WorldWideScience

Sample records for stress wave timing

  1. 3D time-domain spectral elements for stress waves modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudela, P; Ostachowicz, W

    2009-01-01

    Elastic stress waves induced by piezoelectric transducers are extensively used for damage detection purposes. Induced high frequency impulse signals cause that stress wave modelling by the finite element method is inefficient. Instead, numerical model based on the time-domain spectral element method has been developed to simulate stress wave propagation in metallic structures induced by the piezoelectric transducers. The model solves the coupled electromechanical field equations simultaneously in three-dimensional case. Visualisation of the propagating elastic waves generated by the actuator of different shapes and properties has been performed.

  2. Propagation of the Stress Wave Through the Filled Joint with Linear Viscoelastic Deformation Behavior Using Time-Domain Recursive Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Hu, Zhiping; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Qiyao

    2017-12-01

    The dynamic behavior of filled joints is mostly controlled by the filled medium. In addition to nonlinear elastic behavior, viscoelastic behavior of filled joints is also of great significance. Here, a theoretical study of stress wave propagation through a filled rock joint with linear viscoelastic deformation behavior has been carried out using a modified time-domain recursive method (TDRM). A displacement discontinuity model was extended to form a displacement and stress discontinuity model, and the differential constitutive relationship of viscoelastic model was adopted to introduce the mass and viscoelastic behavior of filled medium. A standard linear solid model, which can be degenerated into the Kelvin and Maxwell models, was adopted in deriving this method. Transmission and reflection coefficients were adopted to verify this method. Besides, the effects of some parameters on wave propagation across a filled rock joint with linear viscoelastic deformation behavior were discussed. Then, a comparison of the time-history curves calculated by the present method with those by frequency-domain method (FDM) was performed. The results indicated that change tendencies of the transmission and reflection coefficients for these viscoelastic models versus incident angle were the same as each other but not frequency. The mass and viscosity coupling of filled medium did not fundamentally change wave propagation. The modified TDRM was found to be more efficient than the FDM.

  3. Interdigital Piezopolymer Transducers for Time of Flight Measurements with Ultrasonic Lamb Waves on Carbon-Epoxy Composites under Pure Bending Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bulletti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interdigital transducers fabricated with piezopolymer film have been realized to excite ultrasonic Lamb waves in a composite laminate subjected to pure bending stresses. Lamb waves were generated and detected in a cross-ply [0°/90°] 4 mm thick carbon-fiber composite, by using two interdigital transducers in pitch-catch configuration. We demonstrate that the choice of the piezopolymer transducer technology is suitable for this type of investigation and the advantages of the proposed transducer assembly and bonding are described. A full set-up is described to determine the relationship between the time of flight of the recorded signals and the applied bending moment. Interdigital transducers were designed according to simulations of the dispersion curves, in order to operate at a central frequency of 450 kHz. This frequency corresponds to a central wavelength of 16 mm and to a group velocity of about 6000 m/s for the first symmetric guided wave mode. The variations in the time of flight of ultrasonic recorded signals were measured as a function of the variations in the bending moment. The static and dynamic load tests were in good agreement with strain gage measurements performed in the micro deformation range (0–1400 µm/m.

  4. Lattice dynamics approach to determine the dependence of the time-of-flight of transversal polarized acoustic waves on external stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarar, K. S.; Pluta, M.; Amjad, U.; Grill, W.

    2011-04-01

    Based on the lattice dynamics approach the dependence of the time-of-flight (TOF) on stress has been modeled for transversal polarized acoustic waves. The relevant dispersion relation is derived from the appropriate mass-spring model together with the dependencies on the restoring forces including the effect of externally applied stress. The lattice dynamics approach can also be interpreted as a discrete and strictly periodic lumped circuit. In that case the modeling represents a finite element approach. In both cases the properties relevant for wavelengths large with respect to the periodic structure can be derived from the respective limit relating also to low frequencies. The model representing a linear chain with stiffness to shear and additional stiffness introduced by extensional stress is presented and compared to existing models, which so far represent each only one of the effects treated here in combination. For a string this effect is well known from musical instruments. The counteracting effects are discussed and compared to experimental results.

  5. Stress wave propagation on standing trees. Part 2, Formation of 3D stress wave contour maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Su; Houjiang Zhang; Xiping Wang

    2009-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of wood quality in standing trees is an important procedure in the forest operational value chain worldwide. The goal of this paper is to investigate how a stress wave travel in a tree stem as it is introduced into the tree through a mechanical impact. Experimental stress wave data was obtained on freshly cut red pine logs in the...

  6. Stress wave analysis: applied to rotating machines; Stress wave analysis: aplicado a maquinas rotativas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Paulo Garcia de [Invensys Brasil Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-11-01

    Stress wave analysis is the technology of data analysis (stress profile - ultrasound spectrum) collected by high-frequency acoustic sensors. Monitoring and analysis of rotating equipment, is a crucial element in predictive maintenance and condition based maintenance projects and, in a broader context, of performance management and optimization of assets. This article discusses the application of stress wave analysis to rotating machines in the context of assets optimization and CBM. (author)

  7. Gravity waves from quantum stress tensor fluctuations in inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chun-Hsien; Hsiang, Jen-Tsung; Ford, L. H.; Ng, Kin-Wang

    2011-01-01

    We consider the effects of the quantum stress tensor fluctuations of a conformal field in generating gravity waves in inflationary models. We find a nonscale invariant, non-Gaussian contribution which depends upon the total expansion factor between an initial time and the end of inflation. This spectrum of gravity wave perturbations is an illustration of a negative power spectrum, which is possible in quantum field theory. We discuss possible choices for the initial conditions. If the initial time is taken to be sufficiently early, the fluctuating gravity waves are potentially observable both in the CMB radiation and in gravity wave detectors, and could offer a probe of trans-Planckian physics. The fact that they have not yet been observed might be used to constrain the duration and energy scale of inflation. However, this conclusion is contingent upon including the contribution of modes which were trans-Planckian at the beginning of inflation.

  8. Gravity waves from quantum stress tensor fluctuations in inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-Hsien; Hsiang, Jen-Tsung; Ford, L. H.; Ng, Kin-Wang

    2011-11-01

    We consider the effects of the quantum stress tensor fluctuations of a conformal field in generating gravity waves in inflationary models. We find a nonscale invariant, non-Gaussian contribution which depends upon the total expansion factor between an initial time and the end of inflation. This spectrum of gravity wave perturbations is an illustration of a negative power spectrum, which is possible in quantum field theory. We discuss possible choices for the initial conditions. If the initial time is taken to be sufficiently early, the fluctuating gravity waves are potentially observable both in the CMB radiation and in gravity wave detectors, and could offer a probe of trans-Planckian physics. The fact that they have not yet been observed might be used to constrain the duration and energy scale of inflation. However, this conclusion is contingent upon including the contribution of modes which were trans-Planckian at the beginning of inflation.

  9. Wave propagation in an initially stressed elastic half-space solids under time-fractional order two-temperature magneto-thermoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, N.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the magneto-thermoelastic disturbances in a homogeneous isotropic perfectly conducting thermoelastic semi-infinite medium caused by the hydrostatic initial stress is investigated. The theory of fractional order two-temperature generalized thermoelasticity associated with one relaxation time parameter is used. The normal mode analysis technique together with the method of displacement potentials are used to obtain the exact formulas of the two temperatures, displacement components, and stresses. Arbitrary application is chosen to enable us to get the complete solution. The considered field variables are presented graphically for a hypothetical material and then discussions are made for the obtained numerical results.

  10. Waves in nonlinear pre-stressed materials

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Wilhelm; Saccomandi, G

    2007-01-01

    The papers in this book provide a unique state-of-the-art multidisciplinary overview on the subject of waves in pre-stressed materials through the interaction of several topics, ranging from the mathematical modelling of incremental material response (elastic and inelastic), to the analysis of the governing differential equations and boundary-value problems, and to computational methods for the solution to these problems, with particular reference to industrial, geophysical, and biomechanical applications. A complete view on the title subject is proposed, including: The basic and fundamental theoretical issues (mechanical modelling, exact solutions, asymptotic methods, numerical treatment); A unified introduction to wave propagation (small on large and large on large); A look toward classical (such as geophysics and the mechanics of rubber-like solids) and emergent (such as biomechanics) applications.

  11. Existence of longitudinal waves in pre-stressed anisotropic elastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium, three types of quasi-waves propagate along an arbi- trary direction. In general, none of the waves is truly longitudinal. The present study finds the specific directions in a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium along which longitudinal waves may propagate. This paper ...

  12. Time evolution of wave packets on nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prunele, E de

    2005-01-01

    Time evolution of wave packets on nanostructures is studied on the basis of a three-dimensional solvable model with singular interactions (de Prunele 1997 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 30 7831). In particular, methods and tools are provided to determine time independent upper bounds for the overlap of the normalized time-dependent wave packet with the time independent normalized wave packet concentrated at an arbitrarily chosen vertex of the nanosystem. The set of upper bounds referring to all initial positions of the wave packet and all overlaps are summarized in a matrix. The analytical formulation allows a detailed study for arbitrary geometrical configurations. Time evolution on truncated quasicrystalline systems has been found to be site selective, depending on the position of the initial wave packet

  13. Wave-induced stress and breaking of sea ice in a coupled hydrodynamic discrete-element wave-ice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Agnieszka

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, a coupled sea ice-wave model is developed and used to analyze wave-induced stress and breaking in sea ice for a range of wave and ice conditions. The sea ice module is a discrete-element bonded-particle model, in which ice is represented as cuboid grains floating on the water surface that can be connected to their neighbors by elastic joints. The joints may break if instantaneous stresses acting on them exceed their strength. The wave module is based on an open-source version of the Non-Hydrostatic WAVE model (NHWAVE). The two modules are coupled with proper boundary conditions for pressure and velocity, exchanged at every wave model time step. In the present version, the model operates in two dimensions (one vertical and one horizontal) and is suitable for simulating compact ice in which heave and pitch motion dominates over surge. In a series of simulations with varying sea ice properties and incoming wavelength it is shown that wave-induced stress reaches maximum values at a certain distance from the ice edge. The value of maximum stress depends on both ice properties and characteristics of incoming waves, but, crucially for ice breaking, the location at which the maximum occurs does not change with the incoming wavelength. Consequently, both regular and random (Jonswap spectrum) waves break the ice into floes with almost identical sizes. The width of the zone of broken ice depends on ice strength and wave attenuation rates in the ice.

  14. Investigation into stress wave propagation in metal foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate stress wave propagation in metal foams under high-speed impact loading. Three-dimensional Voronoi model is established to represent real closed-cell foam. Based on the one-dimensional stress wave theory and Voronoi model, a numerical model is developed to calculate the velocity of elastic wave and shock wave in metal foam. The effects of impact velocity and relative density of metal foam on the stress wave propagation in metal foams are explored respectively. The results show that both elastic wave and shock wave propagate faster in metal foams with larger relative density; with increasing the impact velocity, the shock wave propagation velocity increase, but the elastic wave propagation is not sensitive to the impact velocity.

  15. Magneto-thermo-visco-elastic waves in an initially stressed conducting layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakshit, Amit Kumar; Sengupta, P.R.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate magneto-thermo-visco-elastic surface waves in electrically and thermally conducting layers involving time rates of strain and stress of order n, the media being under an initial stress in the nature of hydrostatic tension or compression. The theory of magneto-thermo-visco-elastic surface waves in the conducting medium involving strain rate and stress rate of nth order is derived under initial stress. This theory is then employed to obtain wave velocity equations in specific cases. Results obtained in the above cases reduce to well-known classical results when additional fields are absent. (author)

  16. Reflection of plane waves in an initially stressed perfectly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    stress and magnetic field on the reflection coef- ficients and energy ratios of reflected waves in a perfectly conducting initially stressed transversely isotropic elastic solid half-space. The present work is supposed to be useful in further studies of wave propagation in the more realistic models which have been extensively ...

  17. Wave velocities in a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wave velocities in a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium. M D Sharma ... Modified Christoffel equations are derived for three-dimensional wave propagation in a general anisotropic medium under initial stress.The three roots of a ... Department of Mathematics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119, India. UIET ...

  18. Nondestructive evaluation of standing trees with a stress wave method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Robert J. Ross; Michael McClellan; R. James Barbour; John R. Erickson; John W. Forsman; Gary D. McGinnis

    2001-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the usefulness of a stress wave technique for evaluating wood strength and stiffness of young-growth western hemlock and Sitka spruce in standing trees. A secondary objective was to determine if the effects of silvicultural practices on wood quality can be identified using this technique. Stress wave measurements...

  19. Wave-induced stresses and pore pressures near a mudline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Sawicki

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional methods for the determination of water-wave induced stresses inseabeds composed of granular soils are based on Biot-type models, in which the soilskeleton is treated as an elastic medium. Such methods predict effective stressesin the soil that are unacceptable from the physical point of view, as they permittensile stresses to occur near the upper surface of the seabed. Therefore, in thispaper the granular soil is assumed to behave as an elastic-ideally plastic material,with the Coulomb-Mohr yield criterion adopted to bound admissible stress states inthe seabed. The governing equations are solved numerically by a~finite differencemethod. The results of simulations, carried out for the case of time-harmonicwater waves, illustrate the depth distributions of the excess pore pressures and theeffective stresses in the seabed, and show the shapes of zones of soil in the plastic state.~In particular, the effects on the seabed behaviour of suchparameters as the degree of pore water saturation, the soil permeability, and theearth pressure coefficient, are illustrated.

  20. Stresses in a submarine topography under ocean waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, C.C.; McTigue, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of submarine slope stability is of interest to both offshore engineering and geology. In an uneven topography, the weight above a horizontal plane induces two-dimensional variation in the static stress field. The action of wave pressure, which changes with depth, further introduces excess pore pressure and dynamic stresses in the sea bottom. In the present paper, we combine a simple analytical theory for the static stress by the present authors, and the recent solution by Mei and Foda for wave-induced stresses in a plane poro-elastic sea bed to account for mild bottom slope and wave shoaling, to obtain the effective stress field in a submarine topography under sea waves. Sample results are given for a ridge and a canyon. In particular the dynamic pore pressure and the combined static and dynamic effective stresses are presented. 10 references, 11 figures.

  1. Stresses in a submarine topography under ocean waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, C.C.; McTigue, D.F.

    1984-09-01

    The problem of submarine slope stability is of interest to both offshore engineering and geology. In an uneven topography, the weight above a horizontal plane induces two-dimensional variation in the static stress field. The action of wave pressure, which changes with depth, further introduces excess pore pressure and dynamic stresses in the sea bottom. In the present paper, we combine a simple analytical theory for the static stress by the present authors, and the recent solution by Mei and Foda for wave-induced stresses in a plane poro-elastic sea bed to account for mild bottom slope and wave shoaling, and obtain the effective stress field in a submarine topography under sea waves. Sample results are given for a ridge and a canyon. In particular, the dynamic pore pressure and the combined static and dynamic effective stresses are presented.

  2. Gravitational Waves and Time Domain Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan; Nissanke, Samaya; Williams, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe will open in roughly five years, when Advanced LIGO and Virgo achieve the first detections of high frequency gravitational waves, most likely coming from compact binary mergers. Electromagnetic follow-up of these triggers, using radio, optical, and high energy telescopes, promises exciting opportunities in multi-messenger time domain astronomy. In the decade, space-based observations of low frequency gravitational waves from massive black hole mergers, and their electromagnetic counterparts, will open up further vistas for discovery. This two-part workshop featured brief presentations and stimulating discussions on the challenges and opportunities presented by gravitational wave astronomy. Highlights from the workshop, with the emphasis on strategies for electromagnetic follow-up, are presented in this report.

  3. Surface Wave Velocity-Stress Relationship in Uniaxially Loaded Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shokouhi, Parisa; Zoëga, Andreas; Wiggenhauser, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    loading cycles revealed that the velocities show a stress-memory effect in good agreement with the Kaiser effect. Comparing the velocities measured during loading and unloading, the effects of stress and damage on the measured velocities could be differentiated. Moreover, the stress dependency of surface......The sonic surface wave (or Rayleigh wave) velocity measured on prismatic concrete specimens under uniaxial compression was found to be highly stress-dependent. At low stress levels, the acoustoelastic effect and the closure of existing microcracks results in a gradual increase in surface wave...... velocities. At higher stress levels, concrete suffers irrecoverable damage: the existing microcracks widen and coalesce and new microcracks form. This progressive damage process leads first to the flattening and eventually the drop in the velocity-stress curves. Measurements on specimens undergoing several...

  4. Wave velocities in a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of differential stress environment in the sediments. In the problems of foundation engineering, the influence of initial stress appears in a buoyancy effect which amounts to floating a building on its foundation. The theory of elastic wave propaga- tion in pre-stressed solids has a nearly two-century long history. In perhaps, the ...

  5. Eliminating time dispersion from seismic wave modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koene, Erik F. M.; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Broggini, Filippo; Andersson, Fredrik

    2018-04-01

    We derive an expression for the error introduced by the second-order accurate temporal finite-difference (FD) operator, as present in the FD, pseudospectral and spectral element methods for seismic wave modeling applied to time-invariant media. The `time-dispersion' error speeds up the signal as a function of frequency and time step only. Time dispersion is thus independent of the propagation path, medium or spatial modeling error. We derive two transforms to either add or remove time dispersion from synthetic seismograms after a simulation. The transforms are compared to previous related work and demonstrated on wave modeling in acoustic as well as elastic media. In addition, an application to imaging is shown. The transforms enable accurate computation of synthetic seismograms at reduced cost, benefitting modeling applications in both exploration and global seismology.

  6. Theoretical Studies of Stress Wave Propagation in Laterally Confined Soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rohani, Behzad

    1999-01-01

    .... A considerable body of scientific literature on one-dimensional stress wave propagation for such models has been published in recent years by various researchers, both in the United States and abroad...

  7. Assimilation of Wave Imaging Radar Observations for Real-time Wave-by-Wave Forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Alexandra [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Haller, Merrick [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). School of Civil & Construction Engineering; Walker, David [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lynett, Pat [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-08-29

    This project addressed Topic 3: “Wave Measurement Instrumentation for Feed Forward Controls” under the FOA number DE-FOA-0000971. The overall goal of the program was to develop a phase-resolving wave forecasting technique for application to the active control of Wave Energy Conversion (WEC) devices. We have developed an approach that couples a wave imaging marine radar with a phase-resolving linear wave model for real-time wave field reconstruction and forward propagation of the wave field in space and time. The scope of the project was to develop and assess the performance of this novel forecasting system. Specific project goals were as follows: Develop and verify a fast, GPU-based (Graphical Processing Unit) wave propagation model suitable for phase-resolved computation of nearshore wave transformation over variable bathymetry; Compare the accuracy and speed of performance of the wave model against a deep water model in their ability to predict wave field transformation in the intermediate water depths (50 to 70 m) typical of planned WEC sites; Develop and implement a variational assimilation algorithm that can ingest wave imaging radar observations and estimate the time-varying wave conditions offshore of the domain of interest such that the observed wave field is best reconstructed throughout the domain and then use this to produce model forecasts for a given WEC location; Collect wave-resolving marine radar data, along with relevant in situ wave data, at a suitable wave energy test site, apply the algorithm to the field data, assess performance, and identify any necessary improvements; and Develop a production cost estimate that addresses the affordability of the wave forecasting technology and include in the Final Report. The developed forecasting algorithm (“Wavecast”) was evaluated for both speed and accuracy against a substantial synthetic dataset. Early in the project, performance tests definitively demonstrated that the system was capable of

  8. Reflection of plane waves in an initially stressed perfectly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reflection of plane waves is studied at a free surface of a perfectly conducting transversely isotropic elastic solid half-space with initial stress. The governing equations are solved to obtain the velocity equation which indicates the existence of two quasi planar waves in the medium. Reflection coefficients and energy.

  9. Reflection of plane waves in an initially stressed perfectly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reflection of plane waves is studied at a free surface of a perfectly conducting transversely isotropic elastic solid half-space with initial stress. The governing equations are solved to obtain the velocity equation which indicates the existence of two quasi planar waves in the medium. Reflection coefficients and energy ratios ...

  10. Stress Wave Propagation in Larch Plantation Trees-Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenglu Liu; Fang Jiang; Xiping Wang; Houjiang Zhang; Wenhua Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we attempted to simulate stress wave propagation in virtual tree trunks and construct two dimensional (2D) wave-front maps in the longitudinal-radial section of the trunk. A tree trunk was modeled as an orthotropic cylinder in which wood properties along the fiber and in each of the two perpendicular directions were different. We used the COMSOL...

  11. Wave velocities in a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Modified Christoffel equations are derived for three-dimensional wave propagation in a general anisotropic medium under initial stress.The three roots of a cubic equation define the phase velocities of three quasi-waves in the medium.Analytical expressions are used to calculate the directional derivatives of phase ...

  12. Relationship between ultrasonic Rayleigh waves and surface residual stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, L.; Cook, K.V.; Dewey, B.R.; King, R.T.

    1977-01-01

    Local variations of Rayleigh (surface) circumferential ultrasonic wave velocity near a pipe-girth weld in large-diameter thin-wall type 316H stainless steel pipe were measured. The weldment was similar to those anticipated for the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) piping systems. The residual stress distribution was estimated independently from shell theory for an elastic, infinite, thin shell with circumferential line loading. An upper bound on the magnitude of the residual stresses was estimated assuming the deformation of the shell was entirely elastic. The pattern of surface wave velocity variations matches the theoretical residual stress pattern closely. It is suggested that the monitoring of surface wave velocity variations might be used for characterizing residual stress patterns near critical welds in piping, aiding in design calculations, and for in-service monitoring of the state of stress of weldments

  13. Eddy Viscosity for Time Reversing Waves in a Dissipative Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Josselin; Nachbin, André

    2004-10-01

    We present new results for the time reversal of weakly nonlinear pulses traveling in a random dissipative environment. Also we describe a new theory for calculating the eddy viscosity for weakly nonlinear waves propagating over a random surface. The turbulent viscosity is calculated from first principles, namely, without imposing any stress-strain hypothesis. A viscous shallow water model is considered and its effective viscosity characterized. We also show that weakly nonlinear waves can still be time reversed under weak dissipation. Incoherently scattered signals are recompressed, both for time reversal in transmission as well as in reflection. Under the weakly nonlinear, weakly dissipative regime, dissipation only affects the refocused pulse profile regarding its amplitude, but its shape is not corrupted. Numerical experiments are presented.

  14. Real time wave measurements and wave hindcasting in deep waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anand, N.M.; Mandal, S.; SanilKumar, V.; Nayak, B.U.

    Deep water waves off Karwar (lat. 14~'45.1'N, long. 73~'34.8'E) at 75 m water depth pertaining to peak monsoon period have been measured using a Datawell waverider buoy. Measured wave data show that the significant wave height (Hs) predominantly...

  15. Time-reversal waves and super resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, M [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique, Ecole Suprieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielle de la Ville de Paris, Universit Denis Diderot, UMR CNRS 7587, 10 Rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France)], E-mail: mathias.fink@espci.fr

    2008-07-15

    Time-reversal mirrors (TRMs) refocus an incident acoustic field to the position of the original source regardless of the complexity of the propagation medium. TRM's have now been implemented in a variety of physical scenarios from MHz ultrasonics with order centimeter aperture size to hundreds/thousands of Hz in ocean acoustics with order hundred meter aperture size. Common to this broad range of scales is a remarkable robustness exemplified by observations at all scales that the more complex the medium between the probe source and the TRM, the sharper the focus. The relation between the medium complexity and the size of the focal spot is studied in this paper. It is certainly the most exciting property of TRM compared to standard focusing devices. A TRM acts as an antenna that uses complex environments to appears wider than it is, resulting for a broadband pulse in a refocusing quality that does not depend of the TRM aperture. In this paper, we investigate the time-reversal approach in various media of increasing complexity We will also demonstrated that time-reversal focusing opens completely new approaches to super-resolution. We will show that in medium made of random distribution of sub-wavelength scatterers, a time-reversed wave field interacts with the random medium to regenerate not only the propagating but also the evanescent waves required to refocus below the diffraction limit. Finally, we will discuss the link existing between time-reversal approaches and new imaging methods recently developed where Green's functions of complex media can be extracted from diffusive noise by cross-correlating the recordings of a diffuse random wave field.

  16. The role of stress waves and cavitation in stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Songlin; Cocks, Franklin H; Preminger, Glenn M; Zhong, Pei

    2002-05-01

    Using an experimental system that mimics stone fragmentation in the renal pelvis, we have investigated the role of stress waves and cavitation in stone comminution in shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL). Spherical plaster-of-Paris stone phantoms (D = 10 mm) were exposed to 25, 50, 100, 200, 300 and 500 shocks at the beam focus of a Dornier HM-3 lithotripter operated at 20 kV and a pulse repetition rate of 1 Hz. The stone phantoms were immersed either in degassed water or in castor oil to delineate the contribution of stress waves and cavitation to stone comminution. It was found that, while in degassed water there is a progressive disintegration of the stone phantoms into small pieces, the fragments produced in castor oil are fairly sizable. From 25 to 500 shocks, clinically passable fragments (stones with a primary composition of calcium oxalate monohydrate. After 200 shocks, 89% of the fragments of the kidney stones treated in degassed water became passable, but only 22% of the fragments of the kidney stones treated in castor oil were less than 2 mm in size. This apparent size limitation of the stone fragments produced primarily by stress waves (in castor oil) is likely caused by the destructive superposition of the stress waves reverberating inside the fragments, when their sizes are less than half of the compressive wavelength in the stone material. On the other hand, if a stone is only exposed to cavitation bubbles induced in SWL, the resultant fragmentation is much less effective than that produced by the combination of stress waves and cavitation. It is concluded that, although stress wave-induced fracture is important for the initial disintegration of kidney stones, cavitation is necessary to produce fine passable fragments, which are most critical for the success of clinical SWL. Stress waves and cavitation work synergistically, rather than independently, to produce effective and successful disintegration of renal calculi in SWL

  17. DETECTING GRAVITATIONAL WAVE MEMORY WITH PULSAR TIMING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, J. M.; Jenet, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    We compare the detectability of gravitational bursts passing through the solar system with those passing near each millisecond pulsar in an N-pulsar timing array. The sensitivity to Earth-passing bursts can exploit the correlation expected in pulse arrival times while pulsar-passing bursts, though uncorrelated between objects, provide an N-fold increase in overall time baseline that can compensate for the lower sensitivity. Bursts with memory from mergers of supermassive black holes produce step functions in apparent spin frequency that are the easiest to detect in pulsar timing. We show that the burst rate and amplitude distribution, while strongly dependent on inadequately known cosmological evolution, may favor detection in the pulsar terms rather than the Earth timing perturbations. Any contamination of timing data by red spin noise makes burst detection more difficult because both signals grow with the length of the time data span T. Furthermore, the different bursts that could appear in one or more data sets of length T ≈ 10 yr also affect the detectability of the gravitational wave stochastic background that, like spin noise, has a red power spectrum. A burst with memory is a worthwhile target in the timing of multiple pulsars in a globular cluster because it should produce a correlated signal with a time delay of less than about 10 years in some cases.

  18. Detecting Gravitational Wave Memory with Pulsar Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, J. M.; Jenet, F. A.

    2012-06-01

    We compare the detectability of gravitational bursts passing through the solar system with those passing near each millisecond pulsar in an N-pulsar timing array. The sensitivity to Earth-passing bursts can exploit the correlation expected in pulse arrival times while pulsar-passing bursts, though uncorrelated between objects, provide an N-fold increase in overall time baseline that can compensate for the lower sensitivity. Bursts with memory from mergers of supermassive black holes produce step functions in apparent spin frequency that are the easiest to detect in pulsar timing. We show that the burst rate and amplitude distribution, while strongly dependent on inadequately known cosmological evolution, may favor detection in the pulsar terms rather than the Earth timing perturbations. Any contamination of timing data by red spin noise makes burst detection more difficult because both signals grow with the length of the time data span T. Furthermore, the different bursts that could appear in one or more data sets of length T ≈ 10 yr also affect the detectability of the gravitational wave stochastic background that, like spin noise, has a red power spectrum. A burst with memory is a worthwhile target in the timing of multiple pulsars in a globular cluster because it should produce a correlated signal with a time delay of less than about 10 years in some cases.

  19. Stress, Gender and Time Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonke, Jens; Gerstoft, Frederik

    This paper investigates the gender aspect of stress within a welfare state regime with high employment rates for both women and men. By applying an economic model, an extended model and a stress-level model, we find that higher incomes lead to stress among women and men, confirming findings for A...

  20. Experimental Study of the Effect of Internal Defects on Stress Waves during Automated Fiber Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Han

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The detection technique of component defects is currently only realized to detect offline defects and online surface defects during automated fiber placement (AFP. The characteristics of stress waves can be effectively applied to identify and detect internal defects in material structure. However, the correlation mechanism between stress waves and internal defects remains unclear during the AFP process. This paper proposes a novel experimental method to test stress waves, where continuous loading induced by process itself is used as an excitation source without other external excitation. Twenty-seven groups of thermosetting prepreg laminates under different processing parameters are manufactured to obtain different void content. In order to quantitatively estimate the void content in the prepreg structure, the relation model between the void content and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient is revealed using an A-scan ultrasonic flaw detector and photographic methods by optical microscope. Furthermore, the high-frequency noises of stress waves are removed using Haar wavelet transform. The peaks, the Manhattan distance and mean stress during the laying process are analyzed and evaluated. Partial conclusions in this paper could provide theoretical support for online real-time detection of internal defects based on stress wave characteristics.

  1. Forecasting ocean wave energy: A Comparison of the ECMWF wave model with time series methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reikard, Gordon; Pinson, Pierre; Bidlot, Jean

    2011-01-01

    (ECMWF) Wave Model, and two statistical techniques, time-varying parameter regressions and neural networks. Thirteen data sets at locations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and the Gulf of Mexico are tested. The quantities to be predicted are the significant wave height, the wave period, and the wave...

  2. Stress-wave experiments on selected crustal rocks and minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, D. E.

    1983-09-01

    Large amplitude compressive stress wave experiments on selected crustal rocks and minerals was performed. The materials studied included Vermont marble, Blair dolomite, Oakhall limestone, z-cut calcite and oil shale. In each case specific constitutive features were studied. Features include interrelation of plastic yielding and phase transformation, rate dependent plastic flow, dilatency under dynamic loading conditions, and energy dissipation at stress amplitudes below measured Hugoniot elastic limits. A new experimental method using inmaterial mutual inductance magnetic gauges is also described.

  3. Stress wave emission: a bibliographical survey No 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucia, A.C.; Galli, M.

    1976-01-01

    This report gives an inventory of papers and publications which deal with stress wave emission (ultrasonic emission). This bibliography is up date until end of 1974. It contains also titles of papers published before 1973 but not contained in our first bibliographical report (EUR--5616e)

  4. Measurement and modeling of bed shear stress under solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, S.; Guard, P.A.; Baldock, T.E.

    Direct measurements of bed shear stresses (using a shear cell apparatus) generated by non-breaking solitary waves are presented. The measurements were carried out over a smooth bed in laminar and transitional flow regimes (~ 10 sup (4) < R sub (e...

  5. Time Out for Stress Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Judy; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses stress among child-care professionals. Lists major items contributing to job stress, and includes a self-test to determine coping style. Identifies 4 primary coping strategies, and discusses the top 11 coping strategies used by child-care professionals. (ET)

  6. Flow under standing waves Part 1. Shear stress distribution, energy flux and steady streaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Kjartan; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Deigaard, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The conditions for energy flux, momentum flux and the resulting streaming velocity are analysed for standing waves formed in front of a fully reflecting wall. The exchange of energy between the outer wave motion and the near bed oscillatory boundary layer is considered, determining the horizontal...... energy flux inside and outside the boundary layer. The momentum balance, the mean shear stress and the resulting time averaged streaming velocities are determined. For a laminar bed boundary layer the analysis of the wave drift gives results similar to the original work of Longuet-Higgins from 1953...

  7. Determination of stress glut moments of total degree 2 from teleseismic surface wave amplitude spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukchin, B. G.

    1995-08-01

    A special case of the seismic source, where the stress glut tensor can be expressed as a product of a uniform moment tensor and a scalar function of spatial coordinates and time, is considered. For such a source, a technique of determining stress glut moments of total degree 2 from surface wave amplitude spectra is described. The results of application of this technique for the estimation of spatio-temporal characteristics of the Georgian earthquake, 29.04.91 are presented.

  8. THE BASIS OF MATHEMATICAL DESCRIPTION FOR WAVE MODEL OF STRESSES PROPAGATION IN RAILWAY TRACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Kurhan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Modern scientific research has repeatedly cited practical examples of the dynamic effects of railway track operation that go beyond the static calculation schemes. For the track sections where the train speed is approaching to the velocity of wave propagation in the slab track layers such issues are of particular relevance. An adequate tool for the study of such issues can be the use of the wave theory of stress propagation. The purpose of the article is the creation of a mathematical description of the basic principles of the stress propagation wave model in the railway track, which can be used as a basis for the practical development of the relevant calculation system. Methodology. The model of stress-strain states of the railway track on the basis of the stress wave propagation theory is to bring together the equations of the geometry of the outline of the space systems that is involved in the interaction at a given time, and the dynamic equilibrium equations of deformation. The solution is based on the use of the laws of the theory of elasticity. The wave front is described by an ellipsoid equation. When determining the variation in time of the surface position of the ellipsoid a vector approach is used. Findings. The geometry equations of the wave motion determine the volumes of material layers of the slab track involved in the interaction at a given time. The dynamic equilibrium determination of the deformed condition of the space bounded by the wave front makes it possible to calculate both the stresses and strains, and their changes during the time of the load perception. Thus, mathematical descriptions of the processes that occur in the perception of the load by the elements of railway track at high speeds were obtained. Originality. The simulation tasks of the track and rolling stock interaction, in particular taking into account the dynamic deflection of slab track were further developed. For the first time the article

  9. Transient Stress Waves in Study of Coconut Physical Properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnka, Jan; Dvořáková, Pavla

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2010), s. 19-25 ISSN 0732-8818 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA201990701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : stress waves * double-pulse holography * coconut * exploding wires Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 0.505, year: 2010 http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/121567342/PDFSTART

  10. Slow waves moving near the openings in highly stressed conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzev, Michail; Makarov, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    In situ experiments have shown the unusual deformation waves near the openings on high depth of the construction. Process of the wave spreading is beginning after the mining and has two stages of the zonal mesocracking structure formation and development [1]. Extending in a radial direction, the wave poorly fades with distance. For phenomenon modelling the theoretical decision for non-Eucledian models about opening of round cross-section in strongly compressed rock massif is used [2]. The decision qualitatively repeats behaviour of a wave in a rock mass, adjustment of phenomenological parametres is executed. References [1] Vladimir V. Makarov, Mikhail A. Guzev, Vladimir N. Odintsev, Lyudmila S. Ksendzenko (2016) Periodical zonal character of damage near the openings in highly-stressed rock mass conditions. Journal of Rock Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering. Volume 8, Issue 2, pp. 164-169. [2] M.A. Guzev, V.V. Makarov, 2007. Deforming and failure of the high stressed rocks around the openings, RAS Edit., Vladivostok, 2007, P. 232 (in Russian).

  11. Stress in the zoo: Tracking the impact of stress on memory formation over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Susanne; Schwabe, Lars

    2016-09-01

    Although stress is well known to modulate human memory, precisely how memory formation is altered by a stressful encounter remains unclear. Stress effects on cognition are mainly mediated by the rapidly acting sympathetic nervous system, resulting in the release of catecholamines, and the slower acting hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis secreting cortisol, which induces its effects on cognition through fast, non-genomic actions and delayed, genomic actions. Importantly, these different waves of the physiological stress response are thought to dynamically alter neural processing in brain regions important for memory such as the amygdala and the hippocampus. However, the precise time course of stress effects on memory formation is still unclear. To track the development of stress effects on memory over time, we tested individuals who underwent a stressful experience or a control procedure before a 2-h walk through a zoo, while an automatic camera continuously photographed the events they encoded. In a recognition memory test one week later, participants were presented with target photographs of their own zoo tour and lure photographs from an alternate tour. Stressed participants showed better memory for the experimental treatment than control participants, and this memory enhancement for the stressful encounter itself was directly linked to the sympathetic stress response. Moreover, stress enhanced memory for events encoded 41-65min after stressor onset, which was associated with the cortisol stress response, most likely arising from non-genomic cortisol actions. However, memory for events encoded long after the stressor, when genomic cortisol actions had most likely developed, remained unchanged. Our findings provide novel insights into how stress effects on memory formation develop over time, depending on the activity of major physiological stress response systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Determination of Stress-Acoustic Coefficients of Rayleigh Wave by Use of Laser Doppler Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lingfeng; Kobayashi, Shoichi

    In the present paper, 1) a new non-contact ultrasonic stress measurement technique is proposed based on acoustoelasticity, in which ultrasonic wave motion is detected by use of a laser Doppler velocimeter, and 2) the stress-acoustic coefficients of Rayleigh wave for aluminum alloy and structural steel are determined by the technique. In the measurement system, Rayleigh waves are emitted into the specimen by a wedge-type piezoelectric transducer and vertical velocities of the surface motions of the traveling Rayleigh waves are detected by the laser Doppler velocimeter at two points of 4 cm apart. In order to measure the traveling time of the wave between the two points, the converted voltage signals are supplied both to i) a sing-around unit and ii) to a digital oscilloscope. The time-of-flight over the distance between the two points is obtained either by subtracting the sing-around periods measured at the two points or by direct reading at zero-cross of the overlapped images of the two waves on the CR display of the oscilloscope. Both measurements are made at the same time under increasing or decreasing loads. The stress-acoustic coefficients obtained are -1.2×10-5/MPa and -0.21×10-5/MPa for aluminum alloy 5052 and structural steel SS400, respectively. These results are in good agreement with those determined using two knife-edge contact piezoelectric transducers. This study shows that the proposed non-contact measuring technique by use of laser velocimetry is applicable to determining the stress-acoustic coefficients.

  13. Numerical simulation of stress wave propagation from underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, J.T.; Petersen, F.L.

    1970-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of stress wave propagation (SOC) which uses material properties data from a preshot testing program to predict the stress-induced effects on the rock mass involved in a Plowshare application. SOC calculates stress and particle velocity history, cavity radius, extent of brittle failure, and the rock's efficiency for transmitting stress. The calculations are based on an equation of state for the rock, which is developed from preshot field and laboratory measurements of the rock properties. The field measurements, made by hole logging, determine in situ values of the rock's density, water content, and propagation velocity for elastic waves. These logs also are useful in judging the layering of the rock and in choosing which core samples to test in the laboratory. The laboratory analysis of rock cores includes determination of hydrostatic compressibility to 40 kb, triaxial strength data, tensile strength, Hugoniot elastic limit, and, for the rock near the point of detonation, high-pressure Hugoniot data. Equation-of-state data are presented for rock from three sites subjected to high explosive or underground nuclear shots, including the Hardhat and Gasbuggy sites. SOC calculations of the effects of these two shots on the surrounding rock are compared with the observed effects. In both cases SOC predicts the size of the cavity quite closely. Results of the Gasbuggy calculations indicate that useful predictions of cavity size and chimney height can be made when an adequate preshot testing program is run to determine the rock's equation of state. Seismic coupling is very sensitive to the low-pressure part of the equation of state, and its successful prediction depends on agreement between the logging data and the static compressibility data. In general, it appears that enough progress has been made in calculating stress wave propagation to begin looking at derived numbers, such as number of cracks per zone, for some insight into the

  14. Fourier optics and time evolution of de Broglie wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, G.

    2012-06-01

    It is shown that, under the conditions of validity of the Fresnel approximation, diffraction and interference for a monochromatic wave traveling in the z-direction may be described in terms of the spreading in time of the transverse ( x, y wave packet. The time required for the evolved wave packet to yield identical patterns as given by standard optics corresponds to the time for the quantum to cross the optical apparatus. This point of view may provide interesting cues in wave mechanics and quantum physics education.

  15. Real-time directional wave data collection

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    AshokKumar, K.; Diwan, S.G.; Pednekar, P.S.

    The wave measurements carried out along the east and west coasts off India at 13 locations using the directional waverider buoys are referred in this paper. The total number of buoy days are 4501 and out of which the data collected are 4218 days...

  16. A simplified method of evaluating the stress wave environment of internal equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, J. D.; Desmond, T. P.

    1979-01-01

    A simplified method called the transfer function technique (TFT) was devised for evaluating the stress wave environment in a structure containing internal equipment. The TFT consists of following the initial in-plane stress wave that propagates through a structure subjected to a dynamic load and characterizing how the wave is altered as it is transmitted through intersections of structural members. As a basis for evaluating the TFT, impact experiments and detailed stress wave analyses were performed for structures with two or three, or more members. Transfer functions that relate the wave transmitted through an intersection to the incident wave were deduced from the predicted wave response. By sequentially applying these transfer functions to a structure with several intersections, it was found that the environment produced by the initial stress wave propagating through the structure can be approximated well. The TFT can be used as a design tool or as an analytical tool to determine whether a more detailed wave analysis is warranted.

  17. Stress Wave Propagation due to a Moving Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K. M.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the performance of two numerical methods of solving the problem of a time dependent moving force on the surface of an elastic continuum will be evaluated. One method is the finite element method (FEM) formulated in convected coordinates coupled with an absorbing boundary condition...... of the impedance type. The other method to be considered is the boundary element method (BEM), where a new formulation using Green's functions transformed to a moving coordinate system is introduced. The methods are tested by the classic wave propagation problem of a Ricker Pulse propagating from the surface...... of an elastic halfspace. The time integral net impulse of the considered loading must be null for the considered FEM to work. Further, the FEM is unable to absorb Rayleigh waves, since the considered impedance condition has been tuned P- and S-waves. By contrast the BEM is able to handle also these cases...

  18. Stress wave velocity patterns in the longitudinal-radial plane of trees for defect diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanghui Li; Xiang Weng; Xiaocheng Du; Xiping Wang; Hailin Feng

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic tomography for urban tree inspection typically uses stress wave data to reconstruct tomographic images for the trunk cross section using interpolation algorithm. This traditional technique does not take into account the stress wave velocity patterns along tree height. In this study, we proposed an analytical model for the wave velocity in the longitudinal–...

  19. Interaction of laser-induced stress waves with metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauer, A. H.; Fairand, B. P.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of high intensity laser induced stress waves on the hardness and tensile strength of 2024 and 7075 aluminum and on the fatigue properties of 7075 aluminum were investigated. Laser shocking increases the hardness of the underaged 2024-T351 but has little or no effect on the peak aged 2024-T351 and 7075-T651 or the overaged 7075-T73. The fretting fatigue life of fastener joints of 7075-T6 was increased by orders of magnitude by laser shocking the region around the fastener hole; the fatigue crack propagation rates were decreased by laser shocking.

  20. The Bloch wave operator: generalizations and applications: Part I. The time-independent case

    CERN Document Server

    Killingbeck, J P

    2003-01-01

    This is part 1 of a two-part review on wave operator theory and methods. The basic theory of the time-independent wave operator is presented in terms of partitioned matrix theory for the benefit of general readers, with a discussion of the links between the matrix and projection operator approaches. The matrix approach is shown to lead to simple derivations of the wave operators and effective Hamiltonians of Loewdin, Bloch, Des Cloizeaux and Kato as well as to some associated variational forms. The principal approach used throughout stresses the solution of the nonlinear equation for the reduced wave operator, leading to the construction of the effective Hamiltonians of Bloch and of Des Cloizeaux. Several mathematical techniques which are useful in implementing this approach are explained, some of them being relatively little known in the area of wave operator calculations. The theoretical discussion is accompanied by several specimen numerical calculations which apply the described techniques to a selection ...

  1. Wave-Based Turing Machine: Time Reversal and Information Erasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrard, S.; Fort, E.; Couder, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The investigation of dynamical systems has revealed a deep-rooted difference between waves and objects regarding temporal reversibility and particlelike objects. In nondissipative chaos, the dynamic of waves always remains time reversible, unlike that of particles. Here, we explore the dynamics of a wave-particle entity. It consists in a drop bouncing on a vibrated liquid bath, self-propelled and piloted by the surface waves it generates. This walker, in which there is an information exchange between the particle and the wave, can be analyzed in terms of a Turing machine with waves as the information repository. The experiments reveal that in this system, the drop can read information backwards while erasing it. The drop can thus backtrack on its previous trajectory. A transient temporal reversibility, restricted to the drop motion, is obtained in spite of the system being both dissipative and chaotic.

  2. Quantum fields interacting with colliding plane waves: the stress-energy tensor and backreaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorca, M.; Verdaguer, E.

    1997-01-01

    Following a previous work on the quantization of a massless scalar field in a space-time representing the head on collision of two plane waves which focus into a Killing-Cauchy horizon, we compute the renormalized expectation value of the stress-energy tensor of the quantum field near that horizon in the physical state which corresponds to the Minkowski vacuum before the collision of the waves. It is found that for minimally coupled and conformally coupled scalar fields the respective stress-energy tensors are unbounded in the horizon. The specific form of the divergences suggests that when the semiclassical Einstein equations describing the backreaction of the quantum fields on the space-time geometry are taken into account, the horizon will acquire a curvature singularity. Thus the Killing-Cauchy horizon which is known to be unstable under ''generic'' classical perturbations is also unstable by vacuum polarization. The calculation is done following the point-splitting regularization technique. The dynamical colliding wave space-time has four quite distinct space-time regions, namely, one flat region, two single plane wave regions, and one interaction region. Exact mode solutions of the quantum field equation cannot be found exactly, but the blueshift suffered by the initial modes in the plane wave and interaction regions makes the use of the WKB expansion a suitable method of solution. To ensure the correct regularization of the stress-energy tensor, the initial flat modes propagated into the interaction region must be given to a rather high adiabatic order of approximation. (orig.)

  3. Features of propagation and recordingof the stress waves in plates of finite thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherednichenko Rostislav Andreevich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This work was carried out to study at the same time the dynamics of wave propagation in plane and axisymmetric plates by finite-difference numerical calculation and by the method of dynamic photoelasticity.In many cases it is possible to carry out the investigation of the dynamic stressed state of solid structures under the impact of seismic waves in plane statement, observing the foundation and the building itself in the conditions of plane deformation. Such problems in structural mechanics are usually investigated on plates providing the conditions of generalized plane stressed condition and accounting for the necessity of the known substitution of elastic constants. In case of applying the model of generalized plane stressed state for investigating two-dimensional waves’ propagation in three-dimensional elastic medium it may be necessary to observe certain additional conditions, which for example limit the class of external impacts of high frequencies (short waves. The use of candling for wave recording in plane models explored with the method of dynamic photoelasticity in the observed cases of impulse loading of the plates with finite thickness gives satisfactory results.

  4. Determination of the Stress State From Transverse Wave Speeds in Isotropic Inelastic Solids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scheidler, Mike

    1997-01-01

    For a transverse acceleration wave propagating along a principal axis of strain in a nonlinear isotropic elastic solid, a simple formula due to Ericksen relates the wave speed to the stress and strain...

  5. Plane-wave least-squares reverse-time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2013-06-03

    A plane-wave least-squares reverse-time migration (LSRTM) is formulated with a new parameterization, where the migration image of each shot gather is updated separately and an ensemble of prestack images is produced along with common image gathers. The merits of plane-wave prestack LSRTM are the following: (1) plane-wave prestack LSRTM can sometimes offer stable convergence even when the migration velocity has bulk errors of up to 5%; (2) to significantly reduce computation cost, linear phase-shift encoding is applied to hundreds of shot gathers to produce dozens of plane waves. Unlike phase-shift encoding with random time shifts applied to each shot gather, plane-wave encoding can be effectively applied to data with a marine streamer geometry. (3) Plane-wave prestack LSRTM can provide higher-quality images than standard reverse-time migration. Numerical tests on the Marmousi2 model and a marine field data set are performed to illustrate the benefits of plane-wave LSRTM. Empirical results show that LSRTM in the plane-wave domain, compared to standard reversetime migration, produces images efficiently with fewer artifacts and better spatial resolution. Moreover, the prestack image ensemble accommodates more unknowns to makes it more robust than conventional least-squares migration in the presence of migration velocity errors. © 2013 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  6. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Manfred

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights.

  7. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuntz, M. (Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, Boulder, CO (USA) Heidelberg Universitaet (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights. 74 refs.

  8. Tunneling-time calculations for general finite wave packets based on the presence-time formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barco, O. del; Ortuno, M.; Gasparian, V.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the tunneling-time problem via the presence time formalism. With this method we reproduce previous results for very long wave packets and we are able to calculate the tunneling time for general wave packets of arbitrary shape and length. The tunneling time for a general wave packet is equal to the average over the energy components of the standard phase time. With this approach we can also calculate the time uncertainty. We have checked that the results obtained with this approach agree extremely well with numerical simulations of the wave packet evolution

  9. Feasibility of Residual Stress Nondestructive Estimation Using the Nonlinear Property of Critical Refraction Longitudinal Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual stress has significant influence on the performance of mechanical components, and the nondestructive estimation of residual stress is always a difficult problem. This study applies the relative nonlinear coefficient of critical refraction longitudinal (LCR wave to nondestructively characterize the stress state of materials; the feasibility of residual stress estimation using the nonlinear property of LCR wave is verified. The nonlinear ultrasonic measurements based on LCR wave are conducted on components with known stress state to calculate the relative nonlinear coefficient. Experimental results indicate that the relative nonlinear coefficient monotonically increases with prestress and the increment of relative nonlinear coefficient is about 80%, while the wave velocity only decreases about 0.2%. The sensitivity of the relative nonlinear coefficient for stress is much higher than wave velocity. Furthermore, the dependence between the relative nonlinear coefficient and deformation state of components is found. The stress detection resolution based on the nonlinear property of LCR wave is 10 MPa, which has higher resolution than wave velocity. These results demonstrate that the nonlinear property of LCR wave is more suitable for stress characterization than wave velocity, and this quantitative information could be used for residual stress estimation.

  10. Nonlinear ultrasonic guided waves for stress monitoring in prestressing tendons for post-tensioned concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Ivan; Nucera, Claudio; Srivastava, Ankit; Salamone, Salvatore; Phillips, Robert; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Coccia, Stefano; Sikorsky, Charles S.

    2009-03-01

    Many bridges, including 90% of the California inventory, are post-tensioned box-girders concrete structures. Prestressing tendons are the main load-carrying components of these and other post-tensioned structures. Despite their criticality, much research is needed to develop and deploy techniques able to provide real-time information on the level of prestress in order to detect dangerous stress losses. In collaboration with Caltrans, UCSD is investigating the combination of ultrasonic guided waves and embedded sensors to provide both prestress level monitoring and defect detection capabilities in concrete-embedded PS tendons. This paper presents a technique based on nonlinear ultrasonic guided waves in the 100 kHz - 2 MHz range for monitoring prestress levels in 7-wire PS tendons. The technique relies on the fact that an axial stress on the tendon generates a proportional radial stress between adjacent wires (interwire stress). In turn, the interwire stress modulates nonlinear effects in ultrasonic wave propagation through both the presence of finite strains and the interwire contact. The nonlinear ultrasonic behavior of the tendon under changing levels of prestress is monitored by tracking higher-order harmonics at (nω) arising under a fundamental guided-wave excitation at (ω). Experimental results will be presented to identify (a) ranges of fundamental excitations at (ω) producing maximum nonlinear response, and (b) optimum lay-out of the transmitting and the receiving transducers within the test tendons. Compared to alternative methods based on linear ultrasonic features, the proposed nonlinear ultrasonic technique appears more sensitive to prestress levels and more robust against changing excitation power at the transmitting transducer or changing transducer/tendon bond conditions.

  11. Results of fatigue tests and prediction of fatigue life under superposed stress wave and combined superposed stress wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasugi, Shunji; Horikawa, Takeshi; Tsunenari, Toshiyasu; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    1983-01-01

    In order to examine fatigue life prediction methods at high temperatures where creep damage need not be taken into account, fatigue tests were carried out on plane bending specimens of alloy steels (SCM 435, 2 1/4Cr-1Mo) under superposed and combined superposed stress waves at room temperature and 500 0 C. The experimental data were compared with the fatigue lives predicted by using the cycle counting methods (range pair, range pair mean and zero-cross range pair mean methods), the modified Goodman's equation and the modified Miner's rule. The main results were as follows. (1) The fatigue life prediction method which is being used for the data at room temperature is also applicable to predict the life at high temperatures. The range pair mean method is especially better than other cycle counting methods. The zero-cross range pair mean method gives the estimated lives on the safe side of the experimental lives. (2) The scatter bands of N-bar/N-barsub(es) (experimental life/estimated life) becomes narrower when the following equation is used instead of the modified Goodman's equation for predicting the effect of mean stress on fatigue life. σ sub(t) = σ sub(a) / (1 - Sigma-s sub(m) / kσ sub(B)) σ sub(t); stress amplitude at zero mean stress (kg/mm 2 ) σ sub(B); tensile strength (kg/mm 2 ) σ sub(m); mean stress (kg/mm 2 ) σ sub(a); stress amplitude (kg/mm 2 ) k; modified coefficient of σ sub(B) (author)

  12. Solitary waves on inclined films: their characteristics and the effects on wall shear stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tihon, J. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Serifi, K.; Argyriadi, K.; Bontozoglou, V. [University of Thessaly, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Volos (Greece)

    2006-07-15

    The properties of solitary waves, developing from inlet disturbances of controlled frequency along an inclined film flow, are systematically studied experimentally and computationally. Time-variations of film height and wall shear stress are measured, using respectively a capacitance probe and an electrodiffusion sensor. Computational data are provided from simulations performed by a Galerkin finite element scheme. The height and spacing of solitary humps, their phase velocity and the wavelength of the preceding capillary ripples are reported as functions of the Reynolds number (10stress modulation imposed by the passage of solitary waves is studied experimentally and computationally as a function of Re. Distinct nonlinear characteristics are noted, including a steep maximum and a negative minimum, with the effects intensifying at intermediate Re. All computer predictions are found to be in good quantitative agreement with the experimental data. (orig.)

