WorldWideScience

Sample records for stress velopharyngeal incompetence

  1. Interim palatal lift prosthesis as a constituent of multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of velopharyngeal incompetence

    OpenAIRE

    Raj, Neerja; Raj, Vineet; Aeran, Himanshu

    2012-01-01

    The velopharynx is a tridimensional muscular valve located between the oral and nasal cavities, consisting of the lateral and posterior pharyngeal walls and the soft palate, and controls the passage of air. Velopharyngeal insufficiency may take place when the velopharyngeal valve is unable to perform its own closing, due to a lack of tissue or lack of proper movement. Treatment options include surgical correction, prosthetic rehabilitation, and speech therapy; though optimal results often req...

  2. Velopharyngeal incompetence diagnosed in a series of cardiac patients prompted by the finding of a 22q11.2 deletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, D.A.; Emanuel, B.S.; Goldmuntz, E. [The Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Congenital heart disease is very common and may occur as an isolated malformation or as part of a well-defined syndrome. In some syndromes, specific types are overrepresented as compared to their incidence in the general population. Conotruncal anomalies are one such example where they are seen as part of DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) and Velo-Cardio-Facial syndrome (VCFS). Often, the diagnosis of VCFS is not suspected because mild facial dysmorphia is frequently not appreciated in the newborn period. While overt cleft palate, a characteristic finding in VCFS, would be detected early, a submucousal cleft palate or velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI) may go unrecognized in the pre-verbal child and may remain undiagnosed in the older patient who is not referred for a palatal evaluation. In patients with either DGS or VCFS, microdeletions of chromosome 22q11.2 have been demonstrated in almost 90% of patients. As part of our ongoing study, twenty patients with a conotruncal cardiac anomaly, without an overt cleft palate, were referred for 22q11.2 deletion analysis. 13/20 patients were found to have a deletion. All 13 deleted patients underwent palatal evaluations by a plastic surgeon and speech pathologist. 7 patients were noted to have VPI. Intervention including speech therapy and/or posterior pharyngeal flap surgery for these previously undiagnosed abnormalities is underway. These results suggest that palatal abnormalities are underdiagnosed in a significant proportion of patients with conotruncal cardiac defects. We therefore propose deletion studies in these patients followed by prompt palatal evaluations when the deletion is present. Early diagnosis of VPI and submucousal cleft palate should lead to early intervention and appropriate management of the speech difficulties encountered by these individuals.

  3. [Velopharyngeal closure pattern and speech performance among submucous cleft palate patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Yin; Chunli, Guo; Bing, Shi; Yang, Li; Jingtao, Li

    2017-06-01

    To characterize the velopharyngeal closure patterns and speech performance among submucous cleft palate patients. Patients with submucous cleft palate visiting the Department of Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University between 2008 and 2016 were reviewed. Outcomes of subjective speech evaluation including velopharyngeal function, consonant articulation, and objective nasopharyngeal endoscopy including the mobility of soft palate, pharyngeal walls were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 353 cases were retrieved in this study, among which 138 (39.09%) demonstrated velopharyngeal competence, 176 (49.86%) velopharyngeal incompetence, and 39 (11.05%) marginal velopharyngeal incompetence. A total of 268 cases were subjected to nasopharyngeal endoscopy examination, where 167 (62.31%) demonstrated circular closure pattern, 89 (33.21%) coronal pattern, and 12 (4.48%) sagittal pattern. Passavant's ridge existed in 45.51% (76/167) patients with circular closure and 13.48% (12/89) patients with coronal closure. Among the 353 patients included in this study, 137 (38.81%) presented normal articulation, 124 (35.13%) consonant elimination, 51 (14.45%) compensatory articulation, 36 (10.20%) consonant weakening, 25 (7.08%) consonant replacement, and 36 (10.20%) multiple articulation errors. Circular closure was the most prevalent velopharyngeal closure pattern among patients with submucous cleft palate, and high-pressure consonant deletion was the most common articulation abnormality. Articulation error occurred more frequently among patients with a low velopharyngeal closure rate.

  4. Autologous fat injection combined with palatoplasty and pharyngoplasty for velopharyngeal insufficiency and cleft palate: preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yimei; Ma, Tingting; Wu, Di; Yin, Ningbei; Zhao, Zhenmin

    2013-08-01

    The aim was to evaluate clinical application of autologous fat transplantation in the posterior pharynx to treat velopharyngeal incompetence and cleft palate. Case series with chart review. Cleft Lip and Palate Center of Plastic Surgery Hospital, an academic medical center. We studied 11 patients (age, 5-26 years) with a cleft palate and velopharyngeal insufficiency who underwent autologous fat injection. Patients were followed for 9 to 40 months. Pronunciation evaluation, visual appearance of the palatopharyngeal area, nasopharyngeal fibroscopy (NPF), palatopharyngeal lateral radiography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were undertaken before and after the operation. Speech intelligibility was markedly increased in all patients. Pronunciation was good to excellent compared with the preoperative level (P = .001). Mean velopharyngeal insufficiency rate was significantly reduced from 26.05% to 6.96% (P = .028) by NPF and from 26.42% to 7.11% (P = .017) by MRI (axial plane). Magnetic resonance imaging indicated significantly reduced mean minimum velopharyngeal distance, from 10.39 to 3.65 mm (P = .012) in the sagittal plane, and markedly increased thickness of transplanted fat in the posterior pharyngeal wall (sagittal, 5.43 mm; axial, 4.74 mm). There were few complications (sleep apnea, nasopharyngeal regurgitation). Autologous fat transplantation in the posterior pharyngeal wall was a good method for treating velopharyngeal incompetence. The safety profile was good in our sample, and we got a consistent result in the follow-up period. In addition, it also could be combined with routine surgery.

  5. Evolutionary games under incompetence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleshnina, Maria; Filar, Jerzy A; Ejov, Vladimir; McKerral, Jody C

    2018-02-26

    The adaptation process of a species to a new environment is a significant area of study in biology. As part of natural selection, adaptation is a mutation process which improves survival skills and reproductive functions of species. Here, we investigate this process by combining the idea of incompetence with evolutionary game theory. In the sense of evolution, incompetence and training can be interpreted as a special learning process. With focus on the social side of the problem, we analyze the influence of incompetence on behavior of species. We introduce an incompetence parameter into a learning function in a single-population game and analyze its effect on the outcome of the replicator dynamics. Incompetence can change the outcome of the game and its dynamics, indicating its significance within what are inherently imperfect natural systems.

  6. A radiological study on the velopharyngeal movement of dysarthric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M. J.; Oh, K. K.; Park, C. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Velopharyngeal incompetency may be the main cause of dysarthria. Velopharyngeal incompetency can be induced by congenital anomalies, such as cleft palate and short soft palate and deformity of soft palte, or complication of adenoidectomy, and neuromuscular disorders affecting the velopharyngeal movement. The present study is aimed to evaluate the velopharyngeal movement in dysarthric patients. The material consisted of 38 cases of dysarthric patients and 30 cases of non-dysarthric control persons examined at the Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine from September, 1982 through August, 1983. The radiologic examinations of the soft palate and pharynx were done at neutral and phonation state using Toshiba 500mA Imaging Intensifier. All cases were subjected to morphometric analysis by measuring the soft palate and pharynx. Results obtained were as follows: 1. In control group, the length of the soft palate was 40.7±0.71mm in neutral state and increased 11% in vowel sound, 13% in consonant sound. The thickness of the soft palate was 9.4±0.19mm in neutral state and increased 17% in vowel sound, 16% in consonant sound. The distance between the lateral pharyngeal walls was 36.2±0.92mm in neutral state and decreased 8% in vowel sound, 11% consonant sound. The gap between the soft palate and posterior pharyngeal walla was not present and the levator eminence was higher than the level of the hard palate in phonation. 2. Among the dysarthric patients, 1) In group of dysarthric patients patients with morphological abnormality, the thickness of soft palate was minimally changed in relation to the control group, while the distance between the lateral pharyngeal walls was more decreased than the control group. The gap between the soft palate and posterior pharyngeal wall was more than 3 mm in 90.9% of these cases, and the levator eminence was at or below the level of hard palate. 2) In group of dysarthric patients with functional abnormality, the

  7. A radiological study on the velopharyngeal movement of dysarthric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M. J.; Oh, K. K.; Park, C. Y. [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-03-15

    Velopharyngeal incompetency may be the main cause of dysarthria. Velopharyngeal incompetency can be induced by congenital anomalies, such as cleft palate and short soft palate and deformity of soft palte, or complication of adenoidectomy, and neuromuscular disorders affecting the velopharyngeal movement. The present study is aimed to evaluate the velopharyngeal movement in dysarthric patients. The material consisted of 38 cases of dysarthric patients and 30 cases of non-dysarthric control persons examined at the Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine from September, 1982 through August, 1983. The radiologic examinations of the soft palate and pharynx were done at neutral and phonation state using Toshiba 500mA Imaging Intensifier. All cases were subjected to morphometric analysis by measuring the soft palate and pharynx. Results obtained were as follows: 1. In control group, the length of the soft palate was 40.7{+-}0.71mm in neutral state and increased 11% in vowel sound, 13% in consonant sound. The thickness of the soft palate was 9.4{+-}0.19mm in neutral state and increased 17% in vowel sound, 16% in consonant sound. The distance between the lateral pharyngeal walls was 36.2{+-}0.92mm in neutral state and decreased 8% in vowel sound, 11% consonant sound. The gap between the soft palate and posterior pharyngeal walla was not present and the levator eminence was higher than the level of the hard palate in phonation. 2. Among the dysarthric patients, 1) In group of dysarthric patients patients with morphological abnormality, the thickness of soft palate was minimally changed in relation to the control group, while the distance between the lateral pharyngeal walls was more decreased than the control group. The gap between the soft palate and posterior pharyngeal wall was more than 3 mm in 90.9% of these cases, and the levator eminence was at or below the level of hard palate. 2) In group of dysarthric patients with functional abnormality, the

  8. THE MODERN APPROACH OF CHILDREN’S TREATMENT WITH VELOPHARYNGEAL INSUFFICIENCY IN THE POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Nelyubina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Velopharyngeal insufficiency is one of the main causes of speech disorders in children with congenital cleft palate, leading to social exclusion and disability of patients. This article describes an integrated approach to the treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency, aimed in improving the anatomical and physiological function of velopharyngeal ring. Velopharyngeal ring is considered as the nervemuscle complex in the treatment of patients with this pathology. It is shown that a one-time complex treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency, estimated with the program «Compare» in the below-described clinical example, increased velopharyngeal closure ring by 25%, thus eliminating nasality and significantly improve the quality of speech.

  9. Velopharyngeal sphincter pathophysiologic aspects in the in cleft palat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collares, Marcus Vinicius Martins

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cleft lip and palate are common congenital abnormalities with typical functional disorders on speech, deglutition and middle ear function. Objective: This article reviews functional labiopalatine disorders through a pathophysiological view. Method: We performed a literature search on line, as well as books and periodicals related to velopharyngeal sphincter. Our sources were LILACS, MEDLINE and SciELO databases, and we applied to the research Keywords of interest on the velopharyngeal pathophysiology, for articles published between 1965 and 2007. Conclusion: Velopharyngeal sphincter plays a central role in speech, swallowing and middle ear physiology in patients with labiopalatine cleft. At the end of our bibliographic review, pursuant to the velopharyngeal physiology in individuals with this disorder in the functional speech, deglutition and otologic function, we observed that although there is a great number of published data discussing this issue, further studies are necessary to completely understand the pathophysiology, due to the fact they have been exploited superficially.

  10. Aerodynamic indices of velopharyngeal function in childhood apraxia of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealey, Linda R; Giddens, Cheryl L

    2010-06-01

    Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is characterized as a deficit in the motor processes of speech for the volitional control of the articulators, including the velum. One of the many characteristics attributed to children with CAS is intermittent or inconsistent hypernasality. The purpose of this study was to document differences in velopharyngeal function in children diagnosed with CAS from children with typically-developing speech. Pressure-flow techniques were used to estimate the velopharyngeal port size and measure the temporal sequencing of airflow and pressure events associated with production of a nasal + oral plosive sequence in the speech of three children with CAS and three age-matched comparison participants. The results of this pilot study revealed significant differences between the performance of the CAS group and the comparison group in three timing measures of velopharyngeal port closure and velopharyngeal orifice area during speech.

  11. Iatrogenic velopharyngeal insufficiency caused by neonatal nasogastric feeding tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Aron Z; Ward, Robert F; DeRowe, Ari; April, Max M

    2014-08-01

    Complications from a prolonged nasogastric tube intubation, though seldom reported, are well described. Herein we describe the first two reported cases of velopharyngeal insufficiency secondary to velopharyngeal scarring and immobility from repetitive nasogastric tube insertions and prolonged use. Differing only in location, the proposed pathophysiologic mechanism of injury is identical to that of the nasogastric tube syndrome, a rare and serious, well described entity consisting of bilateral vocal fold paralysis due to pressure-induced ulceration of the posterior cricoarytenoid musculature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Variations in Velopharyngeal Structure in Adults With Repaired Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jamie L; Kotlarek, Katelyn J; Sutton, Bradley P; Kuehn, David P; Jaskolka, Michael S; Fang, Xiangming; Point, Stuart W; Rauccio, Frank

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in velopharyngeal structures between adults with repaired cleft palate and normal resonance and adults without cleft palate. Thirty-six English-speaking adults, including 6 adults (2 males and 4 females) with repaired cleft palate (M = 32.5 years of age, SD = 17.4 years) and 30 adults (15 males and 15 females) without cleft palate (M = 23.3 years of age, SD = 4.1 years), participated in the study. Fourteen velopharyngeal measures were obtained on magnetic resonance images and compared between groups (cleft and noncleft). After adjusting for body size and sex effects, there was a statistically significant difference between groups for 10 out of the 14 velopharyngeal measures. Compared to those without cleft palate, participants with repaired cleft palate had a significantly shorter hard palate height and length, shorter levator muscle length, shorter intravelar segment, more acute levator angles of origin, shorter and thinner velum, and greater pharyngeal depth. Although significant differences were evident in the cleft palate group, individuals displayed normal resonance. These findings suggest that a wide variability in velopharyngeal anatomy can occur in the presence of normal resonance, particularly for those with repaired cleft palate. Future research is needed to understand how anatomic variability impacts function, such as during speech.

  13. Correlation of Vocal Intensity with Velopharyngeal Closing Mechanism in Individuals with and without Complaint of Velopharyngeal Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girelli, Karina

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Velopharyngeal sphincter is a portion of the muscle of the palatopharyngeal arch that is capable of separating the oral cavity from the nasal cavity. It has not been determined yet whether voice intensity has an influence on this capacity. Velopharyngeal sphincter closure is accomplished by elevating and retracting the soft palate at the same time as the nasopharyngeal walls are constricted. Objective This study aims to correlate voice intensity with velopharyngeal sphincter closure in individuals without velopharyngeal dysfunction and patients with cleft lip and palate. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional, comparative, and contemporary study. The sample consisted of 16 individuals in the control group and 16 individuals in the study group. Patients underwent instrumental assessment, which we subsequently analyzed using a computer program, and a brief medical history review. The mean age of the control group was 27.6 years, whereas the mean age of the case group was 15.6 years. Results Cases showed higher voice intensity in regular and weak fricative sentences when compared with controls. There was no agreement on the analysis of the instrumental assessment between the assessors and the computer program. Regardless of voice intensity, the computer program demonstrated a similar closure pattern. Conclusion The computer program showed similar closure pattern for the three levels of intensity. There was no agreement between the three assessors and the closure pattern determined by the computer program. There was no statistically significant correlation between voice intensity and degree of velopharyngeal sphincter closure.

  14. Effect of Vocal Fry on Voice and on Velopharyngeal Sphincter

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    Elias, Vanessa Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction It is known that the basal sound promotes shortening and adduction of the vocal folds and leaves the mucosa looser. However there are few studies that address the supralaryngeal physiological findings obtained using the technique. Objective To check the effectiveness of using vocal fry on the voice and velopharingeal port closure of five adult subjects, whose cleft palate has been corrected with surgery. Methods Case study with five subjects who underwent otolaryngology examination by means of nasopharyngoscopy for imaging and measurement of the region of velopharyngeal port closure before and after using the vocal fry technique for three minutes. During the exam, the subjects sustained the isolated vowel /a:/ in their usual pitch and loudness. The emission of the vowel /a:/ was also used for perceptual analysis and spectrographic evaluation of their voices. Results Four subjects had an improvement in the region of velopharyngeal port closure; the results of the spectrographic evaluation were indicative of decreased hypernasality, and the results of the auditory-perceptual analysis suggested improved overall vocal quality, adequacy of loudness, decreased hypernasality, improvement of type of voice and decreased hoarseness. Conclusion This study showed a positive effect of vocal fry on voice and greater velopharyngeal port closure.

  15. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Changes Velopharyngeal Control in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Michael J.; Barlow, Steven M.; Lyons, Kelly E.; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Adequate velopharyngeal control is essential for speech, but may be impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD). Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) improves limb function in PD, but the effects on velopharyngeal control remain unknown. We tested whether STN DBS would change aerodynamic measures of velopharyngeal…

  16. Adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have a different velopharyngeal anatomy with predisposition to velopharyngeal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Charles; Impieri, Davide; Aagenæs, Ingegerd; Breugem, Corstiaan; Høgevold, Hans Erik; Særvold, Tone; Aukner, Ragnhild; Lima, Kari; Tønseth, Kim; Abrahamsen, Tore G

    2018-04-01

    To find out if subjects with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DS) have a different velopharyngeal anatomy which could cause velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). A prospective study of 16 subjects >16 years of age with 22q11.2 DS, without overt cleft palate and without previous VPI surgery, and 48 healthy controls >18 years of age were included in the study. Speech was recorded and scored blindly by two independent senior speech therapists. All 64 individuals had MRI scans, which were analyzed blindly by a consultant radiologist. Subjects with 22q11.2 DS had a mild degree of weak pressure consonants (mean score); borderline to mild degree of hypernasality and audible nasal emission (mean score). All controls had normal speech. When comparing subjects (22q11.2 DS) to controls, we found the subjects to have the following: A shorter distance between left and right points of origin of the levator veli palatini muscle (LVP) (p 22q11.2 DS showed a different velopharyngeal anatomy, which will make these individuals more prone to VPI. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Does velopharyngeal closure pattern affect the success of pharyngeal flap pharyngoplasty?

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    Armour, Alexis; Fischbach, Simone; Klaiman, Paula; Fisher, David M

    2005-01-01

    Historically at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, pharyngeal flap pharyngoplasty has been the treatment of choice for treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency, regardless of velopharyngeal closure pattern. The authors hypothesize that pharyngeal flap pharyngoplasty is more effective in treating velopharyngeal insufficiency in patients with circular or sagittal velopharyngeal closure and less effective in treating the coronal closure pattern. Ninety-three patients who underwent superiorly based pharyngeal flap surgery for velopharyngeal insufficiency were evaluated in a retrospective chart review. Closure pattern was determined preoperatively by nasopharyngoscopy or multiview videofluoroscopy. Nasalance was assessed preoperatively and at 6 weeks and 1 year postoperatively. Nasalance during nonnasal speech was decreased on average, for all closure patterns, postoperatively. However, a significantly higher percentage of patients were corrected to normal nasalance scores in thenoncoronal group than in the coronal group (57 percent versus 35 percent, respectively) at 1 year postoperatively (p approach to the management of velopharyngeal insufficiency and are more inclined to treat coronal pattern velopharyngeal insufficiency with sphincter pharyngoplasty.

  18. Adequacy of velopharyngeal closure and speech competency following prosthetic management of soft palate resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElDakkak, M

    1999-01-01

    Ten patients who had undergone soft palate resection for the removal of palatal tumors were studied. In each patient, the surgical defect involved the posterior margin of the soft palate and lead to velopharyngeal insufficiency. None of the patients suffered any speech, hearing or nasal problems before surgery. For each patient, a speech aid obturator was constructed and was used at least one month before the evaluation. Prosthetic management of each subject was evaluated as reflected in adequacy of velopharyngeal closure and speech competency. Various aspects of speech including intelligibility, articulation, nasality, hoarseness and overall speech were correlated with the adequacy of velopharyngeal closure. (author)

  19. Pregnancy Outcome in Cervical Incompetence: Comparison of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Cervical incompetence is a major cause of recurrent mid-trimester pregnancy loss and preterm deliveries; it contributes significantly to fetal loss and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Despite its wide use, the effectiveness of cervical cerclage in its management remains unsettled. Objective: To evaluate the ...

  20. Feasibility of dynamic MRI for evaluating velopharyngeal insufficiency in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drissi, C.; Mitrofanoff, M.; Talandier, C.; Falip, C.; Couls, V. le; Adamsbaum, C.

    2011-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of dynamic MRI with near-real-time temporal resolution for analysing velopharyngeal closure. Eleven children and young adults (seven girls, four boys, mean age: 8.4 years) with suspected velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI), and one healthy volunteer underwent MRI (1.5 Tesla) using T2 fast imaging sequences. Imaging was done without any sedation at rest and during various phonations in the axial and sagittal planes. Images were analysed by two radiologists, a plastic surgeon and a speech therapist. The MRI examinations were well tolerated by even the youngest patient. A qualitative analysis found that the sagittal dynamic sequences during phonation were in relation to the clinical data in all patients. A quantitative analysis enabled calculation of the elevation angle of the soft palate in relation to the hard palate, the velar eminence angle and the percentage of reduction of the antero-posterior diameter of the pharyngeal lumen. Dynamic MRI is a non-invasive, rapid and repeatable method. It can be considered a complementary tool to endoscopy and fluoroscopy, particularly in children, for assessing VPI without any sedation or radiation exposure. (orig.)

  1. Study of relationship between clinical factors and velopharyngeal closure in cleft palate patients

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    Chen, Qi; Zheng, Qian; Shi, Bing; Yin, Heng; Meng, Tian; Zheng, Guang-ning

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was carried out to analyze the relationship between clinical factors and velopharyngeal closure (VPC) in cleft palate patients. METHODS: Chi-square test was used to compare the postoperative velopharyngeal closure rate. Logistic regression model was used to analyze independent variables associated with velopharyngeal closure. RESULTS: Difference of postoperative VPC rate in different cleft types, operative ages and surgical techniques was significant (P=0.000). Results of logistic regression analysis suggested that when operative age was beyond deciduous dentition stage, or cleft palate type was complete, or just had undergone a simple palatoplasty without levator veli palatini retropositioning, patients would suffer a higher velopharyngeal insufficiency rate after primary palatal repair. CONCLUSIONS: Cleft type, operative age and surgical technique were the contributing factors influencing VPC rate after primary palatal repair of cleft palate patients. PMID:22279464

  2. Oxidative status shifts in uterine cervical incompetence patients.

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    Zolotukhin, Petr; Aleksandrova, Anzhela; Goncharova, Anna; Shestopalov, Aleksandr; Rymashevskiy, Aleksandr; Shkurat, Tatyana

    2014-04-01

    Uterine cervical incompetence (UCI) is a pregnancy complication affecting about 10% of the pregnancies in the western world. Studying the etiology of the UCI requires a specific approach adequate for this highly heterogenous syndrome. Oxidative status disorders are associated with various pathologies, including pregnancy complications. As such, general oxidative status profiling is a promising methodology to treat UCI. We aimed at assaying the closely interrelated oxidative status markers in the uterine cervical incompetence patients by means of the systems biology-oriented approach. Chemiluminescent assay, circulating thioredoxin 1 protein, uric acid, and homocysteine level measurements were used to assess the character of the oxidative status regulation in the UCI patients. We found UCI to be associated with the atypical plasma oxidative status deregulation; UCI plasma samples demonstrated lowered proneness to the pro-oxidative processes, and this was not due to the excessive antioxidant activity. There were neither signs of oxidative stress nor destructive pro-oxidant feedforward circuit locking in the UCI group. We also report increased circulating levels of uric acid in the UCI patients.

  3. Velopharyngeal dysfunction: a systematic review of major instrumental and auditory-perceptual assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paniagua, Lauren Medeiros

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Velopharyngeal dysfunction may cause impaired verbal communication skills in individuals with cleft lip and palate; thus, patients with this disorder need to undergo both instrumental and auditory-perceptual assessments. Objective: To investigate the main methods used to evaluate velopharyngeal function in individuals with cleft lip and palate and to determine whether there is an association between videonasoendoscopy results and auditory-perceptual assessments. Method: We conducted a systematic review of the literature on instrumental and auditory-perceptual assessments. We searched the PubMed, Medline, Lilacs, Cochrane, and SciELO databases from October to November 2012. Summary of findings: We found 1,300 studies about the topic of interest published between 1990 and 2012. Of these, 56 studies focused on velopharyngeal physiology; 29 studies presented data on velopharyngeal physiology using at least 1 instrumental assessment and/or 1 auditory-perceptual assessment, and 12 studies associated the results of both types of assessments. Only 3 studies described in detail the analysis of both methods of evaluating velopharyngeal function; however, associations between these findings were not analyzed. Conclusion: We found few studies clearly addressing the criteria chosen to investigate velopharyngeal dysfunction and associations between videonasoendoscopy results and auditory-perceptual assessments.

  4. Corruption and Incompetence in Public Procurement

    OpenAIRE

    Estache, Antonio; Foucart, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    We study a game where inefficiencies in public procurement managed by politicians comefrom two sources: corruption (moral hazard) and incompetence (adverse selection). We characterizethe respective impact of judicial and accounting courts on the cost effectiveness ofprocurement and the level of corruption. Although improving the quality of both courts mattersas a direct deterrent of corruption, it may also indirectly decrease the quality of the poolof politicians and hence deteriorates the co...

  5. [Morphological classification and velopharyngeal function analysis of submucous cleft palate patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Yin; Chunli, Guo; Bing, Shi; Yang, Li; Jingtao, Li

    2016-10-01

    To enhance the accuracy in diagnosis and management of submucous cleft palate via a thorough analysis of its anatomical and functional details. Two hundred seventy-six submucous cleft palate cases from 2008 to 2014 were retrospectively investigated. Subgroup analysis were performed on the basis of preoperative velopharyngeal function, palatal morphology, cleft lip concurrence, and patient motives for treatment. Among the included cases, 96 (34.78%) were presented as velopharyngeal competence (VPC), 151 (54.71%) as velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI), and 29 (10.51%) as marginal VPI (MVPI). Eighty cases (28.99%) also demonstrated cleft lip deformity, and 196 cases (71.01%) were merely submucous cleft palate. Compared with patients with submucous cleft palate only, those with cleft lips exhibited higher rates of complete velopharyngeal closure. The pathological spectrum of submucous cleft palate varied significantly. Only 103 (37.32%) cases met all the three diagnostic criteria proposed by Calnan. Given that the velopharyngeal closure rate varies among the subgroups, the factors analyzed in this study should be considered in the personalized manage-ment of submucous cleft palate.

  6. 38 CFR 1.465 - Incompetent and deceased patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Sickle Cell Anemia § 1.465 Incompetent and deceased patients. (a) Incompetent patients other than minors..., alcoholism or alcohol abuse, infection with the HIV, or sickle cell anemia is subject to §§ 1.460 through 1.... (3) Information related to sickle cell anemia. Information related to sickle cell anemia may be...

  7. 20 CFR 725.507 - Guardian for minor or incompetent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guardian for minor or incompetent. 725.507... FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT, AS AMENDED Payment of Benefits General Provisions § 725.507 Guardian for minor or incompetent. An adjudication officer may require that a legal guardian or representative...

  8. Feasibility study to assess clinical applications of 3-T cine MRI coupled with synchronous audio recording during speech in evaluation of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagar, Pallavi; Nimkin, Katherine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-08-16

    In the past decade, there has been increased utilization of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluating and understanding velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). To our knowledge, none of the prior studies with MRI has simultaneously linked the audio recordings of speech during cine MRI acquisition with the corresponding images and created a video for evaluating VPI. To develop an MRI protocol with static and cine sequences during phonation to evaluate for VPI in children and compare the findings to nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy. Five children, ages 8-16 years, with known VPI, who had previously undergone nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy, were included. MRI examination was performed on a 3-T Siemens scanner. Anatomical data was obtained using an isotropic T2-weighted 3-D SPACE sequence with multiplanar reformation capability. Dynamic data was obtained using 2-D FLASH cine sequences of the airway in three imaging planes during phonation. Audio recordings were captured by a MRI compatible optical microphone. All five cases had MRI and nasopharyngoscopy and four had videofluoroscopy performed. VPI was identified by MRI in all five patients. The location and severity of the velopharyngeal gap, closure pattern, velar size and shape and levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle were identified in all patients. MRI was superior in visualizing the integrity of the LVP muscle. MRI was unable to identify hemipalatal weakness in one case. In a case of stress-induced VPI, occurring only during clarinet playing, cine MRI demonstrated discordant findings of a velopharyngeal gap during phonatory tasks but not with instrument playing. Overall, there was satisfactory correlation among MRI, nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy findings. Cine MRI of the airway during speech is a noninvasive, well-tolerated diagnostic imaging tool that has the potential to serve as a guide prior to and after surgical correction of VPI. MRI provided superior anatomical detail of the levator

  9. Feasibility study to assess clinical applications of 3-T cine MRI coupled with synchronous audio recording during speech in evaluation of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Pallavi; Nimkin, Katherine

    2015-02-01

    In the past decade, there has been increased utilization of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluating and understanding velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). To our knowledge, none of the prior studies with MRI has simultaneously linked the audio recordings of speech during cine MRI acquisition with the corresponding images and created a video for evaluating VPI. To develop an MRI protocol with static and cine sequences during phonation to evaluate for VPI in children and compare the findings to nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy. Five children, ages 8-16 years, with known VPI, who had previously undergone nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy, were included. MRI examination was performed on a 3-T Siemens scanner. Anatomical data was obtained using an isotropic T2-weighted 3-D SPACE sequence with multiplanar reformation capability. Dynamic data was obtained using 2-D FLASH cine sequences of the airway in three imaging planes during phonation. Audio recordings were captured by a MRI compatible optical microphone. All five cases had MRI and nasopharyngoscopy and four had videofluoroscopy performed. VPI was identified by MRI in all five patients. The location and severity of the velopharyngeal gap, closure pattern, velar size and shape and levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle were identified in all patients. MRI was superior in visualizing the integrity of the LVP muscle. MRI was unable to identify hemipalatal weakness in one case. In a case of stress-induced VPI, occurring only during clarinet playing, cine MRI demonstrated discordant findings of a velopharyngeal gap during phonatory tasks but not with instrument playing. Overall, there was satisfactory correlation among MRI, nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy findings. Cine MRI of the airway during speech is a noninvasive, well-tolerated diagnostic imaging tool that has the potential to serve as a guide prior to and after surgical correction of VPI. MRI provided superior anatomical detail of the levator

  10. Feasibility study to assess clinical applications of 3-T cine MRI coupled with synchronous audio recording during speech in evaluation of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagar, Pallavi; Nimkin, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been increased utilization of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluating and understanding velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). To our knowledge, none of the prior studies with MRI has simultaneously linked the audio recordings of speech during cine MRI acquisition with the corresponding images and created a video for evaluating VPI. To develop an MRI protocol with static and cine sequences during phonation to evaluate for VPI in children and compare the findings to nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy. Five children, ages 8-16 years, with known VPI, who had previously undergone nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy, were included. MRI examination was performed on a 3-T Siemens scanner. Anatomical data was obtained using an isotropic T2-weighted 3-D SPACE sequence with multiplanar reformation capability. Dynamic data was obtained using 2-D FLASH cine sequences of the airway in three imaging planes during phonation. Audio recordings were captured by a MRI compatible optical microphone. All five cases had MRI and nasopharyngoscopy and four had videofluoroscopy performed. VPI was identified by MRI in all five patients. The location and severity of the velopharyngeal gap, closure pattern, velar size and shape and levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle were identified in all patients. MRI was superior in visualizing the integrity of the LVP muscle. MRI was unable to identify hemipalatal weakness in one case. In a case of stress-induced VPI, occurring only during clarinet playing, cine MRI demonstrated discordant findings of a velopharyngeal gap during phonatory tasks but not with instrument playing. Overall, there was satisfactory correlation among MRI, nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy findings. Cine MRI of the airway during speech is a noninvasive, well-tolerated diagnostic imaging tool that has the potential to serve as a guide prior to and after surgical correction of VPI. MRI provided superior anatomical detail of the levator

  11. Palatal lifting prosthesis and velopharyngeal insufficiency: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboloyoun, Ali Ibrahim; Ghorab, Sahar; Farooq, Mian Usman

    2013-01-01

    Our study aimed to highlight the effectiveness of palatal lift prosthesis in patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency with previous operated cleft palate. This study was done undertaken January 2008 to December of 2009 in the Phoniatic unit of Alnoor Specialist Hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia. Ten patients of ≥ 8 years to ≤ 10 years of age, who had previously undergone surgery for cleft palate, with or without cleft lip, with no other systemic illness and normal intelligent quotient level, were selected and managed by palatal lift prosthesis. All the study subjects were subjected to auditory perceptual speech evaluation for assessment of the degree of hypernasality, compensatory articulator mechanisms, glottal and pharyngeal articulation, audible nasal emission, facial grimace and overall intelligibility of speech. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. The study included 10 subjects whose mean ± standard deviation of age was (8.9±0.9). On auditory speech perceptual evaluation after prosthesis application, significant improvement was found in glottal articulation 6 (85.7%), p=0.04, facial grimace 6 (85.7%) p=0.04, hyper nasality 10 (10%) p=0.008, and speech intelligibility 9 (90%) p=0.008. Young patients with repaired palatal cleft have significant improvement after application of palatal lift prosthesis. Copyright © 2013 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  12. Palatal lifting prosthesis and velopharyngeal insufficiency: Preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ibrahim Aboloyoun

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Our study aimed to highlight the effectiveness of palatal lift prosthesis in patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency with previous operated cleft palate. Methods. This study was done undertaken January 2008 to December of 2009 in the Phoniatic unit of Alnoor Specialist Hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia. Ten patients of ≥ 8 years to ≤ 10 years of age, who had previously undergone surgery for cleft palate, with or without cleft lip, with no other systemic illness and normal intelligent quotient level, were selected and managed by palatal lift prosthesis. All the study subjects were subjected to auditory perceptual speech evaluation for assessment of the degree of hypernasality, compensatory articulator mechanisms, glottal and pharyngeal articulation, audible nasal emission, facial grimace and overall intelligibility of speech. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Results. The study included 10 subjects whose mean ± standard deviation of age was (8.9±0.9. On auditory speech perceptual evaluation after prosthesis application, significant improvement was found in glottal articulation 6 (85.7%, p=0.04, facial grimace 6 (85.7% p=0.04, hyper nasality 10 (10% p=0.008, and speech intelligibility 9 (90% p=0.008. Conclusion. Young patients with repaired palatal cleft have significant improvement after application of palatal lift prosthesis.

  13. Video Game Rehabilitation of Velopharyngeal Dysfunction: A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelman, Talia; Braden, Maia N.; Woodnorth, Geralyn Harvey; Stepp, Cara E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Video games provide a promising platform for rehabilitation of speech disorders. Although video games have been used to train speech perception in foreign language learners and have been proposed for aural rehabilitation, their use in speech therapy has been limited thus far. We present feasibility results from at-home use in a case series of children with velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) using an interactive video game that provided real-time biofeedback to facilitate appropriate nasalization. Method Five participants were recruited across a range of ages, VPD severities, and VPD etiologies. Participants completed multiple weeks of individual game play with a video game that provides feedback on nasalization measured via nasal accelerometry. Nasalization was assessed before and after training by using nasometry, aerodynamic measures, and expert perceptual judgments. Results Four participants used the game at home or school, with the remaining participant unwilling to have the nasal accelerometer secured to his nasal skin, perhaps due to his young age. The remaining participants showed a tendency toward decreased nasalization after training, particularly for the words explicitly trained in the video game. Conclusion Results suggest that video game–based systems may provide a useful rehabilitation platform for providing real-time feedback of speech nasalization in VPD. Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5116828 PMID:28655049

  14. We can predict postpalatoplasty velopharyngeal insufficiency in cleft palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Jacques E; Godbout, Audrey; Arteau-Gauthier, Isabelle; Lacour, Sophie; Abel, Kati; McConnell, Elisa-Maude

    2014-02-01

    To find an anatomical measurement of the cleft palate (or a calculated parameter) that predicts the occurrence of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) after palatal cleft repair. Retrospective cohort study. Charts were reviewed from cleft palate patients who underwent palatoplasty by the Von Langenbeck technique for isolated cleft palate or Bardach two-flap palatoplasty for cleft lip-palate. Seven anatomical cleft parameters were prospectively measured during the palatoplasty procedure. Three blinded speech-language pathologists retrospectively scored the clinically assessed VPI at 4 years of age. The recommendation of pharyngoplasty was also used as an indicator of VPI. From 1993 to 2008, 67 patients were enrolled in the study. The best predicting parameter was the ratio a/(30 - b1), in which a is defined as the posterior gap between the soft palate and the posterior pharyngeal wall and b1 is the width of the cleft at the hard palate level. An a/(30 - b1) ratio >0.7 to 0.8 is associated with a higher risk of developing VPI (relative risk = 2.2-5.1, sensitivity = 72%-81%, P cleft at the hard palate level and the posterior gap between the soft palate and the posterior pharyngeal wall were found to be the most significant parameters in predicting VPI. The best correlation was obtained with the ratio a/(30 - b1). 4. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. Video Game Rehabilitation of Velopharyngeal Dysfunction: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cler, Gabriel J; Mittelman, Talia; Braden, Maia N; Woodnorth, Geralyn Harvey; Stepp, Cara E

    2017-06-22

    Video games provide a promising platform for rehabilitation of speech disorders. Although video games have been used to train speech perception in foreign language learners and have been proposed for aural rehabilitation, their use in speech therapy has been limited thus far. We present feasibility results from at-home use in a case series of children with velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) using an interactive video game that provided real-time biofeedback to facilitate appropriate nasalization. Five participants were recruited across a range of ages, VPD severities, and VPD etiologies. Participants completed multiple weeks of individual game play with a video game that provides feedback on nasalization measured via nasal accelerometry. Nasalization was assessed before and after training by using nasometry, aerodynamic measures, and expert perceptual judgments. Four participants used the game at home or school, with the remaining participant unwilling to have the nasal accelerometer secured to his nasal skin, perhaps due to his young age. The remaining participants showed a tendency toward decreased nasalization after training, particularly for the words explicitly trained in the video game. Results suggest that video game-based systems may provide a useful rehabilitation platform for providing real-time feedback of speech nasalization in VPD. https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5116828.

  16. Velopharyngeal Structural and Functional Assessment of Speech in Young Children Using Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jamie L; Kuehn, David P; Sutton, Bradley P; Fang, Xiangming

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate a novel method for examining the velopharyngeal mechanism using static and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the sentence-level production in young children with normal anatomy. This study examined whether velopharyngeal events occurring in the midsagittal plane are correlated to muscle events occurring along the plane of velopharyngeal closure. Adenoid involvement in velopharyngeal function was also explored. A high-resolution, T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo three-dimensional anatomical scan was used to acquire static velopharyngeal data and a fast-gradient echo fast low angle shot multishot spiral technique (15.8 frames per second) was used to acquire dynamic data on 11 children between 4 and 9 years old. Changes in velar knee height from rest to the bilabial /p/ production was strongly correlated with changes in the velar configuration (r = 0.680, P = .021) and levator muscle contraction (r = 0.703, P = .016). Velar configuration was highly correlated to levator muscle changes (r = 0.685, P = .020). Mean alpha angle during bilabial /p/ production was 176°, which demonstrated that subjects achieve velopharyngeal closure at or just below the palatal plane. Subjects with a larger adenoid pad used significantly less (r = -0.660, P = .027) levator muscle contraction compared with individuals with smaller adenoids. This study demonstrates a potentially useful technique in dynamic MRI that does not rely on cyclic repetitions or sustained phonation. This study lends support to the clinical potential of dynamic MRI methods for cleft palate management.

  17. Perceptual Assessment of Velopharyngeal Dysfunction by Otolaryngology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Sydney C; Truong, Alan; Forde, Christina; Stefanov, Dimitre G; Marrinan, Eileen

    2016-12-01

    To assess the ability of otolaryngology residents to rate the hypernasal resonance of patients with velopharyngeal dysfunction. We hypothesize that experience (postgraduate year [PGY] level) and training will result in improved ratings of speech samples. Prospective cohort study. Otolaryngology training programs at 2 academic medical centers. Thirty otolaryngology residents (PGY 1-5) were enrolled in the study. All residents rated 30 speech samples at 2 separate times. Half the residents completed a training module between the rating exercises, with the other half serving as a control group. Percentage agreement with the expert rating of each speech sample and intrarater reliability were calculated for each resident. Analysis of covariance was used to model accuracy at session 2. The median percentage agreement at session 1 was 53.3% for all residents. At the second session, the median scores were 53.3% for the control group and 60% for the training group, but this difference was not statistically significant. Intrarater reliability was moderate for both groups. Residents were more accurate in their ratings of normal and severely hypernasal speech. There was no correlation between rating accuracy and PGY level. Score at session 1 positively correlated with score at session 2. Perceptual training of otolaryngology residents has the potential to improve their ratings of hypernasal speech. Length of time in residency may not be best predictor of perceptual skill. Training modalities incorporating practice with hypernasal speech samples could improve rater skills and should be studied more extensively. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  18. Change in Quality of Life with Velopharyngeal Insufficiency Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirko, Jonathan R; Weaver, Edward M; Perkins, Jonathan A; Kinter, Sara; Eblen, Linda; Martina, Julie; Sie, Kathleen C Y

    2015-11-01

    (1) To define the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) of the Velopharyngeal Insufficiency (VPI) Effects on Life Outcomes (VELO) instrument, and (2) to test for the change in quality of life (QOL) after VPI surgery. Prospective observational cohort. VPI clinic at a tertiary pediatric medical center. Children with VPI and their parents completed the VELO instrument (higher score is better QOL) at enrollment and then underwent VPI surgery (Furlow palatoplasty or sphincter pharyngoplasty, n = 32), other treatments (obturator or oronasal fistula repair, n = 7), or no treatment (n = 18). They completed the VELO instrument again and an instrument of global rating of change in QOL at 1 year. The MCID was anchored to the global change instrument scores corresponding to "a little" or "somewhat" better. Within-group (paired t test) and between-group (Student t test) changes in VELO scores were tested for the VPI surgery and no treatment groups. The association between treatment group and change in VELO scores was tested with multivariate linear regression, adjusting for confounders. Follow-up was obtained for 37 of 57 (65%) patients. The mean (±standard deviation) change in VELO scores corresponding to the MCID anchor was 15 ± 13. The VELO score improved significantly more in the VPI surgery group (change, 22 ± 15; P change, 9 ± 12; P = .04), after adjusting for confounders (P = .007 between groups). VPI surgery using the Furlow palatoplasty or sphincter pharyngoplasty improves VPI-specific QOL, and the improvement is clinically important. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  19. A Computational Model Quantifies the Effect of Anatomical Variability on Velopharyngeal Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Joshua M.; Perry, Jamie L.; Lin, Kant Y.; Blemker, Silvia S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study predicted the effects of velopharyngeal (VP) anatomical parameters on VP function to provide a greater understanding of speech mechanics and aid in the treatment of speech disorders. Method: We created a computational model of the VP mechanism using dimensions obtained from magnetic resonance imaging measurements of 10 healthy…

  20. Nasalance Scores of Children with Repaired Cleft Palate Who Exhibit Normal Velopharyngeal Closure during Aerodynamic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajac, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if children with repaired cleft palate and normal velopharyngeal (VP) closure as determined by aerodynamic testing exhibit greater acoustic nasalance than control children without cleft palate. Method: Pressure-flow procedures were used to identify 2 groups of children based on VP closure during the production of /p/ in the…

  1. Analysis of the correlative factors for velopharyngeal closure of patients with cleft palate after primary repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Li, Yang; Shi, Bing; Yin, Heng; Zheng, Guang-Ning; Zheng, Qian

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the correlative factors for velopharyngeal closure of patients with cleft palate after primary repair. Ninety-five nonsyndromic patients with cleft palate were enrolled. Two surgical techniques were applied in the patients: simple palatoplasty and combined palatoplasty with pharyngoplasty. All patients were assessed 6 months after the operation. The postoperative velopharyngeal closure (VPC) rate was compared by χ(2) test and the correlative factors were analyzed with logistic regression model. The postoperative VPC rate of young patients was higher than that of old patients, the group with incomplete cleft palate was higher than the group with complete cleft palate, and combined palatoplasty with pharyngoplasty was higher than simple palatoplasty. Operative age, cleft type, and surgical technique were the contributing factors for postoperative VPC rate. Operative age, cleft type, and surgical technique were significant factors influencing postoperative VPC rate of patients with cleft palate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Imaging appearance of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer implant injections for treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinjikji, W; Cofer, S A; Lane, J I

    2015-06-01

    Dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer implants are used in treating velopharyngeal insufficiency. These posterior nasopharyngeal implants can be mistaken for pathologic conditions such as retropharyngeal abscess on imaging. We studied the imaging appearance of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer implants in patients treated for velopharyngeal insufficiency. A consecutive series of patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency treated with dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer were included in this study. Data on patient characteristics and volume of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer injected were obtained. Postoperative imaging characteristics on plain radiography, CT, and MR imaging were assessed. The imaging appearance of postoperative complications was determined. Sixteen patients were included in this study. Seven patients underwent postoperative plain radiographs, 5 patients underwent CT, and 9 patients underwent MR imaging. Plain radiographs demonstrated soft-tissue swelling in the retropharyngeal space, which resolved at 1 month. On CT, dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer implants appeared as bilateral nasopharyngeal soft-tissue masses isoattenuated to hypoattenuated relative to muscle in 80% (4/5) of patients. On MR imaging, dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer implants appeared as bilateral nasopharyngeal soft-tissue masses that were isointense to muscle on T1 (8/9, 88.9%) and hyperintense to muscle on T2 (8/9, 88.9%) and demonstrated no restricted diffusion (4/4, 100.0%) or peripheral enhancement (7/7, 100.0%). The normal postoperative findings of posterior nasopharyngeal dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer injection on MR imaging is characterized by the presence of bilateral nasopharyngeal soft-tissue masses that are isointense to muscle on T1 and hyperintense on T2, with no restricted diffusion or peripheral enhancement. Velopharyngeal dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer implants are iso- to hypoattenuated to muscle on CT and are not visible

  3. Current Controversies in Diagnosis and Management of Cleft Palate and Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Antonio Ysunza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the most controversial topics concerning cleft palate is the diagnosis and treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI. Objective. This paper reviews current genetic aspects of cleft palate, imaging diagnosis of VPI, the planning of operations for restoring velopharyngeal function during speech, and strategies for speech pathology treatment of articulation disorders in patients with cleft palate. Materials and Methods. An updated review of the scientific literature concerning genetic aspects of cleft palate was carried out. Current strategies for assessing and treating articulation disorders associated with cleft palate were analyzed. Imaging procedures for assessing velopharyngeal closure during speech were reviewed, including a recent method for performing intraoperative videonasopharyngoscopy. Results. Conclusions from the analysis of genetic aspects of syndromic and nonsyndromic cleft palate and their use in its diagnosis and management are presented. Strategies for classifying and treating articulation disorders in patients with cleft palate are presented. Preliminary results of the use of multiplanar videofluoroscopy as an outpatient procedure and intraoperative endoscopy for the planning of operations which aimed to correct VPI are presented. Conclusion. This paper presents current aspects of the diagnosis and management of patients with cleft palate and VPI including 3 main aspects: genetics and genomics, speech pathology and imaging diagnosis, and surgical management.

