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Sample records for stress hybrid finite-element

  1. Extension to linear dynamics for hybrid stress finite element formulation based on additional displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumihara, K.

    Based upon legitimate variational principles, one microscopic-macroscopic finite element formulation for linear dynamics is presented by Hybrid Stress Finite Element Method. The microscopic application of Geometric Perturbation introduced by Pian and the introduction of infinitesimal limit core element (Baby Element) have been consistently combined according to the flexible and inherent interpretation of the legitimate variational principles initially originated by Pian and Tong. The conceptual development based upon Hybrid Finite Element Method is extended to linear dynamics with the introduction of physically meaningful higher modes.

  2. A novel hybrid stress-function finite element method immune to severe mesh distortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cen Song; Zhou Mingjue; Fu Xiangrong

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a hybrid stress-function finite element method proposed recently for developing 2D finite element models immune to element shapes. Deferent from the first version of the hybrid-stress element constructed by Pian, the stress function φ of 2D elastic or fracture problem is regarded as the functional variable of the complementary energy functional. Then, the basic analytical solutions of φ are taken as the trial functions for finite element models, and meanwhile, the corresponding unknown stress-function constants are introduced. By using the principle of minimum complementary energy, these unknown stress-function constants can be expressed in terms of the displacements along element edges. Finally, the complementary energy functional can be rewritten in terms of element nodal displacement vector, and thus, the element stiffness matrix of such hybrid-function element can be obtained. As examples, two (8- and 12-node) quadrilateral plane elements and an arbitrary polygonal crack element are constructed by employing different basic analytical solutions of different stress functions. Numerical results show that, the 8- and 12-node plane models can produce the exact solutions for pure bending and linear bending problems, respectively, even the element shape degenerates into triangle and concave quadrangle; and the crack element can also predict accurate results with very low computational cost in analysis of stress-singularity problems.

  3. Hybrid determination of mixed-mode stress intensity factors on discontinuous finite-width plate by finite element and photoelasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Tae Hyun; Chen, Lei; Hong, Dong Pyo

    2011-01-01

    For isotropic material structure, the stress in the vicinity of crack tip is generally much higher than the stress far away from it. This phenomenon usually leads to stress concentration and fracture of structure. Previous researches and studies show that the stress intensity factor is one of most important parameter for crack growth and propagation. This paper provides a convenient numerical method, which is called hybrid photoelasticity method, to accurately determine the stress field distribution in the vicinity of crack tip and mixed-mode stress intensity factors. The model was simulated by finite element method and isochromatic data along straight lines far away from the crack tip were calculated. By using the isochromatic data obtained from finite element method and a conformal mapping procedure, stress components and photoelastic fringes in the hybrid region were calculated. To easily compare calculated photoelastic fringes with experiment results, the fringe patterns were reconstructed, doubled and sharpened. Good agreement shows that the method presented in this paper is reliable and convenient. This method can then directly be applied to obtain mixed mode stress intensity factors from the experimentally measured isochromatic data along the straight lines

  4. Analyses of large quasistatic deformations of inelastic bodies by a new hybrid-stress finite element algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, K. W.; Atluri, S. N.

    1983-01-01

    A new hybrid-stress finite element algorithm, suitable for analyses of large, quasistatic, inelastic deformations, is presented. The algorithm is base upon a generalization of de Veubeke's complementary energy principle. The principal variables in the formulation are the nominal stress rate and spin, and thg resulting finite element equations are discrete versions of the equations of compatibility and angular momentum balance. The algorithm produces true rates, time derivatives, as opposed to 'increments'. There results a complete separation of the boundary value problem (for stress rate and velocity) and the initial value problem (for total stress and deformation); hence, their numerical treatments are essentially independent. After a fairly comprehensive discussion of the numerical treatment of the boundary value problem, we launch into a detailed examination of the numerical treatment of the initial value problem, covering the topics of efficiency, stability and objectivity. The paper is closed with a set of examples, finite homogeneous deformation problems, which serve to bring out important aspects of the algorithm.

  5. A multigrid solution method for mixed hybrid finite elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, W. [Universitaet Augsburg (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    We consider the multigrid solution of linear equations arising within the discretization of elliptic second order boundary value problems of the form by mixed hybrid finite elements. Using the equivalence of mixed hybrid finite elements and non-conforming nodal finite elements, we construct a multigrid scheme for the corresponding non-conforming finite elements, and, by this equivalence, for the mixed hybrid finite elements, following guidelines from Arbogast/Chen. For a rectangular triangulation of the computational domain, this non-conforming schemes are the so-called nodal finite elements. We explicitly construct prolongation and restriction operators for this type of non-conforming finite elements. We discuss the use of plain multigrid and the multilevel-preconditioned cg-method and compare their efficiency in numerical tests.

  6. finite element model for predicting residual stresses in shielded

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    This paper investigates the prediction of residual stresses developed ... steel plates through Finite Element Model simulation and experiments. ... The experimental values as measured by the X-Ray diffractometer were of ... Based on this, it can be concluded that Finite Element .... Comparison of Residual Stresses from X.

  7. Finite element analysis of thermal stress distribution in different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice. Journal Home ... Von Mises and thermal stress distributions were evaluated. Results: In all ... distribution. Key words: Amalgam, finite element method, glass ionomer cement, resin composite, thermal stress ...

  8. Thermal stresses in rectangular plates: variational and finite element solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laura, P.A.A.; Gutierrez, R.H.; Sanchez Sarmiento, G.; Basombrio, F.G.

    1978-01-01

    This paper deals with the development of an approximate method for the analysis of thermal stresses in rectangular plates (plane stress problem) and an evaluation of the relative accuracy of the finite element method. The stress function is expanded in terms of polynomial coordinate functions which identically satisfy the boundary conditions, and a variational approach is used to determine the expansion coefficients. The results are in good agreement with a finite element approach. (Auth.)

  9. Finite element analysis of thermal stress distribution in different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • Jan-Feb 2016 • Vol 19 • Issue 1. Abstract ... Key words: Amalgam, finite element method, glass ionomer cement, resin composite, thermal stress ... applications for force analysis and assessment of different.

  10. Finite Element Residual Stress Analysis of Planetary Gear Tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A method to simulate residual stress field of planetary gear is proposed. In this method, the finite element model of planetary gear is established and divided to tooth zone and profile zone, whose different temperature field is set. The gear's residual stress simulation is realized by the thermal compression stress generated by the temperature difference. Based on the simulation, the finite element model of planetary gear train is established, the dynamic meshing process is simulated, and influence of residual stress on equivalent stress of addendum, pitch circle, and dedendum of internal and external meshing planetary gear tooth profile is analyzed, according to non-linear contact theory, thermodynamic theory, and finite element theory. The results show that the equivalent stresses of planetary gear at both meshing and nonmeshing surface are significantly and differently reduced by residual stress. The study benefits fatigue cracking analysis and dynamic optimization design of planetary gear train.

  11. Finite element stress analysis of brick-mortar masonry under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stress analysis of a brick-mortar couplet as a substitute for brick wall structure has been performed by finite element method, and algorithm for determining the element stiffness matrix for a plane stress problem using the displacement approach was developed. The nodal displacements were derived for the stress in each ...

  12. Hybrid-finite-element analysis of some nonlinear and 3-dimensional problems of engineering fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atluri, S. N.; Nakagaki, M.; Kathiresan, K.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, efficient numerical methods for the analysis of crack-closure effects on fatigue-crack-growth-rates, in plane stress situations, and for the solution of stress-intensity factors for arbitrary shaped surface flaws in pressure vessels, are presented. For the former problem, an elastic-plastic finite element procedure valid for the case of finite deformation gradients is developed and crack growth is simulated by the translation of near-crack-tip elements with embedded plastic singularities. For the latter problem, an embedded-elastic-singularity hybrid finite element method, which leads to a direct evaluation of K-factors, is employed.

  13. Fillet Weld Stress Using Finite Element Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnhoff, T. F.; Green, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    Average elastic Von Mises equivalent stresses were calculated along the throat of a single lap fillet weld. The average elastic stresses were compared to initial yield and to plastic instability conditions to modify conventional design formulas is presented. The factor is a linear function of the thicknesses of the parent plates attached by the fillet weld.

  14. Stress analysis of heated concrete using finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, P.; Gupta, A.; Marchertas, A.

    1994-01-01

    Described is a finite element analysis of concrete, which is subjected to rapid heating. Using thermal mass transport calculation, the moisture content, temperature and pore pressure distribution over space and time is obtained first. From these effects, stress at various points of the concrete are computed using the finite element method. Contribution to the stress formulation comes from three components, namely the thermal expansion, pore pressure, and the shrinkage of concrete due to moisture loss (from dehydration). The material properties of concrete are assumed to be homogeneous, elastic, and cracking is not taken into consideration. (orig.)

  15. Finite element calculation of stress induced heating of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akin, J.E.; Moazed, A.

    1976-01-01

    This research is concerned with the calculation of the amount of heat generated due to the development of mechanical stresses in superconducting composites. An emperical equation is used to define the amount of stress-induced heat generation per unit volume. The equation relates the maximum applied stress and the experimental measured hysteresis loop of the composite stress-strain diagram. It is utilized in a finite element program to calculate the total stress-induced heat generation for the superconductor. An example analysis of a solenoid indicates that the stress-induced heating can be of the same order of magnitude as eddy current effects

  16. Hybrid Fundamental Solution Based Finite Element Method: Theory and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyong Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview on the development of hybrid fundamental solution based finite element method (HFS-FEM and its application in engineering problems is presented in this paper. The framework and formulations of HFS-FEM for potential problem, plane elasticity, three-dimensional elasticity, thermoelasticity, anisotropic elasticity, and plane piezoelectricity are presented. In this method, two independent assumed fields (intraelement filed and auxiliary frame field are employed. The formulations for all cases are derived from the modified variational functionals and the fundamental solutions to a given problem. Generation of elemental stiffness equations from the modified variational principle is also described. Typical numerical examples are given to demonstrate the validity and performance of the HFS-FEM. Finally, a brief summary of the approach is provided and future trends in this field are identified.

  17. Hybrid finite element and Brownian dynamics method for charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Gary A., E-mail: ghuber@ucsd.edu; Miao, Yinglong [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0365 (United States); Zhou, Shenggao [Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Center for Interdiscipline Research, Soochow University, 1 Shizi Street, Suzhou, 215006 Jiangsu (China); Li, Bo [Department of Mathematics and Quantitative Biology Graduate Program, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0112 (United States); McCammon, J. Andrew [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0365 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0636 (United States)

    2016-04-28

    Diffusion is often the rate-determining step in many biological processes. Currently, the two main computational methods for studying diffusion are stochastic methods, such as Brownian dynamics, and continuum methods, such as the finite element method. A previous study introduced a new hybrid diffusion method that couples the strengths of each of these two methods, but was limited by the lack of interactions among the particles; the force on each particle had to be from an external field. This study further develops the method to allow charged particles. The method is derived for a general multidimensional system and is presented using a basic test case for a one-dimensional linear system with one charged species and a radially symmetric system with three charged species.

  18. Three-dimensional linear fracture mechanics analysis by a displacement-hybrid finite-element model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atluri, S.N.; Kathiresan, K.; Kobayashi, A.S.

    1975-01-01

    This paper deals with a finite-element procedures for the calculation of modes I, II and III stress intensity factors, which vary, along an arbitrarily curved three-dimensional crack front in a structural component. The finite-element model is based on a modified variational principle of potential energy with relaxed continuity requirements for displacements at the inter-element boundary. The variational principle is a three-field principle, with the arbitrary interior displacements for the element, interelement boundary displacements, and element boundary tractions as variables. The unknowns in the final algebraic system of equations, in the present displacement hybrid finite element model, are the nodal displacements and the three elastic stress intensity factors. Special elements, which contain proper square root and inverse square root crack front variations in displacements and stresses, respectively, are used in a fixed region near the crack front. Interelement displacement compatibility is satisfied by assuming an independent interelement boundary displacement field, and using a Lagrange multiplier technique to enforce such interelement compatibility. These Lagrangean multipliers, which are physically the boundary tractions, are assumed from an equilibrated stress field derived from three-dimensional Beltrami (or Maxwell-Morera) stress functions that are complete. However, considerable care should be exercised in the use of these stress functions such that the stresses produced by any of these stress function components are not linearly dependent

  19. Simulation of Stress Concentration Problems in Laminated Plates by Quasi-Trefftz Finite Element Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Luiz de Silva Bussamra

    Full Text Available Abstract Hybrid quasi-Trefftz finite elements have been applied with success to the analysis of laminated plates. Two independent fields are approximated by linearly independent, hierarchical polynomials: the stress basis in the domain, adapted from Papkovitch-Neuber solution of Navier equations, and the displacement basis, defined on element surface. The stress field that satisfies the Trefftz constraint a priori for isotropic material is adapted for orthotropic materials, which leads to the term "quasi". In this work, the hexahedral hybrid quasi-Trefftz stress element is applied to the modeling of nonsymmetric laminates and laminated composite plates with geometric discontinuities. The hierarchical p-refinement is exploited.

  20. Topology optimization of bounded acoustic problems using the hybrid finite element-wave based method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goo, Seongyeol; Wang, Semyung; Kook, Junghwan

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative topology optimization method for bounded acoustic problems that uses the hybrid finite element-wave based method (FE-WBM). The conventional method for the topology optimization of bounded acoustic problems is based on the finite element method (FEM), which...

  1. Hybrid finite difference/finite element immersed boundary method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Griffith, Boyce; Luo, Xiaoyu

    2017-12-01

    The immersed boundary method is an approach to fluid-structure interaction that uses a Lagrangian description of the structural deformations, stresses, and forces along with an Eulerian description of the momentum, viscosity, and incompressibility of the fluid-structure system. The original immersed boundary methods described immersed elastic structures using systems of flexible fibers, and even now, most immersed boundary methods still require Lagrangian meshes that are finer than the Eulerian grid. This work introduces a coupling scheme for the immersed boundary method to link the Lagrangian and Eulerian variables that facilitates independent spatial discretizations for the structure and background grid. This approach uses a finite element discretization of the structure while retaining a finite difference scheme for the Eulerian variables. We apply this method to benchmark problems involving elastic, rigid, and actively contracting structures, including an idealized model of the left ventricle of the heart. Our tests include cases in which, for a fixed Eulerian grid spacing, coarser Lagrangian structural meshes yield discretization errors that are as much as several orders of magnitude smaller than errors obtained using finer structural meshes. The Lagrangian-Eulerian coupling approach developed in this work enables the effective use of these coarse structural meshes with the immersed boundary method. This work also contrasts two different weak forms of the equations, one of which is demonstrated to be more effective for the coarse structural discretizations facilitated by our coupling approach. © 2017 The Authors International  Journal  for  Numerical  Methods  in  Biomedical  Engineering Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Prediction of residual stress using explicit finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.A. Siswanto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the residual stress behaviour under various values of friction coefficients and scratching displacement amplitudes. The investigation is based on numerical solution using explicit finite element method in quasi-static condition. Two different aeroengine materials, i.e. Super CMV (Cr-Mo-V and Titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-4V, are examined. The usage of FEM analysis in plate under normal contact is validated with Hertzian theoretical solution in terms of contact pressure distributions. The residual stress distributions along with normal and shear stresses on elastic and plastic regimes of the materials are studied for a simple cylinder-on-flat contact configuration model subjected to normal loading, scratching and followed by unloading. The investigated friction coefficients are 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9, while scratching displacement amplitudes are 0.05 mm, 0.10 mm and 0.20 mm respectively. It is found that friction coefficient of 0.6 results in higher residual stress for both materials. Meanwhile, the predicted residual stress is proportional to the scratching displacement amplitude, higher displacement amplitude, resulting in higher residual stress. It is found that less residual stress is predicted on Super CMV material compared to Ti-6Al-4V material because of its high yield stress and ultimate strength. Super CMV material with friction coefficient of 0.3 and scratching displacement amplitude of 0.10 mm is recommended to be used in contact engineering applications due to its minimum possibility of fatigue.

  3. Groundwater flow analysis using mixed hybrid finite element method for radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Hiroomi; Shimomura, Masanori; Kawakami, Hiroto; Suzuki, Shunichi

    2011-01-01

    In safety assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities, ground water flow analysis are used for calculating the radionuclide transport pathway and the infiltration flow rate of groundwater into the disposal facilities. For this type of calculations, the mixed hybrid finite element method has been used and discussed about the accuracy of ones in Europe. This paper puts great emphasis on the infiltration flow rate of groundwater into the disposal facilities, and describes the accuracy of results obtained from mixed hybrid finite element method by comparing of local water mass conservation and the reliability of the element breakdown numbers among the mixed hybrid finite element method, finite volume method and nondegenerated finite element method. (author)

  4. Numerical model for the analysis of unbounded prestressed structures using the hybrid type finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, R.A.; Gastal, F.P.S.L.; Filho, A.C.

    2005-01-01

    Unbounded prestressed concrete has a growing importance all over the world and may be an useful technique for the structures involved in the construction of nuclear facilities. The absence of bonding means no strain compatibility so that equations developed for reinforced concrete are no longer valid. Practical estimates about the ultimate stress in the unbounded tendons may be obtained with empirical or numerical methods only. In order to contribute to the understanding on the behaviour of unbounded prestressed concrete members, a numerical model has been developed using a hybrid type finite element formulation for planar frame structures. Instead of short elements, as in the conventional finite element formulation, long elements may be used, improving computational efficiency. A further advantage is that the curvature variation within the element is obtained with higher accuracy if compared to the traditional formulation. This feature is important for unbounded tendons since its stresses depend on the whole member deformation. Second order effects in the planar frame are considered with either Updated or Partially Updated Lagrangian approaches. Instantaneous and time dependent behaviour as well as cyclic loads are considered too. Comparison with experimental results for prestressed concrete beams shows the adequacy of the proposed model. (authors)

  5. Elastic-plastic and creep analyses by assumed stress finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pian, T.H.H.; Spilker, R.L.; Lee, S.W.

    1975-01-01

    A formulation is presented of incremental finite element solutions for both initial stress and initial strain problems based on modified complementary energy principle with relaxed inter-element continuity requirement. The corresponding finite element model is the assumed stress hybrid model which has stress parameters in the interior of each element and displacements at the individual nodes as unknowns. The formulation includes an important consideration that the states of stress and strain and the beginning of each increment may not satisfy the equilibrium and compatibility equations. These imbalance and mismatch conditions all lead to correction terms for the equivalent nodal forces of the matrix equations. The initial stress method is applied to elastic-plastic analysis of structures. In this case the stress parameters for the individual elements can be eliminated resulting to a system of equations with only nodal displacements as unknowns. Two different complementary energy principles can be formulated, in one of which the equilibrium of the final state of stress is maintained while in the other the equilibrium of the stress increments is maintained. Each of these two different formulations can be combined with different iterative schemes to be used at each incremental steps of the elastic-plastic analysis. It is also indicated clearly that for the initial stress method the state of stress at the beginning of each increments is in general, not in equilibrium and an imbalance correction is needed. Results of a comprehensive evaluation of various solution procedures by the initial stress method using the assumed stress hybrid elements are presented. The example used is the static response of a thick wall cylinder of elastic-perfectly plastic material under internal pressure. Solid of revolution elements with rectangular cross sections are used

  6. Stress distributions in finite element analysis of concrete gravity dam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gravity dams are solid structures built of mass concrete material; they maintain their stability against the design loads from the geometric shape, the mass, and the strength of the concrete. The model was meshed with an 8-node biquadratic plane strain quadrilateral (CPE8R) elements, using ABAQUS, a finite element ...

  7. Hybrid finite elements nanocomposite characterization by stochastic microstructuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteva, Milton

    In this thesis the impact of entangled and non-straight fibers in the determination of the effective elastic and thermal properties of polymer nanocomposite (PNC) is addressed. Most of the models in recent studies assume nanotubes to be well dispersed straight fibers with fixed size. Nonetheless experiments reveal that nanotube formation become wavy during the manufacturing process, due to their high aspect ratio and low bending stiffness. Furthermore, experiments also show that nanotubes come in a variety of diameters and lengths. In the thesis an attempt to model the behavior of entangled fibers is made in which the distributions regarding the nanotube length and diameter are incorporated. First, an approach to generate random microstructures is developed. Then, using the finite element (FE) method with embedded fibers, the effective properties are computed for each of the random microstructures. This approach requires only a regular grid for the FE mesh, circumventing the requisite computationally costly and human labor intensive mesh refinement of ordinary FE in order to capture the local morphology of the composite material. Finally, a Monte Carlo simulation approach is used to obtain statistics of the computed effective physical properties. The numerical results are found in good agreement with experimental data reported in the open literature.

  8. Hybrid Discrete Element - Finite Element Simulation for Railway Bridge-Track Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewunruen, S.; Mirza, O.

    2017-10-01

    At the transition zone or sometimes called ‘bridge end’ or ‘bridge approach’, the stiffness difference between plain track and track over bridge often causes aggravated impact loading due to uneven train movement onto the area. The differential track settlement over the transition has been a classical problem in railway networks, especially for the aging rail infrastructures around the world. This problem is also additionally worsened by the fact that the construction practice over the area is difficult, resulting in a poor compaction of formation and subgrade. This paper presents an advanced hybrid simulation using coupled discrete elements and finite elements to investigate dynamic interaction at the transition zone. The goal is to evaluate the dynamic stresses and to better understand the impact dynamics redistribution at the bridge end. An existing bridge ‘Salt Pan Creek Railway Bridge’, located between Revesby and Kingsgrove, has been chosen for detailed investigation. The Salt Pan Bridge currently demonstrates crushing of the ballast causing significant deformation and damage. Thus, it’s imperative to assess the behaviours of the ballast under dynamic loads. This can be achieved by modelling the nonlinear interactions between the steel rail and sleeper, and sleeper to ballast. The continuum solid elements of track components have been modelled using finite element approach, while the granular media (i.e. ballast) have been simulated by discrete element method. The hybrid DE/FE model demonstrates that ballast experiences significant stresses at the contacts between the sleeper and concrete section. These overburden stress exists in the regions below the outer rails, identify fouling and permanent deformation of the ballast.

  9. Plane stress analysis of wood members using isoparametric finite elements, a computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary D. Gerhardt

    1983-01-01

    A finite element program is presented which computes displacements, strains, and stresses in wood members of arbitrary shape which are subjected to plane strain/stressloading conditions. This report extends a program developed by R. L. Taylor in 1977, by adding both the cubic isoparametric finite element and the capability to analyze nonisotropic materials. The...

  10. Hybrid Finite Element and Volume Integral Methods for Scattering Using Parametric Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volakis, John L.; Sertel, Kubilay; Jørgensen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    n this paper we address several topics relating to the development and implementation of volume integral and hybrid finite element methods for electromagnetic modeling. Comparisons of volume integral equation formulations with the finite element-boundary integral method are given in terms of accu...... of vanishing divergence within the element but non-zero curl. In addition, a new domain decomposition is introduced for solving array problems involving several million degrees of freedom. Three orders of magnitude CPU reduction is demonstrated for such applications....

  11. Finite element type of stress analysis for parts based on S235 JR steel welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Babis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The determination of static and/or variable stress, in case of complex shaped welded structures is hard to achieve. One solution, though, is the use of finite element method, implemented by means of various specialized software. Nowadays, this method has become very popular due to its high precision of data obtained through both research and finite element analysis. Hence, the present paper deals with the modelling of the pull-out behaviour of concave and convex welded joints through finite element method.

  12. Parametric optimization and design validation based on finite element analysis of hybrid socket adapter for transfemoral prosthetic knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neelesh

    2014-10-01

    Finite element analysis has been universally employed for the stress and strain analysis in lower extremity prosthetics. The socket adapter was the principal subject of interest due to its importance in deciding the knee motion range. This article focused on the static and dynamic stress analysis of the designed hybrid adapter developed by the authors. A standard mechanical design validation approach using von Mises was followed. Four materials were considered for the analysis, namely, carbon fiber, oil-filled nylon, Al-6061, and mild steel. The paper analyses the static and dynamic stress on designed hybrid adapter which incorporates features of conventional male and female socket adapters. The finite element analysis was carried out for possible different angles of knee flexion simulating static and dynamic gait situation. Research was carried out on available design of socket adapter. Mechanical design of hybrid adapter was conceptualized and a CAD model was generated using Inventor modelling software. Static and dynamic stress analysis was carried out on different materials for optimization. The finite element analysis was carried out on the software Autodesk Inventor Professional Ver. 2011. The peak value of von Mises stress occurred in the neck region of the adapter and in the lower face region at rod eye-adapter junction in static and dynamic analyses, respectively. Oil-filled nylon was found to be the best material among the four with respect to strength, weight, and cost. Research investigations on newer materials for development of improved prosthesis will immensely benefit the amputees. The study analyze the static and dynamic stress on the knee joint adapter to provide better material used for hybrid design of adapter. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2013.

  13. Finite element modelling of creep process - steady state stresses and strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedmak Aleksandar S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element modelling of steady state creep process has been described. Using an analogy of visco-plastic problem with a described procedure, the finite element method has been used to calculate steady state stresses and strains in 2D problems. An example of application of such a procedure have been presented, using real life problem - cylindrical pipe with longitudinal crack at high temperature, under internal pressure, and estimating its residual life, based on the C*integral evaluation.

  14. Straightened cervical lordosis causes stress concentration: a finite element model study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Wei; Shi, Shiyuan; Fei, Jun; Wang, Yifan; Chen, Chunyue [Hangzhou Red Cross Hospital, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, (China); Liao, Shenhui [School of Information Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China)

    2013-03-15

    In this study, we propose a finite element analysis of the complete cervical spine with straightened and normal physiological curvature by using a specially designed modelling system. An accurate finite element model is established to recommend plausible approaches to treatment of cervical spondylosis through the finite element analysis results. There are few reports of biomechanics influence of the straightened cervical curve. It is difficult to measure internal responses of cervical spine directly. However, the finite element method has been reported to have the capability to quantify both external and internal responses to mechanical loading, such as the strain and stress distribution of spinal components. We choose a subject with a straightened cervical spine from whom to collect the CT scan data, which formed the basis of the finite element analysis. By using a specially designed modelling system, a high quality finite element model of the complete cervical spine with straightened curvature was generated, which was then mapped to reconstruct a normal physiological curvature model by a volumetric mesh deformation method based on discrete differential properties. Then, the same boundary conditions were applied to do a comparison. The result demonstrated that the active movement range of straightened cervical spine decreased by 24–33 %, but the stress increased by 5–95 %. The stress was concentrated at the facet joint cartilage, uncovertebral joint and the disk. The results suggest that cervical lordosis may have a direct impact on cervical spondylosis treatment. These results may be useful for clinical treatment of cervical spondylosis with straightened curvature.

  15. Straightened cervical lordosis causes stress concentration: a finite element model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Wei; Shi, Shiyuan; Fei, Jun; Wang, Yifan; Chen, Chunyue; Liao, Shenhui

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we propose a finite element analysis of the complete cervical spine with straightened and normal physiological curvature by using a specially designed modelling system. An accurate finite element model is established to recommend plausible approaches to treatment of cervical spondylosis through the finite element analysis results. There are few reports of biomechanics influence of the straightened cervical curve. It is difficult to measure internal responses of cervical spine directly. However, the finite element method has been reported to have the capability to quantify both external and internal responses to mechanical loading, such as the strain and stress distribution of spinal components. We choose a subject with a straightened cervical spine from whom to collect the CT scan data, which formed the basis of the finite element analysis. By using a specially designed modelling system, a high quality finite element model of the complete cervical spine with straightened curvature was generated, which was then mapped to reconstruct a normal physiological curvature model by a volumetric mesh deformation method based on discrete differential properties. Then, the same boundary conditions were applied to do a comparison. The result demonstrated that the active movement range of straightened cervical spine decreased by 24–33 %, but the stress increased by 5–95 %. The stress was concentrated at the facet joint cartilage, uncovertebral joint and the disk. The results suggest that cervical lordosis may have a direct impact on cervical spondylosis treatment. These results may be useful for clinical treatment of cervical spondylosis with straightened curvature.

  16. contact stress analysis of involute spur gear by finite element method

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    section using C- programming. Bending stress analysis has been performed using finite element analysis with ANSYS software. Comparison of bending stress analysis has been performed for symmetric and asymmetric spur gear tooth at critical section. Mushin J. Jweeg, et.al. [7] used 2D contact stress FEA model to ...