  13. Body waves separation in the time-frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, R. H.; Tary, J.; Van der Baan, M.

    2013-12-01

    Arrival times of body waves generated by small magnitude microseismic events are usually very close and their limited bandwidth can cause even partial overlap in the time and frequency domains. The separation of P and S waves is then a challenging task that if solved could bring more insights about nature and location of the generating source. Differences in arrival times and frequency content of P and S waves can be seen by using time-frequency decomposition. The traditional time-frequency representation based on the Fourier Transform is limited by its trade-off between time and frequency resolutions, while other alternatives like the Wavelet Transform are still limited by the Heisenberg box. A new derivation of the Continuous Wavelet Transform, called Synchrosqueezing, stretches these boundaries using a mixture of the reassignment method with instantaneous frequency, giving a better frequency representation with improved time localization. Furthermore, all the individual components of the signal are separated in the time domain. This means that we are able to isolate the waveforms of a complex microseismic trace. Each spectral component can then be matched with a body wave plus its associated coda. Proper parameters have to be selected prior to the computation, such as the central frequency and bandwidth of the mother wavelet. We thus include a signal characterization first to find the best matching mother wavelet. In this paper we use the Synchrosqueezing transform to perform the time frequency representation of short brittle events recorded during microseismic experiments. Decomposition results for these examples show that the Synchrosqueezing transform outperforms the Short-Time Fourier Transform. The different components of each body waves (first arrival, coda, frequency components) can then be identified in the time-frequency plane. For some microseismic events, a first P-wave arrival is followed by another arrival at lower frequency that could be a P-wave

  14. Parsimonious wave-equation travel-time inversion for refraction waves

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Lei

    2017-02-14

    We present a parsimonious wave-equation travel-time inversion technique for refraction waves. A dense virtual refraction dataset can be generated from just two reciprocal shot gathers for the sources at the endpoints of the survey line, with N geophones evenly deployed along the line. These two reciprocal shots contain approximately 2N refraction travel times, which can be spawned into O(N2) refraction travel times by an interferometric transformation. Then, these virtual refraction travel times are used with a source wavelet to create N virtual refraction shot gathers, which are the input data for wave-equation travel-time inversion. Numerical results show that the parsimonious wave-equation travel-time tomogram has about the same accuracy as the tomogram computed by standard wave-equation travel-time inversion. The most significant benefit is that a reciprocal survey is far less time consuming than the standard refraction survey where a source is excited at each geophone location.

  15. Analysis of stress wave propagation in an elasto-viscoplastic plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Noritoshi; Kawai, Ryoji; Urushi, Norio.

    1986-01-01

    Stress waves which propagate in the body are reflected at the boundary, and due to the interaction of the reflected stress waves, the focussing of stress waves will take place and a high stress level can be caused. The focussing of stress waves due to the reflection from the boundary may bring about fracture of the body, so that this is an important problem from a viewpoint of dynamic strength of structures. In this paper the process of stress wave focussing and the strain-rate dependence of constitutive equation in elastic and plastic regions are investigated. In the case where an in-plane step load uniformly acts on the straight edge of the plate with a semi-circular boundary, the propagation of stress waves in the plate was numerically analyzed by the finite element method, applying viscoelastic, elasto-plastic and elasto-viscoplastic constitutive equations. As the result, the process of focussing of stress waves due to reflection from the semi-circular boundary was observed and the difference in propagation behaviour of stress waves was discussed in materials represented by some kinds of constitutive equations. (author)

  16. Airy Wave Packets Accelerating in Space-Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondakci, H. Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F.

    2018-04-01

    Although diffractive spreading is an unavoidable feature of all wave phenomena, certain waveforms can attain propagation invariance. A lesser-explored strategy for achieving optical self-similar propagation exploits the modification of the spatiotemporal field structure when observed in reference frames moving at relativistic speeds. For such an observer, it is predicted that the associated Lorentz boost can bring to a halt the axial dynamics of a wave packet of an arbitrary profile. This phenomenon is particularly striking in the case of a self-accelerating beam—such as an Airy beam—whose peak normally undergoes a transverse displacement upon free propagation. Here we synthesize an acceleration-free Airy wave packet that travels in a straight line by deforming its spatiotemporal spectrum to reproduce the impact of a Lorentz boost. The roles of the axial spatial coordinate and time are swapped, leading to "time diffraction" manifested in self-acceleration observed in the propagating Airy wave-packet frame.

  17. Wave Stresses in the Anvil Hammer Rods under Impact Including Ram Mass and Deformation Force of Forgings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Sinitskiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When operating the anvil hammers there occur impacts of die tooling and as a consequence, virtually instantaneous impact stops of motion of drop hammer parts. Such operating conditions come with accelerated failures of the anvil hammer rods because of emerging significant wave stresses. Engineering practice widely uses variation, difference, and integral methods to calculate wave stresses. However, to use them a researcher has to acquire certain skills, and the special programs should be available. The paper considers a method for estimating the wave stress changes in the anvil hammer rods, which is based on the wave equation of the Laplace transform. It presents a procedure for generating differential equations and their solution using the operator method. These equations describe the wave processes of strain and stress propagation in the anvil hammer rod under non-rigid impact with the compliance obstacle of the drop hammer parts. The work defines how the piston and rod mass and also the mechanical and geometric parameters of the rod influence on the stress level in the rod sealing of the hammer ram. Analysis of the results shows that the stresses in the rod sealing are proportional to the total amount of wave stresses caused by the rod and piston impact included in the total weight of the system. The piston influence on the stresses in the rod under impact is in direct proportion to the ratio of its mass to the mass of the rod. Geometric parameters of the rod and speed of drop parts before the impact influence on the stress value as well. It was found that if the time of impact is less than the time of the shock wave running in forward and backward direction, the impact with a compliance obstacle is equivalent to that of with a rigid obstacle, and the dependence of the wave stresses follows the Zhukovsky formula of direct pressure shock. The presented method of stress calculation can be successfully used to select the optimal mass and the rod

  18. Stress Wave E-Rating of Structural Timber—Size and Moisture Content Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of cross sectional size and moisture content on stress wave properties of structural timber in various sizes and evaluate the feasibility of using stress wave method to E-rate timber in green conditions. Four different sizes of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) square timbers were...

  19. Real time wave forecasting using wind time history and numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Pooja; Deo, M. C.; Latha, G.; Rajendran, V.

    Operational activities in the ocean like planning for structural repairs or fishing expeditions require real time prediction of waves over typical time duration of say a few hours. Such predictions can be made by using a numerical model or a time series model employing continuously recorded waves. This paper presents another option to do so and it is based on a different time series approach in which the input is in the form of preceding wind speed and wind direction observations. This would be useful for those stations where the costly wave buoys are not deployed and instead only meteorological buoys measuring wind are moored. The technique employs alternative artificial intelligence approaches of an artificial neural network (ANN), genetic programming (GP) and model tree (MT) to carry out the time series modeling of wind to obtain waves. Wind observations at four offshore sites along the east coast of India were used. For calibration purpose the wave data was generated using a numerical model. The predicted waves obtained using the proposed time series models when compared with the numerically generated waves showed good resemblance in terms of the selected error criteria. Large differences across the chosen techniques of ANN, GP, MT were not noticed. Wave hindcasting at the same time step and the predictions over shorter lead times were better than the predictions over longer lead times. The proposed method is a cost effective and convenient option when a site-specific information is desired.

  20. Effect of Stress on Energy Flux Deviation of Ultrasonic Waves in Ultrasonic Waves in GR/EP Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, William H.; Kriz, R. D.; Fitting, Dale W.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves suffer energy flux deviation in graphite/epoxy because of the large anisotropy. The angle of deviation is a function of the elastic coefficients. For nonlinear solids, these coefficients and thus the angle of deviation is a function of stress. Acoustoelastic theory was used to model the effect of stress on flux deviation for unidirectional T300/5208 using previously measured elastic coefficients. Computations were made for uniaxial stress along the x3 axis fiber axis) and the x1 axis for waves propagating in the x1x3 plane. These results predict a shift as large as three degrees for the quasi-transverse wave. The shift in energy flux offers new nondestructive technique of evaluating stress in composites.

  1. Scattering of a TEM wave from a time varying surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elcrat, Alan R.; Harder, T. Mark; Stonebraker, John T.

    1990-03-01

    A solution is given for reflection of a plane wave with TEM polarization from a planar surface with time varying properties. These properties are given in terms of the currents on the surface. The solution is obtained by numerically solving a system of differential-delay equations in the time domain.

  2. Travelling wave solutions of (2 1)-dimensional generalised time ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Youwei Zhang

    2018-02-09

    Feb 9, 2018 ... Keywords. Time-fractional Hirota equation; fractional complex transform; complete discrimination system; tanh- expansion; travelling wave. PACS Nos 02.30.Jr; 05.45.Yv; 04.20.Jb. 1. Introduction. We consider the solution of the (2 + 1)-dimensional generalised time-fractional Hirota equation. { i∂ α t u + uxy ...

  3. Gravitational wave detection and data analysis for pulsar timing arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasteren, Rutger van

    2011-01-01

    Long-term precise timing of Galactic millisecond pulsars holds great promise for measuring long-period (months-to-years) astrophysical gravitational waves. In this work we develop a Bayesian data analysis method for projects called pulsar timing arrays; projects aimed to detect these gravitational

  4. The Measurement and Interpretation of Surface Wave Group Arrival Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, G.; Kane, D.; Morrow, J.; Zhou, Y.; Tromp, J.

    2005-12-01

    We have recently developed an efficient technique for measuring the relative group arrival times of surface waves by using cross-correlation and cluster analysis of waveform envelope functions. Applying the analysis to minor arc Love and Rayleigh waves in the frequency band 7 to 35 mHz for all events over magnitude 5.5 results in a dataset of over 200,000 measurements at each frequency for long period Rayleigh waves (frequency less than 25 mHz) and about 100,000 measurements at the shorter periods. Analysis of transverse components results in about half as many Love wave measurements. Simple ray theory inversions of the relative arrival times for apparent group velocity produce maps which are accurate representations of the data (often over 90% variance reduction of the relative arrival times) and which show features strongly correlated with tectonics and crustal thickness. The apparent group velocity variations can be extremely large: 30% velocity variations for 20 mHz Rayleigh waves and 40% variations for 30 mHz Rayleigh waves and can have abrupt lateral changes. This raises the concern that non-ray theory effects could be important. Indeed, a recent analysis by Dahlen and Zhou (personal communication) suggests that the group arrival times should be a functions of both the group velocity AND the phase velocity. The simplest way to test the interpretation of the measurements is to perform the analysis on synthetic seismograms computed for a realistic model of the Earth. Here, we use the SEM with a model which incorporates realistic crust and mantle structure. We are currently computing synthetics for a suite of roughly 1000 events recorded globally that extend to a period of 18 seconds. We shall present the results of applying both ray-based and finite frequency inversions to the synthetic data as well as evaluating the effects of off path propagation at short periods using surface wave ray tracing.

  5. Wave equations with time-dependent dissipation II. Effective dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Jens

    This article is intended to present a construction of structural representations of solutions to the Cauchy problem for wave equations with time-dependent dissipation above scaling. These representations are used to give estimates of the solution and its derivatives based on L(R), q⩾2. The article represents the second part within a series. In [Jens Wirth, Wave equations with time-dependent dissipation I. Non-effective dissipation, J. Differential Equations 222 (2) (2006) 487-514] weak dissipations below scaling were discussed.

  6. Reverse time migration of prism waves for salt flank delineation

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2013-09-22

    In this paper, we present a new reverse time migration method for imaging salt flanks with prism wave reflections. It consists of four steps: (1) migrating the seismic data with conventional RTM to give the RTM image; (2) using the RTM image as a reflectivity model to simulate source-side reflections with the Born approximation; (3) zero-lag correlation of the source-side reflection wavefields and receiver-side wavefields to produce the prism wave migration image; and (4) repeating steps 2 and 3 for the receiver-side reflections. An advantage of this method is that there is no need to pick the horizontal reflectors prior to migration of the prism waves. It also separately images the vertical structures at a different step to reduce crosstalk interference. The disadvantage of prism wave migration algorithm is that its computational cost is twice that of conventional RTM. The empirical results with a salt model suggest that prism wave migration can be an effective method for salt flank delineation in the absence of diving waves.

  7. Mode Identification of Guided Ultrasonic Wave using Time- Frequency Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Byung Sik; Yang, Seung Han; Cho, Yong Sang; Kim, Yong Sik; Lee, Hee Jong

    2007-01-01

    The ultrasonic guided waves are waves whose propagation characteristics depend on structural thickness and shape such as those in plates, tubes, rods, and embedded layers. If the angle of incidence or the frequency of sound is adjusted properly, the reflected and refracted energy within the structure will constructively interfere, thereby launching the guided wave. Because these waves penetrate the entire thickness of the tube and propagate parallel to the surface, a large portion of the material can be examined from a single transducer location. The guided ultrasonic wave has various merits like above. But various kind of modes are propagating through the entire thickness, so we don't know the which mode is received. Most of applications are limited from mode selection and mode identification. So the mode identification is very important process for guided ultrasonic inspection application. In this study, various time-frequency analysis methodologies are developed and compared for mode identification tool of guided ultrasonic signal. For this study, a high power tone-burst ultrasonic system set up for the generation and receive of guided waves. And artificial notches were fabricated on the Aluminum plate for the experiment on the mode identification

  8. Time-domain Hydroelasticity Theory of Ships Responding to Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Jinzhu; Wang, Zhaohui

    1997-01-01

    flare forms. The predicted results include linear and non-linear rigid motions and structural responses of ships advancing in regular and irregular waves. The results clearly demonstrate the importance and the magnitude of non-linear effects in ship motions and internal forces. Numerical calculations......A time-domain linear theory of fluid-structure interaction between floating structures and the incident waves is presented. The structure is assumed to be elastic and represented by general separation of variables, whereas the fluid is described as an initial boundary value problem of potential...... free surface flow. The general interface boundary condition is used in the mathematical formulation of the fluid motion around the flexible structure. The general time-domain theory is simplified to a slender-body theory for the analysis of wave-induced global responses of monohull ships. The structure...

  9. Time evolution of wave-packets in topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, Poliana H.; Duque Mesa, Sebastian; Ferreira, Gerson J.; Egues, J. Carlos

    2014-03-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are a fantastic new class of materials that have gapless helical surface (3D TIs) or edge (2D TIs) states embedded within the bulk gap of its host material. This unique property rises from an interface between materials with topologically inequivalent sets of bands structures, i.e. gaps with different signs. Here we investigate the time-evolution of wave-packets in TIs. Within the Dirac equation, the interference between eigenstates from positive and negative energy bands leads to the relativistic oscillatory behavior well known as Zitterbewegung. It was recently discussed the time evolution of the guiding center of a wave-packet in TIs converging towards the edge states. Here we show a more detailed discussion of the evolution of the full wave-packet and its behavior regarding the collision with the edges of the system. Topological insulators (TIs) are a fantastic new class of materials that have gapless helical surface (3D TIs) or edge (2D TIs) states embedded within the bulk gap of its host material. This unique property rises from an interface between materials with topologically inequivalent sets of bands structures, i.e. gaps with different signs. Here we investigate the time-evolution of wave-packets in TIs. Within the Dirac equation, the interference between eigenstates from positive and negative energy bands leads to the relativistic oscillatory behavior well known as Zitterbewegung. It was recently discussed the time evolution of the guiding center of a wave-packet in TIs converging towards the edge states. Here we show a more detailed discussion of the evolution of the full wave-packet and its behavior regarding the collision with the edges of the system. We acknowledge support from the Pró-Reitoria de Pesquisa (PRP/USP) within the Research Support Center Initiative (NAP Q-NANO).

  10. On elastic waves in an thinly-layered laminated medium with stress couples under initial stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pal Roy

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is concerned with a simple transformation rule in finding out the composite elastic coefficients of a thinly layered laminated medium whose bulk properties are strongly anisotropic with a microelastic bending rigidity. These elastic coefficients which were not known completely for a layered laminated structure, are obtained suitably in terms of initial stress components and Lame's constants λi, μi of initially isotropic solids. The explicit solutions of the dynamical equations for a prestressed thinly layered laminated medium under horizontal compression in a gravity field are derived. The results are discussed specifying the effects of hydrostatic, deviatoric and couple stresses upon the characteristic propagation velocities of shear and compression wave modes.

  11. Real Time Wave Forecasting Using Wind Time History and Genetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Kambekar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The significant wave height and average wave period form an essential input for operational activities in ocean and coastal areas. Such information is important in issuing appropriate warnings to people planning any construction or instillation works in the oceanic environment. Many countries over the world routinely collect wave and wind data through a network of wave rider buoys. The data collecting agencies transmit the resulting information online to their registered users through an internet or a web-based system. Operational wave forecasts in addition to the measured data are also made and supplied online to the users. This paper discusses operational wave forecasting in real time mode at locations where wind rather than wave data are continuously recorded. It is based on the time series modeling and incorporates an artificial intelligence technique of genetic programming. The significant wave height and average wave period values are forecasted over a period of 96 hr in future from the observations of wind speed and directions extending to a similar time scale in the past. Wind measurements made by floating buoys at eight different locations around India over a period varying from 1.5 yr to 9.0 yr were considered. The platform of Matlab and C++ was used to develop a graphical user interface that will extend an internet based user-friendly access of the forecasts to any registered user of the data dissemination authority.

  12. High-resolution seismic wave propagation using local time stepping

    KAUST Repository

    Peter, Daniel

    2017-03-13

    High-resolution seismic wave simulations often require local refinements in numerical meshes to accurately capture e.g. steep topography or complex fault geometry. Together with explicit time schemes, this dramatically reduces the global time step size for ground-motion simulations due to numerical stability conditions. To alleviate this problem, local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time stepping scheme to adapt the time step to the element size, allowing nearoptimal time steps everywhere in the mesh. This can potentially lead to significantly faster simulation runtimes.

  13. Dominant winter-time mesospheric wave signatures over a low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    temperature tides have phase relation and hence, tidal features in wind and temperature need not peak at similar latitudes, we avoid discussing about semi- and ter-diurnal features observed in wind data which in recent times were discussed by Jiang et al (2009) for similar latitudes. Further, to find if the similar wave struc-.

  14. Finnish physicians' stress related to information systems keeps increasing: a longitudinal three-wave survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heponiemi, Tarja; Hyppönen, Hannele; Vehko, Tuulikki; Kujala, Sari; Aalto, Anna-Mari; Vänskä, Jukka; Elovainio, Marko

    2017-10-17

    Poorly functioning, time-consuming, and inadequate information systems are among the most important work-related psychosocial factors causing stress in physicians. The present study examined the trend in the perceived stress that was related to information systems (SRIS) among Finnish physicians during a nine-year follow-up. In addition, we examined the associations of gender, age, employment sector, specialization status, leadership position, on-call burden, and time pressure with SRIS change and levels. A longitudinal design with three survey data collection waves (2006, 2010 and 2015) based on a random sample of Finnish physicians in 2006 was used. The study sample included 1095 physicians (62.3% women, mean age 54.4 years) who provided data on SRIS in every wave. GLM repeated measures analyses were used to examine the associations between independent variables and the SRIS trend during the years 2006, 2010, and 2015. SRIS increased during the study period. The estimated marginal mean of SRIS in 2006 was 2.80 (95% CI = 2.68-2.92) and the mean increase was 0.46 (95% CI = 0.30-0.61) points from 2006 to 2010 and 0.25 (95% CI = 0.11-0.39) points from 2010 to 2015. Moreover, our results show that the increase was most pronounced in primary care, whereas in hospitals SRIS did not increase between 2010 and 2015. SRIS increased more among those in a leadership position. On-call duties and high time-pressures were associated with higher SRIS levels during all waves. Changing, difficult, and poorly functioning information systems (IS) are a prominent source of stress among Finnish physicians and this perceived stress continues to increase. Organizations should implement arrangements to ease stress stemming from IS especially for those with a high workload and on-call or leadership duties. To decrease IS-related stress, it would be important to study in more detail the main IS factors that contribute to SRIS. Earlier studies indicate that the usability and stability

  15. Pulsar timing arrays: the promise of gravitational wave detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommen, Andrea N

    2015-12-01

    We describe the history, methods, tools, and challenges of using pulsars to detect gravitational waves. Pulsars act as celestial clocks detecting gravitational perturbations in space-time at wavelengths of light-years. The field is poised to make its first detection of nanohertz gravitational waves in the next 10 years. Controversies remain over how far we can reduce the noise in the pulsars, how many pulsars should be in the array, what kind of source we will detect first, and how we can best accommodate our large bandwidth systems. We conclude by considering the important question of how to plan for a post-detection era, beyond the first detection of gravitational waves.

  16. Noncontact sphygmomanometer based on pulse-wave transit time between the face and hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kazuya; Ohnishi, Takashi; Nishidate, Izumi; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2018-02-01

    Systolic blood pressure (SBP) is highly sensitive to various factors such as psychological stress, and hence its continuous monitoring is essential to evaluate different health conditions. However, conventional sphygmomanometers cannot continuously measure SBP given the time-consuming setup based on a pressure cuff. Moreover, continuous biological signal monitoring is more comfortable when no sensors are attached. A solution for continuous SBP estimation is based on pulse transit time (PTT), which determines the time difference between two pulse waves at different body parts. In previous studies, we successfully measured the PTT using a contactless setup composed by two digital color cameras recording the face and hand of subjects. Then, the acquired images were transformed into blood volume by combining multiple regression analysis and a Monte Carlo method. As a result, the delay among images allowed to determine the PPT from pulse waves. In this study, we simultaneously measured SBP and PTT by using a sphygmomanometer and the two cameras, respectively. We evaluated SBP increases (i.e., stressful situations) and the corresponding PPT by asking participants to either grasp a handgrip or momentarily interrupting breath. We also determined the SBP and PTT without asking for such exercises. Comparison results show that the mean PTT under stress was significantly lower than that without stress, which is consistent with an increased SBP. Finally, we related the SBP and PTT by a nonlinear formula with a coefficient of determination of 0.59, thus confirming the effectiveness of the proposed system.

  17. Stress analysis applications to service failures of the traveling wave tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, H.-Y.

    By utilizing the mathematical analogy between the electrostatic fields and the elastic stress fields, the electrostatic stresses in high voltage electronic devices such as Traveling Wave Tubes (TWT) can be obtained from finite element technique. A new point of view about the vacuum electrical breakdown from the theory of elastic stress concentration has been proposed. The elastic stress concentration factors may be used as a good reference figure for TWT design works.

  18. Quaternion wave equations in curved space-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, J. D., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The quaternion formulation of relativistic quantum theory is extended to include curvilinear coordinates and curved space-time in order to provide a framework for a unified quantum/gravity theory. Six basic quaternion fields are identified in curved space-time, the four-vector basis quaternions are identified, and the necessary covariant derivatives are obtained. Invariant field equations are derived, and a general invertable coordinate transformation is developed. The results yield a way of writing quaternion wave equations in curvilinear coordinates and curved space-time as well as a natural framework for solving the problem of second quantization for gravity.

  19. Determination of relationship between Rayleigh wave velocity and stress with laser Doppler velocimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lingfeng; Kobayashi, Shoichi

    2002-05-01

    A non-contact measurement technique of Rayleigh wave velocity is proposed. In the non-contact measurement system, a laser Doppler velocimeter is used to determine wave motions. With above technique, the relationship between Rayleigh wave velocity and stress for an aluminum alloy 5052 and steel SS400 is determined, and the results are in good agreement with that obtained by contact measurement method.

  20. Polyurea/Fused-silica interfacial decohesion induced by impinging tensile stress-waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mica Grujicic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available All-atom non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations are used to investigate the problems of polyurea-borne tensile-stress waves interacting with a polyurea/fused-silica interface and fused-silica tensile-stress waves interacting with a fused-silica/polyurea interface, and the potential for the accompanying interfacial decohesion. To predict the outcome of the interactions of stress-waves with the material-interfaces in question, at the continuum level, previously determined material constitutive relations for polyurea and fused-silica are used within an acoustic-impedance-matching procedure. These continuum-level predictions pertain solely to the stress-wave/interface interaction aspects resulting in the formation of transmitted and reflected stress- or release-waves, but do not contain any information regarding potential interfacial decohesion. Present direct molecular-level simulations confirmed some of these continuum-level predictions, but also provided direct evidence of the nature and the extent of interfacial decohesion. In the molecular-level simulations, reactive force-field potentials are utilized to properly model the initial state of interfacial cohesion and its degradation during stress-wave-loading. Examination of the molecular-level interfacial structure before the stress-wave has interacted with the given interface, revealed local changes in the bonding structure, suggesting the formation of an “interphase.” This interphase was subsequently found to greatly affect the polyurea/fused-silica decohesion strength and the likelihood for interfacial decohesion during the interaction of the stress-wave with the interface.

  1. Time evolution of the wave equation using rapid expansion method

    KAUST Repository

    Pestana, Reynam C.

    2010-07-01

    Forward modeling of seismic data and reverse time migration are based on the time evolution of wavefields. For the case of spatially varying velocity, we have worked on two approaches to evaluate the time evolution of seismic wavefields. An exact solution for the constant-velocity acoustic wave equation can be used to simulate the pressure response at any time. For a spatially varying velocity, a one-step method can be developed where no intermediate time responses are required. Using this approach, we have solved for the pressure response at intermediate times and have developed a recursive solution. The solution has a very high degree of accuracy and can be reduced to various finite-difference time-derivative methods, depending on the approximations used. Although the two approaches are closely related, each has advantages, depending on the problem being solved. © 2010 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  2. Estimation of Peak Wave Stresses in Slender Complex Concrete Armor Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howell, G.L.; Burcharth, H. F.; Rhee, Joon R

    1991-01-01

    Recent methods for the structural design of concrete armor units divide the forces into static loads, impact loads, and wave or pulsating loads. Physical model technology is being developed at several laboratories to measure wave loads on model armor units. While this technology represents...... significant progress, structural designers require a maximum stress value to design armor units....

  3. Local stimulation of cultured myocyte cells by femtosecond laser-induced stress wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung-En; Wu, Cheng-Chi; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Maezawa, Yasuyo; Okano, Kazunori; Masuhara, Hiroshi; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2010-12-01

    When an 800 nm femtosecond laser is tightly focused into cell culture medium a stress wave is generated at the laser focal point. Since the stress wave localizes in a few tens of μm, it is possible to locally stimulate single cells in vitro. In this work, several kinds of cultured mammalian cells, HeLa, PC12, P19CL6, and C2C12, were stimulated by the stress wave and the cell growth after the stress loading with the laser irradiation was investigated. In comparison with the control conditions, cell growth after the laser irradiation was enhanced for the cells of C2C12 and P19CL6, which can differentiate into myocytes, and suppressed for PC12 and HeLa cell lines. These results suggest a possibility of cell growth enhancement due to myogenic cells response to the femtosecond laser-induced stress.

  4. Time-resolved shock compression of porous rutile: Wave dispersion in porous solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.U.; Graham, R.A.; Holman, G.T.

    1993-08-01

    Rutile (TiO{sub 2}) samples at 60% of solid density have been shock-loaded from 0.21 to 6.1 GPa with sample thickness of 4 mm and studied with the PVDF piezoelectric polymer stress-rate gauge. The technique uses a copper capsule to contain the sample which has PVDF gauge packages in direct contact with front and rear surfaces. A precise measure is made of the compressive stress wave velocity through the sample, as well as the input and propagated shock stress. Initial density is known from sample preparation, and the amount of shock-compression is calculated from the measurement of shock velocity and input stress. Shock states and re-shock states are measured. Observed data are consistent with previously published high pressure data. It is observed that rutile has a ``crush strength`` near 6 GPa. Propagated stress-pulse rise times vary from 234 to 916 nsec. Propagated stress-pulse rise times of shock-compressed HMX, 2Al + Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 3Ni + Al, and 5Ti + 3Si are presented.

  5. Einstein's Symphony: A Gravitational Wave Voyage Through Space and Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro Key, Joey; Yunes, Nico; Grimberg, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Einstein's Symphony: A Gravitational Wave Voyage Through Space and Time is a gravitational wave astronomy planetarium show in production by a collaboration of scientists, filmmakers, and artisits from the Center for Gravitational Wave Astonomy (CGWA) at the University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) and Montana State University (MSU). The project builds on the success of the interdisciplinary Celebrating Einstein collaboration. The artists and scientists who created the A Shout Across Time original film and the Black (W)hole immersive art installation for Celebrating Einstein are teaming with the Museum of the Rockies Taylor Planetarium staff and students to create a new full dome Digistar planetarium show that will be freely and widely distributed to planetaria in the US and abroad. The show uses images and animations filmed and collected for A Shout Across Time and for Black (W)hole as well as new images and animations and a new soundtrack composed and produced by the MSU School of Music to use the full capability of planetarium sound systems. The planetarium show will be narrated with ideas drawn from the Celebrating Einstein danced lecture on gravitational waves that the collaboration produced. The combination of products, resources, and team members assembled for this project allows us to create an original planetarium show for a fraction of the cost of a typical show. In addition, STEM education materials for G6-12 students and teachers will be provided to complement and support the show. This project is supported by the Texas Space Grant Consortium (TSGC), Montana Space Grant Consortium (MSGC), and the American Physical Society (APS).

  6. Numerical modeling of wave propagation in functionally graded materials using time-domain spectral Chebyshev elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayatrasa, Saeid; Bui, Tinh Quoc; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Lim, Chee Wah

    2014-02-01

    Numerical modeling of the Lamb wave propagation in functionally graded materials (FGMs) by a two-dimensional time-domain spectral finite element method (SpFEM) is presented. The high-order Chebyshev polynomials as approximation functions are used in the present formulation, which provides the capability to take into account the through thickness variation of the material properties. The efficiency and accuracy of the present model with one and two layers of 5th order spectral elements in modeling wave propagation in FGM plates are analyzed. Different excitation frequencies in a wide range of 28-350 kHz are investigated, and the dispersion properties obtained by the present model are verified by reference results. The through thickness wave structure of two principal Lamb modes are extracted and analyzed by the symmetry and relative amplitude of the vertical and horizontal oscillations. The differences with respect to Lamb modes generated in homogeneous plates are explained. Zero-crossing and wavelet signal processing-spectrum decomposition procedures are implemented to obtain phase and group velocities and their dispersion properties. So it is attested how this approach can be practically employed for simulation, calibration and optimization of Lamb wave based nondestructive evaluation techniques for the FGMs. The capability of modeling stress wave propagation through the thickness of an FGM specimen subjected to impact load is also investigated, which shows that the present method is highly accurate as compared with other existing reference data.

  7. Plane-wave Least-squares Reverse Time Migration

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2012-11-04

    Least-squares reverse time migration is formulated with a new parameterization, where the migration image of each shot is updated separately and a prestack image is produced with common image gathers. The advantage is that it can offer stable convergence for least-squares migration even when the migration velocity is not completely accurate. To significantly reduce computation cost, linear phase shift encoding is applied to hundreds of shot gathers to produce dozens of planes waves. A regularization term which penalizes the image difference between nearby angles are used to keep the prestack image consistent through all the angles. Numerical tests on a marine dataset is performed to illustrate the advantages of least-squares reverse time migration in the plane-wave domain. Through iterations of least-squares migration, the migration artifacts are reduced and the image resolution is improved. Empirical results suggest that the LSRTM in plane wave domain is an efficient method to improve the image quality and produce common image gathers.

  8. Wave forecasting in near real time basis by neural network

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, S.; Mandal, S.; Prabaharan, N.

    ., forecasting of waves become an important aspect of marine environment. This paper presents application of the neural network (NN) with better update algorithms, namely rprop, quickprop and superSAB for wave forecasting. Measured waves off Marmagoa, Goa, India...

  9. On a `time' reparametrization in relativistic electrodynamics with travelling waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Gaetano

    2018-01-01

    We briefly report on our method [23] of simplifying the equations of motion of charged particles in an electromagnetic (EM) field that is the sum of a plane travelling wave and a static part; it is based on changes of the dependent variables and the independent one (light-like coordinate ξ instead of time t). We sketch its application to a few cases of extreme laser-induced accelerations, both in vacuum and in plane problems at the vacuum-plasma interface, where we are able to reduce the system of the (Lorentz-Maxwell and continuity) partial differential equations into a family of decoupled systems of Hamilton equations in 1 dimension. Since Fourier analysis plays no role, the method can be applied to all kind of travelling waves, ranging from almost monochromatic to socalled "impulses".

  10. Disturbance of SH-type waves due to moving stress discontinuity in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The disturbance and propagation of SH-type waves in an anisotropic soil layer overlying an inhomogeneous elastic half-space by a moving stress discontinuity is considered. Stress discontinuity moves with non-uniform velocity and is impulsive in nature. The displacements are obtained in exact form by themethod due to ...

  11. Disturbance of SH-type waves due to moving stress discontinuity in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The disturbance and propagation of SH-type waves in an anisotropic soil layer overlying an inhomogeneous elastic half-space by a moving stress discontinuity is considered. Stress discontinuity moves with non-uniform velocity and is impulsive in nature. The displacements are obtained in exact form by the method ...

  12. Heat stress related dairy cow mortality during heat waves and control periods in rural Southern Ontario from 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop-Williams, Katherine E; Berke, Olaf; Pearl, David L; Hand, Karen; Kelton, David F

    2015-11-27

    Heat stress is a physiological response to extreme environmental heat such as heat waves. Heat stress can result in mortality in dairy cows when extreme heat is both rapidly changing and has a long duration. As a result of climate change, heat waves, which are defined as 3 days of temperatures of 32 °C or above, are an increasingly frequent extreme weather phenomenon in Southern Ontario. Heat waves are increasing the risk for on-farm dairy cow mortality in Southern Ontario. Heat stress indices (HSIs) are generally based on temperature and humidity and provide a relative measure of discomfort which can be used to predict increased risk of on-farm dairy cow mortality. In what follows, the heat stress distribution was described over space and presented with maps. Similarly, on-farm mortality was described and mapped. The goal of this study was to demonstrate that heat waves and related HSI increases during 2010-2012 were associated with increased on-farm dairy cow mortality in Southern Ontario. Mortality records and farm locations for all farms registered in the CanWest Dairy Herd Improvement Program in Southern Ontario were retrieved for 3 heat waves and 6 three-day control periods from 2010 to 2012. A random sample of controls (2:1) was taken from the data set to create a risk-based hybrid design. On-farm heat stress was estimated using data from 37 weather stations and subsequently interpolated across Southern Ontario by geostatistical kriging. A Poisson regression model was applied to assess the on-farm mortality in relation to varying levels of the HSI. For every one unit increase in HSI the on-farm mortality rate across Southern Ontario increases by 1.03 times (CI95% (IRR) = (1.025,1.035); p = ≤ 0.001). With a typical 8.6 unit increase in HSI from a control period to a heat wave, mortality rates are predicted to increase by 1.27 times. Southern Ontario was affected by heat waves, as demonstrated by high levels of heat stress and increased on-farm mortality

  13. Torsional Wave Propagation in a Pre-Stressed Structure with Corrugated and Loosely Bonded Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Manoj K.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An analytical model is presented to study the behaviour of propagation of torsional surface waves in initially stressed porous layer, sandwiched between an orthotropic half-space with initial stress and pre-stressed inhomogeneous anisotropic half-space. The boundary surfaces of the layer and halfspaces are taken as corrugated, as well as loosely bonded. The heterogeneity of the lower half-space is due to trigonometric variation in elastic parameters of the pre-stressed inhomogeneous anisotropic medium. Expression for dispersion relation has been obtained in closed form for the present analytical model to observe the effect of undulation parameter, flatness parameter and porosity on the propagation of torsional surface waves. The obtained dispersion relation is found to be in well agreement with classical Love wave equation for a particular case. The cases of ideally smooth interface and welded interface have also been analysed. Numerical example and graphical illustrations are made to demonstrate notable effect of initial stress, wave number, heterogeneity parameter and initial stress on the phase velocity of torsional surface waves.

  14. Anisotropic stress as a signature of nonstandard propagation of gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltas, Ippocratis D; Sawicki, Ignacy; Amendola, Luca; Kunz, Martin

    2014-11-07

    We make precise the heretofore ambiguous statement that anisotropic stress is a sign of a modification of gravity. We show that in cosmological solutions of very general classes of models extending gravity-all scalar-tensor theories (Horndeski), Einstein-aether models, and bimetric massive gravity-a direct correspondence exists between perfect fluids apparently carrying anisotropic stress and a modification in the propagation of gravitational waves. Since the anisotropic stress can be measured in a model-independent manner, a comparison of the behavior of gravitational waves from cosmological sources with large-scale-structure formation could, in principle, lead to new constraints on the theory of gravity.

  15. Determination of plane stress state using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyong; Kang, Kai; Wang, Shibin; Li, Lin'an; Xu, Ningning; Han, Jiaguang; He, Mingxia; Wu, Liang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-01-01

    THz wave has been increasingly applied in engineering practice. One of its outstanding advantages is the penetrability through certain optically opaque materials, whose interior properties could be therefore obtained. In this report, we develop an experimental method to determine the plane stress state of optically opaque materials based on the stress-optical law using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). In this method, two polarizers are combined into the conventional THz-TDS system to sense and adjust the polarization state of THz waves and a theoretical model is established to describe the relationship between phase delay of the received THz wave and the plane stress applied on the specimen. Three stress parameters that represent the plane stress state are finally determined through an error function of THz wave phase-delay. Experiments were conducted on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) specimen and a reasonably good agreement was found with measurement using traditional strain gauges. The presented results validate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The proposed method could be further used in nondestructive tests for a wide range of optically opaque materials. PMID:27824112

  16. Nonlinear wave time dependent dynamic evolution in solar flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R.

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the excitation, time dependent dynamic evolution and interaction of weakly nonlinear propagating (i.e. solitary) waves on vertical cylindrical magnetic flux tubes in a compressible solar atmospheric plasma. The axisymmetric flux tube has a field strength of 1000 G at its footpoint what is typical for photospheric regions. Solitons are excited by a footpoint driver. The propagation of the nonlinear signal is investigated by solving numerically a set of fully nonlinear 2D MHD equations in cylindrical coordinates. For the initial conditions the solutions of the linear dispersion relation for wave modes (in the present case we focus on the sausage mode) in a magnetic flux tube is applied. This dispersion relation is solved numerically for a range of plasma parameters. We compare our results with the works of Roberts [1], Wilson [2] (dispersion relation), Molotovshchikov [3] (nonlinear slow sausage waves) and Weisshaar [4] (numerical solutions of the Leibovich-Prichard-Roberts equation). (1) We found solitary solutions and investigate solitary propagating with external sound speed by solving the full MHD equations. (2) We also found a solitary wave propagating with the tube speed. A natural application of our studies may be spicule formation in the chromosphere, as suggested by Roberts [5], where it was demonstrated theoretically, that a solar photospheric magnetic flux tube can support the propagation of solitons governed by the Benjamin-Ono (slow mode) equations. Future possible improvements in modeling and the relevance of the photospheric chromospheric transition region coupling by spicules is suggested. [1] B. Roberts and A. Webb, Sol. Phys., 1978, v. 56, p. 5 [2] P.R. Wilson, Astron. Astrophys., 1980, v. 87, p. 121 [3] A.L. Molotovshchikov and M.S. Ruderman, Sol. Phys., 1987, v. 109, p. 247 [4] E. Weisshaar, Phys. Fluids A, 1989, v. 1(8), p. 1406 [5] B. Roberts and A. Mangeney, Royal Astronomical Society, Monthly

  17. Swell impact on wind stress and atmospheric mixing in a regional coupled atmosphere-wave model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lichuan; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Over the ocean, the atmospheric turbulence can be significantly affected by swell waves. Change in the atmospheric turbulence affects the wind stress and atmospheric mixing over swell waves. In this study, the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress is introduced into an atmosphere......-neutral and unstable stratification conditions is introduced by changing the roughness length. Five year simulation results indicate that adding the swell influence on atmospheric mixing has limited influence, only slightly increasing the near-surface wind speed; in contrast, adding the swell influence on wind stress....... The influence varies with wave characteristics for different sea basins. Swell occurs infrequently in the studied area, and one could expect more influence in high-swell-frequency areas (i.e., low-latitude ocean). We conclude that the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress should be considered...

  18. Effect of stress on energy flux deviation of ultrasonic waves in GR/EP composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, William H.; Kriz, R. D.; Fitting, Dale W.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves suffer energy flux deviation in graphite/epoxy because of the large anisotropy. The angle of deviation is a function of the elastic coefficients. For nonlinear solids, these coefficients and thus the angle of deviation is a function of stress. Acoustoelastic theory was used to model the effect of stress on flux deviation for unidirectional T300/5208 using previously measured elastic coefficients. Computations were made for uniaxial stress along the x3 axis (fiber axis) and the x1 for waves propagating in the x1x3 plane. These results predict a shift as large as three degrees for the quasi-transverse wave. The shift in energy flux offers a new nondestructive technique of evaluating stress in composites.

  19. THE GENERATION OF THERMOELASTIC STRESS WAVES BY IMPULSIVE ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , ABSORPTION), (*STRESSES, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION ), SURFACE PROPERTIES, INTERACTIONS, HEAT TRANSFER, ELASTIC PROPERTIES, ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSES, LASERS, MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS, BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS, SOLIDS

  20. The Bloch wave operator: generalizations and applications: Part I. The time-independent case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killingbeck, John P [Mathematics Department, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX (United Kingdom); Jolicard, Georges [Observatoire de Besancon (UMR-CNRS 6091), Universite de Franche-Comte, 41 bis, Avenue de l' Observatoire, 25000 Besancon (France)

    2003-05-23

    This is part 1 of a two-part review on wave operator theory and methods. The basic theory of the time-independent wave operator is presented in terms of partitioned matrix theory for the benefit of general readers, with a discussion of the links between the matrix and projection operator approaches. The matrix approach is shown to lead to simple derivations of the wave operators and effective Hamiltonians of Loewdin, Bloch, Des Cloizeaux and Kato as well as to some associated variational forms. The principal approach used throughout stresses the solution of the nonlinear equation for the reduced wave operator, leading to the construction of the effective Hamiltonians of Bloch and of Des Cloizeaux. Several mathematical techniques which are useful in implementing this approach are explained, some of them being relatively little known in the area of wave operator calculations. The theoretical discussion is accompanied by several specimen numerical calculations which apply the described techniques to a selection of test matrices taken from the previous literature on wave operator methods. The main emphasis throughout is on the use of numerical methods which use iterative or perturbation algorithms, with simple Pade approximant methods being found sufficient to deal with most of the cases of divergence which are encountered. The use of damping factors and relaxation parameters is found to be effective in stabilizing calculations which use the energy-dependent effective Hamiltonian of Loewdin. In general the computations suggest that the numerical applications of the nonlinear equation for the reduced wave operator are best carried out with the equation split into a pair of equations in which the Bloch effective Hamiltonian appears as a separate entity. The presentation of the theoretical and computational details throughout is accompanied by references to and discussion of many works which have used wave operator methods in physics, chemistry and engineering. Some of

  1. On the intermediate time behavior of the stress tensor and velocity autocorrelation functions for dense hard sphere systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijeren, H. van

    1984-01-01

    It is conjectured that the large values at intermediate times of the stress tensor autocorrelation function, found in computer simulations, may be caused by a coupling of the stress tensor to pairs of slowly decaying extended heat modes of large wave number. Approximate expressions, amenable to

  2. Numerical investigations of internal stresses on carbon steel based on ultrasonic LCR waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, R.; Ibrahim, Z.; Chai, H. K.

    2017-10-01

    Internal stresses or residual stresses in the structural elements are very crucial in carrying out in-service evaluations and fitness-for-purpose assessments. The generation of these internal stresses can occur as result of the fabrication of the steel members, installation sequence or other ad-hoc events such as accidents or impact. The accurate prediction of the internal stresses will contribute towards estimating the integrity state of the structural elements, with respect to their material allowable stresses. This paper investigates the explicit FE based numerical modelling of the ultrasonic based non-destructive technique, utilising the measurable longitudinal critical refracted wave (LCR) and relating these to the internal stresses within the structural elements by the evaluation of the material dependent acoustoelastic factors. The subsurface travel path of the LCR wave inside the structural elements makes it a sub-surface stress measurement technique and the linearised relationship with corresponding internal stresses can be systematically applied repeatedly. The numerical results are compared against laboratory tests data to correlate the findings and to establish modelling feasibility for future proof-of-concepts. It can be concluded from this numerical investigation, that the subsurface ultrasonic LCR wave has great potential to be implemented for in-situ structural residual stress measurements, as compared to other available surface measurements such as strain gauges or x-ray diffraction.

  3. Ombuds' Corner: Time and Stress Management

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Vuillemin

    2010-01-01

    In this series, the Bulletin aims to explain the role of the Ombuds at CERN by presenting practical examples of misunderstandings that could have been resolved by the Ombuds if he had been contacted earlier. Please note that, in all the situations we present, the names are fictitious and used only to improve clarity. 
     Ted* had been working in the Organization for many years. Thanks to his expertise, he was promoted to a position where, in addition to his usual daily tasks, he also had to manage strategic projects involving close contacts with people in different Departments. At the same time, the personnel in his unit had been reduced, so Ted had to deal with many urgent requests from people bursting into his office at all hours of the day. Ted found himself in a stressful situation, having to manage his strategic projects, which required deep thought and reflection, while constantly being interrupted by people needing his help, even for a few minutes. His professional conscience...

  4. Variational space-time (dis)continuous Galerkin method for nonlinear free surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagarina, Elena; van der Vegt, Jacobus J.W.; Ambati, V.R.; Bokhove, Onno

    A new variational finite element method is developed for nonlinear free surface gravity water waves. This method also handles waves generated by a wave maker. Its formulation stems from Miles' variational principle for water waves together with a space-time finite element discretization that is

  5. Softening of stressed granular packings with resonant sound waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichhardt, C J Olson; Lopatina, L M; Jia, X; Johnson, P A

    2015-08-01

    We perform numerical simulations of a two-dimensional bidisperse granular packing subjected to both a static confining pressure and a sinusoidal dynamic forcing applied by a wall on one edge of the packing. We measure the response experienced by a wall on the opposite edge of the packing and obtain the resonant frequency of the packing as the static or dynamic pressures are varied. Under increasing static pressure, the resonant frequency increases, indicating a velocity increase of elastic waves propagating through the packing. In contrast, when the dynamic amplitude is increased for fixed static pressure, the resonant frequency decreases, indicating a decrease in the wave velocity. This occurs both for compressional and for shear dynamic forcing and is in agreement with experimental results. We find that the average contact number Zc at the resonant frequency decreases with increasing dynamic amplitude, indicating that the elastic softening of the packing is associated with a reduced number of grain-grain contacts through which the elastic waves can travel. We image the excitations created in the packing and show that there are localized disturbances or soft spots that become more prevalent with increasing dynamic amplitude. Our results are in agreement with experiments on glass bead packings and earth materials such as sandstone and granite and may be relevant to the decrease in elastic wave velocities that has been observed to occur near fault zones after strong earthquakes, in surficial sediments during strong ground motion, and in structures during earthquake excitation.

  6. Decreasing Students' Stress through Time Management Training: An Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, Alexander; Stock, Armin; Oberst, Verena

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a time management training program on perceived control of time and perceived stress in the context of higher education. Twenty-three undergraduate students attended a time management training intervention and reported demands, perceived stress and perceived control of time directly before 2 and…

  7. Inversion of residual stress profiles from ultrasonic Rayleigh wave dispersion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, P.; Spies, M.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate theoretically and with synthetic data the performance of several inversion methods to infer a residual stress state from ultrasonic surface wave dispersion data. We show that this particular problem may reveal in relevant materials undesired behaviors for some methods that could be reliably applied to infer other properties. We focus on two methods, one based on a Taylor-expansion, and another one based on a piecewise linear expansion regularized by a singular value decomposition. We explain the instabilities of the Taylor-based method by highlighting singularities in the series of coefficients. At the same time, we show that the other method can successfully provide performances which only weakly depend on the material.

  8. Propagation behavior of the stress wave in a hollow Hopkinson transmission bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, G.; Shen, X.; Guo, C.; Vecchio, K. S.; Jiang, F.

    2018-03-01

    In order to investigate the stress wave propagation behavior through a hollow elastic bar that is used in a Hopkinson-bar-loaded fracture testing system, three-point bending fracture experiments were performed in such a system. The effects of sample span and diameter and wall thickness of the hollow elastic bar on the stress wave propagation behavior were studied numerically using the software of ANSYS/LS-DYNA. The experimental results demonstrated that the incident, reflected, and transmitted pulses calculated by the finite element method are coincident with those obtained from the Hopkinson-bar-loaded fracture tests. Compared to the solid transmission bar, the amplitude of the transmitted pulse is relatively larger in the hollow transmission bar under the same loading conditions and decreases with increasing wall thickness. On the other hand, when the inside diameter is fixed, the effect of the wall thickness on the stress wave characteristics is more obvious.

  9. Stress wave communication in concrete: I. Characterization of a smart aggregate based concrete channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Sam; Ji, Qing; Wu, Wenhao; Song, Gangbing; Ding, Zhi

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we explore the characteristics of a concrete block as a communication medium with piezoelectric transducers. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is a piezoceramic material used in smart materials intended for structural health monitoring (SHM). Additionally, a PZT based smart aggregate (SA) is capable of implementing stress wave communications which is utilized for investigating the properties of an SA based concrete channel. Our experiments characterize single-input single-output and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) concrete channels in order to determine the potential capacity limits of SAs for stress wave communication. We first provide estimates and validate the concrete channel response. Followed by a theoretical upper bound for data rate capacity of our two channels, demonstrating a near-twofold increase in channel capacity by utilizing multiple transceivers to form an MIMO system. Our channel modeling techniques and results are also helpful to researchers using SAs with regards to SHM, energy harvesting and stress wave communications.

  10. Travelling wave solutions of (2+ 1)-dimensional generalised time ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article, we have developed new exact analytical solutions of a nonlinear evolution equation that appear in mathematical physics, a (2 + 1)-dimensional ... Wave interaction for the wave propagation strength and angle of field quantity under the long wave limit are analysed: Bell-shape solitons are found and it is found ...

  11. Assessing ground compaction via time lapse surface wave analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dal Moro, Giancarlo; Al-Arifi, N.; Moustafa, S.S.R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2016), s. 249-256 ISSN 1214-9705 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : Full velocity spectrum (FVS) analysis * ground compaction * ground compaction * phase velocities * Rayleigh waves * seismic data inversion * surface wave dispersion * surface waves Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.699, year: 2016

  12. Recent developments in guided wave travel time tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zon, Tim van; Volker, Arno [TNO, Stieltjesweg 1, P.O. box 155 2600 AD Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-02-18

    The concept of predictive maintenance using permanent sensors that monitor the integrity of an installation is an interesting addition to the current method of periodic inspections. Guided wave tomography had been developed to create a map of the wall thickness using the travel times of guided waves. It can be used for both monitoring and for inspection of pipe-segments that are difficult to access, for instance at the location of pipe-supports. An important outcome of the tomography is the minimum remaining wall thickness, as this is critical in the scheduling of a replacement of the pipe-segment. In order to improve the sizing accuracy we have improved the tomography scheme. A number of major improvements have been realized allowing to extend the application envelope to pipes with a larger wall thickness and to larger distances between the transducer rings. Simulation results indicate that the sizing accuracy has improved and that is now possible to have a spacing of 8 meter between the source-ring and the receiver-ring. Additionally a reduction of the number of sensors required might be possible as well.

  13. Elastodynamic metasurface: Depolarization of mechanical waves and time effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutin, Claude, E-mail: claude.boutin@entpe.fr [Ecole Nationale des Travaux Publics de l' Etat, Université de Lyon, LGCB, UMR CNRS 5513, Vaulx-en-Velin (France); Schwan, Logan [Acoustics Research Center, University of Salford, Newton Building, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Dietz, Matthew S. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Bristol, Queen' s Building, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-14

    We report the concept of microstructured surfaces with inner resonance in the field of elastodynamics, so-called elastodynamic metasurfaces. Such metasurfaces allow for wavefield manipulation of mechanical waves by tuning the boundary conditions at specific frequencies. In particular, they can be used to depolarize elastic waves without introducing heterogeneities in the medium itself; the physical means to do so in homogeneous elastic media used to remain, surprisingly, an open question while depolarization is commonplace in electromagnetism. The principle relies on the anisotropic behaviour of a subwavelength array of resonators: Their subwavelength configuration confines the Bragg interferences scattered by resonators into a boundary layer. The effective behaviour of the resonating array is expressed with homogenization as an unconventional impedance, the frequency-dependence, and anisotropy of which lead to depolarization and time effects. The concept of the elastodynamic metasurface is tested experimentally and results bear testament to its efficacy and robustness. Elastodynamic metasurfaces are easily realized and analytically predictable, opening new possibilities in tomography techniques, ultrasonics, geophysics, vibration control, materials and structure design.

  14. Versatile directional searches for gravitational waves with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, D. R.; Zhu, X.-J.; Hobbs, G.; Coles, W.; Shannon, R. M.; Wang, J. B.; Tiburzi, C.; Manchester, R. N.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Dai, S.; Dempsey, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Lasky, P.; Levin, Y.; Osłowski, S.; Ravi, V.; Reardon, D.; Rosado, P.; Spiewak, R.; van Straten, W.; Toomey, L.; Wen, L.; You, X.

