent intracellular accumulation. The occurrence of specific carbonylated proteins upon oxidative stress induced premature senescence...... to belong to functional interaction networks pointing to signalling pathways that have been implicated in the oxidative stress response and subsequent premature senescence....

  14. Antidepressants but not antipsychotics have antiepileptogenic effects with limited effects on comorbid depressive-like behaviour in the WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citraro, Rita; Leo, Antonio; De Fazio, Pasquale; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Russo, Emilio

    2015-06-01

    Two of the most relevant unmet needs in epilepsy are represented by the development of disease-modifying drugs able to affect epileptogenesis and/or the study of related neuropsychiatric comorbidities. No systematic study has investigated the effects of chronic treatment with antipsychotics or antidepressants on epileptogenesis. However, such drugs are known to influence seizure threshold. We evaluated the effects of an early long-term treatment (ELTT; 17 weeks), started before seizure onset (P45), with fluoxetine (selective 5-HT-reuptake inhibitor), duloxetine (dual-acting 5-HT-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor), haloperidol (typical antipsychotic drug), risperidone and quetiapine (atypical antipsychotic drugs) on the development of absence seizures and comorbid depressive-like behaviour in the WAG/Rij rat model. Furthermore, we studied the effects of these drugs on established absence seizures in adult (6-month-old) rats after a chronic 7 weeks treatment. ELTT with all antipsychotics did not affect the development of seizures, whereas, both ELTT haloperidol (1 mg · kg(-1) day(-1)) and risperidone (0.5 mg · kg(-1) day(-1)) increased immobility time in the forced swimming test and increased absence seizures only in adult rats (7 weeks treatment). In contrast, both fluoxetine (30 mg · kg(-1) day(-1)) and duloxetine (10-30 mg · kg(-1) day(-1)) exhibited clear antiepileptogenic effects. Duloxetine decreased and fluoxetine increased absence seizures in adult rats. Duloxetine did not affect immobility time; fluoxetine 30 mg · kg(-1) day(-1) reduced immobility time while at 10 mg · kg(-1) day(-1) an increase was observed. In this animal model, antipsychotics had no antiepileptogenic effects and might worsen depressive-like comorbidity, while antidepressants have potential antiepileptogenic effects even though they have limited effects on comorbid depressive-like behaviour. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Oxidative stress induced by chlorine dioxide as an insecticidal factor to the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Park, Jiyeong; Kim, Eunseong; Na, Jahyun; Chun, Yong Shik; Kwon, Hyeok; Kim, Wook; Kim, Yonggyun

    2015-10-01

    A novel fumigant, chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a commercial bleaching and disinfection agent. Recent study indicates its insecticidal activity. However, its mode of action to kill insects is yet to be understood. This study set up a hypothesis that an oxidative stress induced by ClO2 is a main factor to kill insects. The Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, is a lepidopteran insect pest infesting various stored grains. Larvae of P. interpunctella were highly susceptible to ClO2 gas, which exhibited an acute toxicity. Physiological damages by ClO2 were observed in hemocytes. At high doses, the larvae of P. interpunctella suffered significant reduction of total hemocytes. At low doses, ClO2 impaired hemocyte behaviors. The cytotoxicity of ClO2 was further analyzed using two insect cell lines, where Sf9 cells were more susceptible to ClO2 than High Five cells. The cells treated with ClO2 produced reactive oxygen species (ROS). The produced ROS amounts increased with an increase of the treated ClO2 amount. However, the addition of an antioxidant, vitamin E, significantly attenuated the cytotoxicity of ClO2 in a dose-dependent manner. To support the oxidative stress induced by ClO2, two antioxidant genes (superoxide dismutase (SOD) and thioredoxin-peroxidase (Tpx)) were identified from P. interpunctella EST library using ortholog sequences of Bombyx mori. Both SOD and Tpx were expressed in larvae of P. interpunctella especially under oxidative stress induced by bacterial challenge. Exposure to ClO2 gas significantly induced the gene expression of both SOD and Tpx. RNA interference of SOD or Tpx using specific double stranded RNAs significantly enhanced the lethality of P. interpunctella to ClO2 gas treatment as well as to the bacterial challenge. These results suggest that ClO2 induces the production of insecticidal ROS, which results in a fatal oxidative stress in P. interpunctella. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Behavioral effects of urotensin-II centrally administered in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do-Rego, Jean-Claude; Chatenet, David; Orta, Marie-Hélène; Naudin, Bertrand; Le Cudennec, Camille; Leprince, Jérôme; Scalbert, Elizabeth; Vaudry, Hubert; Costentin, Jean

    2005-11-01

    Urotensin-II (U-II) receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of U-II causes hypertension and bradycardia and stimulates prolactin and thyrotropin secretion. However, the behavioral effects of centrally administered U-II have received little attention. In the present study, we tested the effects of i.c.v. injections of U-II on behavioral, metabolic, and endocrine responses in mice. Administration of graded doses of U-II (1-10,000 ng/mouse) provoked: (1) a dose-dependent reduction in the number of head dips in the hole-board test; (2) a dose-dependent reduction in the number of entries in the white chamber in the black-and-white compartment test, and in the number of entries in the central platform and open arms in the plus-maze test; and (3) a dose-dependent increase in the duration of immobility in the forced-swimming test and tail suspension test. Intracerebroventricular injection of U-II also caused an increase in: food intake at doses of 100 and 1,000 ng/mouse, water intake at doses of 100-10,000 ng/mouse, and horizontal locomotion activity at a dose of 10,000 ng/mouse. Whatever was the dose, the central administration of U-II had no effect on body temperature, nociception, apomorphine-induced penile erection and climbing behavior, and stress-induced plasma corticosterone level. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that the central injection of U-II at doses of 1-10,000 ng/mouse induces anxiogenic- and depressant-like effects in mouse. These data suggest that U-II may be involved in some aspects of psychiatric disorders.