  4. Current Controversies in Diagnosis and Management of Cleft Palate and Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ysunza, Pablo Antonio; Repetto, Gabriela M.; Pamplona, Maria Carmen; Calderon, Juan F.; Shaheen, Kenneth; Chaiyasate, Konkgrit; Rontal, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background. One of the most controversial topics concerning cleft palate is the diagnosis and treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Objective. This paper reviews current genetic aspects of cleft palate, imaging diagnosis of VPI, the planning of operations for restoring velopharyngeal function during speech, and strategies for speech pathology treatment of articulation disorders in patients with cleft palate. Materials and Methods. An updated review of the scientific literature concerning genetic aspects of cleft palate was carried out. Current strategies for assessing and treating articulation disorders associated with cleft palate were analyzed. Imaging procedures for assessing velopharyngeal closure during speech were reviewed, including a recent method for performing intraoperative videonasopharyngoscopy. Results. Conclusions from the analysis of genetic aspects of syndromic and nonsyndromic cleft palate and their use in its diagnosis and management are presented. Strategies for classifying and treating articulation disorders in patients with cleft palate are presented. Preliminary results of the use of multiplanar videofluoroscopy as an outpatient procedure and intraoperative endoscopy for the planning of operations which aimed to correct VPI are presented. Conclusion. This paper presents current aspects of the diagnosis and management of patients with cleft palate and VPI including 3 main aspects: genetics and genomics, speech pathology and imaging diagnosis, and surgical management. PMID:26273595

  5. [Management of labial incompetence and gummy smile using profiloplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucher, M; Quenin, S; Disant, F

    2012-01-01

    Gummy smile and labial incompetence are frequent for consultation in plastic surgery. We wanted to show that rhinoplasty and genioplasty should correct these anomalies. Profiloplasty was performed on 20 patients. Aesthetic and functional items were evaluated. There is a correlation between aesthetic and functional results. Results seem to be better for patients having an important labial incompetence without gummy smile. Those results are based on anatomical and surgical considerations. Some non surgical procedures do exist to treat this problem. It should be a challenge to find the place for each procedure.

  6. Don't be short-sighted: cervical incompetence in a pregnant patient with acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrete, Lindsey M; Spalluto, Lucy B

    2018-01-31

    Delay in diagnosis of cervical incompetence can be detrimental to the fetus. Up to 20-25% of miscarriages in the second trimester can be attributed to the incompetent cervix. Given the profound impact of cervical incompetence on obstetric outcomes, careful attention should be given to evaluation of the cervix on MRI studies in pregnant patients. We present a case of incompetent cervix diagnosed incidentally at the time of MRI performed to evaluate for acute appendicitis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. 7 CFR 784.11 - Death, incompetence, or disappearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Death, incompetence, or disappearance. 784.11 Section 784.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS 2004 EWE LAMB REPLACEMENT AND RETENTION PAYMENT PROGRAM § 784.11...

  8. Pregnancy Outcome after Cerclage for Cervical Incompetence at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    miscarriages, pre-labour rupture of membranes and preterm labour1, 2, 3. Typically an incompetent cervix presents with recurrent mid-trimester miscarriage that is usually sudden with minimal or no abdominal pains1, 2. Diagnosis is often based on history of these recurrent mid trimester miscarriages and on a few occasions ...

  9. 8 CFR 236.2 - Confined aliens, incompetents, and minors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Confined aliens, incompetents, and minors. 236.2 Section 236.2 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS APPREHENSION AND DETENTION OF INADMISSIBLE AND DEPORTABLE ALIENS; REMOVAL OF ALIENS ORDERED REMOVED Detention...

  10. 8 CFR 1236.2 - Confined aliens, incompetents, and minors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Confined aliens, incompetents, and minors. 1236.2 Section 1236.2 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS APPREHENSION AND DETENTION OF INADMISSIBLE AND DEPORTABLE ALIENS; REMOVAL...

  11. Identifying Cancer Driver Genes Using Replication-Incompetent Retroviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Bii

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying novel genes that drive tumor metastasis and drug resistance has significant potential to improve patient outcomes. High-throughput sequencing approaches have identified cancer genes, but distinguishing driver genes from passengers remains challenging. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have emerged as a powerful tool to identify cancer genes. Unlike replicating retroviruses and transposons, replication-incompetent retroviral vectors lack additional mutagenesis events that can complicate the identification of driver mutations from passenger mutations. They can also be used for almost any human cancer due to the broad tropism of the vectors. Replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have the ability to dysregulate nearby cancer genes via several mechanisms including enhancer-mediated activation of gene promoters. The integrated provirus acts as a unique molecular tag for nearby candidate driver genes which can be rapidly identified using well established methods that utilize next generation sequencing and bioinformatics programs. Recently, retroviral vector screens have been used to efficiently identify candidate driver genes in prostate, breast, liver and pancreatic cancers. Validated driver genes can be potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers. In this review, we describe the emergence of retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors as a novel tool to identify cancer driver genes in different cancer types.

  12. 31 CFR 240.14 - Checks issued to incompetent payees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE INDORSEMENT AND PAYMENT OF CHECKS... without submission of documentary proof of the authority of the guardian or other fiduciary, with the... the certifying agency with information as to the incompetence of the payee and documentary evidence...

  13. The role of cephalometry in assessing velopharyngeal dysfunction in velocardiofacial syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerapandiyan, Aravindhan; Blalock, David; Ghosh, Srija; Ip, Edward; Barnes, Craig; Shashi, Vandana

    2011-04-01

    To report our experience with cephalometry in evaluating velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) in velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) and its utility in assessing the role of cervical spine abnormalities in VPD, prior to surgical correction of VPD. Clinical charts and cephalometric radiographs done prior to surgery for VPD were retrospectively analyzed to ascertain velopharyngeal measurements and cervical spine abnormalities. Twenty-six patients (age: 6-23 years) with molecularly confirmed VCFS. Wake Forest University Health Sciences (1997-2005). Cranial base angle, nasopharyngeal depth, velum length, and Need ratio at rest, velar dimple location, and velopharyngeal length during phonation; information on presence/absence of submucous cleft palate and cervical spine abnormalities were also obtained. The relationship between C1 anterior arch abnormalities and Need ratio was examined. Seventy-three percent of the VCFS patients had excessive nasopharyngeal depth, 80% had an abnormal Need ratio, 50% had a short velum, 81% had a submucous or occult submucous cleft palate, 90.5% had a cervical spine abnormality (C1 anterior arch abnormalities in 38%) and 11.5% had platybasia. There was a significant difference in the Need ratio between patients with and without C1 anterior arch abnormalities. Cephalometry can be used to delineate factors such as C1 vertebral abnormalities, excessive pharyngeal depth, and short velum that contribute to VPD in VCFS. This would help otolaryngologists better understand the anatomy prior to surgical treatment of VPD. This is the first study to highlight the frequent occurrence of C1 anterior arch abnormalities in VCFS. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc., Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Absorbed doses and energy imparted from radiographic examination of velopharyngeal function during speech

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isberg, A.; Julin, P.; Kraepelien, T.; Henrikson, C.O.

    1989-01-01

    Absorbed doses of radiation were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) using a skull phantom during simulated cinefluorographic and videofluorographic examination of velopharyngeal function in frontal and lateral projections. Dosages to the thyroid gland, the parotid gland, the pituitary gland, and ocular lens were measured. Radiation dosage was found to be approximately 10 times less for videofluoroscopy when compared with that of cinefluoroscopy. In addition, precautionary measures were found to reduce further the exposure of radiation-sensitive tissues. Head fixation and shielding resulted in dose reduction for both video- and cinefluoroscopy. Pulsing exposure for cinefluoroscopy also reduced the dosage

  15. Wide-band transabdominal cerclage for a foreshortened, incompetent cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodman, M L; Friedman, F; Morrow, J D; Stone, J

    1994-10-01

    The role of cervical cerclage in the prevention of fetal wastage due to cervical incompetence is well established. The transvaginal approach and, failing that, the transabdominal approach, provide sufficient treatment in most cases. However, the traditional techniques require adequate cervical length for placement and maintenance of the suture. We report a new technique used for a patient with a markedly foreshortened cervix and a history of multiple second-trimester pregnancy losses despite placement of McDonald cerclages. To improve the performance of the cervix, we included the lower portion of the uterus in a 3-cm-wide Prolene mesh cerclage. During the patient's subsequent pregnancy, the mesh band funneled the lower uterine segment, creating a functionally longer cervix. The patient successfully carried the pregnancy to term and was delivered by cesarean. This variation on the transabdominal approach is useful in the management of patients with cervical incompetence who demonstrate a foreshortened cervix incapable of maintaining a traditional cervical suture.

  16. Validity of auditory perceptual assessment of velopharyngeal function and dysfunction - the VPC-Sum and the VPC-Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohmander, Anette; Hagberg, Emilie; Persson, Christina

    2017-01-01

    -Sum) and of auditory perceptual ratings of velopharyngeal competence (VPC-Rate). Available VPC-Sum scores and judgments of associated variables (hypernasality, audible nasal air leakage, weak pressure consonants, and non-oral articulation) from 391 5-year olds with repaired cleft palate (the Scandcleft project) were...

  17. Examining a New Method to Studying Velopharyngeal Structures in a Child with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollara, Lakshmi; Schenck, Graham; Jaskolka, Michael; Perry, Jamie L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To date, no studies have imaged the velopharynx in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS) without the use of sedation. Dysmorphology in velopharyngeal structures has been shown to have significant negative implications on speech among these individuals. This single case study was designed to assess the feasibility of a…

  18. Teacher Incompetence, Misconduct and Dismissal in British Columbia: An Archival Analysis (1962–1987

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart M. Piddocke

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of teacher competence and the administrative management of teacher performance are pressing issues of educational accountability. Much is claimed about the putative incompetence of teachers but little systematic data exist to document the extent of this alleged incompetence or to describe incidents of incompetence. This paper reports an archival study of such cases in British Columbia between 1962-1987 and compares these findings with an earlier study from the United States.

  19. Cervical incompetence and cerclage in Denmark 1980-1990. A register based epidemiological survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, O

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To assess the incidence rate of cervical incompetence diagnoses in Denmark 1980-1990 according to maternal age, to analyse regional variations, to investigate how often cerclage is applied, and finally to estimate abortion rates among women with cervical incompetence with and without c...... of cervical incompetence in Denmark was on the average 4.6/1000 births. The incidence rate of the CI-diagnoses has fallen significantly during the last decade, and it increases four-fold with increasing age. Six out of ten patients with cervical incompetence were treated with cerclage....

  20. Changes in the Height of Velopharyngeal Closure Relative to the Cervical Spine From Infancy Through Adolescence in Patients With Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Kazlin N; Riski, John E; Perry, Jamie L

    2018-04-01

    Palpation is often used to identify C1, an intraoperative landmark, for placement of the pharyngoplasty. However, little is known about the relationship between the palatal plane (PP) and this cervical spine landmark across select variables. This study seeks to analyze variations in the height of velopharyngeal closure relative to C1 across differing cleft types and age groups. Retrospective, cross-sectional analysis. Large, multidisciplinary center for craniofacial disorders. Clinical lateral cephalograms were analyzed in nonsyndromic patients who underwent primary palatoplasty. Regression analysis and analysis of covariance were completed to determine how age and cleft type impact underlying cervical and velopharyngeal measures. Age ( P < .001) and cleft type ( P = .036) were significant predictors of the distance between the height of velopharyngeal closure and C1. Those with greater severity of clefting demonstrated larger distances between the height of velopharyngeal closure and C1. Compared to normative data, children with cleft palate have significantly larger distances between the PP and C1. The height of velopharyngeal closure above C1 was observed to range from 3.6 to 12.6 mm across cleft populations. This study demonstrates the variability in C1 as a landmark across variables including cleft type and age. Because of differences in the height of velopharyngeal closure across cleft types relative to C1, it is necessary to preoperatively quantify the vertical distance between the PP and palpable intraoperative landmark, C1, to determine the appropriate height of pharyngoplasty insertion.

  1. Structural Changes Following Velopharyngeal Resistance Training (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy): A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Youkyung; Pfeil, Gwenlyn

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility/effectiveness of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to document velopharyngeal (VP) structural changes induced by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Changes in velar length and thickness, levator veli palatini (LVP) length and thickness, velar volume, and intravelar muscular proportion along the course of CPAP therapy participation (Pre-CPAP, Post-CPAP, and withdrawal). Velar and LVP lengths remained nearly the same, with the median changes (Δ) less than 0.6%, across repeated conditions. Although varying in magnitudes of change, median velar volume (Δ4%), velar thickness (Δ20%), LVP thickness (Δ17%), and intravelar muscular proportion (Δ10%) illustrated a consistent pattern of increases following the 8-week CPAP therapy. These VP structural measurements slightly decreased but remained above the pretraining condition after 8-week detraining. This report successfully demonstrated that MRI is a viable tool to document CPAP therapy-induced VP structural changes while providing preliminary empirical data.

  2. 42 CFR 50.206 - Sterilization of a mentally incompetent individual or of an institutionalized individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sterilization of a mentally incompetent individual..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS POLICIES OF GENERAL APPLICABILITY Sterilization of Persons in Federally Assisted Family Planning Projects § 50.206 Sterilization of a mentally incompetent individual or...

  3. Quantitative analysis of velopharyngeal movement using a stereoendoscope: accuracy and reliability of range images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Asuka; Mishima, Katsuaki; Shiraishi, Ruriko; Ueyama, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    We developed a novel method of producing accurate range images of the velopharynx using a three-dimensional (3D) endoscope to obtain detailed measurements of velopharyngeal movements. The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationship between the distance from the endoscope to an object, elucidate the measurement accuracy along the temporal axes, and determine the degree of blurring when using a jig to fix the endoscope. An endoscopic measuring system was developed in which a pattern projection system was incorporated into a commercially available 3D endoscope. After correcting the distortion of the camera images, range images were produced using pattern projection to achieve stereo matching. Graph paper was used to measure the appropriate distance from the camera to an object, the mesial buccal cusp of the right maxillary first molar was measured to clarify the range image stability, and an electric actuator was used to evaluate the measurement accuracy along the temporal axes. The measurement error was substantial when the distance from the camera to the subject was >6.5 cm. The standard error of the 3D coordinate value produced from 30 frames was within 0.1 mm (range, 0.01-0.08 mm). The measurement error of the temporal axes was 9.16% in the horizontal direction and 9.27% in the vertical direction. The optimal distance from the camera to an object is movements.

  4. Endovenous ablation of incompetent perforating veins is effective treatment for recalcitrant venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Peter F; Alktaifi, Ali; Rigberg, David; DeRubertis, Brian; Gelabert, Hugh; Jimenez, Juan Carlos

    2011-09-01

    Endovenous closure of incompetent saphenous veins has been reported to facilitate venous ulcer healing; however, there is little information about the effectiveness of perforator ablation (PA) in healing recalcitrant venous ulcers. We report our experience with PA with venous ulcers unresponsive to prolonged compression therapy. Patients with nonhealing venous ulcers of >3 months' duration underwent duplex ultrasound to assess their lower extremity venous system for incompetence of superficial, perforating, and deep veins. Patients who had either no saphenous incompetence or persistent ulcers after saphenous ablation underwent PA of incompetent perforating veins >3 mm that demonstrated reflux; initial treatment was performed on the perforator vein adjacent to the ulcer with additional incompetent veins treated if ulcer healing failed. Seventy-five ulcers with 86 associated incompetent perforating veins were treated with PA in 45 patients with CEAP 6 recalcitrant venous ulcers. Treated incompetent perforator veins were located in the medial ankle (61%), calf (37%), and lateral ankle (2%). Initial success of PA, assessed by postprocedure duplex ultrasound, was 58%; repeat ablation was 90% successful and 71% had eventual successful perforator closure. No complications (skin necrosis, infection, or nerve injury) occurred. Failure of ulcer healing with successful perforator closure occurred in 10% and was due to intercurrent illness, patient noncompliance, and patient death due to unrelated causes. Of patients who healed their ulcers, the healing occurred at a mean of 138 days; an average PA of 1.5 incompetent veins per ulcer was required for healing. Ninety percent of ulcers healed when at least one perforator was closed; no ulcer healed without at least one perforator being closed. This experience demonstrates both the feasibility and effectiveness of PA for a selected group of patients with venous ulcers who fail conventional therapy with compression. Copyright

  5. Facing an incompetent leader: The effects of a nonexpert leader on subordinates' perception and behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Darioly, Annick; Schmid Mast, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of a leader's task-incompetence on how subordinates perceive and interact with their leader. In Study 1, 80 participants in a subordinate role interacted via e-mail and in Study 2, 80 participants interacted face-to-face with either a competent or an incompetent leader on a problem-solving task. Participants' dominance behaviour, how much they resisted the leader's influence, their perception of the leader, and their task involvement were assessed. As predicted, su...

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome after operative intervention for velopharyngeal insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jeffrey Crockett

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is often warranted. In this patient population, VPI is characterized by poor palatal elevation and muscular hypotonia with an intact palate. We hypothesize that 22q11.2 deletion patients are at greater risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA after surgical correction of VPI, due, in part, to their functional hypotonia, large velopharyngeal gap size, and the need to surgically obstruct the velopharynx. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome treated at a tertiary pediatric hospital between the years of 2002-2012. The incidence of VPI, need for surgery, post-operative polysomnogram, post-operative VPI assessment, and OSA treatments were evaluated. Results: Forty-three patients (18 males, 25 females, ages 1-14 years fitting the inclusion criteria were identified. Twenty-eight patients were evaluated by speech pathology due to hypernasality. Twenty-one patients had insufficient velopharyngeal function and required surgery. Fifteen underwent pharyngeal flap surgery, three underwent sphincter pharyngoplasty, two underwent Furlow palatoplasty, and one underwent combined sphincter pharyngoplasty with Furlow palatoplasty. Of these, eight had post-operative snoring. Six of these underwent polysomnography. Four patients were found to have OSA based on the results of the polysomnography (average apnea/hypopnea index of 4.9 events/hour, median=5.1, SD=2.1. Two required continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP due to moderate OSA.Conclusion: Surgery is often necessary to correct VPI in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Monitoring for OSA should be considered after surgical correction of VPI due to a high occurrence in this population. Furthermore, families should be counseled of the risk of OSA after surgery and the potential need for treatment with CPAP.

  7. Pharyngeal Flap Is Effective Treatment for Post Maxillary Advancement Velopharyngeal Insufficiency in Patients With Repaired Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentino, Kelley M; Marrinan, Eileen M; Brustowicz, Katherine; Mulliken, John B; Padwa, Bonnie L

    2016-06-01

    Patients with repaired cleft lip and cleft palate (CL/P) can develop velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) after Le Fort I maxillary advancement. The aim of this study was to evaluate speech outcomes in patients who required a pharyngeal flap after Le Fort I maxillary advancement. This retrospective cohort study included all patients with repaired CL/P who underwent a Le Fort I osteotomy and subsequently required a pharyngeal flap to correct VPI. Patients were included if they had outcome measurements documented at 3 time points: 1) before Le Fort I (baseline), 2) after Le Fort I, and 3) after pharyngeal flap. Outcome measurements, including speech characteristics (resonance, nasal emission, and intraoral pressure) and velopharyngeal function, were evaluated on perceptual assessment by a speech pathologist specializing in cleft care. Velopharyngeal closure was assessed with multi-view videofluoroscopy or nasopharyngoscopy. Patient characteristics and descriptive statistics were summarized and continuous data were expressed as mean ± standard deviation. Repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired samples t test were used to measure changes in speech outcome variables between time points. All P values were 2-tailed and considered significant for values less than .05. There were 23 patients for analysis (13 girls [56.5%] and 10 boys [43.5%]). Two patients (9%) had cleft palate only, 9 (39%) had unilateral cleft lip and palate (CLP), and 12 (52%) had bilateral CLP. Follow-up evaluations performed on average 12 months postoperatively showed statistically meaningful improvement for all variables, including decreased hypernasality, reduced nasal emission, and increased intraoral pressure for consonant production. Patients with repaired CL/P who had VPI after Le Fort I maxillary advancement showed significant improvement in all outcome measurements after pharyngeal flap (P < .001). The superiorly based pharyngeal flap is highly successful in correcting VPI after Le

  8. Comparison of urethral pressure profilometry and contrast radiography in the diagnosis of incompetence of the urethral sphincter mechanism in bitches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, S.P.; Cripps, P.J.; Holt, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    Three diagnostic indicators of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence were compared in 25 continent and 25 incontinent anaesthetised bitches: the resting urethral pressure profile, the stressed urethral pressure profile and the radiographic position of the bladder neck. Logistic regression indicated that the best predictor of continence status was the stressed urethral pressure profile as assessed by the percentage of negative peaks extending below the resting intravesical pressure; it classified 43 of the 50 dogs correctly. The radiographic position of the bladder neck was a better predictor of continence than either the measurement of functional profile length or the maximum urethral closure pressure from the resting urethral pressure profile, whether alone or in combination. By combining the percentage of negative peaks on the stressed profile with the position of the bladder neck, 46 of the 50 dogs were classified correctly. Cut-off values for the percentage of negative peaks on the stressed urethral pressure profile, and for the radiographic position of the bladder neck are suggested for use in evaluating incontinent bitches in clinical practice

  9. Splintage in the treatment of sagittal band incompetence and extensor tendon subluxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peelman, J; Markiewitz, A; Kiefhaber, T; Stern, P

    2015-03-01

    This study assessed the success of splintage for traumatic and atraumatic sagittal band incompetence and its relationship to the duration of symptoms before treatment. A retrospective review of all patients with sagittal band incompetence treated with splintage was performed. All patients had extensor tendon subluxation on physical examination. Ninety-two patients were included: 68 traumatic and 24 atraumatic. Subluxation resolved with splintage in 77 patients. Traumatic tendon subluxation resolved in 95% of acute injuries, 100% of subacute injuries, and 67% of chronic injures. Atraumatic tendon subluxation resolved in 100% of patients with acute presentation, 67% of patients with subacute presentation, and 57% of patients with chronic presentation. Surgery was rarely required. Splintage proved very effective for acute sagittal band incompetence, regardless of causation, but decreased in efficiency with chronicity. Level 4. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Evaluation of the face and dental morphologic alterations in adult individuals with labial incompetence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Cristina Valdrighi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate certain facial and dental characteristics by comparing individuals with labial incompetence and individuals withpassive labial sealing. Method: The study analyzed fifty lateral teleradiographs of which 25 were of subjects with labial incompetence, with minimum opening of 4 mm, and 25 of subjects with labial sealing, none of the subjects having undergone orthodontic treatment, all being between 15 and 30 years of age, irrespective of gender and malocclusion, with slight tendency towards vertical growth. The following cephalometric variables were used: Nfp – Nfa with the objective of determining the width of the upper airway, Sn – St to measure the length of the upper lip, Sn –IIs for the vertical length of the maxilla and 1.NA to determine the inclination of the maxillary incisor. Results: The measurements obtained in the group of passive lip sealing (G1 and labial incompetence (G2 respectively, were as follows: 14.12 mm (G1 and 12.76 mm (G2 for width of the upper airway; 24.24 mm (G1 and 23.80 mm (G2 for the length of the upper lip; 26.92 mm (G1 and 28.64 mm (G2 for the vertical length of the maxilla and 26.76º (G1 and 30.76º (G2 for the inclination of themaxillary incisor. Conclusion: The results allowed one to conclude that the individual with labial incompetence presented width of the upper airway similar to that of the individual with passive lip sealing. Individuals with labial incompetence presented increased vertical length of the maxilla and not shortening of the upper lip. The presence of vestibularized maxillary incisors is a condition inherent to the subject with labial incompetence, who will consequently present hypotonicity of the upper lip.

  11. Double valve replacement for acute spontaneous left chordal rupture secondary to chronic aortic incompetence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLenachan Jim

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 54 years old male with undiagnosed chronic calcific degenerative aortic valve incompetence presented with acute left anterior chordae tendinae rupture resulting in severe left heart failure and cardiogenic shock. He was successfully treated with emergency double valve replacement using mechanical valves. The pathogenesis of acute rupture of the anterior chordae tendinae, without any evidence of infective endocarditis or ischemic heart disease seems to have been attrition of the subvalvular mitral apparatus by the chronic regurgitant jet of aortic incompetence with chronic volume overload. We review the literature with specific focus on the occurrence of this unusual event.

  12. Management of Velopharyngeal Insufficiency Using Double Opposing Z-Plasty in Patients Undergoing Primary Two-Flap Palatoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Suk Koh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI may persist after primary repair of the cleftpalate, and surgical correction is necessary in many cases. The purpose of this study is toevaluate the effect of double opposing Z-plasty (DOZ in cleft palate patients suffering fromVPI after primary two-flap palatoplasty.Methods Between March 1999 and August 2005, we identified 82 patients who underwenttwo-flap palatoplasty for cleft palate repair. After excluding the patients with congenitalsyndrome and mental retardation, 13 patients were included in the final study group. Theaverage age of the patients who underwent DOZ at was 5 years and 1 month. Resonance,nasal emission, and articulation were evaluated by a speech pathologist. The velopharyngealgaps were measured before and after surgery.Results Six patients attained normal speech capabilities after DOZ. The hypernasality gradewas significantly improved after surgery in all of the patients (P=0.0015. Whereas nasalemission disappeared in 8 patients (61.5%, it was diminished but still persisted in the remaining5 patients. Articulation was improved in all of the cases. In two cases, the velopharyngeal gapwas measured using a ruler. The gap decreased from 11.5 to 7 mm in one case, and from 12.5 to8 mm in the second case.Conclusions The use of DOZ as a surgical option to correct VPI has many advantages comparedwith other procedures. These include short surgery time, few troublesome complications, and noharmful effects on the dynamic physiological functioning of the pharynx. This study shows thatDOZ can be another option for surgical treatment of patients with VPI after two-flap palatoplasty.

  13. Histology of the pharyngeal constrictor muscle in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and non-syndromic children with velopharyngeal insufficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josine C C Widdershoven

    Full Text Available Plastic surgeons aim to correct velopharyngeal insufficiency manifest by hypernasal speech with a velopharyngoplasty. The functional outcome has been reported to be worse in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome than in patients without the syndrome. A possible explanation is the hypotonia that is often present as part of the syndrome. To confirm a myogenic component of the etiology of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, specimens of the pharyngeal constrictor muscle were taken from children with and without the syndrome. Histologic properties were compared between the groups. Specimens from the two groups did not differ regarding the presence of increased perimysial or endomysial space, fiber grouping by size or type, internalized nuclei, the percentage type I fibers, or the diameters of type I and type II fibers. In conclusion, a myogenic component of the etiology of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome could not be confirmed.

  14. Type I gore-tex laryngoplasty for glottic incompetence in mobile vocal folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmire, Robert A; Bryson, Paul C; Patel, Mihir R

    2011-05-01

    To determine the effectiveness of gore-tex medialization thyroplasty for the management of glottic incompetence (GI) in patients with mobile vocal folds. Twenty patients with glottic incompetence (GI) and mobile vocal folds were retrospectively analyzed after gore-tex medialization laryngoplasty. Pre- and postoperative outcome measures including grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, strain of the voice (GRBAS), glottal function index (GFI), and voice-related quality of life (VRQOL) were compared to detect surgical effectiveness. Two anesthetic subgroups were identified and compared: general anesthesia, via laryngeal mask airway (LMA) anesthetic, and local anesthesia. Statistically significant differences were identified between pre- and postoperative VRQOL (PGore-tex thyroplasty provides reliable medium-term improvement in both perceptual and subjective voice parameters in the setting of GI with mobile vocal folds. Copyright © 2011 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Co-morbidity of cervical incompetence with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) negatively impacts prognosis: A retrospective analysis of 178 patients

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yongqing; Gu, Xunke; Tao, Liyuan; Zhao, Yangyu

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical incompetence is an important cause of miscarriage and premature birth and polycystic ovary syndrome is a heterogeneous endocrine disorder that is the most common cause of anovulatory infertility and eugonadotrophic hypogonadism. By now, it is still debated whether women with PCOS have an increased risk of miscarriage and there have been no studies about the pregnancy outcomes of cervical incompetence patients with PCOS. Methods The following clinical data of cervical incom...

  16. Voter Reaction to Government Incompetence and Corruption Related to the 1999 Earthquakes in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Akarca, Ali T.; Tansel, Aysit

    2015-01-01

    Two major earthquakes which struck northwestern Turkey in 1999 exposed rampant corruption involving construction and zoning code violations. The government's relief efforts were tainted by corruption as well, and exhibited a great deal of incompetence. How voters responded to these in the next election held in 2002 is investigated. The fact that different group of parties were responsible for the construction of the shoddy buildings, and for the corruption and mismanagement related to relief,...

  17. Infectious bursal disease virus as a replication-incompetent viral vector expressing green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Yung-Yi C; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2017-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) has been established as a replication-competent viral vector capable of carrying an epitope at multiple loci in the genome. To enhance the safety and increase the insertion capacity of IBDV as a vector, a replication-incompetent IBDV vector was developed in the present study. The feasibility of replacing one of the viral gene loci, including pvp2, vp3, vp1, or the polyprotein vp243, with the sequence of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was explored. A method combining TCID 50 and immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) determined the most feasible locus for gene replacement to be pvp2. The genomic segment containing gfp at the pvp2 locus was able to be encapsidated into IBDV particles. Furthermore, the expression of GFP in GFP-IBDV infected cells was confirmed by Western blotting and GFP-IBDV particles showed similar morphology and size to that of wildtype IBDV by electron microscopy. By providing the deleted protein in trans in a packaging cell line (pVP2-DF1), replication-incompetent GFP-IBDV particles were successfully plaque-quantified. The gfp sequence from the plaque-forming GFP-IBDV in pVP2-DF1 was confirmed by RT-PCR and sequencing. To our knowledge, GFP-IBDV developed in the present study is the first replication-incompetent IBDV vector which expresses a foreign protein in infected cells without the capability to produce viral progeny. Additionally, such replication-incompetent IBDV vectors could serve as bivalent vaccine vectors for conferring protection against infections with IBDV and other economically important, or zoonotic, avian pathogens.

  18. Randomized trial comparing cyanoacrylate embolization and radiofrequency ablation for incompetent great saphenous veins (VeClose).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Nick; Gibson, Kathleen; McEnroe, Scott; Goldman, Mitchel; King, Ted; Weiss, Robert; Cher, Daniel; Jones, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Whereas thermal ablation of incompetent saphenous veins is highly effective, all heat-based ablation techniques require the use of perivenous subfascial tumescent anesthesia, involving multiple needle punctures along the course of the target vein. Preliminary evidence suggests that cyanoacrylate embolization (CAE) may be effective in the treatment of incompetent great saphenous veins (GSVs). We report herein early results of a randomized trial of CAE vs radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of symptomatic incompetent GSVs. Two hundred twenty-two subjects with symptomatic GSV incompetence were randomly assigned to receive either CAE (n = 108) with the VenaSeal Sapheon Closure System (Sapheon, Inc, Morrisville, NC) or RFA (n = 114) with the ClosureFast system (Covidien, Mansfield, Mass). After discharge, subjects returned to the clinic on day 3 and again at months 1 and 3. The study's primary end point was closure of the target vein at month 3 as assessed by duplex ultrasound and adjudicated by an independent vascular ultrasound core laboratory. Statistical testing focused on showing noninferiority with a 10% delta conditionally followed by superiority testing. No adjunctive procedures were allowed until after the month 3 visit, and missing month 3 data were imputed by various methods. Secondary end points included patient-reported pain during vein treatment and extent of ecchymosis at day 3. Additional assessments included general and disease-specific quality of life surveys and adverse event rates. All subjects received the assigned intervention. By use of the predictive method for imputing missing data, 3-month closure rates were 99% for CAE and 96% for RFA. All primary end point analyses, which used various methods to account for the missing data rate (14%), showed evidence to support the study's noninferiority hypothesis (all P ecchymosis in the treated region was present after CAE compared with RFA (P ecchymosis. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular

  19. Improvement of quality of speech in patients with velo-pharyngeal insufficiency corrected using a buccinator myomucosal flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, D K; Fernando, P D; Dissanayake, R D

    2016-01-01

    Oro-facial clefts involving the palate is the commonest structural defect causing velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) and poor intelli gibility of speech. Proper repair of the soft palateis a surgical challenge. Posterior-based buccinator myomucosal flap (BMF) is used to lengthen the soft palate of patients who undergo primary palatoplasty at Teaching Hospital, Karapitiya (THK). BMF is a good choice for the repair of medium sized mucosal defects in the oral cavity since it has appropriate thickness, contains mucous membrane with mucous glands and has a rich blood supply. Objectives To assess improvement in quality of speech after soft palate repair using BMF in patients with previously corrected cleft pate. Thirty four patients (M:F-1:1) who had undergone palatal lengthening using BMF procedure for correction of VPI for speech improvement at Teaching Hospital, Karapitiya from 2010 to 2012, were assessed before and one year after surgery for quality of speech. All patients below 8 years showed significant reduction of hypernasality (perror at least by one consonant. The group below 8 years showed more improvement in speech quality after surgery. Palatal lengthening using BMF procedure is a good treatment option for correction of VPI.

  20. Oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum with myopathy and velopharyngeal insufficiency. A case report with a non-branchiomeric muscle biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Murialdo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we report on a case of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum presenting fluorescence in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization tests negative, hypotonia of some branchiomeric muscles (with velo-pharyngeal insufficiency, dysphagia and nasal voice and non-branchiomeric muscles (with strabismus and limb hypotrophy. On the basis of the left quadriceps muscle biopsy, showing anisometry and prevalence of type 1 fibers, and on literature data, we underline the relevance of TBX1 gene (regulator of neural crest cells and activator of myogenic factors in branchiomeric muscles development and of PAX3 gene (present in neural crest, inducing migration of these cells and reported in non-branchiomeric muscles. We conclude that the case of OAVS presented a generalized myopathy and we hypothesize that a cluster of genes strictly neural crest cells related, including TBX1 and PAX3, may be responsible of the branchiomeric and non-branchiomeric myopathy; alternatively, a regulatory mechanism abnormally common to OAVS and velo-cardio-facial syndrome could be present.

  1. EVALUATION OF “SEPS” PROCEDURE IN THE MANAGEMENT OF PRIMARY VARICOSE VEINS WITH INCOMPETENT LOWER LIMB PERFORATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaik Ahmad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Varicose veins affect at least 1 out of 5 in the world and the cost of health care for the society is significant. In a developing country like India, study encompassing the clinical evaluation and management of lower limb varicose veins on the conventional lines seems a necessity to improve the quality care with the available resources. OBJECTIVES To study the relation between site of incompetence and complications, pattern of complications, surgical management and its outcome for lower limb varicose veins. METHODS A total 26 number of patients with primary varicose veins admitted, investigated, operated and followed up. Final outcome evaluated. All the information was taken down in the proforma, designed for the study. RESULTS In the study, it was noted that the varicose veins affect younger, adult, and middle age population. (20 to 60 years. Majority of the patients were male (84.60%. Perforator incompetence only = 42.3% (n=11. Perforator incompetence + saphenofemoral/saphenopopliteal incompetence seen in 57.7%. Long saphenous vein involvement was seen in 90.5% of the patients and both LSV and SSV involvement in 9.5%. A greater portion of the patients had combined valvular incompetence (69.56%. The mean ulcer healing time in our study was 2.8 weeks following surgery (90%. Residual incompetent perforators are seen in 7.6% (n=2. New incompetent perforators seen in 7.6% (n=2. Postoperative wound infection of the incision of SPJ ligation was seen in 3.8% (n=1 of the patients, but not the SEPS wound infection and the total complication rate was 3.85%. The mean postoperative stay for patients undergoing SEPS procedure alone was 3.6 days. The mean postoperative stay for patients who underwent perforator ligation with concomitant stripping procedure was 5 days. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSION Majority of the patients present with complications of varicose vein with combined valvular incompetence and surgical treatment with stripping of path

  2. Phleboscintigraphic detection of incompetent perforating veins to guide the surgical treatment of venous stasis ulceration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, A. [Inst. of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic Univ. of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Muzi, M. [Chair of Surgical Pathology, Dept. of Surgery, Univ. Rome (Italy); D`Antini, P. [Chair of Surgical Pathology, Dept. of Surgery, Univ. Rome (Italy); Rulli, F. [Chair of Surgical Pathology, Dept. of Surgery, Univ. Rome (Italy)

    1993-12-31

    Most venous leg ulcers are due to the incompetence of perforating veins. The principal aim of surgery in the treatment of chronic ulcers which are not responsive to conservative therapy, is the identification, division and ligation of those incompetent perforating veins which transmit the hig venous pressure to the ulcerated area. Both radionuclide scanning and contrast venography may be accurate methods of evaluating the deep venous system and incompetent perforating veins; however, the role of radionuclide scanning in this setting is not fully exploited. The authors present one case of chronic, refractory postphlebitic ulcer in which radionuclide venography was employed to detect the incompetent perforating vein responsible for the development of the ulcer. Radionuclide venography (with Tc-99m red blood cells) allowed the main perforating vein to be clearly detected among others already identified by contrast venography. After surgical treatment the ulcer healed, and the perforating vein had disappeared when venoscintigraphy was repeated. In the author`s opinion radionuclide venography is a useful support to contrast venography in planning the surgical treatment of venous stasis ulcers. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die meisten Ulcera cruris entstehen auf der Grundlage von Perforansveneninsuffizienzen. Der prinzipielle Ansatz der chirurgischen Behandlung chronischer Ulcera, die nicht auf eine konservative Therapie ansprechen, ist die Identifizierung und Ligierung der insuffizienten Perforansvenen, die den hohen venoesen Druck in die ulzerierten Areale weiterleiten. Sowohl szintigraphische Methoden als auch die aszendierende Phlebographie sind geeignete Methoden zur Untersuchung des tiefen Beinvenensystems bzw. der insuffizienten Perforansvenen. Der Wert des szintigraphischen Verfahrens fuer diesen Zweck wurde jedoch bis jetzt nicht ausreichend untersucht. Die Autoren berichten ueber den Fall chronischer, therapieresistenter postthrombotischer Ulcera cruris, bei dem zur

  3. Twin Valve Caval Stent for Functional Replacement of Incompetent Tricuspid Valve: A Feasibility Animal Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sochman, Jan; Peregrin, Jan H.; Pavcnik, Dusan; Uchida, Barry T.; Timmermans, Hans A.; Shimohira, Masashi; Choi, Young Ho; Keller, Frederick S.; Rösch, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate feasibility of a twin valve caval stent (TVCS) for functional replacement of an incompetent tricuspid valve (TV) in an acute animal study. Methods: One swine and three sheep were used in the study. TVCS placement was tested in a swine with a normal TV. TVCS function was tested in three sheep with TV regurgitation created by papillary muscle avulsion. Cardiac angiograms and pressure measurements were used to evaluate TVCS function. Two sheep were studied after fluid overload. Results: TVCS was percutaneously placed properly at the central portions of the superior vena cava (SVC) and inferior vena cava (IVC) in the swine. Papillary muscle avulsion in three sheep caused significant tricuspid regurgitation with massive reflux into the right atrium (RA) and partial reflux into the SVC and IVC. TVCS placement eliminated reflux into the SVC and IVC. After fluid overload, there was enlargement of the right ventricle and RA and significant increase in right ventricle, RA, SVC, and IVC pressures, but no reflux into the IVC and SVC. Conclusion: The results of this feasibility study justify detailed evaluation of TVCS insertion for functional chronic replacement of incompetent TV.

  4. Medialization laryngoplasty with Gore-Tex for voice restoration secondary to glottal incompetence: indications and observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitels, Steven M; Mauri, Marcelo; Dailey, Seth H

    2003-02-01

    Gore-Tex has been used as an effective implant for medialization laryngoplasty in the management of paralytic dysphonia; however, reporting of large patient cohorts has been limited. Furthermore, the use of Gore-Tex in the treatment of glottal incompetence secondary to soft tissue defects has not yet been described. Finally, a number of the procedural nuances of using Gore-Tex have not been elucidated. A prospective investigation was done on 142 patients who underwent 152 Gore-Tex medialization laryngoplasties in 183 vocal folds from December 1997 to March 2002. The primary diagnoses prompting the 152 procedures were paralysis in 94, paresis in 18, cancer reconstruction in 14, sulcus vocalis in 6, atrophy in 3, trauma defect in 5, arytenoid dislocation in 3, bilateral paralysis in 3, bilateral paresis in 1, parkinsonism in 4, and neurologic aerodynamic dissociation in 1. One patient who underwent reconstruction of a complex cancer defect required endoscopic removal of the Gore-Tex because of persistent granulation. Clinical observations reveal that Gore-Tex is a versatile implant that is ideally suited for phonosurgical reconstruction of aerodynamic glottal incompetence secondary to a variety of causes. Gore-Tex was especially useful for medialization of complex anatomic soft tissue defects such as those resulting from cancer resection, trauma, atrophy, and sulcus vocalis. There was superior ease in handling, placement, and in vivo adjustability.

  5. Amniopatch treatment for spontaneous previable, preterm premature rupture of membranes associated or not with incompetent cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Hye-Min; Choi, Hyun-Jin; Cha, Hyun-Hwa; Yu, Hee-Jun; Lee, Jee-Hun; Choi, Suk-Joo; Oh, Soo-Young; Roh, Cheong-Rae; Kim, Jong-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed women with previable spontaneous premature rupture of membranes (sPPROM) in whom an amniopatch was performed and compared their pregnancy outcomes with a conservative management group. Amniopatch, an amnioinfusion of autologous platelet concentrate followed by cryoprecipitate, was performed in 7 women with sPPROM diagnosed at 17-23 weeks' gestation, including one twin pregnancy. Three patients had incompetent cervices and the other 4 patients had sPPROM without incompetent cervices. Pregnancy outcomes of the cases were compared with the controls who were managed conservatively (n = 22). Amniopatch treatment was successful in 1 of 7 cases (14.3%), in which the ruptured membranes were completely sealed and the patient delivered a healthy baby at 39 weeks' gestation. No procedure-related complications were observed. Overall, neonatal outcome was similar in the amniopatch and conservatively managed groups, although the incidences of early neonatal sepsis and respiratory distress syndrome were lower in the amniopatch group. The overall success rate of amniopatch among our small number of cases was low. However, if successful, amniopatch may prolong a pregnancy with previable sPPROM to term. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Does peer benefit justify research on incompetent individuals? The same-population condition in codes of research ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Mats; Broström, Linus

    2012-08-01

    Research on incompetent humans raises ethical challenges, especially when there is no direct benefit to these research subjects. Contemporary codes of research ethics typically require that such research must specifically serve to benefit the population to which the research subjects belong. The article critically examines this "same-population condition", raising issues of both interpretation and moral justification. Of particular concern is the risk that the way in which the condition is articulated and rationalized in effect disguises or downplays the instrumentalization of incompetent individuals.

  7. A model treatment refusal procedure for defendants found incompetent to stand trial in the ninth circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epson, Martin; Rodol, Liban; Bloom, Joseph D

    2012-01-01

    Pretrial detainees have a constitutionally protected right to refuse medical treatment in most circumstances; however, individuals found incompetent to stand trial (IST) due to a mental disorder can be treated involuntarily by clinicians who adhere to careful medical and legal procedures. The process of involuntary treatment of IST pretrial detainees begins with categorization into particular legal and medical groups. These different categories affect the individual's access to treatment. In this article, we review the relevant case law for the jurisdiction of the Ninth Circuit and place the medical-legal debate regarding these procedures in the context of recent cases. To address the medical-legal disjunction, we propose and discuss a model for managing treatment refusal in pretrial detainees found IST.

  8. Combined treatment with endovenous laser ablation and compression therapy of incompetent perforating veins for treatment of recalcitrant venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seren, Mustafa; Dumantepe, Mert; Fazliogullari, Osman; Kucukaksu, Suha

    2017-06-01

    Objective Patients with healed venous ulcers often experience recurrence of ulceration, despite the use of long-term compression therapy. This study examines the effect of closing incompetent perforating veins (IPVs) on ulcer recurrence rates in patients with progressive lipodermatosclerosis and impending ulceration. Methods Patients with nonhealing venous ulcers of >2 months' duration underwent duplex ultrasound to assess their lower extremity venous system for incompetence of superficial, perforating, and deep veins. Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) of perforating veins was performed on patients with CEAP 6 disease with increasing hyperpigmentation, lipodermatosclerosis, and/or progressive malleolar pain. A minimum of 2 months of compressive therapy was attempted before endovenous ablation of IPVs. Demographic data, risk factors, CEAP classification, procedural details, and postoperative status were all recorded. Results Forty ulcers with 46 associated IPVs were treated with EVLA in 36 patients with CEAP 6 recalcitrant venous ulcers. Treated incompetent perforator veins were located in the medial ankle (85.7%), calf (10.7%), and lateral ankle (3.5%). Endovenous laser ablation was successful in 76% (35/46) with the first laser treatment of incompetent perforator veins and 15.2% (7/46) additional ablation procedures were performed. Of the 46 treated IPVs, 42 (91.3%) were occluded on the duplex examination at 12 months. The average energy administrated per perforating vein treated was 162 joule. Two patients reported localized paresthesia, which subsided spontaneously, but no deep venous thrombosis or skin burn was observed. Conclusion Especially in the case of liposclerotic or ulcerated skin in the affected region, PAP of IPVs is highly effective, safe, and appears to be feasible. Patients with active venous ulcers appear to benefit from EVLA of incompetent perforators in order to reduce the risk of ulcer recurrence.

  9. STUDY OF CLINICAL OUTCOMES OF SUBFASCIAL PERFORATOR LIGATION SURGERY IN PERFORATOR INCOMPETENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasuki Rajam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic venous insufficiency presents with a spectrum of clinical features ranging from pain or heaviness of affected limbs to non-healing ulcers over the lower limbs and usually require some form of surgical intervention, performing direct perforator vein division preferably by subfascial endoscopic perforator ligation surgery for perforator incompetence, as despite aggressive conservative therapy including compression, lifestyle modification and venotonic medications which are of high cost treatment with increased risk of increasing symptoms. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective longitudinal clinical study of 30 patients selected by systematic sampling method from November 2014 to September 2015 at our institution was conducted to determine the results of subfascial endoscopic perforator vein surgery (SEPS in perforator incompetence. RESULTS For venous clinical severity scoring pre operatively and after 3 weeks post-surgery, the mean for VCSS pre-operatively was 6.66 and a standard deviation of 2.399. The T value was calculated and was found to be 4.9321 and p value of 0.00001(p value less than 0.05 is significant. Similarly for the cases with active ulcer, the size assessment pre-operatively and post-SEPS was again analysed using student t test and the mean ulcer size prior to surgery was found to be 3.3 and standard deviation of 1.984. The T value was calculated and was found to be 1.789009 and a p value of 0.04 (p value less than 0.05 is significant. CONCLUSION Our study concluded that favourable and significant ulcer healing rate with improvement and reduction in clinical severity suggests that SEPS plays an important role in surgical management of advanced stages of venous insufficiency.

  10. Surgical Outcomes for Speech Surgery in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: The Dilemma of Persistent Velopharyngeal Insufficiency After Pharyngeal Flap Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Ryan D; Wolfswinkel, Erik M; Buchanan, Edward P; Khechoyan, David Y

    2017-07-01

    The majority of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome suffer from velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS) commonly present with a large central velopharyngeal gap in the setting of poor velar and pharyngeal wall motion. The posterior pharyngeal flap is considered the most effective technique to treat VPI in this complex patient group. This study aims to critically evaluate success rates of surgical management of VPI in 22qDS patients and discuss options for management of a failed posterior pharyngeal flap (PPF) with persistent VPI. A systematic review was performed through MEDLINE and Scopus to examine the outcomes of PPF surgery to treat VPI in patients with 22qDS. Complications were defined as persistent VPI, hyponasal speech, and obstructive sleep apnea. To demonstrate an approach to management, the authors outline a recent patient with a failed PPF in this patient population at the authors' institution. The authors comprehensively reviewed 58 articles, 13 of which contained relevant information with extractable data. Of the 159 patients with 22qDS who underwent PPF to treat VPI, successful outcomes were reported in 135 patients (80%; range: 0%-100%). Complications were reported in 14% of patients, with need for revision operations in 3%. Surgical management of VPI in patients with 22qDS is challenging, with variable success rates reported in the literature. If unsuccessful, the surgeon faces additional challenges with the revision surgery including a scarred PPF donor site, distorted palatal recipient site, and further medialization of internal carotid arteries. Surgical revision of a failed PPF requires meticulous preoperative planning and technical execution.