    2016-02-01

    By regularly monitoring the most stable millisecond pulsars over many years, pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are positioned to detect and study correlations in the timing behaviour of those pulsars. Gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are an exciting potentially detectable source of such correlations. We describe a straightforward technique by which a PTA can be `phased-up' to form time series of the two polarization modes of GWs coming from a particular direction of the sky. Our technique requires no assumptions regarding the time-domain behaviour of a GW signal. This method has already been used to place stringent bounds on GWs from individual SMBHBs in circular orbits. Here, we describe the methodology and demonstrate the versatility of the technique in searches for a wide variety of GW signals including bursts with unmodelled waveforms. Using the first six years of data from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we conduct an all-sky search for a detectable excess of GW power from any direction. For the lines of sight to several nearby massive galaxy clusters, we carry out a more detailed search for GW bursts with memory, which are distinct signatures of SMBHB mergers. In all cases, we find that the data are consistent with noise.

  15. College Students' Time Management: Correlations with Academic Performance and Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macan, Therese Hoff; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The relationships between time management of college students and self-reported academic performance and various affective measures of stress were explored for 123 undergraduates. The study indicates that self-reported time management is multidimensional and that there are important relationships among time management, performance, and stress.…

  16. Measurements of Overtopping Flow Time Series on the Wave Dragon, Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2009-01-01

    the characteristics of the overtopping flow are discussed and the simulation algorithm is tested. Measured data is shown from a storm build up in October 2006, from theWave Dragon prototype situated in an inland sea in Northern Denmark. This wave energy converter extracts energy from the waves, by funnelling them...

  17. Stress Wave Propagation in Viscoelastic-Plastic Rock-Like Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rock-like materials are composites that can be regarded as a mixture composed of elastic, plastic, and viscous components. They exhibit viscoelastic-plastic behavior under a high-strain-rate loading according to element model theory. This paper presents an analytical solution for stress wave propagation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials under a high-strain-rate loading and verifies the solution through an experimental test. A constitutive equation of viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials was first established, and then kinematic and kinetic equations were then solved to derive the analytic solution for stress wave propagation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials. An experimental test using the SHPB (Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar for a concrete specimen was conducted to obtain a stress-strain curve under a high-strain-rate loading. Inverse analysis based on differential evolution was conducted to estimate undetermined variables for constitutive equations. Finally, the relationship between the attenuation factor and the strain rate in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials was investigated. According to the results, the frequency of the stress wave, viscosity coefficient, modulus of elasticity, and density play dominant roles in the attenuation of the stress wave. The attenuation decreases with increasing strain rate, demonstrating strongly strain-dependent attenuation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials.

  18. Time-domain Hydroelasticity Theory of Ships Responding to Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Jinzhu; Wang, Zhaohui

    1997-01-01

    free surface flow. The general interface boundary condition is used in the mathematical formulation of the fluid motion around the flexible structure. The general time-domain theory is simplified to a slender-body theory for the analysis of wave-induced global responses of monohull ships. The structure...... is represented by a non-uniform beam, while the generalized hydrodynamic coefficients can be obtained from two-dimensional potential flow theory. The linear slender body theory is generalized to treat the non-linear loading effects of rigid motion and structural response of ships travelling in rough seas....... The non-linear hydrostatic restoring force and hydrodynamic momentum action are considered. A numerical solution is presented for the slender body theory. Numerical examples are given for two ship cases with different geometry features, a warship hull and the S175 containership with two different bow...

  19. Wave Induced Stresses Measured at the Wave Dragon Nissum Bredning Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corona, L.; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2006-01-01

    for this paper, first to verify the FEM results obtained by Niras, Danish society in charge of the finite element modelling and structural design, and then to make a first experimental fatigue analysis of a particular part of the Wave Dragon. This last part shall be considered as an exercise for the further work...

  20. Does spending time outdoors reduce stress? A review of real-time stress response to outdoor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelle C. Kondo; Sara F. Jacoby; Eugenia C. South

    2018-01-01

    Everyday environmental conditions impact human health. One mechanism underlying this relationship is the experience of stress. Through systematic review of published literature, we explore how stress has been measured in real-time non-laboratory studies of stress responses to deliberate exposure to outdoor environments. The types of exposures evaluated in this review...

  1. Direct bed stress measurements under solitary tsunami-type waves and breaking tsunami wave fronts

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.; Baldock, T.E.

    steepen and eventually break, thereby generating large pressure gradients that could enhance the likelihood of liquefaction of the seabed. In the drawdown, high shear stresses could trigger debris flow in submarine canyons and on steep ridges. Therefore...

  2. Soil Liquefaction Resulting from Blast-Induced Spherical Stress Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    investigate or improve construction sites. Queiroz, et al. (1967) reported on a program to densify a sandy foundation at the Rio Casca III, Brazil , dam site...8217. calc~lacm6 peak value &mg WOWp UUW’U 0Nk vika far S1Uf 101 10 Figure 8.6 Peak total stress in sand. LI ew mbt~ O E caug I"M sabi VA low Figure 8.7

  3. Existence of longitudinal waves in pre-stressed anisotropic elastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the absence of pre-stresses, i.e., taking. S11 = S22 = S33 = 0, all the expressions, derived in this section, will reduce to the results which are same as in Ting (2006). 4. Triclinic materials. A triclinic material is the most general anisotropic medium, and the elastic compliance b11(N) in this medium is as defined by equation ...

  4. Modeling and simulation of blast-induced, early-time intracranial wave physics leading to traumatic brain injury.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Corey C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Taylor, Paul Allen

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this modeling and simulation study was to establish the role of stress wave interactions in the genesis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) from exposure to explosive blast. A high resolution (1 mm{sup 3} voxels), 5 material model of the human head was created by segmentation of color cryosections from the Visible Human Female dataset. Tissue material properties were assigned from literature values. The model was inserted into the shock physics wave code, CTH, and subjected to a simulated blast wave of 1.3 MPa (13 bars) peak pressure from anterior, posterior and lateral directions. Three dimensional plots of maximum pressure, volumetric tension, and deviatoric (shear) stress demonstrated significant differences related to the incident blast geometry. In particular, the calculations revealed focal brain regions of elevated pressure and deviatoric (shear) stress within the first 2 milliseconds of blast exposure. Calculated maximum levels of 15 KPa deviatoric, 3.3 MPa pressure, and 0.8 MPa volumetric tension were observed before the onset of significant head accelerations. Over a 2 msec time course, the head model moved only 1 mm in response to the blast loading. Doubling the blast strength changed the resulting intracranial stress magnitudes but not their distribution. We conclude that stress localization, due to early time wave interactions, may contribute to the development of multifocal axonal injury underlying TBI. We propose that a contribution to traumatic brain injury from blast exposure, and most likely blunt impact, can occur on a time scale shorter than previous model predictions and before the onset of linear or rotational accelerations traditionally associated with the development of TBI.

  5. Stress wave velocity and dynamic modulus of elasticity of yellow-poplar ranging from 100 to 10 percent moisture content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jody D. Gray; Shawn T. Grushecky; James P. Armstrong

    2008-01-01

    Moisture content has a significant impact on mechanical properties of wood. In recent years, stress wave velocity has been used as an in situ and non-destructive method for determining the stiffness of wooden elements. The objective of this study was to determine what effect moisture content has on stress wave velocity and dynamic modulus of elasticity. Results...

  6. Stress-wave velocity of wood-based panels: effect of moisture, product type, and material direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangping Han; Qinglin Wu; Xiping Wang

    2006-01-01

    The effect of moisture on longitudinal stress-wave velocity (SWV), bending stiffness. and bending strength of commercial oriented strandboard, plywood. particleboard. and southern pine lumber was evaluated. It was shown that the stress-wave verocity decreased in general with increases in panel moisture content (MC). At a given MC level. SWV varied with panel type and...

  7. Stress wave analysis of an object having coating layer using finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Young Doo; Kwon, Hyok Chun; Lee, Sang Tae; Seo, Byung Chul

    2005-01-01

    Generally, as objects impact each other, coating layer is regarded as little affecting transmission and reflection of shock wave. However, we thought that material properties and thickness of coating layer would actually affect objects. So this paper was performed by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) for transmission and reflection of stress wave propagation at two bars having different material properties. Also, as coating layer having different material properties was inserted between bars, we looked into the behavior of stress wave propagation and compared the result of FEA and theoretical result. As using them, FEA for actual piezo electric ceramic was performed. The damaged cause of piezo electric ceramic was confirmed by the effect of reflected wave. To decrease the effect of reflected wave, we analyzed it as changing thickness and material of coating layer and the shape of piezo electric ceramic. Afterwards, we inquired thickness and material of coating layer and the shape of piezo electric ceramic being able to minimize the effect of reflected wave

  8. Optical interferometry methods used to study stress wave propagetion in a human skull

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnka, Jan; Dvořáková, Pavla; Veselý, Eduard

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2004), s. 29-34 ISSN 0732-8818 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2076904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : double-pulse * holo-interferometry * stress waves Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.322, year: 2004

  9. Stress Induced Phononic Properties and Surface Waves in 2D Model of Auxetic Crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trzupek, D.; Twarog, D.; Zielinski, P.

    2009-01-01

    Elastic stiffness parameters are determined in a 2D model system of rigid rods interacting by harmonic force constants. Any positive ('' normal '' crystal) or negative (auxetic crystal) Poisson ratio can be obtained in this model as a function of the external stress. Conditions for opening an absolute stop band (phononic crystal) and for various kinds of surface waves are obtained. (authors)

  10. Condition assessment of timber bridges. 2, Evaluation of several stress-wave tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian K. Brashaw; Robert J. Vatalaro; James P. Wacker; Robert J. Ross

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of several stress-wave devices widely used for locating deteriorated areas in timber bridge members. Bridge components containing different levels of natural decay were tested using various devices. The specimens were then sawn (along their length) into slabs to expose their interior condition. The...

  11. Disturbance of SH-type waves due to moving stress discontinuity in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Disturbance of SH-type waves due to moving stress discontinuity in an anisotropic soil layer overlying an inhomogeneous elastic half-space. D MANDAL1,2∗, P C PAL2 and S KUMAR2. 1Government Engineering College, Chaibasa 833 215, India. 2Department of Applied Mathematics, Indian School of Mines,. Dhanbad ...

  12. Stress Wave Propagation in Soils Modelled by the Boundary Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K. M.

    This thesis deals with different aspects of the boundary element method (BEM) applied to stress wave propagation problems in soils. Among other things BEM formulations for coupled FEM and BEM, moving loads, direct BEM and indirect BEM are presented. For all the formulations both analytical...

  13. Time clustering of wave storms in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besio, Giovanni; Briganti, Riccardo; Romano, Alessandro; Mentaschi, Lorenzo; De Girolamo, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    In this contribution we identify storm time clustering in the Mediterranean Sea through a comprehensive analysis of the Allan factor. This parameter is evaluated from a long time series of wave height provided by oceanographic buoy measurements and hindcast reanalysis of the whole basin, spanning the period 1979-2014 and characterized by a horizontal resolution of about 0.1° in longitude and latitude and a temporal sampling of 1 h Mentaschi et al. (2015). The nature of the processes highlighted by the AF and the spatial distribution of the parameter are both investigated. Results reveal that the Allan factor follows different curves at two distinct timescales. The range of timescales between 12 h to 50 days is characterized by a departure from the Poisson distribution. For timescales above 50 days, a cyclic Poisson process is identified. The spatial distribution of the Allan factor reveals that the clustering at smaller timescales is present to the north-west of the Mediterranean, while seasonality is observed across the whole basin. This analysis is believed to be important for assessing the local increased flood and coastal erosion risks due to storm clustering.

  14. A probabilistic method for constructing wave time-series at inshore locations using model scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Joseph W.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Dalyander, P. Soupy; Thompson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous time-series of wave characteristics (height, period, and direction) are constructed using a base set of model scenarios and simple probabilistic methods. This approach utilizes an archive of computationally intensive, highly spatially resolved numerical wave model output to develop time-series of historical or future wave conditions without performing additional, continuous numerical simulations. The archive of model output contains wave simulations from a set of model scenarios derived from an offshore wave climatology. Time-series of wave height, period, direction, and associated uncertainties are constructed at locations included in the numerical model domain. The confidence limits are derived using statistical variability of oceanographic parameters contained in the wave model scenarios. The method was applied to a region in the northern Gulf of Mexico and assessed using wave observations at 12 m and 30 m water depths. Prediction skill for significant wave height is 0.58 and 0.67 at the 12 m and 30 m locations, respectively, with similar performance for wave period and direction. The skill of this simplified, probabilistic time-series construction method is comparable to existing large-scale, high-fidelity operational wave models but provides higher spatial resolution output at low computational expense. The constructed time-series can be developed to support a variety of applications including climate studies and other situations where a comprehensive survey of wave impacts on the coastal area is of interest.

  15. The impact of developmental timing for stress and recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan G. Gee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress can have lasting effects on the brain and behavior. Delineating the impact of stress on the developing brain is fundamental for understanding mechanisms through which stress induces persistent effects on behavior that can lead to psychopathology. The growing field of translational developmental neuroscience has revealed a significant role of the timing of stress on risk, resilience, and neuroplasticity. Studies of stress across species have provided essential insight into the mechanisms by which the brain changes and the timing of those changes on outcome. In this article, we review the neurobiological effects of stress and propose a model by which sensitive periods of neural development interact with stressful life events to affect plasticity and the effects of stress on functional outcomes. We then highlight how early-life stress can alter the course of brain development. Finally, we examine mechanisms of buffering against early-life stress that may promote resilience and positive outcomes. The findings are discussed in the context of implications for early identification of risk and resilience factors and development of novel interventions that target the biological state of the developing brain to ultimately ameliorate the adverse consequences of stress during childhood and adolescence.

  16. On Time Domain Analysis of Photoplethysmogram Signals for Monitoring Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elgendi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There are a limited number of studies on heat stress dynamics during exercise using the photoplethysmogram (PPG and its second derivative (APG. However, we investigate the most suitable index from short PPG signal recordings for heat stress assessment. The APG waveform consists of a, b, c and d waves in systole and an e wave in diastole. Our preliminary results indicate that the use of the energy of aa area, derived from PPG signals measured from emergency responders in tropical conditions, is promising in determining the heat stress level using 20-s recordings. After examining 14 time domain features using leave-one-out cross-validation, we found that the aa energy extracted from PPG signals is the most informative feature for classifying heat-stressed subjects, with an overall accuracy of 79%. Moreover, the combination of the aa energy with the traditional heart rate variability index of heat stress (i.e., the square root of the mean of the squares of the successive aa intervals improved the heat stress detection to an overall accuracy of 83%.

  17. A Time-Domain Method for Separating Incident and Reflected Irregular Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Brorsen, Michael

    of the model test. Goda and Suzuki (1976) presented a frequency method for estimation of irregular incident and reflected waves in random waves. Mansard and Funke (1980) improved this method uaing a least squares technique. In the following, a time-domain method for seperating the incident waves...

  18. Characterization of Residual Stress in Shot Peened Al 7075 Alloy Using Surface Acoustic Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chung Seok; Kwun, Sook In; Kim, Yong Kwon; Park, Ik Keun

    2006-01-01

    The residual stress in shot-peened Al 7075 alloy was evaluated using surface acoustic wave (SAW). Shot peening was conducted to produce a variation in the residual stress with the depth below the surface under a shot velocity of 30 m/s. The SAW velocity was measured from the V(z) curve using a scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). The Vickers hardness profile from the surface showed a significant work hardening near the surface layer with a thickness of about 0.25 mm. As the residual stress became more compressive, the SAW velocity increased, whereas as the residual stress became more tensile, the SAW velocity decreased. The variation in the SAW velocity through the shot peened surface layer was in good agreement with the distribution of the residual stress measured by X-ray diffraction technique

  19. Nonlinear dynamics of wind waves: multifractal phase/time effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Mellen

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the bispectral coherence method, phase/time analysis of analytic signals is another promising avenue for the investigation of phase effects in wind waves. Frequency spectra of phase fluctuations obtained from both sea and laboratory experiments follow an F-β power law over several decades, suggesting that a fractal description is appropriate. However, many similar natural phenomena have been shown to be multifractal. Universal multifractals are quantified by two additional parameters: the Lévy index 0 α 2 for the type of multifractal and the co-dimension 0 C1 1 for intermittence. The three parameters are a full statistical measure the nonlinear dynamics. Analysis of laboratory flume data is reported here and the results indicate that the phase fluctuations are 'hard multifractal' (α > 1. The actual estimate is close to the limiting value α = 2,  which is consistent with Kolmogorov's lognormal model for turbulent fluctuations. Implications for radar and sonar backscattering from the sea surface are briefly considered.

  20. Coded acoustic wave sensors and system using time diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solie, Leland P. (Inventor); Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus and method for distinguishing between sensors that are to be wirelessly detected is provided. An interrogator device uses different, distinct time delays in the sensing signals when interrogating the sensors. The sensors are provided with different distinct pedestal delays. Sensors that have the same pedestal delay as the delay selected by the interrogator are detected by the interrogator whereas other sensors with different pedestal delays are not sensed. Multiple sensors with a given pedestal delay are provided with different codes so as to be distinguished from one another by the interrogator. The interrogator uses a signal that is transmitted to the sensor and returned by the sensor for combination and integration with the reference signal that has been processed by a function. The sensor may be a surface acoustic wave device having a differential impulse response with a power spectral density consisting of lobes. The power spectral density of the differential response is used to determine the value of the sensed parameter or parameters.

  1. The gravitational-wave discovery space of pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Curt; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Vallisneri, Michele; Lazio, Joseph; Majid, Walid

    2014-02-01

    Recent years have seen a burgeoning interest in using pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) as gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. To date, that interest has focused mainly on three particularly promising source types: supermassive black hole binaries, cosmic strings, and the stochastic background from early-Universe phase transitions. In this paper, by contrast, our aim is to investigate the PTA potential for discovering unanticipated sources. We derive significant constraints on the available discovery space based solely on energetic and statistical considerations: we show that a PTA detection of GWs at frequencies above ˜10-5 Hz would either be an extraordinary coincidence or violate "cherished beliefs;" we show that for PTAs GW memory can be more detectable than direct GWs, and that, as we consider events at ever higher redshift, the memory effect increasingly dominates an event's total signal-to-noise ratio. The paper includes also a simple analysis of the effects of pulsar red noise in PTA searches, and a demonstration that the effects of periodic GWs in the ˜10-7-10-4.5 Hz band would not be degenerate with small errors in standard pulsar parameters (except in a few narrow bands).

  2. The Universe is Like a Hollowed Sphere. The Wave Concept of Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej W. Głuszak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There is space for new ideas of the essence and the entity of time. The article refers to our time concept as a special wave type and presents results of our investigations on this subject. Thus, time defined as waves and an energy carrier could give explanation to multiple unclear phenomena. It could explicate gravity, organization in the planetary systems and light speed limit. A hypothesis that matter exists due to time wave motion would emerge from the elementary particle mass generation by the waves. Time becomes the main driving force in the Universe. The discussed thoughts need further analyses and verification but their confirmation may mean civilization changes.

  3. Modeling Gravitational-Wave Sources for Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Joseph J.

    The recent direct detections of gravitational waves (GWs) from merging black holes by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) marks the beginning of the era of GW astronomy and promises to transform fundamental physics. In the coming years, there is hope for detections across the mass scale of binary black holes. Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs) are galactic-scale low-frequency (nHz - muHz) GW observatories, which aim to directly detect GWs from binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) (≥ 107M solar masses). The frequency and black hole mass range that PTAs are sensitive to is orders of magnitude different from those LIGO is observing, making PTAs a comparable observatory on the GW spectrum. Understanding the link between binary SMBHs and the gravitational radiation detected by PTAs is crucial to the community's capability of making meaningful scientific statements using PTA observations. This dissertation discusses the creation of a state-of-the-art observational-based simulation framework built to provide critical answers to many open questions surrounding the link between PTA data and binary SMBHs. Binary SMBHs are predicted products of galaxy mergers, and are a crucial step in galaxy formation theories. Recent PTA upper limits on the gravitational radiation in the nanohertz frequency band are impacting our understanding of the binary SMBH population. But as upper limits grow more constraining, what can be implied about galaxy evolution? In this dissertation, I will provide insights into this question by investigating which astrophysical parameters have the largest impact on GW predictions, developing direct translations between PTA limits and measured values for the parameters of galaxy evolution, and exploring how the use of different galaxy evolution parameters effects the characterization of the GW signal. During the extended interaction between SMBHs and their host galaxy throughout inspiral, there is the potential for many

  4. Astrometric and Timing Effects of Gravitational Waves from Localized Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.; Schafer, Gerhard; Gwinn, Carl R.; Eubanks, T. Marshall

    1998-01-01

    A consistent approach for an exhaustive solution of the problem of propagation of light rays in the field of gravitational waves emitted by a localized source of gravitational radiation is developed in the first post-Minkowskian and quadrupole approximation of General Relativity. We demonstrate that the equations of light propagation in the retarded gravitational field of an arbitrary localized source emitting quadrupolar gravitational waves can be integrated exactly. The influence of the gra...

  5. Dominant winter-time mesospheric wave signatures over a low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    10.1016/j.jastp.2008.09.017. Taori A, Taylor M J and Franke S 2005 Terdiurnal wave signatures in the upper mesospheric tempera- ture and their association with the wind fields at low latitudes (20. °. N); J. Geophys. Res. 110 D09S06, doi: 10.1029/2004JD004564. Taori A and Taylor M J 2006 Characteristics of wave.

  6. Frictional response of simulated faults to normal stresses perturbations probed with ultrasonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreedharan, S.; Riviere, J.; Marone, C.

    2017-12-01

    We report on a suite of laboratory friction experiments conducted on saw-cut Westerly Granite surfaces to probe frictional response to step changes in normal stress and loading rate. The experiments are conducted to illuminate the fundamental processes that yield friction rate and state dependence. We quantify the microphysical frictional response of the simulated fault surfaces to normal stress steps, in the range of 1% - 600% step increases and decreases from a nominal baseline normal stress. We measure directly the fault slip rate and account for changes in slip rate with changes in normal stress and complement mechanical data acquisition by continuously probing the faults with ultrasonic pulses. We conduct the experiments at room temperature and humidity conditions in a servo controlled biaxial testing apparatus in the double direct shear configuration. The samples are sheared over a range of velocities, from 0.02 - 100 μm/s. We report observations of a transient shear stress and friction evolution with step increases and decreases in normal stress. Specifically, we show that, at low shear velocities and small increases in normal stress ( 5% increases), the shear stress evolves immediately with normal stress. We show that the excursions in slip rate resulting from the changes in normal stress must be accounted for in order to predict fault strength evolution. Ultrasonic wave amplitudes which first increase immediately in response to normal stress steps, then decrease approximately linearly to a new steady state value, in part due to changes in fault slip rate. Previous descriptions of frictional state evolution during normal stress perturbations have not adequately accounted for the effect of large slip velocity excursions. Here, we attempt to do so by using the measured ultrasonic amplitudes as a proxy for frictional state during transient shear stress evolution. Our work aims to improve understanding of induced and triggered seismicity with focus on

  7. Impact of inhomogeneity on SH-type wave propagation in an initially stressed composite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S.; Chattopadhyay, A.; Singh, A. K.

    2018-02-01

    The present analysis has been made on the influence of distinct form of inhomogeneity in a composite structure comprised of double superficial layers lying over a half-space, on the phase velocity of SH-type wave propagating through it. Propagation of SH-type wave in the said structure has been examined in four distinct cases of inhomogeneity viz. when inhomogeneity in double superficial layer is due to exponential variation in density only (Case I); when inhomogeneity in double superficial layers is due to exponential variation in rigidity only (Case II); when inhomogeneity in double superficial layer is due to exponential variation in rigidity, density and initial stress (Case III) and when inhomogeneity in double superficial layer is due to linear variation in rigidity, density and initial stress (Case IV). Closed-form expression of dispersion relation has been accomplished for all four aforementioned cases through extensive application of Debye asymptotic analysis. Deduced dispersion relations for all the cases are found in well-agreement to the classical Love-wave equation. Numerical computation has been carried out to graphically demonstrate the effect of inhomogeneity parameters, initial stress parameters as well as width ratio associated with double superficial layers in the composite structure for each of the four aforesaid cases on dispersion curve. Meticulous examination of distinct cases of inhomogeneity and initial stress in context of considered problem has been carried out with detailed analysis in a comparative approach.

  8. Modeling Gravitational Wave Sources For Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs) are galactic-scale low-frequency (nHz - μHz) gravitational wave (GW) observatories, which aim to directly detect GWs from binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) (≥ 107 M⊙). Binary SMBHs are predicted products of galaxy mergers, and are a crucial step in galaxy formation theories. Understanding the link between binary SMBHs and the gravitational radiation detected by PTAs is crucial to the community's capability of making meaningful scientific statements using PTA observations. Recent PTA upper limits on the gravitational radiation in the nanohertz frequency band are impacting our understanding of the binary SMBH population. But as upper limits grow more constraining, what can be implied about galaxy evolution? In this talk, I will provide insights into this question with investigations into which astrophysical parameters have the largest impact on GW predictions, direct translations between PTA limits and measured values for the parameters of galaxy evolution, and explorations into how the use of different galaxy evolution parameters effects the characterization of the GW signal.The inspiral of binary SMBHs creates extended interaction between the black holes and their host galaxy, and there is the potential for many electromagnetic tracers to accompany the binary's evolution. This talk will also highlight work incorporating models of electromagnetic radiation from binary SMBHs to investigate the potential for jointly detecting a binary's electromagnetic and gravitational radiation. The detection of a single `multi-messenger' source would provide a unique window into a pivotal stage of galaxy evolution, and would revolutionize the understanding of late-stage galaxy evolution.

  9. Real-Time Detection of Rupture Development: Earthquake Early Warning Using P Waves From Growing Ruptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodera, Yuki

    2018-01-01

    Large earthquakes with long rupture durations emit P wave energy throughout the rupture period. Incorporating late-onset P waves into earthquake early warning (EEW) algorithms could contribute to robust predictions of strong ground motion. Here I describe a technique to detect in real time P waves from growing ruptures to improve the timeliness of an EEW algorithm based on seismic wavefield estimation. The proposed P wave detector, which employs a simple polarization analysis, successfully detected P waves from strong motion generation areas of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake rupture. An analysis using 23 large (M ≥ 7) events from Japan confirmed that seismic intensity predictions based on the P wave detector significantly increased lead times without appreciably decreasing the prediction accuracy. P waves from growing ruptures, being one of the fastest carriers of information on ongoing rupture development, have the potential to improve the performance of EEW systems.

  10. Cluster Observations of Non-Time Continuous Magnetosonic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Simon N.; Demekhov, Andrei G.; Boardsen, Scott A.; Ganushkina, Natalia Y.; Sibeck, David G.; Balikhin, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Equatorial magnetosonic waves are normally observed as temporally continuous sets of emissions lasting from minutes to hours. Recent observations, however, have shown that this is not always the case. Using Cluster data, this study identifies two distinct forms of these non temporally continuous use missions. The first, referred to as rising tone emissions, are characterized by the systematic onset of wave activity at increasing proton gyroharmonic frequencies. Sets of harmonic emissions (emission elements)are observed to occur periodically in the region +/- 10 off the geomagnetic equator. The sweep rate of these emissions maximizes at the geomagnetic equator. In addition, the ellipticity and propagation direction also change systematically as Cluster crosses the geomagnetic equator. It is shown that the observed frequency sweep rate is unlikely to result from the sideband instability related to nonlinear trapping of suprathermal protons in the wave field. The second form of emissions is characterized by the simultaneous onset of activity across a range of harmonic frequencies. These waves are observed at irregular intervals. Their occurrence correlates with changes in the spacecraft potential, a measurement that is used as a proxy for electron density. Thus, these waves appear to be trapped within regions of localized enhancement of the electron density.

  11. Potential applicability of stress wave velocity method on pavement base materials as a non-destructive testing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahedi, Masrur

    Aggregates derived from natural sources have been used traditionally as the pavement base materials. But in recent times, the extraction of these natural aggregates has become more labor intensive and costly due to resource depletion and environmental concerns. Thus, the uses of recycled aggregates as the supplementary of natural aggregates are increasing considerably in pavement construction. Use of recycled aggregates such as recycled crushed concrete (RCA) and recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) reduces the rate of natural resource depletion, construction debris and cost. Although recycled aggregates could be used as a viable alternative of conventional base materials, strength characteristics and product variability limit their utility to a great extent. Hence, their applicability is needed to be evaluated extensively based on strength, stiffness and cost factors. But for extensive evaluation, traditionally practiced test methods are proven to be unreasonable in terms of time, cost, reliability and applicability. On the other hand, rapid non-destructive methods have the potential to be less time consuming and inexpensive along with the low variability of test results; therefore improving the reliability of estimated performance of the pavement. In this research work, the experimental program was designed to assess the potential application of stress wave velocity method as a non-destructive test in evaluating recycled base materials. Different combinations of cement treated recycled concrete aggregate (RAP) and recycled crushed concrete (RCA) were used to evaluate the applicability of stress wave velocity method. It was found that, stress wave velocity method is excellent in characterizing the strength and stiffness properties of cement treated base materials. Statistical models, based on P-wave velocity were derived for predicting the modulus of elasticity and compressive strength of different combinations of cement treated RAP, Grade-1 and Grade-2 materials. Two

  12. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Huang, S. L.; Wang, S.; Zhao, W.

    2016-01-01

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert–Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of <1% and thus can act as a universal time-of-flight extraction method for narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

  13. A study of the stress wave factor technique for the characterization of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govada, A. K.; Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Stinchcomb, W. W.

    1985-01-01

    This study has investigated the potential of the Stress Wave Factor as an NDT technique for thin composite laminates. The conventional SWF and an alternate method for quantifying the SWF were investigated. Agreement between the initial SWF number, ultrasonic C-scan, inplane displacements as obtained by full field moire interferometry, and the failure location have been observed. The SWF number was observed to be the highest when measured along the fiber direction and the lowest when measured across the fibers. The alternate method for quantifying the SWF used square root of the zeroth moment (square root of M sub o) of the frequency spectrum of the received signal as a quantitative parameter. From this study it therefore appears that the stress wave factor has an excellent potential to monitor damage development in thin composite laminates.

  14. Nondestructive evaluation of adhesive bond strength using the stress wave factor technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Reis, Henrique L. M.; Krautz, Harold E.

    1986-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation has been conducted to evaluate the adhesive bond strength between rubber and steel plates using the stress wave factor (SWF) measurement technique. Specimens with different bond strength were manufactured and tested using the SWF technique. Two approaches were used to define the SWF. One approach defines the SWF as the signal energy and the other approach defines the SWF as the square root of the zero moment of the frequency spectrum of the received signal. The strength of the rubber-steel adhesive joint was then evaluated using the destructive peel strength test method. It was observed that in both approaches higher values of the SWF measurements correspond to higher values of the peel strength test data. Therefore, these results show that the stress wave factor technique has the potential of being used in quality assurance of the adhesive bond strength between rubber and steel substrates.

  15. Solitary Waves on Inclined Films: Their Characteristics and the Effect on Wall Shear Stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tihon, Jaroslav; Serifi, K.; Argyriadi, K.; Bontozoglou, V.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 1 (2006), s. 79-89 ISSN 0723-4864 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072914 Grant - others:HPMT(XE) CT/2000/00074 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : wavy film flow * solitary waves * wall shear stress Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.112, year: 2006

  16. Stress waves generated in thin metallic films by a Q-switched ruby laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation results on stress waves generated by Q-switched ruby laser irradiated thin metal films under confinement, studied over a wide range of film materials and film thicknesses, are reviewed. The results indicate that the dependence on these parameters is much weaker than is predicted by heat transfer estimations commonly used to describe the interaction of laser irradiation with unconfined bulk-solid surfaces.

  17. A Study of Stress Wave Propagation in Thin Plate Loaded by an Oblique Impact

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnka, Jan; Kolman, Radek; Dvořáková, Pavla; Veselý, Eduard

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 3 (2009), s. 322-331 ISSN 1970-8734 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/07/0588; GA ČR GA101/06/0914 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : Stress wave propagation * Thin-wall structures * Double-pulse holointerferometry * Finite Element Method Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  18. a Quadratic Layer Element for Analyzing Stress Waves in Fgms and its Application in Material Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAN, X.; LIU, G. R.; LAM, K. Y.; OHYOSHI, T.

    2000-09-01

    A novel method is presented for investigating elastic waves in functionally graded material (FGM) plates excited by plane pressure waves. The FGM plate is first divided into quadratic layer elements (QLEs). A general solution for the equation of motion governing the QLE has been derived. The general solution is then used together with the boundary and continuity conditions to obtain the displacement and stress in the frequency domain for an arbitrary FGM plate. The response of the plate to an incident pressure wave is obtained using the Fourier transform techniques. Results obtained by the present method are compared with an existing method using homogeneous layer elements. Numerical examples are presented to investigate stress waves in FGM plates. The relationship between the surface displacement response and the material property of quadratic FGM plates has been analytically obtained for the material characterization. A computational inverse technique is also presented for characterizing material property of an arbitrary FGM plate from the surface displacement response data, using present QLE method as forward solver and genetic algorithm as the inverse operator. This technique is utilized to reconstruct the material property of an actual SiC-C FGM.

  19. Dominant winter-time mesospheric wave signatures over a low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We utilize mesospheric O2 airglow emission intensity and temperature data collected during January–February 2003 on 17 consecutive nights from Maui, Hawaii (20.8°N, 156.2°W) to study the dominant and long period wave features at mesospheric altitudes. Apart from large day-to-day variability, it is found that nocturnal ...

  20. Subsurface signatures and timing of extreme wave events along the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    coastal events in the Indian Ocean, from 550–700 years in Thailand and 1000 years in Indonesia. Detailed ... logical site, 55 km south of Chennai (Madras),. Rajendran et al (2006) reported evidence of two probable extreme wave events at 1000 and 1500 years ago. ..... C–B is 800–900 years, whereas the gap between.

  1. Subsurface signatures and timing of extreme wave events along the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Detailed ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys in Mahabalipuram, southeast India, complemented with sedimentological analyses, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and optical dating provide strong evidence of extreme wave events during the past 3700 years. The diagnostic event signatures include the extent ...

  2. Dispersion-based short-time Fourier transform applied to dispersive wave analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jin-Chul; Sun, Kyung Ho; Kim, Yoon Young

    2005-05-01

    Although time-frequency analysis is effective for characterizing dispersive wave signals, the time-frequency tilings of most conventional analysis methods do not take into account dispersion phenomena. An adaptive time-frequency analysis method is introduced whose time-frequency tiling is determined with respect to the wave dispersion characteristics. In the dispersion-based time-frequency tiling, each time-frequency atom is adaptively rotated in the time-frequency plane, depending on the local wave dispersion. Although this idea can be useful in various problems, its application to the analysis of dispersive wave signals has not been made. In this work, the adaptive time-frequency method was applied to the analysis of dispersive elastic waves measured in waveguide experiments and a theoretical investigation on its time-frequency resolution was presented. The time-frequency resolution of the proposed transform was then compared with that of the standard short-time Fourier transform to show its effectiveness in dealing with dispersive wave signals. In addition, to facilitate the adaptive time-frequency analysis of experimentally measured signals whose dispersion relations are not known, an iterative scheme for determining the relationships was developed. The validity of the present approach in dealing with dispersive waves was verified experimentally. .

  3. Travelling Solitary Wave Solutions for Generalized Time-delayed Burgers-Fisher Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Xijun; Han Libo; Li Xi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, travelling wave solutions for the generalized time-delayed Burgers-Fisher equation are studied. By using the first-integral method, which is based on the ring theory of commutative algebra, we obtain a class of travelling solitary wave solutions for the generalized time-delayed Burgers-Fisher equation. A minor error in the previous article is clarified. (general)

  4. ''Free-space'' boundary conditions for the time-dependent wave equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindman, E.L.

    1975-01-01

    Boundary conditions for the discrete wave equation which act like an infinite region of free space in contact with the computational region can be constructed using projection operators. Propagating and evanescent waves coming from within the computational region generate no reflected waves as they cross the boundary. At the same time arbitrary waves may be launched into the computational region. Well known projection operators for one-dimensional waves may be used for this purpose in one dimension. Extensions of these operators to higher dimensions along with numerically efficient approximations to them are described for higher-dimensional problems. The separation of waves into ingoing and outgoing waves inherent in these boundary conditions greatly facilitates diagnostics

  5. Three-dimensional wave-induced current model equations and radiation stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hua-yong

    2017-08-01

    After the approach by Mellor (2003, 2008), the present paper reports on a repeated effort to derive the equations for three-dimensional wave-induced current. Via the vertical momentum equation and a proper coordinate transformation, the phase-averaged wave dynamic pressure is well treated, and a continuous and depth-dependent radiation stress tensor, rather than the controversial delta Dirac function at the surface shown in Mellor (2008), is provided. Besides, a phase-averaged vertical momentum flux over a sloping bottom is introduced. All the inconsistencies in Mellor (2003, 2008), pointed out by Ardhuin et al. (2008) and Bennis and Ardhuin (2011), are overcome in the presently revised equations. In a test case with a sloping sea bed, as shown in Ardhuin et al. (2008), the wave-driving forces derived in the present equations are in good balance, and no spurious vertical circulation occurs outside the surf zone, indicating that Airy's wave theory and the approach of Mellor (2003, 2008) are applicable for the derivation of the wave-induced current model.

  6. Mie scattering in the time domain. Part 1. The role of surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, James A; Laven, Philip

    2011-06-01

    We computed the Debye series p=1 and p=2 terms of the Mie scattered intensity as a function of scattering angle and delay time for a linearly polarized plane wave pulse incident on a spherical dielectric particle and physically interpreted the resulting numerical data. Radiation shed by electromagnetic surface waves plays a prominent role in the scattered intensity. We determined the surface wave phase and damping rate and studied the structure of the p=1,2 surface wave glory in the time domain.

  7. Time domain characteristics of wave motion in dispersive and anisotropic continuum acoustic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaojun; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2016-12-01

    The authors study the wave propagation in continuum acoustic metamaterials whose all or not all of the principal elements of the mass tensor or the scalar compressibility can be negative due to wave dispersion. Their time-domain wave characteristics are particularly investigated by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, in which algorithms for the Drude and Lorentz dispersion pertinent to acoustic metamaterials are provided necessarily. Wave propagation nature of anisotropic acoustic metamaterials with all admissible material parameters are analyzed in a general manner. It is found that anomalous negative refraction phenomena can appear in several dispersion regimes, and their unique time-domain signatures have been discovered by the FDTD modeling. It is further proposed that two different metamaterial layers with specially assigned dispersions could comprise a conjugate pair that permits wave propagation only at specific points in the wave vector space. The time-domain pulse simulation verifies that acoustic directive radiation capable of modulating radiation angle with the wave frequency can be realized with this conjugate pair. The study provides the detailed analysis of wave propagation in anisotropic and dispersive acoustic mediums, which makes a further step toward dispersion engineering and transient wave control through acoustic metamaterials.

  8. Space-time evolution of whistler mode wave growth in the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, C.R.; Helliwell, R.A.; Inan, U.S.

    1990-01-01

    A new model is developed to simulate the space-time evolution of a propagating coherent whistler mode wave pulse in the magnetosphere. The model is applied to the case of single frequency (2-6 kHz) wave pulses injected into the magnetosphere near L ≅ 4, using the VLF transmitting facility at Siple Station, Antarctica. The mechanism for growth is cyclotron resonance between the circularly polarized waves and the gyrating energetic electrons of the radiation belts. Application of this model reproduces observed exponential wave growth up to a saturated level. Additionally, the model predicts the observed initial linear increase in the output frequency versus time. This is the first time these features have been reproduced using applied wave intensities small enough to be consistent with satellite measurements. The center velocities of the electrons entering the wave pulse are selected in a way which maximizes the growth rate. The results show the importance of the transient aspects in the wave growth process. The growth established as the wave propagates toward the geomagnetic equator results in a spatially advancing wave phase structure due mainly to the geomagnetic inhomogeneity. Through the feedback of this radiation upon other electrons, conditions are established which result in a linearly increasing output frequency with time

  9. Dispersion relations of elastic waves in one-dimensional piezoelectric/piezomagnetic phononic crystal with initial stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao; Wei, Peijun

    2016-03-01

    The dispersion relations of elastic waves in a one-dimensional phononic crystal formed by periodically repeating of a pre-stressed piezoelectric slab and a pre-stressed piezomagnetic slab are studied in this paper. The influences of initial stress on the dispersive relation are considered based on the incremental stress theory. First, the incremental stress theory of elastic solid is extended to the magneto-electro-elasto solid. The governing equations, constitutive equations, and boundary conditions of the incremental stresses in a magneto-electro-elasto solid are derived with consideration of the existence of initial stresses. Then, the transfer matrices of a pre-stressed piezoelectric slab and a pre-stressed piezomagnetic slab are formulated, respectively. The total transfer matrix of a single cell in the phononic crystal is obtained by the multiplication of two transfer matrixes related with two adjacent slabs. Furthermore, the Bloch theorem is used to obtain the dispersive equations of in-plane and anti-plane Bloch waves. The dispersive equations are solved numerically and the numerical results are shown graphically. The oblique propagation and the normal propagation situations are both considered. In the case of normal propagation of elastic waves, the analytical expressions of the dispersion equation are derived and compared with other literatures. The influences of initial stresses, including the normal initial stresses and shear initial stresses, on the dispersive relations are both discussed based on the numerical results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation in nanostructured copper: Stress relaxation tests and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xu-Sheng; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Wang, Guo-Yong; Zhai, Hui-Ru; Dai, L.H.; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, stress relaxation tests, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted on coarse-grained (cg), nanograined (ng), and nanotwinned (nt) copper at temperatures of 22 °C (RT), 30 °C, 40 °C, 50 °C, and 75 °C. The comprehensive investigations provide sufficient information for the building-up of a formula to describe the time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation and clarify the relationship among the strain rate sensitivity parameter, stress exponent, and activation volume. The typically experimental curves of logarithmic plastic strain rate versus stress exhibited a three staged relaxation process from a linear high stress relaxation region to a subsequent nonlinear stress relaxation region and finally to a linear low stress relaxation region, which only showed-up at the test temperatures higher than 22 °C, 22 °C, and 30 °C, respectively, in the tested cg-, ng-, and nt-Cu specimens. The values of stress exponent, stress-independent activation energy, and activation volume were determined from the experimental data in the two linear regions. The determined activation parameters, HRTEM images, and MD simulations consistently suggest that dislocation-mediated plastic deformation is predominant in all tested cg-, ng-, and nt-Cu specimens in the initial linear high stress relaxation region at the five relaxation temperatures, whereas in the linear low stress relaxation region, the grain boundary (GB) diffusion-associated deformation is dominant in the ng- and cg-Cu specimens, while twin boundary (TB) migration, i.e., twinning and detwinning with parallel partial dislocations, governs the time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation in the nt-Cu specimens.

  11. Time course analysis of baroreflex sensitivity during postural stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Berend E.; Gisolf, Janneke; Karemaker, John M.; Wesseling, Karel H.; Secher, Niels H.; van Lieshout, Johannes J.

    2006-01-01

    Postural stress requires immediate autonomic nervous action to maintain blood pressure. We determined time-domain cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and time delay (tau) between systolic blood pressure and interbeat interval variations during stepwise changes in the angle of vertical body axis

  12. Time-dependent strains and stresses in a pumpkin balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerngross, T.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    This paper presents a study of pumpkin-shaped superpressure balloons consisting of gores made from a thin polymeric film attached to high stiffness meridional tendons This type of design is being used for the NASA ULDB balloons The gore film shows considerable time-dependent stress relaxation whereas the behaviour of the tendons is essentially time-independent Upon inflation and pressurization the instantaneous i e linear-elastic strain and stress distributions in the film show significantly higher values in the meridional direction However over time and due to the biaxial visco-elastic stress relaxation of the the gore material the em hoop strains increase and the em meridional stresses decrease whereas the em remaining strain and stress components remain substantially unchanged These results are important for a correct assessment of the structural integrity of a pumpkin balloon in a long-duration mission both in terms of the material performance and the overall stability of the shape of the balloon An experimental investigation of the time dependence of the biaxial strain distribution in the film of a 4 m diameter 48 gore pumpkin balloon is presented The inflated shape of selected gores has been measured using photogrammetry and the time variation in strain components at some particular points of these gores has been measured under constant pressure and temperature The results show good correlation with a numerical study using the ABAQUS finite-element package that includes a widely used model of

  13. INTENSITY- AND TIME COURSE-BASED CLASSIFICATIONS OF OXIDATIVE STRESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Lushchak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In living organisms, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS is counterbalanced by their elimination and/or prevention of formation which in concert can typically maintain a steady-state (stationary ROS level. However, this balance may be disturbed and lead to elevated ROS levels and enhanced damage to biomolecules. Since 1985, when H. Sies first introduced the definition of oxidative stress, this area has become one of the hot topics in biology and, to date, many details related to ROS-induced damage to cellular components, ROS-based signaling, cellular responses and adaptation have been disclosed. However, some basal oxidative damage always occurs under unstressed conditions, and in many experimental studies it is difficult to show definitely that oxidative stress is indeed induced by the stressor. Therefore, usually researchers experience substantial difficulties in the correct interpretation of oxidative stress development. For example, in many cases an increase or decrease in the activity of antioxidant and related enzymes are interpreted as evidences of oxidative stress. Careful selection of specific biomarkers (ROS-modified targets may be very helpful. To avoid these sorts of problems, I propose several classifications of oxidative stress based on its time-course and intensity. The time-course classification includes acute and chronic stresses. In the intensity based classification, I propose to discriminate four zones of function in the relationship between “Dose/concentration of inducer” and the measured “Endpoint”: I – basal oxidative stress zone (BOS; II – low intensity oxidative stress (LOS; III – intermediate intensity oxidative stress (IOS; IV – high intensity oxidative stress (HOS. The proposed classifications may be helpful to describe experimental data where oxidative stress is induced and systematize it based on its time course and intensity. Perspective directions of investigations in the field include

  14. Reynolds-Stress Budgets in an Impinging Shock Wave/Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Manan A.; Yoder, Dennis A.; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2018-01-01

    Implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) of a shock wave/boundary-layer interaction (SBLI) was performed. Comparisons with experimental data showed a sensitivity of the current prediction to the modeling of the sidewalls. This was found to be common among various computational studies in the literature where periodic boundary conditions were used in the spanwise direction, as was the case in the present work. Thus, although the experiment was quasi-two-dimensional, the present simulation was determined to be two-dimensional. Quantities present in the exact equation of the Reynolds-stress transport, i.e., production, molecular diffusion, turbulent transport, pressure diffusion, pressure strain, dissipation, and turbulent mass flux were calculated. Reynolds-stress budgets were compared with past large-eddy simulation and direct numerical simulation datasets in the undisturbed portion of the turbulent boundary layer to validate the current approach. The budgets in SBLI showed the growth in the production term for the primary normal stress and energy transfer mechanism was led by the pressure strain term in the secondary normal stresses. The pressure diffusion term, commonly assumed as negligible by turbulence model developers, was shown to be small but non-zero in the normal stress budgets, however it played a key role in the primary shear stress budget.

  15. Stress Wave Attenuation in Aluminum Alloy and Mild Steel Specimens Under SHPB Tensile Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothnis, J. R.; Ravikumar, G.; Arya, H.; Yerramalli, Chandra S.; Naik, N. K.

    2018-02-01

    Investigations on the effect of intensity of incident pressure wave applied through the striker bar on the specimen force histories and stress wave attenuation during split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tensile testing are presented. Details of the tensile SHPB along with Lagrangian x- t diagram of the setup are included. Studies were carried out on aluminum alloy 7075 T651 and IS 2062 mild steel. While testing specimens using the tensile SHPB setup, it was observed that the force calculated from the transmitter bar strain gauge was smaller than the force obtained from the incident bar strain gauge. This mismatch between the forces in the incident bar and the transmitter bar is explained on the basis of stress wave attenuation in the specimens. A methodology to obtain force histories using the strain gauges on the specimen during SHPB tensile testing is also presented. Further, scanning electron microscope images and photomicrographs are given. Correlation between the microstructure and mechanical properties is explained. Further, uncertainty analysis was conducted to ascertain the accuracy of the results.

  16. A Real-Time Nearshore Wave and Current Prediction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    and 40 in in the )-direction, while that of FLOW varied grids were equidistant and perlectly rectilinear . To from 10 to 30 in. On each side of the WAVE...the domain was deemed small enough to Fig. 4 depicts the relationship between the two grids. assume a uniform wind and water level. I lowever, at the...the magnitude and direction of the ctnrent. Fhe coordinate sN tem is int) UITN1 storm events, causing the movement of a prominent The P(’Tides tidal

  17. Producing accurate wave propagation time histories using the global matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenchain, Matthew B; Cesnik, Carlos E S

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a reliable method for producing accurate displacement time histories for wave propagation in laminated plates using the global matrix method. The existence of inward and outward propagating waves in the general solution is highlighted while examining the axisymmetric case of a circular actuator on an aluminum plate. Problems with previous attempts to isolate the outward wave for anisotropic laminates are shown. The updated method develops a correction signal that can be added to the original time history solution to cancel the inward wave and leave only the outward propagating wave. The paper demonstrates the effectiveness of the new method for circular and square actuators bonded to the surface of isotropic laminates, and these results are compared with exact solutions. Results for circular actuators on cross-ply laminates are also presented and compared with experimental results, showing the ability of the new method to successfully capture the displacement time histories for composite laminates. (paper)

  18. Feasibility analysis of real-time physical modeling using WaveCore processor technology on FPGA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraelen, Martinus Johannes Wilhelmina; Pfeifle, Florian; Bader, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    WaveCore is a scalable many-core processor technology. This technology is specifically developed and optimized for real-time acoustical modeling applications. The programmable WaveCore soft-core processor is silicon-technology independent and hence can be targeted to ASIC or FPGA technologies. The

  19. Adiabatic dynamics of periodic waves in Bose-Einstein condensates with time dependent atomic scattering length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullaev, F.Kh.; Kamchatnov, A.M.; Konotop, V.V.; Brazhnyi, V.A.

    2003-01-01

    Evolution of periodic matter waves in one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates with time-dependent scattering length is described. It is shown that variation of the effective nonlinearity is a powerful tool for controlled generation of bright and dark solitons starting with periodic waves

  20. Travelling wave solutions of (2++1)-dimensional generalised time-fractional Hirota equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youwei

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we have developed new exact analytical solutions of a nonlinear evolution equation that appear in mathematical physics, a (2+1)-dimensional generalised time-fractional Hirota equation, which describes the wave propagation in an erbium-doped nonlinear fibre with higher-order dispersion. By virtue of the tanh-expansion and complete discrimination system by means of fractional complex transform, travelling wave solutions are derived. Wave interaction for the wave propagation strength and angle of field quantity under the long wave limit are analysed: Bell-shape solitons are found and it is found that the complex transform coefficient in the system affects the direction of the wave propagation, patterns of the soliton interaction, distance and direction.

  1. Stress Wave Scattering: Friend or Enemy of Non Destructive Testing of Concrete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggelis, Dimitrios G.; Shiotani, Tomoki; Philippidis, Theodore P.; Polyzos, Demosthenes

    Cementitious materials are by definition inhomogeneous containing cement paste, sand, aggregates as well as air voids. Wave propagation in such a material is characterized by scattering phenomena. Damage in the form of micro or macro cracks certainly enhances scattering influence. Its most obvious manifestation is the velocity variation with frequency and excessive attenuation. The influence becomes stronger with increased mis-match of elastic properties of constituent materials and higher crack content. Therefore, in many cases of large concrete structures, field application of stress waves is hindered since attenuation makes the acquisition of reliable signals troublesome. However, measured wave parameters, combined with investigation with scattering theory can reveal much about the internal condition and supply information that cannot be obtained in any other way. The size and properties of the scatterers leave their signature on the dispersion and attenuation curves making thus the characterization more accurate in case of damage assessment, repair evaluation as well as composition inspection. In this paper, three indicative cases of scattering influence are presented. Namely, the interaction of actual distributed damage, as well as the repair material injected in an old concrete structure with the wave parameters. Other cases are the influence of light plastic inclusions in hardened mortar and the influence of sand and water content in the examination of fresh concrete. In all the above cases, scattering seems to complicate the propagation behavior but also offers the way for a more accurate characterization of the quality of the material.

  2. Accurate measurement of the time delay in the response of the LIGO gravitational wave detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Aso, Yoichi; Goetz, Evan; Kalmus, Peter; Matone, Luca; Márka, Szabolcs; Myers, Joshua; O’Reilly, Brian; Savage, Rick; Schwinberg, Paul; Siemens, Xavier; Sigg, Daniel; Smith, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    We present a method to precisely calibrate the time delay in a long baseline gravitational-wave interferometer. An accurate time stamp is crucial for data analysis of gravitational wave detectors, especially when performing coincidence and correlation analyses between multiple detectors. Our method uses an intensity-modulated radiation pressure force to actuate on the mirrors. The time delay is measured by comparing the phase of the signal at the actuation point with the phase of the recorded...

  3. TROTT computer program for two-dimensional stress wave propagation, volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, L.; Curran, D. R.

    1980-04-01

    TROTT is a Lagrangian finite-difference computer program for calculating two dimensional stress wave propagation through solid, porous, and composite materials. The stress waves may be caused by impact, detonation of an explosive, or a prescribed velocity. The calculational procedure is the standard leapfrog method of von Neumann and Richtmyer, using artificial viscosity to smooth shock fronts. Quadrilateral or triangular cells are used. The momentum relations are derived by treating the cells as finite elements. Axisymmetric or planar flow can be handled. The constitutive relations include the standard Mie-Gruneisen equation-of-state and elastic-plastic, work-hardening deviator stress relations. A polytropic gas and detonating flow relations are provided for explosives. Ductile and brittle fracture and shear banding are provided by nucleation and growth models. Porous materials can be represented by a cap plasticity model. A model for layered composites is also present. The code is constructed for easy insertion of additional material models. The number of extra variables required for each cell for a material model can be specified on an input card. This manual includes many sample problems, a derivation of the flow equations, and a discussion of material models.