  17. Stress-induced alterations in prefrontal cortical dendritic morphology predict selective impairments in perceptual attentional set-shifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liston, Conor; Miller, Melinda M; Goldwater, Deena S; Radley, Jason J; Rocher, Anne B; Hof, Patrick R; Morrison, John H; McEwen, Bruce S

    2006-07-26

    Stressful life events have been implicated clinically in the pathogenesis of mental illness, but the neural substrates that may account for this observation remain poorly understood. Attentional impairments symptomatic of these psychiatric conditions are associated with structural and functional abnormalities in a network of prefrontal cortical structures. Here, we examine whether chronic stress-induced dendritic alterations in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and orbital frontal cortex (OFC) underlie impairments in the behaviors that they subserve. After 21 d of repeated restraint stress, rats were tested on a perceptual attentional set-shifting task, which yields dissociable measures of reversal learning and attentional set-shifting, functions that are mediated by the OFC and mPFC, respectively. Intracellular iontophoretic injections of Lucifer yellow were performed in a subset of these rats to examine dendritic morphology in layer II/III pyramidal cells of the mPFC and lateral OFC. Chronic stress induced a selective impairment in attentional set-shifting and a corresponding retraction (20%) of apical dendritic arbors in the mPFC. In stressed rats, but not in controls, decreased dendritic arborization in the mPFC predicted impaired attentional set-shifting performance. In contrast, stress was not found to adversely affect reversal learning or dendritic morphology in the lateral OFC. Instead, apical dendritic arborization in the OFC was increased by 43%. This study provides the first direct evidence that dendritic remodeling in the prefrontal cortex may underlie the functional deficits in attentional control that are symptomatic of stress-related mental illnesses.

  18. Stress, stress-induced cortisol responses, and eyewitness identification performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerland, Melanie; Raymaekers, Linsey H C; Otgaar, Henry; Memon, Amina; Waltjen, Thijs T; Nivo, Maud; Slegers, Chiel; Broers, Nick J; Smeets, Tom

    2016-07-01

    In the eyewitness identification literature, stress and arousal at the time of encoding are considered to adversely influence identification performance. This assumption is in contrast with findings from the neurobiology field of learning and memory, showing that stress and stress hormones are critically involved in forming enduring memories. This discrepancy may be related to methodological differences between the two fields of research, such as the tendency for immediate testing or the use of very short (1-2 hours) retention intervals in eyewitness research, while neurobiology studies insert at least 24 hours. Other differences refer to the extent to which stress-responsive systems (i.e., the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) are stimulated effectively under laboratory conditions. The aim of the current study was to conduct an experiment that accounts for the contemporary state of knowledge in both fields. In all, 123 participants witnessed a live staged theft while being exposed to a laboratory stressor that reliably elicits autonomic and glucocorticoid stress responses or while performing a control task. Salivary cortisol levels were measured to control for the effectiveness of the stress induction. One week later, participants attempted to identify the thief from target-present and target-absent line-ups. According to regression and receiver operating characteristic analyses, stress did not have robust detrimental effects on identification performance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 The Authors Behavioral Sciences & the Law Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors Behavioral Sciences & the Law Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Reversal of stress-induced social interaction deficits by buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Caroline A; Falcon, Edgardo; Robinson, Shivon A; Berton, Olivier; Lucki, Irwin

    2017-08-31

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) frequently report persistent problems with social interactions, emerging after a traumatic experience. Chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) is a widely used rodent model of stress that produces robust and sustained social avoidance behavior. The avoidance of other rodents can be reversed by 28 days of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), the only pharmaceutical class approved by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration for treating PTSD. In this study, the sensitivity of social interaction deficits evoked by 10 days of CSDS to prospective treatments for PTSD was examined. The effects of acute and repeated treatment with a low dose of buprenorphine (0.25 mg/kg/day) on social interaction deficits in male C57BL/6 mice by CSDS were studied. Another cohort of mice was used to determine the effects of the SSRI fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day), the NMDA antagonist ketamine (10 mg/kg/day) and the selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist CERC-501 (1 mg/kg/day). Changes in mRNA expression of Oprm1 and Oprk1 were assessed in a separate cohort. Buprenorphine significantly reversed social interaction deficits produced by CSDS following 7 days of administration, but not after acute injection. Treatment with fluoxetine for 7 days, but not 24 h, also reinstated social interaction behavior in CSDS-stressed mice. In contrast, CERC-501 and ketamine failed to reverse social avoidance. Gene expression analysis identified reductions in Oprm1 and Oprk1 mRNA expression in the amygdala and hippocampus and increased expression in the frontal cortex in susceptible mice associated with social interaction deficits. Short-term treatment with buprenorphine and fluoxetine normalized social interaction after CSDS. In concert with the changes in opioid receptor expression produced by CSDS, we speculate that buprenorphine's efficacy in this model of PTSD may be associated with the ability of this compound to engage multiple

  20. Dopamine D1 receptors are responsible for stress-induced emotional memory deficit in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongfu; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Bi; Li, Chaocui; Cai, Jing-Xia

    2012-03-01

    It is established that stress impairs spatial learning and memory via the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis response. Dopamine D1 receptors were also shown to be responsible for a stress-induced deficit of working memory. However, whether stress affects the subsequent emotional learning and memory is not elucidated yet. Here, we employed the well-established one-trial step-through task to study the effect of an acute psychological stress (induced by tail hanging for 5, 10, or 20 min) on emotional learning and memory, and the possible mechanisms as well. We demonstrated that tail hanging induced an obvious stress response. Either an acute tail-hanging stress or a single dose of intraperitoneally injected dopamine D1 receptor antagonist (SCH23390) significantly decreased the step-through latency in the one-trial step-through task. However, SCH23390 prevented the acute tail-hanging stress-induced decrease in the step-through latency. In addition, the effects of tail-hanging stress and/or SCH23390 on the changes in step-through latency were not through non-memory factors such as nociceptive perception and motor function. Our data indicate that the hyperactivation of dopamine D1 receptors mediated the stress-induced deficit of emotional learning and memory. This study may have clinical significance given that psychological stress is considered to play a role in susceptibility to some mental diseases such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

  1. Inflammatory cytokines protect retinal pigment epithelial cells from oxidative stress-induced death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Helene B; Faber, Carsten; Svendsen, Signe Goul

    2013-01-01

    -cultured with activated T cells, or treated with cytokines showed increased expression of anti-oxidative genes, with upregulation of superoxide dismutase 2 protein following PCM treatment. CONCLUSION: Oxidative stress-induced cell death was reduced by concomitant inflammatory stress. This is likely due to the cytokine...

