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Sample records for stress wave measurements

  1. Measurement and modeling of bed shear stress under solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, S.; Guard, P.A.; Baldock, T.E.

    Direct measurements of bed shear stresses (using a shear cell apparatus) generated by non-breaking solitary waves are presented. The measurements were carried out over a smooth bed in laminar and transitional flow regimes (~ 10 sup (4) < R sub (e...

  2. Wave Induced Stresses Measured at the Wave Dragon Nissum Bredning Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corona, L.; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2006-01-01

    for this paper, first to verify the FEM results obtained by Niras, Danish society in charge of the finite element modelling and structural design, and then to make a first experimental fatigue analysis of a particular part of the Wave Dragon. This last part shall be considered as an exercise for the further work...

  3. Direct bed stress measurements under solitary tsunami-type waves and breaking tsunami wave fronts

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.; Baldock, T.E.

    steepen and eventually break, thereby generating large pressure gradients that could enhance the likelihood of liquefaction of the seabed. In the drawdown, high shear stresses could trigger debris flow in submarine canyons and on steep ridges. Therefore...

  4. Measurements in a container ship of wave-induced hull girder stresses in excess of design values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes full-scale measurements of the wave-induced vertical bending moment amidships a 9400 TEU container carrier and focuses on the effect of the hydro-elastic high-frequency vibration on the extreme hogging wave bending moment. One extreme event, where the vertical wave-induced ho...

  5. Stress- and Structure-Induced Anisotropy in Southern California From Two Decades of Shear Wave Splitting Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zefeng; Peng, Zhigang

    2017-10-01

    We measure shear wave splitting (SWS) parameters (i.e., fast direction and delay time) using 330,000 local earthquakes recorded by more than 400 stations of the Southern California Seismic Network (1995-2014). The resulting 232,000 SWS measurements (90,000 high-quality ones) provide a uniform and comprehensive database of local SWS measurements in Southern California. The fast directions at many stations are consistent with regional maximum compressional stress σHmax. However, several regions show clear deviations from the σHmax directions. These include linear sections along the San Andreas Fault and the Santa Ynez Fault, geological blocks NW to the Los Angeles Basin, regions around the San Jacinto Fault, the Peninsular Ranges near San Diego, and the Coso volcanic field. These complex patterns show that regional stresses and active faults cannot adequately explain the upper crustal anisotropy in Southern California. Other types of local structures, such as local rock types or tectonic features, also play significant roles.

  6. Wave grouping measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansard, E.; Sand, S.E.; Klinting, P.

    1989-02-01

    There are recent indications that distinct wave groupings can be found even in deep water. The main objective has been to give a statistical description suitable for the design of coastal and offshore structures and it is undertaken to make further investigations in this field by analyzing some prototype records using the concepts of run length of high waves and spectrum of squared elevation, the limitations and performances of which in nonlinear waves will be highlighted in this study. An attempt has been made to relate this wave grouping to the surge motion of a floating structure with a simple mooring arrangement and thereby to propose a motion-based grouping measure. It appears that the observed run length statistics can be suitably described by Kimura's predictions if the records are sufficiently long. Records whose duration are equal to, or less than, 0.6 h reflect a large statistical variability in the various wave grouping measures. The filter cut-off proposed in the concept of SIWEH for the estimation of Groupiness Factor appears to be too high to give meaningful contrasts with respect to prototype values of the peakedness factors. It is therefore proposed to use the Hilbert Transform of the time series and a cut-off which is relevant to the natural period of the test structure. In the absence of information about this natural period a cut-off fc less than or equal to f/sub p//15 may work better. The motion equivalent groupiness factor concept could be used effectively to determine the critical sea state conditions to be used for testing of floating structures. The directional resolution of the sea state and theoretical formulations defining statistical variabilities caused by finite record lengths could be useful in evaluating whether the wave grouping is a linear process. (AB) 49 refs.

  7. Nondestructive evaluation of standing trees with a stress wave method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Robert J. Ross; Michael McClellan; R. James Barbour; John R. Erickson; John W. Forsman; Gary D. McGinnis

    2001-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the usefulness of a stress wave technique for evaluating wood strength and stiffness of young-growth western hemlock and Sitka spruce in standing trees. A secondary objective was to determine if the effects of silvicultural practices on wood quality can be identified using this technique. Stress wave measurements...

  8. Surface Wave Velocity-Stress Relationship in Uniaxially Loaded Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shokouhi, Parisa; Zoëga, Andreas; Wiggenhauser, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    loading cycles revealed that the velocities show a stress-memory effect in good agreement with the Kaiser effect. Comparing the velocities measured during loading and unloading, the effects of stress and damage on the measured velocities could be differentiated. Moreover, the stress dependency of surface......The sonic surface wave (or Rayleigh wave) velocity measured on prismatic concrete specimens under uniaxial compression was found to be highly stress-dependent. At low stress levels, the acoustoelastic effect and the closure of existing microcracks results in a gradual increase in surface wave...... velocities. At higher stress levels, concrete suffers irrecoverable damage: the existing microcracks widen and coalesce and new microcracks form. This progressive damage process leads first to the flattening and eventually the drop in the velocity-stress curves. Measurements on specimens undergoing several...

  9. Direct measurements of mean Reynolds stress and ripple roughness in the presence of energetic forcing by surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Malcolm; Trowbridge, John; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Jones, Katie R.; Traykovski, Peter A.

    2018-01-01

    Direct covariance observations of the mean flow Reynolds stress and sonar images of the seafloor collected on a wave‐exposed inner continental shelf demonstrate that the drag exerted by the seabed on the overlying flow is consistent with boundary layer models for wave‐current interaction, provided that the orientation and anisotropy of the bed roughness are appropriately quantified. Large spatial and temporal variations in drag result from nonequilibrium ripple dynamics, ripple anisotropy, and the orientation of the ripples relative to the current. At a location in coarse sand characterized by large two‐dimensional orbital ripples, the observed drag shows a strong dependence on the relative orientation of the mean current to the ripple crests. At a contrasting location in fine sand, where more isotropic sub‐orbital ripples are observed, the sensitivity of the current to the orientation of the ripples is reduced. Further, at the coarse site under conditions when the currents are parallel to the ripple crests and the wave orbital diameter is smaller than the wavelength of the relic orbital ripples, the flow becomes hydraulically smooth. This transition is not observed at the fine site, where the observed wave orbital diameter is always greater than the wavelength of the observed sub‐orbital ripples. Paradoxically, the dominant along‐shelf flows often experience lower drag at the coarse site than at the fine site, despite the larger ripples, highlighting the complex dynamics controlling drag in wave‐exposed environments with heterogeneous roughness.

  10. Measurement and modelling of bed shear induced by solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.

    horizontal continental shelf. Measurements of bed shear stress, surface elevation and flow velocities were carried out. Periodic waves were also generated and the bed shear stresses measured over a horizontal bed were found to be comparable with the earlier...

  11. Improvement in accuracy of the measurements of residual stresses due to circumferential welds in thin-walled pipe using Rayleigh wave method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhshik, Siamak; Moharrami, Rasool

    2009-01-01

    To achieve an acceptable safety in many industrial applications such as nuclear power plants and power generation, it is extremely important to gain an understanding of the magnitudes and distributions of the residual stresses in a pipe formed by joining two sections with a girth butt weld. Most of the methods for high-accuracy measurement of residual stress are destructive. These destructive measurement methods cannot be applied to engineering systems and structures during actual operation. In this paper, we present a method based on the measurement of ultrasonic Rayleigh wave velocity variations versus the stress state for nondestructive evaluation of residual stress in dissimilar pipe welded joint. We show some residual stress profile obtained by this method. These are then compared with other profiles determined using a semi-destructive technique (hole-drilling) that makes it possible to check our results. According to the results, we also present a new method for adjusting the ultrasonic measurements to improve the agreement with the results obtained from other techniques.

  12. Interdigital Piezopolymer Transducers for Time of Flight Measurements with Ultrasonic Lamb Waves on Carbon-Epoxy Composites under Pure Bending Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bulletti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interdigital transducers fabricated with piezopolymer film have been realized to excite ultrasonic Lamb waves in a composite laminate subjected to pure bending stresses. Lamb waves were generated and detected in a cross-ply [0°/90°] 4 mm thick carbon-fiber composite, by using two interdigital transducers in pitch-catch configuration. We demonstrate that the choice of the piezopolymer transducer technology is suitable for this type of investigation and the advantages of the proposed transducer assembly and bonding are described. A full set-up is described to determine the relationship between the time of flight of the recorded signals and the applied bending moment. Interdigital transducers were designed according to simulations of the dispersion curves, in order to operate at a central frequency of 450 kHz. This frequency corresponds to a central wavelength of 16 mm and to a group velocity of about 6000 m/s for the first symmetric guided wave mode. The variations in the time of flight of ultrasonic recorded signals were measured as a function of the variations in the bending moment. The static and dynamic load tests were in good agreement with strain gage measurements performed in the micro deformation range (0–1400 µm/m.

  13. Relationship between ultrasonic Rayleigh waves and surface residual stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, L.; Cook, K.V.; Dewey, B.R.; King, R.T.

    1977-01-01

    Local variations of Rayleigh (surface) circumferential ultrasonic wave velocity near a pipe-girth weld in large-diameter thin-wall type 316H stainless steel pipe were measured. The weldment was similar to those anticipated for the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) piping systems. The residual stress distribution was estimated independently from shell theory for an elastic, infinite, thin shell with circumferential line loading. An upper bound on the magnitude of the residual stresses was estimated assuming the deformation of the shell was entirely elastic. The pattern of surface wave velocity variations matches the theoretical residual stress pattern closely. It is suggested that the monitoring of surface wave velocity variations might be used for characterizing residual stress patterns near critical welds in piping, aiding in design calculations, and for in-service monitoring of the state of stress of weldments

  14. Stress wave propagation on standing trees. Part 2, Formation of 3D stress wave contour maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Su; Houjiang Zhang; Xiping Wang

    2009-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of wood quality in standing trees is an important procedure in the forest operational value chain worldwide. The goal of this paper is to investigate how a stress wave travel in a tree stem as it is introduced into the tree through a mechanical impact. Experimental stress wave data was obtained on freshly cut red pine logs in the...

  15. Stress wave analysis: applied to rotating machines; Stress wave analysis: aplicado a maquinas rotativas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Paulo Garcia de [Invensys Brasil Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-11-01

    Stress wave analysis is the technology of data analysis (stress profile - ultrasound spectrum) collected by high-frequency acoustic sensors. Monitoring and analysis of rotating equipment, is a crucial element in predictive maintenance and condition based maintenance projects and, in a broader context, of performance management and optimization of assets. This article discusses the application of stress wave analysis to rotating machines in the context of assets optimization and CBM. (author)

  16. Association between work-related psychological stress and arterial stiffness measured by brachial-ankle pulse-wave velocity in young Japanese males from an information service company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kyoko; Nakao, Mutsuhiro; Karita, Kanae; Nishikitani, Mariko; Yano, Eiji

    2005-10-01

    This study examined the relationship between work-related psychological stress and arterial stiffness in young Japanese workers. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 396 Japanese male workers, aged 24 to 39 years, employed in a Japanese information service company. Work-related psychological stress was measured by the Job Content Questionnaire based on the job demand-control model. The job-strain index was defined as the ratio of job demand to job-control scores. The outcome of the study was the degree of arteriosclerosis as assessed by brachial pulse-wave velocity (baPWV). The cardiovascular risk factors analyzed were age, heart rate, blood pressure, body mass index, serum lipid, blood sugar levels, catecholamine levels, ethanol consumption, smoking, and overtime. In addition, psychological responses were assessed by tension-anxiety and anger-hostility scales in the Profile of Mood States (POMS). The baPWV was positively (P<0.05) associated with physiological variables including age, heart rate, body mass index, and serum levels of total cholesterol, fasting glucose, and noradrenaline, but negatively (P<0.01) associated with the job-strain index. Significant associations were not found on the POMS tension-anxiety and anger-hostility scale scores. The negative correlation between baPWV and the job-strain index was consistent even after control for the effects of significant physiological variables. The association between job stress and baPWV was found to be inconsistent with the results of previous western studies, and it may require further investigation while taking into account occupation, cardiovascular risk factors, and Japanese culture.

  17. Real time wave measurements and wave hindcasting in deep waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anand, N.M.; Mandal, S.; SanilKumar, V.; Nayak, B.U.

    Deep water waves off Karwar (lat. 14~'45.1'N, long. 73~'34.8'E) at 75 m water depth pertaining to peak monsoon period have been measured using a Datawell waverider buoy. Measured wave data show that the significant wave height (Hs) predominantly...

  18. Residual-stress measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezeilo, A.N.; Webster, G.A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Webster, P.J. [Salford Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    Because neutrons can penetrate distances of up to 50 mm in most engineering materials, this makes them unique for establishing residual-stress distributions non-destructively. D1A is particularly suited for through-surface measurements as it does not suffer from instrumental surface aberrations commonly found on multidetector instruments, while D20 is best for fast internal-strain scanning. Two examples for residual-stress measurements in a shot-peened material, and in a weld are presented to demonstrate the attractive features of both instruments. (author).

  19. Stress-wave experiments on selected crustal rocks and minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, D. E.

    1983-09-01

    Large amplitude compressive stress wave experiments on selected crustal rocks and minerals was performed. The materials studied included Vermont marble, Blair dolomite, Oakhall limestone, z-cut calcite and oil shale. In each case specific constitutive features were studied. Features include interrelation of plastic yielding and phase transformation, rate dependent plastic flow, dilatency under dynamic loading conditions, and energy dissipation at stress amplitudes below measured Hugoniot elastic limits. A new experimental method using inmaterial mutual inductance magnetic gauges is also described.

  20. IWA : an analysis program for isentropic wave measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ao, Tommy

    2009-02-01

    IWA (Isentropic Wave Analysis) is a program for analyzing velocity profiles of isentropic compression experiments. IWA applies incremental impedance matching correction to measured velocity profiles to obtain in-situ particle velocity profiles for Lagrangian wave analysis. From the in-situ velocity profiles, material properties such as wave velocities, stress, strain, strain rate, and strength are calculated. The program can be run in any current version of MATLAB (2008a or later) or as a Windows XP executable.

  1. Optimal parametric modelling of measured short waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.

    The spectral analysis of measured short waves can efficiently be carried out by the fast Fourier transform technique. Even though many present techniques can be used for the simulation of time series waves, these may not provide accurate...

  2. Coherent Wave Measurement Buoy Arrays to Support Wave Energy Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, F.; Chang, G.; Jones, C.; Janssen, T. T.; Barney, P.; Roberts, J.

    2016-02-01

    Wave energy is the most abundant form of hydrokinetic energy in the United States and wave energy converters (WECs) are being developed to extract the maximum possible power from the prevailing wave climate. However, maximum wave energy capture is currently limited by the narrow banded frequency response of WECs as well as extended protective shutdown requirements during periods of large waves. These limitations must be overcome in order to maximize energy extraction, thus significantly decreasing the cost of wave energy and making it a viable energy source. Techno-economic studies of several WEC devices have shown significant potential to improve wave energy capture efficiency through operational control strategies that incorporate real-time information about local surface wave motions. Integral Consulting Inc., with ARPA-E support, is partnering with Sandia National Laboratories and Spoondrift LLC to develop a coherent array of wave-measuring devices to relay and enable the prediction of wave-resolved surface dynamics at a WEC location ahead of real time. This capability will provide necessary information to optimize power production of WECs through control strategies, thereby allowing for a single WEC design to perform more effectively across a wide range of wave environments. The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000514.

  3. Waves in nonlinear pre-stressed materials

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Wilhelm; Saccomandi, G

    2007-01-01

    The papers in this book provide a unique state-of-the-art multidisciplinary overview on the subject of waves in pre-stressed materials through the interaction of several topics, ranging from the mathematical modelling of incremental material response (elastic and inelastic), to the analysis of the governing differential equations and boundary-value problems, and to computational methods for the solution to these problems, with particular reference to industrial, geophysical, and biomechanical applications. A complete view on the title subject is proposed, including: The basic and fundamental theoretical issues (mechanical modelling, exact solutions, asymptotic methods, numerical treatment); A unified introduction to wave propagation (small on large and large on large); A look toward classical (such as geophysics and the mechanics of rubber-like solids) and emergent (such as biomechanics) applications.

  4. Existence of longitudinal waves in pre-stressed anisotropic elastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium, three types of quasi-waves propagate along an arbi- trary direction. In general, none of the waves is truly longitudinal. The present study finds the specific directions in a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium along which longitudinal waves may propagate. This paper ...

  5. Feasibility of Residual Stress Nondestructive Estimation Using the Nonlinear Property of Critical Refraction Longitudinal Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual stress has significant influence on the performance of mechanical components, and the nondestructive estimation of residual stress is always a difficult problem. This study applies the relative nonlinear coefficient of critical refraction longitudinal (LCR wave to nondestructively characterize the stress state of materials; the feasibility of residual stress estimation using the nonlinear property of LCR wave is verified. The nonlinear ultrasonic measurements based on LCR wave are conducted on components with known stress state to calculate the relative nonlinear coefficient. Experimental results indicate that the relative nonlinear coefficient monotonically increases with prestress and the increment of relative nonlinear coefficient is about 80%, while the wave velocity only decreases about 0.2%. The sensitivity of the relative nonlinear coefficient for stress is much higher than wave velocity. Furthermore, the dependence between the relative nonlinear coefficient and deformation state of components is found. The stress detection resolution based on the nonlinear property of LCR wave is 10 MPa, which has higher resolution than wave velocity. These results demonstrate that the nonlinear property of LCR wave is more suitable for stress characterization than wave velocity, and this quantitative information could be used for residual stress estimation.

  6. Investigation into stress wave propagation in metal foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate stress wave propagation in metal foams under high-speed impact loading. Three-dimensional Voronoi model is established to represent real closed-cell foam. Based on the one-dimensional stress wave theory and Voronoi model, a numerical model is developed to calculate the velocity of elastic wave and shock wave in metal foam. The effects of impact velocity and relative density of metal foam on the stress wave propagation in metal foams are explored respectively. The results show that both elastic wave and shock wave propagate faster in metal foams with larger relative density; with increasing the impact velocity, the shock wave propagation velocity increase, but the elastic wave propagation is not sensitive to the impact velocity.

  7. Directional wave measurements and modelling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.; Bhat, S.S.; SanilKumar, V.

    -dimensional spectra and sech@u2@@ (beta theta) spreading function seem to provide a better estimate of the directional energy distribution for the monsoon conditions. While non-linear wave-wave interaction seems to be the major governing factor in the directional...

  8. Determination of relationship between Rayleigh wave velocity and stress with laser Doppler velocimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lingfeng; Kobayashi, Shoichi

    2002-05-01

    A non-contact measurement technique of Rayleigh wave velocity is proposed. In the non-contact measurement system, a laser Doppler velocimeter is used to determine wave motions. With above technique, the relationship between Rayleigh wave velocity and stress for an aluminum alloy 5052 and steel SS400 is determined, and the results are in good agreement with that obtained by contact measurement method.

  9. Numerical simulation of stress wave propagation from underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, J.T.; Petersen, F.L.

    1970-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of stress wave propagation (SOC) which uses material properties data from a preshot testing program to predict the stress-induced effects on the rock mass involved in a Plowshare application. SOC calculates stress and particle velocity history, cavity radius, extent of brittle failure, and the rock's efficiency for transmitting stress. The calculations are based on an equation of state for the rock, which is developed from preshot field and laboratory measurements of the rock properties. The field measurements, made by hole logging, determine in situ values of the rock's density, water content, and propagation velocity for elastic waves. These logs also are useful in judging the layering of the rock and in choosing which core samples to test in the laboratory. The laboratory analysis of rock cores includes determination of hydrostatic compressibility to 40 kb, triaxial strength data, tensile strength, Hugoniot elastic limit, and, for the rock near the point of detonation, high-pressure Hugoniot data. Equation-of-state data are presented for rock from three sites subjected to high explosive or underground nuclear shots, including the Hardhat and Gasbuggy sites. SOC calculations of the effects of these two shots on the surrounding rock are compared with the observed effects. In both cases SOC predicts the size of the cavity quite closely. Results of the Gasbuggy calculations indicate that useful predictions of cavity size and chimney height can be made when an adequate preshot testing program is run to determine the rock's equation of state. Seismic coupling is very sensitive to the low-pressure part of the equation of state, and its successful prediction depends on agreement between the logging data and the static compressibility data. In general, it appears that enough progress has been made in calculating stress wave propagation to begin looking at derived numbers, such as number of cracks per zone, for some insight into the

  10. Reflection of plane waves in an initially stressed perfectly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    stress and magnetic field on the reflection coef- ficients and energy ratios of reflected waves in a perfectly conducting initially stressed transversely isotropic elastic solid half-space. The present work is supposed to be useful in further studies of wave propagation in the more realistic models which have been extensively ...

  11. Wave velocities in a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wave velocities in a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium. M D Sharma ... Modified Christoffel equations are derived for three-dimensional wave propagation in a general anisotropic medium under initial stress.The three roots of a ... Department of Mathematics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119, India. UIET ...

  12. An ultrasonic technique for measuring stress in fasteners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, K. J.; Day, P.; Byron, D.

    1999-12-01

    High temperature bolting alloys are extensively used in the thermal power generation industry as for example, reheat ESV and Governor valve studs. Remnant life assessment methodologies and plant maintenance procedures require the monitoring of the operational stress levels in these fasteners. Some conventional ultrasonic techniques require longitudinal wave measurements to be undertaken when the nut on the bolt is loosened and then re-tightened. Other techniques use a combination of shear waves and longitudinal waves. In this paper, the problems and pitfalls associated with various ultrasonic techniques for measuring stress in bolts, is discussed. An ultrasonic technique developed for measuring the stress in Durehete 1055 bolts is presented. Material from a textured rolled bar has been used as a test bed in the development work. The technique uses shear wave birefringence and compression waves at several frequencies to measure texture, fastener length and the average stress. The technique was developed by making ultrasonic measurements on bolts tensioned in universal testing machines and a hydraulic nut. The ultrasonic measurements of residual stress have been checked against strain gauge measurements. The Durehete bolts have a hollow cylinder geometry of restricted dimensions, which significantly alters compression and shear wave velocities from bulk values and introduces hoop stresses which can be measured by rotating the polarization of the shear wave probe. Modelling of the experimental results has been undertaken using theories for the elastic wave propagation through waveguides. The dispersion equations allow the velocity and length of the fastener to be measured ultrasonically in some situations where the length of the fastener can not be measured directly with a vernier caliper or micrometer and/or where it is undesirable to loosen nuts to take calibration readings of the shear and compression wave velocities.

  13. An ultrasonic technique for measuring stress in fasteners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, K. J.; Day, P.; Byron, D.

    1999-01-01

    High temperature bolting alloys are extensively used in the thermal power generation industry as for example, reheat ESV and Governor valve studs. Remnant life assessment methodologies and plant maintenance procedures require the monitoring of the operational stress levels in these fasteners. Some conventional ultrasonic techniques require longitudinal wave measurements to be undertaken when the nut on the bolt is loosened and then re-tightened. Other techniques use a combination of shear waves and longitudinal waves. In this paper, the problems and pitfalls associated with various ultrasonic techniques for measuring stress in bolts, is discussed. An ultrasonic technique developed for measuring the stress in Durehete 1055 bolts is presented. Material from a textured rolled bar has been used as a test bed in the development work. The technique uses shear wave birefringence and compression waves at several frequencies to measure texture, fastener length and the average stress. The technique was developed by making ultrasonic measurements on bolts tensioned in universal testing machines and a hydraulic nut. The ultrasonic measurements of residual stress have been checked against strain gauge measurements. The Durehete bolts have a hollow cylinder geometry of restricted dimensions, which significantly alters compression and shear wave velocities from bulk values and introduces hoop stresses which can be measured by rotating the polarization of the shear wave probe. Modelling of the experimental results has been undertaken using theories for the elastic wave propagation through waveguides. The dispersion equations allow the velocity and length of the fastener to be measured ultrasonically in some situations where the length of the fastener can not be measured directly with a vernier caliper or micrometer and/or where it is undesirable to loosen nuts to take calibration readings of the shear and compression wave velocities

  14. Stresses in a submarine topography under ocean waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, C.C.; McTigue, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of submarine slope stability is of interest to both offshore engineering and geology. In an uneven topography, the weight above a horizontal plane induces two-dimensional variation in the static stress field. The action of wave pressure, which changes with depth, further introduces excess pore pressure and dynamic stresses in the sea bottom. In the present paper, we combine a simple analytical theory for the static stress by the present authors, and the recent solution by Mei and Foda for wave-induced stresses in a plane poro-elastic sea bed to account for mild bottom slope and wave shoaling, to obtain the effective stress field in a submarine topography under sea waves. Sample results are given for a ridge and a canyon. In particular the dynamic pore pressure and the combined static and dynamic effective stresses are presented. 10 references, 11 figures.

  15. Stresses in a submarine topography under ocean waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, C.C.; McTigue, D.F.

    1984-09-01

    The problem of submarine slope stability is of interest to both offshore engineering and geology. In an uneven topography, the weight above a horizontal plane induces two-dimensional variation in the static stress field. The action of wave pressure, which changes with depth, further introduces excess pore pressure and dynamic stresses in the sea bottom. In the present paper, we combine a simple analytical theory for the static stress by the present authors, and the recent solution by Mei and Foda for wave-induced stresses in a plane poro-elastic sea bed to account for mild bottom slope and wave shoaling, and obtain the effective stress field in a submarine topography under sea waves. Sample results are given for a ridge and a canyon. In particular, the dynamic pore pressure and the combined static and dynamic effective stresses are presented.

  16. Effect of Stress on Energy Flux Deviation of Ultrasonic Waves in Ultrasonic Waves in GR/EP Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, William H.; Kriz, R. D.; Fitting, Dale W.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves suffer energy flux deviation in graphite/epoxy because of the large anisotropy. The angle of deviation is a function of the elastic coefficients. For nonlinear solids, these coefficients and thus the angle of deviation is a function of stress. Acoustoelastic theory was used to model the effect of stress on flux deviation for unidirectional T300/5208 using previously measured elastic coefficients. Computations were made for uniaxial stress along the x3 axis fiber axis) and the x1 axis for waves propagating in the x1x3 plane. These results predict a shift as large as three degrees for the quasi-transverse wave. The shift in energy flux offers new nondestructive technique of evaluating stress in composites.

  17. Measurements of Wave Power in Wave Energy Converter Effectiveness Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berins J.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the technical solution of alternative budget measuring equipment of the water surface gravity wave oscillation and the theoretical justification of the calculated oscillation power. This solution combines technologies such as lasers, WEB-camera image digital processing, interpolation of defined function at irregular intervals, volatility of discrete Fourier transformation for calculating the spectrum.

  18. Wave velocities in a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of differential stress environment in the sediments. In the problems of foundation engineering, the influence of initial stress appears in a buoyancy effect which amounts to floating a building on its foundation. The theory of elastic wave propaga- tion in pre-stressed solids has a nearly two-century long history. In perhaps, the ...

  19. Estimation of Peak Wave Stresses in Slender Complex Concrete Armor Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howell, G.L.; Burcharth, H. F.; Rhee, Joon R

    1991-01-01

    Recent methods for the structural design of concrete armor units divide the forces into static loads, impact loads, and wave or pulsating loads. Physical model technology is being developed at several laboratories to measure wave loads on model armor units. While this technology represents...... significant progress, structural designers require a maximum stress value to design armor units....

  20. Wave Measurements Using GPS Velocity Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia Chuen Kao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the idea of using GPS-output velocity signals to obtain wave measurement data. The application of the transformation from a velocity spectrum to a displacement spectrum in conjunction with the directional wave spectral theory are the core concepts in this study. Laboratory experiments were conducted to verify the accuracy of the inversed displacement of the surface of the sea. A GPS device was installed on a moored accelerometer buoy to verify the GPS-derived wave parameters. It was determined that loss or drifting of the GPS signal, as well as energy spikes occurring in the low frequency band led to erroneous measurements. Through the application of moving average skill and a process of frequency cut-off to the GPS output velocity, correlations between GPS-derived, and accelerometer buoy-measured significant wave heights and periods were both improved to 0.95. The GPS-derived one-dimensional and directional wave spectra were in agreement with the measurements. Despite the direction verification showing a 10° bias, this exercise still provided useful information with sufficient accuracy for a number of specific purposes. The results presented in this study indicate that using GPS output velocity is a reasonable alternative for the measurement of ocean waves.

  1. Measurement of longitudinal and rayleigh wave velocities by advanced one-sided technique in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Hyun; Song, Won Joon; Popovics, J. S.; Achenbach, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    A new procedure for the advanced one-sided measurement of longitudinal wave and surface wave velocities in concrete is presented in this paper. Stress waves are generated in a consistent fashion with a DC solenoid. Two piezoelectric accelerometers are mounted on the surface of a specimen as receivers. Stress waves propagate along the surface of the specimen and are detected by the receivers. In order to reduce the large incoherent noise levels of the signals, signals are collected and manipulated by a computer program for each velocity measurement. For a known distance between the two receivers and using the measured flight times, the velocities of the longitudinal wave and the surface wave are measured. The velocities of the longitudinal wave determined by this method are compared with those measured by conventional methods on concrete, PMMA and steel.

  2. Theoretical Studies of Stress Wave Propagation in Laterally Confined Soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rohani, Behzad

    1999-01-01

    .... A considerable body of scientific literature on one-dimensional stress wave propagation for such models has been published in recent years by various researchers, both in the United States and abroad...

  3. Reflection of plane waves in an initially stressed perfectly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reflection of plane waves is studied at a free surface of a perfectly conducting transversely isotropic elastic solid half-space with initial stress. The governing equations are solved to obtain the velocity equation which indicates the existence of two quasi planar waves in the medium. Reflection coefficients and energy.

  4. Reflection of plane waves in an initially stressed perfectly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reflection of plane waves is studied at a free surface of a perfectly conducting transversely isotropic elastic solid half-space with initial stress. The governing equations are solved to obtain the velocity equation which indicates the existence of two quasi planar waves in the medium. Reflection coefficients and energy ratios ...

  5. Stress Wave Propagation in Larch Plantation Trees-Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenglu Liu; Fang Jiang; Xiping Wang; Houjiang Zhang; Wenhua Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we attempted to simulate stress wave propagation in virtual tree trunks and construct two dimensional (2D) wave-front maps in the longitudinal-radial section of the trunk. A tree trunk was modeled as an orthotropic cylinder in which wood properties along the fiber and in each of the two perpendicular directions were different. We used the COMSOL...

  6. Wave velocities in a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Modified Christoffel equations are derived for three-dimensional wave propagation in a general anisotropic medium under initial stress.The three roots of a cubic equation define the phase velocities of three quasi-waves in the medium.Analytical expressions are used to calculate the directional derivatives of phase ...

  7. Multiple blast-hole stresses and measured fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Charles H.; Aimone, Catherine T.

    1985-01-01

    A wave superposition code was developed to calculate stresses explosivley induced by long, multiple blast holes within a three dimensional rock mass. Computed stresses were found to correlate with measured fragmentation from fourteen cases in coal cyclotherm geology when actual, rather than planned, initiation times were modelled.

  8. Gravitational Wave Detection via Weak Measurements Amplification

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Meng-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    A universal amplification scheme of ultra-small phase based on weak measurements is given and a weak measurements amplification based laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (WMA-LIGO) is suggested. The WMA-LIGO has potential to amplify the ultra-small phase signal to at least $10^{3}$ order of magnitude such that the sensitivity and bandwidth of gravitational-wave detector can be further improved. Our results not only shed a new light on the quantum measurement but also open a ne...

  9. Numerical investigations of internal stresses on carbon steel based on ultrasonic LCR waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, R.; Ibrahim, Z.; Chai, H. K.

    2017-10-01

    Internal stresses or residual stresses in the structural elements are very crucial in carrying out in-service evaluations and fitness-for-purpose assessments. The generation of these internal stresses can occur as result of the fabrication of the steel members, installation sequence or other ad-hoc events such as accidents or impact. The accurate prediction of the internal stresses will contribute towards estimating the integrity state of the structural elements, with respect to their material allowable stresses. This paper investigates the explicit FE based numerical modelling of the ultrasonic based non-destructive technique, utilising the measurable longitudinal critical refracted wave (LCR) and relating these to the internal stresses within the structural elements by the evaluation of the material dependent acoustoelastic factors. The subsurface travel path of the LCR wave inside the structural elements makes it a sub-surface stress measurement technique and the linearised relationship with corresponding internal stresses can be systematically applied repeatedly. The numerical results are compared against laboratory tests data to correlate the findings and to establish modelling feasibility for future proof-of-concepts. It can be concluded from this numerical investigation, that the subsurface ultrasonic LCR wave has great potential to be implemented for in-situ structural residual stress measurements, as compared to other available surface measurements such as strain gauges or x-ray diffraction.

  10. Anisotropic stress as a signature of nonstandard propagation of gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltas, Ippocratis D; Sawicki, Ignacy; Amendola, Luca; Kunz, Martin

    2014-11-07

    We make precise the heretofore ambiguous statement that anisotropic stress is a sign of a modification of gravity. We show that in cosmological solutions of very general classes of models extending gravity-all scalar-tensor theories (Horndeski), Einstein-aether models, and bimetric massive gravity-a direct correspondence exists between perfect fluids apparently carrying anisotropic stress and a modification in the propagation of gravitational waves. Since the anisotropic stress can be measured in a model-independent manner, a comparison of the behavior of gravitational waves from cosmological sources with large-scale-structure formation could, in principle, lead to new constraints on the theory of gravity.

  11. The role of stress waves and cavitation in stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Songlin; Cocks, Franklin H; Preminger, Glenn M; Zhong, Pei

    2002-05-01

    Using an experimental system that mimics stone fragmentation in the renal pelvis, we have investigated the role of stress waves and cavitation in stone comminution in shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL). Spherical plaster-of-Paris stone phantoms (D = 10 mm) were exposed to 25, 50, 100, 200, 300 and 500 shocks at the beam focus of a Dornier HM-3 lithotripter operated at 20 kV and a pulse repetition rate of 1 Hz. The stone phantoms were immersed either in degassed water or in castor oil to delineate the contribution of stress waves and cavitation to stone comminution. It was found that, while in degassed water there is a progressive disintegration of the stone phantoms into small pieces, the fragments produced in castor oil are fairly sizable. From 25 to 500 shocks, clinically passable fragments (stones with a primary composition of calcium oxalate monohydrate. After 200 shocks, 89% of the fragments of the kidney stones treated in degassed water became passable, but only 22% of the fragments of the kidney stones treated in castor oil were less than 2 mm in size. This apparent size limitation of the stone fragments produced primarily by stress waves (in castor oil) is likely caused by the destructive superposition of the stress waves reverberating inside the fragments, when their sizes are less than half of the compressive wavelength in the stone material. On the other hand, if a stone is only exposed to cavitation bubbles induced in SWL, the resultant fragmentation is much less effective than that produced by the combination of stress waves and cavitation. It is concluded that, although stress wave-induced fracture is important for the initial disintegration of kidney stones, cavitation is necessary to produce fine passable fragments, which are most critical for the success of clinical SWL. Stress waves and cavitation work synergistically, rather than independently, to produce effective and successful disintegration of renal calculi in SWL

  12. Online wave estimation using vessel motion measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    H. Brodtkorb, Astrid; Nielsen, Ulrik D.; J. Sørensen, Asgeir

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a computationally efficient online sea state estimation algorithm isproposed for estimation of the on site sea state. The algorithm finds the wave spectrum estimate from motion measurements in heave, roll and pitch by iteratively solving a set of linear equations. The main vessel p...

  13. Rogue wave early warning through spectral measurements?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the spectra of the Peregrine soliton and higher-order rational solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE), which we use as a model of the rogue waves in optics and in the deep ocean. We show that these solutions have specific triangular spectra that are certainly easily measurable in optical systems and which may be amenable to characterisation in ocean environments. As the triangular feature of the solutions appears at an early stage of their evolution, this raises the possibility of early detection and possible localized warning of the appearance of rogue waves. We anticipate that studying the characteristics of 'early warning spectra' of rogue waves may become an important future field of research.

  14. Effect of stress on energy flux deviation of ultrasonic waves in GR/EP composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, William H.; Kriz, R. D.; Fitting, Dale W.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves suffer energy flux deviation in graphite/epoxy because of the large anisotropy. The angle of deviation is a function of the elastic coefficients. For nonlinear solids, these coefficients and thus the angle of deviation is a function of stress. Acoustoelastic theory was used to model the effect of stress on flux deviation for unidirectional T300/5208 using previously measured elastic coefficients. Computations were made for uniaxial stress along the x3 axis (fiber axis) and the x1 for waves propagating in the x1x3 plane. These results predict a shift as large as three degrees for the quasi-transverse wave. The shift in energy flux offers a new nondestructive technique of evaluating stress in composites.

  15. Directional wave measurements off Navinal, Gulf of Kachchh, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; KrishnaKumar, V.; Suryanarayana, A.; Antony, M.K.; Swamy, G.N.

    Results of directional wave measurements carried out off Navinal, Gulf of Kachchh representing pre-monsoon and southwest monsoon wave conditions are presented. Maximum wave height encountered during pre-monsoon and southwest monsoon is 1.36 and 1...

  16. The measurement of residual stresses in claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, G.; Bender, N.

    1978-01-01

    The ring core method, a variation of the hole drilling method for the measurement of biaxial residual stresses, has been extended to measure stresses from depths of about 5 to 25mm. It is now possible to measure the stress profiles of clad material. Examples of measured stress profiles are shown and compared with those obtained with a sectioning technique. (author)

  17. Measuring stress: Uses and limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, G.W. II [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

    1994-12-31

    The topic of the uses and limitations of measuring stress in the oceans is addressed. The use of the term stress in this context is ambiguous. Rather than assuming that stress is an actual measurable property of oceans, one may assume that the term refers to the complex of harmful things that is going on in the oceans. that is, it is a cover term for a complex of processes and states, many of which are unknown or undefined. The appeal of the term stress used in that way is very tempting. Considerable complexity results from the fact that the ocean consists of numerous and diverse species and ecosystems each of which have various properties that have some claim to protection. Another source of complexity is the diversity of factors which constitute threats to the environment. In evaluating the concepts of ecological risk assessment, there are sources of hazardous agents, there are receptors that are affected, and there is a process by which these interact termed exposure. As a result of exposure there is some probability that the actions of the sources have caused or will cause some effect on the receptor, the risk. Assessments may be source driven; they may attempt to determine the risks associated with a waste outfall. Assessments may also be effects driven; they may attempt to determine the cause of a die-off of marine mammals or determine the likelihood of a particular rise in sea-level. Finally, they may be exposure driven. Each of these components of the causal chain might serve as measures of stress.

  18. Stress wave emission: a bibliographical survey No 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucia, A.C.; Galli, M.

    1976-01-01

    This report gives an inventory of papers and publications which deal with stress wave emission (ultrasonic emission). This bibliography is up date until end of 1974. It contains also titles of papers published before 1973 but not contained in our first bibliographical report (EUR--5616e)

  19. Mechanical Strain Measurement from Coda Wave Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzola, J.; Schmittbuhl, J.; Zigone, D.; Masson, F.; Magnenet, V.

    2017-12-01

    Coda Wave Interferometry (CWI) aims at tracking small changes in solid materials like rocks where elastic waves are diffusing. They are intensively sampling the medium, making the technique much more sensitive than those relying on direct wave arrivals. Application of CWI to ambient seismic noise has found a large range of applications over the past years like for multiscale imaging but also for monitoring complex structures such as regional faults or reservoirs (Lehujeur et al., 2015). Physically, observed changes are typically interpreted as small variations of seismic velocities. However, this interpretation remains questionable. Here, a specific focus is put on the influence of the elastic deformation of the medium on CWI measurements. The goal of the present work is to show from a direct numerical and experimental modeling that deformation signal also exists in CWI measurements which might provide new outcomes for the technique.For this purpose, we model seismic wave propagation within a diffusive medium using a spectral element approach (SPECFEM2D) during an elastic deformation of the medium. The mechanical behavior is obtained from a finite element approach (Code ASTER) keeping the mesh grid of the sample constant during the whole procedure to limit numerical artifacts. The CWI of the late wave arrivals in the synthetic seismograms is performed using both a stretching technique in the time domain and a frequency cross-correlation method. Both show that the elastic deformation of the scatters is fully correlated with time shifts of the CWI differently from an acoustoelastic effect. As an illustration, the modeled sample is chosen as an effective medium aiming to mechanically and acoustically reproduce a typical granitic reservoir rock.Our numerical approach is compared to experimental results where multi-scattering of an acoustic wave through a perforated loaded Au4G (Dural) plate is performed at laboratory scale. Experimental and numerical results of the

  20. Dynamic Characterization of Cohesive Material Based on Wave Velocity Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Sas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a description of the dynamic properties of cohesive material, namely silty clays, obtained by using one of the applied seismology methods, the bender elements technique. The authors’ aim was to present the dynamics of a porous medium, in particular an extremely important passage of seismic waves that travel through the bulk of a medium. Nowadays, the application of the bender element (BE technique to measure, e.g., small strain shear stiffness of soils in the laboratory is well recognized, since it allows for reliable and relatively economical shear wave velocity measurements during various laboratory experiments. However, the accurate estimation of arrival time during BE tests is in many cases unclear. Two different interpretation procedures (from the time domain of BE tests in order to measure travel times of waves were examined. Those values were then used to calculate shear and compression wave velocities and elastic moduli. Results showed that the dynamic parameters obtained by the start-to-start method were always slightly larger (up to about 20% than those obtained using the peak-to-peak one. It was found that the peak-to-peak method led to more scattered results in comparison to the start-to-start method. Moreover, the influence of the excitation frequency, the mean effective stress and the unloading process on the dynamic properties of the tested material was studied. In addition, the obtained results highlighted the importance of initial signal frequency and the necessity to choose an appropriate range of frequencies to measure the shear wave velocity in clayey soils.

  1. Radar cross section measurements using terahertz waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Heiselberg, Henning; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2010-01-01

    Radar cross sections at terahertz frequencies are measured on scale models of aircrafts. A time domain broadband THz system generates freely propagating THz pulses measured with sub-picosecond time resolution. The THz radiation is generated using fs laser pulses by optical rectification in a lith......Radar cross sections at terahertz frequencies are measured on scale models of aircrafts. A time domain broadband THz system generates freely propagating THz pulses measured with sub-picosecond time resolution. The THz radiation is generated using fs laser pulses by optical rectification...... in a lithium niobate crystal with application of the tilted wave front method, resulting in high electric field THz pulses with a broad band spectrum from 100 GHz up to 4 THz. The corresponding wave lengths are two orders of magnitude smaller than normal radars and we therefore use scale models of size 5-10 cm...... in order to measure realistic radar cross sections. RCS polar and azimuthal angle plots of F-16 and F-35 are presented....

  2. Gravity waves from quantum stress tensor fluctuations in inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chun-Hsien; Hsiang, Jen-Tsung; Ford, L. H.; Ng, Kin-Wang

    2011-01-01

    We consider the effects of the quantum stress tensor fluctuations of a conformal field in generating gravity waves in inflationary models. We find a nonscale invariant, non-Gaussian contribution which depends upon the total expansion factor between an initial time and the end of inflation. This spectrum of gravity wave perturbations is an illustration of a negative power spectrum, which is possible in quantum field theory. We discuss possible choices for the initial conditions. If the initial time is taken to be sufficiently early, the fluctuating gravity waves are potentially observable both in the CMB radiation and in gravity wave detectors, and could offer a probe of trans-Planckian physics. The fact that they have not yet been observed might be used to constrain the duration and energy scale of inflation. However, this conclusion is contingent upon including the contribution of modes which were trans-Planckian at the beginning of inflation.

  3. Gravity waves from quantum stress tensor fluctuations in inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-Hsien; Hsiang, Jen-Tsung; Ford, L. H.; Ng, Kin-Wang

    2011-11-01

    We consider the effects of the quantum stress tensor fluctuations of a conformal field in generating gravity waves in inflationary models. We find a nonscale invariant, non-Gaussian contribution which depends upon the total expansion factor between an initial time and the end of inflation. This spectrum of gravity wave perturbations is an illustration of a negative power spectrum, which is possible in quantum field theory. We discuss possible choices for the initial conditions. If the initial time is taken to be sufficiently early, the fluctuating gravity waves are potentially observable both in the CMB radiation and in gravity wave detectors, and could offer a probe of trans-Planckian physics. The fact that they have not yet been observed might be used to constrain the duration and energy scale of inflation. However, this conclusion is contingent upon including the contribution of modes which were trans-Planckian at the beginning of inflation.

  4. Wave directional spectrum from array measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.

    Using the method of Esteva (1976, 1977), whcih assumes that at the frequency band the waves approach from just a single "mean" wave direction, wave direction has been consistently, accurately and unambiguously evaluated as a function of frequency...

  5. Determination of Stress-Acoustic Coefficients of Rayleigh Wave by Use of Laser Doppler Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lingfeng; Kobayashi, Shoichi

    In the present paper, 1) a new non-contact ultrasonic stress measurement technique is proposed based on acoustoelasticity, in which ultrasonic wave motion is detected by use of a laser Doppler velocimeter, and 2) the stress-acoustic coefficients of Rayleigh wave for aluminum alloy and structural steel are determined by the technique. In the measurement system, Rayleigh waves are emitted into the specimen by a wedge-type piezoelectric transducer and vertical velocities of the surface motions of the traveling Rayleigh waves are detected by the laser Doppler velocimeter at two points of 4 cm apart. In order to measure the traveling time of the wave between the two points, the converted voltage signals are supplied both to i) a sing-around unit and ii) to a digital oscilloscope. The time-of-flight over the distance between the two points is obtained either by subtracting the sing-around periods measured at the two points or by direct reading at zero-cross of the overlapped images of the two waves on the CR display of the oscilloscope. Both measurements are made at the same time under increasing or decreasing loads. The stress-acoustic coefficients obtained are -1.2×10-5/MPa and -0.21×10-5/MPa for aluminum alloy 5052 and structural steel SS400, respectively. These results are in good agreement with those determined using two knife-edge contact piezoelectric transducers. This study shows that the proposed non-contact measuring technique by use of laser velocimetry is applicable to determining the stress-acoustic coefficients.

  6. Non-collinear wave mixing for a bulk wave phase velocity measurement in an isotropic solid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demcenko, A.

    2013-01-01

    A measurement method is presented to estimate the bulk wave phase velocity in an isotropic solid when longitudinal or shear wave velocity is known. This method is based on the non-collinear plane wave interaction theory and it does not need to estimate the phase time-of-flight and wave propagation

  7. Overtopping Measurements on the Wave Dragon Nissum Bredning Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the methods used to estimate (calculated from some indirect measurements) the overtopping of the wave energy converter Wave Dragon placed in a real sea environment. The wave energy converter in quistion is the 237-tonne heavy Wave Dragon Nissum Bredning Prototype. Comparisons ...

  8. Plasma Wave Measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Hospodarsky, George B.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C. A.; Bounds, S. R.; Santolik, O.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    The twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft were launched on August 30, 2012 to study the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation includes a plasma wave instrument (Waves) that simultaneously measures three orthogonal components of the wave magnetic field from ~10 Hz to 12 kHz and, with the support of the Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) instrument sensors, three components of the wave electric field from ~10 H...

  9. Torsional ultrasonic wave based level measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, David E [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger A [Knoxville, TN

    2012-07-10

    A level measurement system suitable for use in a high temperature and pressure environment to measure the level of coolant fluid within the environment, the system including a volume of coolant fluid located in a coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment and having a level therein; an ultrasonic waveguide blade that is positioned within the desired coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment; a magnetostrictive electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment and configured to operate in the environment and cooperate with the waveguide blade to launch and receive ultrasonic waves; and an external signal processing system located outside of the high temperature and pressure environment and configured for communicating with the electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment.

  10. Process for measuring residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfinger, F.X.; Peiter, A.; Theiner, W.A.; Stuecker, E.

    1982-01-01

    No single process can at present solve all problems. The complete destructive processes only have a limited field of application, as the component cannot be reused. However, they are essential for the basic determination of stress distributions in the field of research and development. Destructive and non-destructive processes are mainly used if investigations have to be carried out on original components. With increasing component size, the part of destructive tests becomes smaller. The main applications are: quality assurance, testing of manufactured parts and characteristics of components. Among the non-destructive test procedures, X-raying has been developed most. It gives residual stresses on the surface and on surface layers near the edges. Further development is desirable - in assessment - in measuring techniques. Ultrasonic and magnetic crack detection processes are at present mainly used in research and development, and also in quality assurance. Because of the variable depth of penetration and the possibility of automation they are gaining in importance. (orig./RW) [de

  11. Neutron residual stress measurements in linepipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Michael; Gnaëpel-Herold, Thomas; Luzin, Vladimir; Bowie, Graham

    2006-11-01

    Residual stresses in gas pipelines are generated by manufacturing and construction processes and may affect the subsequent pipe integrity. In the present work, the residual stresses in eight samples of linepipe were measured by neutron diffraction. Residual stresses changed with some coating processes. This has special implications in understanding and mitigating stress corrosion cracking, a major safety and economic problem in some gas pipelines.

  12. Neutron residual stress measurements in linepipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Michael; Gnaepel-Herold, Thomas; Luzin, Vladimir; Bowie, Graham

    2006-01-01

    Residual stresses in gas pipelines are generated by manufacturing and construction processes and may affect the subsequent pipe integrity. In the present work, the residual stresses in eight samples of linepipe were measured by neutron diffraction. Residual stresses changed with some coating processes. This has special implications in understanding and mitigating stress corrosion cracking, a major safety and economic problem in some gas pipelines

  13. Transient Stress Waves in Study of Coconut Physical Properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnka, Jan; Dvořáková, Pavla

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2010), s. 19-25 ISSN 0732-8818 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA201990701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : stress waves * double-pulse holography * coconut * exploding wires Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 0.505, year: 2010 http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/121567342/PDFSTART

  14. Slow waves moving near the openings in highly stressed conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzev, Michail; Makarov, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    In situ experiments have shown the unusual deformation waves near the openings on high depth of the construction. Process of the wave spreading is beginning after the mining and has two stages of the zonal mesocracking structure formation and development [1]. Extending in a radial direction, the wave poorly fades with distance. For phenomenon modelling the theoretical decision for non-Eucledian models about opening of round cross-section in strongly compressed rock massif is used [2]. The decision qualitatively repeats behaviour of a wave in a rock mass, adjustment of phenomenological parametres is executed. References [1] Vladimir V. Makarov, Mikhail A. Guzev, Vladimir N. Odintsev, Lyudmila S. Ksendzenko (2016) Periodical zonal character of damage near the openings in highly-stressed rock mass conditions. Journal of Rock Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering. Volume 8, Issue 2, pp. 164-169. [2] M.A. Guzev, V.V. Makarov, 2007. Deforming and failure of the high stressed rocks around the openings, RAS Edit., Vladivostok, 2007, P. 232 (in Russian).

  15. Characterization of Residual Stress in Shot Peened Al 7075 Alloy Using Surface Acoustic Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chung Seok; Kwun, Sook In; Kim, Yong Kwon; Park, Ik Keun

    2006-01-01

    The residual stress in shot-peened Al 7075 alloy was evaluated using surface acoustic wave (SAW). Shot peening was conducted to produce a variation in the residual stress with the depth below the surface under a shot velocity of 30 m/s. The SAW velocity was measured from the V(z) curve using a scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). The Vickers hardness profile from the surface showed a significant work hardening near the surface layer with a thickness of about 0.25 mm. As the residual stress became more compressive, the SAW velocity increased, whereas as the residual stress became more tensile, the SAW velocity decreased. The variation in the SAW velocity through the shot peened surface layer was in good agreement with the distribution of the residual stress measured by X-ray diffraction technique

  16. Flexible Micropost Arrays for Shear Stress Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Palmieri, Frank L.; Hopkins, John W.; Jackson, Allen M.; Connell, John W.; Lin, Yi; Cisotto, Alexxandra A.

    2015-01-01

    Increased fuel costs, heightened environmental protection requirements, and noise abatement continue to place drag reduction at the forefront of aerospace research priorities. Unfortunately, shortfalls still exist in the fundamental understanding of boundary-layer airflow over aerodynamic surfaces, especially regarding drag arising from skin friction. For example, there is insufficient availability of instrumentation to adequately characterize complex flows with strong pressure gradients, heat transfer, wall mass flux, three-dimensionality, separation, shock waves, and transient phenomena. One example is the acoustic liner efficacy on aircraft engine nacelle walls. Active measurement of shear stress in boundary layer airflow would enable a better understanding of how aircraft structure and flight dynamics affect skin friction. Current shear stress measurement techniques suffer from reliability, complexity, and airflow disruption, thereby compromising resultant shear stress data. The state-of-the-art for shear stress sensing uses indirect or direct measurement techniques. Indirect measurements (e.g., hot-wire, heat flux gages, oil interferometry, laser Doppler anemometry, small scale pressure drag surfaces, i.e., fences) require intricate knowledge of the studied flow, restrictive instrument arrangements, large surface areas, flow disruption, or seeding material; with smaller, higher bandwidth probes under development. Direct measurements involve strain displacement of a sensor element and require no prior knowledge of the flow. Unfortunately, conventional "floating" recessed components for direct measurements are mm to cm in size. Whispering gallery mode devices and Fiber Bragg Gratings are examples of recent additions to this type of sensor with much smaller (?m) sensor components. Direct detection techniques are often single point measurements and difficult to calibrate and implement in wind tunnel experiments. In addition, the wiring, packaging, and installation

  17. Wave-induced stresses and pore pressures near a mudline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Sawicki

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional methods for the determination of water-wave induced stresses inseabeds composed of granular soils are based on Biot-type models, in which the soilskeleton is treated as an elastic medium. Such methods predict effective stressesin the soil that are unacceptable from the physical point of view, as they permittensile stresses to occur near the upper surface of the seabed. Therefore, in thispaper the granular soil is assumed to behave as an elastic-ideally plastic material,with the Coulomb-Mohr yield criterion adopted to bound admissible stress states inthe seabed. The governing equations are solved numerically by a~finite differencemethod. The results of simulations, carried out for the case of time-harmonicwater waves, illustrate the depth distributions of the excess pore pressures and theeffective stresses in the seabed, and show the shapes of zones of soil in the plastic state.~In particular, the effects on the seabed behaviour of suchparameters as the degree of pore water saturation, the soil permeability, and theearth pressure coefficient, are illustrated.