  11. Doppler ultrasound evaluation of pattern of venous incompetance and relation with skin changes in varicose vein patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HP Pant

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Varicosity of lower limb is a common problem in agricultural country like Nepal. Doppler ultrasound is a standard investigation modality for confirmation of diagnosis, evaluation of severity and venous mapping to plan treatment. We aim to find out the epidemiology, common pattern of incompetance, severity assessment by doppler and association of the important doppler variables with skin changes. METHODOLOGY Doppler venous study was done in 56 patients from june 2013 to july 2014. Patients with deep vein thrombosis and peripheral arterial disease were excluded. Altogether 56 patients, 96 limbs were studied. Data was entered in preformed proforma. Doppler study was conducted by senior radiologist with linear probes. Data was entered in SPSS software version 16 and statistical significance was calculated using chi square test. RESULTS Bilateral limb involvement was seen in 40 patients and unilateral in 16 patuents only. Skin related changes were seen in 58 limbs. Saphenofemoral junction incompetance was seen in 79(82.2% limbs and was most common pattern of incompetance. Overall, superficial veins were involved in 88(91.7% limbs and deep in 30(31.2% limbs. Prolonged duration of varicosity (>9 year (p=0.000, bilateral limb involvement(p=0.024, reflux in deep venous system(p=0.002, larger Greater Saphenous Vein (GSV size(p=0.003, prolonged duration of reflux(p=0.000 and perforator incompetence (p=0.002 were associated with skin changes. GSV diameter more than 7 mm was associated with reflux significantly (P=0.002. CONCLUSION Superficial vein incompetance is common pattern compared to deep venous system. Sapheno Femoral Junction (SFJ incompetance is the commonest pattern. Larger caliber of vein, prolonged duration of reflux, reflux in deep venous system and perforator insufficiency are significantly associated with skin changes.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i3.12770 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol-10, No-3

  12. Longitudinal Study on Reciprocity between Personality Traits and Parenting Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, Johanna; Tillemann, Kati; Metsäpelto, Riitta-Leena; Kokko, Katja; Pulkkinen, Lea

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocal associations between the Big Five personality traits and parenting stress--including both parents' feelings of their distress and perception of their incompetence as parents--were studied with 248 participants (49% of which were males). Longitudinal data, collected at ages 33/36, 42 and 50 years, were used. Cross-lagged path analysis…

  13. Chronotropic incompetence can limit exercise tolerance in COPD patients with lung hyperinflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulo S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sébastien Hulo,1 Jocelyn Inamo,2 Aurélie Dehon,3 Olivier Le Rouzic,4 Jean-Louis Edme,1 Remi Neviere51Université Lille, CHU Lille, EA 4483, IMPact de l’Environnement Chimique sur la Santé humaine, Lille, France; 2Département de Cardiologie – CHU Fort de France, Martinique – Faculté de Médecine – Université des Antilles, France; 3Pôle d’Anesthésie Réanimation ADRU, CHU Nîmes, Nîmes, France; 4Université Lille, CNRS, Inserm, CHU Lille, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Center for Infection and Immunity of Lille, Lille, France; 5Université Lille, Inserm, CHU Lille, Lille Inflammation Research International Center, Lille, FrancePurpose: Metabolic-chronotropic relationship is the only concept that assesses the entire chronotropic function during exercise, as it takes into account individual fitness. To better understand interrelationships between chronotropic incompetence (CI, dynamic hyperinflation (DH and exercise limitation among Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD disease severity, we evaluated cardiopulmonary responses to symptom-limited cycle exercise in stable patients.Patients and methods: We prospectively studied 47 COPD patients classified by GOLD stage severity. Pulmonary function tests and cardiopulmonary responses to symptom-limited incremental exercise were studied. CI was defined by regression line between percent heart rate (HR reserve and percent oxygen uptake (V’O2 reserve, ie, chronotropic-metabolic index (CMI. DH was defined from the knot resulting from the nonlinear regressions of inspiratory capacity changes from rest to peak (dynamic inspiratory capacity (ICdyn with percentage of maximal HR and CMI.Results: Aerobic capacity (median interquartile ranges peak V’O2, 24.3 (23.6; 25.2, 18.5 (15.5; 21.8, 17.5 (15.4; 19.1 mL·kg-1·min-1 and CMI worsened according to GOLD severity. The optimal knot of ICdyn was equal to −0.34 L. The

  14. A Comparison Of Mini-incisional Ligation, Laser Ablation And Cyanoacrylate Embolization For Incompetent Perforating Vein Closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orçun Gürbüz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our aim was to compare the short- and the midterm results of three main methods of incompetent perforating vein treatment. Methods: Data of 174 procedures performed between January 2012 and January 2015, in a 84 consecutive patients with incompetent perforating veins were retro­spectively analyzed. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to surgical technique: mini-incisional ligation 40 (47.6%, 22 (26.2% endovenous laser ablation and 22 (26.2% cyanoacrylate embolization. Preoperative, op­erative and early follow up data was recorded. All patients were called to assess by ultrasonography for recurrence. Results: Operation time was significantly longer in the mini-incisional ligation group (p<0.001. Cyanoacrylate group showed significantly lower hospital stay (p<0.001, duration of analgesia (p<0.001 and disability (p<0.001. Recurrence was not found in the ligation group (p<0.001, endovenous laser group showed significantly higher re­currence than the cyanoacylate group (p<0.001. Cos­metic problems (hyperpigmentation or scar tissue were significantly higher in the mini-incisional ligation group (p =0.003. Paresthesia was detected after endovenous la­ser (p=0.001. Conclusion: Although ligation has still lowest rate of recurrence after incompetent perforating vein surgery, it is being replaced by the endovascular procedure due to cosmetic problems. Cyanoacrylate embolization seems to be a promising alternative for incompetent perforating veins treatment due to higher recurrence and complica­tion rate after endovenous laser ablation.

  15. Stress !!!

    OpenAIRE

    Fledderus, M.

    2012-01-01

    Twee op de vijf UT-studenten hebben last van ernstige studiestress, zo erg zelfs dat het ze in hun privéleven belemmert. Die cijfers komen overeen met het landelijk beeld van stress onder studenten. Samen met 14 andere universiteits- en hogeschoolbladen enquêteerde UT Nieuws bijna 5500 studenten. Opvallend is dat mannelijke studenten uit Twente zich veel minder druk lijken te maken over hun studie. Onder vrouwen ligt de stress juist erg hoog ten opzichte van het landelijk gemiddelde.

  16. Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Hanne Dauer

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb.......Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb....

  17. Death penalty support for special offender populations of legally convicted murderers: juveniles, the mentally retarded, and the mentally incompetent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boots, Denise Paquette; Heide, Kathleen M; Cochran, John K

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court recently re-examined the constitutionality of the death penalty in the context of two of three special offender populations of murderers (juveniles, mentally retarded, and mentally incompetent). The Court reaffirmed the imposition of the death penalty for juveniles 16 and 17, while reversing itself on the mentally retarded. In reaching its decision, the Court relied on society's "evolving standards of decency." Using Likert-type items, this study is the first to have prospective jurors assess support for the death penalty for these specific offender groups. The public's support for the execution of each of the groups is then compared with existing case law. Descriptive statistics and regression analyses indicate that, as expected, the levels of support for the applicability of capital punishment to the various special offender populations are much lower than that for the general adult offender. Moreover, these findings are congruent with the holdings of the Court with one notable exception: a slight majority of respondents supported executing the mentally incompetent. Reasons for the public's apparent departure from the Supreme Court holding prohibiting the execution of mentally incompetent convicted murderers are discussed. The Court's continued role in protecting marginalized populations from "cruel and unusual punishment" is explored in the context of strong public sentiment demanding justice and finality despite changes in offenders' mental capacity. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Trial Vocal Fold Injection Predicts Thyroplasty Outcomes in Nonparalytic Glottic Incompetence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumberger, Lukas D; Overton, Lewis; Buckmire, Robert A; Shah, Rupali N

    2017-04-01

    Trial vocal fold injection (TVFI) may be used prior to permanent medialization when voice outcome is uncertain. We aimed to determine whether voice outcomes of TVFI are predictive of, or correlate with outcomes after type I Gore-Tex medialization thyroplasty (GMT) in patients with nonparalytic glottic incompetence (GI). Thirty-five patients with nonparalytic GI who underwent TVFI followed by GMT were retrospectively reviewed. Change in voice-related quality of life (VRQOL) after TVFI was compared to change in VRQOL 3 to 9 months after GMT. Similar comparisons were made for change in glottal function index (GFI) and change in grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain (GRBAS). Sample correlation coefficients were calculated. Change in VRQOL after TVFI showed good correlation with change in VRQOL after GMT, r = 0.55. Change in GFI after TVFI showed strong correlation with change in GFI after GMT, r = 0.74. Change in GRBAS after TVFI showed excellent correlation with change in GRBAS after GMT, r = 0.90. The TVFI is a useful tool in nonparalytic GI when outcomes from glottic closure procedures are not clear. Voice outcome measures after TVFI strongly correlate with outcomes from GMT. These data may be used to more confidently counsel patients regarding their predicted outcomes of permanent medialization.

  19. Effect of Yiqi Bufei recipe [see text] on patients with pulmonary incompetence after pneumonectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Shen, You-kui; Zhou, Xing-ming; Fu, Xiao-qing; Mao, Wei-min; Dong, Li-wen; Wang, Jun; Cheng, Gen-miao

    2011-12-01

    To study the effect of Yiqi Bufei Recipe ([see text], YBR) on surgical tolerability, pulmonary compensatory function and post-operation rehabilitation in patients with pulmonary incompetence (PI) after pneumonectomy. YBR intervention was applied to 60 patients with PI after pneumonectomy (as test group), the pulmonary and cardiac functions changes before and after operation, occurrence of postoperative complications, mortality, and the number of hospitalization days and intensive care unit (ICU) confinement period were observed. Meantime, for the negative and positive controls, the same parameters were observed comparatively in 60 patients with normal lung function, and in 60 patients with PI undergoing a similar operation but untreated with Chinese herbs. Lung function in the test group showed insignificant change before and after operation (P >0.05), while significant decrease was seen in the two control groups (P<0.05). Furthermore, the incidences of post-operation complications and mortality as well as the number of hospitalization days and the ICU confinement period in the test group were significantly lower than those in the positive control group respectively (P <0.05). YBR could relieve lung injury after pneumonectomy, improve surgical tolerability, reduce the length of postoperative hospitalization days and ICU confinement period, and lower the incidence of postoperative complications and mortality in patients with PI after pneumonectomy.

  20. Rate responsive pacing using cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with chronotropic incompetence and chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Daniel B; Mignatti, Andrea; Colombo, Paolo C; Uriel, Nir; Garcia, Luis I; Ehlert, Frederick A; Jorde, Ulrich P

    2011-10-01

    Chronotropic incompetence (CI) is a common finding in patients with advanced chronic heart failure (CHF) and is associated with a worse functional capacity. Whether rate responsive pacing with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) would acutely improve exercise performance in patients with advanced CHF and severe CI (heart rate) is unknown. Patients (n = 13) with CHF, a CRT device, and severe CI were randomized in a double-blind crossover pilot study to either DDD (control) or DDDR (rate responsive) pacing. Six minutes walk test (6MWT) distance, oxygen consumption at anaerobic threshold (VO(2) @ AT), and maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2) max) were measured. One week later, testing was repeated in the alternate pacing mode. Rate responsive pacing commenced with standard settings in only 9 of 13 (69%) patients. In these 9 subjects, 6MWT distance improved acutely from 358.5 ± 40.7 to 376.8 ± 24.5 m with DDDR pacing (Pheart rate at minute 3 during rate responsive pacing and improvement in VO(2) @ AT (r = 0.83, Pheart rate response may be beneficial to optimize CRT settings in this patient population.

  1. Offense Characteristics of Incompetent to Stand Trial Defendants Charged With Violent Offenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Jeremy; Green, Debbie; Kunz, Michal; Belfi, Brian; Pequeno, Gabriela

    2015-06-01

    The current study compared offender and offense characteristics of pretrial defendants found incompetent to stand trial (IST) against those described as general offenders by victims in the 2008 Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) survey and evaluated factors that differentiated IST defendants who allegedly used weapons from those who did not during the course of a violent offense. IST defendants were older and used "weapons" more frequently than those reported in the BJS survey; however, other characteristics, including use of firearms, did not differ. No demographic, clinical, or legal factors differentiated pretrial defendants who used weapons from those who did not. Overall, pretrial defendants were frequently diagnosed with a comorbid substance use disorder, and were homeless, unemployed, and had an extensive history of psychiatric hospitalizations and prior arrests at the time of their alleged offenses. Such results indicate that models for comprehensive discharge planning may have utility in addressing the unique needs of this subgroup of mentally disordered offenders. The findings also raise questions about the federal and state prohibition of gun rights to all IST defendants. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The role of circumflex femoral veins in the saphenofemoral junction incompetence: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passariello, F

    2011-04-01

    A 31 year-old female patient, an opera singer, came for a consultation, mainly for aesthetic problems of the lower limbs. An asymptomatic bilateral P-point pelvic shunt was demonstrated by the EchoDoppler, while no nutcracker syndrome was detected. The examination demonstrated a medial circumflex femoral vein (MCFV), going into the common femoral vein and then into the great saphenous vein (GSV). The Valsalva manoeuvre showed the GSV terminal valve incompetence. A dilated MCFV vein at the level of the saphenofemoral junction was the source of the reflux through the GSV, while the external iliac vein was competent. GSV reflux with Valsalva was present only in the lying position. Flow in the MCFV was directed toward the CFV during and after the Valsalva. The examination shows clearly that a GSV reflux can sometimes occur in absence of iliac reflux. Circumflex femoral veins (medial and lateral) are anatomical variations, but common findings during ordinary EchoColourDoppler investigations of the venous system of the lower limbs.

  3. Treatment of unfavourable results of flexor tendon surgery: Ruptured repairs, tethered repairs and pulley incompetence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, David; Giesen, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    As primary repair of divided flexor tendons becomes more common, secondary tendon surgery becomes largely that of the complications of primary repair, namely ruptured and adherent repairs. These occur with an incidence of each in most reported series world-wide of around 5%, with these problems having changed little in the last two decades, despite strengthening our suture repairs. Where the primary referral service is less well-developed, and as a more occasional occurrence where primary treatment is the routine, the surgeon faces different problems. Patients arrive at a hand unit variable, but longer, times after the primary insult, having had no, or bad, previous treatment. Sometimes the situation is the same, viz. an extended finger with no active flexion, but now no longer amenable to primary repair. Frequently, it is much more complex as a result of injuries to the other tissues of the digit and, also, as a result of the unaided healing process within the digit in the presence of an inactive flexor system. We present our experience in dealing with ruptured repairs, tethered repairs and pulley incompetence.

  4. Treatment of unfavourable results of flexor tendon surgery: Ruptured repairs, tethered repairs and pulley incompetence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Elliot

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As primary repair of divided flexor tendons becomes more common, secondary tendon surgery becomes largely that of the complications of primary repair, namely ruptured and adherent repairs. These occur with an incidence of each in most reported series world-wide of around 5%, with these problems having changed little in the last two decades, despite strengthening our suture repairs. Where the primary referral service is less well-developed, and as a more occasional occurrence where primary treatment is the routine, the surgeon faces different problems. Patients arrive at a hand unit variable, but longer, times after the primary insult, having had no, or bad, previous treatment. Sometimes the situation is the same, viz. an extended finger with no active flexion, but now no longer amenable to primary repair. Frequently, it is much more complex as a result of injuries to the other tissues of the digit and, also, as a result of the unaided healing process within the digit in the presence of an inactive flexor system. We present our experience in dealing with ruptured repairs, tethered repairs and pulley incompetence.

  5. Deploying culture as a defence against incompetence: The unconscious dynamics of public service work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peliwe P. Mnguni

    2012-01-01

    Research purpose: This article employs social defense theory to explore manifestations of anxiety and defense within South African public service organisations. Motivation for the study: Dominant discourse on public service institutions over-relies on political, sociological and public administration theories and tends to ignore psychosocial explanations. Further, whilst the psychodynamics of social service work are generally understood, the unconscious dynamics of generic public service work remain under-theorised. Research design, approach and method: This conceptual article draws on my personal observations as a reflective citizen and experiences as a consultant to government departments. Main findings: Herein, an argument is advanced that the deployment of ill-qualified party loyalists to key positions in the public service is perverse: it serves as a collective defense against the impossible aspects of the task at hand. The appointees, in turn, deploy organisational processes to defend against feelings of incompetence and the inevitability of failure. This practice, coupled with acute resource constraints, sets up front line staff for scapegoating. Practical/managerial implications: An appreciation of the multiple meanings of public service work and the defensive role played by public institutions stands to inform purposeful change towards sustainable public service organisational practice. Contribution/value-add: The discussion seeks to contribute to attempts that employ systems psychodynamics to make sense of anxiety and defense within organisations in general and public service institutions in particular.

  6. Prognóstico da incompetência cronotrópica em idosos diabéticos à ecocardiografia sob estresse físico Prognostic value of chronotropic incompetence in elderly patients undergoing exercise echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Silva Santana

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A incompetência cronotrópica (IC, definida como a incapacidade de atingir no esforço 80% da frequência de reserva esperada para a idade, é um fator preditor de mortalidade e eventos cardiovasculares e pode conferir pior prognóstico a grupos em expansão devido ao acelerado processo de envelhecimento populacional, como em idosos diabéticos. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o valor prognóstico da IC em idosos diabéticos considerando desfechos com infarto agudo do miocárdio (IAM, doença cerebrovascular (DCV e óbito geral, e comparar características clínicas e ecocardiográficas entre os que têm IC e os que não têm. MÉTODO: Foram estudados 298 pacientes idosos e diabéticos submetidos a ecocardiografia de estresse sob esforço físico (EF, de janeiro de 2001 a dezembro de 2010. Destes, 109 eram incompetentes cronotrópicos, grupo G1, e foram comparados aos competentes, grupo G2, quanto à ocorrência de eventos cardiovasculares, características clínicas e ecocardiográficas. RESULTADOS: O grupo G1, em relação ao grupo controle, apresentou maior frequência de DCV (9,2% × 3,2; p = 0,027 e maior frequência de óbito para aqueles que sofreram DCV ou IAM. Angina típica e dispneia prévias à realização da EF e sexo masculino foram mais frequentes no G1. A análise das variáveis ecocardiográficas demonstrou que o índice do escore de motilidade do ventrículo esquerdo (IEMVE de repouso e de esforço, o índice de massa do VE (ventrículo esquerdo e o diâmetro do AE (átrio esquerdo foram maiores entre os incompetentes cronotrópicos. CONCLUSÃO: A IC foi associada, de forma independente, à ocorrência de DCV em idosos diabéticosBACKGROUND: Chronotropic incompetence (CI, defined as failure to achieve less than 80% of age-expected heart rate, is a predictor of mortality and adverse cardiovascular events and may confer a worse prognosis in elderly diabetic individuals. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prognostic value of chronotropic

  7. Stress !!!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fledderus, M.

    2012-01-01

    Twee op de vijf UT-studenten hebben last van ernstige studiestress, zo erg zelfs dat het ze in hun privéleven belemmert. Die cijfers komen overeen met het landelijk beeld van stress onder studenten. Samen met 14 andere universiteits- en hogeschoolbladen enquêteerde UT Nieuws bijna 5500 studenten.

  8. Longitudinal Voice Outcomes After Type I Gore-tex Thyroplasty for Nonparalytic Glottic Incompetence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Lewis; Adams, Katherine; Shah, Rupali N; Buckmire, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    Type I Gore-tex thyroplasty (GTP) for nonparalytic glottic incompetence (GI) results in significantly improved subjective and perceptual voice outcomes. We endeavored to investigate the longitudinal course of voice outcomes measuring the same patients across time points stratified by diagnostic subgroup. Seventy-five patients with nonparalytic GI treated with GTP in the past 9 years were retrospectively reviewed and grouped according to their primary diagnoses (atrophy, scar, hypomobility, and paresis). Voice outcome measures, Voice-Related Quality of Life (VRQOL), Glottal Function Index (GFI), and GRBAS (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain) for each individual patient and diagnostic subgroup were grouped by time interval following surgery: 0 to 90 days, 3 to 9 months, 9 to 18 months, 18 to 36 months, 3 to 5 years, and 5 to 10 years. Across all diagnoses, statistically significant improvement in VRQOL was maintained at 3 to 5 years (P = .03) and GFI at 5 to 10 years (P = .02). The GRBAS showed statistically significant improvements out to 18 to 36 months (P = .02). In the subgroup analysis, hypomobility/paresis patients maintained significant improvement voice measures longer than patients with other diagnoses. As a group, scar patients did not show statistically significant postoperative improvement in VRQOL or GFI at any of the tested time points. Gore-tex thyroplasty provides durable improvement in subjective and perceptual voice outcomes for patients with nonparalytic GI. Patients treated for hypomobility/paresis have the most durable vocal outcomes followed by atrophy and lastly, scar. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. The role of cryosurgery in the treatment of the incompetent great saphenous vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Renata; Vizsy, Laszlo; Farics, Akos; Balint, Istvan B

    2016-02-01

    Our aim was to determine the place of cryosurgery in the treatment of the incompetence of the great saphenous vein. Primary end-point of this study was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of cryostripping and cryosclerosis. Complications frequently related to saphenous vein stripping were analyzed secondary. A literature search was conducted in the PubMed-database until September 2014. Randomized controlled trials with at least 6 months follow-up were eligible. Meta-analysis was performed by the IVhet-model. Forty-two unique publications were found- Five of them (3 trials), comparing cryostripping to stripping and endovenous LASER ablation, were eligible for meta-analysis. There were no significant differences between cryostripping and conventional stripping regarding the clinical effectiveness (P=0.06; RR:1.12; 95% of CI: 0.99-1.27) and saphenous neuralgia related to surgery (P=0.48; RR:0.94; 95% of CI: 0.89-0.99). The records of bruising were not uniform and comparable. No randomized controlled trials were found to perform a meta-analysis on cryosclerosis, therefore a short literature review is presented. The study has limitations and weak conclusions because of imprecision (small number of involved trials and limbs) and short term follow-up. Low quality evidences suggest that cryostripping is a reliable, efficient method with better cosmetic results than conventional stripping, however, long term comparisons are not available so far. Cryosclerosis could be an alternate to the known endovenous minimal invasive ablation procedures, but there are no exact strong evidences, especially on the long term.

  10. [Premature birth in patient with cervix incompetence and history of myasthenia gravis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentealba, Maximiliano; Troncoso, Miguel; Vallejos, Joaquin; Ponce, Sebastian; Villablanca, Nelson; Melita, Pablo

    2013-09-01

    Cervical incompetence it's a dilatation of the cervix during the third trimester of pregnancy that ends with the interruption of it. The incidence in Chile is about 0.1-2% of the total pregnancies and it's one of the causes of preterm birth. A 34 years old pregnant patient. Timectomized at age 18 to treat her miastenia gravis, previously trated with medication, had 4 previous preterm labours all of them under 25 weeks and vaginal births. All fetuses died postpartum. A cerclage was made during the third, fourth and fifth pregnancies. She didn't present hypertension during the gestation and no cervical diameter under 15mm. Since the fourth gestation the following tests are taken: Antifosfolipidic antibodies, APTT,PT. All the results are either normal or negative. Microbial cultures were negative. No amniocentesis was made. A McDonald cervical cerclage was made during pregnancies number 3, 4 and 5 on the 16th week to delay the labor. Also oral micronized progesterone, on a 400mg/24 hours dosis, was administered to avoid preterm birth. On the 24th week the pharmacological treatment started including Intramuscular Betamethasone, 12 mg/24 hours (2 doses), to induce lung maturity on the fetus. It is thought that the administration of progesterone could have improved the situation of the patient, because it acts as a labour repressants. The use of cerclage could have helped, but the factors that may influence the effectiveness of this method are unknown. Perhaps there is some immunologic factor associated with the miastenia gravis that alters the normal course of pregnancy.

  11. Numerical simulation of endovenous laser treatment of the incompetent great saphenous vein with external air cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marqa, Mohamad Feras; Mordon, Serge; Hernández-Osma, Esteban; Trelles, Mario; Betrouni, Nacim

    2013-05-01

    Endovenous laser treatment (ELT) has been proposed as an alternative in the treatment of reflux of the great saphenous vein. Before the procedure, peri-saphenous subcutaneous tumescent saline solution infiltration is usually performed. However, diffusion of this tumescent fluid is rapidly observed and can potentially reduce the efficacy as a heat sink. External skin cooling with cold air was proposed as an alternative solution. The objective of this study is to compare endovenous laser treatment without and with air cooling by realistic numerical simulations. An optical-thermal damage model was formulated and implemented using finite element modeling. The general model simulated light distribution using the diffusion approximation of the transport theory, temperature rise using the bioheat equation, and laser-induced injury using the Arrhenius damage model. Parameters, used in clinical procedures, were considered: power, 15 W; pulse duration, 1 s; fiber pull back, 3-mm increments every second; cold air applied in continuous mode during ELT; and no tumescent anesthesia. Simulations were performed for vein locations at 5, 10, and 15 mm in depth, with and without air cooling. For a vein located at 15 mm in depth, no significant difference was observed with and without cooling. For a vein located at 10 mm in depth, surface temperature increase up to 45 °C is observed without cooling. For a vein located at 5 mm, without cooling, temperature increase leads to irreversible damage of dermis and epidermis. Conversely, with air cooling, surface temperature reaches a maximum of 38 °C in accordance with recordings performed on patients. ELT of the incompetent great saphenous vein with external air cooling system is a promising therapy technique. Use of cold air on the skin continuously flowing in the area of laser shot decreased significantly the heat extent and the thermal damage in the perivenous tissues and the skin.

  12. Are Informal Caregivers of Persons With Dementia Open to Extending Medical Aid in Dying to Incompetent Patients? Findings From a Survey Conducted in Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Gina; Rodrigue, Claudie; Arcand, Marcel; Downie, Jocelyn; Dubois, Marie-France; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Hertogh, Cees M; Pautex, Sophie; Van den Block, Lieve

    2017-12-27

    Euthanasia is a controversial and complex issue, especially when involving incompetent patients. On December 10, 2015, Quebec became the first Canadian province to give access to medical aid in dying (MAiD) (ie, euthanasia performed by a physician) to competent patients who satisfy strictly defined criteria. Less than 2 years later, Quebec is considering extending MAiD to incompetent patients who made an advance request. With the objective of contributing scientific data to current societal debates, we conducted a survey among 471 informal caregivers of persons with dementia, reached through Alzheimer Societies. We used a series of vignettes featuring a person with Alzheimer disease to investigate respondents' attitudes towards MAiD. The response rate was 69%. Two-thirds [68%; 95% confidence interval, 63%-73%] found it acceptable to extend MAiD to an incompetent patient at an advanced stage of Alzheimer disease who had made a written request while competent, and 91% (95% confidence interval, 87%-94%) found it acceptable at the terminal stage. Self-determination was the most widely endorsed argument in favor of access to MAiD for incompetent patients. Findings suggest strong support among informal caregivers for extending MAiD to incompetent patients, provided they are terminally-ill and had made a written request before losing capacity.

  13. Legal implications for failure to comply with advance directives: an examination of the incompetent individual's right to refuse life-sustaining medical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Sherynn J

    2002-01-01

    Life-sustaining medical technology in the past century has created a growing body of case law and legislation recognizing the incompetent individual's right to make his or her own end-of-life decisions. This article focuses on California's leadership in the area of these specific end-of-life issues: specifically, exploring the right of an incompetent individual to refuse life-sustaining medical treatment. The article examines advance directives along with various judicial decision-making standards for incompetent individuals and explores the sociobehavioral and legal rationale for compliance with incompetent individual's rights to make end-of-life decisions. Finally this article concludes (i) that advance directives allow competent individuals to state the medical treatment they would prefer in the event they should later become incompetent and (ii) that when advance directives are properly executed in a detailed manner, under laws currently in effect in some jurisdictions, the preferences stated in the directive bind health care providers. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2008-01-01

    We all experience stress as a regular, and sometimes damaging and sometimes useful, part of our daily lives. In our normal ups and downs, we have our share of exhaustion, despondency, and outrage--matched with their corresponding positive moods. But burnout and workaholism are different. They are chronic, dysfunctional, self-reinforcing, life-shortening habits. Dentists, nurses, teachers, ministers, social workers, and entertainers are especially susceptible to burnout; not because they are hard-working professionals (they tend to be), but because they are caring perfectionists who share control for the success of what they do with others and perform under the scrutiny of their colleagues (they tend to). Workaholics are also trapped in self-sealing cycles, but the elements are ever-receding visions of control and using constant activity as a barrier against facing reality. This essay explores the symptoms, mechanisms, causes, and successful coping strategies for burnout and workaholism. It also takes a look at the general stress response on the physiological level and at some of the damage American society inflicts on itself.

  15. Retrograde endovenous laser ablation through saphenopopliteal junctional area for incompetent small saphenous vein; Comparison with antegrade approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Seok; Park, Sang Woo; Yun, Ik Jin; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Song Am; Chee, Hyun Keun; Hwang, Jin Ho [Konkuk University Hospital, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of retrograde endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) and to compare it with the conventional antegrade EVLA for incompetent small saphenous vein (SSV). Small saphenous vein was cannulated via two approaches under ultrasound-guidance. One method involved puncturing the SSV cranially at mid-calf (the antegrade group). If the antegrade puncture into the SSV failed twice, the other approach for puncture was selected that involved puncturing the SSV toward the ankle (the retrograde group). Patients were evaluated in terms of technical and clinical success, closure rates of the SSV, and complications including pain, bruising, or paresthesia at all follow-up visits. The 1470 nm endovenous laser was used in all limbs. Technical success was seen in all limbs in both groups (100%). Closure rate in both groups showed about 95%, without significant difference (p = 0.685). Similar linear endovenous energy density was supplied during the EVLA in both groups (p = 0.876). Three frequent complications including bruising, pain, and paresthesia did not show statistical significance between groups (p = 0.465, 0.823, 1.000, respectively). Major complications were absent in both groups. The EVLA for the incompetent SSV using a retrograde approach is safe and effective and should be considered the alternative method if the antegrade access fails due to vasospasm or small SSV diameter.

  16. Retrograde endovenous laser ablation through saphenopopliteal junctional area for incompetent small saphenous vein; Comparison with antegrade approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Seok; Park, Sang Woo; Yun, Ik Jin; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Song Am; Chee, Hyun Keun; Hwang, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of retrograde endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) and to compare it with the conventional antegrade EVLA for incompetent small saphenous vein (SSV). Small saphenous vein was cannulated via two approaches under ultrasound-guidance. One method involved puncturing the SSV cranially at mid-calf (the antegrade group). If the antegrade puncture into the SSV failed twice, the other approach for puncture was selected that involved puncturing the SSV toward the ankle (the retrograde group). Patients were evaluated in terms of technical and clinical success, closure rates of the SSV, and complications including pain, bruising, or paresthesia at all follow-up visits. The 1470 nm endovenous laser was used in all limbs. Technical success was seen in all limbs in both groups (100%). Closure rate in both groups showed about 95%, without significant difference (p = 0.685). Similar linear endovenous energy density was supplied during the EVLA in both groups (p = 0.876). Three frequent complications including bruising, pain, and paresthesia did not show statistical significance between groups (p = 0.465, 0.823, 1.000, respectively). Major complications were absent in both groups. The EVLA for the incompetent SSV using a retrograde approach is safe and effective and should be considered the alternative method if the antegrade access fails due to vasospasm or small SSV diameter

  17. Co-morbidity of cervical incompetence with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) negatively impacts prognosis: A retrospective analysis of 178 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongqing; Gu, Xunke; Tao, Liyuan; Zhao, Yangyu

    2016-10-12

    Cervical incompetence is an important cause of miscarriage and premature birth and polycystic ovary syndrome is a heterogeneous endocrine disorder that is the most common cause of anovulatory infertility and eugonadotrophic hypogonadism. By now, it is still debated whether women with PCOS have an increased risk of miscarriage and there have been no studies about the pregnancy outcomes of cervical incompetence patients with PCOS. The following clinical data of cervical incompetence patients with/without PCOS who were treated between September 2006 and September 2013 were retrospectively analysed: onset gestational age, termination gestational age, pregnancy outcome, co-morbid insulin resistance (IR) in PCOS patients, the influence of IR, co-morbid hyperandrogenism (HA) in PCOS patients, and the influence of HA. The independent samples t-test and chi-square trend test were used to analyse the data. A total of 178 singleton pregnancy cases with cervical incompetence were identified. The average onset gestational age was 23.9 ± 4.3 weeks, and the average termination gestational age was 32.5 ± 5.5 weeks. Of these 178 singleton pregnancy cases, 40 (22.5 %) ended in miscarriage, 82 (46.1 %) ended in preterm birth, and 56 (31.5 %) ended in term birth. Eighty cases (44.9 %) exhibited PCOS co-morbidity, and those cases had an average onset gestational age of 22.3 ± 3.8 weeks and an average termination gestational age of 31.2 ± 5.7 weeks, which were both significantly different from those of the non-PCOS group (both P PCOS group (15.3 % miscarriage, 48.0 % preterm birth, and 36.7 % term birth), the PCOS group exhibited worse pregnancy outcomes (31.3 % miscarriage, 43.8 % preterm birth, and 25 % term birth) (P = 0.01). Among the 80 PCOS patients, 45 (56.3 %) exhibited co-morbid IR, and the IR group exhibited significantly worse pregnancy outcomes than the non-IR group (P = 0.03). Among the 80 PCOS patients, 54 cases (67.5

  18. TrueFisp versus HASTE sequences in 3T cine MRI: Evaluation of image quality during phonation in patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulinna-Cosentini, Christiane; Czerny, Christian; Weber, Michael; Baumann, Arnulf; Sinko, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the image quality of two fast dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences: True fast imaging with steady state precession (TrueFisp) was compared with half-Fourier acquired single turbo-spin-echo (HASTE) sequence for the characterization of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) in repaired cleft palate patients. Twenty-two patients (10 female and 12 male; mean age, 17.7 ± 10.6 years; range, 9-31) with suspected VPI underwent 3-T MRI using TrueFisp and HASTE sequences. Imaging was performed in the sagittal plane at rest and during phonation of ''ee'' and ''k'' to assess the velum, tongue, posterior pharyngeal wall and a potential VP closure. The results were analysed independently by one radiologist and one orthodontist. HASTE performed better than TrueFisp for all evaluated items, except the tongue evaluation by the orthodontist during phonation of ''k'' and ''ee''. A statistically significant difference in favour of HASTE was observed in assessing the velum at rest and during phonation of ''k'' and ''ee'', and also in assessing VP closure in both raters (p < 0.05). TrueFisp imaging was twice as fast as HASTE (0.36 vs. 0.75 s/image). Dynamic HASTE images were of superior quality to those obtained with TrueFisp, although TrueFisp imaging was twice as fast. (orig.)

  19. Prevalence of microdeletion 22q11 in patients with hypernasal speech due to velopharyngeal insufficiency: Expanded phenotype and clinical comparison to nondeletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel-Bartelt, J.; Cytrynbaum, C.; Witzel, M.A.; Teshima, I.E. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Microdeletion 22q11.2 has been reported as a frequent ethiology of both velocardiofacial (VCF) and DiGeorge syndromes. We have studied the prevalence of microdeletion 22q11 in a group of patients ascertained through a Speech and Language clinic presenting with (1) velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) and (2) difficultly in school. Growth parameters were measured, and facies were scored for features of VCF. Microdeletions were detected at locus D22S75 by FISH with probe N25 (Oncor), and at 22q11.2 with high resolution banding analysis (HRB). One child with typical VCF facies was considered to have a deletion at 22q11 with HRB, but is not deleted with N25, indicating that N25 may not detect all deletion patients. An additional 8/30 children tested to date were deleted with the N25 probe. Heart defects were present in only 2/8 deletion patients: VSD/ASD and PS/AS. One N25 deletion patient was atypica; he has a tall, lanky habitus (height = 90%), and facies not characteristic of CVF. As expected, there is a trend to lower head size, smaller ear size, and more typical facies in deletion patients; however, four of the nondeletion patients also had a clinical diagnosis of VCF. Medially displaced carotid arteries were present in both groups, which is therefore not a diagnostic feature of microdeletion 22q11. Our findings indicate that the microdeletion 22q11 is frequent (26% in this series) in a population with VPI, even when not selected for typical facies. We believe this series supports the view that microdeletion 22q11 has a broader clinical phenotype than previously recognized.

  20. "Macho" Beliefs Moderate the Association Between Negative Sexual Episodes and Activation of Incompetence Schemas in Sexual Context, in Gay and Heterosexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Maria Manuela; Nobre, Pedro

    2017-04-01

    Despite the existence of conceptual models of sexual dysfunction based on cognitive theory, few studies have tested the role of vulnerability factors such as sexual beliefs as moderators of the activation of cognitive schemas in response to negative sexual events. To test the moderator role of dysfunctional sexual beliefs in the association between the frequency of negative sexual episodes and the activation of incompetence schemas in gay and heterosexual men. Five-hundred seventy-five men (287 gay, 288 heterosexual) who completed an online survey on cognitive-affective dimensions and sexual functioning were selected from a larger database. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to test the hypothesis that dysfunctional sexual beliefs moderate the association between the frequency of unsuccessful sexual episodes and the activation of incompetence schemas. Participants completed the Sexual Dysfunctional Beliefs Questionnaire and the Questionnaire of Cognitive Schemas Activated in Sexual Context. Findings indicated that men's ability for always being ready for sex, to satisfy the partner, and to maintain an erection until ending sexual activity constitute "macho" beliefs that moderate the activation of incompetence schemas when unsuccessful sexual events occur in gay and heterosexual men. In addition, activation of incompetence schemas in response to negative sexual events in gay men was moderated by the endorsement of conservative attitudes toward moderate sexuality. The main findings suggested that psychological interventions targeting dysfunctional sexual beliefs could help de-catastrophize the consequences of negative sexual events and facilitate sexual functioning. Despite being a web-based study, it represents the first attempt to test the moderator role of dysfunctional sexual beliefs in the association between the frequency of unsuccessful sexual episodes and the activation of incompetence schemas in gay and heterosexual men. Overall, findings

  1. INCOMPETENCE IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY - IT IS A BRAKE OF PROGRESS OR RAIDING IN THE FIELD OF RESEARCH SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Myamlin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The analysis of the prerequisite appearing of the unfair competition in the market of research services to prevent raiding in science. Methodology. During the conducting of this study methods of scientific analysis and synthesis, the benchmarking method, the method of expert estimations were used. Findings. Possible methods of uncompetitive struggle during the performing of scientific research were examined. The urgency of this problem was proved. Therefore, the problem of the prerequisite appearing for incompetence on the market of research services and the task of its prevention and minimization of adverse effects for the development of science and technique is relevant, especially in the period of formation and the reform of the leading branches of the Ukrainian economy. The prerequisite appearing and conditions for the existence of incompetence in scientific activity were analyzed. The classification of the main ways of raiding was proposed and its justification was proved. Originality. The investigation of the phenomenon of unfair competition in the field of research services was pro-posed. The methods and means of competition between scientific organizations and individual scientists in some fields of knowledge were analyzed. The concept of "raiding" was introduced for the first time in the intellectual sphere. Practical value. The research results can be used to analyze the activity of scientific and engineering organizations, which carry out various studies to assess the validity and legitimacy of the obtained results, and to prevent raiding in science. The results of the study have practical value for public and private organizations in the determination of the competent performers to conduct research and development services, including expertise, and especially related to the evaluation of material losses or lost earnings when the impartiality and independence of this assessment is the guarantee of obtaining the reliable and

  2. Dextranomer/hyaluronic acid bladder neck injection for persistent outlet incompetency after sling procedures in children with neurogenic urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaJusta, Daniel; Gargollo, Patricio; Snodgrass, Warren

    2013-06-01

    We report outcomes after dextranomer/hyaluronic acid (Dx/HA) bladder neck injection for persistent outlet incompetency despite prior sling or Leadbetter/Mitchell bladder neck revision plus sling (LMS) in children with neurogenic urinary incontinence. Consecutive patients with outlet incompetency after sling (n = 17) or LMS (n = 9) underwent a maximum of 2 Dx/HA injections. Antegrade and/or retrograde endoscopy was used to access the bladder outlet, and injection done in quadrants to achieve visual mucosal coaptation. Outcomes were described as either "dry", not requiring pads, or "wet". There were 24 children with follow-up after injection, of which 9 (38%) were initially dry and 15 (62%) remained wet. Of the 9 dry patients, 4 had recurrent incontinence at a mean of 16 months while 5 remained dry at a mean of 27 months. Second injections were done in a total of 14 children, with 1 dry at 39 months. Of all 24 children, up to 2 injections resulted in 6 (25%) dry patients, while the remainder was wet at last follow-up. Gender, initial outlet surgery, pre-injection pad use, injection technique, and volume injected did not predict outcomes. Dx/HA bladder neck injection resulted in dryness in 25% of patients in this series after failed sling or LMS. Second injections after either initial failure or success achieved dryness in only 7%, and are no longer recommended. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fissura palatina reparada: fechamento velofaríngeo antes e durante o som basal Cleft palate repair: velopharyngeal closure before and during the basal tone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giseane Conterno

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Portadores de fissura palatina apresentam inadequado fechamento velofaríngeo (FVF, com consequente hipernasalidade vocal que pode ser diminuída com o som basal. OBJETIVO: Comparar o FVF durante a realização do som basal com a emissão em registro modal, em pacientes com fissura palatina pós-forame reparada. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Estudo de Casos com quatro homens adultos, portadores de fissura palatina pós-forame reparada. Imagens do FVF por nasofaringoscopia, durante a emissão da vogal [a] em registro modal e basal. Julgamento das imagens realizado por quatro otorrinolaringologistas. RESULTADOS: Em três sujeitos, não houve mudança no tipo de FVF entre os registros analisados; as modificações que ocorreram na maioria dos sujeitos referem-se apenas ao grau de movimentação das estruturas envolvidas, pois, em registro basal, o movimento das paredes laterais da faringe se manteve, o movimento da parede posterior da faringe estabilizou, o movimento do véu palatino diminuiu discretamente, e a Prega de Passavant se evidenciou. CONCLUSÕES: O tipo de FVF se manteve em três dos quatro sujeitos analisados, quando comparado o registro modal com o basal, havendo modificações no grau da movimentação das estruturas envolvidas, evidenciando a Prega de Passavant.Patients with palatine fissure have inadequate velopharyngeal closure (VPC, with consequent vocal hypernasality which can be reduced by a basal tone. AIM: to compare VPC during a basal tone with the emission of a modal recording, in patients with repaired post-foramen palatine fissure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: case study with four adult men, all with repaired post-foramen palatine fissure. VPC images through nasal-pharyngoscopy during the emission o f the [a] vowel in a modal and basal recording. The images were studied by four ENTs. RESULTS: in three subjects there was no change in the type of VPC considering the recordings analyzed; the changes which happened to most of the subjects

  4. Combined treatment with compression therapy and ablation of incompetent superficial and perforating veins reduces ulcer recurrence in patients with CEAP 5 venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlander-Locke, Michael; Lawrence, Peter; Jimenez, Juan Carlos; Rigberg, David; DeRubertis, Brian; Gelabert, Hugh

    2012-02-01

    Patients with healed venous ulcers often experience recurrence of ulceration, despite the use of long-term compression therapy. This study examines the effect of closing incompetent superficial and/or perforating veins on ulcer recurrence rates in patients with CEAP 5 who have progressive lipodermatosclerosis and impending ulceration. Endovenous ablation was performed on patients with CEAP 5 disease and incompetent superficial and/or perforator veins and increasing lipodermatosclerosis and/or progressive malleolar pain. A minimum of 3 months of compressive therapy was attempted before endovenous ablation of incompetent veins. Demographic data, risk factors, CEAP classification, procedural details, and postoperative status were all recorded. Patients underwent duplex ultrasound scans before ablation to assess for deep, superficial, and perforator venous incompetence as well as postoperatively to confirm successful ablation. Twenty-eight endovenous ablation procedures (superficial = 19; perforator = 9) were performed on 20 patients (limbs = 21). The mean patient age was 73 years old (range, 45-93 years) and the mean body mass index was 29.5 (18.9-58.4). Ninety-five percent of patients previously wore compression stockings (20-30 mm Hg = 9; 30-40 mm Hg = 10; none = 1) for a mean time of 23.3 months (range, 3-52 months) since the prior ulcer healed. Indications for venous ablation were increasing malleolar pain (55%) and/or lipodermatosclerosis (70%). Technical success rates for the ablation procedures were 100% for superficial veins and 89% for perforators (96.4% overall). All patients underwent closure of at least one incompetent vein. Postoperatively, 95% of patients were compliant with wearing compression stockings (20-30 mm Hg = 8; 30-40 mm Hg = 11; none = 1). Ulcer recurrence rates were 0% at 6 months and 4.8% at 12 and 18 months. These data compare with prior studies showing an ulcer recurrence rate up to 67% at 12 months with compression alone. Patients with

  5. Patrones de cierre velofaringeo: Estudio comparativo entre población sana y pacientes con paladar hendido Patterns of velopharyngeal closure: comparative study between healthy population and patients with cleft palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Prada Madrid

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de este estudio es corroborar los patrones de cierre velofaríngeo descritos en la literatura y su frecuencia de aparición en una muestra no probabilística de voluntarios sanos, así como comparar estos hallazgos con los obtenidos en pacientes con paladar fisurado reparado quirúrgicamente. Diseñamos para ello un estudio descriptivo de corte transversal. Las valoraciones se realizaron en un hospital de cuarto nivel y en el Centro de Rehabilitación para Niños con Labio y Paladar Fisurado (FISULAB, en santa Fe de Bogotá (Colombia. Participaron en el estudio 100 voluntarios sanos estudiantes universitarios y 82 pacientes con paladar hendido reparado quirúrgicamente. Realizamos videonasofaringoscopia para determinar los patrones de cierre velofaríngeo presentes y su frecuencia de aparición. El análisis estadístico se realizó utilizando el Chi², encontrando que no existe diferencia en la frecuencia de presentación de los patrones de cierre entre los voluntarios sanos y los pacientes con paladar hendido. En pacientes sanos encontramos con mayor frecuencia el patrón circular (56% de la muestra, seguido por el coronal (29 % y el circular con rodete de Passavant (15 %. En los pacientes con paladar hendido, igualmente prevaleció el patrón circular (39.02 %, seguido del patrón coronal (24.39 % y el patrón circular con rodete de Passavant (19.51 %. En ninguno de los 2 grupos encontramos el patrón sagital. En conclusión, corroboramos la presentación de 3 de los 4 patrones de cierre velofaríngeo descritos en la literatura (circular, coronal, circular con rodete de Passavant, sin que existiera una diferencia estadística en la frecuencia de presentación de los patrones de cierre velofaríngeo entre los voluntarios sanos y los pacientes con hendidura palatina. No corroboramos la presentación del patrón sagital.The purpose of this study is to define the patterns of velopharyngeal closure described in the literature, and

  6. Formação continuada de professores e fracasso escolar: problematizando o argumento da incompetência Teacher continued education and school failure: problematizing the argument of incompetence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Trento Rebello de Souza

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo aborda o tema da formação docente, especialmente a formação continuada e sua relação com a baixa qualidade dos sistemas públicos de ensino; e apresenta análises de pesquisa sobre os principais programas educacionais implementados pelo governo do estado de São Paulo entre os anos 1982 e 1994. Além da análise documental, foi desenvolvida uma pesquisa empírica que incluiu um estudo de caso de um dos projetos de formação continuada idealizados à época da implementação da Escola Padrão (1991-1994. As análises da literatura educacional e dos programas educacionais indicam que a formação continuada de professores foi encarada como elemento estratégico para forjar a competência do professor. O texto segue registrando a presença de um discurso que tem sustentado a crescente importância atribuída à formação continuada de professores, projetos e ações que visam à melhoria da qualidade dos sistemas de ensino. Trata-se do argumento da incompetência que é então descrito e problematizado. São apresentadas as várias versões que tal argumento assume, de acordo com o contexto no qual comparece, bem como as diferentes apropriações feitas pelos vários atores envolvidos nas políticas de formação continuada, desde os idealizadores dos programas até os professores participantes. Advoga-se que o argumento da incompetência tem fundamentado concepções e práticas reducionistas e homogeneizantes da formação continuada. Reitera-se a importância de se considerar, nas políticas de formação continuada, a heterogeneidade que caracteriza o corpo docente e as escolas e de se desenvolverem políticas educacionais mais abrangentes que visem melhorar de fato a qualidade dos serviços educacionais e não apenas a competência de seus professores.This article deals with the theme of teacher education, especially with continued education and its relation with the low quality of public school systems. It presents

  7. Multidimensional voice outcomes after type I Gore-Tex thyroplasty in patients with nonparalytic glottic incompetence: a subgroup analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rupali N; Deal, Allison M; Buckmire, Robert A

    2013-07-01

    Nonparalytic glottic incompetence (GI) encompasses a variety of laryngeal pathologies, and vocal outcome data for this group is limited. We report a subgroup analysis of validated, subjective, and perceptual voice outcome measures: voice-related quality of life (VRQOL), Glottal Function Index (GFI), and GRBAS (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain), after type I Gore-Tex thyroplasty (GTP) in patients with vocal fold paresis (VFP), hypomobility, scar, and atrophy. Retrospective review. Forty-eight patients with nonparalytic GI treated with GTP were reviewed. Patients were grouped according to primary diagnosis: VFP (n=12), hypomobility (n=20), scar (n=7), and atrophy (n=9). Voice outcome measures (VRQOL, GFI, and GRBAS) obtained during the initial evaluation and the most recent follow-up were collected and analyzed. The median change in VRQOL was significant for each subgroup (all P<.03). Hypomobility and VFP patients demonstrated significantly improved GFI scores postoperatively (P=.0002 and .008, respectively); atrophy and scar groups did not. All groups, with the exception of scar patients (P=.13), showed significant improvement in perceptual scores. Increases in VRQOL moderately correlated with decreases in GFI (rho=-0.52). Regardless of etiology, patients with nonparalytic GI demonstrated improved subjective and perceptual measures following GTP. Although showing trends toward improvement, vocal fold scar patients performed worse than all other subgroups across all three voice outcome measures. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. A Comparative Study of Replication-Incompetent and -Competent Adenoviral Therapy-Mediated Immune Response in a Murine Glioma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Julius W; Miska, Jason; Young, Jacob S; Rashidi, Aida; Kane, J Robert; Panek, Wojciech K; Kanojia, Deepak; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2017-06-16

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a treatment approach with increasing clinical relevance, as indicated by the marked survival benefit seen in animal models and its current exploration in human patients with cancer. The use of an adenovirus vector for this therapeutic modality is common, has significant clinical benefit in animals, and its efficacy has recently been linked to an anti-tumor immune response that occurs following tumor antigen presentation. Here, we analyzed the adaptive immune system's response following viral infection by comparing replication-incompetent and replication-competent adenoviral vectors. Our findings suggest that cell death caused by replication-competent adenoviral vectors is required to induce a significant anti-tumor immune response and survival benefits in immunocompetent mice bearing intracranial glioma. We observed significant changes in the repertoire of immune cells in the brain and draining lymph nodes and significant recruitment of CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs) in response to oncolytic adenoviral therapy, suggesting the active role of the immune system in anti-tumor response. Our data suggest that the response to oncolytic virotherapy is accompanied by local and systemic immune responses and should be taken in consideration in the future design of the clinical studies evaluating oncolytic virotherapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).