  2. Muscle mitochondrial stress-induced metabolic adaptations do not require FGF21 action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, van Evert; Ost, Mario; Stelt, van der Inge; Klaus, Susanne; Keijer, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a key metabolic regulator which was recently discovered as stress-induced myokine and common denominator of muscle mitochondrial disease. However, its precise function and pathophysiological relevance remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that white adipose

  3. Estrogen protects SGC7901 cells from endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis by the Akt pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    FU, ZHENGQI; ZOU, FENG; DENG, HAO; ZHOU, HONGYAN; LIU, LIJIANG

    2014-01-01

    Several previous studies have demonstrated that estrogen may protect cancer cells from endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood. In the present study, human gastric adenocarcinoma SGC7901 cells were treated with tunicamycin (TM) to induce endoplasmic reticulum stress. This was demonstrated by increased glucose-regulated protein 78 expression and enhanced phosphorylation of protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induced caspase-3-mediated apoptosis with the inhibition of Akt; the latter of which was measured by the activity-dependent phosphorylation at Ser473 of Akt. Simultaneous treatment of 10−9 M 17β-estradiol (E2) with TM may protect SGC7901 cells from endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis by counteracting the inhibitory effect of TM on Akt, causing an increase in the phosphorylation of Ser473-Akt. It was concluded that low concentrations of E2 may counteract endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced inactivation of Akt to block caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. PMID:24396487

  4. Individual differences in the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system: Relevance to stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Christopher S; Valentino, Rita J; Wood, Susan K

    2017-04-01

    Repeated exposure to psychosocial stress is a robust sympathomimetic stressor and as such has adverse effects on cardiovascular health. While the neurocircuitry involved remains unclear, the physiological and anatomical characteristics of the locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) system suggest that it is poised to contribute to stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability. A major theme throughout is to review studies that shed light on the role that the LC may play in individual differences in vulnerability to social stress-induced cardiovascular dysfunction. Recent findings are discussed that support a unique plasticity in afferent regulation of the LC, resulting in either excitatory or inhibitory input to the LC during establishment of different stress coping strategies. This contrasting regulation of the LC by either afferent regulation, or distinct differences in stress-induced neuroinflammation would translate to differences in cardiovascular regulation and may serve as the basis for individual differences in the cardiopathological consequences of social stress. The goal of this review is to highlight recent developments in the interplay between the LC-NE and cardiovascular systems during repeated stress in an effort to advance therapeutic treatments for the development of stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Susceptibility to hyperosmotic stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure increases during red blood cell storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Cluitmans, J.C.A.; Groenen, Y.A.; Werre, J.M.; Willekens, F.L.A.; Novotny, V.M.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During storage of red blood cell (RBCs) before transfusion, RBCs undergo a series of structural and functional changes that include the exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS), a potent removal signal. It was postulated that, during blood bank storage, the susceptibility to stress-induced PS

  6. Susceptibility to stress induced visceral hypersensitivity in maternally separated rats is transferred across generations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wijngaard, R. M.; Stanisor, O. I.; van Diest, S. A.; Welting, O.; Wouters, M. M.; Cailotto, C.; de Jonge, W. J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2013-01-01

    In irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), familial clustering and transfer across generations may largely depend on environmental factors but this is difficult to establish in the human setting. Therefore, we aimed to set up a relevant animal model. We investigated whether susceptibility to stress induced

  7. GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex ligands and stress-induced hyperthermia in singly housed mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, B.; Bouwknecht, J.A.; Pattij, T.; Leahy, C.; Oorschot, R. van; Zethof, T.J.

    2002-01-01

    Stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) in singly housed mice, in which the rectal temperature of a mouse is measured twice with a 10-min interval, enables to study the effects of a drug on the basal (T(1)) and on the stress-enhanced temperature (T(2)), 10 min later, using the rectal procedure as

  8. The ER stress inducer DMC enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis in glioblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roosmalen, Ingrid A. M.; Dos Reis, Carlos R; Setroikromo, Rita; Yuvaraj, Saravanan; Joseph, Justin V.; Tepper, Pieter G.; Kruyt, Frank A. E.; Quax, Wim J.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive malignant brain tumour in humans and is highly resistant to current treatment modalities. We have explored the combined treatment of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducing agent 2,5-dimethyl-celecoxib (DMC) and TNF-related

  9. Red wine extract protects against oxidative-stress-induced endothelial senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.P.G. Botden (Ilse); H. Oeseburg (Hisko); M. Durik (Matej); F.P.J. Leijten (Frank); L.C. van Vark-van der Zee (Leonie); U. Musterd-Bhaggoe (Usha); I.M. Garrelds (Ingrid); A.L.B. Seynhaeve (Ann); J.G. Langendonk (Janneke); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); A.H.J. Danser (Jan); A.J.M. Roks (Anton)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractRed wine polyphenols may preserve endothelial function during aging. Endothelial cell senescence enhances age-related endothelial dysfunction. We investigated whether RWE (red wine extract) prevents oxidative-stress-induced senescence in HUVECs (human umbilical-vein endothelial cells).