  18. Estimation of waves and ship responses using onboard measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montazeri, Najmeh

    information. The model is tested on simulated data based on known unimodal and bimodal wave scenarios. The wave parameters in the output are then compared with the true wave parameters. In addition to the numerical experiments, two sets of full-scale measurements from container ships are analysed. Herein...... for tracking the evolution of the wave parameters during the voyage. This provides a prediction of the wave parameters, e.g. 20 minutes ahead of the measurements. Given the predicted parameters, a wave spectrum model and the transfer functions, forecasts of different wave-induced responses are made......This thesis focuses on estimation of waves and ship responses using ship-board measurements. This is useful for development of operational safety and performance efficiency in connection with the broader concept of onboard decision support systems. Estimation of sea state is studied using a set...

  19. Measurements of Overtopping Flow Time Series on the Wave Dragon, Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2009-01-01

    the characteristics of the overtopping flow are discussed and the simulation algorithm is tested. Measured data is shown from a storm build up in October 2006, from theWave Dragon prototype situated in an inland sea in Northern Denmark. This wave energy converter extracts energy from the waves, by funnelling them...

  20. A simplified method of evaluating the stress wave environment of internal equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, J. D.; Desmond, T. P.

    1979-01-01

    A simplified method called the transfer function technique (TFT) was devised for evaluating the stress wave environment in a structure containing internal equipment. The TFT consists of following the initial in-plane stress wave that propagates through a structure subjected to a dynamic load and characterizing how the wave is altered as it is transmitted through intersections of structural members. As a basis for evaluating the TFT, impact experiments and detailed stress wave analyses were performed for structures with two or three, or more members. Transfer functions that relate the wave transmitted through an intersection to the incident wave were deduced from the predicted wave response. By sequentially applying these transfer functions to a structure with several intersections, it was found that the environment produced by the initial stress wave propagating through the structure can be approximated well. The TFT can be used as a design tool or as an analytical tool to determine whether a more detailed wave analysis is warranted.

  1. Stress wave velocity patterns in the longitudinal-radial plane of trees for defect diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanghui Li; Xiang Weng; Xiaocheng Du; Xiping Wang; Hailin Feng

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic tomography for urban tree inspection typically uses stress wave data to reconstruct tomographic images for the trunk cross section using interpolation algorithm. This traditional technique does not take into account the stress wave velocity patterns along tree height. In this study, we proposed an analytical model for the wave velocity in the longitudinal–...

  2. A study of the stress wave factor technique for the characterization of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govada, A. K.; Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Stinchcomb, W. W.

    1985-01-01

    This study has investigated the potential of the Stress Wave Factor as an NDT technique for thin composite laminates. The conventional SWF and an alternate method for quantifying the SWF were investigated. Agreement between the initial SWF number, ultrasonic C-scan, inplane displacements as obtained by full field moire interferometry, and the failure location have been observed. The SWF number was observed to be the highest when measured along the fiber direction and the lowest when measured across the fibers. The alternate method for quantifying the SWF used square root of the zeroth moment (square root of M sub o) of the frequency spectrum of the received signal as a quantitative parameter. From this study it therefore appears that the stress wave factor has an excellent potential to monitor damage development in thin composite laminates.

  3. Nondestructive evaluation of adhesive bond strength using the stress wave factor technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Reis, Henrique L. M.; Krautz, Harold E.

    1986-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation has been conducted to evaluate the adhesive bond strength between rubber and steel plates using the stress wave factor (SWF) measurement technique. Specimens with different bond strength were manufactured and tested using the SWF technique. Two approaches were used to define the SWF. One approach defines the SWF as the signal energy and the other approach defines the SWF as the square root of the zero moment of the frequency spectrum of the received signal. The strength of the rubber-steel adhesive joint was then evaluated using the destructive peel strength test method. It was observed that in both approaches higher values of the SWF measurements correspond to higher values of the peel strength test data. Therefore, these results show that the stress wave factor technique has the potential of being used in quality assurance of the adhesive bond strength between rubber and steel substrates.

  4. Wave-induced stress and breaking of sea ice in a coupled hydrodynamic discrete-element wave-ice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Agnieszka

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, a coupled sea ice-wave model is developed and used to analyze wave-induced stress and breaking in sea ice for a range of wave and ice conditions. The sea ice module is a discrete-element bonded-particle model, in which ice is represented as cuboid grains floating on the water surface that can be connected to their neighbors by elastic joints. The joints may break if instantaneous stresses acting on them exceed their strength. The wave module is based on an open-source version of the Non-Hydrostatic WAVE model (NHWAVE). The two modules are coupled with proper boundary conditions for pressure and velocity, exchanged at every wave model time step. In the present version, the model operates in two dimensions (one vertical and one horizontal) and is suitable for simulating compact ice in which heave and pitch motion dominates over surge. In a series of simulations with varying sea ice properties and incoming wavelength it is shown that wave-induced stress reaches maximum values at a certain distance from the ice edge. The value of maximum stress depends on both ice properties and characteristics of incoming waves, but, crucially for ice breaking, the location at which the maximum occurs does not change with the incoming wavelength. Consequently, both regular and random (Jonswap spectrum) waves break the ice into floes with almost identical sizes. The width of the zone of broken ice depends on ice strength and wave attenuation rates in the ice.

  5. Frictional response of simulated faults to normal stresses perturbations probed with ultrasonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreedharan, S.; Riviere, J.; Marone, C.

    2017-12-01

    We report on a suite of laboratory friction experiments conducted on saw-cut Westerly Granite surfaces to probe frictional response to step changes in normal stress and loading rate. The experiments are conducted to illuminate the fundamental processes that yield friction rate and state dependence. We quantify the microphysical frictional response of the simulated fault surfaces to normal stress steps, in the range of 1% - 600% step increases and decreases from a nominal baseline normal stress. We measure directly the fault slip rate and account for changes in slip rate with changes in normal stress and complement mechanical data acquisition by continuously probing the faults with ultrasonic pulses. We conduct the experiments at room temperature and humidity conditions in a servo controlled biaxial testing apparatus in the double direct shear configuration. The samples are sheared over a range of velocities, from 0.02 - 100 μm/s. We report observations of a transient shear stress and friction evolution with step increases and decreases in normal stress. Specifically, we show that, at low shear velocities and small increases in normal stress ( 5% increases), the shear stress evolves immediately with normal stress. We show that the excursions in slip rate resulting from the changes in normal stress must be accounted for in order to predict fault strength evolution. Ultrasonic wave amplitudes which first increase immediately in response to normal stress steps, then decrease approximately linearly to a new steady state value, in part due to changes in fault slip rate. Previous descriptions of frictional state evolution during normal stress perturbations have not adequately accounted for the effect of large slip velocity excursions. Here, we attempt to do so by using the measured ultrasonic amplitudes as a proxy for frictional state during transient shear stress evolution. Our work aims to improve understanding of induced and triggered seismicity with focus on

  6. Interaction of laser-induced stress waves with metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauer, A. H.; Fairand, B. P.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of high intensity laser induced stress waves on the hardness and tensile strength of 2024 and 7075 aluminum and on the fatigue properties of 7075 aluminum were investigated. Laser shocking increases the hardness of the underaged 2024-T351 but has little or no effect on the peak aged 2024-T351 and 7075-T651 or the overaged 7075-T73. The fretting fatigue life of fastener joints of 7075-T6 was increased by orders of magnitude by laser shocking the region around the fastener hole; the fatigue crack propagation rates were decreased by laser shocking.

  7. Neutron-diffraction measurements of stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments on bent steam-generator tubing have shown that different diffraction peaks, (1 1 1) or (0 0 2), give different results for the sign and magnitude of the stress and strain. From an engineering standpoint, the macroscopic stress field cannot be both positive and negative in the same volume, so this difference must be due to intergranular effects superposed on the macroscopic stress field. Uniaxial tensile test experiments with applied stresses beyond the 0.2% offset yield stress, help to understand this anomaly, by demonstrating the different strain response to applied stress along different crystallographic axes.When Zr-alloys are cooled from elevated temperatures, thermal stresses always develop, so that it is difficult to obtain a stress-free lattice spacing from which residual strains may be derived. From measurements of the temperature dependence of lattice spacing, the temperature at which the thermal stresses vanish may be found. From the lattice spacing at this temperature the stress-free lattice spacings at room temperature can be obtained readily.To interpret the measured strains in terms of macroscopic stress fields it is necessary to know the diffraction elastic constants. Neutron diffraction measurements of the diffraction elastic constants in a ferritic steel for the [1 1 0], [0 0 2] and [2 2 2] crystallographic axes, in directions parallel and perpendicular to the applied stress are compared with theoretical diffraction elastic constants. (orig.)

  8. ICE PLASMA WAVE ELECTRIC FIELD MEASUREMENT DATA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Plasma Wave Data were submitted to National Space Science Data Center after the Principal Investigator's death (Scarf) by S. Chang of TRW. For the electric field...

  9. Determination of the Stress State From Transverse Wave Speeds in Isotropic Inelastic Solids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scheidler, Mike

    1997-01-01

    For a transverse acceleration wave propagating along a principal axis of strain in a nonlinear isotropic elastic solid, a simple formula due to Ericksen relates the wave speed to the stress and strain...

  10. Residual stress measurement for injection molded components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achyut Adhikari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Residual stress induced during manufacturing of injection molded components such as polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA affects the mechanical and optical properties of these components. These residual stresses can be visualized and quantified by measuring their birefringence. In this paper, a low birefringence polariscope (LBP is used to measure the whole-field residual stress distribution of these injection molded specimens. Detailed analytical and experimental study is conducted to quantify the residual stress measurement in these materials. A commercial birefringence measurement system was used to validate the results obtained to our measurement system. This study can help in material diagnosis for quality and manufacturing purpose and be useful for understanding of residual stress in imaging or other applications.

  11. Solitary waves on inclined films: their characteristics and the effects on wall shear stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tihon, J. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Serifi, K.; Argyriadi, K.; Bontozoglou, V. [University of Thessaly, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Volos (Greece)

    2006-07-15

    The properties of solitary waves, developing from inlet disturbances of controlled frequency along an inclined film flow, are systematically studied experimentally and computationally. Time-variations of film height and wall shear stress are measured, using respectively a capacitance probe and an electrodiffusion sensor. Computational data are provided from simulations performed by a Galerkin finite element scheme. The height and spacing of solitary humps, their phase velocity and the wavelength of the preceding capillary ripples are reported as functions of the Reynolds number (10stress modulation imposed by the passage of solitary waves is studied experimentally and computationally as a function of Re. Distinct nonlinear characteristics are noted, including a steep maximum and a negative minimum, with the effects intensifying at intermediate Re. All computer predictions are found to be in good quantitative agreement with the experimental data. (orig.)

  12. Results of fatigue tests and prediction of fatigue life under superposed stress wave and combined superposed stress wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasugi, Shunji; Horikawa, Takeshi; Tsunenari, Toshiyasu; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    1983-01-01

    In order to examine fatigue life prediction methods at high temperatures where creep damage need not be taken into account, fatigue tests were carried out on plane bending specimens of alloy steels (SCM 435, 2 1/4Cr-1Mo) under superposed and combined superposed stress waves at room temperature and 500 0 C. The experimental data were compared with the fatigue lives predicted by using the cycle counting methods (range pair, range pair mean and zero-cross range pair mean methods), the modified Goodman's equation and the modified Miner's rule. The main results were as follows. (1) The fatigue life prediction method which is being used for the data at room temperature is also applicable to predict the life at high temperatures. The range pair mean method is especially better than other cycle counting methods. The zero-cross range pair mean method gives the estimated lives on the safe side of the experimental lives. (2) The scatter bands of N-bar/N-barsub(es) (experimental life/estimated life) becomes narrower when the following equation is used instead of the modified Goodman's equation for predicting the effect of mean stress on fatigue life. σ sub(t) = σ sub(a) / (1 - Sigma-s sub(m) / kσ sub(B)) σ sub(t); stress amplitude at zero mean stress (kg/mm 2 ) σ sub(B); tensile strength (kg/mm 2 ) σ sub(m); mean stress (kg/mm 2 ) σ sub(a); stress amplitude (kg/mm 2 ) k; modified coefficient of σ sub(B) (author)

  13. Softening of stressed granular packings with resonant sound waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichhardt, C J Olson; Lopatina, L M; Jia, X; Johnson, P A

    2015-08-01

    We perform numerical simulations of a two-dimensional bidisperse granular packing subjected to both a static confining pressure and a sinusoidal dynamic forcing applied by a wall on one edge of the packing. We measure the response experienced by a wall on the opposite edge of the packing and obtain the resonant frequency of the packing as the static or dynamic pressures are varied. Under increasing static pressure, the resonant frequency increases, indicating a velocity increase of elastic waves propagating through the packing. In contrast, when the dynamic amplitude is increased for fixed static pressure, the resonant frequency decreases, indicating a decrease in the wave velocity. This occurs both for compressional and for shear dynamic forcing and is in agreement with experimental results. We find that the average contact number Zc at the resonant frequency decreases with increasing dynamic amplitude, indicating that the elastic softening of the packing is associated with a reduced number of grain-grain contacts through which the elastic waves can travel. We image the excitations created in the packing and show that there are localized disturbances or soft spots that become more prevalent with increasing dynamic amplitude. Our results are in agreement with experiments on glass bead packings and earth materials such as sandstone and granite and may be relevant to the decrease in elastic wave velocities that has been observed to occur near fault zones after strong earthquakes, in surficial sediments during strong ground motion, and in structures during earthquake excitation.

  14. Current advances in neutron diffraction stress measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Tomota, Yo

    2007-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has been employed for stress evaluation of various mechanical components. The hkl lattice plane spacings in a diffraction gauge volume are measured, then elastic strains are calculated and finally stresses are determined by using the Hooke's law. Since the real engineering mechanical parts are so complicated that more sophisticated method must be progressed to obtain stress distribution in the inside of a sample. Current advances on this issue are reviewed. (author)

  15. Measurements for stresses in machine components

    CERN Document Server

    Yakovlev, V F

    1964-01-01

    Measurements for Stresses in Machine Components focuses on the state of stress and strain of components and members, which determines the service life and strength of machines and structures. This book is divided into four chapters. Chapter I describes the physical basis of several methods of measuring strains, which includes strain gauges, photoelasticity, X-ray diffraction, brittle coatings, and dividing grids. The basic concepts of the electric strain gauge method for measuring stresses inside machine components are covered in Chapter II. Chapter III elaborates on the results of experim

  16. Criterion validation of a stress measure: the Stress Overload Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirkhan, James H; Urizar, Guido G; Clark, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Validating stress scales poses problems beyond those of other psychological measures. Here, 3 studies were conducted to address those problems and assess the criterion validity of scores from a new theory-derived measure, the Stress Overload Scale (SOS; Amirkhan, 2012). In Study 1, the SOS was tested for its ability to predict postsemester illness in a sample of college students (n = 127). Even with precautions to minimize criterion contamination, scores were found to predict health problems in the month following a final exam on all of 5 different criteria. In Study 2, a community sample (n = 231) was used to test the SOS' ability to differentiate people in stressful circumstances from those in more relaxed contexts. SOS scores demonstrated excellent sensitivity (96%) and specificity (100%) in this general population application. In Study 3, the SOS was tested for its ability to differentiate salivary cortisol responses to a laboratory stressor in a group of pregnant women (n = 40). High scores were found to be associated with a blunted cortisol response, which is indicative of HPA-axis overload and typical of persons suffering chronic stress and stress-related pathology. Across all 3 studies, despite variations in the stressor, criterion, population, and methods, SOS scores emerged as valid indicators of stress. However, each study also introduced new problems that beg additional corrective steps in future stress-scale validity tests. These strategies, and the SOS' utility as a research and diagnostic tool in varied applications and populations, are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of stress wave propagation in an elasto-viscoplastic plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Noritoshi; Kawai, Ryoji; Urushi, Norio.

    1986-01-01

    Stress waves which propagate in the body are reflected at the boundary, and due to the interaction of the reflected stress waves, the focussing of stress waves will take place and a high stress level can be caused. The focussing of stress waves due to the reflection from the boundary may bring about fracture of the body, so that this is an important problem from a viewpoint of dynamic strength of structures. In this paper the process of stress wave focussing and the strain-rate dependence of constitutive equation in elastic and plastic regions are investigated. In the case where an in-plane step load uniformly acts on the straight edge of the plate with a semi-circular boundary, the propagation of stress waves in the plate was numerically analyzed by the finite element method, applying viscoelastic, elasto-plastic and elasto-viscoplastic constitutive equations. As the result, the process of focussing of stress waves due to reflection from the semi-circular boundary was observed and the difference in propagation behaviour of stress waves was discussed in materials represented by some kinds of constitutive equations. (author)

  18. Ocean Wave Separation Using CEEMD-Wavelet in GPS Wave Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring ocean waves plays a crucial role in, for example, coastal environmental and protection studies. Traditional methods for measuring ocean waves are based on ultrasonic sensors and accelerometers. However, the Global Positioning System (GPS has been introduced recently and has the advantage of being smaller, less expensive, and not requiring calibration in comparison with the traditional methods. Therefore, for accurately measuring ocean waves using GPS, further research on the separation of the wave signals from the vertical GPS-mounted carrier displacements is still necessary. In order to contribute to this topic, we present a novel method that combines complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD with a wavelet threshold denoising model (i.e., CEEMD-Wavelet. This method seeks to extract wave signals with less residual noise and without losing useful information. Compared with the wave parameters derived from the moving average skill, high pass filter and wave gauge, the results show that the accuracy of the wave parameters for the proposed method was improved with errors of about 2 cm and 0.2 s for mean wave height and mean period, respectively, verifying the validity of the proposed method.

  19. STRESS SENSITIVITY OF MERCURY INJECTION MEASUREMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Guise, P; Grattoni, C; Allshorn, S; Fisher, QJ; Schiffer, A

    2017-01-01

    Many petrophysical properties (e.g. permeability, electrical resistivity etc.) of tight rocks are very stress sensitive. However, most mercury injection measurements are made using an instrument that does not apply a confining pressure to the samples. Here we further explore the implications of the use and analysis of data from mercury injection porosimetry or mercury capillary pressure measurements (MICP). Two particular aspects will be discussed. First, the effective stress acting on sample...

  20. Three-wave electron vortex lattices for measuring nanofields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, C; Boothroyd, C B; Chang, S L Y; Dunin-Borkowski, R E

    2015-01-01

    It is demonstrated how an electron-optical arrangement consisting of two electron biprisms can be used to generate three-wave vortex lattices with effective lattice spacings between 0.1 and 1 nm. The presence of vortices in these lattices was verified by using a third biprism to perform direct phase measurements via off-axis electron holography. The use of three-wave lattices for nanoscale electromagnetic field measurements via vortex interferometry is discussed, including the accuracy of vortex position measurements and the interpretation of three-wave vortex lattices in the presence of partial spatial coherence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Distributions of freak wave heights measured in the North Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stansell, P.

    2004-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of some of the largest waves occurring during 793 h of surface elevation measurements collected during 14 severe storms in the North Sea. This data contains 104 freak waves. It is found that the probability of occurrence of freak waves is only weekly dependent on the significant wave height, significant wave steepness and spectral bandwidth. The probability does show a slightly stronger dependency on the skew and kurtosis of the surface elevation data, but on removing the contribution to these measures from the presence of the freakwaves themselves, this dependency largely disappears. Distributions of extreme waves are modelled by fitting Generalised Pareto distributions, and extreme value distributions and return periods are given for freak waves in terms of the empirical fitted parameters. It is shown by comparison with these fits that both the Rayleigh distribution and the fit of Nerzic and Prevosto severely under-predict the probability of occurrence of extreme waves. For the most extreme freak wave in our data, the Rayleigh distribution over-predicts the return period by about 300 times when compared to the fitted model. (author)

  2. Cantilever measurements of surface stress, surface reconstruction, film stress and magnetoelastic stress of monolayersc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Kirschner

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We review the application of cantilever-based stress measurements in surface science and magnetism. The application of thin (thickness appr. 0.1 mm single crystalline substrates as cantilevers has been used successfully to measure adsorbate-induced surface stress changes, lattice misfit induced film stress, and magneto-elastic stress of ferromagnetic monolayers. Surface stress changes as small as 0.01 N/m can be readily measured, and this translates into a sensitivity for adsorbate-coverage well below 0.01 of one layer. Stress as large as several GPa, beyond the elasticity limits of high strength materials, is measured, and it is ascribed to the lattice misfit between film and substrate. Our results point at the intimate relation between surface stress and surface reconstruction, stress-induced structural changes in epitaxially strained films, and strain-induced modifications of the magneto-elastic coupling in ferromagnetic monolayers.

  3. Cantilever measurements of surface stress, surface reconstruction, film stress and magnetoelastic stress of monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Dirk; Tian, Zhen; Kirschner, Jürgen

    2008-07-29

    We review the application of cantilever-based stress measurements in surface science and magnetism. The application of thin (thickness appr. 0.1 mm) single crystalline substrates as cantilevers has been used successfully to measure adsorbate-induced surface stress changes, lattice misfit induced film stress, and magneto-elastic stress of ferromagnetic monolayers. Surface stress changes as small as 0.01 N/m can be readily measured, and this translates into a sensitivity for adsorbate-coverage well below 0.01 of one layer. Stress as large as several GPa, beyond the elasticity limits of high strength materials, is measured, and it is ascribed to the lattice misfit between film and substrate. Our results point at the intimate relation between surface stress and surface reconstruction, stress-induced structural changes in epitaxially strained films, and strain-induced modifications of the magneto-elastic coupling in ferromagnetic monolayers.

  4. Stress Wave E-Rating of Structural Timber—Size and Moisture Content Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of cross sectional size and moisture content on stress wave properties of structural timber in various sizes and evaluate the feasibility of using stress wave method to E-rate timber in green conditions. Four different sizes of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) square timbers were...

  5. 3D time-domain spectral elements for stress waves modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudela, P; Ostachowicz, W

    2009-01-01

    Elastic stress waves induced by piezoelectric transducers are extensively used for damage detection purposes. Induced high frequency impulse signals cause that stress wave modelling by the finite element method is inefficient. Instead, numerical model based on the time-domain spectral element method has been developed to simulate stress wave propagation in metallic structures induced by the piezoelectric transducers. The model solves the coupled electromechanical field equations simultaneously in three-dimensional case. Visualisation of the propagating elastic waves generated by the actuator of different shapes and properties has been performed.

  6. Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Jeremiah D.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

  7. Measures against heat stress in the city of Gelsenkirchen, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dütemeyer, Dirk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the near-surface atmosphere, heat waves during the summer cause situations that may lead to human-biometeorological impairment. Because of their high population density, overheated cities are particularly strongly affected by heat stress. In the future, due to the effects of climate change, heat stress will increase in terms of its intensity and spatial expansion in the areas of concern. Taking the example of the city of Gelsenkirchen, Germany, this article presents a method for the identification of areas requiring adaptation or protection. A scenario of the future increase of heat stress events is presented, based on data of the German climate change model STAR II. For the identification of areas requiring adaptation and protection, spatial analyses of the urban heat island, land use and demographic aspects were performed using GIS tools. The application and assessment of adaptation measures is investigated for an urban quarter using the microscale numerical model ENVI-met. Finally adaptation measures in urban planning against heat stress are discussed. The relevant urban planning adaptation measures, which are also important in view of climate change, not only involve heat stress reduction in the residential areas already affected, but also involve the protection and optimisation of existing favourable and compensation areas.

  8. Validation of Standing Wave Liner Impedance Measurement Method, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hersh Acoustical Engineering, Inc. proposes to establish the feasibility and practicality of using the Standing Wave Method (SWM) to measure the impedance of...

  9. Sheet flow measurements on a surf-zone sandbar under shoaling and breaking waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieras, R.; Puleo, J. A.; Cox, D. T.; Anderson, D. L.; Kim, Y.; Hsu, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    A large-scale experiment to quantify sheet flow processes over a sandbar under varying levels of wave steepness was conducted in the wave flume at Oregon State University's O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory. A fixed profile was constructed with concrete slabs anchored to the flume side walls, with the exception of the sandbar crest, where a steel pit was installed and filled with well-sorted sediment (d50 0.17 mm). This hybrid approach allowed for the isolation of small-scale bed response to large-scale wave forcing over the sandbar, where an array of sensors was positioned to measure hydrodynamic forcing and sediment response. Near-bed ( 0.08 m3/m3) were approximated using Conductivity Concentration Profilers. Test conditions consisted of a regular wave train with incident wave heights for individual runs ranging from 0.4 m to 0.6 m and incident wave periods from 5 s to 9 s, encompassing a variety of skewed and asymmetric wave shapes across the shoaling and breaking regimes. Ensemble-averaged sediment concentration profiles exhibit considerable variation across the different conditions. The largest variation in sheet layer thickness occurs beneath the wave crest, ranging from 30 grain diameters for 5 sec, 0.4 m waves, up to 80 grain diameters for 7 sec, 0.6 m waves. Furthermore, the initiation and duration of sheet flow relative to the wave period differs for each condition set. It is likely that more than one mechanism plays a role in determining the aforementioned sheet layer characteristics. In the present work, we focus on the relative magnitude and phase of the near-bed flow acceleration and shear stress in determining the characteristics of the sheet layer.

  10. Magneto-thermo-visco-elastic waves in an initially stressed conducting layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakshit, Amit Kumar; Sengupta, P.R.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate magneto-thermo-visco-elastic surface waves in electrically and thermally conducting layers involving time rates of strain and stress of order n, the media being under an initial stress in the nature of hydrostatic tension or compression. The theory of magneto-thermo-visco-elastic surface waves in the conducting medium involving strain rate and stress rate of nth order is derived under initial stress. This theory is then employed to obtain wave velocity equations in specific cases. Results obtained in the above cases reduce to well-known classical results when additional fields are absent. (author)

  11. Measurement of elastic waves induced by the reflection of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Požar, Tomaž; Možina, Janez

    2013-11-01

    The reflection of light from the surface of an elastic solid gives rise to various types of elastic waves that propagate inside the solid. The weakest waves are generally those that are generated by the radiation pressure acting during the reflection of the light. Here, we present the first quantitative measurement of such light-pressure-induced elastic waves inside an ultrahigh-reflectivity mirror. Amplitudes of a few picometers were observed at the rear side of the mirror with a displacement-measuring conical piezoelectric sensor when laser pulses with a fluence of 1 J/cm(2) were reflected from the front side of the mirror.

  12. Methods of measuring residual stresses in components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossini, N.S.; Dassisti, M.; Benyounis, K.Y.; Olabi, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Defining the different methods of measuring residual stresses in manufactured components. ► Comprehensive study on the hole drilling, neutron diffraction and other techniques. ► Evaluating advantage and disadvantage of each method. ► Advising the reader with the appropriate method to use. -- Abstract: Residual stresses occur in many manufactured structures and components. Large number of investigations have been carried out to study this phenomenon and its effect on the mechanical characteristics of these components. Over the years, different methods have been developed to measure residual stress for different types of components in order to obtain reliable assessment. The various specific methods have evolved over several decades and their practical applications have greatly benefited from the development of complementary technologies, notably in material cutting, full-field deformation measurement techniques, numerical methods and computing power. These complementary technologies have stimulated advances not only in measurement accuracy and reliability, but also in range of application; much greater detail in residual stresses measurement is now available. This paper aims to classify the different residual stresses measurement methods and to provide an overview of some of the recent advances in this area to help researchers on selecting their techniques among destructive, semi destructive and non-destructive techniques depends on their application and the availabilities of those techniques. For each method scope, physical limitation, advantages and disadvantages are summarized. In the end this paper indicates some promising directions for future developments.

  13. Residual stress measurement by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akita, Koichi; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Neutron diffraction method has great advantages, allowing us to determine the residual stress deep present within the bulk materials and components nondestructively. Therefore, the method has been applied to confirm the structural integrity of the actual mechanical components and structures and to improve the manufacturing process and strength reliability of the products. This article reviews the residual stress measurement methodology of neutron diffraction. It also refers to the appropriate treatments of diffraction plane, stress-free lattice spacing, coarse grain and surface error to obtain reliable results. Finally, a few applications are introduced to show the capabilities of the neutron stress measurement method for the studies on the strength and elasto-plastic behaviors of crystalline materials. (author)

  14. [Tool for measuring occupational stress: a nurses' stress inventory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacciarini, J M; Tróccoli, B T

    2000-12-01

    We present an exploratory study aiming at constructing an inventory to measure occupational stress in nurses ("Inventário de Estresse em Enfermeiros"--IEE). A set of items was initially constructed from previously defined categories based on interviews with nurses and then improved through semantic analysis by referees and a pilot-test with nursing students. A sample of 461 nurses--workers from the public services of the Federal District--who answered the IEE was used in the study. Factorial analysis indicated the presence of a second-order global factor and three first-order factors: Interpersonal Relationships, Stressful Career Roles and Intrinsic Job Factors.

  15. Residual stress measurement at Budapest Neutron Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyula, T.

    2005-01-01

    The use of residual stress measurements of different construction element and recent possibilities of Budapest Neutron Centre are presented. The details investigated already: gas turbine wheel, axial compressor blade, turbine blade and plastically deformed stainless steel. We demonstrated the use of a neutron scattering (SANS, residual stress, diffraction) for the materials behavior investigation in order to analyze the processes going on under the different mechanical loading. The direction of possible instrumental development is presented. (author)

  16. On elastic waves in an thinly-layered laminated medium with stress couples under initial stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pal Roy

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is concerned with a simple transformation rule in finding out the composite elastic coefficients of a thinly layered laminated medium whose bulk properties are strongly anisotropic with a microelastic bending rigidity. These elastic coefficients which were not known completely for a layered laminated structure, are obtained suitably in terms of initial stress components and Lame's constants λi, μi of initially isotropic solids. The explicit solutions of the dynamical equations for a prestressed thinly layered laminated medium under horizontal compression in a gravity field are derived. The results are discussed specifying the effects of hydrostatic, deviatoric and couple stresses upon the characteristic propagation velocities of shear and compression wave modes.

  17. Technique for measurements of plane waves of uniaxial strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    The measurement of plane waves in uniaxial strain, in which large surface areas are loaded and the measurements are restricted to a central region that is not influenced by lateral boundaries, is discussed. Measuring techniques are covered and instruments are discussed

  18. Measurements using optic and RF waves

    CERN Document Server

    De Fornel, Frederique

    2013-01-01

    Scientific and technical knowledge for measurements in modern electromagnetism must be vast as our electromagnetic environment covers all frequencies and wavelengths. These measurements must be applied to fields as varied as nanotechnologies, telecommunications, meteorology, geolocalization, radioastronomy, health, biology, etc. In order to cover the multiple facets of the topic, this book sweeps the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from several hertz to terahertz; considers distances ranging from nanometers to light-years in optics; before extending towards the various measurement techniques

  19. Stress Wave Scattering: Friend or Enemy of Non Destructive Testing of Concrete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggelis, Dimitrios G.; Shiotani, Tomoki; Philippidis, Theodore P.; Polyzos, Demosthenes

    Cementitious materials are by definition inhomogeneous containing cement paste, sand, aggregates as well as air voids. Wave propagation in such a material is characterized by scattering phenomena. Damage in the form of micro or macro cracks certainly enhances scattering influence. Its most obvious manifestation is the velocity variation with frequency and excessive attenuation. The influence becomes stronger with increased mis-match of elastic properties of constituent materials and higher crack content. Therefore, in many cases of large concrete structures, field application of stress waves is hindered since attenuation makes the acquisition of reliable signals troublesome. However, measured wave parameters, combined with investigation with scattering theory can reveal much about the internal condition and supply information that cannot be obtained in any other way. The size and properties of the scatterers leave their signature on the dispersion and attenuation curves making thus the characterization more accurate in case of damage assessment, repair evaluation as well as composition inspection. In this paper, three indicative cases of scattering influence are presented. Namely, the interaction of actual distributed damage, as well as the repair material injected in an old concrete structure with the wave parameters. Other cases are the influence of light plastic inclusions in hardened mortar and the influence of sand and water content in the examination of fresh concrete. In all the above cases, scattering seems to complicate the propagation behavior but also offers the way for a more accurate characterization of the quality of the material.

  20. Guided ultrasonic waves for non-destructive monitoring of the stress levels in prestressed steel strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, S; Bourse, G

    2009-02-01

    The safety of prestressed civil structures such as bridges, dams, nuclear power plants, etc. directly involves the security of both environment and users. Health monitoring of the tensioning components, such as strands, tendons, bars, anchorage bolts, etc. is an important research topic and a challenging task bringing together the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and civil engineering communities. This paper deals with a guided ultrasonic wave procedure for monitoring the stress levels in seven-wire steel strands (15.7 mm in diameter). The mechanical and geometrical characteristics of the prestressed strands were taken into account for optimizing the measurement configuration and then the choice of the guided ultrasonic mode at a suitable frequency. Simplified acoustoelastic formulations were derived from the acoustoelasticity theory according to either calibration test or in situ measurement. The results from acoustoelastic measurements on the seven-wire steel strands are presented and discussed in the case of calibration tests and industrially prestressed strands. They show the potential and the suitability of the proposed guided wave method for evaluating the stress levels in the tested seven-wire steel strands.

  1. A new instrumentation to measure seismic waves attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisato, N.; Madonna, C.; Boutareaud, S.; Burg, J.

    2010-12-01

    Attenuation of seismic waves is the general expression describing the loss of energy of an elastic perturbation during its propagation in a medium. As a geophysical method, measuring the attenuation of seismic waves is a key to uncover essential information about fluid saturation of buried rocks. Attenuation of seismic waves depends on several mechanisms. In the case of saturated rock, fluids play an important role. Seismic waves create zones of overpressure by mobilizing the fluids in the pores of the rock. Starting from Gassmann-Biot theory (Gassman, 1951), several models (e.g. White, 1975; Mavko and Jizba, 1991) have been formulated to describe the energy absorption by flow of fluids. According to Mavko et al. (1998) for rock with permeability equals or less than 1 D, fluid viscosity between 1 cP and 10 cP and low frequencies seismic wave ( 100 KPa) in less than 10 ms. The vessel is equipped with 5 pressure sensors buried within the rock sample, a load cell and a strain sensor to measure axial shortening while the motor generates the seismic waves. The sensor conditioning system has been designed and realized by us and the acquisition software has been developed in Matlab. We present the first results, at room pressure and temperature, based on the measurements of pore fluid pressure increase in a sandstone sample with a permeability of 200 to 500 mD and partially saturated with water and air. These preliminary results show the reliability of this new instrumentation to measure seismic wave attenuation at low frequency and to verify the pore fluid flow driven by seismic waves.

  2. Comparison of Model Output of Wind and Wave Parameters with Spaceborne Altimeter Measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hwang, Paul

    1998-01-01

    .... While comparisons with point measurements from discrete and sparsely distributed wave buoys provide some measure of statistical confidence, the spatial distribution of the modeled wind and wave...

  3. Measurement of the shear wave speed in a submerged plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, A J; Cray, B A

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops an inverse method to estimate, in water, the shear wave speed in an isotropic, thick, elastomeric plate. The submerged plate is mechanically shaken and a scanning laser vibrometer is used to measure normal velocity on one surface. The temporal domain measurements are transformed into the frequency domain using a Fourier transform, then, the spatial domain measurements are transformed into the k x ,k y wavevector domain using two Fourier transforms. Once the data is in the wavevector-frequency domain, the propagation wavenumber of each specific wave type can be estimated by fitting a circle to each collection of spectral peaks. Using this measured estimate of the wavenumber corresponding to the propagating wave, the Newton-Raphson gradient method is applied (inserting the estimated wavenumber into to the theoretical dispersion curve equation for wave propagation in a fluid-loaded plate,) hence resulting in an estimate of the shear wave speed. An experiment is included to illustrate the method and statistical properties of the measurement are discussed.

  4. Electric field vector measurements in a surface ionization wave discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin M; Adamovich, Igor V; Lempert, Walter R; Böhm, Patrick S; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the results of time-resolved electric field vector measurements in a short pulse duration (60 ns full width at half maximum), surface ionization wave discharge in hydrogen using a picosecond four-wave mixing technique. Electric field vector components are measured separately, using pump and Stokes beams linearly polarized in the horizontal and vertical planes, and a polarizer placed in front of the infrared detector. The time-resolved electric field vector is measured at three different locations across the discharge gap, and for three different heights above the alumina ceramic dielectric surface, ∼100, 600, and 1100 μm (total of nine different locations). The results show that after breakdown, the discharge develops as an ionization wave propagating along the dielectric surface at an average speed of 1 mm ns −1 . The surface ionization wave forms near the high voltage electrode, close to the dielectric surface (∼100 μm). The wave front is characterized by significant overshoot of both vertical and horizontal electric field vector components. Behind the wave front, the vertical field component is rapidly reduced. As the wave propagates along the dielectric surface, it also extends further away from the dielectric surface, up to ∼1 mm near the grounded electrode. The horizontal field component behind the wave front remains quite significant, to sustain the electron current toward the high voltage electrode. After the wave reaches the grounded electrode, the horizontal field component experiences a secondary rise in the quasi-dc discharge, where it sustains the current along the near-surface plasma sheet. The measurement results indicate presence of a cathode layer formed near the grounded electrode with significant cathode voltage fall, ≈3 kV, due to high current density in the discharge. The peak reduced electric field in the surface ionization wave is 85–95 Td, consistent with dc breakdown field estimated from the Paschen

  5. The Measurement and Interpretation of Surface Wave Group Arrival Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, G.; Kane, D.; Morrow, J.; Zhou, Y.; Tromp, J.

    2005-12-01

    We have recently developed an efficient technique for measuring the relative group arrival times of surface waves by using cross-correlation and cluster analysis of waveform envelope functions. Applying the analysis to minor arc Love and Rayleigh waves in the frequency band 7 to 35 mHz for all events over magnitude 5.5 results in a dataset of over 200,000 measurements at each frequency for long period Rayleigh waves (frequency less than 25 mHz) and about 100,000 measurements at the shorter periods. Analysis of transverse components results in about half as many Love wave measurements. Simple ray theory inversions of the relative arrival times for apparent group velocity produce maps which are accurate representations of the data (often over 90% variance reduction of the relative arrival times) and which show features strongly correlated with tectonics and crustal thickness. The apparent group velocity variations can be extremely large: 30% velocity variations for 20 mHz Rayleigh waves and 40% variations for 30 mHz Rayleigh waves and can have abrupt lateral changes. This raises the concern that non-ray theory effects could be important. Indeed, a recent analysis by Dahlen and Zhou (personal communication) suggests that the group arrival times should be a functions of both the group velocity AND the phase velocity. The simplest way to test the interpretation of the measurements is to perform the analysis on synthetic seismograms computed for a realistic model of the Earth. Here, we use the SEM with a model which incorporates realistic crust and mantle structure. We are currently computing synthetics for a suite of roughly 1000 events recorded globally that extend to a period of 18 seconds. We shall present the results of applying both ray-based and finite frequency inversions to the synthetic data as well as evaluating the effects of off path propagation at short periods using surface wave ray tracing.

  6. Recent advances in residual stress measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withers, P.J.; Turski, M.; Edwards, L.; Bouchard, P.J.; Buttle, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Until recently residual stresses have been included in structural integrity assessments of nuclear pressure vessels and piping in a very primitive manner due to the lack of reliable residual stress measurement or prediction tools. This situation is changing the capabilities of newly emerging destructive (i.e. the contour method) and non-destructive (i.e. magnetic and high-energy synchrotron X-ray strain mapping) residual stress measurement techniques for evaluating ferritic and austenitic pressure vessel components are contrasted against more well-established methods. These new approaches offer the potential for obtaining area maps of residual stress or strain in welded plants, mock-up components or generic test-pieces. The mapped field may be used directly in structural integrity calculations, or indirectly to validate finite element process/structural models on which safety cases for pressurised nuclear systems are founded. These measurement methods are complementary in terms of application to actual plant, cost effectiveness and measurements in thick sections. In each case an exemplar case study is used to illustrate the method and to highlight its particular capabilities

  7. Measurement of cavitation induced wall shear stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkink, R.J.; Ohl, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    The wall shear stress from cavitation bubbles collapsing close to a rigid boundary is measured with a constant temperature anemometer. The bubble is created with focused laser light, and its dynamics is observed with high-speed photography. By correlating the frames, a hydrophone signal, and the

  8. Measuring sea surface height with a GNSS-Wave Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Maqueda, Miguel Angel; Penna, Nigel T.; Foden, Peter R.; Martin, Ian; Cipollini, Paolo; Williams, Simon D.; Pugh, Jeff P.

    2017-04-01

    A GNSS-Wave Glider is a novel technique to measure sea surface height autonomously using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). It consists of an unmanned surface vehicle manufactured by Liquid Robotics, a Wave Glider, and a geodetic-grade GNSS antenna-receiver system, with the antenna installed on a mast on the vehicle's deck. The Wave Glider uses the differential wave motion through the water column for propulsion, thus guaranteeing an, in principle, indefinite autonomy. Solar energy is collected to power all on-board instrumentation, including the GNSS system. The GNSS-Wave Glider was first tested in Loch Ness in 2013, demonstrating that the technology is capable of mapping geoid heights within the loch with an accuracy of a few centimetres. The trial in Loch Ness did not conclusively confirm the reliability of the technique because, during the tests, the state of the water surface was much more benign than would normally be expect in the open ocean. We now report on a first deployment of a GNSS-Wave Glider in the North Sea. The deployment took place in August 2016 and lasted thirteen days, during which the vehicle covered a distance of about 350 nautical miles in the north western North Sea off Great Britain. During the experiment, the GNSS-Wave Glider experienced sea states between 1 (0-0.1 m wave heights) and 5 (2.5-4 m wave heights). The GNSS-Wave Glider data, recorded at 5 Hz frequency, were analysed using a post-processed kinematic GPS-GLONASS precise point positioning (PPP) approach, which were quality controlled using double difference GPS kinematic processing with respect to onshore reference stations. Filtered with a 900 s moving-average window, the PPP heights reveal geoid patterns in the survey area that are very similar to the EGM2008 geoid model, thus demonstrating the potential use of a GNSS-Wave Glider for marine geoid determination. The residual of subtracting the modelled or measured marine geoid from the PPP signal combines information

  9. Long-term wave measurements in a climate change perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomaro, Angela; Bertotti, Luciana; Cavaleri, Luigi; Lionello, Piero; Portilla-Yandun, Jesus

    2017-04-01

    At present multi-decadal time series of wave data needed for climate studies are generally provided by long term model simulations (hindcasts) covering the area of interest. Examples, among many, at different scales are wave hindcasts adopting the wind fields of the ERA-Interim reanalysis of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF, Reading, U.K.) at the global level and by regional re-analysis as for the Mediterranean Sea (Lionello and Sanna, 2006). Valuable as they are, these estimates are necessarily affected by the approximations involved, the more so because of the problems encountered within modelling processes in small basins using coarse resolution wind fields (Cavaleri and Bertotti, 2004). On the contrary, multi-decadal observed time series are rare. They have the evident advantage of somehow representing the real evolution of the waves, without the shortcomings associated with the limitation of models in reproducing the actual processes and the real variability within the wave fields. Obviously, observed wave time series are not exempt of problems. They represent a very local information, hence their use to describe the wave evolution at large scale is sometimes arguable and, in general, it needs the support of model simulations assessing to which extent the local value is representative of a large scale evolution. Local effects may prevent the identification of trends that are indeed present at large scale. Moreover, a regular maintenance, accurate monitoring and metadata information are crucial issues when considering the reliability of a time series for climate applications. Of course, where available, especially if for several decades, measured data are of great value for a number of reasons and can be valuable clues to delve further into the physics of the processes of interest, especially if considering that waves, as an integrated product of the local climate, if available in an area sensitive to even limited changes of the

  10. In Vivo Measures of Shear Wave Speed as a Predictor of Tendon Elasticity and Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jack A; Biedrzycki, Adam H; Lee, Kenneth S; DeWall, Ryan J; Brounts, Sabrina H; Murphy, William L; Markel, Mark D; Thelen, Darryl G

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential for ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) to measure tissue elasticity and ultimate stress in both intact and healing tendons. The lateral gastrocnemius (Achilles) tendons of 41 New Zealand white rabbits were surgically severed and repaired with growth factor coated sutures. SWE imaging was used to measure shear wave speed (SWS) in both the medial and lateral tendons pre-surgery, and at 2 and 4 wk post-surgery. Rabbits were euthanized at 4 wk, and both medial and lateral tendons underwent mechanical testing to failure. SWS significantly (p tendons. SWS was significantly (p tendon elastic modulus (r = 0.52) and ultimate stress (r = 0.58). Thus, ultrasound SWE is a potentially promising non-invasive technology for quantitatively assessing the mechanical integrity of pre-operative and post-operative tendons. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Model basin, measurement of particle velocities in wave crests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-15

    A model set-up, which makes it possible to measure water particle velocities in wave crests, has been developed and tested. The technique includes a tri-axial ultrasonic current probe mounted on a movable frame which is moved vertically by a hydraulic piston thus following the oscillating water surface. Recording is hereby done at a constant depth beneath the water surface and the velocity profiles are found by interpolation/extrapolation between the recordings taken in different levels at a given time during the wave time series. The set-up has been successfully used for measurements indeep-water regular and irregular seastates. Detailed analysis and comparison with various theoretical descriptions of wave kinematics has been performed. Furthermore, the set-up has been used for measurements in freak waves reproduced at a limited waterdepth. The analysis and comparisons with theoretical predictions have shed new light on the freak wave phenomenon. Some disturbance into the area of measurements is introduced by the ultrasonic proble. For the maximum values of particle velocities (under a crest or a trough), this disturbance is minimal as the particles move in practically horizontal directons. (BN).

  12. Magellan radio occultation measurements of atmospheric waves on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, David P.; Jenkins, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Radio occultation experiments were conducted at Venus on three consecutive orbits of the Magellan spacecraft in October 1991. Each occultation occurred over the same topography (67 deg N, 127 deg E) and at the same local time (22 hr 5 min), but the data are sensitive to zonal variations because the atmosphere rotates significantly during one orbit. Through comparisons between observations and predictions of standard wave theory, we have demonstrated that small-scale oscillations in retrieved temperature profiles as well as scintillations in received signal intensity are caused by a spectrum of vertically propagating internal gravity waves. There is a strong similarity between the intensity scintillations observed here and previous measurements, which pertain to a wide range of locations and experiment dates. This implies that the same basic phenomenon underlies all the observations and hence that gravity waves are a persistent, global feature of Venus' atmosphere. We obtained a fairly complete characterization of a gravity wave that appears above the middle cloud in temperature measurements on all three orbits. The amplitude and vertical wavelength are about 4 K and 2.5 km respectively, at 65 km. A model for radiative damping implies that the wave intrinsic frequency is approximately 2 x 10(exp 4) rad/sec, the corresponding ratio between horizontal and vertical wavelengths is approximately 100. The wave is nearly stationary relative to the surface or the Sun. Radiative attenuation limits the wave amplitude at altitudes above approximately 65 km, leading to wave drag on the mean zonal winds of about +0.4 m/sec per day (eastward). The sign, magnitude, and location of this forcing suggest a possible role in explaining the decrease with height in the zonal wind speed that is believed to occur above the cloud tops. Temperature oscillations with larger vertical wavelengths (5-10 km) were also observed on all three orbits, but we are able unable to interpret these

  13. Characteristics of wave structures derived from lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Kathrin; Gerding, Michael; Höffner, Josef; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2016-04-01

    A daylight capable Rayleigh-Mie-Raman (RMR) lidar is in operation since summer 2010 at the mid-latitude station at Kühlungsborn (54° N, 12° E). The RMR lidar system is used for measuring wave structures at day and night to investigate short and long periodic atmospheric waves, like gravity waves (GW) and thermal tides (with diurnal, semidiurnal and terdiurnal components). About 6150 h of data have been acquired so far, with each sounding lasting for at least 6 h. For such long lasting data sets the general problem is the separation of the different wave contributions from the observed superposition of GW, tides or even longer periodic waves in the time series of temperature profiles. For extracting wave induced temperature deviations the most common method is to calculate these from the daily mean. Using this method the daylight capability allows the characterization of tides for a long lasting measurement. We will present the variability of tidal amplitudes on scales of days that are not represented in monthly averages. Because short periodic GW can at least partly hide behind those temperature deviations induced by tides, we use spectral filter methods for extracting GW induced temperature deviations. We will show a comparison of different methods with regard to gravity waves. GW activity and characteristics are derived in an altitude range between ~30 and ~70 km. The results demonstrate that the gravity wave potential energy density (GWPED) strongly depends on the used filter method. The contribution of different spectral ranges to the total GWPED will be presented.

  14. Finnish physicians' stress related to information systems keeps increasing: a longitudinal three-wave survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heponiemi, Tarja; Hyppönen, Hannele; Vehko, Tuulikki; Kujala, Sari; Aalto, Anna-Mari; Vänskä, Jukka; Elovainio, Marko

    2017-10-17

    Poorly functioning, time-consuming, and inadequate information systems are among the most important work-related psychosocial factors causing stress in physicians. The present study examined the trend in the perceived stress that was related to information systems (SRIS) among Finnish physicians during a nine-year follow-up. In addition, we examined the associations of gender, age, employment sector, specialization status, leadership position, on-call burden, and time pressure with SRIS change and levels. A longitudinal design with three survey data collection waves (2006, 2010 and 2015) based on a random sample of Finnish physicians in 2006 was used. The study sample included 1095 physicians (62.3% women, mean age 54.4 years) who provided data on SRIS in every wave. GLM repeated measures analyses were used to examine the associations between independent variables and the SRIS trend during the years 2006, 2010, and 2015. SRIS increased during the study period. The estimated marginal mean of SRIS in 2006 was 2.80 (95% CI = 2.68-2.92) and the mean increase was 0.46 (95% CI = 0.30-0.61) points from 2006 to 2010 and 0.25 (95% CI = 0.11-0.39) points from 2010 to 2015. Moreover, our results show that the increase was most pronounced in primary care, whereas in hospitals SRIS did not increase between 2010 and 2015. SRIS increased more among those in a leadership position. On-call duties and high time-pressures were associated with higher SRIS levels during all waves. Changing, difficult, and poorly functioning information systems (IS) are a prominent source of stress among Finnish physicians and this perceived stress continues to increase. Organizations should implement arrangements to ease stress stemming from IS especially for those with a high workload and on-call or leadership duties. To decrease IS-related stress, it would be important to study in more detail the main IS factors that contribute to SRIS. Earlier studies indicate that the usability and stability

  15. Stress analysis applications to service failures of the traveling wave tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, H.-Y.

    By utilizing the mathematical analogy between the electrostatic fields and the elastic stress fields, the electrostatic stresses in high voltage electronic devices such as Traveling Wave Tubes (TWT) can be obtained from finite element technique. A new point of view about the vacuum electrical breakdown from the theory of elastic stress concentration has been proposed. The elastic stress concentration factors may be used as a good reference figure for TWT design works.

  16. Spatio-Temporal Measurements of Short Wind Water Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocholz, Roland; Jähne, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Spatio-temporal measurements of wind-driven short-gravity capillary waves are reported for a wide range of experimental conditions, including wind, rain and surface slicks. The experiments were conducted in the Hamburg linear wind/wave flume in cooperation with the Institute of Oceanography at the University of Hamburg, Germany. Both components of the slope field were measured optically at a fetch of 14.4 m using a color imaging slope gauge (CISG) with a footprint of 223 x 104 mm and a resolution of 0.7 mm. The instrument was improved versus earlier versions (Jähne and Riemer (1990), Klinke (1992)) to achieve a sampling rate of 312.5 Hz, which now allows for the computation of 3D wavenumber-frequency spectra (see Rocholz (2008)). This made it possible to distinguish waves traveling in and against wind direction, which proved useful to distinguish wind waves from ring waves caused by rain drop impacts. Using a new calibration method it was possible to correct for the intrinsic nonlinearities of the instrument in the slope range up to ±1. In addition, the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) was measured and employed for the restoration of the spectral amplitudes for wavenumbers in the range from 60 to 2300 rad/m. The spectra for pure wind conditions are generally consistent with previous measurements. But, the shape of the saturation spectra in the vicinity of k~1000 rad/m (i.e. pure capillary waves) stands in contradiction to former investigations where a sharp spectral cutoff (k^(-2) or k^(-3)) is commonly reported (e.g. Jähne and Riemer (1990)). This cutoff is reproduced by almost all semi-empirical models of the energy flux in the capillary range (e.g. Kudryavtsev et al. (1999), Apel (1994)). However, the new MTF corrected spectra show only a gentle decrease (between k^(-0.5) and k^(-1)) for k > 1000 rad/m. Therefore the question for the relative importance of different dissipation mechanisms might need a new assessment. References: J. R. Apel. An improved

  17. Tidal and gravity waves study from the airglow measurements at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The other waves may be the upward propagating gravity waves or waves resulting from the interaction of inter-mode tidal oscillations, interaction of tidal waves with planetary waves and gravity waves. Some times, the second harmonic wave has higher vertical velocity than the corresponding fundamental wave. Application ...