  17. A finite element modeling of a multifunctional hybrid composite beam with viscoelastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya; Inman, Daniel J.

    2013-04-01

    The multifunctional hybrid composite structure studied here consists of a ceramic outer layer capable of withstanding high temperatures, a functionally graded ceramic layer combining shape memory alloy (SMA) properties of NiTi together with Ti2AlC (called Graded Ceramic/Metal Composite, or GCMeC), and a high temperature sensor patch, followed by a polymer matrix composite laced with vascular cooling channels all held together with various epoxies. Due to the recoverable nature of SMA and adhesive properties of Ti2AlC, the damping behavior of the GCMeC is largely viscoelastic. This paper presents a finite element formulation for this multifunctional hybrid structure with embedded viscoelastic material. In order to implement the viscoelastic model into the finite element formulation, a second order three parameter Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method is used to describe the viscoelastic behavior. Considering the parameter identification, a strategy to estimate the fractional order of the time derivative and the relaxation time is outlined. The curve-fitting aspects of both GHM and ADF show good agreement with experimental data obtained from dynamic mechanics analysis. The performance of the finite element of the layered multifunctional beam is verified through experimental model analysis.

  18. Two Scales, Hybrid Model for Soils, Involving Artificial Neural Network and Finite Element Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasiński Marcin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid ANN-FE solution is presented as a result of two level analysis of soils: a level of a laboratory sample and a level of engineering geotechnical problem. Engineering properties of soils (sands are represented directly in the form of ANN (this is in contrast with our former paper where ANN approximated constitutive relationships. Initially the ANN is trained with Duncan formula (Duncan and Chang [2], then it is re-trained (calibrated with some available experimental data, specific for the soil considered. The obtained approximation of the constitutive parameters is used directly in finite element method at the level of a single element at the scale of the laboratory sample to check the correct representation of the laboratory test. Then, the finite element that was successfully tested at the level of laboratory sample is used at the macro level to solve engineering problems involving the soil for which it was calibrated.

  19. Contact stress analysis of involute spur gear by Finite Element ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper the contact stress in rolling-sliding contact of involute spur gear and the effect of coefficient of friction was analyzed. To achieve this, first, three dimensional involute spur gear pairs were developed in Solid works 2012 Premium and the 3D model was exported to ANSYS workbench 14.5. Next, the analysis was ...

  20. Maxillofacial fractures and craniocerebral injuries - stress propagation from face to neurocranium in a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huempfner-Hierl, Heike; Schaller, Andreas; Hierl, Thomas

    2015-04-21

    Severe facial trauma is often associated with intracerebral injuries. So it seemed to be of interest to study stress propagation from face to neurocranium after a fistlike impact on the facial skull in a finite element analysis. A finite element model of the human skull without mandible consisting of nearly 740,000 tetrahedrons was built. Fistlike impacts on the infraorbital rim, the nasoorbitoethmoid region, and the supraorbital arch were simulated and stress propagations were depicted in a time-dependent display. Finite element simulation revealed von Mises stresses beyond the yield criterion of facial bone at the site of impacts and propagation of stresses in considerable amount towards skull base in the scenario of the fistlike impact on the infraorbital rim and on the nasoorbitoethmoid region. When impact was given on the supraorbital arch stresses seemed to be absorbed. As patients presenting with facial fractures have a risk for craniocerebral injuries attention should be paid to this and the indication for a CT-scan should be put widely. Efforts have to be made to generate more precise finite element models for a better comprehension of craniofacial and brain injury.

  1. Stress analysis and deformation prediction of sheet metal workpieces based on finite element simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ren Penghao; Wang Aimin; Wang Xiaolong; Zhang Yanlin

    2017-01-01

    After aluminum alloy sheet metal parts machining, the residual stress release will cause a large deformation. To solve this problem, this paper takes a aluminum alloy sheet aerospace workpiece as an example, establishes the theoretical model of elastic deformation and the finite element model, and places quantitative initial stress in each element of machining area, analyses stress release simulation and deformation. Through different initial stress release simulative analysis of deformation ...

  2. SAFE-3D, Stress Analysis of 3-D Composite Structure by Finite Elements Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornell, D.C.; Jadhav, K.; Crowell, J.S.

    1969-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: SAFE-3D is a finite-element program for the three-dimensional elastic analysis of heterogeneous composite structures. The program uses the following types of finite elements - (1) tetrahedral elements to represent the continuum, (2) triangular plane stress membrane elements to represent inner liner or outer case, and (3) uniaxial tension-compression elements to represent internal reinforcement. The structure can be of arbitrary geometry and have any distribution of material properties, temperatures, surface loadings, and boundary conditions. 2 - Method of solution: The finite-element variational method is used. Equilibrium equations are solved by the alternating component iterative method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem - Maxima of: 5000 nodes; 16000 elements. The program cannot be applied to incompressible solids and is not recommended for Poisson's ratio in the range of nu between 0.495 and 0.5

  3. Importance of initial stress for abdominal aortic aneurysm wall motion: Dynamic MRI validated finite element analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkx, M.A.G.; Veer, van 't M.; Speelman, L.; Breeuwer, M.; Buth, J.; Vosse, van de F.N.

    2009-01-01

    Currently the transverse diameter is the primary decision criterion to assess rupture risk in patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). To obtain a measure for more patient-specific risk assessment, aneurysm wall stress, calculated using finite element analysis (FEA), has been evaluated in

  4. A finite element model for the stress and flexibility analysis of curved pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreiro, J.N.C.

    1987-03-01

    We present a finite element model for the analysis of pipe bends with flanged ends or flanged tangents. Comments are made on the consideration of the internal pressure load. Flexibility and stress instensification factores obtained with the present model are compared with others available. (Author) [pt

  5. Computer finite element analysis of stress derived from particular units of torsionally flexible metal coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz KUCZAJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the results of Finite Element Analysis (FEA results of stresses derived from chosen units of torsionally flexible metal coupling are presented. As model and simulation tool for particular component loads is used the Autodesk Inventor Professional 2009 program.

  6. Hybrid variational principles and synthesis method for finite element neutron transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackroyd, R.T.; Nanneh, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    A family of hybrid variational principles is derived using a generalised least squares method. Neutron conservation is automatically satisfied for the hybrid principles employing two trial functions. No interfaces or reflection conditions need to be imposed on the independent even-parity trial function. For some hybrid principles a single trial function can be employed by relating one parity trial function to the other, using one of the parity transport equation in relaxed form. For other hybrid principles the trial functions can be employed sequentially. Synthesis of transport solutions, starting with the diffusion theory approximation, has been used as a way of reducing the scale of the computation that arises with established finite element methods for neutron transport. (author)

  7. Finite element study of growth stress formation in wood and related distortion of sawn timber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormarsson, Sigurdur; Dahlblom, O.; Johansson, M.

    2009-01-01

    -related stresses in wood (drying distortions) and growth-related stresses (distortions appearing when logs are split up to timber boards by sawing). To get more knowledge on how these distortions can be reduced in wooden products, there is a need for improved understanding of this material behaviour through good...... numerical tools developed from empirical data. A three-dimensional finite element board distortion model developed by Ormarsson (1999) has been extended to include the influence of growth stresses by incorporating a one-dimensional finite element growth stress model developed here. The growth stress model...... is formulated as an axisymmetric general plane strain model where material for all new annual rings is progressively added to the tree during the analysis. The simulation results presented include how stresses are progressively generated during the tree growth, distortions related to the redistribution...

  8. Finite element analysis of residual stress in plasma-sprayed ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, R.L.; Hendricks, R.C.; McDonald, G.

    1985-01-01

    Residual stress in a ZrO 2 -Y 2 O 3 ceramic coating resulting from the plasma spraying operation is calculated. The calculations were done using the finite element method. Both thermal and mechanical analysis were performed. The resulting residual stress field was compared to the measurements obtained by Hendricks and McDonald. Reasonable agreement between the predicted and measured moment occurred. However, the resulting stress field is not in pure bending

  9. Finite Element Analysis and Test Results Comparison for the Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the comparison of test measurements and predictive finite element analysis results for a hybrid wing body center section test article. The testing and analysis efforts were part of the Airframe Technology subproject within the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. Test results include full field displacement measurements obtained from digital image correlation systems and discrete strain measurements obtained using both unidirectional and rosette resistive gauges. Most significant results are presented for the critical five load cases exercised during the test. Final test to failure after inflicting severe damage to the test article is also documented. Overall, good comparison between predicted and actual behavior of the test article is found.

  10. Viscoelastic finite element analysis of residual stresses in porcelain-veneered zirconia dental crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongho; Dhital, Sukirti; Zhivago, Paul; Kaizer, Marina R; Zhang, Yu

    2018-06-01

    The main problem of porcelain-veneered zirconia (PVZ) dental restorations is chipping and delamination of veneering porcelain owing to the development of deleterious residual stresses during the cooling phase of veneer firing. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effects of cooling rate, thermal contraction coefficient and elastic modulus on residual stresses developed in PVZ dental crowns using viscoelastic finite element methods (VFEM). A three-dimensional VFEM model has been developed to predict residual stresses in PVZ structures using ABAQUS finite element software and user subroutines. First, the newly established model was validated with experimentally measured residual stress profiles using Vickers indentation on flat PVZ specimens. An excellent agreement between the model prediction and experimental data was found. Then, the model was used to predict residual stresses in more complex anatomically-correct crown systems. Two PVZ crown systems with different thermal contraction coefficients and porcelain moduli were studied: VM9/Y-TZP and LAVA/Y-TZP. A sequential dual-step finite element analysis was performed: heat transfer analysis and viscoelastic stress analysis. Controlled and bench convection cooling rates were simulated by applying different convective heat transfer coefficients 1.7E-5 W/mm 2 °C (controlled cooling) and 0.6E-4 W/mm 2 °C (bench cooling) on the crown surfaces exposed to the air. Rigorous viscoelastic finite element analysis revealed that controlled cooling results in lower maximum stresses in both veneer and core layers for the two PVZ systems relative to bench cooling. Better compatibility of thermal contraction coefficients between porcelain and zirconia and a lower porcelain modulus reduce residual stresses in both layers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of parafunctional loading and prosthetic connection on stress distribution: a 3D finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torcato, Leonardo Bueno; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Falcón-Antenucci, Rosse Mary; Santiago Júnior, Joel Ferreira; de Faria Almeida, Daniel Augusto

    2015-11-01

    Clinicians should consider parafunctional occlusal load when planning treatment. Prosthetic connections can reduce the stress distribution on an implant-supported prosthesis. The purpose of this 3-dimensional finite element study was to assess the influence of parafunctional loading and prosthetic connections on stress distribution. Computer-aided design software was used to construct 3 models. Each model was composed of a bone and an implant (external hexagon, internal hexagon, or Morse taper) with a crown. Finite element analysis software was used to generate the finite element mesh and establish the loading and boundary conditions. A normal force (200-N axial load and 100-N oblique load) and parafunctional force (1000-N axial and 500-N oblique load) were applied. Results were visualized as the maximum principal stress. Three-way analysis of variance and Tukey test were performed, and the percentage of contribution of each variable to the stress concentration was calculated from sum-of squares-analysis. Stress was concentrated around the implant at the cortical bone, and models with the external hexagonal implant showed the highest stresses (PProsthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Finite-element stress and deflection analysis of CDF yike and end plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wands, R.; Grimson, J.; Kephart, R.; Theriot, D.

    1982-01-01

    A large detector is being designed to study anti pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of up to 2000 GeV as part of the Fermilab Collider Detector Facility (CDF). The central detector of this facility consists of a solenoid, calorimeter yoke, and a variety of particle measurement devices. The yoke will be a large steel structure that will provide the magnetic flux return path as well as support structure for calorimetry and other instrumentation. It must resist both electromagnetic and gravitational loads while exhibiting only small elastic deformations. The instrumented endplugs of the yoke are subjected to large electromagnetic loads. Moreover, due to the presence of wire chambers within these plugs, they must also be particularly stiff. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a finite element stress and deflection analysis of these structures under various anticipated load conditions. The PATRAN-G finite element modeling program, installed on a CDF-VAX 11/780 and operating from a Ramtek 6212 colorgraphics terminal, was used to generate the analysis models. The actual finite element analysis was performed by the ANSYS general purpose finite element program, installed on the Fermilab Cyber 175's

  13. Finite Element Analysis of Absorbable Sheath to Prevent Stress Shielding of Tibial Interlocking Intramedullary Nail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yansheng; Wang, Yongqing; Dong, Limin; Jia, Peng; Lu, Fengcheng

    2017-07-01

    The nail with absorbable sheath (AS nail) is designed to reduce the stress shielding effect of internal fixation with interlocking intramedullary nail. In order to verify its feasibility, two types of the finite element models of internal fixation of tibia with the AS nail and the common metal nail (CM nail) are established using the Softwares of Mimics, Geomagic, SolidWorks and ANSYS according to the CT scanning data of tibia. The result of the finite element analysis shows that the AS nail has great advantages compared with the CM nail in reducing the stress shielding effect in different periods of fracture healing. The conclusion is that the AS nail can realize the static fixation to the dynamic fixation from the early to the later automatically to shorten the time of fracture healing, which also provides a new technique to the interlocking intramedullary nail.

  14. FEAST: a two-dimensional non-linear finite element code for calculating stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayal, M.

    1986-06-01

    The computer code FEAST calculates stresses, strains, and displacements. The code is two-dimensional. That is, either plane or axisymmetric calculations can be done. The code models elastic, plastic, creep, and thermal strains and stresses. Cracking can also be simulated. The finite element method is used to solve equations describing the following fundamental laws of mechanics: equilibrium; compatibility; constitutive relations; yield criterion; and flow rule. FEAST combines several unique features that permit large time-steps in even severely non-linear situations. The features include a special formulation for permitting many finite elements to simultaneously cross the boundary from elastic to plastic behaviour; accomodation of large drops in yield-strength due to changes in local temperature and a three-step predictor-corrector method for plastic analyses. These features reduce computing costs. Comparisons against twenty analytical solutions and against experimental measurements show that predictions of FEAST are generally accurate to ± 5%

  15. Microstructural analysis of alumina chromium composites by X-ray tomography and 3-D finite element simulation of thermal stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geandier, G.; Hazotte, A.; Denis, S.; Mocellin, A.; Maire, E.

    2003-01-01

    X-ray microtomography is used to measure volume fraction and connectivity of the metallic phase in an alumina-chromium composite. Reconstructed images are used as input data for a finite element calculation of the residual thermal stresses. Results confirm the main trends shown by similar calculations previously performed on less-realistic finite element models

  16. Microstructural analysis of alumina chromium composites by X-ray tomography and 3-D finite element simulation of thermal stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geandier, G.; Hazotte, A.; Denis, S.; Mocellin, A.; Maire, E

    2003-04-14

    X-ray microtomography is used to measure volume fraction and connectivity of the metallic phase in an alumina-chromium composite. Reconstructed images are used as input data for a finite element calculation of the residual thermal stresses. Results confirm the main trends shown by similar calculations previously performed on less-realistic finite element models.

  17. A third order accurate Lagrangian finite element scheme for the computation of generalized molecular stress function fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasano, Andrea; Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    2017-01-01

    A third order accurate, in time and space, finite element scheme for the numerical simulation of three- dimensional time-dependent flow of the molecular stress function type of fluids in a generalized formu- lation is presented. The scheme is an extension of the K-BKZ Lagrangian finite element me...

  18. Parametric study for welding residual stresses in nozzle of nuclear power plants using finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wan Jae; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Tae Ryong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Tae Kwang [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Distribution of welding residual stresses are mainly characterized by degrees and frequencies of thermal loads applied to materials. However, other effects as component size and clamping condition can also affect stress distributions to a certain extent thus careful manipulation of these parameters based on clear understanding of how they affect residual stresses distributions and why can be additional measure to mitigate residual stresses. This paper discusses aforementioned issues for the case of safety and relief nozzle in nuclear power plant through finite element analysis.

  19. Finite element modeling of reinforced concrete beams with a hybrid combination of steel and aramid reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawileh, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Modeling of concrete beams reinforced steel and FRP bars. • Developed finite element models achieved good results. • The models are validated via comparison with experimental results. • Parametric studies are performed. - Abstract: Corrosion of steel bars has an adverse effect on the life-span of reinforced concrete (RC) members and is usually associated with crack development in RC beams. Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) bars have been recently used to reinforce concrete members in flexure due to their high tensile strength and superior corrosion resistance properties. However, FRP materials are brittle in nature, thus RC beams reinforced with such materials would exhibit a less ductile behavior when compared to similar members reinforced with conventional steel reinforcement. Recently, researchers investigated the performance of concrete beams reinforced with a hybrid combination of steel and Aramid Fiber Reinforced Polymer (AFRP) reinforcement to maintain a reasonable level of ductility in such members. The function of the AFRP bars is to increase the load-carrying capacity, while the function of the steel bars is to ensure ductility of the flexural member upon yielding in tension. This paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model that predicted the load versus mid-span deflection response of tested RC beams conducted by other researchers with a hybrid combination of steel and AFRP bars. The developed FE models account for the constituent material nonlinearities and bond–slip behavior between the reinforcing bars and adjacent concrete surfaces. It was concluded that the developed models can accurately capture the behavior and predicts the load-carrying capacity of such RC members. In addition, a parametric study is conducted using the validated models to investigate the effect of AFRP bar size, FRP material type, bond–slip action, and concrete compressive strength on the performance of concrete beams when reinforced

  20. Finite element modeling of stress corrosion cracking for electromagnetic nondestructive evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Yusa, N.; Hashizume, H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses appropriate numerical model for a stress corrosion crack (SCC) from the viewpoint of anisotropy of their conductivity. Two SCCs, which are introduced into a plate of type 316 stainless steel, are considered. Finite element simulations are carried out to evaluate the conductivity. In the simulations, the cracks are modeled as a region with a constant width on the basis of the destructive tests. The results show the conductivity on direction of width has large effect to the accuracy of numerical modeling of SCC, whereas the conductivities on direction of length and depth almost do not have remarkable effects. The results obtained by this study indicate that distribution of conductivity along the surface of a crack would be more important than the anisotropy in modeling SCCs in finite element simulations

  1. Finite element analysis for prediction of the residual stresses induced by shot peening II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cheol; Seok, Chang Sung; Yang, Won Ho; Ryu, Myung Hai

    2002-01-01

    Shot peening is a surface impact treatment widely used to improve the performance of metal parts and welded details subjected to fatigue loading, contact fatigue, stress corrosion and other damage mechanisms. The better performance of the peened parts is mainly due to the residual stresses resulting from the plastic deformation of the surface layers of the material caused by the impact of the shot. In this paper the simulation technique is applied to predict the magnitude and distribution of the residual stress and plastic deformation caused by shot peening with the help of finite element analysis

  2. Finite element analysis of interface stress between neutron absorption coating and chop disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Changliang; Zhang Xiaozhang; Jiang Lei; Dai Xingjian

    2012-01-01

    The performance of disk chopper is directly affected by bond strength between neutron absorption coating and chop disk. Based on the finite element analysis software ANSYS, the interface stress distribution under high speed centrifugal load was calculated, which was to investigate the effects of coating's elastic modulus, poisson ratio and coating thickness on the interfacial stress distribution. The results show that soft and tough coating can reduce the peak stress effectively, and coating thickness reducing is helpful to avoid the plastic failure of opening in the disk under high speed centrifugal load. (authors)

  3. Finite element modeling for buckling analysis of hybrid piezoelectric beam under electromechanical loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeb ur Rahman

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional finite element model for buckling analysis of hybrid piezoelectric beams under electromechanical load is presented in this work. The coupled zigzag theory is used for making the model. The inplane displacement is approximated as a combination of a global third order variation across the thickness with an additional layer wise linear variation. The longitudinal electric field is also taken into account. The deflection field is approximated to account for the transverse normal strain induced by electric fields. Two nodded elements with four mechanical and a variable number of electric degrees of freedom at each node are considered. To meet the convergence requirements for weak integral formulation, cubic Hermite interpolation function is used for deflection and electric potential at the sub-layers and linear interpolation function is used for axial displacement and shear rotation. The expressions for the variationally consistent stiffness matrix and load vector are derived and evaluated in closed form using exact integration. The present 1D-FE formulation of zigzag theory is validated by comparing the results with the analytical solution for simply-supported beam and 2D-FE results obtained using ABAQUS. The finite element model is free of shear locking. The critical buckling parameters are obtained for clamped-free and clamped-clamped hybrid beams. The obtained results are compared with the 2D-FE results to establish the accuracy of the zigzag theory for above boundary conditions. The effect of lamination angle on critical buckling load is also studied.

  4. Stress analysis and deformation prediction of sheet metal workpieces based on finite element simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Penghao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After aluminum alloy sheet metal parts machining, the residual stress release will cause a large deformation. To solve this problem, this paper takes a aluminum alloy sheet aerospace workpiece as an example, establishes the theoretical model of elastic deformation and the finite element model, and places quantitative initial stress in each element of machining area, analyses stress release simulation and deformation. Through different initial stress release simulative analysis of deformation of the workpiece, a linear relationship between initial stress and deformation is found; Through simulative analysis of coupling direction-stress release, the superposing relationship between the deformation caused by coupling direction-stress and the deformation caused by single direction stress is found. The research results provide important theoretical support for the stress threshold setting and deformation controlling of the workpieces in the production practice.

  5. Contact Stress Analysis for Gears of Different Helix Angle Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Santosh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The gear contact stress problem has been a great point of interest for many years, but still an extensive research is required to understand the various parameters affecting this stress. Among such parameters, helix angle is one which has played a crucial role in variation of contact stress. Numerous studies have been carried out on spur gear for contact stress variation. Hence, the present work is an attempt to study the contact stresses among the helical gear pairs, under static conditions, by using a 3D finite element method. The helical gear pairs on which the analysis is carried are 0, 5, 15, 25 degree helical gear sets. The Lagrange multiplier algorithm has been used between the contacting pairs to determine the stresses. The helical gear contact stress is evaluated using FE model and results have also been found at different coefficient of friction, varying from 0.0 to 0.3. The FE results have been further compared with the analytical calculations. The analytical calculations are based upon Hertz and AGMA equations, which are modified to include helix angle. The commercial finite element software was used in the study and it was shown that this approach can be applied to gear design efficiently. The contact stress results have shown a decreasing trend, with increase in helix angle.

  6. [Finite element analysis of stress changes of posterior spinal pedicle screw infixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jia-Zhi; Wu, Zhi-Hong; Xu, Ri-Xin; Wang, Xue-Song; Xing, Ze-Jun; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Shen, Jian-Xiong; Wang, Yi-Peng; Qiu, Gui-Xing

    2009-01-06

    To evaluate the mechanical response of L3-L4 segment after posterior interfixation with a transpedicle screw system. Spiral CT machine was used to conduct continuous parallel scan on the L3-L4 section of a 40-year-old healthy male Chinese. The image data thus obtained were introduced into MIMICS software to reconstruct the 2-D data into volume data and obtain 3-D models of every element.. Pro/3-D model construction software system was used to simulate the 3-D entity of L3-L4 fixed by screw robs through spinal pedicle via posterior approach that was introduced into the finite element software ABAQUS to construct a 3-D finite element model. The stress changes on the vertebrae and screw under the axial pressure of 0.5 mPa was analyzed. Under the evenly distributed pressure the displacement of the L4 model was 0.00125815 mm, with an error of only 0.8167% from the datum displacement. The convergence of the model was good. The stress of the fixed vertebral body, intervertebral disc, and internal fixators changed significantly. The stress concentration zone of the intervertebral disc turned from the posterolateral side to anterolateral side. The stress produced by the fixed vertebral bodies decreased significantly. Obvious stress concentration existed in the upper and lower sides of the base of screw and the fixed screw at the upper vertebral body bore greater stress than the lower vertebral body. Integration of computer aided device and finite element analysis can successfully stimulate the internal fixation of L3-IA visa posterior approach and observe the mechanic changes in the vertebral column more directly.

  7. Mechanical stress calculations for toroidal field coils by the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soell, M.; Jandl, O.; Gorenflo, H.

    1976-09-01

    After discussing fundamental relationships of the finite element method, this report describes the calculation steps worked out for mechanical stress calculations in the case of magnetic forces and forces produced by thermal expansion or compression of toroidal field coils using the SOLID SAP IV computer program. The displacement and stress analysis are based on the 20-node isoparametric solid element. The calculation of the nodal forces produced by magnetic body forces are discussed in detail. The computer programs, which can be used generally for mesh generation and determination of the nodal forces, are published elsewhere. (orig.) [de

  8. Large-Scale Parallel Finite Element Analysis of the Stress Singular Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriyuki Kushida; Hiroshi Okuda; Genki Yagawa

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the convergence behavior of large-scale parallel finite element method for the stress singular problems was investigated. The convergence behavior of iterative solvers depends on the efficiency of the pre-conditioners. However, efficiency of pre-conditioners may be influenced by the domain decomposition that is necessary for parallel FEM. In this study the following results were obtained: Conjugate gradient method without preconditioning and the diagonal scaling preconditioned conjugate gradient method were not influenced by the domain decomposition as expected. symmetric successive over relaxation method preconditioned conjugate gradient method converged 6% faster as maximum if the stress singular area was contained in one sub-domain. (authors)

  9. Finite element modelling of concrete beams reinforced with hybrid fiber reinforced bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smring, Santa binti; Salleh, Norhafizah; Hamid, NoorAzlina Abdul; Majid, Masni A.

    2017-11-01

    Concrete is a heterogeneous composite material made up of cement, sand, coarse aggregate and water mixed in a desired proportion to obtain the required strength. Plain concrete does not with stand tension as compared to compression. In order to compensate this drawback steel reinforcement are provided in concrete. Now a day, for improving the properties of concrete and also to take up tension combination of steel and glass fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars promises favourable strength, serviceability, and durability. To verify its promise and support design concrete structures with hybrid type of reinforcement, this study have investigated the load-deflection behaviour of concrete beams reinforced with hybrid GFRP and steel bars by using ATENA software. Fourteen beams, including six control beams reinforced with only steel or only GFRP bars, were analysed. The ratio and the ordinate of GFRP to steel were the main parameters investigated. The behaviour of these beams was investigated via the load-deflection characteristics, cracking behaviour and mode of failure. Hybrid GFRP-Steel reinforced concrete beam showed the improvement in both ultimate capacity and deflection concomitant to the steel reinforced concrete beam. On the other hand, finite element (FE) modelling which is ATENA were validated with previous experiment and promising the good result to be used for further analyses and development in the field of present study.

  10. Hybrid finite volume/ finite element method for radiative heat transfer in graded index media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Zhao, J. M.; Liu, L. H.; Wang, S. Y.

    2012-09-01

    The rays propagate along curved path determined by the Fermat principle in the graded index medium. The radiative transfer equation in graded index medium (GRTE) contains two specific redistribution terms (with partial derivatives to the angular coordinates) accounting for the effect of the curved ray path. In this paper, the hybrid finite volume with finite element method (hybrid FVM/FEM) (P.J. Coelho, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf., vol. 93, pp. 89-101, 2005) is extended to solve the radiative heat transfer in two-dimensional absorbing-emitting-scattering graded index media, in which the spatial discretization is carried out using a FVM, while the angular discretization is by a FEM. The FEM angular discretization is demonstrated to be preferable in dealing with the redistribution terms in the GRTE. Two stiff matrix assembly schemes of the angular FEM discretization, namely, the traditional assembly approach and a new spherical assembly approach (assembly on the unit sphere of the solid angular space), are discussed. The spherical assembly scheme is demonstrated to give better results than the traditional assembly approach. The predicted heat flux distributions and temperature distributions in radiative equilibrium are determined by the proposed method and compared with the results available in other references. The proposed hybrid FVM/FEM method can predict the radiative heat transfer in absorbing-emitting-scattering graded index medium with good accuracy.

  11. Hybrid finite volume/ finite element method for radiative heat transfer in graded index media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Zhao, J.M.; Liu, L.H.; Wang, S.Y.