  10. Stress-induced activation of brown adipose tissue prevents obesity in conditions of low adaptive thermogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Razzoli

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate that thermogenesis and BAT function are determinant of the resilience or vulnerability to stress-induced obesity. Our data support a model in which adrenergic and purinergic pathways exert complementary/synergistic functions in BAT, thus suggesting an alternative to βARs agonists for the activation of human BAT.

  11. Effects of Active Mastication on Chronic Stress-Induced Bone Loss in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Kagaku; Furuzawa, Manabu; Fujiwara, Shu; Yamada, Kumiko; Kubo, Kin-ya

    2015-01-01

    Chronic psychologic stress increases corticosterone levels, which decreases bone density. Active mastication or chewing attenuates stress-induced increases in corticosterone. We evaluated whether active mastication attenuates chronic stress-induced bone loss in mice. Male C57BL/6 (B6) mice were randomly divided into control, stress, and stress/chewing groups. Stress was induced by placing mice in a ventilated restraint tube (60 min, 2x/day, 4 weeks). The stress/chewing group was given a wooden stick to chew during the experimental period. Quantitative micro-computed tomography, histologic analysis, and biochemical markers were used to evaluate the bone response. The stress/chewing group exhibited significantly attenuated stress-induced increases in serum corticosterone levels, suppressed bone formation, enhanced bone resorption, and decreased trabecular bone mass in the vertebrae and distal femurs, compared with mice in the stress group. Active mastication during exposure to chronic stress alleviated chronic stress-induced bone density loss in B6 mice. Active mastication during chronic psychologic stress may thus be an effective strategy to prevent and/or treat chronic stress-related osteopenia.

  12. Overexpression of an abiotic-stress inducible plant protein in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-17

    Sep 17, 2008 ... The aim of our work was the overexpression of the abiotic stress-inducible dehydrin protein, namely. RAB16A, from rice in the BL21 ... various abiotic stress like water deficit, high salinity and low temperature or .... tomato Adh2 gene and Adh2 pseudogenes, and a study of Adh2 gene expression in fruit.

  13. Electroacupuncture Promotes Proliferation of Amplifying Neural Progenitors and Preserves Quiescent Neural Progenitors from Apoptosis to Alleviate Depressive-Like and Anxiety-Like Behaviours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the effects of electroacupuncture (EA on depressive-like and anxiety-like behaviours and neural progenitors in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG in a chronic unpredictable stress (CUS rat model of depression. After being exposed to a CUS procedure for 2 weeks, rats were subjected to EA treatment, which was performed on acupoints Du-20 (Bai-Hui and GB-34 (Yang-Ling-Quan, once every other day for 15 consecutive days (including 8 treatments, with each treatment lasting for 30 min. The behavioural tests (i.e., forced swimming test, elevated plus-maze test, and open-field entries test revealed that EA alleviated the depressive-like and anxiety-like behaviours of the stressed rats. Immunohistochemical results showed that proliferative cells (BrdU-positive in the EA group were significantly larger in number compared with the Model group. Further, the results showed that EA significantly promoted the proliferation of amplifying neural progenitors (ANPs and simultaneously inhibited the apoptosis of quiescent neural progenitors (QNPs. In a word, the mechanism underlying the antidepressant-like effects of EA is associated with enhancement of ANPs proliferation and preserving QNPs from apoptosis.

  14. Birth origin differentially affects depressive-like behaviours: are captive-born cynomolgus monkeys more vulnerable to depression than their wild-born counterparts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine M J Camus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adverse early-life experience might lead to the expression of abnormal behaviours in animals and the predisposition to psychiatric disorder (e.g. major depressive disorder in Humans. Common breeding processes employ weaning and housing conditions different from what happens in the wild. METHODS: The present study, therefore, investigated whether birth origin impacts the possible existence of spontaneous atypical/abnormal behaviours displayed by 40 captive-born and 40 wild-born socially-housed cynomolgus macaques in farming conditions using an unbiased ethological scan-sampling analysis followed by multifactorial correspondence and hierarchical clustering analyses. RESULTS: We identified 10 distinct profiles (groups A to J that significantly differed on several behaviours, body postures, body orientations, distances between individuals and locations in the cage. Data suggest that 4 captive-born and 1 wild-born animals (groups G and J present depressive-like symptoms, unnatural early life events thereby increasing the risk of developing pathological symptoms. General differences were also highlighted between the captive- and wild-born populations, implying the expression of differential coping mechanisms in response to the same captive environment. CONCLUSIONS: Birth origin thus impacts the development of atypical ethologically-defined behavioural profiles, reminiscent of certain depressive-like symptoms. The use of unbiased behavioural observations might allow the identification of animal models of human mental/behavioural disorders and their most appropriate control groups.

  15. The Effect of Exercise on Learning and Spatial Memory Following Stress-Induced Sleep Deprivation (Sleep REM) in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Darkhah; Zarghami,; Shetab Bushehri; Fatemi

    2016-01-01

    Background Stress induced by sleep deprivation can cause degradation of learning in the acquisition phase, and low-intensity exercise can prevent the negative effects of stress. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the moderating role of aerobic exercise on spatial memory and learning following stress-induced insomnia (sleep REM) in animal models. Materials and Methods ...