  9. Embolization of Incompetent Pelvic Veins for the Treatment of Recurrent Varicose Veins in Lower Limbs and Pelvic Congestion Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneses, Luis, E-mail: lmeneseq@gmail.com; Fava, Mario; Diaz, Pia; Andia, Marcelo [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Radiology Department and Biomedical Imaging Center (Chile); Tejos, Cristian; Irarrazabal, Pablo [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Biomedical Imaging Center (Chile); Uribe, Sergio, E-mail: suribe@med.puc.cl [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Radiology Department and Biomedical Imaging Center (Chile)

    2013-02-15

    We present our experience with embolization of incompetent pelvic veins (IPV) in women with recurrence of varicose veins (VV) in lower limbs, as well as symptoms of pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS), after first surgery. In addition, we evaluated the effects of embolization in decreasing the symptoms of VV before surgery as well as its effects on PCS symptoms. We included 10 women who had consulted a vascular surgeon because of recurrent VV in lower limbs after surgery. All of these patients were included in the study because they also had symptoms of PCS, probably due to IPV. In patients who had confirmed IPV, we performed embolization before a second surgery. VV and PCS were assessed before and at 3 months after embolization (before the second surgery) using a venous clinical severity score (VCSS) and a visual analog pain scale (VAS), respectively. Patients were controlled between 3 and 6 months after embolization. Paired Student t test analysis was used for comparing data before and after embolization. Fifteen vein segments in 10 women were suitable for embolization. There was a significant (p < 0.001) decrease of VCSS after embolization, and recurrence of VV was not detected within a period of 6 months. There was also significant (p < 0.01) relief of chronic pelvic pain related to PCS evaluated using VAS at 3 months after embolization. Embolization decreases the risk of VV recurrence after surgery and also improves PCS symptoms in women with VV in lower limbs and IPV.

  10. Embolization of Incompetent Pelvic Veins for the Treatment of Recurrent Varicose Veins in Lower Limbs and Pelvic Congestion Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneses, Luis; Fava, Mario; Diaz, Pía; Andía, Marcelo; Tejos, Cristian; Irarrazabal, Pablo; Uribe, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    We present our experience with embolization of incompetent pelvic veins (IPV) in women with recurrence of varicose veins (VV) in lower limbs, as well as symptoms of pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS), after first surgery. In addition, we evaluated the effects of embolization in decreasing the symptoms of VV before surgery as well as its effects on PCS symptoms. We included 10 women who had consulted a vascular surgeon because of recurrent VV in lower limbs after surgery. All of these patients were included in the study because they also had symptoms of PCS, probably due to IPV. In patients who had confirmed IPV, we performed embolization before a second surgery. VV and PCS were assessed before and at 3 months after embolization (before the second surgery) using a venous clinical severity score (VCSS) and a visual analog pain scale (VAS), respectively. Patients were controlled between 3 and 6 months after embolization. Paired Student t test analysis was used for comparing data before and after embolization. Fifteen vein segments in 10 women were suitable for embolization. There was a significant (p < 0.001) decrease of VCSS after embolization, and recurrence of VV was not detected within a period of 6 months. There was also significant (p < 0.01) relief of chronic pelvic pain related to PCS evaluated using VAS at 3 months after embolization. Embolization decreases the risk of VV recurrence after surgery and also improves PCS symptoms in women with VV in lower limbs and IPV.

  11. A Comparative Study of Replication-Incompetent and -Competent Adenoviral Therapy-Mediated Immune Response in a Murine Glioma Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius W. Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy is a treatment approach with increasing clinical relevance, as indicated by the marked survival benefit seen in animal models and its current exploration in human patients with cancer. The use of an adenovirus vector for this therapeutic modality is common, has significant clinical benefit in animals, and its efficacy has recently been linked to an anti-tumor immune response that occurs following tumor antigen presentation. Here, we analyzed the adaptive immune system’s response following viral infection by comparing replication-incompetent and replication-competent adenoviral vectors. Our findings suggest that cell death caused by replication-competent adenoviral vectors is required to induce a significant anti-tumor immune response and survival benefits in immunocompetent mice bearing intracranial glioma. We observed significant changes in the repertoire of immune cells in the brain and draining lymph nodes and significant recruitment of CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs in response to oncolytic adenoviral therapy, suggesting the active role of the immune system in anti-tumor response. Our data suggest that the response to oncolytic virotherapy is accompanied by local and systemic immune responses and should be taken in consideration in the future design of the clinical studies evaluating oncolytic virotherapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM.

  12. Fidelity in Animal Modeling: Prerequisite for a Mechanistic Research Front Relevant to the Inflammatory Incompetence of Acute Pediatric Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory incompetence is characteristic of acute pediatric protein-energy malnutrition, but its underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Perhaps substantially because the research front lacks the driving force of a scholarly unifying hypothesis, it is adrift and research activity is declining. A body of animal-based research points to a unifying paradigm, the Tolerance Model, with some potential to offer coherence and a mechanistic impetus to the field. However, reasonable skepticism prevails regarding the relevance of animal models of acute pediatric malnutrition; consequently, the fundamental contributions of the animal-based component of this research front are largely overlooked. Design-related modifications to improve the relevance of animal modeling in this research front include, most notably, prioritizing essential features of pediatric malnutrition pathology rather than dietary minutiae specific to infants and children, selecting windows of experimental animal development that correspond to targeted stages of pediatric immunological ontogeny, and controlling for ontogeny-related confounders. In addition, important opportunities are presented by newer tools including the immunologically humanized mouse and outbred stocks exhibiting a magnitude of genetic heterogeneity comparable to that of human populations. Sound animal modeling is within our grasp to stimulate and support a mechanistic research front relevant to the immunological problems that accompany acute pediatric malnutrition. PMID:27077845

  13. Cystoscopic injections of dextranomer hyaluronic acid into proximal urethra for urethral incompetence: efficacy and adverse outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightner, Deborah J; Fox, Janelle; Klingele, Christopher

    2010-06-01

    To determine whether dextranomer/hyaluronic acid would be more efficacious or would produce fewer complications when using the material in a standard proximal-urethra cystoscopically-directed injection technique. Injectable periurethral bulking agents are an alternative to stress incontinence surgery. Dextranomer, a highly hydrophilic dextran polymer, solubilized in a base of nonanimal stabilized hyaluronic acid, has been approved as an injectable agent for the treatment of childhood vesicoureteric reflux (Deflux, Q-Med AB, Uppsala, Sweden), and in Europe for women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) (Zuidex, Q-Med AB, Uppsala, Sweden). A previous multicenter trial demonstrated nonequivalence compared with bovine glutaraldehyde cross-linked collagen with a high complication rate. We sought to determine whether the failure of the treatment lay in the material itself or the use of a blind, midurethral injection technique. A retrospective case series of 56 patients undergoing cystoscopically guided bladder neck injections of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid with follow-up in 42, included 35 women with intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD), 4 men with postprostatectomy incontinence, 2 men with sphincteric denervation secondary to spinal cord injury, and 1 woman with sphincteric failure after a neobladder. Outcome assessment used gender-appropriate International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire, clinical records, and/or urodynamic assessment. Of 35 women with ISD, 4 developed pseudoabscess formation with outlet obstruction requiring multiple operative interventions. Patient-defined treatment failure occurred in all 4 carefully selected postprostatectomy incontinent men, and in 23 of 35 females with ISD. Complications with cystoscopically injected dextranomer hyaluronic acid at the bladder neck occurred at a high rate, and using a validated questionnaire, the efficacy of dextranomer hyaluronic acid applied in this manner for ISD was poor. Copyright (c) 2010

  14. Short-term results of isolated phlebectomy with preservation of incompetent great saphenous vein (ASVAL procedure) in primary varicose veins disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotukhin, Igor A; Seliverstov, Evgeny I; Zakharova, Elena A; Kirienko, Alexander I

    2017-10-01

    Objective To establish an effect of isolated phlebectomy in patients with incompetent great saphenous vein (Ambulatory Selective Varices Ablation under Local anesthesia (ASVAL) procedure) on the reflux and diameter of the trunk and to assess recurrence rate of varicose veins at one year. Material and methods We conducted a prospective study on patients with primary varicose veins and with C2 or C2,3 or C2,3,4 or C2,4 classes of chronic venous disease and great saphenous vein incompetence. The study included 67 patients (51 women and 16 men; 75 limbs in total). Age varied from 17 to 71 years; mean age was 46.8 years (SD 13.9). We recorded the presence or absence of reflux in the great saphenous vein with duplex ultrasound before and after surgery. The recurrence of varicose veins was evaluated at 12 months. All the patients underwent isolated phlebectomy with preservation of incompetent great saphenous vein (ASVAL procedure) under local anesthesia. Results At one year after removing of tributaries of the incompetent trunk, 66% of them were competent. Reflux persisted in 17% of great saphenous veins with reflux above mid-thigh and in 61% of trunks with reflux extended below the mid-thigh (p = 0.0004). The diameter of all the veins decreased significantly no matter reflux disappeared or not. Varicose veins reoccurred in 13.5% cases. In 6.5% of limbs with a reflux above the mid-thigh, the recurrence was registered at one year, while in the limbs with the reflux below the mid-thigh at a baseline, the recurrence rate was 25% (p = 0.036). Conclusion Isolated phlebectomy with a preservation of incompetent great saphenous vein leads to disappearance of reflux in a majority of cases and to significant decrease of vein diameter in all the cases. ASVAL procedure could be considered as a less aggressive and less expensive approach in selected cases. Clear indications for isolated phlebectomy need to be established.

  15. Chronotropic incompetence in Chagas disease: effectiveness of blended sensor (volume/minute and accelerometer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes Junior, Antonio da Silva; Silva, Aline Pereira da; Profahl, Giovana Gurian Batista; Ottobeli, Catarine; Louzeiro, Jutay Fernando Silva

    2015-01-01

    Technological progress of pacemakers has allowed the association of two or more sensors in one heart rate system response. The accelerometer sensor measures the intensity of the activity; it has a relatively rapid response to the beginning of it, however, it may present insufficient response to less strenuous or of less impact exercise. The minute ventilation sensor changes the pacing rate in response to changes in respiratory frequency in relation to tidal volume, allowing responses to situations of emotional stress and low impact exercises. To evaluate the cardiorespiratory response of the accelerometer with respect to the blended sensor (BS=accelerometer sensor+minute ventilation sensor) to exercise in chagasic patients undergoing cardiopulmonary exercise test. This was a prospective, observational, randomized, cross-sectional study. Patients who met the inclusion criteria were selected. The maximum heart rate of the sensor was programmed by age (220-age). The results were analyzed through t test with paired samples (Psensor and the blended sensor, however, metabolic equivalent in the blended sensor was higher than the expected, all data with Psensor provided a physiological electrical sequence when compared to the accelerometer sensor, providing better physical fitness test in cardiopulmonary hemodynamics and greater efficiency.

  16. Embolization of incompetent pelvic veins for the treatment of recurrent varicose veins in lower limbs and pelvic congestion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Luis; Fava, Mario; Diaz, Pía; Andía, Marcelo; Tejos, Cristian; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Irarrazabal, Pablo; Uribe, Sergio

    2013-02-01

    We present our experience with embolization of incompetent pelvic veins (IPV) in women with recurrence of varicose veins (VV) in lower limbs, as well as symptoms of pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS), after first surgery. In addition, we evaluated the effects of embolization in decreasing the symptoms of VV before surgery as well as its effects on PCS symptoms. We included 10 women who had consulted a vascular surgeon because of recurrent VV in lower limbs after surgery. All of these patients were included in the study because they also had symptoms of PCS, probably due to IPV. In patients who had confirmed IPV, we performed embolization before a second surgery. VV and PCS were assessed before and at 3 months after embolization (before the second surgery) using a venous clinical severity score (VCSS) and a visual analog pain scale (VAS), respectively. Patients were controlled between 3 and 6 months after embolization. Paired Student t test analysis was used for comparing data before and after embolization. Fifteen vein segments in 10 women were suitable for embolization. There was a significant (p < 0.001) decrease of VCSS after embolization, and recurrence of VV was not detected within a period of 6 months. There was also significant (p < 0.01) relief of chronic pelvic pain related to PCS evaluated using VAS at 3 months after embolization. Embolization decreases the risk of VV recurrence after surgery and also improves PCS symptoms in women with VV in lower limbs and IPV.

  17. Investigation into The Effect of Arabic Incompetence on The Students’ Performance in Islamic Studies in Ibadan South-East Of Oyo State In Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazeem Adekunle Adegoke

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study investigated the effect of incompetence in Arabic language on students’ performances in Islamic studies in the selected senior secondary schools in Ibadan South-East Local Government Area of Oyo State, Nigeria. The main objective of this study was to ascertain the argument that the poor performance of senior secondary students in Islamic studies is as a result of incompetence and non-proficiency in Arabic language on the side of learners and teachers. The methodology employed in this study was the quantitative approach. Location of the study was Ibadan South-East Local Government Area of Oyo State. Teachers of Islamic studies and students were randomly selected using the stratified random sampling technique from six senior secondary schools. The data gathered were analysed using simple percentages and chi-square statistical analysis. The findings revealed that significant number of students in Senior Secondary School’s poor performance in Islamic studies was due to their incompetence in Arabic as a result of their lack of exposure to the Arabic language and their poor background in Arabic from the previous classes. It also revealed that some of their teachers in Islamic studies were not competent in Arabic reading and writing. Abstrak Penelitian ini menginvestigasi efek ketidakmampuan bahasa Arab terhadap kinerja siswa studi Islam di sekolah-sekolah menengah atas terpilih di Ibadan Tenggara, di Area Pemerintahan Daerah Negara Oyo, Nigeria. Tujuan utama penelitian ini untuk menegaskan argumen bahwa buruknya kinerja siswa sekolah menengah atas pada studi Islam adalah akibat dari ketidakmampuan dan ketidakmahiran bahasa Arab pada peserta didik dan guru. Metode penelitian pendekatan kuantitatif. Lokasi penelitian adalah di Area Pemerintah Daerah Ibadan Tenggara Negara Oyo. Guru dan siswa program studi Islam dipilih secara acak menggunakan teknik stratified random sampling dari enam sekolah menengah atas. Data yang terkumpul

  18. Left ventricular dimensions during isometric exercise in aortic valve incompetence assessed by M-mode echocardiography and gated equilibrium radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundstroem, K.; Huikuri, H.; Korhonen, U.; Ikaeheimo, M.; Torniainen, P.; Heikkilae, J.; Linnaluoto, M.; Takkunen, J.; Oulu Univ.; Oulu Univ.

    1989-01-01

    We compared M-mode echocardiographic and gated equilibrium radionuclide angiography assessment of the left ventricular (LV) dimensions at rest and during isometric exercise in 18 patients with chronic aortic valve incompetence. The two methods showed a satisfactory correlation when comparing LV size at rest and during exercise (LV end-diastolic dimension in echocardiography vs LV end-diastolic volume in radionuclide angiography, r=0.80, P<0.01 at rest and r=0.81, P<0.01 during exercise; LV end-systolic dimension in echocardiography vs LV end-systolic volume in radionuclide angiography, r=0.81, P<0.01 at rest and r=0.75; P<0.01 during exercise), but fractional shortening in echocardiography and ejection fraction in radionuclide angiography did not correlate (r=0.27, not significant (NS) at rest and r=0.34, NS during exercise). Thus echocardiography and radionuclide angiography describe LV dimensions at rest and during handgrip exercise in a similar fashion, documenting the concordance of these noninvasive methods to describe LV size in aortic incompetence at rest and during exercise. (orig.)

  19. Public health officials and MECs should be held liable for harm caused to patients through incompetence, indifference, maladministration or negligence regarding the availability of hospital equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuoid-Mason, David Jan

    2016-06-17

    There have been several reports of state hospitals not having functional equipment such as radiological equipment. Where these are due to incompetence, Indifference, maladministration or negligence by the public officials concerned, they may be held personally liable for the resulting harm to patients. However, the courts have often observed that where the State has been sued vicariously for the wrongs of public officials, it has not obtained reimbursement from the offending official. It has therefore been suggested that irresponsible public servants should be sued in their personal capacity (in addition to the State), to prevent taxpayers always having to pay for their misdeeds. If an individual public official cannot afford to pay all the damages awarded, the injured party can recover the balance from the State by citing it as a vicarious joint wrongdoer.

  20. Influencia del sobrepase y la incompetencia bilabial como factores predisponentes de traumatismos dentoalveolares Influence of overpass and the bilabial incompetence like predisposing factors of dentoalveolar traumata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarisleydis Pérez Cordero

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available En un 95 % de los casos que presentan vestibuloversión de incisivos superiores con incompetencia bilabial, originada fundamentalmente por hábitos bucales deformantes, está presente el traumatismo dentoalveolar. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo de corte transversal sobre los traumatismos dentoalveolares en un grupo de pacientes de edades comprendidas entre 0 y 15 años, durante los meses de enero a diciembre del año 2009, en el Policlínico Universitario "Antonio Pulido Humarán", La Habana, Cuba. El propósito fue relacionar el sobrepase dentario anterior y la competencia labial con los traumatismos dentoalveolares. La información se obtuvo a través del interrogatorio y por el método de la observación, mediante los exámenes clínico y radiográfico. Se encontró que la mayor presencia de traumatismos dentales estuvo en los pacientes afectados por maloclusiones (76,8 %, y dentro de ellas se encontró un sobrepase de un tercio de la corona en 47,2 % de los pacientes. El trauma de mayor aparición fue la fractura coronaria no complicada (46,6 %. En cuanto a la relación bilabial se observó el predominio de la incompetencia labial en pacientes con traumas dentarios portadores de maloclusiones. Los dientes más afectados fueron los incisivos centrales superiores.In the 95 % of cases presenting vestibuloversion of upper incisors with bilabial incompetence provoked mainly due to deforming oral habits, it is present the dentoalveolar trauma. To relate the anterior dental overpass, the labial incompetence according to the tooth involved as well as to assess the potential relation between the types of dentoalveolar traumata suffered, according the dental overpass and the bilabial relation, a cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted on the dentoalveolar traumata in a group of patient aged between 1 and 15 from January to December, 2009 in the "Antonio Pulido Humarán" University Polyclinic, La Habana, Cuba. Information was gathered

  1. Evaluation of seasonal influenza vaccines for H1N1pdm09 and type B viruses based on a replication-incompetent PB2-KO virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Hiroki; Yamayoshi, Seiya; Uraki, Ryuta; Kiso, Maki; Oishi, Kohei; Murakami, Shin; Mimori, Shigetaka; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2017-04-04

    Vaccination is the first line of protection against influenza virus infection in humans. Although inactivated and live-attenuated vaccines are available, each vaccine has drawbacks in terms of immunogenicity and safety. To overcome these issues, our group has developed a replication-incompetent PB2-knockout (PB2-KO) influenza virus that replicates only in PB2-expressing cells. Here we generated PB2-KO viruses possessing the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) segments from H1N1pdm09 or type B viruses and tested their vaccine potential. The two PB2-KO viruses propagated efficiently in PB2-expressing cells, and expressed chimeric HA as expected. Virus-specific IgG and IgA antibodies were detected in mice immunized with the viruses, and the immunized mice showed milder clinical signs and/or lower virus replication levels in the respiratory tract upon virus challenge. Our results indicate that these PB2-KO viruses have potential as vaccine candidates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Suppression of leaky expression of adenovirus genes by insertion of microRNA-targeted sequences in the replication-incompetent adenovirus vector genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahori Shimizu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaky expression of adenovirus (Ad genes occurs following transduction with a conventional replication-incompetent Ad vector, leading to an induction of cellular immunity against Ad proteins and Ad protein-induced toxicity, especially in the late phase following administration. To suppress the leaky expression of Ad genes, we developed novel Ad vectors by incorporating four tandem copies of sequences with perfect complementarity to miR-122a or miR-142-3p into the 3′-untranslated region (UTR of the E2A, E4, or pIX gene, which were mainly expressed from the Ad vector genome after transduction. These Ad vectors easily grew to high titers comparable to those of a conventional Ad vector in conventional 293 cells. The leaky expression of these Ad genes in mouse organs was significantly suppressed by 2- to 100-fold, compared with a conventional Ad vector, by insertion of the miRNA-targeted sequences. Notably, the Ad vector carrying the miR-122a–targeted sequences into the 3′-UTR of the E4 gene expressed higher and longer-term transgene expression and more than 20-fold lower levels of all the Ad early and late genes examined in the liver than a conventional Ad vector. miR-122a–mediated suppression of the E4 gene expression in the liver significantly reduced the hepatotoxicity which an Ad vector causes via both adaptive and non-adaptive immune responses.

  3. Stress Management: Job Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Job stress can be all-consuming — but it doesn't have to be. Address your triggers, keep perspective and know when ... effects of stress at work. Effectively coping with job stress can benefit both your professional and personal ...

  4. Cloning of replication-incompetent herpes simplex viruses as bacterial artificial chromosomes to facilitate development of vectors for gene delivery into differentiated neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeisser, Falko; Weir, Jerry P

    2006-01-01

    We have previously described the adaptation of a tetracycline-regulated system of gene expression for herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors and demonstrated that such a system was capable of inducible foreign gene expression in irreversibly differentiated neurons. These studies suggested that such gene delivery vectors would be especially useful for studying the neuron in vitro. Here, we describe the cloning of a replication-incompetent HSV vector as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) to facilitate vector construction. Using prokaryotic genetic techniques for allele replacement, we demonstrate the ease of manipulation of the BAC-containing vector, including the construction of vector mutations for which there is no simple phenotypic selection. Such constructions include the insertion of a tetracycline-regulated gene cassette into the UL41 gene for regulated gene expression and the mutation of the UL48 gene to reduce vector toxicity. In addition, HSV vectors cloned as BACs can be sequentially modified to make multiple changes to the vector platform. Finally, using the BAC system, we constructed an HSV vector that expressed an inducible human superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) gene for delivery into differentiated human NT-neurons (cells of the human embryonal carcinoma cell line NT2, which differentiate irreversibly into postmitotic neuron-like cells after treatment with retinoic acid). The results indicated that there is appreciable expression of SOD1 from this HSV vector in the presence of doxycycline and that vector-expressed SOD1 interacts with endogenous SOD1. Thus, the BAC system provides a practicable platform for construction and manipulation of HSV vectors that are suitable for gene delivery into postmitotic neurons in vitro.

  5. Which endovenous ablation method does offer a better long-term technical success in the treatment of the incompetent great saphenous vein? Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Renata; Farics, Akos; Parti, Krisztina; Vizsy, Laszlo; Batorfi, Jozsef; Menyhei, Gabor; Balint, Istvan B

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this review article was to evaluate the long-term technical success rates of the known endovenous ablation procedures in the treatment of the incompetence of the great saphenous vein. A literature search was conducted in the PubMed-database until the 5 January 2016. All publications with four to five years follow-up were eligible. Meta-analysis was performed by the IVhet-model. Eight hundred and sixty-two unique publications were found; 17 of them were appropriate for meta-analysis. Overall, 1420 limbs were included in the trial, 939 for endovenous laser ablation, 353 for radiofrequency ablation and 128 for ultrasound guided foam sclerotherapy. Overall, technical success rates were 84.8% for endovenous laser ablation, 88.7% for radiofrequency ablation and 32.8% for ultrasound guided foam sclerotherapy. There were no significant differences between endovenous laser ablation, radiofrequency ablation and ultrasound guided foam sclerotherapy regarding the great saphenous vein reopening (p = 0.66; OR: 0.22; 95% of CI: 0.08-0.62 for radiofrequency ablation vs. endovenous laser ablation; p = 0.96; OR: 0.11; 95% of CI: 0.06-0.20 for endovenous laser ablation vs. ultrasound guided foam sclerotherapy; p = 0.93; OR: 3.20; 95% of CI: 0.54-18.90 for ultrasound guided foam sclerotherapy vs. radiofrequency ablation). Both endovenous laser ablation and radiofrequency ablation are efficient in great saphenous vein occlusion on the long term. Lacking long-conducted large trials, the efficacy and reliability of ultrasound guided foam sclerotherapy to treat great saphenous vein-reflux is not affirmed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. "Rising to the Level of Your Incompetence": Exploring What Physicians' Self-Assessment of Their Performance Reveals About the Impact of the Imposter Syndrome in Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDonna, Kori A; Ginsburg, Shiphra; Watling, Christopher

    2017-11-07

    Mistakes are ubiquitous in medicine; when confronted by error, physicians may experience anxiety, guilt, and self-doubt. Feedback may be useful for navigating these feelings, but only if it matches a physician's self-assessment; self-doubt and the imposter syndrome are examples of inaccurate self-assessments that may affect receptivity to feedback. The impact of real or imagined underperformance on seemingly competent physicians is poorly understood. This study aimed to develop a deeper understanding in order to identify strategies to support all physicians who struggle. In 2015, 28 practicing physicians were interviewed about their experiences with underperformance at an academic institution in Canada. Early in the data collection process, participants spontaneously identified the imposter syndrome as a feature of their experiences; questions about the imposter syndrome were probed in subsequent interviews. Many participants-even those at advanced career stages-questioned the validity of their achievements; progressive independence and career advancement were variably experienced as "rising to the level of your incompetence." Not all participants identified as imposters; the imposter syndrome occurred at the extreme end of a spectrum of self-doubt. Even positive feedback could not buffer participants' insecurities, which participants rarely shared with their colleagues. Self-doubt variably affects clinicians at all career stages. Frequent transitions may cause a resurgence of self-doubt that may affect feedback credibility. Medical educators must recognize that it is not just the underperforming or failing learners who struggle and require support, and medical culture must create space for physicians to share their struggles.

  7. Stress Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management By Mayo Clinic Staff Stress basics Stress is a normal psychological and physical ... of life. Start practicing stress management techniques today. Stress relief The pace and challenges of modern life ...

  8. Childhood Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Childhood Stress KidsHealth / For Parents / Childhood Stress What's in this ... and feel stress to some degree. Sources of Stress Stress is a function of the demands placed ...

  9. Parenting Stress of Parents of Adolescents with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Judith; Biondic, Daniella; Grimbos, Teresa; Herbert, Monique

    2016-04-01

    This study examined parenting stress among parents of adolescents with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The sample comprised 138 adolescents (84 ADHD, 52 boys, 32 girls; 54 non-ADHD, 24 boys, 30 girls) age 13 to 18 and their parents. Mothers (n = 135) and fathers (n = 98) of participating teens completed the Stress Index for Parents of Adolescents. Mothers and fathers of adolescents with ADHD reported more stress than parents of adolescents without ADHD with regard to their children's challenging behaviors (Adolescent domain stress). Mothers of adolescents with ADHD also reported that they experienced elevated levels of stress in terms of role restrictions, feelings of social alienation, conflict with their partner, feelings of guilt and incompetence (Parent domain stress), and relationship with their children (Adolescent-Parent Relationship domain stress; APR). The extent to which clinical levels of adolescent Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) symptoms or externalizing behavior in general were associated with parenting stress depended on the rater of these behaviors. Parenting stress was associated with higher levels of ODD and other externalizing behaviors when these behaviors were rated by parents but not when they were rated by teachers. In addition, over and above adolescent ADHD classification, mothers' self-reported ADHD symptoms were associated with higher parenting stress in the Adolescent and Parent domains, and fathers' self-reported ADHD symptoms were associated with lower APR stress. The results suggest directions that should be considered for addressing parenting stress when designing interventions for families of adolescents with ADHD.

  10. Critical significance of the region between Helix 1 and 2 for efficient dominant-negative inhibition by conversion-incompetent prion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzuru Taguchi

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are fatal infectious neurodegenerative disorders in man and animals associated with the accumulation of the pathogenic isoform PrP(Sc of the host-encoded prion protein (PrP(c. A profound conformational change of PrP(c underlies formation of PrP(Sc and prion propagation involves conversion of PrP(c substrate by direct interaction with PrP(Sc template. Identifying the interfaces and modalities of inter-molecular interactions of PrPs will highly advance our understanding of prion propagation in particular and of prion-like mechanisms in general. To identify the region critical for inter-molecular interactions of PrP, we exploited here dominant-negative inhibition (DNI effects of conversion-incompetent, internally-deleted PrP (ΔPrP on co-expressed conversion-competent PrP. We created a series of ΔPrPs with different lengths of deletions in the region between first and second α-helix (H1∼H2 which was recently postulated to be of importance in prion species barrier and PrP fibril formation. As previously reported, ΔPrPs uniformly exhibited aberrant properties including detergent insolubility, limited protease digestion resistance, high-mannose type N-linked glycans, and intracellular localization. Although formerly controversial, we demonstrate here that ΔPrPs have a GPI anchor attached. Surprisingly, despite very similar biochemical and cell-biological properties, DNI efficiencies of ΔPrPs varied significantly, dependant on location and inversely correlated with the size of deletion. This data demonstrates that H1∼H2 and the region C-terminal to it are critically important for efficient DNI. It also suggests that this region is involved in PrP-PrP interaction and conversion of PrP(C into PrP(Sc. To reconcile the paradox of how an intracellular PrP can exert DNI, we demonstrate that ΔPrPs are subject to both proteasomal and lysosomal/autophagic degradation pathways. Using autophagy pathways ΔPrPs obtain access to the locale

  11. Prognóstico da incompetência cronotrópica em idosos diabéticos à ecocardiografia sob estresse físico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Silva Santana

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A incompetência cronotrópica (IC, definida como a incapacidade de atingir no esforço 80% da frequência de reserva esperada para a idade, é um fator preditor de mortalidade e eventos cardiovasculares e pode conferir pior prognóstico a grupos em expansão devido ao acelerado processo de envelhecimento populacional, como em idosos diabéticos. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o valor prognóstico da IC em idosos diabéticos considerando desfechos com infarto agudo do miocárdio (IAM, doença cerebrovascular (DCV e óbito geral, e comparar características clínicas e ecocardiográficas entre os que têm IC e os que não têm. MÉTODO: Foram estudados 298 pacientes idosos e diabéticos submetidos a ecocardiografia de estresse sob esforço físico (EF, de janeiro de 2001 a dezembro de 2010. Destes, 109 eram incompetentes cronotrópicos, grupo G1, e foram comparados aos competentes, grupo G2, quanto à ocorrência de eventos cardiovasculares, características clínicas e ecocardiográficas. RESULTADOS: O grupo G1, em relação ao grupo controle, apresentou maior frequência de DCV (9,2% × 3,2; p = 0,027 e maior frequência de óbito para aqueles que sofreram DCV ou IAM. Angina típica e dispneia prévias à realização da EF e sexo masculino foram mais frequentes no G1. A análise das variáveis ecocardiográficas demonstrou que o índice do escore de motilidade do ventrículo esquerdo (IEMVE de repouso e de esforço, o índice de massa do VE (ventrículo esquerdo e o diâmetro do AE (átrio esquerdo foram maiores entre os incompetentes cronotrópicos. CONCLUSÃO: A IC foi associada, de forma independente, à ocorrência de DCV em idosos diabéticos

  12. Stress and perceived faculty support among foreign-born baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junious, DeMonica L; Malecha, Ann; Tart, Kathryn; Young, Anne

    2010-05-01

    Using the triangulation approach at the method level, this study explored and described the essence of stress and perceived faculty support as identified by foreign-born students (N = 10) enrolled in a generic baccalaureate degree nursing program. Philosophical principles outlined by Heidegger served as the core component guiding this study. Quantitative data from a larger study examining nursing students' stress and perceptions of faculty support served as the supplementary component. Results uncovered an overarching theme of the foreign-born nursing students wanting to be valued and accepted by the nursing faculty, their classmates, and the educational institution leading to patterns of stress, strain, and cultural ignorance. Language issues, stereotyping, discrimination, cultural incompetence, financial issues, and lack of accommodation as an international student were stressors that were not captured by the quantitative measures.

  13. Toward the Prevention of Incompetence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J. McVicker

    The mental health of the citizens of a community is in part dependent upon their ability to join in and obtain the rewards of the fulfilled life of a competent member of society. This has been very difficult for the disadvantaged to accomplish because their backgrounds have been one of deprivation and their opportunities have been limited. But the…

  14. Stress Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Chronic stress can wreak havoc on your mind and body. Take steps to control your stress. By Mayo Clinic ... your life. Your reaction to a potentially stressful event is different from anyone else's. How you react ...

  15. Stress Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress incontinence Overview Urinary incontinence is the unintentional loss of urine. Stress incontinence happens when physical movement or activity — such ... coughing, sneezing, running or heavy lifting — puts pressure (stress) on your bladder. Stress incontinence is not related ...

  16. Manage Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Manage Stress Print This Topic En español Manage Stress Browse Sections The Basics Overview Signs and Health ... and Health Effects What are the signs of stress? When people are under stress, they may feel: ...

  17. Caregiver Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home A-Z Health Topics Caregiver stress Caregiver stress > A-Z Health Topics Caregiver fact sheet (PDF, ... receive Publications email updates Enter email Submit Caregiver stress Caregivers care for someone with an illness, injury, ...

  18. Articulação compensatória associada à fissura de palato ou disfunção velofaríngea: revisão de literatura Compensatory articulation associated to cleft palate or velopharyngeal dysfunction: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Cristina de Castro Marino

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: articulação compensatória na fissura palatina. OBJETIVO: contribuir para o aprofundamento de informações sobre os tipos de articulação compensatória descritos na literatura e, ainda, discutir as implicações e contribuições da avaliação clínica e instrumental na identificação destas produções. CONCLUSÃO: as articulações compensatórias merecem a atenção de clínicos e pesquisadores que atuam no Brasil, já que estas alterações são encontradas com grande freqüência em crianças e adultos com fissura palatina ou disfunção velofaríngea, o que compromete a qualidade de vida destes sujeitos. Os fonoaudiólogos devem aprofundar seus conhecimentos sobre os tipos de articulação compensatória e os procedimentos de avaliação, bem como devem estabelecer programas preventivos que favoreçam a aquisição fonológica sem o desenvolvimento dessas compensações.BACKGROUND: compensatory articulation in cleft lip and palate. PURPOSE: to contribute with information regarding the types of compensatory articulation described in the literature and discuss the implications and contributions of clinical and instrumental evaluation of these speech productions. CONCLUSION: compensatory articulation deserves attention from Brazilian physicians and researchers, since that these productions occur in children and adults with cleft palate and velopharyngeal dysfunction, compromising their speech intelligibility and consequently quality of their lives. Speech-language pathologists need to improve knowledge regarding different types of compensatory articulation and also on the procedures for evaluating these productions, in order to settle preventive programs that favor phonological acquisition in children with cleft palate without developing compensatory articulation.

  19. Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH HEAT STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir NEW OSHA- ... hot environments may be at risk of heat stress. Exposure to extreme heat can result in occupational ...

  20. Cold Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  1. Stress Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress fractures Overview Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by repetitive force, often from overuse — such as repeatedly jumping up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of ...

  2. Parental stress and dyadic consensus in early parenthood among mothers and fathers in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widarsson, Margareta; Engström, Gabriella; Berglund, Anders; Tydén, Tanja; Lundberg, Pranee

    2014-12-01

    Parental stress can negatively affect the parent-child relationship and reduce the well-being of the whole family. Family disagreement is associated with parental divorce and with psychological problems in children. The aim was to examine perceived parental stress and draw comparisons among mothers and among fathers, in relation to educational level, parental experience, existence of a parental role model and sense of coherence. The aim was also to examine perceived dyadic consensus and its association with perceived parental stress within couples. Questionnaires were completed by 320 mothers and 315 fathers at 1 week and 18 months post-partum. The Swedish Parenthood Stress Questionnaire, the Sense of Coherence Scale and the Dyadic Consensus Subscale were used. Low education, lack of a role model and poor sense of coherence promoted stress in mothers in the subareas social isolation and spouse relationship problems, while lack of a role model and poor sense of coherence promoted stress in fathers in the subarea social isolation. Furthermore, parental experiences promoted stress among mothers in the subarea incompetence while this was not seen among fathers. Mothers perceived a higher level of dyadic consensus than fathers in the items recreational activities, friends, aims and life goals, time spent together, and decisions regarding career and personal development. Household tasks was the only item where fathers perceived a higher level of dyadic consensus than mothers. Additionally, there were associations between perceived parental stress and dyadic consensus in several items and in the total score. To promote parents' health and family stability, health professionals should consider factors affecting stress and stress reactions, and take gender roles into account. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  3. Geopotential Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Christian; Nielsen, S.B.

    Density heterogeneity in the Earth’s lithosphere causes lateral pressure variations. Horizontal gradients of the vertically integrated lithostatic pressure, the Geopotential Energy (GPE), are a source of stresses (Geopotential Stress) that contribute to the Earth’s Stress Field. In theory the GPE...... is linearly related to the lithospheric part of the Geoid. The Geopotential Stress can be calculated if either the density structure and as a consequence the GPE or the lithospheric contribution to the Geoid is known. The lithospheric Geoid is usually obtained by short pass filtering of satellite Geoid...... are not entirely suitable for the stress calculations but can be compiled and adjusted. We present an approach in which a global lithospheric density model based on CRUST2.0 is obtained by simultaneously fitting topography and surface heat flow in the presence of isostatic compensation and long-wavelength lateral...

  4. Learn to manage stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress - managing; Stress - recognizing; Stress - relaxation techniques ... LEARN TO RECOGNIZE STRESS The first step in managing stress is recognizing it in your life. Everyone feels stress in a different way. ...

  5. Stress incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... years after delivery. Symptoms The main symptom of stress incontinence is leaking urine when you: Are physically active Cough Exercise Have sexual intercourse Sneeze Stand Exams and Tests Your health care provider will perform ...

  6. Stressing academia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opstrup, Niels; Pihl-Thingvad, Signe

    Incongruences between the individual and the organizational work context are potential stressors. The present study focuses on the relationship between a complementary need-supply fit and Danish researchers’ self-perceived job stress. Strain is expected to increase as organizational supplies fall...... to “soft” dimensions as freedom and independence in the job, personal and professional development at work, and receiving peer recognition is highly significant for the researchers’ self-perceived stress-level. The better the fit is the lower stress-levels the researchers’ on average report. On the other...... hand, the fit on “hard” dimensions as salary, financial rewards and career opportunities is found to be unrelated to the researchers’ self-perceived stress-level. The fit with regard to job security is an important exception, however....

  7. Thermal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    and Science in Sports and Exercise 37: 1328--1334. Coris EE, Ramirez AM, and Van Durme DJ (2004) Heat illness in athletes : The dangerous combination...of heat, humidity and exercise. Sports Medicine 34: 9--16. Gordon CJ and Leon LR (2005) Thermal stress and the physiological response to environmental...code) 2011 Book Chapter-Enc. of Environmental Health Thermal Stress L.R. Leon, C.J. Gordon Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division U.S. Research

  8. A Comparison of Objective and Subjective Stress in Homogeneous Male and Female Teams in a Mars Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, S.; Sundaresan, A.

    Introduction The role of stress and its impact on coping performance motivation behavior cognitive functioning and psychological well-being has become a key focus for long duration missions Since all extreme environments are characterized by significant physical demands e g skiing climbing EVAs as well as inescapable environmental characteristics e g imminent danger noise isolation confinement loss of normal sensory stimuli an examination of the impact of prolong stress in analogue environments should provide insight into developing effective support and countermeasures for long duration space crews The presence of even low levels of chronic stressors if not met with functional adaptation and or countermeasures has been shown to produce subjective symptoms of stress persistent performance incompetence accelerated fatiguability altered mood states increased rate of infections and decrements in attention and cognitive Gender has been shown to cut across both individual factors and group factors including response to stress and ways of coping Generally men and women differ in many arenas such as interaction and communication styles need for affiliation responses to crowding privacy and confined spaces Men and women in homogeneous groups interact in significantly different ways than those in mixed groups Therefore differences between genders on subjective and objective responses to stress are of interest The Mars Society Utah Desert Simulation MDRS facility provides a unique opportunity to examine the interaction of

  9. Plastia valvar aórtica por ampliação de válvula com pericárdio bovino: nota prévia Reparative operation for aortic valve incompetence by leaflet advancement with bovine pericardial: preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hércules Lisboa Bongiovani

    1988-08-01

    Full Text Available Apresenta-se, preliminarmente, uma técnica para a correção do refluxo valvar aórtico pela ampliação de uma ou mais válvulas com pericárdio bovino. Após estudo experimental em peças animais isoladas, a técnica foi empregada, com sucesso, em uma paciente.A new technique for correction of aortic incompetence by the advancement of one more valve leaflets with bovine pericardial is presented. After experimental studies in isolated animal hearts this technique was used with success in one patient.

  10. Predictors of stress and coping strategies of US accelerated vs. generic Baccalaureate Nursing students: an embedded mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Linda; Stidham, Andrea Warner; Ross, Ratchneewan

    2015-01-01

    Stress is an inevitable part of life and is especially pervasive in the lives of nursing students. Identifying the predictors of stress as well as coping strategies used can allow for the implementation of appropriate coping interventions to assist in the management of stress in nursing students. Mixed methods research that has been undertaken to gain an understanding about student stress, especially juxtaposing generic versus accelerated nursing students could not be identified. (1) Identify predictors of stress between accelerated and generic Baccalaureate Nursing (BSN) students; and (2) Describe stressors and coping strategies used by accelerated students in comparison with generic students. Embedded mixed methods study. Accelerated and generic BSN third- and fourth-year nursing students at two Midwestern universities. 210 participants: accelerated (n=75) and generic (n=135). A questionnaire packet, including demographics, history of depression, the Perceived Stress Questionnaire, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and open-ended questions were administered to students at the end of a class. Simultaneous multiple regression was used to examine predictors of stress. Content analysis was used to analyze qualitative data. Predictors of stress for both the accelerated and generic groups included history of depression, year in the program, emotional support, and self-esteem. Fear of failure and clinical incompetence, problematic relationships, and time management issues were identified as major stressors. Coping strategies used by both groups included positive thinking and social support. Senior students with a history of depression, low self-esteem, and little social support were more likely to experience high levels of stress. This gives educators the potential to identify at risk students and establish stress reduction programs. Encouraging students to use individualized coping strategies will be beneficial. Copyright

  11. Stressing academia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opstrup, Niels; Pihl-Thingvad, Signe

    Incongruences between the individual and the organizational work context are potential stressors. The present study focuses on the relationship between a complementary need-supply fit and Danish researchers’ self-perceived job stress. Strain is expected to increase as organizational supplies fall...... hand, the fit on “hard” dimensions as salary, financial rewards and career opportunities is found to be unrelated to the researchers’ self-perceived stress-level. The fit with regard to job security is an important exception, however....

  12. Stress Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    The following types of forces contribute to the stresses in a Dolos in a pack exposed to waves: 1)Gravity forces Compaction forces (mainly due to settlements, gravity and flow forces) 2) Flow forces 3) Impact forces (impacts between moving concrete blocks)......The following types of forces contribute to the stresses in a Dolos in a pack exposed to waves: 1)Gravity forces Compaction forces (mainly due to settlements, gravity and flow forces) 2) Flow forces 3) Impact forces (impacts between moving concrete blocks)...

  13. Plastia valvar aórtica por ampliação de válvula(s com pericárdio bovino Reparative operation for aortic valve incompetence by leaflet advancement with bovine pericardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo José de Freitas Ribeiro

    1990-08-01

    Full Text Available É apresentada técnica para correção do refluxo valvar aórtico pela desinserção e ampliação de uma ou mais das válvulas com pericárdio bovino. Após estudo experimental em peças animais isoladas, a técnica foi empregada, com sucesso imediato, em seis pacientes. Em todos os casos, ampliou-se a válvula não coronariana e, em dois, ampliou-se, também, a válvula coronariana esquerda. O levantamento das comissuras valvares poderá constituir-se em uma técnica complementar, desde que foi uma constante em todos os pacientes operados. Uma paciente faleceu no sétimo mês de pós-operatório por endocardite bacteriana. Os demais pacientes encontram-se em períodos de observação de quatro a 12 meses. As observações iniciais permitem afirmar que a técnica é reproduzível com bons resultados imediatos. A evolução clínica a médio e a longo prazo é fundamental para uma apreciação mais definitiva, sendo motivo de constante preocupação a ocorrência de endocardite bacteriana e as conseqüências da evolução do processo reumático.A new technique for correction of aortic incompetence by the advancement of one more valve leaflets with bovine pericardium is presented. After experimental studies in isolated animal hearts, this technique was used with immediate success in six patients. In all cases non coronarian leaflet was advanced and in two cases the left coronarian leaflet was also advanced. The elevation of valve comissure may constitute a complimentary technique, as long as it has been constant in all cases operated. One patient died in the seventh month after surgery of bacterian endocarditis. All the others are now in postoperative follow-up of four to twelve months. Early observation allows the statement that the technique is reproducible with good immediate results. The early and late follow-up are fundamental to take a more definitive conclusion. The occurence of bacterian endocarditis and the consequences of evolution of

  14. (stress) testing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, maximal HR was significantly higher in all groups during their sporting activities than during stress testing in the laboratory (P < 0.01). Conclusions. Maximal HR in veteran athletes during specific sporting activities was significantly higher than that attained during a routine sECG. This finding was not sport-specific, ...