    2012-01-01

    The rays propagate along curved path determined by the Fermat principle in the graded index medium. The radiative transfer equation in graded index medium (GRTE) contains two specific redistribution terms (with partial derivatives to the angular coordinates) accounting for the effect of the curved ray path. In this paper, the hybrid finite volume with finite element method (hybrid FVM/FEM) (P.J. Coelho, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf., vol. 93, pp. 89-101, 2005) is extended to solve the radiative heat transfer in two-dimensional absorbing-emitting-scattering graded index media, in which the spatial discretization is carried out using a FVM, while the angular discretization is by a FEM. The FEM angular discretization is demonstrated to be preferable in dealing with the redistribution terms in the GRTE. Two stiff matrix assembly schemes of the angular FEM discretization, namely, the traditional assembly approach and a new spherical assembly approach (assembly on the unit sphere of the solid angular space), are discussed. The spherical assembly scheme is demonstrated to give better results than the traditional assembly approach. The predicted heat flux distributions and temperature distributions in radiative equilibrium are determined by the proposed method and compared with the results available in other references. The proposed hybrid FVM/FEM method can predict the radiative heat transfer in absorbing-emitting-scattering graded index medium with good accuracy.

  12. Finite element modelling for fatigue stress analysis of large suspension bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tommy H. T.; Guo, L.; Li, Z. X.

    2003-03-01

    Fatigue is an important failure mode for large suspension bridges under traffic loadings. However, large suspension bridges have so many attributes that it is difficult to analyze their fatigue damage using experimental measurement methods. Numerical simulation is a feasible method of studying such fatigue damage. In British standards, the finite element method is recommended as a rigorous method for steel bridge fatigue analysis. This paper aims at developing a finite element (FE) model of a large suspension steel bridge for fatigue stress analysis. As a case study, a FE model of the Tsing Ma Bridge is presented. The verification of the model is carried out with the help of the measured bridge modal characteristics and the online data measured by the structural health monitoring system installed on the bridge. The results show that the constructed FE model is efficient for bridge dynamic analysis. Global structural analyses using the developed FE model are presented to determine the components of the nominal stress generated by railway loadings and some typical highway loadings. The critical locations in the bridge main span are also identified with the numerical results of the global FE stress analysis. Local stress analysis of a typical weld connection is carried out to obtain the hot-spot stresses in the region. These results provide a basis for evaluating fatigue damage and predicting the remaining life of the bridge.

  13. Interpretation of stress measurements around mining cavities in rock salt - a finite-element study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heusermann, S.

    1986-01-01

    Finite-element studies of stress measurements using the overcoring method and of large drift fields in rock salt show that the measurements are affected by local stress relaxation occurring near the test borehole and by general time-dependent stress redistribution in the marginal zones of adjacent drifts. Analysis of the overcoring method indicates that the following local effects have to be considered in the interpretation of the test results as opposed to measurements in elastic rock: The inelastic deformation behaviour of rock salt causes stress relaxation at the pilot borehole which can lead to an underestimation of the actual stress state in rock. During overcoring considerable inelastic deformations occur in rock salt which demand a modified interpretation of the measurements and as a result of stress relaxation at the borehole various tests conditions, such as overcoring diameter, pilot borehole diameter and time between drilling and overcoring, have an effect on the test results. (orig./PW)

  14. Stress categorization in nozzle to pressure vessel connections finite elements models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, Levi Barcelos de

    1999-01-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III , is the most important code for nuclear pressure vessels design. Its design criteria were developed to preclude the various pressure vessel failure modes throughout the so-called 'Design by Analysis', some of them by imposing stress limits. Thus, failure modes such as plastic collapse, excessive plastic deformation and incremental plastic deformation under cyclic loading (ratchetting) may be avoided by limiting the so-called primary and secondary stresses. At the time 'Design by Analysis' was developed (early 60's) the main tool for pressure vessel design was the shell discontinuity analysis, in which the results were given in membrane and bending stress distributions along shell sections. From that time, the Finite Element Method (FEM) has had a growing use in pressure vessels design. In this case, the stress results are neither normally separated in membrane and bending stress nor classified in primary and secondary stresses. This process of stress separation and classification in Finite Element (FE) results is what is called stress categorization. In order to perform the stress categorization to check results from FE models against the ASME Code stress limits, mainly from 3D solid FE models, several research works have been conducted. This work is included in this effort. First, a description of the ASME Code design criteria is presented. After that, a brief description of how the FEM can be used in pressure vessel design is showed. Several studies found in the literature on stress categorization for pressure vessel FE models are reviewed and commented. Then, the analyses done in this work are presented in which some typical nozzle to pressure vessel connections subjected to internal pressure and concentrated loads were modeled with solid finite elements. The results from linear elastic and limit load analyses are compared to each other and also with the results obtained by formulae for simple shell

  15. Finite element analysis of hybrid energy harvesting of piezoelectric and electromagnetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Yazid Muhammad Ammar Faris

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Harvesting energy from ambient vibrations is a highly required method because of the wide range of available sources that produce vibration energy application from industrial machinery to human motion application. In this paper, the implementation of harvesting energy from two technologies to form a hybrid energy harvester system was analyzed. These two technologies involve the piezoelectric harvesting energy and the electromagnetic harvesting energy. A finite element model was developed using the Ansys software with the harmonic analysis solver to analyze and examine hybrid harvesting energy system. Both power output generated from the magnet and the piezoelectric is then combined to form one unit of energy. Further, it was found that the result shows the system generate the maximum power output of 14.85 μW from 100 Hz, 4.905 m/s2, and 0.6 cm3 for resonance frequency, acceleration, and the volume respectively from the optimal energy harvester design. Normalized Power Density (NPD result of 10.29 kgs/m3 comparable with other literature also can be used in energy harvesting system for vibration application.

  16. Hybrid finite element method for describing the electrical response of biological cells to applied fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Wenjun; Henriquez, Craig S

    2007-04-01

    A novel hybrid finite element method (FEM) for modeling the response of passive and active biological membranes to external stimuli is presented. The method is based on the differential equations that describe the conservation of electric flux and membrane currents. By introducing the electric flux through the cell membrane as an additional variable, the algorithm decouples the linear partial differential equation part from the nonlinear ordinary differential equation part that defines the membrane dynamics of interest. This conveniently results in two subproblems: a linear interface problem and a nonlinear initial value problem. The linear interface problem is solved with a hybrid FEM. The initial value problem is integrated by a standard ordinary differential equation solver such as the Euler and Runge-Kutta methods. During time integration, these two subproblems are solved alternatively. The algorithm can be used to model the interaction of stimuli with multiple cells of almost arbitrary geometries and complex ion-channel gating at the plasma membrane. Numerical experiments are presented demonstrating the uses of the method for modeling field stimulation and action potential propagation.

  17. Finite element analysis of maxillary bone stress caused by Aramany Class IV obturator prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Elcio Ricardo; Mattos, Beatriz Silva Câmara; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito; Navarro, Hamilton

    2012-05-01

    The retention of an Aramany Class IV removable partial dental prosthesis can be compromised by a lack of support. The biomechanics of this obturator prosthesis result in an unusual stress distribution on the residual maxillary bone. This study evaluated the biomechanics of an Aramany Class IV obturator prosthesis with finite element analysis and a digital 3-dimensional (3-D) model developed from a computed tomography scan; bone stress was evaluated according to the load placed on the prosthesis. A 3-D model of an Aramany Class IV maxillary resection and prosthesis was constructed. This model was used to develop a finite element mesh. A 120 N load was applied to the occlusal and incisal platforms corresponding to the prosthetic teeth. Qualitative analysis was based on the scale of maximum principal stress; values obtained through quantitative analysis were expressed in MPa. Under posterior load, tensile and compressive stresses were observed; the tensile stress was greater than the compressive stress, regardless of the bone region, and the greatest compressive stress was observed on the anterior palate near the midline. Under an anterior load, tensile stress was observed in all of the evaluated bone regions; the tensile stress was greater than the compressive stress, regardless of the bone region. The Aramany Class IV obturator prosthesis tended to rotate toward the surgical resection when subjected to posterior or anterior loads. The amount of tensile and compressive stress caused by the Aramany Class IV obturator prosthesis did not exceed the physiological limits of the maxillary bone tissue. (J Prosthet Dent 2012;107:336-342). Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Numerical stress analysis of toroidal coil by three-dimensional finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Hidetomo; Shimamoto, Susumu

    1977-10-01

    A structure analysis program based on finite element method for toroidal coils, developed in JAERI, and its example application to a medium-size tokamak are described. In this application, the effects of material anisotropy, poloidal field and spring constant value were studied, and also the influence of toroidal coil failure on the peak stress. The following were revealed. The effect of anisotropy on the peak stress in reinforcement must be considered. The effect of poloidal field on the peak stress is small compared with that of toroidal field. The spring constant value between coil and support does not much influence the peak stress value, The peak stress in reinforcement rises with increasing number of failed coils. In the case of 2000 nodes on the structure, CPU time with the program is about 40 min. (auth.)

  19. Finite Element Simulation and Experimental Verification of Internal Stress of Quenched AISI 4140 Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Qin, Shengwei; Hao, Qingguo; Chen, Nailu; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua

    2017-03-01

    The study of internal stress in quenched AISI 4140 medium carbon steel is of importance in engineering. In this work, the finite element simulation (FES) was employed to predict the distribution of internal stress in quenched AISI 4140 cylinders with two sizes of diameter based on exponent-modified (Ex-Modified) normalized function. The results indicate that the FES based on Ex-Modified normalized function proposed is better consistent with X-ray diffraction measurements of the stress distribution than FES based on normalized function proposed by Abrassart, Desalos and Leblond, respectively, which is attributed that Ex-Modified normalized function better describes transformation plasticity. Effect of temperature distribution on the phase formation, the origin of residual stress distribution and effect of transformation plasticity function on the residual stress distribution were further discussed.

  20. Finite element modelling to assess the effect of surface mounted piezoelectric patch size on vibration response of a hybrid beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, N.; Alam, M. N.

    2018-02-01

    Vibration response analysis of a hybrid beam with surface mounted patch piezoelectric layer is presented in this work. A one dimensional finite element (1D-FE) model based on efficient layerwise (zigzag) theory is used for the analysis. The beam element has eight mechanical and a variable number of electrical degrees of freedom. The beams are also modelled in 2D-FE (ABAQUS) using a plane stress piezoelectric quadrilateral element for piezo layers and a plane stress quadrilateral element for the elastic layers of hybrid beams. Results are presented to assess the effect of size of piezoelectric patch layer on the free and forced vibration responses of thin and moderately thick beams under clamped-free and clamped-clamped configurations. The beams are subjected to unit step loading and harmonic loading to obtain the forced vibration responses. The vibration control using in phase actuation potential on piezoelectric patches is also studied. The 1D-FE results are compared with the 2D-FE results.

  1. A 3D finite element model to investigate prosthetic interface stresses of different posterior tibial slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yi; Li, Xiaomiao; Fu, Xiaodong; Wang, Weili

    2015-11-01

    Posterior tibial slope that is created during proximal tibial resection in total knee arthroplasty has emerged as an important factor in the mechanics of the knee joint and the surgical outcome. But the ideal degree of posterior tibial slope for recovery of the knee joint function and preventions of complications remains controversial and should vary in different racial groups. The objective of this paper is to investigate the effects of posterior tibial slope on contact stresses in the tibial polyethylene component of total knee prostheses. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to calculate contact stresses in tibial polyethylene component of total knee prostheses subjected to a compressive load. The 3D finite element model of total knee prosthesis was constructed from the images produced by 3D scanning technology. Stresses in tibial polyethylene component were calculated with four different posterior tibial slopes (0°, 3°, 6° and 9°). The 3D finite element model of total knee prosthesis we presented was well validated. We found that the stress distribution in the polythene as evaluated by the distributions of the von Mises stress, the maximum principle stress, the minimum principle stress and the Cpress were more uniform with 3° and 6° posterior tibial slopes than with 0° and 9° posterior tibial slopes. Moreover, the peaks of the above stresses and trends of changes with increasing degree of knee flexion were more ideal with 3° and 6° posterior slopes. The results suggested that the tibial component inclination might be favourable to 7°-10° so far as the stress distribution is concerned. The range of the tibial component inclination also can decrease the wear of polyethylene. Chinese posterior tibial slope is bigger than in the West, and the current domestic use of prostheses is imported from the West, so their demands to tilt back bone cutting can lead to shorten the service life of prostheses; this experiment result is of important

  2. Stress analysis of disconnected structures in contact through finite element gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadter, J.T.; Weiss, R.O.

    1976-07-01

    A numerical procedure is presented for analyzing thermal stress problems of disconnected structures in contact across separations or gaps. The new procedure is called SAASGAPS, an adaptation of the basic SAAS III computer program. The SAAS program uses the finite element method and allows analyses of plane and axisymmetric bodies with temperature dependent material properties, subject to thermal and mechanical loads. A secant modulus approach with a bilinear stress-strain curve is used for elastic-plastic problems. The SAASGAPS version contains all of the features of the original SAAS program. A special gap element is used together with a stress invariance principle to model the contact process. The iterative procedure implemented in SAASGAPS is described. Results are discussed for five problems involving frictionless contact. Two of these problems are associated with the thermal stress analysis of the heat shield for the Multi-Hundred Watt Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator. Input instructions for the program are described in an appendix

  3. Influence of PEEK Coating on Hip Implant Stress Shielding: A Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesica Anguiano-Sanchez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress shielding is a well-known failure factor in hip implants. This work proposes a design concept for hip implants, using a combination of metallic stem with a polymer coating (polyether ether ketone (PEEK. The proposed design concept is simulated using titanium alloy stems and PEEK coatings with thicknesses varying from 100 to 400 μm. The Finite Element analysis of the cancellous bone surrounding the implant shows promising results. The effective von Mises stress increases between 81 and 92% for the complete volume of cancellous bone. When focusing on the proximal zone of the implant, the increased stress transmission to the cancellous bone reaches between 47 and 60%. This increment in load transferred to the bone can influence mineral bone loss due to stress shielding, minimizing such effect, and thus prolonging implant lifespan.

  4. Finite Element Simulation of Shot Peening: Prediction of Residual Stresses and Surface Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariépy, Alexandre; Perron, Claude; Bocher, Philippe; Lévesque, Martin

    Shot peening is a surface treatment that consists of bombarding a ductile surface with numerous small and hard particles. Each impact creates localized plastic strains that permanently stretch the surface. Since the underlying material constrains this stretching, compressive residual stresses are generated near the surface. This process is commonly used in the automotive and aerospace industries to improve fatigue life. Finite element analyses can be used to predict residual stress profiles and surface roughness created by shot peening. This study investigates further the parameters and capabilities of a random impact model by evaluating the representative volume element and the calculated stress distribution. Using an isotropic-kinematic hardening constitutive law to describe the behaviour of AA2024-T351 aluminium alloy, promising results were achieved in terms of residual stresses.

  5. Finite element modelling of stress development during deposition of ion assisted coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.J.; Arnell, R.D.

    2002-01-01

    Ion assisted physical vapour deposited (IAPVD) films typically have a high state of residual stress. This residual stress comprises two components: a thermal stress, which forms as the system cools to room temperature; and an intrinsic stress which is caused by the processes of deposition. Much work has been published on the tribology and mechanical behaviour of surface coatings without consideration of the residual stress. It was therefore considered desirable to develop a finite element (FE) simulation to be used either as a precursor to any realistic mechanical study of the behaviour of such surface coatings, or to be used as a tool to study the effects of varying the deposition parameters. Previous experimental work has shown that the residual stress is related to deposition parameters, such as incident ion and atom fluxes and energies, and recent molecular dynamics studies have indicated that trapped inert gas species may play a major role in the mechanism for creation of the intrinsic stress. The FE simulation assumes that the processes of ion bombardment and material deposition are consecutive, but as the analysis time step tends to zero this assumption approximates the simultaneity of the processes. Suitable mathematical descriptions are employed in the bombarded region of the growing coating to simulate the macroscopic effects of the microscopic atomic collision phenomena and diffusion processes. Two finite element simulations are presented. The first is based on an analytical model, which has gained popular acceptance and this was presented in a previous year at this conference. The second builds on this to simulate wider aspects of known behaviour and is presented in this follow-up paper. The predicted trends of mean stress and its distribution are similar to those observed in published experimental work

  6. Computation of stress intensity factors for nozzle corner cracks by various finite element procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broekhoven, M.J.G.

    1975-01-01

    The present study aims at deriving accurate K-factors for a series of 5 elliptical nozzle corner cracks of increasing size by various finite element procedures, using a three-level recursive substructuring scheme to perform the computations in an economic way on an intermediate size computer (IBM 360/65 system). A nozzle on a flat plate has been selected for subsequent experimental verification, this configuration being considered an adequate simulation of a nozzle on a shallow shell. The computations have been performed with the ASKA finite element system using mainly HEXEC-27 (incomplete quartic) elements. The geometry has been subdivided into 5 subnets with a total of 3515 nodal points and 6250 unknowns, two main nets and one hyper net. Each crack front is described by 11 nodal points and all crack front nodes are inserted in the hyper net, which allows for the realization of the successive crack geometries by changing only a relatively small hyper net (615 to 725 unknowns). Output data have been interpreted in terms of K-factors by the global energy method, the displacement method and the stress method. Besides, a stiffness derivative procedure, recently developed at Brown University, which takes full advantage of the finite element formulation to calculate local K-factors, has been applied. Finally it has been investigated whether sufficiently accurate results can be obtained by analyzing a considerably smaller part than one half of the geometry (as strictly required by symmetry considerations), using fixed boundary conditions derived from a far cheaper analysis of the uncracked structure

  7. A hybrid finite element - statistical energy analysis approach to robust sound transmission modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynders, Edwin; Langley, Robin S.; Dijckmans, Arne; Vermeir, Gerrit

    2014-09-01

    When considering the sound transmission through a wall in between two rooms, in an important part of the audio frequency range, the local response of the rooms is highly sensitive to uncertainty in spatial variations in geometry, material properties and boundary conditions, which have a wave scattering effect, while the local response of the wall is rather insensitive to such uncertainty. For this mid-frequency range, a computationally efficient modeling strategy is adopted that accounts for this uncertainty. The partitioning wall is modeled deterministically, e.g. with finite elements. The rooms are modeled in a very efficient, nonparametric stochastic way, as in statistical energy analysis. All components are coupled by means of a rigorous power balance. This hybrid strategy is extended so that the mean and variance of the sound transmission loss can be computed as well as the transition frequency that loosely marks the boundary between low- and high-frequency behavior of a vibro-acoustic component. The method is first validated in a simulation study, and then applied for predicting the airborne sound insulation of a series of partition walls of increasing complexity: a thin plastic plate, a wall consisting of gypsum blocks, a thicker masonry wall and a double glazing. It is found that the uncertainty caused by random scattering is important except at very high frequencies, where the modal overlap of the rooms is very high. The results are compared with laboratory measurements, and both are found to agree within the prediction uncertainty in the considered frequency range.

  8. Finite element formulation for thermal stress analysis of thin reactor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Kennedy, J.M.; Belytschko, T.B.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes the formulation of a finite-element procedure for the thermal stress analysis of thin wall reactor components. A general temperature-dependent constituent relationship is derived from a Gibbs potential function and a temperature-dependent yield surface. This form of constitutive relationship is applicable to problems of small strain. A similar form of a hypoelastic-plastic type is also developed for large strains. The variation of the yield surface with temperature is based upon a temperature-dependent, work-hardening model. The model uses a temperature-equivalent stress-plastic strain diagram which is generated from isothermal unaxial stress-strain data. The above constitutive relationships are incorporated into two computer codes and a previously developed numerical algorithm is used with minor modifications. A set of problems is presented validating the thermal analysis capability of the computer codes to a variety of problem types. (Auth.)

  9. The finite element analysis for prediction of residual stresses induced by shot peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cheol; Yang, Won Ho; Sung, Ki Deug; Cho, Myoung Rae; Ko, Myung Hoon

    2000-01-01

    The shot peening is largely used for a surface treatment in which small spherical parts called shots are blasted on a surface of a metallic components with velocities up to 100m/s. This treatment leads to an improvement of fatigue behavior due to the developed compressive residual stresses, and so it has gained widespread acceptance in the automobile and aerospace industries. The residual stress profile on surface layer depends on the parameters of shot peening, which are, shot velocity, shot diameter, coverage, impact angle, material properties etc. and the method to confirm this profile is only measurement by X-ray diffractometer. Despite its importance to automobile and aerospace industries, little attention has been devoted to the accurate modeling of the process. In this paper, the simulation technique is applied to predict the magnitude and distribution of the residual stress and plastic deformation caused by shot peening with the help of the finite element analysis

  10. Simulating Stresses Associated with the Bending of Wood Using a Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Gaff

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the stress-strain curves of various thicknesses of soft and hard wood when bent during three-point loading. The finite element method was used to simulate the course of stresses that occurred during the bending of these materials. Reference curves obtained by bending real specimens offered a basis for simulation. The results showed that with increasing material thickness, deflection values decreased and the proportionality limit increased; eventually, the bendability coefficient value decreased and the loading force necessary for bending increased. Moreover, it was apparent when bending hard materials that higher loading forces were necessary for different materials of the same thickness. It is possible to determine the stress-strain curves without having to perform experiments (except for indispensable reference ones under real conditions.

  11. A fully coupled finite element model for stress distribution in buried gas pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahya Sukirman; Zainal Zakaria; Woong Soon Yue

    2001-01-01

    The study of stress-strain relationship is very important in many designs of buried structures over the years. The behavior and mechanism between the interaction of soil and buried structures such as a natural pipeline will mostly contributes to the integrity of the pipeline. This paper presents a fully coupled finite element of consolidation analysis model to study the stress-strain distribution along a buried pipeline before it excess its maximum deformation limit. The behavior of the soil-pipeline system can be modelled by a non-linear elasto-plastic based on Mohr-Coulomb and critical state yield surfaces. The deformation and deflection of the pipeline due to drained and external loading condition will be considered here. Finally the stress-strain distribution of the buried pipeline will be utilised to obtain the maximum deformation limit and the deflection of the buried pipeline. (Author)

  12. Stress Concentration Factor of Expanded Aluminum Tubes Using Finite Element Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Mhamdi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the development of semi-empirical relations for the maximum stress concentration factor (SCF around circular holes embedded in aluminum tubes under various expansion ratios and mandrel angles. Finite element models were developed to study the expansion of a typical aluminum tube with embedded holes of various sizes. An elastic perfectly-plastic material behaviour was used to describe the structural response of the tubes under expansion. Various hole-diameter-to-tubewall- thickness ratios, tube expansion ratios, and mandrel angles were considered to determine the stress state around the hole at zero and 90 degree locations from which the maximum SCF was determined. Semi-empirical relations for the maximum SCF using the Lagrange interpolation formulation were developed. The developed relations were found to predict the SCFs accurately.

  13. SAFE-PLANE, Stress Analysis of Planar Structure by Finite Elements Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornell, D.C.; Reich, Morris

    1967-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: SAFE-PLANE is applied to two- dimensional structures of arbitrary geometry under in-plane loads. Either plane stress or plane strain conditions may be imposed. Mechanical and thermal loads are permitted. 2 - Method of solution: The finite-element method is used to construct a mathematical model by assembling discrete elements. The total potential energy of the structure is determined and subsequently minimized by iteration on components of the displacement field until static equilibrium of the structure is attained. Strains and stresses are computed from the resulting displacements. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Multi-material structures with varying rigidities converge very slowly. Not valid for incompressible materials. Maximum number of nodal points = 675. Maximum number of elements = 1350

  14. Finite element simulations of internal stresses generated during the ferroelastic deformation of NiTi bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manach, P.Y.; Favier, D.; Rio, G.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the generation of internal stresses during the predeformation of NiTi shape memory alloys in the martensitic state. This allows to determine the initial stress state in which the material will transform during the shape memory effect due to heating consecutively to this prestrain. In that way a three-dimensional finite element model of the deformation of shape memory alloys has been developed, the constitutive law being defined using an elastohysteresis tensor model. The influence of behavioural and geometrical factors are illustrated considering the numerical simulation of different cases of practical importance for industrial applications : the study of the bending behaviour of a NiTi cantilever beam as well as the study of the swelling of a pipe connection under both uniform and non uniform internal displacement fields. (orig.)

  15. Solution of finite element problems using hybrid parallelization with MPI and OpenMP Solution of finite element problems using hybrid parallelization with MPI and OpenMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Vargas-Félix

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Finite Element Method (FEM is used to solve problems like solid deformation and heat diffusion in domains with complex geometries. This kind of geometries requires discretization with millions of elements; this is equivalent to solve systems of equations with sparse matrices and tens or hundreds of millions of variables. The aim is to use computer clusters to solve these systems. The solution method used is Schur substructuration. Using it is possible to divide a large system of equations into many small ones to solve them more efficiently. This method allows parallelization. MPI (Message Passing Interface is used to distribute the systems of equations to solve each one in a computer of a cluster. Each system of equations is solved using a solver implemented to use OpenMP as a local parallelization method.The Finite Element Method (FEM is used to solve problems like solid deformation and heat diffusion in domains with complex geometries. This kind of geometries requires discretization with millions of elements; this is equivalent to solve systems of equations with sparse matrices and tens or hundreds of millions of variables. The aim is to use computer clusters to solve these systems. The solution method used is Schur substructuration. Using it is possible to divide a large system of equations into many small ones to solve them more efficiently. This method allows parallelization. MPI (Message Passing Interface is used to distribute the systems of equations to solve each one in a computer of a cluster. Each system of equations is solved using a solver implemented to use OpenMP as a local parallelization method.

  16. Comparison of finite-element stress analysis with experimental copper sphere impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frantz, C.E.; Hecker, S.S.; Stout, M.G.; Browning, R.V.

    1980-07-01

    Three copper spheres were impacted on targets of varying surface finishes at 100 m/s. Impact face friction was varied for each test and the impact was photographed with a high-speed camera. Postimpact strains and deformation were measured. A finite-element computer code, NONSAP, was used to model the impact. The best agreement between computer prediction and experiment was obtained using isoparametric elements, a graded mesh, and actual high-strain-rate copper stress-strain data. Frictional conditions at the impact face were also modeled by altering the standard NONSAP code. The most critical test of NONSAP was accurate prediction of experimental impact strains. The best agreement we could obtain had a maximum point-to-point error of 20%, although in general, the comparison was much better. Results of this research indicate that we must know more about material and impact interface friction in order to obtain reliable numerical predictions

  17. Mechanical Performance of Natural / Natural Fiber Reinforced Hybrid Composite Materials Using Finite Element Method Based Micromechanics and Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Muhammad Ziaur

    2017-01-01

    A micromechanical analysis of the representative volume element (RVE) of a unidirectional flax/jute fiber reinforced epoxy composite is performed using finite element analysis (FEA). To do so, first effective mechanical properties of flax fiber and jute fiber are evaluated numerically and then used in evaluating the effective properties of ax/jute/epoxy hybrid composite. Mechanics of Structure Genome (MSG), a new homogenization tool developed in Purdue University, is used to calculate the hom...

  18. Different finite element techniques to predict welding residual stresses in aluminum alloy plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moein, Hadi; Sattari-Far, Iradj

    2014-01-01

    This study is a 3D thermomechanical finite element (FE) analysis of a single-pass and butt-welded work-hardened aluminum (Al) 5456 plates. It aims to validate the use of FE welding simulations to predict residual stress states in assessing the integrity of welded components. The predicted final residual stresses in the plate from the FE simulations are verified through comparison with experimental measurements. Three techniques are used to simulate the welding process. In the first two approaches, welding deposition is applied by using element birth and interaction techniques. In the third approach, the entire weld zone is simultaneously deposited. Results show a value at approximately the yield strength for longitudinal residual stresses of the welded center of the butt-welded Al alloy plates with a thickness of 2 mm. Considering the application of a comprehensive heat source, along with heat loss modeling and the temperature dependent properties of the material, the approach without deposition predicts a reasonable distribution of residual stresses. However, the element birth and interaction techniques, compared with the no-deposit technique, provide more accurate results in calculating residual stresses. Furthermore, the element interaction technique, compared with the element birth technique, exhibits higher efficiency and flexibility in modeling the deposition of welded metals as well as less modeling cost.

  19. Stress analysis in pressure vessels by mixed finite element methods taking into account shear deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, L.P.; Toledo, E.M.; Loula, A.F.D.; Garcia, E.L.M.