  16. Behavioral and cognitive impact of early life stress: Insights from an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hesong; Atrooz, Fatin; Salvi, Ankita; Salim, Samina

    2017-08-01

    Children subjected to traumatic events during childhood are reported to exhibit behavioral and cognitive deficits later in life, often leading to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression. Interestingly, some children continue to remain normal despite being exposed to the same risk factors. These trauma-related behavioral and cognitive profiles across different stages of life are not well understood. Animal studies can offer useful insights. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of early life exposure to traumatic events on behavioral and cognitive profile in rats by tracking the behavior of each rat at different ages. We utilized the single prolonged stress (SPS), a rodent model of PTSD, to study the effects of early life stress. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to SPS on post-natal day (PND) 25. Tests to assess anxiety- and depression-like behavior, as well as learning and memory function were performed at PND32, 60 and 90. Rats exposed to SPS exhibited both anxiety- and depression-like behavior at PND32. And, short-term (STM) but not long-term memory (LTM) was impaired. Rats exposed to SPS at PND60 exhibited anxiety- but not depression-like behavior. STM but not LTM was impaired. Rats exposed to SPS at PND90 exhibited fearful (as indicated by elevated plus maze test) but not an overall anxiety-like behavior (in light and dark test). These rats also displayed significant depression-like behavior with no changes in STM or LTM. Interestingly, when data was further analyzed, two subsets of PND90 rats exposed to SPS were identified, "susceptible": with depression-like behavior and "resilient": without depression-like behavior. Importantly, while resilient group expressed early signs of anxiety- (at PND32 and PND60) and depression-like behavior (at PND32), these behavioral deficits were absent at PND90. On the other hand, susceptible PND90 rats exposed to SPS expressed later onset of anxiety-like behavior (at PND60), while depression-like

  17. 5-HT2A receptor deficiency alters the metabolic and transcriptional, but not the behavioral, consequences of chronic unpredictable stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minal Jaggar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress enhances risk for psychiatric disorders, and in animal models is known to evoke depression-like behavior accompanied by perturbed neurohormonal, metabolic, neuroarchitectural and transcriptional changes. Serotonergic neurotransmission, including serotonin2A (5-HT2A receptors, have been implicated in mediating specific aspects of stress-induced responses. Here we investigated the influence of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS on depression-like behavior, serum metabolic measures, and gene expression in stress-associated neurocircuitry of the prefrontal cortex (PFC and hippocampus in 5-HT2A receptor knockout (5-HT2A−/− and wild-type mice of both sexes. While 5-HT2A−/− male and female mice exhibited a baseline reduced anxiety-like state, this did not alter the onset or severity of behavioral despair during and at the cessation of CUS, indicating that these mice can develop stress-evoked depressive behavior. Analysis of metabolic parameters in serum revealed a CUS-evoked dyslipidemia, which was abrogated in 5-HT2A−/− female mice with a hyperlipidemic baseline phenotype. 5-HT2A−/− male mice in contrast did not exhibit such a baseline shift in their serum lipid profile. Specific stress-responsive genes (Crh, Crhr1, Nr3c1, and Nr3c2, trophic factors (Bdnf, Igf1 and immediate early genes (IEGs (Arc, Fos, Fosb, Egr1-4 in the PFC and hippocampus were altered in 5-HT2A−/− mice both under baseline and CUS conditions. Our results support a role for the 5-HT2A receptor in specific metabolic and transcriptional, but not behavioral, consequences of CUS, and highlight that the contribution of the 5-HT2A receptor to stress-evoked changes is sexually dimorphic. Keywords: 5-HT2A−/− mice, Prefrontal cortex, Hippocampus, Gene expression, Sexual dimorphism, Despair

  18. Modified Aloe Polysaccharide Restores Chronic Stress-Induced Immunosuppression in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjoo; Im, Sun-A; Kim, Jiyeon; Lee, Sungwon; Kwon, Junghak; Lee, Heetae; Kong, Hyunseok; Song, Youngcheon; Shin, Eunju; Do, Seon-Gil; Lee, Chong-Kil; Kim, Kyungjae

    2016-09-30

    Chronic stress generally experienced in our daily lives; is known to augment disease vulnerability by suppressing the host immune system. In the present study; the effect of modified Aloe polysaccharide (MAP) on chronic stress-induced immunosuppression was studied; this Aloe compound was characterized in our earlier study. Mice were orally administered with MAP for 24 days and exposed to electric foot shock (EFS; duration; 3 min; interval; 10 s; intensity; 2 mA) for 17 days. The stress-related immunosuppression and restorative effect of MAP were then analyzed by measuring various immunological parameters. MAP treatment alleviated lymphoid atrophy and body weight loss. The numbers of lymphocyte subsets were significantly normalized in MAP-treated mice. Oral administration of MAP also restored the proliferative activities of lymphocytes; ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell proliferation; antibody production; and the cell killing activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In summary; oral administration of MAP ameliorated chronic EFS stress-induced immunosuppression.

  19. Xiaoyaosan Decoction, a Traditional Chinese Medicine, Inhibits Oxidative-Stress-Induced Hippocampus Neuron Apoptosis In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-zhi Meng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoyaosan (XYS decoction is a famous prescription for the treatment of mental disorders in China. In this experiment, we explored the way in which XYS decoction-reverse hippocampus neuron apoptosis in vitro. We used XYS decoction-containing serum to treat oxidative-stress-induced hippocampus neuron apoptosis and used immunofluorescence to determine the concentration of free calcium, mitochondrial membrane potential, and apoptotic rate of neuron. Results showed that 3-hour oxidative stress decrease mitochondrial membrane potential, increase the concentration of free calcium and apoptotic rate of neuron via triggering pathological changes of nucleus such as karyorrhexis, karyopyknosis. Low, medium, high dose of XYS-decoction-containing serum could reverse these phenomenon, and the effect of low-dose XYS-decoction-containing serum was significant in improving mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptotic rate of neuron. These findings suggest that XYS decoction may be helpful in reducing oxidative-stress-induced hippocampus neuron apoptosis.

  20. A study on anti-stress property of Nardostachys jatamamsi on stress induced Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpashree R.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a feeling that’s created when we react to particular events. It s the body’s way of rising to a challenge and preparing to meet a tough situation with focus, strength, stamina, and heightened alertness. As a result of the stress immune system can be suppressed by chronic stress opening to increased infections and increasing the risk of autoimmune diseases. So one has to learn away to overcome stress. Here is an attempt made to overcome the stress induced in Drosophila melanogaster a model organism, in this study. Methotrexate is used to induce the stress at different concentration taking different group of flies and a Nardostachys jatamamsi plant extract having antistress property is used to relieve the stress induced. This stress relieve measured by the various stress related enzymes like catalase and Superoxide dismutase by this antistress property of the plant Nardostachys jatamamsi was shown.