  4. Attenuation compensation in least-squares reverse time migration using the visco-acoustic wave equation

    KAUST Repository

    Dutta, Gaurav

    2013-08-20

    Attenuation leads to distortion of amplitude and phase of seismic waves propagating inside the earth. Conventional acoustic and least-squares reverse time migration do not account for this distortion which leads to defocusing of migration images in highly attenuative geological environments. To account for this distortion, we propose to use the visco-acoustic wave equation for least-squares reverse time migration. Numerical tests on synthetic data show that least-squares reverse time migration with the visco-acoustic wave equation corrects for this distortion and produces images with better balanced amplitudes compared to the conventional approach. © 2013 SEG.

  5. Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of Impulsive Stress Waves Propagating from the Greater Trochanter of the Femur by a Sideways Fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarai, Takaaki; Tokumoto, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Fall accidents are a common cause of femoral fracture in the elderly. The greater trochanter of the femur is often subjected to impact loading by a sideways fall, and thus it is worth studying the impulsive stress waves propagating in the femur. In this study, the impulsive stress was analyzed by the dynamic finite element method using a 3-dimensional model of the femur, and the influence of the fall configuration on the stress was discussed. The stress was concentrated around the femoral neck during the propagation of the stress wave, and the tensile maximum principal stress changed into compressive minimum principle stress on the anterior and medial sides of the neck. On the other hand, the compressive minimum principal stress changed into tensile maximum principle stress on the lateral side of the neck. The largest maximum principal stress during the impact loading was always larger in the neck than in the impact region. The largest absolute value of the minimum principal stress was found in the neck or the impact region depending on the fall configuration. The largest absolute values of the maximum and minimum principal stress were nearly equal, indicating that the bone fracture due to the tensile stress may occur around the femoral neck.

  6. Effect of initial stress on Love waves in a piezoelectric structure carrying a functionally graded material layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zheng-Hua; Jin, Feng; Lu, Tianjian; Kishimoto, Kikuo; Hirose, Sohichi

    2010-01-01

    The effect of initial stress on the propagation behavior of Love waves in a piezoelectric half-space of polarized ceramics carrying a functionally graded material (FGM) layer is analytically investigated in this paper from the three-dimensional equations of linear piezoelectricity. The analytical solutions are obtained for the dispersion relations of Love wave propagating in this kind of structure with initial stress for both electrical open case and electrical short case, respectively. One numerical example is given to graphically illustrate the effect of initial stress on dispersive curve, phase velocity and electromechanical coupling factor of the Love wave propagation. The results reported here are meaningful for the design of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices with high performance.

  7. Application of the Time-Dependent Mild-Slope Equations for the Simulation of Wake Effects in the Lee of a Farm of Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beels, Charlotte; Troch, Peter; Visch, Kenneth De

    2010-01-01

    Time-dependent mild-slope equations have been extensively used to compute wave transformations near coastal and offshore structures for more than 20 years. Recently the wave absorption characteristics of a Wave Energy Converter (abbreviated as WEC) of the overtopping type have been implemented...

  8. Wavelet Transform Based Higher Order Statistical Analysis of Wind and Wave Time Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib Huseni, Gulamhusenwala; Balaji, Ramakrishnan

    2017-10-01

    Wind, blowing on the surface of the ocean, imparts the energy to generate the waves. Understanding the wind-wave interactions is essential for an oceanographer. This study involves higher order spectral analyses of wind speeds and significant wave height time histories, extracted from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast database at an offshore location off Mumbai coast, through continuous wavelet transform. The time histories were divided by the seasons; pre-monsoon, monsoon, post-monsoon and winter and the analysis were carried out to the individual data sets, to assess the effect of various seasons on the wind-wave interactions. The analysis revealed that the frequency coupling of wind speeds and wave heights of various seasons. The details of data, analysing technique and results are presented in this paper.

  9. A Gravitational Wave Pulsar Timing Backend for DSN Telescopes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop a state-of-the-art pulsar timing processor to be installed at the DSN to demonstrate precision pulsar timing capability along with a novel signal processing...

  10. Space-time extreme wind waves: Analysis and prediction of shape and height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvise, Benetazzo; Francesco, Barbariol; Filippo, Bergamasco; Sandro, Carniel; Mauro, Sclavo

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we present the analysis of the temporal profile and height of space-time (ST) extreme wind waves. Wave data were gathered from an observational ST sample of sea surface elevations collected during an active sea state, and they were examined to detect the highest waves (exceeding the rogue wave threshold) of specific 3D wave groups close to the apex of their development. Two different investigations are conducted. Firstly, local maximum elevations of the groups are examined within the framework of statistical models for ST extreme waves, and compared with observations and predictions of maxima derived by one-point time series of sea surface elevations. Secondly, the temporal profile near the maximum wave crests is analyzed and compared with the expectations of the linear and second-order nonlinear extension of the Quasi-Determinism (QD) theory. Our goal is to verify, with real sea data, to what extent, one can estimate the shape and the crest-to-trough height of near-focusing large 3D wave groups using the QD and ST extreme model results. From this study, it emerges that the elevations close to the crest apex are narrowly distributed around a mean profile, whilst a larger dispersion is observed away from the maximum elevation. Yet the QD model furnishes, on average, a fair prediction of the maximum wave heights, especially when nonlinearities are taken into account. Moreover, we discuss how the combination of ST extreme and QD model predictions allows establishing, for a given sea condition, the portrait of waves with very large crest height. Our results show that these theories have the potential to be implemented in a numerical spectral model for wave extreme prediction.

  11. Discretization of space and time in wave mechanics: the validity limit

    OpenAIRE

    Roatta, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Assuming that space and time can only have discrete values, it is shown that wave mechanics must necessarily have a specific applicability limit: in a discrete context, unlike in a continuous one, frequencies can not have arbitrarily high values.

  12. Comparison of shock wave rise time prediction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspet, Richard; Bass, Henry E.

    1990-01-01

    Two techniques for predicting sonic-boom rise times are described, and the values of the rise time (defined as the time required for the shock front to go from 10 percent to 90 percent of the maximum overpressure) predicted when using the two approaches are compared. The results are applied to the prediction of the rise time from two hypothetical supersonic transport aircraft. In both cases, the rise time predicted at the ground was much greater than that predicted for a conventional SST.

  13. Existence and Stability of Traveling Waves for Degenerate Reaction-Diffusion Equation with Time Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Jin, Chunhua; Mei, Ming; Yin, Jingxue

    2018-01-01

    This paper deals with the existence and stability of traveling wave solutions for a degenerate reaction-diffusion equation with time delay. The degeneracy of spatial diffusion together with the effect of time delay causes us the essential difficulty for the existence of the traveling waves and their stabilities. In order to treat this case, we first show the existence of smooth- and sharp-type traveling wave solutions in the case of c≥c^* for the degenerate reaction-diffusion equation without delay, where c^*>0 is the critical wave speed of smooth traveling waves. Then, as a small perturbation, we obtain the existence of the smooth non-critical traveling waves for the degenerate diffusion equation with small time delay τ >0 . Furthermore, we prove the global existence and uniqueness of C^{α ,β } -solution to the time-delayed degenerate reaction-diffusion equation via compactness analysis. Finally, by the weighted energy method, we prove that the smooth non-critical traveling wave is globally stable in the weighted L^1 -space. The exponential convergence rate is also derived.

  14. The Bloch wave operator: generalizations and applications: II. The time-dependent case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolicard, Georges [Observatoire de Besancon (UMR-CNRS 6091), Universite de Franche-Comte, 41 bis, Avenue de l' Observatoire, 25000 Besancon (France); Killingbeck, John P [Observatoire de Besancon (UMR-CNRS 6091), Universite de Franche-Comte, 41 bis, Avenue de l' Observatoire, 25000 Besancon (France); Mathematics Department, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX (United Kingdom)

    2003-10-10

    Part II of the review shows how the stationary Bloch wave operator of part I can be suitably modified to give a time-dependent wave operator. This operator makes it possible to use a relatively small active space in order to describe the dynamical processes which occur in quantum mechanical systems which have a time-dependent Hamiltonian. A close study is made of the links between the time-dependent and time-independent wave operators at the adiabatic limit; the analysis clarifies the way in which the wave operator formalism allows the time evolution of a system or a wave packet to be described in terms of a fast evolution inside the active space together with weak transitions out of this space which can be treated by perturbation methods. Two alternative wave operator equations of motion are derived and analysed. The first one is a non-linear differential equation in the usual Hilbert space; the second one is a differential equation in an extended Hilbert space with an extra time variable added and becomes equivalent to the usual Bloch equation when the Floquet Hamiltonian is taken in place of the ordinary Hamiltonian. A study is made of the close relationships between the time-dependent wave operator formalism, the Floquet theory and the (t, t') theory. Some original methods of solution of the two forms of wave operator equation are proposed and lead to new techniques of integration for the time-dependent Schroedinger equation (e.g., the generalized Green equation procedure). Mixed procedures involving both the time-independent and time-dependent wave operators are shown to be applicable to the internal eigenstate problem for large complex matrices. A detailed account is given of the description of inelastic and photoreactive processes by means of the time-dependent wave operator formalism, with particular attention to laser-molecule interactions. The emphasis is on projection operator techniques, with special attention being given to the method of selection

  15. Ebola outbreak in West Africa: real-time estimation and multiple-wave prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang-Sheng; Zhong, Luoyi

    2015-10-01

    Based on the reported data until 18 March 2015 and numerical fitting via a simple formula of cumulative case number, we provide real-time estimation on basic reproduction number, inflection point, peak time and final outbreak size of ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa. From our simulation, we conclude that the first wave has passed its inflection point and predict that a second epidemic wave may appear in the near future.

  16. Forced solitary Rossby waves under the influence of slowly varying topography with time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hong-Wei; Yin Bao-Shu; Yang De-Zhou; Xu Zhen-Hua

    2011-01-01

    By using a weakly nonlinear and perturbation method, the generalized inhomogeneous Korteweg—de Vries (KdV)—Burgers equation is derived, which governs the evolution of the amplitude of Rossby waves under the influence of dissipation and slowly varying topography with time. The analysis indicates that dissipation and slowly varying topography with time are important factors in causing variation in the mass and energy of solitary waves. (general)

  17. Dynamic acoustics for the STAR-100. [computer algorithms for time dependent sound waves in jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, A.; Turkel, E.

    1979-01-01

    An algorithm is described to compute time dependent acoustic waves in a jet. The method differs from previous methods in that no harmonic time dependence is assumed, thus permitting the study of nonharmonic acoustical behavior. Large grids are required to resolve the acoustic waves. Since the problem is nonstiff, explicit high order schemes can be used. These have been adapted to the STAR-100 with great efficiencies and permitted the efficient solution of problems which would not be feasible on a scalar machine.

  18. Time-Lapse Monitoring with 4D Seismic Coda Waves in Active, Passive and Ambient Noise Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, D. E.; Kamei, R.; Saygin, E.; Shragge, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth's subsurface is continuously changing, due to temporal variations in fluid flow, stress, temperature, geomechanics and geochemistry, for example. These physical changes occur at broad tectonic and earthquake scales, and also at very detailed near-surface and reservoir scales. Changes in the physical states of the earth cause time-varying changes in the physical properties of rocks and fluids, which can be monitored with natural or manmade seismic waves. Time-lapse (4D) seismic monitoring is important for applications related to natural and induced seismicity, hydrocarbon and groundwater reservoir depletion, CO2 sequestration etc. An exciting new research area involves moving beyond traditional methods in order to use the full complex time-lapse scattered wavefield (4D coda waves) for both manmade active-source 3D/4D seismic data, and also to use continuous recordings of natural-source passive seismic data, especially (micro) earthquakes and ocean ambient noise. This research involves full wave-equation approaches including waveform inversion (FWI), interferometry, Large N sensor arrays, "big data" information theory, and high performance supercomputing (HPC). I will present high-level concepts and recent data results that are quite spectacular and highly encouraging.

  19. Bulk elastic waves with unidirectional backscattering-immune topological states in a time-dependent superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinteck, N., E-mail: swinteck@email.arizona.edu; Matsuo, S.; Runge, K.; Lucas, P.; Deymier, P. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Vasseur, J. O. [Institut d' Electronique, de Micro-électronique et de Nanotechnologie, UMR CNRS 8520, Cité Scientifique, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2015-08-14

    Recent progress in electronic and electromagnetic topological insulators has led to the demonstration of one way propagation of electron and photon edge states and the possibility of immunity to backscattering by edge defects. Unfortunately, such topologically protected propagation of waves in the bulk of a material has not been observed. We show, in the case of sound/elastic waves, that bulk waves with unidirectional backscattering-immune topological states can be observed in a time-dependent elastic superlattice. The superlattice is realized via spatial and temporal modulation of the stiffness of an elastic material. Bulk elastic waves in this superlattice are supported by a manifold in momentum space with the topology of a single twist Möbius strip. Our results demonstrate the possibility of attaining one way transport and immunity to scattering of bulk elastic waves.

  20. On shallow water waves in a medium with time-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy I. Abdel-Gawad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we studied the progression of shallow water waves relevant to the variable coefficient Korteweg–de Vries (vcKdV equation. We investigated two kinds of cases: when the dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients are proportional, and when they are not linearly dependent. In the first case, it was shown that the progressive waves have some geometric structures as in the case of KdV equation with constant coefficients but the waves travel with time dependent speed. In the second case, the wave structure is maintained when the nonlinearity balances the dispersion. Otherwise, water waves collapse. The objectives of the study are to find a wide class of exact solutions by using the extended unified method and to present a new algorithm for treating the coupled nonlinear PDE’s.

  1. The Analysis of Stress Waves at a Junction of Beam and String

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the bridge engineering, there are some problems about the dynamics that traditional theory cannot solve. So, the theory about stress waves is introduced to solve the related problems. This is a new attempt that the mechanic theory is applied to practical engineering. The stress wave at a junction of the structure composed of beams and strings is investigated in this paper. The structure is studied because the existence of a soft rope makes the transmission of the force in the bridge structure different from the traditional theory, and it is the basis for further research. The equilibrium equations of the displacement and the internal force are built based on the hypothesis. The fast Fourier transform (FFT numerical algorithm is used to express an incident pulse of arbitrary shape. The analytical solutions are substantiated by comparing with the finite element programs. The conclusion that if the cross section of the string is relatively small, then the energy density of the structure is relatively large, which is disadvantageous to the structure, can be obtained from this paper.

  2. Guided ultrasonic waves for non-destructive monitoring of the stress levels in prestressed steel strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, S; Bourse, G

    2009-02-01

    The safety of prestressed civil structures such as bridges, dams, nuclear power plants, etc. directly involves the security of both environment and users. Health monitoring of the tensioning components, such as strands, tendons, bars, anchorage bolts, etc. is an important research topic and a challenging task bringing together the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and civil engineering communities. This paper deals with a guided ultrasonic wave procedure for monitoring the stress levels in seven-wire steel strands (15.7 mm in diameter). The mechanical and geometrical characteristics of the prestressed strands were taken into account for optimizing the measurement configuration and then the choice of the guided ultrasonic mode at a suitable frequency. Simplified acoustoelastic formulations were derived from the acoustoelasticity theory according to either calibration test or in situ measurement. The results from acoustoelastic measurements on the seven-wire steel strands are presented and discussed in the case of calibration tests and industrially prestressed strands. They show the potential and the suitability of the proposed guided wave method for evaluating the stress levels in the tested seven-wire steel strands.

  3. Real time device for biosensing: design of a bacteriophage model using love acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarin, O; Comeau, S; Déjous, C; Moynet, D; Rebière, D; Bezian, J; Pistré, J

    2003-05-01

    Love wave sensors (ST-cut quartz substrate with interdigital transducers, SiO(2) guiding layer and sensitive coating) have been receiving a great deal of attention for a few years. Indeed, the wave coupled in a guiding layer confers a high gravimetric sensitivity and the shear horizontal (SH) polarization allows to work in liquid media. In this paper, an analytical method is proposed to calculate the Love wave phase velocity and the gravimetric sensitivity for a complete multilayer structure. This allows us to optimize the Love wave devices design in order to improve their gravimetric sensitivity in liquid media. As a model for virus or bacteria detection in liquids (drinking or bathing water, food em leader ) we design a model using M13 bacteriophage. The first step is the anti-M13 (AM13) monoclonal antibody grafting, on the device surface (SiO(2)). The second step is an immunoreaction in between the M13 bacteriophage and the AM13 antibody. The Love wave device allows to detect in real time the graft of the AM13 sensitive coating, as well as the immobilization of the M13 bacteriophages. With a pH change, the M13 bacteriophages can be removed from the sensor surface, in order to be numerated as plaque forming unit (pfu). Results on the sensitivity of Love waves are compared with similar immunological works with bulk acoustic wave devices, and demonstrate the high potentialities of Love waves sensors.

  4. Research on Formation Mechanism of Dynamic Response and Residual Stress of Sheet Metal Induced by Laser Shock Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Aixin; Cao, Yupeng; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Zhengang

    2018-01-01

    In order to reveal the quantitative control of the residual stress on the surface of metal materials, the relevant theoretical and experimental studies were carried out to investigate the dynamic response of metal thin plates and the formation mechanism of residual stress induced by laser shock wave. In this paper, the latest research trends on the surface residual stress of laser shock processing technology were elaborated. The main progress of laser shock wave propagation mechanism and dynamic response, laser shock, and surface residual stress were discussed. It is pointed out that the multi-scale characterization of laser and material, surface residual stress and microstructure change is a new hotspot in laser shock strengthening technology.

  5. The effect of inhomogeneous initial stress on Love wave propagation in layered magneto-electro-elastic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Shen, Y P; Du, J K

    2008-01-01

    The effect of inhomogeneous initial stress on Love wave propagation in layered magneto-electro-elastic structures is investigated in this paper. The coupled magneto-electro-elastic field equations are solved by adopting the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB) approximate approach. Then the phase velocity can be calculated by applying boundary and continuity conditions. A specific example of a structure consisting of a CoFe 2 O 4 layer and a BaTiO 3 substrate is used to illustrate the influence of inhomogeneous initial stress on the phase velocity, corresponding coupled magneto-electric factor and stress fields. The different influence between constant initial stress and inhomogeneous initial stress is discussed and the results are expected to be helpful for the preparation and application of Love wave sensors

  6. Influence of timing algorithm on brachialankle pulse wave velocity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Li, Ke; Ren, Hongwei; Li, Peng; Wang, Xinpei; Liu, Changchun

    2014-01-01

    The baPWV measurement is a non-invasive and convenient technique in an assessment of arterial stiffness. Despite its widespread application, the influence of different timing algorithms is still unclear. The present study was conducted to investigate the influence of six timing algorithms (MIN, MAX, D1, D2, MDP and INS) on the baPWV measurement and to evaluate the performance of them. Forty-five CAD patients and fifty-five healthy subjects were recruited in this study. A PVR acquisition apparatus was built up for baPWV measurement. The baPWV and other related parameters were calculated separately by the six timing algorithms. The influence and performance of the six algorithms was analyzed. The six timing algorithms generate significantly different baPWV values (left: F=29.036, Pvalue (≥ 18.6%) than the other methods, while the INS has the lowest CV value (≤ 2.7%). On the performance of classification, the INS produces the highest AUC values (left: 0.854; right: 0.872). The MIN and D2 also have a passable performance (AUC > 0.8). The choice of timing algorithm affects baPWV values and the quality of measurement. The INS method is recommended for baPWV measurement.

  7. Time-of-arrival analysis applied to ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. C.; Fujimaru, S.

    2012-12-01

    Time-of-arrival (TOA) analysis is applied to observations performed during ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) HF transmitter in Gakona, Alaska. In 2012, a variety of ELF/VLF wave generation techniques were employed to identify the dominant source altitude for each case. Observations were performed for beat-wave modulation, AM modulation, STF modulation, ICD modulation, and cubic frequency modulation, among others. For each of these cases, we identify the dominant ELF/VLF source altitude and compare the experimental results with theoretical HF heating predictions.

  8. Electron and VLF travel time differences for wave-particle interactions at L=4: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rash, J.P.S.; Scourfield, M.W.J.; Dougherty, M.K.

    1984-01-01

    The cyclotron resonance or gyroresonance interaction has been widely invoked as a generation mechanism for discrete VLF emissions and plasmaspheric hiss. This interaction involves electrons and VLF waves travelling in opposite directions along a geomagnetic field line. We examine, for an interaction region in the equatorial plane at L=4, the energy of the resonant electrons as a function of VLF wave frequency and ambient equatorial electron density. Then for two different spatial configurations of the interaction and two standard plasma distribution models we examine the difference in travel times to a ground-based observer in the Southern hemisphere for the electrons and waves taking part in the interaction. This difference in travel times is shown as a function of VLF wave frequency and equatorial electron density. The results, and their significance for observations of auroral electrons and VLF at Sanae, Antarctica, are discussed and compared with similar results for the Cerenkov interaction discussed in an earlier paper

  9. Principal Time Management Skills: Explaining Patterns in Principals' Time Use, Job Stress, and Perceived Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, Jason A.; Loeb, Susanna; Mitani, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Time demands faced by school principals make principals' work increasingly difficult. Research outside education suggests that effective time management skills may help principals meet job demands, reduce job stress, and improve their performance. The purpose of this paper is to investigate these hypotheses. Design/methodology/approach:…

  10. Energy decay of a variable-coefficient wave equation with nonlinear time-dependent localized damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieqiong Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the energy decay for the Cauchy problem of the wave equation with nonlinear time-dependent and space-dependent damping. The damping is localized in a bounded domain and near infinity, and the principal part of the wave equation has a variable-coefficient. We apply the multiplier method for variable-coefficient equations, and obtain an energy decay that depends on the property of the coefficient of the damping term.

  11. The impact of a stochastic gravitational-wave background on pulsar timing parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J. A.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Verbiest, J. P. W.

    2011-11-01

    Gravitational waves are predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity as well as other theories of gravity. The rotational stability of the fastest pulsars means that timing of an array of these objects can be used to detect and investigate gravitational waves. Simultaneously, however, pulsar timing is used to estimate spin period, period derivative, astrometric and binary parameters. Here we calculate the effects that a stochastic background of gravitational waves has on pulsar timing parameters through the use of simulations and data from the millisecond pulsars PSR J0437-4715 and PSR J1713+0747. We show that the reported timing uncertainties become underestimated with increasing background amplitude by up to a factor of ˜10 for a stochastic gravitational-wave background amplitude of A= 5 × 10-15, where A is the amplitude of the characteristic strain spectrum at one-year gravitational wave periods. We find evidence for prominent low-frequency spectral leakage in simulated data sets including a stochastic gravitational-wave background. We use these simulations along with independent very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements of parallax to set a 2σ upper limit of A≤ 9.1 × 10-14. We find that different supermassive black hole assembly scenarios do not have a significant effect on the calculated upper limits. We also test the effects that ultralow-frequency (10-12 to 10-9 Hz) gravitational waves have on binary pulsar parameter measurements and find that the corruption of these parameters is less than those due to 10-9 to 10-7 Hz gravitational waves.

  12. Asymptotic behaviors of solutions for viscoelastic wave equation with space-time dependent damping term

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we consider a viscoelastic wave equation with an absorbing term and space-time dependent damping term. Based on the weighted energy method, and by assuming that the kernel decaying exponentially, we obtain the L2 decay rates of the solutions. More precisely, we show that the decay rates are the same as those obtained in Lin et al. (2010) [15] for the semilinear wave equation with absorption term. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  13. Determination of the thermal stress wave propagation in orthotropic hollow cylinder based on classical theory of thermoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahani, Amir Reza; Sharifi Torki, Hamid

    2018-01-01

    The thermoelasticity problem in a thick-walled orthotropic hollow cylinder is solved analytically using finite Hankel transform and Laplace transform. Time-dependent thermal and mechanical boundary conditions are applied on the inner and the outer surfaces of the cylinder. For solving the energy equation, the temperature itself is considered as boundary condition to be applied on both the inner and the outer surfaces of the orthotropic cylinder. Two different cases are assumed for solving the equation of motion: traction-traction problem (tractions are prescribed on both the inner and the outer surfaces) and traction-displacement (traction is prescribed on the inner surface and displacement is prescribed on the outer surface of the hollow orthotropic cylinder). Due to considering uncoupled theory, after obtaining temperature distribution, the dynamical structural problem is solved and closed-form relations are derived for radial displacement, radial and hoop stress. As a case study, exponentially decaying temperature with respect to time is prescribed on the inner surface of the cylinder and the temperature of the outer surface is considered to be zero. Owing to solving dynamical problem, the stress wave propagation and its reflections were observed after plotting the results in both cases.

  14. Electromagnetic time reversal focusing of near field waves in metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabalko, Matthew J.; Sample, Alanson P.

    2016-12-01

    Precise control of electromagnetic energy on a deeply subwavelength scale in the near field regime is a fundamentally challenging problem. In this letter we demonstrate the selective focusing of electromagnetic energy via the electromagnetic time reversal in the near field of a metamaterial. Our analysis begins with fundamental mathematics, and then is extended to the experimental realm where focusing in space and time of the magnetic fields in the near field of a 1-Dimensional metamaterial is shown. Under time reversal focusing, peak instantaneous fields at receiver locations are at minimum ˜200% greater than other receivers. We then leverage the strong selective focusing capabilities of the system to show individual and selective powering of light emitting diodes connected to coil receivers placed in the near field of the metamaterial. Our results show the possibility of improving display technologies, near field imaging systems, increasing channel capacity of near field communication systems, and obtaining a greater control of energy delivery in wireless power transfer systems.

  15. Full-Wave Analysis of Traveling-Wave Field-Effect Transistors Using Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Narahara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear transmission lines, which define transmission lines periodically loaded with nonlinear devices such as varactors, diodes, and transistors, are modeled in the framework of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD method. Originally, some root-finding routine is needed to evaluate the contributions of nonlinear device currents appropriately to the temporally advanced electrical fields. Arbitrary nonlinear transmission lines contain large amount of nonlinear devices; therefore, it costs too much time to complete calculations. To reduce the calculation time, we recently developed a simple model of diodes to eliminate root-finding routines in an FDTD solver. Approximating the diode current-voltage relation by a piecewise-linear function, an extended Ampere's law is solved in a closed form for the time-advanced electrical fields. In this paper, we newly develop an FDTD model of field-effect transistors (FETs, together with several numerical examples that demonstrate pulse-shortening phenomena in a traveling-wave FET.

  16. Real-time fracture monitoring in Engineered Geothermal Systems with seismic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jose A. Rial; Jonathan Lees

    2009-03-31

    As proposed, the main effort in this project is the development of software capable of performing real-time monitoring of micro-seismic activity recorded by an array of sensors deployed around an EGS. The main milestones are defined by the development of software to perform the following tasks: • Real-time micro-earthquake detection and location • Real-time detection of shear-wave splitting • Delayed-time inversion of shear-wave splitting These algorithms, which are discussed in detail in this report, make possible the automatic and real-time monitoring of subsurface fracture systems in geothermal fields from data collected by an array of seismic sensors. Shear wave splitting (SWS) is parameterized in terms of the polarization of the fast shear wave and the time delay between the fast and slow shear waves, which are automatically measured and stored. The measured parameters are then combined with previously measured SWS parameters at the same station and used to invert for the orientation (strike and dip) and intensity of cracks under that station. In addition, this grant allowed the collection of seismic data from several geothermal regions in the US (Coso) and Iceland (Hengill) to use in the development and testing of the software.

  17. Pressure-induced forces and shear stresses on rubble mound breakwater armour layers in regular waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne; Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results from an experimental investigation of the pressure-induced forces in the core material below the main armour layer and shear stresses on the armour layer for a porous breakwater structure. Two parallel experiments were performed which both involved pore pressure...... measurements in the core material: (1) core material with an idealized armour layer made out of spherical objects that also allowed for detailed velocity measurements between and above the armour, and (2) core material with real rock armour stones. The same core material was applied through the entire...... and turbulence measurements showed that the large outward directed pressure gradients in general coincide, both in time and space, with the maximum bed-shear stresses on the armour layer based on the Reynolds-stresses. The bed-shear stresses were found to result in a Shields parameter in the same order...

  18. Pn seismic wave travel time at the Semipalatinsk Test Site - Borovoe seismic station trace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, V.A.; Kaazik, P.B.; Ovchinnikov, V.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper preparation involved 160 explosions at the Degelen Site conducted in 1961-1989 and 89 explosions at the Balapan Site conducted in 1968-1989. Pn wave travel time was tied to the sea level in accordance with velocity characteristics of the explosion hypocenter medium; and to average epicentral distance for every site basing on their local travel time curves of Pn wave relative to Borovoe station. Maximum amplitude of mean-year travel times variations is 0.3-0.5 s as at the Nevada Test Site - Borovoe trace and Mirniy (Antarctica). However, the linear trend in contrast to previous traces has negative sign (0.08 s for Degelen and 0.1 s for Balapan). Thus, Pn wave velocity increases with calendar time. (author)

  19. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...

  20. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR SOLVING THE MULTI-TERM TIME-FRACTIONAL WAVE-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, F.; Meerschaert, M.M.; McGough, R.J.; Zhuang, P.; Liu, Q.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the multi-term time-fractional wave-diffusion equations are considered. The multi-term time fractional derivatives are defined in the Caputo sense, whose orders belong to the intervals [0,1], [1,2), [0,2), [0,3), [2,3) and [2,4), respectively. Some computationally effective numerical methods are proposed for simulating the multi-term time-fractional wave-diffusion equations. The numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of theoretical analysis. These methods and technique...

  1. Dissipation of Impact Stress Waves within the Artificial Blasting Damage Zone in the Surrounding Rocks of Deep Roadway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Ning

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial explosions are commonly used to prevent rockburst in deep roadways. However, the dissipation of the impact stress wave within the artificial blasting damage zone (ABDZ of the rocks surrounding a deep roadway has not yet been clarified. The surrounding rocks were divided into the elastic zone, blasting damage zone, plastic zone, and anchorage zone in this research. Meanwhile, the ABDZ was divided into the pulverizing area, fractured area, and cracked area from the inside out. Besides, the model of the normal incidence of the impact stress waves in the ABDZ was established; the attenuation coefficient of the amplitude of the impact stress waves was obtained after it passed through the intact rock mass, and ABDZ, to the anchorage zone. In addition, a numerical simulation was used to study the dynamic response of the vertical stress and impact-induced vibration energy in the surrounding rocks. By doing so, the dissipation of the impact stress waves within the ABDZ of the surrounding rocks was revealed. As demonstrated in the field application, the establishment of the ABDZ in the surrounding rocks reduced the effect of the impact-induced vibration energy on the anchorage support system of the roadway.

  2. Stabilization of the Wave Equation with Boundary Time-Varying Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the stabilization of the wave equation with variable coefficients in a bounded domain and a time-varying delay term in the time-varying, weakly nonlinear boundary feedbacks. By the Riemannian geometry methods and a suitable assumption of nonlinearity, we obtain the uniform decay of the energy of the closed loop system.

  3. On scattering of scalar waves in static space-times, particularly Schwarzschild

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beig, R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper aims at laying foundations of a rigorous scattering theory for scalar waves in a static space-time. The treatment includes geometries which can be thought of as representing the exterior of a black hole. Schwarzschild space-time, as a particular example, is studied in more detail. (Auth.)

  4. Monostable traveling waves for a time-periodic and delayed nonlocal reaction-diffusion equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Panxiao; Wu, Shi-Liang

    2018-04-01

    This paper is concerned with a time-periodic and delayed nonlocal reaction-diffusion population model with monostable nonlinearity. Under quasi-monotone or non-quasi-monotone assumptions, it is known that there exists a critical wave speed c_*>0 such that a periodic traveling wave exists if and only if the wave speed is above c_*. In this paper, we first prove the uniqueness of non-critical periodic traveling waves regardless of whether the model is quasi-monotone or not. Further, in the quasi-monotone case, we establish the exponential stability of non-critical periodic traveling fronts. Finally, we illustrate the main results by discussing two types of death and birth functions arising from population biology.

  5. A study of the stress wave factor technique for evaluation of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Kiernan, M. T.; Grosskopf, P. P.

    1989-01-01

    The acousto-ultrasonic approach for nondestructive evaluation provides a measurement procedure for quantifying the integrated effect of globally distributed damage characteristic of fiber reinforced composite materials. The evaluation procedure provides a stress wave factor that correlates closely with several material performance parameters. The procedure was investigated for a variety of materials including advanced composites, hybrid structure bonds, adhesive bonds, wood products, and wire rope. The research program focused primarily on development of fundamental understanding and applications advancements of acousto-ultrasonics for materials characterization. This involves characterization of materials for which detection, location, and identification of imperfections cannot at present be analyzed satisfactorily with mechanical performance prediction models. In addition to presenting definitive studies on application potentials, the understanding of the acousto-ultrasonic method as applied to advanced composites is reviewed.

  6. Bilinear Time-frequency Analysis for Lamb Wave Signal Detected by Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenxiu; Liu, Guoqiang; Xia, Hui; Xia, Zhengwu

    2018-03-01

    Accurate acquisition of the detection signal travel time plays a very important role in cross-hole tomography. The experimental platform of aluminum plate under the perpendicular magnetic field is established and the bilinear time-frequency analysis methods, Wigner-Ville Distribution (WVD) and the pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution (PWVD), are applied to analyse the Lamb wave signals detected by electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT). By extracting the same frequency component of the time-frequency spectrum as the excitation frequency, the travel time information can be obtained. In comparison with traditional linear time-frequency analysis method such as short-time Fourier transform (STFT), the bilinear time-frequency analysis method PWVD is more appropriate in extracting travel time and recognizing patterns of Lamb wave.

  7. Adolescents' sleep in low-stress and high-stress (exam) times: a prospective quasi-experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewald, Julia F; Meijer, Anne Marie; Oort, Frans J; Kerkhof, Gerard A; Bögels, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    This prospective quasi-experiment (N = 175; mean age = 15.14 years) investigates changes in adolescents' sleep from low-stress (regular school week) to high-stress times (exam week), and examines the (moderating) role of chronic sleep reduction, baseline stress, and gender. Sleep was monitored over three consecutive weeks using actigraphy. Adolescents' sleep was more fragmented during the high-stress time than during the low-stress time, meaning that individuals slept more restless during stressful times. However, sleep efficiency, total sleep time, and sleep onset latency remained stable throughout the three consecutive weeks. High chronic sleep reduction was related to later bedtimes, later sleep start times, later sleep end times, later getting up times, and more time spent in bed. Furthermore, low chronic sleep reduction and high baseline stress levels were related to more fragmented sleep during stressful times. This study shows that stressful times can have negative effects on adolescents' sleep fragmentation, especially for adolescents with low chronic sleep reduction or high baseline stress levels.

  8. Complex time paths for semiclassical wave packet propagation with complex trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jakob; Kay, Kenneth G

    2014-08-07

    The use of complex-valued trajectories in semiclassical wave packet methods can lead to problems that prevent calculation of the wave function in certain regions of the configuration space. We investigate this so-called bald spot problem in the context of generalized Gaussian wave packet dynamics. The analysis shows that the bald spot phenomenon is essentially due to the complex nature of the initial conditions for the trajectories. It is, therefore, expected to be a general feature of several semiclassical methods that rely on trajectories with such initial conditions. A bald region is created when a trajectory, needed to calculate the wave function at a given time, reaches a singularity of the potential energy function in the complex plane at an earlier, real time. This corresponds to passage of a branch point singularity across the real axis of the complex time plane. The missing portions of the wave function can be obtained by deforming the time path for the integration of the equations of motion into the complex plane so that the singularity is circumvented. We present examples of bald spots, singularity times, and suitable complex time paths for one-dimensional barrier transmission in the Eckart and Gaussian systems. Although the bald regions for the Eckart system are often localized, they are found to be semi-infinite for the Gaussian system. For the case of deep tunneling, the bald regions for both systems may encompass the entire portion of space occupied by the transmitted wave packet. Thus, the use of complex time paths becomes essential for a treatment of barrier tunneling.

  9. Stress and Time Management Settings in University of Maroua, Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph BESONG BESONG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to examine stress and time in educational management in Maroua University. These two phenomena are profound in educational issues in Cameroon due to the complex administration or management. Education comprised of diversity of activities ranging from administration, discipline, teaching, evaluation and learning. Each of these activities requires time schedule to avoid stress in the face of pressure. Administration requires planning, organizing, controlling, commanding, coordinating, reporting and budgeting. Each of these managing variables requires time, just as discipline, teaching, evaluation and learning should need. The situation may be affected by higher authority interference and cause a rush thus affecting every schedule in the system on this note, it is necessary that every administrator on management cadre should develop a list of activities such as admissions, examinations, sports, vacations and other ceremonies which requires his attention on daily, weekly, or monthly bases and there after allocate in a tentative fashion the most appropriate times for dealing with such activities. Some profile recommendations are: strict adhering to schedules to avoid overlapping or prolongation to other programs; the schedules should be pasted or placed at a convenient point in the office for reference to avoid forgetfulness: as an administrator, time should be allocated for meeting or consulting with visitors and subordinates; he should delegate functions to his accredited subordinates to crave chance or time for essential duty; he should review the school or organization programs on daily, weekly or monthly bases the degree to which his administration goals have been attained and he (i.e. administrator should crave time for rest i.e. holidays, relaxation and various forms of physical exercises to revitalizes the body for subsequent activities. The paper recommends planning which is vital in management to avoid time waste

  10. Increased sensitivity of prolonged P-wave during exercise stress test in detection of angiographically documented coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wsol, Agnieszka; Wydra, Wioletta; Chmielewski, Marek; Swiatowiec, Andrzej; Kuch, Marek

    2017-01-01

    A retrospective study was designed to investigate P-wave duration changes in exercise stress test (EST) for the prediction of angiographically documented substantial coronary artery disease (CAD). We analyzed 265 cases of patients, who underwent EST and subsequently coronary angiography. Analysis of P-wave duration was performed in leads II, V5 at rest, and in the recovery period. The sensitivity and specificity for the isolated ST-segment depression were only 31% and 76%, respectively. The combination of ST-depression with other exercise-induced clinical and electrocardio-graphic abnormalities (chest pain, ventricular arrhythmia, hypotension, left bundle branch block) was characterized by 41% sensitivity and 69% specificity. The combination of abnormal recovery P-wave duration (≥ 120 ms) with ST-depression and other exercise-induced abnormalities had 83% sensitivity but only 20% specificity. Combined analysis of increased delta P-wave duration, ST-depression and other exercise-induced abnormalities had 69% sensitivity and 42% specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of the increase in delta P-wave duration for left CAD was 69% and 47%, respectively, and for 3-vessel CAD 70% and 50%, respectively. The presence of arterial hypertension negatively influenced the prog-nostic value of P-wave changes in the stress test. The results of the study show that an addition of P-wave duration changes assessment to ST-depression analysis and other exercise-induced abnormalities increase sensitivity of EST, especially for left CAD and 3-vessel coronary disease. We have also provided evidence for the negative influence of the presence of arterial hypertension on the predictive value of P-wave changes in the stress test. (Cardiol J 2017; 24, 2: 159-166).

  11. Time-dependent wave-packet description of dissociative electron attachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gertitschke, P.L.; Domcke, W.

    1993-01-01

    A time-dependent description of the dissociative-attachment process is formulated within the framework of the projection-operator formalism of scattering theory. A generally applicable computational scheme for the solution of the resulting integro-differential equation of motion is developed. The concepts and computational techniques are illustrated for a model of a d-wave shape resonance as well as for the p-wave 2 Σ u + shape resonance in electron-H 2 collisions. It is shown that the time-dependent wave-packet picture yields qualitative insight into the dynamics of the dissociative-attachment reaction. The origin of the complete failure of the local-complex-potential approximation for the 2 Σ u + resonance in e+H 2 becomes apparent in the time-dependent picture

  12. Time-domain comparisons of power law attenuation in causal and noncausal time-fractional wave equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; McGough, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The attenuation of ultrasound propagating in human tissue follows a power law with respect to frequency that is modeled by several different causal and noncausal fractional partial differential equations. To demonstrate some of the similarities and differences that are observed in three related time-fractional partial differential equations, time-domain Green's functions are calculated numerically for the power law wave equation, the Szabo wave equation, and for the Caputo wave equation. These Green's functions are evaluated for water with a power law exponent of y = 2, breast with a power law exponent of y = 1.5, and liver with a power law exponent of y = 1.139. Simulation results show that the noncausal features of the numerically calculated time-domain response are only evident very close to the source and that these causal and noncausal time-domain Green's functions converge to the same result away from the source. When noncausal time-domain Green's functions are convolved with a short pulse, no evidence of noncausal behavior remains in the time-domain, which suggests that these causal and noncausal time-fractional models are equally effective for these numerical calculations. PMID:27250193

  13. Stress- and Structure-Induced Anisotropy in Southern California From Two Decades of Shear Wave Splitting Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zefeng; Peng, Zhigang

    2017-10-01

    We measure shear wave splitting (SWS) parameters (i.e., fast direction and delay time) using 330,000 local earthquakes recorded by more than 400 stations of the Southern California Seismic Network (1995-2014). The resulting 232,000 SWS measurements (90,000 high-quality ones) provide a uniform and comprehensive database of local SWS measurements in Southern California. The fast directions at many stations are consistent with regional maximum compressional stress σHmax. However, several regions show clear deviations from the σHmax directions. These include linear sections along the San Andreas Fault and the Santa Ynez Fault, geological blocks NW to the Los Angeles Basin, regions around the San Jacinto Fault, the Peninsular Ranges near San Diego, and the Coso volcanic field. These complex patterns show that regional stresses and active faults cannot adequately explain the upper crustal anisotropy in Southern California. Other types of local structures, such as local rock types or tectonic features, also play significant roles.

  14. Characterizing Global Flood Wave Travel Times to Optimize the Utility of Near Real-Time Satellite Remote Sensing Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, G. H.; David, C. H.; Andreadis, K. M.; Emery, C. M.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2017-12-01

    Earth observing satellites provide valuable near real-time (NRT) information about flood occurrence and magnitude worldwide. This NRT information can be used in early flood warning systems and other flood management applications to save lives and mitigate flood damage. However, these NRT products are only useful to early flood warning systems if they are quickly made available, with sufficient time for flood mitigation actions to be implemented. More specifically, NRT data latency, or the time period between the satellite observation and when the user has access to the information, must be less than the time it takes a flood to travel from the flood observation location to a given downstream point of interest. Yet the paradigm that "lower latency is always better" may not necessarily hold true in river systems due to tradeoffs between data latency and data quality. Further, the existence of statistical breaks in the global distribution of flood wave travel time (i.e. a jagged statistical distribution) would represent preferable latencies for river-observation NRT remote sensing products. Here we present a global analysis of flood wave velocity (i.e. flow celerity) and travel time. We apply a simple kinematic wave model to a global hydrography dataset and calculate flow wave celerity and travel time during bankfull flow conditions. Bankfull flow corresponds to the condition of maximum celerity and thus we present the "worst-case scenario" minimum flow wave travel time. We conduct a similar analysis with respect to the time it takes flood waves to reach the next downstream city, as well as the next downstream reservoir. Finally, we conduct these same analyses, but with regards to the technical capabilities of the planned Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission, which is anticipated to provide waterbody elevation and extent measurements at an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. We validate these results with discharge records from paired

  15. Extension of a spectral time-stepping domain decomposition method for dispersive and dissipative wave propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botts, Jonathan; Savioja, Lauri

    2015-04-01

    For time-domain modeling based on the acoustic wave equation, spectral methods have recently demonstrated promise. This letter presents an extension of a spectral domain decomposition approach, previously used to solve the lossless linear wave equation, which accommodates frequency-dependent atmospheric attenuation and assignment of arbitrary dispersion relations. Frequency-dependence is straightforward to assign when time-stepping is done in the spectral domain, so combined losses from molecular relaxation, thermal conductivity, and viscosity can be approximated with little extra computation or storage. A mode update free from numerical dispersion is derived, and the model is confirmed with a numerical experiment.

  16. Global periodic attractor for strongly damped wave equations with time-periodic driving force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongyan; Zhou Shengfan; Yin Fuqi

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the existence of a global periodic attractor for a strongly damped nonlinear wave equation with time-periodic driving force under homogeneous Dirichlet boundary condition. It is proved that in certain parameter region, for arbitrary time-periodic driving force, the system has a unique periodic solution attracting any bounded set exponentially. This implies that the system behaves exactly as a one-dimensional system. We mention, in particular, that the obtained result can be used to prove the existence of global periodic attractor of the usual damped and driven wave equations

  17. Quantum stress tensor in Schwarzschild space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, K.W.; Candelas, P.

    1984-01-01

    The vacuum expectation value of the stress-energy tensor for the Hartle-Hawking state in Schwartzschild space-time has been calculated for the conformal scalar field. separates naturally into the sum of two terms. The first coincides with an approximate expression suggested by Page. The second term is a ''remainder'' that may be evaluated numerically. The total expression is in good qualitative agreement with Page's approximation. These results are at variance with earlier results given by Fawcett whose error is explained

  18. Variation of Time Domain Failure Probabilities of Jack-up with Wave Return Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Ahmad; Harahap, Indra S. H.; Ali, Montassir Osman Ahmed

    2018-04-01

    This study evaluated failure probabilities of jack up units on the framework of time dependent reliability analysis using uncertainty from different sea states representing different return period of the design wave. Surface elevation for each sea state was represented by Karhunen-Loeve expansion method using the eigenfunctions of prolate spheroidal wave functions in order to obtain the wave load. The stochastic wave load was propagated on a simplified jack up model developed in commercial software to obtain the structural response due to the wave loading. Analysis of the stochastic response to determine the failure probability in excessive deck displacement in the framework of time dependent reliability analysis was performed by developing Matlab codes in a personal computer. Results from the study indicated that the failure probability increases with increase in the severity of the sea state representing a longer return period. Although the results obtained are in agreement with the results of a study of similar jack up model using time independent method at higher values of maximum allowable deck displacement, it is in contrast at lower values of the criteria where the study reported that failure probability decreases with increase in the severity of the sea state.

  19. Off-Time Pubertal Timing Predicts Physiological Reactivity to Postpuberty Interpersonal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Anne Emilie; Powers, Sally I.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated associations between retrospectively assessed timing of pubertal development, interpersonal interactions, and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity to an interpersonal stress task in 110 young adult women. Participants provided salivary cortisol samples at points prior and subsequent to a video-taped conflict discussion…

  20. Time-resolved PIV measurements of the atmospheric boundary layer over wind-driven surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markfort, Corey; Stegmeir, Matt

    2017-11-01

    Complex interactions at the air-water interface result in two-way coupling between wind-driven surface waves and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Turbulence generated at the surface plays an important role in aquatic ecology and biogeochemistry, exchange of gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide, and it is important for the transfer of energy and controlling evaporation. Energy transferred from the ABL promotes the generation and maintenance of waves. A fraction of the energy is transferred to the surface mixed layer through the generation of turbulence. Energy is also transferred back to the ABL by waves. There is a need to quantify the details of the coupled boundary layers of the air-water system to better understand how turbulence plays a role in the interactions. We employ time-resolved PIV to measure the detailed structure of the air and water boundary layers under varying wind and wave conditions in the newly developed IIHR Boundary-Layer Wind-Wave Tunnel. The facility combines a 30-m long recirculating water channel with an open-return boundary layer wind tunnel. A thick turbulent boundary layer is developed in the 1 m high air channel, over the water surface, allowing for the study of boundary layer turbulence interacting with a wind-driven wave field.

  1. Analysis and Numerical Simulation on the Reduction Effect of Stress Waves Caused by Water Jet Slotting Near Blasting Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengfeng Su

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most serious “side effects” of blast excavation, blast-induced vibration must be controlled for existing buildings and human beings. This paper proposes a method for blast-induced vibration reduction with water jet assistance according to the cutting characters of low-noised, environment-friendly water jet. The mechanism of vibration-isolation with water jet assistance was analyzed, and the stress wave energy attenuation models were established based on blasting theory and stress wave theory. Influence law on shock wave attenuation by vibration-isolation slot was studied by numerical simulation. Simulation results agree with the theoretical analysis roughly. The results of this study put forward a method for blast-induced vibration near blasting source and provide a certain theoretical basis.

  2. Modeling Seismic Wave Propagation Using Time-Dependent Cauchy-Navier Splines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammann, P.

    2005-12-01

    Our intention is the modeling of seismic wave propagation from displacement measurements by seismographs at the Earth's surface. The elastic behaviour of the Earth is usually described by the Cauchy-Navier equation. A system of fundamental solutions for the Fourier transformed Cauchy-Navier equation are the Hansen vectors L, M and N. We apply an inverse Fourier transform to obtain an orthonormal function system depending on time and space. By means of this system we construct certain splines, which are then used for interpolating the given data. Compared to polynomial interpolation, splines have the advantage that they minimize some curvature measure and are, therefore, smoother. First, we test this method on a synthetic wave function. Afterwards, we apply it to realistic earthquake data. (P. Kammann, Modelling Seismic Wave Propagation Using Time-Dependent Cauchy-Navier Splines, Diploma Thesis, Geomathematics Group, Department of Mathematics, University of Kaiserslautern, 2005)

  3. Travelling wave solutions for some time-delayed equations through factorizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahmy, E.S.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we use factorization method to find explicit particular travelling wave solutions for the following important nonlinear second-order partial differential equations: The generalized time-delayed Burgers-Huxley, time-delayed convective Fishers, and the generalized time-delayed Burgers-Fisher. Using the particular solutions for these equations we find the general solutions, two-parameter solution, as special cases

  4. The Influence of Time Management Practices on Job Stress Level among Beginning Secondary Agriculture Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Misty D.; Torres, Robert M.; Tummons, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring the stress of teachers continues to be important--particularly stress levels of beginning agriculture teachers. The study sought to describe the relationship between beginning teachers' perceived ability to manage their time and their level of stress. The Time Management Practices Inventory and the Job Stress Survey were used to measure…

  5. Adolescents' Sleep in Low-Stress and High-Stress (Exam) Times: A Prospective Quasi-Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewald, Julia F.; Meijer, Anne Marie; Oort, Frans J.; Kerkhof, Gerard A.; Bögels, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    This prospective quasi-experiment (N = 175; mean age = 15.14 years) investigates changes in adolescents' sleep from low-stress (regular school week) to high-stress times (exam week), and examines the (moderating) role of chronic sleep reduction, baseline stress, and gender. Sleep was monitored over

  6. Adolescents' sleep in low-stress and high-stress (exam) times: a prospective quasi-experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewald, J.F.; Meijer, A.M.; Oort, F.J.; Kerkhof, G.A.; Bögels, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    This prospective quasi-experiment (N=175; mean age: 15.14 years) investigates changes in adolescents' sleep from low-stress (regular school week) to high-stress times (exam week) and examines the (moderating) role of chronic sleep reduction, baseline stress, and gender. Sleep was monitored over

  7. Time-domain full waveform inversion using the gradient preconditioning based on transmitted waves energy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiao-bo

    2017-06-01

    The gradient preconditioning approach based on seismic wave energy can effectively avoid the huge storage consumption in the gradient preconditioning algorithms based on Hessian matrices in time-domain full waveform inversion (FWI), but the accuracy is affected by the energy of reflected waves when strong reflectors are present in velocity model. To address this problem, we propose a gradient preconditioning method, which scales the gradient based on the energy of the “approximated transmitted wavefield” simulated by the nonreflecting acoustic wave equation. The method does not require computing or storing the Hessian matrix or its inverse. Furthermore, it can effectively eliminate the effects caused by geometric diffusion and non-uniformity illumination on gradient. The results of model experiments confirm that the time-domain FWI using the gradient preconditioning based on transmitted waves energy can achieve higher inversion precision for high-velocity body and the deep strata below when compared with using the gradient preconditioning based on seismic waves energy.

  8. Time stress measurement device: system design and synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harchani, Noursaied; Jimenez, Fernando; Al-Mohammed, Mohammed; Esteve, Daniel; Courvoisier, M.

    2000-04-01

    System design methodology becomes a strategic activity in the industrial competition. Obtaining substantial reduction of time to market for complex and reliable products is one of the priorities for the manufacturers. Top down design, automated generation of architecture, co-design, virtual prototyping, etc. are already identified as research topics which have to be privileged. To be efficient, each theoretical contribution must be inserted in a global procedure of project management where complementary elements such as marketing, technico-economic survey, road-mapping, internal know-how,.. must be considered. In this context, this paper will present a design methodology starting from the requirement statement until the technical realization of the product, and applied to the design of a Time Stress Measurement Device for the observation of aeronautical mechanical systems.

  9. Operationalizing cognitive vulnerability and stress from the perspective of the hopelessness theory: a multi-wave longitudinal study of children of affectively ill parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, John R Z; McGirr, Alexander

    2007-11-01

    The current study tested the diathesis-stress component of the hopelessness theory (HT) in a sample of youth using (1) a weakest link approach towards operationalizing cognitive vulnerability (e.g. a child's degree of vulnerability is determined by his/her most depressogenic inferential style; DIS) and (2) an idiographic approach towards operationalizing high stress (e.g. high stress is when a child is experiencing a level of stress that is higher than his/her own average level of stress). We also examined whether the association between within-subject fluctuations in hassles and depressive symptoms in cognitively vulnerable youth was moderated by absolute stress levels (the between-subject effect of stress). A multi-wave longitudinal design was used to examine whether the association between within-subject fluctuations in hassles and depressive symptoms was moderated by a depressogenic weakest link. At Time 1, 140 children (between 6 and 14 years of age) of parents with a history of major depressive episodes completed measures assessing DISs and depressive symptoms. Every 6 weeks, for the subsequent year, children completed measures assessing depressive symptoms and hassles. The results of hierarchical linear modelling analyses indicated that a depressogenic weakest link was associated with greater elevations in depressive symptoms following elevations in hassles in girls but not in boys. Results provide partial support for the applicability of the diathesis-stress component of the HT to youth. Integration of the current findings with those obtained in past research examining the diathesis-stress component of the hopelessness theory in youth suggests the utilization of an idiographic approach to examining vulnerability-stress theories may potentially lead to an increased understanding of gender differences in depression.