    1988-12-01

    A new finite element method is employed to approximate axisymmetric shell problems. This formulation enhances stability and accuracy, from thin to moderately thick shells, compared to the correspondent Galerkin finite element approximations. Numerical results illustrate the good performance of the present method on some typical pressure vessels aplications. (author) [pt

  20. Stress analysis of composite wind turbine blade by finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Meng-Kao; Wang, Chen-Hsu

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the finite element analysis software ANSYS was used to analyze the composite wind turbine blade. The wind turbine blade model used is adopted from the 5 MW model of US National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The wind turbine blade is a sandwich structure, comprising outermost carbon fiber cloth/epoxy composites, the inner glass fiber/vinylester layers, and PVC foam core, together with stiffeners. The wind pressure is converted into the load on the blade structure. The stress distribution and deformation of wind turbine blade were obtained by considering different pitch angles and at different angular positions. The Tsai-Hill criterion was used to determine the failure of wind turbine blade. The results show that at the 0° pitch angle, the wind turbine blade is subjected to the largest combined load and therefore the stress is the largest; with the increasing pitch angle, the load gradually decreases and the stress is also smaller. The stress and displacement are the greatest when the wind blade is located at 120° angular position from its highest vertex.

  1. Construction of finite element model and stress analysis of anterior cruciate ligament tibial insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Can; Yang, Liu; Guo, Lin; Wang, Fuyou; Gou, Jingyue; Deng, Zhilong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a more realistic finite element (FE) model of the human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tibial insertion and to analyze the stress distribution in the ACL internal fibers under load. The ACL tibial insertions were processed histologically. With Photoshop software, digital images taken from the histological slides were collaged, contour lines were drawn, and different gray values were filled based on the structure. The data were exported to Amira software and saved as ".hmascii" file. This document was imported into HyperMesh software. The solid mesh model generated using HyperMesh software was imported into Abaqus software. The material properties were introduced, boundary conditions were set, and load was added to carry out the FE analysis. The stress distribution of the ACL internal fibers was uneven. The lowest stress could be observed in the ACL lateral fibers under tensile and shear load. The establishment of ACL tibial insertion FE model and mechanical analysis could reveal the stress distribution in the ACL internal fibers under load. There was greater load carrying capacity in the ACL lateral fibers which could sustain greater tensile and shear forces.

  2. Mixed hybrid finite elements and streamline computation for the potential flow problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaasschieter, E.F.; Huijben, A.J.M.

    1992-01-01

    An important class of problems in mathematical physics involves equations of the form -¿ · (A¿¿) = f. In a variety of problems it is desirable to obtain an accurate approximation of the flow quantity u = -A¿¿. Such an accurate approximation can be determined by the mixed finite element method. In

  3. Stresses in faulted tunnel models by photoelasticity and adaptive finite element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladkany, S.G.; Huang, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Research efforts in this area continue to investigate the development of a proper technique to analyze the stresses in the Ghost Dance fault and the effect of the fault on the stability of drifts in the proposed repository. Results from two parallel techniques are being compared to each other - Photoelastic models and Finite Element (FE) models. The Photoelastic plexiglass model (88.89 mm thick ampersand 256.1 mm long and wide) has two adjacent spare openings (57.95 mm long and wide) and a central round opening (57.95 mm diameter) placed at a clear distance approximately equal to its diameter from the square openings. The vertical loading on top of the model is 2269 N (500 lb.). Saw cuts (0.5388 mm wide), representing a fault, are being propagated from the tunnels outward with stress measurements taken at predefined locations, as the saw cuts increase in length. The FE model duplicates exactly the Photoelastic models. The adaptive mesh generation method is used to refine the FE grid at every step of the analysis. This nonlinear interactive computational techniques uses various uses various percent tolerance errors in the convergence of stress values as a measure in ending the iterative process

  4. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis on Stress Distribution of Internal Implant-Abutment Engagement Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Yong; Huh, Yun-Hyuk; Park, Chan-Jin; Cho, Lee-Ra

    To investigate the stress distribution in an implant-abutment complex with a preloaded abutment screw by comparing implant-abutment engagement features using three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). For FEA modeling, two implants-one with a single (S) engagement system and the other with a double (D) engagement system-were placed in the human mandibular molar region. Two types of abutments (hexagonal, conical) were connected to the implants. Different implant models (a single implant, two parallel implants, and mesial and tilted distal implants with 1-mm bone loss) were assumed. A static axial force and a 45-degree oblique force of 200 N were applied as the sum of vectors to the top of the prosthetic occlusal surface with a preload of 30 Ncm in the abutment screw. The von Mises stresses at the implant-abutment and abutment-screw interfaces were measured. In the single implant model, the S-conical abutment type exhibited broader stress distribution than the S-hexagonal abutment. In the double engagement system, the stress concentration was high in the lower contact area of the implant-abutment engagement. In the tilted implant model, the stress concentration point was different from that in the parallel implant model because of the difference in the bone level. The double engagement system demonstrated a high stress concentration at the lower contact area of the implant-abutment interface. To decrease the stress concentration, the type of engagement features of the implant-abutment connection should be carefully considered.

  5. Dynamic, large-deflection, inelastic and thermal stress analysis by the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisler, W.E.; Stricklin, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    A finite element theory and computer program have been developed for predicting the dynamic, large displacement, inelastic and thermal response of stiffened and layered structures. The dependence of material properties on temperature is explicitly accounted for and any arbitrary, transient mechanical or thermal load history is allowed. The shell may have internal or external stiffeners and be constructed with up to three layers. The equations of motion are developed by using the pseudo force approach to represent all nonlinearities and are then solved by using either the Houbolt method or central differences. Moderately large rotations are allowed. The program is based on an incremental theory of plasticity using the Von Mises yield condition and associated flow rule. The post yield or work-hardening behavior is idealized with either the isotropic hardening or mechanical sublayer models. Two models are utilized since it has been found through comparison with experimental results that isotropic hardening is best for simple loading conditions while the mechanical sublayer model is better for reverse and cyclic loading. Strain-rate effects are also accounted for in the program by using a power-law type model based on the strain rate. The dependence of material properties on temperature is taken into account in the pseudo forces. Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, thermal coefficient of expansion, the yield stress, and the entire stress strain curve are treated as functions of the applied temperature. Containment vessels subjected to transient and shock-type mechanical and thermal loads have been analyzed

  6. On the stress assessment and verification of 3D finite element models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neto, M.M.; Miranda, C.A.J.; Cruz, J.R.B.; Bezerra, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    The evaluation of components using three dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA) does not generally fall into the shell type verification. Consequently, the demonstration that the modes of failure are avoided sometimes is not straightforward. Elastic rules, developed by limit load theory, require the computation of the shell type through wall membrane and bending stresses. How to calculate these stresses from 3D FEA is not necessarily self-evident. One approach to be considered is to develop recommendations in a case-by-case basis for the most common pressure vessel geometries and loads based on comparison between the results of elastic and also plastic FEA. In this paper the case of a complex geometry -- lugs attached to a cylindrical pressure vessel wall -- is examined and discussed. This case is typically a three-dimensional (3D) configuration where it is not a simple task to check the requirements of the ASME code. From the comparison of the results of 3D elastic and elastic-plastic FEA some conclusions are addressed

  7. Bending stress modeling of dismountable furniture joints applied with a use of finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Šimek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented work focuses on bending moment stress modeling of dismountable furniture joints with a use of Finite Element Method. The joints are created from Minifix and Rondorfix cams combined with non-glued wooden dowels. Laminated particleboard 18 mm of thickness is used as a connected material. The connectors were chosen such as the most applied kind in furniture industry for the case furniture. All gained results were reciprocally compared to each other and also in comparison to experimental testing by the mean of stiffness. The non-linear numerical model of chosen joints was successfully created using the software Ansys Workbench. The detailed analysis of stress distribution in the joint was achieved with non-linear numerical simulation. A relationship between numerical si­mu­la­tion and experimental testing was showed by comparison stiffness tangents. A numerical simulation of RTA joint loads also demonstrated the important role of non-glued dowels in the tested joints. The low strength of particleboard in the tension parallel to surface (internal bond is the most likely the cause of the joint failure. Results are applicable for strength designing of furniture with the aid of Computer Aided Engineering.

  8. Finite Element Method Study on Stress State in Soil Induced by Agricultural Traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Molnar-Irimie

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In general, when a tyre is running on a deformable soil, the soil compaction will occur not only on surface layers, but also on soil profile, in deeper layers. This leads to a series of negative effects not only on physical and mechanical properties of soil, but also influences the crops growth and the crop yield. For these reasons, currently are needed solutions to reduce soil compaction, caused mainly by agricultural implements passing on the soil surface in order to aply the specific crop production technologies. From our simulation we can draw the following conclusions: the soil stresses decreased with depth; the soil displacements magnitude increased with soil water content due to lower friction forces between soil particles (water acts like a lubricant between soil particles; decreasing rate for soil displacement is influenced by load magnitude and tyre inflation pressure; the soil particles moved in vertical plain from the top to the bottom, but also in horizontal direction, from the center to the edge in cross section and in longitudinal direction; the dimensions of the geometric shape of the mentioned soil volume is influenced by load and tyre inflation pressure. In this paper the agricultural traffic and its influence on stress state in soil, it was used a software application based on Finite Element Method, that has been proved to be a useful tool for soil compaction assessment in order to find the right decisions for a proper field traffic management.

  9. Finite element time domain modeling of controlled-Source electromagnetic data with a hybrid boundary condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Hongzhu; Hu, Xiangyun; Xiong, Bin

    2017-01-01

    method which is unconditionally stable. We solve the diffusion equation for the electric field with a total field formulation. The finite element system of equation is solved using the direct method. The solutions of electric field, at different time, can be obtained using the effective time stepping...... method with trivial computation cost once the matrix is factorized. We try to keep the same time step size for a fixed number of steps using an adaptive time step doubling (ATSD) method. The finite element modeling domain is also truncated using a semi-adaptive method. We proposed a new boundary...... condition based on approximating the total field on the modeling boundary using the primary field corresponding to a layered background model. We validate our algorithm using several synthetic model studies....

  10. CRANIOFACIAL STRESS PATTERNS AND DISPLACEMENTS AFTER ACTIVATION OF HYRAX DEVICE: FINITE ELEMENT MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Bosiakov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid maxillary expansion is employed for the treatment of cross-bite and deficiency of transversal dimension of the maxilla in patients with and without cleft of palate and lip. For this procedure, generally, different orthodontic appliances and devices generating significant transversal forces are used. The aim of this study is the finite-element analysis of stresses and displacements of the skull without palate cleft and the skull with unilateral and bilateral cleft after activation of the Hyrax orthodontic device. Two different constructions of the orthodontic device Hyrax with different positions of the screw relative palate are considered. In the first case, the screw is in the occlusal horizontal plane, and in the other, the screw is located near the palate. Activation of the orthodontic device corresponds to the rotation of the screw on one-quarter turn. It is established that the screw position significantly affects the distributions of stresses in skull and displacements of the cranium without palate cleft and with unilateral or bilateral palate cleft. Stresses in the bone structures of the craniums without cleft and with cleft are transferred from the maxilla to the pterygoid plate and pharyngeal tubercle if the screw displaces from the occlusal plane to the palate. Depending on the construction of the orthodontic appliance, the maxilla halves in the transversal plane are unfolded or the whole skull is entirely rotated in the sagittal plane. The stresses patterns and displacements of the skull with bilateral palate cleft are almost unchanged after activation of the orthodontic devices with different positions of the screw, only magnitudes of stresses and displacements are changed. The obtained results can be used for design of orthodontic appliances with the Hyrax screw, as well as for planning of osteotomies during the surgical assistance of the rapid maxillary expansion.

  11. Effect of restoration volume on stresses in a mandibular molar: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Jennifer S; Chande, Ruchi; Porter, H Christian; Janus, Charles

    2014-10-01

    There can be significant disagreement among dentists when planning treatment for a tooth with a failing medium-to-large--sized restoration. The clinician must determine whether the restoration should be replaced or treated with a crown, which covers and protects the remaining weakened tooth structure during function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stresses generated in different sized amalgam restorations via a computational modeling approach and reveal whether a predictable pattern emerges. A computer tomography scan was performed of an extracted mandibular first molar, and the resulting images were imported into a medical imaging software package for tissue segmentation. The software was used to separate the enamel, dentin, and pulp cavity through density thresholding and surface rendering. These tissue structures then were imported into 3-dimensional computer-aided design software in which material properties appropriate to the tissues in the model were assigned. A static finite element analysis was conducted to investigate the stresses that result from normal occlusal forces. Five models were analyzed, 1 with no restoration and 4 with increasingly larger restoration volume proportions: a normal-sized tooth, a small-sized restoration, 2 medium-sized restorations, and 1 large restoration as determined from bitewing radiographs and occlusal surface digital photographs. The resulting von Mises stresses for dentin-enamel of the loaded portion of the tooth grew progressively greater as the size of the restoration increased. The average stress in the normal, unrestored tooth was 4.13 MPa, whereas the smallest restoration size increased this stress to 5.52 MPa. The largest restoration had a dentin-enamel stress of 6.47 MPa. A linear correlation existed between restoration size and dentin-enamel stress, with an R(2) of 0.97. A larger restoration volume proportion resulted in higher dentin-enamel stresses under static loading. A comparison of the von Mises

  12. Application of the method finite elements by numerical modeling stress-strain state in conveyor belts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maras Michal

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Solving problems connected with damaging a conveyor belt at the transfer points is conditioned by knowing laws of this phenomenon. Acquiring the knowledge on this phenomen is possible to be gained either by experimental research or by the numerical model GEM 22, which enables to determine the distribution of stresses and strains in a suitably selected cross-section of a conveyor belt. The paper begins by defining the problem, determining the boundary model conditions and continues by modelling the dynamic force acting on the conveyor belt. In the conclusions of the paper there are given table and graphical results of the numerical modelling aimed at solving the problems connected with the damaging of a conveyor belt. By numerical modelling, in this case the finite element method, in the given way can be realized the parametric studies with changing values of input parameters, especially: - stretching force, - thickness of cover layers of the conveyor belt and strain properties of the rubber, - parameters of the steel cord of the conveyor belt.

  13. Hybrid Modeling and Optimization of Manufacturing Combining Artificial Intelligence and Finite Element Method

    CERN Document Server

    Quiza, Ramón; Davim, J Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) techniques and the finite element method (FEM) are both powerful computing tools, which are extensively used for modeling and optimizing manufacturing processes. The combination of these tools has resulted in a new flexible and robust approach as several recent studies have shown. This book aims to review the work already done in this field as well as to expose the new possibilities and foreseen trends. The book is expected to be useful for postgraduate students and researchers, working in the area of modeling and optimization of manufacturing processes.

  14. Hybrid finite element/waveguide mode analysis of passive RF devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Daniel T.

    1993-07-01

    A numerical solution for time-harmonic electromagnetic fields in two-port passive radio frequency (RF) devices has been developed, implemented in a computer code, and validated. Vector finite elements are used to represent the fields in the device interior, and field continuity across waveguide apertures is enforced by matching the interior solution to a sum of waveguide modes. Consequently, the mesh may end at the aperture instead of extending into the waveguide. The report discusses the variational formulation and its reduction to a linear system using Galerkin's method. It describes the computer code, including its interface to commercial CAD software used for geometry generation. It presents validation results for waveguide discontinuities, coaxial transitions, and microstrip circuits. They demonstrate that the method is an effective and versatile tool for predicting the performance of passive RF devices.

  15. Multilayer Finite-Element Model Application to Define the Bearing Structure Element Stress State of Launch Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Zverev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article objective is to justify the rationale for selecting the multilayer finite element model parameters of the bearing structure of a general-purpose launch complex unit.A typical design element of the launch complex unit, i.e. a mount of the hydraulic or pneumatic cylinder, block, etc. is under consideration. The mount represents a set of the cantilevered axis and external structural cage. The most loaded element of the cage is disk to which a moment is transferred from the cantilevered axis due to actuator effort acting on it.To calculate the stress-strain state of disk was used a finite element method. Five models of disk mount were created. The only difference in models was the number of layers of the finite elements through the thickness of disk. There were models, which had one, three, five, eight, and fourteen layers of finite elements through the thickness of disk. For each model, we calculated the equivalent stresses arising from the action of the test load. Disk models were formed and calculated using the MSC Nastran complex software.The article presents results in the table to show data of equivalent stresses in each of the multi-layered models and graphically to illustrate the changing equivalent stresses through the thickness of disk.Based on these results we have given advice on selecting the proper number of layers in the model allowing a desirable accuracy of results with the lowest run time. In addition, it is concluded that there is a need to use the multi-layer models in assessing the performance of structural elements in case the stress exceeds the allowable one in their surface layers.

  16. Stress analysis for shells with double curvature by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.

    1981-08-01

    A simple triangular finite element for plates and shells, is presented. Since the rotation fields are assumed independent of the displacement fields, simple shape functions of second and third degree were used. An implicit penalty method allows one to solve thin shell problems since the Kirchoff-Love hypothesis are automatically satisfied. (Author) [pt

  17. Stress and Deformation Analysis in Base Isolation Elements Using the Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Iavornic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In Modern tools as Finite Element Method can be used to study the behavior of elastomeric isolation systems. The simulation results obtained in this way provide a large series of data about the behavior of elastomeric isolation bearings under different types of loads and help in taking right decisions regarding geometrical optimizations needed for improve such kind of devices.

  18. On the Stress Analysis of the Kappel Propeller using Finite Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, P.; Andersen, Poul

    2003-01-01

    The Kappel propeller design concept promotes the inclusion of a "forward facing" blade tip winglet with the objective that propeller efficiency may be improved. Design development has enabled a series of finite element investigations in order to establish how the inclusion of an unconventional bl...

  19. Finite-element formulations for the thermal stress analysis of two- and three-dimensional thin reactor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Kennedy, J.M.; Belytschko, T.B.; Schoeberle, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes finite-element formulations for the thermal stress analysis of LMFBR structures. The first formulation is applicable to large displacement rotation problems in which the strains are small. For this formulation, a general temperature-dependent constituent relationship is derived from a Gibbs potential and a temperature dependent surface. A second formulation is presented for problems characterized by both large displacement-rotations and large strains. Here a set of large strain hypoelastic-plastic relationships are developed to linearly relate the rate of stress to the rate of deformation. These developments were incorporated into two ANL developed finite-element computer codes: the implicit version of STRAW and the 3D Implicit Structural Analaysis code. A set of problems is presented to validate both the 3D and 2D programs and to illustrate their applicability to a variety of problems. (Auth.)

  20. Finite element modelling of shot peening process: Prediction of the compressive residual stresses, the plastic deformations and the surface integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frija, M.; Hassine, T.; Fathallah, R.; Bouraoui, C.; Dogui, A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical simulation of the shot peening process using finite element method. The majority of the controlling parameters of the process have been taken into account. The shot peening loading has been characterised by using energy equivalence between the dynamic impact and a static indentation of a peening shot in the treated surface. The behaviour of the subjected material is supposed to be elastic plastic with damage. An integrated law of the damage proposed by Lemaitre and Chaboche has been used. The proposed model leads to obtain the residual stress, the plastic deformation profiles and the surface damage. An application on a shot peened Ni-based super alloy Waspaloy has been carried out. The comparison of the residual stresses, obtained by X-ray diffraction method and by finite element calculation, shows a good correlation. The in-depth profile of the plastic deformations and the superficial damage values are in good agreement with the experimental observations

  1. Time-domain finite-difference/finite-element hybrid simulations of radio frequency coils in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shumin; Duyn, Jeff H

    2008-01-01

    A hybrid method that combines the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and the finite-element time-domain (FETD) method is presented for simulating radio-frequency (RF) coils in magnetic resonance imaging. This method applies a high-fidelity FETD method to RF coils, while the human body is modeled with a low-cost FDTD method. Since the FDTD and the FETD methods are applied simultaneously, the dynamic interaction between RF coils and the human body is fully accounted for. In order to simplify the treatment of the highly irregular FDTD/FETD interface, composite elements are proposed. Two examples are provided to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the hybrid method in high-field receive-and-transmit coil design. This approach is also applicable to general bio-electromagnetic simulations

  2. FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR PREDICTING RESIDUAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR PREDICTING RESIDUAL STRESSES IN ... the transverse residual stress in the x-direction (σx) had a maximum value of 375MPa ... the finite element method are in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  3. Calculation of stress intensity factors using the UNCLE finite element system and their application in fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, J.H.B.

    1978-02-01

    The behaviour of crack-like defects in loaded structures is in many cases characterised by the stress intensity factor, K, which describes the spatial distribution around the crack tip. Analytical evaluation of K for generalised loading and geometry would be extremely complex. A finite element approach is described which utilises the existing UNCLE system of the UKAEA. The interpretation of the results for a fracture mechanics analysis is briefly reviewed. (author)

  4. INTEREST OF FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS TO DETERMINE STRESS FIELDS AT THE SUMMIT OF A VY FLAP ABOUT ONE CLINICAL CASE

    OpenAIRE

    Pauchot , Julien; Remache , Djamel; Chambert , Jérôme; Elkhyat , Ahmed; Jacquet , Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    International audience; After performing a V-Y advancement flap, we observed an unusually shaped necrosis, resembling a keyhole at the apex of the flap. As high closing tensions are an accepted cause of skin necrosis, we developed a mathematical model based on the finite element analysis in order to determine the stress field by simulating the mechanical behavior of human skin during suture and to explain this particular shape of necrosis. For the modeling, a planar nonlinear two-dimensional ...

  5. Influence of the crack propagation rate in the obtaining opening and closing stress intensity factor by finite element method

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Carlos H. Ricardo; Carlos Alexandre J. Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Crack propagation simulation began with the development of the finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique as criterion design. The aim of this paper is to verify the effect of different crack propagation rates in determination of crack opening and closing stress of an ASTM specimen under a standard suspension spectrum loading fr...

  6. Experimental and finite element analysis of tibial stress fractures using a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklyn, Melanie; Field, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    To determine if rabbit models can be used to quantify the mechanical behaviour involved in tibial stress fracture (TSF) development. Fresh rabbit tibiae were loaded under compression using a specifically-designed test apparatus. Weights were incrementally added up to a load of 30 kg and the mechanical behaviour of the tibia was analysed using tests for buckling, bone strain and hysteresis. Structural mechanics equations were subsequently employed to verify that the results were within the range of values predicted by theory. A finite element (FE) model was developed using cross-sectional computer tomography (CT) images scanned from one of the rabbit bones, and a static load of 6 kg (1.5 times the rabbit's body weight) was applied to represent running. The model was validated using the experimental strain gauge data, then geometric and elemental convergence tests were performed in order to find the minimum number of cross-sectional scans and elements respectively required for convergence. The analysis was then performed using both the model and the experimental results to investigate the mechanical behaviour of the rabbit tibia under compressive load and to examine crack initiation. The experimental tests showed that under a compressive load of up to 12 kg, the rabbit tibia demonstrates linear behaviour with little hysteresis. Up to 30 kg, the bone does not fail by elastic buckling; however, there are low levels of tensile stress which predominately occur at and adjacent to the anterior border of the tibial midshaft: this suggests that fatigue failure occurs in these regions, since bone under cyclic loading initially fails in tension. The FE model predictions were consistent with both mechanics theory and the strain gauge results. The model was highly sensitive to small changes in the position of the applied load due to the high slenderness ratio of the rabbit's tibia. The modelling technique used in the current study could have applications in the development of

  7. Effect of Oval Posts on Stress Distribution in Endodontically Treated Teeth: A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Mahmoodi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In post-core crown restorations, the use of prefabricated composite posts concentrate stress at the cervical region and the use of metal posts (prefabricated and customized posts concentrates stress at the interfaces. Fiber reinforced composite posts (FRCs with oval cross-section (oval posts were proposed for post-core crown restorations to reduce the stress levels at the cervical region. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of oval cross-section composite posts on stress distribution of premolar with oval-shaped canal by using three-dimensional (3D finite element analysis. Materials and Methods: An extracted premolar tooth was mounted, sectioned, and photographed to create a 3D model. The surrounding tissues of the tooth, periodontal ligament, as well as cortical and trabecular bones were modeled. Seven taper posts with two different cross-section geometries (circular and oval shapes were modeled, as well. Then, the effect of post geometry, post material (carbon fiber and fiberglass, and cement material were investigated by 3D finite element analysis and the stress distribution results were compared. Results: In all the models, the highest stress levels of the dentin were accumulated at the coronal third of the root, and the highest stress levels at the bonding layers were accumulated at the cervical margin. Narrow circular posts induced the highest stress levels, whereas the stress levels were reduced by using thick oval posts. Application of elastic cement reduces the stress at the bonding layers but increases stress at the dentin. Conclusion: Finite element analysis showed that prefabricated oval posts are superior to traditional circular ones. The use of cement with low elastic modulus reduces the risk of debonding but raises the risk of root fracture.

  8. Finite Element Analysis of Bone Stress for Miniscrew Implant Proximal to Root Under Occlusal Force and Implant Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Li-Hua; Guo, Na; Zhou, Guan-jun; Qie, Hui; Li, Chen-Xi; Lu, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Because of the narrow interradicular spaces and varying oral anatomies of individual patients, there is a very high risk of root proximity during the mini implants inserting. The authors hypothesized that normal occlusal loading and implant loading affected the stability of miniscrew implants placed in proximity or contact with the adjacent root. The authors implemented finite element analysis (FEA) to examine the effectiveness of root proximity and root contact. Stress distribution in the bone was assessed at different degrees of root proximity by generating 4 finite element models: the implant touches the root surface, the implant was embedded in the periodontal membrane, the implant touches the periodontal surface, and the implant touches nothing. Finite element analysis was then carried out with simulations of 2 loading conditions for each model: condition A, involving only tooth loading and condition B, involving both tooth and implant loading. Under loading condition A, the maximum stress on the bone for the implant touching the root was the distinctly higher than that for the other models. For loading condition B, peak stress areas for the implant touching the root were the area around the neck of the mini implant and the point of the mini implant touches the root. The results of this study suggest that normal occlusal loading and implant loading contribute to the instability of the mini implant when the mini implant touches the root.

  9. Simulation of ultrasonic wave propagation in anisotropic poroelastic bone plate using hybrid spectral/finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu-Hieu; Naili, Salah

    2012-08-01

    This paper deals with the modeling of guided waves propagation in in vivo cortical long bone, which is known to be anisotropic medium with functionally graded porosity. The bone is modeled as an anisotropic poroelastic material by using Biot's theory formulated in high frequency domain. A hybrid spectral/finite element formulation has been developed to find the time-domain solution of ultrasonic waves propagating in a poroelastic plate immersed in two fluid halfspaces. The numerical technique is based on a combined Laplace-Fourier transform, which allows to obtain a reduced dimension problem in the frequency-wavenumber domain. In the spectral domain, as radiation conditions representing infinite fluid halfspaces may be exactly introduced, only the heterogeneous solid layer needs to be analyzed by using finite element method. Several numerical tests are presented showing very good performance of the proposed procedure. A preliminary study on the first arrived signal velocities computed by using equivalent elastic and poroelastic models will be presented. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Distribution of stress on TMJ disc induced by use of chincup therapy: assessment by the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calçada, Flávio Siqueira; Guimarães, Antônio Sérgio; Teixeira, Marcelo Lucchesi; Takamatsu, Flávio Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To assess the distribution of stress produced on TMJ disc by chincup therapy, by means of the finite element method. Methods: a simplified three-dimensional TMJ disc model was developed by using Rhinoceros 3D software, and exported to ANSYS software. A 4.9N load was applied on the inferior surface of the model at inclinations of 30, 40, and 50 degrees to the mandibular plane (GoMe). ANSYS was used to analyze stress distribution on the TMJ disc for the different angulations, by means of finite element method. Results: The results showed that the tensile and compressive stresses concentrations were higher on the inferior surface of the model. More presence of tensile stress was found in the middle-anterior region of the model and its location was not altered in the three directions of load application. There was more presence of compressive stress in the middle and mid-posterior regions, but when a 50o inclined load was applied, concentration in the middle region was prevalent. Tensile and compressive stresses intensities progressively diminished as the load was more vertically applied. Conclusions: stress induced by the chincup therapy is mainly located on the inferior surface of the model. Loads at greater angles to the mandibular plane produced distribution of stresses with lower intensity and a concentration of compressive stresses in the middle region. The simplified three-dimensional model proved useful for assessing the distribution of stresses on the TMJ disc induced by the chincup therapy. PMID:29160348

  11. Finite Element Modeling of Perturbation Fields due to Colonies of Stress Corrosion Cracks(SCCs) in a Gas Transmission Pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Sun Ho

    2001-01-01

    The detection of axial cracks using conventional MFL pig is a significant challenge in the gas pipeline inspection. In this study, a technique using interaction of circumferentially induced torrents with axial stress corrosion crack is presented. The feasibility of this technique is investigated using finite element modeling. Finite element analysis of such interaction is a difficult problem in terms of both computation time and memory requirements. The challenges arise due to the nonlinearity of material properties, the small sire of tight cracks relative to that of the magnetizer, and also time stepping involved in modeling velocity effects. This paper presents an approach based on perturbation methods. The overall analysis procedure is divided into 4 simple steps that can be performed sequentially. Modeling results show that this technique can effectively detect colonies of SCC as well as single SCC

  12. Influence of the crack propagation rate in the obtaining opening and closing stress intensity factor by finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos H. Ricardo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Crack propagation simulation began with the development of the finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique as criterion design. The aim of this paper is to verify the effect of different crack propagation rates in determination of crack opening and closing stress of an ASTM specimen under a standard suspension spectrum loading from FD&E SAE Keyhole Specimen Test Load Histories by finite element analysis. The crack propagation simulation was based on release nodes at the minimum loads to minimize convergence problems. To understand the crack propagation processes under variable amplitude loading, retardation effects are discussed.