  15. Bacterial stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Bacterial stress. Physicochemical and chemical parameters: temperature, pressure, pH, salt concentration, oxygen, irradiation. Nutritional depravation: nutrient starvation, water shortage. Toxic compounds: Antibiotics, heavy metals, toxins, mutagens. Interactions with other cells: ...

  16. Immunologic, hemodynamic, and adrenal incompetence in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Louise Madeleine; Bendtsen, Flemming; Møller, Søren

    2015-01-01

    , cardiac output, and renal perfusion. Consequently, the cardiovascular and renal dysfunction is aggravated, resulting in a hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). HRS is seen exclusively in patients with liver disease and has been considered an entirely functional prerenal dysfunction, rather than a structural...

  17. Is the Problem Cultural Incompetence or Racism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Linda

    2015-10-01

    Clinical competence-including asking about and understanding the impact of a patient's culture-should be what we all expect when we seek treatment. Behavioral health organizations have opportunities to create culturally competent and responsive services. But we need to add another call to action-acknowledging and addressing the disparities caused by racism.

  18. 8 CFR 1240.43 - Incompetent respondents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 1240.43 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Proceedings To Determine Deportability of Aliens in the United States: Hearing and Appeal (for Proceedings Commenced Prior...

  19. Aerodynamic Indices of Velopharyngeal Function in Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealey, Linda R.; Giddens, Cheryl L.

    2010-01-01

    Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is characterized as a deficit in the motor processes of speech for the volitional control of the articulators, including the velum. One of the many characteristics attributed to children with CAS is intermittent or inconsistent hypernasality. The purpose of this study was to document differences in velopharyngeal…

  20. What Is Stress Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stress testing provides information about how your heart works during physical stress. Some heart problems are easier to diagnose when ... Testing Show? Stress testing shows how your heart works during physical stress (exercise) and how healthy your heart is. A ...

  1. Repetitive Stress Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Repetitive Stress Injuries KidsHealth / For Teens / Repetitive Stress Injuries What's ... t had any problems since. What Are Repetitive Stress Injuries? Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) are injuries that ...

  2. Stress and your heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronary heart disease - stress; Coronary artery disease - stress ... Your body responds to stress on many levels. First, it releases stress hormones that make you breathe faster. Your blood pressure goes up. Your muscles ...

  3. Stress and Mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Relaxation Emotions & Relationships HealthyYouTXT Tools Home » Stress & Mood Stress & Mood Many people who go back to smoking ... story: Time Out Times 10 >> share What Causes Stress? Read full story: What Causes Stress? >> share The ...

  4. Stress Management: Positive Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Positive thinking helps with stress management and can even improve your health. Practice overcoming negative self-talk ... with optimism is a key part of effective stress management. And effective stress management is associated with ...

  5. Oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unceasing need for oxygen is in contradiction to the fact that it is in fact toxic to mammals. Namely, its monovalent reduction can have as a consequence the production of short-living, chemically very active free radicals and certain non-radical agents (nitrogen-oxide, superoxide-anion-radicals, hydroxyl radicals, peroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid, and others. There is no doubt that they have numerous positive roles, but when their production is stepped up to such an extent that the organism cannot eliminate them with its antioxidants (superoxide-dismutase, glutathione-peroxidase, catalase, transferrin, ceruloplasmin, reduced glutathion, and others, a series of disorders is developed that are jointly called „oxidative stress.“ The reactive oxygen species which characterize oxidative stress are capable of attacking all main classes of biological macromolecules, actually proteins, DNA and RNA molecules, and in particular lipids. The free radicals influence lipid peroxidation in cellular membranes, oxidative damage to DNA and RNA molecules, the development of genetic mutations, fragmentation, and the altered function of various protein molecules. All of this results in the following consequences: disrupted permeability of cellular membranes, disrupted cellular signalization and ion homeostasis, reduced or loss of function of damaged proteins, and similar. That is why the free radicals that are released during oxidative stress are considered pathogenic agents of numerous diseases and ageing. The type of damage that will occur, and when it will take place, depends on the nature of the free radicals, their site of action and their source. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173034, br. 175061 i br. 31085

  6. NF-κB regulates protein quality control after heat stress through modulation of the BAG3-HspB8 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivon, Mathieu; Abou-Samra, Michel; Richet, Emma; Guyot, Boris; Arrigo, André-Patrick; Kretz-Remy, Carole

    2012-03-01

    We previously found that the NF-κB transcription factor is activated during the recovery period after heat shock; moreover, we demonstrated that NF-κB is essential for cell survival after heat shock by activating autophagy, a mechanism that probably helps the cell to cope with hyperthermic stress through clearance of damaged proteins. In this study, we analyze the involvement of NF-κB in basal and heat-stress-induced protein quality control, by comparing the level of multiubiquitylated and/or aggregated proteins, and proteasome and autophagic activity in NF-κB-competent and NF-κB-incompetent cells. We show that NF-κB has only a minor role in basal protein quality control, where it modulates autophagosome maturation. By contrast, NF-κB is shown to be a key player in protein quality control after hyperthermia. Indeed, NF-κB-incompetent cells show highly increased levels of multiubiquitylated and/or aggregated proteins and aggresome clearance defects; a phenotype that disappears when NF-κB activity is restored to normal. We demonstrate that during heat shock recovery NF-κB activates selective removal of misfolded or aggregated proteins--a process also called 'aggrephagy'--by controlling the expression of BAG3 and HSPB8 and by modulating the level of the BAG3-HspB8 complex. Thus NF-κB-mediated increase in the level of the BAG3-HspB8 complex leads to upregulation of aggrephagy and clearance of irreversibly damaged proteins and might increase cell survival in conditions of hyperthermia.

  7. Managing Leadership Stress

    CERN Document Server

    Bal, Vidula; McDowell-Larsen, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Everyone experiences stress, and leaders face the additional stress brought about by the unique demands of leadership: having to make decisions with limited information, to manage conflict, to do more with less . . . and faster! The consequences of stress can include health problems and deteriorating relationships. Knowing what signs of stress to look for and having a strategy for increasing your resources will help you manage leadership stress and be more effective over a long career.Table of ContentsThe Stress of Leadership 7Why Is Leadership Stressful? 8Stress Assessment 13When Stress Is Wh

  8. Prediction of stress relaxation under multiaxial stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstroem, R.; Malen, K.; Otterberg, R.

    1981-01-01

    Computations have been made of the relaxation of residual stresses in a thick walled tube under conditions corresponding to commercial stress relief heat treatment of the nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel A533B. The distribution of residual stresses which were introduced was peaked around a given radius in the tube. The relax- ation of the equivalent stresses followed almost exactly a uniaxial behavior. The relaxation rate of the hydrostatic stress was of about the same order or slower than that of the equivalent stress. The time dependence of the hydrostatic stress was mainly controlled by the initial magnitude of hydrostatic stress whereas the degree of the constraint and thereby the boundary conditions at the tube walls had only a small influence. The relaxation rate decreased with increasing initial magnitude of the hydrostatic stress. The computed relaxation behaviour under multiaxial stress could be rationalized in terms of a developed model. This model was also suc- cessfully applied to Gott's measurements on stress relaxation during stress relief heat treatment of a welded joint between 130 mm thick plates of A533B where the stress state was highly triaxial. (Authors)

  9. Resultados gestacionais e perinatais de gestações com insuficiência cervical submetidas a circlagem eletiva Gestational and perinatal outcomes of pregnancies with cervical incompetence submitted to elective cerclage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Luís Nomura

    2003-08-01

    women submitted to cervical cerclage during pregnancy. METHODS: a series of 123 pregnancies in 116 women submitted to elective cervical cerclage by Espinosa-Bahamondes, Palmer and MacDonald techniques and followed at the High-Risk Antenatal Care Unit at CAISM/UNICAMP is described. Variables were analyzed through frequency, mean and standard deviation, comparisons were made using c² or Fisher exact tests. RESULTS: 73% had at least one previous abortion, 17.9% had had 3 prior abortions, and 48% had prior preterm deliveries. The mean gestational age at cerclage was 16 weeks. Cerclage by the Espinosa-Bahamondes technique predominated (94.3%. The overall complication rate was 69%, with preterm labor as the most frequent (31.7%, followed by vaginitis (26%, preterm premature rupture of membranes (10.5% and fetal death (8.7%. Other clinical complications were less common and included urinary tract infections (5.6%, hypertensive disorders (4% and gestational diabetes (2.4%. Fetal loss occurred in 8.9% of pregnancies (11 stillbirths. Premature deliveries were present in 18%. History of previous premature deliveries was associated with the occurrence of premature deliveries. CONCLUSION: Obstetrical history compatible with cervical incompetence was frequent, and prior preterm delivery was associated with a preterm delivery in the pregnancy under analysis. The use of cerclage by the Espinosa-Bahamondes technique resulted in 18% of premature newborns, and 104 per thousand rate of perinatal death. Prospective, controlled trials are needed to evaluate the real benefits of cervical cerclage performed during pregnancy.

  10. Nuclear Stress Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nuclear Stress Test Menu Topics Topics FAQs Nuclear Stress Test A nuclear stress test lets doctors see ... with caffeine, such as coffee, tea, sodas, or chocolate. When you return, doctors will give you another ...

  11. Stress Management: Tai Chi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Tai chi helps reduce stress and anxiety. And it also helps increase flexibility and balance. By Mayo ... you're looking for a way to reduce stress, consider tai chi (TIE-CHEE). Originally developed for ...

  12. Overcoming job stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000884.htm Overcoming job stress To use the sharing features on this page, ... stay healthy and feel better. Causes of Job Stress Although the cause of job stress is different ...

  13. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) KidsHealth / For Parents / Posttraumatic Stress Disorder ( ... My Child? Looking Ahead Print What Is Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)? Someone who is the victim of ( ...

  14. Stress and Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It Works Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Stress and Heart Health Updated:Jan 8,2018 When ... therapist in your community. Last reviewed 6/2014 Stress Management • Home • How Does Stress Affect You? Introduction ...

  15. Stress Management: Being Assertive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Assertiveness can help you control stress and anger and improve coping skills. Recognize and learn assertive behavior ... and earn others' respect. This can help with stress management, especially if you tend to take on ...

  16. Teacher Wellness: Too Stressed for Stress Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipps-Vaughan, Debi; Ponsart, Tyler; Gilligan, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    Healthier, happier teachers promote healthier, happier, and more effective learning environments. Yet, many teachers experience considerable stress. Studies have found that between one fifth and one fourth of teachers frequently experience a great deal of stress (Kyriacou, 1998). Stress in teaching appears to be universal across nations and…

  17. Prenatal Maternal Stress Programs Infant Stress Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Glynn, Laura M.; Waffarn, Feizal; Sandman, Curt A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Prenatal exposure to inappropriate levels of glucocorticoids (GCs) and maternal stress are putative mechanisms for the fetal programming of later health outcomes. The current investigation examined the influence of prenatal maternal cortisol and maternal psychosocial stress on infant physiological and behavioral responses to stress.…

  18. Exercise stress test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercise treadmill; Stress ECG; Exercise electrocardiography; Stress test - exercise treadmill; CAD - treadmill; Coronary artery disease - treadmill; Chest pain - treadmill; Angina - treadmill; Heart disease - ...

  19. Stress and Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2014-01-01

    Background Stress is an important public health issue. One in ten Danish adults experience high levels of stress in their daily lives and stress is one of the main occupational health problems in Europe. The link between stress and health is still debated in the scientific literature...... and the pathways underlying these potential health effects are far from elucidated. The dissertation contributions to the literature on stress and health by empirically testing the relationship between stress and major chronic disorders and by providing new evidence on the underlying physiological, psychological...... and behavioral mechanisms. Stress is a complex concept and in order to better understand the relation between stress and health, the dissertation works with a clear distinction between the health consequences of different types of stress including external stressors, perceived stress, and measures of the stress...

  20. The effect of academic stress and attachment stress on stress-eaters and stress-undereaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emond, Michael; Ten Eycke, Kayla; Kosmerly, Stacey; Robinson, Adele Lafrance; Stillar, Amanda; Van Blyderveen, Sherry

    2016-05-01

    It is well established that stress is related to changes in eating patterns. Some individuals are more likely to increase their overall food intake under conditions of stress, whereas others are more likely to consume less food when stressed. Attachment style has been linked to disordered eating and eating disorders; however, comparisons of eating behaviors under attachment versus other types of stress have yet to be explored. The present laboratory study examined the eating patterns in self-identified stress-undereaters and stress-eaters under various types of stress. More specifically, the study examined the effects of academic and attachment stress on calorie, carbohydrate and sugar consumption within these two groups. Under the guise of critiquing student films, university students viewed either one of two stress-inducing videos (academic stress or attachment stress, both designed to be emotionally arousing) or a control video (designed to be emotionally neutral), and their food intake was recorded. Results demonstrated that the video manipulations were effective in inducing stress. Differential patterns of eating were noted based on group and stress condition. Specifically, stress-undereaters ate fewer calories, carbohydrates and sugars than stress-eaters in the academic stress condition, but not in the attachment stress or control condition. Findings suggest that specific types of stressors may influence eating behaviors differently. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Agrobacterium Mediated Transformation of Fld and GUS Genes into Canola for Salinity Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niapour, Nazila

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is one of the major abiotic stress which limits wide spread canola cultivation. One way to overcome this problem could be transfection, to produce tolerable species. Cotyledonary and hypocotyls explants obtained from 4 and 7 days old seedling of Elite and RJS003 varieties were utilized in this study. Genetic transformation was implemented through Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404 containing PBI121 plasmid and Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58, LBA4404, AGL0 and EHA 101 strains which contain P6u- ubi- fvt1 construct. The T-DNA region of P6u- Ubi- Fvt1 plasmid included HPT (Hygromycin phosphotransferase plant selectable marker and Fld (flavodoxin gene. PBI121 plasmid had NptII (Neomycin phosphotransferase plant Selectable marker and β-glucuronidase (GUS reporter genes. Transfected explants were analyzed by PCR and histochemical assay for Fld and Gus genes, respectively. Our data indicated that the cotyledonary explants of both cultivars were incompetent to be infected with Fld gens. However, the transformation in Elite hypocotyls explants with Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 and LBA 4404 strains were confirmed through PCR product and histochemical evaluation for Fld and GUS genes, respectively. Therefore, the result of this manuscript may to certain degree fulfill the endeavor appointed to this oilseed.

  2. Stress and eating behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Achim; Langemann, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    How stress, the stress response, and the adaptation of the stress response influence our eating behavior is a central question in brain research and medicine. In this report, we highlight recent advances showing the close links between eating behavior, the stress system, and neurometabolism.

  3. Coping With Occupational Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dianne Boswell

    1981-01-01

    Ways of reducing occupational stress include: (1) avoiding the stressful situation; (2) changing the response to the stress; and (3) changing the environment. Administrators can help teachers manage stress by developing communication techniques, steering committees, and support groups. A second part of this article will be published in the January…

  4. Stress og insomni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Zachariae, Bobby

    2012-01-01

    Insomnia and stress are two conditions, which are strongly associated and appear to be pathophysiologically integrated: the occurrence of stress increases the risk of insomnia, insomnia exacerbates stress, and coexistence of both factors has a negative influence on their prognosis. Stress...

  5. Stress og aldring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the popular notion that psychological stress states may accelerate aging. Stress has been shown to influence cellular systems known to be involved in the aging process. Furthermore, stress is associated with an increased risk of various age-related medical disorders....... These effects are likely mediated by the secretion of stress hormones. In this short review we focus on biochemical and epidemiological evidence for a link between stress and aging....

  6. Stress and Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2014-01-01

    Background Stress is an important public health issue. One in ten Danish adults experience high levels of stress in their daily lives and stress is one of the main occupational health problems in Europe. The link between stress and health is still debated in the scientific literature and the path......Background Stress is an important public health issue. One in ten Danish adults experience high levels of stress in their daily lives and stress is one of the main occupational health problems in Europe. The link between stress and health is still debated in the scientific literature...... and behavioral mechanisms. Stress is a complex concept and in order to better understand the relation between stress and health, the dissertation works with a clear distinction between the health consequences of different types of stress including external stressors, perceived stress, and measures of the stress......, breast cancer, Parkinson’s disease and atopic disorders. The dissertation also aims to empirically test the relationship between measures of stress and total and cause-specific mortality, which provides a measure of the combined public health burden. Understanding the mechanisms linking stress to chronic...

  7. Overall bolt stress optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2013-01-01

    The state of stress in bolts and nuts with International Organization for Standardization metric thread design is examined and optimized. The assumed failure mode is fatigue, so the applied preload and the load amplitude together with the stress concentrations define the connection strength....... Maximum stress in the bolt is found at the fillet under the head, at the thread start, or at the thread root. To minimize the stress concentration, shape optimization is applied. Nut shape optimization also has a positive effect on the maximum stress. The optimization results show that designing a nut......, which results in a more evenly distribution of load along the engaged thread, has a limited influence on the maximum stress due to the stress concentration at the first thread root. To further reduce the maximum stress, the transition from bolt shank to the thread must be optimized. Stress reduction...

  8. Stress in childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... events that an adult can manage will cause stress in a child. As a result, even small changes can impact ... be. Encourage physical activity. Recognize signs of unresolved stress in your child. Seek help or advice from a health care ...

  9. What Is Stress Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center for Applied Learning Research at Seattle Pacific University, says creativity, productivity, motivation and sometimes even your immune system will all suffer chronic stress. How Do We Learn to Manage Our Stress? ...

  10. The stress of life

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Selye, H

    1978-01-01

    .... This is also a dependable personal guide that tells you how to combat both physical and mental stress, how to handle yourself during the stress of everyday life, and how your bodily changes can help...

  11. Stress Management: Spirituality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... al. Manage Your Stress: Overcoming Stress in the Modern World. New York, N.Y.: St. Martin's Press; ... logo are trademarks of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. © 1998-2018 Mayo Foundation for Medical ...

  12. Psychological Stress and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... learn to cope with psychological stress? Emotional and social support can help patients learn to cope with psychological stress. Such support can reduce levels of depression, anxiety, and disease- and treatment-related symptoms among patients. ...

  13. Job Satisfaction and Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F. William

    1981-01-01

    Sources of job satisfaction and job related stress among public school physical educators are examined. Recommended techniques are offered for physical education administrators to reduce their employees' job-related stress and to improve the quality of worklife. (JN)

  14. Takotsubo (Stress) Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Takotsubo (Stress) Cardiomyopathy Scott W. Sharkey , John R. Lesser , Barry ... heart contraction has returned to normal. Importance of Stress In 85% of cases, takotsubo is triggered by ...

  15. Stress Management: Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Having close friends and family has far-reaching benefits for your health. Here's how to build and ... can be critical to help you through the stress of tough times, whether you've had a ...

  16. Stress and Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spotlight On News Content Capsule Contact Understanding Migraine Stress and Migraine Doctor Q&A Managing Migraine Migraine ... of Headache Disorders Cluster Headache Post-Traumatic Headache Stress and Migraine March 16, 2017 How to cope ...

  17. Stress Management: Massage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Massage can be a powerful tool to help you take charge of your health and well-being. ... that it is an effective treatment for reducing stress, pain and muscle tension. While more research is ...

  18. Stress og insomni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Zachariae, Bobby

    2012-01-01

    Insomnia and stress are two conditions, which are strongly associated and appear to be pathophysiologically integrated: the occurrence of stress increases the risk of insomnia, insomnia exacerbates stress, and coexistence of both factors has a negative influence on their prognosis. Stress...... and insomnia thus share complex interactions and the mechanisms involved are insufficiently understood but involve both psychological and physiological processes. First choice interventions involve behavioural and cognitive strategies and, to a lesser extent, pharmacological treatment....

  19. Stress og insomni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Zachariae, Bobby

    2012-01-01

    and insomnia thus share complex interactions and the mechanisms involved are insufficiently understood but involve both psychological and physiological processes. First choice interventions involve behavioural and cognitive strategies and, to a lesser extent, pharmacological treatment.......Insomnia and stress are two conditions, which are strongly associated and appear to be pathophysiologically integrated: the occurrence of stress increases the risk of insomnia, insomnia exacerbates stress, and coexistence of both factors has a negative influence on their prognosis. Stress...

  20. Optimization of Bolt Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2013-01-01

    The state of stress in bolts and nuts with ISO metric thread design is examined and optimized. The assumed failure mode is fatigue so the applied preload and the load amplitude together with the stress concentrations define the connection strength. Maximum stress in the bolt is found at, the fillet...... under the head, at the thread start or at the thread root. To minimize the stress concentration shape optimization is applied....

  1. Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Patient Education FAQs Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Patient Education ...

  2. Perceived stress and stress-related parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, G; Sancini, A; Capozzella, A; Caciari, T; Tomei, F; Nieto, H A; Gioffrè, P A; Marrocco, M; De Sio, S; Rosati, M V; Ciarrocca, M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate, using a questionnaire developed by our research group, whether occupational exposure to physical, chemical and psychosocial urban stressors can lead to alterations in perceived stress in a group of both male and female outdoor workers. The study also examines possible correlations between the levels of stress as inferred from the scores of the questionnaire and the levels of certain stress-related parameters (prolactin levels, consumption of coffee, chocolate, alcohol and cigarette smoking). We evaluated a final sample of 480 subjects (342 male and 138 female). All workers included in the study were divided into three groups on the basis of scores of the questionnaire. About 60% of workers showed a moderate or severe stress condition, with a statistically significant prevalence of female workers and younger subjects. There was a statistically significant correlation between the questionnaire score and the mean levels of stress-related parameters. The increase of perceived stress increases significantly the mean levels of prolactin and the consumption of coffee, chocolate and cigarettes. There was no statistically significant differences for alcohol consumption. The results show that exposure to chemical physical and psycho-social urban stressors can influence perceived stress in outdoor workers. The questionnaire used in our research could be an useful instruments for physicians during the health surveillance visits

  3. Stress i gymnasiet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Maj; Lagermann, Laila Colding

    Denne undersøgelse af stress hos gymnasieelever i Aalborg viser, hvordan stress giver sig udslag i gymnasiet, hvad der stresser eleverne, hvad der adskiller de stressramte elever fra andre elever, hvordan et stressreduktionskurset Åben og Rolig for Unge virker for de unge i gymnasiet, og hvad der...... kan modvirke stress i gymnasiet....

  4. Managing Stress. Project Seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Donna; Wilk, Jan

    One of eight papers from Project Seed, this paper describes a stress management project undertaken with high school sophomores. Managing Stress is described as an interactive workshop that offers young people an opportunity to examine specific areas of stress in their lives and to learn effective ways to deal with them. The program described…

  5. Leadership and Occupational Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickle, Fred E.; Scott, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    In a leadership position, it is important to understand what stress is and how it affects others. In an occupational setting, stressors vary according to personality types, gender, and occupational rank. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the foundations of stress and to explore how personality characteristics influence stress.…

  6. Stress Management: Yoga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Is yoga right for you? It is if you want to fight stress, get fit and stay healthy. By Mayo Clinic ... your partner wants to know what's for dinner. Stress and anxiety are everywhere. If they're getting ...

  7. MICRONUTRIENTS AND STRESS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pathways is not unitary and nonspecific. The response varies according to the nature and severity of the stimulus.'·'. Psychological stress may be acute or chronic, positive or negative, minor or major. Most life stress, however, is caused by a combination of stressors, including those of a physical nature. Acute stress, if quickly ...

  8. Sleep, Stress & Relaxation: Rejuvenate Body & Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep, Stress & Relaxation: Rejuvenate Body & Mind; Relieve Stress; best ways to relieve stress; best way to relieve stress; different ways to relieve stress; does smoking relieve stress; does tobacco relieve stress; how can I relieve stress; how can you relieve stress; how do I relieve stress; reduce stress; does smoking reduce stress; how can I reduce stress; how to reduce stress; reduce stress; reduce stress levels; reducing stress; smoking reduce stress; smoking reduces stress; stress reducing techniques; techniques to reduce stress; stress relief; best stress relief; natural stress relief; need stress relief; relief for stress; relief from stress; relief of stress; smoking and stress relief; smoking for stress relief; smoking stress relief; deal with stress; dealing with stress; dealing with anger; dealing with stress; different ways of dealing with stress; help dealing with stress; how to deal with anger; how to deal with stress; how to deal with stress when quitting smoking; stress management; free stress management; how can you manage stress; how do you manage stress; how to manage stress; manage stress; management of stress; management stress; managing stress; strategies for managing stress; coping with stress; cope with stress; copeing with stress; coping and stress; coping skills for stress; coping strategies for stress; coping strategies with stress; coping strategy for stress; coping with stress; coping with stress and anxiety; emotional health; emotional health; emotional health article; emotional health articles; deep relaxation; deep breathing relaxation techniques; deep muscle relaxation; deep relaxation; deep relaxation meditation; deep relaxation technique; deep relaxation techniques; meditation exercises; mindful exercises; mindful meditation exercises; online relaxation exercises; relaxation breathing exercises; relaxation exercise; relaxation exercises; stress relaxation; methods of relaxation for stress; relax stress; relax techniques stress

  9. Bone stress injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuru, M.J.; Pihlajamaeki, H.K.; Ahovuo, J.A. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology

    2004-05-01

    Bone stress injuries are due to cyclical overuse of the bone. They are relatively common in athletes and military recruits but also among otherwise healthy people who have recently started new or intensive physical activity. Diagnosis of bone stress injuries is based on the patient's history of increased physical activity and on imaging findings. The general symptom of a bone stress injury is stress-related pain. Bone stress injuries are difficult to diagnose based only on a clinical examination because the clinical symptoms may vary depending on the phase of the pathophysiological spectrum in the bone stress injury. Imaging studies are needed to ensure an early and exact diagnosis, because if the diagnosis is not delayed most bone stress injuries heal well without complications.

  10. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases. Major source of oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS is related to mitochondria as an endogenous source. Although there is ample evidence from tissues of patients with neurodegenerative disorders of morphological, biochemical, and molecular abnormalities in mitochondria, it is still not very clear whether the oxidative stress itself contributes to the onset of neurodegeneration or it is part of the neurodegenerative process as secondary manifestation. This paper begins with an overview of how oxidative stress occurs, discussing various oxidants and antioxidants, and role of oxidative stress in diseases in general. It highlights the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The last part of the paper describes the role of oxidative stress causing deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 hyperactivity associated with neurodegeneration.

  11. Stress and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffer, Johansen,; Sørensen, Ivalu; Lim Høeg, Beverly

    2017-01-01

    The role of stress in relation to cancer remains controversial. Stress is assumed to be an emerging public health problem in modern society. Still, we argue that it is relevant to view the role of stress in cancer from a scientific point of view. A critical overview of existing evidence...... is presented through previous review studies, and the importance of methodological challenges is highlighted. We summarize the evidence on the role of stress as a cause of cancer, on the impact of stress on cancer prognosis, and on how coping mechanisms may influence stress levels in cancer patients. Finally......, we describe the evidence on interventions to relieve stress in cancer patients for the purpose of improving both well-being and cancer prognosis. Against public opinion, we critically dismiss the evidence on psychotherapy as a tool to prolong life after cancer as inconsistent and unresolved....

  12. Stress Management and Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vidisha A.

    2009-01-01

    Stress can affect anyone, and gifted children are no exception. Giftedness can sometimes be the cause of the stress. Perfectionism, sensitivity, and intensity are characteristics of gifted children that may exacerbate stress. Stress can be constructive. Prolonged stress, however, with no time to recover becomes detrimental. Continued stress upsets…

  13. Interoception and Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André eSchulz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Afferent neural signals are continuously transmitted from visceral organs to the brain. Interoception refers to the processing of visceral-afferent neural signals by the central nervous system, which can finally result in the conscious perception of bodily processes. Interoception can, therefore, be described as a prominent example of information processing on the ascending branch of the brain-body axis. Stress responses involve a complex neuro-behavioral cascade, which is elicited when the organism is confronted with a potentially harmful stimulus. As this stress cascade comprises a range of neural and endocrine pathways, stress can be conceptualized as a communication process on the descending branch of the brain-body axis. Interoception and stress are, therefore, associated via the bi-directional transmission of information on the brain-body axis. It could be argued that excessive and/or enduring activation (e.g. by acute or chronic stress of neural circuits, which are responsible for successful communication on the brain-body axis, induces malfunction and dysregulation of these information processes. As a consequence, interoceptive signal processing may be altered, resulting in physical symptoms contributing to the development and/or maintenance of body-related mental disorders, which are associated with stress. In the current paper, we summarize findings on psychobiological processes underlying acute and chronic stress and their interaction with interoception. While focusing on the role of the physiological stress axes (HPA axis and autonomic nervous system, psychological factors in acute and chronic stress are also discussed. We propose a feed-forward model involving stress (in particular early life or chronic stress, as well as major adverse events, the dysregulation of physiological stress axes, altered perception of bodily sensations, and the generation of physical symptoms, which may in turn facilitate stress.

  14. Critical incident stress management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J J; Childs, J; Gonsalves, K

    2000-10-01

    Recent studies have indicated implementation of the CISM Program has impacted and reduced the cost of workers' compensation claims for stress related conditions and the number of lost work days (Ott, 1997; Western Management Consultants, 1996). Occupational health professionals need to be ready to develop and implement a comprehensive critical incident stress management process in anticipation of a major event. The ability to organize, lead, or administer critical incident stress debriefings for affected employees is a key role for the occupational health professional. Familiarity with these concepts and the ability to identify a critical incident enhances value to the business by mitigating the stress and impact to the workplace. Critical Incident Stress Management Systems have the potential for decreasing stress and restoring employees to normal life function--a win/win situation for both the employees and the organization.

  15. Stress transmission in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Schjønning, Per

    We urgently need increased quantitative knowledge on stress transmission in real soils loaded with agricultural machinery. 3D measurements of vertical stresses under tracked wheels were performed in situ in a Stagnic Luvisol (clay content 20 %) continuously cropped with small grain cereals......). Seven load cells were inserted horizontally from a pit with minimal disturbance of soil in each of three depths (0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 m), covering the width of the wheeled area. The position of the wheel relative to the transducers was recorded using a laser sensor. Finally, the vertical stresses near...... the soil-tyre interface were measured in separate tests by 17 stress transducers across the width of the tyres. The results showed that the inflation pressure controlled the level of maximum stresses at 0.3 m depth, while the wheel load was correlated to the measured stresses at 0.9 m depth. This supports...

  16. Stress Analysis in Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Fenyvesi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a known phenomenon that loads during fruit treatment (e.g., harvesting, transport, and manipulating result in the damage of product parts, primarily below the surface. The maximum stress likely develops inside the fruit, which leads to its damage. This phenomenon was analysed in a general manner (general material properties, unit load by finite element method (FEM simulations on an apple and a pear. The shell was found to have a significant effect on the developed stress state, especially for juicy fruits. The mechanism that determines how the stress properties of tomatoes affect the stress state was analysed. According to our model, the stress maxima develop in the middle of the analysed fruits. Such stress maxima might be the reason for the inner damage, which, in the case of a missing healing period, results in fruit breakage.

  17. STRESS IN ENGINEERING STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Thomaz, Patricia Ester; Rocha, Luciano Baracho; Neto, Vicente Machado

    2012-01-01

    This article aims at studying the stress factors in students of an engineering course at the city of Curitiba. Although stress can be also regarded as a positive factor to the subjects, while responses to stress agents are mild and light, the notion most often widespread and damaging is that in which the estressor has a negative character and more prolonged, which indicates greater severity. Academic, social, profissional, exams, dedlines to be met, learning new technologies in short ti...

  18. Theory of thermal stresses

    CERN Document Server

    Boley, Bruno A

    1997-01-01

    Highly regarded text presents detailed discussion of fundamental aspects of theory, background, problems with detailed solutions. Basics of thermoelasticity, heat transfer theory, thermal stress analysis, more. 1985 edition.

  19. The teacher under stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krnjajić Stevan B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical records consistently point to the fact that the phenomenon of stress is characteristic of service professions, especially of teacher’s. Although stress in teachers is a problem of public interest, it is still a relatively new field of empirical investigations. Data available show that stress in teachers can have negative effects on school as an organization teacher professional achievement, his/her and his/her family psychosocial status. The most frequent symptoms of a prolonged professional stress are anxiety, depression, frustration, unfriendly behavior towards students and colleagues, emotional weariness, and extreme tension. Health and psychological problems cause, most frequently, the reduction of self-esteem job dissatisfaction, job resignation, absenteeism, and wrong decision-making. In an attempt to call professional public attention to negative effects of stress on the outcomes of teacher work, we have analyzed four important aspects of stress teachers experience in their everyday work (a definition and measurement of stress, (b distribution and sources of stress (problem behaviors in students, poor working conditions, lack of time, poor school ethos, (c teacher personality traits (sex, age, work experience, locus of control, job satisfaction, intention to resign absenteeism, (d strategies for overcoming and reducing negative effects of stress (direct action techniques, palliative techniques.

  20. Management of Occupational Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trandafir Lenuţa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Stress is an important problem in the majority of countries. Apart from the fact that it is responsible for numerous diseases, it also causes much suffering. Stress appears as an adaptation reaction of our body to those external factors that we perceive as being agressive and which frequently lead us to an alarm state, felt both psychically (tension, fear, anxiety, and physically (increase of the adrenaline secretion, intensity of heartbeats, sweating. It isn’t actually a disease, but it can lead to sickness in time. This is why it is good to know what stresses us and how we can escape stress.

  1. STRESS MANAGEMENT AMONG GRADUATES

    OpenAIRE

    V. R. Vidya; Dr. P. Maruthu Pandian

    2017-01-01

    Stress has become an inevitable part of lives. Stress arises as a result of relations with the constantly changing environment and the adaptation to it. Actually managing stress is an art, through this all human beings can enjoy their life in its full spirit. Stress management is the need of the hour. Stressors, if not escapable, are fairly manageable. College students are at a critical period where they will enter adulthood. They are expected to be the elites in the society. Thus, they shoul...

  2. Stress and hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salam Ranabir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the modern environment one is exposed to various stressful conditions. Stress can lead to changes in the serum level of many hormones including glucocorticoids, catecholamines, growth hormone and prolactin. Some of these changes are necessary for the fight or flight response to protect oneself. Some of these stressful responses can lead to endocrine disorders like Graves′ disease, gonadal dysfunction, psychosexual dwarfism and obesity. Stress can also alter the clinical status of many preexisting endocrine disorders such as precipitation of adrenal crisis and thyroid storm.

  3. Stress: Concepts and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, O.H.; Martin, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The stress theorem determines the stress from the electronic ground state of any quantum system with arbitrary strains and atomic displacements. We derive this theorem in reciprocal space, within the local-density-functional approximation. The evaluation of stress, force and total energy permits, among other things, the determination of complete stress-strain relations including all microscopic internal strains. We describe results of ab-initio calculations for Si, Ge, and GaAs, giving the equilibrium lattice constant, all linear elastic constants c ij and the internal strain parameter ζ. (orig.)

  4. Sambandet mellan stress mindset och upplevd stress hos gymnasieungdomar

    OpenAIRE

    Edblad, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    Studien undersökte sambandet mellan stress mindset (individens övertygelser om stress) och upplevd stress hos gymnasieungdomar. 122 deltagare i åldrarna 16-19 år deltog i studien genom att svara på ett elektroniskt formulär. Frågorna bestod av Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-14), som undersökte upplevd stress, och Stress Mindset Measure (SMM), som undersökte deltagarnas mindset om stress. Resultatet visade en signifikant negativ korrelation mellan stress mindset och upplevd stress. Detta gav stöd...

  5. STRESS IN ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Elena, GHEORDUNESCU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account the changes that are currently taking place in our country, it is clear that these changes, which occur in almost all companies, lead to new stress factors for both employees and the organization. Occupational stress is a major problem for employees and managers, but also for the whole society. The issue of stress in organizations has given birth to many debates and studies. It is a common theme that is addressed by managers, employees and consultants from different perspectives. According to a study by the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work, in the European Union, work-related stress is the second work-related health issue after dorsal disorders. It affects 28% of EU employees. The European Parliament is fully involved in addressing issues related to the psychological support of the staff. Preventing work-related stress is one of the objectives set out in the Communique of the European Commission for Employment and Social Affairs regarding their new health and safety at work strategy. Manifestations of stress in organizations are easily observable, being manifested by behaviors such as: difficulties in adapting to the changes required to work or the dramatic drop in labor productivity. Also a double action is met: both the person who passes through the stressful situation and at the organization level on which it is reflected the existence of a stressful environment. This paper aims to address the implications of workplace stress, symptoms of stress in the workplace and strategies to eliminate and prevent stress at work This paper represents an exploratory research based on qualitative methods, being consulted various sources of information: the literature, case studies, media articles, reports of relevant organizations, etc.

  6. Work-related stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, I.L.D.

    2005-01-01

    Changes in the content and organisation of work in recent decades have resulted in an intensification of work, which is commonly regarded as a cause of stress. This report presents trends in the risks and consequences of work-related stress, and identifies how these can be prevented. The focus

  7. Reynolds Stress Turbulence Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Torii

    1995-01-01

    the Reynolds stress in the inner wall region is substantially diminished due to the inner core movement, resulting in a decrease in the heat transfer performance, and (iii an increase in the velocity ratio of the moving inner core of the fluid flow induces a decrease in the Nusselt number as well as the Reynolds stress in the region near the inner core.

  8. Helping Children Manage Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Maggie; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes interventions used to enhance coping and stress management to children and adolescents. Argues that the model of stress upon which the intervention is based dictates the intervention. Implications are discussed of the acceptance of an extended Lazarus/Folkman model for interventions in schools. (CFR)

  9. Neuropathology of stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, P.J.; Pruessner, J.; Sousa, N.; Almeida, O.F.X.; van Dam, A.M.; Rajkowska, G.; Swaab, D.F.; Czéh, B.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental challenges are part of daily life for any individual. In fact, stress appears to be increasingly present in our modern, and demanding, industrialized society. Virtually every aspect of our body and brain can be influenced by stress and although its effects are partly mediated by

  10. Neuropathology of stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, Paul J; Pruessner, Jens; Sousa, Nuno; Almeida, Osborne F X; Van Dam, Anne Marie; Rajkowska, Grazyna; Swaab, Dick F; Czéh, Boldizsár

    Environmental challenges are part of daily life for any individual. In fact, stress appears to be increasingly present in our modern, and demanding, industrialized society. Virtually every aspect of our body and brain can be influenced by stress and although its effects are partly mediated by

  11. Stress and Fear Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maren, Stephen; Holmes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Stress has a critical role in the development and expression of many psychiatric disorders, and is a defining feature of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Stress also limits the efficacy of behavioral therapies aimed at limiting pathological fear, such as exposure therapy. Here we examine emerging evidence that stress impairs recovery from trauma by impairing fear extinction, a form of learning thought to underlie the suppression of trauma-related fear memories. We describe the major structural and functional abnormalities in brain regions that are particularly vulnerable to stress, including the amygdala, prefrontal cortex, and hippocampus, which may underlie stress-induced impairments in extinction. We also discuss some of the stress-induced neurochemical and molecular alterations in these brain regions that are associated with extinction deficits, and the potential for targeting these changes to prevent or reverse impaired extinction. A better understanding of the neurobiological basis of stress effects on extinction promises to yield novel approaches to improving therapeutic outcomes for PTSD and other anxiety and trauma-related disorders. PMID:26105142

  12. Creatively Coping with Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Roger T.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The authors suggest that the best way to deal effectively with stress is better management of one's life style. Some of the coping strategies include developing good eating and exercise habits, learning relaxation techniques, building an emotional support system, and anticipating and managing stressful life events. (SK)

  13. Allometric trajectories and "stress"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anfodillo, Tommaso; Petit, Giai; Sterck, Frank; Lechthaler, Silvia; Olson, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    The term "stress" is an important but vague term in plant biology. We show situations in which thinking in terms of "stress" is profitably replaced by quantifying distance from functionally optimal scaling relationships between plant parts. These relationships include, for example, the

  14. TeknoStress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Niels Thyge

    2017-01-01

    Denne artikel handler om hvordan målstyring skaber stress. Normalt tænker vi på målstyring og andre ledelsesteknologier, som neutrale instrumenter og som i sig selv ikke er harmfulde. Men hvad hvis ledelsesteknologier slet ikke er neutrale og harmløse? Og hvad hvis kimen til stress blandt andet...

  15. Stresses in Dolosse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Liu, Zhou; Howell, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    Failures of rubble mound breakwaters armoured with complex types of unreinforced concrete armour units are often due to breakage. This happens when the stresses exceed the material strength. Sufficient parametric studies of the stresses are not yet available to produce design diagrams...

  16. Stress, arousal, and sleep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanford, Larry D.; Suchecki, Deborah; Meerlo, Peter; Meerlo, Peter; Benca, Ruth M.; Abel, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Stress is considered to be an important cause of disrupted sleep and insomnia. However, controlled and experimental studies in rodents indicate that effects of stress on sleep-wake regulation are complex and may strongly depend on the nature of the stressor. While most stressors are associated with

  17. MICRONUTRIENTS AND STRESS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychological stress and cancer. The belief that psychosocial factors play a role in cancer has been evident throughout the documented history of medicine; going back at least to the second century AD." Epidemiological studies conducted since the 1950s have confirmed that intense emotional stress and certain personality ...

  18. Stress and reward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chumbley, J R; Hulme, O; Köchli, H

    2014-01-01

    Healthy individuals tend to consume available rewards like food and sex. This tendency is attenuated or amplified in most stress-related psychiatric conditions, so we asked if it depends on endogenous levels of the 'canonical stress hormone' cortisol. We unobtrusively quantified how hard healthy...

  19. Stress of stoicism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doan, Stacey N.; Dich, Nadya; Evans, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    The present longitudinal study examined the combined effects of task persistence and negative emotionality (NE) on allostatic load (AL), a physiological indicator of chronic stress. In line with John Henryism theory, we hypothesized that high persistence combined with low NE may be indicative...... persistence was associated with higher physiological stress. Our results have implications for both clinical and intervention contexts....

  20. Videnarbejde og stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Anders; Andersen, Vibeke; Sørensen, Ole Henning

    . Videnarbejde kan for den enkelte være vejen til selvrealisering og begejstring, men rummer også i sig kimen til stress og udbrændthed. Og det er netop i spændingsfeltet - i kampen - mellem begejstring og belastning, at bogen ser stress i det moderne arbejdsliv, som en uoverensstemmelse mellem ydre krav og...

  1. Stress Management for Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaichkowsky, Leonard D., Ed.; Sime, Wesley E., Ed.

    Included in this volume are papers on stress management in athletics; eight of the ten papers are followed with a "Coach's Reaction": (1) "Competitive Athletic Stress Factors in Athletes and Coaches" (Walter Kroll); (2) "Mental Preparation for Peak Performance in Swimmers" (Eugene F. Gauron)--Coach's Reaction by Suzi…

  2. Stress and disorders of the stress system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrousos, George P

    2009-07-01

    All organisms must maintain a complex dynamic equilibrium, or homeostasis, which is constantly challenged by internal or external adverse forces termed stressors. Stress occurs when homeostasis is threatened or perceived to be so; homeostasis is re-established by various physiological and behavioral adaptive responses. Neuroendocrine hormones have major roles in the regulation of both basal homeostasis and responses to threats, and are involved in the pathogenesis of diseases characterized by dyshomeostasis or cacostasis. The stress response is mediated by the stress system, partly located in the central nervous system and partly in peripheral organs. The central, greatly interconnected effectors of this system include the hypothalamic hormones arginine vasopressin, corticotropin-releasing hormone and pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides, and the locus ceruleus and autonomic norepinephrine centers in the brainstem. Targets of these effectors include the executive and/or cognitive, reward and fear systems, the wake-sleep centers of the brain, the growth, reproductive and thyroid hormone axes, and the gastrointestinal, cardiorespiratory, metabolic, and immune systems. Optimal basal activity and responsiveness of the stress system is essential for a sense of well-being, successful performance of tasks, and appropriate social interactions. By contrast, excessive or inadequate basal activity and responsiveness of this system might impair development, growth and body composition, and lead to a host of behavioral and somatic pathological conditions.

  3. Stress and Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2014-01-01

    mortality rates in the aftermath of major acute events such as natural disasters and terrorism as well as among those who experience the more enduring stress of daily life. In the dissertation, chronic stress is most strongly associated with deaths from respiratory disorders and external causes including...... of Parkinson’s disease is not supported in the dissertation. The experience of major life events appears, on the other hand, to be strongly associated with onset of depression, which is a common non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s disease progression. Mechanisms linking stress to health include a combination...... the importance of developing public health initiatives to remedy the problem. Conceptual confusion combined with a limited focus on single stressors or specific life situations may lead to misclassification of a person’s actual stress level and consequently an underestimation of the relationship between stress...

  4. Piping Stress Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setjo, Renaningsih

    2000-01-01

    Piping stress analysis on Primary Sampling System, Reactor Cooling System, and Feedwater System for AP600 have been performed. Piping stress analysis is one of the requirements in the design of piping system. Piping stress is occurred due to static and dynamic loads during service. Analysis was carried out. Using PS+CAEPIPE software based on the individual and combination loads with assumption that failure could be happened during normal, upset, emergency and faulted condition as describe in ASME III/ANSI B31.1. With performing the piping stress analysis, the layout (proper pipe routing) of the piping system can be design with the requirements of piping stress and pipe supports in mind I.e sufficient flexibility for thermal expansion, etc to commensurate with the i tended service such as temperatures, pressure, seismic and anticipated loading

  5. Stress urinary incontinence in pregnant women: a review of prevalence, pathophysiology, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangsawang, Bussara; Sangsawang, Nucharee

    2013-06-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is the most common type of urinary incontinence (UI) in pregnant women and is known to have detrimental effects on the quality of life in approximately 54.3 %. Pregnancy is the main risk factor for the development of SUI. This review provides details of the pathophysiology leading to SUI in pregnant women and SUI prevalence and treatment during pregnancy. We conducted a PubMed search for English-language and human-study articles registered from January 1990 to September 2012. This search was performed for articles dealing with prevalence and treatment of SUI during pregnancy. In the intervention studies, we included studies that used a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design or studies comparing a treatment intervention to no treatment. A total of 534 articles were identified; 174 full-text articles were reviewed, and 28 of them met eligibility criteria and are reported on here. The mean prevalence of SUI during pregnancy was 41 % (18.6-60 %) and increased with gestational age. The increasing pressure of the growing uterus and fetal weight on pelvic-floor muscles (PFM) throughout pregnancy, together with pregnancy-related hormonal changes, may lead to reduced PFM strength as well as their supportive and sphincteric function. These cause mobility of the bladder neck and urethra, leading to urethral sphincter incompetence. Pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFME) is a safe and effective treatment for SUI during pregnancy, without significant adverse effects. Understanding these issues can be useful for health-care professionals when informing and counseling pregnant women to help prevent SUI during pregnancy and the postpartum period.

  6. Assessment of Workplace Stress: Occupational Stress, Its Consequences, and Common Causes of Teacher Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jo-Ida; Sullivan, Brandon A.