  18. Polyurea/Fused-silica interfacial decohesion induced by impinging tensile stress-waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mica Grujicic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available All-atom non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations are used to investigate the problems of polyurea-borne tensile-stress waves interacting with a polyurea/fused-silica interface and fused-silica tensile-stress waves interacting with a fused-silica/polyurea interface, and the potential for the accompanying interfacial decohesion. To predict the outcome of the interactions of stress-waves with the material-interfaces in question, at the continuum level, previously determined material constitutive relations for polyurea and fused-silica are used within an acoustic-impedance-matching procedure. These continuum-level predictions pertain solely to the stress-wave/interface interaction aspects resulting in the formation of transmitted and reflected stress- or release-waves, but do not contain any information regarding potential interfacial decohesion. Present direct molecular-level simulations confirmed some of these continuum-level predictions, but also provided direct evidence of the nature and the extent of interfacial decohesion. In the molecular-level simulations, reactive force-field potentials are utilized to properly model the initial state of interfacial cohesion and its degradation during stress-wave-loading. Examination of the molecular-level interfacial structure before the stress-wave has interacted with the given interface, revealed local changes in the bonding structure, suggesting the formation of an “interphase.” This interphase was subsequently found to greatly affect the polyurea/fused-silica decohesion strength and the likelihood for interfacial decohesion during the interaction of the stress-wave with the interface.

  19. Local stimulation of cultured myocyte cells by femtosecond laser-induced stress wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung-En; Wu, Cheng-Chi; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Maezawa, Yasuyo; Okano, Kazunori; Masuhara, Hiroshi; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2010-12-01

    When an 800 nm femtosecond laser is tightly focused into cell culture medium a stress wave is generated at the laser focal point. Since the stress wave localizes in a few tens of μm, it is possible to locally stimulate single cells in vitro. In this work, several kinds of cultured mammalian cells, HeLa, PC12, P19CL6, and C2C12, were stimulated by the stress wave and the cell growth after the stress loading with the laser irradiation was investigated. In comparison with the control conditions, cell growth after the laser irradiation was enhanced for the cells of C2C12 and P19CL6, which can differentiate into myocytes, and suppressed for PC12 and HeLa cell lines. These results suggest a possibility of cell growth enhancement due to myogenic cells response to the femtosecond laser-induced stress.

  20. Survey of Temperature Measurement Techniques For Studying Underwater Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Several optical methods for measuring temperature near underwater shock waves are reviewed and compared. The relative merits of the different techniques are compared, considering accuracy, precision, ease of use, applicable temperature range, maturity, spatial resolution, and whether or not special additives are required.

  1. Experiment and numerical simulation for laser ultrasonic measurement of residual stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yu; Liu, Changsheng; Kong, Xiangwei; Lin, Zhongya

    2017-01-01

    Laser ultrasonic is a most promising method for non-destructive evaluation of residual stress. The residual stress of thin steel plate is measured by laser ultrasonic technique. The pre-stress loading device is designed which can easily realize the condition of the specimen being laser ultrasonic tested at the same time in the known stress state. By the method of pre-stress loading, the acoustoelastic constants are obtained and the effect of different test directions on the results of surface wave velocity measurement is discussed. On the basis of known acoustoelastic constants, the longitudinal and transverse welding residual stresses are measured by the laser ultrasonic technique. The finite element method is used to simulate the process of surface wave detection of welding residual stress. The pulsed laser is equivalent to the surface load and the relationship between the physical parameters of the laser and the load is established by the correction coefficient. The welding residual stress of the specimen is realized by the ABAQUS function module of predefined field. The results of finite element analysis are in good agreement with the experimental method. The simple and effective numerical and experimental methods for laser ultrasonic measurement of residual stress are demonstrated. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Characteristic and principle of the residual stress measurement by neutron diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiniwa, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Although X-ray method has been widely used as the nondestructive measurement method of residual stress, the object to be measured with laboratory X-ray was limited to the vicinity of surface, and the nondestructive measurement of stress inside an essential component could not be performed. Since the neutron method utilizes the wave characteristics of electrically neutral particles, the penetrability is excellent so that information up to the inside of a material can be obtained sufficiently. As the feature of neutron stress measurement, it is suitable for measurement inside metals such as iron and aluminum, which cannot be measured with X-rays. For the measurement of residual stress in localized region, the use of high energy synchrotron radiation is advantageous. In the stress measurement utilizing diffraction phenomena, there is the strain calculated from a change in diffraction lattice spacing. The measured strain is converted into stress using Hooke's Law. As the measurement examples of neutron stress evaluation, the following are introduced: (1) residual stress distribution around the ferrite steel (50 mm thick) welded joint of a large-sized structure, (2) residual stress due to the heat treatment of aluminum alloy with a plate thickness of 20 to 140 mm, and (3) change in the strain of aluminum die block in the vicinity of a cast iron cylinder liner of engine, when heating/cooling up to 470degC. (A.O.)

  3. Measurements on wave propagation characteristics of spiraling electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A.; Getty, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Dispersion characteristics of cyclotron-harmonic waves propagating on a neutralized spiraling electron beam immersed in a uniform axial magnetic field are studied experimentally. The experimental setup consisted of a vacuum system, an electron-gun corkscrew assembly which produces a 110-eV beam with the desired delta-function velocity distribution, a measurement region where a microwave signal is injected onto the beam to measure wavelengths, and a velocity analyzer for measuring the axial electron velocity. Results of wavelength measurements made at beam currents of 0.15, 1.0, and 2.0 mA are compared with calculated values, and undesirable effects produced by increasing the beam current are discussed. It is concluded that a suitable electron beam for studies of cyclotron-harmonic waves can be generated by the corkscrew device.

  4. Disturbance of SH-type waves due to moving stress discontinuity in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The disturbance and propagation of SH-type waves in an anisotropic soil layer overlying an inhomogeneous elastic half-space by a moving stress discontinuity is considered. Stress discontinuity moves with non-uniform velocity and is impulsive in nature. The displacements are obtained in exact form by themethod due to ...

  5. Disturbance of SH-type waves due to moving stress discontinuity in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The disturbance and propagation of SH-type waves in an anisotropic soil layer overlying an inhomogeneous elastic half-space by a moving stress discontinuity is considered. Stress discontinuity moves with non-uniform velocity and is impulsive in nature. The displacements are obtained in exact form by the method ...

  6. Experimental Study of the Effect of Internal Defects on Stress Waves during Automated Fiber Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Han

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The detection technique of component defects is currently only realized to detect offline defects and online surface defects during automated fiber placement (AFP. The characteristics of stress waves can be effectively applied to identify and detect internal defects in material structure. However, the correlation mechanism between stress waves and internal defects remains unclear during the AFP process. This paper proposes a novel experimental method to test stress waves, where continuous loading induced by process itself is used as an excitation source without other external excitation. Twenty-seven groups of thermosetting prepreg laminates under different processing parameters are manufactured to obtain different void content. In order to quantitatively estimate the void content in the prepreg structure, the relation model between the void content and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient is revealed using an A-scan ultrasonic flaw detector and photographic methods by optical microscope. Furthermore, the high-frequency noises of stress waves are removed using Haar wavelet transform. The peaks, the Manhattan distance and mean stress during the laying process are analyzed and evaluated. Partial conclusions in this paper could provide theoretical support for online real-time detection of internal defects based on stress wave characteristics.

  7. Torsional Wave Propagation in a Pre-Stressed Structure with Corrugated and Loosely Bonded Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Manoj K.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An analytical model is presented to study the behaviour of propagation of torsional surface waves in initially stressed porous layer, sandwiched between an orthotropic half-space with initial stress and pre-stressed inhomogeneous anisotropic half-space. The boundary surfaces of the layer and halfspaces are taken as corrugated, as well as loosely bonded. The heterogeneity of the lower half-space is due to trigonometric variation in elastic parameters of the pre-stressed inhomogeneous anisotropic medium. Expression for dispersion relation has been obtained in closed form for the present analytical model to observe the effect of undulation parameter, flatness parameter and porosity on the propagation of torsional surface waves. The obtained dispersion relation is found to be in well agreement with classical Love wave equation for a particular case. The cases of ideally smooth interface and welded interface have also been analysed. Numerical example and graphical illustrations are made to demonstrate notable effect of initial stress, wave number, heterogeneity parameter and initial stress on the phase velocity of torsional surface waves.

  8. Stress measurements in welds: Problem areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, T.M. [Northern Stress Technologies, Deep River, Ont., K0J 1P0 (Canada); Suzuki, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Institute, Tokai (Japan); Carr, D.G. [Australian Science and Technology Organization, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)]. E-mail: david.carr@ansto.gov.au; Ripley, M.I. [Australian Science and Technology Organization, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Clausen, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2006-11-10

    There have been many stress measurements on welds by neutron diffraction over the past 20 years but there are still a number of serious experimental issues that are often not addressed. The primary fact is that the microstructure generally changes across the weld and accompanying this may be a change in the concentration of strengthening elements in solution. This will lead to a shift in lattice spacing which may be incorrectly interpreted as a strain. Secondly, a gradient of plastic deformation near the weld may be expected. Since plastic deformation by application of a stress always generates intergranular (type-2) strains this may lead to a range of intergranular effects superposed on the conventional weld-related strains. The effects are illustrated by neutron diffraction studies of Zr-4, ferritic and austenitic welds where chemistry, intergranular effects and crystallographic texture can all play a role.

  9. Analyzing Lagrange gauge measurements of spherical, cylindrical, or plane waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aidun, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    Material response characterizations that are very useful in constitutive model development can be obtained from careful analysis of in-material (embedded, Lagrangian) gauge measurements of stress and/or particle velocity histories at multiple locations. The requisite measurements and the analysis are feasible for both laboratory and field experiments. The final product of the analysis is a set of load paths (e.g., radial stress vs. radial strain, tangential vs. radial stress, tangential vs. radial strain, radial stress vs. particle velocity) and their possible variation with propagation distance. Material model development can be guided and constrained by this information, but extra information or assumptions are needed to first establish a parameterized representation of the material response

  10. Development of SMM wave laser scattering apparatus for the measurements of waves and turbulences in the tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, T.; Hamada, Y.; Yamashita, T.; Ikeda, M.; Nakamura, M.

    1980-01-01

    The SMM wave laser scattering apparatus has been developed for the measurement of the waves and turbulences in the plasma. This apparatus will help greatly to clarify the physics of RF heating of the tokamak plasma. The present status of main parts of the apparatus, the SMM wave laser and the Schottky barrier diode mixer for the heterodyne receiver, are described. (author)

  11. Swell impact on wind stress and atmospheric mixing in a regional coupled atmosphere-wave model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lichuan; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Over the ocean, the atmospheric turbulence can be significantly affected by swell waves. Change in the atmospheric turbulence affects the wind stress and atmospheric mixing over swell waves. In this study, the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress is introduced into an atmosphere......-neutral and unstable stratification conditions is introduced by changing the roughness length. Five year simulation results indicate that adding the swell influence on atmospheric mixing has limited influence, only slightly increasing the near-surface wind speed; in contrast, adding the swell influence on wind stress....... The influence varies with wave characteristics for different sea basins. Swell occurs infrequently in the studied area, and one could expect more influence in high-swell-frequency areas (i.e., low-latitude ocean). We conclude that the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress should be considered...

  12. Exploring Heat Stress Relief Measures among the Australian Labour Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Kerstin K; Mathew, Supriya; Garnett, Stephen T

    2018-02-26

    Australia experiences frequent heat waves and generally high average temperatures throughout the continent with substantial impacts on human health and the economy. People adapt to heat by adopting various relief measures in their daily lives including changing their behaviour. Many labour intensive outdoor industries implement standards for heat stress management for their workforce. However, little is known about how people cope with heat at their workplaces apart from studies targeting some specific industries where labourers are exposed to extreme heat. Here, we analysed responses from 1719 people in the Australian labour force to self-reported heat stress and associated coping mechanisms. Three quarters of respondents experienced heat stress at their workplace with fatigue and headache being the two most frequently stated symptoms. Almost all of those who were affected by heat would hydrate (88%), 67% would cool, and 44% would rest as a strategy for coping with heat. About 10% intended to change their jobs because of heat stress in the workplace. We found differences in heat relief measures across gender, education, health, level of physical intensity of job, and time spent working outside. People working in jobs that were not very demanding physically were more likely to choose cooling down as a relief measure, while those in labour intensive jobs and jobs that required considerable time outside were more likely to rest. This has potential consequences for their productivity and work schedules. Heat affects work in Australia in many types of industry with impact dependent on workforce acclimatisation, yet public awareness and work relief plans are often limited to outdoor and labour intensive industries. Industries and various levels of government in all sectors need to implement standards for heat management specific to climate zones to help people cope better with high temperatures as well as plan strategies in anticipation of projected temperature

  13. Exploring Heat Stress Relief Measures among the Australian Labour Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin K. Zander

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Australia experiences frequent heat waves and generally high average temperatures throughout the continent with substantial impacts on human health and the economy. People adapt to heat by adopting various relief measures in their daily lives including changing their behaviour. Many labour intensive outdoor industries implement standards for heat stress management for their workforce. However, little is known about how people cope with heat at their workplaces apart from studies targeting some specific industries where labourers are exposed to extreme heat. Here, we analysed responses from 1719 people in the Australian labour force to self-reported heat stress and associated coping mechanisms. Three quarters of respondents experienced heat stress at their workplace with fatigue and headache being the two most frequently stated symptoms. Almost all of those who were affected by heat would hydrate (88%, 67% would cool, and 44% would rest as a strategy for coping with heat. About 10% intended to change their jobs because of heat stress in the workplace. We found differences in heat relief measures across gender, education, health, level of physical intensity of job, and time spent working outside. People working in jobs that were not very demanding physically were more likely to choose cooling down as a relief measure, while those in labour intensive jobs and jobs that required considerable time outside were more likely to rest. This has potential consequences for their productivity and work schedules. Heat affects work in Australia in many types of industry with impact dependent on workforce acclimatisation, yet public awareness and work relief plans are often limited to outdoor and labour intensive industries. Industries and various levels of government in all sectors need to implement standards for heat management specific to climate zones to help people cope better with high temperatures as well as plan strategies in anticipation of projected

  14. THE GENERATION OF THERMOELASTIC STRESS WAVES BY IMPULSIVE ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , ABSORPTION), (*STRESSES, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION ), SURFACE PROPERTIES, INTERACTIONS, HEAT TRANSFER, ELASTIC PROPERTIES, ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSES, LASERS, MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS, BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS, SOLIDS

  15. Recovery of Stokes waves from velocity measurements on an axis of symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matioc, Bogdan-Vasile

    2015-01-01

    We provide a new method to recover the profile of Stokes waves, and more generally of waves with smooth vorticity, from measurements of the horizontal velocity component on a vertical axis of symmetry of the wave surface. Although we consider periodic waves only, the extension to solitary waves is straightforward. (paper)

  16. Feasibility of ultrasonic and eddy current methods for measurement of residual stress in shot peened metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrentyev, Anton I.; Stucky, Paul A.; Veronesi, William A.

    2000-01-01

    Shot peening is a well-known method for extending the fatigue life of metal components by introducing compressive residual stresses near their surfaces. The capability to nondestructively evaluate the near surface residual stress would greatly aid the assurance of proper fatigue life in shot-peened components. This paper presents preliminary results from a feasibility study examining the use of ultrasonic and eddy current NDE methods for residual stress measurement in components where the stress has been introduced by shot peening. With an ultrasonic method, a variation of ultrasonic surface wave speed with shot peening intensity was measured. Near surface conductivity was measured by eddy current methods. Since the effective penetration depth of both methods employed is inversely related to the excitation frequency, by making measurements at different frequencies, each method has the potential to provide the stress-depth profile. Experiments were conducted on aluminum specimens (alloy 7075-T7351) peened within the Almen peening intensity range of 4C to 16C. The experimental results obtained demonstrate a correlation between peening intensity and Rayleigh wave velocity and between peening intensity and conductivity. The data suggests either of the methods may be suitable, with limitations, for detecting unsatisfactory levels of shot peening. Several factors were found to contribute to the measured responses: surface roughness, near surface plastic deformation (cold work) and residual stress. The contribution of each factor was studied experimentally. The feasibility of residual stress determination from the measured data is discussed

  17. Field measurements of turbulence at an unstable interface between current and wave bottom boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Erin E.; Luznik, Luksa; Nayak, Aditya R.; Katz, Joseph; Osborn, Thomas R.

    2011-02-01

    In situ particle image velocimetry measurements, at a resolution of 3.5 Kolmogorov scales, have been performed in the inner part of the coastal bottom boundary layer. The spatial details enable us to directly determine the vertical distributions of mean velocity, Reynolds shear stress, shear production and dissipation rates, energy spectra, and abundance of eddies. Focusing on cases with wave velocity of similar magnitude as the mean current, velocity profiles have logarithmic distributions in the upper half of the sample area. Below the log layer, but well above the bottom ripples, an inflection point appears, indicating a region of flow instability. Based on data interpretation, which includes variations in wave phase with height, this inflection occurs near the interface between current and thinner wave boundary layer (WBL) below it. Scaling of mean velocity profiles with shear velocity and characteristic roughness is effective only above the inflection point, while turbulence parameters scale reasonably well at all elevations. Instabilities associated with the inflection are manifested by a peak in turbulent shear production rate and a rapid increase in small-scale turbulence, as is evident from trends of the dissipation rate, energy spectra, and distribution of eddies with elevation. Therefore, the presence of a WBL generates a shear production peak and rapid increase in the dissipation rate at higher elevations than those found in rough-wall steady boundary layers. Transition between current and wave boundary layers is also characterized by broad Reynolds stress peaks and shear production exceeding the dissipation rate.

  18. Heat stress related dairy cow mortality during heat waves and control periods in rural Southern Ontario from 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop-Williams, Katherine E; Berke, Olaf; Pearl, David L; Hand, Karen; Kelton, David F

    2015-11-27

    Heat stress is a physiological response to extreme environmental heat such as heat waves. Heat stress can result in mortality in dairy cows when extreme heat is both rapidly changing and has a long duration. As a result of climate change, heat waves, which are defined as 3 days of temperatures of 32 °C or above, are an increasingly frequent extreme weather phenomenon in Southern Ontario. Heat waves are increasing the risk for on-farm dairy cow mortality in Southern Ontario. Heat stress indices (HSIs) are generally based on temperature and humidity and provide a relative measure of discomfort which can be used to predict increased risk of on-farm dairy cow mortality. In what follows, the heat stress distribution was described over space and presented with maps. Similarly, on-farm mortality was described and mapped. The goal of this study was to demonstrate that heat waves and related HSI increases during 2010-2012 were associated with increased on-farm dairy cow mortality in Southern Ontario. Mortality records and farm locations for all farms registered in the CanWest Dairy Herd Improvement Program in Southern Ontario were retrieved for 3 heat waves and 6 three-day control periods from 2010 to 2012. A random sample of controls (2:1) was taken from the data set to create a risk-based hybrid design. On-farm heat stress was estimated using data from 37 weather stations and subsequently interpolated across Southern Ontario by geostatistical kriging. A Poisson regression model was applied to assess the on-farm mortality in relation to varying levels of the HSI. For every one unit increase in HSI the on-farm mortality rate across Southern Ontario increases by 1.03 times (CI95% (IRR) = (1.025,1.035); p = ≤ 0.001). With a typical 8.6 unit increase in HSI from a control period to a heat wave, mortality rates are predicted to increase by 1.27 times. Southern Ontario was affected by heat waves, as demonstrated by high levels of heat stress and increased on-farm mortality

  19. A Shortened Stress Measure in Military Nursing Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-17

    Psychology 14. ABSTRACT A Shortened Stress Measure with Military Nursing Personnel Abstract Stress is a psychological construct with important... psychological construct with important consequences for human health. A substantial number of stress measures are available that vary in length and...that were similar in strength to longer versions of the PSQ. Keywords: psychological stress, psychometrics, military personnel The views expressed are

  20. Stress Wave Propagation due to a Moving Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K. M.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the performance of two numerical methods of solving the problem of a time dependent moving force on the surface of an elastic continuum will be evaluated. One method is the finite element method (FEM) formulated in convected coordinates coupled with an absorbing boundary condition...... of the impedance type. The other method to be considered is the boundary element method (BEM), where a new formulation using Green's functions transformed to a moving coordinate system is introduced. The methods are tested by the classic wave propagation problem of a Ricker Pulse propagating from the surface...... of an elastic halfspace. The time integral net impulse of the considered loading must be null for the considered FEM to work. Further, the FEM is unable to absorb Rayleigh waves, since the considered impedance condition has been tuned P- and S-waves. By contrast the BEM is able to handle also these cases...

  1. A collision-based model for measuring bedload transport from the seismic waves generated by rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, D. L.; Finnegan, N. J.; Brodsky, E. E.; Stark, C. P.

    2011-12-01

    Accurately predicting rates of coarse sediment transport in river channels is a central goal of fluvial geomorphology and civil engineering. However, it is difficult to evaluate sediment transport and bedrock abrasion models in large rivers because quantitative measures of bedload transport are labor intensive and often dangerous to obtain in floods. Two recent studies show that the amplitude of seismic waves near rivers may record bedload flux, indicating that seismometers near rivers provide a potential means of monitoring bedload transport. In an effort to better interpret seismic waves generated by rivers, we seek a relationship between the variables governing bedload transport and seismic waves. Our approach relies on the fact that elastic waves are generated when momentum is transferred to the bed during a bedload particle impact. For an impacting particle of known mass and velocity, the momentum transfer can be computed from Hertzian impact theory. Here we combine analytic results based on Hertzian and elastic wave theories with empirical equations developed to describe the ballistics of bedload particles in terms of fluid shear stress and grain size. From this synthesis we arrive at a semi-analytic expression that predicts how the characteristic frequencies and amplitudes of seismic waves generated from saltating bedload particles should scale with fluid shear stress, grain size, and coarse sediment flux. Preliminary tests of our predictions using previously published and newly acquired laboratory data indicate that seismic signals near rivers can record information about the size, velocity and number of particles impacting the bed. Additionally, our analytical results help identify bedload transport events in seismic data collected along the Chijiawan River in Taiwan. Here the river is evolving rapidly in response to a dam removal - resulting in predictable changes in bedload transport efficiency in time and space that we can compare to local seismic data.

  2. A study of the stress wave factor technique for evaluation of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Kiernan, M. T.; Grosskopf, P. P.

    1989-01-01

    The acousto-ultrasonic approach for nondestructive evaluation provides a measurement procedure for quantifying the integrated effect of globally distributed damage characteristic of fiber reinforced composite materials. The evaluation procedure provides a stress wave factor that correlates closely with several material performance parameters. The procedure was investigated for a variety of materials including advanced composites, hybrid structure bonds, adhesive bonds, wood products, and wire rope. The research program focused primarily on development of fundamental understanding and applications advancements of acousto-ultrasonics for materials characterization. This involves characterization of materials for which detection, location, and identification of imperfections cannot at present be analyzed satisfactorily with mechanical performance prediction models. In addition to presenting definitive studies on application potentials, the understanding of the acousto-ultrasonic method as applied to advanced composites is reviewed.

  3. Low power RF measurements of travelling wave type linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Sivananda; Wanmode, Yashwant; Bhisikar, A.; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2015-01-01

    RRCAT is engaged in the development of travelling wave (TW) type linear accelerator for irradiation of industrial and agricultural products. TW accelerator designed for 2π/3 mode to operate at frequency of 2856 MHz. It consists of input coupler, buncher cells, regular cells and output coupler. Low power measurement of this structure includes measurement of resonant frequency of the cells for different resonant modes and quality factor, tuning of input-output coupler and measurement of phase advance per cell and electric field in the structure. Steele's non-resonant perturbation technique has been used for measurement of phase advance per cell and electric field in the structure. Kyhl's method has been used for the tuning of input-output coupler. Computer based automated bead pull set-up has been developed for measurement of phase advance per cell and electric field profile in the structure. All the codes are written in Python for interfacing of Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) , stepper motor with computer. These codes also automate the measurement process. This paper describes the test set- up for measurement and results of measurement of travelling wave type linear accelerating structure. (author)

  4. Invariant measures for stochastic nonlinear beam and wave equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzezniak, Z.; Ondreját, Martin; Seidler, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 260, č. 5 (2016), s. 4157-4179 ISSN 0022-0396 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP201/10/0752 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : stochastic partial differential equation * stochastic beam equation * stochastic wave equation * invariant measure Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.988, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/SI/ondrejat-0453412.pdf

  5. Neutron stress measurement of W-fiber reinforced Cu composite

    CERN Document Server

    Nishida, M; Ikeuchi, Y; Minakawa, N

    2003-01-01

    Stress measurement methods using neutron and X-ray diffraction were examined by comparing the surface stresses with internal stresses in the continuous tungsten-fiber reinforced copper-matrix composite. Surface stresses were measured by X-ray stress measurement with the sin sup 2 psi method. Furthermore, the sin sup 2 psi method and the most common triaxal measurement method using Hooke's equation were employed for internal stress measurement by neutron diffraction. On the other hand, microstress distributions developed by the difference in the thermal expansion coefficients between these two phases were calculated by FEM. The weighted average strains and stresses were compared with the experimental results. The FEM results agreed with the experimental results qualitatively and confirmed the importance of the triaxial stress analysis in the neutron stress measurement. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Neutron stress measurement of W-fiber reinforced Cu composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, M.; Hanabusa, T.; Ikeuchi, Y.; Minakawa, N.

    2003-01-01

    Stress measurement methods using neutron and X-ray diffraction were examined by comparing the surface stresses with internal stresses in the continuous tungsten-fiber reinforced copper-matrix composite. Surface stresses were measured by X-ray stress measurement with the sin 2 ψ method. Furthermore, the sin 2 ψ method and the most common triaxal measurement method using Hooke's equation were employed for internal stress measurement by neutron diffraction. On the other hand, microstress distributions developed by the difference in the thermal expansion coefficients between these two phases were calculated by FEM. The weighted average strains and stresses were compared with the experimental results. The FEM results agreed with the experimental results qualitatively and confirmed the importance of the triaxial stress analysis in the neutron stress measurement. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Towards ambulatory mental stress measurement from physiological parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijsman, J.L.P; Vullers, Ruud; Polito, Salvatore; Agell, Carlos; Penders, Julien; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    Ambulatory mental stress monitoring requires longterm physiological measurements. This paper presents a data collection protocol for ambulatory recording of physiological parameters for stress measurement purposes. We present a wearable sensor system for ambulatory recording of ECG, EMG, respiration

  8. The method for measuring residual stress in stainless steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimov, Georgy; Rozenbaum, Mikhail; Serebryakov, Alexandr; Serebryakov, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    The main reason of appearance and growth of corrosion damages of the nuclear steam generator heat exchanger tubes is the process of stress-corrosion cracking of metal under the influence of residual tensile stress. Methods used in the production for estimating residual stresses (such as a method of ring samples) allow measuring only the average tangential stress of the pipe wall. The method of ring samples does not allow to assess the level of residual stress in the surface layer of the pipe. This paper describes an experimental method for measuring the residual stresses on the pipe surface by etching a thin surface layer of the metal. The construction and working principle of a trial installation are described. The residual stresses in the wall of the tubes 16 × 1.5 mm (steel AISI 321) for nuclear steam generators is calculated. Keywords: heat exchange pipes, stress corrosion cracking, residual stresses, stress distribution, stress measurement.

  9. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan L. Danilishin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point at which quantum behavior of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is around the corner, and finding ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation of the first and second generation. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Standard Quantum Limit and the methods of its surmounting.

  10. Advanced Sine Wave Modulation of Continuous Wave Laser System for Atmospheric CO2 Differential Absorption Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with ITT Exelis have been experimenting with Continuous Wave (CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) as a means of performing atmospheric CO2 column measurements from space to support the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission.Because range resolving Intensity Modulated (IM) CW lidar techniques presented here rely on matched filter correlations, autocorrelation properties without side lobes or other artifacts are highly desirable since the autocorrelation function is critical for the measurements of lidar return powers, laser path lengths, and CO2 column amounts. In this paper modulation techniques are investigated that improve autocorrelation properties. The modulation techniques investigated in this paper include sine waves modulated by maximum length (ML) sequences in various hardware configurations. A CW lidar system using sine waves modulated by ML pseudo random noise codes is described, which uses a time shifting approach to separate channels and make multiple, simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Unlike the pure ML sequence, this technique is useful in hardware that is band pass filtered as the IM sine wave carrier shifts the main power band. Both amplitude and Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated IM carriers are investigated that exibit perfect autocorrelation properties down to one cycle per code bit. In addition, a method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a Gaussian filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions that does not seriously degrade the resolution or introduce side lobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth.

  11. Residual stress measurements of welded stainless steel 304 plate using the HANARO residual stress instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, M. K.; Lee, C. H.; Em, V. T.

    2001-01-01

    In order to nondestructively measure in-depth residual stress distribution of the metallic materials, it is unique method to use neutron diffraction. In this paper the principles of residual stress measurements by neutron diffraction is described. The residual stress distribution of welded strainless steeel 304 plate using te HANARO residual stress instrument is also described

  12. Propagation behavior of the stress wave in a hollow Hopkinson transmission bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, G.; Shen, X.; Guo, C.; Vecchio, K. S.; Jiang, F.

    2018-03-01

    In order to investigate the stress wave propagation behavior through a hollow elastic bar that is used in a Hopkinson-bar-loaded fracture testing system, three-point bending fracture experiments were performed in such a system. The effects of sample span and diameter and wall thickness of the hollow elastic bar on the stress wave propagation behavior were studied numerically using the software of ANSYS/LS-DYNA. The experimental results demonstrated that the incident, reflected, and transmitted pulses calculated by the finite element method are coincident with those obtained from the Hopkinson-bar-loaded fracture tests. Compared to the solid transmission bar, the amplitude of the transmitted pulse is relatively larger in the hollow transmission bar under the same loading conditions and decreases with increasing wall thickness. On the other hand, when the inside diameter is fixed, the effect of the wall thickness on the stress wave characteristics is more obvious.

  13. Stress wave communication in concrete: I. Characterization of a smart aggregate based concrete channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Sam; Ji, Qing; Wu, Wenhao; Song, Gangbing; Ding, Zhi

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we explore the characteristics of a concrete block as a communication medium with piezoelectric transducers. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is a piezoceramic material used in smart materials intended for structural health monitoring (SHM). Additionally, a PZT based smart aggregate (SA) is capable of implementing stress wave communications which is utilized for investigating the properties of an SA based concrete channel. Our experiments characterize single-input single-output and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) concrete channels in order to determine the potential capacity limits of SAs for stress wave communication. We first provide estimates and validate the concrete channel response. Followed by a theoretical upper bound for data rate capacity of our two channels, demonstrating a near-twofold increase in channel capacity by utilizing multiple transceivers to form an MIMO system. Our channel modeling techniques and results are also helpful to researchers using SAs with regards to SHM, energy harvesting and stress wave communications.

  14. Gravitational waves from pulsars with measured braking index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Jose C.N. de; Coelho, Jaziel G.; Costa, Cesar A. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Divisao de Astrofisica, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    We study the putative emission of gravitational waves (GWs) in particular for pulsars with measured braking index. We show that the appropriate combination of both GW emission and magnetic dipole brakes can naturally explain the measured braking index, when the surface magnetic field and the angle between the magnetic dipole and rotation axes are time dependent. Then we discuss the detectability of these very pulsars by aLIGO and the Einstein Telescope. We call attention to the realistic possibility that aLIGO can detect the GWs generated by at least some of these pulsars, such as Vela, for example. (orig.)

  15. Extracting Earth's Elastic Wave Response from Noise Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, Roel; Larose, Eric

    2013-05-01

    Recent research has shown that noise can be turned from a nuisance into a useful seismic source. In seismology and other fields in science and engineering, the estimation of the system response from noise measurements has proven to be a powerful technique. To convey the essence of the method, we first treat the simplest case of a homogeneous medium to show how noise measurements can be used to estimate waves that propagate between sensors. We provide an overview of physics research—dating back more than 100 years—showing that random field fluctuations contain information about the system response. This principle has found extensive use in surface-wave seismology but can also be applied to the estimation of body waves. Because noise provides continuous illumination of the subsurface, the extracted response is ideally suited for time-lapse monitoring. We present examples of time-lapse monitoring as applied to the softening of soil after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, the detection of a precursor to a landslide, and temporal changes in the lunar soil.

  16. Investigation of gravity waves using horizontally resolved radial velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stober, G.; Sommer, S.; Rapp, M.; Latteck, R.

    2013-10-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) on the island of Andøya in Northern Norway (69.3° N, 16.0° E) observes polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE). These echoes are used as tracers of atmospheric dynamics to investigate the horizontal wind variability at high temporal and spatial resolution. MAARSY has the capability of pulse-to-pulse beam steering allowing for systematic scanning experiments to study the horizontal structure of the backscatterers as well as to measure the radial velocities for each beam direction. Here we present a method to retrieve gravity wave parameters from these horizontally resolved radial wind variations by applying velocity azimuth display and volume velocity processing. Based on the observations a detailed comparison of the two wind analysis techniques is carried out in order to determine the zonal and meridional wind as well as to measure first-order inhomogeneities. Further, we demonstrate the possibility to resolve the horizontal wave properties, e.g., horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and propagation direction. The robustness of the estimated gravity wave parameters is tested by a simple atmospheric model.

  17. Investigation of gravity waves using horizontally resolved radial velocity measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stober

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY on the island of Andøya in Northern Norway (69.3° N, 16.0° E observes polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE. These echoes are used as tracers of atmospheric dynamics to investigate the horizontal wind variability at high temporal and spatial resolution. MAARSY has the capability of pulse-to-pulse beam steering allowing for systematic scanning experiments to study the horizontal structure of the backscatterers as well as to measure the radial velocities for each beam direction. Here we present a method to retrieve gravity wave parameters from these horizontally resolved radial wind variations by applying velocity azimuth display and volume velocity processing. Based on the observations a detailed comparison of the two wind analysis techniques is carried out in order to determine the zonal and meridional wind as well as to measure first-order inhomogeneities. Further, we demonstrate the possibility to resolve the horizontal wave properties, e.g., horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and propagation direction. The robustness of the estimated gravity wave parameters is tested by a simple atmospheric model.

  18. Comparison of an empirical S-wave velocity model and a calculated stress-strain model for a rock mass disturbed by mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiec, Krzysztof; Czarny, Rafał

    2017-11-01

    In the article a comparison analysis is presented between a numerical model of the stress and deformation state in a rock mass and an S-wave velocity model obtained as a result of in situ measurement. The research was conducted using data from the Jastrzębie and Moszczenica coal mines. The part of the rock mass examined was strongly disturbed by multi-seam exploitation of coal. To obtain the S-wave velocity model 6 hours of ambient seismic noise data were recorded using 11 seismometers. The propagation of the Rayleigh surface wave between the seismometers was reconstructed utilising the seismic interferometry and the cross correlation technique. Estimation of a two dimensional model of the Swave velocity field was performed on the basis of dispersion curves of the Rayleigh wave phase velocity. The stress and deformation field were calculated assuming a plane state of stress with the use of the elastic-plastic Coulomb-Mohr strength criterion. Images of the vertical stress, horizontal stress, vertical strain and horizontal strain as well as the subsidence profile on the model surface were obtained as a result of the calculation. Analysis of the results shows correlation between the field of S-wave velocity and the modelled field of stress and strain.

  19. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  20. Flow under standing waves Part 1. Shear stress distribution, energy flux and steady streaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Kjartan; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Deigaard, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The conditions for energy flux, momentum flux and the resulting streaming velocity are analysed for standing waves formed in front of a fully reflecting wall. The exchange of energy between the outer wave motion and the near bed oscillatory boundary layer is considered, determining the horizontal...... energy flux inside and outside the boundary layer. The momentum balance, the mean shear stress and the resulting time averaged streaming velocities are determined. For a laminar bed boundary layer the analysis of the wave drift gives results similar to the original work of Longuet-Higgins from 1953...

  1. Stress Wave Propagation in Viscoelastic-Plastic Rock-Like Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rock-like materials are composites that can be regarded as a mixture composed of elastic, plastic, and viscous components. They exhibit viscoelastic-plastic behavior under a high-strain-rate loading according to element model theory. This paper presents an analytical solution for stress wave propagation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials under a high-strain-rate loading and verifies the solution through an experimental test. A constitutive equation of viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials was first established, and then kinematic and kinetic equations were then solved to derive the analytic solution for stress wave propagation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials. An experimental test using the SHPB (Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar for a concrete specimen was conducted to obtain a stress-strain curve under a high-strain-rate loading. Inverse analysis based on differential evolution was conducted to estimate undetermined variables for constitutive equations. Finally, the relationship between the attenuation factor and the strain rate in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials was investigated. According to the results, the frequency of the stress wave, viscosity coefficient, modulus of elasticity, and density play dominant roles in the attenuation of the stress wave. The attenuation decreases with increasing strain rate, demonstrating strongly strain-dependent attenuation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials.

  2. Determination of stress glut moments of total degree 2 from teleseismic surface wave amplitude spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukchin, B. G.

    1995-08-01

    A special case of the seismic source, where the stress glut tensor can be expressed as a product of a uniform moment tensor and a scalar function of spatial coordinates and time, is considered. For such a source, a technique of determining stress glut moments of total degree 2 from surface wave amplitude spectra is described. The results of application of this technique for the estimation of spatio-temporal characteristics of the Georgian earthquake, 29.04.91 are presented.

  3. Investigation of the Effects of Ship Induced Waves on the Littoral Zone with Field Measurements and CFD Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Fleit

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Waves induced by ship movement might be harmful for the habitat in the littoral zone of rivers due to the temporally increasing bed shear stress, the high-energy breaking waves and the consequently related detachment of benthic animals. In order to understand the complex hydrodynamic phenomena resulting from littoral waves, we present the testing of a novel methodology that incorporates field observations and numerical tools. The study is performed at a section of the Danube River in Hungary and analyzes the influence of different ship types. The field methods consist of parallel acoustic measurements (using Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV conducted at the riverbed and Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV of the water surface. ADV measurements provided near-bed flow velocities based on which the wave induced currents and local bed shear stress could be estimated. The LSPIV was able to quantify the dynamics of the breaking waves along the bank. Furthermore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD modeling was successfully applied to simulate the propagation and the breaking of littoral waves. The used techniques complement each other well and their joint application provides an adequate tool to support the improvement of riverine habitats.

  4. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didenkulov, Igor, E-mail: din@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov str., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay, E-mail: nikvas@rf.unn.ru [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  5. Soil Liquefaction Resulting from Blast-Induced Spherical Stress Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    investigate or improve construction sites. Queiroz, et al. (1967) reported on a program to densify a sandy foundation at the Rio Casca III, Brazil , dam site...8217. calc~lacm6 peak value &mg WOWp UUW’U 0Nk vika far S1Uf 101 10 Figure 8.6 Peak total stress in sand. LI ew mbt~ O E caug I"M sabi VA low Figure 8.7

  6. Existence of longitudinal waves in pre-stressed anisotropic elastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the absence of pre-stresses, i.e., taking. S11 = S22 = S33 = 0, all the expressions, derived in this section, will reduce to the results which are same as in Ting (2006). 4. Triclinic materials. A triclinic material is the most general anisotropic medium, and the elastic compliance b11(N) in this medium is as defined by equation ...

  7. Analytical Investigation for In Situ Stress Measurement with Rheological Stress Recovery Method and Its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quansheng Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ stress is one of the most important parameters in underground engineering. Due to the difficulty and weakness of current stress measurement methods in deep soft rock, a new one, rheological stress recovery (RSR method, to determine three-dimensional stress tensor is developed. It is supposed that rock stresses will recover gradually with time and can be measured by embedding transducers into the borehole. In order to explore the relationship between the measured recovery stress and the initial stress, analytical solutions are developed for the stress measurement process with RSR method in a viscoelastic surrounding rock. The results showed that the measured recovery stress would be more close to the initial stress if the rock mass has a better rheological property, and the property of grouting material should be close to that of rock mass. Then, the RSR method, as well as overcoring technique, was carried out to measure the in situ stresses in Pingdingshan Number 1 coal mines in Henan Province, China. The stress measurement results are basically in the same order, and the major principal stresses are approximately in the direction of NW-SE, which correlates well with the stress regime of Pingdingshan zone known from the tectonic movement history.

  8. Field instrumentation for hydrofracturing stress measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjarnason, Bjarni; Torikka, Arne.

    1989-08-01

    A recently developed system for rock stress measurements by the hydraulic fracturing method is documented in detail. The new equipment is intended for measurement in vertical or nearvertical boreholes, down to a maximum depth of 1000 m. The minimum borehole, diameter required is 56 mm. Downhole instrumentation comprises a straddle packer assembly for borehole fracturing, equipment for determination of fracture orientations and a pressure transducer. The downhole tools are operated by means of a multihose system, containing high pressure hydraulic tubings, signal cable and carrying wire into one hose unit. The surface components of the equipment include a system for generation and control of water pressures up to approximately 75 MPa, an hydraulically operated drum for the multihose and a data acquisition system. All surface instrumentation is permanently mounted on a truck, which also serves as power source for the instrumentation. In addition to the description of instrumentation, the theoretical fundament and the testing procedures associated with the hydraulic fracturing method are briefly outlined

  9. Impact of the interfaces for wind and wave modeling - interpretation using COAWST, SAR and point measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Air and sea interacts, where winds generate waves and waves affect the winds. This topic is ever relevant for offshore functions such as shipping, portal routines, wind farm operation and maintenance. In a coupled modeling system, the atmospheric modeling and the wave modeling interfere with each...... use the stress directly, thus avoiding the uncertainties caused by parameterizations. This study examines the efficiency of the wave impact transfer to the atmospheric modeling through the two types of interfaces, roughness length and stress, through the coupled-ocean...

  10. Stress wave velocity and dynamic modulus of elasticity of yellow-poplar ranging from 100 to 10 percent moisture content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jody D. Gray; Shawn T. Grushecky; James P. Armstrong

    2008-01-01

    Moisture content has a significant impact on mechanical properties of wood. In recent years, stress wave velocity has been used as an in situ and non-destructive method for determining the stiffness of wooden elements. The objective of this study was to determine what effect moisture content has on stress wave velocity and dynamic modulus of elasticity. Results...

  11. Stress-wave velocity of wood-based panels: effect of moisture, product type, and material direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangping Han; Qinglin Wu; Xiping Wang

    2006-01-01

    The effect of moisture on longitudinal stress-wave velocity (SWV), bending stiffness. and bending strength of commercial oriented strandboard, plywood. particleboard. and southern pine lumber was evaluated. It was shown that the stress-wave verocity decreased in general with increases in panel moisture content (MC). At a given MC level. SWV varied with panel type and...

  12. Stress wave analysis of an object having coating layer using finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Young Doo; Kwon, Hyok Chun; Lee, Sang Tae; Seo, Byung Chul

    2005-01-01

    Generally, as objects impact each other, coating layer is regarded as little affecting transmission and reflection of shock wave. However, we thought that material properties and thickness of coating layer would actually affect objects. So this paper was performed by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) for transmission and reflection of stress wave propagation at two bars having different material properties. Also, as coating layer having different material properties was inserted between bars, we looked into the behavior of stress wave propagation and compared the result of FEA and theoretical result. As using them, FEA for actual piezo electric ceramic was performed. The damaged cause of piezo electric ceramic was confirmed by the effect of reflected wave. To decrease the effect of reflected wave, we analyzed it as changing thickness and material of coating layer and the shape of piezo electric ceramic. Afterwards, we inquired thickness and material of coating layer and the shape of piezo electric ceramic being able to minimize the effect of reflected wave

  13. Optical interferometry methods used to study stress wave propagetion in a human skull

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnka, Jan; Dvořáková, Pavla; Veselý, Eduard

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2004), s. 29-34 ISSN 0732-8818 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2076904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : double-pulse * holo-interferometry * stress waves Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.322, year: 2004

  14. Stress Induced Phononic Properties and Surface Waves in 2D Model of Auxetic Crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trzupek, D.; Twarog, D.; Zielinski, P.

    2009-01-01

    Elastic stiffness parameters are determined in a 2D model system of rigid rods interacting by harmonic force constants. Any positive ('' normal '' crystal) or negative (auxetic crystal) Poisson ratio can be obtained in this model as a function of the external stress. Conditions for opening an absolute stop band (phononic crystal) and for various kinds of surface waves are obtained. (authors)

  15. Condition assessment of timber bridges. 2, Evaluation of several stress-wave tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian K. Brashaw; Robert J. Vatalaro; James P. Wacker; Robert J. Ross

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of several stress-wave devices widely used for locating deteriorated areas in timber bridge members. Bridge components containing different levels of natural decay were tested using various devices. The specimens were then sawn (along their length) into slabs to expose their interior condition. The...

  16. Disturbance of SH-type waves due to moving stress discontinuity in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Disturbance of SH-type waves due to moving stress discontinuity in an anisotropic soil layer overlying an inhomogeneous elastic half-space. D MANDAL1,2∗, P C PAL2 and S KUMAR2. 1Government Engineering College, Chaibasa 833 215, India. 2Department of Applied Mathematics, Indian School of Mines,. Dhanbad ...

  17. Stress Wave Propagation in Soils Modelled by the Boundary Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K. M.

    This thesis deals with different aspects of the boundary element method (BEM) applied to stress wave propagation problems in soils. Among other things BEM formulations for coupled FEM and BEM, moving loads, direct BEM and indirect BEM are presented. For all the formulations both analytical...

  18. Experimental Measurement of Wave Field Variations around Wave Energy Converter Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise O’Boyle

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wave energy converters (WECs inherently extract energy from incident waves. For wave energy to become a significant power provider in the future, large farms of WECs will be required. This scale of energy extraction will increase the potential for changes in the local wave field and coastal environment. Assessment of these effects is necessary to inform decisions on the layout of wave farms for optimum power output and minimum environmental impact, as well as on potential site selection. An experimental campaign to map, at high resolution, the wave field variation around arrays of 5 oscillating water column WECs and a methodology for extracting scattered and radiated waves is presented. The results highlight the importance of accounting for the full extent of the WEC behavior when assessing impacts on the wave field. The effect of radiated waves on the wave field is not immediately apparent when considering changes to the entire wave spectrum, nor when observing changes in wave climate due to scattered and radiated waves superimposed together. The results show that radiated waves may account for up to 50% of the effects on wave climate in the near field in particular operating conditions.

  19. THE BASIS OF MATHEMATICAL DESCRIPTION FOR WAVE MODEL OF STRESSES PROPAGATION IN RAILWAY TRACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Kurhan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Modern scientific research has repeatedly cited practical examples of the dynamic effects of railway track operation that go beyond the static calculation schemes. For the track sections where the train speed is approaching to the velocity of wave propagation in the slab track layers such issues are of particular relevance. An adequate tool for the study of such issues can be the use of the wave theory of stress propagation. The purpose of the article is the creation of a mathematical description of the basic principles of the stress propagation wave model in the railway track, which can be used as a basis for the practical development of the relevant calculation system. Methodology. The model of stress-strain states of the railway track on the basis of the stress wave propagation theory is to bring together the equations of the geometry of the outline of the space systems that is involved in the interaction at a given time, and the dynamic equilibrium equations of deformation. The solution is based on the use of the laws of the theory of elasticity. The wave front is described by an ellipsoid equation. When determining the variation in time of the surface position of the ellipsoid a vector approach is used. Findings. The geometry equations of the wave motion determine the volumes of material layers of the slab track involved in the interaction at a given time. The dynamic equilibrium determination of the deformed condition of the space bounded by the wave front makes it possible to calculate both the stresses and strains, and their changes during the time of the load perception. Thus, mathematical descriptions of the processes that occur in the perception of the load by the elements of railway track at high speeds were obtained. Originality. The simulation tasks of the track and rolling stock interaction, in particular taking into account the dynamic deflection of slab track were further developed. For the first time the article

  20. Moire interferometry and hole drilling system for residual stress measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ya, Min; Dai, Fulong; Lu, Jian

    2003-04-01

    A combined system of four beams moire interferometer and incremental hole-driling machine was designed and applied for residual stress measurement. Two typical experiments were done using this system: non-uniform in-depth residual stress measurement of an ultrasonic shot-peening Aluminum plate; non-uniform in-plane residual stress measurement of an elastic-plastic Aluminum bent beam. Experiments results show good accordant with other measurement results and theory analysis results.

  1. Measurement Verification of Plane Wave Synthesis Technique Based on Multi-probe MIMO-OTA Setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Wei; Carreño, Xavier; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum

    2012-01-01

    Standardization work for MIMO OTA testing methods is currently ongoing, where a multi-probe anechoic chamber based solution is an important candidate. In this paper, the probes located on an OTA ring are used to synthesize a plane wave field in the center of the OTA ring. This paper investigates...... the extent to which we can approach the synthesized plane wave in practical measurement systems. Both single plane wave with certain AoA and multiple plane waves with different AoAs and power weightings are synthesized and measured. Deviations of the measured plane wave and the simulated plane wave field...

  2. Elastic Wave Measurement Using a MEMS AE Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Omori

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, with the continuing progress of aging social infrastructures such as bridges and tunnels, there has been high demand for the assessment of deterioration of their performance and conditions. Since current inspection methods for those structures have mainly relied on human resources, it is important to reduce their increasing maintenance cost. One of the key methods for achieving effective maintenance without expensive human costs is to use sensors to discriminate between healthy and unhealthy conditions. In this paper, a MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems wideband frequency sensor, which is referred to as a super acoustic (SA sensor, is evaluated through the pencil lead break (PLB test. Due to its wideband frequency characteristics, the SA sensor is expected to be a promising alternative to the existing vibration sensors, including acoustic emission (AE sensors. Several PLB signals were generated on an aluminum plate (5 mm thick, and propagating Lamb waves were detected by both AE and SA sensors. SA sensors were able to identify the location of PLB sources on the plate by measuring time differences between each sensor. By comparing the wave spectrums of both the AE and SA sensors analyzed by wavelet transform, the applicability of SA sensor for AE measurement is verified.

  3. Psychological stress measurement through voice output analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Older, H. J.; Jenney, L. L.

    1975-01-01

    Audio tape recordings of selected Skylab communications were processed by a psychological stress evaluator. Strip chart tracings were read blind and scores were assigned based on characteristics reported by the manufacturer to indicate psychological stress. These scores were analyzed for their empirical relationships with operational variables in Skylab judged to represent varying degrees of situational stress. Although some statistically significant relationships were found, the technique was not judged to be sufficiently predictive to warrant its use in assessing the degree of psychological stress of crew members in future space missions.

  4. Measuring type II stresses using 3DXRD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Schmidt, Søren; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2010-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for characterization of the grain resolved (type II) stress states in a polycrystalline sample based on monochromatic X-ray diffraction data. The algorithm is a robust 12-parameter-per-grain fit of the centre-of-mass grain positions, orientations and stress tensors...

  5. Childhood Socioeconomic Status and Stress in Late Adulthood: A Longitudinal Approach to Measuring Allostatic Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Katelyn Y; Nowakowski, Alexandra C H

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study examines how the effects of childhood socioeconomic status (SES) may carry on into late adulthood. Methods: We examine how childhood SES affects both perceived stress and allostatic load, which is a cumulative measure of the body's biologic response to chronic stress. We use the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, Waves 1 and 2, and suggest a novel method of incorporating a longitudinal allostatic load measure. Results: Individuals who grew up in low SES households have higher allostatic load scores in late adulthood, and this association is mediated mostly by educational attainment. Discussion: The longitudinal allostatic load measure shows similar results to the singular measures and allows us to include 2 time points into one outcome measure. Incorporating 2 separate time points into one measure is important because allostatic load is a measure of cumulative physiological dysregulation, and longitudinal data provide a more comprehensive measure.

  6. Measurement of internal stress within bulk materials using neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, A.; Andreani, C.; Hutchings, M.T.; Windsor, C.G.

    1981-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measures stress through the small changes in atomic lattice parameters caused by strain. The method is similar to X-ray diffraction with the vital difference that a thermal neutron beam penetrates several centimetres in most materials allowing measurements within bulk samples. Ways of achieving the high resolution necessary for quantitative measurements are described. Results are presented for the strains in a mild steel bar subjected to known elastic stresses, and on the internal stresses in a deformed bar. (author)

  7. Features of propagation and recordingof the stress waves in plates of finite thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherednichenko Rostislav Andreevich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This work was carried out to study at the same time the dynamics of wave propagation in plane and axisymmetric plates by finite-difference numerical calculation and by the method of dynamic photoelasticity.In many cases it is possible to carry out the investigation of the dynamic stressed state of solid structures under the impact of seismic waves in plane statement, observing the foundation and the building itself in the conditions of plane deformation. Such problems in structural mechanics are usually investigated on plates providing the conditions of generalized plane stressed condition and accounting for the necessity of the known substitution of elastic constants. In case of applying the model of generalized plane stressed state for investigating two-dimensional waves’ propagation in three-dimensional elastic medium it may be necessary to observe certain additional conditions, which for example limit the class of external impacts of high frequencies (short waves. The use of candling for wave recording in plane models explored with the method of dynamic photoelasticity in the observed cases of impulse loading of the plates with finite thickness gives satisfactory results.