  1. Anxiety- and depressive-like responses and c-fos activity in preproenkephalin knockout mice: oversensitivity hypothesis of enkephalin deficit-induced posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Jen-Chuang; Chen, Tsung-Chieh; Shyu, Bai-Chuang; Hsiao, Sigmund; Huang, Andrew Chih Wei

    2010-04-21

    The present study used the preproenkephalin knockout (ppENK) mice to test whether the endogenous enkephalins deficit could facilitate the anxiety- and depressive-like symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). On Day 1, sixteen wildtype (WT) and sixteen ppENK male mice were given a 3 mA or no footshock treatment for 10 seconds in the footshock apparatus, respectively. On Days 2, 7, and 13, all mice were given situational reminders for 1 min per trial, and the freezing response was assessed. On Day 14, all mice were tested in the open field test, elevated plus maze, light/dark avoidance test, and forced swim test. Two hours after the last test, brain tissues were stained to examine c-fos expression in specific brain areas. The present results showed that the conditioned freezing response was significant for different genotypes (ppENK vs WT). The conditioned freezing effect of the ppENK mice was stronger than those of the WT mice. On Day 14, the ppENK mice showed more anxiety- and depressive-like responses than WT mice. The magnitude of Fos immunolabeling was also significantly greater in the primary motor cortex, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis-lateral division, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis-supracapsular division, paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus-lateral magnocellular part, central nucleus of the amygdala, and basolateral nucleus of the amygdala in ppENK mice compared with WT mice. In summary, animals with an endogenous deficit in enkephalins might be more sensitive to PTSD-like aversive stimuli and elicit stronger anxiety and depressive PTSD symptoms, suggesting an oversensitivity hypothesis of enkephalin deficit-induced PTSD.

  2. Depressive-like behavioural profiles in captive-bred single- and socially-housed rhesus and cynomolgus macaques: a species comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine MJ Camus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: To unravel the causes of major depressive disorder (MDD, the third leading cause of disease burden around the world, ethological animal models have recently been proposed. Our previous studies highlighted a depressive-like profile among single- and socially-housed farm-bred cynomolgus macaques. Although phylogenetically close, cynomolgus and rhesus macaques, the two most commonly used macaque species in biomedical research, differ on several levels such as patterns of aggression, reconciliation, temperament or dominance styles. The question of whether one captive macaque species was more vulnerable than another in the development of a pathological profile reminiscent of MDD symptoms was explored.Methods: Behavioural data (including body postures, orientations, gaze directions, inter-individual distances and locations in the cage were collected in farming conditions. Using an unbiased validated ethological scan-sampling method, followed by multiple correspondence and hierarchical clustering analyses, 40 single- and 35 socially-housed rhesus macaques were assessed. Independently, for each housing condition, inter-species comparisons were made with previously acquired data on farm-bred cynomolgus monkeys.Results: Consistent with our previous studies, we found depressive-like characteristics (e.g. inactivity, low level of investigation and maintenance, long time spent inactive while facing the wall among single- and socially-housed rhesus macaques. Species-specificities were reported in non-depressive time budgets and in the prevalence of the pathological profiles.Conclusions: Our results suggest that rhesus may be more vulnerable to developing a despair-like state than cynomolgus macaques, both in single- and in social-housing conditions. Therefore, rhesus macaques are more suitable for use as a spontaneous model of depressive disorders.

  3. Modulating Oxidative Stress Relieves Stress-Induced Behavioral and Cognitive Impairments in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Solanki, Naimesh; Salvi, Ankita; Patki, Gaurav; Salim, Samina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Persistent psychological stress often leads to anxiety disorders and depression. Benzodiazepines and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are popular treatment options but have limited efficacy, supporting the need for alternative treatment. Based on our recent preclinical work suggesting a causal link between neurobehavioral deficits and elevated oxidative stress, we hypothesized that interventions that mitigate oxidative stress can attenuate/overcome neurobehavioral ...

  4. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade prevents stress-induced modulation of multiple memory systems in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Lars; Tegenthoff, Martin; Höffken, Oliver; Wolf, Oliver T

    2013-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that stress may orchestrate the engagement of multiple memory systems in the brain. In particular, stress is thought to favor dorsal striatum-dependent procedural over hippocampus-dependent declarative memory. However, the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying these modulatory effects of stress remain elusive, especially in humans. Here, we targeted the role of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the stress-induced modulation of dorsal striatal and hippocampal memory systems in the human brain using a combination of event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and pharmacologic blockade of the MR. Eighty healthy participants received the MR antagonist spironolactone (300 mg) or a placebo and underwent a stressor or control manipulation before they performed, in the scanner, a classification task that can be supported by the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum. Stress after placebo did not affect learning performance but reduced explicit task knowledge and led to a relative increase in the use of more procedural learning strategies. At the neural level, stress promoted striatum-based learning at the expense of hippocampus-based learning. Functional connectivity analyses showed that this shift was associated with altered coupling of the amygdala with the hippocampus and dorsal striatum. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade before stress prevented the stress-induced shift toward dorsal striatal procedural learning, same as the stress-induced alterations of amygdala connectivity with hippocampus and dorsal striatum, but resulted in significantly impaired performance. Our findings indicate that the stress-induced shift from hippocampal to dorsal striatal memory systems is mediated by the amygdala, required to preserve performance after stress, and dependent on the MR. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  5. Oxidative stress-induced epigenetic changes associated with malignant transformation of human kidney epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingaiah, Prathap Kumar S; Ponnusamy, Logeswari; Singh, Kamaleshwar P