    This chapter introduces teachers and other education professionals to the assessment of occupational stress. It begins with a brief discussion of what occupational stress is, and overview of the consequences of prolonged stress, and a review of the common causes of teacher stress. Next, it presents methods for reducing occupational stress through…

  7. Basic stress analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Iremonger, M J

    1982-01-01

    BASIC Stress Analysis aims to help students to become proficient at BASIC programming by actually using it in an important engineering subject. It also enables the student to use computing as a means of learning stress analysis because writing a program is analogous to teaching-it is necessary to understand the subject matter. The book begins by introducing the BASIC approach and the concept of stress analysis at first- and second-year undergraduate level. Subsequent chapters contain a summary of relevant theory, worked examples containing computer programs, and a set of problems. Topics c

  8. Environmental thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, Samuel M; Guisto, John A; Sullivan, John B

    2002-01-01

    Thermal stress from cold and heat can affect health and productivity in a wide range of environmental and workload conditions. Health risks typically occur in the outer zones of heat and cold stress, but are also related to workload. Environmental factors related to thermal stress are reviewed. Individuals undergo thermoregulatory physiologic changes to adapt and these changes are reviewed. Heat and cold related illnesses are reviewed as well as their appropriate therapy. Published standards, thresholds and recommendations regarding work practices, personal protection and types of thermal loads are reviewed.

  9. Stress-Detection Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    An Ames Research Center scientist invented an infrared lens used in sunglasses to filter out ultraviolet rays. This product finds its origins in research for military enemy detection. Through a Space Act Agreement, Optical Sales Corporation introduced the Hawkeye Lenses not only as sunglasses but as plant stress detection lenses. The lenses enhance the stressed part of the leaf, which has less chlorophyll than healthy leaves, through dyes that filter out certain wavelengths of light. Plant stress is visible earlier, at a stage when something can be done to save the plants.

  10. Stress and Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2014-01-01

    mortality rates in the aftermath of major acute events such as natural disasters and terrorism as well as among those who experience the more enduring stress of daily life. In the dissertation, chronic stress is most strongly associated with deaths from respiratory disorders and external causes including...... suicide. The relationship between chronic stress and mortality is probably due to a combination of etiological pathways affecting disease incidence and factors such as treatment seeking behavior and individual vulnerability, which are likely to affect disease progression. Several experimental studies...

  11. Pacing stress echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrusta Marco

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-rate pacing is a valid stress test to be used in conjunction with echocardiography; it is independent of physical exercise and does not require drug administration. There are two main applications of pacing stress in the echo lab: the noninvasive detection of coronary artery disease through induction of a regional transient dysfunction; and the assessment of contractile reserve through peak systolic pressure/ end-systolic volume relationship at increasing heart rates to assess global left ventricular contractility. Methods The pathophysiologic rationale of pacing stress for noninvasive detection of coronary artery disease is obvious, with the stress determined by a controlled increase in heart rate, which is a major determinant of myocardial oxygen demand, and thereby tachycardia may exceed a fixed coronary flow reserve in the presence of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. The use of pacing stress echo to assess left ventricular contractile reserve is less established, but promising. Positive inotropic interventions are mirrored by smaller end-systolic volumes and higher end-systolic pressures. An increased heart rate progressively increases the force of ventricular contraction (Bowditch treppe or staircase phenomenon. To build the force-frequency relationship, the force is determined at different heart rate steps as the ratio of the systolic pressure (cuff sphygmomanometer/end-systolic volume index (biplane Simpson rule. The heart rate is determined from ECG. Conclusion Two-dimensional echocardiography during pacing is a useful tool in the detection of coronary artery disease. Because of its safety and ease of repeatability noninvasive pacing stress echo can be the first-line stress test in patients with permanent pacemaker. The force-frequency can be defined as up- sloping (normal when the peak stress pacing systolic pressure/end-systolic volume index is higher than baseline and intermediate stress

  12. Stresses of Single Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Stresses of Single Parenting Page Content Article Body What are some ways ... way. Check your local library for books on parenting. Local hospitals, the YMCA, and church groups often ...

  13. Clinical Stress Echocardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Karagiannis

    2007-01-01

    textabstractTwo-dimensional echocardiography is a commonly used non-invasive method for the assessment of left ventricular function. It provides precise information on both global and segmental myocardial function by displaying endocardial motion and wall thickening. Dobutamine stress

  14. Stress tolerant plants

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio, Vicente; Iniesto Sánchez, Elisa; Irigoyen Miguel, María Luisa

    2014-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to transgenic plants and methods for modulating abscisic acid (ABA) perception and signal transduction in plants. The plants find use in increasing yield in plants, particularly under abiotic stress.

  15. Stress and Your Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lack of focus Trouble getting things done Poor self-esteem Short temper Trouble sleeping Upset stomach Back pain ... A-Z Health Topics Related information Anxiety disorders fact sheet Caregiver stress fact sheet Depression fact sheet ...

  16. Stress - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Section Coping with Stress - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Traditional (Cantonese dialect) (繁體中文) Expand Section Coping ...

  17. Thermal stress and seismogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Huilan; Wei Dongping

    1989-05-01

    In this paper, the Fourier stress method was applied to deal with the problem of plane thermal stress, and a computing formula was given. As an example, we set up a variate temperature field to describe the uplifted upper mantle in Bozhong area of China, and the computing results shows that the maximum value of thermal plane shear stress is up to nearly 7x10 7 P α in two regions of this area. Since the Bohai earthquake (18 July, 1969, M s = 7.4) occurred at the edge of one of them and Tangshan earthquake (28 July, 1976, M s = 7.8) within another, their occurrences can be related reasonably to the thermal stress. (author). 15 refs, 7 figs

  18. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... But when someone has PTSD, his or her stress response system doesn't switch off as it should. Traumatic events that can cause PTSD include: violent assaults, including rape fire physical or sexual abuse acts of violence (such ...

  19. Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 13. Safran MR, Zachazewski J, Stone DA. Metatarsal stress fracture. In: Safran MR, Zachazewski J, Stone DA, ...

  20. Calcaneal stress fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jason M; Vidt, Louis G; Gehl, Richard S; Montgomery, Travis

    2005-01-01

    The majority of plantar heel pain is diagnosed as plantar fasciitis or heel spur syndrome. When historic or physical findings are unusual or when routine treatment proves ineffective, one should consider an atypical cause of heel pain. Stress fractures of the calcaneus are a frequently unrecognized source of heel pain. In some cases they can continue to go unrecognized because the symptoms of calcaneal stress fractures sometimes improves with treatments aimed at plantar fasciitis. Calcaneal stress fractures can occur in any population of adults and even children and are common among active people, such as athletes, sports enthusiasts, and military personnel. It is likely that the number of diagnosed calcaneal stress fractures will rise among practitioners with an increased recognition of their possibility.

  1. Survival pathways under stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Survival pathways under stress. Bacteria survive by changing gene expression. pattern. Three important pathways will be discussed: Stringent response. Quorum sensing. Proteins performing function to control oxidative damage.

  2. Occupational stress among dentists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    2011-01-01

    Dentists report a high degree of occupational stress.(Cooper, Mallinger, and Kahn, 1978;Coster, Carstens, and Harris, 1987;DiMatteo, Shugars, and Hays, 1993;Hakeberg et al., 1992;Möller and Spangenberg, 1996;Moore, 2000;Myers and Myers, 2004;O'Shea, Corah, and Ayer, 1984) This chapter reviews...... the literature of studies that elaborate on the circumstances of occupational stress of dentists. These will include the frequency of occurrence of occupational stress among dentists in several countries, frequency and intensity of identified stressors specific to dentistry, as well as the consequences...... of this occupational stress. The literature on consequences includes effects on dentists' physical health, personal and occupational performance, including "burnout" phenomena, as well as topics of alcohol or substance abuse and reports of suicidal behaviour among dentists. One specific and less conventionally...

  3. Bolt Thread Stress Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2012-01-01

    Designs of threaded fasteners are controlled by different standards, and the number of different thread definitions is large. The most commonly used thread is probably the metric ISO thread, and this design is therefore used in this paper. Thread root design controls the stress concentration factor...... of threads and therefore indirectly the bolt fatigue life. The root shape is circular, and from shape optimization for minimum stress concentration it is well known that the circular shape is seldom optimal. An axisymmetric Finite Element (FE) formulation is used to analyze the bolted connection, and a study...... is performed to establish the need for contact modeling with regard to finding the correct stress concentration factor. Optimization is performed with a simple parameterization with two design variables. Stress reduction of up to 9% is found in the optimization process, and some similarities are found...

  4. Stress and Eating Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Yau, Yvonne H. C.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a heterogeneous construct that, despite multiple and diverse attempts, has been difficult to treat. One conceptualization gaining media and research attention in recent years is that foods, particularly hyperpalatable (e.g., high-fat, high sugar) ones, may possess addictive qualities. Stress is an important factor in the development of addiction and in addiction relapse, and may contribute to an increased risk for obesity and other metabolic diseases. Uncontrollable stress changes ...

  5. Chronic Stress and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Prolonged stress exposures and elevated GC levels ( cortisol in humans and corticosterone in rodents) can cause detrimental effects on the brain...body by increasing adrenaline and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) that produces cortisol . Cells in the amygdala have shown to increase after...restraint stress. Physiology and Behavior, 87(4), 643-649. Gorzalka, B. B., & Hanson, L. A. (1998). Sexual behavior and wet dog shakes in the male rat

  6. Stress and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqutayan, Shadiya

    2011-01-01

    This is an experimental study and it discusses the effectiveness of social support in managing academic stress among students. The purpose of this study is to understand the importance of social support in managing stress. Simple random sampling was assigned to a number of 120 students, equally divided into an experimental and a control group. Classes on social support as coping mechanisms were given to the experimental group only. The accumulated data were then analyzed, descriptive statistics were used to interpret and evaluate the prevalence of academic stress, and social support. Correlation analysis was employed in the examination of the relationship between stress and social support. The findings of this study indicate that there are significant differences between the experimental group and the control group in relation to stress and social support. Eventually, the experimental group proved to cope with academic stress better than the control group, and they were satisfied with their academic performance during the experimentation. Hence, it is highly advisable to encourage the students to use social support as coping mechanisms.

  7. Student under stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krnjajić Stevan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a natural phenomenon, sooner or later experienced by the most Rapid increase in the number of students with health problems, seeking health and advisory services, causes deep concern to parents, schools and wider community. This, in turn, arouses the interest in the research of the negative effects of poor physical and mental health on academic success. Considering the fact that school age population was rarely the subject of research, this paper deals with psycho-social and developmental aspects of stress, namely, with causes, consequences and the strategies for overcoming stressful events in the education of children and adolescents. Life events in which children most often participate and which are also potential sources of stress (stressors can be classified into familial, interpersonal, personal and academic. Out of numerous identified sources of stress, we have focused our attention on several less researched ones in the field of school life starting school, transition from primary school to secondary and from secondary school to university, peer rejection and problems concerning financing school education. Anxiety, depression and anger were analyzed as the most frequent consequences of unfavorable life events. The following strategies for overcoming stress are most often used by children and adolescents: seeking social support, problem-solving orientation, reduction and avoidance of tension as well as sport and recreation.

  8. Stress and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Nagata

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Three factors in recent medical research and treatment (advances in the field of psychoneuroimmunology, epidemiological evidence regarding important interaction between psychosocial factors and development of disease, and the recognition of the importance of patient education for self-management of asthma have led clinicians and researchers to reconsider the role of psychosocial stress in asthma. There are many reports suggesting that stressful life events, family problems and a behavior pattern that increases psychological conflict may influence the development or relapse of asthma and influence its clinical course. Depression is known as one of the risk factors of fatal asthmatic attack. In laboratory studies, about 20% of asthmatics were considered reactors who showed an airway change after exposure to emotional stress. Studies regarding the pathway of stress effect on allergy and asthma are reviewed and discussed from the standpoint of psychoneuroimmunology; for example, the enhancement of IgE production and increased susceptibility to respiratory infection by stress, conditioned anaphylaxis and nerve/mast cell interaction, the effect of stress on various bronchial responses and the inhibition of the immediate and late asthmatic response by anterior hypothalamic lesioning.

  9. Stressful life events, vulnerable to stress and depression among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was carried out to observe the difference between male and female Eritrean students on the basis of stressful life events, vulnerable to stress and depression. Stressful life Events Questionnaire, Vulnerable to Stress Instrument and Beck Depression Scale were administered to gather information. The data ...

  10. Psychosocial Stress and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Metabolomics and Perceived Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    continuing work on the role of stress in ovarian cancer development indicates that chronic stress may increase risk of developing ovarian cancer. 15...advice. Dr. Poole was also a peer mentor to three post-doctoral fellows working in the CDNM. Results from the ongoing research in the role of stress in...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0493 TITLE: Psychosocial Stress and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Metabolomics and Perceived Stress PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

  11. STRESS FRACTURES IN SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đivo Ban

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Children and adolescents today, all before starting with regular sports activities and involvement in semi-professional and top professional sport, so it increases the num- ber of discovered stress fractures in this age. This type of injury can occur as a consequence of action one strong force, or the many repeated small force strength, to be exact, when the load (stress transcend ability reparations bones. Stress fractures are recorded and described up to the lower limbs. Research has been confirmed that the bones of lower leg are mostly made in injury, and with the el- derly and with the population of children and young adolescents. Occur in many sports, something to them is greater when the frequency of running and often are present in the female population. According to the results of numerous investigations, mistakes in the training are the most common cause of the emergence of stress fracture. In a direct comparison with complemented these injuries is the condition of muscles, so it is important that at the sa- me time carry out exercises strengthen muscles and stretching. Typical clinical signs of stress fractures are localized painful sensitivity to palpa- tion and runoff in a small number of cases. The basic diagnostic procedure is a medical check, it is the small, radiology and scintigraphyc diagnostics (most accurate and mag- netic resonance imaging. Treatment is usually without surgery and conservative, with rest and reducing stress, and its activity athlete breaks mainly between four and eight weeks. Only the very need surgical treatment The most important thing is that attention is focused on the proper prevention and to take all that it ever occurred to stress fractures that athletes ramble of the courts and the competition (better education of sports workers, separation of groups with increa- sed risk of the formation of an injury, adaptation activities age and abilities of athletes, adequate sports equipment, high-quality sports

  12. Perceived Stress among Deaf Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elaine G.; Ouellette, Sue E.; Kang, Youngmi

    2006-01-01

    The Present Article describes the effectiveness of stress management classes in decreasing perceived stress among Deaf adults. Deaf adults may experience unique stressors, in addition to circumstances associated with increased stress in the general population. The Perceived Stress Scale (S. Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983) was used as a…

  13. Stress echocardiography expert consensus statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Sicari (Rosa); P. Nihoyannopoulos (Petros); A. Evangelista (Arturo); J. Kasprzak (Jaroslav); P. Lancellotti (Patrizio); D. Poldermans (Don); J.U. Voigt; J.L. Zamorano (Jose)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractStress echocardiography is the combination of 2D echocardiography with a physical, pharmacological or electrical stress. The diagnostic end point for the detection of myocardial ischemia is the induction of a transient worsening in regional function during stress. Stress echocardiography

  14. Doctors' experiences and their perception of the most stressful aspects of complaints processes in the UK: an analysis of qualitative survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Tom; Vanderhaegen, Joke; Vranken, Renilt; Wynants, Laure; De Cock, Bavo; Peters, Mike; Timmerman, Dirk; Van Calster, Ben; Jalmbrant, Maria; Van Audenhove, Chantal

    2016-07-04

    To examine doctors' experiences of complaints, including which aspects are most stressful. We also investigated how doctors felt complaints processes could be improved. A qualitative study based on a cross-sectional survey of members of the British Medical Association (BMA). We asked the following: (1) Try to summarise as best as you can your experience of the complaints process and how it made you feel. (2) What were the most stressful aspects of the complaint? (3) What would you improve in the complaints system? We sent the survey to 95 636 doctors, and received 10 930 (11.4%) responses. Of these, 6146 had a previous, recent or current complaint and 3417 (31.3%) of these respondents answered questions 1 and 2. We randomly selected 1000 answers for analysis, and included 100 using the saturation principle. Of this cohort, 93 responses for question 3 were available. Doctors frequently reported feeling powerless, emotionally distressed, and experiencing negative feelings towards both those managing complaints and the complainants themselves. Many felt unsupported, fearful of the consequences and that the complaint was unfair. The most stressful aspects were the prolonged duration and unpredictability of procedures, managerial incompetence, poor communication and perceiving that processes are biased in favour of complainants. Many reported practising defensively or considering changing career after a complaint, and few found any positive outcomes from complaints investigations. Physicians suggested procedures should be more transparent, competently managed, time limited, and that there should be an open dialogue with complainants and policies for dealing with vexatious complaints. Some felt more support for doctors was needed. Complaints seriously impact on doctors' psychological wellbeing, and are associated with defensive practise. This is not beneficial to patient care. To improve procedures, doctors propose they are simplified, time limited and more

  15. Stress, Epigenetics, and Alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonat, Sachin; Pandey, Subhash C.

    2012-01-01

    Acute and chronic stressors have been associated with alterations in mood and increased anxiety that may eventually result in the development of stress-related psychiatric disorders. Stress and associated disorders, including anxiety, are key factors in the development of alcoholism because alcohol consumption can temporarily reduce the drinker’s dysphoria. One molecule that may help mediate the relationship between stress and alcohol consumption is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein that regulates the structure and function of the sites where two nerve cells interact and exchange nerve signals (i.e., synapses) and which is involved in numerous physiological processes. Aberrant regulation of BDNF signaling and alterations in synapse activity (i.e., synaptic plasticity) have been associated with the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders and alcoholism. Mechanisms that contribute to the regulation of genetic information without modification of the DNA sequence (i.e., epigenetic mechanisms) may play a role in the complex control of BDNF signaling and synaptic plasticity—for example, by modifying the structure of the DNA–protein complexes (i.e., chromatin) that make up the chromosomes and thereby modulating the expression of certain genes. Studies regarding the epigenetic control of BDNF signaling and synaptic plasticity provide a promising direction to understand the mechanisms mediating the interaction between stress and alcoholism. PMID:23584115

  16. [Complex posttraumatic stress disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Tamar; Kotler, Moshe

    2007-11-01

    The characteristic symptoms resulting from exposure to an extreme trauma include three clusters of symptoms: persistent experience of the traumatic event, persistent avoidance of stimuli associated with the trauma and persistent symptoms of increased arousal. Beyond the accepted clusters of symptoms for posttraumatic stress disorder exists a formation of symptoms related to exposure to extreme or prolonged stress e.g. childhood abuse, physical violence, rape, and confinement within a concentration camp. With accumulated evidence of the existence of these symptoms began a trail to classify a more complex syndrome, which included, but was not confined to the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. This review addresses several subjects for study in complex posttraumatic stress disorder, which is a complicated and controversial topic. Firstly, the concept of complex posttraumatic stress disorder is presented. Secondly, the professional literature relevant to this disturbance is reviewed and finally, the authors present the polemic being conducted between the researchers of posttraumatic disturbances regarding validity, reliability and the need for separate diagnosis for these symptoms.

  17. Stress: Neurobiology, consequences and management

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Anil; Rinwa, Puneet; Kaur, Gurleen; Machawal, Lalit

    2013-01-01

    Stress, both physical and psychological, is attracting increasing attention among neuroresearchers. In the last 20 decades, there has been a surge of interest in the research of stress-induced manifestations and this approach has resulted in the development of more appropriate animal models for stress-associated pathologies and its therapeutic management. These stress models are an easy and convenient method for inducing both psychological and physical stress. To understand the behavioral cha...

  18. Tips to Manage Anxiety and Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2018 Conference Snapshot Tips to Manage Anxiety and Stress When you're feeling anxious or stressed, the ... Subscribe to ADAA Triumph: Free Monthly E-News Stress Relief Kits Feeling stressed? Get an ADAA stress ...

  19. Stress fractures in athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschberger, R.; Henning, A.; Graff, K.H.

    1984-01-01

    The early exclusion of the presence of a stress fracture may be decisive for the success of an athlete. Scintigraphy with a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical is suitable for the early detection of stress lesions. Of 30 athletes, fractures were demonstrated in 17 whereas in 6 they were excluded. We found most fractures in the tarsal bones such as os naviculare pedis, ossa cuneiformia and talus. The type of sport engaged in appears to be an important factor in determining the location of the fracture. Scintiphotos were taken in several views using region of interest techniques and two phase-scintigraphy. This method is considered to be useful for localization and follow-up of skeletal stress lesions as well as for differential diagnosis. (orig.) [de

  20. Stress fractures in athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirschberger, R.; Henning, A.; Graff, K.H.

    1984-12-01

    The early exclusion of the presence of a stress fracture may be decisive for the success of an athlete. Scintigraphy with a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical is suitable for the early detection of stress lesions. Of 30 athletes, fractures were demonstrated in 17 whereas in 6 they were excluded. We found most fractures in the tarsal bones such as os naviculare pedis, ossa cuneiformia and talus. The type of sport engaged in appears to be an important factor in determining the location of the fracture. Scintiphotos were taken in several views using region of interest techniques and two phase-scintigraphy. This method is considered to be useful for localization and follow-up of skeletal stress lesions as well as for differential diagnosis.

  1. Posttraumatisk stress efter arbejdsulykker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K; Lauritsen, Jens; Hansen, O N

    1999-01-01

    This study focuses on post-traumatic stress disorder in a follow up one to two years after the occupational accident. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of PTSD, changes in general health status and issues of compensation. The material was all serious accidents registered in the Danish National...... of posttraumatic stress disorder as a chronic state was 2.8% (102 persons), of whom half had been given compensation. Among the most severe accidents the prevalence was 7.6%. In conclusion, in a large cohort of persons with moderate and severe occupational injuries this study demonstrated that post-traumatic...... stress disorder and lasting psychological distress should be a matter for concern in addition to the physical injury....

  2. Coping with Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Ines Marques

    is to provide insights into the ecological role of soil microbes living in a community and its capabilities to cope with short- and long-term stresses. In the introduction, the problem of using RNA based approaches in soil ecology is presented in parallel with the importance of soil microbes for the ecosystem...... research directions is presented. This PhD-thesis resulted in four draft-manuscripts where RNA sequencing techniques were used to answer different research questions related to the response of soil microorganisms to different types of stress: MANUSCRIPT 1 explores the effect of soil sieving...... towards microwaving-heat were detected and corresponded to traits conserved at high taxonomical level. Moreover, using the detected tolerance ranges, it was possible to point nitrification as “at risk” in systems exposed to rapid heat stress, even though some functional redundancy may have occurred...

  3. 31 CFR 10.51 - Incompetence and disreputable conduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... this paragraph (a)(13) include those which reflect or result from a knowing misstatement of fact or law... revealed, or from consciously disregarding information indicating that material facts expressed in the opinion or offering material are false or misleading. For purposes of this paragraph (a)(13), reckless...

  4. Cardiogenic shock – a look at acute functional mitral incompetence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case report. A 44-year-old man presented to an emerg- ency room, complaining of acute breath- lessness that had started that day. Further questioning revealed a 3-day history of diar- rhoea and a 7-month history of a produc- tive cough with bloodstained sputum. The patient reported having had fevers and night sweats for ...

  5. 7 CFR 82.17 - Death, incompetency, or disappearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND... that is eligible to receive benefits in accordance with this part, any person or persons who will, under 7 CFR part 707 of this title, be eligible for payments and benefits covered by this part, may...

  6. 7 CFR 81.17 - Death, incompetency, or disappearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND... is eligible to receive benefits in accordance with this part, such person or persons who would, under 7 CFR part 707 be eligible for payments and benefits covered by that part, may receive the tree...

  7. Research without informed patient consent in incompetent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobb, G J

    2015-05-01

    Most patients needing intensive care cannot give informed consent to participation in research. This includes the most acutely and severely ill, with the highest mortality and morbidity where research has the greatest potential to improve patient outcomes. In these circumstances consent is usually sought from a substitute decision maker, but while survivors of intensive care believe substitute decision makers will look after their interests, evidence suggests substitute decision makers are poorly equipped for this task. Various models have been suggested for research without patient informed consent when intervention is urgent and cannot wait until first person consent is possible, including a waiver of consent if conditions are met. A nationally consistent model is proposed for Australia with a robust process for initial waiver of consent followed by first person consent to further research-related procedures or ongoing follow-up when this can be competently provided.

  8. Stress and Salivary Glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keremi, Beata; Beck, Anita; Fabian, Tibor Karoly; Fabian, Gabor; Szabo, Geza; Nagy, Akos; Varga, Gabor

    2017-10-30

    Salivary glands produce a bicarbonate-rich fluid containing digestive and protective proteins and other components to be delivered into the gastrointestinal tract. Its function is under strict control of the autonomic nervous system. Salivary electrolyte and fluid secretion are primarily controlled by parasympathetic activity, while protein secretion is primaily triggered by sympathetic stimulation. Stress activates the hypothalamic - pituitary - adrenal axis. The peripheral limb of this axis is the efferent sympathetic/adrenomedullary system. Stress reaction, even if it is sustained for long, does not cause obvious damage to salivary glands. However, stress induces dramatic changes in the constituents of secreted saliva. Since salivary protein secretion is strongly dependent on sympathetic control, changes in saliva can be utilized as sensitive stress indicators. Some of the secreted compounds are known for their protective effect in the mouth and the gut, while others may just pass through the glands from blood plasma because of their chemical nature and the presence of transcellular salivary transporting systems. Indeed, most compounds that appear in blood circulation can also be identified in saliva, although at different concentrations. This work overviews the presently recognized salivary stress biosensors, such as amylase, cortisol, heat shock proteins and other compounds. It also demonstrates that saliva is widely recognised as a diagnostic tool for early and sensitive discovery of salivary and systemic conditions and disorders. At present it may be too early to introduce most of these biomarkers in daily routine diagnostic applications, but advances in salivary biomarker standardisation should permit their wide-range utilization in the future including safe, reliable and non-invasive estimation of acute and chronic stress levels in patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Flow stress anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, G.

    1996-01-01

    stress Variation in the rolling plane, which may be as high as 20%, are presented. The traditional Taylor model is applied to the data to account for the effect of texture. However, texture effects alone are not enough to explain all of the observed anisotropy. New models which take the combined effects...... of texture and deformation microstructure into account are presented. The models are based on the Taylor and Sachs models but modified with an anisotropic critical shear stress to account for the effect of the microstructure. The agreement between experimental data and model predictions is definitely better...

  10. Thyro-stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the biopsychosocial model of health, and its influence on chronic endocrine conditions, has improved over the past few decades. We can distinguish, for example, between diabetes distress and major depressive disorders in diabetes. Similar to diabetes distress, we suggest the existence of “thyrostress” in chronic thyroid disorders. Thyro-stress is defined as an emotional state, characterized by extreme apprehension, discomfort or dejection, caused by the challenges and demand of living with thyroid disorders such as hypothyroidism. This communication describes the etiology, clinical features, differential diagnosis, and management of thyro-stress.

  11. Residual-stress measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezeilo, A.N.; Webster, G.A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Webster, P.J. [Salford Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    Because neutrons can penetrate distances of up to 50 mm in most engineering materials, this makes them unique for establishing residual-stress distributions non-destructively. D1A is particularly suited for through-surface measurements as it does not suffer from instrumental surface aberrations commonly found on multidetector instruments, while D20 is best for fast internal-strain scanning. Two examples for residual-stress measurements in a shot-peened material, and in a weld are presented to demonstrate the attractive features of both instruments. (author).

  12. Stress and personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecic-Tosevski, D; Vukovic, O; Stepanovic, J

    2011-01-01

    Stress is an adaptation reaction of living organisms in response to internal or external threats to homeostasis. It is considered as a complex defence mechanism representing the final endpoint of numerous dynamic and interconnected factors of biological, psychological and social nature. Stress is not a simple, stimulus-response reaction, but the interaction between an individual and the environment, involving subjective perception and assessment of stressors, thus constituting a highly personalized process. Specific inherited characteristics, early experience in life, and particular, learned cognitive predispositions make individuals more or less susceptible to the effects of stressors. Resilience and vulnerability to stressors as well as intensity of stress response are greatly dependable on age, gender, intelligence, and numerous characteristics of personality, such as hardiness,locus of control, self-efficacy, self-esteem, optimism, hostility (component of type A personality)and type D traits (negative affectivity and social inhibition). To understand the relation between personality and stress, it is essential to recognize the impact of individual differences in the following four aspects: (1) choice or avoidance of environments that are associated with specific stressors, challenges or benefits, (2) way of interpreting a stressful situation and evaluating one's own abilities and capacities for proactive behaviour so as to confront or avoid it, (3) intensity of response to a stressor,and (4) coping strategies employed by the individual facing a stressful situation. Studies have recorded considerable consistency in coping strategies employed to confront stressful situations, independentlyof situational factors and in connection with permanent personality and temperamental traits,such as neuroticism, extraversion, sense of humour, persistence, fatalism, conscientiousness, andopenness to experience. Positive affect has been associated with positive reappraisal

  13. Modelling Stresses on Icy Satellites: Upgrading SatStressGUI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Chad; Pappalardo, Robert T.; Patthoff, Alex; Doan, Nhu

    2017-10-01

    SatStressGUI is a program that calculates surface stresses resulting from candidate stress sources, specifically: diurnal tidal forces, nonsynchronous rotation, ice shell thickening, obliquity, and orbital migration on icy and rocky satellites. SatStressGUI is designed to enable quick calculations and easy to create stress field visuals. Here we report on recent upgrades to SatStressGUI; specifically, enabling it to calculate stresses resulting from obliquity driven stressing in a viscoelastic regime. We define obliquity as the tilt of the satellite’s equatorial plane relative to the orbital plane. Obliquity driven stresses cause asymmetric stress fields about the equator. The resulting asymmetries can affect the orientation of the principal stresses and thereby result in the arcuate (as opposed to boxy) cycloid patterns seen in some icy satellites and allow for fractures to propagate across the equator. In the past, SatStressGUI had the ability to calculate obliquity stresses only for an elastic body; however, icy satellites are better described as viscoelastic bodies. As a result of our recent upgrades; these stress fields, which can result in the formation of surface features such as the lineaments and cycloids found on Europa, can now be more accurately simulated. We used an obliquity model that follows the calculations the calculations of Hermes et al. (Icarus, 215, 417-438, 2011), which takes a closer look at the effects of a non-zero obliquity in a viscoelastic regime. By the calculations of Hermes et al. (Icarus, 215, 417-438, 2011), accounting for viscoelastic behavior of ice could result in a westward shift of the entire stress field. By permitting simulation of surface features from various tidal stresses and comparison them to observations, SatStressGUI can help us gain insight into icy bodies’ deformation history: a history which can better informing our predictions about the interiors and geological histories of satellites such as Europa.

  14. Stress in Harmonic Serialism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Kathryn Ringler

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation proposes a model of word stress in a derivational version of Optimality Theory (OT) called Harmonic Serialism (HS; Prince and Smolensky 1993/2004, McCarthy 2000, 2006, 2010a). In this model, the metrical structure of a word is derived through a series of optimizations in which the "best" metrical foot is chosen…

  15. Stress and Child Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ross A.

    2014-01-01

    Children's early social experiences shape their developing neurological and biological systems for good or for ill, writes Ross Thompson, and the kinds of stressful experiences that are endemic to families living in poverty can alter children's neurobiology in ways that undermine their health, their social competence, and their ability…

  16. Exercise stress testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, B.

    1975-01-01

    Positive maximum stress tests in the management of coronary patients are discussed. It is believed that coronary angiography would be the ultimate test to predict the future of patients with coronary heart disease. Progression of angina, myocardial infarction, and death due to heart disease were analyzed.

  17. to salt stress

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tony

    2012-02-14

    Feb 14, 2012 ... signal transduction, transcription factor, stress and defense-related proteins and transport facilitation. The expression patterns of six genes having direct or indirect relation with ..... primers, which have also been reported in maritime pine and Spartina alterniflora (Dubos and Plomion, 2003;. Baisakh et al.

  18. The stress ulcer syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A. van Essen

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe stress ulcer syndrome is described in this thesis. This syndrome is seen in patients admitted to intensive care departments or being treated in field hospitals, in disaster areas, or battle fields. Acute mucosal lesions associated with burns (Curling's ulcers) and central nervous

  19. Nonexercise cardiac stress testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, J.L.; Baldwin, T.

    1989-01-01

    Many patients who require evaluation for coronary artery disease are unable to undergo exercise stress testing because of physiologic or psychological limitations. Drs Vacek and Baldwin describe three alternative methods for assessment of cardiac function in these patients, all of which have high levels of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. 23 references

  20. [Vitamins and oxidative stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodentsova, V M; Vrzhesinskaia, O A; Mazo, V K

    2013-01-01

    The central and local stress limiting systems, including the antioxidant defense system involved in defending the organism at the cellular and systemic levels from excess activation response to stress influence, leading to damaging effects. The development of stress, regardless of its nature [cold, increased physical activity, aging, the development of many pathologies (cardiovascular, neurodegenerative diseases, diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, ischemia, the effects of burns), immobilization, hypobaric hypoxia, hyperoxia, radiation effects etc.] leads to a deterioration of the vitamin status (vitamins E, A, C). Damaging effect on the antioxidant defense system is more pronounced compared to the stress response in animals with an isolated deficiency of vitamins C, A, E, B1 or B6 and the combined vitamins deficiency in the diet. Addition missing vitamin or vitamins restores the performance of antioxidant system. Thus, the role of vitamins in adaptation to stressors is evident. However, vitamins C, E and beta-carotene in high doses, significantly higher than the physiological needs of the organism, may be not only antioxidants, but may have also prooxidant properties. Perhaps this explains the lack of positive effects of antioxidant vitamins used in extreme doses for a long time described in some publications. There is no doubt that to justify the current optimal doses of antioxidant vitamins and other dietary antioxidants specially-designed studies, including biochemical testing of initial vitamin and antioxidant status of the organism, as well as monitoring their change over time are required.

  1. Stress and childhood epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campen, J.S. van

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood, characterized by the enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures. Children with epilepsy and their parents often report seizures precipitated by stress. In order to increase our understanding of the pathophysiological

  2. Stress in Humanitarian Workers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Stress in Humanitarian Workers: Case of the UNHCR Office in Senegal. S A Dia, A S Mohamed, M C Gaye Fall,. M Ndiaye. NB Dieng,. Department of Occupational Medicine and Forensic Medicine, Cheikh Anta Diop University at Dakar, Senegal. Corresponding author. Azhar Salim Mohamed. Dakar Fann, Sénégal, Tel: + ...

  3. Mobbing and Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Erkan

    2015-01-01

    Mobbing is an important construct which has impact on the numerous psychological variables. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between mobbing and stress. Participants were 436 teachers (206 (55%) were female, 230 (45%) were male) from Sakarya, Turkey. Their ages ranged from 26 to 55 years and the mean age of the…

  4. Memory dynamics under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaedflieg, Conny W E M; Schwabe, Lars

    2018-03-01

    Stressful events have a major impact on memory. They modulate memory formation in a time-dependent manner, closely linked to the temporal profile of action of major stress mediators, in particular catecholamines and glucocorticoids. Shortly after stressor onset, rapidly acting catecholamines and fast, non-genomic glucocorticoid actions direct cognitive resources to the processing and consolidation of the ongoing threat. In parallel, control of memory is biased towards rather rigid systems, promoting habitual forms of memory allowing efficient processing under stress, at the expense of "cognitive" systems supporting memory flexibility and specificity. In this review, we discuss the implications of this shift in the balance of multiple memory systems for the dynamics of the memory trace. Specifically, stress appears to hinder the incorporation of contextual details into the memory trace, to impede the integration of new information into existing knowledge structures, to impair the flexible generalisation across past experiences, and to hamper the modification of memories in light of new information. Delayed, genomic glucocorticoid actions might reverse the control of memory, thus restoring homeostasis and "cognitive" control of memory again.

  5. Meditation and Teacher Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaszar, Imre Emeric; Buchanan, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Early childhood teachers can be relaxed and peaceful as they create playful and harmonious classrooms, even if they work in stressful contexts. However, the stressors faced by teachers may lead to negative consequences that can undermine their ability to sustain personal health and positive interactions. In the absence of positive coping…

  6. Stress-related IBS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    related anxiety/stress response circuit. However, symptom- based therapies do not necessarily modify the natural history of the disorder, and a greater appreciation of the postulated pathophysiology may well refine therapeutic approaches.2,11. Brain–gut–enteric microbiota axis. The brain–gut axis. Stressors compel the ...

  7. Living with urea stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Intracellular organic osmolytes are present in certain organisms adapted to harsh environments. These osmolytes protect intracellular macromolecules against denaturing environmental stress. In contrast to the usually benign effects of most organic osmolytes, the waste product urea is a well-known perturbant of ...

  8. Stress og Socialitet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøbæk, Pernille Solveig

    2009-01-01

    Ifølge de etablerede arbejdsstressteorier skal miljømæssige krav balanceres op imod individuelle kontrolmuligheder, og der peges derfor på behovet for både sociologiske og psykologiske niveauer af arbejdsstress. Selvom en niveauinddelt tilgang til stress er vigtig, risikeres en opsplitning mellem...

  9. Heat stress in Tunisia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RACHID BOURAOUI

    Humidity Index (THI), examine heat stress effects on lactating cows and to suggest potential management strategies that can be ... monthly temperature and relative humidity data from different weather stations. ... The objectives of the current work were to characterize the environmental conditions to which dairy cows are ...

  10. environmental stress indicators system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    TESs =TELd/As = (DMI+DPO+2HF-I)/As. (7). From the above-mentioned calculated Formulas (4) (5) (7), it can be observed that TESg, TESn and TESs can help construct a country's total carried environmental stress via the material flow indicators. Ecological footprint intensity indicators and ecological overshoot indicators.

  11. Residual stresses in material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaczek, K. J.; Watkins, T. R.; Hubbard, C. R.; Wang, Xun-Li; Spooner, S.

    Material manufacturing processes often introduce residual stresses into the product. The residual stresses affect the properties of the material and often are detrimental. Therefore, the distribution and magnitude of residual stresses in the final product are usually an important factor in manufacturing process optimization or component life prediction. The present paper briefly discusses the causes of residual stresses. It then addresses the direct, nondestructive methods of residual stress measurement by X ray and neutron diffraction. Examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of residual stress measurement in machining and joining operations.

  12. Stress Managment and Health Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Dadkhah

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Health promotion approach is utilized to address the prevention, management and early intervention for stress management and also to promote positive mental and psychological health. Stress affects everyone and must be managed effectively to reduce its chronic and deleterious effects this study consists of two sections: in first section the principals of health promotion in different human existence levels, prevention of disease related to stress, the effect of stress on human well-being, and stress management were discussed. In second section the role of rehabilitation specialists (Medical technologist, nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, respiratory therapists, and social workers in stress management were counted.

  13. Feeling Stressed? Stress Relief Might Help Your Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... decline,” says Dr. Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, a leading stress researcher at Ohio State University. She and other researchers have found that stress affects the body’s immune system The system that ...

  14. Kinetics of stress fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachowiak, Matthew R; O'Shaughnessy, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Stress fibers are contractile cytoskeletal structures, tensile actomyosin bundles which allow sensing and production of force, provide cells with adjustable rigidity and participate in various processes such as wound healing. The stress fiber is possibly the best characterized and most accessible multiprotein cellular contractile machine. Here we develop a quantitative model of the structure and relaxation kinetics of stress fibers. The principal experimentally known features are incorporated. The fiber has a periodic sarcomeric structure similar to muscle fibers with myosin motor proteins exerting contractile force by pulling on actin filaments. In addition the fiber contains the giant spring-like protein titin. Actin is continuously renewed by exchange with the cytosol leading to a turnover time of several minutes. In order that steady state be possible, turnover must be regulated. Our model invokes simple turnover and regulation mechanisms: actin association and dissociation occur at filament ends, while actin filament overlap above a certain threshold in the myosin-containing regions augments depolymerization rates. We use the model to study stress fiber relaxation kinetics after stimulation, as observed in a recent experimental study where some fiber regions were contractile and others expansive. We find that two distinct episodes ensue after stimulation: the turnover-overlap system relaxes rapidly in seconds, followed by the slow relaxation of sarcomere lengths in minutes. For parameter values as they have been characterized experimentally, we find the long time relaxation of sarcomere length is set by the rate at which actin filaments can grow or shrink in response to the forces exerted by the elastic and contractile elements. Consequently, the stress fiber relaxation time scales inversely with both titin spring constant and the intrinsic actin turnover rate. The model's predicted sarcomere velocities and contraction-expansion kinetics are in good

  15. Kinetics of stress fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowiak, Matthew R; O' Shaughnessy, Ben [Department of Chemical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)], E-mail: bo8@columbia.edu

    2008-02-15

    Stress fibers are contractile cytoskeletal structures, tensile actomyosin bundles which allow sensing and production of force, provide cells with adjustable rigidity and participate in various processes such as wound healing. The stress fiber is possibly the best characterized and most accessible multiprotein cellular contractile machine. Here we develop a quantitative model of the structure and relaxation kinetics of stress fibers. The principal experimentally known features are incorporated. The fiber has a periodic sarcomeric structure similar to muscle fibers with myosin motor proteins exerting contractile force by pulling on actin filaments. In addition the fiber contains the giant spring-like protein titin. Actin is continuously renewed by exchange with the cytosol leading to a turnover time of several minutes. In order that steady state be possible, turnover must be regulated. Our model invokes simple turnover and regulation mechanisms: actin association and dissociation occur at filament ends, while actin filament overlap above a certain threshold in the myosin-containing regions augments depolymerization rates. We use the model to study stress fiber relaxation kinetics after stimulation, as observed in a recent experimental study where some fiber regions were contractile and others expansive. We find that two distinct episodes ensue after stimulation: the turnover-overlap system relaxes rapidly in seconds, followed by the slow relaxation of sarcomere lengths in minutes. For parameter values as they have been characterized experimentally, we find the long time relaxation of sarcomere length is set by the rate at which actin filaments can grow or shrink in response to the forces exerted by the elastic and contractile elements. Consequently, the stress fiber relaxation time scales inversely with both titin spring constant and the intrinsic actin turnover rate. The model's predicted sarcomere velocities and contraction-expansion kinetics are in good

  16. Stress: Neurobiology, consequences and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress, both physical and psychological, is attracting increasing attention among neuroresearchers. In the last 20 decades, there has been a surge of interest in the research of stress-induced manifestations and this approach has resulted in the development of more appropriate animal models for stress-associated pathologies and its therapeutic management. These stress models are an easy and convenient method for inducing both psychological and physical stress. To understand the behavioral changes underlying major depression, molecular and cellular studies are required. Dysregulation of the stress system may lead to disturbances in growth and development, and may this may further lead to the development of various other psychiatric disorders. This article reviews the different types of stress and their neurobiology, including the different neurotransmitters affected. There are various complications associated with stress and their management through various pharmacological and non-pharmacological techniques. The use of herbs in the treatment of stress-related problems is practiced in both Indian and Western societies, and it has a vast market in terms of anti-stress medications and treatments. Non-pharmacological techniques such as meditation and yoga are nowadays becoming very popular as a stress-relieving therapy because of their greater effectiveness and no associated side effects. Therefore, this review highlights the changes under stress and stressor and their impact on different animal models in understanding the mechanisms of stress along with their effective and safe management.

  17. Determinants of academic stress and stress-related self- medication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Academic stress in undergraduate students in health disciplines is perceived to be high by ... factors for stress [2]. During preclinical studies and research it has been observed that individuals with stress used to self-medicate hence leading to drug abuse for controlled ..... Memory Enhancers (Ginseng, Ginkgo).

  18. Weld Residual Stress in Corner Boxing Joints

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuyoshi, Matsuoka; Tokuharu, Yoshii; Ship Research Institute, Ministry of Transport; Ship Research Institute, Ministry of Transport

    1998-01-01

    Fatigue damage often occurs in corner boxing welded joints because of stress concentration and residual stress. The hot spot stress approach is applicable to stress concentration. However, the number of suitable methods for estimating residual stress in welded joints is limited. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the residual stress in corner boxing joints. The method of estimating residual stresses based on the inherent stress technique is presented. Residual stress measurements are per...

  19. Mild mental stress in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, P; Mehlsen, J; Sestoft, L

    1985-01-01

    A TV-game of tennis of 20 min duration was used to study the influence of mild mental stress on subcutaneous blood-flow (SBF), blood-pressure and heart rate in nine insulin-dependent diabetics and nine healthy subjects. SBF was measured on the thigh by local clearance of xenon-133. Measurements...... were made before, during and after the period of stress. During stress, SBF increased significantly by 26% in the healthy subjects, while SBF remained unchanged in the diabetics. The difference between the two groups was significant (P less than 0.05). Following stress, SBF returned to pre-stress level...... in the healthy subjects, while a significant decrease of 33% was observed in the diabetics. The pre-stress heart rate level was higher and the stress-induced increase in heart rate was less in the diabetics compared with the healthy subjects (P less than 0.05). During the stress a slight--but insignificant...

  20. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) Information 6 Things You ... Disease and Dementia (12/20/13) Research Spotlights Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Shown To ...

  1. The Benefits of Leisure Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jr., Richard G.

    1982-01-01

    Leisure bereft of all stress is action without purpose. Maximum motivation and gratification are achieved when a balance is achieved between abilities and responsibilities. Stress is an essential leisure ingredient that provides meaning and clarity to social experience. (CJ)

  2. What Is Child Traumatic Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awareness Sustainability Policy Issues What Is Child Traumatic Stress? Order NCTSN documents and other products where you ... these challenging times. Questions & Answers about Child Traumatic Stress Network experts answer questions about child trauma and ...

  3. Mental stress in college students

    OpenAIRE

    BLECHOVÁ, Romana

    2016-01-01

    The thesis deals with an incidence of mental stress of college students. The thesis is not only focused on the present, but also on the degree of mental stress and the factors that affect the degree of stress. The first objective is to analyse the incidence and impact of mental stress at students of the faculty. A partial objective is to describe the relation of physical activity and mental load, as many authors state that physically active individuals are mentally more resistant. Furthermore...

  4. Thermoelastic Stress Analysis: The Mean Stress Effect in Metallic Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Baaklini, George Y.

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this study involved the utilization of the thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) method to demonstrate the mean stress dependence of the thermoelastic constant. Titanium and nickel base alloys, commonly employed in aerospace gas turbines, were the materials of interest. The repeatability of the results was studied through a statistical analysis of the data. Although the mean stress dependence was well established, the ability to confidently quantify it was diminished by the experimental variations. If calibration of the thermoelastic response to mean stress can be successfully implemented, it is feasible to use the relationship to determine a structure's residual stress state.

  5. Corrosion product film-induced stress facilitates stress corrosion cracking

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young’s modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic subst...

  6. Stress: a naturalistic proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de Lourdes Rodríguez Campuzano

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Some of the stress related topics, especially from the conceptual framework of Lazarus and Folkman are reviewed on this work. It is sustained that this approach is dualistic and that the research made from this view is made on the basis of morphological criteria that don’t allow studying important elements of this kind of behavior. From an interbehavioral approach three functional criteria are proposed to study this phenomenon: the functional nature of situations, aptitude levels of behavior, and its three dimensions. Emphasis is made on the singular and individual nature of stress reactions. Finally it is suggested to take into account these functional criteria to develop a generic situational taxonomy to study these reactions as parts of complex behavioral patterns.

  7. Encyclopedia of thermal stresses

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Thermal Stresses is an important interdisciplinary reference work.  In addition to topics on thermal stresses, it contains entries on related topics, such as the theory of elasticity, heat conduction, thermodynamics, appropriate topics on applied mathematics, and topics on numerical methods. The Encyclopedia is aimed at undergraduate and graduate students, researchers and engineers. It brings together well established knowledge and recently received results. All entries were prepared  by leading experts from all over the world, and are presented in an easily accessible format. The work is lavishly illustrated, examples and applications are given where appropriate, ideas for further development abound, and the work will challenge many students and researchers to pursue new results of their own. This work can also serve as a one-stop resource for all who need succinct, concise, reliable and up to date information in short encyclopedic entries, while the extensive references will be of inte...