  13. Use of simple finite elements for mechanical systems impact analysis based on stereomechanics, stress wave propagation, and energy method approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, Michael L.; Moradi, Rasoul; Lankarani, Hamid M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of analyzing impact events in mechanical systems for design purposes using simple or low ordered finite elements. Traditional impact dynamics analyses of mechanical systems namely stereomechanics, energy method, stress-wave propagation and contact mechanics approaches are limited to very simplified geometries and provide basic analyses in making predictions and understanding the dominant features of the impact in a mechanical system. In engineering practice, impacted systems present a complexity of geometry, stiffness, mass distributions, contact areas and impact angles that are impossible to analyze and design with the traditional impact dynamics methods. In real cases, the effective tool is the finite element (FE) method. The high-end FEA codes though may be not available for typical engineer/designer. This paper provides information on whether impact events of mechanical systems can be successfully modeled using simple or low-order finite elements. FEA models using simple elements are benchmarked against theoretical impact problems and published experimental impact results. As a case study, an FE model using simple plastic beam elements is further tested to predict stresses and deflections in an experimental structural impact

  14. Evaluation of stress distribution of implant-retained mandibular overdenture with different vertical restorative spaces: A finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadian, Behnaz; Farzin, Mahmoud; Talebi, Saeid; Khodaeian, Niloufar

    2012-01-01

    Background: Available restorative space and bar height is an important factor in stress distribution of implant-supported overdentures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different vertical restorative spaces and different bar heights on the stress distribution around implants by 3D finite element analysis. Materials and Methods: 3D finite element models were developed from mandibular overdentures with two implants in the interforaminal region. In these models, four different bar heights from gingival crest (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 mm) with 15 mm occlusal plane height and three different occlusal plane heights from gingival crest (9, 12, 15 mm) with 2 mm bar height were analyzed. A vertical unilateral and a bilateral load of 150 N were applied to the central occlusal fossa of the first molar and the stress of bone around implant was analyzed by finite element analysis. Results: By increasing vertical restorative space, the maximum stress values around implants were found to be decreased in unilateral loading models but slightly increased in bilateral loading cases. By increasing bar height from gingival crest, the maximum stress values around implants were found to be increased in unilateral loading models but slightly decreased in bilateral loading cases. In unilateral loading models, maximum stress was found in a model with 9 mm occlusal plane height and 1.5 mm bar height (6.254 MPa), but in bilateral loading cases, maximum stress was found in a model with 15 mm occlusal plane height and 0.5 mm bar height (3.482 MPa). Conclusion: The reduction of bar height and increase in the thickness of acrylic resin base in implant-supported overdentures are biomechanically favorable and may result in less stress in periimplant bone. PMID:23559952

  15. Accuracy of finite-element models for the stress analysis of multiple-holed moderator blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.D.; Sullivan, R.M.; Lewis, A.C.; Yu, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    Two steps have been taken to quantify and improve the accuracy in the analysis. First, the limitations of various approximation techniques have been studied with the aid of smaller benchmark problems containing fewer holes. Second, a new family of computer programs has been developed for handling such large problems. This paper describes the accuracy studies and the benchmark problems. A review is given of some proposed modeling techniques including local mesh refinement, homogenization, a special-purpose finite element, and substructuring. Some limitations of these approaches are discussed. The new finite element programs and the features that contribute to their efficiency are discussed. These include a standard architecture for out-of-core data processing and an equation solver that operates on a peripheral array processor. The central conclusions of the paper are: (1) modeling approximation methods such as local mesh refinement and homogenization tend to be unreliable, and they should be justified by a fine mesh benchmark analysis; and (2) finite element codes are now available that can achieve accurate solutions at a reasonable cost, and there is no longer a need to employ modeling approximations in the two-dimensional analysis of HTGR fuel elements. 10 figures

  16. Stress analysis of different prosthesis materials in implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis using 3D finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Iranmanesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the present study, the finite element method (FEM was used to investigate the effects of prosthesis material types on stress distribution of the bone surrounding implants and to evaluate stress distribution in three-unit implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis (FDP. Materials and Methods: A three-dimensional (3D finite element FDP model of the maxillary second premolar to the second molar was designed. Three load conditions were statically applied on the functional cusps in horizontal (57.0 N, vertical (200.0 N, and oblique (400.0 N, θ = 120° directions. Four standard framework materials were evaluated: Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA, base-metal, porcelain fused to metal, andporcelain. Results: The maximum of von Mises stress in the oblique direction was higher than the vertical and horizontal directions in all conditions. In the bone-crestal section, the maximum von Mises stress (53.78 MPa was observed in PMMA within oblique load. In FDPs, the maximum stress was generated at the connector region in all conditions. Conclusion: A noticeable difference was not observed in the bone stress distribution pattern with different prosthetic materials. Although, higher stress value could be seen in polymethyl methacrylate, all types of prosthesis yielded the same stress distribution pattern in FDP. More clinical studies are needed to evaluate the survival rate of these materials.

  17. Finite element analysis of stresses in fixed prosthesis and cement layer using a three-dimensional model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunachalam Sangeetha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: To understand the effect of masticatory and parafunctional forces on the integrity of the prosthesis and the underlying cement layer. Aims: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stress pattern in the cement layer and the fixed prosthesis, on subjecting a three-dimensional finite element model to simulated occlusal loading. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional finite element model was simulated to replace missing mandibular first molar with second premolar and second molar as abutments. The model was subjected to a range of occlusal loads (20, 30, 40 MPa in two different directions - vertical and 30° to the vertical. The cements (zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate, glass ionomer, and composite were modeled with two cement thicknesses - 25 and 100 μm. Stresses were determined in certain reference points in fixed prosthesis and the cement layer. Statistical Analysis Used: The stress values are mathematic calculations without variance; hence, statistical analysis is not routinely required. Results: Stress levels were calculated according to Von Mises criteria for each node. Maximum stresses were recorded at the occlusal surface, axio-gingival corners, followed by axial wall. The stresses were greater with lateral load and with 100-μm cement thickness. Results revealed higher stresses for zinc phosphate cement, followed by composites. Conclusions: The thinner cement interfaces favor the success of the prosthesis. The stresses in the prosthesis suggest rounding of axio-gingival corners and a well-established finish line as important factors in maintaining the integrity of the prosthesis.

  18. Effect of platform connection and abutment material on stress distribution in single anterior implant-supported restorations: a nonlinear 3-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marco Aurélio; Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha; Pessanha Henriques, Guilherme Elias

    2014-11-01

    Although various abutment connections and materials have recently been introduced, insufficient data exist regarding the effect of stress distribution on their mechanical performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different abutment materials and platform connections on stress distribution in single anterior implant-supported restorations with the finite element method. Nine experimental groups were modeled from the combination of 3 platform connections (external hexagon, internal hexagon, and Morse tapered) and 3 abutment materials (titanium, zirconia, and hybrid) as follows: external hexagon-titanium, external hexagon-zirconia, external hexagon-hybrid, internal hexagon-titanium, internal hexagon-zirconia, internal hexagon-hybrid, Morse tapered-titanium, Morse tapered-zirconia, and Morse tapered-hybrid. Finite element models consisted of a 4×13-mm implant, anatomic abutment, and lithium disilicate central incisor crown cemented over the abutment. The 49 N occlusal loading was applied in 6 steps to simulate the incisal guidance. Equivalent von Mises stress (σvM) was used for both the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the implant and abutment in all the groups and the maximum (σmax) and minimum (σmin) principal stresses for the numerical comparison of the zirconia parts. The highest abutment σvM occurred in the Morse-tapered groups and the lowest in the external hexagon-hybrid, internal hexagon-titanium, and internal hexagon-hybrid groups. The σmax and σmin values were lower in the hybrid groups than in the zirconia groups. The stress distribution concentrated in the abutment-implant interface in all the groups, regardless of the platform connection or abutment material. The platform connection influenced the stress on abutments more than the abutment material. The stress values for implants were similar among different platform connections, but greater stress concentrations were observed in internal connections

  19. 3-dimensional earthquake response analysis of embedded reactor building using hybrid model of boundary elements and finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, K.; Motosaka, M.; Kamata, M.; Masuda, K.; Urao, K.; Mameda, T.

    1985-01-01

    In order to investigate the 3-dimensional earthquake response characteristics of an embedded structure with consideration for soil-structure interaction, the authors have developed an analytical method using 3-dimensional hybrid model of boundary elements (BEM) and finite elements (FEM) and have conducted a dynamic analysis of an actual nuclear reactor building. This paper describes a comparative study between two different embedment depths in soil as elastic half-space. As the results, it was found that the earthquake response intensity decreases with the increase of the embedment depth and that this method was confirmed to be effective for investigating the 3-D response characteristics of embedded structures such as deflection pattern of each floor level, floor response spectra in high frequency range. (orig.)

  20. On the residual stress modeling of shot-peened AISI 4340 steel: finite element and response surface methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Ali; Dehestani, Pouya; Poruraminaie, Iman

    2018-02-01

    Shot peening is a well-known process in applying the residual stress on the surface of industrial parts. The induced residual stress improves fatigue life. In this study, the effects of shot peening parameters such as shot diameter, shot speed, friction coefficient, and the number of impacts on the applied residual stress will be evaluated. To assess these parameters effect, firstly the shot peening process has been simulated by finite element method. Then, effects of the process parameters on the residual stress have been evaluated by response surface method as a statistical approach. Finally, a strong model is presented to predict the maximum residual stress induced by shot peening process in AISI 4340 steel. Also, the optimum parameters for the maximum residual stress are achieved. The results indicate that effect of shot diameter on the induced residual stress is increased by increasing the shot speed. Also, enhancing the friction coefficient magnitude always cannot lead to increase in the residual stress.

  1. Contact stresses, pressure and area in a fixed-bearing total ankle replacement: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Nicolo; Baretta, Silvia; Pagano, Jenny; Bianchi, Alberto; Villa, Tomaso; Casaroli, Gloria; Galbusera, Fabio

    2017-11-25

    Mobile-bearing ankle implants with good clinical results continued to increase the popularity of total ankle arthroplasty to address endstage ankle osteoarthritis preserving joint movement. Alternative solutions used fixed-bearing designs, which increase stability and reduce the risk of bearing dislocation, but with a theoretical increase of contact stresses leading to a higher polyethylene wear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the contact stresses, pressure and area in the polyethylene component of a new total ankle replacement with a fixed-bearing design, using 3D finite element analysis. A three-dimensional finite element model of the Zimmer Trabecular Metal Total Ankle was developed and assembled based on computed tomography images. Three different sizes of the polyethylene insert were modeled, and a finite element analysis was conducted to investigate the contact pressure, the von Mises stresses and the contact area of the polyethylene component during the stance phase of the gait cycle. The peak value of pressure was found in the anterior region of the articulating surface, where it reached 19.8 MPa at 40% of the gait cycle. The average contact pressure during the stance phase was 6.9 MPa. The maximum von Mises stress of 14.1 MPa was reached at 40% of the gait cycle in the anterior section. In the central section, the maximum von Mises stress of 10.8 MPa was reached at 37% of the gait cycle, whereas in the posterior section the maximum stress of 5.4 MPa was reached at the end of the stance phase. The new fixed-bearing total ankle replacement showed a safe mechanical behavior and many clinical advantages. However, advanced models to quantitatively estimate the wear are need. To the light of the clinical advantages, we conclude that the presented prosthesis is a good alternative to the other products present in the market.

  2. Finite Element Analysis of the Effect of Proximal Contour of Class II Composite Restorations on Stress Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Abachizadeh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of proximal contour of class II composite restorations placed with straight or contoured matrix band using composite resins with different modulus of elasticity on stress distribution by finite element method. Methods: In order to evaluate the stress distribution of class II composite restorations using finite element method, upper right first molar and second premolar were modeled. Proximal boxes were designed and restored with universal Z250 and packable P60 composite resins (3M ESPE using two matrix systems: flat Tofflemire matrix and precurved sectional matrix. Finally models were evaluated under loads of 200 and 400 Newton at 90 degrees angle and the results were graphically illustrated in the form of Von Misses stresses. Results: In general the stress obtained under 400 Newton load was significantly greater than the stress of models under 200 Newton load. Von Misses stress distribution pattern of two different Z250 and P60 composites were very similar in all modes of loading and proximal contour. In all analyzed models there was a significant difference between models restored with Tofflemire matrix with flat contour and models restored with sectional matrix with curved contour. This difference was greater in first molar than second premolar. Conclusion: Use of a contoured matrix band results in less stress in class II composite resin restorations.

  3. [Effect of zirconia abutment angulation on stress distribution in the abutment and the bone around implant: a finite element study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan-zhong; Tian, Xiao-hua; Zhou, Yan-min

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effect of three different zirconia angular abutments on the stress distribution in bone and abutment using three-dimensional finite element analysis, and provide instruction for clinical application. Finite element analysis (FEA) was applied to analyze the stress distribution of three different zirconia/titanium angular abutments and bone around implant. The maximum Von Minses stress that existed in abutment, bolt and bone of the angular abutment model was significantly higher than that existed in the straight abutment model. The maximum Von Minses stress that existed in abutment, bolt and bone of the 20 ° angular abutment model was significantly higher than that existed in 15 ° angular abutment model. There was no significant difference between zirconia abutment model and titanium abutment model. The abutment angulation has a significant influence on the stress distribution in the abutment, bolt and bone, and exacerbates as the angulation increases, which suggest that we should take more attention to the implant orientation and use straight abutment or little angular abutment. The zirconia abutment can be used safely, and there is no noticeable difference between zirconia abutment and titanium abutment on stress distribution.

  4. Finite element analysis when orthogonal cutting of hybrid composite CFRP/Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Jinyang; Mansori, Mohamed El

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid composite, especially CFRP/Ti stack, is usually considered as an innovative structural configuration for manufacturing the key load-bearing components in modern aerospace industry. This paper originally proposed an FE model to simulate the total chip formation process dominated the hybrid cutting operation. The hybrid composite model was established based on three physical constituents, i.e., Ti constituent, interface and CFRP constituent. Different constitutive models and damage criteria were introduced to replicate the interrelated cutting behaviour of the stack material. The CFRP/Ti interface was modelled as a third phase through the concept of cohesive zone (CZ). Particular attention was made on the comparative studies of the influence of different cutting-sequence strategies on the machining responses induced in hybrid stack cutting. The numerical results emphasized the pivotal role of cutting-sequence strategy on the various machining induced responses including cutting-force generation, machined surface quality and induced interface damage. (paper)

  5. Finite Element Verification of Non-Homogeneous Strain and Stress Fields during Composite Material Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2015-01-01

    Uni-directional glass fiber reinforced polymers play a central role in the task increasing the length of wind turbines blades and thereby lowering the cost of energy from wind turbine installations. During this, optimizing the mechanical performance regarding material stiffness, compression...... strength and fatigue performance is essential. Nevertheless, testing composites includes some challenges regarding stiffness determination using conventional strain gauges and achieving correct material failure unaffected by the gripping region during fatigue testing. Challenges, which in the present study......, has been addressed using the finite element method. During this, a verification of experimental observations, a deeper understanding on the test coupon loading and thereby improved test methods has been achieved....

  6. Thermo-elastic stress analysis of containment wall penetrations using improved finite element formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramani, D.T.; Dimopoulos, A.; Heglin, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    An increased application of finite element techniques, particularly in evaluating structural integrity of nuclear containment walls around penetration points, has aroused considerable interest. Due to extreme thermal effects in the vicinity of penetrations, the concrete containment wall is subject to unwarranted cracking effects, which must be controlled in accordance with ASME-III Code. This paper essentially deals with a unique finite element method of analysis in which nonlinear heat transfer problem across the penetration assembly in the nuclear containment drywell wall, is formulated. Using this technique, thermal analysis, dealing with an evaluation of temperature distribution around axisymmetric penetration assembly accomodating main steam lines or other vital piping at 600 0 F, is carried out. The method of analysis considers steady-state heat transfer energy balance across the process-pipe, insulation layer, guard-pipe sleeve, two intermediate air layers and an axisymmetric opening in the concrete containment wall, the outer faces of which are maintained at ambient temperature of 120 0 F. (orig.)

  7. SAFE-AXISYM, Stress Analysis of Axisymmetric Composite Structure by Finite Elements Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornell, D.C.

    1967-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: SAFE-AXISYM is a program for the analysis of multi-material axisymmetric composite structures. It is designed for the analysis of heterogeneous structures such as reinforced and/or prestressed concrete vessels. The structure is assumed to be linearly elastic, and only bodies of revolution subjected to axisymmetric loading can be treated. 2 - Method of solution: SAFE-AXISYM uses a finite element method with a modified Gauss-Seidel iteration scheme. A reference grid subdivides the structure into ring-like small, finite elements, the vertices of which are called nodes. The grid may be generated by hand, by the computer or by a combination of the two methods. Each node has two degrees of freedom, translation in the and in the axial direction. Both zero and non-zero fixed displacement constraints may be assumed, and the loading condition may be mechanical and/or thermal. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Multi-material structures with varying rigidities converge very slowly. Not valid for incompressible materials. Maximum number of nodes = 475. Maximum number of elements = 1100

  8. TSAAS: finite-element thermal and stress analysis of plane and axisymmetric solids with orthotropic temperature-dependent material properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browning, R.V.; Anderson, C.A.

    1982-02-01

    The finite element method is used to determine the temperatures, displacements, stresses, and strains in axisymmetric solids with orthotropic, temperature-dependent material properties under axisymmetric thermal and mechanical loads. The mechanical loads can be surface pressures, surface shears, and nodal point forces as well as an axial or centripetal acceleration. The continuous solid is replaced by a system of ring elements with triangular or quadrilateral cross sections. Accordingly, the method is valid for solids that are composed of many different materials and that have complex geometry. Nonlinear mechanical behavior as typified by plastic, locking, or creeping materials can be approximated. Two dimensional mesh generation, plotting, and editing features allow the computer program to be readily used. In addition to a stress analysis program that is based on a modified version of the SAAS code, TSAAS can carry out a transient thermal analysis with the finite element mesh used in stress analysis. An implicit time differencing scheme allows the use of arbitrary time steps with consequent fast running times. At specified times, the program will return to SAAS for thermal stress analysis. Nonlinear thermal properties and Arrhenius reaction kinetics are also incorporated into TSAAS. Several versions of TSAAS are in use at Los Alamos, running on CDC-7600, CRAY-1 and VAX 11/780 computers. This report describes the nominal TSAAS; other versions may have some unique features.

  9. Stress Distribution in Single Dental Implant System: Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis Based on an In Vitro Experimental Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Carlos Eduardo Edwards; Chase-Diaz, Melody; Costa, Max Doria; Albarracin, Max Laurent; Paschoeto, Gabriela; Sousa, Edson Antonio Capello; Rubo, José Henrique; Borges, Ana Flávia Sanches

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to analyze the stress distribution in single implant system and to evaluate the compatibility of an in vitro model with finite element (FE) model. The in vitro model consisted of Brånemark implant; multiunit set abutment of 5 mm height; metal-ceramic screw-retained crown, and polyurethane simulating the bone. Deformations were recorded in the peri-implant region in the mesial and distal aspects, after an axial 300 N load application at the center of the occlusal aspect of the crown, using strain gauges. This in vitro model was scanned with micro CT to design a three-dimensional FE model and the strains in the peri-implant bone region were registered to check the compatibility between both models. The FE model was used to evaluate stress distribution in different parts of the system. The values obtained from the in vitro model (20-587 με) and the finite element analysis (81-588 με) showed agreement among them. The highest stresses because of axial and oblique load, respectively were 5.83 and 40 MPa for the cortical bone, 55 and 1200 MPa for the implant, and 80 and 470 MPa for the abutment screw. The FE method proved to be effective for evaluating the deformation around single implant. Oblique loads lead to higher stress concentrations.

  10. Comparative study of finite element method, isogeometric analysis, and finite volume method in elastic wave propagation of stress discontinuities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Berezovski, A.; Kolman, Radek; Blažek, Jiří; Kopačka, Ján; Gabriel, Dušan; Plešek, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 12 (2014) ISSN 1435-4934. [European Conference on Non-Destructive Testing (ECNDT 2014) /11./. Praha, 06.10.2014-10.10.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/0288; GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/12/2315 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : elastic wave propagation * finite element method * isogeometric analysis * finite volume method * stress discontinuities * spurious oscillations Subject RIV: JR - Other Machinery http://www.ndt.net/events/ECNDT2014/app/content/Paper/25_Berezovski_Rev1.pdf

  11. Assessment of stress-strain data suitable for finite-element elastic--plastic analysis of shipping containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, H.J.; Knorovsky, G.A.

    1978-09-01

    Stress-strain data which describes the influence of strain rate and temperature on the mechanical response of materials presently being used for light water reactor fuel shipping containers have been assembled. Selection of data has been limited to that which is suitable for use in finite-element elastic--plastic analysis of shipping containers (e.g., they must include complete material history profiles). Based on this information, recommendations have been made for further work which is required to complete the necessary data base

  12. A Hybrid Finite Element-Fourier Spectral Method for Vibration Analysis of Structures with Elastic Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-You Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel hybrid method, which simultaneously possesses the efficiency of Fourier spectral method (FSM and the applicability of the finite element method (FEM, is presented for the vibration analysis of structures with elastic boundary conditions. The FSM, as one type of analytical approaches with excellent convergence and accuracy, is mainly limited to problems with relatively regular geometry. The purpose of the current study is to extend the FSM to problems with irregular geometry via the FEM and attempt to take full advantage of the FSM and the conventional FEM for structural vibration problems. The computational domain of general shape is divided into several subdomains firstly, some of which are represented by the FSM while the rest by the FEM. Then, fictitious springs are introduced for connecting these subdomains. Sufficient details are given to describe the development of such a hybrid method. Numerical examples of a one-dimensional Euler-Bernoulli beam and a two-dimensional rectangular plate show that the present method has good accuracy and efficiency. Further, one irregular-shaped plate which consists of one rectangular plate and one semi-circular plate also demonstrates the capability of the present method applied to irregular structures.

  13. Constitutive modeling and finite element procedure development for stress analysis of prismatic high temperature gas cooled reactor graphite core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Majumdar, Saurindranath; Srinivasan, Makuteswara

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Finite element procedure developed for stress analysis of HTGR graphite component. • Realistic fluence profile and reflector brick shape considered for the simulation. • Also realistic H-451 grade material properties considered for simulation. • Typical outer reflector of a GT-MHR type reactor considered for numerical study. • Based on the simulation results replacement of graphite bricks can be scheduled. -- Abstract: High temperature gas cooled reactors, such as prismatic and pebble bed reactors, are increasingly becoming popular because of their inherent safety, high temperature process heat output, and high efficiency in nuclear power generation. In prismatic reactors, hexagonal graphite bricks are used as reflectors and fuel bricks. In the reactor environment, graphite bricks experience high temperature and neutron dose. This leads to dimensional changes (swelling and or shrinkage) of these bricks. Irradiation dimensional changes may affect the structural integrity of the individual bricks as well as of the overall core. The present paper presents a generic procedure for stress analysis of prismatic core graphite components using graphite reflector as an example. The procedure is demonstrated through commercially available ABAQUS finite element software using the option of user material subroutine (UMAT). This paper considers General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) as a bench mark design to perform the time integrated stress analysis of a typical reflector brick considering realistic geometry, flux distribution and realistic irradiation material properties of transversely isotropic H-451 grade graphite

  14. Constitutive modeling and finite element procedure development for stress analysis of prismatic high temperature gas cooled reactor graphite core components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Majumdar, Saurindranath [Argonne National Laboratory, South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Finite element procedure developed for stress analysis of HTGR graphite component. • Realistic fluence profile and reflector brick shape considered for the simulation. • Also realistic H-451 grade material properties considered for simulation. • Typical outer reflector of a GT-MHR type reactor considered for numerical study. • Based on the simulation results replacement of graphite bricks can be scheduled. -- Abstract: High temperature gas cooled reactors, such as prismatic and pebble bed reactors, are increasingly becoming popular because of their inherent safety, high temperature process heat output, and high efficiency in nuclear power generation. In prismatic reactors, hexagonal graphite bricks are used as reflectors and fuel bricks. In the reactor environment, graphite bricks experience high temperature and neutron dose. This leads to dimensional changes (swelling and or shrinkage) of these bricks. Irradiation dimensional changes may affect the structural integrity of the individual bricks as well as of the overall core. The present paper presents a generic procedure for stress analysis of prismatic core graphite components using graphite reflector as an example. The procedure is demonstrated through commercially available ABAQUS finite element software using the option of user material subroutine (UMAT). This paper considers General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) as a bench mark design to perform the time integrated stress analysis of a typical reflector brick considering realistic geometry, flux distribution and realistic irradiation material properties of transversely isotropic H-451 grade graphite.

  15. Stress distribution patterns of implant supported overdentures-analog versus finite element analysis: A comparative in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumyadev Satpathy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to asses & compare the load transfer characteristics of Ball/O-ring and Bar/Clip attachment systems in implant supported overdentures using analog and finite element analysis models. Methodology: For the analog part of the study, castable bar was used for the bar and clip attachment and a metallic housing with a rubber O-ring component was used for the ball/O-ring attachment. The stress on the implant surface was measured using the strain-gauge technique. For the finite element analysis, the model were fabricated and load applications were done in a similar manner as in analog study. Results: The difference between both the attachment systems was found to be statistically significant (P<0.001. Conclusion: Ball/O-ring attachment system transmitted lesser amount of stresses to the implants on the non-loading side, as compared to the Bar-Clip attachment system. When overall stress distribution is compared, the Bar-Clip attachment seems to perform better than the Ball/O-ring attachment, because the force was distributed better.

  16. Probabilistic finite elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belytschko, Ted; Wing, Kam Liu

    1987-01-01

    In the Probabilistic Finite Element Method (PFEM), finite element methods have been efficiently combined with second-order perturbation techniques to provide an effective method for informing the designer of the range of response which is likely in a given problem. The designer must provide as input the statistical character of the input variables, such as yield strength, load magnitude, and Young's modulus, by specifying their mean values and their variances. The output then consists of the mean response and the variance in the response. Thus the designer is given a much broader picture of the predicted performance than with simply a single response curve. These methods are applicable to a wide class of problems, provided that the scale of randomness is not too large and the probabilistic density functions possess decaying tails. By incorporating the computational techniques we have developed in the past 3 years for efficiency, the probabilistic finite element methods are capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. Sample results for an elastic-plastic ten-bar structure and an elastic-plastic plane continuum with a circular hole subject to cyclic loadings with the yield stress on the random field are given.