  8. Estimations of On-site Directional Wave Spectra from Measured Ship Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2006-01-01

    include an quivalence of energy in the governing equations and, as regards the parametric concept, a frequency dependent spreading of the waves is introduced. The paper includes an extensive analysis of full-scale measurements for which the directional wave spectra are estimated by the two ship response......In general, two main concepts can be applied to estimate the on-site directional wave spectrum on the basis of ship response measurements: 1) a parametric method which assumes the wave spectrum to be composed by parameterised wave spectra, or 2) a non-parametric method where the directional wave...

  9. Impact of inhomogeneity on SH-type wave propagation in an initially stressed composite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S.; Chattopadhyay, A.; Singh, A. K.

    2018-02-01

    The present analysis has been made on the influence of distinct form of inhomogeneity in a composite structure comprised of double superficial layers lying over a half-space, on the phase velocity of SH-type wave propagating through it. Propagation of SH-type wave in the said structure has been examined in four distinct cases of inhomogeneity viz. when inhomogeneity in double superficial layer is due to exponential variation in density only (Case I); when inhomogeneity in double superficial layers is due to exponential variation in rigidity only (Case II); when inhomogeneity in double superficial layer is due to exponential variation in rigidity, density and initial stress (Case III) and when inhomogeneity in double superficial layer is due to linear variation in rigidity, density and initial stress (Case IV). Closed-form expression of dispersion relation has been accomplished for all four aforementioned cases through extensive application of Debye asymptotic analysis. Deduced dispersion relations for all the cases are found in well-agreement to the classical Love-wave equation. Numerical computation has been carried out to graphically demonstrate the effect of inhomogeneity parameters, initial stress parameters as well as width ratio associated with double superficial layers in the composite structure for each of the four aforesaid cases on dispersion curve. Meticulous examination of distinct cases of inhomogeneity and initial stress in context of considered problem has been carried out with detailed analysis in a comparative approach.

  10. Neutron diffraction residual strain / stress measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradowska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Residual stresses affect mechancial properties of materials and prodcuts, it is essential to estimate them practically in order to esatblish acceptable limits. Knowledge of the development of residual stresses in components at the various production stages- extrusion, rolling, machining, welding and heat treating-can be used to imporve product reliability and performance. This short article gives an example relevant to the power industry using ANSTO's 'Kowari' neutron strain scanner.

  11. Nonlinear ultrasonic guided waves for stress monitoring in prestressing tendons for post-tensioned concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Ivan; Nucera, Claudio; Srivastava, Ankit; Salamone, Salvatore; Phillips, Robert; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Coccia, Stefano; Sikorsky, Charles S.

    2009-03-01

    Many bridges, including 90% of the California inventory, are post-tensioned box-girders concrete structures. Prestressing tendons are the main load-carrying components of these and other post-tensioned structures. Despite their criticality, much research is needed to develop and deploy techniques able to provide real-time information on the level of prestress in order to detect dangerous stress losses. In collaboration with Caltrans, UCSD is investigating the combination of ultrasonic guided waves and embedded sensors to provide both prestress level monitoring and defect detection capabilities in concrete-embedded PS tendons. This paper presents a technique based on nonlinear ultrasonic guided waves in the 100 kHz - 2 MHz range for monitoring prestress levels in 7-wire PS tendons. The technique relies on the fact that an axial stress on the tendon generates a proportional radial stress between adjacent wires (interwire stress). In turn, the interwire stress modulates nonlinear effects in ultrasonic wave propagation through both the presence of finite strains and the interwire contact. The nonlinear ultrasonic behavior of the tendon under changing levels of prestress is monitored by tracking higher-order harmonics at (nω) arising under a fundamental guided-wave excitation at (ω). Experimental results will be presented to identify (a) ranges of fundamental excitations at (ω) producing maximum nonlinear response, and (b) optimum lay-out of the transmitting and the receiving transducers within the test tendons. Compared to alternative methods based on linear ultrasonic features, the proposed nonlinear ultrasonic technique appears more sensitive to prestress levels and more robust against changing excitation power at the transmitting transducer or changing transducer/tendon bond conditions.

  12. Primordial gravitational waves measurements and anisotropies of CMB polarization rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yu Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Searching for the signal of primordial gravitational waves in the B-modes (BB power spectrum is one of the key scientific aims of the cosmic microwave background (CMB polarization experiments. However, this could be easily contaminated by several foreground issues, such as the interstellar dust grains and the galactic cyclotron electrons. In this paper we study another mechanism, the cosmic birefringence, which can be introduced by a CPT-violating interaction between CMB photons and an external scalar field. Such kind of interaction could give rise to the rotation of the linear polarization state of CMB photons, and consequently induce the CMB BB power spectrum, which could mimic the signal of primordial gravitational waves at large scales. With the recently released polarization data of BICEP2 and the joint analysis data of BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck, we perform a global fitting analysis on constraining the tensor-to-scalar ratio r by considering the polarization rotation angle [α(nˆ] which can be separated into a background isotropic part [α¯] and a small anisotropic part [Δα(nˆ]. Since the data of BICEP2 and Keck Array experiments have already been corrected by using the “self-calibration” method, here we mainly focus on the effects from the anisotropies of CMB polarization rotation angle. We find that including Δα(nˆ in the analysis could slightly weaken the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r, when using current CMB polarization measurements. We also simulate the mock CMB data with the BICEP3-like sensitivity. Very interestingly, we find that if the effects of the anisotropic polarization rotation angle could not be taken into account properly in the analysis, the constraints on r will be dramatically biased. This implies that we need to break the degeneracy between the anisotropies of the CMB polarization rotation angle and the CMB primordial tensor perturbations, in order to measure the signal of primordial

  13. Stress-Associated Intrinsic and Scattering Attenuation from Laboratory Ultrasonic Measurements on Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Junhua; Fu, Li-Yun; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Yan

    2018-03-01

    Seismic attenuation is sensitive to stress-induced subtle changes in the physical state of rocks. In this study, the stress- and frequency-associated attenuation is quantified through ultrasonic measurements on three differently oriented cylindrical shale samples under various axial stresses. As an improvement to the single-scattering model, the elastic Monte Carlo method is employed to investigate multiple-scattering attenuations by incorporating the boundary reflections and wave conversions. Our results show that, as the axial stress increases, the intrinsic attenuation decreases in all directions, while the scattering attenuation decreases slightly in the direction perpendicular to the bedding but increases largely and nonlinearly in other directions. These discrepancies result from different attenuation mechanisms. Both the intrinsic and scattering attenuation are found to be largest in the direction 45° to the bedding, but least in the perpendicular direction. The S-wave attenuation is larger and more sensitive to stress changes than P-wave attenuation due to its shorter wavelength. As expected from sandstone examples, the scattering attenuation in shales is significantly larger and more sensitive to stress changes than the intrinsic attenuation. The frequency dependence of scattering attenuation suggests that the peak frequency with the maximum scattering attenuation is independent of axial stresses, but varies in different directions of an individual rock with different heterogeneity and anisotropy scales. The peak frequency of S-coda is smaller and its peak scattering attenuation is larger than P-coda. In conclusion, the stress and frequency dependence of ultrasonic attenuations in shales differ largely in various directions, indicating significant anisotropy and heterogeneity.

  14. Residual Stress Measurement of Titanium Casting Alloy by Neutron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, M.; Jing, T.; Muslih, M. R.; Hanabusa, T.

    2008-03-01

    Neutron stress measurement can detect strain and stress information in deep region because of large penetration ability of neutron beams. The present paper describes procedure and results in the residual stress measurement of titanium casting alloy by neutron diffraction. In this study, the three axial method using Hooke's equation was employed for neutron stress measurement. This method was applied to the cylindrical shape sample of titanium casting alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). Form the results of this study, this sample has large crystal grain in the inside whole position, it is assumed this large grain was grown up during casting manufacture process. Furthermore, the peak profile used to the stress measurement appears in very weak because of the HCP crystal system of titanium character and effect of large crystal grain. These conditions usually make difficult to measure the accuracy values of residual stresses. Therefore, it had to spend a long time to measure the satisfied data from titanium sample. Regarding to the results of stress measurement, the stress values in the cylindrical sample of three directions is almost same tendency, and residual stresses change from the compressive state in the outer part to the tensile state in the inner part gradually.

  15. Degenerate four-wave mixing measurement in iodine vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Bo; Chen, De-Ying; Fan, Rong-Wei; Yang, Jun

    2008-12-01

    Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) is a nonlinear optical process that has been developed as a detective tool for making quantitative measurements of gas dynamic properties in the various environments. This technique can be used to measure temperature and species concentration in both flames and plasma environments. The resulting coherent signal beam makes DFWM particularly attractive for luminous and harsh environments, compared to incoherent techniques, such as laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Forward DFWM with self-stability of spilt-beam system has been demonstrated in iodine vapor. It's found that there exists no LIF because of collision quenching at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. But observed vivid DFWM spectroscopy (554-556nm) of iodine vapor at 0oC and room temperature. Furthermore, DFWM can probe non-fluorescing species. We describe a novel advanced sensor method for measuring temperature of gas flows using DFWM. This technique without suffering of severe quenching problems at atmospheric pressure is of importance to trace atom, molecular and radical in combustion diagnosis.

  16. Development and Applications of Residual Stress Measurements Using Neutron Beams

    OpenAIRE

    ABRIOLA S. A.; BALAGUROV A.; BASHIR J.; DAS A.; EDWARDS L.; GNAEUPEL-HEROLD T.; GOH B.; IONITA I.; MIKULA P.; OHMS Carsten; PELD N.; SCHNEIDER Rainer; SUTIARSO S.; TOROK G.; VENTER A.

    2012-01-01

    The deep penetration and selective absorption of neutrons make them a powerful tool in nondestructive testing of materials with large samples or objects. Residual stress formed in a material during manufacturing, welding, utilization or repairs can be measured by means of neutron diffraction. In fact, neutron diffraction is the only non-destructive testing method, which can facilitate 3-D mapping of residual stress in a bulk component. Stress measurement using neutron beams is a technique ...

  17. Quantum fields interacting with colliding plane waves: the stress-energy tensor and backreaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorca, M.; Verdaguer, E.

    1997-01-01

    Following a previous work on the quantization of a massless scalar field in a space-time representing the head on collision of two plane waves which focus into a Killing-Cauchy horizon, we compute the renormalized expectation value of the stress-energy tensor of the quantum field near that horizon in the physical state which corresponds to the Minkowski vacuum before the collision of the waves. It is found that for minimally coupled and conformally coupled scalar fields the respective stress-energy tensors are unbounded in the horizon. The specific form of the divergences suggests that when the semiclassical Einstein equations describing the backreaction of the quantum fields on the space-time geometry are taken into account, the horizon will acquire a curvature singularity. Thus the Killing-Cauchy horizon which is known to be unstable under ''generic'' classical perturbations is also unstable by vacuum polarization. The calculation is done following the point-splitting regularization technique. The dynamical colliding wave space-time has four quite distinct space-time regions, namely, one flat region, two single plane wave regions, and one interaction region. Exact mode solutions of the quantum field equation cannot be found exactly, but the blueshift suffered by the initial modes in the plane wave and interaction regions makes the use of the WKB expansion a suitable method of solution. To ensure the correct regularization of the stress-energy tensor, the initial flat modes propagated into the interaction region must be given to a rather high adiabatic order of approximation. (orig.)

  18. Frontline and future of residual stress measurement by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    Neutron diffraction method is very much effective for measurements of residual stress and texture. In this paper the present techniques for measurements of residual stress and texture are reviewed and plans of improvement of RESA in JRR-3 and Ibaraki Prefecture's Material Design Diffractometer to be installed in J-PARC are introduced. (author)

  19. Liquefaction assessment based on combined use of CPT and shear wave velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bán, Zoltán; Mahler, András; Győri, Erzsébet

    2017-04-01

    Soil liquefaction is one of the most devastating secondary effects of earthquakes and can cause significant damage in built infrastructure. For this reason liquefaction hazard shall be considered in all regions where moderate-to-high seismic activity encounters with saturated, loose, granular soil deposits. Several approaches exist to take into account this hazard, from which the in-situ test based empirical methods are the most commonly used in practice. These methods are generally based on the results of CPT, SPT or shear wave velocity measurements. In more complex or high risk projects CPT and VS measurement are often performed at the same location commonly in the form of seismic CPT. Furthermore, VS profile determined by surface wave methods can also supplement the standard CPT measurement. However, combined use of both in-situ indices in one single empirical method is limited. For this reason, the goal of this research was to develop such an empirical method within the framework of simplified empirical procedures where the results of CPT and VS measurements are used in parallel and can supplement each other. The combination of two in-situ indices, a small strain property measurement with a large strain measurement, can reduce uncertainty of empirical methods. In the first step by careful reviewing of the already existing liquefaction case history databases, sites were selected where the records of both CPT and VS measurement are available. After implementing the necessary corrections on the gathered 98 case histories with respect to fines content, overburden pressure and magnitude, a logistic regression was performed to obtain the probability contours of liquefaction occurrence. Logistic regression is often used to explore the relationship between a binary response and a set of explanatory variables. The occurrence or absence of liquefaction can be considered as binary outcome and the equivalent clean sand value of normalized overburden corrected cone tip

  20. Solitary Waves on Inclined Films: Their Characteristics and the Effect on Wall Shear Stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tihon, Jaroslav; Serifi, K.; Argyriadi, K.; Bontozoglou, V.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 1 (2006), s. 79-89 ISSN 0723-4864 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072914 Grant - others:HPMT(XE) CT/2000/00074 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : wavy film flow * solitary waves * wall shear stress Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.112, year: 2006

  1. Stress waves generated in thin metallic films by a Q-switched ruby laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation results on stress waves generated by Q-switched ruby laser irradiated thin metal films under confinement, studied over a wide range of film materials and film thicknesses, are reviewed. The results indicate that the dependence on these parameters is much weaker than is predicted by heat transfer estimations commonly used to describe the interaction of laser irradiation with unconfined bulk-solid surfaces.

  2. A Study of Stress Wave Propagation in Thin Plate Loaded by an Oblique Impact

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnka, Jan; Kolman, Radek; Dvořáková, Pavla; Veselý, Eduard

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 3 (2009), s. 322-331 ISSN 1970-8734 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/07/0588; GA ČR GA101/06/0914 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : Stress wave propagation * Thin-wall structures * Double-pulse holointerferometry * Finite Element Method Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  3. Van Allen Probe Measurements of the Scale Sizes and Detailed Properties of EMIC Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, L. W.; Bonnell, J. W.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are able to resonate with MeV electrons and cause precipitation loss of radiation belt electrons. EMIC waves can provide a strong source of electron pitch angle diffusion, but the waves are often quite localized - thus the spatial extents of these waves can have a large effect on their overall scattering efficiency. Using measurements from the dual Van Allen Probes, we characterize the spatial and temporal extents of EMIC wave active regions and how these depend on local time, radial distance, and wave properties (e.g. amplitude, frequency). Analysis of the detailed wave properties is also performed; we estimate the active region and coherence scales of EMIC waves and examine nonlinear features and parallel electric fields present in some events. These investigations help determine the nature of EMIC wave-particle interactions and support more accurate quantification of their effects on the outer radiation belt.

  4. a Quadratic Layer Element for Analyzing Stress Waves in Fgms and its Application in Material Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAN, X.; LIU, G. R.; LAM, K. Y.; OHYOSHI, T.

    2000-09-01

    A novel method is presented for investigating elastic waves in functionally graded material (FGM) plates excited by plane pressure waves. The FGM plate is first divided into quadratic layer elements (QLEs). A general solution for the equation of motion governing the QLE has been derived. The general solution is then used together with the boundary and continuity conditions to obtain the displacement and stress in the frequency domain for an arbitrary FGM plate. The response of the plate to an incident pressure wave is obtained using the Fourier transform techniques. Results obtained by the present method are compared with an existing method using homogeneous layer elements. Numerical examples are presented to investigate stress waves in FGM plates. The relationship between the surface displacement response and the material property of quadratic FGM plates has been analytically obtained for the material characterization. A computational inverse technique is also presented for characterizing material property of an arbitrary FGM plate from the surface displacement response data, using present QLE method as forward solver and genetic algorithm as the inverse operator. This technique is utilized to reconstruct the material property of an actual SiC-C FGM.

  5. Measuring Variation in Ecosystem Sensitivity to Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-28

    Pergamon Press, New York. Hedtke S. F. 1984. Structure and function of copper-stressed aquatic microcosms. Aquatic Toxicology . 5:227-244. Plafkin, J...and interactive effects of metal and acid contamination from an abandoned mine on stream communities. To Aquatic Toxicology . Cairns, J., Jr., and P. V

  6. PIV measurements in two hypersonic shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Williams, Owen; Smits, Alexander J.

    2017-11-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry measurements were performed to study two compression corner interactions in hypersonic flow. The experiments, carried out at Mach 7.2 and at a Reynolds number based on momentum thickness of 3500, included mean flow surveys as well as turbulence measurements in the near-field of the interaction. For the 8° compression corner, the flow remained attached, and for the 33° compression corner a large separation bubble formed. For the attached case, the influence of the shock wave on the streamwise turbulence intensities is weak, but the wall-normal component and the Reynolds shear stress show considerable amplification. In the fully separated case, both the streamwise and wall normal velocity fluctuations, as well as the Reynolds shear stresses, show strong amplification across the interaction. In contrast with the behavior in the attached case, equilibrium flow is approached much more rapidly in the separated case. Turbulence measurements in such complex hypersonic flows are far from trivial, with particle frequency response limitations often significantly reducing the measured wall-normal turbulence. We will therefore discuss these influences on overall data quality as well as the interpretation of flow physics based on these results.

  7. Absolute stress measurements at the rangely anticline, Northwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz, R. V.; Raleigh, C.B.

    1972-01-01

    Five different methods of measuring absolute state of stress in rocks in situ were used at sites near Rangely, Colorado, and the results compared. For near-surface measurements, overcoring of the borehole-deformation gage is the most convenient and rapid means of obtaining reliable values for the magnitude and direction of the state of stress in rocks in situ. The magnitudes and directions of the principal stresses are compared to the geologic features of the different areas of measurement. The in situ stresses are consistent in orientation with the stress direction inferred from the earthquake focal-plane solutions and existing joint patterns but inconsistent with stress directions likely to have produced the Rangely anticline. ?? 1972.

  8. Evaluation of stresses generated in steel finger joint of bridge by X-ray stress measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohri, Ami; Kawano, Yutaka; Nishido, Takayuki

    2017-01-01

    In a steel bridge, the evaluation of the stress generated in the finger joint without a gap to absorb temperature change can be an index when evaluating the remaining life. This study chose as the object the finger joint of a diagonal bridge, where the generated stress state is considered to be more complicated, prepared a finger joint test specimen that simulated an actual part, and performed a load test. For judgment, FEM analysis, non-destructive X-ray stress measurement, and measurement of the generated stress using strain gauge were applied. Compared with the FEM analysis results, the difference in the stress value was generated due to the difference in the contact state, but the trends of the stress distribution were equivalent. In addition, the same measurement value as the strain gauge was obtained, and the validity of the X-ray stress measurement method was confirmed. As a result, it was found that the stress measurement method by X-ray is effective for measuring the generated stress including the residual stress of the finger joint without gap at a bridge. (A.O.)

  9. Neutron stress measurement using neutron image plate. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Toshihiko; Hirose, Yukio; Minakawa, Noriaki; Morii, Yukio; Niimura, Nobuo

    2001-01-01

    A fundamental study on the neutron stress measurement using an image plate neutron detector was described. First, a method for determining internal mean stress over the area where incident beams pass through was explained. The method is based on the α angle method by which the stress analysis is conducted using information along a diffraction ring. Second, a neutron diffraction experiment was shown. This was conducted using the research reactor, JRR-3M, at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The 211 diffraction rings from steel sample were obtained using the image plate neutron detector. It was found that the mean stress obtained by the image plate agreed with stress applied. (author)

  10. Direct analysis of dispersive wave fields from near-field pressure measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horchens, L.

    2011-01-01

    Flexural waves play a significant role for the radiation of sound from plates. The analysis of flexural wave fields enables the detection of sources and transmission paths in plate-like structures. The measurement of these wave fields can be carried out indirectly by means of near-field acoustic

  11. On the local plane wave methods for in situ measurement of acoustic absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnant, Ysbrand H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we address a series of so-called local plane wave methods (LPW) to measure acoustic absorption. As opposed to other methods, these methods do not rely on assumptions of the global sound field, like e.g. a plane wave or diffuse field, but are based on a local plane wave assumption.

  12. Quantum analysis of the direct measurement of light waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldanha, Pablo L

    2014-01-01

    In a beautiful experiment performed about a decade ago, Goulielmakis et al (2004 Science 305 1267–69) made a direct measurement of the electric field of light waves. However, they used a laser source to produce the light field, whose quantum state has a null expectation value for the electric field operator, so how was it possible to measure this electric field? Here we present a quantum treatment for the f:2f interferometer used to calibrate the carrier–envelope phase of the light pulses in the experiment. We show how the special nonlinear features of the f:2f interferometer can change the quantum state of the electromagnetic field inside the laser cavity to a state with a definite oscillating electric field, explaining how the ‘classical’ electromagnetic field emerges in the experiment. We discuss that this experiment was, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of an absolute coherent superposition of different photon number states in the optical regime. (paper)

  13. Analysis of multidimensional measurements of electromagnetic waves in the Earth's magnetosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Pechal, Radim

    2011-01-01

    Title: Analysis of multidimensional measurements of electromagnetic waves in the Earth's magnetosphere Author: Radim Pechal Department: Department of Surface and Plasma Science Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Lubomír Přech, Dr. Supervisor's e-mail address: Abstract: The thesis introduces into basic knowledge of waves in plasma, especially waves in the Earth's magnetosphere. There are mentioned some space projects focused on chorus waves. The second part of this thesis is a la...

  14. Three-dimensional wave-induced current model equations and radiation stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hua-yong

    2017-08-01

    After the approach by Mellor (2003, 2008), the present paper reports on a repeated effort to derive the equations for three-dimensional wave-induced current. Via the vertical momentum equation and a proper coordinate transformation, the phase-averaged wave dynamic pressure is well treated, and a continuous and depth-dependent radiation stress tensor, rather than the controversial delta Dirac function at the surface shown in Mellor (2008), is provided. Besides, a phase-averaged vertical momentum flux over a sloping bottom is introduced. All the inconsistencies in Mellor (2003, 2008), pointed out by Ardhuin et al. (2008) and Bennis and Ardhuin (2011), are overcome in the presently revised equations. In a test case with a sloping sea bed, as shown in Ardhuin et al. (2008), the wave-driving forces derived in the present equations are in good balance, and no spurious vertical circulation occurs outside the surf zone, indicating that Airy's wave theory and the approach of Mellor (2003, 2008) are applicable for the derivation of the wave-induced current model.

  15. Millimeter-Wave Transmittance and Reflectance Measurement on Pure and Diluted Carbonyl Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Konstantin; Chen, Shu; Li, Zijing; Afsar, Mohammed

    2010-03-01

    Transmittance and reflectance measurements on highly absorbing carbonyl iron materials over a broad millimeter-wave frequency range have been performed. Frequency dependence of the complex dielectric permittivity of carbonyl iron diluted composite and pure powdered materials have been determined in the millimeter waves for the first time. The measurements have been employed using a free-space quasi-optical millimeter-wave spectrometer equipped with a set of high power backward wave oscillators as sources of coherent radiation, tunable in the range from 30 -- 120 GHz. Significant transmission zone of the millimeter-wave radiation at frequency around 60 GHz has been observed in transmittance spectra for the carbonyl iron materials.

  16. Investigations of some rock stress measuring techniques and the stress field in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanssen, Tor Harald

    1997-12-31

    Rock stresses are important to the safe construction and operation of all man-made structures in rock, whether In mining, civil or petroleum engineering. The crucial issue is their relative magnitude and orientation. This thesis develops equipment and methods for further rock stress assessment and reevaluates existing overcoring rock stress measurements, and relates this information to the present geological setting. Both laboratory work and field work are involved. In the field, rock stresses are measured by the overcoring and the hydraulic fracturing technique. An observation technique for assessing likely high stresses is developed. The field data refer to several hydropower projects and to some offshore hydrocarbon fields. The principal sections are: (1) Tectonic setting in the western Fennoscandia, (2) Triaxial rock stress measurements by overcoring using the NTH cell (a strain gauge cell developed at the Norwegian technical university in Trondheim and based on the CSIR cell of the South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research), (3) Laboratory testing of the NTH cell, (4) Quality ranking of stresses measured by the NTH cell, (4) Recalculated rock stresses and implications to the regional stress field, (5) Hydraulic fracturing stress measurements. 113 refs., 98 figs., 62 tabs.

  17. Tidal and gravity waves study from the airglow measurements at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E) during the period 2004–2007 are analyzed to study the dominant waves present in the 80–100 km altitude region of the atmosphere. The nocturnal intensity variations of different airglow emissions are observed using scanning temperature controlled filter photometers. Waves having period lying between 2 and 12 hours ...

  18. Tidal and gravity waves study from the airglow measurements at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    downward phase propagation both for the first and the second harmonics. In normal condition, down- ward wave propagation is not tenable. Such propa- gation in localized region may be observed due to the strong wind effect or the influence of multi- wave mode coupling. Analysing OI and OH emis- sion data, Fagundes et ...

  19. Detection of Electromechanical Wave Propagation Using Synchronized Phasor Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryawanshi, Prakash; Dambhare, Sanjay; Pramanik, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Considering electrical network as a continuum has become popular for electromechanical wave analysis. This paper reviews the concept of electromechanical wave propagation. Analysis of large number of generator ring system will be an easy way to illustrate wave propagation. The property of traveling waves is that the maximum and minimum values do not occur at the same time instants and hence the difference between these time delays can be easily calculated. The homogeneous, isotropic 10 generator ring system is modeled using electromagnetic transient simulation programs. The purpose of this study is to investigate the time delays and wave velocities using Power System Computer Aided Design (PSCAD)/Electromagnetic Transient Program (EMTP). The disturbances considered here are generator disconnections and line trips.

  20. Dispersion relations of elastic waves in one-dimensional piezoelectric/piezomagnetic phononic crystal with initial stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao; Wei, Peijun

    2016-03-01

    The dispersion relations of elastic waves in a one-dimensional phononic crystal formed by periodically repeating of a pre-stressed piezoelectric slab and a pre-stressed piezomagnetic slab are studied in this paper. The influences of initial stress on the dispersive relation are considered based on the incremental stress theory. First, the incremental stress theory of elastic solid is extended to the magneto-electro-elasto solid. The governing equations, constitutive equations, and boundary conditions of the incremental stresses in a magneto-electro-elasto solid are derived with consideration of the existence of initial stresses. Then, the transfer matrices of a pre-stressed piezoelectric slab and a pre-stressed piezomagnetic slab are formulated, respectively. The total transfer matrix of a single cell in the phononic crystal is obtained by the multiplication of two transfer matrixes related with two adjacent slabs. Furthermore, the Bloch theorem is used to obtain the dispersive equations of in-plane and anti-plane Bloch waves. The dispersive equations are solved numerically and the numerical results are shown graphically. The oblique propagation and the normal propagation situations are both considered. In the case of normal propagation of elastic waves, the analytical expressions of the dispersion equation are derived and compared with other literatures. The influences of initial stresses, including the normal initial stresses and shear initial stresses, on the dispersive relations are both discussed based on the numerical results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling of the propagation and reception of elastic waves emitted by a crack under stress. Application to the simulation of non-destructive testing by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Khalifa, Warida

    2013-01-01

    AE Non-destructive testing is used in many fields such as nuclear energy, oil and gas, civil engineering or mechanical engineering to check the integrity of structures under stress. Depending on the ratio of structure thickness to wavelength, the energy released by a crack under stress can propagate either as guided waves (in thin structures) or as Rayleigh wave (in thick structures). The analysis of signals resulting from this ultrasonic 'passive' method is particularly difficult due to the complexity of typically measured signals. The objective of this thesis is to develop models to enable the simulation of AE testing experiments in the case of thick or thin structure. The developed models rely on the coupling between an AE source model, wave propagation models and an AE Sensor model. In the case of thick structures two 2D models (for plane and cylindrical surfaces) and a 3D model (for plane surface) have been developed to predict the signal corresponding to the Rayleigh wave emitted by a crack under stress. In the case of thin structures, a 2D model has been developed to predict the signal corresponding to the guided modes emitted by a crack under stress. Several parametric studies have been conducted to determine the influence of the different model input data on the AE signals and thus help to interpret AE testing results. (author) [fr

  2. Measuring Resilience to Operational Stress in Canadian Armed Forces Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellewell, Sarah C; Cernak, Ibolja

    2018-02-01

    Adaptability to stress is governed by innate resilience, comprised of complex neuroendocrine and immune mechanisms alongside inherited or learned behavioral traits. Based on their capacity to adapt, some people thrive in stressful situations, whereas others experience maladaptation. In our study, we used state-of-the-art tools to assess the resilience level in individuals, as well as their susceptibility to developing military stress-induced behavioral and cognitive deficits. To address this complex question, we tested Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) personnel in three distinct stress environments (baselines): during predeployment training, deployment in Afghanistan, and readjustment upon return to Canada. Our comprehensive outcome measures included psychometric tests, saliva biomarkers, and computerized cognitive tests that used the Cambridge Neuropsychological Automated Test Battery. Participants were categorized based on initial biomarker measurements as being at low-, moderate-, or high stress-maladaptation risk. Biomarkers showed significant changes (ds = 0.56 to 2.44) between baselines, calculated as "delta" changes. Participants at low stress-maladaptation risk demonstrated minimal changes, whereas those at high stress-maladaptation risk showed significant biomarker variations. The psychometric patterns and cognitive functions were likewise affected across baselines, suggesting that the panel of saliva stress biomarkers could be a useful tool for determining the risk of stress maladaptation that can cause psychological and cognitive decline. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  3. Reynolds-Stress Budgets in an Impinging Shock Wave/Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Manan A.; Yoder, Dennis A.; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2018-01-01

    Implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) of a shock wave/boundary-layer interaction (SBLI) was performed. Comparisons with experimental data showed a sensitivity of the current prediction to the modeling of the sidewalls. This was found to be common among various computational studies in the literature where periodic boundary conditions were used in the spanwise direction, as was the case in the present work. Thus, although the experiment was quasi-two-dimensional, the present simulation was determined to be two-dimensional. Quantities present in the exact equation of the Reynolds-stress transport, i.e., production, molecular diffusion, turbulent transport, pressure diffusion, pressure strain, dissipation, and turbulent mass flux were calculated. Reynolds-stress budgets were compared with past large-eddy simulation and direct numerical simulation datasets in the undisturbed portion of the turbulent boundary layer to validate the current approach. The budgets in SBLI showed the growth in the production term for the primary normal stress and energy transfer mechanism was led by the pressure strain term in the secondary normal stresses. The pressure diffusion term, commonly assumed as negligible by turbulence model developers, was shown to be small but non-zero in the normal stress budgets, however it played a key role in the primary shear stress budget.

  4. Study on storage and measurement system of shock-wave pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Zehui; Tian Zhong; Tang Jian; Yang Jian; Wei Xiangwen; Wang Lihua

    1998-12-01

    The principle, systematic structure of the storage and measurement system of shock-wave pressure and the calibration and application measurement of the system are introduced. The measured results show that the measuring system can be used as a substitute of the traditional pressure measurement system and used for storage and measurement of pressure wave shape of the shock-wave resulted from explosion. It has the following advantages: free of lead-wire, resistant against bad conditions, anti-interference, high reliability, easy calibration and simple measurement procedure, easy to carry, direct communication with micro-computer

  5. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  6. Wave Journal Bearing. Part 2: Experimental Pressure Measurements and Fractional Frequency Whirl Threshold for Wave and Plain Journal Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James F.; Dimofte, Florin; Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    A new hydrodynamic bearing concept, the wave journal bearing, is being developed because it has better stability characteristics than plain journal bearings while maintaining similar load capacity. An analysis code to predict the steady state and dynamic performance of the wave journal bearing is also part of the development. To verify numerical predictions and contrast the wave journal bearing's stability characteristics to a plain journal bearing, tests were conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center using an air bearing test rig. Bearing film pressures were measured at 16 ports located around the bearing circumference at the middle of the bearing length. The pressure measurements for both a plain journal bearing and a wave journal bearing compared favorably with numerical predictions. Both bearings were tested with no radial load to determine the speed threshold for self-excited fractional frequency whirl. The plain journal bearing started to whirl immediately upon shaft start-up. The wave journal did not incur self-excited whirl until 800 to 900 rpm as predicted by the analysis. Furthermore, the wave bearing's geometry limited the whirl orbit to less than the bearing's clearance. In contrast, the plain journal bearing did not limit the whirl orbit, causing it to rub.

  7. Broadband Mm-Wave OFDM Communications in Doubly Selective Channel: Performance Evaluation Using Measured Mm-Wave Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Fan, Wei; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2018-01-01

    coefficients of the broadband mm-wave channel do not follow Gaussian distribution due to the broad bandwidth. It is also shown that, given a cyclic prefix (CP) length for a certain delay spread, an effective PN mitigation scheme enables a PN corrupted OFDM system to function with small subcarrier spacing and......In this work, we evaluate the performance of the broadband millimeter-wave (mm-wave) OFDM system in the presence of phase noise (PN) of phase-locked loop based oscillator and delay spread of measured mm-wave channel. It is shown, using Akaike's information criterion, that the channel tap......, therefore, small CP overhead, with only slight degradation of the error rate performance....

  8. The wave vane - A device to measure the breaker angle

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandramohan, P.; Nayak, B.U.; Anand, N.M.

    with the shoreline at the wave vane is equal to the breaker angle as the wave vane is installed very close to breaker zone. Repeating the procedure, the breaker angles for a required duration can be estimated. FIELD TEST A 4 km long beach near Karwar on the west... in Table 1. Ob- servations on breaker angles were made for 20 minutes duration every day. The average breaker angle computed based on the 20 minute observation is presented in Table 1. A directional wave rider buoy was deployed at 16 m water depth...

  9. Neutron diffraction studies for the measurement of strains and stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swallowe, G.M.; Wimpory, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the neutron diffraction method for the measurements of residual strains and illustrated the method with examples of measurements on a mining chain link and a Single Lap Shear (SLS) Joint. It is shown that compressive stresses in the chain surface contribution to the fatigue resistance of the link.. Results for the SLS joint cast doubt on current finite elements models of joint stress distribution and quantity the stress redistribution which occurs in the joint with ageing. The extension of the method for the measurement of dislocation densities and dislocation cell sizes is illustrated with an example of a plastically deformed cooper sample.(author)

  10. 3D Tyre/Road pavement contact stress measurements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, Morris

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The CSIR’s proprietary Stress-in-Motion (SIM) measurements provide rational descriptions of 1D, 2D and 3D tyre/road pavement stresses for: Road pavement design testing and evaluation, as well as tyre design, testing and evaluation....

  11. Comparing measured with simulated vertical soil stress under vehicle load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Thomas; Lamandé, Mathieu; Arvidsson, Johan

    The load transfer within agricultural soil is typically modelled on the basis of the theory of stress transmission in elastic media, usually in the semi-empirical form that includes the “concentration factor” (v). Measurements of stress in soil are needed to evaluate model calculations, but may...... be biased because transducers do not read true stresses. The aim of this paper was to measure and simulate soil stress under defined loads. First, we investigated the accuracy of the transducers in situ by measuring stress at high spatial and temporal resolution at 0.1 m depth under a known load. Stress...... in the soil profile at 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 m depth was measured during wheeling at field capacity on five soils (13-66% clay). Stress propagation was then simulated with the semi-analytical model, using vertical stress at 0.1 m depth estimated from tyre characteristics as upper boundary condition, and v...

  12. Measurement of spatial stress gradients near grain boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basu, Indranil; Ocelík, Vaclav; De Hosson, Jeff Th M.

    2017-01-01

    A correlative method based on electron back scattered diffraction and focused ion-beam-digital image correlation slit milling technique was used to quantitatively determine spatially resolved stress profiles in the vicinity of grain boundaries in pure titanium. Measured local stress gradients were

  13. Stress Wave Attenuation in Aluminum Alloy and Mild Steel Specimens Under SHPB Tensile Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothnis, J. R.; Ravikumar, G.; Arya, H.; Yerramalli, Chandra S.; Naik, N. K.

    2018-02-01

    Investigations on the effect of intensity of incident pressure wave applied through the striker bar on the specimen force histories and stress wave attenuation during split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tensile testing are presented. Details of the tensile SHPB along with Lagrangian x- t diagram of the setup are included. Studies were carried out on aluminum alloy 7075 T651 and IS 2062 mild steel. While testing specimens using the tensile SHPB setup, it was observed that the force calculated from the transmitter bar strain gauge was smaller than the force obtained from the incident bar strain gauge. This mismatch between the forces in the incident bar and the transmitter bar is explained on the basis of stress wave attenuation in the specimens. A methodology to obtain force histories using the strain gauges on the specimen during SHPB tensile testing is also presented. Further, scanning electron microscope images and photomicrographs are given. Correlation between the microstructure and mechanical properties is explained. Further, uncertainty analysis was conducted to ascertain the accuracy of the results.

  14. Nondestructive Measurement of Sugar Content in Apples by Millimeter-Wave Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Makoto; Mase, Atsushi; Uchino, Kiichiro

    2012-02-01

    A millimeter-wave reflectometer has been developed for the nondestructive measurement of the sugar content in apples. The intensity of the reflected wave from fruit was confirmed to depend on the sugar content and temperature by performing reflectometry with a vector network analyzer of aqueous sucrose solutions. Moreover, the developed reflectometer was applied to the sugar content measurement of apples. We obtained a strong, almost linear relationship between the intensity of the reflected wave and the sugar content in apples.

  15. Wind Stress Variability Directly Measured at a Tidal Inlet from a Mobile Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Suslow, D. G.; Haus, B. K.; Laxague, N.; Williams, N. J.; Graber, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    Tidal inlets are characterized by a dynamic coupling of waves, currents, wind, and topography and to better understand these processes the Riverine and Estuarine Transport (RIVET) experiment was conducted during the month of May 2012 at New River Inlet, North Carolina. As a part of that effort, the Surface Physics Experimental Catamaran (SPEC) was outfitted with a suite of concurrently sampled atmospheric and oceanographic sensors. These included a meteorological mast capable of measuring the air-sea momentum flux, paired subsurface ADV's, a downward looking ADCP, and a bow-mounted wave-staff array. Using a mobile platform enabled capturing the fine-scale dynamical features across this highly sheared zone, without compromising spatial or temporal resolution. The SPEC was deployed, in part, to make direct wind stress measurements and the eddy covariance method was used to calculate the 10 m neutral drag coefficients from the observed wind shear velocities. In general, for any given wind speed, measured drag coefficients were about 2.5 times greater than those derived from bulk relations (e.g. Smith, 1988). Observations of the wind stress angle show significant wind stress steering, up to about 70o off the mean wind direction, within 2 km off-shore of the inlet mouth. The causes for the departure of these observations from conventional open ocean results remains under investigation, although it is highly likely that these findings highlight processes unique to coastal waters that are not regarded in the well-established algorithms (e.g. depth-limited wave breaking and wave-current interactions). Preliminary results from the second installment in the RIVET campaign, which took place at the Mouth of the Columbia River during the spring of 2013, will also be shown.

  16. Biochemical Measurements of the Human Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    8217 biochemical stress response. Dr Thomas Longridge was the project scientist and Dr Joe De Maio was the task scientist. This research was conducted by the...under condition A described in next paragraph. Second, DOPAC, MHPG, HVA, 5-HIAA, and VMA were determined by a modified method of Joseph, Kadam , and...n tt Ln 0 0 vJ 0 (N ’lw %.D w 0 0) to CI la, co 0 (r) Ch 𔃺I I 0 𔃺 0 0 0 (’) v 01-4 V~ 4 Hn qqJ Ln NOD & OD N r- ai r, m 0 ~ $4 c4 H 0 OI H r) (n t

  17. PIV measurements of velocities and accelerations under breaking waves on a slope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vested, Malene Hovgaard; Carstensen, Stefan; Christensen, Erik Damgaard

    2017-01-01

    waves. In this study, we have investigated the wave kinematics under steep and breaking waves on a laboratory beach with a slope of 1/25. The velocity field was measured by use of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) at a sample rate of 96Hz. The high sample rate allowed for the accelerations...... to be determined directly from the sampled velocities. It was found that both velocities and accelerations differ from the ones predicted from common wave theories such as streamfunction theory. This was especially evident at the top part of the wave close to the surface. This was not surprising, since...

  18. The last three minutes - Issues in gravitational-wave measurements of coalescing compact binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Curt; Apostolatos, Theocharis A.; Bildsten, Lars; Finn, Lee S.; Flanagan, Eanna E.; Kennefick, Daniel; Markovic, Dragoljub M.; Ori, Amos; Poisson, Eric; Sussman, Gerald J.

    1993-01-01

    Gravitational-wave interferometers are expected to monitor the last three minutes of inspiral and final coalescence of neutron star and black hole binaries at distances approaching cosmological, where the event rate may be many per year. Because the binary's accumulated orbital phase can be measured to a fractional accuracy much lower than 10 exp -3, and relativistic effects are large, the wave forms will be far more complex and carry more information than has been expected. Improved wave form modeling is needed as a foundation for extracting the waves' information, but is not necessary for wave detection.

  19. Wave transformation at select locations along the Indian coast through measurements, modelling and remote sensing

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Aboobacker, V.M.

    on Ocean Wave Measurement and Analysis, Waves 93 (ASCE, New York), 180-193. Kinsman, B., 1965: Wind waves, their generation and propagation on the ocean surface, Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 676 pp. Kline, S.A., and J.L. Hanson..., 1978: Energy loss and set-up due to breaking in random waves, Proc. 16 th Coastal Engineering Conference, Hamburg, Germany, 569-587. Belcher, S.E. and J.C.R. Hunt, 1993: Turbulent shear flow over slowly moving waves, J. Fluid Mech., 251, 109...

  20. Lagrangian modelling of ocean surface waves and synthetic aperture radar wave measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouques, Sebastien

    2005-07-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the estimation of the ocean wave spectrum from synthetic aperture radar imaging and the modelling of ocean surface waves using the Lagrangian formalism. The first part gives a short overview of the theories of ocean surface waves and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) whereas the second part consists of five independent publications. The first two articles investigate the influence of the radar backscatter model on the SAR imaging of ocean waves. In Article I, Monte Carlo simulations of SAR images of the ocean surface are carried out using a nonlinear backscatter model that include both specular reflection and Bragg scattering and the results are compared to simulations from the classical Hasselmann integral transform (Hasselmann and Hasselmann, 1991). It is shown that nonlinearities in the backscatter model strongly influence the imaging of range-travelling waves and that the former can suppress the range-splitting effect (Bruning et al., 1988). Furthermore, in Article II a database of Envisat-ASAR Wave Mode products co-located with directional wave spectra from the numerical model WAM and which contains range-travelling wave cases only, is set up. The WAM spectra are used as input to several ocean-to-SAR integral transforms, with various real aperture radar (RAR) models and the obtained SAR image cross-spectra are compared to the Envisat-ASAR observations. A first result is that the use of a linear backscatter model leads to a high proportion of non-physical negative backscatter values in the RAR image, as suggested by Schulz-Stellenfleth (2001). Then, a comparison between the observed SAR cross-spectra and the ones simulated through Hasselmann's integral transform reveals that only twenty percents of the observations show a range-splitting effect as strong as in the simulations. A much better agreement is obtained when using the integral transform by Schulz-Stellenfleth (2003), which is based on a nonlinear hackscatter model

  1. Development of a stress sensor based on the piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate for impact stress measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiming; Xu, Bin; Li, Lifei; Li, Bing

    2012-04-01

    The measurement of stress of concrete structures under impact loading and other strong dynamic loadings is crucial for the monitoring of health and damage detection. Due to its main advantages including availability, extremely high rigidity, high natural frequency, wide measuring range, high stability, high reproducibility, high linearity and wide operating temperature range, piezoelectric (Lead Zirconate Titanate, PZT) ceramic materials has been a widely used smart material for both sensing and actuation for monitoring and control in engineering structures. In this paper, a kind of stress sensor based on piezoelectric ceramics for impact stress measuring of concrete structures is developed. Because the PZT is fragile, in order to employ it for the health monitoring of concrete structures, special handling and treatment should be taken to protect the PZT and to make it survive and work properly in concrete. The commercially available PZT patch with lead wires is first applied with an insulation coating to prevent water and moisture damage, and then is packaged by jacketing it by two small precasted cylinder concrete blocks with enough strength to form a smart aggregate (SA). The employed PZT patch has a dimension of 10mm x 10mm x 0.3mm. In order to calibrate the PZT based stress sensor for impact stress measuring, a dropping hammer was designed and calibration test on the sensitivity of the proposed transducer was carried out with an industry charge amplifier. The voltage output of the stress sensor and the impact force under different free falling heights and impact mass were recorded with a high sampling rate data acquisition system. Based on the test measurements, the sensibility of the PZT based stress sensor was determined. Results show that the output of the PZT based stress sensor is proportional to the stress level and the repeatability of the measurement is very good. The self-made piezoelectric stress sensor can be easily embedded in concrete and provide

  2. Stress measurement technique using neutron diffraction and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is the only method by which residual stresses inside materials at centimeter-order depth can be measured nondestructively. Residual lattice strains in (hkl) can be evaluated from the shift of the diffraction peak from its original position under the stress-free condition. Residual stresses can be calculated by applying Hooke's law to lattice strains measured in three orthogonal directions. In addition, the neutron diffraction method can evaluate macroscopic deformation of engineering materials by measuring microstructural factors such as microstrains. Therefore, the neutron diffraction technique is very helpful in the design and development of engineering components, as well as in studies on materials engineering. This paper shows principle of neutron stress measurement and engineering neutron diffractometers as well as some applications. (author)

  3. TROTT computer program for two-dimensional stress wave propagation, volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, L.; Curran, D. R.

    1980-04-01

    TROTT is a Lagrangian finite-difference computer program for calculating two dimensional stress wave propagation through solid, porous, and composite materials. The stress waves may be caused by impact, detonation of an explosive, or a prescribed velocity. The calculational procedure is the standard leapfrog method of von Neumann and Richtmyer, using artificial viscosity to smooth shock fronts. Quadrilateral or triangular cells are used. The momentum relations are derived by treating the cells as finite elements. Axisymmetric or planar flow can be handled. The constitutive relations include the standard Mie-Gruneisen equation-of-state and elastic-plastic, work-hardening deviator stress relations. A polytropic gas and detonating flow relations are provided for explosives. Ductile and brittle fracture and shear banding are provided by nucleation and growth models. Porous materials can be represented by a cap plasticity model. A model for layered composites is also present. The code is constructed for easy insertion of additional material models. The number of extra variables required for each cell for a material model can be specified on an input card. This manual includes many sample problems, a derivation of the flow equations, and a discussion of material models.

  4. Residual stress measurements on a stress relieved Zircaloy-4 weld by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, D.G. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1 Menai 2234, NSW (Australia)]. E-mail: dgc@ansto.gov.au; Ripley, M.I. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1 Menai 2234, NSW (Australia); Brown, D.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Vogel, S.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Holden, T.M. [Northern Stress Technologies, Deep River, Ont., K0J 1P0 (Canada)

    2006-12-15

    The macroscopic stress distribution across an annealed Zircaloy-4 gas tungsten arc weld was measured by neutron time-of-flight diffraction at the SMARTS diffractometer at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The stresses after annealing are about 40% lower than those in the same weld prior to heat treatment. The intergranular strains in the reference coupons, which give the macroscopic stress free lattice spacings, are consistent with the difference in cooling the strongly textured plate and the weakly textured weld.

  5. Continuous Wavelet Transform Analysis of Acceleration Signals Measured from a Wave Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Laurence Zsu-Hsin; Wu, Li-Chung; Wang, Jong-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Accelerometers, which can be installed inside a floating platform on the sea, are among the most commonly used sensors for operational ocean wave measurements. To examine the non-stationary features of ocean waves, this study was conducted to derive a wavelet spectrum of ocean waves and to synthesize sea surface elevations from vertical acceleration signals of a wave buoy through the continuous wavelet transform theory. The short-time wave features can be revealed by simultaneously examining the wavelet spectrum and the synthetic sea surface elevations. The in situ wave signals were applied to verify the practicality of the wavelet-based algorithm. We confirm that the spectral leakage and the noise at very-low-frequency bins influenced the accuracies of the estimated wavelet spectrum and the synthetic sea surface elevations. The appropriate thresholds of these two factors were explored. To study the short-time wave features from the wave records, the acceleration signals recorded from an accelerometer inside a discus wave buoy are analysed. The results from the wavelet spectrum show the evidence of short-time nonlinear wave events. Our study also reveals that more surface profiles with higher vertical asymmetry can be found from short-time nonlinear wave with stronger harmonic spectral peak. Finally, we conclude that the algorithms of continuous wavelet transform are practical for revealing the short-time wave features of the buoy acceleration signals. PMID:23966188

  6. Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of Impulsive Stress Waves Propagating from the Greater Trochanter of the Femur by a Sideways Fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarai, Takaaki; Tokumoto, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Fall accidents are a common cause of femoral fracture in the elderly. The greater trochanter of the femur is often subjected to impact loading by a sideways fall, and thus it is worth studying the impulsive stress waves propagating in the femur. In this study, the impulsive stress was analyzed by the dynamic finite element method using a 3-dimensional model of the femur, and the influence of the fall configuration on the stress was discussed. The stress was concentrated around the femoral neck during the propagation of the stress wave, and the tensile maximum principal stress changed into compressive minimum principle stress on the anterior and medial sides of the neck. On the other hand, the compressive minimum principal stress changed into tensile maximum principle stress on the lateral side of the neck. The largest maximum principal stress during the impact loading was always larger in the neck than in the impact region. The largest absolute value of the minimum principal stress was found in the neck or the impact region depending on the fall configuration. The largest absolute values of the maximum and minimum principal stress were nearly equal, indicating that the bone fracture due to the tensile stress may occur around the femoral neck.

  7. Walkie-Talkie Measurements for the Speed of Radio Waves in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombi, Andra; Tunyagi, Arthur; Neda, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    A handheld emitter-receiver device suitable for the direct estimation of the velocity of radio waves in air is presented. The velocity of radio waves is measured using the direct time-of-flight method, without the need for any tedious and precise settings. The results for two measurement series are reported. Both sets of results give an estimate…

  8. Development of fiber optic sensors at TNO for explosion and shock wave measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Smorenburg, C.; Bree, J.L.M.J. van; Bouma, R.H.B.; Meer, B.J. van der; Prinse, W.C.; Scholtes, J.H.G.

    2000-01-01

    Fiber Optic sensors are found to be very suitable for explosion and shock wave measurements because they are immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). In the past few years, TNO has developed a number of sensor systems for explosion and shock wave measurements in which the optical fiber is a

  9. Fibre-optical techniques for measuring various properties of shock waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinse, W.C.; Esveld, R.J. van; Oostdam, R. van; Rooijen, M. van; Bouma, R.H.B.

    1999-01-01

    For the past years we have developed several optical techniques to measure properties of shock waves. The fibre optic probe (FOP) is developed to measure the shock-wave velocity and/or the detonation velocity inside an explosive. The space resolution can be as small as 0.5 mm. Single fibres are used

  10. Effect of initial stress on Love waves in a piezoelectric structure carrying a functionally graded material layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zheng-Hua; Jin, Feng; Lu, Tianjian; Kishimoto, Kikuo; Hirose, Sohichi

    2010-01-01

    The effect of initial stress on the propagation behavior of Love waves in a piezoelectric half-space of polarized ceramics carrying a functionally graded material (FGM) layer is analytically investigated in this paper from the three-dimensional equations of linear piezoelectricity. The analytical solutions are obtained for the dispersion relations of Love wave propagating in this kind of structure with initial stress for both electrical open case and electrical short case, respectively. One numerical example is given to graphically illustrate the effect of initial stress on dispersive curve, phase velocity and electromechanical coupling factor of the Love wave propagation. The results reported here are meaningful for the design of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices with high performance.

  11. Measured residual stresses in overlay pipe weldments removed from service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shack, W.J.

    1985-02-01

    Surface and throughwall residual stresses were measured on an elbow-to-pipe weldment that had been removed from the Hatch-2 reactor about a year after the application of a weld overlay. The results were compared with experimental measurements on three mock-up weldments and with finite-element calculations. The comparison shows that there are significant differences in the form and magnitude of the residual stress distributions. However, even after more than a year of service, the residual stresses over most of the inner surface of the actual plant weldment with an overlay were strongly compressive. 3 refs., 7 figs

  12. High precision stress measurements in semiconductor structures by Raman microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlig, Benjamin

    2009-07-01

    Stress in silicon structures plays an essential role in modern semiconductor technology. This stress has to be measured and due to the ongoing miniaturization in today's semiconductor industry, the measuring method has to meet certain requirements. The present thesis deals with the question how Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the state of stress in semiconductor structures. In the first chapter the relation between Raman peakshift and stress in the material is explained. It is shown that detailed stress maps with a spatial resolution close to the diffraction limit can be obtained in structured semiconductor samples. Furthermore a novel procedure, the so called Stokes-AntiStokes-Difference method is introduced. With this method, topography, tool or drift effects can be distinguished from stress related influences in the sample. In the next chapter Tip-enhanced Raman Scattering (TERS) and its application for an improvement in lateral resolution is discussed. For this, a study is presented, which shows the influence of metal particles on the intensity and localization of the Raman signal. A method to attach metal particles to scannable tips is successfully applied. First TERS scans are shown and their impact on and challenges for high resolution stress measurements on semiconductor structures is explained. (orig.)