  10. Moderate Childhood Stress Buffers Against Depressive Response to Proximal Stressors: A Multi-Wave Prospective Study of Early Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapero, Benjamin G; Hamilton, Jessica L; Stange, Jonathan P; Liu, Richard T; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2015-11-01

    Although the majority of research in the field has focused on childhood stressors as a risk factor for psychopathology, a burgeoning body of literature has focused on the possible steeling effect of moderate types of stressful events. The current study investigated the effects of proximal life stressors on prospective changes in depressive symptoms, and whether a history of moderate childhood adversity would moderate this relationship in a multi-wave study of a diverse community sample of early adolescents (N = 163, 52 % female, 51 % Caucasian). Hierarchical linear modeling was run with four waves of data. Adolescents with greater moderately severe early life events evinced a blunted depressive symptom response to changes in proximal stressful events in the previous 9 months, compared to those with fewer early moderately severe experiences of adversity. These results held after controlling for between-subject factors such as race, gender, severe early life stress, and average stress over the four waves of data. Findings indicate that greater exposure to moderate childhood stressors may buffer against the negative effects of subsequent stressors, suggesting the importance of a nuanced developmental approach to studying the effects of early life stress.

  11. Time adaptivity in the diffusive wave approximation to the shallow water equations

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan

    2013-05-01

    We discuss the use of time adaptivity applied to the one dimensional diffusive wave approximation to the shallow water equations. A simple and computationally economical error estimator is discussed which enables time-step size adaptivity. This robust adaptive time discretization corrects the initial time step size to achieve a user specified bound on the discretization error and allows time step size variations of several orders of magnitude. In particular, the one dimensional results presented in this work feature a change of four orders of magnitudes for the time step over the entire simulation. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Prediction of Compressional Wave Velocity Using Regression and Neural Network Modeling and Estimation of Stress Orientation in Bokaro Coalfield, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Suman; Ali, Muhammad; Chatterjee, Rima

    2018-01-01

    Velocity of compressional wave ( V P) of coal and non-coal lithology is predicted from five wells from the Bokaro coalfield (CF), India. Shear sonic travel time logs are not recorded for all wells under the study area. Shear wave velocity ( Vs) is available only for two wells: one from east and other from west Bokaro CF. The major lithologies of this CF are dominated by coal, shaly coal of Barakar formation. This paper focuses on the (a) relationship between Vp and Vs, (b) prediction of Vp using regression and neural network modeling and (c) estimation of maximum horizontal stress from image log. Coal characterizes with low acoustic impedance (AI) as compared to the overlying and underlying strata. The cross-plot between AI and Vp/ Vs is able to identify coal, shaly coal, shale and sandstone from wells in Bokaro CF. The relationship between Vp and Vs is obtained with excellent goodness of fit ( R 2) ranging from 0.90 to 0.93. Linear multiple regression and multi-layered feed-forward neural network (MLFN) models are developed for prediction Vp from two wells using four input log parameters: gamma ray, resistivity, bulk density and neutron porosity. Regression model predicted Vp shows poor fit (from R 2 = 0.28) to good fit ( R 2 = 0.79) with the observed velocity. MLFN model predicted Vp indicates satisfactory to good R2 values varying from 0.62 to 0.92 with the observed velocity. Maximum horizontal stress orientation from a well at west Bokaro CF is studied from Formation Micro-Imager (FMI) log. Breakouts and drilling-induced fractures (DIFs) are identified from the FMI log. Breakout length of 4.5 m is oriented towards N60°W whereas the orientation of DIFs for a cumulative length of 26.5 m is varying from N15°E to N35°E. The mean maximum horizontal stress in this CF is towards N28°E.

  13. Numerical study of the time evolution of a wave packet in quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segura, J.; Fernandez de Cordoba, P.

    1993-01-01

    We solve the Schrodinger equation in order to study the time evolution of a wave packet in different situations of physical interest. This work illustrates, with pedagogical aim, some quantum phenomena which shock our classical conception of the universe: propagation in classically forbidden regions, energy quantization. (Author)

  14. Atmospheric-radiation boundary conditions for high-frequency waves in time-distance helioseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, D.; Leguèbe, M.; Hanson, C. S.; Gizon, L.; Barucq, H.; Chabassier, J.; Duruflé, M.

    2017-12-01

    The temporal covariance between seismic waves measured at two locations on the solar surface is the fundamental observable in time-distance helioseismology. Above the acoustic cut-off frequency ( 5.3 mHz), waves are not trapped in the solar interior and the covariance function can be used to probe the upper atmosphere. We wish to implement appropriate radiative boundary conditions for computing the propagation of high-frequency waves in the solar atmosphere. We consider recently developed and published radiative boundary conditions for atmospheres in which sound-speed is constant and density decreases exponentially with radius. We compute the cross-covariance function using a finite element method in spherical geometry and in the frequency domain. The ratio between first- and second-skip amplitudes in the time-distance diagram is used as a diagnostic to compare boundary conditions and to compare with observations. We find that a boundary condition applied 500 km above the photosphere and derived under the approximation of small angles of incidence accurately reproduces the "infinite atmosphere" solution for high-frequency waves. When the radiative boundary condition is applied 2 Mm above the photosphere, we find that the choice of atmospheric model affects the time-distance diagram. In particular, the time-distance diagram exhibits double-ridge structure when using a Vernazza Avrett Loeser atmospheric model.

  15. HANET: Millimeter wave based intelligent radio architecture for serving place time capacity issue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lala, Purnima; Sørensen, Troels Bundgaard; Prasad, Ramjee

    2015-01-01

    hotspot conditions aka Place Time Capacity (PTC). In this paper, we explore a disparate way of employing multi-UAV systems by proposing a concept of Hovering Ad-Hoc Network (HANET) distinctively to solve PTC congestion using millimeter wave communication. We present a suitable architecture based...

  16. Non-linear wave loads and ship responses by a time-domain strip theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Jinzhu; Wang, Zhaohui; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    1998-01-01

    . Based on this time-domain strip theory, an efficient non-linear hydroelastic method of wave- and slamming-induced vertical motions and structural responses of ships is developed, where the structure is represented as a Timoshenko beam. Numerical calculations are presented for the S175 Containership...

  17. Non-Linear Wave Loads and Ship responses by a time-domain Strip Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Jinzhu; Wang, Zhaohui; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    1998-01-01

    . Based on this time-domain strip theory, an efficient non-linear hyroelastic method of wave- and slamming-induced vertical motions and structural responses of ships is developed, where the structure is represented by the Timoshenko beam theory. Numerical calculations are presented for the S175...

  18. Electromagnetism, magnetic monopoles and matter-waves in space-time algebra (part II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daviau, C.

    1989-01-01

    The formalism of space-time algebra of Hestenes is used: - in the first part to write the equations of electromagnetism of Maxwell and Louis de Broglie, when magnetic monopoles exist; - second to explain equivalence between the equations of Dirac and Hestenes, and to extend this equivalence to Lochak's theory of magnetic monopoles; - to establish that monopoles can exist with very small magnetic charge; - in this second part, to compare waves of fermions and electromagnetism, to associate an electromagnetic field to Dirac's waves and to join the equation of Maxwell - de Broglie to the equation of Dirac - Hestenes [fr

  19. Perfectly Matched Layer for the Wave Equation Finite Difference Time Domain Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yutaka; Tsuchiya, Takao

    2012-07-01

    The perfectly matched layer (PML) is introduced into the wave equation finite difference time domain (WE-FDTD) method. The WE-FDTD method is a finite difference method in which the wave equation is directly discretized on the basis of the central differences. The required memory of the WE-FDTD method is less than that of the standard FDTD method because no particle velocity is stored in the memory. In this study, the WE-FDTD method is first combined with the standard FDTD method. Then, Berenger's PML is combined with the WE-FDTD method. Some numerical demonstrations are given for the two- and three-dimensional sound fields.

  20. Improving Students' Understanding of Waves by Plotting a Displacement-Time Graph in Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yajun

    2012-04-01

    The topic of waves is one that many high school physics students find difficult to understand. This is especially true when using some A-level textbooks1,2used in the U.K., where the concept of waves is introduced prior to the concept of simple harmonic oscillations. One of the challenges my students encounter is understanding the difference between displacement-time graphs and displacement-position graphs. Many students wonder why these two graphs have the same sinusoidal shape. Having the students use multimedia simulations allows them to see, in a hands-on fashion, the relationship between the two graphs.

  1. Time reversal for photoacoustic tomography based on the wave equation of Nachman, Smith, and Waag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowar, Richard

    2014-02-01

    One goal of photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is to estimate an initial pressure function φ from pressure data measured at a boundary surrounding the object of interest. This paper is concerned with a time reversal method for PAT that is based on the dissipative wave equation of Nachman, Smith, and Waag [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 88, 1584 (1990), 10.1121/1.400317]. This equation is a correction of the thermoviscous wave equation such that its solution has a finite wave front speed and, in contrast, it can model several relaxation processes. In this sense, it is more accurate than the thermoviscous wave equation. For simplicity, we focus on the case of one relaxation process. We derive an exact formula for the time reversal image I, which depends on the relaxation time τ1 and the compressibility κ1 of the dissipative medium, and show I (τ1,κ1)→φ for κ1→0. This implies that I =φ holds in the dissipation-free case and that I is similar to φ for sufficiently small compressibility κ1. Moreover, we show for tissue similar to water that the small wave number approximation I0 of the time reversal image satisfies I0=η0*xφ with accent="true">η̂0(|k|)≈const. for |k|≪1/c0τ1, where φ denotes the initial pressure function. For such tissue, our theoretical analysis and numerical simulations show that the time reversal image I is very similar to the initial pressure function φ and that a resolution of σ ≈0.036mm is feasible (for exact measurement data).

  2. Quantum time crystal by decoherence: Proposal with an incommensurate charge density wave ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsugawa, K.; Fujii, T.; Tanda, S.

    2017-09-01

    We show that time translation symmetry of a ring system with a macroscopic quantum ground state is broken by decoherence. In particular, we consider a ring-shaped incommensurate charge density wave (ICDW ring) threaded by a fluctuating magnetic flux: the Caldeira-Leggett model is used to model the fluctuating flux as a bath of harmonic oscillators. We show that the charge density expectation value of a quantized ICDW ring coupled to its environment oscillates periodically. The Hamiltonians considered in this model are time independent unlike "Floquet time crystals" considered recently. Our model forms a metastable quantum time crystal with a finite length in space and in time.

  3. Computer-games for gravitational wave science outreach: Black Hole Pong and Space Time Quest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbone, L; Bond, C; Brown, D; Brückner, F; Grover, K; Lodhia, D; Mingarelli, C M F; Fulda, P; Smith, R J E; Unwin, R; Vecchio, A; Wang, M; Whalley, L; Freise, A

    2012-01-01

    We have established a program aimed at developing computer applications and web applets to be used for educational purposes as well as gravitational wave outreach activities. These applications and applets teach gravitational wave physics and technology. The computer programs are generated in collaboration with undergraduates and summer students as part of our teaching activities, and are freely distributed on a dedicated website. As part of this program, we have developed two computer-games related to gravitational wave science: 'Black Hole Pong' and 'Space Time Quest'. In this article we present an overview of our computer related outreach activities and discuss the games and their educational aspects, and report on some positive feedback received.

  4. Isolation of gravitational waves from displacement noise and utility of a time-delay device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somiya, Kentaro; Goda, Keisuke; Chen, Yanbei; Mikhailov, Eugeniy E

    2007-01-01

    Interferometers with kilometer-scale arms have been built for gravitational-wave detections on the ground; ones with much longer arms are being planned for space-based detection. One fundamental motivation for long baseline interferometry is from displacement noise. In general, the longer the arm length L, the larger the motion the gravitational-wave induces on the test masses, until L becomes comparable to the gravitational wavelength. Recently, schemes have been invented, in which displacement noise can be evaded by employing differences between the influence of test-mass motions and that of gravitational waves on light propagation. However, in these schemes, such differences only becomes significant when Lapproaches the gravitational wavelength. In this paper, we explore a use of artificial time delay in displacement-noise-free interferometers, which will shift the frequency band of the effect being significant and may improve their shot-noise-limited sensitivity at low frequencies

  5. Isolation of gravitational waves from displacement noise and utility of a time-delay device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somiya, Kentaro [Max-Planck Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Goda, Keisuke [LIGO Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Chen, Yanbei [Max-Planck Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Mikhailov, Eugeniy E [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States)

    2007-05-15

    Interferometers with kilometer-scale arms have been built for gravitational-wave detections on the ground; ones with much longer arms are being planned for space-based detection. One fundamental motivation for long baseline interferometry is from displacement noise. In general, the longer the arm length L, the larger the motion the gravitational-wave induces on the test masses, until L becomes comparable to the gravitational wavelength. Recently, schemes have been invented, in which displacement noise can be evaded by employing differences between the influence of test-mass motions and that of gravitational waves on light propagation. However, in these schemes, such differences only becomes significant when Lapproaches the gravitational wavelength. In this paper, we explore a use of artificial time delay in displacement-noise-free interferometers, which will shift the frequency band of the effect being significant and may improve their shot-noise-limited sensitivity at low frequencies.

  6. Splitting methods for time-independent wave propagation in random media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Time-independent wave propagation is treated in media where the index of refraction contains a random component, but its mean is invariant with respect to translation in some direction distinguishing the wave propagation. Abstract splitting operators are used to decompose the wave field into forward and backward traveling components satisfying a coupled pair of equations. Mode-coupled equations follow directly from these after implementing a specific representation for the abstract splitting operators. Here we indicate a formal solution to these equations, concentrating on the diffusion regime, where we estimate the forward- and backscattering contributions to the mode specific diffusion coefficients. We consider, in detail, random media with uniform (random atmosphere) and square law (stochastic lense) mean refractive indices

  7. An arbitrary-order staggered time integrator for the linear acoustic wave equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaejoon; Park, Hyunseo; Park, Yoonseo; Shin, Changsoo

    2018-02-01

    We suggest a staggered time integrator whose order of accuracy can arbitrarily be extended to solve the linear acoustic wave equation. A strategy to select the appropriate order of accuracy is also proposed based on the error analysis that quantitatively predicts the truncation error of the numerical solution. This strategy not only reduces the computational cost several times, but also allows us to flexibly set the modelling parameters such as the time step length, grid interval and P-wave speed. It is demonstrated that the proposed method can almost eliminate temporal dispersive errors during long term simulations regardless of the heterogeneity of the media and time step lengths. The method can also be successfully applied to the source problem with an absorbing boundary condition, which is frequently encountered in the practical usage for the imaging algorithms or the inverse problems.

  8. Spectral and partial-wave decomposition of time-dependent wave functions on a grid: Photoelectron spectra of H and H2+ in electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolopoulos, L. A. A.; Kjeldsen, T. K.; Madsen, L. B.

    2007-01-01

    We present a method for spectral (bound and continuum) and partial-wave analysis of a three-dimensional time-dependent wave function, defined on a grid, without projecting onto the field-free eigenstates of the system. The method consists of propagating the time-dependent Schroedinger equation to obtain its autocorrelation function C(t)= after the end of the interaction, at time T, of the system with an external time-dependent field. The Fourier spectrum of this correlation function is directly related to the expansion coefficients of the wave function on the field-free bound and continuum energy eigenstates of the system. By expanding on a spherical harmonics basis we show how to calculate the contribution of the various partial waves to the total photoelectron energy spectrum

  9. Time Domain Simulation of Sound Waves Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Algorithm with Artificial Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH, as a Lagrangian, meshfree method, is supposed to be useful in solving acoustic problems, such as combustion noise, bubble acoustics, etc., and has been gradually used in sound wave computation. However, unphysical oscillations in the sound wave simulation cannot be ignored. In this paper, an artificial viscosity term is added into the standard SPH algorithm used for solving linearized acoustic wave equations. SPH algorithms with or without artificial viscosity are both built to compute sound propagation and interference in the time domain. Then, the effects of the smoothing kernel function, particle spacing and Courant number on the SPH algorithms of sound waves are discussed. After comparing SPH simulation results with theoretical solutions, it is shown that the result of the SPH algorithm with the artificial viscosity term added attains good agreement with the theoretical solution by effectively reducing unphysical oscillations. In addition, suitable computational parameters of SPH algorithms are proposed through analyzing the sound pressure errors for simulating sound waves.

  10. Does Viewing Pornography Diminish Religiosity Over Time? Evidence From Two-Wave Panel Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Samuel L

    2017-02-01

    Research consistently shows a negative association between religiosity and viewing pornography. While scholars typically assume that greater religiosity leads to less frequent pornography use, none have empirically examined whether the reverse could be true: that greater pornography use may lead to lower levels of religiosity over time. I tested for this possibility using two waves of the nationally representative Portraits of American Life Study (PALS). Persons who viewed pornography at all at Wave 1 reported more religious doubt, lower religious salience, and lower prayer frequency at Wave 2 compared to those who never viewed porn. Considering the effect of porn-viewing frequency, viewing porn more often at Wave 1 corresponded to increases in religious doubt and declining religious salience at Wave 2. However, the effect of earlier pornography use on later religious service attendance and prayer was curvilinear: Religious service attendance and prayer decline to a point and then increase at higher levels of pornography viewing. Testing for interactions revealed that all effects appear to hold regardless of gender. Findings suggest that viewing pornography may lead to declines in some dimensions of religiosity but at more extreme levels may actually stimulate, or at least be conducive to, greater religiosity along other dimensions.

  11. Multi-Channel Optical Coherence Elastography Using Relative and Absolute Shear-Wave Time of Flight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Elyas

    Full Text Available Elastography, the imaging of elastic properties of soft tissues, is well developed for macroscopic clinical imaging of soft tissues and can provide useful information about various pathological processes which is complementary to that provided by the original modality. Scaling down of this technique should ply the field of cellular biology with valuable information with regard to elastic properties of cells and their environment. This paper evaluates the potential to develop such a tool by modifying a commercial optical coherence tomography (OCT device to measure the speed of shear waves propagating in a three-dimensional (3D medium. A needle, embedded in the gel, was excited to vibrate along its long axis and the displacement as a function of time and distance from the needle associated with the resulting shear waves was detected using four M-mode images acquired simultaneously using a commercial four-channel swept-source OCT system. Shear-wave time of arrival (TOA was detected by tracking the axial OCT-speckle motion using cross-correlation methods. Shear-wave speed was then calculated from inter-channel differences of TOA for a single burst (the relative TOA method and compared with the shear-wave speed determined from positional differences of TOA for a single channel over multiple bursts (the absolute TOA method. For homogeneous gels the relative method provided shear-wave speed with acceptable precision and accuracy when judged against the expected linear dependence of shear modulus on gelatine concentration (R2 = 0.95 and ultimate resolution capabilities limited by 184μm inter-channel distance. This overall approach shows promise for its eventual provision as a research tool in cancer cell biology. Further work is required to optimize parameters such as vibration frequency, burst length and amplitude, and to assess the lateral and axial resolutions of this type of device as well as to create 3D elastograms.

  12. Effects of stressful stimuli: a comparison between two time periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslowsky, M; Solomon, Z; Bleich, A; Laor, N

    1996-05-01

    Studies of the effects of stressful stimuli that occurred sometime in the past have generally found both intrusion and avoidance as consequences. The present investigation used Horowitz et al.'s (1979) Impact of Events Scale to compare the responses of victims who had been recently evacuated to a hotel after a missile attack on their home with a similar group one year later. Although during the attacks intrusion responses were found to be significantly higher than avoidance, the means on the two mental states did not differ significantly one year after. In addition, intrusion was found to be more highly correlated with several functioning measures; this latter trend becoming more pronounced at Time 2. Implications of the findings and limitations of the study were mentioned.

  13. Improvement of a picking algorithm real-time P-wave detection by kurtosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, H.; Yamada, M.

    2016-12-01

    Earthquake early warning (EEW) requires fast and accurate P-wave detection. The current EEW system in Japan uses the STA/LTAalgorithm (Allen, 1978) to detect P-wave arrival.However, some stations did not trigger during the 2011 Great Tohoku Earthquake due to the emergent onset. In addition, accuracy of the P-wave detection is very important: on August 1, 2016, the EEW issued a false alarm with M9 in Tokyo region due to a thunder noise.To solve these problems, we use a P-wave detection method using kurtosis statistics. It detects the change of statistic distribution of the waveform amplitude. This method was recently developed (Saragiotis et al., 2002) and used for off-line analysis such as making seismic catalogs. To apply this method for EEW, we need to remove an acausal calculation and enable a real-time processing. Here, we propose a real-time P-wave detection method using kurtosis statistics with a noise filter.To avoid false triggering by a noise, we incorporated a simple filter to classify seismic signal and noise. Following Kong et al. (2016), we used the interquartilerange and zero cross rate for the classification. The interquartile range is an amplitude measure that is equal to the middle 50% of amplitude in a certain time window. The zero cross rate is a simple frequency measure that counts the number of times that the signal crosses baseline zero. A discriminant function including these measures was constructed by the linear discriminant analysis.To test this kurtosis method, we used strong motion records for 62 earthquakes between April, 2005 and July, 2015, which recorded the seismic intensity greater equal to 6 lower in the JMA intensity scale. The records with hypocentral distance earthquakes and improve the shaking intensity estimation for an earthquake early warning.

  14. OPTIMAL STRATEGIES FOR CONTINUOUS GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION IN PULSAR TIMING ARRAYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Creighton, J. D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are expected to emit a continuous gravitational wave signal in the pulsar timing array (PTA) frequency band (10 –9 to 10 –7 Hz). The development of data analysis techniques aimed at efficient detection and characterization of these signals is critical to the gravitational wave detection effort. In this paper, we leverage methods developed for LIGO continuous wave gravitational searches and explore the use of the F-statistic for such searches in pulsar timing data. Babak and Sesana have used this approach in the context of PTAs to show that one can resolve multiple SMBHB sources in the sky. Our work improves on several aspects of prior continuous wave search methods developed for PTA data analysis. The algorithm is implemented fully in the time domain, which naturally deals with the irregular sampling typical of PTA data and avoids spectral leakage problems associated with frequency domain methods. We take into account the fitting of the timing model and have generalized our approach to deal with both correlated and uncorrelated colored noise sources. We also develop an incoherent detection statistic that maximizes over all pulsar-dependent contributions to the likelihood. To test the effectiveness and sensitivity of our detection statistics, we perform a number of Monte Carlo simulations. We produce sensitivity curves for PTAs of various configurations and outline an implementation of a fully functional data analysis pipeline. Finally, we present a derivation of the likelihood maximized over the gravitational wave phases at the pulsar locations, which results in a vast reduction of the search parameter space.

  15. The characteristic of heat wave effects on coronary heart disease mortality in Beijing, China: a time series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhaoxing; Li, Shanshan; Zhang, Jinliang; Guo, Yuming

    2013-01-01

    There is limited evidence for the impacts of heat waves on coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in Beijing, capital city of China. We aimed to find a best heat wave definition for CHD mortality; and explore the characteristic of heat wave effects on CHD in Beijing, China. We obtained daily data on weather and CHD mortality in Beijing for years 2000-2011. A quasi-Poisson regression model was used to assess the short-term impact of heat waves on CHD mortality in hot season (May-September), while controlling for relative humidity, day of the week, long-term trend and season. We compared 18 heat wave definitions by combining heat wave thresholds (87.5(th), 90.0(th), 92.5(th), 95(th), 97.5(th), and 99(th) percentile of daily mean temperature) with different duration days (≥ 2 to ≥ 4 days), using Akaike information criterion for quasi-Poisson. We examined whether heat wave effects on CHD mortality were modified by heat wave duration and timing. Heat wave definition using 97.5(th) percentile of daily mean temperature (30.5 °C) and duration ≥ 2 days produced the best model fit. Based on this heat wave definition, we found that men and elderly were sensitive to the first heat waves of the season, while women and young were sensitive to the second heat waves. In general, the longer duration of heat waves increased the risks of CHD mortality more than shorter duration for elderly. The first two days of heat waves had the highest impact on CHD mortality. Women and elderly were at higher risks than men and young when exposed to heat waves, but the effect differences were not statistically significant. Heat waves had significant impact on CHD mortality. This finding may have implications for policy making towards protecting human health from heat waves.

  16. The characteristic of heat wave effects on coronary heart disease mortality in Beijing, China: a time series study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoxing Tian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is limited evidence for the impacts of heat waves on coronary heart disease (CHD mortality in Beijing, capital city of China. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to find a best heat wave definition for CHD mortality; and explore the characteristic of heat wave effects on CHD in Beijing, China. METHODS: We obtained daily data on weather and CHD mortality in Beijing for years 2000-2011. A quasi-Poisson regression model was used to assess the short-term impact of heat waves on CHD mortality in hot season (May-September, while controlling for relative humidity, day of the week, long-term trend and season. We compared 18 heat wave definitions by combining heat wave thresholds (87.5(th, 90.0(th, 92.5(th, 95(th, 97.5(th, and 99(th percentile of daily mean temperature with different duration days (≥ 2 to ≥ 4 days, using Akaike information criterion for quasi-Poisson. We examined whether heat wave effects on CHD mortality were modified by heat wave duration and timing. RESULTS: Heat wave definition using 97.5(th percentile of daily mean temperature (30.5 °C and duration ≥ 2 days produced the best model fit. Based on this heat wave definition, we found that men and elderly were sensitive to the first heat waves of the season, while women and young were sensitive to the second heat waves. In general, the longer duration of heat waves increased the risks of CHD mortality more than shorter duration for elderly. The first two days of heat waves had the highest impact on CHD mortality. Women and elderly were at higher risks than men and young when exposed to heat waves, but the effect differences were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Heat waves had significant impact on CHD mortality. This finding may have implications for policy making towards protecting human health from heat waves.

  17. The Investigation of EM Scattering from the Time-Varying Overturning Wave Crest Model by the IEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Meng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the electromagnetic (EM scattering of time-varying overturning wave crests is a worthwhile endeavor. Overturning wave crest is one of the reasons of sea spike generation, which increases the probability of false radar alarms and reduces the performance of multitarget detection in the environment. A three-dimensional (3D time-varying overturning wave crest model is presented in this paper; this 3D model is an improvement of the traditional two-dimensional (2D time-varying overturning wave crest model. The integral equation method (IEM was employed to investigate backward scattering radar cross sections (RCS at various incident angles of the 3D overturning wave crest model. The super phenomenon, where the intensity of horizontal polarization scattering is greater than that of vertical polarization scattering, is an important feature of sea spikes. Simulation results demonstrate that super phenomena may occur in some time samples as variations in the overturning wave crest.

  18. Listing of 502 Times When the Ulysses Magnetic Fields Instrument Observed Waves Due to Newborn Interstellar Pickup Protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Bradford E.; Smith, Charles W.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Joyce, Colin J.; Murphy, Neil; Nuno, Raquel G.

    2017-05-01

    In two earlier publications we analyzed 502 intervals of magnetic waves excited by newborn interstellar pickup protons that were observed by the Ulysses spacecraft. Due to the considerable effort required in identifying these events, we provide a list of the times for the 502 wave event intervals previously identified. In the process, we provide a brief description of how the waves were found and what their properties are. We also remind the reader of the conditions that permit the waves to reach observable levels and explain why the waves are not seen more often.

  19. Listing of 502 Times When the Ulysses Magnetic Fields Instrument Observed Waves Due to Newborn Interstellar Pickup Protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, Bradford E.; Smith, Charles W.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Joyce, Colin J.; Murphy, Neil; Nuno, Raquel G.

    2017-01-01

    In two earlier publications we analyzed 502 intervals of magnetic waves excited by newborn interstellar pickup protons that were observed by the Ulysses spacecraft. Due to the considerable effort required in identifying these events, we provide a list of the times for the 502 wave event intervals previously identified. In the process, we provide a brief description of how the waves were found and what their properties are. We also remind the reader of the conditions that permit the waves to reach observable levels and explain why the waves are not seen more often.

  20. Time-Dependent Wave Packet Dynamics Calculations of Cross Sections for Ultracold Scattering of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiayu; Liu, Shu; Zhang, Dong H.; Krems, Roman V.

    2018-04-01

    Because the de Broglie wavelength of ultracold molecules is very large, the cross sections for collisions of molecules at ultracold temperatures are always computed by the time-independent quantum scattering approach. Here, we report the first accurate time-dependent wave packet dynamics calculation for reactive scattering of ultracold molecules. Wave packet dynamics calculations can be applied to molecular systems with more dimensions and provide real-time information on the process of bond rearrangement and/or energy exchange in molecular collisions. Our work thus makes possible the extension of rigorous quantum calculations of ultracold reaction properties to polyatomic molecules and adds a new powerful tool for the study of ultracold chemistry.

  1. Protection of the lung from blast overpressure by stress wave decouplers, buffer plates or sandwich panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedman, Andrew; Hepper, A

    2018-03-19

    This paper outlines aspects of UK Ministry of Defence's research and development of blast overpressure protection technologies appropriate for use in body armour, with the aim of both propagating new knowledge and updating existing information. Two simple models are introduced not only to focus the description of the mechanism by which the lungs can be protected, but also to provide a bridge between fields of research that may hold the key to further advances in protection technology and related body armour. Protection can be provided to the lungs by decoupling the stress wave transmission into the thorax by managing the blast energy imparted through the protection system. It is proposed that the utility of the existing 'simple decoupler' blast overpressure protection is reviewed in light of recent developments in the treatment of those sustaining both overpressure and fragment injuries. It is anticipated that further advances in protection technology may be generated by those working in other fields on the analogous technologies of 'buffer plates' and 'sandwich panels'. © Crown copyright (2018), Dstl. This material is licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence except where otherwise stated. To view this licence, visit http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3 or write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email: psi@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk.

  2. Time reversibility of a Lamb wave for damage detection in a metallic plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poddar, B; Kumar, A; Mitra, M; Mujumdar, P M

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, an experimental study has been carried out to develop a baseline-free damage detection technique using the time reversibility of a Lamb wave. The experiments have been carried out on a metallic plate. Time reversibility is the process in which a response signal recorded at a receiver location is reversed in time and transmitted back through the receiver to the original transmitter location. In the absence of any defect or damage in the path between the transmitter–receiver locations, theoretically the signal received back at the original transmitter location (reconstructed signal) is identical to the original input signal. The initial part of the present work is aimed at understanding the time reversibility of a Lamb wave in an undamaged metallic plate. This involves a thorough study of different parameters such as frequency, pulse frequency band width, transducer size and the effects of tuning these parameters on the quality of a reconstructed input signal. This paper also suggests a method to mitigate the effects of the frequency dependent attenuation of Lamb wave modes (amplitude dispersion) and thus achieve better reconstruction for an undamaged plate. Finally, the time reversal process (TRP) is used to detect damage in an aluminium plate without using any information from the undamaged structure. A block mass, a notch and an area of surface erosion are considered as representative of different types of damage. The results obtained show that the effect of damage on TRP is significant, contrary to the results reported earlier

  3. Accurate measurement of the time delay in the response of the LIGO gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aso, Yoichi; Kalmus, Peter; Matone, Luca; Marka, Szabolcs [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Goetz, Evan [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Myers, Joshua; Savage, Rick; Schwinberg, Paul; Sigg, Daniel [LIGO Hanford Observatory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); O' Reilly, Brian [LIGO Livingston Observatory, Livingston, LA 70754 (United States); Siemens, Xavier [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Smith, Nicolas, E-mail: aso@caltech.ed [LIGO Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-03-07

    We present a method to precisely calibrate the time delay in a long baseline gravitational-wave interferometer. An accurate time stamp is crucial for data analysis of gravitational wave detectors, especially when performing coincidence and correlation analyses between multiple detectors. Our method uses an intensity-modulated radiation pressure force to actuate on the mirrors. The time delay is measured by comparing the phase of the signal at the actuation point with the phase of the recorded signal within the calibrated data stream used for gravitational wave searches. Because the signal-injection path is independent of the interferometer's control system, which is used for the standard calibration, this method can be an independent verification of the timing error in the system. A measurement performed with the 4 km interferometer at the LIGO Hanford Observatory shows a 1 mus relative accuracy when averaging over 50 min. Our understanding of the systematic time delay in the detector response has reached the level of 10 mus.

  4. In stressful company – Changes in stress and work ties over time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldstrøm, Christian; Parker, Andrew; Shah, Neha P.

    Recent research on stress and burnout has highlighted the collective aspects of stress symptoms, perceived stress, and coping mechanisms. Much of this work, however, is focused on group and team dynamics rather than how network factors shape individuals’ feelings of stress and burnout. We use...

  5. Do time-invariant confounders explain away the association between job stress and workers' mental health? Evidence from Japanese occupational panel data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshio, Takashi; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Inoue, Akiomi

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that job stress is negatively related to workers' mental health, but most recent studies have not controlled for unobserved time-invariant confounders. In the current study, we attempted to validate previous observations on the association between job stress and workers' mental health, by removing the effects of unobserved time-invariant confounders. We used data from three to four waves of an occupational Japanese cohort survey, focusing on 31,382 observations of 9741 individuals who participated in at least two consecutive waves. We estimated mean-centered fixed effects models to explain psychological distress in terms of the Kessler 6 (K6) scores (range: 0-24) by eight job stress indicators related to the job demands-control, effort-reward imbalance, and organizational injustice models. Mean-centered fixed effects models reduced the magnitude of the association between jobs stress and K6 scores to 44.8-54.2% of those observed from pooled ordinary least squares. However, the association remained highly significant even after controlling for unobserved time-invariant confounders for all job stress indicators. In addition, alternatively specified models showed the robustness of the results. In all, we concluded that the validity of major job stress models, which link job stress and workers' mental health, was robust, although unobserved time-invariant confounders led to an overestimation of the association. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Three-dimensional coupled thermoelastodynamic stress and flux induced wave propagation for isotropic half-space with scalar potential functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Yazdan; Eskandari-Ghadi, Morteza

    2018-02-01

    An asymmetric three-dimensional thermoelastodynamic wave propagation with scalar potential functions is presented for an isotropic half-space, in such a way that the wave may be originated from an arbitrary either traction or heat flux applied on a patch at the free surface of the half-space. The displacements, stresses and temperature are presented within the framework of Biot's coupled thermoelasticity formulations. By employing a complete representation for the displacement and temperature fields in terms of two scalar potential functions, the governing equations of coupled thermoelasticity are uncoupled into a sixth- and a second-order partial differential equation in cylindrical coordinate system. By virtue of Fourier expansion and Hankel integral transforms, the angular and radial variables are suppressed respectively, and a 6{th}- and a 2{nd}-order ordinary differential equation in terms of depth are received, which are solved readily, from which the displacement, stresses and temperature fields are derived in transformed space by satisfying both the regularity and boundary conditions. By applying the inverse Hankel integral transforms, the displacements and temperature are numerically evaluated to determine the solutions in the real space. The numerical evaluations are done for three specific cases of vertical and horizontal time-harmonic patch traction and a constant heat flux passing through a circular disc on the surface of the half-space. It has been previously proved that the potential functions used in this paper are applicable from elastostatics to thermoelastodynamics. Thus, the analytical solutions presented in this paper are verified by comparing the results of this study with two specific problems reported in the literature, which are an elastodynamic problem and an axisymmetric quasi-static thermoelastic problem. To show the accuracy of numerical results, the solution of this study is also compared with the solution for elastodynamics exists in

  7. Dynamic Stress Concentration at the Boundary of an Incision at the Plate Under the Action of Weak Shock Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulich Olena

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the novel technique for analysis of dynamic stress state of multi-connected infinite plates under the action of weak shock waves. For solution of the problem it uses the integral and discrete Fourier transforms. Calculation of transformed dynamic stresses at the incisions of plates is held using the boundary-integral equation method and the theory of complex variable functions. The numerical implementation of the developed algorithm is based on the method of mechanical quadratures and collocation technique. For calculation of originals of the dynamic stresses it uses modified discrete Fourier transform. The algorithm is effective in the analysis of the dynamic stress state of defective plates.

  8. Delay-time distribution in the scattering of time-narrow wave packets (II)—quantum graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilansky, Uzy; Schanz, Holger

    2018-02-01

    We apply the framework developed in the preceding paper in this series (Smilansky 2017 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 50 215301) to compute the time-delay distribution in the scattering of ultra short radio frequency pulses on complex networks of transmission lines which are modeled by metric (quantum) graphs. We consider wave packets which are centered at high wave number and comprise many energy levels. In the limit of pulses of very short duration we compute upper and lower bounds to the actual time-delay distribution of the radiation emerging from the network using a simplified problem where time is replaced by the discrete count of vertex-scattering events. The classical limit of the time-delay distribution is also discussed and we show that for finite networks it decays exponentially, with a decay constant which depends on the graph connectivity and the distribution of its edge lengths. We illustrate and apply our theory to a simple model graph where an algebraic decay of the quantum time-delay distribution is established.

  9. Workplace harassment, stress, and drinking behavior over time: Gender differences in a national sample

    OpenAIRE

    Rospenda, Kathleen M.; Fujishiro, Kaori; Shannon, Candice A.; Richman, Judith A.

    2008-01-01

    Research suggests that workplace harassment (WH) significantly predicts alcohol use and problem drinking behavior, but has generally failed to consider concurrent effects of other sources of stress. This two-wave study (n=1418) is the first to explore whether sexual harassment (SH) and generalized workplace harassment (GWH) predict increased drinking independently of the effects of job and life stress, and whether effects differ by gender, in a nationally representative sample. SH and GWH pre...

  10. Mathematical Framework for Hydromechanical Time-Domain Simulation of Wave Energy Converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Seixas de Medeiros

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient design of wave energy converters based on floating body motion heavily depends on the capacity of the designer to accurately predict the device’s dynamics, which ultimately leads to the power extraction. We present a (quasi-nonlinear time-domain hydromechanical dynamic model to simulate a particular type of pitch-resonant WEC which uses gyroscopes for power extraction. The dynamic model consists of a time-domain three-dimensional Rankine panel method coupled, during time integration, with a MATLAB algorithm that solves for the equations of the gyroscope and Power Take-Off (PTO. The former acts as a force block, calculating the forces due to the waves on the hull, which is then sent to the latter through TCP/IP, which couples the external dynamics and performs the time integration using a 4th-order Runge-Kutta method. The panel method, accounting for the gyroscope and PTO dynamics, is then used for the calculation of the optimal flywheel spin, PTO damping, and average power extracted, completing the basic design cycle of the WEC. The proposed numerical method framework is capable of considering virtually any type of nonlinear force (e.g., nonlinear wave loads and it is applied and verified in the paper against the traditional frequency domain linear model. It proved to be a versatile tool to verify performance in resonant conditions.

  11. A Data-Driven Noise Reduction Method and Its Application for the Enhancement of Stress Wave Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Lin Feng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD has been recently used to recover a signal from observed noisy data. Typically this is performed by partial reconstruction or thresholding operation. In this paper we describe an efficient noise reduction method. EEMD is used to decompose a signal into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs. The time intervals between two adjacent zero-crossings within the IMF, called instantaneous half period (IHP, are used as a criterion to detect and classify the noise oscillations. The undesirable waveforms with a larger IHP are set to zero. Furthermore, the optimum threshold in this approach can be derived from the signal itself using the consecutive mean square error (CMSE. The method is fully data driven, and it requires no prior knowledge of the target signals. This method can be verified with the simulative program by using Matlab. The denoising results are proper. In comparison with other EEMD based methods, it is concluded that the means adopted in this paper is suitable to preprocess the stress wave signals in the wood nondestructive testing.

  12. Scaling relation between earthquake magnitude and the departure time from P wave similar growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Shunta; Ellsworth, William L.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new scaling relation between earthquake magnitude (M) and a characteristic of initial P wave displacement. By examining Japanese K-NET data averaged in bins partitioned by Mw and hypocentral distance, we demonstrate that the P wave displacement briefly displays similar growth at the onset of rupture and that the departure time (Tdp), which is defined as the time of departure from similarity of the absolute displacement after applying a band-pass filter, correlates with the final M in a range of 4.5 ≤ Mw ≤ 7. The scaling relation between Mw and Tdp implies that useful information on the final M can be derived while the event is still in progress because Tdp occurs before the completion of rupture. We conclude that the scaling relation is important not only for earthquake early warning but also for the source physics of earthquakes.

  13. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Adaptive Time Integration for Electrical Wave Propagation on the Purkinje System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Wenjun; Henriquez, Craig S

    2015-01-01

    A both space and time adaptive algorithm is presented for simulating electrical wave propagation in the Purkinje system of the heart. The equations governing the distribution of electric potential over the system are solved in time with the method of lines. At each timestep, by an operator splitting technique, the space-dependent but linear diffusion part and the nonlinear but space-independent reactions part in the partial differential equations are integrated separately with implicit schemes, which have better stability and allow larger timesteps than explicit ones. The linear diffusion equation on each edge of the system is spatially discretized with the continuous piecewise linear finite element method. The adaptive algorithm can automatically recognize when and where the electrical wave starts to leave or enter the computational domain due to external current/voltage stimulation, self-excitation, or local change of membrane properties. Numerical examples demonstrating efficiency and accuracy of the adaptive algorithm are presented.

  14. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Adaptive Time Integration for Electrical Wave Propagation on the Purkinje System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Ying

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A both space and time adaptive algorithm is presented for simulating electrical wave propagation in the Purkinje system of the heart. The equations governing the distribution of electric potential over the system are solved in time with the method of lines. At each timestep, by an operator splitting technique, the space-dependent but linear diffusion part and the nonlinear but space-independent reactions part in the partial differential equations are integrated separately with implicit schemes, which have better stability and allow larger timesteps than explicit ones. The linear diffusion equation on each edge of the system is spatially discretized with the continuous piecewise linear finite element method. The adaptive algorithm can automatically recognize when and where the electrical wave starts to leave or enter the computational domain due to external current/voltage stimulation, self-excitation, or local change of membrane properties. Numerical examples demonstrating efficiency and accuracy of the adaptive algorithm are presented.

  15. Complex time dependent wave packet technique for thermal equilibrium systems - Electronic spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, J. R.; Wilson, K. R.; Heller, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    A time dependent wave packet method is presented for the rapid calculation of the properties of systems in thermal equilibrium and is applied, as an illustration, to electronic spectra. The thawed Gaussian approximation to quantum wave packet dynamics combined with evaluation of the density matrix operator by imaginary time propagation is shown to give exact electronic spectra for harmonic potentials and excellent results for both a Morse potential and for the band contours of the three transitions of the visible electronic absorption spectrum of the iodine molecule. The method, in principle, can be extended to many atoms (e.g., condensed phases) and to other properties (e.g., infrared and Raman spectra and thermodynamic variables).

  16. Time-resolved wave profile measurements in copper to Megabar pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabildas, L C; Asay, J R

    1981-01-01

    Many time-resolved techniques have been developed which have greatly aided in the understanding of dynamic material behavior such as the high pressure-dynamic strength of materials. In the paper, time-resolved measurements of copper (at shock-induced high pressures and temperatures) are used to illustrate the capability of using such techniques to investigate high pressure strength. Continuous shock loading and release wave profiles have been made in copper to 93 GPa using velocity interferometric techniques. Fine structure in the release wave profiles from the shocked state indicates an increase in shear strength of copper to 1.5 GPa at 93 GPa from its ambient value of 0.08 GPa.

  17. Space-time topology optimization for one-dimensional wave propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2009-01-01

    -dimensional transient wave propagation in an elastic rod with time dependent Young's modulus. By two simulation examples it is demonstrated how dynamic structures can display rich dynamic behavior such as wavenumber/frequency shifts and lack of energy conservation. The optimization method's potential for creating...... structures with novel dynamic behavior is illustrated by a simple example; it is shown that an elastic rod in which the optimized stiffness distribution is allowed to vary in time can be much more efficient in prohibiting wave propagation compared to a static bandgap structure. Optimized designs in form...... of spatio-temporal laminates and checkerboards are generated and discussed. The example lays the foundation for creating designs with more advanced functionalities in future work....

  18. Cellular dislocations patterns in monolike silicon: Influence of stress, time under stress and impurity doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, V. A.; Rocha, M.; Lantreibecq, A.; Tsoutsouva, M. G.; Tran-Thi, T. N.; Baruchel, J.; Camel, D.

    2018-05-01

    Besides the well-known local sub-grain boundaries (SGBs) defects, monolike Si ingots grown by Directional Solidification present distributed background cellular dislocation structures. In the present work, the influence of stress level, time under stress, and doping by O and Ge, on the formation of dislocation cells in monolike silicon, is analysed. This is achieved by performing a comparative study of the dislocation structures respectively obtained during crystallisation of pilot scale monolike ingots on Czochralski (CZ) and monolike seeds, during annealing of Float Zone (FZ), CZ, and 1 × 1020 at/cm3 Ge-doped CZ (GCZ) samples, and during 4-point bending of FZ and GCZ samples at 1300 °C under resolved stresses of 0.3, 0.7 and 1.9 MPa during 1-20 h. Synchrotron X-ray White-beam Topography and Rocking Curve Imaging (RCI) are applied to visualize the dislocation arrangements and to quantify the spatial distribution of the associated lattice distortions. Annealed samples and samples bent under 0.3 MPa present dislocation structures corresponding to transient creep stages where dislocations generated from surface defects are propagating and multiplying in the bulk. The addition of the hardening element Ge is found to block the propagation of dislocations from these surface sources during the annealing test, and to retard dislocation multiplication during bending under 0.3 MPa. On the opposite, cellular structures corresponding to the final stationary creep stage are obtained both in the non-molten seeds and grown part of monolike ingots and in samples bent under 0.7 and 1.9 MPa. A comparative discussion is made of the dynamics of formation of these final dislocation structures during deformation at high temperature and monolike growth.

  19. On the background estimation by time slides in a network of gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, Michal; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Leroy, Nicolas; Robinet, Florent; Vavoulidis, Miltiadis

    2010-01-01

    Time shifting the outputs of gravitational wave detectors operating in coincidence is a convenient way to estimate the background in a search for short-duration signals. However, this procedure is limited as increasing indefinitely the number of time shifts does not provide better estimates. We show that the false alarm rate estimation error saturates with the number of time shifts. In particular, for detectors with very different trigger rates, this error saturates at a large value. Explicit computations are done for two detectors, and for three detectors where the detection statistic relies on the logical 'OR' of the coincidences of the three couples in the network.

  20. Heat wave over India during summer 2015: an assessment of real time extended range forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanaik, D. R.; Mohapatra, M.; Srivastava, A. K.; Kumar, Arun

    2017-08-01

    Hot winds are the marked feature of summer season in India during late spring preceding the climatological onset of the monsoon season in June. Some years the conditions becomes very vulnerable with the maximum temperature ( T max) exceeding 45 °C for many days over parts of north-western, eastern coastal states of India and Indo-Gangetic plain. During summer of 2015 (late May to early June) eastern coastal states, central and northwestern parts of India experienced severe heat wave conditions leading to loss of thousands of human life in extreme high temperature conditions. It is not only the loss of human life but also the animals and birds were very vulnerable to this extreme heat wave conditions. In this study, an attempt is made to assess the performance of real time extended range forecast (forecast up to 3 weeks) of this scorching T max based on the NCEP's Climate Forecast System (CFS) latest version coupled model (CFSv2). The heat wave condition was very severe during the week from 22 to 28 May with subsequent week from 29 May to 4 June also witnessed high T max over many parts of central India including eastern coastal states of India. The 8 ensemble members of operational CFSv2 model are used once in a week to prepare the weekly bias corrected deterministic (ensemble mean) T max forecast for 3 weeks valid from Friday to Thursday coinciding with the heat wave periods of 2015. Using the 8 ensemble members separately and the CFSv2 corresponding hindcast climatology the probability of above and below normal T max is also prepared for the same 3 weeks. The real time deterministic and probabilistic forecasts did indicate impending heat wave over many parts of India during late May and early June of 2015 associated with strong northwesterly wind over main land mass of India, delaying the sea breeze, leading to heat waves over eastern coastal regions of India. Thus, the capability of coupled model in providing early warning of such killer heat wave can be very

  1. Analysis and Numerical Simulation on the Reduction Effect of Stress Waves Caused by Water Jet Slotting Near Blasting Source

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Dengfeng; Kang, Yong; Li, Dongyang; Wang, Xiaochuan; Yan, Fuwen

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most serious “side effects” of blast excavation, blast-induced vibration must be controlled for existing buildings and human beings. This paper proposes a method for blast-induced vibration reduction with water jet assistance according to the cutting characters of low-noised, environment-friendly water jet. The mechanism of vibration-isolation with water jet assistance was analyzed, and the stress wave energy attenuation models were established based on blasting theory and stres...

  2. Nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy in symbiosis with time reversal for localization of defects: TR-NEWS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dos Santos, S.; Vejvodová, Šárka; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2009), s. 14-14 ISSN 1213-3825. [NDT in PROGRESS. 12.11.2009-14.11.2009, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/07/1393; GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/274 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) * ESAM * time reversal (TR) * TR-NEWS imaging * tomography * DORT Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  3. Wave packet dynamics and photofragmentation in time-dependent quadratic potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1996-01-01

    We study the dynamics of generalized harmonic oscillator states in time-dependent quadratic potentials and derive analytical expressions for the momentum space and the Wigner phase space representation of these wave packets. Using these results we consider a model for the rotational excitation...... of a diatomic fragment produced in the photofragmentation of a triatomic molecule and we highlight the signatures of classical mechanics in the final product distribution of this process. (C) 1996 American Institute of Physics....

  4. Noise Performance of Millimeter-wave Silicon Based Mixed Tunneling Avalanche Transit Time(MITATT) Diode

    OpenAIRE

    Aritra Acharyya; Moumita Mukherjee; J. P. Banerjee

    2010-01-01

    A generalized method for small-signal simulation of avalanche noise in Mixed Tunneling Avalanche Transit Time (MITATT) device is presented in this paper where the effect of series resistance is taken into account. The method is applied to a millimeter-wave Double Drift Region (DDR) MITATT device based on Silicon to obtain noise spectral density and noise measure as a function of frequency for different values of series resistance. It is found that noise measure of the dev...

  5. THE NEW SOLUTION OF TIME FRACTIONAL WAVE EQUATION WITH CONFORMABLE FRACTIONAL DERIVATIVE DEFINITION

    OpenAIRE

    Çenesiz, Yücel; Kurt, Ali

    2015-01-01

    – In this paper, we used new fractional derivative definition, the conformable fractional derivative, for solving two and three dimensional time fractional wave equation. This definition is simple and very effective in the solution procedures of the fractional differential equations that have complicated solutions with classical fractional derivative definitions like Caputo, Riemann-Liouville and etc. The results show that conformable fractional derivative definition is usable and convenient ...

  6. Mountain Building in Central and Western Tien Shan Orogen: Insight from Joint Inversion of Surface Wave Phase Velocities and Body Wave Travel Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S.; Yang, Y.; Wang, K.

    2017-12-01

    The Tien Shan orogeny, situated in central Asia about 2000 km away from the collision boundary between Indian plate and Eurasian plate, is one of the highest, youngest, and most active intracontinental mountain belts on the earth. It first formed during the Paleozoic times and became reactivated at about 20Ma. Although many studies on the dynamic processes of the Tien Shan orogeny have been carried out before, its tectonic rejuvenation and uplift mechanism are still being debated. A high-resolution model of crust and mantle beneath Tien Shan is critical to discern among competing models for the mountain building. In this study, we collect and process seismic data recorded by several seismic arrays in the central and western Tien Shan region to generate surface wave dispersion curves at 6-140 s period using ambient noise tomography (ANT) and two-plane surface wave tomography (TPWT) methods. Using these dispersion curves, we construct a high-resolution 3-D image of shear wave velocity (Vs) in the crust and upper mantle up to 300 km depth. Our current model constrained only by surface waves shows that, under the Tien Shan orogenic belt, a strong low S-wave velocity anomaly exists in the uppermost mantle down to the depth of 200km, supporting the model that the hot upper mantle is upwelling under the Tien Shan orogenic belt, which may be responsible for the mountain building. To the west of central Tien Shan across the Talas-Fergana fault, low S-wave velocity anomalies in the upper mantle become much weaker and finally disappear beneath the Fergana basin. Because surface waves are insensitive to the structures below 300 km, body wave arrival times will be included for a joint inversion with surface waves to generate S-wave velocity structure from the surface down to the mantle transition zone. The joint inversion of both body and surface waves provide complementary constraints on structures at different depths and helps to achieve a more realistic model compared with

  7. An efficient higher-order PML in WLP-FDTD method for time reversed wave simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Kun; Shao, Wei; Ou, Haiyan; Wang, Bing-Zhong

    2016-09-01

    Derived from a stretched coordinate formulation, a higher-order complex frequency shifted (CFS) perfectly matched layer (PML) is proposed for the unconditionally stable finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method based on weighted Laguerre polynomials (WLPs). The higher-order PML is implemented with an auxiliary differential equation (ADE) approach. In order to further improve absorbing performance, the parameter values of stretching functions in the higher-order PML are optimized by the multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA). The optimal solutions can be chosen from the Pareto front for trading-off between two independent objectives. It is shown in a numerical test that the higher-order PML is efficient in terms of attenuating propagating waves and reducing late time reflections. Moreover, the higher-order PML can be placed very close to the wall when analyzing the channel characteristics of time reversal (TR) waves in a multipath indoor environment. Numerical examples of TR wave propagation demonstrate the availability of the proposed method.