  17. Finite element analysis and measurement for residual stress of dissimilar metal weld in pressurizer safety nozzle mockup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung Soo; Kim, W.; Lee, Jeong Geun; Park, Chi Yong; Yang, Jun Seok; Kim, Tae Ryong; Park, Jai Hak

    2009-01-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis and experiment for weld residual stress (WRS) in the pressurizer safety nozzle mockup is described in various processes and results. Foremost of which is the dissimilar simulation metal welding (DMW) between carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel. Thermal and structural analyses were compared with actual residual stress, and actual measurements of. Magnitude and distribution of WRS in the nozzle mockup were assessed. Two measurement methods were used: hole-drilling method (HDM) with strain gauge for residual stress on the surface of the mockup, and block removal and splitting layer (BRSL) method for through-thickness. FE analysis and measurement data showed good agreement. In conclusion, the characteristics of weld residual stress of DMW could be well understood and the simplified FE analysis was verified as acceptable for estimating WRS

  18. Finite element analysis and measurement for residual stress of dissimilar metal weld in pressurizer safety nozzle mockup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Soo; Kim, W.; Lee, Jeong Geun; Park, Chi Yong; Yang, Jun Seok; Kim, Tae Ryong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jai Hak [Chungbuk University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-11-15

    Finite element (FE) analysis and experiment for weld residual stress (WRS) in the pressurizer safety nozzle mockup is described in various processes and results. Foremost of which is the dissimilar simulation metal welding (DMW) between carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel. Thermal and structural analyses were compared with actual residual stress, and actual measurements of. Magnitude and distribution of WRS in the nozzle mockup were assessed. Two measurement methods were used: hole-drilling method (HDM) with strain gauge for residual stress on the surface of the mockup, and block removal and splitting layer (BRSL) method for through-thickness. FE analysis and measurement data showed good agreement. In conclusion, the characteristics of weld residual stress of DMW could be well understood and the simplified FE analysis was verified as acceptable for estimating WRS

  19. Effect of Integration Patterns Around Implant Neck on Stress Distribution in Peri-Implant Bone: A Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jingyun; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Chao

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the biomechanical performance of different osseointegration patterns between cortical bone and implants using finite element analysis. Fifteen finite element models were constructed of the mandibular fixed prosthesis supported by implants. Masticatory loads (200 N axial, 100 N oblique, 40 N horizontal) were applied. The cortical bone/implant interface was divided equally into four layers: upper, upper-middle, lower-middle, and lower. The bone stress and implant displacement were calculated for 5 degrees of uniform integration (0, 20%, 40%, 60%, and 100%) and 10 integration patterns. The stress was concentrated in the bone margin and gradually decreased as osseointegration progressed, when the integrated and nonintegrated areas were alternated on the bone-implant surface. Compared with full integration, the integration of only the lower-middle layer or lower half layers significantly decreased von Mises, tensile, and compressive stresses in cortical bone under oblique and horizontal loads, and these patterns did not induce higher stress in the cancellous bone. For the integration of only the upper or upper-middle layer, stress in the cortical and cancellous bones significantly increased and was considerably higher than in the case of nonintegration. In addition, the maximum stress in the cortical bone was sensitive to the quantity of integrated nodes at the bone margin; lower quantity was associated with higher stress. There was no significant difference in the displacement of implants among 15 models. Integration patterns of cortical bone significantly affect stress distribution in peri-implant bone. The integration of only the lower-middle or lower half layers helps to increase the load-bearing capacity of peri-implant bone and decrease the risk of overloading, while upper integration may further increase the risk of bone resorption. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  20. A multiscale coupled finite-element and phase-field framework to modeling stressed grain growth in polycrystalline thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamshidian, M., E-mail: jamshidian@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Structural Mechanics, Bauhaus-University Weimar, Marienstrasse 15, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Thamburaja, P., E-mail: prakash.thamburaja@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi 43600 (Malaysia); Rabczuk, T., E-mail: timon.rabczuk@tdt.edu.vn [Division of Computational Mechanics, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Civil Engineering, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2016-12-15

    A previously-developed finite-deformation- and crystal-elasticity-based constitutive theory for stressed grain growth in cubic polycrystalline bodies has been augmented to include a description of excess surface energy and grain-growth stagnation mechanisms through the use of surface effect state variables in a thermodynamically-consistent manner. The constitutive theory was also implemented into a multiscale coupled finite-element and phase-field computational framework. With the material parameters in the constitutive theory suitably calibrated, our three-dimensional numerical simulations show that the constitutive model is able to accurately predict the experimentally-determined evolution of crystallographic texture and grain size statistics in polycrystalline copper thin films deposited on polyimide substrate and annealed at high-homologous temperatures. In particular, our numerical analyses show that the broad texture transition observed in the annealing experiments of polycrystalline thin films is caused by grain growth stagnation mechanisms. - Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Developing a theory for stressed grain growth in polycrystalline thin films. • Implementation into a multiscale coupled finite-element and phase-field framework. • Quantitative reproduction of the experimental grain growth data by simulations. • Revealing the cause of texture transition to be due to the stagnation mechanisms.

  1. Suggestions on performance of finite element limit analysis for eliminating the necessity of stress classifications in design and defect assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujioka, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    In structural design of a nuclear power component, stress classification from elastic stress analysis resultants is often used. Alternatively, to improve accuracy, finite element limit analysis may be performed. This paper examines some issues relating to the use of limit analysis; specifically, the treatment of multiple applied loads and the definition of the limit load from analysis using hardening plasticity laws. These are addressed both by detailed analysis for a simple geometry and by using the reference stress approach to estimate the inelastic displacement. The proposals are also applicable to a defect assessment of a cracked component, and treatment of distributed loads. It is shown that multiple or distributed loads should be treated as if they were applied proportionally irrespective of the actual nature of loads, and that the limit load from analysis with general plasticity laws may be estimated using a newly suggested reduced elastic slope method. (author)

  2. Suggestions on performance of finite element limit analysis for eliminating the necessity of stress classifications in design and defect assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, T.

    2001-01-01

    In structural design of a nuclear power component, stress classification from elastic stress analysis resultants is often used. Alternatively, to improve accuracy, finite element limit analysis may be performed. This paper examines some issues relating to the use of limit analysis; specifically, the treatment of multiple applied loads and the definition of the limit load from analysis using hardening plasticity laws. These are addressed both by detailed analysis for a simple geometry and by using the reference stress approach to estimate the inelastic displacement. The proposals are also applicable to a defect assessment of a cracked component, and treatment of distributed loads. It is shown that multiple or distributed loads should be treated as if they were applied proportionally irrespective of the actual nature of loads, and that the limit load from analysis with general plasticity laws may be estimated using a newly suggested reduced elastic slope method. (author)

  3. Finite element analysis to determine the stress distribution, displacement and safety factor on a microplate for the fractured jaw case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratama, Juan; Mahardika, Muslim

    2018-03-01

    Microplate is a connecting plate that can be used for jaw bone fixation. In the last two decades, microplate has been used so many times to help reconstruction of fractured jaw bone which is called mandibular bone or mandible bone. The plate is used to provide stable fixation of the fractured bone tissue during healing and reconstruction process. In this study Finite Element Analysis was used to predict the stress concentration and distribution on a microplate, displacement on the microplate and also to determine the safety factor of the microplate based on maximum allowable stress value, and finally to ascertain whether microplate is safe to use or not. The microplate was produced from punching process using titanium grade 1 (pure titanium) as material with a thickness of 500 µm. The results of the research indicated that the microplate was safe to use according to the maximum stress around the hole, displacement around the hole and also the safety factor of the microplate.

  4. Programming the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, I M; Margetts, L

    2013-01-01

    Many students, engineers, scientists and researchers have benefited from the practical, programming-oriented style of the previous editions of Programming the Finite Element Method, learning how to develop computer programs to solve specific engineering problems using the finite element method. This new fifth edition offers timely revisions that include programs and subroutine libraries fully updated to Fortran 2003, which are freely available online, and provides updated material on advances in parallel computing, thermal stress analysis, plasticity return algorithms, convection boundary c

  5. Reduced Fracture Finite Element Model Analysis of an Efficient Two-Scale Hybrid Embedded Fracture Model

    KAUST Repository

    Amir, Sahar Z.

    2017-06-09

    A Hybrid Embedded Fracture (HEF) model was developed to reduce various computational costs while maintaining physical accuracy (Amir and Sun, 2016). HEF splits the computations into fine scale and coarse scale. Fine scale solves analytically for the matrix-fracture flux exchange parameter. Coarse scale solves for the properties of the entire system. In literature, fractures were assumed to be either vertical or horizontal for simplification (Warren and Root, 1963). Matrix-fracture flux exchange parameter was given few equations built on that assumption (Kazemi, 1968; Lemonnier and Bourbiaux, 2010). However, such simplified cases do not apply directly for actual random fracture shapes, directions, orientations …etc. This paper shows that the HEF fine scale analytic solution (Amir and Sun, 2016) generates the flux exchange parameter found in literature for vertical and horizontal fracture cases. For other fracture cases, the flux exchange parameter changes according to the angle, slop, direction, … etc. This conclusion rises from the analysis of both: the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) and the HEF schemes. The behavior of both schemes is analyzed with exactly similar fracture conditions and the results are shown and discussed. Then, a generalization is illustrated for any slightly compressible single-phase fluid within fractured porous media and its results are discussed.

  6. Mixed-hybrid finite element method for the transport equation and diffusion approximation of transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartier, J.

    2006-04-01

    This thesis focuses on mathematical analysis, numerical resolution and modelling of the transport equations. First of all, we deal with numerical approximation of the solution of the transport equations by using a mixed-hybrid scheme. We derive and study a mixed formulation of the transport equation, then we analyse the related variational problem and present the discretization and the main properties of the scheme. We particularly pay attention to the behavior of the scheme and we show its efficiency in the diffusion limit (when the mean free path is small in comparison with the characteristic length of the physical domain). We present academical benchmarks in order to compare our scheme with other methods in many physical configurations and validate our method on analytical test cases. Unstructured and very distorted meshes are used to validate our scheme. The second part of this thesis deals with two transport problems. The first one is devoted to the study of diffusion due to boundary conditions in a transport problem between two plane plates. The second one consists in modelling and simulating radiative transfer phenomenon in case of the industrial context of inertial confinement fusion. (author)

  7. Reduced Fracture Finite Element Model Analysis of an Efficient Two-Scale Hybrid Embedded Fracture Model

    KAUST Repository

    Amir, Sahar Z.; Chen, Huangxin; Sun, Shuyu

    2017-01-01

    A Hybrid Embedded Fracture (HEF) model was developed to reduce various computational costs while maintaining physical accuracy (Amir and Sun, 2016). HEF splits the computations into fine scale and coarse scale. Fine scale solves analytically for the matrix-fracture flux exchange parameter. Coarse scale solves for the properties of the entire system. In literature, fractures were assumed to be either vertical or horizontal for simplification (Warren and Root, 1963). Matrix-fracture flux exchange parameter was given few equations built on that assumption (Kazemi, 1968; Lemonnier and Bourbiaux, 2010). However, such simplified cases do not apply directly for actual random fracture shapes, directions, orientations …etc. This paper shows that the HEF fine scale analytic solution (Amir and Sun, 2016) generates the flux exchange parameter found in literature for vertical and horizontal fracture cases. For other fracture cases, the flux exchange parameter changes according to the angle, slop, direction, … etc. This conclusion rises from the analysis of both: the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) and the HEF schemes. The behavior of both schemes is analyzed with exactly similar fracture conditions and the results are shown and discussed. Then, a generalization is illustrated for any slightly compressible single-phase fluid within fractured porous media and its results are discussed.

  8. Finite-element formulations for the thermal stress analysis of two- and three-dimensional thin ractor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Kennedy, J.M.; Belytschko, T.B.; Schoeberle, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes finite-element formulations for the thermal stress analysis of LMFBR structures. The first formulation is applicable to large displacement rotation problems in which the strains are small. For this formulation, a general temperature-dependent constituent relationship is derived from a Gibbs potential function and a temperature dependent yield surface. The temperature dependency of the yield surface is based upon a temperature-dependent, material-hardening model. The model uses a temperature-equivalent stress-plastic strain diagram which is generated from isothermal uniaxial stress-strain data. A second formulation is presented for problems characterized by both large displacement-rotations and large strains. Here a set of large strain hypoelastic-plastic relationships are developed to linearly relate the rate of stress to the rate of deformation. The temperature field is described through time-dependent values at mesh node points; the temperature fields in each element are then obtained by interpolation formulas. Hence, problems with both spatial and temporal dependent temperature fields can easily be treated. The above developments were incorporated into two ANL developed finite-element computer codes: the implicit version of STRAW and the 3D Implicit Structural Analysis Code. STRAW is a two-dimensional code with a plane stress/plane strain beam element. The 3D Implicit code has a triangular flat plate element which is capable of sustaining both membrane and bending loads. To insure numerical stability both codes are based on an iterative-incremental solution procedure with equilibrium checks based on an error in energy

  9. Periodontal ligament influence on the stress distribution in a removable partial denture supported by implant: a finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Marcelo Archangelo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The non-homogenous aspect of periodontal ligament (PDL has been examined using finite element analysis (FEA to better simulate PDL behavior. The aim of this study was to assess, by 2-D FEA, the influence of non-homogenous PDL on the stress distribution when the free-end saddle removable partial denture (RPD is partially supported by an osseointegrated implant. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six finite element (FE models of a partially edentulous mandible were created to represent two types of PDL (non-homogenous and homogenous and two types of RPD (conventional RPD, supported by tooth and fibromucosa; and modified RPD, supported by tooth and implant [10.00x3.75 mm]. Two additional Fe models without RPD were used as control models. The non-homogenous PDL was modeled using beam elements to simulate the crest, horizontal, oblique and apical fibers. The load (50 N was applied in each cusp simultaneously. Regarding boundary conditions the border of alveolar ridge was fixed along the x axis. The FE software (Ansys 10.0 was used to compute the stress fields, and the von Mises stress criterion (svM was applied to analyze the results. RESULTS: The peak of svM in non-homogenous PDL was higher than that for the homogenous condition. The benefits of implants were enhanced for the non-homogenous PDL condition, with drastic svM reduction on the posterior half of the alveolar ridge. The implant did not reduce the stress on the support tooth for both PDL conditions. Conclusion: The PDL modeled in the non-homogeneous form increased the benefits of the osseointegrated implant in comparison with the homogeneous condition. Using the non-homogenous PDL, the presence of osseointegrated implant did not reduce the stress on the supporting tooth.

  10. Residual Stress Analysis of Severe Plastic Deformed Materials using the Finite Element Method and the Neutron Diffraction Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Mi Hyun; Seong, Back Suck; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2009-01-01

    Severe plastic deformation (SPD) is one of the most promising top-down techniques, moving towards industrialization to fabricate bulk ultrafine grain materials. The strain distribution and deformation behavior during the ECAP (equal channel angular pressing), influenced by tool angles, friction and material behavior, was studied through experimental and numerical analyses. The residual stress of work piece which was straight before ECAP produces many serious problems in the next processing e.g. input of the work piece for the next ECAP. The bent work piece needs additional straightening or surface polishing even if the amount of bending is small, and residual stress need to be released before service applications. Residual stress, particularly tensile residual stress can be a very important factor in affecting the reliability and integrity of working parts. The formation of tensile residual stress may result in initiation of fatigue cracks, stress corrosion cracking, or other types of fracture. Hence, residual stress and resulting bending need to be controlled during ECAP. Thus, in current study the bending behavior and the residual stress of the work piece in ECAP are analyzed through experimental and finite element analyses by considering the effects of material, geometric, and processing parameters individually. The stress states in the ECAP processed work piece were measured by the non-destructive way using neutron diffraction. Efforts were made to suggest the alternate routes to reduce the residual stress and bending of work piece in ECAP

  11. Correlation of Stress Concentration Factors for T-Welded Connections – Finite Element Simulations and Fatigue Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Terán Méndez

    Full Text Available Abstract The stress concentration factors (SCFs in welded connections usually occur at zones with high stress levels. Stress concentrations reduce the fatigue behavior of welded connections in offshore structures and cracking can develop. By using the grinding technique, cracking can be eliminated. Stress concentration factors are defined as a ratio of maximum stress at the intersection to nominal stress on the brace. Defining the stress concentration factor is an important stage in the fatigue behavior of welded connections. Several approaches have evolved for designing structures with the classical S-N approach for estimating total life. This work correlates to the stress concentration factors of T-welded connections and the fatigue behavior. Stress concentration factors were computed with the finite element employing 3D T-welded connections with intact and grinding depth conditions. Then, T-welded connections were constructed with A36 plate steel and welded with E6013 electrodes to obtain the stress-life (S-N approach. The methodology from previous works was used to compute the SCF and fabricate the T-welded connections. The results indicated that the grinding process could restore the fatigue life of the T-welded connections for SCFs values in the range of 1.29. This value can be considered to be a low SCF value in T-welded connection. However, for higher SCF values, the fatigue life decreased, compromising and reducing the structural integrity of the T-welded connections.

  12. Time-independent hybrid enrichment for finite element solution of transient conduction–radiation in diffusive grey media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, M. Shadi, E-mail: m.s.mohamed@durham.ac.uk [School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Seaid, Mohammed; Trevelyan, Jon [School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Laghrouche, Omar [Institute for Infrastructure and Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    We investigate the effectiveness of the partition-of-unity finite element method for transient conduction–radiation problems in diffusive grey media. The governing equations consist of a semi-linear transient heat equation for the temperature field and a stationary diffusion approximation to the radiation in grey media. The coupled equations are integrated in time using a semi-implicit method in the finite element framework. We show that for the considered problems, a combination of hyperbolic and exponential enrichment functions based on an approximation of the boundary layer leads to improved accuracy compared to the conventional finite element method. It is illustrated that this approach can be more efficient than using h adaptivity to increase the accuracy of the finite element method near the boundary walls. The performance of the proposed partition-of-unity method is analyzed on several test examples for transient conduction–radiation problems in two space dimensions.

  13. Basic Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Hae

    1992-02-01

    This book gives descriptions of basic finite element method, which includes basic finite element method and data, black box, writing of data, definition of VECTOR, definition of matrix, matrix and multiplication of matrix, addition of matrix, and unit matrix, conception of hardness matrix like spring power and displacement, governed equation of an elastic body, finite element method, Fortran method and programming such as composition of computer, order of programming and data card and Fortran card, finite element program and application of nonelastic problem.

  14. A finite element elastic-plastic analysis of residual stresses due to clad welding in reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchalet, C.; Riccardella, P.C.

    1972-01-01

    Residual stresses due to weld deposited cladding on the inside of a typical Westinghouse pressurized water reactor vessel are investigated using an axisymmetric finite element elastic-plastic analysis. At the beginning of the analysis, one head of the weld cladding is assumed to lie on the reactor vessel wall at melting temperature (2600degF), but in the solid phase, while the vessel remains at 300degF (preheat temperature). All material properties used in the calculations are taken as temperature-dependent. Temperature profiles are obtained in the cladding and base metal at several discrete time intervals. These temperatures profiles are used to obtain the stress distribution for the same time intervals. Residual hoop tensile stresses of approximately 25 ksi were found to exist in the cladding. Peak tensile stresses in the hoop direction occur in the base metal near the cladding interface and reach a value of 60 ksi at the end of the transient. The tensile stress decreases very rapidly through the thickness of the base metal and becomes insignificant at about two inches from the inside surface. In order to lower residual stresses, a post-weld heat treatment is performed by uniformly heating the vessel to 1100degF, holding at that temperature for a specified period of time and then cooling slowly. The analysis shows that after this treatment, the peak stresses in the base metal decrease from 60 ksi to 32 ksi, while the stress in the cladding does not change significantly. (author)

  15. Determination of the contact stresses in double-row tapered roller bearings using the finite element method, experimental analysis and analytical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lostado, Ruben [University of La Rioja, Logroño (Spain); Martinez, Roberto Fernandez [University of Basque Country UPV/EHU, Bilbao (Spain); MacDonald, Bryan J. [Dublin City University, Dublin (Ireland)

    2015-11-15

    Double-row Tapered roller bearings (TRBs) are mechanical devices that are designed to support high axial, radial and torque loads. This combination of loads produces high contact stresses on the bearing raceways that are difficult to predict and validate experimentally, and can cause defects like pitting and fatigue spalling. In response, theoretical models have been proposed by many researchers to calculate the approximate distribution of contact stresses over the bearing raceways. More recently, numerical methods that are based on the Finite element method (FEM) have been used to obtain the contact stresses, although this method requires that the mesh size first be adjusted. This paper shows a process for adjusting a double-row TRB Finite element (FE) model. It is based on generating successive nonlinear FE submodels to calculate the distribution of contact stresses. A theoretical model and contact pressure sensors were used to adjust and validate the Finite element (FE) model.

  16. Stress Distribution during Rapid Canine Retraction with a Distraction Device: A Finite Element Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nareen Chakravarthy Challagulla

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The periodontium in the maxillary first molar region showed the maximum stress and the canine showed unequal stress distribution with more stress at the crest of the alveolar bone and lesser stress at the apical region which lessens root resorption.

  17. Three Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Distal Abutment Stresses of Removable Partial Dentures with Different Retainer Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrati, Simindokht; Heidari, Fatemeh; Kashani, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This finite element method study aimed to compare the amount of stress on an isolated mandibular second premolar in two conventional reciprocal parallel interface designs of removable partial dentures (RPDs) and the same RPD abutment tooth (not isolated). Materials and Methods: A Kennedy Class 1, modification 1 RPD framework was simulated on a 3D model of mandible with three different designs: an isolated tooth with a mesial rest, an isolated tooth with mesial and distal rests and an abutment with a mesial rest (which was not isolated); 26 N occlusal forces were exerted bilaterally on the first molar sites. Stress on the abutment teeth was analyzed using Cosmos Works 2009 Software. Results: In all designs, the abutment tooth stress concentration was located in the buccal alveolar crest. In the first model, the von Mises stress distribution in the contact area of I-bar clasp and cervical portion of the tooth was 19 MPa and the maximum stress was 30 MPa. In the second model, the maximum von Mises stress distribution was 15 MPa in the cervical of the tooth. In the third model, the maximum von Mises stress was located in the cervical of the tooth and the distal proximal plate. Conclusion: We recommend using both mesial and distal rests on the distal abutment teeth of distal extension RPDs. The abutment of an extension base RPD, which is not isolated in presence of its neighboring more anterior tooth, may have a better biomechanical prognosis. PMID:26884772

  18. Three Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Distal Abutment Stresses of Removable Partial Dentures with Different Retainer Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrati, Simindokht; Bahrami, Mehran; Heidari, Fatemeh; Kashani, Jamal

    2015-06-01

    This finite element method study aimed to compare the amount of stress on an isolated mandibular second premolar in two conventional reciprocal parallel interface designs of removable partial dentures (RPDs) and the same RPD abutment tooth (not isolated). A Kennedy Class 1, modification 1 RPD framework was simulated on a 3D model of mandible with three different designs: an isolated tooth with a mesial rest, an isolated tooth with mesial and distal rests and an abutment with a mesial rest (which was not isolated); 26 N occlusal forces were exerted bilaterally on the first molar sites. Stress on the abutment teeth was analyzed using Cosmos Works 2009 Software. In all designs, the abutment tooth stress concentration was located in the buccal alveolar crest. In the first model, the von Mises stress distribution in the contact area of I-bar clasp and cervical portion of the tooth was 19 MPa and the maximum stress was 30 MPa. In the second model, the maximum von Mises stress distribution was 15 MPa in the cervical of the tooth. In the third model, the maximum von Mises stress was located in the cervical of the tooth and the distal proximal plate. We recommend using both mesial and distal rests on the distal abutment teeth of distal extension RPDs. The abutment of an extension base RPD, which is not isolated in presence of its neighboring more anterior tooth, may have a better biomechanical prognosis.

  19. Investigations on thermal properties, stress and deformation of Al/SiC metal matrix composite based on finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Ramesh Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AlSiC is a metal matrix composite which comprises of aluminium matrix with silicon carbide particles. It is characterized by high thermal conductivity (180-200 W/m K, and its thermal expansion are attuned to match other important materials that finds enormous demand in industrial sectors. Although its application is very common, the physics behind the Al-SiC formation, functionality and behaviors are intricate owing to the temperature gradient of hundreds of degrees, over the volume, occurring on a time scale of a few seconds, involving multiple phases. In this study, various physical, metallurgical and numerical aspects such as equation of continuum for thermal, stress and deformation using finite element (FE matrix formulation, temperature dependent material properties, are analyzed. Modelling and simulation studies of Al/SiC composites are a preliminary attempt to view this research work from computational point of view.

  20. Using an optimization approach to design an insole for lowering plantar fascia stress--a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-Chun; Gung, Yih-Wen; Shih, Shih-Liang; Feng, Chi-Kuang; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Yu, Chung-Huang; Chen, Chen-Sheng

    2008-08-01

    Plantar heel pain is a commonly encountered orthopedic problem and is most often caused by plantar fasciitis. In recent years, different shapes of insole have been used to treat plantar fasciitis. However, little research has been focused on the junction stress between the plantar fascia and the calcaneus when wearing different shapes of insole. Therefore, this study aimed to employ a finite element (FE) method to investigate the relationship between different shapes of insole and the junction stress, and accordingly design an optimal insole to lower fascia stress.A detailed 3D foot FE model was created using ANSYS 9.0 software. The FE model calculation was compared to the Pedar device measurements to validate the FE model. After the FE model validation, this study conducted parametric analysis of six different insoles and used optimization analysis to determine the optimal insole which minimized the junction stress between plantar fascia and calcaneus. This FE analysis found that the plantar fascia stress and peak pressure when using the optimal insole were lower by 14% and 38.9%, respectively, than those when using the flat insole. In addition, the stress variation in plantar fascia was associated with the different shapes of insole.

  1. A deep learning approach to estimate stress distribution: a fast and accurate surrogate of finite-element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Liu, Minliang; Martin, Caitlin; Sun, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Structural finite-element analysis (FEA) has been widely used to study the biomechanics of human tissues and organs, as well as tissue-medical device interactions, and treatment strategies. However, patient-specific FEA models usually require complex procedures to set up and long computing times to obtain final simulation results, preventing prompt feedback to clinicians in time-sensitive clinical applications. In this study, by using machine learning techniques, we developed a deep learning (DL) model to directly estimate the stress distributions of the aorta. The DL model was designed and trained to take the input of FEA and directly output the aortic wall stress distributions, bypassing the FEA calculation process. The trained DL model is capable of predicting the stress distributions with average errors of 0.492% and 0.891% in the Von Mises stress distribution and peak Von Mises stress, respectively. This study marks, to our knowledge, the first study that demonstrates the feasibility and great potential of using the DL technique as a fast and accurate surrogate of FEA for stress analysis. © 2018 The Author(s).

  2. Bone density and anisotropy affect periprosthetic cement and bone stresses after anatomical glenoid replacement: A micro finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Yan; Santos, Inês; Müller, Peter E; Pietschmann, Matthias F

    2016-06-14

    Glenoid loosening is still a main complication for shoulder arthroplasty. We hypothesize that cement and bone stresses potentially leading to fixation failure are related not only to glenohumeral conformity, fixation design or eccentric loading, but also to bone volume fraction, cortical thickness and degree of anisotropy in the glenoid. In this study, periprosthetic bone and cement stresses were computed with micro finite element models of the replaced glenoid depicting realistic bone microstructure. These models were used to quantify potential effects of bone microstructural parameters under loading conditions simulating different levels of glenohumeral conformity and eccentric loading simulating glenohumeral instability. Results show that peak cement stresses were achieved near the cement-bone interface in all loading schemes. Higher stresses within trabecular bone tissue and cement mantle were obtained within specimens of lower bone volume fraction and in regions of low anisotropy, increasing with decreasing glenohumeral conformity and reaching their maxima below the keeled design when the load is shifted superiorly. Our analyses confirm the combined influences of eccentric load shifts with reduced bone volume fraction and anisotropy on increasing periprosthetic stresses. They finally suggest that improving fixation of glenoid replacements must reduce internal cement and bone tissue stresses, in particular in glenoids of low bone density and heterogeneity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermoelastic Stress Field Investigation of GaN Material for Laser Lift-off Technique based on Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, Wang; Zhan-Zhong, Cui; Li-Xin, Xu

    2009-01-01

    The transient thermoelastic stress fields of GaN films is analyzed by the finite element method for the laser lift-off (LLO) technique. Stress distributions in GaN films irradiated by pulse laser with different energy densities as functions of time and depth are simulated. The results show that the high thermoelastic stress distributions in GaN films localize within about 1 μm below the GaN/Al 2 O 3 interface using proper laser parameters. It is also found that GaN films can avoid the thermal deformation because the maximum thermoelastic stress 4.28 GPa is much smaller than the yield strength of GaN 15GPa. The effects of laser beam dimension and the thickness of GaN films on stress distribution are also analyzed. The variation range of laser beam dimension as a function of the thickness of GaN films is simulated to keep the GaN films free of thermal deformation. LLO experiments are also carried out. GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are separated from sapphire substrates using the parameters obtained from the simulation. Compared with devices before LLO, P–I–V measurements of GaN-based LEDs after LLO show that the electrical and optical characteristics improve greatly, indicating that no stress damage is brought to GaN films using proper parameters obtained by calculation during LLO

  4. Composite resin reinforced with pre-tensioned fibers: a three-dimensional finite element study on stress distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Lin; Shinya, Akikazu; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2013-01-01

    Pre-tensioned construction material is utilized in engineering applications of high strength demands. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the pre-tensioning fibers of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) using three-dimensional finite element (FE) analysis. The 3D FE models of particulate composite resin (CR), FRC and composite resin reinforced with pre-tensioned fibers (PRE-T-FRC) were constructed. The uniaxial three-point bending test was simulated using FE analysis to calculate the principal stress distribution. In the FRC and PRE-T-FRC, stresses were higher than CR, and they were located in the fiber. However, the maximum principal stress value at the composite of PRE-T-FRC was lower than the FRC and CR. Composite resin reinforced with pre-tensioned fibers was advantageous for stress distribution and lowering the stress at the composite itself. Experimental studies on physical properties of pre-tensioned FRC are encouraged to be conducted.