  13. Possible standard specimens for neutron diffraction residual stress measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brand, P.C.; Prask, H.J.; Fields, R.J.; Blackburn, J.; Proctor, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    Increasingly, sub-surface residual stress measurements by means of neutron diffraction are being conducted at various laboratories around the world. Unlike X-ray diffraction residual stress measurement setups, neutron instruments in use worldwide vary widely in design, neutron flux, and level of dedication towards residual stress measurements. Although confidence in the neutron technique has increased within the materials science and engineering communities, no demonstration of standardization or consistency between laboratories has been made. One of the steps in the direction of such standardization is the development of standard specimens, that have well characterized residual stress states and which could be examined worldwide. In this paper the authors will examine two options for a neutron stress standard specimen: (1) a steel ring-plug specimen with very well defined diametrical interference; (2) a spot weld in a High Strength Low Alloy steel disk. The results of neutron residual stress measurements on these specimens will be discussed and conclusions as to their usefulness as neutron stress standards will be presented

  14. Residual stress measurement in veneering ceramic by hole-drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie K; Schajer, Gary S; Vanheusden, Alain J; Sadoun, Michaël J

    2011-05-01

    Mismatch in thermal expansion properties between veneering ceramic and metallic or high-strength ceramic cores can induce residual stresses and initiate cracks when combined with functional stresses. Knowledge of the stress distribution within the veneering ceramic is a key factor for understanding and predicting chipping failures, which are well-known problems with Yttria-tetragonal-zirconia-polycrystal based fixed partial dentures. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for measuring the stress profile in veneering ceramics and to compare ceramic-fused-to-metal compounds to veneered Yttria-tetragonal-zirconia-polycrystal ceramic. The hole-drilling method, often used for engineering measurements, was adapted for use with veneering ceramic. Because of the high sensitivity needed in comparison with industrial applications, a high sensitivity electrical measurement chain was developed. All samples exhibited the same type of stress vs. depth profile, starting with compressive at the ceramic surface, decreasing with depth and becoming tensile at 0.5-1.0mm from the surface, and then becoming slightly compressive again. The zirconia samples exhibited a stress depth profile of larger magnitude. The hole drilling method was shown be a practical tool for measuring residual stresses in veneering ceramics. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of stress gradient by x-ray stress measurement based on change in angle phi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Toshihiko; Kuramoto, Makoto; Yoshioka, Yasuo.

    1985-01-01

    A new principle of X-ray stress evaluation for a sample with steep stress gradient has been prosed. The feature of this method is that the stress is determined by using so-called phi-method based on the change of phi-angle and thus has no effect on the penetration depth of X-rays. The procedure is as follows; firstly, an average stress within the penetration depth of X-rays is determined by changing only phi-angle under a fixed psi-angle, and then a distribution of the average stress vs. the penetration depth of X-rays is detected by repeating the similar procedure at different psi-angles. The following conclusions were found out as the result of residual stress measurements on a carbon steel of type S 55 C polished by emery paper. This method is practical enough to use for a plane stress problem. And the assumption of a linear stress gradient adopted in the authors' previous investigations is valid. In case of a triaxial stress analysis, this method is effective for the solution of three shearing stresses. However, three normal stresses can not be solved perfectly except particular psi-angles. (author)

  16. Measurements of wave attenuation due to a soft bottom: The SWAMP experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forristall, George Z.; Reece, Allan M.

    1985-03-01

    The Sea Wave Attenuation Measurement Program (SWAMP) was designed to provide measurements of the attenuation of waves as they travel from deep water to relatively shallow water off the Mississippi Delta. The soft bottom was suspected of causing strong attenuation in the area. This effect has now been measured. A wave staff and electromagnetic current meter were used to estimate directional wave spectra at the Cognac platform in 312 m (1025 feet) of water and at platform VV in South Pass Block 27 in 19 m (63 feet) of water. In addition, measurements of vertical bottom motion were made at platform VV. Seven storm periods from Sepember 1979 to February 1981 were studied. The directional spectral comparisons showed that the theoretically calculated refraction and shoaling can explain the changes in the spectra when the wave height is low. However, as the wave height increases, a nonlinear attenuation mechanism becomes increasingly strong. The attenuation is a strong function of deep-water wave height and a weak function of wave frequency. The bottom motion measurements showed that the bottom moved downward with small amplitude under wave crests.

  17. Pressure-induced forces and shear stresses on rubble mound breakwater armour layers in regular waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne; Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results from an experimental investigation of the pressure-induced forces in the core material below the main armour layer and shear stresses on the armour layer for a porous breakwater structure. Two parallel experiments were performed which both involved pore pressure...... measurements in the core material: (1) core material with an idealized armour layer made out of spherical objects that also allowed for detailed velocity measurements between and above the armour, and (2) core material with real rock armour stones. The same core material was applied through the entire...... and turbulence measurements showed that the large outward directed pressure gradients in general coincide, both in time and space, with the maximum bed-shear stresses on the armour layer based on the Reynolds-stresses. The bed-shear stresses were found to result in a Shields parameter in the same order...

  18. Wave transformation and attenuation along the west coast of India: Measurements and numerical simulations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Aboobacker, V.M.; Vethamony, P.; Samiksha, S.V.; Rashmi, R.; Jyoti, K.

    Rider Buoys [Datawell, 2001]. The details of location and duration of measurements are given in Table 1.The wave rider buoy can function within -20 to +20 m of surface elevation with an accuracy of 3% within the wave period of 1.6 to 30.0 s.... The direction accuracy is within 0.5° to 2.0° depending on the latitude. The sampling duration is 20 minutes during which waves with frequencies 0.025 and 0.58 Hz are measured in the form of wave spectra. Wind sea and swell parameters were separated from...

  19. Precise stress measurements with white synchrotron x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, Donald J.; Vaughan, Michael T.; Wang Liping; Long, Hongbo; Li Li; Dixon, Nathaniel A.; Durham, William B.

    2010-01-01

    In situ measurement of stress in polycrystalline samples forms the basis for studies of the mechanical properties of materials with very broad earth science and materials science applications. Synchrotron x rays have been used to define the local elastic strain in these samples, which in turn define stress. Experimental work to date has been carried out on a prototype detection system that provided a strain measurement precision >10 -4 , which corresponds to a stress resolution >50 MPa for silicate minerals. Here we report operation of a new, permanent, energy dispersive detection system for white radiation, which has been developed at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The new system provides differential strain measurements with a precision of 3x10 -5 for volumes that are 50x50x500 μm 3 . This gives a stress precision of about 10 MPa for silicate minerals.

  20. Velocity flow field and water level measurements in shoaling and breaking water waves

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mukaro, R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available levels were measured using capacitive waves gauges, while the instantaneous velocity flow fields were measured using video techniques together with digital correlation techniques. The instantaneous velocity flow fields were further analyzed to yield...

  1. Estimations of On-site Directional Wave Spectra from Measured Ship Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2006-01-01

    In general, two main concepts can be applied to estimate the on-site directional wave spectrum on the basis of ship response measurements: 1) a parametric method which assumes the wave spectrum to be composed by parameterised wave spectra, or 2) a non-parametric method where the directional wave...... spectrum is found directly as the values in a completely discretised frequency-directional domain without a priori assumptions on the spectrum. The paper outlines the theory of these two concepts, and it is shown how to deal with the speed-of-advance problem for operating ships. In addition, the methods...... include an quivalence of energy in the governing equations and, as regards the parametric concept, a frequency dependent spreading of the waves is introduced. The paper includes an extensive analysis of full-scale measurements for which the directional wave spectra are estimated by the two ship response...

  2. Aortic pulse wave velocity measurement in systemic sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sebastiani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic sclerosis (SSc is characterized by endothelial dysfunction and widespread microangiopathy. However, a macrovascular damage could be also associated. Aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV is known to be a reliable indicator of arterial stiffness and a useful prognostic predictor of cardiovascular events. Moreover, aPWV may be easily measured by non-invasive, user-friendly tool. Aim of our study was to evaluate aPWV alterations in a series of SSc patients. Methods. The aPWV was evaluated in 35 consecutive female SSc patients and 26 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. aPWV alterations were correlated with cardiopulmonary involvement. Results. A significant increase of aPWV was observed in SSc patients compared to controls (9.4±3.2 m/s vs 7.3±1 m/s; P=0.002. In particular, 14/35 (40% SSc patients and only 1/26 (4% controls (P=0.0009 showed increased aPWV (>9 m/s cut-off value. Moreover, echocardiography evaluation showed an increased prevalence of right atrial and ventricular dilatation (atrial volume: 23.6±6.2 mL vs 20.3±4.3 mL, P=0.026; ventricular diameter 19.5±4.9 mm vs 15.9±1.6 mm; P=0.001 associated to higher values of pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PAPs in SSc patients (31.5±10.4 mmHg vs 21.6±2.9 mmHg; P50 years old. Furthermore, altered aPWV was more frequently associated with limited cutaneous pattern, longer disease duration (≥5 years, and/or presence of anticentromere antibody (ACA. Conclusions. A significantly higher prevalence of abnormally increased aPWV was evidenced in SSc patients compared to healthy controls. The possibility of more pronounced and diffuse vascular damage in a particular SSc subset (ACA-positive subjects with limited cutaneous scleroderma and longer disease duration might be raised.

  3. Wave Stresses in the Anvil Hammer Rods under Impact Including Ram Mass and Deformation Force of Forgings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Sinitskiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When operating the anvil hammers there occur impacts of die tooling and as a consequence, virtually instantaneous impact stops of motion of drop hammer parts. Such operating conditions come with accelerated failures of the anvil hammer rods because of emerging significant wave stresses. Engineering practice widely uses variation, difference, and integral methods to calculate wave stresses. However, to use them a researcher has to acquire certain skills, and the special programs should be available. The paper considers a method for estimating the wave stress changes in the anvil hammer rods, which is based on the wave equation of the Laplace transform. It presents a procedure for generating differential equations and their solution using the operator method. These equations describe the wave processes of strain and stress propagation in the anvil hammer rod under non-rigid impact with the compliance obstacle of the drop hammer parts. The work defines how the piston and rod mass and also the mechanical and geometric parameters of the rod influence on the stress level in the rod sealing of the hammer ram. Analysis of the results shows that the stresses in the rod sealing are proportional to the total amount of wave stresses caused by the rod and piston impact included in the total weight of the system. The piston influence on the stresses in the rod under impact is in direct proportion to the ratio of its mass to the mass of the rod. Geometric parameters of the rod and speed of drop parts before the impact influence on the stress value as well. It was found that if the time of impact is less than the time of the shock wave running in forward and backward direction, the impact with a compliance obstacle is equivalent to that of with a rigid obstacle, and the dependence of the wave stresses follows the Zhukovsky formula of direct pressure shock. The presented method of stress calculation can be successfully used to select the optimal mass and the rod

  4. Wave attenuation model for dephasing and measurement of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An analysis of previous models to simulate inelastic scattering in such systems is presented and a relatively new model based on wave attenuation is introduced. The problem of Aharonov–Bohm (AB) oscillations in conductance of a mesoscopic ring is studied. We show that the conductance is symmetric under flux reversal ...

  5. Wave attenuation model for dephasing and measurement of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Further the wave attenuation model is applied to a fundamental problem in quantum mechanics, that of the ... The process of dephasing or decoherence leads to the diminishing of quantum effects or loss of quantum ... injected back with an uncorrelated phase leading to irreversible loss of phase memory. This model has ...

  6. Stress measurements of planar dielectric elastomer actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmani, Bekim; Aeby, Elise A.; Müller, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) micro- and nano-structures are referred to artificial muscles because of their specific continuous power and adequate time response. The bending measurement of an asymmetric, planar DEA is described. The asymmetric cantilevers consist of 1 or 5 μm-thin DEAs deposited on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) substrates 16, 25, 38, or 50 μm thick. The application of a voltage to the DEA electrodes generates an electrostatic pressure in the sandwiched silicone elastomer layer, which causes the underlying PEN substrate to bend. Optical beam deflection enables the detection of the bending angle vs. applied voltage. Bending radii as large as 850 m were reproducibly detected. DEA tests with electric fields of up to 80 V/μm showed limitations in electrode’s conductivity and structure failures. The actuation measurement is essential for the quantitative characterization of nanometer-thin, low-voltage, single- and multi-layer DEAs, as foreseen for artificial sphincters to efficiently treat severe urinary and fecal incontinence.

  7. Stress measurements of planar dielectric elastomer actuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmani, Bekim; Aeby, Elise A.; Müller, Bert [Biomaterials Science Center, University of Basel, Gewerbestrasse 14, 4123 Allschwil (Switzerland)

    2016-05-15

    Dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) micro- and nano-structures are referred to artificial muscles because of their specific continuous power and adequate time response. The bending measurement of an asymmetric, planar DEA is described. The asymmetric cantilevers consist of 1 or 5 μm-thin DEAs deposited on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) substrates 16, 25, 38, or 50 μm thick. The application of a voltage to the DEA electrodes generates an electrostatic pressure in the sandwiched silicone elastomer layer, which causes the underlying PEN substrate to bend. Optical beam deflection enables the detection of the bending angle vs. applied voltage. Bending radii as large as 850 m were reproducibly detected. DEA tests with electric fields of up to 80 V/μm showed limitations in electrode’s conductivity and structure failures. The actuation measurement is essential for the quantitative characterization of nanometer-thin, low-voltage, single- and multi-layer DEAs, as foreseen for artificial sphincters to efficiently treat severe urinary and fecal incontinence.

  8. Residual stress measurements by means of neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pintschovius, L.; Jung, V.; Macherauch, E.; Voehringer, O.

    1983-01-01

    A new method for the analysis of multiaxial residual stress states is presented, which is based on high resolution neutron diffraction. It is analogous to X-ray stress analysis, but the use of neutrons instead of X-rays allows the analysis of the stress distributions also in the interior of technical components in a non-destructive way. To prove the feasibility of the method, investigations of the loading stress distributions of an aluminium bar subjected to purely elastic bending were performed. Limiting factors due to the volume of the internal probe region and the sample thickness are discussed. Complete neutron residual stress analyses were carried out for a plastically deformed bending bar and a transformation-free water-quenched steel cylinder. The results are in fairly good agreement with theoretical expectations and with X-ray control measurements at the surface of the objects. (Auth.)

  9. Analysis of rock stress and rock stress measurements with application to Aespoe HRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundholm, Beatrice

    2000-11-01

    The process of choosing a site for a nuclear waste repository means that many aspects have to be taken into consideration. One of these is that the repository has to be mechanically stable for a long time. The mechanical stability of the rock is very difficult to determine. One of several factors, which determine the mechanical stability, is the virgin state of stress. The thesis project consists of two parts. In the first part the state of stress at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory had to be defined. This was done based on earlier rock stress measurements conducted during the years 1988 to 1997. Two different measurement techniques have been used, hydraulic fracturing and overcoring. During the overcoring two types of cells have been used, CSIRO HI-cell and a cell developed by the Swedish State Power Board (SSPB). In the second part of the project, investigation of the correlation between the stress and geological structures are made using numerical modelling tools such as FLAC, UDEC and 3DEC. The rock stress measurements using the hydraulic fracturing gave orientations of the horizontal stress that coincide with earlier hydraulic fracturing measurements conducted in Scandinavia. The magnitudes of rock stresses are slightly lower than the earlier reported stress magnitudes for the Scandinavian part of the earth crust. The rock stresses obtained from the overcoring resulted in higher stresses than what was predicted by the hydraulic fracturing measurements. However, the orientation of the maximum horizontal stresses coincides well between the two techniques. The orientation is also more or less constant with respect to increasing depth. The state of stress at Aespoe is defined by using the results from the hydraulic fracturing and the measurements conducted by SSPB-cell. The measurements from the SSPB-cell are used since these have a Poisson's ratio that corresponds well with the uniaxial tests of rock samples and since the measurements have been done at a distance from

  10. Ocean Wind and Wave Measurements Using X-Band Marine Radar: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Huang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ocean wind and wave parameters can be measured by in-situ sensors such as anemometers and buoys. Since the 1980s, X-band marine radar has evolved as one of the remote sensing instruments for such purposes since its sea surface images contain considerable wind and wave information. The maturity and accuracy of X-band marine radar wind and wave measurements have already enabled relevant commercial products to be used in real-world applications. The goal of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of the state of the art algorithms for ocean wind and wave information extraction from X-band marine radar data. Wind measurements are mainly based on the dependence of radar image intensities on wind direction and speed. Wave parameters can be obtained from radar-derived wave spectra or radar image textures for non-coherent radar and from surface radial velocity for coherent radar. In this review, the principles of the methodologies are described, the performances are compared, and the pros and cons are discussed. Specifically, recent developments for wind and wave measurements are highlighted. These include the mitigation of rain effects on wind measurements and wave height estimation without external calibrations. Finally, remaining challenges and future trends are discussed.

  11. The Analysis of Stress Waves at a Junction of Beam and String

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the bridge engineering, there are some problems about the dynamics that traditional theory cannot solve. So, the theory about stress waves is introduced to solve the related problems. This is a new attempt that the mechanic theory is applied to practical engineering. The stress wave at a junction of the structure composed of beams and strings is investigated in this paper. The structure is studied because the existence of a soft rope makes the transmission of the force in the bridge structure different from the traditional theory, and it is the basis for further research. The equilibrium equations of the displacement and the internal force are built based on the hypothesis. The fast Fourier transform (FFT numerical algorithm is used to express an incident pulse of arbitrary shape. The analytical solutions are substantiated by comparing with the finite element programs. The conclusion that if the cross section of the string is relatively small, then the energy density of the structure is relatively large, which is disadvantageous to the structure, can be obtained from this paper.

  12. Measurements of residual stresses and textures by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    Many measurement methods of residual stress are compared and characteristic properties of neutron diffraction method are described. The penetration depth of neutron, photon radiation and Cu-Kα ray to metals are compared and the values of neutron are larger than others. Two kinds of measurement methods of residual stress by neutron diffraction, the angular scattering and the time of flight method, are explained. The results of measurement of residual stresses of carbon steel and titanium butt weld joint, Wasploy alloy, aluminum alloy and Incoloy 800 tube in stream generator of nuclear power plant are reported. Neutron diffraction profile of SiCp/Al2024-T6 was measured by TOF method. The textures of Zr-2.5% Nb and SUS316 steel were observed. (S.Y.)

  13. Measurement of residual stresses in alloy 600 pressurizer penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.F.; Molkenthin, J.P.; Prevey, P.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    Alloy 600 penetrations in several pressurized water reactors have experienced primary water stress corrosion cracking near the partial penetration J-welds between the Alloy 600 and the cladding on the inside diameter of the components. The microstructure and tensile properties indicated that the Alloy 600 was susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) providing that a high tensile stress (applied + residual) was present. The residual stress distributions at the inside diameter surface and at different depths below the surface were measured in Alloy 600 nozzle and heater sleeve mockups. Surface residual stresses on the nozzle mockup ranged from -350 to +830 MPa. For the heater sleeve mockup, the surface residual stresses ranged from -330 to +525 MPa. In the areas of high tensile residual stress, for the most part, the residual stresses decreased with increasing depth below the surface. For the nozzle and heater sleeve mockups, the percent cold-world and yield strength as a function of depth were determined. (authors). 12 figs., 4 refs

  14. [German translation and validation of the Stress Appraisal Measure (SAM)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahaye, M; Stieglitz, R D; Graf, M; Keppler, C; Maes, J; Pflueger, M

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, the German-language version of the Stress Appraisal Measure (SAM) by Peacock and Wong was validated in a student population. SAM is a relatively short questionnaire (28 items) that evaluates a current, stress-triggering event. The theoretical background is provided by the stress model of Lazarus and Folkman. 85 students (age: 23; 59 female, 26 male) were exposed to two stress scenarios in order to test whether they were suited to provoke stress. A factor analysis was performed and the internal consistency of the seven SAM scales was determined. In addition, the convergent validity of SAM with State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) and specific emotion scales was investigated via Pearson's product-moment correlation. The two stress scenarios were suited to evoke stress. The factor structure and the internal consistency of the individual scales, as well as the convergent validity of SAM were replicated with minor limitations in the present German version. Some items (especially from the fifth factor) were only replicated partially. SAM can also be employed in the German language version. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. X-ray stress measurement of the materials with texture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashiro, Tsutomu

    1981-01-01

    The X-ray stress analysis of materials with texture was investigated on the basis of the application to the non-distructive testing. The portable X-ray stress analyzer with the fixed phi method was developed and the measured result of low carbon cold rolled steel was compaired with the calculated result by the elastic anisotropic theory averaged by the distribution of phi-dependent intensity of (211) reflection. (author)

  16. Research on Formation Mechanism of Dynamic Response and Residual Stress of Sheet Metal Induced by Laser Shock Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Aixin; Cao, Yupeng; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Zhengang

    2018-01-01

    In order to reveal the quantitative control of the residual stress on the surface of metal materials, the relevant theoretical and experimental studies were carried out to investigate the dynamic response of metal thin plates and the formation mechanism of residual stress induced by laser shock wave. In this paper, the latest research trends on the surface residual stress of laser shock processing technology were elaborated. The main progress of laser shock wave propagation mechanism and dynamic response, laser shock, and surface residual stress were discussed. It is pointed out that the multi-scale characterization of laser and material, surface residual stress and microstructure change is a new hotspot in laser shock strengthening technology.

  17. The effect of inhomogeneous initial stress on Love wave propagation in layered magneto-electro-elastic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Shen, Y P; Du, J K

    2008-01-01

    The effect of inhomogeneous initial stress on Love wave propagation in layered magneto-electro-elastic structures is investigated in this paper. The coupled magneto-electro-elastic field equations are solved by adopting the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB) approximate approach. Then the phase velocity can be calculated by applying boundary and continuity conditions. A specific example of a structure consisting of a CoFe 2 O 4 layer and a BaTiO 3 substrate is used to illustrate the influence of inhomogeneous initial stress on the phase velocity, corresponding coupled magneto-electric factor and stress fields. The different influence between constant initial stress and inhomogeneous initial stress is discussed and the results are expected to be helpful for the preparation and application of Love wave sensors

  18. Stress measurement and stress relaxation during magnetron sputter deposition of cubic boron nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abendroth, B.; Gago, R.; Kolitsch, A.; Moeller, W.

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic in situ analysis of stress and film thickness provide fast and more physical information on growth and stress evolution in cBN layers than integrating (ex situ) methods. Especially, features of the layered structure of boron nitride films, like the evolution of instantaneous stress and growth rates during deposition can be resolved by in situ methods. This work is concerned with dynamic in-situ stress measurement by means of cantilever bending during magnetron sputter deposition of cBN thin films. Laser deflection in combination with in situ ellipsometry is used to determine the instantaneous stress of the films. The results show in agreement with results that were obtained previously from ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD), that the hBN and cBN layers exhibit different levels of stress under constant deposition conditions. The stress increases from less than -4 GPa to very high values (-10 GPa) after the coalescence of the cBN nuclei. Therefore, it is possible to establish the point of cBN nucleation instantly. A simultaneous medium energy ion bombardment is used for stress relaxation during film deposition. A modified substrate bias voltage, combining negative high and low voltage pulses, is used to enable an ion bombardment of the growing film with energies up to 8 keV. In this way, cBN films with a stress as low as -1.7 GPa could be produced without destroying the sp 3 -bonds significantly

  19. Millimeter Wave Attenuation in Moist Air: Laboratory Measurements and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    estimated by possible, though very weak, electric dipole transitions in isotopic species of . N2 and 02 [20]. LA .* 2.2 Modeling * Modeling reduces the... engen in the quantitative deorip im of the inter- (0) Water ion activity ...... .28. 45 action betven, millimeter waves and moist air. The water...over the range t - 0.77 to 0.84. The e ratios generates high electric field strengths and lightning discharges 04 are CIDe to values of C defined in

  20. Shear-wave splitting measurements – Problems and solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vecsey, Luděk; Plomerová, Jaroslava; Babuška, Vladislav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 462, č. 1-4 (2008), s. 178-196 ISSN 0040-1951 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB300120605; GA AV ČR IAA3012405; GA AV ČR IAA300120709 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : seismic anisotropy * shear-wave splitting * comparison of cross- correlation * eigenvalue * transverse minimization methods Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.677, year: 2008

  1. S-wave velocity measurements along levees in New Orleans using passive surface wave methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K.; Lorenzo, J. M.; Craig, M. S.; Gostic, A.

    2017-12-01

    In order to develop non-invasive methods for levee inspection, geophysical investigations were carried out at four sites along levees in the New Orleans area: 17th Street Canal, London Avenue Canal, Marrero Levee, and Industrial Canal. Three of the four sites sustained damage from Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and have since been rebuilt. The geophysical methods used include active and passive surface wave methods, and capacitively coupled resistivity. This paper summarizes the acquisition and analysis of the 1D and 2D passive surface wave data. Twelve wireless seismic data acquisition units with 2 Hz vertical component geophones were used to record data. Each unit includes a GPS receiver so that all units can be synchronized over any distance without cables. The 1D passive method used L shaped arrays of three different sizes with geophone spacing ranging from 5 to 340 m. Ten minutes to one hour of ambient noise was recorded with each array, and total data acquisition took approximately two hours at each site. The 2D method used a linear array with a geophone spacing of 5m. Four geophones were moved forward every 10 minutes along 400 1000 m length lines. Data acquisition took several hours for each line. Recorded ambient noise was processed using the spatial autocorrelation method and clear dispersion curves were obtained at all sites (Figure 1a). Minimum frequencies ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 Hz and maximum frequencies ranged from 10 to 30 Hz depending on the site. Non-linear inversion was performed and 1D and 2D S-wave velocity models were obtained. The 1D method penetrated to depths ranging from 200 to 500 m depending on the site (Figure 1b). The 2D method penetrated to a depth of 40 60 m and provided 400 1000 m cross sections along the levees (Figure 2). The interpretation focused on identifying zones beneath the levees or canal walls having low S-wave velocities corresponding to saturated, unconsolidated sands, or low-rigidity clays. Resultant S-wave velocity profiles

  2. Characteristics of abnormal large waves measured from coastal videos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yoo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, tsunami-like sea-level oscillations occurred in a region of the west coast of Korea (i.e. in the eastern part of the Yellow Sea, during a typical rough spring weather episode on 4 May 2008. The analysis of these tsunami-like abnormal waves focuses solely on the videos recorded by a CCTV surveillance system in the directions of the entrance and inside parts of a local coastal pocket beach. Time-series of the vertical and horizontal sea surface oscillations were extracted from the video recordings through calibrating image distortions, accumulating 1-D intensity arrays along the line transects of interest in time, and identifying the trajectories of the oscillations. Frequency and time-domain analysis of the time-series signals revealed that the maximum height of the tsunami-like waves reached 1.3 m, having a dominant period of 185 s (3.1 min. In addition, the results indicate that the celerity of the maximum height wave approximated 7.3 m/s, which lead to the losses of life of several people who could not escape immediately from the fast tsunami flooding the shore.

  3. Wave processes in the human cardiovascular system: The measuring complex, computing models, and diagnostic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganiev, R. F.; Reviznikov, D. L.; Rogoza, A. N.; Slastushenskiy, Yu. V.; Ukrainskiy, L. E.

    2017-03-01

    A description of a complex approach to investigation of nonlinear wave processes in the human cardiovascular system based on a combination of high-precision methods of measuring a pulse wave, mathematical methods of processing the empirical data, and methods of direct numerical modeling of hemodynamic processes in an arterial tree is given.

  4. Ground penetrating radar antenna measurements based on plane-wave expansions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of the system consisting of the ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna and the air-soil interface is measured using a loop buried in the soil. The plane-wave spectrum is used to determine various parameters characterizing the radiation of the GPR antenna...

  5. Measuring oblique incidence sound absorption using a local plane wave assumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, E.R.; Wijnant, Ysbrand H.; de Boer, Andries

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a method for the measurement of the oblique incidence sound absorption coefficient is presented. It is based on a local field assumption, in which the acoustic field is locally approximated by one incident- and one specularly reflected plane wave. The amplitudes of these waves can be

  6. A noninvasive ultrasound elastography technique for measuring surface waves on the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Osborn, Thomas; Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate an ultrasound based surface wave elastography (SWE) technique for generating and detecting surface waves on the lung. The motivation was to develop a noninvasive technique for assessing superficial lung tissue disease including interstitial lung disease (ILD). ILD comprises a number of lung disorders in which the lung tissue is stiffened and damaged due to fibrosis of the lung tissue. Currently, chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are the most common clinical methods for evaluating lung disease, but they are associated with radiation and cannot measure lung mechanical properties. The novelty of SWE is to develop a noninvasive and nonionizing technique to measure the elastic properties of superficial lung tissue. We propose to generate waves on the lung surface through wave propagation from a local harmonic vibration excitation on the chest through an intercostal space. The resulting surface wave propagation on the lung is detected using an ultrasound probe through the intercostal space. To demonstrate that surface waves can be generated on the lung, an ex vivo muscle-lung model was developed to evaluate lung surface wave generation and detection. In this model, swine muscle was laid atop a swine lung. A vibration excitation of 0.1s 100Hz wave was generated on the muscle surface and the surface waves on the lung were detected using a linear array ultrasound probe at 5MHz. To test its feasibility for patient use, SWE was used to measure both lungs of an ILD patient through eight intercostal spaces. The mean wave speed was 1.71±0.20m/s (±SD) at the functional residual capacity, while the mean wave speed was 2.36±0.33m/s at the total lung capacity. These studies support the feasibility of SWE for noninvasive measurement of elastic properties of lung and demonstrate potential for assessment of ILD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Shear wave elastography using ultrasound: effects of anisotropy and stretch stress on a tissue phantom and in vivo reactive lymph nodes in the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ha Young [Dept. of Radiology, University of Inha College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Hyun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, So Yeon; Shin, Hee Jung; Choi, Young Jun; Baek, Jung Hwa [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong Seon [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate how the anisotropy and the static stretch stress of the cervical musculature influence the measured shear modulus in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in cervical lymph nodes in vivo by using shear wave elastography (SWE). SWE was performed on a phantom using a pig muscle and on the middle jugular cervical lymph nodes in six volunteers. Tissue elasticity was quantified using the shear modulus and a supersonic shear wave imaging technique. For the phantom study, first, the optimal depth for measurement was determined, and then, SWE was performed in parallel and perpendicular to the muscle fiber orientation with and without strain stress. For the in vivo study, SWE was performed on the cervical lymph nodes in parallel and perpendicular to the sternocleidomastoid muscle fiber direction with and without neck stretching. The mean values of the shear modulus (meanSM) were then analyzed. In the phantom study, the measured depth significantly influenced the meanSM with a sharp decrease at the depth of 1.5 cm (P<0.001). Strain stress increased the meanSM, irrespective of the muscle fiber orientation (P<0.001). In the in vivo study, the meanSM values obtained in parallel to the muscle fiber orientation were greater than those obtained perpendicular to the fiber orientation, irrespective of the stretch stress (P<0.001). However, meanSM was affected significantly by the stretch stress parallel to the muscle fiber orientation (P<0.001). The anisotropic nature of the cervical musculature and the applied stretch stress explain the variability of the SWE measurements and should be identified before applying Swee for the interpretation of the measured shear modulus values.

  8. Near-surface shear-wave velocity measurements in unlithified sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, B.T.; Steeples, D.; Miller, R.; Ivanov, J.; Peterie, S.; Sloan, S.D.; McKenna, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    S-wave velocity can be directly correlated to material stiffness and lithology making it a valuable physical property that has found uses in construction, engineering, and environmental projects. This study compares different methods for measuring S-wave velocities, investigating and identifying the differences among the methods' results, and prioritizing the different methods for optimal S-wave use at the U. S. Army's Yuma Proving Grounds YPG. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves MASW and S-wave tomography were used to generate S-wave velocity profiles. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. A strong signal-to-noise ratio at the study site gives the MASW method promising resolution. S-wave first arrivals are picked on impulsive sledgehammer data which were then used for the tomography process. Three-component downhole seismic data were collected in-line with a locking geophone, providing ground truth to compare the data and to draw conclusions about the validity of each data set. Results from these S-wave measurement techniques are compared with borehole seismic data and with lithology data from continuous samples to help ascertain the accuracy, and therefore applicability, of each method. This study helps to select the best methods for obtaining S-wave velocities for media much like those found in unconsolidated sediments at YPG. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  9. Molecular force sensors to measure stress in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhune, Meenakshi; Rehfeldt, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph F

    2017-01-01

    Molecularly generated forces are essential for most activities of biological cells, but also for the maintenance of steady state or homeostasis. To quantitatively understand cellular dynamics in migration, division, or mechanically guided differentiation, it will be important to exactly measure stress fields within the cell and the extracellular matrix. Traction force microscopy and related techniques have been established to determine the stress transmitted from adherent cells to their substrates. However, different approaches are needed to directly assess the stress generated inside the cell. This has recently led to the development of novel molecular force sensors. In this topical review, we briefly mention methods used to measure cell-external forces, and then summarize and explain different designs for the measurement of cell-internal forces with their respective advantages and disadvantages. (topical review)

  10. Molecular force sensors to measure stress in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhune, Meenakshi; Rehfeldt, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2017-06-01

    Molecularly generated forces are essential for most activities of biological cells, but also for the maintenance of steady state or homeostasis. To quantitatively understand cellular dynamics in migration, division, or mechanically guided differentiation, it will be important to exactly measure stress fields within the cell and the extracellular matrix. Traction force microscopy and related techniques have been established to determine the stress transmitted from adherent cells to their substrates. However, different approaches are needed to directly assess the stress generated inside the cell. This has recently led to the development of novel molecular force sensors. In this topical review, we briefly mention methods used to measure cell-external forces, and then summarize and explain different designs for the measurement of cell-internal forces with their respective advantages and disadvantages.

  11. Optical residual stress measurement in TFT-LCD panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Chung; Sung, Po-Chi

    2017-06-01

    The residual stress of the glass substrate might be one of causes to produce the non-uniform light distribution defect, i.e. Mura, in thin film transistor-liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) panels. Glass is a birefringent material with very low birefringence. Furthermore, the thinner and thinner thickness request from the market makes the traditional photoelasticity almost impossible to measure the residual stresses produced in thin glass plates. Recently, a low-level stress measurement method called transmissivity extremities theory of photoelasticity (TEToP) was successfully developed to measure the residual stress in glass plate. Besides, to measure the stress of the glass plate in the TFT-LCD panel whose rear surface may has different kinds of coatings, an advanced reflection photoelasticity was also developed. In this paper, three commercially available glass plates with 0.33mm nominal thickness and three glass circular disks with different coatings were inspected to verify the feasibility of the TEToP and the advanced reflection photoelasticity, respectively.

  12. Results and conclusions of stress measurements at Stripa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doe, T.W.; Hustrulid, W.A.; Leijon, B.; Ingevald, K.; Strindell, L.; Carlsson, H.

    1982-10-01

    This paper describes the results of stress measurements at Stripa, compares the results obtained by different techniques, and recommends a stress measurement program for a hard rock repository site. The state of stress at the Stripa Mine has been measured both in a 381-m-deep hole drilled from the surface and in holes drilled from the drifts underground. Hydraulic fracturing and several overcoring methods have been used (Lulea triaxial gauge, CSIRO gauge, USBM gauge, Swedish State Power Board deep-hole Leeman triaxial gauge). The results of overcoring and hydraulic fracturing agree well, particularly for the magnitude and orientation of the greatest stress. A recommended program for stress measurement at a repository site would include hydraulic fracturing and deep-hole overcoring in a deep hole drilled from surface, and overcoring (Lulea gauge and USBM gauge) and hydraulic fracturing from holes drilled from underground openings when access is available. Propagation of the hydraulic fractures should be monitored acoustically to determine their location and orientation

  13. Rock stress measurements. Preparatory stage of the equipment development project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mononen, S.; Hakala, M.; Mikkola, P.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years the rock stress measurement methods used in Finland have been overcoring and hydraulic fracturing. There have been mainly two companies involved in these measurements, namely Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) and SwedPower AB. Smoy has done measurements for mines and for rock engineering projects, whereas SwedPower AB has mainly been involved in nuclear waste disposal investigations and conducted hydraulic fracturing measurements in deep boreholes. Smoy together with its partners started in February 2001 a project named JTM, which was a preliminary stage for a future project, which aims to develop a device most suitable for rock stress measurements in Finland. The partners in the project were HUT Rock Engineering, Posiva Oy, Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Gridpoint Finland Oy and Geopros Oy. Tekes, the National Technology Agency, provided almost half of the project funding. In the management group of the project were Pekka Mikkola (chairman) and Tero Laurila from Smoy, Pekka Saerkkae and Sakari Mononen (full-time researcher) from HUT, Aimo Hautojaervi (Posiva Oy), Erik Johansson (Saanio and Riekkola Oy), Matti Hakala (Gridpoint Finland Oy) and Heikki Haemaelaeinen (Geopros Oy). The aim of the JTM-project was to find out the needs for the development of a device most suitable for rock stress measurements in Finnish mines and rock engineering projects. During the project work was done to find out the range of rock stress measurement devices available, to find out the needs for measurements, and to get acquainted to the measurements done in Scandinavia. Also a report of the most suitable methods for Finnish rock conditions was done based on literature and on interviews of rock stress experts. Based on all the information collected during the project a clear picture of the needs for rock stress measurements in Finland could be formed and a preliminary plan of a future project was done. The aim of the suggested project is to build a device based on hydraulic fracturing

  14. Resolution potential of surface wave phase velocity measurements at small arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Thomas; Maupin, Valérie

    2008-02-01

    The deployment of temporary arrays of broadband seismological stations over dedicated targets is common practice. Measurement of surface wave phase velocity across a small array and its depth-inversion gives us information about the structure below the array which is complementary to the information obtained from body-wave analysis. The question is however: what do we actually measure when the array is much smaller than the wave length, and how does the measured phase velocity relates to the real structure below the array? We quantify this relationship by performing a series of numerical simulations of surface wave propagation in 3-D structures and by measuring the apparent phase velocity across the array on the synthetics. A principal conclusion is that heterogeneities located outside the array can map in a complex way onto the phase velocities measured by the array. In order to minimize this effect, it is necessary to have a large number of events and to average measurements from events well-distributed in backazimuth. A second observation is that the period of the wave has a remarkably small influence on the lateral resolution of the measurement, which is dominantly controlled by the size of the array. We analyse if the artefacts created by heterogeneities can be mistaken for azimuthal variations caused by anisotropy. We also show that if the amplitude of the surface waves can be measured precisely enough, phase velocities can be corrected and the artefacts which occur due to reflections and diffractions in 3-D structures greatly reduced.

  15. Residual stress measurement of welding area by neutron diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Tamaki; Sugiyama, Masaaki; Oikawa, Hatsuhiko; Nose, Tetsuro; Imafuku, Muneyuki; Tomota, Yo; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Moriai, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Resistance spot welding technique is extensively applied to join the body steel sheets in the manufacturing process for the automobile industry. It is known that the fatigue crack initiates occasionally inside of the spot-welded zone in this material, which is a serious issue of the fatigue life. Although this phenomenon is supposed to be related to internal residual stress, the actual residual stress distribution inside of the spot-welded zone is not clear up to now. In this study, a neutron diffraction residual stress measurement technique with well-defined sub-mm 3 square gauge volume is applied in order to clarify the internal three dimensional residual stress distribution just below the spot-welded part of the steel sheets. (author)

  16. Neutron diffraction measurement of residual stress in NPP construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinca, R.; Bokuchava, G.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the investigation is to study the level of residual stresses induced by the surfacing in the weld deposit zone and in the base metal, where considerable thermal gradients are present. Surfacing high-nickel filler on an austenitic base metal is one of techniques in repair of primary collector the primary circuit of nuclear power plant type VVER. The repair technology was developed at Welding Research Institute Bratislava. Measurements of residual stresses in the weld overlay and the base metal are necessary for approving the mechanical analysis and verifying of residual stresses determination on welded material by numerical weld g computer simulation. Investigations of residual stresses are important for developing optimal welding techniques. (authors)

  17. Extraction of lateral eigenmode properties in thin film bulk acoustic wave resonator from interferometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkonen, Kimmo; Pensala, Tuomas; Meltaus, Johanna; Kaivola, Matti

    2010-04-01

    A heterodyne laser interferometer is used to study acoustic wave fields excited in a 1.8 GHz AlN thin film bulk acoustic wave resonator. The electrical response of the resonator exhibits a strong thickness resonance onto which spurious modes, caused by lateral standing plate waves, are superposed. Optical interferometer measurements are used to extract dispersion curves of the laterally propagating waves responsible for the spurious responses. A discrete eigenmode spectrum due to the finite lateral dimensions of the resonator is observed. An equivalent circuit model for a multimode resonator is fitted to the mechanical resonator response extracted along a single curve in the dispersion diagram, and is used to determine properties, such as Q-values, of the individual lateral eigenmodes. Measured wave field images, extracted dispersion curves, and the eigenmode spectrum with the model fitting results are presented.

  18. Experimental measurements of lower-hybrid wave propagation in the Versator II tokamak using microwave scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohatgi, R.; Chen, K.; Bekefi, G.; Bonoli, P.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Mayberry, M.; Porkolab, M.; Villasenor, J.

    1991-01-01

    A series of 139 GHz microwave scattering experiments has been performed on the Versator II tokamak (B. Richards, Ph.D. thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1981) to study the propagation of externally launched 0.8 GHz lower-hybrid waves. During lower-hybrid current drive, the launched waves are found to follow a highly directional resonance cone in the outer portion of the plasma. Wave power is also detected near the center of the plasma, and evidence of wave absorption is seen. Scattering of lower-hybrid waves in k space by density fluctuations appears to be a weak effect, although measurable frequency broadening by density fluctuations is found, Δω/ω=3x10 -4 . In the detectable range (2.5 parallel parallel spectra inferred from the scattering measurements are quite similar above and below the current drive density limit. Numerical modeling of these experiments using ray tracing is also presented

  19. Ionospheric wave and irregularity measurements using passive radio astronomy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, W.C.; Mahoney, M.J.; Jacobson, A.R.; Knowles, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The observation of midlatitude structures using passive radio astronomy techniques is discussed, with particular attention being given to the low-frequency radio telescope at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. The present telescope operates in the 10-125-MHz frequency range. Observations of the ionosphere at separations of a few kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers by the lines of sight to sources are possible, allowing the determination of the amplitude, wavelength, direction of propagation, and propagation speed of ionospheric waves. Data are considered on large-scale ionospheric gradients and the two-dimensional shapes and sizes of ionospheric irregularities. 10 references

  20. Theory of fidelity measure in degenerate four-wave mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochove, E.J.

    1983-01-01

    Phase-conjugate beam fidelity is studied in degenerate four-wave mixing with spatially varying pump beams. The analysis includes the effects of probe depletion, diffracting non-linear phase variation focussing, and finally that of losses. Relatively simple algebraic expressions are found for the phase conjugate reflectivity for the cases of collinear and near-collinear beam gemetries. It is found that by focussing the probe beam into the mixing medium, the fraction of energy in the phase conjugate beam which was transferred to other modes, may typically be reduced by one order of magnitude. (Author) [pt

  1. Wave attenuation model for dephasing and measurement of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Here kl1 and kl2 are the phase increments of the wave function in the absence of flux. θl1/L and θl2/L are the phase shifts due to flux in the upper and lower branches. Clearly, (θl1/L)+(θl2/L) = 2πΦ/Φ0, where Φ is the flux piercing the loop and Φ0 is the flux quantum hc/e. The transmission and reflection co- efficients in eq.

  2. Cluster multispacecraft measurement of spatial scales of foreshock Langmuir waves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Souček, Jan; Santolík, Ondřej; Dudok de Wit, T.; Pickett, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 114, A02 (2009), A02213/1-A02213/11 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA301120601; GA AV ČR IAA300420602; GA AV ČR IAA300420702 Grant - others:Czech Science Foundation(CZ) 20508P129; NASA (US) NNX07AI24G Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : kinetic waves and instabilities * solar wind * multi-spacecraft methods Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.082, year: 2009

  3. Field measurements and modeling of wave propagation and subsequent weak layer failure in snow due to explosive loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simioni, Stephan; Sidler, Rolf; Dual, Jürg; Schweizer, Jürg

    2015-04-01

    Avalanche control by explosives is among the key temporary preventive measures. Yet, little is known about the mechanism involved in releasing avalanches by the effect of an explosion. Here, we test the hypothesis that the stress induced by acoustic waves exceeds the strength of weak snow layers. Consequently the snow fails and the onset of rapid crack propagation might finally lead to the release of a snow slab avalanche. We performed experiments with explosive charges over a snowpack. We installed microphones above the snowpack to measure near-surface air pressure and accelerometers within three snow pits. We also recorded pit walls of each pit with high speed cameras to detect weak layer failure. Empirical relationships and a priori information from ice and air were used to characterize a porous layered model from density measurements of snow profiles in the snow pits. This model was used to perform two-dimensional numerical simulations of wave propagation in Biot-type porous material. Locations of snow failure were identified in the simulation by comparing the axial and deviatoric stress field of the simulation to the corresponding snow strength. The identified snow failure locations corresponded well with the observed failure locations in the experiment. The acceleration measured in the snowpack best correlated with the modeled acceleration of the fluid relative to the ice frame. Even though the near field of the explosion is expected to be governed by non-linear effects as for example the observed supersonic wave propagation in the air above the snow surface, the results of the linear poroelastic simulation fit well with the measured air pressure and snowpack accelerations. The results of this comparison are an important step towards quantifying the effectiveness of avalanche control by explosives.

  4. Rock stress measurements using the LUT-Gauge overcoring method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leijon, B.

    1988-04-01

    With overcoring techniques, rock stresses are determined indirectly from measurements of the dimensional changes of a borehole, occurring when the rock volume surrounding the hole is isolated from the stresses in the host rock. This thesis describes the development and application of an overcoring technique. The key-component of the instrumentation that has been developed is a triaxial borehole strain cell, referred to as the LUT-Gauge. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of the instrumentation. Special emphasis was given to determining temperature sensitivity of the measuring system since this was identified as a potential source of measurement error. Results indicated good instrument reliability and that the measurement error due to temperature variations typically experienced under field conditions is ± 1 MPa or less. The technique was also evaluated by a series of field tests. Comparison of the results obtained by the different methods showed satisfactory agreement. Analysis of the comprehensive field data collected showed that the confidence that can be attached to an overcoring test is largely governed by the mechanical characteristics of the overcored specimen. Expressed as the standard deviation of the mean stress magnitude, the scatter obtained from repeated testing within a borehole section of about 10 m in length, is found to be ± 4 MPa or less. Rock engineering investigations typically refer to a scale of hundreds of metres or more. This study has demonstrated the existence of significant variations of the stress field on this scale. These variations thus impose difficulties in the application of stress data to the analysis of problems in rock engineering, since the pointwise results obtained from stress measurements cannot be extrapolated with good confidence. (30 refs.) (author)

  5. Test with different stress measurement methods in two orthogonal bore holes in Aespoe HRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janson, Thomas; Stigsson, Martin

    2002-12-01

    Within the scope of work, to provide the necessary rock mechanics support for the site investigations, SKB has studied some available pieces of equipment for in situ stress measurements in deep boreholes. A project with the objective to compare three different pieces of equipment for in situ stress measurements under similar conditions has been carried out. The main objective for the project is to compare the three different pieces of equipment for in situ stress measurements and find a strategy for SKB's Site Investigations to determine the state of stress in the rock mass. Two units of equipment use the overcoring method while the third uses the hydraulic fracturing method. The overcoring was performed by AECL, using Deep Door stopper Gauge System (DDGS), and SwedPower, using their triaxial strain measuring instrument (Borre Probe). MeSy Geo Systeme GmbH performed the hydraulic fracturing. The DDGS system is a new method to SKB while the experience of the SwedPower overcoring and the hydraulic fracturing methods are long. The tests were performed in the same orthogonal boreholes at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Oskarshamn, Sweden. The measured results have been verified against known conditions at the Aespoe HRL. The results from the three in situ stress measurement methods rose more questions than answers. Which illustrate the complexity to determine the in situ stresses in a rock mass. To understand the difference in results and answer the questions, it was necessary to do deeper investigations such as laboratory tests and theoretical calculations such as geological structure model, analysis of the influence of a nearby fracture, P-wave measurements, uniaxial tests on small cores from the HQ-3 core, theoretical and numerical analyses of the hole bottom (theoretical strains, stress concentrations and microcracking), auditing of DDGS measurements results and assumptions in the DDGS analyse and microscopy investigations on the cores. The following conclusions

  6. Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stress for industrial application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minakawa, Nobuaki

    1999-01-01

    The neutron diffraction method is used to measure the inner strain distribution of material using the penetrating power of neutron as one of the effective use of the research reactor for the study and to evaluate a correct fatigue and a lifetime. Internal residual stress measurements have attracted great interest in material science where it is especially important to know the distribution of the internal stress when we estimated the strength of construction materials or processed goods for the industrial applications. This measurement can be applied to the study of hardening of processed goods, metal fatigue, strain of welding. Conventional techniques to measure strain such as strain gauge method, optical interference fringes method, X-ray diffraction method, Raman spectroscopic analysis method, and magnetostriction method, etc. can measure the strain only near the surface of materials. On the other hand, neutron diffractometer for residual stress analysis, RESA, installed at T2-1 port of JRR-3M enables us to study the internal stress non-destructively. (J.P.N.)

  7. Quantum correlation measurements in interferometric gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynov, D. V.; Frolov, V. V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Izumi, K.; Miao, H.; Mavalvala, N.; Hall, E. D.; Lanza, R.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R. X.; Anderson, S. B.; Ananyeva, A.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Aston, S. M.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Batch, J. C.; Bell, A. S.; Betzwieser, J.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Blair, C. D.; Bork, R.; Brooks, A. F.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Countryman, S. T.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Danzmann, K.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Driggers, J. C.; Dwyer, S. E.; Effler, A.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fair, H.; Fernández Galiana, A.; Fisher, R. P.; Fritschel, P.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Grote, H.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Heintze, M. C.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Hough, J.; Jones, R.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kijbunchoo, N.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kuehn, G.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lormand, M.; Lundgren, A. P.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Mendell, G.; Merilh, E. L.; Meyers, P. M.; Miller, J.; Mittleman, R.; Moreno, G.; Mueller, G.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Palamos, J. R.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Phelps, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I.; Principe, M.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Raab, F. J.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Robertson, N. A.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Ryan, K.; Sadecki, T.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Savage, R. L.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Sellers, D.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sigg, D.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Sorazu, B.; Staley, A.; Strain, K. A.; Tanner, D. B.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Walker, M.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Weaver, B.; Weiss, R.; Weßels, P.; Willke, B.; Wipf, C. C.; Worden, J.; Wu, G.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Zhang, L.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LSC Instrument Authors

    2017-04-01

    Quantum fluctuations in the phase and amplitude quadratures of light set limitations on the sensitivity of modern optical instruments. The sensitivity of the interferometric gravitational-wave detectors, such as the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), is limited by quantum shot noise, quantum radiation pressure noise, and a set of classical noises. We show how the quantum properties of light can be used to distinguish these noises using correlation techniques. Particularly, in the first part of the paper we show estimations of the coating thermal noise and gas phase noise, hidden below the quantum shot noise in the Advanced LIGO sensitivity curve. We also make projections on the observatory sensitivity during the next science runs. In the second part of the paper we discuss the correlation technique that reveals the quantum radiation pressure noise from the background of classical noises and shot noise. We apply this technique to the Advanced LIGO data, collected during the first science run, and experimentally estimate the quantum correlations and quantum radiation pressure noise in the interferometer.

  8. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...

  9. Dissipation of Impact Stress Waves within the Artificial Blasting Damage Zone in the Surrounding Rocks of Deep Roadway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Ning

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial explosions are commonly used to prevent rockburst in deep roadways. However, the dissipation of the impact stress wave within the artificial blasting damage zone (ABDZ of the rocks surrounding a deep roadway has not yet been clarified. The surrounding rocks were divided into the elastic zone, blasting damage zone, plastic zone, and anchorage zone in this research. Meanwhile, the ABDZ was divided into the pulverizing area, fractured area, and cracked area from the inside out. Besides, the model of the normal incidence of the impact stress waves in the ABDZ was established; the attenuation coefficient of the amplitude of the impact stress waves was obtained after it passed through the intact rock mass, and ABDZ, to the anchorage zone. In addition, a numerical simulation was used to study the dynamic response of the vertical stress and impact-induced vibration energy in the surrounding rocks. By doing so, the dissipation of the impact stress waves within the ABDZ of the surrounding rocks was revealed. As demonstrated in the field application, the establishment of the ABDZ in the surrounding rocks reduced the effect of the impact-induced vibration energy on the anchorage support system of the roadway.

  10. Ocean Wind and Wave Measurements Using X-Band Marine Radar: A Comprehensive Review

    OpenAIRE

    Weimin Huang; Xinlong Liu; Eric W. Gill

    2017-01-01

    Ocean wind and wave parameters can be measured by in-situ sensors such as anemometers and buoys. Since the 1980s, X-band marine radar has evolved as one of the remote sensing instruments for such purposes since its sea surface images contain considerable wind and wave information. The maturity and accuracy of X-band marine radar wind and wave measurements have already enabled relevant commercial products to be used in real-world applications. The goal of this paper is to provide a comprehensi...