  8. Pulsar Timing and Its Application for Navigation and Gravitational Wave Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Werner; Kramer, Michael; Sesana, Alberto

    2018-02-01

    Pulsars are natural cosmic clocks. On long timescales they rival the precision of terrestrial atomic clocks. Using a technique called pulsar timing, the exact measurement of pulse arrival times allows a number of applications, ranging from testing theories of gravity to detecting gravitational waves. Also an external reference system suitable for autonomous space navigation can be defined by pulsars, using them as natural navigation beacons, not unlike the use of GPS satellites for navigation on Earth. By comparing pulse arrival times measured on-board a spacecraft with predicted pulse arrivals at a reference location (e.g. the solar system barycenter), the spacecraft position can be determined autonomously and with high accuracy everywhere in the solar system and beyond. We describe the unique properties of pulsars that suggest that such a navigation system will certainly have its application in future astronautics. We also describe the on-going experiments to use the clock-like nature of pulsars to "construct" a galactic-sized gravitational wave detector for low-frequency (f_{GW}˜ 10^{-9} - 10^{-7} Hz) gravitational waves. We present the current status and provide an outlook for the future.

  9. Teens and Stress: Who Has Time for It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... list of the things that are causing your stress. Think about your friends, family, school, and other activities. Accept that you can’t ... This could be your priest or minister, a school counselor, or your family ... don’t help you deal with stress? There are safe and unsafe ways to deal ...

  10. Wind Stress, METOP ASCAT, 0.25 degrees, Global, Near Real Time, Curl

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes near real time wind stress data in zonal, meridional, modulus, and wind stress curl sets. This data begins with wind velocity...

  11. Wind Stress, METOP ASCAT, 0.25 degrees, Global, Near Real Time, Meridional

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes near real time wind stress data in zonal, meridional, modulus, and wind stress curl sets. This data begins with wind velocity...

  12. Wind Stress, METOP ASCAT, 0.25 degrees, Global, Near Real Time, Modulus

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes near real time wind stress data in zonal, meridional, modulus, and wind stress curl sets. This data begins with wind velocity...

  13. Wind Stress, METOP ASCAT, 0.25 degrees, Global, Near Real Time, Zonal

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes near real time wind stress data in zonal, meridional, modulus, and wind stress curl sets. This data begins with wind velocity...

  14. Expression for time travel based on diffusive wave theory: applicability and considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, J. C.; Escauriaza, C. R.; Passalacqua, P.; Gironas, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Prediction of hydrological response is of utmost importance when dealing with urban planning, risk assessment, or water resources management issues. With the advent of climate change, special care must be taken with respect to variations in rainfall and runoff due to rising temperature averages. Nowadays, while typical workstations have adequate power to run distributed routing hydrological models, it is still not enough for modeling on-the-fly, a crucial ability in a natural disaster context, where rapid decisions must be made. Semi-distributed time travel models, which compute a watershed's hydrograph without explicitly solving the full shallow water equations, appear as an attractive approach to rainfall-runoff modeling since, like fully distributed models, also superimpose a grid on the watershed, and compute runoff based on cell parameter values. These models are heavily dependent on the travel time expression for an individual cell. Many models make use of expressions based on kinematic wave theory, which is not applicable in cases where watershed storage is important, such as mild slopes. This work presents a new expression for concentration times in overland flow, based on diffusive wave theory, which considers not only the effects of storage but also the effects on upstream contribution. Setting upstream contribution equal to zero gives an expression consistent with previous work on diffusive wave theory; on the other hand, neglecting storage effects (i.e.: diffusion,) is shown to be equivalent to kinematic wave theory, currently used in many spatially distributed time travel models. The newly found expression is shown to be dependent on plane discretization, particularly when dealing with very non-kinematic cases. This is shown to be the result of upstream contribution, which gets larger downstream, versus plane length. This result also provides some light on the limits on applicability of the expression: when a certain kinematic threshold is reached, the

  15. Theory of electromagnetic cyclotron wave growth in a time-varying magnetoplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gail, W.B.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent growth rate for parallel propagating electromagnetic cyclotron waves is derived for a magnetoplasma which is characterized by a time dependent compressional perturbation superimposed on an equilibrium configuration. Such perturbations are commonly observed in the Earth's magnetosphere as a consequence of resonant field line oscillations, solar-wind disturbances, and other phenomena. The time dependencies of the magnetic field, thermal plasma density, energetic particle distribution function, and resonance condition are first related through a single dimensionless time parameter b(t) using the ideal MHD assumption. For cases in which the particle distribution can be described by F(α, E) = f(E)sin a(E) α, the time dependent wave growth rate is then given by γ≅ γ 0 (1 + Λ) where γ 0 is the equilibrium growth rate and Λ(b) is a function of the equilibrium parameters and the time parameter b. The term |Λ| is generally small compared to 1, and the effect is a small modulation of the equilibrium growth rate by Λ. If the particle distribution is locally near marginal stability, however, |Λ| is large compared to 1, and the growth rate modulation can be much larger than for a distribution which is not near marginal stability. The results suggest that particle populations which are near marginal stability may be strongly influenced by perturbations in the magnetic field and plasma. Marginally stable distributions may thus play an important role in magnetospheric dynamics as well as determination of radiation belt characteristics

  16. Solid State Spin-Wave Quantum Memory for Time-Bin Qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündoğan, Mustafa; Ledingham, Patrick M; Kutluer, Kutlu; Mazzera, Margherita; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2015-06-12

    We demonstrate the first solid-state spin-wave optical quantum memory with on-demand read-out. Using the full atomic frequency comb scheme in a Pr(3+):Y2SiO5 crystal, we store weak coherent pulses at the single-photon level with a signal-to-noise ratio >10. Narrow-band spectral filtering based on spectral hole burning in a second Pr(3+):Y2SiO5 crystal is used to filter out the excess noise created by control pulses to reach an unconditional noise level of (2.0±0.3)×10(-3) photons per pulse. We also report spin-wave storage of photonic time-bin qubits with conditional fidelities higher than achievable by a measure and prepare strategy, demonstrating that the spin-wave memory operates in the quantum regime. This makes our device the first demonstration of a quantum memory for time-bin qubits, with on-demand read-out of the stored quantum information. These results represent an important step for the use of solid-state quantum memories in scalable quantum networks.

  17. Hyperspherical time-dependent method with semiclassical outgoing waves for double photoionization of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazansky, A.K.; Selles, P.; Malegat, L.

    2003-01-01

    The hyperspherical time-dependent method with semiclassical outgoing waves for study of double photoionization of helium is presented. It is closely related to the hyperspherical R-matrix method with semiclassical outgoing waves [Phys. Rev. A 65, 032711 (2002)]: both split configuration space into two regions to solve the stationary inhomogeneous Schroedinger equation associated with the one-photon ionization problem, and both apply the same treatment to the outer region. However, the two methods differ radically in their treatments of the problem in the inner region: the most recent one applies a time-dependent approach for calculating the stationary wave function, while the previous one uses a R-matrix treatment. The excellent agreement observed between the triple differential cross sections obtained from these two basically different methods provides very strong support for both of them. Importantly, the very different numerical structures of both methods might make the most recent one a better candidate for investigating the near-threshold region

  18. Modification of 2-D Time-Domain Shallow Water Wave Equation using Asymptotic Expansion Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairuman, Teuku; Nasruddin, MN; Tulus; Ramli, Marwan

    2018-01-01

    Generally, research on the tsunami wave propagation model can be conducted by using a linear model of shallow water theory, where a non-linear side on high order is ignored. In line with research on the investigation of the tsunami waves, the Boussinesq equation model underwent a change aimed to obtain an improved quality of the dispersion relation and non-linearity by increasing the order to be higher. To solve non-linear sides at high order is used a asymptotic expansion method. This method can be used to solve non linear partial differential equations. In the present work, we found that this method needs much computational time and memory with the increase of the number of elements.

  19. Real-time measurements of spontaneous breathers and rogue wave events in optical fibre modulation instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Närhi, Mikko; Wetzel, Benjamin; Billet, Cyril; Toenger, Shanti; Sylvestre, Thibaut; Merolla, Jean-Marc; Morandotti, Roberto; Dias, Frederic; Genty, Goëry; Dudley, John M

    2016-12-19

    Modulation instability is a fundamental process of nonlinear science, leading to the unstable breakup of a constant amplitude solution of a physical system. There has been particular interest in studying modulation instability in the cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation, a generic model for a host of nonlinear systems including superfluids, fibre optics, plasmas and Bose-Einstein condensates. Modulation instability is also a significant area of study in the context of understanding the emergence of high amplitude events that satisfy rogue wave statistical criteria. Here, exploiting advances in ultrafast optical metrology, we perform real-time measurements in an optical fibre system of the unstable breakup of a continuous wave field, simultaneously characterizing emergent modulation instability breather pulses and their associated statistics. Our results allow quantitative comparison between experiment, modelling and theory, and are expected to open new perspectives on studies of instability dynamics in physics.

  20. Effect of wave-function localization on the time delay in photoemission from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, C.-H.; Thumm, U.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate streaking time delays in the photoemission from a solid model surface as a function of the degree of localization of the initial-state wave functions. We consider a one-dimensional slab with lattice constant a latt of attractive Gaussian-shaped core potentials of width σ. The parameter σ/a latt thus controls the overlap between adjacent core potentials and localization of the electronic eigenfunctions on the lattice points. Small values of σ/a latt latt > or approx 0.4. By numerically solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, we calculate photoemission spectra from which we deduce a characteristic bimodal shape of the band-averaged photoemission time delay: as the slab eigenfunctions become increasingly delocalized, the time delay quickly decreases near σ/a latt =0.3 from relatively large values below σ/a latt ∼0.2 to much smaller delays above σ/a latt ∼0.4. This change in wave-function localization facilitates the interpretation of a recently measured apparent relative time delay between the photoemission from core and conduction-band levels of a tungsten surface.

  1. Timing noise of radio pulsars and implications to neutron star's interior structure and gravitational wave detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Xie, Yi

    Abstract: Radio pulsars are the most stable natural clocks in the universe, yet timing irregularities or noises can still be substantial when the times of arrivals of their pulses are fitted with some well accepted spin-down models or templates of pulsars. In this talk, I will review our recent work on modeling the timing noises of radio pulsars. Our model includes a long-term power-law decay modulated by periodic oscillations of the surface magnetic fields of neutron stars. Our model can explain the statistical properties of their timing noises. We find that the spin-down evolutions of young and old pulsars are dominated by the power-law decay and periodic oscillations, respectively. By applying our model to the individual spin-down evolutions of several well-measured radio pulsars, we find evidence for Hall drifts and Hall waves in the crusts of neutron stars. The relaxation behaviors of both classical and slow glitches can also be modeled as evolution of their surface magnetic fields, but with opposite trends. Finally we also attempt to improve the sensitivity of detecting gravitational waves with pulsars by applying our model to reduce the timing residuals of millisecond radio pulsars. Our main publications related to this talk are: 2012, ApJ, 757, 153; 2012, ApJ, 761, 102; 2013, ApJ, 778, 31; arXiv:1307.6413, 1312.3049.

  2. Combined stress urinary incontinence surgery at the time of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    based approach to the problem of preventing stress urinary incontinence (SUI) following prolapse surgery. Design. We reviewed the current English language literature available on PubMed (Medline), as well as current relevant textbooks in print.

  3. Reduced Order Modelling in searches for continuous gravitational waves - I. barycentering time delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkin, M.; Doolan, S.; McMenamin, L.; Wette, K.

    2018-02-01

    The frequencies and phases of emission from extra-solar sources measured by Earth-bound observers are modulated by the motions of the observer with respect to the source, and through relativistic effects. These modulations depend critically on the source's sky-location. Precise knowledge of the modulations are required to coherently track the source's phase over long observations, for example, in pulsar timing, or searches for continuous gravitational waves. The modulations can be modelled as sky-location and time dependent time delays that convert arrival times at the observer to the inertial frame of the source, which can often be the solar system barycentre (SSB). We study the use of Reduced Order Modelling for speeding up the calculation of this time delay for any sky-location. We find that the time delay model can be decomposed into just four basis vectors, and with these the delay for any sky-location can be reconstructed to sub-nanosecond accuracy. When compared to standard routines for time delay calculation in gravitational wave searches, using the reduced basis can lead to speed-ups of 30 times. We have also studied components of time delays for sources in binary systems. Assuming eccentricities speed-ups of a factor of 10, or factors of two when interpolating the basis for different orbital periods or time stamps. In long-duration phase-coherent searches for sources with sky-position uncertainties, or binary parameter uncertainties, these speed-ups could allow enhancements in their scopes without large additional computational burdens.

  4. Examining the Relationship between Stress and Time Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-02-20

    listening to a musical performance, the sound of violins may be heard before the vocals (sequence), and the horns and drums may be heard together...tests used in the assessment of temporal perspective have included projective story telling and projective drawing techniques (e.g., Cottle, 1967...arithmetic while prompting them to work faster and more accurately is a commonly used stress induction technique in studies of stress (see review by Biondi

  5. Time-domain full-waveform inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves in presence of free-surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yudi; Gao, Lingli; Bohlen, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Correct estimation of near-surface seismic-wave velocity when encountering lateral heterogeneity and free surface topography is one of the challenges to current shallow seismic. We propose to use time-domain full-waveform inversion (FWI) of surface waves, including both Rayleigh and Love waves, to solve this problem. We adopt a 2D time-domain finite-difference method with an improved vacuum formulation (IVF) to simulate shallow-seismic Rayleigh wave in presence of free-surface topography. We modify the IVF for SH-wave equation for the simulation of Love wave in presence of topographic free surface and prove its accuracy by benchmark tests. Checkboard model tests are performed in both cases when free-surface topography is included or neglected in FWI. Synthetic model containing a dipping planar free surface and lateral heterogeneity was then tested, in both cases of considering and neglecting free-surface topography. Both checkerboard and synthetic models show that Rayleigh- and Love-wave FWI have similar ability of reconstructing near-surface structures when free-surface topography is considered, while Love-wave FWI could reconstruct near-surface structures better than Rayleigh-wave when free-surface topography is neglected.

  6. Transient stresses al Parkfield, California, produced by the M 7.4 Landers earthquake of June 28, 1992: implications for the time-dependence of fault friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Fletcher

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available he M 7.4 Landers earthquake triggered widespread seismicity in the Western U.S. Because the transient dynamic stresses induced at regional distances by the Landers surface waves are much larger than the expected static stresses, the magnitude and the characteristics of the dynamic stresses may bear upon the earthquake triggering mechanism. The Landers earthquake was recorded on the UPSAR array, a group of 14 triaxial accelerometers located within a 1-square-km region 10 km southwest of the town of Parkfield, California, 412 km northwest of the Landers epicenter. We used a standard geodetic inversion procedure to determine the surface strain and stress tensors as functions of time from the observed dynamic displacements. Peak dynamic strains and stresses at the Earth's surface are about 7 microstrain and 0.035 MPa, respectively, and they have a flat amplitude spectrum between 2 s and 15 s period. These stresses agree well with stresses predicted from a simple rule of thumb based upon the ground velocity spectrum observed at a single station. Peak stresses ranged from about 0.035 MPa at the surface to about 0.12 MPa between 2 and 14 km depth, with the sharp increase of stress away from the surface resulting from the rapid increase of rigidity with depth and from the influence of surface wave mode shapes. Comparison of Landers-induced static and dynamic stresses at the hypocenter of the Big Bear aftershock provides a clear example that faults are stronger on time scales of tens of seconds than on time scales of hours or longer.

  7. Timing Effects of Heat-Stress on Plant Ecophysiological Characteristics and Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Heckathorn, Scott A; Mainali, Kumar; Tripathee, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    Heat-waves with higher intensity and frequency and longer durations are expected in the future due to global warming, which could have dramatic impacts in agriculture, economy and ecology. This field study examined how plant responded to heat-stress (HS) treatment at different timing in naturally occurring vegetation. HS treatment (5 days at 40.5°C) were applied to 12 1 m 2 plots in restored prairie vegetation dominated by a warm-season C 4 grass, Andropogon gerardii , and a warm-season C 3 forb, Solidago canadensis , at different growing stages. During and after each heat stress (HS) treatment, temperature were monitored for air, canopy, and soil; net CO 2 assimilation ( A net ), quantum yield of photosystem II (Φ PSII ), stomatal conductance ( g s ), and internal CO 2 level ( C i ), specific leaf area (SLA), and chlorophyll content of the dominant species were measured. One week after the last HS treatment, all plots were harvested and the biomass of above-ground tissue and flower weight of the two dominant species were determined. HS decreased physiological performance and growth for both species, with S. canadensis being affected more than A. gerardii , indicated by negative HS effect on both physiological and growth responses for S. canadensis . There were significant timing effect of HS on the two species, with greater reductions in the net photosynthetic rate and productivity occurred when HS was applied at later-growing season. The reduction in aboveground productivity in S. canadensis but not A. gerardii could have important implications for plant community structure by increasing the competitive advantage of A. gerardii in this grassland. The present experiment showed that HS, though ephemeral, may promote long-term effects on plant community structure, vegetation dynamics, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning of terrestrial biomes when more frequent and severe HS occur in the future.

  8. Real-time protein aggregation monitoring with a Bloch surface wave-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Sara; Barakat, Elsie; Descrovi, Emiliano; Neier, Reinhard; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2014-05-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of amyloid proteins has been associated with incurable diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. In the specific case of Alzheimer's disease, recent studies have shown that cell toxicity is caused by soluble oligomeric forms of aggregates appearing in the early stages of aggregation, rather than by insoluble fibrils. Research on new strategies of diagnosis is imperative to detect the disease prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. Here, we propose the use of an optical method for protein aggregation dynamic studies using a Bloch surface wave based approach. A one dimension photonic crystal made of a periodic stack of silicon oxide and silicon nitride layers is used to excite a Bloch surface wave, which is sensitive to variation of the refractive index of an aqueous solution. The aim is to detect the early dynamic events of protein aggregation and fibrillogenesis of the amyloid-beta peptide Aβ42, which plays a central role in the onset of the Alzheimer's disease. The detection principle relies on the refractive index changes caused by the depletion of the Aβ42 monomer concentration during oligomerization and fibrillization. We demonstrate the efficacy of the Bloch surface wave approach by monitoring in real-time the first crucial steps of Aβ42 oligomerization.

  9. Gravitational waves from a supercooled electroweak phase transition and their detection with pulsar timing arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobakhidze, Archil; Lagger, Cyril; Manning, Adrian [University of Sydney, ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Yue, Jason [National Taiwan Normal University, Department of Physics, Taipei (China)

    2017-08-15

    We investigate the properties of a stochastic gravitational wave background produced by a first-order electroweak phase transition in the regime of extreme supercooling. We study a scenario whereby the percolation temperature that signifies the completion of the transition, T{sub p}, is as low as a few MeV (nucleosynthesis temperature), while most of the true vacuum bubbles are formed much earlier at the nucleation temperature, T{sub n} ∝ 50 GeV. This implies that the gravitational wave spectrum is mainly produced by the collisions of large bubbles and characterised by a large amplitude and a peak frequency as low as f ∝ 10{sup -9}-10{sup -7} Hz. We show that such a scenario can occur in (but not limited to) a model based on a non-linear realisation of the electroweak gauge group, so that the Higgs vacuum configuration is altered by a cubic coupling. In order to carefully quantify the evolution of the phase transition of this model over such a wide temperature range we go beyond the usual fast transition approximation, taking into account the expansion of the Universe as well as the behaviour of the nucleation probability at low temperatures. Our computation shows that there exists a range of parameters for which the gravitational wave spectrum lies at the edge between the exclusion limits of current pulsar timing array experiments and the detection band of the future Square Kilometre Array observatory. (orig.)

  10. Properties of information carrying waves in cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Shea, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recently we studied the effects of information carrying waves propagating through isotropic cosmologies. By information carrying we mean that the waves have an arbitrary dependence on a function. We found that the waves introduce shear and anisotropic stress into the universe. We then constructed explicit examples of pure gravity wave perturbations for which the presence of this anisotropic stress is essential and the null hypersurfaces playing the role of the histories of the wavefronts in the background space-time are shear free. Motivated by this result we now prove that these two properties are true for all information carrying waves in isotropic cosmologies

  11. Multi-Mode Lamb Wave Arrival Time Extraction for Improved Tomographic Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinders, Mark K.; Hou Jidong; Leonard, Kevin R.

    2005-01-01

    An ultrasonic signal processing technique is applied to multi-mode arrival time estimation from Lamb waveforms. The basic tool is a simplified time-scale projection called a dynamic wavelet fingerprint (DWFP) which enables direct observation of the variation of features of interest in non-stationary ultrasonic signals. The DWFP technique was used to automatically detect and evaluate each candidate through-transmitted Lamb mode. The area of the dynamic wavelet fingerprint was then used as a feature to distinguish false modes caused by noise and other interference from the true modes of interest. The set of estimated arrival times were then used as inputs for tomographic reconstruction. The Lamb wave tomography images generated with these estimated arrival times were able to indicate different defects in aluminum plates

  12. Body wave travel times and amplitudes for present-day seismic model of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raevskiy, Sergey; Gudkova, Tamara

    At the moment Martian interior structure models are constrained by the satellite observational data (the mass, the moment of inertia factor, the Love number k _{2}) (Konopliv et al., 2011) and high pressure experimental data (Bertka and Fei, 1997). Seismological observations could provide unparalleled capability for studying Martian interiors. Future missions include seismic experiments on Mars (Lognonné et al., 2012). The main instrument for these seismic experiments is a broadband seismometer (Robert et al., 2012). When seismic measurements are not yet available, physically consistent interior models, characterized by properties of relevant minerals, make possible to study of the seismic response of the planet. \\To estimate travel times for direct P, S, core reflected PcP, ScS and core refracted PKP body waves as a function of epicentral distance and hypocentral depth, as well as their amplitudes at the surface for a given marsquake, software product was developed in MatLab, as it encompasses many plotting routines that plot resulting travel times and ray paths. The computational results have been compared with the program TTBox (Knapmeyer, 2004). The code computes seismic ray paths and travel times for a one-dimentional spherical interior model (density and seismic velocities are functions of a radius only). Calculations of travel times tables for direct P, S, core reflected PcP, ScS and core refracted PKP waves and their amplitudes are carried out for a trial seismic model of Mars M14_3 from (Zharkov et al., 2009): the core radius is 1800 km, the thickness of the crust is 50 km. Direct and core reflected P and S waves are recorded to a maximum epicentral distance equal to about 100(°) , and PKP arrivals can be detected for epicental distances larger than 150(°) . The shadow zone is getting wider in comparison with previous results (Knapmeyer, 2010), as the liquid core radius of the seismic model under consideration is larger. Based on the estimates of

  13. ARRIVAL TIME DIFFERENCES BETWEEN GRAVITATIONAL WAVES AND ELECTROMAGNETIC SIGNALS DUE TO GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ryuichi [Faculty of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan)

    2017-01-20

    In this study we demonstrate that general relativity predicts arrival time differences between gravitational wave (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) signals caused by the wave effects in gravitational lensing. The GW signals can arrive earlier than the EM signals in some cases if the GW/EM signals have passed through a lens, even if both signals were emitted simultaneously by a source. GW wavelengths are much larger than EM wavelengths; therefore, the propagation of the GWs does not follow the laws of geometrical optics, including the Shapiro time delay, if the lens mass is less than approximately 10{sup 5} M {sub ⊙}( f /Hz){sup −1}, where f is the GW frequency. The arrival time difference can reach ∼0.1 s ( f /Hz){sup −1} if the signals have passed by a lens of mass ∼8000 M {sub ⊙}( f /Hz){sup −1} with the impact parameter smaller than the Einstein radius; therefore, it is more prominent for lower GW frequencies. For example, when a distant supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) in a galactic center is lensed by an intervening galaxy, the time lag becomes of the order of 10 days. Future pulsar timing arrays including the Square Kilometre Array and X-ray detectors may detect several time lags by measuring the orbital phase differences between the GW/EM signals in the SMBHBs. Gravitational lensing imprints a characteristic modulation on a chirp waveform; therefore, we can deduce whether a measured arrival time lag arises from intrinsic source properties or gravitational lensing. Determination of arrival time differences would be extremely useful in multimessenger observations and tests of general relativity.

  14. Bipolar square-wave current source for transient electromagnetic systems based on constant shutdown time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shilong; Yin, Changchun; Lin, Jun; Yang, Yu; Hu, Xueyan

    2016-03-01

    Cooperative work of multiple magnetic transmitting sources is a new trend in the development of transient electromagnetic system. The key is the bipolar current waves shutdown, concurrently in the inductive load. In the past, it was difficult to use the constant clamping voltage technique to realize the synchronized shutdown of currents with different peak values. Based on clamping voltage technique, we introduce a new controlling method with constant shutdown time. We use the rising time to control shutdown time and use low voltage power source to control peak current. From the viewpoint of the circuit energy loss, by taking the high-voltage capacitor bypass resistance and the capacitor of the passive snubber circuit into account, we establish the relationship between the rising time and the shutdown time. Since the switch is not ideal, we propose a new method to test the shutdown time by the low voltage, the high voltage and the peak current. Experimental results show that adjustment of the current rising time can precisely control the value of the clamp voltage. When the rising time is fixed, the shutdown time is unchanged. The error for shutdown time deduced from the energy consumption is less than 6%. The new controlling method on current shutdown proposed in this paper can be used in the cooperative work of borehole and ground transmitting system.

  15. An innovative method for automatic determination of time of arrival for Lamb waves excited by impact events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junxiao; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Patil, Devendra; Ge, Maochen; Li, Hongnan; Song, Gangbing

    2017-05-01

    Lamb waves have great potential as a diagnostic tool in the application of structural health monitoring. Propagation properties of Lamb waves are affected by the state of the structure that the waves are traveling upon. Thus Lamb waves can carry information about the structure as they travel across a structure. However, the dispersive, multimodal and attenuation characteristics of Lamb waves make it difficult to determine the time of arrival of Lamb waves. To deal with these characteristics, an innovative method to automatically determine the time of arrival for impact-induced Lamb waves without human intervention is proposed in this paper. Lead zirconate titanate sensors mounted on the surface of an aluminum plate were used to measure the Lamb waves excited by an impact. The time of arrival was determined based on wavelet decomposition, Hilbert transform and statistics (Grubbs’ test and maximum likelihood estimation). Both of numerical analysis and physical measurements have verified the accuracy of this method for impacts on an aluminum plate.

  16. Variational space–time (dis)continuous Galerkin method for nonlinear free surface water waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagarina, Elena; Ambati, V.R.; van der Vegt, Jacobus J.W.; Bokhove, Onno

    2014-01-01

    A new variational finite element method is developed for nonlinear free surface gravity water waves using the potential flow approximation. This method also handles waves generated by a wave maker. Its formulation stems from Miles’ variational principle for water waves together with a finite element

  17. STEREO WAVES Capabilities for Studying Initiation and Early-time Dynamics of Solar Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, M. L.

    2005-01-01

    In 2006, NASA will launch the twin STEREO spacecraft from Kennedy Space Center into a pair of heliocentric orbits near 1 AU such that the spacecraft will move away from Earth (ahead and behind) at about 22 degrees per year. The purposes of the STEREO Mission are to understand the causes and mechanisms of coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation and to follow the propagation of CMEs through the heliosphere. Additionally, STEREO will study the mechanisms and sites of solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration and determine 3-D time-dependent traces of the magnetic topology, temperature, density and velocity of the solar wind between the sun and Earth. To accomplish these goals, each STEREO spacecraft will be equipped with set of optical and particles and fields instruments including the STEREO WAVES (SWAVES) instrument which will use radio waves to track the location of CME-driven shocks (via type I1 bursts) and the 3-D topology of open field lines along which energetic particles flow (via the ubiquitous type I11 bursts). Type 11 bursts very often commence with a series of special type 111 bursts (called SA or type 111-L bursts) that likely coincide with CME liftoff time, thus SWAVES should be able to determine this time to within 15 sec. It is also known that the occurrence of SEP events is usually accompanied by type I1 radio bursts at decametric wavelengths as well as strong type III bursts at all wavelengths. SWAVES will be able to determine the initiation of these bursts to within 15 sec, and from the simultaneous measurements from the two spacecraft, should be able to triangulate their source locations. The utility of radio observations and the capabilities of SWAVES will be illustrated by showing a number of examples using the similar Wind WAVES instrument in combination with SOH0 coronagraph and RHESSI high energy X-ray/gamma ray observations.

  18. Significance of T wave normalization in the electrocardiogram during exercise stress test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, J.J.; Heng, M.K.; Sevrin, R.; Udhoji, V.N.

    1987-01-01

    Although normalization of previously inverted T waves in the ECG is not uncommon during exercise treadmill testing, the clinical significance of this finding is still unclear. This was investigated in 45 patients during thallium-201 exercise testing. Patients with secondary T wave abnormalities on the resting ECG and ischemic exercise ST segment depression were excluded. On the thallium-201 scans, the left ventricle was divided into anterior-septal and inferior-posterior segments; these were considered equivalent to T wave changes in leads V1 and V5, and aVF, respectively. A positive thallium-201 scan was found in 43 of 45 (95%) patients and in 49 of 52 (94%) cardiac segments that showed T wave normalization. When thallium scans and T wave changes were matched to sites of involvement, 76% of T wave normalization in lead aV, was associated with positive thallium scans in the inferior-posterior segments, and 77% of T wave normalization in V1 and V5 was associated with positive thallium scans in the anterior-septal segments. These site correlations were similar for reversible and fixed thallium defects, and for patients not on digoxin therapy. Similar correlations were noted for the sites of T wave changes and coronary artery lesions in 12 patients who had angiography. In patients with a high prevalence for coronary artery disease, exercise T wave normalization is highly specific for the presence of the disease. In addition, it represents predominantly either previous injury or exercise-induced ischemic changes over the site of ECG involvement, rather than reciprocal changes of the opposite ventricular wall

  19. Detection of Ultrasonic Stress Waves in Structures Using 3D Shaped Optic Fiber Based on a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chengming; Zhou, Wensong; Xie, Yawen

    2018-04-16

    This work proposes a 3D shaped optic fiber sensor for ultrasonic stress waves detection based on the principle of a Mach–Zehnder interferometer. This sensor can be used to receive acoustic emission signals in the passive damage detection methods and other types of ultrasonic signals propagating in the active damage detection methods, such as guided wave-based methods. The sensitivity of an ultrasonic fiber sensor based on the Mach–Zehnder interferometer mainly depends on the length of the sensing optical fiber; therefore, the proposed sensor achieves the maximum possible sensitivity by wrapping an optical fiber on a hollow cylinder with a base. The deformation of the optical fiber is produced by the displacement field of guided waves in the hollow cylinder. The sensor was first analyzed using the finite element method, which demonstrated its basic sensing capacity, and the simulation signals have the same characteristics in the frequency domain as the excitation signal. Subsequently, the primary investigations were conducted via a series of experiments. The sensor was used to detect guided wave signals excited by a piezoelectric wafer in an aluminum plate, and subsequently it was tested on a reinforced concrete beam, which produced acoustic emission signals via impact loading and crack extension when it was loaded to failure. The signals obtained from a piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor were used for comparison, and the results indicated that the proposed 3D fiber optic sensor can detect ultrasonic signals in the specific frequency response range.

  20. S-wave propagating in an anisotropic inhomogeneous elastic medium under the influence of gravity, initial stress, electric and magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakar Rajneesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of gravity, initial stress, non-homogeneity, electric and magnetic field on the propagation of shear waves in an anisotropic incompressible medium. Various graphs are plotted to show the effect of direction of propagation, the anisotropy, magnetic field, electric field, non-homogeneity of the medium and the initial stress on shear waves. The dispersion equations for shear waves are obtained and discussed for different cases. In fact, in the absence of various material parameters, these equations are in agreement with the classical results for isotropic medium.

  1. Expected Time to Return to Athletic Participation After Stress Fracture in Division I Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L; Jamieson, Marissa; Everson, Sonsecharae; Siegel, Courtney

    2017-12-01

    Few studies have documented expected time to return to athletic participation after stress fractures in elite athletes. Time to return to athletic participation after stress fractures would vary by site and severity of stress fracture. Retrospective cohort study. Level 3. All stress fractures diagnosed in a single Division I collegiate men's and women's track and field/cross-country team were recorded over a 3-year period. Site and severity of injury were graded based on Kaeding-Miller classification system for stress fractures. Time to return to full unrestricted athletic participation was recorded for each athlete and correlated with patient sex and site and severity grade of injury. Fifty-seven stress fractures were diagnosed in 38 athletes (mean age, 20.48 years; range, 18-23 years). Ten athletes sustained recurrent or multiple stress fractures. Thirty-seven injuries occurred in women and 20 in men. Thirty-three stress fractures occurred in the tibia, 10 occurred in the second through fourth metatarsals, 3 occurred in the fifth metatarsal, 6 in the tarsal bones (2 navicular), 2 in the femur, and 5 in the pelvis. There were 31 grade II stress fractures, 11 grade III stress fractures, and 2 grade V stress fractures (in the same patient). Mean time to return to unrestricted sport participation was 12.9 ± 5.2 weeks (range, 6-27 weeks). No significant differences in time to return were noted based on injury location or whether stress fracture was grade II or III. The expected time to return to full unrestricted athletic participation after diagnosis of a stress fracture is 12 to 13 weeks for all injury sites. Athletes with grade V (nonunion) stress fractures may require more time to return to sport.

  2. Gravitational-wave limits from pulsar timing constrain supermassive black hole evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, R M; Ravi, V; Coles, W A; Hobbs, G; Keith, M J; Manchester, R N; Wyithe, J S B; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Khoo, J; Levin, Y; Osłowski, S; Sarkissian, J M; van Straten, W; Verbiest, J P W; Wang, J-B

    2013-10-18

    The formation and growth processes of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are not well constrained. SMBH population models, however, provide specific predictions for the properties of the gravitational-wave background (GWB) from binary SMBHs in merging galaxies throughout the universe. Using observations from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we constrain the fractional GWB energy density (Ω(GW)) with 95% confidence to be Ω(GW)(H0/73 kilometers per second per megaparsec)(2) formation model implemented in the Millennium Simulation Project is inconsistent with our limit with 50% probability.

  3. Multi-Channel Optical Coherence Elastography Using Relative and Absolute Shear-Wave Time of Flight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elyas, Eli; Grimwood, Alex; Erler, Janine Terra

    2017-01-01

    Elastography, the imaging of elastic properties of soft tissues, is well developed for macroscopic clinical imaging of soft tissues and can provide useful information about various pathological processes which is complementary to that provided by the original modality. Scaling down...... propagating in a three-dimensional (3D) medium. A needle, embedded in the gel, was excited to vibrate along its long axis and the displacement as a function of time and distance from the needle associated with the resulting shear waves was detected using four M-mode images acquired simultaneously using...

  4. Time domain simulation of piezoelectric excitation of guided waves in rails using waveguide finite elements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available by * ploveday@csir.co.za Sensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems 2007, edited by Masayoshi Tomizuka, Chung-Bang Yun, Victor Giurgiutiu, Proc. of SPIE Vol. 6529, 65290V, (2007) · 0277-786X/07/$18 · doi: 10... waves excited by the patch when driven with a 1 Vpeak harmonic excitation. In order to verify the proposed numerical method, time responses were computed and compared to measured responses. The measurements were performed using a National...

  5. Cost, Time, and Risk Assessment of Different Wave Energy Converter Technology Development Trajectories: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Jochem W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Laird, Daniel [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Costello, Ronan [Wave Venture; Roberts, Jesse [Sandia National Laboratories; Bull, Diana [Sandia National Laboratories; Babarit, Aurelien [Ecole Centrale de Nantes; Nielsen, Kim [Ramboll; Ferreira, Claudio Bittencourt [DNV-GL; Kennedy, Ben [Wave Venture

    2017-09-14

    This paper presents a comparative assessment of three fundamentally different wave energy converter technology development trajectories. The three technology development trajectories are expressed and visualised as a function of technology readiness levels and technology performance levels. The assessment shows that development trajectories that initially prioritize technology readiness over technology performance are likely to require twice the development time, consume a threefold of the development cost, and are prone to a risk of technical or commercial failure of one order of magnitude higher than those development trajectories that initially prioritize technology performance over technology readiness.

  6. Exact Time-Dependent Nonlinear Dispersive Wave Solutions in Compressible Magnetized Plasmas Exhibiting Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Nikhil; Maity, Chandan; Schamel, Hans

    2011-04-01

    Compressional waves in a magnetized plasma of arbitrary resistivity are treated with the Lagrangian fluid approach. An exact nonlinear solution with a nontrivial space and time dependence is obtained with boundary conditions as in Harris’ current sheet. The solution shows competition among hydrodynamic convection, magnetic field diffusion, and dispersion. This results in a collapse of density and the magnetic field in the absence of dispersion. The dispersion effects arrest the collapse of density but not of the magnetic field. A possible application is in the early stage of magnetic star formation.

  7. Time-domain hybrid method for simulating large amplitude motions of ships advancing in waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukui Liu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Typical results obtained by a newly developed, nonlinear time domain hybrid method for simulating large amplitude motions of ships advancing with constant forward speed in waves are presented. The method is hybrid in the way of combining a time-domain transient Green function method and a Rankine source method. The present approach employs a simple double integration algorithm with respect to time to simulate the free-surface boundary condition. During the simulation, the diffraction and radiation forces are computed by pressure integration over the mean wetted surface, whereas the incident wave and hydrostatic restoring forces/moments are calculated on the instantaneously wetted surface of the hull. Typical numerical results of application of the method to the seakeeping performance of a standard containership, namely the ITTC S175, are herein presented. Comparisons have been made between the results from the present method, the frequency domain 3D panel method (NEWDRIFT of NTUA-SDL and available experimental data and good agreement has been observed for all studied cases between the results of the present method and comparable other data.

  8. Electromagnetic wave energy and momentum equations in transparent, dispersive, space- and time-varying media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katou, Kanemitsu

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that the transport equations for the electromagnetic wave energy density W sub(k) and momentum density P sub(k) in transparent, dispersive, space- and time-varying media are given by dW sub(k)/dt = ωsub(k)sup(-1)deltaωsub(k)/delta t W sub(k) + 2γsub(k)W sub(k) and by dP sub(k)/dt = -k -1 .deltaωsub(k)/delta r P sub(k) + 2γsub(k)P sub(k), respectively, where d/dt denotes the total time derivative along the ray trajectory and γsub(k) is the growth rate. The terms ωsub(k)sup(-1)deltaωsub(k)/delta t W sub(k) and -k -1 .deltaωsub(k)/delta r P sub(k) result from the fact that the wave energy and momentum density are not adiabatic invariants in space- and time-varying media. It is assumed that the geometric optics approximation and the nonlocal linear response theory are valid. (author)

  9. A Combined Time Domain Impedance Probe And Plasma Wave Receiver System For Small Satellite Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, E. A.; Clark, D. C.; Vadepu, S. K.; Patra, S.

    2017-12-01

    A Time Domain Impedance Probe (TDIP) measures electron density and electron neutral collision frequencies in the ionosphere. This instrument has been tested on a sounding rocket flight and is now being further developed to fly on a NASA Undergraduate Student Instrument Program (USIP) cubesat to be launched out of the ISS in 2019. Here we report on the development of a new combined TDIP and plasma wave instrument that can be used on cubesat platforms to measure local electron parameters, and also to receive or transmit electron scale waves. This combined instrument can be used to study short time and space scale phenomena in the upper ionosphere using only RF signals. The front end analog circuitry is dual-purposed to perform active or passive probing of the ambient plasma. Two dipole antennas are used, one is optimzed for impedance measurements, while the other is optimized for transmitter-receiver performance. We show our circuit realization, and initial results from laboratory measurements using the TDIP prototype modified for receiver function. We also show Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulations of an electrically long antenna immersed in a magnetized plasma used to optimize the transmitter receiver performance.

  10. Wave-induced abiotic stress shapes phenotypic diversity in a coral reef fish across a geographical cline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, C. J.; Binning, S. A.; Wainwright, P. C.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2013-09-01

    While morphological variation across geographical clines has been well documented, it is often unclear whether such changes enhance individual performance to local environments. We examined whether the damselfish Acanthochromis polyacanthus display functional changes in swimming phenotype across a 40-km cline in wave-driven water motion on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. A. polyacanthus populations displayed strong intraspecific variation in swimming morphology and performance that matched local levels of water motion: individuals on reefs subject to high water motion displayed higher aspect-ratio fins and faster swimming speeds than conspecifics on sheltered reefs. Remarkably, intraspecific variation within A. polyacanthus spanned over half the diversity seen among closely related damselfish species from the same region. We find that local selection driven by wave-induced abiotic stress is an overarching ecological mechanism shaping the inter- and intraspecific locomotor diversity of coral reef fishes.

  11. Time-dependent density-functional theory in the projector augmented-wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Michael; Häkkinen, Hannu; Lehtovaara, Lauri

    2008-01-01

    We present the implementation of the time-dependent density-functional theory both in linear-response and in time-propagation formalisms using the projector augmented-wave method in real-space grids. The two technically very different methods are compared in the linear-response regime where we fo...... surfaces for a set of atoms and molecules with the linear-response method and by calculating nonlinear emission spectra using the time-propagation method....... found perfect agreement in the calculated photoabsorption spectra. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the two methods as well as their convergence properties. We demonstrate different applications of the methods by calculating excitation energies and excited state Born–Oppenheimer potential...

  12. Progress in parallel implementation of the multilevel plane wave time domain algorithm

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yang

    2013-07-01

    The computational complexity and memory requirements of classical schemes for evaluating transient electromagnetic fields produced by Ns dipoles active for Nt time steps scale as O(NtN s 2) and O(Ns 2), respectively. The multilevel plane wave time domain (PWTD) algorithm [A.A. Ergin et al., Antennas and Propagation Magazine, IEEE, vol. 41, pp. 39-52, 1999], viz. the extension of the frequency domain fast multipole method (FMM) to the time domain, reduces the above costs to O(NtNslog2Ns) and O(Ns α) with α = 1.5 for surface current distributions and α = 4/3 for volumetric ones. Its favorable computational and memory costs notwithstanding, serial implementations of the PWTD scheme unfortunately remain somewhat limited in scope and ill-suited to tackle complex real-world scattering problems, and parallel implementations are called for. © 2013 IEEE.

  13. Ocean Current and Wave Effects on Wind Stress Drag Coefficient Over the Global Ocean

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kara, A. B; Metzger, E. J; Bourassa, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    ...%), but the notable impact of the latter is only evident in the tropical Pacific Ocean; (2) the presence of waves generally makes winds weaker and C0 lower almost everywhere over the global ocean; (3...

  14. Layering Concept for Wave Shaping and Lateral Distribution of Stresses During Impact

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ding, J

    2001-01-01

    .... Numerical simulations were carried out to address the research objectives. To explore the layering concept, we first used numerical simulations to demonstrate the feasibility of load spreading and wave shaping by layered structures...

  15. Multi-Wave Prospective Examination of the Stress-Reactivity Extension of Response Styles Theory of Depression in High-Risk Children and Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, John R. Z.; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Sheshko, Dana M.; Fishman, Michael B.; Stolow, Darren

    2012-01-01

    The current study tested the stress-reactivity extension of response styles theory of depression (Nolen-Hoeksema "Journal of Abnormal Psychology" 100:569-582, 1991) in a sample of high-risk children and early adolescents from a vulnerability-stress perspective using a multi-wave longitudinal design. In addition, we examined whether obtained…

  16. The interplay of couple's shared time, women's intimacy, and intradyadic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milek, Anne; Butler, Emily A; Bodenmann, Guy

    2015-12-01

    Theoretically, spending time together should be central for couples to build intimacy and should be associated with less relationship stress; however, few empirical studies have examined these links. The present study used 14 days of diary data from 92 women to investigate the interplay between the amount of time they spent with their partner (shared time), intimacy, and daily stress originating inside the relationship (intradyadic stress) on a within- and between-personal level. Multilevel analyses revealed moderation patterns: For example, when women spent more time with their partners than usual on a weekday with low levels of intradyadic stress, they reported higher intimacy. These associations varied substantially between women and were weaker on the weekend or on days with high levels of intradyadic stress. At the between-person level, higher average shared time appeared to buffer the negative association between intradyadic stress and intimacy. Our results suggest that daily fluctuations in intradyadic stress, intimacy, and shared time may have different implications compared with aggregated amounts of those variables. Spending more time together on a weekday with low intimacy might be linked to more intradyadic stress, but aggregated over the long run, spending more time together may provide opportunities for stress resolution and help couples to maintain their intimacy. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Wound treatment and pain management: a stressful time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Kyoichi; Upton, Dominic

    2013-12-01

    This review and case study report considers the evidence to indicate that the progress of wound healing is negatively affected by the presence of stressors and in circumstances where patients are in pain. It considers the relationship between perceptions of pain, stress and delayed wound healing with a specific focus on guidance for clinical practice. It is appreciated that although the literature has examined these issues in the management of acute wounds, demonstrating that psychological stress can have detrimental effects on the wound-healing process, the evidence to support this link in relation to chronic wounds is limited. The review considers evidence indicating that punch biopsy wounds heal more slowly in subjects under stress on account of caring for family members with long-term illnesses and also considers briefly the relationship between cortisol secretion in response to stress and the consequent influences on cytokine levels and the wound-healing process. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  18. Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Time for Integration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Shannon

    2003-01-01

    An increasing prevalence of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnoses among women illustrates problems and limitations of the medical model system. Article explores overlapping relationship between BPD and PTSD and critiques how both are viewed within the mental health community. Previous research is…

  19. Stress and emotional memory : a matter of timing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joëls, Marian; Fernandez, Guillen; Roozendaal, Benno

    Stressful events activate the amygdala and a network of associated brain regions. Studies in both humans and rodents indicate that noradrenaline has a prominent role in this activation. Noradrenaline induces a hypervigilant state that helps to remember the event. This mnemonic effect is enhanced

  20. Combined stress urinary incontinence surgery at the time of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-09-18

    Sep 18, 2009 ... of UI (history, questionnaire). No leakage during. UDS. 42 (SD. 18) mo. (range. 12 - 74). De novo SUI. 26.4%. Control group. N=32. 38 (SD. 19) mo. (range. 15 - 71). De novo SUI 3.1%. ASCP = open abdominal sacrocolpopexy; SUI = stress urinary incontinence; POP = pelvic organ prolapse; UI = urinary ...

  1. Experimental analysis on stress wave in inhomogeneous multi-layered structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yun Ho; Ham, Hyo Sick

    1998-01-01

    The guided wave propagation in inhomogeneous multi-layered structures is experimentally explored based on theoretical dispersion curves. It turns out that proper selection of incident angle and frequency is critical for guided wave generation in multi-layered structures. Theoretical dispersion curves greatly depend on adhesive zone thickness, layer thickness and material properties. It was possible to determine the adhesive zone thickness of an inhomogeneous multi-layered structure by monitoring experimentally the change of dispersion curves.

  2. Characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in time-varying magnetized plasma in magnetic window region of reentry blackout mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The “magnetic window” is considered a promising means to eliminate reentry communication blackout. However, the turbulence of plasma sheath results in phase jitter and amplitude turbulence of electromagnetic (EM wave and may influence the eliminating effect. Therefore, the effect of fluctuating property of reentry plasma sheath on EM wave propagation when a magnetic field is used for eliminating blackout is investigated. For this purpose, a time-varying electron density model, which includes both temporal variation and spatial turbulence, is proposed. Hybrid matrix method is also employed to investigate the interaction between time-varying magnetized plasma and EM wave. The EM wave transmission coefficients in time-varying magnetized and unmagnetized plasmas are likewise compared. Simulation results show that amplitude variation and phase jitter also exist on transmitted EM wave, and the turbulent deviation increases as the degree of plasma fluctuates. Meanwhile, the fluctuation of transmitted EM wave attenuates at low-frequency passband and increases at high-frequency passband with the increasing magnetic field. That is, comparing with unmagnetized time-varying plasma, the fluctuation effect can be mitigated by using a magnetic field when the EM wave frequency is at low-frequency passband. However, the mitigating effect can be influenced by the nonuniformity of magnetic field.

  3. Single Sources in the Low-Frequency Gravitational Wave Sky:properties and time to detection by pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Blecha, Laura; Hernquist, Lars; Sesana, Alberto; Taylor, Stephen R.

    2018-03-01

    We calculate the properties, occurrence rates and detection prospects of individually resolvable `single sources' in the low frequency gravitational wave (GW) spectrum. Our simulations use the population of galaxies and massive black hole binaries from the Illustris cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, coupled to comprehensive semi-analytic models of the binary merger process. Using mock pulsar timing arrays (PTA) with, for the first time, varying red-noise models, we calculate plausible detection prospects for GW single sources and the stochastic GW background (GWB). Contrary to previous results, we find that single sources are at least as detectable as the GW background. Using mock PTA, we find that these `foreground' sources (also `deterministic'/`continuous') are likely to be detected with ˜ 20 yr total observing baselines. Detection prospects, and indeed the overall properties of single sources, are only moderately sensitive to binary evolution parameters—namely eccentricity & environmental coupling, which can lead to differences of ˜ 5 yr in times to detection. Red noise has a stronger effect, roughly doubling the time to detection of the foreground between a white-noise only model (˜ 10 - 15 yr) and severe red noise (˜20 - 30 yr). The effect of red noise on the GWB is even stronger, suggesting that single source detections may be more robust. We find that typical signal-to-noise ratios for the foreground peak near f = 0.1 yr-1, and are much less sensitive to the continued addition of new pulsars to PTA.

  4. Timing effects of heat-stress on plant physiological characteristics and growth: a field study with prairie vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available More intense, more frequent, and longer heat-waves are expected in the future due to global warming, which could have dramatic agricultural, economic and ecological impacts. This field study examined how plant responded to heat-stress (HS treatment at different timing in naturally-occurring vegetation. HS treatment (5 days at 40.5 ºC were applied to 12 1m2 plots in restored prairie vegetation dominated by Andropogon gerardii (warm-season C4 grass and Solidago canadensis (warm-season C3 forb at different growing stages. During and after HS, air, canopy, and soil temperature were monitored; net CO2 assimilation (Pn, quantum yield of photosystem II (ФPSII, stomatal conductance (gs, and internal CO2 level (Ci of the dominant species were measured. One week after the last HS treatment, all plots were harvested and the biomass of above-ground tissue and flower weight of the two dominant species was determined. HS decreased physiological performance and growth for both species, with S. canadensis being affected more than A. gerardii, indicated by negative heat stress effect on both physiological and growth responses. There were significant timing effect of heat stress on the two species, with greater reductions in the photosynthesis and productivity occurred when heat stress was applied at later-growing season. The reduction in aboveground productivity in S. canadensis but not A. gerardii could have important implications for plant community structure by increasing the competitive advantage of A. gerardii in this grassland. The present experiment showed that heat stress, though ephemeral, may promote long-term effects on plant community structure, vegetation dynamics, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning of terrestrial biomes when more frequent and severe heat stress occur in the future.

  5. Comparison of an empirical S-wave velocity model and a calculated stress-strain model for a rock mass disturbed by mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiec, Krzysztof; Czarny, Rafał

    2017-11-01

    In the article a comparison analysis is presented between a numerical model of the stress and deformation state in a rock mass and an S-wave velocity model obtained as a result of in situ measurement. The research was conducted using data from the Jastrzębie and Moszczenica coal mines. The part of the rock mass examined was strongly disturbed by multi-seam exploitation of coal. To obtain the S-wave velocity model 6 hours of ambient seismic noise data were recorded using 11 seismometers. The propagation of the Rayleigh surface wave between the seismometers was reconstructed utilising the seismic interferometry and the cross correlation technique. Estimation of a two dimensional model of the Swave velocity field was performed on the basis of dispersion curves of the Rayleigh wave phase velocity. The stress and deformation field were calculated assuming a plane state of stress with the use of the elastic-plastic Coulomb-Mohr strength criterion. Images of the vertical stress, horizontal stress, vertical strain and horizontal strain as well as the subsidence profile on the model surface were obtained as a result of the calculation. Analysis of the results shows correlation between the field of S-wave velocity and the modelled field of stress and strain.