  5. Stress distribution of metatarsals during forefoot strike versus rearfoot strike: A finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shudong; Zhang, Yan; Gu, Yaodong; Ren, James

    2017-12-01

    Due to the limitations of experimental approaches, comparison of the internal deformation and stresses of the human man foot between forefoot and rearfoot landing is not fully established. The objective of this work is to develop an effective FE modelling approach to comparatively study the stresses and energy in the foot during forefoot strike (FS) and rearfoot strike (RS). The stress level and rate of stress increase in the Metatarsals are established and the injury risk between these two landing styles is evaluated and discussed. A detailed subject specific FE foot model is developed and validated. A hexahedral dominated meshing scheme was applied on the surface of the foot bones and skin. An explicit solver (Abaqus/Explicit) was used to stimulate the transient landing process. The deformation and internal energy of the foot and stresses in the metatarsals are comparatively investigated. The results for forefoot strike tests showed an overall higher average stress level in the metatarsals during the entire landing cycle than that for rearfoot strike. The increase rate of the metatarsal stress from the 0.5 body weight (BW) to 2 BW load point is 30.76% for forefoot strike and 21.39% for rearfoot strike. The maximum rate of stress increase among the five metatarsals is observed on the 1st metatarsal in both landing modes. The results indicate that high stress level during forefoot landing phase may increase potential of metatarsal injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Finite element study to quantify the relationship between masticatory stress and prognathism

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kok, S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available displacements and/or stresses, conclusions are drawn regarding which geometry is better suited to perform a particular function. In this project, we demonstrated the ability of the FEM to predict patient-specific stress distributions due to a variation in facial...

  7. A hybrid finite element analysis and evolutionary computation method for the design of lightweight lattice components with optimized strut diameter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salonitis, Konstantinos; Chantzis, Dimitrios; Kappatos, Vasileios

    2017-01-01

    approaches or with the use of topology optimization methodologies. An optimization approach utilizing multipurpose optimization algorithms has not been proposed yet. This paper presents a novel user-friendly method for the design optimization of lattice components towards weight minimization, which combines...... finite element analysis and evolutionary computation. The proposed method utilizes the cell homogenization technique in order to reduce the computational cost of the finite element analysis and a genetic algorithm in order to search for the most lightweight lattice configuration. A bracket consisting...

  8. Finite element analysis of the stress distributions in peri-implant bone in modified and standard-threaded dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Dundar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the stress distributions with three different loads in two different geometric and threaded types of dental implants by finite element analysis. For this purpose, two different implant models, Nobel Replace and Nobel Active (Nobel Biocare, Zurich, Switzerland, which are currently used in clinical cases, were constructed by using ANSYS Workbench 12.1. The stress distributions on components of the implant system under three different static loadings were analysed for the two models. The maximum stress values that occurred in all components were observed in FIII (300 N. The maximum stress values occurred in FIII (300 N when the Nobel Replace implant is used, whereas the lowest ones, in the case of FI (150 N loading in the Nobel Active implant. In all models, the maximum tensions were observed to be in the neck region of the implants. Increasing the connection between the implant and the bone surface may allow more uniform distribution of the forces of the dental implant and may protect the bone around the implant. Thus, the implant could remain in the mouth for longer periods. Variable-thread tapered implants can increase the implant and bone contact.

  9. A Structural Finite Element Model for Lamellar Unit of Aortic Media Indicates Heterogeneous Stress Field After Collagen Recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunes, James R.; Pal, Siladitya; Fortunato, Ronald N.; Phillippi, Julie A.; Gleason, Thomas G.; Vorp, David A.; Maiti, Spandan

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of collagen structural information into the study of biomechanical behavior of ascending thoracic aortic (ATA) wall tissue should provide better insight into the pathophysiology of ATA. Structurally motivated constitutive models that include fiber dispersion and recruitment can successfully capture overall mechanical response of the arterial wall tissue. However, these models cannot examine local microarchitectural features of the collagen network, such as the effect of fiber disruptions and interaction between fibrous and non-fibrous components, which may influence emergent biomechanical properties of the tissue. Motivated by this need, we developed a finite element based three-dimensional structural model of the lamellar units of the ATA media that directly incorporates the collagen fiber microarchitecture. The fiber architecture was computer generated utilizing network features, namely fiber orientation distribution, intersection density and areal concentration, obtained from image analysis of multiphoton microscopy images taken from human aneurysmal ascending thoracic aortic media specimens with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) phenotype. Our model reproduces the typical J-shaped constitutive response of the aortic wall tissue. We found that the stress state in the non-fibrous matrix was homogeneous until the collagen fibers were recruited, but became highly heterogeneous after that event. The degree of heterogeneity was dependent upon local network architecture with high stresses observed near disrupted fibers. The magnitude of non-fibrous matrix stress at higher stretch levels was negatively correlated with local fiber density. The localized stress concentrations, elucidated by this model, may be a factor in the degenerative changes in aneurysmal ATA tissue. PMID:27113538

  10. Weld residual stress according to the ways of heat input in the simulation of weld process using finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun Seog; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong

    2008-01-01

    This paper is to discuss distribution of welding residual stresses of a ferritic low alloy steel nozzle with dissimilar metal weld using Alloy 82/182. Two Dimensional (2D) thermo-mechanical finite element analyses are carried out to simulate multi-pass welding process on the basis of the detailed and fabrication data. On performing the welding analysis generally, the characteristics on the heat input and heat transfer of weld are affected on the weld residual stress analyses. Thermal analyses in the welding heat cycle process is very important process in weld residual stress analyses. Therefore, heat is rapidly input to the weld pass material, using internal volumetric heat generation, at a rate which raises the peak weld metal temperature to 2200 .deg. C and the base metal adjacent to the weld to about 1400 .deg. C. These are approximately the temperature that the weld metal and surrounding base materials reach during welding. Also, According to the various ways of applying the weld heat source, the predicted residual stress results are compared with measured axial, hoop and radial through-wall profiles in the heat affected zone of test component. Also, those results are compared with those of full 3-dimensional simulation

  11. Stress analysis of two methods of ceramic inlay preparation by finite element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Pishevar

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Cements with minimum shrinkage and as thin layer as possible should be used. Filling the undercut with glass ionomer cement decreases the stress. Other experimental and clinical studies must follow this research.

  12. Finite Element Analysis for Fatigue Damage Reduction in Metallic Riveted Bridges Using Pre-Stressed CFRP Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyas Ghafoori

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Many old riveted steel bridges remain operational and require retrofit to accommodate ever increasing demands. Complicating retrofit efforts, riveted steel bridges are often considered historical structures where structural modifications that affect the original construction are to be avoided. The presence of rivets along with preservation requirements often prevent the use of traditional retrofit methods, such as bonding of fiber reinforced composites, or the addition of supplementary steel elements. In this paper, an un-bonded post-tensioning retrofit method is numerically investigated using existing railway riveted bridge geometry in Switzerland. The finite element (FE model consists of a global dynamic model for the whole bridge and a more refined sub-model for a riveted joint. The FE model results include dynamic effects from axle loads and are compared with field measurements. Pre-stressed un-bonded carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP plates will be considered for the strengthening elements. Fatigue critical regions of the bridge are identified, and the effects of the un-bonded post-tensioning method with different pre-stress levels on fatigue susceptibility are explored. With an applied 40% CFRP pre-stress, fatigue damage reductions of more than 87% and 85% are achieved at the longitudinal-to-cross beam connections and cross-beam bottom flanges, respectively.

  13. Time dependent voiding mechanisms in polyamide 6 submitted to high stress triaxiality: experimental characterisation and finite element modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selles, Nathan; King, Andrew; Proudhon, Henry; Saintier, Nicolas; Laiarinandrasana, Lucien

    2017-08-01

    Double notched round bars made of semi-crystalline polymer polyamide 6 (PA6) were submitted to monotonic tensile and creep tests. The two notches had a root radius of 0.45 mm, which imposes a multiaxial stress state and a state of high triaxiality in the net (minimal) section of the specimens. Tests were carried out until the failure occurred from one of the notches. The other one, unbroken but deformed under steady strain rate or steady load, was inspected using the Synchrotron Radiation Computed Tomography (SRCT) technique. These 3D through thickness inspections allowed the study of microstructural evolution at the peak stress for the monotonic tensile test and at the beginning of the tertiary creep for the creep tests. Cavitation features were assessed with a micrometre resolution within the notched region. Spatial distributions of void volume fraction ( Vf) and void morphology were studied. Voiding mechanisms were similar under steady strain rates and steady loads. The maximum values of Vf were located between the axis of revolution of the specimens and the notch surface and voids were considered as flat cylinders with a circular basis perpendicular to the loading direction. A model, based on porous plasticity, was used to simulate the mechanical response of this PA6 material under high stress triaxiality. Both macroscopic behaviour (loading curves) and voiding micro-mechanisms (radial distributions of void volume fraction) were accurately predicted using finite element simulations.

  14. Finite element simulation of stress evolution in thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarz, P.

    2007-07-01

    Gas turbine materials exposed to extreme high temperature require protective coatings. To design reliable components, a better understanding of the coating failure mechanisms is required. Damage in Thermal Barrier Coating Systems (TBCs) is related to oxidation of the Bond Coat, sintering of the ceramic, thermal mismatch of the material constituents, complex shape of the BC/TGO/TBC interface, redistribution of stresses via creep and plastic deformation and crack resistance. In this work, experimental data of thermo-mechanical properties of CMSX-4, MCrAlY (Bond Coat) and APS-TBC (partially stabilized zirconia), were implemented into an FE-model in order to simulate the stress development at the metal/ceramic interface. The FE model reproduced the specimen geometry used in corresponding experiments. It comprises a periodic unit cell representing a slice of the cylindrical specimen, whereas the periodic length of the unit cell equals an idealized wavelength of the rough metal/ceramic interface. Experimental loading conditions in form of thermal cycling with a dwelltime at high temperature and consideration of continuous oxidation were simulated. By a stepwise consideration of various material properties and processes, a reference model was achieved which most realistically simulated the materials behavior. The influences of systematic parameter variations on the stress development and critical sites with respect to possible crack paths were shown. Additionally, crack initiation and propagation at the peak of asperity at BC/TGO interface was calculated. It can be concluded that a realistic modeling of stress development in TBCs requires at least reliable data of i) BC and TGO plasticity, ii) BC and TBC creep, iii) continuous oxidation including in particular lateral oxidation, and iv) critical energy release rate for interfaces (BC/TGO, TGO/TBC) and for each layer. The main results from the performed parametric studies of material property variations suggest that

  15. Three Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Distal Abutment Stresses of Removable Partial Dentures with Different Retainer Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simindokht Zarrati

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This finite element method study aimed to compare the amount of stress on an isolated mandibular second premolar in two conventional reciprocal parallel interface designs of removable partial dentures (RPDs and the same RPD abutment tooth (not isolated.Materials and Methods: A Kennedy Class 1, modification 1 RPD framework was simulated on a 3D model of mandible with three different designs: an isolated tooth with a mesial rest, an isolated tooth with mesial and distal rests and an abutment with a mesial rest (which was not isolated; 26 N occlusal forces were exerted bilaterally on the first molar sites. Stress on the abutment teeth was analyzed using Cosmos Works 2009 Software.Results: In all designs, the abutment tooth stress concentration was located in the buccal alveolar crest. In the first model, the von Mises stress distribution in the contact area of I-bar clasp and cervical portion of the tooth was 19 MPa and the maximum stress was 30 MPa. In the second model, the maximum von Mises stress distribution was 15 MPa in the cervical of the tooth. In the third model, the maximum von Mises stress was located in the cervical of the tooth and the distal proximal plate.Conclusion: We recommend using both mesial and distal rests on the distal abutment teeth of distal extension RPDs. The abutment of an extension base RPD, which is not isolated in presence of its neighboring more anterior tooth, may have a better biomechanical prognosis.      

  16. Finite Element Analysis of the Effect of Superstructure Materials and Loading Angle on Stress Distribution around the Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari K

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: A general process in implant design is to determine the reason of possible problems and to find the relevant solutions. The success of the implant depends on the control technique of implant biomechanical conditions. Objectives: The goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of both abutment and framework materials on the stress of the bone around the implant by using threedimensional finite element analysis. Materials and Methods: A three-dimensional model of a patient’s premaxillary bone was fabricated using Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT. Then, three types of abutment from gold, nickel-chromium and zirconia and also three types of crown frame from silver-palladium, nickel-chromium and zirconia were designed. Finally, a 178 N force at angles of zero, 30 and 45 degrees was exerted on the implant axis and the maximum stress and strain in the trabecular, cortical bones and cement was calculated. Results: With changes of the materials and mechanical properties of abutment and frame, little difference was observed in the level and distribution pattern of stress. The stress level was increased with the rise in the angle of pressure exertion. The highest stress concentration was related to the force at the angle of 45 degrees. The results of the cement analysis proved an inverse relationship between the rate of elastic modulus of the frame material and that of the maximum stress in the cement. Conclusions: The impact of the angle at which the force was applied was more significant in stress distribution than that of abutment and framework core materials.

  17. A finite element study on stress distribution of two different attachment designs under implant supported overdenture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed I. El-Anwar

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Locator and ball and socket attachments induce equivalent stresses on bone surrounding implants. Locator attachment performance was superior to that of the ball and socket attachment in the implants, nylon caps, and overdenture. Locator attachments are highly recommended and can increase the interval between successive maintenance sessions.

  18. Finite element analysis of residual stress in the welded zone of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The distribution of the residual stress in the weld joint of HQ130 grade high strength steel was in- vestigated by ... was adopted in this work to find out the instantaneous distribution of .... welding zone of high strength steel are related to the for-.

  19. Effect of crown-to-implant ratio on peri-implant stress: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Batista, Victor Eduardo de Souza; Santiago, Joel Ferreira; Almeida, Daniel Augusto de Faria; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate stress distribution in the fixation screws and bone tissue around implants in single-implant supported prostheses with crowns of different heights (10, 12.5, 15 mm - crown-to-implant ratio 1:1, 1.25:1, 1.5:1, respectively). It was designed using three 3-D models. Each model was developed with a mandibular segment of bone block including an internal hexagon implant supporting a screw-retained, single metal-ceramic crown. The crown height was set at 10, 12.5, and 15 mm with crown-to-implant ratio of 1:1, 1.25:1, 1.5:1, respectively. The applied forces were 200N (axial) and 100 N (oblique). The increase of crown height showed differences with the oblique load in some situations. By von Mises' criterion, a high stress area was concentrated at the implant/fixation screw and abutment/implant interfaces at crown-to-implant ratio of 1:1, 1.25:1, 1.5:1, respectively. Using the maximum principal criteria, the buccal regions showed higher traction stress intensity, whereas the distal regions showed the largest compressive stress in all models. The increase of C/I ratio must be carefully evaluated by the dentist since the increase of this C/I ratio is proportional to the increase of average stress for both screw fixation (C/I 1:1 to 1:1.25 ratio=30.1% and C/I 1:1 to 1:1.5 ratio=46.3%) and bone tissue (C/I 1:1 to 1:1.25 ratio=30% and C/I 1:1 to 1:1.5 ratio=51.5%). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Probabilistic fracture finite elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. K.; Belytschko, T.; Lua, Y. J.

    1991-05-01

    The Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics (PFM) is a promising method for estimating the fatigue life and inspection cycles for mechanical and structural components. The Probability Finite Element Method (PFEM), which is based on second moment analysis, has proved to be a promising, practical approach to handle problems with uncertainties. As the PFEM provides a powerful computational tool to determine first and second moment of random parameters, the second moment reliability method can be easily combined with PFEM to obtain measures of the reliability of the structural system. The method is also being applied to fatigue crack growth. Uncertainties in the material properties of advanced materials such as polycrystalline alloys, ceramics, and composites are commonly observed from experimental tests. This is mainly attributed to intrinsic microcracks, which are randomly distributed as a result of the applied load and the residual stress.

  1. Application of the method finite elements by numerical modeling stress-strain state in conveyor belts

    OpenAIRE

    Maras Michal; Hatala Jozef; Marasová Daniela

    1997-01-01

    Solving problems connected with damaging a conveyor belt at the transfer points is conditioned by knowing laws of this phenomenon. Acquiring the knowledge on this phenomen is possible to be gained either by experimental research or by the numerical model GEM 22, which enables to determine the distribution of stresses and strains in a suitably selected cross-section of a conveyor belt. The paper begins by defining the problem, determining the boundary model conditions and continues by modellin...

  2. A finite element analysis of the stress distribution to the mandible from impact forces with various orientations of third molars*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun-feng; Wang, Russell; Baur, Dale A.; Jiang, Xian-feng

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the stress distribution to the mandible, with and without impacted third molars (IM3s) at various orientations, resulting from a 2000-Newton impact force either from the anterior midline or from the body of the mandible. Materials and methods: A 3D mandibular virtual model from a healthy dentate patient was created and the mechanical properties of the mandible were categorized to 9 levels based on the Hounsfield unit measured from computed tomography (CT) images. Von Mises stress distributions to the mandibular angle and condylar areas from static impact forces (Load I-front blow and Load II left blow) were evaluated using finite element analysis (FEA). Six groups with IM3 were included: full horizontal bony, full vertical bony, full 450 mesioangular bony, partial horizontal bony, partial vertical, and partial 450 mesioangular bony impaction, and a baseline group with no third molars. Results: Von Mises stresses in the condyle and angle areas were higher for partially than for fully impacted third molars under both loading conditions, with partial horizontal IM3 showing the highest fracture risk. Stresses were higher on the contralateral than on the ipsilateral side. Under Load II, the angle area had the highest stress for various orientations of IM3s. The condylar region had the highest stress when IM3s were absent. Conclusions: High-impact forces are more likely to cause condylar rather than angular fracture when IM3s are missing. The risk of mandibular fracture is higher for partially than fully impacted third molars, with the angulation of impaction having little effect on facture risk. PMID:29308606

  3. Analysis of stress-strain relationship in materials containing voids by means of plastic finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Haruki; Tabuchi, Masaaki

    2000-01-01

    Applying the finite element method in two dimensions, an analysis is performed to derive the stress-strain relationship of material containing voids in matrix, and which is subjected to large deformation. The conditions assumed for the analysis are applicability of continuum body mechanics, Mises yield criterion, J2 flow theory, power work-hardening, plane stress in two-dimensional system and uniform cyclically recurring void distribution. Taking as example a case of material presenting 0.3 work-hardening, it is indicated from the analysis that: With voids arrayed in square lattice, total elongation would be little affected by change in void size; With a void spacing in lattice of 10 μ m, a uniform elongation 12-14% should be obtained in a wide range of void sizes from 0.01 to 8.0 μm; Tensile strength should start to lower at a void areal fraction of around 1%; A sharply lowered uniform elongation of a level far below 1% should be presented by material of low work-hardening exponent. The severe decline of ductility seen with 316 stainless steel upon neutron irradiation at temperatures around 600 K is interpreted as resulting from a combination of low work-hardening and the presence of voids in matrix. (author)

  4. The influence of pulse duration on the stress levels in ablation of ceramics: A finite element study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verde, A. Vila; Ramos, Marta M.D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a finite element model to investigate the dynamic thermal and mechanical response of ceramic materials to pulsed infrared radiation. The model was applied to the specific problem of determining the influence of the pulse duration on the stress levels reached in human dental enamel irradiated by a CO 2 laser at 10.6 μm with pulse durations between 0.1 and 100 μs and sub-ablative fluence. Our results indicate that short pulses with durations much larger than the characteristic acoustic relaxation time of the material can still cause high stress transients at the irradiated site, and indicate that pulse durations of the order of 10 μs may be more adequate both for enamel surface modification and for ablation than pulse durations up to 1 μs. The model presented here can easily be modified to investigate the dynamic response of ceramic materials to mid-infrared radiation and help determine optimal pulse durations for specific procedures

  5. Failure phenomena in fibre-reinforced composites. Part 6: a finite element study of stress concentrations in unidirectional carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, P.W.J.; Goutianos, S.; Young, R.J.; Peijs, A.A.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) finite element (FE) analysis of the stress situation around a fibre break in a unidirectional carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy composite has been performed. Two cases were considered: (i) good fibre/matrix adhesion and (ii) fibre/matrix debonding. In the case of good adhesion,

  6. Improving Hybrid III injury assessment in steering wheel rim to chest impacts using responses from finite element Hybrid III and human body model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmqvist, Kristian; Davidsson, Johan; Mendoza-Vazquez, Manuel; Rundberget, Peter; Svensson, Mats Y; Thorn, Stefan; Törnvall, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to improve the quality of injury risk assessments in steering wheel rim to chest impacts when using the Hybrid III crash test dummy in frontal heavy goods vehicle (HGV) collision tests. Correction factors for chest injury criteria were calculated as the model chest injury parameter ratios between finite element (FE) Hybrid III, evaluated in relevant load cases, and the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS). This is proposed to be used to compensate Hybrid III measurements in crash tests where steering wheel rim to chest impacts occur. The study was conducted in an FE environment using an FE-Hybrid III model and the THUMS. Two impactor shapes were used, a circular hub and a long, thin horizontal bar. Chest impacts at velocities ranging from 3.0 to 6.0 m/s were simulated at 3 impact height levels. A ratio between FE-Hybrid III and THUMS chest injury parameters, maximum chest compression C max, and maximum viscous criterion VC max, were calculated for the different chest impact conditions to form a set of correction factors. The definition of the correction factor is based on the assumption that the response from a circular hub impact to the middle of the chest is well characterized and that injury risk measures are independent of impact height. The current limits for these chest injury criteria were used as a basis to develop correction factors that compensate for the limitations in biofidelity of the Hybrid III in steering wheel rim to chest impacts. The hub and bar impactors produced considerably higher C max and VC max responses in the THUMS compared to the FE-Hybrid III. The correction factor for the responses of the FE-Hybrid III showed that the criteria responses for the bar impactor were consistently overestimated. Ratios based on Hybrid III and THUMS responses provided correction factors for the Hybrid III responses ranging from 0.84 to 0.93. These factors can be used to estimate C max and VC max values when the Hybrid III is

  7. Finite element based stress analysis of BWR internals exposed to accident loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altstadt, E; Weiss, F P; Werner, M; Willschuetz, H G

    1998-10-01

    During a hypothetical accident the reactor pressure vessel internals of boiling water reactors can be exposed to considerable loads resulting from temperature gradients and pressure waves. Three dimensional FE models were developed for the core shroud, the upper and the lower core supporting structure, the steam separator pipes and the feed water distributor. The models of core shroud, upper core structure and lower core structure were coupled by means of the substructure technique. All FE models can be used for thermal and for structural mechanical analyses. As an example the FE analysis for the case of a station black-out scenario (loss of power supply for the main circulating pumps) with subsequent emergency core cooling is demonstrated. The transient temperature distributions within the core shroud and within the steam dryer pipes as well were calculated based on the fluid temperatures and the heat transfer coefficients provided by thermo-hydraulic codes. At the maximum temperature gradients in the core shroud, the mechanical stress distribution was computed in a static analysis with the actual temperature field being the load. (orig.)

  8. Finite element analysis of the equivalent stress distribution in Schanz screws during the use of a femoral fracture distractor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Giordano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT To evaluate the mechanical stress and elastic deformation exercised in the thread/shaft transition of Schanz screws in assemblies with different screw anchorage distances in the entrance to the bone cortex, through the distribution and location of tension in the samples. An analysis of 3D finite elements was performed to evaluate the distribution of the equivalent stress (triple stress state in a Schanz screw fixed bicortically and orthogonally to a tubular bone, using two mounting patterns: (1 thread/shaft transition located 20 mm from the anchorage of the Schanz screws in the entrance to the bone cortex and (2 thread/shaft transition located 3 mm from the anchorage of the Schanz screws in entrance to the bone cortex. The simulations were performed maintaining the same direction of loading and the same distance from the force vector in relation to the center of the hypothetical bone. The load applied, its direction, and the distance to the center of the bone were constant during the simulations in order to maintain the moment of flexion equally constant. The present calculations demonstrated linear behavior during the experiment. It was found that the model with a distance of 20 mm between the Schanz screws anchorage in the entrance to the bone cortex and the thread/shaft transition reduces the risk of breakage or fatigue of the material during the application of constant static loads; in this model, the maximum forces observed were higher (350 MPa. The distance between the Schanz screws anchorage at the entrance to the bone cortex and the smooth thread/shaft transition of the screws used in a femoral distractor during acute distraction of a fracture must be farther from the entrance to the bone cortex, allowing greater degree of elastic deformation of the material, lower mechanical stress in the thread/shaft transition, and minimized breakage or fatigue. The suggested distance is 20 mm.

  9. Stress Analysis of a TRISO Coated Particle Fuel by Using ABAQUS Finite Element Visco-Elastoplastic Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Moon Sung; Kim, Y. M.; Lee, Y. W.

    2006-01-01

    The fundamental design for a gas-cooled reactor relies on an understanding of the behavior of a coated particle fuel. KAERI, which has been carrying out the Korean VHTR (Very High Temperature modular gas cooled Reactor) Project since 2004, is developing a fuel performance analysis code for a VHTR named COPA (COated Particle fuel Analysis). A validation of COPA was attempted by comparing its benchmark results with the visco-elastic solutions obtained from the ABAQUS code calculations for the IAEA-CRP-6 TRISO coated particle benchmark problems involving a creep, swelling, and pressure. However, the ABAQUS finite element model used for the above-mentioned analysis did not consider the material nonlinearity of the SiC coating layer that showed stress levels higher than the assumed yield point of the material. In this study, a consideration of the material nonlinearity is included in the ABAQUS model to obtain the visco-elastoplastic solutions and the results are compared with the visco-elastic solutions obtained from the previous ABAQUS model

  10. A set of pathological tests to validate new finite elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The finite element method entails several approximations. Hence it ... researchers have designed several pathological tests to validate any new finite element. The .... Three dimensional thick shell elements using a hybrid/mixed formu- lation.

  11. A three-dimensional finite element study on the stress distribution pattern of two prosthetic abutments for external hexagon implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Wagner; Hermann, Caio; Pereira, Jucélio Tomás; Balbinoti, Jean Anacleto; Tiossi, Rodrigo

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical behavior of two different straight prosthetic abutments (one- and two-piece) for external hex butt-joint connection implants using three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA). Two 3D-FEA models were designed, one for the two-piece prosthetic abutment (2 mm in height, two-piece mini-conical abutment, Neodent) and another one for the one-piece abutment (2 mm in height, Slim Fit one-piece mini-conical abutment, Neodent), with their corresponding screws and implants (Titamax Ti, 3.75 diameter by 13 mm in length, Neodent). The model simulated the single restoration of a lower premolar using data from a computerized tomography of a mandible. The preload (20 N) after torque application for installation of the abutment and an occlusal loading were simulated. The occlusal load was simulated using average physiological bite force and direction (114.6 N in the axial direction, 17.1 N in the lingual direction and 23.4 N toward the mesial at an angle of 75° to the occlusal plan). The regions with the highest von Mises stress results were at the bottom of the initial two threads of both prosthetic abutments that were tested. The one-piece prosthetic abutment presented a more homogeneous behavior of stress distribution when compared with the two-piece abutment. Under the simulated chewing loads, the von Mises stresses for both tested prosthetic-abutments were within the tensile strength values of the materials analyzed which thus supports the clinical use of both prosthetic abutments.