    2017-02-14

    Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) in humans is positively influenced by oxidative stress status in kidneys. We recently reported that adaptive response to low level of chronic oxidative stress induces malignant transformation of immortalized human renal tubular epithelial cells. Epigenetic alterations in human RCC are well documented, but its role in oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation of kidney cells is not known. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the potential role of epigenetic changes in chronic oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation of HK-2, human renal tubular epithelial cells. The results revealed aberrant expression of epigenetic regulatory genes involved in DNA methylation (DNMT1, DNMT3a and MBD4) and histone modifications (HDAC1, HMT1 and HAT1) in HK-2 cells malignantly transformed by chronic oxidative stress. Additionally, both in vitro soft agar assay and in vivo nude mice study showing decreased tumorigenic potential of malignantly transformed HK-2 cells following treatment with DNA de-methylating agent 5-aza 2' dC further confirmed the crucial role of DNA hypermethyaltion in oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation. Changes observed in global histone H3 acetylation (H3K9, H3K18, H3K27 and H3K14) and decrease in phospho-H2AX (Ser139) also suggest potential role of histone modifications in increased survival and malignant transformation of HK-2 cells by oxidative stress. In summary, the results of this study suggest that epigenetic reprogramming induced by low levels of oxidative stress act as driver for malignant transformation of kidney epithelial cells. Findings of this study are highly relevant in potential clinical application of epigenetic-based therapeutics for treatments of kidney cancers.

  6. The interplay between neuroendocrine activity and psychological stress-induced exacerbation of allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Tomomitsu; Dobashi-Okuyama, Kaori; Takahashi, Tomoko; Takayanagi, Motoaki; Ohno, Isao

    2018-01-01

    Psychological stress is recognized as a key factor in the exacerbation of allergic asthma, whereby brain responses to stress act as immunomodulators for asthma. In particular, stress-induced enhanced type 2 T-helper (Th2)-type lung inflammation is strongly associated with asthma pathogenesis. Psychological stress leads to eosinophilic airway inflammation through activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal pathway and autonomic nervous system. This is followed by the secretion of stress hormones into the blood, including glucocorticoids, epinephrine, and norepinephrine, which enhance Th2 and type 17 T-helper (Th17)-type asthma profiles in humans and rodents. Recent evidence has shown that a defect of the μ-opioid receptor in the brain along with a defect of the peripheral glucocorticoid receptor signaling completely disrupted stress-induced airway inflammation in mice. This suggests that the stress response facilitates events in the central nervous and endocrine systems, thus exacerbating asthma. In this review, we outline the recent findings on the interplay between stress and neuroendocrine activities followed by stress-induced enhanced Th2 and Th17 immune responses and attenuated regulatory T (Treg) cell responses that are closely linked with asthma exacerbation. We will place a special focus on our own data that has emphasized the continuity from central sensing of psychological stress to enhanced eosinophilic airway inflammation. The mechanism that modulates psychological stress-induced exacerbation of allergic asthma through neuroendocrine activities is thought to involve a series of consecutive pathological events from the brain to the lung, which implies there to be a "neuropsychiatry phenotype" in asthma. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Alcoholic beverages and gastric epithelial cell viability: effect on oxidative stress-induced damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loguercio, C; Tuccillo, C; Federico, A; Fogliano, V; Del Vecchio Blanco, C; Romano, M

    2009-12-01

    Alcohol is known to cause damage to the gastric epithelium independently of gastric acid secretion. Different alcoholic beverages exert different damaging effects in the stomach. However, this has not been systematically evaluated. Moreover, it is not known whether the non-alcoholic components of alcoholic beverages also play a role in the pathogenesis of gastric epithelial cell damage. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate whether different alcoholic beverages, at a similar ethanol concentration, exerted different damaging effect in gastric epithelial cells in vitro. Moreover, we evaluated whether pre-treatment of gastric epithelial cells with alcoholic beverages prevented oxidative stress-induced damage to gastric cells. Cell damage was assessed, in MKN-28 gastric epithelial cells, by MTT assay. Oxidative stress was induced by incubating cells with xanthine and xanthine oxidase. Gastric cell viability was assessed following 30, 60, and 120 minutes incubation with ethanol 17.5-125 mg/ml(-1) or different alcoholic beverages (i.e., beer, white wine, red wine, spirits) at comparable ethanol concentration. Finally, we assessed whether pre-incubation with red wine (with or without ethanol) prevented oxidative stress-induced cell damage. Red wine caused less damage to gastric epithelial cells in vitro compared with other alcoholic beverages at comparable ethanol concentration. Pre-treatment with red wine, but not with dealcoholate red wine, significantly and time-dependently prevented oxidative stress-induced cell damage. 1) red wine is less harmful to gastric epithelial cells than other alcoholic beverages; 2) this seems related to the non-alcoholic components of red wine, because other alcoholic beverages with comparable ethanol concentration exerted more damage than red wine; 3) red wine prevents oxidative stress-induced cell damage and this seems to be related to its ethanol content.

  8. Antioxidant effect of phycocyanin on oxidative stress induced with monosodium glutamate in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Bertolin,Telma Elita; Farias, Daniele; Guarienti, Cíntia; Petry, Fernanda Tais Souza; Colla,Luciane Maria; Costa,Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the antioxidant effect of phycocyanin on the oxidative stress induced by monosodium glutamate in the rats. The tests were performed with 32 rats of Wistar breed, divided into four groups, which were administered saline solution of phycocyanin, monosodium glutamate and monosodium glutamate plus phycocyanin. Sulfhydryl groups and the secondary substances derived from lipid oxidation were determined through the level of TBA. The evaluation of these values ...