  8. Posttraumatisk stress efter arbejdsulykker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K; Lauritsen, Jens; Hansen, O N

    1999-01-01

    This study focuses on post-traumatic stress disorder in a follow up one to two years after the occupational accident. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of PTSD, changes in general health status and issues of compensation. The material was all serious accidents registered in the Danish National...... Register of Work Accidents during 1991. Seriousness was defined by type of injury, including all cases of amputations, bone fractures and extensive body lesions. Of 4745 possible, 3663 persons (77%) participated in a questionnaire study. The prevalence fulfilling the complete set of criteria...... of posttraumatic stress disorder as a chronic state was 2.8% (102 persons), of whom half had been given compensation. Among the most severe accidents the prevalence was 7.6%. In conclusion, in a large cohort of persons with moderate and severe occupational injuries this study demonstrated that post...

  9. Static and dynamic stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tishin, A.M.; Spichkin, Yu.I.; Bohr, Jakob

    1999-01-01

    to the appearance of anomalies in elastic constants, as well as to additional damping of sound oscillations in the lanthanide materials. The importance of understanding the nature of magnetoelastic interactions and related effects arises from the scientific desire to gather a better knowledge of magnetism, as well......In this chapter we shall consider the properties of lanthanide metals, their alloys and compounds which can be studied using static and alternating mechanical stresses. The main attention will be paid to the effects related to magnetoelastic interactions. These interactions in magnetic materials...... can display themselves in static magnetostriction deformations (this effect is not considered here) and in the changing of the magnetic state under mechanical stress. The latter causes variation of the magnetic phase transition temperatures, magnetization and magnetic structures, and leads...

  10. Stress, Gender and Time Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonke, Jens; Gerstoft, Frederik

    This paper investigates the gender aspect of stress within a welfare state regime with high employment rates for both women and men. By applying an economic model, an extended model and a stress-level model, we find that higher incomes lead to stress among women and men, confirming findings for A...

  11. Stress relief of transition zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, J.; van Rooyen, D.

    1984-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of intergranular stress corrosion cracking, initiated on the primary side, in the expansion transition region of roller expanded Alloy 600 tubing. In general it is believed that residual stresses, arising from the expansion process, are the cause of the problem. The work reported here concentrated on the identification of an optimal, in-situ stress relief treatment

  12. The heritability of perceived stress.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Federenko, I.S.; Schlotz, W.; Kirschbaum, C.; Bartels, M.; Hellhammer, D.H.; Wüst, S.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Exploration of the degree to which perceived chronic stress is heritable is important as these self-reports have been linked to stress-related health outcomes. The aims of this study were to estimate whether perceived stress is a heritable condition and to assess whether heritability

  13. Help Teachers Feel Less Stressed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The author's concern for how teachers nationwide are coping with unrelenting levels of stress is the topic of current research. A national sample of 1,200 teachers was asked to complete a survey addressing three areas: the sources of teacher stress; the manifestations of stress; and coping strategies they found most successful. Knowing the areas…

  14. Perceived stress in myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, Suzanne V.; Smolderen, K.G.E.; Buchanan, Donna M.; Li, Yan; Spertus, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine the association of chronic stress with long-term adverse outcomes after acute myocardial infarction (AMI).BackgroundChronic stress has been shown to be associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and, in the case of particular types of stress

  15. Stress Management as a Pacifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echterling, Lennis G.; Wylie, Mary Lou

    While numerous studies have identified economic, social, and environmental conditions related to stress, greater stress has been found to be related to poverty, unemployment, assembly line work, crowding, and chronic exposure to noise. These stressful situations most frequently confront people with little personal, economic, or political resources…

  16. Stress, Distress, and Psychosocial Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Lennert

    1973-01-01

    This paper, presented at the Occupational Stress Conference of the Center for Occupational Mental Health, Sept. 22, 1972, discusses the possibility of a relationship between psychosocial stimuli and stress-related disease. Using Selye's understanding of stress, the author views it in relation to non-specific diseases and suggests hypotheses…

  17. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger David John

    2012-01-01

    Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. It can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress, and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged ...

  18. Force Lines in Plane Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathkjen, Arne

    A state of plane stress is illustrated by means of two families of curves, each family representing constant values of a derivative of Airy's stress function. The two families of curves form a map giving in the first place an overall picture of regions of high and low stress, and in the second pl...

  19. Stress among Health Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    García-Moran, María de Carmen; Universidad de Zaragoza (España); Gil-Lacruz, Marta; Universidad de Zaragoza (España)

    2016-01-01

    Stress among health professionals constitutes a significant problem, because of its strong impact both on them and their patients. This study finds that this syndrome varies according to gender, type of work and job role. We find that primary, secondary and tertiary prevention strategies are effective in minimizing this syndrome. These include better work management, an adjusted work schedule, a balance between work and family life, workforce personnel involvement, and improvement of employme...

  20. Stress in Work Life

    OpenAIRE

    Kurt, Burak; Akbaba, Muhsin; Ötegen, Volkan Recai

    2018-01-01

    TheInternational Labor Organization (ILO) has defined psychosocial factors as"interactions between job satisfaction, business organization andmanagement, environmental and organizational conditions and workers' expertiseand needs".Job stress is harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when there isa mismatch between the needs of the worker and the skills, resources, or needsof a worker who changes the psychological and / or physical behaviors thatdiverge from the nor...

  1. Stresses induced by heteroepitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Million, A.; Magnea, N.

    1987-06-01

    Development of techniques of thin layers of compounds II-VI allows currently the use of substrates having mesh parameter well different from those of the epitaxy layer. A systematic study of stresses in CdTe layers, with molecular beam epitaxy on substrate Cd 0.96 Zn 0.04 Te, has been made in relation to depth x by X-ray diffraction on planes parallel to surface and by study of the absorption line [fr

  2. Contact stress sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotovsky, Jack [Oakland, CA

    2012-02-07

    A contact stress sensor includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a thermal compensator and a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  3. Thermal Stresses in Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the transient temperature fields and the hereby induced deformations and stressses in a butt-welded mild steel plate modelledrespectively in 2D plane stress state (as well as plane strain state) and in full 3D have been done. The model has been implemented in the generalpurpose FE-soft......-software package ABAQUS. In this work, the results have been qualitatively evaluated....

  4. Secondary Traumatic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayla Kahil

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic events do not only affect the person who was directly exposed to the incident, but they might also lead to some reactions on people with whom they interact. It is argued that, reactions given to a traumatic event by being exposed to the incident either primarily or secondarily, resemble each other. While in primary exposure the perceived threat is subjective, in secondary exposure the threat belongs to the person one interacts with. Secondary exposition to trauma may lead to re-experiencing, avoidance, and increased arousal symptoms as well as impairment in daily functioning. Briefly, secondary exposition to a traumatic incident induces parallel reactions as in those who are primarily exposed. In addition to these, taking specific precautions help decreasing the negative effects of secondary traumatic stress. This review focuses on the secondary traumatic stress and secondary traumatic stress disorder of workers who offer service in relief operations. For this aim, related theoretical concepts along with the literature studies are presented and information regarding ways of coping with the negative effects of secondary traumatization is discussed.

  5. Subterranean stress engineering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.R.; Colgate, S.A.; Wheat, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    The state of stress in a subterranean rock mass has classically been assumed to be constant at best. In soil with a high clay content, preconsolidation and drainage methods can lead to more stable foundation material, but methods for engineering the stresses in large masses of rock are not well known. This paper shows the results from an experiment designed to alter the in situ rock stress field in an oil shale mine. This was done by hydrofracturing the rock by use of a packed-well injection system and then propping the crack open with a thixotropic gel, which slowly hardened to the consistency of cement. Successive hydrofracture and high-pressure grouting resulted in an overstressed region. Well-head injection pressures, surface tilts, injection rates, and subterranean strains were measured and recorded on floppy disk by a Z-80 microprocessor. The results were then transmitted to the large computer system at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). To put the data in a more useful form, computer-generated movies of the tilts and strains were made by use of computer graphics developed at LASL. The purpose of this paper is to present results from the Single Large Instrumented Test conducted in the Colony Oil Shale Mine near Rifle, Colorado. 13 figures

  6. Cantilever measurements of surface stress, surface reconstruction, film stress and magnetoelastic stress of monolayersc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Kirschner

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We review the application of cantilever-based stress measurements in surface science and magnetism. The application of thin (thickness appr. 0.1 mm single crystalline substrates as cantilevers has been used successfully to measure adsorbate-induced surface stress changes, lattice misfit induced film stress, and magneto-elastic stress of ferromagnetic monolayers. Surface stress changes as small as 0.01 N/m can be readily measured, and this translates into a sensitivity for adsorbate-coverage well below 0.01 of one layer. Stress as large as several GPa, beyond the elasticity limits of high strength materials, is measured, and it is ascribed to the lattice misfit between film and substrate. Our results point at the intimate relation between surface stress and surface reconstruction, stress-induced structural changes in epitaxially strained films, and strain-induced modifications of the magneto-elastic coupling in ferromagnetic monolayers.

  7. Cantilever measurements of surface stress, surface reconstruction, film stress and magnetoelastic stress of monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Dirk; Tian, Zhen; Kirschner, Jürgen

    2008-07-29

    We review the application of cantilever-based stress measurements in surface science and magnetism. The application of thin (thickness appr. 0.1 mm) single crystalline substrates as cantilevers has been used successfully to measure adsorbate-induced surface stress changes, lattice misfit induced film stress, and magneto-elastic stress of ferromagnetic monolayers. Surface stress changes as small as 0.01 N/m can be readily measured, and this translates into a sensitivity for adsorbate-coverage well below 0.01 of one layer. Stress as large as several GPa, beyond the elasticity limits of high strength materials, is measured, and it is ascribed to the lattice misfit between film and substrate. Our results point at the intimate relation between surface stress and surface reconstruction, stress-induced structural changes in epitaxially strained films, and strain-induced modifications of the magneto-elastic coupling in ferromagnetic monolayers.

  8. Underground water stress release models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Dang, Shenjun; Lü, Shaochuan

    2011-08-01

    The accumulation of tectonic stress may cause earthquakes at some epochs. However, in most cases, it leads to crustal deformations. Underground water level is a sensitive indication of the crustal deformations. We incorporate the information of the underground water level into the stress release models (SRM), and obtain the underground water stress release model (USRM). We apply USRM to the earthquakes occurred at Tangshan region. The analysis shows that the underground water stress release model outperforms both Poisson model and stress release model. Monte Carlo simulation shows that the simulated seismicity by USRM is very close to the real seismicity.

  9. Antiferromagnetic character of workplace stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Jun-Ichiro; Akitomi, Tomoaki; Ara, Koji; Yano, Kazuo

    2011-07-01

    We study the nature of workplace stress from the aspect of human-human interactions. We investigated the distribution of Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale scores, a measure of the degree of stress, in workplaces. We found that the degree of stress people experience when around other highly stressed people tends to be low, and vice versa. A simulation based on a model describing microlevel human-human interaction reproduced this observed phenomena and revealed that the energy state of a face-to-face communication network correlates with workplace stress macroscopically.

  10. Seeding Stress Resilience through Inoculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Ashokan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a generalized set of physiological and psychological responses observed when an organism is placed under challenging circumstances. The stress response allows organisms to reattain the equilibrium in face of perturbations. Unfortunately, chronic and/or traumatic exposure to stress frequently overwhelms coping ability of an individual. This is manifested as symptoms affecting emotions and cognition in stress-related mental disorders. Thus environmental interventions that promote resilience in face of stress have much clinical relevance. Focus of the bulk of relevant neurobiological research at present remains on negative aspects of health and psychological outcomes of stress exposure. Yet exposure to the stress itself can promote resilience to subsequent stressful episodes later in the life. This is especially true if the prior stress occurs early in life, is mild in its magnitude, and is controllable by the individual. This articulation has been referred to as “stress inoculation,” reminiscent of resilience to the pathology generated through vaccination by attenuated pathogen itself. Using experimental evidence from animal models, this review explores relationship between nature of the “inoculum” stress and subsequent psychological resilience.

  11. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  12. The shape of change in perceived stress, negative affect, and stress sensitivity during mindfulness based stress reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, E.; Dziak, J.J.; Lanza, S.T.; Nyklicek, I.; Wichers, M.

    2017-01-01

    Both daily stress and the tendency to react to stress with heightened levels of negative affect (i.e., stress sensitivity) are important vulnerability factors for adverse mental health outcomes. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) may help to reduce perceived daily stress and stress

  13. The Shape of Change in Perceived Stress, Negative Affect, and Stress Sensitivity During Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, Evelien; Dziak, John J.; Lanza, Stephanie T.; Nykliek, Ivan; Wichers, Marieke

    Both daily stress and the tendency to react to stress with heightened levels of negative affect (i.e., stress sensitivity) are important vulnerability factors for adverse mental health outcomes. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) may help to reduce perceived daily stress and stress

  14. Global Geopotential Energy & Stress Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Christian; Nielsen, S.B.

    and stress induced geological structures. Quantifying single stress sources however remains a difficult and not uncommonly vague procedure. Modelling stress contributions can provide principle insight into the total and relative stress composition. One contribution is the internal gravitational stress...... in the lithosphere, induced by lateral density variation. The leading quantity is the Geopotential Energy, the integrated lithostatic pressure in a rock column, which is related to horizontal stresses by the Equations of Equilibrium. The Geopotential Energy can be furthermore linearly related to the Geoid under...... of the oceanic lithosphere. An entire modelling of the shallow Geopotential Energy is hereby approached, not taking into account possible deeper signals but all lithospheric signals for the subsequent stress calculation. Therefore a global lithospheric density model is necessary to calculate the corresponding...

  15. Lexical Stress Assignment in Italian Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paizi, Despina; Zoccolotti, Pierluigi; Burani, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Stress assignment to Italian polysyllabic words is unpredictable, because stress is neither marked nor predicted by rule. Stress assignment, especially to low frequency words, has been reported to be a function of stress dominance and stress neighbourhood. Two experiments investigate stress assignment in sixth-grade, skilled and dyslexic, readers.…

  16. Corrosion Product Film-Induced Stress Facilitates Stress Corrosion Cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-06-11

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young's modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic substrate is superimposed on the applied load to increase the crack tip strain and facilitate localized plasticity deformation. In addition, the stress in the CPF surface contributes to the rupture of the CPFs. The results provide physical insights into the role of CPFs in SCC.

  17. Resiliency against stress among athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Litwic-Kaminska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of this paper is to describe the results of a study concerning the relationship between resiliency and appraisal of a stressful situation, anxiety reactions and undertaken methods of coping among sportsmen. Participants and procedure The research concerned 192 competitors who actively train in one of the Olympic disciplines – individual or team. We used the following instruments: Resiliency Assessment Scale (SPP-25; Stress Appraisal Questionnaire A/B; Reactions to Competition Questionnaire; Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS; Sport Stress Coping Strategies Questionnaire (SR3S, self-constructed. Results Athletes most frequently apply positive types of stress appraisal, and they cope with stress through a task-oriented style during competitions. There is a relationship between the level of resiliency and the analysed aspects of the process of stress. The higher the resiliency, the more positive is the appraisal of a stressful situation and the more task-oriented are the strategies applied. Similarly, in everyday situations resilient sportspeople positively appraise difficult situations and undertake mostly task-oriented strategies. Resiliency is connected with less frequently experiencing reactions in the form of anxiety. Conclusions The obtained results, similarly to previous research, suggest that resiliency is connected with experiencing positive emotions. It causes more frequent appraisal of stressful situations as a challenge. More resilient people also choose more effective and situation-appropriate coping strategies. Therefore they are more resistant to stress.

  18. Stress-Induced Eating Dampens Physiological and Behavioral Stress Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Finch, LE; Tomiyama, AJ

    2014-01-01

    Both psychological and physical stressors induce the secretion of glucocorticoids and insulin, which increase the consumption of palatable high-fat, high-sugar "comfort foods." Chronic engagement in stress-induced eating behavior leads to visceral fat accumulation, which in turn dampens hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. The joint role of stress-induced eating and abdominal fat stores in attenuating physiological stress responses has been well characterized in nonhuman animal model...

  19. Equivalence of Stress and Energy Calculations of Mean Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Bøcker; Brown, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    Calculations of the mean stress in a plastically deformed matrix containing randomly distributed elastic inclusions are considered. The mean stress for an elastically homogeneous material is calculated on the basis of an energy consideration which completely accounts for elastic interactions....... The result is shown to be identical to that obtained from a stress calculation. The possibility of including elastic interactions in the case of elastic inhomogeneity is discussed....

  20. No myocardial vulnerability to mental stress in Takotsubo stress cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olov Collste

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Due to the frequent use of coronary angiography the awareness of Takotsubo stress cardiomyopathy (TSC has increased although the exact pathophysiology of TSC is still largely unknown. Our objective was to investigate the effects of mental stress on myocardial function, heart rate variability (HRV and salivary cortisol (SC in TSC patients. DESIGN: This study is a case-control study and a sub-study of the Stockholm Myocardial Infarction with Normal Coronaries (SMINC study. SETTING: Mental stress test was performed more than 6 months after the acute event in TSC patients and age- and sex-matched controls. Standard echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI -derived time-phases of cardiac cycle were recorded to calculate myocardial performance index (MPI to assess ventricular function before and during mental stress. Holter-ECG recording was made to estimate HRV before, during and after mental stress. SC was measured at baseline, before and 20 minutes after mental stress. SUBJECTS: Twenty-two TSC patients and 22 sex-and age-matched controls were recruited from the SMINC-study and investigated with a mental stress test. All TSC patients had a previous normal cardiovascular magnetic resonance investigation. RESULTS: There were no significant differences at rest or during mental stress for left and right ventricular MPI or other standard diastolic variables between TSC patients and controls. HRV did not differ between TSC patients and controls. There was a trend towards less increase in SC after mental stress in TSC patients compared to controls. CONCLUSION: Mental stress did not induce a significant difference in myocardial function or HRV response between TSC and controls. Moreover, no significant difference could be seen in SC response at baseline, during or after mental stress. This study indicates that myocardial vulnerability to mental stress does not persist in TSC patients.

  1. Stress induced obesity: lessons from rodent models of stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Zachary R.; Abizaid, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Stress was once defined as the non-specific result of the body to any demand or challenge to homeostasis. A more current view of stress is the behavioral and physiological responses generated in the face of, or in anticipation of, a perceived threat. The stress response involves activation of the sympathetic nervous system and recruitment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. When an organism encounters a stressor (social, physical, etc.), these endogenous stress systems are stimulated in order to generate a fight-or-flight response, and manage the stressful situation. As such, an organism is forced to liberate energy resources in attempt to meet the energetic demands posed by the stressor. A change in the energy homeostatic balance is thus required to exploit an appropriate resource and deliver useable energy to the target muscles and tissues involved in the stress response. Acutely, this change in energy homeostasis and the liberation of energy is considered advantageous, as it is required for the survival of the organism. However, when an organism is subjected to a prolonged stressor, as is the case during chronic stress, a continuous irregularity in energy homeostasis is considered detrimental and may lead to the development of metabolic disturbances such as cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes mellitus and obesity. This concept has been studied extensively using animal models, and the neurobiological underpinnings of stress induced metabolic disorders are beginning to surface. However, different animal models of stress continue to produce divergent metabolic phenotypes wherein some animals become anorexic and lose body mass while others increase food intake and body mass and become vulnerable to the development of metabolic disturbances. It remains unclear exactly what factors associated with stress models can be used to predict the metabolic outcome of the organism. This review will explore a variety of rodent stress models and discuss the

  2. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata eChaudhari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS. Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturb fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways has been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and others. In this review we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress and mitochondrial signaling events which further induce or exacerbate ER stress.

  3. Oxidative stress in myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Bosch-Morell; Salvador, Mérida; Amparo, Navea

    2015-01-01

    Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem.

  4. The Young and the Stressed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leppink, Eric W.; Odlaug, Brian L.; Lust, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    among college students, are limited. This study examined potential associations between perceived stress, academic achievement, physical/mental health, and impulse control disorders in young adults. A total of 1805 students completed an online survey and were included in the analysis. Responders were...... grouped by their overall score on the Perceived Stress Scale into mild, moderate, or severe. Severe perceived stress was associated with worse academic achievement and worse physical health, as well as higher rates of psychiatric and impulsive disorders. These findings may suggest associations between......High levels of stress are common among young adults, particularly those enrolled in college. These degrees of stress have shown numerous deleterious effects across both academic and health variables. Findings regarding the role of stress in the presentation of impulse control disorders, particular...

  5. A Piezoelectric Shear Stress Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress suppressing effects of normal stress generated from the vortex lift-up by applying opposite poling vectors to the: piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces and it showed high sensitivity to shear stress (=91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of PMN-33%PT (d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also showed almost no sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is 0-800 Hz. Keywords: Piezoelectric sensor, shear stress, floating element, electromechanical symmetry

  6. [Stress and auto-immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delévaux, I; Chamoux, A; Aumaître, O

    2013-08-01

    The etiology of auto-immune disorders is multifactorial. Stress is probably a participating factor. Indeed, a high proportion of patients with auto-immune diseases report uncommon stress before disease onset or disease flare. The biological consequences of stress are increasingly well understood. Glucocorticoids and catecholamines released by hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during stress will alter the balance Th1/Th2 and the balance Th17/Treg. Stress impairs cellular immunity, decreases immune tolerance and stimulates humoral immunity exposing individuals to autoimmune disease among others. The treatment for autoimmune disease should include stress management. Copyright © 2012 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Stress and music performance anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Simoens, Veerle

    2012-01-01

    Acute and chronic stress, as well as accompanying changes of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, affect cognitive processes, including memory. In professional musicians occupational stress and music performance anxiety (MPA) are a major source of concern during a musical career, whereas a boost is to a certain extent necessary for a musical performance. ---------- A protocol was successfully designed to induce acute stress in healthy students while measuring electro-encephalography...

  8. STRESS COPING SKILLS IN ADDICTS

    OpenAIRE

    A EBRAHIMI; SG MOOSAVI; R SAMOOEIE; A ,HASAN ZADEH

    2002-01-01

    Introduction. Stress coping skills is one of the most important factors in prediction of addictive behavior. The purpose of this study was to determine this pattern and to compare them with those of non-addicts. Methods. One hundred subjects with substance dependency and 100 non-addict subjects were selected. Both groups were matched on the basis of their socioeconomic state. Stress coping skills of study participants were examined using CS-R scale. Results. Stress coping skills in ...

  9. Left ventricular wall stress compendium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L; Ghista, D N; Tan, R S

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) wall stress has intrigued scientists and cardiologists since the time of Lame and Laplace in 1800s. The left ventricle is an intriguing organ structure, whose intrinsic design enables it to fill and contract. The development of wall stress is intriguing to cardiologists and biomedical engineers. The role of left ventricle wall stress in cardiac perfusion and pumping as well as in cardiac pathophysiology is a relatively unexplored phenomenon. But even for us to assess this role, we first need accurate determination of in vivo wall stress. However, at this point, 150 years after Lame estimated left ventricle wall stress using the elasticity theory, we are still in the exploratory stage of (i) developing left ventricle models that properly represent left ventricle anatomy and physiology and (ii) obtaining data on left ventricle dynamics. In this paper, we are responding to the need for a comprehensive survey of left ventricle wall stress models, their mechanics, stress computation and results. We have provided herein a compendium of major type of wall stress models: thin-wall models based on the Laplace law, thick-wall shell models, elasticity theory model, thick-wall large deformation models and finite element models. We have compared the mean stress values of these models as well as the variation of stress across the wall. All of the thin-wall and thick-wall shell models are based on idealised ellipsoidal and spherical geometries. However, the elasticity model's shape can vary through the cycle, to simulate the more ellipsoidal shape of the left ventricle in the systolic phase. The finite element models have more representative geometries, but are generally based on animal data, which limits their medical relevance. This paper can enable readers to obtain a comprehensive perspective of left ventricle wall stress models, of how to employ them to determine wall stresses, and be cognizant of the assumptions involved in the use of specific models.

  10. STRESS INDUCED OBESITY: LESSONS FROM RODENT MODELS OF STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Robert Patterson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Stress is defined as the behavioral and physiological responses generated in the face of, or in anticipation of, a perceived threat. The stress response involves activation of the sympathetic nervous system and recruitment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis. When an organism encounters a stressor (social, physical, etc., these endogenous stress systems are stimulated in order to generate a fight-or-flight response, and manage the stressful situation. As such, an organism is forced to liberate energy resources in attempt to meet the energetic demands posed by the stressor. A change in the energy homeostatic balance is thus required to exploit an appropriate resource and deliver useable energy to the target muscles and tissues involved in the stress response. Acutely, this change in energy homeostasis and the liberation of energy is considered advantageous, as it is required for the survival of the organism. However, when an organism is subjected to a prolonged stressor, as is the case during chronic stress, a continuous irregularity in energy homeostasis is considered detrimental and may lead to the development of metabolic disturbances such as cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes mellitus and obesity. This concept has been studied extensively using animal models, and the neurobiological underpinnings of stress induced metabolic disorders are beginning to surface. However, different animal models of stress continue to produce divergent metabolic phenotypes wherein some animals become anorexic and loose body mass while others increase food intake and body mass and become vulnerable to the development of metabolic disturbances. It remains unclear exactly what factors associated with stress models can be used to predict the metabolic outcome of the organism. This review will explore a variety of rodent stress models and discuss the elements that influence the metabolic outcome in order to further our understanding of stress

  11. Stress management, aging, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomi, K; Seitsamo, J; Huuhtanen, P

    1999-01-01

    The association of stress management, work, and individual factors with the incidence of upper-back disorders and coronary heart disease was studied according to the House paradigm of stress research. The features of work concerned its organization and social environment. Stress management and individual factors covered coping styles, sense of coherence, family roles, gender, and age. These factors were measured by questionnaire studies in 1992 when the subjects (n = 1101, mean age 58 years) were active workers, and again in 1997. Manageability and withdrawal stress response prevented upper-back disorders, whereas dissatisfaction with the work schedule predicted these disorders. Male gender predicted coronary heart disease.

  12. Post-traumatic stress disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Post-traumatic stress disorder References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. ...

  13. Designing a Stress Management Curiculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Michael E.

    1982-01-01

    Educators must develop, for therapeutic recreation students, curriculum that teaches stress management techniques and theories. Guidelines for curriculum revision or enhancement in this area are presented. (CJ)

  14. Effect of Maxillary Osteotomy on Speech in Cleft Lip and Palate: Perceptual Outcomes of Velopharyngeal Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Valerie J.; Sell, Debbie; Tuomainen, Jyrki

    2013-01-01

    Background: Abnormal facial growth is a well-known sequelae of cleft lip and palate (CLP) resulting in maxillary retrusion and a class III malocclusion. In 10-50% of cases, surgical correction involving advancement of the maxilla typically by osteotomy methods is required and normally undertaken in adolescence when facial growth is complete.…

  15. SCANDCLEFT RANDOMIZED TRIALS: SPEECH OUTCOMES IN 5-YEAR-OLDS WITH UCLP - velopharyngeal competency and hypernasality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohmander, Anette; Persson, Christina; Willadsen, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    ) operated on with different surgical methods for primary palatal repair. A secondary aim was to estimate burden of care in terms of received additional secondary surgeries and speech therapy. Design: Three parallel group, randomised clinical trials were undertaken as an international multicentre study by 10...... of secondary pharyngeal surgeries, number of fistulae, and speech therapy visits differed. Trial registration: ISRCTN29932826. Keywords: Randomised clinical trial, Scandcleft, primary palatal repair, unilateral cleft lip and palate, speech, intercentre study, cross-linguistic...

  16. Job Stress, Job Dissatisfaction and Stress Related Illnesses Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between self-reported job stress and job dissatisfaction and the prevalence of stress related illnesses and risk factors amongst educators. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a representative sample of 21,307 educators from public schools in South Africa.

  17. Less Stress : Oxidative stress and glutathione kinetics in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Rook (Denise)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDue to immature antioxidant defenses, preterm infants are at susceptible to oxidative stress, which is associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity and periventricular leukomalacia. The general aim of this thesis was to study oxidative stress in preterm infants

  18. Changing stress levels through gaining information on stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Madu

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this research was to find out the effect of the Information Phase of a Stress Management Program (SMP on the perceptions of participants about their stress levels. Method: A total sample of 100 workers (nursing staff, private business men and women, laboratory assistants, the protective services [foreman and security staff], as well as people in human resources departments took part in this study. All the participants were from the Northern and Gauteng Provinces in South Africa. The Combined Hassles and Uplifts Scale (Folkman & Lazarus, 1989 was used as an instrument to measure the perceived stress level of participants in a SMP. Result: A significant reduction in stress levels was achieved among those who received the Information Phase of the SMP only, as well as those who received the whole stress management techniques. There was no significant difference between the amount of reduction in perceived stress-levels achieved among those that received the Information Phase of the SMP only, compared to that of those who received the whole techniques. Conclusion: The authors conclude that where the resources are limited, only the information phase of a SMP may be given to desiring clients. That should help to save time and money spent on participating in SMPs. This should however not discourage the use of the whole SPM, where affordable. Keywords: Stress Management Programs, Information Phase, Perception, Stress Level.

  19. Does Stressing Performance Goals Lead to Too Much, Well, Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockterman, David; Weber, Chris

    2017-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that stressing goals leads to stress and negatively affects the very objectives that educators are trying to achieve. Reaching testing goals matter, but if we are not careful, the goal of educating children for the 21st century becomes subsumed by the narrow measures meant to track progress. Performance measures become…

  20. Stress training improves performance during a stressful flight

    OpenAIRE

    McClernon, Christopher K.; McCauley, Michael E.; O'Connor, Paul E.; Warm, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/00187€0811405317. This study investigated whether stress training introduced during the acquisition of simulator-based flight skills enhances pilot performance during subsequent stressful flight operations in an actual aircraft.

  1. Stressing Out: Connecting Race, Gender, and Stress with Faculty Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagan, M. Kevin, Jr.; Garvey, Jason C.

    2015-01-01

    This study uses multilevel modeling to analyze data from a national sample of full-time, undergraduate faculty at four-year institutions to examine the connections among race, gender, sources of stress, and productivity in the areas of research, teaching, and service. We find that stress due to discrimination has particular negative salience for…

  2. Stress concentration at notches

    CERN Document Server

    Savruk, Mykhaylo P

    2017-01-01

    This book compiles solutions of linear theory of elasticity problems for isotropic and anisotropic bodies with sharp and rounded notches. It contains an overview of established and recent achievements, and presents the authors’ original solutions in the field considered with extensive discussion. The volume demonstrates through numerous, useful examples the effectiveness of singular integral equations for obtaining exact solutions of boundary problems of the theory of elasticity for bodies with cracks and notches. Incorporating analytical and numerical solutions of the problems of stress concentrations in solid bodies with crack-like defects, this volume is ideal for scientists and PhD students dealing with the problems of theory of elasticity and fracture mechanics. Stands as a modern and extensive compendium of solutions to the problems of linear theory of elasticity of isotropic and anisotropic bodies with sharp and rounded notches; Adopts a highly reader-friendly layout of tables, charts, approximation ...

  3. -Lesser known stress fractures-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybier, M; Hamze, B; Champsaur, P; Parlier, C

    1997-01-01

    Stress fractures of the tibia may disclose a longitudinal orientation which is obvious at bone scanning; a mild periostosis may appear on plain films; CT demonstrates a radially-oriented fracture in one aspect of the diaphyseal cortex. A cortical dissection-like vertically oriented insufficiency fracture may involve the medial aspect of the femoral shaft underlying the lesser trochanter; the fracture is concentric to the femoral cortex at CT. Insufficiency fractures of the sacrum may be misdiagnosed on plain films; bone scanning displays a typical H-shaped increased uptake which is a specific pattern. Insufficiency fractures of the pubis may appear as tumoral bone destruction; however no soft tissue mass is present at CT which in addition demonstrates normal fat tissue abutting the osseous lesion.

  4. Occupational Stress and Perceived Organizational Effectiveness in Formal Groups: An Examination of Stress Level and Stress Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, R. Douglas; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Studied the relationship between stress and the perceived effectiveness of formal organization groups. Analysis of data from four firms showed a negative relationship. Results suggest that the type of stress moderates the stress and effectiveness relationship. Dysfunctional stress was the dominant type of stress in all four firms. (Author)

  5. A Model of Teacher Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriacou, Chris; Sutcliffe, John

    1978-01-01

    A definition and model of teacher stress is presented which conceptualizes teacher stress as a response syndrome (anger or depression) mediated by (1) an appraisal of threat to the teacher's self-esteem or well-being and (2) coping mechanisms activated to reduce the perceived threat. (Author)

  6. National Child Traumatic Stress Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NCTSN eBulletin Información en Español Topics What is Child Traumatic Stress Trauma Types Finding Help Trauma-Informed Screening & Assessment ... and Adolescent Trauma Education and online community. Understanding Child Traumatic Stress What it is. Why it matters. Information Resource ...

  7. Moral Stress in Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colnerud, Gunnel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to study whether moral stress is a phenomenon relevant to teaching practice and which may make a significant contribution to understanding why teachers repeatedly reported feeling burdened by work. Moral stress can be caused by acting in conflict with one's own conscience, e.g. when one knows the right thing to…

  8. Telecommuting: stress and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, J T; Smith, A L; Wood, D L

    1994-06-01

    Occupational stress and social support were measured in adults, 15 working as telecommuters, 9 working at home, and 14 working in a company office. Analysis showed telecommuters and office workers perceived more support than those working at home. Telecommuters also reported less stress and a stronger preference for this new work option.

  9. Residual stresses around Vickers indents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajares, A.; Guiberteau, F.; Steinbrech, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    The residual stresses generated by Vickers indentation in brittle materials and their changes due to annealing and surface removal were studied in 4 mol% yttria partially stabilized zirconia (4Y-PSZ). Three experimental methods to gain information about the residual stress field were applied: (i) crack profile measurements based on serial sectioning, (ii) controlled crack propagation in post indentation bending tests and (iii) double indentation tests with smaller secondary indents located around a larger primary impression. Three zones of different residual stress behavior are deduced from the experiments. Beneath the impression a crack free spherical zone of high hydrostatic stresses exists. This core zone is followed by a transition regime where indentation cracks develop but still experience hydrostatic stresses. Finally, in an outward third zone, the crack contour is entirely governed by the tensile residual stress intensity (elastically deformed region). Annealing and surface removal reduce this crack driving stress intensity. The specific changes of the residual stresses due to the post indentation treatments are described and discussed in detail for the three zones

  10. Comparative Studies of Acculturative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, J. W.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Studies of acculturative stress are reported from Canada. The reduction in health status among people undergoing acculturation has psychological, somatic, and social aspects. The stress varies across types of groups and individual differences. Further study is needed to determine variations across host societies. (VM)

  11. Mechanical Stresses in Carotid Plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuel, Samuel Alberg

    simulationer, som tillod beregning af longitudinelle stress-niveauer i den fibrøse kappe. Afhandlingen indeholder tre artikler, som beskriver denne metode. Den første; “Mechanical Stresses in Carotid Plaques using MRI-Based Fluid Structure Interaction Models”, beskriver i detaljer metoden til at danne de...

  12. Stress Management in Leisure Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Arnold H.; Heywood, Lloyd A.

    1982-01-01

    While recreation and leisure have not traditionally been considered a high stress profession, many professionals in the fields are becoming more concerned with their work environment and attendant job satisfaction. Various stressors for leisure and recreation personnel are listed along with ways to manage stress. (CJ)

  13. Stress, depression and hippocampal damage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and exacerbation of psychiatric disorders like depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (Sapolsky 1996). Amongst the prime targets of stress in the brain ... discrete stages of development, the DG retains the ability to exhibit neurogenesis throughout adulthood in several species, including rodents, primates and ...

  14. Coping with Stress. Research Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Debra J.

    1995-01-01

    Research related to the impact of exercise on stress indicates that a regular aerobic exercise program is important to control the negative effects of stress. It was also reported that those who are physically fit have higher levels of self-esteem. Implications for camp staff involve starting a regular exercise program to offset job-related…

  15. Stress Relief for the Caregiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stress 10 common signs of caregiver stress 1 Denial about the disease and its effect on the person who has been diagnosed. I know Mamma is going to get better. 2 Anger at the person with Alzheimer’s disease or frustration that he or she can’ ...

  16. Stress among Finnish farm entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallioniemi, Marja Kristiina; Simola, Ahti Jarkko Kalervo; Kymäläinen, Hanna-Riitta; Vesala, Hannu Tapio; Louhelainen, Jarmo Kyösti

    2008-01-01

    The aims were to examine the prevalence of stress among Finnish full-time farm entrepreneurs in 2004 (n = 1,182) and to compare the results with those for the general working population in 2003. The second aim was to analyze which factors were associated with the prevalence of stress. A stratified random sample of farm entrepreneurs gathered from the farm register was surveyed using computer-assisted telephone interviews. A binary logistic regression model was used to analyze the association with background factors. One third (34 %) of the examined farmers had experienced stress. This amount was lower than among the general working population (44 %). The most common factors associated with farmers' stress were problems in social family relationships and mental support. Physical factors such as the strenuousness of agricultural work, illness and a low estimation of their own working ability, were also related to stress. Increased stress was also associated with economic problems. Health and extension services should pay special attention to encouraging farm entrepreneurs to maintain their social relationships. The relatively low level of stress observed may indicate that those who have continued within the agricultural sector have the psychological capacity to deal with stressful situations.

  17. Life Stress and Academic Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Hui; Huang, Yun-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Stress has been shown to negatively affect learning. Academic burnout is a significant problem associated with poor academic performance. Although there has been increased attention on these two issues, literature on the relationship between students' life stress and burnout is relatively limited. This study surveys academic burnout and life…

  18. Protect Yourself from Heat Stress

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-07-19

    Heat stress can be a major concern for indoor and outdoor workers, especially during the hot summer months. Learn how to identify the symptoms and protect yourself from heat stress.  Created: 7/19/2016 by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 7/19/2016.

  19. Integrated Inflammatory Stress (ITIS) Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Elisabeth O.; Hjorth, Poul G.; Olufsen, Mette S.

    2017-01-01

    maintains a long-term level of the stress hormone cortisol which is also anti-inflammatory. A new integrated model of the interaction between these two subsystems of the inflammatory system is proposed and coined the integrated inflammatory stress (ITIS) model. The coupling mechanisms describing...

  20. Time Out for Stress Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Judy; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses stress among child-care professionals. Lists major items contributing to job stress, and includes a self-test to determine coping style. Identifies 4 primary coping strategies, and discusses the top 11 coping strategies used by child-care professionals. (ET)

  1. T-stresses for internally cracked components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fett, T.

    1997-12-01

    The failure of cracked components is governed by the stresses in the vicinity of the crack tip. The singular stress contribution is characterised by the stress intensity factor K, the first regular stress term is represented by the so-called T-stress. T-stress solutions for components containing an internal crack were computed by application of the Bundary Collocation Method (BCM). The results are compiled in form of tables or approximative relations. In addition a Green's function of T-stresses is proposed for internal cracks which enables to compute T-stress terms for any given stress distribution in the uncracked body. (orig.) [de

  2. PCBA depaneling stress minimization study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darus, M. H. B. M.; Aziz, M. H. B. A.; Ong, N. R.; Alcain, J. B.; Retnasamy, V.

    2017-09-01

    Printed circuit board (PCB) is board that used to connect the electricity using the conductive pathways. The PCB that consists with electronic components was called as printed circuit board assembly (PCBA). Bending process has been used as one of the depaneling techniques may contribute to mechanical stress and the failure of capacitors and other components to function. As a result, the idea to create holes in particular location was implemented in order to absorb the stress. In this study, finite element analysis is demonstrated by using ANSYS software. Two PCBA design models are considered in order to investigate the effect of the hole and the stress response. The simulation results show that the hole on the PCBA has reduced the stress. For Design model 2, the stress response of the holes located vertically to the PCBA is lower than the holes located horizontally to the PCBA.

  3. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Weon Yi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1 has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to treat human cancer. Thus, it is essential to understand the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. In this review, we briefly summarize BRCA1’s many binding partners and mechanisms, and discuss data supporting the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. Finally, we consider its significance in prevention and/or treatment of BRCA1-related cancers.

  4. Credibility and Crisis Stress Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lian Ong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Credibility is the bedrock of any crisis stress test. The use of stress tests to manage systemic risk was introduced by the U.S. authorities in 2009 in the form of the Supervisory Capital Assessment Program. Since then, supervisory authorities in other jurisdictions have also conducted similar exercises. In some of those cases, the design and implementation of certain elements of the framework have been criticized for their lack of credibility. This paper proposes a set of guidelines for constructing an effective crisis stress test. It combines financial markets impact studies of previous exercises with relevant case study information gleaned from those experiences to identify the key elements and to formulate their appropriate design. Pertinent concepts, issues and nuances particular to crisis stress testing are also discussed. The findings may be useful for country authorities seeking to include stress tests in their crisis management arsenal, as well as for the design of crisis programs.

  5. Types of Stresses Experienced by Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzella, Bernadette M.; And Others

    This study was conducted to examine the types of stresses experienced by professionals. Subjects were 56 persons enrolled in graduate classes who completed the Tennessee Stress Scale-L, Work Related Stress Inventory for Professionals. Besides the Total stress score, the instrument produced three subscale scores: Stress Producers, Coping…

  6. Toxic stress and child refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John S

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the phenomenon of toxic stress and its impact on the physical and mental health of child refugees. Almost two decades ago, researchers found that recurring adverse childhood events (ACEs; e.g., physical, psychological, and sexual abuse, neglect, and household dysfunction such as substance abuse, mental illness, and criminal behavior) were associated with a significant increase in serious illnesses during adulthood. Illnesses include heart, lung, and liver disease, cancer, and bone fractures. The scientists reported that experiencing four or more ACEs during childhood significantly increases the risk for toxic stress. Toxic stress is defined as the exposure to extreme, frequent, and persistent adverse events without the presence of a supportive caretaker. There is a paucity of literature related to toxic stress and child refugees. However, it has been clearly established that the prolonged brutal and traumatizing war in Syria is having a profound impact on the physical and mental health of child refugees at a distressing rate. Prevention of toxic stress should be a primary goal of all pediatric healthcare professionals working with child refugees. While this seems daunting given the population, and the seemingly insurmountable stressors they experience, some basic interventions should be considered. Providing basic anticipatory guidance to parents and caregivers of child refugees, to encourage positive parenting and strengthening support networks, will be highly effective in developing the requisite buffers that mitigate the effects of stress and avoid toxic stress. Efforts should also be focused on addressing caregiver stress and improving their ability to provide safe, reliable, and nurturing care that will help to mitigate any stress response experienced by a child. It is critical that greater awareness be placed on the effects of toxic stress on child refugees who are exposed to significant adverse events early in life

  7. Criterion validation of a stress measure: the Stress Overload Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirkhan, James H; Urizar, Guido G; Clark, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Validating stress scales poses problems beyond those of other psychological measures. Here, 3 studies were conducted to address those problems and assess the criterion validity of scores from a new theory-derived measure, the Stress Overload Scale (SOS; Amirkhan, 2012). In Study 1, the SOS was tested for its ability to predict postsemester illness in a sample of college students (n = 127). Even with precautions to minimize criterion contamination, scores were found to predict health problems in the month following a final exam on all of 5 different criteria. In Study 2, a community sample (n = 231) was used to test the SOS' ability to differentiate people in stressful circumstances from those in more relaxed contexts. SOS scores demonstrated excellent sensitivity (96%) and specificity (100%) in this general population application. In Study 3, the SOS was tested for its ability to differentiate salivary cortisol responses to a laboratory stressor in a group of pregnant women (n = 40). High scores were found to be associated with a blunted cortisol response, which is indicative of HPA-axis overload and typical of persons suffering chronic stress and stress-related pathology. Across all 3 studies, despite variations in the stressor, criterion, population, and methods, SOS scores emerged as valid indicators of stress. However, each study also introduced new problems that beg additional corrective steps in future stress-scale validity tests. These strategies, and the SOS' utility as a research and diagnostic tool in varied applications and populations, are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Takotsubo (Stress Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin J Hourmozdi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 59-year-old male presented to the emergency department in shock from pneumonia. The patient was initially afebrile, pulse rate 120 beats per minute, blood pressure 117/69 mmHg, respiratory rate 42 breaths per minute, pulse oximetry 94% on a non-rebreather mask and a lactate of 14 mmol/L. He became progressively more hypotensive despite fluid resuscitation and was started on norepinephrine. Shortly after, the patient developed torsades de pointes that was terminated with intravenous push magnesium. His initial ECG had shown sinus tachycardia; however, repeat ECG showed ST-segment elevation in the inferolateral leads and the patient had troponin I elevation that peaked at 16 ng/mL. Significant findings: Bedside echocardiography showed the findings consistent with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Echocardiographic images are shown in subxiphoid (A and apical four chamber (B views. Note the apical ballooning appearance (asterisk of the left ventricle (LV. Discussion: Formal echocardiography confirmed features classic for Takotsubo (stress cardiomyopathy, including globally depressed left ventricle (LV ejection fraction, systolic apical ballooning appearance of the LV, mid and apical segments of LV depression, and hyper kinesis of the basal walls. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a syndrome known to cause ST-segment elevation on ECG, transient LV dysfunction, and dysrhythmia in the absence of acute obstructive coronary disease. There is no consensus on diagnostic criteria; however, these criteria are commonly used: 1 transient hypokinesis, akinesis, or dyskinesis in the LV mid-segments with or without apical involvement; regional wall motion abnormalities that extend beyond a single epicardial vascular distribution; and frequently, but not always, a stressful trigger 2 the absence of acute coronary disease or angiographic evidence of acute plaque rupture 3 new ECG abnormalities (ST-segment elevation and/or T-wave inversion or modest

  9. Stress Management by Biofeedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    In the 1980's, Dr. Patrick Doyle served on a project to train U.S. astronauts at Johnson Space Center in biofeedback techniques to control anxiety and hypertension. Traditional biofeedback concepts were found to be too mundane, repetitive and boring, so Doyle developed Bio-Games with more interesting and involved formats. The first product, Bio-Ball, is an interactive, multimedia baseball video game that is played by relaxing in order to hit the ball. Gradually the player is able to relax at will, and with practice is able to apply the skills to real-life situations. Doyle has since gone on to create a number of biofeedback games marketed by Creative MultiMedia Inc. including Bio-Golf, Clutch City, and Pachyderm. Stress-busting screen savers are also being marketed under the Buddies series. In addition to being used in the corporate world, Bio-Games have been recognized by the Starbright Foundation which focuses on improving the total hospital environments of critically injured and chronically-ill children.

  10. Antimicrobials, stress and mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides are ancient and ubiquitous immune effectors that multicellular organisms use to kill and police microbes whereas antibiotics are mostly employed by microorganisms. As antimicrobial peptides (AMPs mostly target the cell wall, a microbial 'Achilles heel', it has been proposed that bacterial resistance evolution is very unlikely and hence AMPs are ancient 'weapons' of multicellular organisms. Here we provide a new hypothesis to explain the widespread distribution of AMPs amongst multicellular organism. Studying five antimicrobial peptides from vertebrates and insects, we show, using a classic Luria-Delbrück fluctuation assay, that cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs do not increase bacterial mutation rates. Moreover, using rtPCR and disc diffusion assays we find that AMPs do not elicit SOS or rpoS bacterial stress pathways. This is in contrast to the main classes of antibiotics that elevate mutagenesis via eliciting the SOS and rpoS pathways. The notion of the 'Achilles heel' has been challenged by experimental selection for AMP-resistance, but our findings offer a new perspective on the evolutionary success of AMPs. Employing AMPs seems advantageous for multicellular organisms, as it does not fuel the adaptation of bacteria to their immune defenses. This has important consequences for our understanding of host-microbe interactions, the evolution of innate immune defenses, and also sheds new light on antimicrobial resistance evolution and the use of AMPs as drugs.