  11. A gravitational-wave standard siren measurement of the Hubble constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Angelova, S. V.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atallah, D. V.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aultoneal, K.; Austin, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barkett, K.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bawaj, M.; Bayley, J. C.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bero, J. J.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonilla, E.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bossie, K.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderón; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chase, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Chatziioannou, K.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H.-P.; Chia, H.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Clearwater, P.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Cohen, D.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordero-Carrión, I.; Corley, K. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Dálya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; da Silva Costa, C. F.; Datrier, L. E. H.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; de, S.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; de Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Demos, N.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; de Pietri, R.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; Derosa, R. T.; de Rossi, C.; Desalvo, R.; de Varona, O.; Devenson, J.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; di Fiore, L.; di Giovanni, M.; di Girolamo, T.; di Lieto, A.; di Pace, S.; di Palma, I.; di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Dovale Álvarez, M.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Dreissigacker, C.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dupej, P.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Estevez, D.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fee, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finstad, D.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fishbach, M.; Fisher, R. P.; Fitz-Axen, M.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Font, J. A.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.

    2017-11-01

    On 17 August 2017, the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors observed the gravitational-wave event GW170817—a strong signal from the merger of a binary neutron-star system. Less than two seconds after the merger, a γ-ray burst (GRB 170817A) was detected within a region of the sky consistent with the LIGO-Virgo-derived location of the gravitational-wave source. This sky region was subsequently observed by optical astronomy facilities, resulting in the identification of an optical transient signal within about ten arcseconds of the galaxy NGC 4993. This detection of GW170817 in both gravitational waves and electromagnetic waves represents the first ‘multi-messenger’ astronomical observation. Such observations enable GW170817 to be used as a ‘standard siren’ (meaning that the absolute distance to the source can be determined directly from the gravitational-wave measurements) to measure the Hubble constant. This quantity represents the local expansion rate of the Universe, sets the overall scale of the Universe and is of fundamental importance to cosmology. Here we report a measurement of the Hubble constant that combines the distance to the source inferred purely from the gravitational-wave signal with the recession velocity inferred from measurements of the redshift using the electromagnetic data. In contrast to previous measurements, ours does not require the use of a cosmic ‘distance ladder’: the gravitational-wave analysis can be used to estimate the luminosity distance out to cosmological scales directly, without the use of intermediate astronomical distance measurements. We determine the Hubble constant to be about 70 kilometres per second per megaparsec. This value is consistent with existing measurements, while being completely independent of them. Additional standard siren measurements from future gravitational-wave sources will enable the Hubble constant to be constrained to high precision.

  12. A gravitational-wave standard siren measurement of the Hubble constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-02

    On 17 August 2017, the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors observed the gravitational-wave event GW170817-a strong signal from the merger of a binary neutron-star system. Less than two seconds after the merger, a γ-ray burst (GRB 170817A) was detected within a region of the sky consistent with the LIGO-Virgo-derived location of the gravitational-wave source. This sky region was subsequently observed by optical astronomy facilities, resulting in the identification of an optical transient signal within about ten arcseconds of the galaxy NGC 4993. This detection of GW170817 in both gravitational waves and electromagnetic waves represents the first 'multi-messenger' astronomical observation. Such observations enable GW170817 to be used as a 'standard siren' (meaning that the absolute distance to the source can be determined directly from the gravitational-wave measurements) to measure the Hubble constant. This quantity represents the local expansion rate of the Universe, sets the overall scale of the Universe and is of fundamental importance to cosmology. Here we report a measurement of the Hubble constant that combines the distance to the source inferred purely from the gravitational-wave signal with the recession velocity inferred from measurements of the redshift using the electromagnetic data. In contrast to previous measurements, ours does not require the use of a cosmic 'distance ladder': the gravitational-wave analysis can be used to estimate the luminosity distance out to cosmological scales directly, without the use of intermediate astronomical distance measurements. We determine the Hubble constant to be about 70 kilometres per second per megaparsec. This value is consistent with existing measurements, while being completely independent of them. Additional standard siren measurements from future gravitational-wave sources will enable the Hubble constant to be constrained to high precision.

  13. A finite element model to study the effect of tissue anisotropy on ex vivo arterial shear wave elastography measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakova, D A; Debusschere, N; Caenen, A; Iannaccone, F; Pernot, M; Swillens, A; Segers, P

    2017-07-07

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is an ultrasound (US) diagnostic method for measuring the stiffness of soft tissues based on generated shear waves (SWs). SWE has been applied to bulk tissues, but in arteries it is still under investigation. Previously performed studies in arteries or arterial phantoms demonstrated the potential of SWE to measure arterial wall stiffness-a relevant marker in prediction of cardiovascular diseases. This study is focused on numerical modelling of SWs in ex vivo equine aortic tissue, yet based on experimental SWE measurements with the tissue dynamically loaded while rotating the US probe to investigate the sensitivity of SWE to the anisotropic structure. A good match with experimental shear wave group speed results was obtained. SWs were sensitive to the orthotropy and nonlinearity of the material. The model also allowed to study the nature of the SWs by performing 2D FFT-based and analytical phase analyses. A good match between numerical group velocities derived using the time-of-flight algorithm and derived from the dispersion curves was found in the cross-sectional and axial arterial views. The complexity of solving analytical equations for nonlinear orthotropic stressed plates was discussed.

  14. Chorus whistler wave source scales as determined from multipoint Van Allen Probe measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapitov, Oleksiy; Mozer, Forrest; Blum, Lauren; Bonnell, John; Wygant, John

    2017-04-01

    Whistler-mode chorus waves are a particularly important process in outer radiation belt dynamics due to their key role in controlling the acceleration and scattering of electrons over a very wide energy range. The key parameters for both nonlinear and quasi-linear treatment of wave-particle interactions are the temporal and spatial scales of the wave source region and coherence of the wave field perturbations. Both of these scales, the source scale and the coherence scale, are not well-established experimentally, mostly because of a lack of VLF waveform data. We present an unprecedentedly long interval of coordinated VLF waveform measurements (sampled at 16384 s-1) aboard the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft. The cross spacecraft distance varied from about 100 up to 5000 km. Using time-domain correlation techniques, the chorus source regions have been determined to be about 450-550 km for upper band chorus waves with amplitude less than 100 pT and up to 1000 km for larger amplitude lower band chorus waves. The ratio between wave amplitudes measured on the two spacecraft is also examined and reveals that the wave amplitude distribution within a region of chorus element generation can be well approximated by the Gaussian with the characteristic distance r0 around 300 km. This work was supported by the JHU/APL contract 922613 (RBSP-EFW) and NASA Grant NNX16AF85G.

  15. Sex differences in objective measures of sleep in post-traumatic stress disorder and healthy control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Anne; Metzler, Thomas J; Ruoff, Leslie M; Inslicht, Sabra S; Rao, Madhu; Talbot, Lisa S; Neylan, Thomas C

    2013-12-01

    A growing literature shows prominent sex effects for risk for post-traumatic stress disorder and associated medical comorbid burden. Previous research indicates that post-traumatic stress disorder is associated with reduced slow wave sleep, which may have implications for overall health, and abnormalities in rapid eye movement sleep, which have been implicated in specific post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, but most research has been conducted in male subjects. We therefore sought to compare objective measures of sleep in male and female post-traumatic stress disorder subjects with age- and sex-matched control subjects. We used a cross-sectional, 2 × 2 design (post-traumatic stress disorder/control × female/male) involving83 medically healthy, non-medicated adults aged 19-39 years in the inpatient sleep laboratory. Visual electroencephalographic analysis demonstrated that post-traumatic stress disorder was associated with lower slow wave sleep duration (F(3,82)  = 7.63, P = 0.007) and slow wave sleep percentage (F(3,82)  = 6.11, P = 0.016). There was also a group × sex interaction effect for rapid eye movement sleep duration (F(3,82)  = 4.08, P = 0.047) and rapid eye movement sleep percentage (F(3,82)  = 4.30, P = 0.041), explained by greater rapid eye movement sleep in post-traumatic stress disorder females compared to control females, a difference not seen in male subjects. Quantitative electroencephalography analysis demonstrated that post-traumatic stress disorder was associated with lower energy in the delta spectrum (F(3,82)  = 6.79, P = 0.011) in non-rapid eye movement sleep. Slow wave sleep and delta findings were more pronounced in males. Removal of post-traumatic stress disorder subjects with comorbid major depressive disorder, who had greater post-traumatic stress disorder severity, strengthened delta effects but reduced rapid eye movement effects to non-significance. These findings support previous evidence that post

  16. Operationalizing cognitive vulnerability and stress from the perspective of the hopelessness theory: a multi-wave longitudinal study of children of affectively ill parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, John R Z; McGirr, Alexander

    2007-11-01

    The current study tested the diathesis-stress component of the hopelessness theory (HT) in a sample of youth using (1) a weakest link approach towards operationalizing cognitive vulnerability (e.g. a child's degree of vulnerability is determined by his/her most depressogenic inferential style; DIS) and (2) an idiographic approach towards operationalizing high stress (e.g. high stress is when a child is experiencing a level of stress that is higher than his/her own average level of stress). We also examined whether the association between within-subject fluctuations in hassles and depressive symptoms in cognitively vulnerable youth was moderated by absolute stress levels (the between-subject effect of stress). A multi-wave longitudinal design was used to examine whether the association between within-subject fluctuations in hassles and depressive symptoms was moderated by a depressogenic weakest link. At Time 1, 140 children (between 6 and 14 years of age) of parents with a history of major depressive episodes completed measures assessing DISs and depressive symptoms. Every 6 weeks, for the subsequent year, children completed measures assessing depressive symptoms and hassles. The results of hierarchical linear modelling analyses indicated that a depressogenic weakest link was associated with greater elevations in depressive symptoms following elevations in hassles in girls but not in boys. Results provide partial support for the applicability of the diathesis-stress component of the HT to youth. Integration of the current findings with those obtained in past research examining the diathesis-stress component of the hopelessness theory in youth suggests the utilization of an idiographic approach to examining vulnerability-stress theories may potentially lead to an increased understanding of gender differences in depression.

  17. Inversion of residual stress profiles from ultrasonic Rayleigh wave dispersion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, P.; Spies, M.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate theoretically and with synthetic data the performance of several inversion methods to infer a residual stress state from ultrasonic surface wave dispersion data. We show that this particular problem may reveal in relevant materials undesired behaviors for some methods that could be reliably applied to infer other properties. We focus on two methods, one based on a Taylor-expansion, and another one based on a piecewise linear expansion regularized by a singular value decomposition. We explain the instabilities of the Taylor-based method by highlighting singularities in the series of coefficients. At the same time, we show that the other method can successfully provide performances which only weakly depend on the material.

  18. Ultrasonic measurement of through-thickness stress gradients in textured sheet metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man Chising; Li Jianbo; Fan Xingyan; Lu Weiyang

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to explore the possibility of using the dispersion of high-frequency Rayleigh waves for the evaluation of through-thickness stress gradients at the surface of metal sheets. We consider an orthorhombic sheet of cubic metal with through-thickness inhomogeneities in stress and texture, and adopt a coordinate system under which the rolling (RD), transverse (TD), and normal direction (ND) of the sheet are taken as the 1-, 2-, and 3-direction, respectively. We restrict our attention to the special case where only the stress components T 11 (x 3 ) and T 22 (x 3 ) in the sheet are nonzero, and consider only Rayleigh waves of sufficiently high frequency for which the sheet can be taken as the half-space x 3 ≥0. For Rayleigh waves of two different frequencies (with wave numbers k 1 and k k 2 respectively) propagating on the same wave path along either RD or TD, we appeal to an analysis of J. Li and Man to obtain a high-frequency asymptotic formula which gives the relative change in time-of-flight Δt/t 0 as (1/k 1 -1/k 2 ) times a linear combination of the derivatives T 11 ' (0), T 22 ' (0), W 4m0 ' (0)(m=0,2,4) and W 6m0 (0)(m=0,2,4,6) at the surface are ascertained and the material constants in the acoustoelastic consitutive equation of this polycrystal are known. An experiment was performed on an AA7075-T651 aluminum alloy beam, in which Δt/t 0 was measured for various values of T 11 (0) and T 11 ' (0) produced by beam bending (with (T 22 ≡0). The relevant texture coefficients of the beam were measured by X-ray diffraction. To obtain specific predictions from the aforementioned symptotic formula, we replace the material constants of the sample by their counterparts predicted for polycrystalline (pure) aluminum by the Man-Paroni model. The predictions and Δt/t 0 are then compared with the experimental results

  19. Measurement and structure of spiral wave response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierckx, Hans; Verschelde, Henri; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2017-09-01

    The rotating spiral waves that emerge in diverse natural and man-made systems typically exhibit a particle-like behaviour since their adjoint critical eigenmodes (response functions) are often seen to be localised around the spiral core. We present a simple method to numerically compute response functions for circular-core and meandering spirals by recording their drift response to many elementary perturbations. Although our method is computationally more expensive than solving the adjoint system, our technique is fully parallellisable, does not suffer from memory limitations and can be applied to experiments. For a cardiac tissue model with the linear spiral core, we find that the response functions are localised near the turning points of the trajectory.

  20. Wave Shape and Impact Pressure Measurements at a Rock Coast Cliff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, S. J.; Rosser, N. J.; Brain, M.; Vann Jones, E. C.

    2016-02-01

    Rock coast research focuses largely on wave behaviour across beaches and shore platforms but rarely considers direct wave interaction with cliffs. Hydraulic action is one of the most important drivers of erosion along rock coasts. The magnitude of wave impact pressure has been shown by numerical and laboratory studies to be related to the wave shape. In deep water, a structure is only subjected to the hydrostatic pressure due to the oscillating clapotis. Dynamic pressures, related to the wave celerity, are exerted in shallower water when the wave is breaking at the point of impact; very high magnitude, short duration shock pressures are theorised to occur when the approaching wavefront is vertical. As such, wave shape may directly influence the potential of the impact to weaken rock and cause erosion. Measurements of impact pressure at coastal cliffs are limited, and the occurrence and influence of this phenomenon is currently poorly constrained. To address this, we have undertaken a field monitoring study on the magnitude and vertical distribution of wave impact pressures at the rocky, macro-tidal coastline of Staithes, North Yorkshire, UK. A series of piezo-resistive pressure transducers and a camera were installed at the base of the cliff during low tide. Transducers were deployed vertically up the cliff face and aligned shore-normal to capture the variation in static and dynamic pressure with height during a full spring tidal cycle. Five minute bursts of 5 kHz pressure readings and 4 Hz wave imaging were sampled every 30 minutes for six hours during high tide. Pressure measurements were then compensated for temperature and combined with wave imaging to produce a pressure time series and qualitative wave shape category for each wave impact. Results indicate the presence of a non-linear relationship between pressure impact magnitude, the occurrence of shock pressures, wave shape and tidal stage, and suggest that breaker type on impact (and controls thereof) may

  1. Increased sensitivity of prolonged P-wave during exercise stress test in detection of angiographically documented coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wsol, Agnieszka; Wydra, Wioletta; Chmielewski, Marek; Swiatowiec, Andrzej; Kuch, Marek

    2017-01-01

    A retrospective study was designed to investigate P-wave duration changes in exercise stress test (EST) for the prediction of angiographically documented substantial coronary artery disease (CAD). We analyzed 265 cases of patients, who underwent EST and subsequently coronary angiography. Analysis of P-wave duration was performed in leads II, V5 at rest, and in the recovery period. The sensitivity and specificity for the isolated ST-segment depression were only 31% and 76%, respectively. The combination of ST-depression with other exercise-induced clinical and electrocardio-graphic abnormalities (chest pain, ventricular arrhythmia, hypotension, left bundle branch block) was characterized by 41% sensitivity and 69% specificity. The combination of abnormal recovery P-wave duration (≥ 120 ms) with ST-depression and other exercise-induced abnormalities had 83% sensitivity but only 20% specificity. Combined analysis of increased delta P-wave duration, ST-depression and other exercise-induced abnormalities had 69% sensitivity and 42% specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of the increase in delta P-wave duration for left CAD was 69% and 47%, respectively, and for 3-vessel CAD 70% and 50%, respectively. The presence of arterial hypertension negatively influenced the prog-nostic value of P-wave changes in the stress test. The results of the study show that an addition of P-wave duration changes assessment to ST-depression analysis and other exercise-induced abnormalities increase sensitivity of EST, especially for left CAD and 3-vessel coronary disease. We have also provided evidence for the negative influence of the presence of arterial hypertension on the predictive value of P-wave changes in the stress test. (Cardiol J 2017; 24, 2: 159-166).

  2. Calibration of Heat Stress Monitor and its Measurement Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, Can

    2017-07-01

    Wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) equation is a heat stress index that gives information for the workers in the industrial areas. WBGT equation is described in ISO Standard 7243 (ISO 7243 in Hot environments—estimation of the heat stress on working man, based on the WBGT index, ISO, Geneva, 1982). WBGT is the result of the combined quantitative effects of the natural wet-bulb temperature, dry-bulb temperature, and air temperature. WBGT is a calculated parameter. WBGT uses input estimates, and heat stress monitor measures these quantities. In this study, the calibration method of a heat stress monitor is described, and the model function for measurement uncertainty is given. Sensitivity coefficients were derived according to GUM. Two-pressure humidity generators were used to generate a controlled environment. Heat stress monitor was calibrated inside of the generator. Two-pressure humidity generator, which is located in Turkish Standard Institution, was used as the reference device. This device is traceable to national standards. Two-pressure humidity generator includes reference temperature Pt-100 sensors. The reference sensor was sheltered with a wet wick for the calibration of natural wet-bulb thermometer. The reference sensor was centred into a black globe that has got 150 mm diameter for the calibration of the black globe thermometer.

  3. Chaos and Brain Wave Activity: Measures of Irregular Time Series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    West, Bruce

    1988-01-01

    Physiological measurements of the electrical activity of the brain may provide the predictive information necessary for a sensitive measure of the attention state of an airplane pilot or air traffic controller...

  4. Evaluation of methods for gravity wave extraction from middle-atmospheric lidar temperature measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ehard

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates commonly used methods of extracting gravity-wave-induced temperature perturbations from lidar measurements. The spectral response of these methods is characterized with the help of a synthetic data set with known temperature perturbations added to a realistic background temperature profile. The simulations are carried out with the background temperature being either constant or varying in time to evaluate the sensitivity to temperature perturbations not caused by gravity waves. The different methods are applied to lidar measurements over New Zealand, and the performance of the algorithms is evaluated. We find that the Butterworth filter performs best if gravity waves over a wide range of periods are to be extracted from lidar temperature measurements. The running mean method gives good results if only gravity waves with short periods are to be analyzed.

  5. S-wave velocity structures of the Taipei Basin, Taiwan, using microtremor array measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huey-Chu; Wu, Cheng-Feng; Lee, Feng-Mei; Hwang, Ruey-Der

    2015-04-01

    The S-wave velocity structures of the Taipei Basin in Taiwan are investigated using the array records of microtremors at 15 sites. Dispersion curves at these sites are calculated using the frequency-wavenumber (F-K) spectrum method. The S-wave velocity structures in the Taipei Basin are then estimated by employing surface wave inversion technique. Harder strata sites have higher phase velocities than softer sites. If the S-wave velocity of the Tertiary Basement is assumed to be 1000 m/s, then the Quaternary alluvial thicknesses in the Taipei Basin are between about 100 m and 650 m. The thickness of the alluvium gradually increases from the southeast to the northwest. The inversion results are also in good agreement with well-logging data and seismic reflection studies of the Taipei Basin. The study concludes that microtremor array measurement is a useful tool for estimating S-wave velocity structure.

  6. Development and Applications of Residual Stress Measurements Using Neutron Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The deep penetration and selective absorption of neutrons make them a powerful tool for the non-destructive testing of large samples of material or large objects. Residual stress that is formed in a material during manufacturing, welding, utilization or repair can be measured by means of neutron diffraction. In fact, neutron diffraction is the only non-destructive testing method which can facilitate three dimensional mapping of residual stress in a bulk component. Stress measurement using neutron beams is a technique that enables this kind of high quality non-destructive investigation, and provides insight into the material strain and stress state deep within engineering components and structures under various conditions representative of those which might be experienced in service. Such studies are of importance to improve the quality of industrial components in production and to optimize design criteria in applications. Anisotropies in macroscopic properties such as thermal and electrical conductivities, for instance of fuel elements, and mechanical properties of materials depend on the textures developed during their preparation or thermal treatment. Such textures also can be studied using neutron diffraction techniques. There is currently substantial scientific and industrial demand for high quality non-destructive residual stress measurements, and the continuing competitive drive to optimize performance and minimize weight in many applications indicates that this demand will continue to grow. As such, the neutron diffraction technique is an increasingly important tool for mechanical and materials engineering in the search for improved manufacturing processes to reduce stress and distortion. Considering this trend, and in accordance with its purpose of promoting the peaceful use of nuclear applications, in 2006-2009 the IAEA organized a Coordinated Research Project on the Development and Application of the Techniques of Residual Stress Measurements in Materials

  7. Principles of the measurement of residual stress by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, G.A.; Ezeilo, A.N. [Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-11-01

    The presence of residual stresses in engineering components can significantly affect their load carrying capacity and resistance to fracture. In order to quantify their effect it is necessary to know their magnitude and distribution. Neutron diffraction is the most suitable method of obtaining these stresses non-destructively in the interior of components. In this paper the principles of the technique are described. A monochromatic beam of neutrons, or time of flight measurements, can be employed. In each case, components of strain are determined directly from changes in the lattice spacings between crystals. Residual stresses can then be calculated from these strains. The experimental procedures for making the measurements are described and precautions for achieving reliable results discussed. These include choice of crystal planes on which to make measurements, extent of masking needed to identify a suitable sampling volume, type of detector and alignment procedure. Methods of achieving a stress free reference are also considered. A selection of practical examples is included to demonstrate the success of the technique. (author) 14 figs., 1 tab., 18 refs.

  8. Principles of the measurement of residual stress by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, G.A.; Ezeilo, A.N.

    1996-01-01

    The presence of residual stresses in engineering components can significantly affect their load carrying capacity and resistance to fracture. In order to quantify their effect it is necessary to know their magnitude and distribution. Neutron diffraction is the most suitable method of obtaining these stresses non-destructively in the interior of components. In this paper the principles of the technique are described. A monochromatic beam of neutrons, or time of flight measurements, can be employed. In each case, components of strain are determined directly from changes in the lattice spacings between crystals. Residual stresses can then be calculated from these strains. The experimental procedures for making the measurements are described and precautions for achieving reliable results discussed. These include choice of crystal planes on which to make measurements, extent of masking needed to identify a suitable sampling volume, type of detector and alignment procedure. Methods of achieving a stress free reference are also considered. A selection of practical examples is included to demonstrate the success of the technique. (author) 14 figs., 1 tab., 18 refs

  9. Measurement of the dispersion and attenuation of cylindrical ultrasonic guided waves in long bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Dean; Wang, Weiqi; Wang, YuanYuan; Le, Lawrence H; Zhou, Yuqing

    2009-04-01

    Osteoporotic bones are likely to have less cortical bone than healthy bones. The velocities of guided waves propagating in a long cylindrical bone are very sensitive to bone properties and cortical thickness (CTh). This work studies the dispersion and attenuation of ultrasonic guided waves propagating in long cylindrical bone. A hollow cylinder filled with a viscous liquid was used to model the long bone and then to calculate the theoretical phase and group velocities, as well as the attenuation of the waves. The generation and selection of guided wave modes were based on theoretical dispersive curves. The phase velocity and attenuation of cylindrical guided wave modes, such as L(0,1), L(0,2) and L(0,3), were measured in bovine tibia using angled beam transducers at various propagation distances ranging from 75 to 160 mm. The results showed that the phase velocity of the L(0,2) guided wave mode decreased with an increase in CTh. The attenuation of the low cylindrical guided wave modes was a nonlinear function that increased with propagation distance and mode order. The L(0,2) mode had a different attenuation for each CTh. The experimental results were in good agreement with the predicted values. Cylindrical guided waves of low-frequency and low-order have been shown to demonstrate more dispersion and less attenuation and should, therefore, be used to evaluate long bone.

  10. A Hydraulic Stress Measurement System for Deep Borehole Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ask, Maria; Ask, Daniel; Cornet, Francois; Nilsson, Tommy

    2017-04-01

    Luleå University of Technology (LTU) is developing and building a wire-line system for hydraulic rock stress measurements, with funding from the Swedish Research Council and Luleå University of Technology. In this project, LTU is collaborating with University of Strasbourg and Geosigma AB. The stress state influences drilling and drillability, as well as rock mass stability and permeability. Therefore, knowledge about the state of in-situ stress (stress magnitudes, and orientations) and its spatial variation with depth is essential for many underground rock engineering projects, for example for underground storage of hazardous material (e.g. nuclear waste, carbon dioxide), deep geothermal exploration, and underground infrastructure (e.g. tunneling, hydropower dams). The system is designed to conduct hydraulic stress testing in slim boreholes. There are three types of test methods: (1) hydraulic fracturing, (2) sleeve fracturing and (3) hydraulic testing of pre-existing fractures. These are robust methods for determining in situ stresses from boreholes. Integration of the three methods allows determination of the three-dimensional stress tensor and its spatial variation with depth in a scientific unambiguously way. The stress system is composed of a downhole and a surface unit. The downhole unit consists of hydraulic fracturing equipment (straddle packers and downhole imaging tool) and their associated data acquisition systems. The testing system is state of the art in several aspects including: (1) Large depth range (3 km), (2) Ability to test three borehole dimensions (N=76 mm, H=96 mm, and P=122 mm), (3) Resistivity imager maps the orientation of tested fracture; (4) Highly stiff and resistive to corrosion downhole testing equipment; and (5) Very detailed control on the injection flow rate and cumulative volume is obtained by a hydraulic injection pump with variable piston rate, and a highly sensitive flow-meter. At EGU General Assembly 2017, we would like to

  11. Neutron measurement of residual stresses in a used railway rail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, P.J.; Low, K.S.; Mills, G.; Webster, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The high resolution neutron diffraction technique has been applied to determine, non-destructively, the residual stress distribution developed in the head of a railway rail after normal service. Measurements were made, using the neutron strain scanner at the Institute Laue Langevin, Grenoble, on a transverse slice of rail 12mm thick taken from a section of straight track. The rail head was scanned in the three principal orientations in a series of parallel traverses sufficiently close to enable a two-dimensional matrix of data to be accumulated and vertical, transverse and longitudinal residual stress contours to be drawn. The results demonstrate the effectiveness and unique characteristics of the neutron technique to determine nondestructively and continuously the residual stresses inside engineering components

  12. Time series analysis of continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar wind measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Mikkelsen, Torben; Mann, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused 1.55 mu m continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar on observed wind turbulence measured in the atmospheric surface layer over homogeneous terrain is described and analysed. Comparison of Lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra simultaneou......The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused 1.55 mu m continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar on observed wind turbulence measured in the atmospheric surface layer over homogeneous terrain is described and analysed. Comparison of Lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra...

  13. Analysis and Numerical Simulation on the Reduction Effect of Stress Waves Caused by Water Jet Slotting Near Blasting Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengfeng Su

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most serious “side effects” of blast excavation, blast-induced vibration must be controlled for existing buildings and human beings. This paper proposes a method for blast-induced vibration reduction with water jet assistance according to the cutting characters of low-noised, environment-friendly water jet. The mechanism of vibration-isolation with water jet assistance was analyzed, and the stress wave energy attenuation models were established based on blasting theory and stress wave theory. Influence law on shock wave attenuation by vibration-isolation slot was studied by numerical simulation. Simulation results agree with the theoretical analysis roughly. The results of this study put forward a method for blast-induced vibration near blasting source and provide a certain theoretical basis.

  14. Alfven waves in the auroral ionosphere: A numerical model compared with measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, D.J.; Kelley, M.C.; Vickrey, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    The authors solve a linear numerical model of Alfven waves reflecting from the high-latitude ionosphere, both to better understanding the role of the ionosphere in the magnetosphere/ionosphere coupling process and to compare model results with in situ measurements. They use the model to compute the frequency-dependent amplitude and phase relations between the meridional electric and the zonal magnetic fields due to Alfven waves. These relations are compared with measurements taken by an auroral sounding rocket flow in the morningside oval and by the HILAT satellite traversing the oval at local noon. The sounding rocket's trajectory was mostly parallel to the auroral oval, and is measured enhanced fluctuating field energy in regions of electron precipitation. The rocket-measured phase data are in excellent agreement with the Alfven wave model, and the relation between the modeled and the measured by HILAT are related by the height-integrated Pedersen conductivity Σ p , indicating that the measured field fluctuations were due mainly to structured field-aligned current systems. A reason for the relative lack of Alfven wave energy in the HILAT measurements could be the fact that the satellite traveled mostly perpendicular to the oval and therefore quickly traversed narrow regions of electron precipitation and associated wave activity

  15. Scanning laser vibrometer measurement of guided waves in rails

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available from the measured frequency responses by using a pseudo-inverse technique and mode shape information computed from a semi-analytical finite element model. Scanning laser measurements were performed in the field at distances of 10m and 500m from a...

  16. Raman microprobe measurements of stress in ion implanted materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nugent, K.W.; Prawer, S.; Weiser, P.S.; Dooley, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    Raman microprobe measurements of ion implanted diamond and silicon have shown significant shifts in the Raman line due to stresses in the materials. The Raman line shifts to higher energy if the stress is compressive and to lower energy for tensile stress 1 . The silicon sample was implanted in a 60 μm square with 2.56 x 10 17 ions per square centimeter of 2 MeV Helium. This led to the formation of raised squares with the top 370mm above the original surface. In Raman studies of silicon using visible light, the depth of penetration of the laser beam into the sample is much less than one micron. It was found that the Raman line is due to the silicon overlying the damage region. The diamond sample was implanted with 2 x 10 15 ions per square centimeter of 2.8 MeV carbon. It was concluded that the Raman spectrum could provide information concerning both the magnitude and the direction of stress in an ion implanted sample. It was possible in some cases to determine whether the stress direction is parallel or perpendicular to the sample surface. 1 refs., 2 figs

  17. Raman microprobe measurements of stress in ion implanted materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, K.W.; Prawer, S.; Weiser, P.S.; Dooley, S.P. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Raman microprobe measurements of ion implanted diamond and silicon have shown significant shifts in the Raman line due to stresses in the materials. The Raman line shifts to higher energy if the stress is compressive and to lower energy for tensile stress{sup 1}. The silicon sample was implanted in a 60 {mu}m square with 2.56 x 10{sup 17} ions per square centimeter of 2 MeV Helium. This led to the formation of raised squares with the top 370mm above the original surface. In Raman studies of silicon using visible light, the depth of penetration of the laser beam into the sample is much less than one micron. It was found that the Raman line is due to the silicon overlying the damage region. The diamond sample was implanted with 2 x 10{sup 15} ions per square centimeter of 2.8 MeV carbon. It was concluded that the Raman spectrum could provide information concerning both the magnitude and the direction of stress in an ion implanted sample. It was possible in some cases to determine whether the stress direction is parallel or perpendicular to the sample surface. 1 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Stress Rupture Life Reliability Measures for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Thesken, John C.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie

    2007-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are often used for storing pressurant gases onboard spacecraft. Kevlar (DuPont), glass, carbon and other more recent fibers have all been used as overwraps. Due to the fact that overwraps are subjected to sustained loads for an extended period during a mission, stress rupture failure is a major concern. It is therefore important to ascertain the reliability of these vessels by analysis, since the testing of each flight design cannot be completed on a practical time scale. The present paper examines specifically a Weibull statistics based stress rupture model and considers the various uncertainties associated with the model parameters. The paper also examines several reliability estimate measures that would be of use for the purpose of recertification and for qualifying flight worthiness of these vessels. Specifically, deterministic values for a point estimate, mean estimate and 90/95 percent confidence estimates of the reliability are all examined for a typical flight quality vessel under constant stress. The mean and the 90/95 percent confidence estimates are computed using Monte-Carlo simulation techniques by assuming distribution statistics of model parameters based also on simulation and on the available data, especially the sample sizes represented in the data. The data for the stress rupture model are obtained from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) stress rupture testing program, carried out for the past 35 years. Deterministic as well as probabilistic sensitivities are examined.

  19. Combined fluorescence, reflectance, and ground measurements of a stressed Norway spruce forest for forest damage assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banninger, C.

    1991-01-01

    The detection and monitoring of stress and damage in forested areas is of utmost importance to forest managers for planning purposes. Remote sensing are the most suitable means to obtain this information. This requires that remote sensing data employed in a forest survey be properly chosen and utilized for their ability to measure canopy spectral features directly related to key tree and canopy properties that are indicators of forest health and vitality. Plant reflectance in the visible to short wave IR regions (400 to 2500 nm) provides information on its biochemical, biophysical, and morphological make up, whereas plant fluorescence in the 400 to 750 nm region is more indicative of the capacity and functioning of its photosynthetic apparatus. A measure of both these spectral properties can be used to provide an accurate assessment of stress and damage within the forest canopy. Foliar chlorophyll and nitrogen are essential biochemical constituents required for the proper functioning and maintenance of a plant's biological processes. Chlorophyll-a is the prime reactive center for photosynthesis, by which a plant converts CO2 and H2O into necessary plant products. Nitrogen forms an important component of the amino-acids, enzymes, proteins, alkaloids, and cyanogenic compounds that make up a plant, including its pigments. Both chlorophyll and nitrogen have characteristic absorption features in the visible to short wave IR region. By measuring the wavelength position and depth of these features and the fluorescence response of the foliage, the health and vitality of a canopy can be ascertained. Examples for a stressed Norway spruce forest in south-eastern Austria are presented.

  20. Linear and nonlinear modulus surfaces in stress space, from stress-strain measurements on Berea sandstone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boudjema

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The elastic response of many rocks to quasistatic stress changes is highly nonlinear and hysteretic, displaying discrete memory. Rocks also display unusual nonlinear response to dynamic stress changes. A model to describe the elastic behavior of rocks and other consolidated materials is called the Preisach-Mayergoyz (PM space model. In contrast to the traditional analytic approach to stress-strain, the PM space picture establishes a relationship between the quasistatic data and a number density of hysteretic mesoscopic elastic elements in the rock. The number density allows us to make quantitative predictions of dynamic elastic properties. Using the PM space model, we analyze a complex suite of quasistatic stress-strain data taken on Berea sandstone. We predict a dynamic bulk modulus and a dynamic shear modulus surface as a function of mean stress and shear stress. Our predictions for the dynamic moduli compare favorably to moduli derived from time of flight measurements. We derive a set of nonlinear elastic constants and a set of constants that describe the hysteretic behavior of the sandstone.

  1. A Study on Parametric Wave Estimation Based on Measured Ship Motions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Iseki, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    The paper studies parametric wave estimation based on the ‘wave buoy analogy’, and data and results obtained from the training ship Shioji-maru are compared with estimates of the sea states obtained from other measurements and observations. Furthermore, the estimating characteristics of the param......The paper studies parametric wave estimation based on the ‘wave buoy analogy’, and data and results obtained from the training ship Shioji-maru are compared with estimates of the sea states obtained from other measurements and observations. Furthermore, the estimating characteristics...... of the parametric model are discussed by considering the results of a similar estimation concept based on Bayesian modelling. The purpose of the latter comparison is not to favour the one estimation approach to the other but rather to highlight some of the advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches....

  2. A brute-force spectral approach for wave estimation using measured vessel motions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik D.; Brodtkorb, Astrid H.; Sørensen, Asgeir J.

    2018-01-01

    , and the procedure is simple in its mathematical formulation. The actual formulation is extending another recent work by including vessel advance speed and short-crested seas. Due to its simplicity, the procedure is computationally efficient, providing wave spectrum estimates in the order of a few seconds......The article introduces a spectral procedure for sea state estimation based on measurements of motion responses of a ship in a short-crested seaway. The procedure relies fundamentally on the wave buoy analogy, but the wave spectrum estimate is obtained in a direct - brute-force - approach......, and the estimation procedure will therefore be appealing to applications related to realtime, onboard control and decision support systems for safe and efficient marine operations. The procedure's performance is evaluated by use of numerical simulation of motion measurements, and it is shown that accurate wave...

  3. X ray measurement of residual stresses on metallic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbarin, P.; Convert, M.; Miege

    1983-01-01

    The principle of measuring residual stresses by X ray diffraction (the famous Bragg'law is used) may be applied at an industrial level. CETIM has perfected an outfit adjusted to measurements on the spot, which can be used on metallic parts of a large size. This paper describes this equipment, giving its advantages towards previous devices, and assessing measurements errors. Some actual cases for results obtained are given. This paper starts with a brief historical account and theoretical backgrounds of the method [fr

  4. Estimation of femoral bone density from trabecular direct wave and cortical guided wave ultrasound velocities measured at the proximal femur in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkmann, Reinhard; Dencks, Stefanie; Bremer, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    and of guided waves through cortical bone could be used to estimate BMD. In two centres, Kiel and Odense, we measured time-of-flight (TOF) of waves through the trabecular greater trochanter and cortical intertrochanter as well as a wave through soft tissue only. TOF was adjusted for leg width using ultrasound......Bone mineral density (BMD) of the proximal femur is a predictor of hip fracture risk. We developed a Quantitative Ultrasound (QUS) scanner for measurements at this site with similar performance (FemUS). In this study we tested if ultrasound velocities of direct waves through trabecular bone...

  5. Primary and Secondary Appraisals in Measuring Resilience to Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris B. Velichkovsky

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Measuring resilience to stress (or stress resistance validly and reliably is an important theoretical and practical problem. Process-oriented stress theories assume that primary and secondary appraisals play an important role in determining the level of resilience. In the present study, a model of resilience based on the analysis of the interplay between primary and secondary appraisal processes is developed. Resilience is high if benign primary appraisals of taxing situations are accompanied by secondary appraisals of coping resources as being sufficient for controlling stressors. In an implementation of the model, the quality of primary appraisals is assessed through the assessment of anxiety, anger and depression, which characterize the most typical cognitive-emotional reactions to demanding situations. The assessment of secondary appraisals is restricted to the analysis of psychophysiological (functional resources, which are involved in all forms of coping activities. The implementation of the model gives rise to a measure of resilience, which is shown to successfully predict the outcome of the stress process in a sample of Russian police officers.

  6. Measuring in-situ stress in deep boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    The hydrofracturing method of in-situ stress measurement is the only technique which has been proven to be reliable in boreholes below depths of 300 m. The method has been used in a variety of applications at depths of up to 5000m, and in a range of borehole diameters. The equipment used is composed of standard components from proven and long-established oil industry well-logging tools and is simple to operate. This is preferable to the delicate electrical devices used in the overcoring stress measurement method. Electrical components are difficult to waterproof, very small strains are monitored and the tendency of electrical circuits to drift, due to a variety of effects, makes interpretation of the results difficult. However, the interpretation of hydrofracturing test results is often not easy. Many factors can prevent ideal fracturing behaviour from occurring, in which case conventional analyses will yield incorrect answers. The complete state of stress can often not be determined and sweeping assumptions are commonly made about principal stress direction, which cannot always be subsequently verified. (author)

  7. Study of the directional spectrum of ocean waves using array, buoy and radar measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.

    reasons why PTPD methods for determining wave direction from array measure- ments have not become popular, the first being the insufficient documentation of Borgman [1974] in case of linear arrays; and the second being the failure of Esteva [1976... direction. Esteva, using ?consistency? within these 10 redundant estimates of wave direction as a criterion for accuracy, reported success in determining the direction of swell of 16s and failure in case of swell of 8s; and on the basis of computer...

  8. Accurate measurement of the time delay in the response of the LIGO gravitational wave detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Aso, Yoichi; Goetz, Evan; Kalmus, Peter; Matone, Luca; Márka, Szabolcs; Myers, Joshua; O’Reilly, Brian; Savage, Rick; Schwinberg, Paul; Siemens, Xavier; Sigg, Daniel; Smith, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    We present a method to precisely calibrate the time delay in a long baseline gravitational-wave interferometer. An accurate time stamp is crucial for data analysis of gravitational wave detectors, especially when performing coincidence and correlation analyses between multiple detectors. Our method uses an intensity-modulated radiation pressure force to actuate on the mirrors. The time delay is measured by comparing the phase of the signal at the actuation point with the phase of the recorded...

  9. Moderate Childhood Stress Buffers Against Depressive Response to Proximal Stressors: A Multi-Wave Prospective Study of Early Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapero, Benjamin G; Hamilton, Jessica L; Stange, Jonathan P; Liu, Richard T; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2015-11-01

    Although the majority of research in the field has focused on childhood stressors as a risk factor for psychopathology, a burgeoning body of literature has focused on the possible steeling effect of moderate types of stressful events. The current study investigated the effects of proximal life stressors on prospective changes in depressive symptoms, and whether a history of moderate childhood adversity would moderate this relationship in a multi-wave study of a diverse community sample of early adolescents (N = 163, 52 % female, 51 % Caucasian). Hierarchical linear modeling was run with four waves of data. Adolescents with greater moderately severe early life events evinced a blunted depressive symptom response to changes in proximal stressful events in the previous 9 months, compared to those with fewer early moderately severe experiences of adversity. These results held after controlling for between-subject factors such as race, gender, severe early life stress, and average stress over the four waves of data. Findings indicate that greater exposure to moderate childhood stressors may buffer against the negative effects of subsequent stressors, suggesting the importance of a nuanced developmental approach to studying the effects of early life stress.

  10. Simultaneous airglow, lidar, and radar measurements of mesospheric gravity waves over Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shin; Nakamura, Takuji; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Kawahara, Takuya D.

    In order to investigate the gravity wave dynamics in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region, we have conducted coordinated observations of mesospheric gravity waves during the ANDON campaign at midlatitude. Two all-sky airglow imagers (ASIs) were used in this campaign to derive two-dimensional structure of the gravity waves: one has been operated by Nagoya university as a part of the optical mesosphere thermosphere imagers (OMTIS) at the MU observatory in Shigaraki (34.9N, 136.1E), and the other imager, named ANDON, developed by Kyoto University is newly installed at the DYNIC Astropark Observatory in Taga (35.2N, 136.3E). Simultaneous horizontal winds and temperatures in the MLT region are provided by meteor-mode observations of the MU radar at Shigaraki and a sodium lidar at Uji (34.9N, 135.8E), respectively. On 2 October 2008, gravity waves with a horizontal wavelength of 180 km and wave period of 1 h propagating northeastward at 50 m/s were observed in the airglow keograms. We also found that similar wave structures were observed in the time-series of the meteor wind and lidar temperature, and their phase relations with the airglow intensity variations were consistent with the linear theory of gravity wave. The phase speed estimated from the MU radar and the momentum fluxes of the wave were also in good agreements with the airglow measurements. These results show that, for the first time, a comprehensive structure of mesospheric gravity waves (wave-induced airglow intensities, horizontal wind, and temperature perturbations) was observed.

  11. Measurement of occupational stress in hospital settings: two validity studies of a measure of self-reported stress in medical emergency rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, J S; Jones, J W; Lyons, J S; Sixsmith, D; Afficiando, E

    1985-04-01

    The present study details the development of a stress scale for medical personnel. The Medical Personnel Stress Scale is a 48-item subjective stress measure capable of assessing both organizational and individual dimensions of stress. It demonstrated both the ability to discriminate between divergent medical emergency room organizations and to predict self reported on-the-job difficulties.

  12. Measurement of residual stresses in welded sample of dissimilar materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, Tanius Rodrigues; Gomes, Paulo de Tarso Vida; Scaldaferri, Denis Henrique Bianchi; Martins, Geraldo Antonio Scoralick; Atanazio Filho, Nelson do Nascimento

    2008-01-01

    reactors, what can generate significant residual stresses due so much to the welding procedure as for the difference of the coefficients of thermal expansion of the involved materials. In this work, are shown the results of the measurement of residual tensions in welded sample of steel carbon SA 508 Cl 3 and stainless steel 316L. The Inconel 182 was used as weld metal. (author)

  13. Comparison of bed shear under non-breaking and breaking solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.; Baldock, T.E.

    New experimental measurements of bed shear under solitary waves and solitary bores that represent tsunamis are presented. The total bed shear stress was measured directly using a shear cell apparatus. The solitary wave characteristics were measured...

  14. Video imaging measurement of interfacial wave velocity in air-water flow through a horizontal elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wazzan, Amir; Than, Cheok F.; Moghavvemi, Mahmoud; Yew, Chia W.

    2001-10-01

    Two-phase flow in pipelines containing elbows represents a common situation in the oil and gas industries. This study deals with the stratified flow regime between the gas and liquid phase through an elbow. It is of interest to study the change in wave characteristics by measuring the wave velocity and wavelength at the inlet and outlet of the elbow. The experiments were performed under concurrent air-water stratified flow in a horizontal transparent polycarbonate pipe of 0.05m diameter and superficial air and water velocities up to 8.97 and 0.0778 m/s respectively. A non-intrusive video imaging technique was applied to capture the waves. For image analysis, a frame by frame direct overlapping method was used to detect for pulsating flow and a pixel shifting method based on the detection of minimum values in the overlap function was used to determine wave velocity and wavelength. Under superficial gas velocity of less than 4.44 m/s, the results suggest a regular pulsating outflow produced by the elbow. At higher gas velocities, more random pulsation was found and the emergence of localized interfacial waves was detected. Wave velocities measured by this technique were found to produce satisfactory agreement with direct measurements.

  15. Influence of timing algorithm on brachialankle pulse wave velocity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Li, Ke; Ren, Hongwei; Li, Peng; Wang, Xinpei; Liu, Changchun

    2014-01-01

    The baPWV measurement is a non-invasive and convenient technique in an assessment of arterial stiffness. Despite its widespread application, the influence of different timing algorithms is still unclear. The present study was conducted to investigate the influence of six timing algorithms (MIN, MAX, D1, D2, MDP and INS) on the baPWV measurement and to evaluate the performance of them. Forty-five CAD patients and fifty-five healthy subjects were recruited in this study. A PVR acquisition apparatus was built up for baPWV measurement. The baPWV and other related parameters were calculated separately by the six timing algorithms. The influence and performance of the six algorithms was analyzed. The six timing algorithms generate significantly different baPWV values (left: F=29.036, Pvalue (≥ 18.6%) than the other methods, while the INS has the lowest CV value (≤ 2.7%). On the performance of classification, the INS produces the highest AUC values (left: 0.854; right: 0.872). The MIN and D2 also have a passable performance (AUC > 0.8). The choice of timing algorithm affects baPWV values and the quality of measurement. The INS method is recommended for baPWV measurement.

  16. [Measurement of unemployment-related psychological stress: Validation of the Unemployment Stress (USS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabóné Kapuvári, Virág; Martos, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the theme of unemployment and the given answers of it are up to date questions in psychology. In spite of this fact, the psychological methods measuring this phenomenon are often missing. That is why the Unemployment Stress Scale (USS) is presented in this article. The aim of our study is to develop a scale called USS and test it's validity and reliability. There were 287 adult unemployed persons asked in this study. Besides the USS we used the Beck Depression Scale, the Spielberger Anxiety Scale (TRAIT), the Sense of Coherence Scale (Hungarian version) and the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale. According to our results, USS has showed an excellent criterion and construct validity. A useful scale has been formed according to test-retest results. (Cronbach-alfa: 0.88 and 0.86 according to the samples). Moreover our scale has a strong correlation with the Spielberger Anxiety Scale (TRAIT) and the Beck Depression Scale. These chracteristics of the new scale proved that we fond a factor, independent from the self esteem and the sense of coherence, which represents the stress level in the situation of unemployment. This scale is a professional construction to measure stress contributed to unemployment. The USS can be a useful scale in clinical practice because after measuring with this scale we can protect the personality of the unemployed by representing the actual unemployment stress level. That is why professionals can help earlier in a crisis like this.

  17. Measurement of plasma conductivity using faraday rotation of submillimeter waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmenko, P.J.; Self, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper examines the application of Faraday rotation to the measurement of electron combustion MHD plasmas. Details on the design of a working system are given, including the selection of operating wavelength. A theoretical comparison between the Faraday rotation technique and two-path interferometry shows Faraday rotation in its simplest form to be somewhat less sensitive to changes in electron concentration. This deficit can be balanced against greater immunity to vibration and thermal drift. Improved techniques of measuring the rotation angle promise greater sensitivity. A preliminary experiment has verified the technique

  18. The measurement of capillary waves on a weldpool formed by a Nd:YAG laser

    CERN Document Server

    Deam, R T; Harris, J

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were performed using an on-line pyrometer to measure the capillary waves on a weldpool formed by a Nd: YAG laser. The surface temperature measurements taken from the weldpool revealed strong temporal fluctuations. Fourier transform of the pyrometer data revealed distinct peaks, consistent with calculated resonant frequencies for capillary surface waves on the weldpool formed by the laser. The possibility of using on-line measurement of surface temperature fluctuations to control weldpool depth in laser welds is discussed. The work forms part of an on-going programme to develop closed loop control for laser processing at Swinburne University

  19. The Prophylactic Effect of Vitamin C on Oxidative Stress Indexes Following Exposure to Radio Frequency Wave Generated by a BTS Antenna Model in Rat Liver and Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamali Jelodar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radio frequency wave (RFW generated by base transceiver station (BTS has been reported to make deleterious effects on liver and kidney, possibly through oxidative stress. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of radiofrequency wave (RFW-induced oxidative stress in the liver and kidney and the prophylactic effect of vitamin C on this organs by measuring the antioxidant enzymes activity including: glutathione peroxidase (GPx, superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT, and malondialdehyde (MDA. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, thirty-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four experimental groups and treated daily for 45 days as follows: control, vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid 200 mg/kg of body weight/day by gavage, test (exposed to 900MHz RFW and the treated group (received vitamin C in addition to exposure to RFW. At the end of the experiment all animals were sacrificed and their liver and kidney were removed and were used for measurement of antioxidant enzymes and MDA activity. Results: The results indicate that exposure to RFW in the test group decreased antioxidant enzymes activity and increased MDA compared with the control groups (p<0.05. In the treated group vitamin C improved antioxidant enzymes activity and reduced MDA compared to the test group (p<0.05. Conclusion: It can be concluded that RFW causes oxidative stress in liver and kidney, and vitamin C improves the antioxidant enzymes activity and decreases MDA.

  20. Measurement of crack in rock using transmitted elastic wave; Toka danseiha ni yoru ganbannai kiretsu keisoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomishima, Y. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    With an objective to measure at high accuracy the positions and sizes of cracks existing in rocks, a theoretical study has been carried out on a method which utilizes initial movement characteristics of P-wave. The P-wave which diffracts and propagates at a crack tip has a characteristic that its phase may reverse according to the positional relationship between vibration transmitting and receiving points. This positional relationship is decided by the Poisson ratio of media alone. Therefore, when the P-wave is measured while the vibration transmitting and receiving points are moved sandwiching a crack, the polarity of received waveform is changed from negative to positive at a certain position as a boundary. In order to measure this change at high accuracy, an elastic wave of high frequency is required, but it is not easy to obtain the wave in situ. In contrast, utilizing the initial movement polarity can not only identify the change in the polarity, but also perform measurement at high accuracy. The present study discussed a case where cracks are parallel with a free surface and a case where the cracks have angles with the free surface, whereas it was shown that positions of the upper and lower tips of a crack, and length of the crack can be measured accurately. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Developments in wireline in-situ rock stress measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedroso, Carlos [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Canas, Jesus A.; Holzberg, Bruno; Gmach, Helmut [Schlumberger Servicos de Petroleo Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents recent developments of in-situ stress measurements with wireline tools. The stress measurements are based on the micro hydraulic techniques that can be initialized when an interval is pressurized by pumping fluid until a tensile fracture begins or by packers fracturing (sleeve fracturing). Ultrasonic and Micro-resistivity borehole image logs (before and after the testes) are used as a complement, in order to observe the fractures created by the tests, evaluating the mechanical behavior of the formation. An offshore case study is presented, where shales and tight sandstones at depths deeper than 4500 meters depth were successfully evaluated. A workflow to succeed on stress measurements on such environments is proposed, what includes a planning phase: where breakdown pressures ranges are estimated and compared with the capacity of the tools, a Real Time Monitoring phase, where a decision tree is proposed to help on quick decisions while testing, and an interpretation phase, where appropriate techniques are indicated to evaluate the results. Also, the paper presents the main operational needs to succeed on such environments. Basically, such tests require an entirely software controlled, motorized and modular design tool consisting of dual packer (DP), pump out and flow control modules (Figure 1). These modules were upgraded for the present environment: conditions such as temperatures above 300 deg F, formation pressures above 10,000 psia, very low formation permeability, high pressure differential need and oil based mud (OBM) environment. (author)

  2. Measurements of Electric Field in a Nanosecond Pulse Discharge by 4-WAVE Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratte, Edmond; Adamovich, Igor V.; Simeni Simeni, Marien; Frederickson, Kraig

    2017-06-01

    Picosecond four-wave mixing is used to measure temporally and Picosecond four-wave mixing is used to measure temporally and spatially resolved electric field in a nanosecond pulse dielectric discharge sustained in room air and in an atmospheric pressure hydrogen diffusion flame. Measurements of the electric field, and more precisely the reduced electric field (E/N) in the plasma is critical for determination rate coefficients of electron impact processes in the plasma, as well as for quantifying energy partition in the electric discharge among different molecular energy modes. The four-wave mixing measurements are performed using a collinear phase matching geometry, with nitrogen used as the probe species, at temporal resolution of about 2 ns . Absolute calibration is performed by measurement of a known electrostatic electric field. In the present experiments, the discharge is sustained between two stainless steel plate electrodes, each placed in a quartz sleeve, which greatly improves plasma uniformity. Our previous measurements of electric field in a nanosecond pulse dielectric barrier discharge by picosecond 4-wave mixing have been done in air at room temperature, in a discharge sustained between a razor edge high-voltage electrode and a plane grounded electrode (a quartz plate or a layer of distilled water). Electric field measurements in a flame, which is a high-temperature environment, are more challenging because the four-wave mixing signal is proportional to the to square root of the difference betwen the populations of N2 ground vibrational level (v=0) and first excited vibrational level (v=1). At high temperatures, the total number density is reduced, thus reducing absolute vibrational level populations of N2. Also, the signal is reduced further due to a wider distribution of N2 molecules over multiple rotational levels at higher temperatures, while the present four-wave mixing diagnostics is using spectrally narrow output of a ps laser and a high

  3. Methods and results of measurements of parameters of wave-guide ferritic plugs of high power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peplov, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    Main parameters of ferrite rectifiers used in wave lines of HF feeding systems were checked by classic technical methods of UHF measurements. It was shown that in general they correspond to the requirements, but direct and inverse energy losses should be measured carefully

  4. Reliable intraocular pressure measurement using automated radio-wave telemetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paschalis EI

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eleftherios I Paschalis,* Fabiano Cade,* Samir Melki, Louis R Pasquale, Claes H Dohlman, Joseph B CiolinoMassachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: To present an autonomous intraocular pressure (IOP measurement technique using a wireless implantable transducer (WIT and a motion sensor.Methods: The WIT optical aid was implanted within the ciliary sulcus of a normotensive rabbit eye after extracapsular clear lens extraction. An autonomous wireless data system (AWDS comprising of a WIT and an external antenna aided by a motion sensor provided continuous IOP readings. The sensitivity of the technique was determined by the ability to detect IOP changes resulting from the administration of latanoprost 0.005% or dorzolamide 2%, while the reliability was determined by the agreement between baseline and vehicle (saline IOP.Results: On average, 12 diurnal and 205 nocturnal IOP measurements were performed with latanoprost, and 26 diurnal and 205 nocturnal measurements with dorzolamide. No difference was found between mean baseline IOP (13.08±2.2 mmHg and mean vehicle IOP (13.27±2.1 mmHg (P=0.45, suggesting good measurement reliability. Both antiglaucoma medications caused significant IOP reduction compared to baseline; latanoprost reduced mean IOP by 10% (1.3±3.54 mmHg; P<0.001, and dorzolamide by 5% (0.62±2.22 mmHg; P<0.001. Use of latanoprost resulted in an overall twofold higher IOP reduction compared to dorzolamide (P<0.001. Repeatability was ±1.8 mmHg, assessed by the variability of consecutive IOP measurements performed in a short period of time (≤1 minute, during which the IOP is not expected to change.Conclusion: IOP measurements in conscious rabbits obtained without the need for human interactions using the AWDS are feasible and provide reproducible results.Keywords: IOP, pressure transducer, wireless, MEMS, implant, intraocular

  5. Laser vibrometer measurement of guided wave modes in rail track

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available propagating in a pipe by measuring the 14 time response at eight different circumferential positions at the same axial distance 15 from the source. The extraction technique exploited the orthogonality of the modes in 16 the circumferential direction... piezoelectric sandwich transducer comprising a back mass, four 12 piezoelectric ceramic rings, a front mass and a centre bolt was used to excite the rail. 13 The transducer, which resembles an ultrasonic cleaning transducer, was attached 14 under the head...