  9. Psychological and physical stress induce differential effects on human colonic motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S S; Hatfield, R A; Suls, J M; Chamberlain, M J

    1998-06-01

    Stress modulates gut function, but whether the type of stressor influences colonic motor activity is unclear. The motor patterns and regional variations are also poorly understood. Our aim was to determine the effects of psychological and physical stress on colonic motility. Ambulatory colonic manometry was performed by placing a six-sensor probe up to the mid-transverse colon, without sedation, in 12 healthy subjects. Five hours later, a dichotomous listening test (psychological stress) was performed, which was preceded by listening to a narrative passage (control); recovery entailed listening to relaxing music (1 h each). Subsequently, intermittent hand immersion in cold (4 degrees C) water (physical stress) was performed, preceded by hand immersion in warm (37 degrees C) water (1/2-h each). Colonic pressure activity and cardiovascular responses were measured throughout the study. When compared with the control period, both stressors induced a greater number of pressure waves (p physical stress increased (p rate and blood pressure. There were no regional differences in colonic motility. During recovery, the motor activity returned to baseline after physical stress, but remained high after psychological stress. Psychological stress induced more (p physical stress induced more (p activity, but psychological stress induced a prolonged response with propagated activity and without appreciable autonomic response. Thus, colonic motor responses may vary depending on the stressor.

  10. Stress Induced Mechano-electrical Writing-Reading of Polymer Film Powered by Contact Electrification Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sumita; Nandy, Suman; Calmeiro, Tomás R.; Igreja, Rui; Martins, Rodrigo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Mechano-electrical writing and reading in polyaniline (PANI) thin film are demonstrated via metal-polymer contact electrification mechanism (CEM). An innovative conception for a non-destructive self-powered writable-readable data sheet is presented which can pave the way towards new type of stress induced current harvesting devices. A localized forced deformation of the interface has been enacted by pressing the atomic force microscopic probe against the polymer surface, allowing charge transfer between materials interfaces. The process yields a well-defined charge pattern by transmuting mechanical stress in to readable information. The average of output current increment has been influenced from 0.5 nA to 15 nA for the applied force of 2 nN to 14 nN instead of electrical bias. These results underscore the importance of stress-induced current harvesting mechanism and could be scaled up for charge patterning of polymer surface to writable-readable data sheet. Time evolutional current distribution (TECD) study of the stress-induced patterned PANI surface shows the response of readability of the recorded data with time.

  11. (-)Epigallocatechin-3-gallate decreases the stress-induced impairment of learning and memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soung, Hung-Sheng; Wang, Mao-Hsien; Tseng, Hsiang-Chien; Fang, Hsu-Wei; Chang, Kuo-Chi

    2015-08-18

    Stress induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) and causes alterations in brain cytoarchitecture and cognition. Green tea has potent antioxidative properties especially the tea catechin (-) epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). These powerful antioxidative properties are able to protect against various oxidative damages. In this study we investigated the impact of stress on rats' locomotor activity, learning and memory. Many tea catechins, including EGCG, were examined for their possible therapeutic effects in treating stress-induced impairment. Our results indicated that locomotor activity was decreased, and the learning and memory were impaired in stressed rats (SRs). EGCG treatment was able to prevent the decreased locomotor activity as well as improve the learning and memory in SRs. EGCG treatment was also able to reduce the increased oxidative status in SRs' hippocampi. The above results suggest a therapeutic effect of EGCG in treating stress-induced impairment of learning and memory, most likely by means of its powerful antioxidative properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Stress Induces a Shift Towards Striatum-Dependent Stimulus-Response Learning via the Mineralocorticoid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Susanne; Klumpers, Floris; Schröder, Tobias Navarro; Oplaat, Krista T; Krugers, Harm J; Oitzl, Melly S; Joëls, Marian; Doeller, Christian F; Fernández, Guillén

    2017-05-01

    Stress is assumed to cause a shift from flexible 'cognitive' memory to more rigid 'habit' memory. In the spatial memory domain, stress impairs place learning depending on the hippocampus whereas stimulus-response learning based on the striatum appears to be improved. While the neural basis of this shift is still unclear, previous evidence in rodents points towards cortisol interacting with the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) to affect amygdala functioning. The amygdala is in turn assumed to orchestrate the stress-induced shift in memory processing. However, an integrative study testing these mechanisms in humans is lacking. Therefore, we combined functional neuroimaging of a spatial memory task, stress-induction, and administration of an MR-antagonist in a full-factorial, randomized, placebo-controlled between-subjects design in 101 healthy males. We demonstrate that stress-induced increases in cortisol lead to enhanced stimulus-response learning, accompanied by increased amygdala activity and connectivity to the striatum. Importantly, this shift was prevented by an acute administration of the MR-antagonist spironolactone. Our findings support a model in which the MR and the amygdala play an important role in the stress-induced shift towards habit memory systems, revealing a fundamental mechanism of adaptively allocating neural resources that may have implications for stress-related mental disorders.

  13. Ascorbic acid and beta-carotene reduce stress-induced oxidative organ damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrefoglu, M; Akinci, A; Taslidere, E; Elbe, H; Cetin, A; Ates, B

    2016-10-01

    Antioxidants are potential therapeutic agents for reducing stress-induced organ damage. We investigated the effects of ascorbic acid and β-carotene on oxidative stress-induced cerebral, cerebellar, cardiac and hepatic damage using microscopy and biochemistry. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into five groups: untreated control, stressed, stressed + saline, stressed + ascorbic acid and stressed + β-carotene. The rats in the stressed groups were subjected to starvation, immobilization and cold. The histopathological damage scores for the stressed and stressed + saline groups were higher than those of the control group for all organs examined. The histopathological damage scores and mean tissue malondialdehyde levels for the groups treated with antioxidants were lower than those for the stressed and stressed + saline groups. Mean tissue superoxide dismutase activities for groups that received antioxidants were higher than those for the stressed + saline group for most organs evaluated. Ascorbic acid and β-carotene can reduce stress-induced organ damage by both inhibiting lipid oxidation and supporting the cellular antioxidant defense system.

  14. Oxidative Stress Induces Endothelial Cell Senescence via Downregulation of Sirt6

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