  11. Pattern Driven Stress Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Andrew; Crosby, Alfred

    2010-03-01

    The self-assembly of patterns from isotropic initial states is a major driver of modern soft-matter research. This avenue of study is directed by the desire to understand the complex physics of the varied structures found in Nature, and by technological interest in functional materials that may be derived through biomimicry. In this work we show how a simple striped phase can respond with significant complexity to an appropriately chosen perturbation. In particular, we show how a buckled elastic plate transitions into a state of stress localization using a simple, self-assembled variation in surface topography. The collection of topographic boundaries act in concert to change the state from isotropic sinusoidal wrinkles, to sharp folds or creases separated by relatively flat regions. By varying the size of the imposed topographic pattern or the wavelength of the wrinkles, we construct a state diagram of the system. The localized state has implications for both biological systems, and for the control of non-linear pattern formation.

  12. Immune function in acute stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, A B; Bruno, S; Forte, W C N

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate immune function in acute stress in medical students before academic examinations. Twenty-five medical students were selected because they presented intense acute stress, evaluated by the presence of the following classic signs: cold hands, intense sudoresis in the extremities, generalized sudoresis, paleness, tachycardia, confused reasoning, nervous irritability, diarrhea, and sleep disorders in the hours preceding the examination (agitated sleep, insomnia). Immediately before the examination, peripheral blood was collected from the 25 students presenting acute stress to analyze T and B cells, CD4+ and CD8+ cells, immunoglobulins, and C3 and C4 complement components, as well as phagocytic activity in neutrophils and monocytes. These investigations were repeated in the same students in situations free of acute stress. The results of the two samples collected from each student were compared. The means and standard deviations showed no significant differences for any of the parameters analyzed (p> or =0.01). We conclude that acute stress did not cause changes in the lymphocyte subpopulations, phagocytic activity of neutrophils and monocytes, serum immunoglobulins, or C3 and C4 complement components in students participating in the present study. In conditions of basal chronic stress, acute stress may cause alterations in immune function.

  13. Concept Analysis: Alzheimer's Caregiver Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanque, Sarah; Savage, Lynette; Rosenburg, Neal; Caserta, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article was to analyze the concept of caregiver stress in the context of caring for a person with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. Currently, there are more than 15 million unpaid caregivers for persons suffering from Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. This unpaid care can be stressful for caregivers due to the chronic nature of the disease process, as well as other factors. The paper incorporates the modified method of Wilson's concept analysis procedure to analyze the concept of caregiver stress. A review of the literature was undertaken using the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Google Scholar, and PubMed. A theoretical definition of caregiver stress is provided, and the defining attributes, related concepts, antecedents, and consequences of caregiver stress are proposed, and case studies are presented. The analysis demonstrates that caregiver stress is the unequal exchange of assistance among people who stand in close relationship to one another, which results in emotional and physical stress on the caregiver. Implications for future nursing research and practice conclude the paper. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. [Stress management in manufacturing industries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Misuzu

    2003-01-01

    Job strain factors and stress management for workers in the manufacturing industries were reviewed in this article. Major job stress factors included high job demands, low job control, low social support, role ambiguity and conflict, the physical, chemical and ergonomics of the work environment, work patterns with work schedule and shift work, and job insecurity regarding future employment. In considering effective stress management plans which counteract the job stress factors mentioned above, it is essential to use an organizational approach in the work environment. For workers in the manufacturing industry, through this approach, it is important to promote more autonomy and activities with increasing job control, to give more clarified roles and responsibilities, to provide a more mutually supportive system with better ways to communicate and to introduce a system giving additional rewards, such as paid holidays for refreshment. Plans are also needed for individuals and groups, such as workers, managers, supervisors and workgroups, regarding education, skill training and mutual training according to the personnel characteristics of each target. In order to make these stress management plans successful in the long term, an actual system for stress management is required, with recognition and support by top management. It is also important to assess the effectiveness and method of each stress management plan with proper measurements.

  15. Residual Stresses In 3013 Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

    2009-01-01

    The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

  16. Employee occupational stress in banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidis, Maria; Georgiou, Yiota

    2005-01-01

    Occupational stress literature emphasizes the importance of assessment and management of work related stress. The recognition of the harmful physical and psychological effects of stress on both individuals and organizations is widely studied in many parts of the world. However, in other regions such research is only at the introductory stages. The present study examines occupational stress of employees in the banking sector. A sample of 60 bank employees at different organizational levels and educational backgrounds was used. Data collection utilized the Occupational Stress Indicator (OSI). Results of data analysis provided evidence that employees' educational levels affect the degree of stress they experience in various ways. Bank employees cannot afford the time to relax and "wind down" when they are faced with work variety, discrimination, favoritism, delegation and conflicting tasks. The study also shows the degree to which some employees tend to bring work-related problems home (and take family problems to work) depends on their educational background, the strength of the employees' family support, and the amount of time available for them to relax. Finally, the drinking habits (alcohol) of the employees were found to play a significant role in determining the levels of occupational stress.

  17. Stress and the Athlete: Coping with Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick

    1986-01-01

    Athletes, including recreational athletes, must cope with stress, both from within and from others. The causes of stress, identifying the distressed athlete, and coping with stress are dealt with. (MT)

  18. Help your teen cope with stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolescents - stress; Anxiety - cope with stress ... Common sources of stress in teens include: Worrying about schoolwork or grades Juggling responsibilities, such as school and work or sports Having problems ...

  19. [Peptic ulcer disease and stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herszényi, László; Juhász, Márk; Mihály, Emese; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2015-08-30

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of peptic ulcer disease revolutionised our views on the etiology and treatment of the disease. This discovery has tempted many experts to conclude that psychological factors and, specifically, stress are unimportant. However, Helicobacter pylori infection alone does not explain fully the incidence and prevalence of peptic ulcer disease. It has been demonstrated that stress can cause peptic ulcer disease even in the absence of Helicobacter pylori infection, supporting a multicausal model of peptic ulcer etiology. Psychological stress among other risk factors can function as a cofactor with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  20. Stress og profylakse samt behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netterstrøm, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Prevention of stress should address the stressors and factors which modify the effect of these. At the community level legislation and agreements on the labour market are important tools. At the enterprise level policies to reduce stress and monitoring the psychosocial work environment has...... the first priority in prevention. Treatment of stress is often a long-term process involving diagnostic assessment, psycho-education and counselling. The Danish National Board of Health has published recommendations to both general practitioners and the public in this area....

  1. PDX vacuum vessel stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodem, Z.D.

    1975-01-01

    A stress analysis of PDX vacuum vessel is described and the summary of results is presented. The vacuum vessel is treated as a toroidal shell of revolution subjected to an internal vacuum. The critical buckling pressure is calculated. The effects of the geometrical discontinuity at the juncture of toroidal shell head and cylindrical outside wall, and the concavity of the cylindrical wall are examined. An effect of the poloidal field coil supports and the vessel outside supports on the stress distribution in the vacuum vessel is determined. A method evaluating the influence of circular ports in the vessel wall on the stress level in the vessel is outlined

  2. Stress, memory and the amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozendaal, Benno; McEwen, Bruce S; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2009-06-01

    Emotionally significant experiences tend to be well remembered, and the amygdala has a pivotal role in this process. But the efficient encoding of emotional memories can become maladaptive - severe stress often turns them into a source of chronic anxiety. Here, we review studies that have identified neural correlates of stress-induced modulation of amygdala structure and function - from cellular mechanisms to their behavioural consequences. The unique features of stress-induced plasticity in the amygdala, in association with changes in other brain regions, could have long-term consequences for cognitive performance and pathological anxiety exhibited in people with affective disorders.

  3. Mental Retardation and Parenting Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Siamaga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Backround: The presence, upbringing and looking after of a mentally retarded child in the family, can become a threat to the mental health of its parents and is the main predisposing factor of stress for the parents.Aim: The purpose of this systematic review is (a to document the contemporary research bibliography related to the stress of parents with mentally retarded children, (b to aggregate the factors and secondary parameters based on the contemporary research related to the influence of the (child’s mental retardation on the parents and (c to show an intercultural aspect regarding the presence of stress to parents with mentally retarded children.Methods: Systematic review of research articles published in scientific journals included in the international academic databases HEAL-LING, SAGE, ELSEVIER, WILSON, SCIENCEDIRECT, MEDLINE, PUBMED, PsycINFO, Cochrane, EMBASE, SCIRUS and CINAHL having as search criteria and key words the terms («parental stress and mental retardation» [MeSH], «parenting stress and persons with special needs» [MeSH], «mental retardation and family problems» [MeSH], «stress and parents» [MeSH], «parenting and stress» [MeSH], «mental delay and parents» [MeSH], «developmental disabilities and family stress» [MeSH], «intellectual handicap and parenting» [MeSH], «maternal stress and child with disabilities» [MeSH].Discussion: The review has proven that all forms of mental retardation have an important -from a statistic point of viewimpacton the parents’ mental health. Anxiety, stress and depression are common symptoms mentioned by the parents.Additionally, there are individual variables such as the husband-wife relationship, the parents’ approach to their child’s disability, the parental strategies used in order to cope with the daily life of the child’s disability and the behavioural problems of their child, all of which contribute to the increase of the level of parental stress

  4. Maxwell stresses and dielectric materials

    CERN Document Server

    Kloos, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatic stresses are a fascinating field where materials science, continuum mechanics and electrical engineering all come together. This is one of the reasons why the study of these so-called Maxwell stresses is so interesting.This treatment of electrostatic Maxwell stresses is restricted to the macroscopic description of the phenomenon, but  an attempt is made to provide readers with methods and results which will allow them to deal with cases of low material symmetry, as well as with the effect of viscoelasticity upon the material response. Non-standard orientation of the material samp

  5. Pathogenesis of Chronic Hyperglycemia: From Reductive Stress to Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Jun Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic overnutrition creates chronic hyperglycemia that can gradually induce insulin resistance and insulin secretion impairment. These disorders, if not intervened, will eventually be followed by appearance of frank diabetes. The mechanisms of this chronic pathogenic process are complex but have been suggested to involve production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and oxidative stress. In this review, I highlight evidence that reductive stress imposed by overflux of NADH through the mitochondrial electron transport chain is the source of oxidative stress, which is based on establishments that more NADH recycling by mitochondrial complex I leads to more electron leakage and thus more ROS production. The elevated levels of both NADH and ROS can inhibit and inactivate glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, respectively, resulting in blockage of the glycolytic pathway and accumulation of glycerol 3-phospate and its prior metabolites along the pathway. This accumulation then initiates all those alternative glucose metabolic pathways such as the polyol pathway and the advanced glycation pathways that otherwise are minor and insignificant under euglycemic conditions. Importantly, all these alternative pathways lead to ROS production, thus aggravating cellular oxidative stress. Therefore, reductive stress followed by oxidative stress comprises a major mechanism of hyperglycemia-induced metabolic syndrome.

  6. [Psychosocial Stress, Stress Perception and Stress Management of Students of Social Work: a Quantitative Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriener, C; Schwertfeger, A; Deimel, D; Köhler, T

    2018-02-01

    In this quantitative study, data on 746 students of social work were collected regarding their current sense of stress, experience of psychosocial drain as well as their use of specific coping strategies. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Trier Inventory of Chronic Stress (TICS) were used. The results show that one out of 3 students suffer from a lot of to extreme stress. One-fourth of the students report feeling overworked and socially overburdened. More than half of the students are exposed to psychosocial drain as a consequence of past events in their biography (e. g. death or mental illness of a close relative). Despite these obvious burdens, only one-fourth made use of professional aid or counseling. Students who are primarily using functional coping strategies have a lower sensibility to stress and feel less overworked than students primarily using dysfunctional coping strategies. In the university setting, the theoretically and empirically sound knowledge based on this report can be used profitably: The increasing implementation of seminars on coping with stress at universities itself suggests that learning and utilizing functional coping strategies can contribute to a reduction of stress and strain among students. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Re-conceptualizing stress: Shifting views on the consequences of stress and its effects on stress reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jenny J W; Vickers, Kristin; Reed, Maureen; Hadad, Marilyn

    2017-01-01

    The consequences of stress are typically regarded from a deficit-oriented approach, conceptualizing stress to be entirely negative in its outcomes. This approach is unbalanced, and may further hinder individuals from engaging in adaptive coping. In the current study, we explored whether negative views and beliefs regarding stress interacted with a stress framing manipulation (positive, neutral and negative) on measures of stress reactivity for both psychosocial and physiological stressors. Ninety participants were randomized into one of three framing conditions that conceptualized the experience of stress in balanced, unbalanced-negative or unbalanced-positive ways. After watching a video on stress, participants underwent a psychosocial (Trier Social Stress Test), or a physiological (CO2 challenge) method of stress-induction. Subjective and objective markers of stress were assessed. Most of the sampled population regarded stress as negative prior to framing. Further, subjective and objective reactivity were greater to the TSST compared to the CO2 challenge. Additionally, significant cubic trends were observed in the interactions of stress framing and stress-induction methodologies on heart rate and blood pressure. Balanced framing conditions in the TSST group had a significantly larger decrease in heart rate and diastolic blood pressure following stress compared to the positive and negative framing conditions. Findings confirmed a deficit-orientation of stress within the sampled population. In addition, results highlighted the relative efficacy of the TSST compared to CO2 as a method of stress provocation. Finally, individuals in framing conditions that posited stress outcomes in unbalanced manners responded to stressors less efficiently. This suggests that unbalanced framing of stress may have set forth unrealistic expectations regarding stress that later hindered individuals from adaptive responses to stress. Potential benefits of alternative conceptualizations

  8. [Occupational stress and mental health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigantesco, Antonella; Lega, Ilaria

    2013-01-01

    One fifth of workers reports experiencing stress in the work environment in Europe. A number of studies show that psychosocial stressors in the workplace are associated with adverse physical and mental health outcomes, including symptoms of anxiety and depression. The present paper: briefly describes the characteristics of occupational stress and the main psychosocial stressful risk factors in the work environment; reports the main results of studies on psychosocial risk factors in the work environment as risk factor for common mental disorders; presents findings from an Italian study aimed at assessing prevalence of common mental disorders and workplace psychosocial stressors in a sample of hospital employees; provides the "Working conditions Questionnaire", a validated self-administered instrument to assess perceived stress in the workplace; this questionnaire includes the assessment of organizational justice.

  9. SEDflume - High Shear Stress Flume

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers High Shear Stress flume (SEDflume) is designed for estimating erosion rates of fine-grained and mixed fine/coarse grained sediments...

  10. Sleep in High Stress Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn-Evans, Erin

    2014-01-01

    High stress occupations are associated with sleep restriction, circadian misalignment and demanding workload. This presentation will provide an overview of sleep duration, circadian misalignment and fatigue countermeasures and performance outcomes during spaceflight and commercial aviation.

  11. Individualized Stress Detection System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Given the extended duration of future missions and the isolated, extreme, and confined environments, there is the possibility that stress-related behavioral...

  12. Interpersonal predictors of stress generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, Nicole K; Hammen, Constance L

    2009-05-01

    Hammen (1991) provided evidence for a stress generation process in which individuals with a history of depression contributed to the occurrence of stressors, especially interpersonal and conflict events. However, few studies have examined the factors contributing to stress generation. This study examines aspects of individuals' interpersonal style, operationalized as attachment, dependency, and reassurance seeking, as predictors of conflict stress generation within romantic relationships. These effects were examined both prospectively over a 4-week period and cross-sectionally using a 14-day daily diary in a sample of female college students. Overall, there was significant evidence that interpersonal style contributes to the occurrence of interpersonal stressors. Specifically, anxious attachment and reassurance seeking prospectively predicted romantic conflict stress over a 4-week period, and a variety of interpersonal behaviors were associated with romantic conflict stressors on a daily basis. These results are interpreted in relation to previous literature, and limitations and directions for future research are discussed.

  13. Individualized Stress Detection System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Given the extended duration of future missions and the isolated, extreme and confined environments, there is the possibility that stress-related behavioral...

  14. Combat and Operational Stress Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusher, Edward A

    2007-01-01

    Combat and Operational Stress (COS) includes all the physiological and emotional stresses encountered as a direct result of the dangers and mission demands of combat. Combat and Operational Stress Control (COSC) in the US. Army may be defined as programs developed and actions taken by military leadership to prevent, identify, and manage adverse Combat and Operational Stress Reactions (COSR) in units. This program optimizes mission performance, conserves the fighting strength, and prevents or minimizes adverse effects of COSR on Soldiers and their physical, psychological, intellectual, and social health. Its goal is to return Soldiers to duty expeditiously. COSC activities include routine screening of individuals when recruited; continued surveillance throughout military service, especially before, during, and after deployment; and continual assessment and consultation with medical and other personnel from garrison to the battlefield.

  15. Normal Stress or Adjustment Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder is a type of stress-related mental illness that can affect your feelings, thoughts and behaviors. Signs and symptoms of an adjustment disorder can include: Anxiety Poor school or work performance Relationship problems Sadness ...

  16. Reduce stress while improving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, C

    1993-05-01

    In summary, employee empowerment is a necessary component of the corporate culture because it increases productivity and the rate of employee retention. It simultaneously diminished employee job stress and associated costs.

  17. Residual stress analysis: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finlayson, T.R.

    1983-01-01

    The techniques which are or could be employed to measure residual stresses are outlined. They include X-ray and neutron diffraction. Comments are made on the reliability and accuracy to be expected from particular techniques

  18. Improved Computation of Dynamic Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Tarun K.

    1991-01-01

    Method combining modified computational procedure with preprocessing and postprocessing program yields additional data and reduces time and cost of using DYNRE1 module of STARDYNE computer program to compute distributions of stresses in machinery under dynamic loads.

  19. Stressing out in medieval Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamble, Julia A.; Boldsen, Jesper L.; Hoppa, Robert D.

    2017-01-01

    with the information from adult skeletal remains, such as age at death. The purpose of this research was to use a life history approach to the exploration of sex differences in the relationship between childhood stress and adult longevity by examining accentuated striae of Retzius (AS). A medieval Danish sample (n......The influence of early life stress on later life experiences has become a major focus of research in medicine and more recently in bioarchaeology. Dental enamel, which preserves a record of childhood stress events, represents an important resource for this investigation when paired...... = 70) drawn from the rural cemetery of Sejet and the urban cemetery of Ole Wormsgade was considered for AS and age at death. The results suggest sex differences in survivorship, with more stress being associated with reduced survivorship in males and increased survivorship in females. A consideration...

  20. Stress, depression and hippocampal damage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    adrenocortical (HPA) axis which regulates secretion of the stress responsive corticosteroids. The hippocampus is known to provide an inhibitory feedback to the HPA axis. Hippocampal damage then would result in disinhibition of the HPA axis ...

  1. Stress from electricity and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maes, W.

    1992-01-01

    The author, a journalist and a free expert in constructional biology, discusses the origins of electricity and radiation and their effects on human health. The emphasis is on the causes and measurement of stress-inducing or stress-enhancing factors. Preventive measures are pointed out. The book goes into detail about a.c. electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic waves, d.c. electric and magnetic fields, natural radioactivity, terrestrial radiation, vibration, and airborne pollutants. (uhe) [de

  2. Psychosocial stress among Danish vicars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyntelberg, F; Hein, H O; Suadicani, P

    2012-01-01

    Burnout and depression are common among clergy members of several religions and denominations. Despite this, no studies have analysed whether differences in psychosocial workloads between vicars and others explain their higher prevalence of stress-related symptoms.......Burnout and depression are common among clergy members of several religions and denominations. Despite this, no studies have analysed whether differences in psychosocial workloads between vicars and others explain their higher prevalence of stress-related symptoms....

  3. Stress Tests and Vulnerability Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, A.; Lorenz, P.

    2012-01-01

    After the accident in Fukushima, nuclear safety as topic in anti-nuclear work has gained importance within the Joint Project countries. Therefore, nuclear safety and in particular the activities of the European stress tests were chosen to be the main focus of the Joint Project 2011/2012 as well as the common theme of the national projects. This brochure describes: A) Vulnerability Assessment A critical review of the EU Nuclear Stress Tests in Bulgaria, Hungary, Romania and Ukraine is presented in chapter 1. The review details the main weaknesses identified within the stress tests. Important shortcomings not mentioned in the stress tests reports are also discussed. These evaluations do not claim to be exhaustive, but the findings contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of safety and risk of nuclear power plants in Europe. B) Transparency of the stress tests In chapter 2 the experience of the Joint Project NGOs concerning transparency of the stress tests is presented. The information is not meant to be an evaluation of the transparency of the stress tests in general – such an evaluation is not possible within the scope of this brochure. The evaluation aims to show activities concerning stress tests and how they were conceived by the JP NGOs. Some recommendations for improvement are given. C) Safety focus Within the main topic “nuclear safety” of the Joint Project 2011/2012 the NGOs of each JP country selected a special safety relevant topic, which is/was of particular interest in their country: Bulgaria: The short story of Belene NPP – The victory – Key points of the campaign against the nuclear power plant Romania: Risks of the CANDU reactor design Czech Republic: Results of the conference “Power Plant Load Testing: Safety Inspection or Propaganda?“ Slovakia: Safety deficits of the NPP Mochovce These safety relevant issues are discussed in separate sections within the brochure at hand. (author)

  4. Are Geotehrmal Reservoirs Stressed Out?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatzes, N. C.; Laboso, R. C.; Layland-Bachmann, C. E.; Feigl, K. L.; Foxall, W.; Tabrez, A. R.; Mellors, R. J.; Templeton, D. C.; Akerley, J.

    2017-12-01

    Crustal permeability can be strongly influenced by developing connected networks of open fractures. However, the detailed evolution of a fracture network, its extent, and the persistence of fracture porosity are difficult to analyze. Even in fault-hosted geothermal systems, where heat is brought to the surface from depth along a fault, hydrothermal flow is heterogeneously distributed. This is presumably due to variations in fracture density, connectivity, and attitude, as well as variations in fracture permeability caused by sealing of fractures by precipitated cements or compaction. At the Brady Geothermal field in Nevada, we test the relationship between the modeled local stress state perturbed by dislocations representing fault slip or volume changes in the geothermal reservoir inferred from surface deformation measured by InSAR and the location of successful geothermal wells, hydrothermal activity, and seismicity. We postulate that permeability is favored in volumes that experience positive Coulomb stress changes and reduced compression, which together promote high densities of dilatant fractures. Conversely, permeability can be inhibited in locations where Coulomb stress is reduced, compression promotes compaction, or where the faults are poorly oriented in the stress field and consequently slip infrequently. Over geologic time scales spanning the development of the fault system, these local stress states are strongly influenced by the geometry of the fault network relative to the remote stress driving slip. At shorter time scales, changes in fluid pressure within the fracture network constituting the reservoir cause elastic dilations and contractions. We integrate: (1) direct observations of stress state and fractures in boreholes and the mapped geometry of the fault network; (2) evidence of permeability from surface hydrothermal features, production/injection wells and surface deformations related to pumping history; and (3) seismicity to test the

  5. Stress fractures in military training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jofre, M.J.; Sierralta, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    During military training, the incidence of overuse injuries like stress fractures increase. The aim of the study was to investigate the utility of bone scan in a military population with clinical suspected stress fractures or periostitis. Material and methods: A three-year retrospective analysis was made on patients who were clinically diagnosed with stress fractures at the Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department. Thirty-seven patients were studied (mean age 23. +/- 8 y.o; 31 males), 28 cases of which (76%) had tibial stress syndrome. Other localizations were lumbar spine, femoral, fibular, tarsal or metatarsal. Bone scintigraphy was performed injecting 1036 MBq of Tc99m-MDP i.v. Whole body images and lateral projections of lower extremities were done. Results: Bone scan in tibial syndrome was positive for 23 cases (82%), 65% of them were bilateral and 13% also had femoral injuries. X-rays were done in 10 cases and were all negative. In other localizations, the bone scans were negative, but demonstrated other degenerative lesions. All stress fractures were conservatively treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatories and suspension of physical activity. Conclusions: Bone scan is a reliable confirmatory tool for tibial stress syndrome diagnosis. In addition, it helps to determine both the severity and extension of the injury as well as support the indication of rest in the military population

  6. Job stress and productivity increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaramola, Samson Sunday

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines mental and physical pressures that workers bear at work. The authors discuss how on the-job stress affects a person's capabilities and productivity, and how such pressures lend to higher incidences of accidents at work. The paper also discuss methods of reducing job-related stress and increasing productivity. An intervention was conducted amongst workers in a private firm. It shows mental and emotional pressure can affect performance and productivity of a worker on the job. One of the biggest influences of today's worker is on the-job stress. Job stress occurs when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources, or needs of the worker. This consequently affects how a person would normally deal with customer service problems, grievances, violence, conflict, and decisions on the job. Stress is an inevitable part of everyday life, and is therefore a distinct part of a person's job. To properly control the outcome of stress, there are certain precautions and methods that should be taken that will boost productivity.

  7. Thyroid function and stress hormones in children with stress hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordbar, Mohammad Reza; Taj-Aldini, Reza; Karamizadeh, Zohre; Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Karimi, Mehran; Omrani, Gholam Hossein

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the prevalence of stress hyperglycemia and to investigate how thyroid and stress hormones alter during stress hyperglycemia in children admitted to pediatric emergency wards. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in children, less than 19 years old, who were admitted to pediatric emergency wards of Nemazee and Dastgheib Hospitals, Shiraz, Southern Iran. Those patients taking steroids, beta-agonists or intravenously administered glucose before venipuncture, and patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) or thyroid diseases were excluded. Children with blood glucose ≥ 150 mg/dL during admission were regarded as cases. The controls were age- and- sex- matched, euglycemic children. Stress hormones including cortisol, insulin, growth hormone, and prolactin were measured, and thyroid function was tested with a radioimmunoassay (RIA) method in all cases and controls. The results showed that among 1,054 screened children, 39 cases (3.7 %) had stress hyperglycemia and 89 controls were included in the study. The occurrence of hyperglycemia was independent of sex, but it occurred mostly in children under 6 years old. Hyperglycemia occurred more frequently in patients with a positive family history of DM (odds ratio = 3.2, 95 % CI = 1.3-7.9, and P = 0.009). There were no significant differences between cases and controls regarding any hormones except higher cortisol, and lower total T3 and T4 in cases compared with controls. Neither of cases developed diabetes in the 24-month follow-up period. These findings led us to the conclusion that stress hyperglycemia is occasionally seen in critically ill patients. Among the stress hormones measured, only cortisol increased during hyperglycemia. It seems that hyperglycemia is not an important risk factor for future diabetes.

  8. Stress, stress-induced cortisol responses, and eyewitness identification performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerland, Melanie; Raymaekers, Linsey H C; Otgaar, Henry; Memon, Amina; Waltjen, Thijs T; Nivo, Maud; Slegers, Chiel; Broers, Nick J; Smeets, Tom

    2016-07-01

    In the eyewitness identification literature, stress and arousal at the time of encoding are considered to adversely influence identification performance. This assumption is in contrast with findings from the neurobiology field of learning and memory, showing that stress and stress hormones are critically involved in forming enduring memories. This discrepancy may be related to methodological differences between the two fields of research, such as the tendency for immediate testing or the use of very short (1-2 hours) retention intervals in eyewitness research, while neurobiology studies insert at least 24 hours. Other differences refer to the extent to which stress-responsive systems (i.e., the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) are stimulated effectively under laboratory conditions. The aim of the current study was to conduct an experiment that accounts for the contemporary state of knowledge in both fields. In all, 123 participants witnessed a live staged theft while being exposed to a laboratory stressor that reliably elicits autonomic and glucocorticoid stress responses or while performing a control task. Salivary cortisol levels were measured to control for the effectiveness of the stress induction. One week later, participants attempted to identify the thief from target-present and target-absent line-ups. According to regression and receiver operating characteristic analyses, stress did not have robust detrimental effects on identification performance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 The Authors Behavioral Sciences & the Law Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors Behavioral Sciences & the Law Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Teacher stress and coping strategies used to reduce stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Vicky; Shah, Surya; Muncer, Steven

    2005-01-01

    This pilot study investigated teachers' symptoms of stress and their coping strategies. Measurements of 'stress levels' and 'coping strategies' used were acquired by constructing a questionnaire made up of four individual standardized questionnaires. The data were analysed by a series of correlational analyses that highlighted significant relationships between ways of coping and levels of distress. Differences between the stress-related areas were measured using the Friedman test and Wilcoxon signed rank test for hierarchy. The findings implied that 'escape avoidance', 'accepting responsibility' and 'uncontrolled aggression' were used as negative coping strategies and only one strategy, 'exercise', was indicated to be an effective way of coping. The teachers' strategies were examined for similarities and differences with those recommended by occupational therapists. This pilot study was limited to two schools and it is recommended that it be extended to better generalize the results. Furthermore, ways of coping, as measured by psychological measures, do not seem to reduce stress so it is possible that the activity-based Stress Management Questionnaire, as advocated by Stein et al. (2003), might be more advantageous.

  10. Prenatal stress, prematurity and asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medsker, Brock; Forno, Erick; Simhan, Hyagriv; Celedón, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting millions of children in the U.S. and worldwide. Prematurity is a risk factor for asthma, and certain ethnic or racial minorities such as Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic Blacks are disproportionately affected by both prematurity and asthma. In this review, we examine current evidence to support maternal psychosocial stress as a putative link between prematurity and asthma, while also focusing on disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and immune responses as potential underlying mechanisms for stress-induced “premature asthma”. Prenatal stress may not only cause abnormalities in the HPA axis but also epigenetic changes in the fetal glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1), leading to impaired glucocorticoid metabolism. Moreover, maternal stress can alter fetal cytokine balance, favoring Th2 (allergic) immune responses characteristic of atopic asthma: IL-6, which has been associated with premature labor, can promote Th2 responses by stimulating production of IL-4 and IL-13. Given a link among stress, prematurity, and asthma, future research should include birth cohorts aimed at confirming and better characterizing “premature asthma”. If confirmed, clinical trials of prenatal maternal stress reduction would be warranted to reduce the burden of these common co-morbidities. While awaiting the results of such studies, sound policies to prevent domestic and community violence (e.g. from firearms) are justified, not only by public safety but also by growing evidence of detrimental effects of violence-induced stress on psychiatric and somatic health. PMID:26676148

  11. Parenting stress and parental bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willinger, Ulrike; Diendorfer-Radner, Gabriela; Willnauer, Ruth; Jörgl, Gudrun; Hager, Veronika

    2005-01-01

    Attachment experiences are thought to be important because of their implications for later development. The authors' aim with the questionnaire-based study was to investigate the differences between recalled parental bonding regarding 4 types of maternal and paternal bonding with respect to experienced parenting stress caused by child characteristics, parent attributes, and life events under the consideration of the child's gender and age. The authors gathered parental bonding behavior data with the German version of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI). The authors assessed parenting stress with their German version of the "Parenting Stress Index (PSI)." They found significant differences among 120 mothers grouped in the 4 maternal and the 4 paternal bonding types regarding parenting stress caused by child, maternal bonding: F(5, 113) = 4.13, p = .002, paternal bonding: F(5, 111) = 8.50, p mothers who themselves recalled the "optimal parental bonding type" with respect to the child and parental domain. The authors did not find any significant differences between the 4 maternal, F(5, 113) = 1.25, p = .29, and the 4 paternal, F(5, 111) = 1.87, p = .106, bonding types with respect to the life stress. According to the authors' findings, the representation of attachment relationships seems to have a special impact on the adult's capacity to cope with challenges and stress, either directly or indirectly as an internal working model of attachment. For the clinical practice, these findings seem to recommend the combination of both the PSI and PBI regarding the diagnostic of stressful mother-child system to plan an optimal intervention program.

  12. 77 FR 3408 - Annual Stress Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ...-2011-0029] RIN 1557-AD58 Annual Stress Test AGENCY: Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (``OCC... certain companies to conduct annual stress tests pursuant to regulations prescribed by their respective... stress test as prescribed by this proposed rule. In addition to the annual stress test requirement, such...

  13. Stress Assignment in Reading Italian Polysyllabic Pseudowords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulpizio, Simone; Arduino, Lisa S.; Paizi, Despina; Burani, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    In 4 naming experiments we investigated how Italian readers assign stress to pseudowords. We assessed whether participants assign stress following distributional information such as stress neighborhood (the proportion and number of existent words sharing orthographic ending and stress pattern) and whether such distributional information affects…

  14. The measurement of residual stresses in claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, G.; Bender, N.

    1978-01-01

    The ring core method, a variation of the hole drilling method for the measurement of biaxial residual stresses, has been extended to measure stresses from depths of about 5 to 25mm. It is now possible to measure the stress profiles of clad material. Examples of measured stress profiles are shown and compared with those obtained with a sectioning technique. (author)

  15. Effective stress coefficient for uniaxial strain condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, M.M.; Fabricius, I.L.

    2012-01-01

    one dimensional rock mechanical deformation. We further investigated the effect of boundary condition on the stress dependency of effective stress coefficient and discussed its application in reservoir study. As stress field in the reservoirs are most unlikely to be hydrostatic, effective stress...... determined under uniaxial strain condition will be more relevant in reservoir studies. Copyright 2012 ARMA, American Rock Mechanics Association....

  16. Stress in College Athletics: Causes, Consequences, Coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, James H.; Yow, Deborah A.; Bowden, William W.

    This book addresses the causes and consequences of stress in college sports and offers effective coping mechanisms to help individuals understand and control stressors and emotions in their environment. The chapters are: (1) "Understanding Stress"; (2) "Perceptions of Stress in College Athletics"; (3) "Stress among College Athletes"; (4) "Stress…

  17. Consequences of Stress for Public School Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Kathy J.

    2010-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: This study is a quantitative study of Oklahoma Public School Superintendents. The data was collected by surveys using an online format. Data was analyzed to determine correlation and predictive values of the four specific stress factors: conflict mediating stress, boundary spanning stress, task based stress and role…

  18. Neutron residual stress measurements in linepipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Michael; Gnaëpel-Herold, Thomas; Luzin, Vladimir; Bowie, Graham

    2006-11-01

    Residual stresses in gas pipelines are generated by manufacturing and construction processes and may affect the subsequent pipe integrity. In the present work, the residual stresses in eight samples of linepipe were measured by neutron diffraction. Residual stresses changed with some coating processes. This has special implications in understanding and mitigating stress corrosion cracking, a major safety and economic problem in some gas pipelines.

  19. Neutron residual stress measurements in linepipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Michael; Gnaepel-Herold, Thomas; Luzin, Vladimir; Bowie, Graham

    2006-01-01

    Residual stresses in gas pipelines are generated by manufacturing and construction processes and may affect the subsequent pipe integrity. In the present work, the residual stresses in eight samples of linepipe were measured by neutron diffraction. Residual stresses changed with some coating processes. This has special implications in understanding and mitigating stress corrosion cracking, a major safety and economic problem in some gas pipelines

  20. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... post-traumatic stress (PTS) is a lot like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) but not as severe. Patients have a ... traumatic stress (PTS), which is a lot like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is a specific group of symptoms ...

  1. Residual thermal stresses in injection moulded products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoetelief, W.F.; Douven, L.F.A.; Ingen Housz, A.J.; Ingen housz, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    Nonisothermal flow of a polymer melt in a cold mold cavity introduces stresses that are partly frozen-in during solidification. Flow-induced stresses cause anisotropy of mechanical, thermal, and optical properties, while the residual thermal stresses induce warpage and stress-cracking. In this

  2. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and Classing...

  3. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.440 Section 154.440 Shipping COAST... Tank Type A § 154.440 Allowable stress. (a) The allowable stresses for an independent tank type A must... Commandant (CG-522). (b) A greater allowable stress than required in paragraph (a)(1) of this section may be...

  4. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for stress...

  5. Stress induced reorientation of vanadium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beardsley, M.B.

    1977-10-01

    The critical stress for the reorientation of vanadium hydride was determined for the temperature range 180 0 to 280 0 K using flat tensile samples containing 50 to 500 ppM hydrogen by weight. The critical stress was observed to vary from a half to a third of the macroscopic yield stress of pure vanadium over the temperature range. The vanadium hydride could not be stress induced to precipitate above its stress-free precipitation temperature by uniaxial tensile stresses or triaxial tensile stresses induced by a notch

  6. Abiotic stress signaling and responses in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Summary As sessile organisms, plants must cope with abiotic stress such as soil salinity, drought, and extreme temperatures. Core stress signaling pathways involve protein kinases related to the yeast SNF1 and mammalian AMPK, suggesting that stress signaling in plants evolved from energy sensing. Stress signaling regulates proteins critical for ion and water transport and for metabolic and gene-expression reprogramming to bring about ionic and water homeostasis and cellular stability under stress conditions. Understanding stress signaling and responses will increase our ability to improve stress resistance in crops to achieve agricultural sustainability and food security for a growing world population. PMID:27716505

  7. How Psychological Stress Affects Emotional Prosody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulmann, Silke; Furnes, Desire; Bøkenes, Anne Ming; Cozzolino, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    We explored how experimentally induced psychological stress affects the production and recognition of vocal emotions. In Study 1a, we demonstrate that sentences spoken by stressed speakers are judged by naïve listeners as sounding more stressed than sentences uttered by non-stressed speakers. In Study 1b, negative emotions produced by stressed speakers are generally less well recognized than the same emotions produced by non-stressed speakers. Multiple mediation analyses suggest this poorer recognition of negative stimuli was due to a mismatch between the variation of volume voiced by speakers and the range of volume expected by listeners. Together, this suggests that the stress level of the speaker affects judgments made by the receiver. In Study 2, we demonstrate that participants who were induced with a feeling of stress before carrying out an emotional prosody recognition task performed worse than non-stressed participants. Overall, findings suggest detrimental effects of induced stress on interpersonal sensitivity. PMID:27802287

  8. Management of journalists professional stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rvović Jelena J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research has been conducted with the purpose of identifying the causes of stress (stressors within the journalists' work in Serbia, their intensity and frequency, as well as their negative impact on health on one hand, and on the other hand to identify what is the role of Human Resources Management within the media in overcoming journalists' stress caused by identified stressors. . The research method, a Questionnaire (N=60 was created as a combination of modified pSS (perceived Stress Scale and a Questionnaire proposed by Cousins et al. (2004 for measuring of work-related stress intensity, adapted to the specific features of this research. Results have revealed a large number of stressors that can and must be managed; therefore the specific goal of this research would include the creation of a draft template for management of journalists' professional stress. If the media in Serbia wish to be organizations that care about their journalists' health, they will have to adopt certain activities through a department of HR management to prevail over stress at work, due to permanent exposure of journalists to their great professional demands. However, human resources management in the media can not protect the health of their journalists most efficiently by one activity only, considering that a large number of stressors have been identified in the research. The proposed activities of HR management in overcoming the work-related stress represent only a macro-framework for outlining this phenomenon in Serbia, because we shall not be able to ascertain that the proposed template for journalists' professional stress management is completely efficient, before its application is proven empirically, i.e. in practice. This should not be regarded as a limitation to this research, considering that only a small number of credible studies in the world are using quantified data for verifying their conclusions. In any case the need for a study based on evidence

  9. [Tool for measuring occupational stress: a nurses' stress inventory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacciarini, J M; Tróccoli, B T

    2000-12-01

    We present an exploratory study aiming at constructing an inventory to measure occupational stress in nurses ("Inventário de Estresse em Enfermeiros"--IEE). A set of items was initially constructed from previously defined categories based on interviews with nurses and then improved through semantic analysis by referees and a pilot-test with nursing students. A sample of 461 nurses--workers from the public services of the Federal District--who answered the IEE was used in the study. Factorial analysis indicated the presence of a second-order global factor and three first-order factors: Interpersonal Relationships, Stressful Career Roles and Intrinsic Job Factors.

  10. Investigation of Stress-Strain History Modeling at Stress Risers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-06-01

    4 v.FtIoOD COVEE~ tD (INVESTIGATION OF STRESS STRAIN HISM4rYI I a,.5..1 eW 96 - ,v MODEiLINGi AT STRESS RISERS, ______~ .- ,-* . - ’ LG77ERM33 - h...spacmn F 0’r of ZOY-76’ i Iyr FodIM hxrtwv.rtrjj ’ti~n Iri of o.(.1)2. morn A; 2 C0.02 ni 7,4 from F~ifuri.l /6 1i I1 17.4-0.135 for thu first CYGIa

  11. Stress, memory, and the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingenfeld, Katja; Wolf, Oliver T

    2014-01-01

    Stress hormones, i.e. cortisol in human and cortisone in rodents, influence a wide range of cognitive functions, including hippocampus-based declarative memory performance. Cortisol enhances memory consolidation, but impairs memory retrieval. In this context glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity and hippocampal integrity play an important role. This review integrates findings on the relationships between the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, one of the main coordinators of the stress response, hippocampus, and memory. Findings obtained in healthy participants will be compared with selected mental disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and borderline personality disorder (BPD). These disorders are characterized by alterations of the HPA axis and hippocampal dysfunctions. Interestingly, the acute effects of stress hormones on memory in psychiatric patients are different from those found in healthy humans. While cortisol administration has failed to affect memory retrieval in patients with MDD, patients with PTSD and BPD have been found to show enhanced rather than impaired memory retrieval after hydrocortisone. This indicates an altered sensitivity to stress hormones in these mental disorders. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  12. The history of stress hyperglycaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasanthiran, A; Shotliff, K

    2015-01-01

    Stress hyperglycaemia, is a common phenomenon, frequently associated with adverse outcomes in a number of prevalent conditions including myocardial infarction and stroke. Knowledge on stress hyperglycaemia evolved in tandem with knowledge relating to homeostasis, stress and disease and involved some of the world's most eminent thinkers. Despite this, it still remains under-recognised. This paper illustrates significant points in the history of stress hyperglycaemia, from antiquity through to the present day, as well as the challenges faced in translating research into clinical benefit for patients. Profiles of significant protagonists including Claude Bernard, Walter Cannon and Hans Seyle are presented, as well their roles in the emergence of modern-day terminology and pathophysiological models. Major themes such as 'fight or flight' and homeostasis are central to this discussion. Closer to the present day, the role of stress hyperglycaemia in a number of common medical conditions is explored in more detail. Contention around evidence for treatment and the future risk of diabetes mellitus are also discussed.

  13. Oxidative stress and leaf senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Hatami

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Senescence is an important developmental process that leads to the cell death through highly regulated genetically controlled processes in plants. Biotic and abiotic Oxidative stresses can also artificially induce senescence and increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS specifically in chloroplast. One of the important oxidative stresses is paraquat that induces deviation of electron from photosynthesis electron chain and lead to the production of more ROS in chloroplast. Plants have evolved special adoptive mechanism to reallocate nutrient to reproductive and juvenile organs in senescence and different oxidative stresses. Rubisco seems to be the most abundant protein in plants and is involved in many changes during senescence. Results In the present study, the effects of ROS on Rubisco during senescence and oxidative stresses were evaluated by measuring photosynthesis factors such as net photosynthesis rate (Pn, stomatal conductance (G, evaporation rate (E, intra cellular CO2 concentration (Ci, fluorescence and total protein during three stages of development. Our results showed that in paraquat treated plants, CO2 assimilation is the most effective factor that refers to Rubisco damages. The highest correlation and regression coefficient belonged to Ci, while correlation coefficient between photosynthesis rate and total protein was much smaller. Conclusion It appears in the early stage of oxidative stresses such as exposing to paraquat, ROS has the most effect on Rubisco activity that induces more susceptibility to Rubisco specific protease. Moreover, Rubisco deactivation acts as an initiative signal for Rubisco degradation.

  14. Blunted stress reactivity in chronic cannabis users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttler, Carrie; Spradlin, Alexander; Nusbaum, Amy T; Whitney, Paul; Hinson, John M; McLaughlin, Ryan J

    2017-08-01

    One of the most commonly cited reasons for chronic cannabis use is to cope with stress. Consistent with this, cannabis users have shown reduced emotional arousal and dampened stress reactivity in response to negative imagery. To our knowledge, the present study represents the first to examine the effects of an acute stress manipulation on subjective stress and salivary cortisol in chronic cannabis users compared to non-users. Forty cannabis users and 42 non-users were randomly assigned to complete either the stress or no stress conditions of the Maastricht Acute Stress Test (MAST). The stress condition of the MAST manipulates both physiological (placing hand in ice bath) and psychosocial stress (performing math under conditions of social evaluation). Participants gave baseline subjective stress ratings before, during, and after the stress manipulation. Cortisol was measured from saliva samples obtained before and after the stress manipulation. Further, cannabis cravings and symptoms of withdrawal were measured. Subjective stress ratings and cortisol levels were significantly higher in non-users in the stress condition relative to non-users in the no stress condition. In contrast, cannabis users demonstrated blunted stress reactivity; specifically, they showed no increase in cortisol and a significantly smaller increase in subjective stress ratings. The stress manipulation had no impact on cannabis users' self-reported cravings or withdrawal symptoms. Chronic cannabis use is associated with blunted stress reactivity. Future research is needed to determine whether this helps to confer resiliency or vulnerability to stress-related psychopathology as well as the mechanisms underlying this effect.

  15. MANAGEMENT OF STRESS AND MOTIVATION OF EMPLOYEES

    OpenAIRE

    UNNIKRISHNAN.P

    2017-01-01

    Stress is a physical and emotional reaction when everyone encounters the various challenges of life. It will lead to mental unrest. Stress is the body’s automatic response to any physical or mental demand placed on it. Stress is a negative concept and creates a negative mental attitude in the mind of individuals. The various reasons for stress in organizations are over work load, role ambiguity, role conflict, isolation, lack of family-social support etc. Moderate stress relating to job aspec...

  16. Stressing Academia? Stress-as-Offence-to-Self at Danish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opstrup, Niels; Pihl-Thingvad, Signe

    2016-01-01

    Academic work has traditionally been seen as relatively stress free. However, a growing number of studies have reported increases in occupational stress experienced by university researchers. In order to explain stress among this group, we build on a new perspective in occupational stress research: the so-called stress-as-offence-to-self…

  17. The effects of perceived stress, traits, mood states, and stressful daily events on salivary cortisol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanEck, M; Berkhof, H; Nicolson, N; Sulon, J

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the effects of perceived stress and related individual characteristics, mood states, and stressful daily events on salivary cortisol levels. Forty-one ''high stress'' and 46 ''low stress'' subjects were selected on the basis of Perceived Stress Scale scores from a sample of male,

  18. Stress Regularity or Consistency? Reading Aloud Italian Polysyllables with Different Stress Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burani, Cristina; Arduino, Lisa S.

    2004-01-01

    Stress assignment to three- and four-syllable Italian words is not predictable by rule, but needs lexical look-up. The present study investigated whether stress assignment to low-frequency Italian words is determined by stress regularity, or by the number of words sharing the final phonological segment and the stress pattern (stress neighborhood…

  19. Improved Heat-Stress Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teets, Edward H., Jr.; Fehn, Steven

    2007-01-01

    NASA Dryden presents an improved and automated site-specific algorithm for heat-stress approximation using standard atmospheric measurements routinely obtained from the Edwards Air Force Base weather detachment. Heat stress, which is the net heat load a worker may be exposed to, is officially measured using a thermal-environment monitoring system to calculate the wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT). This instrument uses three independent thermometers to measure wet-bulb, dry-bulb, and the black-globe temperatures. By using these improvements, a more realistic WBGT estimation value can now be produced. This is extremely useful for researchers and other employees who are working on outdoor projects that are distant from the areas that the Web system monitors. Most importantly, the improved WBGT estimations will make outdoor work sites safer by reducing the likelihood of heat stress.

  20. Stressful social relations and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rikke; Christensen, Ulla; Nilsson, Charlotte Juul

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies have examined the relationship between stressful social relations in private life and all-cause mortality. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between stressful social relations (with partner, children, other family, friends and neighbours, respectively) and all...... men and women aged 36-52 years, linked to the Danish Cause of Death Registry for information on all-cause mortality until 31 December 2011. Associations between stressful social relations with partner, children, other family, friends and neighbours, respectively, and all-cause mortality were examined...... hazards model. RESULTS: Frequent worries/demands from partner or children were associated with 50-100% increased mortality risk. Frequent conflicts with any type of social relation were associated with 2-3 times increased mortality risk. Interaction between labour force participation and worries...