  6. Measurement of Compressional Wave Parameters in Saturated Sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-08

    until the sediment-water mixture was 24 cm deep. Pouring was halted at intervals and the mixture kneaded like bread dough to remove air trapped in the...INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE COMPLETING FORM I. REPORT NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. S. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMSER . - fi b .-06’_-_ _. 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE ...Austin (ARL:UT), has carried out many measurements of this type and has pioneered the development of transducers for the generation and sensing of

  7. Millimeter wave radiative transfer studies for precipitation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Evans, Frank

    1989-01-01

    Scattering calculations using the discrete dipole approximation and vector radiative transfer calculations were performed to model multiparameter radar return and passive microwave emission for a simple model of a winter storm. The issue of dendrite riming was addressed by computing scattering properties of thin ice disks with varying bulk density. It was shown that C-band multiparameter radar contains information about particle density and the number concentration of the ice particles. The radiative transfer modeling indicated that polarized multifrequency passive microwave emission may be used to infer some properties of ice hydrometers. Detailed radar modeling and vector radiative transfer modeling is in progress to enhance the understanding of simultaneous radar and radiometer measurements, as in the case of the proposed TRMM field program. A one-dimensional cloud model will be used to simulate the storm structure in detail and study the microphysics, such as size and density. Multifrequency polarized radiometer measurements from the SSMI satellite instrument will be analyzed in relation to dual-frequency and dual-polarization radar measurements.

  8. Stress analysis and mitigation measures for floating pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenpeng, Guo; Yuqing, Liu; Chao, Li

    2017-03-01

    Pipeline-floating is a kind of accident with contingency and uncertainty associated to natural gas pipeline occurring during rainy season, which is significantly harmful to the safety of pipeline. Treatment measures against pipeline floating accident are summarized in this paper on the basis of practical project cases. Stress states of pipeline upon floating are analyzed by means of Finite Element Calculation method. The effectiveness of prevention ways and subsequent mitigation measures upon pipeline-floating are verified for giving guidance to the mitigation of such accidents.

  9. NORMAL PRESSURE AND FRICTION STRESS MEASUREMENT IN ROLLING PROCESSES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Arentoft, Mogens; Lagergren, Jonas

    2005-01-01

    the output from the transducer, the friction stress and normal pressure in the contact zone can be determined. The new concept differs from existing pin designs by a lower disturbance of lubricant film and material flow and limited penetration of material between transducer and roll. Aluminum, cupper...... and steel strips with a width of 40 mm was rolled with reduction varying from 2.7% to 29%, in a pilot mill. For evaluating the transducer, the measured contact forces are compared with external measurements of roll separating forces and torque. The determined friction coefficients are compared with values...

  10. Magnetic hysteresis measurements of thin films under isotropic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Patrick; Dubey, Archana; Geerts, Wilhelmus

    2000-10-01

    Nowadays, ferromagnetic thin films are widely applied in devices for information technology (credit cards, video recorder tapes, floppies, hard disks) and sensors (air bags, anti-breaking systems, navigation systems). Thus, with the increase in the use of magnetic media continued investigation of magnetic properties of materials is necessary to help in determining the useful properties of materials for new or improved applications. We are currently interested in studying the effect of applied external stress on Kerr hysteresis curves of thin magnetic films. The Ni and NiFe films were grown using DC magnetron sputtering with Ar as the sputter gas (pAr=4 mTorr; Tsub=55-190 C). Seed and cap layers of Ti were used on all films for adhesion and oxidation protection, respectively. A brass membrane pressure cell was designed to apply in-plane isotropic stress to thin films. In this pressure cell, gas pressure is used to deform a flexible substrate onto which a thin magnetic film has been sputtered. The curvature of the samples could be controlled by changing the gas pressure to the cell. Magneto-Optical in-plane hysteresis curves at different values of strain were measured. The results obtained show that the stress sensitivity is dependent on the film thickness. For the 500nm NiFe films, the coercivity strongly decreased as a function of the applied stress.

  11. Millimeter wave transmittance/absorption measurements on micro and nano hexaferrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Konstantin A.; Chen, Shu; Barua, Radhika; Afsar, Mohammed N.; Chen, Yajie; Harris, Vincent G.

    2017-05-01

    Millimeter wave transmittance measurements have been successfully performed on commercial samples of micro- and nano-sized particles of BaFe12O19 and SrFe12O19 hexaferrite powders and nano-sized particles of BaFeO2 and SrFeO2 powders. Broadband millimeter wave transmittance measurements have been performed using free space quasi-optical spectrometer, equipped with a set of high power backward wave oscillators covering the frequency range of 30 - 120 GHz. Real and imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity for both types of micro- and nanoferrites have been calculated using analysis of recorded high precision transmittance spectra. Frequency dependences of magnetic permeability of ferrite powders, as well as saturation magnetization and anisotropy field have been determined based on Schlöemann's theory for partially magnetized ferrites. Micro- and nano-sized ferrite powders have been further investigated by DC magnetization to assess magnetic behavior and compare with millimeter wave data. Consistency of saturation magnetization determined independently by both millimeter wave absorption and DC magnetization have been found for all ferrite powders. These materials seem to be quite promising as tunable millimeter wave absorbers and filters, based on their size-dependent absorption.

  12. Millimeter wave transmittance/absorption measurements on micro and nano hexaferrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin A. Korolev

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Millimeter wave transmittance measurements have been successfully performed on commercial samples of micro- and nano-sized particles of BaFe12O19 and SrFe12O19 hexaferrite powders and nano-sized particles of BaFeO2 and SrFeO2 powders. Broadband millimeter wave transmittance measurements have been performed using free space quasi-optical spectrometer, equipped with a set of high power backward wave oscillators covering the frequency range of 30 – 120 GHz. Real and imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity for both types of micro- and nanoferrites have been calculated using analysis of recorded high precision transmittance spectra. Frequency dependences of magnetic permeability of ferrite powders, as well as saturation magnetization and anisotropy field have been determined based on Schlöemann’s theory for partially magnetized ferrites. Micro- and nano-sized ferrite powders have been further investigated by DC magnetization to assess magnetic behavior and compare with millimeter wave data. Consistency of saturation magnetization determined independently by both millimeter wave absorption and DC magnetization have been found for all ferrite powders. These materials seem to be quite promising as tunable millimeter wave absorbers and filters, based on their size-dependent absorption.

  13. Measurement of stress strain and vibrational properties of tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revel, Gian Marco; Scalise, Alessandro; Scalise, Lorenzo

    2003-08-01

    The authors present a new non-intrusive experimental procedure based on laser techniques for the measurement of mechanical properties of tendons. The procedure is based on the measurement of the first resonance frequency of the tendon by laser Doppler vibrometry during in vitro tensile experiments, with the final aim of establishing a measurement procedure to perform the mechanical characterization of tendons by extracting parameters such as the resonance frequency, also achievable during in vivo investigation. The experimental procedure is reported, taking into account the need to simulate the physiological conditions of the Achilles tendon, and the measurement technique used for the non-invasive determination of tendon cross-sectional area during tensile vibration tests at different load levels is described. The test procedure is based on a tensile machine, which measures longitudinal tendons undergoing controlled load conditions. Cross-sectional area is measured using a new non-contact procedure for the measurement of tendon perimeter (repeatability of 99% and accuracy of 2%). For each loading condition, vibration resonance frequency and damping, cross-sectional area and tensile force are measured, allowing thus a mechanical characterization of the tendon. Tendon stress-strain curves are reported. Stress-strain curves have been correlated to the first vibration resonance frequency and damping of the tendon measured using a single-point laser Doppler vibrometer. Moreover, experimental results have been compared with a theoretical model of a vibrating cord showing discrepancies. In vitro tests are reported, demonstrating the validity of the method for the comparison of different aged rabbit tendons.

  14. Performance Improvement of Membrane Stress Measurement Equipment through Evaluation of Added Mass of Membrane and Error Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Wook Jin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important issues in keeping membrane structures in stable condition is to maintain the proper stress distribution over the membrane. However, it is difficult to determine the quantitative real stress level in the membrane after the completion of the structure. The stress relaxation phenomenon of the membrane and the fluttering effect due to strong wind or ponding caused by precipitation may cause severe damage to the membrane structure itself. Therefore, it is very important to know the magnitude of the existing stress in membrane structures for their maintenance. The authors have proposed a new method for separately estimating the membrane stress in two different directions using sound waves instead of directly measuring the membrane stress. The new method utilizes the resonance phenomenon of the membrane, which is induced by sound excitations given through an audio speaker. During such experiment, the effect of the surrounding air on the vibrating membrane cannot be overlooked in order to assure high measurement precision. In this paper, an evaluation scheme for the added mass of membrane with the effect of air on the vibrating membrane and the correction of measurement error is discussed. In addition, three types of membrane materials are used in the experiment in order to verify the expandability and accuracy of the membrane measurement equipment.

  15. Characteristics and measurement of supersonic projectile shock waves by a 32-microphone ring array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho; Wu, Yan-Chyuan; Tsung, Tsing-Tshih

    2011-08-01

    This paper discusses about the characteristics of supersonic projectile shock wave in muzzle region during firing of high explosive anti-tank (HEAT) and high explosive (HE) projectiles. HEAT projectiles are fired horizontally at a muzzle velocity of Mach 3.5 from a medium caliber tank gun equipped with a newly designed multi-perforated muzzle brake, whereas HE projectiles are fired at elevation angles at a muzzle velocity of Mach 2 from a large caliber howitzer equipped with a newly designed double-baffle muzzle brake. In the near field, pressure signatures of the N-wave generated from projectiles are measured by 32-microphone ring array wrapped by cotton sheath. Records measured by the microphone array are used to demonstrate several key characteristics of the shock wave of supersonic projectile. All measurements made in this study can be a significant reference for developing guns, tanks, or the chassis of fighting vehicles.

  16. A combined algorithm for T-wave alternans qualitative detection and quantitative measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan XiangKui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T-wave alternans (TWA provides a noninvasive and clinically useful marker for the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD. Current most widely used TWA detection algorithms work in two different domains: time and frequency. The disadvantage of the spectral analytical techniques is that they treat the alternans signal as a stationary wave with a constant amplitude and a phase. They cannot detect non-stationary characteristics of the signal. The temporal domain methods are sensitive to the alignment of the T-waves. In this study, we sought to develop a robust combined algorithm (CA to assess T-wave alternans, which can qualitatively detect and quantitatively measure TWA in time domain. Methods The T wave sequences were extracted and the total energy of each T wave within the specified time-frequency region was calculated. The rank-sum test was applied to the ranked energy sequences of T waves to detect TWA qualitatively. The ECG containing TWA was quantitatively analyzed with correlation method. Results Simulation test result proved a mean sensitivity of 91.2% in detecting TWA, and for the SNR not less than 30 dB, the accuracy rate of detection achieved 100%. The clinical data experiment showed that the results from this method vs. spectral method had the correlation coefficients of 0.96. Conclusions A novel TWA analysis algorithm utilizing the wavelet transform and correlation technique is presented in this paper. TWAs are not only correctly detected qualitatively in frequency domain by energy value of T waves, but the alternans frequency and amplitude in temporal domain are measured quantitatively.

  17. The in situ passive acoustic measurement of shingle movement under waves and currents: instrument (TOSCA) development and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgaris, G.; Wilkin, M. P.; Collins, M. B.

    1995-08-01

    An instrumented platform (TOSCA) is described for monitoring coarse-grained sediment transport in high (wave and tidal) energy environments. The system consists of a number of sensors which measure: instantaneous current velocities at three levels; sea surface elevation; and self-generated noise (SGN) caused by intercollision of particles in transit. SGN is related to transport rates, on the basis of laboratory calibration; this, in turn, allows a correlation with simultaneous near-bed shear stress to be established. During the field measurements, PC-based real-time data transmission is realised through the use of a (buoyed) radio telemetry system. TOSCA has been deployed in eastern Christchurch Bay, southern England. Burst data were collected every 2 h, over 10 min, with a sampling frequency of 5 Hz. The data sets obtained permit detailed investigations into near-bed flow structure and shingle movement, on time-scales comparable to those of the turbulence.

  18. Turbulent stress measurements of fibre suspensions in a straight pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Jordan; Söderberg, Daniel; Swerin, Agne; Lundell, Fredrik

    2018-02-01

    The focus of the present work is an experimental study of the behaviour of semi-dilute, opaque fibre suspensions in fully developed cylindrical pipe flows. Measurements of the normal and turbulent shear stress components and the mean flow were acquired using phase-contrast magnetic resonance velocimetry. Two fibre types, namely, pulp fibre and nylon fibre, were considered in this work and are known to differ in elastic modulus. In total, three different mass concentrations and seven Reynolds numbers were tested to investigate the effects of fibre interactions during the transition from the plug flow to fully turbulent flow. It was found that in fully turbulent flows of nylon fibres, the normal, ⟨uzuz ⟩ +, and shear, ⟨uzur ⟩ + (note that ⟨.⟩ is the temporal average, u is the fluctuating velocity, z is the axial or streamwise component, and r is the radial direction), turbulent stresses increased with Reynolds number regardless of the crowding number (a concentration measure). For pulp fibre, the turbulent stresses increased with Reynolds number when a fibre plug was present in the flow and were spatially similar in magnitude when no fibre plug was present. Pressure spectra revealed that the stiff, nylon fibre reduced the energy in the inertial-subrange with an increasing Reynolds and crowding number, whereas the less stiff pulp fibre effectively cuts the energy cascade prematurely when the network was fully dispersed.

  19. Residual Stress Measurements After Proof and Flight: ETP-0403

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Ronald L..

    1997-01-01

    The intent of this testing was to evaluate the residual stresses that occur in and around the attachment details of a case stiffener segment that has been subjected to flight/recovery followed by proof loading. Not measured in this test were stresses relieved at joint disassembly due to out-of-round and interference effects, and those released by cutting the specimens out of the case segment. The test article was lightweight case stiffener segment 1U50715, S/N L023 which was flown in the forward stiffener position on flight SRM 14A and in the aft position on flight SRM24A. Both of these flights were flown with the 3 stiffener ring configuration. Stiffener L023 had a stiffener ring installed only on the aft stub in its first flight, and it had both rings installed on its second flight. No significant post flight damage was found on either flight. Finally, the segment was used on the DM-8 static test motor in the forward position. No stiffener rings were installed. It had only one proof pressurization prior to assignment to its first use, and it was cleaned and proof tested after each flight. Thus, the segment had seen 3 proof tests, two flight pressurizations, and two low intensity water impacts prior to manufacturing for use on DM-8. On DM-8 it received one static firing pressurization in the horizontal configuration. Residual stresses at the surface and in depth were evaluated by both the x-ray diffraction and neutron beam diffraction methods. The x-ray diffraction evaluations were conducted by Technology for Energy Corporation (TEC) at their facilities in Knoxville, TN. The neutron beam evaluations were done by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in Ontario. The results showed general agreement with relatively high compressive residual stresses on the surface and moderate to low subsurface tensile residual stresses.

  20. Protection of the lung from blast overpressure by stress wave decouplers, buffer plates or sandwich panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedman, Andrew; Hepper, A

    2018-03-19

    This paper outlines aspects of UK Ministry of Defence's research and development of blast overpressure protection technologies appropriate for use in body armour, with the aim of both propagating new knowledge and updating existing information. Two simple models are introduced not only to focus the description of the mechanism by which the lungs can be protected, but also to provide a bridge between fields of research that may hold the key to further advances in protection technology and related body armour. Protection can be provided to the lungs by decoupling the stress wave transmission into the thorax by managing the blast energy imparted through the protection system. It is proposed that the utility of the existing 'simple decoupler' blast overpressure protection is reviewed in light of recent developments in the treatment of those sustaining both overpressure and fragment injuries. It is anticipated that further advances in protection technology may be generated by those working in other fields on the analogous technologies of 'buffer plates' and 'sandwich panels'. © Crown copyright (2018), Dstl. This material is licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence except where otherwise stated. To view this licence, visit http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3 or write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email: psi@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk.

  1. Opportunities for inelastic neutron scattering and residual stress measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, M.; Studer, A.J.; Cussen, L.; Kirstein, O.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The Triple Axis Spectrometer (TAS) at the HIFAR reactor has recently undergone a major refurbishment consisting of the replacement of the motors and motor control system, the construction of a sample table with XYZ translation, modification of the analyser system and the installation of a multiwire position sensitive detector. This has enabled its use for both inelastic neutron scattering and residual stress measurements. This instrument will provide a facility for such fields of work within Australia until the installation of a new state-of-the-art TAS and Residual Stress diffractometer at the Replacement Research Reactor. In this talk we will describe the capabilities of the refurbished TAS and how it fits into the overall picture of neutron scattering facilities available, at present and in the future, to the Australian science community

  2. Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in NPP construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinca, R.; Bokuchava, G.

    2001-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is one of the most powerful methods for condensed matter studies. This method is used for non-destructive determination of residual stresses in material. The fundamental aspects of neutron diffraction are discussed, together with a brief description of the experimental facility. The principal advantage of using neutrons rather than the more conventional X-rays is the fact that neutron can penetrate deeply (2-4 cm for steel and more than 10 cm for aluminium) into metals to determine internal parameters within the bulk of materials. We present results of measurements residual stresses in NPP construction material - austenitic stainless steel (Cr-18%, Ni-10%, Ti-1%) coated with high-nickel alloy. (authors)

  3. Improved analysis of all-sky meteor radar measurements of gravity wave variances and momentum fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Andrioli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of using a composite day analysis for all-sky interferometric meteor radars when measuring mean winds and tides are widely known. On the other hand, problems arise if this technique is applied to Hocking's (2005 gravity wave analysis for all-sky meteor radars. In this paper we describe how a simple change in the procedure makes it possible to use a composite day in Hocking's analysis. Also, we explain how a modified composite day can be constructed to test its ability to measure gravity wave momentum fluxes. Test results for specified mean, tidal, and gravity wave fields, including tidal amplitudes and gravity wave momentum fluxes varying strongly with altitude and/or time, suggest that the modified composite day allows characterization of monthly mean profiles of the gravity wave momentum fluxes, with good accuracy at least at the altitudes where the meteor counts are large (from 89 to 92.5 km. In the present work we also show that the variances measured with Hocking's method are often contaminated by the tidal fields and suggest a method of empirical correction derived from a simple simulation model. The results presented here greatly increase our confidence because they show that our technique is able to remove the tide-induced false variances from Hocking's analysis.

  4. Measuring Stress and Ability to Recover from Stress with Salivary Alpha-Amylase Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    device and/or sleeve. Upon closing the lever , saliva is transferred from the test strip to the reagent paper. Concurrently, a timer begins when the... lever is closed and rings after the saliva transfer is complete. This process takes approximately 10 seconds. After the alarm rings, it is...resilience measurement system. Davis T., Lockhart T.E. (2003) The effects of age on stress and the biomechanics of slips and falls. In: Proceedings

  5. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, D P; Chen, Y; Kletzing, C A; Denton, M H; Kurth, W S

    2015-02-01

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1-0.9 f ce ). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wave intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10 -3 nT 2 , using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.

  6. Atom localization and center-of-mass wave-function determination via multiple simultaneous quadrature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evers, Joerg; Qamar, Shahid; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2007-01-01

    We discuss localization and center-of-mass wave-function measurement of a quantum particle using multiple simultaneous dispersive interactions of the particle with different standing-wave fields. In particular, we consider objects with an internal structure consisting of a single ground state and several excited states. The transitions between ground and the corresponding excited states are coupled to the light fields in the dispersive limit, thus giving rise to a phase shift of the light field during the interaction. We show that multiple simultaneous measurements allow both an increase in the measurement or localization precision in a single direction and the performance of multidimensional measurements or localization. Further, we show that multiple measurements may relax the experimental requirements for each individual measurement

  7. On the discrepancy in measurement of Q using surface waves and normal modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschede, M.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    We revisit the decade-old unsolved problem of why measurements of the quality factor (Q) for fundamental mode propagating Rayleigh waves differs by up to 20% from that measured using normal modes, in the frequency band where both approaches are possible. Surface wave measurements consistently yield lower Q values than modes. Since it is unclear which measurement is more accurate, this is currently a limitation on the resolution of 1D average Q profiles in the Earth, compounded by the fact that the measurement bias may not only affect the region of the spectrum where both methods are available but every Q measurement that is based upon one or the other of the mentioned techniques. We investigate the effect of elastic focussing and defocussing on long time series using a spectral element method that we have shown to be accurate enough for the relevant period ranges and the necessarily long time series. While previous investigations are based upon approximate methods that are only valid for smooth 3D models and weak heterogeneities, the SEM allows us to estimate the effect of more realistic distributions of heterogeneities on amplitude measurements, and therefore Q. Our investigations show a bias towards lower Q in the first arriving surface wave trains and a bias towards higher Q in later arrivals which could explain the mode surface-wave discrepancy. Heuristically this can be explained by the fact that energy that has been scattered off the great circle path is brought back into the great circle after multiple-orbits, leading to increased amplitude in late arrivals. Further we reinvestigate the effects of noise that predominantly influences the later part of the seismogram, the effect of post-processing as well as mode amplitude modulations that could potentially bias the measurements. We plan to present preliminary results on applying our insights to debias real data and reduce the error bounds on 1D Q models from normal modes and surface waves.

  8. Child Autism Spectrum Disorder Traits and Parenting Stress: The Utility of Using a Physiological Measure of Parental Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor, Reina S.; Swain, Deanna M.; Scarpa, Angela

    2018-01-01

    Caregivers of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) report greater stress due to unique parenting demands (e.g.; Estes et al. in "Brain Dev" 35(2):133-138, 2013). Stress is often studied through self-report and has not been extensively studied using physiological measures. This study compared parenting stress in mothers of…

  9. Dynamic Stress Concentration at the Boundary of an Incision at the Plate Under the Action of Weak Shock Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulich Olena

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the novel technique for analysis of dynamic stress state of multi-connected infinite plates under the action of weak shock waves. For solution of the problem it uses the integral and discrete Fourier transforms. Calculation of transformed dynamic stresses at the incisions of plates is held using the boundary-integral equation method and the theory of complex variable functions. The numerical implementation of the developed algorithm is based on the method of mechanical quadratures and collocation technique. For calculation of originals of the dynamic stresses it uses modified discrete Fourier transform. The algorithm is effective in the analysis of the dynamic stress state of defective plates.

  10. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSORPTION, EMISSIVITY REDUCTION, AND LOCAL SUPPRESSION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, D.-Y.; Liang, Z.-C.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui; Sun, M.-T.

    2009-01-01

    The power of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions is lower relative to the quiet Sun. Absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of acoustic waves contribute to the observed power reduction in magnetic regions. We propose a model for the energy budget of acoustic waves propagating through a sunspot in terms of the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of the sunspot. Using the property that the waves emitted along the wave path between two points have no correlation with the signal at the starting point, we can separate the effects of these three mechanisms. Applying this method to helioseismic data filtered with direction and phase-velocity filters, we measure the fraction of the contribution of each mechanism to the power deficit in the umbra of the leading sunspot of NOAA 9057. The contribution from absorption is 23.3 ± 1.3%, emissivity reduction 8.2 ± 1.4%, and local suppression 68.5 ± 1.5%, for a wave packet corresponding to a phase velocity of 6.98 x 10 -5 rad s -1 .

  11. Surface Wave Multipathing and its Influence on Phase Velocities Measured by Small Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, V.

    2011-12-01

    Networks of temporary broadband seismological stations are commonly deployed over dedicated targets. Measurement of surface wave phase velocity across the network and its depth-inversion gives us information about the structure below the network which is complementary to the information obtained from body-wave analysis. For small networks, we face however the fundamental problem that the dimensions of the heterogeneities to image are not large compared to the wavelengths of the surface waves used to image them. In addition, multipathing is very common is teleseismic surface waves at moderate frequencies and the complexity of the incoming wavefield has to be taken into account during the tomographic process. We perform a series of numerical simulations of surface wave propagation in 3-D structures using complex incoming wavefields in order to analyse how the nature of the incoming wavefield plays together with the 3-D structure to determine phases and amplitudes at the different stations of a network. We analyse how different tomographic methods cope with the complex wavefield, the consequences on the resolution of the resulting tomographic models and we try to provide recommendations for data selection. The numerical simulations are done using a multiple-scattering mode coupling scheme. The amount of multipathing is taken from a recent study using teleseismic surface waves recorded on a temporary network in Southern Norway. The period range of 20 to 200s and the 450km x 600km dimension of the network is also taken form the same study.

  12. Time-resolved PIV measurements of the atmospheric boundary layer over wind-driven surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markfort, Corey; Stegmeir, Matt

    2017-11-01

    Complex interactions at the air-water interface result in two-way coupling between wind-driven surface waves and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Turbulence generated at the surface plays an important role in aquatic ecology and biogeochemistry, exchange of gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide, and it is important for the transfer of energy and controlling evaporation. Energy transferred from the ABL promotes the generation and maintenance of waves. A fraction of the energy is transferred to the surface mixed layer through the generation of turbulence. Energy is also transferred back to the ABL by waves. There is a need to quantify the details of the coupled boundary layers of the air-water system to better understand how turbulence plays a role in the interactions. We employ time-resolved PIV to measure the detailed structure of the air and water boundary layers under varying wind and wave conditions in the newly developed IIHR Boundary-Layer Wind-Wave Tunnel. The facility combines a 30-m long recirculating water channel with an open-return boundary layer wind tunnel. A thick turbulent boundary layer is developed in the 1 m high air channel, over the water surface, allowing for the study of boundary layer turbulence interacting with a wind-driven wave field.

  13. Non-iterative determination of the stress-density relation from ramp wave data through a window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Evan; Fratanduono, Dayne; Swift, Damian

    2017-06-01

    In the canonical ramp compression experiment, a smoothly-increasing load is applied the surface of the sample, and the particle velocity history is measured at interfaces two or more different distances into the sample. The velocity histories are used to deduce a stress-density relation by correcting for perturbations caused by reflected release waves, usually via the iterative Lagrangian analysis technique of Rothman and Maw. We previously described a non-iterative (recursive) method of analysis, which was more stable and orders of magnitude faster than iteration, but was subject to the limitation that the free surface velocity had to be sampled at uniform intervals. We have now developed more general recursive algorithms suitable for analyzing ramp data through a finite-impedance window. Free surfaces can be treated seamlessly, and the need for uniform velocity sampling has been removed. These calculations require interpolation of partially-released states using the partially-constructed isentrope, making them slower than the previous free-surface scheme, but they are still much faster than iterative analysis. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has similar predictive value as measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Sara V; Blicher, Marie K; Kruger, Ruan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) adds significantly to traditional cardiovascular risk prediction, but is not widely available. Therefore, it would be helpful if cfPWV could be replaced by an estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV) using age and mean blood...... pressure, and previously published equations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ePWV could predict cardiovascular events independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and/or cfPWV. METHOD: cfPWV was measured and ePWV was calculated in 2366 patients from four age groups...... healthy patients, ePWV and cfPWV (per SD) added independently to SCORE in prediction of combined endpoint [hazard ratio (95%CI) = 1.38(1.09-1.76) and hazard ratio (95%CI) = 1.18(1.01-1.38)] and to FRS [hazard ratio (95%CI) = 1.33(1.06-1.66) and hazard ratio (95%CI) = 1.16(0.99-1.37)]. If healthy patients...

  15. Estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has similar predictive value as measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael; Greve, Sara; Blicher, Marie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) adds significantly to traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk prediction, but is not widely available. Therefore, it would be helpful if cfPWV could be replaced by an estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV) using age and mean blood...... pressure and previously published equations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ePWV could predict CV events independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and/or cfPWV. DESIGN AND METHOD: cfPWV was measured and ePWV calculated in 2366 apparently healthy subjects from four age......, ePVW and cfPWV (per standard deviation) added independently to SCORE in prediction of CEP (HR [95% CI] = 1.38[1.09-1.76] and HR [95% CI] = 1.18[1.01-1.38]) and to FRS (HR [95% CI] = 1.33[1.06-1.66] and HR [95% CI] = 1.16[0.99-1.37]). If healthy subjects with ePWV and/or cfPWV ≥ 10 m/s were...

  16. Spectral analysis of ICRF [Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies] wave field measurements in the Tara Central Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Golovato, S.N.; Horne, S.F.

    1987-12-01

    A simple spectral analysis technique has been developed to analyse the digital signals from an array of magnetic probes for ICRF field measurements in the Tara Tandem Mirror central cell. The wave dispersion relations of both the applied ICRF and the Alfven Ion Cyclotron Instability have been studied and the waves have been identified as slow in cyclotron waves. The radial profiles of field amplitude and wave vectors were also generated. 9 refs., 10 figs

  17. Measurement of Underwater Operational Noise Emitted by Wave and Tidal Stream Energy Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, Paul A; Robinson, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    The increasing international growth in the development of marine and freshwater wave and tidal energy harvesting systems has been followed by a growing requirement to understand any associated underwater impact. Radiated noise generated during operation is dependent on the device's physical properties, the sound-propagation environment, and the device's operational state. Physical properties may include size, distribution in the water column, and mechanics/hydrodynamics. The sound-propagation environment may be influenced by water depth, bathymetry, sediment type, and water column acoustic properties, and operational state may be influenced by tidal cycle and wave height among others This paper discusses some of the challenges for measurement of noise characteristics from these devices as well as a case study of the measurement of radiated noise from a full-scale wave energy converter.

  18. Near-surface current meter array measurements of internal gravity waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H.B.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    We have developed various processing algorithms used to estimate the wave forms produced by hydrodynamic Internal Waves. Furthermore, the estimated Internal Waves are used to calculate the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) which relates the current and strain rate subsurface fields to surface scattering phenomenon imaged by radar. Following a brief discussion of LLNL`s measurement platform (a 10 sensor current meter array) we described the generation of representative current and strain rate space-time images from measured or simulated data. Then, we present how our simulation capability highlighted limitations in estimating strain rate. These limitations spurred the application of beamforming techniques to enhance our estimates, albeit at the expense of collapsing our space-time images to 1-D estimates. Finally, we discuss progress with regard to processing the current meter array data captured during the recent Loch Linnhe field trials.

  19. Residual strain and stress measurements by neutron diffraction in the industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    The residual stress remarkably affects fracture strength, fatigue strength and stress corrosion cracking. It is very much important to measure the residual stresses in the materials in order to secure the reliability of structure. One of the big characteristics of neutron is large penetration depth. This feature enables to measure the residual strain or stress inside of structural components and machine parts. In this paper, several industrial applications of residual stress and strain measurements by neutron diffraction would be introduced. (author)

  20. StressPhone: smartphone based platform for measurement of cortisol for stress detection (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aadhar; Rey, Elizabeth; Lee, Seoho; O'Dell, Dakota; Erickson, David

    2016-03-01

    Anxiety disorders are estimated to be the most common mental illness in US affecting around 40 million people and related job stress is estimated to cost US industry up to $300 billion due to lower productivity and absenteeism. A personal diagnostic device which could help identify stressed individuals would therefore be a huge boost for workforce productivity. We are therefore developing a point of care diagnostic device that can be integrated with smartphones or tablets for the measurement of cortisol - a stress related salivary biomarker, which is known to be strongly involved in body's fight-or-flight response to a stressor (physical or mental). The device is based around a competitive lateral flow assay whose results can then be read and quantified through an accessory compatible with the smartphone. In this presentation, we report the development and results of such an assay and the integrated device. We then present the results of a study relating the diurnal patterns of cortisol levels and the alertness of an individual based on the circadian rhythm and sleep patterns of the individual. We hope to use the insight provided by combining the information provided by levels of stress related to chemical biomarkers of the individual with the physical biomarkers to lead to a better informed and optimized activity schedule for maximized work output.

  1. Mass sensitivity of acoustic wave devices from group and phase velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, G.; Martin, F.; Newton, M. I.

    2002-09-01

    The effect of dispersion on acoustic wave sensors is considered. The discussion is focused upon layer guided surface acoustic waves (Love waves), which obtain their high mass sensitivity for the first Love wave mode by optimizing the guiding layer thickness, d, such that dapprox][lambdal/4; the wavelength in the layer is given by lambdal=f/vl where f is the operating frequency and vl is the shear acoustic speed of the guiding layer. We show that this optimization of guiding layer thickness corresponds to strong dispersion so that the phase and group velocities can be quite different. From the definition of the phase velocity mass sensitivity, we show that it can be determined from either the slope of the curve of phase velocity with normalized guiding layer thickness, z=d/lambdal, or from the phase and group velocities measured for a given guiding layer thickness. Experimental data for a poly(methylmethacrylate) polymer guiding layer on 36deg XY Lithium Tantalate is presented. Measurements of phase velocity and group velocity determined by a network analyzer were obtained for systematically increasing guiding layer thicknesses; a pulse transit experiment was also used to provide independent confirmation of the group velocity data. Two independent estimates of the mass sensitivity are obtained for z=d/lambdal<0.22 from (i) the slope of the phase velocity curve and (ii) the measurements of the group and phase velocity. These two estimates are shown to be consistent and we, therefore, conclude that it is possible to determine the mass sensitivity for a Love wave device with a given guiding layer thickness from measurements of the phase and group velocities. Moreover, we argue that the formula using group velocity to determine phase velocity mass sensitivity can be extended to a wide range of other acoustic wave sensors. In addition, we suggest that variations in the group velocity due to deposited mass may be a more sensitive parameter than variations in the phase

  2. Magnitude of shear stress on the san andreas fault: implications of a stress measurement profile at shallow depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoback, M D; Roller, J C

    1979-10-26

    A profile of measurements of shear stress perpendicular to the San Andreas fault near Palmdale, California, shows a marked increase in stress with distance from the fault. The pattern suggests that shear stress on the fault increases slowly with depth and reaches a value on the order of the average stress released during earthquakes. This result has important implications for both long- and shortterm prediction of large earthquakes.

  3. Comparison of Shuttle Imaging Radar-B ocean wave image spectra with linear model predictions based on aircraft measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaldo, Frank M.; Lyzenga, David R.

    1988-01-01

    During October 1984, coincident Shuttle Imaging Radar-B synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery and wave measurements from airborne instrumentation were acquired. The two-dimensional wave spectrum was measured by both a radar ocean-wave spectrometer and a surface-contour radar aboard the aircraft. In this paper, two-dimensional SAR image intensity variance spectra are compared with these independent measures of ocean wave spectra to verify previously proposed models of the relationship between such SAR image spectra and ocean wave spectra. The results illustrate both the functional relationship between SAR image spectra and ocean wave spectra and the limitations imposed on the imaging of short-wavelength, azimuth-traveling waves.

  4. Pressure and intracorporal acceleration measurements in pigs exposed to strong shock waves in a free field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassout, P.; Franke, R.; Parmentier, G.; Evrard, G.; Dancer, A.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical study on the propagation of a pressure wave in a diphasic medium, when compared to the onset mechanism of pulmonary lesions in subjects exposed to strong shock waves, shows an increase in the incident overpressure at the interface level. Using hydrophones, intracorporal pressure was measured in pigs. The authors recorded the costal wall acceleration on the side directly exposed to the shock wave and calculated the displacement of the costal wall after a shock wave passed by. These experiments were conducted for shock waves in a free field, at an overpressure peak level ranging from 26 kFPa to 380 kPa and for a first positive phase lasting 2 ms. Sensors placed in an intracorporal position detected no increase of the overpressure level for any value of the incident pressure. A comparison of the costal wall displacement, measured experimentally, relative to the theoretical displacement of the entire animal mass indicates that the largest relative displacement of the costal wall could be the origin of the pulmonary lesions found. 5 refs., 13 figs

  5. Heave Motion Measurement by Adaptive Filter Based on Longuet-Higgins Wave Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazhen Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A method is proposed to obtain heave motion information based on the Longuet-Higgins wave model. The Longuet-Higgins wave model which is closer to the sea wave is introduced. Based on it, random process of the noise is analyzed and the highpass filter is designed to reduce errors. Then it is the key point in this article that an adaptive algorithm is put forward because of the complexity of the waves. The algorithm adjusts the cutoff frequency to reduce the amplitude attenuation of the filter by analyzing the wave. For the same reason the comprehensive parameter of the phase compensation can be also obtained by the algorithm. Simulation measurement results show that under the rough sea situation the maximum value of absolute error is 0.4942 m according to the normal method, the method is 0.1170 m, and the average error ratio of the rough sea test reduces to 3.89% from 12.54%, which demonstrates that the adaptive filter is more effective in measuring heave movement. A variety of simulation cases show that the adaptive filter can also improve the precision of the heave motion under different sea situations.

  6. Case study of wave breaking with high-resolution turbulence measurements with LITOS and WRF simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Andreas; Wagner, Johannes; Söder, Jens; Gerding, Michael; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2017-06-01

    Measurements of turbulent energy dissipation rates obtained from wind fluctuations observed with the balloon-borne instrument LITOS (Leibniz-Institute Turbulence Observations in the Stratosphere) are combined with simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to study the breakdown of waves into turbulence. One flight from Kiruna (68° N, 21° E) and two flights from Kühlungsborn (54° N, 12° E) are analysed. Dissipation rates are of the order of 0. 1 mW kg-1 (˜ 0.01 K d-1) in the troposphere and in the stratosphere below 15 km, increasing in distinct layers by about 2 orders of magnitude. For one flight covering the stratosphere up to ˜ 28 km, the measurement shows nearly no turbulence at all above 15 km. Another flight features a patch with highly increased dissipation directly below the tropopause, collocated with strong wind shear and wave filtering conditions. In general, small or even negative Richardson numbers are affirmed to be a sufficient condition for increased dissipation. Conversely, significant turbulence has also been observed in the lower stratosphere under stable conditions. Observed energy dissipation rates are related to wave patterns visible in the modelled vertical winds. In particular, the drop in turbulent fraction at 15 km mentioned above coincides with a drop in amplitude in the wave patterns visible in the WRF. This indicates wave saturation being visible in the LITOS turbulence data.

  7. Analysis and Numerical Simulation on the Reduction Effect of Stress Waves Caused by Water Jet Slotting Near Blasting Source

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Dengfeng; Kang, Yong; Li, Dongyang; Wang, Xiaochuan; Yan, Fuwen

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most serious “side effects” of blast excavation, blast-induced vibration must be controlled for existing buildings and human beings. This paper proposes a method for blast-induced vibration reduction with water jet assistance according to the cutting characters of low-noised, environment-friendly water jet. The mechanism of vibration-isolation with water jet assistance was analyzed, and the stress wave energy attenuation models were established based on blasting theory and stres...

  8. Unsteady Heat-Flux Measurements of Second-Mode Instability Waves in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kergerise, Michael A.; Rufer, Shann J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report on the application of the atomic layer thermopile (ALTP) heat- flux sensor to the measurement of laminar-to-turbulent transition in a hypersonic flat plate boundary layer. The centerline of the flat-plate model was instrumented with a streamwise array of ALTP sensors and the flat-plate model was exposed to a Mach 6 freestream over a range of unit Reynolds numbers. Here, we observed an unstable band of frequencies that are associated with second-mode instability waves in the laminar boundary layer that forms on the flat-plate surface. The measured frequencies, group velocities, phase speeds, and wavelengths of these instability waves are in agreement with data previously reported in the literature. Heat flux time series, and the Morlet-wavelet transforms of them, revealed the wave-packet nature of the second-mode instability waves. In addition, a laser-based radiative heating system was developed to measure the frequency response functions (FRF) of the ALTP sensors used in the wind tunnel test. These measurements were used to assess the stability of the sensor FRFs over time and to correct spectral estimates for any attenuation caused by the finite sensor bandwidth.

  9. Measurements of upper mantle shear wave anisotropy from a permanent network in southern Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Benthem, S.A.C.; Valenzuela, R.W.; Ponce, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Upper mantle shear wave anisotropy under stations in southern Mexico was measured using records of SKS phases. Fast polarization directions where the Cocos plate subducts subhorizontally are oriented in the direction of the relative motion between the Cocos and North American plates, and are

  10. Evaluation of methods for gravity wave extraction from middle atmospheric lidar temperature measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Ehard, Benedikt; Kaifler, Bernd; Kaifler, Natalie; Rapp, Markus

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates commonly used methods of extracting gravity wave induced temperature perturbations from lidar measurements. The spectral response of these methods is characterized with the help of a synthetic dataset with known temperature perturbations added to a realistic background temperature profile. The simulations are carried out with the background temperature being either constant or varying in time to evaluate the sensitivit...

  11. On measuring surface wave phase velocity from station–station cross-correlation of ambient signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boschi, Lapo; Weemstra, Cornelis; Verbeke, Julie

    2012-01-01

    We apply two different algorithms to measure surface wave phase velocity, as a function of frequency, from seismic ambient noise recorded at pairs of stations from a large European network. The two methods are based on consistent theoretical formulations, but differ in the implementation: one met...

  12. Measurement of Plane-Wave Spectra of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) loop antenna close to the air-soil interface is measured by means of a probe buried in soil. Probe correction is implemented based upon knowledge about the complex permittivity of the soil and the current distribution...

  13. Accuracy of soil stress measurements as affected by transducer dimensions and shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Keller, Thomas; Berisso, Feto Esimo

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurements of soil stress are needed to evaluate the impact of traffic on soil properties and prevent soil compaction. Four types of transducer commonly used to measure vertical stress were calibrated in realistic traffic conditions in the field. The four transducer types differed...... in shape and dimensions, which are important factors influencing stress. Deviation of measured stress from true stress ranged from 15% underestimation to 18% overestimation, with transducer thickness to width ratio being the most important shape factor influencing the stress recorded. Changes in physical...... conditions in the soil above the transducers due to their installation did not influence the accuracy of vertical stress measurements. The results of this calibration are valid for correcting stress measurements in topsoil, but should be used with caution for vertical stress measurements in subsoil. All...

  14. Electromagnetic pulse measurement system based on optical fiber transmission under radiated-wave test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shunkun; Nie Xin; Chen Xiangyue; Xiang Hui

    2010-01-01

    Radiated-wave Electromagnetic Pulse Simulator is an important device used to study Electromagnetic Pulse effect of large electronic equipment in test. On the characteristic of radiated-EMP simulator test and the needs to measurement system, Electromagnetic Pulse measurement system based on optical fiber transmission and its composition are introduced in the paper. Sort of measurement system and Calibration method of its are present. The expression of uncertainty in Electromagnetic Pulse measurement system is discussed also. The measurement results are analyzed which be gained by radiated field test. (authors)

  15. Guided waves in pre-stressed hyperelastic plates and tubes: Application to the ultrasound elastography of thin-walled soft materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo-Yang; He, Qiong; Mangan, Robert; Xu, Guoqiang; Mo, Chi; Luo, Jianwen; Destrade, Michel; Cao, Yanping

    2017-05-01

    In vivo measurement of the mechanical properties of thin-walled soft tissues (e.g., mitral valve, artery and bladder) and in situ mechanical characterization of thin-walled artificial soft biomaterials in service are of great challenge and difficult to address via commonly used testing methods. Here we investigate the properties of guided waves generated by focused acoustic radiation force in immersed pre-stressed plates and tubes, and show that they can address this challenge. To this end, we carry out both (i) a theoretical analysis based on incremental wave motion in finite deformation theory and (ii) finite element simulations. Our analysis leads to a novel method based on the ultrasound elastography to image the elastic properties of pre-stressed thin-walled soft tissues and artificial soft materials in a non-destructive and non-invasive manner. To validate the theoretical and numerical solutions and demonstrate the usefulness of the corresponding method in practical measurements, we perform (iii) experiments on polyvinyl alcohol cryogel phantoms immersed in water, using the Verasonics V1 System equipped with a L10-5 transducer. Finally, potential clinical applications of the method have been discussed.

  16. Automation of measurement of heights waves around a model ship; Mokeisen mawari no hako keisoku no jidoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikehata, M.; Kato, M.; Yanagida, F. [Yokohama National University, Yokohama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-10-01

    Trial fabrication and tests were performed on an instrument to automate measurement of heights of waves around a model ship. The currently used electric wave height measuring instrument takes long time for measurement, hence poor in efficiency. The method for processing optical images also has a problem in accuracy. Therefore, a computer controlled system was structured by using AC servo motors in driving the X and Y axes of a traverse equipment. Equipment was fabricated to automate the wave height measurement, in which four servo type wave height meters are installed on a moving rack in the lateral (Y-axial) direction so that wave heights to be measured by four meters can be measured automatically all at once. Wave heights can be measured continuously by moving the moving rack at a constant speed, verifying that wave shapes in longitudinal cross sections can be acquired by only one towing. Time required in the measurements using the instrument was 40 hours as a net time for fixed point measurement and 12 hours for continuous measurement, or 52 hours in total. On the other hand, the time may reach 240 hours for fixed point measurement when the conventional all-point manual traverse equipment is used. Enormous effects were obtained from automating the instrument. Collection of wave height data will continue also on tankers and other types of ships. 2 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Stiffness measurement and defect detection in laminated composites by dry-coupled plate waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W.; Ziola, Steve M.; Dorighi, John F.; Gorman, Michael R.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents a novel non-destruction technique for stiffness measurement and defect detection in laminated composite plates using dry-coupled ultrasonic plate waves. The technique involves using a pari of wide-band transducers normally-placed on the plate surface to generate and receive the lowest order flexural mode (A0 mode) at low frequencies. The stiffness measurement first experimentally determines the phase velocity of the A0 mode, then reconstructs the stiffness matrix components D11, D22, A44, and A55 utilizing the higher order plate wave solution for laminated composites and a nonlinear least-square optimization method. Such stiffness measurements can be used for quality control/quality assurance of in-service composite structures or composite manufacturing process, and for verification of composite design. As well as the stiffness measurements, the time-of- flight and amplitude measurements are achieved by keeping the pulser-receiver distance and pulsing frequency constant, and scanning the transducers over the plate surface. Since the plate wave measurements are based on the direct first arrival of the flexural mode, they are not limited by the thinness of the specimen as the conventional c-scan. Examples of stiffness measurement and defect detection are given, including cases of impact damage, delamination and debonding in composite structures. Finally the main hardware and software features of a recently-developed F-Scan system are also described.

  18. Measurements of the thickness of model sea ice by UHF waves (abstract)

    OpenAIRE

    Takashima,Hayao; Yamakoshi,Hisao; Maeda,Toshio; Sakurai,Akio

    1993-01-01

    It is indispensable to know the dielectric constant of model sea ice in order to detect the ice thickness by radar. The authors measured the dielectric constsnt of model sea ice by the space reflection method using UHF waves. A UHF signal is swept from 200MHz to 1000MHz and is transmitted from an antenna toward the model sea ice set on a metal sheet. The transmitting antenna is a conical log spiral antenna for a right circular polarized wave. The receiving antenna is an inverse type antenna s...

  19. On Mass Loading and Dissipation Measured with Acoustic Wave Sensors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Voinova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize current trends in the analysis of physical properties (surface mass density, viscosity, elasticity, friction, and charge of various thin films measured with a solid-state sensor oscillating in a gaseous or liquid environment. We cover three different types of mechanically oscillating sensors: the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D monitoring, surface acoustic wave (SAW, resonators and magnetoelastic sensors (MESs. The fourth class of novel acoustic wave (AW mass sensors, namely thin-film bulk acoustic resonators (TFBARs on vibrating membranes is discussed in brief. The paper contains a survey of theoretical results and practical applications of the sensors and includes a comprehensive bibliography.

  20. Measurement and fitting techniques for the assessment of material nonlinearity using nonlinear Rayleigh waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torello, David [GW Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech (United States); Kim, Jin-Yeon [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Tech (United States); Qu, Jianmin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University (United States); Jacobs, Laurence J. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Tech and GW Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech (United States)

    2015-03-31

    This research considers the effects of diffraction, attenuation, and the nonlinearity of generating sources on measurements of nonlinear ultrasonic Rayleigh wave propagation. A new theoretical framework for correcting measurements made with air-coupled and contact piezoelectric receivers for the aforementioned effects is provided based on analytical models and experimental considerations. A method for extracting the nonlinearity parameter β{sub 11} is proposed based on a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting algorithm that is tailored for Rayleigh wave measurements. Quantitative experiments are conducted to confirm the predictions for the nonlinearity of the piezoelectric source and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the curve-fitting procedure. These experiments are conducted on aluminum 2024 and 7075 specimens and a β{sub 11}{sup 7075}/β{sub 11}{sup 2024} measure of 1.363 agrees well with previous literature and earlier work.

  1. In-situ Measurements of the Direction of Propagation of Pump Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, H. G.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Leyser, T.; Siefring, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    In the course of an experiment to modify the ionosphere, the direction of pump wave propagation is affected by density gradients in the horizontal and vertical directions, fundamentally affecting wave-energy transport. Horizontal gradients on various scales may await a modification attempt as a preexisting state of the ionosphere and/or be changed by the deposition of heater radio-frequency energy. In the results from the Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) in the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP), we have recorded on the order of 100 flights over ionospheric heaters revealing a variety of processes that high-frequency pump waves experience in the ionosphere. E-POP flies on the Canadian satellite CASSIOPE in an elliptic (320 x 1400 km), highly-inclined (81°) orbit. High frequency measurements have been/are being made near SPEAR, HAARP, Sura, EISCAT Heating and Arecibo. Electromagnetic waves from ground-based heaters are detected by the two, orthogonal, 6-m dipoles on the RRI. The high input impedance of the RRI means that the dipoles act as voltage probes, from which the electric field of incoming waves can be simply computed. When combined with cold-magnetoplasma electric-field theory, the relationship of voltages on the two orthogonal dipoles is used to deduce the direction of arrival of an incoming wave in three dimensions. We illustrate the technique by its application to analysis of signals from different transmitters. These results show a variety of pump-wave propagation directions, indicating the complexity of density structure within which modification might take place. Such complexity illustrates the importance of three-dimensional models of density in the vicinity of modification.