  6. Comparative study of finite element method, isogeometric analysis, and finite volume method in elastic wave propagation of stress discontinuities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Berezovski, A.; Kolman, Radek; Blažek, Jiří; Kopačka, Ján; Gabriel, Dušan; Plešek, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 12 (2014) ISSN 1435-4934. [European Conference on Non-Destructive Testing (ECNDT 2014) /11./. Praha, 06.10.2014-10.10.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/0288; GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/12/2315 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : elastic wave propagation * finite element method * isogeometric analysis * finite volume method * stress discontinuities * spurious oscillations Subject RIV: JR - Other Machinery http://www.ndt.net/events/ECNDT2014/app/content/Paper/25_Berezovski_Rev1.pdf

  7. Stress depended changes in activityof gp red blood cells receptors and its correction by therahertz waves at nitric oxide frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirichuk V.F.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of electromagnetic radiation in the terahertz range frequencies of molecular spectrum of emission and absorption of nitric oxide 150.176–150.664 GHz for the restoration of the impaired carbohydrate component and functional activity glikoproteid receptors of erythrocytes of white rats in a state of acute imm obilization stress. Shown that exposure to electromagnetic waves at these frequencies is the normalization of the increased content of b-D-galactose in the carbohydrate component and the restoration of the impaired activity of the receptors glikoproteid erythrocytes

  8. Shear stress with appropriate time-step and amplification enhances endothelial cell retention on vascular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haifeng; Gong, Xianghui; Jing, Xiaohui; Ding, Xili; Yao, Yuan; Huang, Yan; Fan, Yubo

    2017-11-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are sensitive to changes in shear stress. The application of shear stress to ECs has been well documented to improve cell retention when placed into a haemodynamically active environment. However, the relationship between the time-step and amplification of shear stress on EC functions remains elusive. In the present study, human umbilical cord veins endothelial cells (HUVECs) were seeded on silk fibroin nanofibrous scaffolds and were preconditioned by shear stress at different time-steps and amplifications. It is shown that gradually increasing shear stress with appropriate time-steps and amplification could improve EC retention, yielding a complete endothelial-like monolayer both in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism of this improvement is mediated, at least in part, by an upregulation of integrin β1 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) expression, which contributed to fibronectin (FN) assembly enhancement in ECs in response to the shear stress. A modest gradual increase in shear stress was essential to allow additional time for ECs to gradually acclimatize to the changing environment, with the goal of withstanding the physiological levels of shear stress. This study recognized that the time-steps and amplifications of shear stress could regulate EC tolerance to shear stress and the anti-thrombogenicity function of engineered vascular grafts via an extracellular cell matrix-specific, mechanosensitive signalling pathway and might prevent thrombus formation in vivo. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Visualization of Time-Series Sensor Data to Inform the Design of Just-In-Time Adaptive Stress Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin, Moushumi; Raij, Andrew; Epstien, David; Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Beck, J Gayle; Vhaduri, Sudip; Preston, Kenzie; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-09-01

    We investigate needs, challenges, and opportunities in visualizing time-series sensor data on stress to inform the design of just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs). We identify seven key challenges: massive volume and variety of data, complexity in identifying stressors, scalability of space, multifaceted relationship between stress and time, a need for representation at multiple granularities, interperson variability, and limited understanding of JITAI design requirements due to its novelty. We propose four new visualizations based on one million minutes of sensor data (n=70). We evaluate our visualizations with stress researchers (n=6) to gain first insights into its usability and usefulness in JITAI design. Our results indicate that spatio-temporal visualizations help identify and explain between- and within-person variability in stress patterns and contextual visualizations enable decisions regarding the timing, content, and modality of intervention. Interestingly, a granular representation is considered informative but noise-prone; an abstract representation is the preferred starting point for designing JITAIs.

  10. A numerical dispersion compensation technique for time recompression of Lamb wave signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, René; Goyette, Jacques; Zellouf, Djamel

    2002-05-01

    A Fourier domain numerical reconstruction technique has been created in order to eliminate the time spread of Lamb wave signals caused by their dispersive nature. This method allows a good time compaction of the echoes obtained from a Lamb wave inspection. In a pulse-echo setup, reflection peaks coming from targets located close one from each other that could not be separated or seen within raw signals are identified using this procedure. The utility of this new technique goes from simple signal analysis to imaging purposes such as the improvement of B-scan images or SAFT processing. It has been tested in three different situations with the S0 mode generated in a frequency bandwidth where it is highly dispersive. The reconstruction of a pure reflection coming from the edge of a plate, the separation of the echoes resulting from reflections on two targets near one each other and the effects of the presence of an obstacle between the emitter and the receiver are treated. Good results are obtained for every case studied.

  11. The contribution of activated processes to Q. [stress corrosion cracking in seismic wave attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetzler, H. A.; Getting, I. C.; Swanson, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible role of activated processes in seismic attenuation is investigated. In this study, a solid is modeled by a parallel and series configuration of dashpots and springs. The contribution of stress and temperature activated processes to the long term dissipative behavior of this system is analyzed. Data from brittle rock deformation experiments suggest that one such process, stress corrosion cracking, may make a significant contribution to the attenuation factor, Q, especially for long period oscillations under significant tectonic stress.

  12. Real-time beam tracing for control of the deposition location of electron cyclotron waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, M., E-mail: matthias.reich@ipp.mpg.de; Bilato, R.; Mszanowski, U.; Poli, E.; Rapson, C.; Stober, J.; Volpe, F.; Zille, R.

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • We successfully integrated a real-time EC beam tracing code at ASDEX Upgrade. • The calculation of EC beam deposition location is fast enough for control purposes. • The accuracy of the deposition location calculation exceeds equivalent measurements. • The implementation method is by design portable to larger fusion devices. - Abstract: Plasma control techniques that use electron cyclotron (EC) resonance heating and current drive such as control of neoclassical tearing modes require accurate control of the deposition location of EC beams. ASDEX Upgrade has successfully implemented a real-time version of the beam-tracing code TORBEAM into its real-time diagnostic system to act as a globally available module that calculates current deposition location and its sensitivity from other real-time diagnostic measurements for all its moveable EC wave launchers. Based on a highly (100×) accelerated version of TORBEAM, the software implementation as a diagnostic process uses parallelization and achieves cycle times of 15–20 ms for determining the radial deposition location of 12 beams in the plasma. This cycle time includes data input–output overhead arising from the use of available real-time signals. The system is by design portable to other machines such as ITER.

  13. Experimental and numerical analysis of stress wave propagation in polymers and the role of interfaces in armour systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorwade, Chandragupt V.; Ashcroft, Ian A.; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.; Hughes, Foz T. R.; Swallowe, Gerry M.

    2012-12-01

    Advanced polymeric materials are finding an increasing range of industrial and defence applications. These materials have the potential to improve combat survivability, whilst reducing the cost and weight of armour systems. In this paper the results from a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) test of a high density polyethylene (HDPE) sample involving multiple stress waves is discussed with aid of a finite element model of the test. It is seen that the phenomenon of impedance mismatch at interfaces plays an important role in the levels of stress and deformation seen in the sample. A multi-layer armour system is then investigated using the finite element model. This case study illustrates the role of impedance mismatch and interface engineering in the design and optimisation of armour solutions.

  14. The time dependent Schrodinger equation revisited I: quantum field and classical Hamilton-Jacobi routes to Schrodinger's wave equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scully, M O

    2008-01-01

    The time dependent Schrodinger equation is frequently 'derived' by postulating the energy E → i h-bar (∂/∂t) and momentum p-vector → ( h-bar /i)∇ operator relations. In the present paper we review the quantum field theoretic route to the Schrodinger wave equation which treats time and space as parameters, not operators. Furthermore, we recall that a classical (nonlinear) wave equation can be derived from the classical action via Hamiltonian-Jacobi theory. By requiring the wave equation to be linear we again arrive at the Schrodinger equation, without postulating operator relations. The underlying philosophy is operational: namely 'a particle is what a particle detector detects.' This leads us to a useful physical picture combining the wave (field) and particle paradigms which points the way to the time-dependent Schrodinger equation

  15. Convergence to nonlinear diffusion waves for solutions of Euler equations with time-depending damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haibo; Yin, Haiyan; Zhang, Jinshun; Zhu, Changjiang

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with the asymptotic behavior of solutions to the system of Euler equations with time-depending damping, in particular, include the constant coefficient damping. We rigorously prove that the solutions time-asymptotically converge to the diffusion wave whose profile is self-similar solution to the corresponding parabolic equation, which justifies Darcy's law. Compared with previous results about Euler equations with constant coefficient damping obtained by Hsiao and Liu (1992) [2], and Nishihara (1996) [9], we obtain a general result when the initial perturbation belongs to the same space, i.e. H3 (R) ×H2 (R). Our proof is based on the classical energy method.

  16. Nonequilibrium dynamics of strings in time-dependent plane wave backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nardi, R., E-mail: rnardi@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), R. Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Vancea, I.V., E-mail: ionvancea@ufrrj.br [Grupo de Fisica Teorica e Matematica Fisica, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Cx. Postal 23851, BR 465 Km 7, 23890-000 Seropedica, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-06-21

    We formulate and study the nonequilibrium dynamics of strings near the singularity of the time-dependent plane wave background in the framework of the Nonequilibrium Thermo Field Dynamics (NETFD). In particular, we construct the Hilbert space of the thermal string oscillators at nonequilibrium and generalize the NETFD to describe the coordinates of the center of mass of the thermal string. The equations of motion of the thermal fields and the Hamiltonian are derived. Due to the time-dependence of the oscillator frequencies, a counterterm is present in the Hamiltonian. This counterterm determines the correlation functions in a perturbative fashion. We compute the two point correlation function of the thermal string at zero order in the power expansion.

  17. A 2D Time Domain DRBEM Computer Model for MagnetoThermoelastic Coupled Wave Propagation Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdelsabour Fahmy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A numerical computer model based on the dual reciprocity boundary element method (DRBEM is extended to study magneto-thermoelastic coupled wave propagation problems with relaxation times involving anisotropic functionally graded solids. The model formulation is tested through its application to the problem of a solid placed in a constant primary magnetic field acting in the direction of the z-axis and rotating about this axis with a constant angular velocity. In the case of two-dimensional deformation, an implicit-explicit time domain DRBEM was presented and implemented to obtain the solution for the displacement and temperature fields. A comparison of the results is presented graphically in the context of Lord and Shulman (LS and Green and Lindsay (GL theories. Numerical results that demonstrate the validity of the proposed method are also presented graphically.

  18. Frequency variations of gravity waves interacting with a time-varying tide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, C.M.; Zhang, S.D.; Yi, F.; Huang, K.M.; Gan, Q.; Gong, Y. [Wuhan Univ., Hubei (China). School of Electronic Information; Ministry of Education, Wuhan, Hubei (China). Key Lab. of Geospace Environment and Geodesy; State Observatory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zhang, Y.H. [Nanjing Univ. of Information Science and Technology (China). College of Hydrometeorolgy

    2013-11-01

    Using a nonlinear, 2-D time-dependent numerical model, we simulate the propagation of gravity waves (GWs) in a time-varying tide. Our simulations show that when aGW packet propagates in a time-varying tidal-wind environment, not only its intrinsic frequency but also its ground-based frequency would change significantly. The tidal horizontal-wind acceleration dominates the GW frequency variation. Positive (negative) accelerations induce frequency increases (decreases) with time. More interestingly, tidal-wind acceleration near the critical layers always causes the GW frequency to increase, which may partially explain the observations that high-frequency GW components are more dominant in the middle and upper atmosphere than in the lower atmosphere. The combination of the increased ground-based frequency of propagating GWs in a time-varying tidal-wind field and the transient nature of the critical layer induced by a time-varying tidal zonal wind creates favorable conditions for GWs to penetrate their originally expected critical layers. Consequently, GWs have an impact on the background atmosphere at much higher altitudes than expected, which indicates that the dynamical effects of tidal-GW interactions are more complicated than usually taken into account by GW parameterizations in global models.

  19. Overeating at dinner time among Japanese workers: Is overeating related to stress response and late dinner times?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akiko; Sakurazawa, Hirofumi; Fujita, Takanori; Akamatsu, Rie

    2016-06-01

    There are several known risk factors for overeating, including negative feelings and hunger. It was hypothesized that overtime work is associated with stress responses and later dinner times, leading to longer periods of time without eating, and that this, in turn, leads to a strong experience of hunger and consequent overeating at dinner. The aim of this study was to examine relationships among overeating at dinner, stress responses (e.g., fatigue, anxiety, and depression), and dinner times in Japanese male workers. In December 2012, 255 Japanese male workers at a leasing company completed a self-report questionnaire about overeating at dinner, psychological stress responses, physical stress responses, and dinner times. Each worker was sent an email with a link to the questionnaire website, where his answers were collected. Relationships between overeating at dinner and lifestyle issues were investigated using multiple linear regression analysis treating overeating as a dependent variable. Factors related to overeating at dinner included psychological stress response (β = 0.251 p overeating at dinner is related to dinner time in men and to stress responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Time-accurate AB-simulations of irregular coastal waves above bathymetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.; Andonowati, A.; Lee, Joseph Hun-Wei; Ng, Chiu-On

    2011-01-01

    In this contribution the performance is shown of a hybrid spectral-spatial implementation of the AB model for uni-directional waves above varying bottom. For irregular waves of JONSWAP-type, with peak periods of 9 and 12[s], significant wave height of 3[m], running from 30 to 15[m] depth over a 1:20

  1. Effects of different timing of stress on corticosterone, BDNF and memory in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radahmadi, Maryam; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Sharifi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Nasrin

    2015-02-01

    Learning and memory seem to be affected by chronic stress. Previous reports have considered chronic stress as a precipitating factor of different neuropsychological disorders, while others reported neurobiological adaptations following stress. The present study investigated the effects of chronic stress before, after, and during learning on the changes of learning and memory, on serum and hippocampal levels of corticosterone (CORT), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and body weight in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=10) including Control (Co), Stress-Learning-Rest (St-L-Re), Rest-Learning-Stress (Re-L-St), and Stress-Learning-Stress (St-L-St) groups. The chronic restraint stress was applied 6 h/day for 21 days. Moreover, the passive avoidance test was used to assess memory deficit, 1, 7, and 21 days after training. At the end of experiments, CORT and BDNF levels were measured. The findings did not support adaptation in chronic stress conditions. The acquisition time as well as the short and mid-term memories was significantly impaired in the St-L-Re group. Short, mid, and long-term memories were significantly impaired in the Re-L-St and St-L-St groups compared with the Co group, as a result of the enhancement of CORT and reduction of BDNF levels. In the St-L-St group, changes in memory functions were less pronounced than in the Re-L-St group. Also, body weight declined following the chronic stress, while recovery period enhanced the body weight gain in stressed rats. It can be concluded that a potential time-dependent involvement of stress and recovery period on the level of BDNF. Longer duration time of chronic stress might promote adaptive effects on memory and CORT level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Is timing noise important in the gravitational wave detection of neutron stars?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we ask whether the phenomenon of timing noise long known in electromagnetic pulsar astronomy is likely to be important in gravitational wave (GW) observations of spinning-down neutron stars. We find that timing noise is strong enough to be of importance only in the young pulsars, which must have larger triaxialities than theory predicts for their GW emission to be detectable. However, assuming that their GW emission is detectable, we list the pulsars for which timing noise is important, either because it is strong enough that its neglect by the observer would render the source undetectable or else because it is a measurable feature of the GW signal. We also find that timing noise places a limit on the observation duration of a coherent blind GW search, and suggest that hierarchical search techniques might be able to cope with this problem. Demonstration of the presence or absence of timing noise in the GW channel would give a new probe of neutron star physics

  3. The influence of social stress on time perception and psychophysiological reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hedger, Kathryne; Necka, Elizabeth A; Barakzai, Anam K; Norman, Greg J

    2017-05-01

    Time perception is a fundamental component of everyday life. Although time can be measured using standard units, the relationship between an individual's experience of perceived time and a standard unit is highly sensitive to context. Stressful and threatening stimuli have been previously shown to produce time distortion effects, such that individuals perceive the stimuli as lasting for different amounts of time as compared to a standard unit. As a highly social species, humans are acutely sensitive to social stressors; however, time distortion effects have not been studied in the context of social stress. We collected psychophysiological (electrocardiogram and impedance cardiography) and time perception data before, during, and after a modified version of the Trier Social Stress Test for 42 participants. Based on prior theories and evidence from the time perception literature, we hypothesized that experiencing a stressful event would result in time distortion. This hypothesis was supported by the data, with individuals on average reproducing short and long duration negative and positive stimuli as lasting longer after experiencing social stress, t(41) = -3.55, p = .001, and t(41) = -4.12, p social stress. These findings are in line with some other studies of time distortion, and provide evidence for the interoceptive salience model of time perception. Implications for mechanisms of time distortion are discussed. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  4. Time-dependent effects of rapamycin on consolidation of predator stress-induced hyperarousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifield, Kathleen; Hebert, Mark; Williams, Kimberly; Linehan, Victoria; Whiteman, Jesse D; Mac Callum, Phillip; Blundell, Jacqueline

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated that rapamycin, a potent inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, blocks consolidation of shock-induced associative fear memories. Moreover, rapamycin's block of associative fear memories is time-dependent. It is unknown, however, if rapamycin blocks consolidation of predator stress-induced non-associative fear memories. Furthermore, the temporal pattern of mTOR activation following predator stress is unknown. Thus, the goal of the current studies was to determine if rapamycin blocks consolidation of predator stress-induced fear memories and if so, whether rapamycin's effect is time-dependent. Male rats were injected systemically with rapamycin at various time points following predator stress. Predator stress involves an acute, unprotected exposure of a rat to a cat, which causes long-lasting non-associative fear memories manifested as generalized hyperarousal and increased anxiety-like behaviour. We show that rapamycin injected immediately after predator stress blocked consolidation of stress-induced startle. However, rapamycin injected 9, 24 or 48h post predator stress potentiated stress-induced startle. Consistent with shock-induced associative fear memories, we show that mTOR signalling is essential for consolidation of predator stress-induced hyperarousal. However, unlike shock-induced fear memories, a second, persistent, late phase mTOR-dependent process following predator stress actually dampens startle. Consistent with previous findings, our data support the potential role for rapamycin in treatment of stress related disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder. However, our data suggest timing of rapamycin administration is critical. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Stress within a Restricted Time Window Selectively Affects the Persistence of Long-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qin; Chai, Ning; Zhao, Li-Yan; Xue, Yan-Xue; Luo, Yi-Xiao; Jian, Min; Han, Ying; Shi, Hai-Shui; Lu, Lin; Wu, Ping; Wang, Ji-Shi

    2013-01-01

    The effects of stress on emotional memory are distinct and depend on the stages of memory. Memory undergoes consolidation and reconsolidation after acquisition and retrieval, respectively. Stress facilitates the consolidation but disrupts the reconsolidation of emotional memory. Previous research on the effects of stress on memory have focused on long-term memory (LTM) formation (tested 24 h later), but the effects of stress on the persistence of LTM (tested at least 1 week later) are unclear. Recent findings indicated that the persistence of LTM requires late-phase protein synthesis in the dorsal hippocampus. The present study investigated the effect of stress (i.e., cold water stress) during the late phase after the acquisition and retrieval of contextual fear memory in rats. We found that stress and corticosterone administration during the late phase (12 h) after acquisition, referred to as late consolidation, selectively enhanced the persistence of LTM, whereas stress during the late phase (12 h) after retrieval, referred to as late reconsolidation, selectively disrupted the restabilized persistence of LTM. Moreover, the effects of stress on the persistence of LTM were blocked by the corticosterone synthesis inhibitor metyrapone, which was administered before stress, suggesting that the glucocorticoid system is involved in the effects of stress on the persistence of LTM. We conclude that stress within a restricted time window after acquisition or retrieval selectively affects the persistence of LTM and depends on the glucocorticoid system. PMID:23544051

  6. Stress within a restricted time window selectively affects the persistence of long-term memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Yang

    Full Text Available The effects of stress on emotional memory are distinct and depend on the stages of memory. Memory undergoes consolidation and reconsolidation after acquisition and retrieval, respectively. Stress facilitates the consolidation but disrupts the reconsolidation of emotional memory. Previous research on the effects of stress on memory have focused on long-term memory (LTM formation (tested 24 h later, but the effects of stress on the persistence of LTM (tested at least 1 week later are unclear. Recent findings indicated that the persistence of LTM requires late-phase protein synthesis in the dorsal hippocampus. The present study investigated the effect of stress (i.e., cold water stress during the late phase after the acquisition and retrieval of contextual fear memory in rats. We found that stress and corticosterone administration during the late phase (12 h after acquisition, referred to as late consolidation, selectively enhanced the persistence of LTM, whereas stress during the late phase (12 h after retrieval, referred to as late reconsolidation, selectively disrupted the restabilized persistence of LTM. Moreover, the effects of stress on the persistence of LTM were blocked by the corticosterone synthesis inhibitor metyrapone, which was administered before stress, suggesting that the glucocorticoid system is involved in the effects of stress on the persistence of LTM. We conclude that stress within a restricted time window after acquisition or retrieval selectively affects the persistence of LTM and depends on the glucocorticoid system.

  7. Intensive wave power and steel quenching 3-D model for cylindrical sample. Time direct and reverse formulations and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buikis Andris

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop mathematical models for three dimensional hyperbolic heat equations (wave equation or telegraph equation with inner source power and construct their analytical solutions for the determination of the initial heat flux for cylindrical sample. As additional conditions the temperature and heat flux at the end time are given. In some cases we give expression of wave energy. In some cases we give expression of wave energy. Some solutions of time inverse problems are obtained in the form of first kind Fredholm integral equation, but others has been obtained in closed analytical form as series. We viewed both direct and inverse problems at the time. For the time inverse problem we use inversion in the time argument.

  8. Guided Waves in Structures for SHM The Time - domain Spectral Element Method

    CERN Document Server

    Ostachowicz, Wieslaw; Krawczuk, Marek; Zak, Arkadiusz

    2011-01-01

    Presents the state of the art in the modelling, analysis and experimental investigation of elastic wave propagation using a technique of rapidly increasing interest and development Addressing an important issue in the field of guided-wave-based damage identification and structural health monitoring,Guided Waves in Structures for SHM presents the modelling, analysis and experimental investigation of elastic wave propagation in engineering structures made of isotropic or composite materials. The authors begin by summarising present-day knowledge on elastic wave propagation in solids, focusing on

  9. Incidence and Time to Return to Training for Stress Fractures during Military Basic Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Wood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, little is known about the length of time required to rehabilitate patients from stress fractures and their return to preinjury level of physical activity. Previous studies have looked at the return to sport in athletes, in a general population, where rehabilitation is not as controlled as within a captive military population. In this study, a longitudinal prospective epidemiological database was assessed to determine the incidence of stress fractures and the time taken to rehabilitate recruits to preinjury stage of training. Findings demonstrated a background prevalence of 5% stress fractures in Royal Marine training; femoral and tibial stress fractures take 21.1 weeks to return to training with metatarsal stress fractures being the most common injury taking 12.2 weeks. Rehabilitation from stress fractures accounts for 814 weeks of recruit rehabilitation time per annum. Stress fracture incidence is still common in military training; despite this stress fracture recovery times remain constant and represent a significant interruption in training. It takes on average 5 weeks after exercise specific training has restarted to reenter training at a preinjury level, regardless of which bone has a stress fracture. Further research into their prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation is required to help reduce these burdens.

  10. Geological structure analysis in Central Java using travel time tomography technique of S waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palupi, I. R.; Raharjo, W.; Nurdian, S. W.; Giamboro, W. S.; Santoso, A.

    2016-01-01

    Java is one of the islands in Indonesia that is prone to the earthquakes, in south of Java, there is the Australian Plate move to the Java island and press with perpendicular direction. This plate movement formed subduction zone and cause earthquakes. The earthquake is the release of energy due to the sudden movement of the plates. When an earthquake occurs, the energy is released and record by seismometers in the waveform. The first wave recorded is called the P waves (primary) and the next wave is called S waves (secondary). Both of these waves have different characteristics in terms of propagation and direction of movement. S wave is composed of waves of Rayleigh and Love waves, with each direction of movement of the vertical and horizontal, subsurface imaging by using S wave tomography technique can describe the type of the S wave through the medium. The variation of wave velocity under Central Java (esearch area) is ranging from -10% to 10% at the depth of 20, 30 and 40 km, the velocity decrease with the depth increase. Moho discontinuity is lies in the depth of 32 km under the crust, it is indicates there is strong heterogenity in Moho. (paper)

  11. Analysis of a time fractional wave-like equation with the homotopy analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hang; Cang Jie

    2008-01-01

    The time fractional wave-like differential equation with a variable coefficient is studied analytically. By using a simple transformation, the governing equation is reduced to two fractional ordinary differential equations. Then the homotopy analysis method is employed to derive the solutions of these equations. The accurate series solutions are obtained. Especially, when h f =h g =-1, these solutions are exactly the same as those results given by the Adomian decomposition method. The present work shows the validity and great potential of the homotopy analysis method for solving nonlinear fractional differential equations. The basic idea described in this Letter is expected to be further employed to solve other similar nonlinear problems in fractional calculus

  12. Analysis of a time fractional wave-like equation with the homotopy analysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hang; Cang, Jie

    2008-02-01

    The time fractional wave-like differential equation with a variable coefficient is studied analytically. By using a simple transformation, the governing equation is reduced to two fractional ordinary differential equations. Then the homotopy analysis method is employed to derive the solutions of these equations. The accurate series solutions are obtained. Especially, when ℏ=ℏ=-1, these solutions are exactly the same as those results given by the Adomian decomposition method. The present work shows the validity and great potential of the homotopy analysis method for solving nonlinear fractional differential equations. The basic idea described in this Letter is expected to be further employed to solve other similar nonlinear problems in fractional calculus.

  13. Effective modeling and reverse-time migration for novel pure acoustic wave in arbitrary orthorhombic anisotropic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shigang; Liu, Yang

    2018-03-01

    The conventional pseudo-acoustic wave equations (PWEs) in arbitrary orthorhombic anisotropic (OA) media usually have coupled P- and SV-wave modes. These coupled equations may introduce strong SV-wave artifacts and numerical instabilities in P-wave simulation results and reverse-time migration (RTM) profiles. However, pure acoustic wave equations (PAWEs) completely decouple the P-wave component from the full elastic wavefield and naturally solve all the aforementioned problems. In this article, we present a novel PAWE in arbitrary OA media and compare it with the conventional coupled PWEs. Through decomposing the solution of the corresponding eigenvalue equation for the original PWE into an ellipsoidal differential operator (EDO) and an ellipsoidal scalar operator (ESO), the new PAWE in time-space domain is constructed by applying the combination of these two solvable operators and can effectively describe P-wave features in arbitrary OA media. Furthermore, we adopt the optimal finite-difference method (FDM) to solve the newly derived PAWE. In addition, the three-dimensional (3D) hybrid absorbing boundary condition (HABC) with some reasonable modifications is developed for reducing artificial edge reflections in anisotropic media. To improve computational efficiency in 3D case, we adopt graphic processing unit (GPU) with Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) instead of traditional central processing unit (CPU) architecture. Several numerical experiments for arbitrary OA models confirm that the proposed schemes can produce pure, stable and accurate P-wave modeling results and RTM images with higher computational efficiency. Moreover, the 3D numerical simulations can provide us with a comprehensive and real description of wave propagation.

  14. Workplace harassment, stress, and drinking behavior over time: Gender differences in a national sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rospenda, Kathleen M.; Fujishiro, Kaori; Shannon, Candice A.; Richman, Judith A.

    2008-01-01

    Research suggests that workplace harassment (WH) significantly predicts alcohol use and problem drinking behavior, but has generally failed to consider concurrent effects of other sources of stress. This two-wave study (n=1418) is the first to explore whether sexual harassment (SH) and generalized workplace harassment (GWH) predict increased drinking independently of the effects of job and life stress, and whether effects differ by gender, in a nationally representative sample. SH and GWH predicted increases in problem drinking one year later for men but not women, while life stress was associated with increased problem drinking for women but not men. This study confirms the importance of examining the associations between different types of stressors and drinking-related outcomes in gendered contexts. PMID:18384975

  15. Workplace harassment, stress, and drinking behavior over time: gender differences in a national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rospenda, Kathleen M; Fujishiro, Kaori; Shannon, Candice A; Richman, Judith A

    2008-07-01

    Research suggests that workplace harassment (WH) significantly predicts alcohol use and problem drinking behavior, but has generally failed to consider concurrent effects of other sources of stress. This two-wave study (n=1418) is the first to explore whether sexual harassment (SH) and generalized workplace harassment (GWH) predict increased drinking independently of the effects of job and life stress, and whether effects differ by gender, in a nationally representative sample. SH and GWH predicted increases in problem drinking one year later for men but not women, while life stress was associated with increased problem drinking for women but not men. This study confirms the importance of examining the associations between different types of stressors and drinking-related outcomes in gendered contexts.

  16. Assessing pulsar timing array sensitivity to gravitational wave bursts with memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madison, D. R.; Cordes, J. M.; Chatterjee, S.

    2014-01-01

    Highly energetic astrophysical phenomena like supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) mergers are predicted to emit prodigious amounts of gravitational waves (GWs). An anticipated component of the gravitational waveform known as 'memory' is permanent and nonoscillatory. For SMBHB mergers, the memory is created primarily during the most violent moments of the inspiral immediately preceding the final plunge and ring-down when the strongest gravitational fields are at work and the nonlinearities of general relativity are most pronounced. The essentially time-domain nature of memory makes it forbiddingly difficult to detect with ground based GW detectors, leaving pulsar timing array (PTA) experiments as the most promising means by which it may be detected and studied. In this paper, we discuss how GW bursts with memory (BWMs) influence pulsar timing experiments and develop methods to assess how sensitive modern timing efforts are to such GW events. We discuss how PTA searches for BWMs can be used to constrain the rate of BWMs and how these constraints relate to information regarding the population of SMBHBs.

  17. Assessing Pulsar Timing Array Sensitivity to Gravitational Wave Bursts with Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, D. R.; Cordes, J. M.; Chatterjee, S.

    2014-06-01

    Highly energetic astrophysical phenomena like supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) mergers are predicted to emit prodigious amounts of gravitational waves (GWs). An anticipated component of the gravitational waveform known as "memory" is permanent and nonoscillatory. For SMBHB mergers, the memory is created primarily during the most violent moments of the inspiral immediately preceding the final plunge and ring-down when the strongest gravitational fields are at work and the nonlinearities of general relativity are most pronounced. The essentially time-domain nature of memory makes it forbiddingly difficult to detect with ground based GW detectors, leaving pulsar timing array (PTA) experiments as the most promising means by which it may be detected and studied. In this paper, we discuss how GW bursts with memory (BWMs) influence pulsar timing experiments and develop methods to assess how sensitive modern timing efforts are to such GW events. We discuss how PTA searches for BWMs can be used to constrain the rate of BWMs and how these constraints relate to information regarding the population of SMBHBs.

  18. Introducing time-dependent molecular fields: a new derivation of the wave equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Michael

    2018-02-01

    This article is part of a series of articles trying to establish the concept molecular field. The theory that induced us to introduce this novel concept is based on the Born-Huang expansion as applied to the Schroedinger equation that describes the interaction of a molecular system with an external electric field. Assuming the molecular system is made up of two coupled adiabatic states the theory leads from a single spatial curl equation, two space-time curl equations and one single space-time divergent equation to a pair of decoupled wave equations usually encountered within the theory of fields. In the present study, just like in the previous study [see Baer et al., Mol. Phys. 114, 227 (2016)] the wave equations are derived for an electric field having two features: (a) its intensity is high enough; (b) its duration is short enough. Although not all the findings are new the derivation, in the present case, is new, straightforward, fluent and much friendlier as compared to the previous one and therefore should be presented again. For this situation the study reveals that the just described interaction creates two fields that coexist within a molecule: one is a novel vectorial field formed via the interaction of the electric field with the Born-Huang non-adiabatic coupling terms (NACTs) and the other is an ordinary, scalar, electric field essentially identical to the original electric field. Section 4 devoted to the visualization of the outcomes via two intersecting Jahn-Teller cones which contain NACTs that become singular at the intersection point of these cones. Finally, the fact that eventually we are facing a kind of a cosmic situation may bring us to speculate that singular NACTs are a result of cosmic phenomena. Thus, if indeed this singularity is somehow connected to reality then, like other singularities in physics, it is formed at (or immediately after) the Big Bang and consequently, guarantees the formation of molecules.

  19. Assessing the Effect of the Role of Detonation Wave Curvature on the Firing Times of High Voltage Detonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Rod; Explosive Materials; Initiation Science Group Team

    2017-06-01

    In detonators the lost time is the difference between the measured and calculated time for the reactive wave to transit the explosive charge. The calculated time is derived from the charge thickness and the steady state detonation velocity. For both EBW and EFI detonators the lost time is significant and, for detonators of comparable dimensions, greater in EBW detonators. Typically, the lost time is attributed to a finite growth to detonation time. The bridgewires and foil flyers of EBW and EFI detonators respectively establish reaction fronts over very small areas in the explosive. Even with a significant run to detonation distance, the detonation front may be expected to be highly curved and, thus, have a detonation velocity below the steady state velocity. Consequently, the time and distance required for a steady state detonation velocity to be established may also contribute to the lost time in EBW and EFI detonators. To assess the relevance of wave curvature on lost time a simple analytical model has been developed which takes into account growth to detonation and detonation wave curvature effects. The model showed that detonation wave curvature could be responsible for at least some of the lost time of EBW detonators. British Crown Owned Copyright 2017/AWE.

  20. Cardiorespiratory Dynamic Response to Mental Stress: A Multivariate Time-Frequency Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devy Widjaja

    2013-01-01

    out continuously in time to evaluate the dynamic response to mental stress and attention. The results show an increased heart and respiratory rate during stress and attention, compared to a resting condition. Also a fast reduction in vagal activity is noted. The partial TF analysis reveals a faster reduction of RRV power related to (3 s than unrelated to (30 s respiration, demonstrating that the autonomic response to mental stress is driven by mechanisms characterized by different temporal scales.

  1. Measurement invariance of the perceived stress scale and latent mean differences across gender and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; Kostick, Marylynne; Lei, Ming; McPherson, Sterling; Roper, Virginia; Hoekstra, Trynke; Wright, Bruce

    2013-08-01

    Measurement invariance of the 2-factor model of the Perceived Stress Scale--10-item version (Cohen & Williamson, 1988) was tested across men and women at two time points and in the combined total sample over a 2-year time frame (n = 871). Measurement invariance results indicated that the scale measured the latent factors, stress and counter-stress, equivalently in men and women and over time. With measurement invariance demonstrated, differences in latent means were tested. Results indicated that men had lower levels of frequencies of stressors, and at one time point, higher levels of counter-stress, when compared with women. When examining change in frequencies of stressors and counter-stress over 2 years with the combined male and female sample, stressors remained stable, yet counter-stress increased over time. These findings may aid in the interpretation of results when examining stressors and counter-stress in clinical samples where one would expect stress to increase, whereas positive psychological states decrease. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Internal structural changes in keratin fibres resulting from combined hair waving and stress relaxation treatments: a Raman spectroscopic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuhara, A

    2016-04-01

    The objective of our research was to investigate the influence of chemical treatments (reduction, stress relaxation and oxidation) on hair keratin fibres. The structure of cross-sections at various depths of virgin white human hair resulting from permanent waving treatments with stress relaxation process was directly analysed at a molecular level using Raman spectroscopy. In particular, the three disulphide (-SS-) conformations in human hair were compared by S-S band analysis. The gauche-gauche-gauche (GGG) and gauche-gauche-trans (GGT) contents of -SS- groups remarkably decreased, while the trans-gauche-trans (TGT) content was not changed by performing the reduction process with thioglycolic acid. In addition, the high-temperature stress relaxation process after reduction accelerated the disconnection of -SS- (GGG and GGT) groups in the human hair, while the low-temperature stress relaxation process after reduction accelerated the reconnection of -SS- (GGG and GGT) groups. Moreover, the S-O band intensity at 1042 cm(-1) , assigned to cysteic acid, existing in the cuticle region and the surface of the cortex region increased, while the GGG content significantly decreased by performing the oxidation process after the reduction and the high-temperature stress relaxation processes. The author concluded that the high-temperature relaxation process after reduction accelerated the disconnection of -SS- (GGG and GGT) groups, thereby leading to the remarkable local molecular disorganization (an increase in the cysteic acid content and a decrease in the GGG content) on the cuticle and cortex cells during the oxidation process. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  3. Simulating population recovery of an aquatic isopod: Effects of timing of stress and landscape structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galic, Nika; Baveco, Hans; Hengeveld, Geerten M.; Thorbek, Pernille; Bruns, Eric; Brink, Paul J. van den

    2012-01-01

    In agroecosystems, organisms may regularly be exposed to anthropogenic stressors, e.g. pesticides. Species' sensitivity to stress depends on toxicity, life-history, and landscape structure. We developed an individual-based model of an isopod, Asellus aquaticus, to explore how timing of stress events affects population dynamics in a seasonal environment. Furthermore, we tested the relevance of habitat connectivity and spatial distribution of stress for the recovery of a local and total population. The simulation results indicated that population recovery is mainly driven by reproductive periods. Furthermore, high habitat connectivity led to faster recovery both for local and total populations. However, effects of landscape structure disappeared for homogeneously stressed populations, where local survivors increased recovery rate. Finally, local populations recovered faster, implying that assessing recovery in the field needs careful consideration of spatial scale for sampling. We emphasize the need for a coherent definition of recovery for more relevant ecosystem risk assessment and management. - Highlights: ► Non-target arthropod population recovery after short-term stress in agroecosystems. ► Recovery depends on timing of stress events and is governed by reproductive periods. ► Populations recover faster in well connected landscapes. ► Time to recovery depends on spatial distribution of stress. ► Considering appropriate spatial scale very relevant for assessing recovery. - Population recovery after stress is governed by reproduction and movement in the landscape, where recovery speed and potential are affected by spatial distribution of stress.

  4. Wind-wave, and turbidity time-series data from Little Holland Tract (station HWC), Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — Time series data of water surface elevation, wave height, and turbidity were collected in Little Holland Tract (LHT) beginning in December 2015 as part of “Wind-wave...

  5. Deep Learning for real-time gravitational wave detection and parameter estimation: Results with Advanced LIGO data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel George

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The recent Nobel-prize-winning detections of gravitational waves from merging black holes and the subsequent detection of the collision of two neutron stars in coincidence with electromagnetic observations have inaugurated a new era of multimessenger astrophysics. To enhance the scope of this emergent field of science, we pioneered the use of deep learning with convolutional neural networks, that take time-series inputs, for rapid detection and characterization of gravitational wave signals. This approach, Deep Filtering, was initially demonstrated using simulated LIGO noise. In this article, we present the extension of Deep Filtering using real data from LIGO, for both detection and parameter estimation of gravitational waves from binary black hole mergers using continuous data streams from multiple LIGO detectors. We demonstrate for the first time that machine learning can detect and estimate the true parameters of real events observed by LIGO. Our results show that Deep Filtering achieves similar sensitivities and lower errors compared to matched-filtering while being far more computationally efficient and more resilient to glitches, allowing real-time processing of weak time-series signals in non-stationary non-Gaussian noise with minimal resources, and also enables the detection of new classes of gravitational wave sources that may go unnoticed with existing detection algorithms. This unified framework for data analysis is ideally suited to enable coincident detection campaigns of gravitational waves and their multimessenger counterparts in real-time.

  6. Deep Learning for real-time gravitational wave detection and parameter estimation: Results with Advanced LIGO data

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Daniel; Huerta, E. A.

    2018-03-01

    The recent Nobel-prize-winning detections of gravitational waves from merging black holes and the subsequent detection of the collision of two neutron stars in coincidence with electromagnetic observations have inaugurated a new era of multimessenger astrophysics. To enhance the scope of this emergent field of science, we pioneered the use of deep learning with convolutional neural networks, that take time-series inputs, for rapid detection and characterization of gravitational wave signals. This approach, Deep Filtering, was initially demonstrated using simulated LIGO noise. In this article, we present the extension of Deep Filtering using real data from LIGO, for both detection and parameter estimation of gravitational waves from binary black hole mergers using continuous data streams from multiple LIGO detectors. We demonstrate for the first time that machine learning can detect and estimate the true parameters of real events observed by LIGO. Our results show that Deep Filtering achieves similar sensitivities and lower errors compared to matched-filtering while being far more computationally efficient and more resilient to glitches, allowing real-time processing of weak time-series signals in non-stationary non-Gaussian noise with minimal resources, and also enables the detection of new classes of gravitational wave sources that may go unnoticed with existing detection algorithms. This unified framework for data analysis is ideally suited to enable coincident detection campaigns of gravitational waves and their multimessenger counterparts in real-time.

  7. Effects of Stress and Relaxation on Time Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    1998). Common relaxation methods include progressive muscle relaxation, meditation, imaging, autogenic training (self- hypnosis ), listening to 14 music...2001). Menstrual and circadian rythms in time perception in healthy women and women with premenstrual syndrome. Neuroscience Research, 41(4), 339

  8. Stress Wave Propagation in Cracked Geological Solids Using Finite Difference Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakavas, P. A.; Kalapodis, N. A.

    The aim of this study is the numerical computation of the wave propagation in crack geological solids. The finite difference method was applied to solve the differential equations involved in the problem. Since the problem is symmetric, we prefer to use this technique instead of the finite element method and/or boundary elements technique. A comparison of the numerical results with analytical solutions is provided.

  9. Analytical reverse time migration: An innovation in imaging of infrastructures using ultrasonic shear waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahi, Aziz; Khazanovich, Lev

    2018-04-11

    The emergence of ultrasonic dry point contact (DPC) transducers that emit horizontal shear waves has enabled efficient collection of high-quality data in the context of a nondestructive evaluation of concrete structures. This offers an opportunity to improve the quality of evaluation by adapting advanced imaging techniques. Reverse time migration (RTM) is a simulation-based reconstruction technique that offers advantages over conventional methods, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique. RTM is capable of imaging boundaries and interfaces with steep slopes and the bottom boundaries of inclusions and defects. However, this imaging technique requires a massive amount of memory and its computation cost is high. In this study, both bottlenecks of the RTM are resolved when shear transducers are used for data acquisition. An analytical approach was developed to obtain the source and receiver wavefields needed for imaging using reverse time migration. It is shown that the proposed analytical approach not only eliminates the high memory demand, but also drastically reduces the computation time from days to minutes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Leisure Time in Modern Societies: A New Source of Boredom and Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Max; Hadler, Markus; Kaup, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    The increase in leisure time over the last century is well documented. We know much less, however, about the quality of the use of leisure time. Quite divergent predictions exist in this regard: Some authors have argued that the new, extensive free time will lead to new forms of time pressure and stress; others have foreseen an expansion of…

  11. Rise Time Perception and Detection of Syllable Stress in Adults with Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Victoria; Hamalainen, Jarmo; Soltesz, Fruzsina; Goswami, Usha

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The perception of syllable stress has not been widely studied in developmental dyslexia, despite strong evidence for auditory rhythmic perceptual difficulties. Here we investigate the hypothesis that perception of sound rise time is related to the perception of syllable stress in adults with developmental dyslexia. Methods: A…

  12. The Method of Lines Solution of the Regularized Long-Wave Equation Using Runge-Kutta Time Discretization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. O. Bakodah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of lines approach to the numerical solution of nonlinear wave equations typified by the regularized long wave (RLW is presented. The method developed uses a finite differences discretization to the space. Solution of the resulting system was obtained by applying fourth Runge-Kutta time discretization method. Using Von Neumann stability analysis, it is shown that the proposed method is marginally stable. To test the accuracy of the method some numerical experiments on test problems are presented. Test problems including solitary wave motion, two-solitary wave interaction, and the temporal evaluation of a Maxwellian initial pulse are studied. The accuracy of the present method is tested with and error norms and the conservation properties of mass, energy, and momentum under the RLW equation.

  13. Time-domain study of tectonic strain-release effects on seismic waves from underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, K.K.; Sherman, N.W.

    1982-09-01

    Tectonic strain release affects both the amplitude and phase of seismic waves from underground nuclear explosions. Surface wave magnitudes are strongly affected by the component of tectonic strain release in the explosion. Amplitudes and radiation patterns of surface waves from explosions with even small tectonic components change magnitudes significantly and show a strong dependence on receiver locations. A thrust-slip source superimposed on an isotropic explosion can explain observed reversals in waveform at different azimuths and phase delays between normal and reversed Rayleigh waves. The mechanism of this reversal is due to the phase relationship between reasonable explosion and tectonic release sources. Spallation or an unusual source time function are not required. The observations of Shagan River events imply thrust-slip motion along faults in a northwest-southeast direction, which is consistent with regional tectonics

  14. Study of a new technique for measuring the travel time of ultrasonic waves using the frequency spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Allan Xavier dos

    2010-01-01

    During the operation of a nuclear plant and other industrial plants, the operational time and the exposition to severe working conditions may cause the wear of its components, consequently, compromising the safety and the performance of the installation. The implementation of periodical inspections helps to ensure the safe operation and the best performance of the plant. In this way, the use of ultrasonic techniques for inspection and materials characterization becomes more and more attractive, since they offer quick, precise results and are technically ease to implement. The usual ultrasonic techniques, need to the measure the travelling time of the ultrasonic wave in the material examined in order to extract information useful to characterize it. Thus, the measurement of the travelling time of the ultrasonic wave is the overriding factor in most of the applications made with ultrasound. In this work a new technique was developed for measuring the travelling time of the ultrasonic wave using a Fourier's Fast Transformer (FFT). It will be shown mathematically and experimentally that it is possible to use the ultrasonic signal in the frequency domain to determine the travelling time of the ultrasonic wave. Five experiments were carried out for the experimental validation of this new technique. The materials used were 20 ceramic pastilles with different porosities and 3 aluminum plates of different thicknesses. The obtained results have shown that the new technique proposed in this work was able to determine the travelling time of the ultrasonic wave with the same precision as the conventional technique. It was shown, furthermore, that this new technique is able to measure the travelling time of the ultrasonic wave in situations where the conventional technique cannot be applied greatly expanding the range of application of ultrasonic testing and inspections. (author)

  15. Preparing meals under time stress. The experience of working mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshara, Monica; Hutchinson, Amanda; Wilson, Carlene

    2010-12-01

    The present study quantitatively explored the effects of mothers' perceived time pressure, as well as meal-related variables including mothers' convenience orientation and meal preparation confidence, on the healthiness of evening meals served to school-aged children (5-18 years old) over a 7-day period. A sample of 120 employed mothers, who identified themselves as the chief meal-preparers in their households, completed a brief, self-report, meal-related questionnaire. Results revealed that mothers' perceived time pressure did not significantly predict meal healthiness. Mothers' confidence in their ability to prepare a healthy meal was the only unique, significant predictor of a healthy evening meal. Mothers who were more confident in their ability to prepare a healthy meal served healthier evening meals than those who were less confident. In addition, mothers' perceived time pressure and convenience orientation were negatively related to healthy meal preparation confidence. Results suggest that mothers' perceived time pressure and convenience orientation, may indirectly compromise meal healthiness, by decreasing mothers' meal preparation confidence. Practical and theoretical implications of the study's findings are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of electromagnetic wave interactions on nonlinear scatterers using time domain volume integral equations

    KAUST Repository

    Ulku, Huseyin Arda

    2014-07-06

    Effects of material nonlinearities on electromagnetic field interactions become dominant as field amplitudes increase. A typical example is observed in plasmonics, where highly localized fields “activate” Kerr nonlinearities. Naturally, time domain solvers are the method of choice when it comes simulating these nonlinear effects. Oftentimes, finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is used for this purpose. This is simply due to the fact that explicitness of the FDTD renders the implementation easier and the material nonlinearity can be easily accounted for using an auxiliary differential equation (J.H. Green and A. Taflove, Opt. Express, 14(18), 8305-8310, 2006). On the other hand, explicit marching on-in-time (MOT)-based time domain integral equation (TDIE) solvers have never been used for the same purpose even though they offer several advantages over FDTD (E. Michielssen, et al., ECCOMAS CFD, The Netherlands, Sep. 5-8, 2006). This is because explicit MOT solvers have never been stabilized until not so long ago. Recently an explicit but stable MOT scheme has been proposed for solving the time domain surface magnetic field integral equation (H.A. Ulku, et al., IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag., 61(8), 4120-4131, 2013) and later it has been extended for the time domain volume electric field integral equation (TDVEFIE) (S. B. Sayed, et al., Pr. Electromagn. Res. S., 378, Stockholm, 2013). This explicit MOT scheme uses predictor-corrector updates together with successive over relaxation during time marching to stabilize the solution even when time step is as large as in the implicit counterpart. In this work, an explicit MOT-TDVEFIE solver is proposed for analyzing electromagnetic wave interactions on scatterers exhibiting Kerr nonlinearity. Nonlinearity is accounted for using the constitutive relation between the electric field intensity and flux density. Then, this relation and the TDVEFIE are discretized together by expanding the intensity and flux - sing half

  17. Victimization from workplace bullying after a traumatic event: time-lagged relationships with symptoms of posttraumatic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Birkeland; Birkeland, Marianne Skogbrott; Hansen, Marianne Bang; Knardahl, Stein; Heir, Trond

    2017-07-01

    This study examined relationships between victimization from bullying and symptoms of posttraumatic stress (PTSS) after exposure to a terror attack at the workplace. It was hypothesized that (1) victims of bullying report higher and more stable levels of PTSS over time compared to their non-bullied colleagues and (2) that PTSS provides an increased risk of subsequent victimization from bullying. The hypotheses were tested in a two-wave prospective sample comprising 2337 employees from Norwegian governmental ministries who were exposed to the 2011 Oslo terror attack. The two waves of data collection were conducted 10 and 22 months after the terror attack. Hypothesis 1 was partially supported: victims of bullying reported significantly higher levels of PTSS than non-bullied employees at both measurement points, but bullying was not related to the stability in PTSS over time. In support of hypothesis 2, PTSS at 10 months was significantly associated with an increased risk of feeling victimized by bullying 1 year later. The results indicate that victimization from bullying is associated with elevated levels of PTSS in the aftermath of a workplace terror attack, but that bullying does not have any impact on the long-term development of PTSS. PTSS may be a potential antecedent of bullying. These findings suggest that organizations must give high priority to the psychosocial work environment of traumatized employees to prevent further detrimental health consequences.

  18. [PULSE WAVE TRANSIT TIME - ONE MORE ATTEMPT OF NON-INVASIVE CARDIAC OUTPUT MEASUREMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akselrod, B A; Tolstova, L A; Pshenichniy, T A; Fedulova, S V

    2017-09-01

    Estimated continuous cardiac output (esCCOTM) based on pulse wave transit time is one of alternative non-invasive CO measurement techniques. Randomized study included 23 scheduled patients operated upon due to cardiovascular diseases. Cardiac index (CI) was measured Comparative analyses of esCCO and others CO measurement methods used intraoperative was carried out. In the first group (n = 9) esCCO was compared with transpulmonary thermodilution (PiCCO-plus); in the second group (n = 8) - with pulmonary artery thermodilution; in the third group (n = 6) - with transoesophageal echocardiography (velocity-time integral). In the 1st group direct correlation was found (r = 0,773, p measurements were out of reference interval (more than ? 15%). Blend- Altman method showed the dispersion of results in all groups. 1. Estimated continuous cardiac output measurement technique based on PWTT has a direct correla- tion with prepulmonary thermodilution and transoesophageal echocardiography, medium and high power respectively. 2. esCCO has significant differences with the referential techniques during general anesthesia in cardiac surgery pa- tients. 3. Calibration based on invasive blood pressure and outside cardiac output measurement does not increase the accuracy of measurements. 4. esCCO has a negative diagnostic value and cannot be recommendedfor the cardiac out- put evaluation during cardiac surgery. 5. This method can be useful for analyze general effectiveness of perioperative hemodynamics.

  19. Attenuation compensation for least-squares reverse time migration using the viscoacoustic-wave equation

    KAUST Repository

    Dutta, Gaurav

    2014-10-01

    Strong subsurface attenuation leads to distortion of amplitudes and phases of seismic waves propagating inside the earth. Conventional acoustic reverse time migration (RTM) and least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) do not account for this distortion, which can lead to defocusing of migration images in highly attenuative geologic environments. To correct for this distortion, we used a linearized inversion method, denoted as Qp-LSRTM. During the leastsquares iterations, we used a linearized viscoacoustic modeling operator for forward modeling. The adjoint equations were derived using the adjoint-state method for back propagating the residual wavefields. The merit of this approach compared with conventional RTM and LSRTM was that Qp-LSRTM compensated for the amplitude loss due to attenuation and could produce images with better balanced amplitudes and more resolution below highly attenuative layers. Numerical tests on synthetic and field data illustrated the advantages of Qp-LSRTM over RTM and LSRTM when the recorded data had strong attenuation effects. Similar to standard LSRTM, the sensitivity tests for background velocity and Qp errors revealed that the liability of this method is the requirement for smooth and accurate migration velocity and attenuation models.

  20. Real-time stress monitoring of highway bridges with a secured wireless sensor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    "This collaborative research aims to develop a real-time stress monitoring system for highway bridges with a secured wireless sensor network. The near term goal is to collect wireless sensor data under different traffic patterns from local highway br...

  1. Time Work by Overworked Professionals: Strategies in Response to the Stress of Higher Status

    OpenAIRE

    Moen, Phyllis; Lam, Jack; Ammons, Samantha; Kelly, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    How are professionals responding to the time strains brought on by the stress of their higher status jobs? Qualitative data from professionals reveal (a) general acceptance of the emerging temporal organization of professional work, including rising time demands and blurred boundaries around work/ nonwork times and places, and (b) time work as strategic responses to work intensification, overloads, and boundarylessness. We detected four time-work strategies: prioritizing time, scaling back ob...

  2. Prediction of Sound Waves Propagating Through a Nozzle Without/With a Shock Wave Using the Space-Time CE/SE Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2000-01-01

    The benchmark problems in Category 1 (Internal Propagation) of the third Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Work-shop sponsored by NASA Glenn Research Center are solved using the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. The first problem addresses the propagation of sound waves through a nearly choked transonic nozzle. The second one concerns shock-sound interaction in a supersonic nozzle. A quasi one-dimension CE/SE Euler solver for a nonuniform mesh is developed and employed to solve both problems. Numerical solutions are compared with the analytical solution for both problems. It is demonstrated that the CE/SE method is capable of solving aeroacoustic problems with/without shock waves in a simple way. Furthermore, the simple nonreflecting boundary condition used in the CE/SE method which is not based on the characteristic theory works very well.

  3. Estimating the location of a tunnel using interferometric times of Rayleigh-wave scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaslilar, A.; Harmankaya, U.; Wapenaar, C.P.A.; Draganov, D.S.

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by a technique called seismic interferometry, we estimate the location of a scatterer using scattered waves. We isolate the scattered wavefield and evaluate the result of correlating scattered waves at different receiver locations. The cross-correlation eliminates the travel path between a

  4. Lapse-time-dependent coda-wave depth sensitivity to local velocity perturbations in 3-D heterogeneous elastic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, Anne; Planès, Thomas; Hadziioannou, Céline; Campillo, Michel

    2016-10-01

    In the context of seismic monitoring, recent studies made successful use of seismic coda waves to locate medium changes on the horizontal plane. Locating the depth of the changes, however, remains a challenge. In this paper, we use 3-D wavefield simulations to address two problems: first, we evaluate the contribution of surface- and body-wave sensitivity to a change at depth. We introduce a thin layer with a perturbed velocity at different depths and measure the apparent relative velocity changes due to this layer at different times in the coda and for different degrees of heterogeneity of the model. We show that the depth sensitivity can be modelled as a linear combination of body- and surface-wave sensitivity. The lapse-time-dependent sensitivity ratio of body waves and surface waves can be used to build 3-D sensitivity kernels for imaging purposes. Second, we compare the lapse-time behaviour in the presence of a perturbation in horizontal and vertical slabs to address, for instance, the origin of the velocity changes detected after large earthquakes.

  5. Direct measurements of mean Reynolds stress and ripple roughness in the presence of energetic forcing by surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Malcolm; Trowbridge, John; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Jones, Katie R.; Traykovski, Peter A.

    2018-01-01

    Direct covariance observations of the mean flow Reynolds stress and sonar images of the seafloor collected on a wave‐exposed inner continental shelf demonstrate that the drag exerted by the seabed on the overlying flow is consistent with boundary layer models for wave‐current interaction, provided that the orientation and anisotropy of the bed roughness are appropriately quantified. Large spatial and temporal variations in drag result from nonequilibrium ripple dynamics, ripple anisotropy, and the orientation of the ripples relative to the current. At a location in coarse sand characterized by large two‐dimensional orbital ripples, the observed drag shows a strong dependence on the relative orientation of the mean current to the ripple crests. At a contrasting location in fine sand, where more isotropic sub‐orbital ripples are observed, the sensitivity of the current to the orientation of the ripples is reduced. Further, at the coarse site under conditions when the currents are parallel to the ripple crests and the wave orbital diameter is smaller than the wavelength of the relic orbital ripples, the flow becomes hydraulically smooth. This transition is not observed at the fine site, where the observed wave orbital diameter is always greater than the wavelength of the observed sub‐orbital ripples. Paradoxically, the dominant along‐shelf flows often experience lower drag at the coarse site than at the fine site, despite the larger ripples, highlighting the complex dynamics controlling drag in wave‐exposed environments with heterogeneous roughness.

  6. Unidirectional Wave Vector Manipulation in Two-Dimensional Space with an All Passive Acoustic Parity-Time-Symmetric Metamaterials Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tuo; Zhu, Xuefeng; Chen, Fei; Liang, Shanjun; Zhu, Jie

    2018-03-01

    Exploring the concept of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians respecting parity-time symmetry with classical wave systems is of great interest as it enables the experimental investigation of parity-time-symmetric systems through the quantum-classical analogue. Here, we demonstrate unidirectional wave vector manipulation in two-dimensional space, with an all passive acoustic parity-time-symmetric metamaterials crystal. The metamaterials crystal is constructed through interleaving groove- and holey-structured acoustic metamaterials to provide an intrinsic parity-time-symmetric potential that is two-dimensionally extended and curved, which allows the flexible manipulation of unpaired wave vectors. At the transition point from the unbroken to broken parity-time symmetry phase, the unidirectional sound focusing effect (along with reflectionless acoustic transparency in the opposite direction) is experimentally realized over the spectrum. This demonstration confirms the capability of passive acoustic systems to carry the experimental studies on general parity-time symmetry physics and further reveals the unique functionalities enabled by the judiciously tailored unidirectional wave vectors in space.

  7. Life time forecasting method upon occurrence of stress corrosion cracking of structure and test device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzai, Hideya; Kida, Toshitaka; Urayama, Yoshinao; Kikuchi, Eiji; Shimanuki, Sei; Kuniya, Jiro; Nakata, Kiyotomo; Izumitani, Masakiyo; Hattori, Shigeo.

    1993-01-01

    A load stress is applied to a metal piece made of a material identical with the constituent material of a structure and having the sensitivity enhanced to a predetermined level, and plurality of such pieces are immersed in a corrosive circumstance in this state. Then, the time from the immersion till the rupture thereof and the number of ruptured pieces of the metal pieces are detected while observing them. The relation with the probability of rupture is plotted on a paper to determine the life time for the occurrence of minimum stress corrosion creacks (SSC) of the metal pieces. Based on the relationship between the previously determined stress and the life time for the occurrence of minimum SSC, the ratio between the life time for the occurrence of minimum SSC relative to estimated stress applied to the structure and the life time for the occurrence of minimum SSC relative to the stress applied to the metal pieces is determined as a first SSC acceleration rate. The ratio between the time of occurrence for minimum SSC and the sensitivity is determined as a second SSC acceleration rate. The first and the second SSC acceleration rates are multiplied to estimate the time for the occurrence of SSC of the structure. Then, the life time for the occurrence of SSC for the equipments and structures can be recognized quantitatively, to prevent ruptures of actual equipments and extend the life time. (N.H.)

  8. Whose Time Is It? The Effect of Employment and Work/Family Stress on Children's Housework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gager, Constance T.; Sanchez, Laura A.; Demaris, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    Children's time use--and specifically the time they spend on household chores--is an important arena for understanding social change. However, few studies accurately depict the multiple factors influencing children's household labor, including parent's and children's available time and parent's levels of work/family stress. We address these gaps…

  9. Stress Prevention through a Time Management Training Intervention: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, Alexander; Stock, Armin; Pinneker, Lydia; Ströhle, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a short-term time management training programme on perceived control of time and perceived stress. The sample of 177 freshmen was randomly assigned to a time management training (n?=?89) and an active control group (CG) (n?=?88). We expected that an increase in external demands during the…

  10. Global Time Tomography of Finite Frequency Waves with Optimized Tetrahedral Grids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelli, R.; Montelli, R.; Nolet, G.; Dahlen, F. A.; Masters, G.; Hung, S.

    2001-12-01

    frequency seismic waves sensitive to three-dimensional structure off rays. Dahlen et al (2000) used the Born approximation to find a double-ray sum representation of the 3D Fréchet kernel. Destructive interference among adjacent frequencies in the broad-band pulse renders a cross-correlation traveltime measurement sensitive only to the wave speed in a hollow banana-shaped region surrounding the unperturbed geometrical ray. We combined the banana-doughnut kernel with the formalism for the adaptive parametrization based on resolution criterion for a long-period body wave data set. Both absolute and differential times are computed using cross-correlation of each observed arrival with a synthetic pulse contructed by convolving the impulse response of the instrument at Albuquerque (ANMO) and an attenuation operator for the preliminary reference earth model (PREM). We shall present some first results illustrating the effects of using banana-doughnut Fréchet kernels instead of ray theory on the contruction of optimized Delaunay meshes.

  11. A method for the frequency control in time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Kaneko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe an extension of the time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging based on the optical pump-probe technique with periodic light source at a fixed repetition frequency. Usually such imaging measurement may generate and detect acoustic waves with their frequencies only at or near the integer multiples of the repetition frequency. Here we propose a method which utilizes the amplitude modulation of the excitation pulse train to modify the generation frequency free from the mentioned limitation, and allows for the first time the discrimination of the resulted upper- and lower-side-band frequency components in the detection. The validity of the method is demonstrated in a simple measurement on an isotropic glass plate covered by a metal thin film to extract the dispersion curves of the surface acoustic waves.

  12. A method for the frequency control in time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Shogo; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    We describe an extension of the time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging based on the optical pump-probe technique with periodic light source at a fixed repetition frequency. Usually such imaging measurement may generate and detect acoustic waves with their frequencies only at or near the integer multiples of the repetition frequency. Here we propose a method which utilizes the amplitude modulation of the excitation pulse train to modify the generation frequency free from the mentioned limitation, and allows for the first time the discrimination of the resulted upper- and lower-side-band frequency components in the detection. The validity of the method is demonstrated in a simple measurement on an isotropic glass plate covered by a metal thin film to extract the dispersion curves of the surface acoustic waves.

  13. The influence of social support and perceived stress on response time inconsistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phibbs, Sandi; Stawski, Robert S; MacDonald, Stuart W S; Munoz, Elizabeth; Smyth, Joshua M; Sliwinski, Martin J

    2017-11-24

    Lack of social support and high levels of stress represent potentially modifiable risk factors for cognitive aging. In this study we examined the relationships between these two risk factors and response time inconsistency (RTI), or trial-to-trial variability in choice response time tasks. RTI is an early indicator of declining cognitive health, and examining the influence of modifiable psychosocial risk factors on RTI is important for understanding and promoting cognitive health during adulthood and old age. Using data from a community sample study (n = 317; M age = 49, range = 19-83), we examined the effects of social support, including size of network and satisfaction with support, global perceived stress, and their interactions on RTI. Neither size of network nor satisfaction with support was associated with RTI independent of perceived stress. Stress was positively associated with increased RTI on all tasks, independent of social support. Perceived stress did not interact with either dimension of social support to predict RTI, and perceived stress effects were invariant across age and sex. Perceived stress, but not social support, may be a unique and modifiable risk factor for normal and pathological cognitive aging. Discussion focuses on the importance of perceived stress and its impact on RTI in supporting cognitive health in adulthood and old age.

  14. Economic stress and low leisure-time physical activity: Two life course hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lindström

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to investigate associations between economic stress in childhood and adulthood, and low leisure-time physical activity (LTPA in adulthood from two life course perspectives. The public health survey in Scania in the southernmost part of Sweden in 2012 is a cross-sectional study based on a stratified random sample with 28,029 respondents aged 18–80 (51.7% response rate. Associations between childhood and adult economic stress, and low LTPA were analyzed with logistic regressions. A 14.8% prevalence of men and 13.5% of women had low LTPA (sedentary lifestyle. Low LTPA was associated with higher age, being born abroad, low socioeconomic status, low trust, smoking, poor self-rated health, and economic stress in childhood and adulthood. The odds ratios of low LTPA increased with more accumulated economic stress across the life course in a dose-response relationship. There was no specific critical period (childhood or adulthood, because economic stress in childhood and adulthood were both associated with low LTPA but the associations were attenuated after the introduction of smoking and self-rated health. The accumulation hypothesis was supported because the odds ratios of low LTPA indicated a graded response to life course economic stress. The critical period hypothesis was thus not supported. Economic stress across the life course seems to be associated with low LTPA in adulthood. Keywords: Economic stress, Leisure-time physical activity, Accumulation, Critical period, Social capital, Sweden

  15. Proposal for element size and time increment selection guideline by 3-D finite element method for elastic waves propagation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Hitoshi; Meshii, Toshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a guideline for selection of element size and time increment by 3-D finite element method, which is applied to elastic wave propagation analysis for a long distance of a large structure. An element size and a time increment are determined by quantitative evaluation of strain, which must be 0 on the analysis model with a uniform motion, caused by spatial and time discretization. (author)

  16. Flow Stress of V, Mo, Ta, and W on Nanosecond Time Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, D C; Hawreliak, J A; El-Dasher, B S; McNaney, J M; Milathianaki, D; Lorenzana, H E; Kumar, M; Remington, B A; Tierney, T E

    2009-07-27

    The mechanisms and kinetics of plastic flow in body-centered cubic materials are of current interest in the development of fundamental theories of dynamic strength, applicable at high strain rates such as are found in high explosive and laser loading. We have performed dynamic loading experiments with the Janus and Trident lasers, using tailored pulse shapes to induce shock or ramp loading. The response of the sample was investigated through the surface velocity history, and in some cases with in-situ x-ray diffraction. The velocity histories exhibited clear elastic waves, from which the flow stress was deduced and compared with the elastic strain as determined by diffraction. We compare the deduced flow stress with models calibrated to samples millimeters thick, and to theoretical studies.

  17. Effects of Thoratec pulsatile ventricular assist device timing on the abdominal aortic wave intensity pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahren, Silje Ekroll; Amacher, Raffael; Weber, Alberto; Most, Henriette; Flammer, Shannon Axiak; Traupe, Tobias; Stoller, Michael; de Marchi, Stefano; Vandenberghe, Stijn

    2014-10-15

    Arterial waves are seen as possible independent mediators of cardiovascular risks, and the wave intensity analysis (WIA) has therefore been proposed as a method for patient selection for ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation. Interpreting measured wave intensity (WI) is challenging, and complexity is increased by the implantation of a VAD. The waves generated by the VAD interact with the waves generated by the native heart, and this interaction varies with changing VAD settings. Eight sheep were implanted with a pulsatile VAD (PVAD) through ventriculoaortic cannulation. The start of PVAD ejection was synchronized to the native R wave and delayed between 0 and 90% of the cardiac cycle in 10% steps or phase shifts (PS). Pressure and velocity signals were registered, with the use of a combined Doppler and pressure wire positioned in the abdominal aorta, and used to calculate the WI. Depending on the PS, different wave interference phenomena occurred. Maximum unloading of the left ventricle (LV) coincided with constructive interference and maximum blood flow pulsatility, and maximum loading of the LV coincided with destructive interference and minimum blood flow pulsatility. We believe that noninvasive WIA could potentially be used clinically to assess the mechanical load of the LV and to monitor the peripheral hemodynamics such as blood flow pulsatility and risk of intestinal bleeding. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Null stream analysis of Pulsar Timing Array data: localisation of resolvable gravitational wave sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Janna; Veitch, John; Sesana, Alberto; Vecchio, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    Super-massive black hole binaries are expected to produce a gravitational wave (GW) signal in the nano-Hertz frequency band which may be detected by pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) in the coming years. The signal is composed of both stochastic and individually resolvable components. Here we develop a generic Bayesian method for the analysis of resolvable sources based on the construction of `null-streams' which cancel the part of the signal held in common for each pulsar (the Earth-term). For an array of N pulsars there are N - 2 independent null-streams that cancel the GW signal from a particular sky location. This method is applied to the localisation of quasi-circular binaries undergoing adiabatic inspiral. We carry out a systematic investigation of the scaling of the localisation accuracy with signal strength and number of pulsars in the PTA. Additionally, we find that source sky localisation with the International PTA data release one is vastly superior than what is achieved by its constituent regional PTAs.

  19. Systolic Time Interval Estimation Using Continuous Wave Radar With On-Body Antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxi, Dilpreet; Hermeling, Evelien; Mercuri, Marco; Beutel, Fabian; van der Westen, Roberto Garcia; Torfs, Tom; Redoute, Jean-Michel; Yuce, Mehmet Rasit

    2018-01-01

    The estimation of systolic time intervals (STIs) is done using continuous wave (CW) radar at 2.45 GHz with an on-body antenna. In the state of the art, typically bioimpedance, heart sounds and/or ultrasound are used to measure STIs. All three methods suffer from insufficient accuracy of STI estimation due to various reasons. CW radar is investigated for its ability to overcome the deficiencies in the state of the art. Ten healthy male subjects aged 25-45 were asked to lie down at a 30 incline. Recordings of 60 s were taken without breathing and with paced breathing. Heart sounds, electrocardiogram, respiration, and impedance cardiogram were measured simultaneously as reference. The radar antennas were placed at two positions on the chest. The antennas were placed directly on the body as well as with cotton textile in between. The beat to beat STIs have been determined from the reference signals as well as CW radar signals. The results indicate that CW radar can be used to estimate STIs in ambulatory monitoring. The results pave way to a potentially more compact method of estimating STIs, which can be integrated into a wearable device.

  20. A perfectly matched layer for the time-dependent wave equation in heterogeneous and layered media

    KAUST Repository

    Duru, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    A mathematical analysis of the perfectly matched layer (PML) for the time-dependent wave equation in heterogeneous and layered media is presented. We prove the stability of the PML for discontinuous media with piecewise constant coefficients, and derive energy estimates for discontinuous media with piecewise smooth coefficients. We consider a computational setup consisting of smaller structured subdomains that are discretized using high order accurate finite difference operators for approximating spatial derivatives. The subdomains are then patched together into a global domain by a weak enforcement of interface conditions using penalties. In order to ensure the stability of the discrete PML, it is necessary to transform the interface conditions to include the auxiliary variables. In the discrete setting, the transformed interface conditions are crucial in deriving discrete energy estimates analogous to the continuous energy estimates, thus proving stability and convergence of the numerical method. Finally, we present numerical experiments demonstrating the stability of the PML in a layered medium and high order accuracy of the proposed interface conditions. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  1. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunes, Nicolás; Siemens, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein's theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime . Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  2. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Yunes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein’s theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime. Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  3. Rapid evaluation of radiation boundary kernels for time-domain wave propagation on black holes: implementation and numerical tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Stephen R

    2004-01-01

    For scalar, electromagnetic, or gravitational wave propagation on a fixed Schwarzschild black hole background, we consider the exact nonlocal radiation outer boundary conditions (ROBC) appropriate for a spherical outer boundary of finite radius enclosing the black hole. Such boundary conditions feature temporal integral convolution between each spherical harmonic mode of the wave field and a time-domain radiation kernel (TDRK). For each orbital angular integer l the associated TDRK is the inverse Laplace transform of a frequency-domain radiation kernel (FDRK). Drawing upon theory and numerical methods developed in a previous article, we numerically implement the ROBC via a rapid algorithm involving approximation of the FDRK by a rational function. Such an approximation is tailored to have relative error ε uniformly along the axis of imaginary Laplace frequency. Theoretically, ε is also a long-time bound on the relative convolution error. Via study of one-dimensional radial evolutions, we demonstrate that the ROBC capture the phenomena of quasinormal ringing and decay tails. We also consider a three-dimensional evolution based on a spectral code, one showing that the ROBC yield accurate results for the scenario of a wave packet striking the boundary at an angle. Our work is a partial generalization to Schwarzschild wave propagation and Heun functions of the methods developed for flatspace wave propagation and Bessel functions by Alpert, Greengard, and Hagstrom

  4. Use of simple finite elements for mechanical systems impact analysis based on stereomechanics, stress wave propagation, and energy method approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, Michael L.; Moradi, Rasoul; Lankarani, Hamid M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of analyzing impact events in mechanical systems for design purposes using simple or low ordered finite elements. Traditional impact dynamics analyses of mechanical systems namely stereomechanics, energy method, stress-wave propagation and contact mechanics approaches are limited to very simplified geometries and provide basic analyses in making predictions and understanding the dominant features of the impact in a mechanical system. In engineering practice, impacted systems present a complexity of geometry, stiffness, mass distributions, contact areas and impact angles that are impossible to analyze and design with the traditional impact dynamics methods. In real cases, the effective tool is the finite element (FE) method. The high-end FEA codes though may be not available for typical engineer/designer. This paper provides information on whether impact events of mechanical systems can be successfully modeled using simple or low-order finite elements. FEA models using simple elements are benchmarked against theoretical impact problems and published experimental impact results. As a case study, an FE model using simple plastic beam elements is further tested to predict stresses and deflections in an experimental structural impact

  5. A Comparison of Brain Wave Patterns of High and Low Grade Point Average Students During Rest, Problem Solving, and Stress Situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montor, Karel

    The purpose of this study was to compare brain wave patterns produced by high and low grade point average students, while they were resting, solving problems, and subjected to stress situations. The study involved senior midshipmen at the United States Naval Academy. The high group was comprised of those whose cumulative grade point average was…

  6. Modeling of the propagation and reception of elastic waves emitted by a crack under stress. Application to the simulation of non-destructive testing by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Khalifa, Warida

    2013-01-01

    AE Non-destructive testing is used in many fields such as nuclear energy, oil and gas, civil engineering or mechanical engineering to check the integrity of structures under stress. Depending on the ratio of structure thickness to wavelength, the energy released by a crack under stress can propagate either as guided waves (in thin structures) or as Rayleigh wave (in thick structures). The analysis of signals resulting from this ultrasonic 'passive' method is particularly difficult due to the complexity of typically measured signals. The objective of this thesis is to develop models to enable the simulation of AE testing experiments in the case of thick or thin structure. The developed models rely on the coupling between an AE source model, wave propagation models and an AE Sensor model. In the case of thick structures two 2D models (for plane and cylindrical surfaces) and a 3D model (for plane surface) have been developed to predict the signal corresponding to the Rayleigh wave emitted by a crack under stress. In the case of thin structures, a 2D model has been developed to predict the signal corresponding to the guided modes emitted by a crack under stress. Several parametric studies have been conducted to determine the influence of the different model input data on the AE signals and thus help to interpret AE testing results. (author) [fr

  7. Time-averaged and time-dependent energy-related quantities of harmonic waves in inhomogeneous viscoelastic anisotropic media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červený, V.; Pšenčík, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 170, č. 3 (2007), s. 1253-1261 ISSN 0956-540X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/05/2182 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : inhomogeneous media * seismic anisotropy * seismic waves Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.112, year: 2007

  8. Feasibility of transient elastography versus real-time two-dimensional shear wave elastography in difficult-to-scan patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staugaard, Benjamin; Christensen, Peer Brehm; Mössner, Belinda

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Transient elastography (TE) is hampered in some patients by failures and unreliable results. We hypothesized that real time two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2D-SWE), the FibroScan XL probe, and repeated TE exams, could be used to obtain reliable liver stiffness...

  9. Time-stepping stability of continuous and discontinuous finite-element methods for 3-D wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.A.; Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the time-stepping stability for the 3-D acoustic wave equation, discretized on tetrahedral meshes. Two types of methods are considered: mass-lumped continuous finite elements and the symmetric interior-penalty discontinuous Galerkin method. Combining the spatial discretization with the

  10. 3D elastic wave modeling using modified high‐order time stepping schemes with improved stability conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2009-01-01

    We present two Lax‐Wendroff type high‐order time stepping schemes and apply them to solving the 3D elastic wave equation. The proposed schemes have the same format as the Taylor series expansion based schemes, only with modified temporal extrapolation coefficients. We demonstrate by both theoretical analysis and numerical examples that the modified schemes significantly improve the stability conditions.

  11. Effect of Initial Stress on the Dynamic Response of a Multi-Layered Plate-Strip Subjected to an Arbitrary Inclined Time-Harmonic Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daşdemir, A.

    2017-08-01

    The forced vibration of a multi-layered plate-strip with initial stress under the action of an arbitrary inclined time-harmonic force resting on a rigid foundation is considered. Within the framework of the piecewise homogeneous body model with the use of the three-dimensional linearized theory of elastic waves in initially stressed bodies (TLTEWISB), a mathematical modelling is presented in plane strain state. It is assumed that there exists the complete contact interaction at the interface between the layers and the materials of the layer are linearly elastic, homogeneous and isotropic. The governing system of the partial differential equations of motion for the considered problem is solved approximately by employing the Finite Element Method (FEM). Further, the influence of the initial stress parameter on the dynamic response of the plate-strip is presented.

  12. The time-varying association between perceived stress and hunger within and between days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jimi; Shiyko, Mariya; Keller, Stefan; Dunton, Genevieve; Schembre, Susan M

    2015-06-01

    Examine the association between perceived stress and hunger continuously over a week in free-living individuals. Forty five young adults (70% women, 30% overweight/obese) ages 18 to 24 years (Mean = 20.7, SD = 1.5), with BMI between 17.4 and 36.3 kg/m(2) (Mean = 23.6, SD = 4.0) provided between 513 and 577 concurrent ratings of perceived stress and hunger for 7 days via hourly, text messaging assessments and real-time eating records. Time-varying effect modeling was used to explore whether the within-day fluctuations in stress are related to perceived hunger assessed on a momentary basis. A generally positive stress-hunger relationship was confirmed, but we found that the strength of the relationship was not linear. Rather, the magnitude of the association between perceived stress and hunger changed throughout the day such that only during specific time intervals were stress and hunger significantly related. Specifically, the strength of the positive association peaked during late afternoon hours on weekdays (β = 0.31, p hunger associations that peak in the afternoon or evening hours. While we are unable to infer causality from these analyses, our findings provide empirical evidence for a potentially high-risk time of day for stress-induced eating. Replication of these findings in larger, more diverse samples will aid with the design and implementation of real-time intervention studies aimed at reducing stress-eating. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Real-Time Forecasting System of Winds, Waves and Surge in Tropical Cyclones

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Graber, Hans C; Donelan, Mark A; Brown, Michael G; Slinn, Donald N; Hagen, Scott C; Thompson, Donald R; Jensen, Robert E; Black, Peter G; Powell, Mark D; Guiney, John L; Cardone, Vincent J; Cox, Andrew T; Augustus, Ellsworth H; Colonnese, Christopher P

    2003-01-01

    The long-term goal of this partnership is to establish an operational forecasting system of the wind field and resulting waves and surge impacting the coastline during the approach and landfall of tropical cyclones...

  14. Real-Time Forecasting System of Winds, Waves and Surge in Tropical Cyclones

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Graber, Hans C; Donelan, Mark A; Brown, Michael G; Slinn, Donald N; Hagen, Scott C; Thompson, Donald R; Jensen, Robert E; Black, Peter G; Powell, Mark D; Guiney, John L

    2004-01-01

    The long-term goal of this partnership is to establish an operational forecasting system of the wind field and resulting waves and surge impacting the coastline during the approach and landfall of tropical cyclones...

  15. Real-Time Forecasting System of Winds, Waves and Surge in Tropical Cyclones

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Graber, Hans C; Donelan, Mark A; Brown, Michael G; Slinn, Donald N; Hagen, Scott C; Thompson, Donald R; Jensen, Robert E; Black, Peter G; Powell, Mark D; Guiney, John L

    2005-01-01

    The long-term goal of this partnership is to establish an operational forecasting system of the wind field and resulting waves and surge impacting the coastline during the approach and landfall of tropical cyclones...

  16. Numerical Time-Domain Modeling of Lamb Wave Propagation Using Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Rappel

    2014-01-01

    integration technique (EFIT as well as its validation with analytical results. Lamb wave method is a long range inspection technique which is considered to have unique future in the field of structural health monitoring. One of the main problems facing the lamb wave method is how to choose the most appropriate frequency to generate the waves for adequate transmission capable of properly propagating in the material, interfering with defects/damages, and being received in good conditions. Modern simulation tools based on numerical methods such as finite integration technique (FIT, finite element method (FEM, and boundary element method (BEM may be used for modeling. In this paper, two sets of simulation are performed. In the first set, group velocities of lamb wave in a steel plate are obtained numerically. Results are then compared with analytical results to validate the simulation. In the second set, EFIT is employed to study fundamental symmetric mode interaction with a surface braking defect.

  17. The upper mantle structure of the central Rio Grande rift region from teleseismic P and S wave travel time delays and attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, P.D.; Davis, P.M.; Baldridge, W.S.; Olsen, K.H.; Glahn, A.; Achauer, U.; Spence, W.

    1996-01-01

    The lithosphere beneath a continental rift should be significantly modified due to extension. To image the lithosphere beneath the Rio Grande rift (RGR), we analyzed teleseismic travel time delays of both P and S wave arrivals and solved for the attenuation of P and S waves for four seismic experiments spanning the Rio Grande rift. Two tomographic inversions of the P wave travel time data are given: an Aki-Christofferson-Husebye (ACH) block model inversion and a downward projection inversion. The tomographic inversions reveal a NE-SW to NNE-SSW trending feature at depths of 35 to 145 km with a velocity reduction of 7 to 8% relative to mantle velocities beneath the Great Plains. This region correlates with the transition zone between the Colorado Plateau and the Rio Grande rift and is bounded on the NW by the Jemez lineament, a N52??E trending zone of late Miocene to Holocene volcanism. S wave delays plotted against P wave delays are fit with a straight line giving a slope of 3.0??0.4. This correlation and the absolute velocity reduction imply that temperatures in the lithosphere are close to the solidus, consistent with, but not requiring, the presence of partial melt in the mantle beneath the Rio Grande rift. The attenuation data could imply the presence of partial melt. We compare our results with other geophysical and geologic data. We propose that any north-south trending thermal (velocity) anomaly that may have existed in the upper mantle during earlier (Oligocene to late Miocene) phases of rifting and that may have correlated with the axis of the rift has diminished with time and has been overprinted with more recent structure. The anomalously low-velocity body presently underlying the transition zone between the core of the Colorado Plateau and the rift may reflect processes resulting from the modern (Pliocene to present) regional stress field (oriented WNW-ESE), possibly heralding future extension across the Jemez lineament and transition zone.

  18. Impacts of short-time scale water column variability on broadband high-frequency acoustic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickmeier, Justin

    Acoustical oceanography is one way to study the ocean, its internal layers, boundaries and all processes occurring within using underwater acoustics. Acoustical sensing techniques allows for the measurement of ocean processes from within that logistically or financially preclude traditional in-situ measurements. Acoustic signals propagate as pressure wavefronts from a source to a receiver through an ocean medium with variable physical parameters. The water column physical parameters that change acoustic wave propagation in the ocean include temperature, salinity, current, surface roughness, seafloor bathymetry, and vertical stratification over variable time scales. The impacts of short-time scale water column variability on acoustic wave propagation include coherent and incoherent surface reflections, wavefront arrival time delay, focusing or defocusing of the intensity of acoustic beams and refraction of acoustic rays. This study focuses on high-frequency broadband acoustic waves, and examines the influence of short-time scale water column variability on broadband high-frequency acoustics, wavefronts, from 7 to 28 kHz, in shallow water. Short-time scale variability is on the order of seconds to hours and the short-spatial scale variability is on the order of few centimeters. Experimental results were collected during an acoustic experiment along 100 m isobaths and data analysis was conducted using available acoustic wave propagation models. Three main topics are studied to show that acoustic waves are viable as a remote sensing tool to measure oceanographic parameters in shallow water. First, coherent surface reflections forming striation patterns, from multipath receptions, through rough surface interaction of broadband acoustic signals with the dynamic sea surface are analyzed. Matched filtered results of received acoustic waves are compared with a ray tracing numerical model using a sea surface boundary generated from measured water wave spectra at the time of

  19. Oblique lower band chorus waves: Time shifts between discrete elements observed by the Cluster spacecraft

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chum, Jaroslav; Santolík, Ondřej; Gurnett, D. A.; Pickett, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 114, - (2009), A00F02/1-A00F02/13 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1253; GA AV ČR IAA301120601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : plasma waves * wave particle interaction * inner magnetosphere * radiation belt Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.082, year: 2009

  20. Energy-flux characterization of conical and space-time coupled wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotti, A.; Couairon, A.; Faccio, D.; Trapani, P. Di

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the concept of energy density flux as a characterization tool for the propagation of ultrashort laser pulses with spatiotemporal coupling. In contrast with calculations for the Poynting vector, those for energy density flux are derived in the local frame moving at the velocity of the envelope of the wave packet under examination and do not need knowledge of the magnetic field. We show that the energy flux defined from a paraxial propagation equation follows specific geometrical connections with the phase front of the optical wave packet, which demonstrates that the knowledge of the phase fronts amounts to the measurement of the energy flux. We perform a detailed numerical study of the energy density flux in the particular case of conical waves, with special attention paid to stationary-envelope conical waves (X or O waves). A full characterization of linear conical waves is given in terms of their energy flux. We extend the definition of this concept to the case of nonlinear propagation in Kerr media with nonlinear losses.

  1. Calculating the number of shock waves, expulsion time, and optimum stone parameters based on noncontrast computerized tomography characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Khaled; Abdeldaeim, Hussein; Youssif, Mohamed; Assem, Akram

    2013-11-01

    To define the parameters that accompanied a successful extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), namely the number of shock waves (SWs), expulsion time (ET), mean stone density (MSD), and the skin-to-stone distance (SSD). A total of 368 patients diagnosed with renal calculi using noncontrast computerized tomography had their MSD, diameter, and SSD recorded. All patients were treated using a Siemens lithotripter. ESWL success meant a stone-free status or presence of residual fragments 934 HUs and SSD >99 mm. The required number of SWs and the expected ET can be anticipated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Numerical Simulation on Seismic Response of the Filled Joint under High Amplitude Stress Waves Using Finite-Discrete Element Method (FDEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaolin; Zhao, Qi; Qi, Shengwen; Xia, Kaiwen; Grasselli, Giovanni; Chen, Xuguang

    2016-12-27

    This paper numerically investigates the seismic response of the filled joint under high amplitude stress waves using the combined finite-discrete element method (FDEM). A thin layer of independent polygonal particles are used to simulate the joint fillings. Each particle is meshed using the Delaunay triangulation scheme and can be crushed when the load exceeds its strength. The propagation of the 1D longitude wave through a single filled joint is studied, considering the influences of the joint thickness and the characteristics of the incident wave, such as the amplitude and frequency. The results show that the filled particles under high amplitude stress waves mainly experience three deformation stages: (i) initial compaction stage; (ii) crushing stage; and (iii) crushing and compaction stage. In the initial compaction stage and crushing and compaction stage, compaction dominates the mechanical behavior of the joint, and the particle area distribution curve varies little. In these stages, the transmission coefficient increases with the increase of the amplitude, i.e., peak particle velocity (PPV), of the incident wave. On the other hand, in the crushing stage, particle crushing plays the dominant role. The particle size distribution curve changes abruptly with the PPV due to the fragments created by the crushing process. This process consumes part of wave energy and reduces the stiffness of the filled joint. The transmission coefficient decreases with increasing PPV in this stage because of the increased amount of energy consumed by crushing. Moreover, with the increase of the frequency of the incident wave, the transmission coefficient decreases and fewer particles can be crushed. Under the same incident wave, the transmission coefficient decreases when the filled thickness increases and the filled particles become more difficult to be crushed.

  3. Numerical Simulation on Seismic Response of the Filled Joint under High Amplitude Stress Waves Using Finite-Discrete Element Method (FDEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper numerically investigates the seismic response of the filled joint under high amplitude stress waves using the combined finite-discrete element method (FDEM. A thin layer of independent polygonal particles are used to simulate the joint fillings. Each particle is meshed using the Delaunay triangulation scheme and can be crushed when the load exceeds its strength. The propagation of the 1D longitude wave through a single filled joint is studied, considering the influences of the joint thickness and the characteristics of the incident wave, such as the amplitude and frequency. The results show that the filled particles under high amplitude stress waves mainly experience three deformation stages: (i initial compaction stage; (ii crushing stage; and (iii crushing and compaction stage. In the initial compaction stage and crushing and compaction stage, compaction dominates the mechanical behavior of the joint, and the particle area distribution curve varies little. In these stages, the transmission coefficient increases with the increase of the amplitude, i.e., peak particle velocity (PPV, of the incident wave. On the other hand, in the crushing stage, particle crushing plays the dominant role. The particle size distribution curve changes abruptly with the PPV due to the fragments created by the crushing process. This process consumes part of wave energy and reduces the stiffness of the filled joint. The transmission coefficient decreases with increasing PPV in this stage because of the increased amount of energy consumed by crushing. Moreover, with the increase of the frequency of the incident wave, the transmission coefficient decreases and fewer particles can be crushed. Under the same incident wave, the transmission coefficient decreases when the filled thickness increases and the filled particles become more difficult to be crushed.

  4. Cognitive Vulnerabilities Amplify the Effect of Early Pubertal Timing on Interpersonal Stress Generation During Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Jonathan P.; Kleiman, Evan M.; Hamlat, Elissa J.; Abramson, Lyn Y.; Alloy, Lauren B.

    2013-01-01

    Early pubertal timing has been found to confer risk for the occurrence of interpersonal stressful events during adolescence. However, pre-existing vulnerabilities may exacerbate the effects of early pubertal timing on the occurrence of stressors. Thus, the current study prospectively examined whether cognitive vulnerabilities amplified the effects of early pubertal timing on interpersonal stress generation. In a diverse sample of 310 adolescents (M age = 12.83 years, 55 % female; 53 % African American), early pubertal timing predicted higher levels of interpersonal dependent events among adolescents with more negative cognitive style and rumination, but not among adolescents with lower levels of these cognitive vulnerabilities. These findings suggest that cognitive vulnerabilities may heighten the risk of generating interpersonal stress for adolescents who undergo early pubertal maturation, which may subsequently place adolescents at greater risk for the development of psychopathology. PMID:24061858

  5. Prediction of creep of metallic materials under time-variable temperatures and stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batsoulas, N.D.

    1994-01-01

    A method is presented for the prediction of metallic materials creep behaviour at time-variable temperatures, exclusively with creep input data under constant loading. The method is derived from a more general physical-phenomenological model and, additionally, incorporates the prediction under time-variable stresses. To test the method's predicting capability, a series of experiments was carried out for the creep strain at time-variable temperatures and stresses for austenitic steel X8CrNiMoNb 16-16. The test data were predicted reasonably well using the method in question. (orig.) [de

  6. Modelling and analysis of nonlinear guided waves interaction at a breathing crack using time-domain spectral finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shuai; Ng, Ching Tai

    2017-08-01

    This study proposes a time-domain spectral finite element (SFE) model and investigates nonlinear guided wave interaction at a breathing crack. An extended time-domain SFE method based on the Mindlin-Hermann rod and Timoshenko beam theory is proposed to predict the nonlinear guided wave generation at the breathing crack. An SFE crack element is proposed to simulate the mode-conversion effect, in which a bilinear crack mechanism is implemented to take into account the contact nonlinearity at the breathing crack. There is good agreement between the results calculated using the proposed time-domain SFE method and three-dimensional finite element simulation. This demonstrates the accuracy of the proposed SFE method in simulating contact nonlinearity at the breathing crack. Parametric studies using the fundamental symmetric (S0) and anti-symmetric (A0) modes of guided waves are also carried out to provide physical insights into the higher harmonics generated due to the contact nonlinearity at the breathing crack. The magnitude of the higher harmonics generated as a function of the crack depth is investigated in detail. The results show that the mode-converted higher harmonic guided waves provide valuable information for damage detection.

  7. Measurement Invariance of the Perceived Stress Scale and Latent Mean Differences across Gender and Time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbosa-Leiker, C.; Kostick, M.; Lei, M.; McPherson, S.; Roper, V.; Hoekstra, T.; Wright, B.

    2013-01-01

    Measurement invariance of the 2-factor model of the Perceived Stress Scale - 10-item version (Cohen & Williamson, 1988) was tested across men and women at two time points and in the combined total sample over a 2-year time frame (n = 871). Measurement invariance results indicated that the scale

  8. Acute immobilization stress following contextual fear conditioning reduces fear memory: timing is essential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwaya, Akemi; Lee, Hyunjin; Park, Jonghyuk; Lee, Hosung; Muto, Junko; Nakajima, Sanae; Ohta, Shigeo; Mikami, Toshio

    2016-02-24

    Histone acetylation is regulated in response to stress and plays an important role in learning and memory. Chronic stress is known to deteriorate cognition, whereas acute stress facilitates memory formation. However, whether acute stress facilitates memory formation when it is applied after fear stimulation is not yet known. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of acute stress applied after fear training on memory formation, mRNA expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), epigenetic regulation of BDNF expression, and corticosterone level in mice in vivo. Mice were subjected to acute immobilization stress for 30 min at 60 or 90 min after contextual fear conditioning training, and acetylation of histone 3 at lysine 14 (H3K14) and level of corticosterone were measured using western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. A freezing behavior test was performed 24 h after training, and mRNA expression of BDNF was measured using real-time polymerase chain reactions. Different groups of mice were used for each test. Freezing behavior significantly decreased with the down-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression caused by acute immobilization stress at 60 min after fear conditioning training owing to the reduction of H3K14 acetylation. However, BDNF mRNA expression and H3K14 acetylation were not reduced in animals subjected to immobilization stress at 90 min after the training. Further, the corticosterone level was significantly high in mice subjected to immobilization stress at 60 min after the training. Acute immobilization stress for 30 min at 60 min after fear conditioning training impaired memory formation and reduced BDNF mRNA expression and H3K14 acetylation in the hippocampus of mice owing to the high level of corticosterone.

  9. Music Listening and Stress in Daily Life-a Matter of Timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemann, Alexandra; Wenzel, Mario; Grammes, Jennifer; Kubiak, Thomas; Nater, Urs M

    2018-04-01

    Despite increasing evidence suggesting that music listening in daily life has stress-reducing effects, studies mostly rely on subjective, retrospective data on music listening. Thus, the temporal dynamics underlying the stress-reducing effect of music listening remain unclear. Therefore, we aimed to examine the temporal dynamics of the associations between stress and music listening by assessing subjective and objective data on music in daily life. An exploratory Ambulatory Assessment study examining a total of 60 participants (37 women), aged 18 to 34 years (M = 22.4 years, SD = 3.5) was conducted. For 1 week, participants answered questions on music listening and stress six times per day via an electronic diary device, which additionally objectively sampled the exact time point of music listening and its duration. Self-reports on mere music listening were associated with lower stress reports, whereas objectively assessed data was not. However, concerning duration of music listening, both subjective and objective data on music listening showed associations between a minimum of 20 min of music listening and lower stress reports. Concerning the latency, objective data on music listening revealed that the association between stress reports and music listening occurs in a time-delayed manner. Although the study design does not allow for causal inferences, substantial associations among subjectively and objectively assessed data on music listening were found to differentially affect the experience of stress after music listening. In particular, when focusing on the temporal dynamics, objectively assessed data allowed for a more fine-grained analysis. In consequence, subjectively and objectively reported data on music listening should be assessed jointly when investigating effects of music listening on health. Experimental research with rigorous methodological control is required in order to corroborate our findings in a laboratory setting.

  10. Planar time-resolved PIV for velocity and pressure retrieval in atmospheric boundary layer over surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Sergeev, Daniil; Bopp, Maximilian; Caulliez, Guillemette

    2017-04-01

    Air-sea coupling in general is important for weather, climate, fluxes. Wind wave source is crucially important for surface waves' modeling. But the wind-wave growth rate is strongly uncertain. Using direct measurements of pressure by wave-following Elliott probe [1] showed, weak and indefinite dependence of wind-wave growth rate on the wave steepness, while Grare et.al. [2] discuss the limitations of direct measurements of pressure associated with the inability to measure the pressure close to the surface by contact methods. Recently non-invasive methods for determining the pressure on the basis of technology of time-resolved PIV are actively developed [3]. Retrieving air flow velocities by 2D PIV techniques was started from Reul et al [4]. The first attempt for retrieving wind pressure field of waves in the laboratory tank from the time-resolved PIV measurements was done in [5]. The experiments were performed at the Large Air-Sea Interaction Facility (LASIF) - MIO/Luminy (length 40 m, cross section of air channel 3.2 x 1.6 m). For 18 regimes with wind speed up to 14 m/s including presence of puddle waves, a combination of time resolved PIV technique and optical measurements of water surface form was applied to detailed investigation of the characteristics of the wind flow over the water surface. Ammonium chloride smoke was used for flow visualization illuminated by two 6 Wt blue diode lasers combined into a vertical laser plane. Particle movement was captured with high-speed camera using Scheimpflug technique (up to 20 kHz frame rate with 4-frame bursts, spatial resolution about 190 μm, field of view 314x12 mm). Velocity air flow field was retrieved by PIV images processing with adaptive cross-correlation method on the curvilinear grid following surface wave form. The resulting time resolved instantaneous velocity fields on regular grid allowed us to obtain momentum fluxes directly from measured air velocity fluctuations. The average wind velocity patterns were

  11. Deep sleep after social stress: NREM sleep slow-wave activity is enhanced in both winners and losers of a conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, Jeanine; Lancel, Marike; Koolhaas, Jaap M; Meerlo, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Sleep is considered to be a recovery process of prior wakefulness. Not only duration of the waking period affects sleep architecture and sleep EEG, the quality of wakefulness is also highly important. Studies in rats have shown that social defeat stress, in which experimental animals are attacked and defeated by a dominant conspecific, is followed by an acute increase in NREM sleep EEG slow wave activity (SWA). However, it is not known whether this effect is specific for the stress of social defeat or a result of the conflict per se. In the present experiment, we examined how sleep is affected in both the winners and losers of a social conflict. Sleep-wake patterns and sleep EEG were recorded in male wild-type Groningen rats that were subjected to 1h of social conflict in the middle of the light phase. All animals were confronted with a conspecific of similar aggression level and the conflict took place in a neutral arena where both individuals had an equal chance to either win or lose the conflict. NREM sleep SWA was significantly increased after the social conflict compared to baseline values and a gentle stimulation control condition. REM sleep was significantly suppressed in the first hours after the conflict. Winners and losers did not differ significantly in NREM sleep time, NREM sleep SWA and REM sleep time immediately after the conflict. Losers tended to have slightly more NREM sleep later in the recovery period. This study shows that in rats a social conflict with an unpredictable outcome has quantitatively and qualitatively largely similar acute effects on subsequent sleep in winners and losers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Structure of xanthan gum and cell ultrastructure at different times of alkali stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvielmo, Márcia de Mello; Borges, Caroline Dellinghausen; Toyama, Daniela de Oliveira; Vendruscolo, Claire Tondo; Scamparini, Adilma Regina Pippa

    2016-01-01

    The effect of alkali stress on the yield, viscosity, gum structure, and cell ultrastructure of xanthan gum was evaluated at the end of fermentation process of xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris pv. manihotis 280-95. Although greater xanthan production was observed after a 24h-alkali stress process, a lower viscosity was observed when compared to the alkali stress-free gum, regardless of the alkali stress time. However, this outcome is not conclusive as further studies on gum purification are required to remove excess sodium, verify the efficiency loss and the consequent increase in the polymer viscosity. Alkali stress altered the structure of xanthan gum from a polygon-like shape to a star-like form. At the end of the fermentation, early structural changes in the bacterium were observed. After alkali stress, marked structural differences were observed in the cells. A more vacuolated cytoplasm and discontinuities in the membrane cells evidenced the cell lysis. Xanthan was observed in the form of concentric circles instead of agglomerates as observed prior to the alkali stress. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Phase wave between two oscillators in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction depending on the difference in the illumination time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Satoshi; Kashima, Kenji; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Mori, Yoshihito

    2010-09-02

    To investigate the nature of the phase wave between two connected oscillators, the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction was examined for two connected circular reaction fields, which were drawn by using computer software and then projected on a filter paper soaked with BZ solution by using a liquid-crystal projector. The difference in the time at which illumination was terminated between the two circles (Deltat(0)) was changed to control the time at which the phase wave was induced. When Deltat(0) was small (0-3 s), the phase wave normally propagated on the two circles in one direction. In contrast, when Deltat(0) was large (6-10 s), the velocity of the wave decreased near the intersection of the two circles. These different features are discussed in relation to the excitability of the circles and Deltat(0). The experimental results were qualitatively reproduced by a numerical calculation based on the modified three-variable Oregonator model that included photosensitivity.

  14. Six years after the wave. Trajectories of posttraumatic stress following a natural disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesson, Kerstin Bergh; Arinell, Hans; Arnberg, Filip K

    2015-12-01

    The characteristics of long-term trajectories of distress after disasters are unclear, since few studies include a comparison group. This study examines trajectories of recovery among survivors in comparison to individuals with indirect exposure. Postal surveys were sent to Swedish tourists, repatriated from the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami (n=2268), at 1, 3, and 6 years after the tsunami to assess posttraumatic stress (PTS) and poor mental health. Items were used to ascertain high and moderate disaster exposure groups and an indirect exposure comparison group. Long-term PTS trajectories were best characterized by a resilient (72.3%), a severe chronic (4.6%), a moderate chronic (11.2%) and a recovering (11.9%) trajectory. Trajectories reported higher levels of PTS than the comparison group. Exposure severity and bereavement were highly influential risk factors. These findings have implications regarding anticipation of long-term psychological adjustment after natural disasters and need for interventions after a single traumatic event with few secondary stressors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Time series analysis of continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar wind measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Mikkelsen, Torben; Mann, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused 1.55 mu m continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar on observed wind turbulence measured in the atmospheric surface layer over homogeneous terrain is described and analysed. Comparison of Lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra simultaneou......The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused 1.55 mu m continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar on observed wind turbulence measured in the atmospheric surface layer over homogeneous terrain is described and analysed. Comparison of Lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra...

  16. Dispersal timing and drought history influence the response of bacterioplankton to drying-rewetting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, Anna J; Langenheder, Silke

    2017-08-01

    The extent and frequency of drought episodes is expected to increase in the following decades making it a crucial stress factor for smaller water bodies. However, very little is known about how bacterioplankton is affected by increased evaporation and how these communities reassemble after rewetting. Here, we present results from a microcosm experiment that assessed the effect of drying-rewetting stress on bacterioplankton in the light of the stress history and the rate and timing of dispersal after the rewetting. We found that the drying phase resulted mainly in a change of function, whereas the complete desiccation and rewetting processes strongly affected both composition and function, which were, however, influenced by the initial conditions and stress history of the communities. Effects of dispersal were generally stronger when it occurred at an early stage after the rewetting. At this stage, selective establishment of dispersed bacteria coupled with enhanced compositional and functional recovery was found, whereas effects of dispersal were neutral, that is, predictable by dispersal rates, at later stages. Our studies therefore show that both the stress history and the timing of dispersal are important factors that influence the response of bacterial communities to environmental change and stress events.

  17. Behavioral changes over time in post-traumatic stress disorder: Insights from a rat model of single prolonged stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhuoyun; Tian, Qing; Li, Feng; Gao, Junqiao; Liu, Yan; Mao, Meng; Liu, Jing; Wang, Shuyan; Li, Genmao; Ge, Dongyu; Mao, Yingqiu; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Zhaolan; Song, Yuehan

    2016-03-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is manifested as a persistent mental and emotional condition after potentially life-threatening events. Different animal models of PTSD have been developed for neuro-pathophysiology and pharmacological evaluations. A single prolonged stress (SPS) induced animal model has demonstrated to result in specific neuro-endocrinological dysregulation, and behavior abnormalities observed in PTSD. However, animal studies of PTSD have mostly been performed at one time point after SPS exposure. To better understand the development of PTSD-like behaviors in the SPS animal model, and to identify an optimal period of study, we examined depressive behavior, anxiety-like behavior, physical activity and body weight in SPS model rats for two weeks. Our results confirmed the SPS-induced PTSD-like behavior and physical activity observed in previous studies, and indicated that the most pronounced symptomatic behavior changes were observed on day 1 and 7 after SPS exposure, which may involve stress-induced acute hormone changes and unclear secondary neurobiological changes, respectively. These results provide a solid basis for further investigation into the neuro-pathophysiology of or neuropharmacology for PTSD using the SPS rat model. However, for chronic (pharmacological) studies longer than 7 days, a prolonged PTSD animal model should be developed, perhaps using enhanced stimulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of T-wave alternans activity under stress conditions after 5 d and 21 d of sedentary head-down bed rest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín-Yebra, A; Caiani, E G; Pellegrini, A; Monasterio, V; Laguna, P; Martínez, J P

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that prolonged microgravity leads to cardiovascular deconditioning, inducing significant changes in autonomic control of the cardiovascular system. This may adversely influence cardiac repolarization, and provoke cardiac rhythm disturbances. T-wave alternans (TWA), reflecting temporal and spatial repolarization heterogeneity, could be affected. The aim of this work was to test the hypothesis that 5 d and 21 d head-down (−6°) bed rest (HDBR) increases TWA, thus suggesting a higher underlying electrical instability and related arrhythmogenic risk.Forty-four healthy male volunteers were enrolled in the experiments as part of the European Space Agency’s HDBR studies. High-fidelity ECG was recorded during orthostatic tolerance (OT) and aerobic power (AP) tests, before (PRE) and after HDBR (POST). A multilead scheme for TWA amplitude estimation was used, where non-normalized and T-wave amplitude normalized TWA indices were computed. In addition, spectral analysis of heart rate variability during OT was assessed.Both 5 d and 21 d HDBR induced a reduction in orthostatic tolerance time (OTT), as well as a decrease in maximal oxygen uptake and reserve capacity, thus suggesting cardiovascular deconditioning. However, TWA indices were found not to increase. Interestingly, subjects with lower OTT after 5 d HDBR also showed higher TWA during recovery after OT testing, associated with unbalanced sympathovagal response, even before the HDBR. In contrast with previous observations, augmented ventricular heterogeneity related to 5 d and 21 d HDBR was not sufficient to increase TWA under stress conditions. (paper)

  19. Testing the time-scale dependence of delayed interactions: A heat wave during the egg stage shapes how a pesticide interacts with a successive heat wave in the larval stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Lizanne; Tüzün, Nedim; Stoks, Robby

    2017-11-01

    Under global change organisms are exposed to multiple, potentially interacting stressors. Especially interactions between successive stressors are poorly understood and recently suggested to depend on their timing of exposure. We particularly need studies assessing the impact of exposure to relevant stressors at various life stages and how these interact. We investigated the single and combined impacts of a heat wave (mild [25 °C] and extreme [30 °C]) during the egg stage, followed by successive exposure to esfenvalerate (ESF) and a heat wave during the larval stage in damselflies. Each stressor caused mortality. The egg heat wave and larval ESF exposure had delayed effects on survival, growth and lipid peroxidation (MDA). This resulted in deviations from the prediction that stressors separated by a long time interval would not interact: the egg heat wave modulated the interaction between the stressors in the larval stage. Firstly, ESF caused delayed mortality only in larvae that had been exposed to the extreme egg heat wave and this strongly depended upon the larval heat wave treatment. Secondly, ESF only increased MDA in larvae not exposed to the egg heat wave. We found little support for the prediction that when there is limited time between stressors, synergistic interactions should occur. The intermediate ESF concentration only caused delayed mortality when combined with the larval heat wave, and the lowest ESF concentrations only increased oxidative damage when followed by the mild larval heat wave. Survival selection mitigated the interaction patterns between successive stressors that are individually lethal, and therefore should be included in a predictive framework for the time-scale dependence of the outcome of multistressor studies with pollutants. The egg heat wave shaping the interaction pattern between successive pesticide exposure and a larval heat wave highlights the connectivity between the concepts of 'heat-induced pesticide sensitivity' and

  20. Time Travel: The Role of Temporality in Enabling Semantic Waves in Secondary School Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matruglio, Erika; Maton, Karl; Martin, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the theoretical understandings from Legitimation Code Theory (Maton, 2013) and Systemic Functional Linguistics (Martin, 2013) underpinning the research discussed in this special issue, this paper focuses on classroom pedagogy to illustrate an important strategy for making semantic waves in History teaching, namely "temporal shifting". We…