  2. Measurement of lower-hybrid-driven current profile by Abel inversion of electron-cyclotron wave transmission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidone, I.; Giruzzi, G.; Caron, X.; Meyer, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    A method for measuring the radial profile of the lower-hybrid-driven current in a low-density tokamak plasma using electron-cyclotron wave attenuation is discussed. This diagnostic scheme is reminiscent of the transmission interferometry approach, commonly used in tokamaks to measure the plasma density, but now the wave amplitude instead of the phase is measured. Wave attenuation of the ordinary mode at ω p much-lt ω c along vertical chords is measured; at these frequencies, the waves are absorbed by the superthermal tail sustained by lower-hybrid waves and the local wave absorption coefficient is proportional to the noninductive current density. The radial profile of this current is obtained from Abel inversion. An application to the Tore Supra tokamak is presented

  3. Precise measurement and accuracy analysis for determining the fast or slow axis of wave plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guixia; Su, Junhong; Xu, Junqi

    2018-01-01

    A method used for precisely measuring the placement of the fast or slow axis of wave plate is presented. In this method, a test wave plate is placed between a polarizer and an analyzer. With the polarizer and analyzer being rotated to different positions, the intensity of the emergent light is measured and one of the optics principal axes of the test wave plate is marked. Then whether this optics principal axis is a fast or slow axis is measured by checking the state of the emergent light polarization. By taking the method of identifying the intensity value near the inflection point, the error caused by directly searching the extreme value of the light intensity can be avoided and the accuracy of determining axis can also be improved significantly. In addition, the source of the determining axis accuracy, which is +/-0.1° . is also analyzed in detail. With regard to the method, there are no requirements for the wavelength of the light source or the linearity, undercurrent and isotropy of the photoelectric detector. Above all, it can be applied to determining the axis of wave plate with any phase retardation.

  4. Measurement of current drive profile using electron cyclotron wave attenuation near the O-mode cutoff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidone, I.; Meyer, R.L.; Caron, X.

    1992-01-01

    A method for determining the radial profile of the lower-hybrid current drive in tokamaks using electron cyclotron attenuation of the O mode for frequencies ω near the cutoff frequency is discussed. The basic idea is that, for a given wave frequency, the cutoff plays the role of a spatial filter selecting a variable portion of the noninductive current. It is shown that the incremental attenuation resulting from a small increase of ω displays specific features related to the current density near the cutoff point. Using the relation between the wave damping and the current density, it is possible to determine the radial profile of the current drive from the wave attenuation measurements. A numerical application is also presented for plasma parameters in the reactor regime

  5. Measurement of the speed and attenuation of the Biot slow wave using a large ultrasonic transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzidi, Youcef; Schmitt, Douglas R.

    2009-08-01

    Two compressional wave modes, a fast P1 and a slow P2, propagate through fluid-saturated porous and permeable media. This contribution focuses on new experimental tests of existing theories describing wave propagation in such media. Updated observations of this P2 mode are obtained through a water-loaded, porous sintered glass bead plate with a novel pair of ultrasonic transducers consisting of a large transmitter and a near-point receiver. The properties of the porous plate are measured in independent laboratory experiments. Waveforms are acquired as a function of the angle of incidence over the range from -50° to +50° with respect to the normal. The porous plate is fully characterized, and the physical properties are used to calculate the wave speeds and attenuations of the P1, the P2, and the shear S waves. Comparisons of theory and observation are further facilitated by numerically modeling the observed waveforms. This modeling method incorporates the frequency and angle of incidence-dependent reflectivity, transmissivity, and transducer edge effects; the modeled waveforms match well those observed. Taken together, this study provides further support for existing poroelastic bulk wave propagation and boundary condition theory. However, observed transmitted P1 and S mode amplitudes could not be adequately described unless the attenuation of the medium's frame was also included. The observed P2 amplitudes could be explained without any knowledge of the solid frame attenuation.

  6. A comparison of the Standing Wave and Two Microphone Methods in Measuring The Sound Absorption Coefficient of Wood

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Chunwon; Matsumura, Junji; Oda, Kazuyuki

    2006-01-01

    To compare the standing wave method with two microphone transfer function method in the measuring the sound absorption properties of wood, we measured the sound absorption coefficients of beech wood experimentally in the frequency range of 50 to 1600 Hz by the standing wave method and two-microphone method. The sound absorption coefficient under a continuous frequency range can be estimated in a shorter time by the two microphone transfer function method than the standing wave method. There...

  7. Measurement of the environmental broadband electromagnetic waves in a mid-size European city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, R; Gil, I

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the level of exposure to broadband radiofrequency electromagnetic field in a mid-size European city was evaluated in accordance with the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines from 1998. With the aim to analyse all the potential electromagnetic waves present in the city up to 18GHz, a total of 271 locations distributed along Terrassa (Spain) have been measured. To show the results in an easy-to-interpret way by the citizen, the results have been represented in a set of raster maps. The measurement results obtained showed that the electromagnetic wave measured in all broadband frequency range along the city is much lower than the safety level according to the international regulations for both public and occupational sectors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Near-surface viscosity measurements with a love acoustic wave device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collings, A.F.; Cooper, B.J.; Lappas, S.; Sor, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: In the last decade, considerable research effort has been directed towards interfacing piezoelectric transducers with biological detection systems to produce efficient and highly selective biosensors. Several types of piezoelectric or, more specifically, acoustic wave transducers have been investigated. Our group has developed Love wave (guided surface skimming wave) devices which are made by attaching a thin overlayer with the appropriate acoustic properties to the surface of a conventional surface horizontal mode device. An optimised layer concentrates most of the propagating wave energy in the guiding layer and can improve the device sensitivity in detecting gas-phase mass loading on the surface some 20- to 40-fold. Love wave devices used in liquid phase sensing will also respond to viscous, as well as mass, loading on the device surface. We have studied the propagation of viscous waves into liquid sitting on a Love wave device both theoretically and experimentally. Modelling of the effect of a viscous liquid layer on a Love wave propagating in a layered medium predicts the velocity profile in the solid substrate and in the adjoining liquid. This is a function of the thickness of the guiding layer, the elastic properties of the guiding layer and the piezoelectric substrate, and of the viscosity and density of the liquid layer. We report here on measurements of the viscosity of aqueous glycerine solutions made with a quartz Love wave device with a 5.5 μm SiO 2 guiding layer. The linear relationship between the decrease in the device frequency and the square root of the viscosity density product is accurately observed at Newtonian viscosities. At higher viscosities, there is an increase in damping, the insertion loss of the device saturates, Δf is no longer proportional to (ηp) l/2 and reaches a maximum. We also show results for the determination of the gelation time in protein and inorganic aqueous gels and for the rate of change of viscosity with

  9. Measurement as absorption of Feynman trajectories: Collapse of the wave function can be avoided

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchewka, A.; Schuss, Z.

    2002-01-01

    We define a measuring device (detector) of the coordinate of quantum particle as an absorbing wall that cuts off the particle's wave function. The wave function in the presence of such a detector vanishes on the detector. The trace the absorbed particles leave on the detector is identified as the absorption current density on the detector. This density is calculated from the solution of Schroedinger's equation with a reflecting boundary at the detector. This current density is not the usual Schroedinger current density. We define the probability distribution of the time of arrival to a detector in terms of the absorption current density. We define coordinate measurement by an absorbing wall in terms of four postulates. In the resulting theory the quantum-mechanical collapse of the wave function is replaced with the usual collapse of the probability distribution after observation. Two measurement experiments are proposed to measure time of arrival and the probability density function of a freely propagating two-dimensional Gaussian packet from the measurement of the absorption current on two planes

  10. Eo-1 Hyperion Measures Canopy Drought Stress In Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, Gregory P.; Nepstad, Daniel; Cardinot, Gina; Moutinho, Paulo; Harris, Thomas; Ray, David

    2004-01-01

    The central, south and southeast portions of the Amazon Basin experience a period of decreased cloud cover and precipitation from June through November. There are likely important effects of seasonal and interannual rainfall variation on forest leaf area index, canopy water stress, productivity and regional carbon cycling in the Amazon. While both ground and spaceborne studies of precipitation continue to improve, there has been almost no progress made in observing forest canopy responses to rainfall variability in the humid tropics. This shortfall stems from the large stature of the vegetation and great spatial extent of tropical forests, both of which strongly impede field studies of forest responses to water availability. Those few studies employing satellite measures of canopy responses to seasonal and interannual drought (e.g., Bohlman et al. 1998, Asner et al. 2000) have been limited by the spectral resolution and sampling available from Landsat and AVHRR sensors. We report on a study combining the first landscape-level, managed drought experiment in Amazon tropical forest with the first spaceborne imaging spectrometer observations of this experimental area. Using extensive field data on rainfall inputs, soil water content, and both leaf and canopy responses, we test the hypothesis that spectroscopic signatures unique to hyperspectral observations can be used to quantify relative differences in canopy stress resulting from water availability.

  11. Particle transport in 3He-rich events: wave-particle interactions and particle anisotropy measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hada

    Full Text Available Energetic particles and MHD waves are studied using simultaneous ISEE-3 data to investigate particle propagation and scattering between the source near the Sun and 1 AU. 3 He-rich events are of particular interest because they are typically low intensity "scatter-free" events. The largest solar proton events are of interest because they have been postulated to generate their own waves through beam instabilities. For 3 He-rich events, simultaneous interplanetary magnetic spectra are measured. The intensity of the interplanetary "fossil" turbulence through which the particles have traversed is found to be at the "quiet" to "intermediate" level of IMF activity. Pitch angle scattering rates and the corresponding particle mean free paths lW - P are calculated using the measured wave intensities, polarizations, and k directions. The values of lW - P are found to be ~ 5 times less than the value of lHe , the latter derived from He intensity and anisotropy time profiles. It is demonstrated by computer simulation that scattering rates through a 90° pitch angle are lower than that of other pitch angles, and that this is a possible explanation for the discrepancy between the lW - P and lHe values. At this time the scattering mechanism(s is unknown. We suggest a means where a direct comparison between the two l values could be made. Computer simulations indicate that although scattering through 90° is lower, it still occurs. Possibilities are either large pitch angle scattering through resonant interactions, or particle mirroring off of field compression regions. The largest solar proton events are analyzed to investigate the possibilities of local wave generation at 1 AU. In accordance with the results of a previous calculation (Gary et al., 1985 of beam stability, proton beams at 1 AU are found to be marginally stable. No evidence for substantial wave amplitude was found. Locally generated waves, if present, were less than 10-3 nT 2 Hz-1 at the leading

  12. Evaluation and adjustment of altimeter measurement and numerical hindcast in wave height trend estimation in China's coastal seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuiqing; Guan, Shoude; Hou, Yijun; Liu, Yahao; Bi, Fan

    2018-05-01

    A long-term trend of significant wave height (SWH) in China's coastal seas was examined based on three datasets derived from satellite measurements and numerical hindcasts. One set of altimeter data were obtained from the GlobWave, while the other two datasets of numerical hindcasts were obtained from the third-generation wind wave model, WAVEWATCH III, forced by wind fields from the Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform (CCMP) and NCEP's Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR). The mean and extreme wave trends were estimated for the period 1992-2010 with respect to the annual mean and the 99th-percentile values of SWH, respectively. The altimeter wave trend estimates feature considerable uncertainties owing to the sparse sampling rate. Furthermore, the extreme wave trend tends to be overestimated because of the increasing sampling rate over time. Numerical wave trends strongly depend on the quality of the wind fields, as the CCMP waves significantly overestimate the wave trend, whereas the CFSR waves tend to underestimate the trend. Corresponding adjustments were applied which effectively improved the trend estimates from the altimeter and numerical data. The adjusted results show generally increasing mean wave trends, while the extreme wave trends are more spatially-varied, from decreasing trends prevailing in the South China Sea to significant increasing trends mainly in the East China Sea.

  13. Measurement and modeling of wind waves at the northern coast of Santa Catarina, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Henrique G. M. Alves

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Directional measurements of wind-wave spectra made during the year of 1996 are used in a preliminary investigation of the wind-wave climate and its transformation at the São Francisco do Sul island, northern coast of the Santa Catarina state. Four major sea states and associated meteorological conditions are identified through analyses of joint distributions of observed wave parameters. Transformations of these main sea-state patterns due to refraction and shoaling are investigated through a numerical modeling approach that allows the reconstruction of the wave field within extensive coastal areas, using single point measurements of the wave spectrum in shallow waters. Cross-validation of measured and reconstructed spectra at the study site yield consistent results, suggesting that the proposed methodology works well for the São Francisco do Sul coast.Medições do espectro direcional de ondas geradas pelo vento realizadas em 1996 são utilizadas em uma investigação preliminar do clima de ondas no litoral norte de Santa Catarina, Brasil. Quatro estados de mar predominantes são identificados, em conjunto com os padrões meteorológicos associados a sua ocorrência, através de análises estatísticas. As transformações desses quatro estados de mar devido a refraçâo e empinamento são investigadas através de modelos numéricos, que permitem obter estimativas do campo de ondas em áreas extensas a partir de medições pontuais feitas em águas rasas. Comparações entre espectros medidos e modelados produzem resultados consistentes, sugerindo que a metodologia proposta é válida para a costa de São Francisco do Sul.

  14. Time stress measurement device: system design and synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harchani, Noursaied; Jimenez, Fernando; Al-Mohammed, Mohammed; Esteve, Daniel; Courvoisier, M.

    2000-04-01

    System design methodology becomes a strategic activity in the industrial competition. Obtaining substantial reduction of time to market for complex and reliable products is one of the priorities for the manufacturers. Top down design, automated generation of architecture, co-design, virtual prototyping, etc. are already identified as research topics which have to be privileged. To be efficient, each theoretical contribution must be inserted in a global procedure of project management where complementary elements such as marketing, technico-economic survey, road-mapping, internal know-how,.. must be considered. In this context, this paper will present a design methodology starting from the requirement statement until the technical realization of the product, and applied to the design of a Time Stress Measurement Device for the observation of aeronautical mechanical systems.

  15. Soil Stress-Strain Behavior: Measurement, Modeling and Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ling, Hoe I; Leshchinsky, Dov; Koseki, Junichi; A Collection of Papers of the Geotechnical Symposium in Rome

    2007-01-01

    This book is an outgrowth of the proceedings for the Geotechnical Symposium in Roma, which was held on March 16 and 17, 2006 in Rome, Italy. The Symposium was organized to celebrate the 60th birthday of Prof. Tatsuoka as well as honoring his research achievement. The publications are focused on the recent developments in the stress-strain behavior of geomaterials, with an emphasis on laboratory measurements, soil constitutive modeling and behavior of soil structures (such as reinforced soils, piles and slopes). The latest advancement in the field, such as the rate effect and dynamic behavior of both clay and sand, behavior of modified soils and soil mixtures, and soil liquefaction are addressed. A special keynote paper by Prof. Tatsuoka is included with three other keynote papers (presented by Prof. Lo Presti, Prof. Di Benedetto, and Prof. Shibuya).

  16. Stress-Strain Measurements of Semi-Aquatic Snake Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Nisha; Norwood, David, , Dr.; Fontenot, Cliff, , Dr.; Wallace, Addison; Koduri, Mahitha; Allain, Rhett, , Dr.

    It is of interest to understand the mechanism by which semi-aquatic maintain visual acuity when moving from land to underwater. Toward that end, we are interested in the mechanical properties of snake lenses and how this might affect the ability of snakes to deform the lens and thus alter the lens power. In this presentation, we will present data taken with a force sensor and a rotary motion sensor to measure, in one shot, force versus displacement, from which we estimate mechanical properties of stress and strain of the eye lens of a water snake. We will compare the results from lenses freshly removed from snake to those that have been stored. More importantly though, we will compare results from one species of semi-aquatic snakes to the other species of interest

  17. Propagation of the Stress Wave Through the Filled Joint with Linear Viscoelastic Deformation Behavior Using Time-Domain Recursive Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Hu, Zhiping; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Qiyao

    2017-12-01

    The dynamic behavior of filled joints is mostly controlled by the filled medium. In addition to nonlinear elastic behavior, viscoelastic behavior of filled joints is also of great significance. Here, a theoretical study of stress wave propagation through a filled rock joint with linear viscoelastic deformation behavior has been carried out using a modified time-domain recursive method (TDRM). A displacement discontinuity model was extended to form a displacement and stress discontinuity model, and the differential constitutive relationship of viscoelastic model was adopted to introduce the mass and viscoelastic behavior of filled medium. A standard linear solid model, which can be degenerated into the Kelvin and Maxwell models, was adopted in deriving this method. Transmission and reflection coefficients were adopted to verify this method. Besides, the effects of some parameters on wave propagation across a filled rock joint with linear viscoelastic deformation behavior were discussed. Then, a comparison of the time-history curves calculated by the present method with those by frequency-domain method (FDM) was performed. The results indicated that change tendencies of the transmission and reflection coefficients for these viscoelastic models versus incident angle were the same as each other but not frequency. The mass and viscosity coupling of filled medium did not fundamentally change wave propagation. The modified TDRM was found to be more efficient than the FDM.

  18. Stress Measurements in Railroad Wheels Via the Barkhausen Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-02-01

    The feasibility of utilizing the Barkhausen Effect in ferromagnetic steels as a nondestructive means for ascertaining residual stresses in railroad wheels was investigated. Railroad wheels are generally manufactured with compressive stress distributi...

  19. Determining the near-surface current profile from measurements of the wave dispersion relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Benjamin; Maxwell, Peter; Aesøy, Eirik; Ellingsen, Simen

    2017-11-01

    The current-induced Doppler shifts of waves can yield information about the background mean flow, providing an attractive method of inferring the current profile in the upper layer of the ocean. We present measurements of waves propagating on shear currents in a laboratory water channel, as well as theoretical investigations of inversion techniques for determining the vertical current structure. Spatial and temporal measurements of the free surface profile obtained using a synthetic Schlieren method are analyzed to determine the wave dispersion relation and Doppler shifts as a function of wavelength. The vertical current profile can then be inferred from the Doppler shifts using an inversion algorithm. Most existing algorithms rely on a priori assumptions of the shape of the current profile, and developing a method that uses less stringent assumptions is a focus of this study, allowing for measurement of more general current profiles. The accuracy of current inversion algorithms are evaluated by comparison to measurements of the mean flow profile from particle image velocimetry (PIV), and a discussion of the sensitivity to errors in the Doppler shifts is presented.

  20. Phase change measurement of ultrasonic shear waves on reflection from a curing epoxy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, S; Lanyon, B

    2005-01-01

    Simple modelling shows that an ultrasonic shear wave with a frequency in the megahertz range, travelling in an elastic medium, that is subsequently reflected at normal incidence from an interface with a viscous medium will undergo a phase change equivalent to a temporal shift of the order of nanoseconds for realistic material properties. This suggests a new technique to observe and characterize curing epoxy adhesives in a reflection geometry that is preferable in many industrial situations. It has been shown by previous workers that in the case of reflection from a classic viscous liquid only the phase or the amplitude need to be measured in order to return the viscosity of the liquid. This paper explores the more general case for a viscoelastic substance where both amplitude and phase must be measured in order to return the viscosity and elastic modulus of the material under investigation. Non-contact electromagnetic acoustic transducers, generating wideband shear wave pulses in the 0.5-8 MHz frequency range, are used to perform ultrasonic measurements of a shear wave reflected from the interface of an aluminium-curing epoxy resin sample. The viscosity and the shear elastic modulus of the epoxy resin sample are calculated over the cure cycle. As expected the accuracy is limited by significant measurement errors in the reflected amplitude

  1. Measurement of internal stresses in a welded assembly made of 20 MND 53 ferritic steel. Stress relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.L.

    1981-05-01

    An assembly consisting of two flanged plates welded end to end was realized, the plates being made of 20 MND 53 ferritic steel. This grade of steel is used to fabricate PWR reactor vessels. At each important stage in the realization of the assembly, internal stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction techniques. These measurements showed that the finished realization manifested compression stresses in the main parts of its structure and large amplitude tensile stresses in the central weld seam. A heat treatment was performed (615 0 C - 17 hours). Stresses levels almost every where in the assembly dropped to practically zero. Although stress relaxation kinetics are probably slower in voluminous parts, this result and most of the results published in literature on this subject, indicate that such treatment notably diminishes internal welding stress even in thick parts [fr

  2. Significance of T wave normalization in the electrocardiogram during exercise stress test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, J.J.; Heng, M.K.; Sevrin, R.; Udhoji, V.N.

    1987-01-01

    Although normalization of previously inverted T waves in the ECG is not uncommon during exercise treadmill testing, the clinical significance of this finding is still unclear. This was investigated in 45 patients during thallium-201 exercise testing. Patients with secondary T wave abnormalities on the resting ECG and ischemic exercise ST segment depression were excluded. On the thallium-201 scans, the left ventricle was divided into anterior-septal and inferior-posterior segments; these were considered equivalent to T wave changes in leads V1 and V5, and aVF, respectively. A positive thallium-201 scan was found in 43 of 45 (95%) patients and in 49 of 52 (94%) cardiac segments that showed T wave normalization. When thallium scans and T wave changes were matched to sites of involvement, 76% of T wave normalization in lead aV, was associated with positive thallium scans in the inferior-posterior segments, and 77% of T wave normalization in V1 and V5 was associated with positive thallium scans in the anterior-septal segments. These site correlations were similar for reversible and fixed thallium defects, and for patients not on digoxin therapy. Similar correlations were noted for the sites of T wave changes and coronary artery lesions in 12 patients who had angiography. In patients with a high prevalence for coronary artery disease, exercise T wave normalization is highly specific for the presence of the disease. In addition, it represents predominantly either previous injury or exercise-induced ischemic changes over the site of ECG involvement, rather than reciprocal changes of the opposite ventricular wall

  3. Detection of Ultrasonic Stress Waves in Structures Using 3D Shaped Optic Fiber Based on a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chengming; Zhou, Wensong; Xie, Yawen

    2018-04-16

    This work proposes a 3D shaped optic fiber sensor for ultrasonic stress waves detection based on the principle of a Mach–Zehnder interferometer. This sensor can be used to receive acoustic emission signals in the passive damage detection methods and other types of ultrasonic signals propagating in the active damage detection methods, such as guided wave-based methods. The sensitivity of an ultrasonic fiber sensor based on the Mach–Zehnder interferometer mainly depends on the length of the sensing optical fiber; therefore, the proposed sensor achieves the maximum possible sensitivity by wrapping an optical fiber on a hollow cylinder with a base. The deformation of the optical fiber is produced by the displacement field of guided waves in the hollow cylinder. The sensor was first analyzed using the finite element method, which demonstrated its basic sensing capacity, and the simulation signals have the same characteristics in the frequency domain as the excitation signal. Subsequently, the primary investigations were conducted via a series of experiments. The sensor was used to detect guided wave signals excited by a piezoelectric wafer in an aluminum plate, and subsequently it was tested on a reinforced concrete beam, which produced acoustic emission signals via impact loading and crack extension when it was loaded to failure. The signals obtained from a piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor were used for comparison, and the results indicated that the proposed 3D fiber optic sensor can detect ultrasonic signals in the specific frequency response range.

  4. State of charge estimation for lithium-ion pouch batteries based on stress measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Haifeng; Yu, Chenchen; Wei, Xuezhe; Sun, Zechang

    2017-01-01

    State of charge (SOC) estimation is one of the important tasks of battery management system (BMS). Being different from other researches, a novel method of SOC estimation for pouch lithium-ion battery cells based on stress measurement is proposed. With a comprehensive experimental study, we find that, the stress of the battery during charge/discharge is composed of the static stress and the dynamic stress. The static stress, which is the measured stress in equilibrium state, corresponds to SOC, this phenomenon facilitates the design of our stress-based SOC estimation. The dynamic stress, on the other hand, is influenced by multiple factors including charge accumulation or depletion, current and historical operation, thus a multiple regression model of the dynamic stress is established. Based on the relationship between static stress and SOC, as well as the dynamic stress modeling, the SOC estimation method is founded. Experimental results show that the stress-based method performs well with a good accuracy, and this method offers a novel perspective for SOC estimation. - Highlights: • A State of Charge estimator based on stress measurement is proposed. • The stress during charge and discharge is investigated with comprehensive experiments. • Effects of SOC, current, and operation history on battery stress are well studied. • A multiple regression model of the dynamic stress is established.

  5. Measuring Bus Drivers' Occupational Stress Under Changing Working Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hlotova, Y.; Cats, O.; Meijer, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Stress is an immense problem in modern society; approximately half of all occupational illnesses are directly or indirectly related to stress. The work of a bus driver is typically associated with high stress levels that negatively influence individual well-being as well as workforce management. The

  6. Realtime 3D stress measurement in curing epoxy packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Jacob; Hyldgård, A.; Birkelund, Karen

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to characterize stress in microsystem packaging. A circular p-type piezoresistor is implemented on a (001) silicon chip. We use the circular stress sensor to determine the packaging induced stress in a polystyrene tube filled with epoxy. The epoxy curing process...

  7. S-wave propagating in an anisotropic inhomogeneous elastic medium under the influence of gravity, initial stress, electric and magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakar Rajneesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of gravity, initial stress, non-homogeneity, electric and magnetic field on the propagation of shear waves in an anisotropic incompressible medium. Various graphs are plotted to show the effect of direction of propagation, the anisotropy, magnetic field, electric field, non-homogeneity of the medium and the initial stress on shear waves. The dispersion equations for shear waves are obtained and discussed for different cases. In fact, in the absence of various material parameters, these equations are in agreement with the classical results for isotropic medium.

  8. Investigation of turbulence measurements with a continuous wave, conically scanning LiDAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Mikkelsen, Torben; Courtney, Michael

    averaging is done in two steps: 1) the weighted averaging of the wind speed in the probe volume of the laser beam; 2) the averaging of the wind speeds occurring on the circular path described by the conically scanning lidar. Therefore the standard deviation measured by a lidar resolves only the turbulence...... of a continuous wave, conically scanning Zephir lidar. First, the wind speed standard deviation measured by such a lidar gives on average 80% of the standard deviation measured by a cup anemometer. This difference is due to the spatial averaging inherently made by a cw conically scanning lidar. The spatial...

  9. Scrape-off measurements during Alfven wave heating in the TCA tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, F.; Hollenstein, C.; Joye, B.; Lietti, A.; Lister, J.B.; Pochelon, A.; Gimzewski, J.K.; Veprek, S.

    1984-01-01

    Plasma parameters and impurity fluxes in the scrape-off layer of the TCA tokamak have been measured during Alfven wave heating. Langmuir probes are used to measure electron density, electron temperature and plasma potential. Collection probes, in conjunction with XPS surface analysis, are used to determine impurity fluxes and ion impact energies. During RF heating, the electron edge temperature rises, the plasma potential drops and impurity fluxes are enhanced. Probe erosion due to impurity sputtering is clearly observed. The measurements are correlated with other diagnostics on TCA. (orig.)

  10. Unravelling the noise: the discrimination of wave function collapse models under time-continuous measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genoni, Marco G.; Duarte, O. S.; Serafini, Alessio

    2016-10-01

    Inspired by the notion that environmental noise is in principle observable, while fundamental noise due to spontaneous localization would not be, we study the estimation of the diffusion parameter induced by wave function collapse models under continuous monitoring of the environment. We take into account finite measurement efficiencies and, in order to quantify the advantage granted by monitoring, we analyse the quantum Fisher information associated with such a diffusion parameter, identify optimal measurements in limiting cases, and assess the performance of such measurements in more realistic conditions.

  11. Vitamin C protects rat cerebellum and encephalon from oxidative stress following exposure to radiofrequency wave generated by a BTS antenna model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Abolfazl; Jelodar, Gholamali; Nazifi, Saeed

    2014-06-01

    Radio frequency wave (RFW) generated by base transceiver station has been reported to produce deleterious effects on the central nervous system function, possibly through oxidative stress. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of RFW-induced oxidative stress in the cerebellum and encephalon and the prophylactic effect of vitamin C on theses tissues by measuring the antioxidant enzymes activity, including: glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and malondialdehyde (MDA). Thirty-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four equal groups. The control group; the control-vitamin C group received L-ascorbic acid (200 mg/kg of body weight/day by gavage) for 45 days. The RFW group was exposed to RFW and the RFW+ vitamin C group was exposed to RFW and received vitamin C. At the end of the experiment, all groups were killed and encephalon and cerebellum of all rats were removed and stored at -70 °C for measurement of antioxidant enzymes activity and MDA. The results indicate that exposure to RFW in the test group decreased antioxidant enzymes activity and increased MDA compared with the control groups (p < 0.05). The protective role of vitamin C in the treated group improved antioxidant enzymes activity and reduced MDA compared with the test group (p < 0.05). It can be concluded that RFW causes oxidative stress in the brain and vitamin C improves the antioxidant enzymes activity and decreases MDA.

  12. Determination of elastic anisotropy of rocks from P- and S-wave velocities: numerical modelling and lab measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitek, Tomáš; Vavryčuk, Václav; Lokajíček, Tomáš; Petružálek, Matěj

    2014-12-01

    The most common type of waves used for probing anisotropy of rocks in laboratory is the direct P wave. Information potential of the measured P-wave velocity, however, is limited. In rocks displaying weak triclinic anisotropy, the P-wave velocity depends just on 15 linear combinations of 21 elastic parameters, called the weak-anisotropy parameters. In strong triclinic anisotropy, the P-wave velocity depends on the whole set of 21 elastic parameters, but inversion for six of them is ill-conditioned and these parameters are retrieved with a low accuracy. Therefore, in order to retrieve the complete elastic tensor accurately, velocities of S waves must also be measured and inverted. For this purpose, we developed a lab facility which allows the P- and S-wave ultrasonic sounding of spherical rock samples in 132 directions distributed regularly over the sphere. The velocities are measured using a pair of P-wave sensors with the transmitter and receiver polarized along the radial direction and using two pairs of S-wave sensors with the transmitter and receiver polarized tangentially to the spherical sample in mutually perpendicular directions. We present inversion methods of phase and ray velocities for elastic parameters describing general triclinic anisotropy. We demonstrate on synthetic tests that the inversion becomes more robust and stable if the S-wave velocities are included. This applies even to the case when the velocity of the S waves is measured in a limited number of directions and with a significantly lower accuracy than that of the P wave. Finally, we analyse velocities measured on a rock sample from the Outokumpu deep drill hole, Finland. We present complete sets of elastic parameters of the sample including the error analysis for several levels of confining pressure ranging from 0.1 to 70 MPa.

  13. Pressure transducer used for measuring close-in shock waves of nuclear explosions in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, J.; Zhou, Z.

    1985-01-01

    This paper introduces a variable reluctance pressure transducer. It has been successfully used for the measurement of close-in shock waves of nuclear explosions in the atmosphere. This transducer's highest pressure range is 100kg/cm 2 and its response rise time for all ranges is lms. It uses a specially made oil-filled pressure which allows the transducer to be able to realize underground installation. In this way, it can endure the intense nuclear radiation of nuclear explosions without losing its fast speed response characteristics. This transducer has undergone a series of environmental tests and dynamic standardizations. Therefore, it was used to measure the complete waveform of shock wave overpressure in areas near the fire ball of nuclear explosions. This paper lists the test data of a group of nuclear explosion tests

  14. Studies of Gravity Waves Using Michelson Interferometer Measurements of OH (3-1 Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-In Won

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available As part of a long-term program for polar upper atmospheric studies, temperatures and intensities of the OH (3-1 bands were derived from spectrometric observations of airglow emissions over King Sejong station (62.22o S, 301.25o E. These measurements were made with a Michelson interferometer to cover wavelength regions between 1000 nm and 2000 nm. A spectral analysis was performed to individual nights of data to acquire information on the waves in the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. It is assumed that the measured fluctuations in the intensity and temperature of the OH (3-1 airglow were caused by gravity waves propagating through the emission layer. Correlation of intensity and temperature variation revealed oscillations with periods ranging from 2 to 9 hours. We also calculated Krassovsky's parameter and compared with published values.

  15. MEASUREMENTS OF SHOCK WAVE FORCE IN SHOCK TUBE WITH INDIRECT METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Dobrilović

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Tests have been conducted at the “Laboratory for testing of civil explosives, detonators, electrical detonators and pyrotechnical materials”, Department for mining and geotechnics of the Faculty of mining, geology and petroleum engineering, University of Zagreb with the purpose of designing a detonator that would unite advantages of a non-electric system and the precision in regulation of time delay in electronic initiation system. Sum of energy released by the wave force in shock tube is a pre-condition for operation of the new detonator, and measurement of wave force is the first step in determining the sum of energy. The sum of energy is measured indirectly, based on two principles: movement sensors and strain.

  16. Wave-induced abiotic stress shapes phenotypic diversity in a coral reef fish across a geographical cline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, C. J.; Binning, S. A.; Wainwright, P. C.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2013-09-01

    While morphological variation across geographical clines has been well documented, it is often unclear whether such changes enhance individual performance to local environments. We examined whether the damselfish Acanthochromis polyacanthus display functional changes in swimming phenotype across a 40-km cline in wave-driven water motion on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. A. polyacanthus populations displayed strong intraspecific variation in swimming morphology and performance that matched local levels of water motion: individuals on reefs subject to high water motion displayed higher aspect-ratio fins and faster swimming speeds than conspecifics on sheltered reefs. Remarkably, intraspecific variation within A. polyacanthus spanned over half the diversity seen among closely related damselfish species from the same region. We find that local selection driven by wave-induced abiotic stress is an overarching ecological mechanism shaping the inter- and intraspecific locomotor diversity of coral reef fishes.

  17. An alpha particle diagnostic based on measurements of lower hybrid wave fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.

    1989-07-01

    It is shown that the one-dimensional alpha particle velocity distribution function can be determined from the fluctuation- dissipation theorem based on measurements of lower hybrid wave fluctuations in an equilibrium plasma. This method uses collective Thomson scattering data with large signal-to-noise ratio, but it is applicable only when the alpha particles have an isotropic velocity distribution. 16 refs., 1 fig

  18. Quantifying Electromagnetic Wave Propagation Environment Using Measurements From A Small Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Additionally, MOST is limited in its application to surfaces, such as ocean waves, that have their own dynamic structures ( Hill 1989). Foken...campaign. Figure 6 shows the general measurement area with the green stars (Points A1 and A2) denoting the locations of the surface floats used to tether...deployments during CASPER-East. 21 The two green stars denote the locations of the surface super sites (Point A1 and Point A2) at 16 nm and 34 nm

  19. Measuring test mass acceleration noise in space-based gravitational wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congedo, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    The basic constituent of interferometric gravitational wave detectors—the test-mass-to-test-mass interferometric link—behaves as a differential dynamometer measuring effective differential forces, comprising an integrated measure of gravity curvature, inertial effects, as well as nongravitational spurious forces. This last contribution is going to be characterized by the LISA Pathfinder mission, a technology precursor of future space-borne detectors like eLISA. Changing the perspective from displacement to acceleration can benefit the data analysis of LISA Pathfinder and future detectors. The response in differential acceleration to gravitational waves is derived for a space-based detector's interferometric link. The acceleration formalism can also be integrated into time delay interferometry by building up the unequal-arm Michelson differential acceleration combination. The differential acceleration is nominally insensitive to the system's free evolution dominating the slow displacement dynamics of low-frequency detectors. Working with acceleration also provides an effective way to subtract measured signals acting as systematics, including the actuation forces. Because of the strong similarity with the equations of motion, the optimal subtraction of systematic signals, known within some amplitude and time shift, with the focus on measuring the noise provides an effective way to solve the problem and marginalize over nuisance parameters. The F statistic, in widespread use throughout the gravitation waves community, is included in the method and suitably generalized to marginalize over linear parameters and noise at the same time. The method is applied to LPF simulator data and, thanks to its generality, can also be applied to the data reduction and analysis of future gravitational wave detectors.

  20. A directional wave measurement attack against the Kish key distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Lachlan J; Allison, Andrew; Abbott, Derek

    2014-09-24

    The Kish key distribution system has been proposed as a classical alternative to quantum key distribution. The idealized Kish scheme elegantly promises secure key distribution by exploiting thermal noise in a transmission line. However, we demonstrate that it is vulnerable to nonidealities in its components, such as the finite resistance of the transmission line connecting its endpoints. We introduce a novel attack against this nonideality using directional wave measurements, and experimentally demonstrate its efficacy.

  1. A computer program (COSTUM) to calculate confidence intervals for in situ stress measurements. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzik, E.J.; Walker, J.R.; Martin, C.D.

    1989-03-01

    The state of in situ stress is one of the parameters required both for the design and analysis of underground excavations and for the evaluation of numerical models used to simulate underground conditions. To account for the variability and uncertainty of in situ stress measurements, it is desirable to apply confidence limits to measured stresses. Several measurements of the state of stress along a borehole are often made to estimate the average state of stress at a point. Since stress is a tensor, calculating the mean stress and confidence limits using scalar techniques is inappropriate as well as incorrect. A computer program has been written to calculate and present the mean principle stresses and the confidence limits for the magnitudes and directions of the mean principle stresses. This report describes the computer program, COSTUM

  2. High-frequency Surface Wave Measurements of Micro-tunamis generated by Glacier Calving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minowa, Masahiro; Sugiyama, Shin; Sakakibara, Daiki; Podolskiy, Evgeny; Ohashi, Yoshihiko; Skvarca, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Calving plays a key role in recent rapid retreat of glaciers in Greenland, Alaska and Patagonia. However, processes related to calving are poorly understood since direct observations are difficult. When calving occurred at the glacier front, ice hits water surface and generates surface wave or micro-tsunami. Because characteristics of the micro-tsunami are dependent on the impact on water, it is expected that analysis of the wave provides useful information on the size and type of calving. To study the calving processes from surface wave, we performed field observations at Glaciar Perito Moreno, a freshwater calving glacier in the Southern Patagonia Icefield. We measured the surface level by recording water pressure every 2 s (0.5 Hz), using a sensor installed in a lake 300 m from the calving front. Spectral and statistical analyses were performed on the wave data. We also carried out time-lapse photography, ice speed and water temperature measurements. The time-lapse photographs were used to identify the types of observed calving events (1. Subaqueous, 2. Topple, 3. Drop, 4. Small serac failure). During summer (15 December 2013-4 January 2014) and spring (6-20 October 2014) field campaigns, 640 (30 events d-1) and 195 (12 events d-1) calving events were recorded by the pressure sensor, respectively. The number of calving events varied in time (from 0 to 6 events h-1) and this variation correlates well with lakewater temperature. Subaqueous calving account for only 2.4 % of calving events recorded during the field campaigns (7 out of 364 events). These results imply importance of melting at/under water surface as a triggering mechanism of calving. Waves generated by subaerial calving events (type 2, 3 and 4) showed similar frequency spectrums, whereas those by subaqueous calving had smaller power in frequency range between 0.12-0.25 Hz. The amplitude of the surface waves increased with size of calving, which was quantified by the time-lapse photographs. Our results

  3. Preliminary results from the MEMO multicomponent measurements of waves on-board INTERBALL 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lefeuvre

    Full Text Available The MEMO (MEsure Multicomposante des Ondes experiment is a part of the INTERBALL 2 wave consortium. It is connected to a total of six electric and nine magnetic independent sensors. It provides waveforms associated with the measurement of two to five components in three frequency bands: ELF (5–1000 Hz, VLF (1–20 kHz, LF (20–250 kHz. Preliminary analyses of low and high resolution data are presented. The emphasis is put on the estimation of the propagation characteristics of the observed waves.VLF hiss emissions are shown to be mainly whistler mode emissions, but other modes are present. An accurate estimation of the local plasma frequency is proposed when the low L = 0 cutoff frequency is identified. AKR emissions observed just above source regions are studied. R-X and L-O modes are found: the first at the lowest frequencies and the second at the highest. Both propagate with wave normal directions weakly oblique or quasi-parallel to the Earth's magnetic field direction. Propagation characteristics are also determined for a (non-drifting fine structure of AKR. There is no fundamental difference with structurless events. Nightside and dayside bursts of ELF electromagnetic emissions are presented. It is not clear whether the two emissions belong to the "lion roar" emissions or not.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; plasma waves and instabilities; instruments and techniques

  4. Measuring the flexoelectric coefficient of bulk barium titanate from a shock wave experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Taotao; Deng, Qian; Liang, Xu; Shen, Shengping

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a phenomenon of polarization introduced by shock waves is experimentally studied. Although this phenomenon has been reported previously in the community of physics, this is the first time to link it to flexoelectricity, the coupling between electric polarization and strain gradients in dielectrics. As the shock waves propagate in a dielectric material, electric polarization is thought to be induced by the strain gradient at the shock front. First, we control the first-order hydrogen gas gun to impact and generate shock waves in unpolarized bulk barium titanate (BT) samples. Then, a high-precision oscilloscope is used to measure the voltage generated by the flexoelectric effect. Based on experimental results, strain elastic wave theory, and flexoelectric theory, a longitudinal flexoelectric coefficient of the bulk BT sample is calculated to be μ 11 = 17.33 × 10 - 6 C/m, which is in accord with the published transverse flexoelectric coefficient. This method effectively suppresses the majority of drawbacks in the quasi-static and low frequency dynamic techniques and provides more reliable results of flexoelectric behaviors.

  5. Ocean Current and Wave Effects on Wind Stress Drag Coefficient Over the Global Ocean

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kara, A. B; Metzger, E. J; Bourassa, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    ...%), but the notable impact of the latter is only evident in the tropical Pacific Ocean; (2) the presence of waves generally makes winds weaker and C0 lower almost everywhere over the global ocean; (3...

  6. Layering Concept for Wave Shaping and Lateral Distribution of Stresses During Impact

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ding, J

    2001-01-01

    .... Numerical simulations were carried out to address the research objectives. To explore the layering concept, we first used numerical simulations to demonstrate the feasibility of load spreading and wave shaping by layered structures...

  7. Multi-Wave Prospective Examination of the Stress-Reactivity Extension of Response Styles Theory of Depression in High-Risk Children and Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, John R. Z.; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Sheshko, Dana M.; Fishman, Michael B.; Stolow, Darren

    2012-01-01

    The current study tested the stress-reactivity extension of response styles theory of depression (Nolen-Hoeksema "Journal of Abnormal Psychology" 100:569-582, 1991) in a sample of high-risk children and early adolescents from a vulnerability-stress perspective using a multi-wave longitudinal design. In addition, we examined whether obtained…

  8. Surface preparation for residual stress measurement of an accelerated corrosion tested welded marine steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Bilal; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Residual stress measurement is often required for the assessment of structural integrity of components. Measurement of residual stress in corrosion tested specimens is challenging owing to the difficulty of accessing the surface because of the rust layer. This study explored the potential methods for the surface preparation of an ultrasonically-peened and accelerated corrosion tested DH36 marine steel fillet welded specimen to ease the way for subsequent residual stress measurement using neutron diffraction and the contour method. We find that hydroblasting introduces compressive residual stress at the surface that will alter the surface stress to be measured

  9. Developing the new method measuring thickness and quality of bottom sediments in using ultrasonic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tomonari; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Hozumi, Naohiro

    2017-07-01

    Measuring the quality and thickness of bottom sediment that it causes some environmental problem, the shortage of water storage volume and anaerobic zone in the bottom of reservoirs, takes huge costs and long time. The purpose of our research is to develop a new method to measure the thickness and size characteristics of bottom sediment using ultrasonic waves that allow obtaining the quality of it indirectly. This new method applies the echo characteristic of bottom sediment in each particle size using the higher frequency than another method, which uses for measuring geological layer at seabed survey. In this research, we attempted to estimate the particle size of bottom sediment by ultrasonic waves irradiating from two different directions such as horizontal and vertical direction, and compare these experiments. We use sediment that we sampled from the lake bottom classified by particle size. At first, we acquired the results that show a relation between particle size and intensity; the obtained echo intensities, which were observed with oscilloscope, were changed depending on the particle sizes. In addition, peaks, which were obtained by power spectrum analysis, appeared on the same frequency band even though the different particle size. However the relation between the experiments of horizontal and vertical direction is not clear. This research indicated the possibility of estimating the characteristics of each particle size in bottom sediment by ultrasonic waves.

  10. Observations of gravity waves associated with enhanced auroral activity: GPS, FPI and magnetometer measurements over Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katamzi, Z. T.; Habarulema, J. B.; Aruliah, A. L.; Oksavik, K.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves have been observed as perturbations in the neutral density and temperatures and hence fluctuations of airglow intensity and electron density. Since gravity waves are a dynamical process that transport energy between different atmospheric regions, they are an interesting example of the coupling of the ionosphere from below (e.g. generated through meteorological processes) and from above (e.g. generated through space weather conditions). In this study, gravity waves have been observed using Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) intensity of oxygen red line emission at 630 nm and Global Positioning System (GPS) total electron content (TEC) measurements over Svalbard during enhanced auroral activity associated with substorms on the night of 6-7 Jan 2014. These disturbances have periods ranging between 32 and 58 minutes. Their propagation characteristics at 240 km as measured by the FPI and at 350 km as measured by GPS ground based receivers will be compared in order to gather further insight on the dissipation of energy as they propagate away from their source region.

  11. Experimental analysis on stress wave in inhomogeneous multi-layered structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yun Ho; Ham, Hyo Sick

    1998-01-01

    The guided wave propagation in inhomogeneous multi-layered structures is experimentally explored based on theoretical dispersion curves. It turns out that proper selection of incident angle and frequency is critical for guided wave generation in multi-layered structures. Theoretical dispersion curves greatly depend on adhesive zone thickness, layer thickness and material properties. It was possible to determine the adhesive zone thickness of an inhomogeneous multi-layered structure by monitoring experimentally the change of dispersion curves.

  12. A strategy for accommodating residual stresses in the assessment of repair weldments based upon measurement of near surface stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcdonald, E.J.; Hallam, K.R.; Flewitt, P.E.J.

    2005-01-01

    On many occasions repairs are undertaken to ferritic steel weldments on plant either during construction or to remove service induced defects. These repaired weldments are subsequently put into service with or without a post-weld heat treatment. In either case, but particularly for the latter, there is a need to accommodate the associated residual stresses in structural integrity assessments such as those based upon the R6 failure avoidance procedure. Although in some circumstances the residual macro-stresses developed within weldments of components and structures can be calculated this is not so readily achieved in the case of residual stresses introduced by repair welds. There is a range of physical and mechanical techniques available to undertake the measurement of macro-residual stresses. Of these X-ray diffraction has the advantage that it is essentially non-destructive and offers the potential for evaluating stresses, which exist in the near surface layer. Although for many structural integrity assessments both the magnitude and distribution of residual stresses have to be accommodated it is not practical to make destructive measurements on weld repaired components and structures to establish the through section distribution of stresses. An approach is to derive a description of the appropriate macro-stresses by a combination of measurement and calculation on trial ferritic steel repair weldments. Surface measurements on the plant can then be made to establish the relationship between the repaired component or structure and the trial weld and thereby improve confidence in predicted stresses and their distribution from the near-surface measured values. Hence X-ray diffraction measurements at the near-surface of the plant weldment can be used to underwrite the quality of the repair by confirming the magnitude and distribution of residual stresses used for the integrity assessment to demonstrate continued safe operation

  13. The Community Child Health Network Life Stress Interview: a brief chronic stress measure for community health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner Stapleton, Lynlee R; Dunkel Schetter, Christine; Dooley, Larissa N; Guardino, Christine M; Huynh, Jan; Paek, Cynthia; Clark-Kauffman, Elizabeth; Schafer, Peter; Woolard, Richard; Lanzi, Robin Gaines

    2016-07-01

    Chronic stress is implicated in many theories as a contributor to a wide range of physical and mental health problems. The current study describes the development of a chronic stress measure that was based on the UCLA Life Stress Interview (LSI) and adapted in collaboration with community partners for use in a large community health study of low-income, ethnically diverse parents of infants in the USA (Community Child Health Network [CCHN]). We describe the instrument, its purpose and adaptations, implementation, and results of a reliability study in a subsample of the larger study cohort. Interviews with 272 mothers were included in the present study. Chronic stress was assessed using the CCHN LSI, an instrument designed for administration by trained community interviewers to assess four domains of chronic stress, each rated by interviewers. Significant correlations ranging from small to moderate in size between chronic stress scores on this measure, other measures of stress, biomarkers of allostatic load, and mental health provide initial evidence of construct and concurrent validity. Reliability data for interviewer ratings are also provided. This relatively brief interview (15 minutes) is available for use and may be a valuable tool for researchers seeking to measure chronic stress reliably and validly in future studies with time constraints.

  14. Study of gravity waves propagation in the thermosphere of Mars based on MAVEN/NGIMS density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vals, M.

    2017-09-01

    We use MAVEN/NGIMS CO2 density measurements to analyse gravity waves in the thermosphere of Mars. In particular the seasonal/latitudinal variability of their amplitude is studied and interpreted. Key background parameters controlling the activity of gravity waves are analysed with the help of the Mars Climate Database (MCD). Gravity waves activity presents a good anti-correlation to the temperature variability retrieved from the MCD. An analysis at pressure levels is ongoing.

  15. Potential applicability of stress wave velocity method on pavement base materials as a non-destructive testing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahedi, Masrur

    Aggregates derived from natural sources have been used traditionally as the pavement base materials. But in recent times, the extraction of these natural aggregates has become more labor intensive and costly due to resource depletion and environmental concerns. Thus, the uses of recycled aggregates as the supplementary of natural aggregates are increasing considerably in pavement construction. Use of recycled aggregates such as recycled crushed concrete (RCA) and recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) reduces the rate of natural resource depletion, construction debris and cost. Although recycled aggregates could be used as a viable alternative of conventional base materials, strength characteristics and product variability limit their utility to a great extent. Hence, their applicability is needed to be evaluated extensively based on strength, stiffness and cost factors. But for extensive evaluation, traditionally practiced test methods are proven to be unreasonable in terms of time, cost, reliability and applicability. On the other hand, rapid non-destructive methods have the potential to be less time consuming and inexpensive along with the low variability of test results; therefore improving the reliability of estimated performance of the pavement. In this research work, the experimental program was designed to assess the potential application of stress wave velocity method as a non-destructive test in evaluating recycled base materials. Different combinations of cement treated recycled concrete aggregate (RAP) and recycled crushed concrete (RCA) were used to evaluate the applicability of stress wave velocity method. It was found that, stress wave velocity method is excellent in characterizing the strength and stiffness properties of cement treated base materials. Statistical models, based on P-wave velocity were derived for predicting the modulus of elasticity and compressive strength of different combinations of cement treated RAP, Grade-1 and Grade-2 materials. Two

  16. Reliable practical technique for in-situ rock stress measurements in deep gold mines.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stacey, TR

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The proposed primary output of this research project is the development of a set of equipment and method of in situ stress measurements in a high stress environment typical of the deep level gold mines....

  17. Accurate calibration of waveform data measured by the Plasma Wave Experiment on board the ARASE satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, M.; Katoh, Y.; Hikishima, M.; Kasahara, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Kojima, H.; Ozaki, M.; Yagitani, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) is installed on board the ARASE satellite to measure the electric field in the frequency range from DC to 10 MHz, and the magnetic field in the frequency range from a few Hz to 100 kHz using two dipole wire-probe antennas (WPT) and three magnetic search coils (MSC), respectively. In particular, the Waveform Capture (WFC), one of the receivers of the PWE, can detect electromagnetic field waveform in the frequency range from a few Hz to 20 kHz. The Software-type Wave Particle Interaction Analyzer (S-WPIA) is installed on the ARASE satellite to measure the energy exchange between plasma waves and particles. Since S-WPIA uses the waveform data measured by WFC to calculate the relative phase angle between the wave magnetic field and velocity of energetic electrons, the high-accuracy is required to calibration of both amplitude and phase of the waveform data. Generally, the calibration procedure of the signal passed through a receiver consists of three steps; the transformation into spectra, the calibration by the transfer function of a receiver, and the inverse transformation of the calibrated spectra into the time domain. Practically, in order to reduce the side robe effect, a raw data is filtered by a window function in the time domain before applying Fourier transform. However, for the case that a first order differential coefficient of the phase transfer function of the system is not negligible, the phase of the window function convoluted into the calibrated spectra is shifted differently at each frequency, resulting in a discontinuity in the time domain of the calibrated waveform data. To eliminate the effect of the phase shift of a window function, we suggest several methods to calibrate a waveform data accurately and carry out simulations assuming simple sinusoidal waves as an input signal and using transfer functions of WPT, MSC, and WFC obtained in pre-flight tests. In consequence, we conclude that the following two methods can

  18. Comparative study of finite element method, isogeometric analysis, and finite volume method in elastic wave propagation of stress discontinuities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Berezovski, A.; Kolman, Radek; Blažek, Jiří; Kopačka, Ján; Gabriel, Dušan; Plešek, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 12 (2014) ISSN 1435-4934. [European Conference on Non-Destructive Testing (ECNDT 2014) /11./. Praha, 06.10.2014-10.10.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/0288; GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/12/2315 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : elastic wave propagation * finite element method * isogeometric analysis * finite volume method * stress discontinuities * spurious oscillations Subject RIV: JR - Other Machinery http://www.ndt.net/events/ECNDT2014/app/content/Paper/25_Berezovski_Rev1.pdf

  19. Stress depended changes in activityof gp red blood cells receptors and its correction by therahertz waves at nitric oxide frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirichuk V.F.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of electromagnetic radiation in the terahertz range frequencies of molecular spectrum of emission and absorption of nitric oxide 150.176–150.664 GHz for the restoration of the impaired carbohydrate component and functional activity glikoproteid receptors of erythrocytes of white rats in a state of acute imm obilization stress. Shown that exposure to electromagnetic waves at these frequencies is the normalization of the increased content of b-D-galactose in the carbohydrate component and the restoration of the impaired activity of the receptors glikoproteid erythrocytes

  20. Residual stress measurement by neutron diffraction inside a steel bar quenched after induction heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Harukiyo; Tomota, Yo; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Kawasaki, Kazuhiro; Moriai, Atsushi; Minakawa, Nobuaki; Morii, Yukio

    2004-01-01

    The residual stress of a quenched steel bar with induction heating was measured by neutron diffraction. The conventional X-ray sin 2 ψ method was also used and three dimensional stress condition was estimated from plane-stress data obtained by a progressive polishing technique. Good agreements were found between the results by the neutron and X-ray methods. Improvements of the neutron stress measurement discussed. (author)