  12. Stress and displacement patterns in the craniofacial skeleton with rapid maxillary expansion—a finite element method study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Priyadarshini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid maxillary expansion (RME, indicated in the treatment of maxillary deficiency directs high forces to maxillary basal bone and to other adjacent skeletal bones. The aim of this study is to (i evaluate stress distribution along craniofacial sutures and (ii study the displacement of various craniofacial structures with rapid maxillary expansion therapy by using a Finite Element model. Methods An analytical model was developed from a dried human skull of a 12 year old male. CT scan images of the skull were taken in axial direction parallel to the F-H plane at 1 mm interval, processed using Mimics software, required portion of the skull was exported into stereo-lithography model. ANSYS software was used to solve the mathematical equation. Contour plots of the displacement and stresses were obtained from the results of the analysis performed. Results At Node 47005, maximum X-displacement was 5.073 mm corresponding to the incisal edge of the upper central incisor. At Node 3971, maximum negative Y-displacement was -0.86 mm which corresponds to the anterior zygomatic arch, indicating posterior movement of craniofacial complex. At Node 32324, maximum negative Z-displacement was -0.92 mm representing the anterior and deepest convex portion of the nasal septum; indicating downward displacement of structures medial to the area of force application. Conclusions Pyramidal displacement of maxilla was evident. Apex of pyramid faced the nasal bone and base was located on the oral side. Posterosuperior part of nasal cavity moved minimally in lateral direction and width of nasal cavity at the floor of the nose increased, there was downward and forward movement of maxilla with a tendency toward posterior rotation. Maximum von Mises stresses were found along midpalatal, pterygomaxillary, nasomaxillary and frontomaxillary sutures.

  13. Relationship between screw sagittal angle and stress on endplate of adjacent segments after anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion with internal fixation: a Chinese finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Tang, Yibo; Shen, Hongxing

    2017-12-01

    In order to reduce the incidence of adjacent segment disease (ASD), the current study was designed to establish Chinese finite element models of normal 3rd~7th cervical vertebrae (C3-C7) and anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) with internal fixation , and analyze the influence of screw sagittal angle (SSA) on stress on endplate of adjacent cervical segments. Mimics 8.1 and Abaqus/CAE 6.10 softwares were adopted to establish finite element models. For C4 superior endplate and C6 inferior endplate, their anterior areas had the maximum stress in anteflexion position, and their posterior areas had the maximum stress in posterior extension position. As SSA increased, the stress reduced. With an increase of 10° in SSA, the stress on anterior areas of C4 superior endplate and C6 inferior endplate reduced by 12.67% and 7.99% in anteflexion position, respectively. With an increase of 10° in SSA, the stress on posterior areas of C4 superior endplate and C6 inferior endplate reduced by 9.68% and 10.22% in posterior extension position, respectively. The current study established Chinese finite element models of normal C3-C7 and ACCF with internal fixation , and demonstrated that as SSA increased, the stress on endplate of adjacent cervical segments decreased. In clinical surgery, increased SSA is able to play important role in protecting the adjacent cervical segments and reducing the incidence of ASD.

  14. Stress distribution in delayed replanted teeth splinted with different orthodontic wires: a three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Fernando Isquierdo; Poi, Wilson Roberto; da Silva, Vanessa Ferreira; Martini, Ana Paula; Melo, Regis Alexandre da Cunha; Panzarini, Sonia Regina; Rocha, Eduardo Passos

    2015-06-01

    The aim was to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of the supporting bony structures of replanted teeth and the periodontal ligament (PDL) of adjacent teeth when orthodontic wires with different mechanical properties are applied, with three-dimensional finite element analysis. Based on tomographic and microtomographic data, a three-dimensional model of the anterior maxilla with the corresponding teeth (tooth 13-tooth 23) was generated to simulate avulsion and replantation of the tooth 21. The teeth were splinted with orthodontic wire (Ø 0.8 mm) and composite resin. The elastic modulus of the three orthodontic wires used, that is, steel wire (FA), titanium-molybdenum wire (FTM), and nitinol wire (FN) were 200 GPa, 84 GPa, and 52 GPa, respectively. An oblique load (100 N) was applied at an angle of 45° on the incisal edge of the replanted tooth and was analyzed using Ansys Workbench software. The maximum (σmax) and minimum (σmin) principal stresses generated in the PDL, cortical and alveolar bones, and the modified von Mises (σvM) values for the orthodontic wires were obtained. With regard to the cortical bone and PDL, the highest σmin and σmax values for FTM, FN, and FA were checked. With regard to the alveolar bone, σmax and σmin values were highest for FA, followed by FTM and FN. The σvM values of the orthodontic wires followed the order of rigidity of the alloys, that is, FA > FTM > FN. The biomechanical behavior of the analyzed structures with regard to all the three patterns of flexibility was similar. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Stress distribution of the foot during mid-stance to push-off in barefoot gait: a 3-D finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W P; Tang, F T; Ju, C W

    2001-08-01

    To quantify stress distribution of the foot during mid-stance to push-off in barefoot gait using 3-D finite element analysis. To simulate the foot structure and facilitate later consideration of footwear. Finite element model was generated and loading condition simulating barefoot gait during mid-stance to push-off was used to quantify the stress distributions. A computational model can provide overall stress distributions of the foot subject to various loading conditions. A preliminary 3-D finite element foot model was generated based on the computed tomography data of a male subject and the bone and soft tissue structures were modeled. Analysis was performed for loading condition simulating barefoot gait during mid-stance to push-off. The peak plantar pressure ranged from 374 to 1003 kPa and the peak von Mises stress in the bone ranged from 2.12 to 6.91 MPa at different instants. The plantar pressure patterns were similar to measurement result from previous literature. The present study provides a preliminary computational model that is capable of estimating the overall plantar pressure and bone stress distributions. It can also provide quantitative analysis for normal and pathological foot motion. This model can identify areas of increased pressure and correlate the pressure with foot pathology. Potential applications can be found in the study of foot deformities, footwear, surgical interventions. It may assist pre-treatment planning, design of pedorthotic appliances, and predict the treatment effect of foot orthosis.

  16. Sensitivity analyses of finite element method for estimating residual stress of dissimilar metal multi-pass weldment in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Unviersity, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    In nuclear power plants, ferritic low alloy steel components were connected with austenitic stainless steel piping system through alloy 82/182 butt weld. There have been incidents recently where cracking has been observed in the dissimilar metal weld. Alloy 82/182 is susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking. Weld-induced residual stress is main factor for crack growth. Therefore exact estimation of residual stress is important for reliable operating. This paper presents residual stress computation performed by 6'' safety and relief nozzle. Based on 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional finite element analyses, effect of welding variables on residual stress variation is estimated for sensitivity analysis.

  17. Finite element analysis of stresses in Berkovich, Vickers and Knoop indentation for densifying and non-densifying glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kanghua

    2002-08-01

    A constitutive law for fused silica accounting for its permanent densification under large compressive stresses is presented. The implementation of the constitutive equations in the general-purpose finite element code ABAQUS via user subroutine is proposed and carefully verified. The three-dimensional indentation mechanics under Berkovich, Vickers and Knoop indenters is extensively investigated based on the proposed constitutive relation. The results of stress distribution and plastic zone for both densifying and non-densifying optical glasses are systematically compared. These numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental observations of optical manufacturing. That is, fused silica shows lower material removal rate, smaller surface roughness and subsurface damage in contrast to non-densifying optical glasses under the same grinding condition. Material densification of fused silica is thoroughly studied through numerical simulations of indentation mechanics. The exact amount of densification and shear strain of fused silica under Berkovich indentation is calculated to show the deformation mechanism of glass materials under three-dimensional indentations. The surface profiles show the material "pile-up" around the indenter tip for non-densifying glasses and "sink-in" for fused silica after the indentation load is removed. An important inverse problem is studied: estimation of abrasive size and indentation load through the examination of residual indentation footprints. A series of 2D axisymmetric spherical indentation simulations generate a wide range of relationships among the indentation load, indenter size, residual indentation depth and size of residual indentation zone for the five selected brittle materials: glass fused silica (FS), BK7, semiconductor Si, laser glass LHG8, and optical crystal CaF2.. The application of the inverse problem is verified by the good agreement between the estimated abrasive size and the actual abrasive size found

  18. Hybrid Direct and Iterative Solver with Library of Multi-criteria Optimal Orderings for h Adaptive Finite Element Method Computations

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.

    2016-06-02

    In this paper we present a multi-criteria optimization of element partition trees and resulting orderings for multi-frontal solver algorithms executed for two dimensional h adaptive finite element method. In particular, the problem of optimal ordering of elimination of rows in the sparse matrices resulting from adaptive finite element method computations is reduced to the problem of finding of optimal element partition trees. Given a two dimensional h refined mesh, we find all optimal element partition trees by using the dynamic programming approach. An element partition tree defines a prescribed order of elimination of degrees of freedom over the mesh. We utilize three different metrics to estimate the quality of the element partition tree. As the first criterion we consider the number of floating point operations(FLOPs) performed by the multi-frontal solver. As the second criterion we consider the number of memory transfers (MEMOPS) performed by the multi-frontal solver algorithm. As the third criterion we consider memory usage (NONZEROS) of the multi-frontal direct solver. We show the optimization results for FLOPs vs MEMOPS as well as for the execution time estimated as FLOPs+100MEMOPS vs NONZEROS. We obtain Pareto fronts with multiple optimal trees, for each mesh, and for each refinement level. We generate a library of optimal elimination trees for small grids with local singularities. We also propose an algorithm that for a given large mesh with identified local sub-grids, each one with local singularity. We compute Schur complements over the sub-grids using the optimal trees from the library, and we submit the sequence of Schur complements into the iterative solver ILUPCG.

  19. Finite element analysis of the influence of elastic anisotropy on stress intensification at stress corrosion cracking initiation sites in fcc alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meric de Bellefon, G.; van Duysen, J. C.

    2018-05-01

    A recent finite-element method (FEM)-based study from the present authors quantified the effect of elastic anisotropy of grains on stress intensification at potential intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) initiation sites in austenitic stainless steels. In particular, it showed that the auxetic behavior of grains (negative Poisson's ratio) in some directions plays a very important role in IGSCC initiation, since it can induce local stress intensification factors of about 1.6. A similar effect is expected for other fcc alloys such as Ni-based alloys. The present article confirms those results and paves the way to the definition of an IGSCC susceptibility index by identifying grain configurations that are the most favorable for crack initiation. The index will rely on the probability to get those configurations on surface of specimens.

  20. 3D finite element analysis of stress distributions and strain energy release rates for adhesive bonded flat composite lap shear joints having pre-existing delaminations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parida, S. K.; Pradhan, A. K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar (India)

    2014-02-15

    The rate of propagation of embedded delamination in the strap adherend of lap shear joint (LSJ) made of carbon/epoxy composites has been evaluated employing three-dimensional non-linear finite elements. The delamination has been presumed to pre-exist in the thin resin layer between the first and second plies of the strap adherend. The inter-laminar peel and shear stress distributions have been studied in details and are seen to be predominantly three-dimensional in nature. The components of strain energy release rate (SERR) corresponding to the opening, sliding and cross sliding modes of delamination are significantly different at the two fronts of the embedded delamination. The sequential release of multi-point constraint (MPC) finite elements in the vicinity of the delamination fronts enables to simulate the growth of the delamination at either ends. This simulation procedure can be utilized effectively for evaluation of the status of the structural integrity of the bonded joints.

  1. Stress Characterization of 4H-SiC Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor (MOSFET) using Raman Spectroscopy and the Finite Element Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Kosaka, Kenichi; Seki, Hirohumi; Kimoto, Tsunenobu

    2016-07-01

    We measured the depolarized and polarized Raman spectra of a 4H-SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) and found that compressive stress of approximately 20 MPa occurs under the source and gate electrodes and tensile stress of approximately 10 MPa occurs between the source and gate electrodes. The experimental result was in close agreement with the result obtained by calculation using the finite element method (FEM). A combination of Raman spectroscopy and FEM provides much data on the stresses in 4H-SiC MOSFET. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Generalized finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachspress, E.

    2009-01-01

    Triangles and rectangles are the ubiquitous elements in finite element studies. Only these elements admit polynomial basis functions. Rational functions provide a basis for elements having any number of straight and curved sides. Numerical complexities initially associated with rational bases precluded extensive use. Recent analysis has reduced these difficulties and programs have been written to illustrate effectiveness. Although incorporation in major finite element software requires considerable effort, there are advantages in some applications which warrant implementation. An outline of the basic theory and of recent innovations is presented here. (authors)

  3. Finite elements and approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zienkiewicz, O C

    2006-01-01

    A powerful tool for the approximate solution of differential equations, the finite element is extensively used in industry and research. This book offers students of engineering and physics a comprehensive view of the principles involved, with numerous illustrative examples and exercises.Starting with continuum boundary value problems and the need for numerical discretization, the text examines finite difference methods, weighted residual methods in the context of continuous trial functions, and piecewise defined trial functions and the finite element method. Additional topics include higher o

  4. Finite element modelling of the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 with a controlled metal-oxide interface and the influence of growth stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumpicchiat, Guillaume; Pascal, Serge; Tupin, Marc; Berdin-Méric, Clotilde

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: We developed two finite element models of zirconium-based alloy oxidation using the CEA Cast3M code to simulate the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4: the diffuse interface model and the sharp interface model. We also studied the effect of stresses on the oxidation kinetics. The main results are: • Both models lead to parabolic oxidation kinetics in agreement with the Wagner’s theory. • The modellings enable to calculate the stress distribution in the oxide as well as in the metal. • A strong effect of the hydrostatic stress on the oxidation kinetics has been evidenced. • The stress gradient effect changes the parabolic kinetics into a sub-parabolic law closer to the experimental kinetics because of the stress gradient itself, but also because of the growth stress increase with the oxide thickness. - Abstract: Experimentally, zirconium-based alloys oxidation kinetics is sub-parabolic, by contrast with the Wagner theory which predicts a parabolic kinetics. Two finite element models have been developed to simulate this phenomenon: the diffuse interface model and the sharp interface model. Both simulate parabolic oxidation kinetics. The growth stress effects on oxygen diffusion are studied to try to explain the gap between theory and experience. Taking into account the influence of the hydrostatic stress and its gradient into the oxygen flux expression, sub-parabolic oxidation kinetics have been simulated. The sub-parabolic behaviour of the oxidation kinetics can be explained by a non-uniform compressive stress level into the oxide layer.

  5. Differences in the stress distribution in the distal femur between patellofemoral joint replacement and total knee replacement: a finite element study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Jonbergen Hans-Peter W

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patellofemoral joint replacement is a successful treatment option for isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. However, results of later conversion to total knee replacement may be compromised by periprosthetic bone loss. Previous clinical studies have demonstrated a decrease in distal femoral bone mineral density after patellofemoral joint replacement. It is unclear whether this is due to periprosthetic stress shielding. The main objective of the current study was to evaluate the stress shielding effect of prosthetic replacement with 2 different patellofemoral prosthetic designs and with a total knee prosthesis. Methods We developed a finite element model of an intact patellofemoral joint, and finite element models of patellofemoral joint replacement with a Journey PFJ prosthesis, a Richards II prosthesis, and a Genesis II total knee prosthesis. For each of these 4 finite element models, the average Von Mises stress in 2 clinically relevant regions of interest were evaluated during a simulated squatting movement until 120 degrees of flexion. Results During deep knee flexion, in the anterior region of interest, the average Von Mises stress with the Journey PFJ design was comparable to the physiological knee, while reduced by almost 25% for both the Richards II design and the Genesis II total knee joint replacement design. The average Von Mises stress in the supracondylar region of interest was similar for both patellofemoral prosthetic designs and the physiological model, with slightly lower stress for the Genesis II design. Conclusions Patellofemoral joint replacement results in periprosthetic stress-shielding, although to a smaller degree than in total knee replacement. Specific patellofemoral prosthetic design properties may result in differences in femoral stress shielding.

  6. Differences in the stress distribution in the distal femur between patellofemoral joint replacement and total knee replacement: a finite element study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral joint replacement is a successful treatment option for isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. However, results of later conversion to total knee replacement may be compromised by periprosthetic bone loss. Previous clinical studies have demonstrated a decrease in distal femoral bone mineral density after patellofemoral joint replacement. It is unclear whether this is due to periprosthetic stress shielding. The main objective of the current study was to evaluate the stress shielding effect of prosthetic replacement with 2 different patellofemoral prosthetic designs and with a total knee prosthesis. Methods We developed a finite element model of an intact patellofemoral joint, and finite element models of patellofemoral joint replacement with a Journey PFJ prosthesis, a Richards II prosthesis, and a Genesis II total knee prosthesis. For each of these 4 finite element models, the average Von Mises stress in 2 clinically relevant regions of interest were evaluated during a simulated squatting movement until 120 degrees of flexion. Results During deep knee flexion, in the anterior region of interest, the average Von Mises stress with the Journey PFJ design was comparable to the physiological knee, while reduced by almost 25% for both the Richards II design and the Genesis II total knee joint replacement design. The average Von Mises stress in the supracondylar region of interest was similar for both patellofemoral prosthetic designs and the physiological model, with slightly lower stress for the Genesis II design. Conclusions Patellofemoral joint replacement results in periprosthetic stress-shielding, although to a smaller degree than in total knee replacement. Specific patellofemoral prosthetic design properties may result in differences in femoral stress shielding. PMID:22704638

  7. Inside finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Weiser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    All relevant implementation aspects of finite element methods are discussed in this book. The focus is on algorithms and data structures as well as on their concrete implementation. Theory is covered as far as it gives insight into the construction of algorithms. Throughout the exercises a complete FE-solver for scalar 2D problems will be implemented in Matlab/Octave.

  8. A three-dimensional finite element study on the effect of hydroxyapatite coating thickness on the stress distribution of the surrounding dental implant-bone interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Asgharzadeh Shirazi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Hydroxyapatite coating has allocated a special place in dentistry due to its biocompatibility and bioactivity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relation between the hydroxyapatite thickness and stress distribution by using finite element method.   Materials and Methods: In this paper, the effect of hydroxyapatite coating thickness on dental implants was studied using finite element method in the range between 0 to 200 microns. A 3D model including one section of mandible bone was modeled by a thick layer of cortical surrounding dense cancellous and a Nobel Biocare commercial brand dental implant was simulated and analyzed under static load in the Abaqus software.   Results The diagram of maximum von Mises stress versus coating thickness was plotted for the cancellous and cortical bones in the range between 0 to 200 microns. The obtained results showed that the magnitude of maximum von Mises stress of bone decreased as the hydroxyapatite coating thickness increased. Also, the thickness of coating exhibited smoother stress distribution and milder variations of maximum von Mises stress in a range between 60 to 120 microns.   Conclusion: In present study, the stress was decreased in the mandible bone where hydroxyapatite coating was used. This stress reduction leads to a faster stabilization and fixation of implant in the mandible bone. Using hydroxyapatite coating as a biocompatible and bioactive material could play an important role in bone formation of implant- bone interface.

  9. Three dimensional stress analysis of nozzle-to-shell intersections by the finite element method and a auto-mesh generation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujihara, Hirohiko; Ueda, Masahiro

    1975-01-01

    In the design of chemical reactors or nuclear pressure vessels it is often important to evaluate the stress distribution in nozzle-to-shell intersections. The finite element method is a powerful tool for stress analysis, but it has a defects to require troublesome work in preparing input data. Specially, the mesh data of oblique nozzles and tangential nozzles, in which stress concentration is very high, are very difficult to be prepared. The authors made a mesh generation program which can be used to any nozzle-to-shell intersections, and combining this program with a three dimensional stress analysis program by the finite element method they made the stress analysis of nozzle-to-shell intersections under internal pressure. Consequently, stresses, strains and deformations of nozzles nonsymmetrical to spherical shells and nozzles tangential to cylindrical shells were made clear and it was shown that the curvature of the inner surface of the nozzle corner was a controlling factor in reducing stress concentration. (auth.)

  10. Hybrid finite difference/finite element solution method development for non-linear superconducting magnet and electrical circuit breakdown transient analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, H.G.; Jones, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of non-linear superconducting magnet and electrical protection circuit system transients is formulated. To enable studying the effects of coil normalization transients, coil distortion (due to imbalanced magnetic forces), internal coil arcs and shorts, and other normal and off-normal circuit element responses, the following capabilities are included: temporal, voltage and current-dependent voltage sources, current sources, resistors, capacitors and inductors. The concept of self-mutual inductance, and the form of the associated inductance matrix, is discussed for internally shorted coils. This is a Kirchhoff's voltage loop law and Kirchhoff's current node law formulation. The non-linear integrodifferential equation set is solved via a unique hybrid finite difference/integral finite element technique. (author)

  11. Stress distribution in the temporo-mandibular joint discs during jaw closing: a high-resolution three-dimensional finite-element model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoldelli, Charles; Bouchard, Pierre-Olivier; Loudad, Raounak; Baque, Patrick; Tillier, Yannick

    2012-07-01

    This study aims at analysing the stresses distribution in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using a complete high-resolution finite element model (FE Model). This model is used here to analyse the stresses distribution in the discs during a closing jaw cycle. In the end, this model enables the prediction of the stress evolution in the TMJ disc submitted to various loadings induced by mandibular trauma, surgery or parafunction. The geometric data for the model were obtained from MRI and CT scans images of a healthy male patient. Surface and volume meshes were successively obtained using a 3D image segmentation software (AMIRA(®)). Bone components of skull and mandible, both of joint discs, temporomandibular capsules and ligaments and dental arches were meshed as separate bodies. The volume meshes were transferred to the FE analysis software (FORGE(®)). Material properties were assigned for each region. Boundary conditions for closing jaw simulations were represented by different load directions of jaws muscles. The von Mises stresses distribution in both joint discs during closing conditions was analyzed. The pattern of von Mises stresses in the TMJ discs is non-symmetric and changed continuously during jaw movement. Maximal stress is reached on the surface disc in areas in contact with others bodies. The three-dimension finite element model of masticatory system will make it possible to simulate different conditions that appear to be important in the cascade of events leading to joint damage.

  12. Evaluation of stress patterns on maxillary posterior segment when intruded with mini implant anchorage: A three-dimensional finite element study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhita Pekhale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study is to evaluate stress and displacement effects of maxillary posterior intrusion mechanics with mini-implant anchorage by using finite element method. Materials and Methods: A computer stimulation of three-dimensional model maxilla with all teeth, PDL, bone, mini-implants, brackets, arch wire, force element, and transpalatal arch was constructed on the basis of average anatomic morphology. Finite element analysis was done to evaluate the amount of stress and its distribution during orthodontic intrusive force. Results: Increased Von Mises stress values were observed in mesio-cervical region of first molar. The middle third of second premolar and second molar and regions adjacent to force application sites also showed relatively high stress values. Minimum stress values were observed in apical region of first premolar as it is away from force application. Conclusion: Using three mini-implant and transpalatal arches, this study demonstrates that significant amount of true intrusion of maxillary molars could be obtained with lesser concentration of stresses in the apical area recorded.

  13. Study of 3-D stress development in parent and twin pairs of a hexagonal close-packed polycrystal: Part II - Crystal plasticity finite element modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdolvand, Hamidreza; Majkut, Marta; Oddershede, Jette

    2015-01-01

    for each grain from the 3DXRD experiment is within the stress variation zone of the grain modeled in the CPFE simulation. Also, the CPFE average stress calculation for each grain is in good agreement with the measured average stress values. It is shown that upon considering the stress variations within......Stress heterogeneity within each individual grain of polycrystalline Zircaloy-2 is studied using a crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) model. For this purpose, the weighted Voronoi tessellation method is used to construct 3D geometries of more than 2600 grains based on their center......-of-mass positions and volumes as measured by three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) microscopy. The constructed microstructure is meshed with different element densities and for different numbers of grains. Then a selected group of twin and parent pairs are studied. It is shown that the measured average stress...

  14. STRAP-2, Stress Analysis of Structure with Static Loading by Finite Elements Method. STRAP-D, Stress Analysis of Structure with Time-Dependent Loading by Finite Elements Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearien, J.A.; Uldrich, E.D.

    1975-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: The code STRAP (Structural Analysis Package) was developed to analyze the response of structural systems to static and dynamic loading conditions. STRAP-S solves for the displacements and member forces of structural systems under static loads and temperature gradients. STRAP-D will solve numerically a given structural dynamics problem. 2 - Method of solution: STRAP-S generates the stiffness matrix of a structure by the finite element method and solves the resulting equations for structural displacements and member forces. STRAP-D generates the stiffness matrix, solves for eigenvalues and eigenvectors, uncouples and solves the series of second-order ordinary differential equations, and then calculates and plots the requested member forces. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: STRAP-S maxima: 250 degrees of freedom, 100 members; STRAP-D maxima: 100 degrees of freedom, 80 time-steps in the forcing function input

  15. Heat Transfer and Thermal Stress Analysis of a Mandibular Molar Tooth Restored by Different Indirect Restorations Using a Three-Dimensional Finite Element Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik Köycü, Berrak; İmirzalıoğlu, Pervin

    2017-07-01

    Daily consumption of food and drink creates rapid temperature changes in the oral cavity. Heat transfer and thermal stress caused by temperature changes in restored teeth may damage the hard and soft tissue components, resulting in restoration failure. This study evaluates the temperature distribution and related thermal stress on mandibular molar teeth restored via three indirect restorations using three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA). A 3D finite element model was constructed of a mandibular first molar and included enamel, dentin, pulp, surrounding bone, and indirect class 2 restorations of type 2 dental gold alloy, ceramic, and composite resin. A transient thermal FEA was performed to investigate the temperature distribution and the resulting thermal stress after simulated temperature changes from 36°C to 4 or 60°C for a 2-second time period. The restoration models had similar temperature distributions at 2 seconds in both the thermal conditions. Compared with 60°C exposure, the 4°C condition resulted in thermal stress values of higher magnitudes. At 4ºC, the highest stress value observed was tensile stress (56 to 57 MPa), whereas at 60°C, the highest stress value observed was compressive stress (42 to 43 MPa). These stresses appeared at the cervical region of the lingual enamel. The thermal stress at the restoration surface and resin cement showed decreasing order of magnitude as follows: composite > gold > ceramic, in both thermal conditions. The properties of the restorative materials do not affect temperature distribution at 2 seconds in restored teeth. The pulpal temperature is below the threshold for vital pulp tissue (42ºC). Temperature changes generate maximum thermal stress at the cervical region of the enamel. With the highest thermal expansion coefficient, composite resin restorations exhibit higher stress patterns than ceramic and gold restorations. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  16. Probabilistic finite elements for fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besterfield, Glen

    1988-01-01

    The probabilistic finite element method (PFEM) is developed for probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM). A finite element which has the near crack-tip singular strain embedded in the element is used. Probabilistic distributions, such as expectation, covariance and correlation stress intensity factors, are calculated for random load, random material and random crack length. The method is computationally quite efficient and can be expected to determine the probability of fracture or reliability.

  17. Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.R. Ghoreishy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This research work is devoted to the footprint analysis of a steel-belted radial tyre (185/65R14 under vertical static load using finite element method. Two models have been developed in which in the first model the tread patterns were replaced by simple ribs while the second model was consisted of details of the tread blocks. Linear elastic and hyper elastic (Arruda-Boyce material models were selected to describe the mechanical behavior of the reinforcing and rubbery parts, respectively. The above two finite element models of the tyre were analyzed under inflation pressure and vertical static loads. The second model (with detailed tread patterns was analyzed with and without friction effect between tread and contact surfaces. In every stage of the analysis, the results were compared with the experimental data to confirm the accuracy and applicability of the model. Results showed that neglecting the tread pattern design not only reduces the computational cost and effort but also the differences between computed deformations do not show significant changes. However, more complicated variables such as shape and area of the footprint zone and contact pressure are affected considerably by the finite element model selected for the tread blocks. In addition, inclusion of friction even in static state changes these variables significantly.

  18. Stress categorization in nozzle to pressure vessel connections finite elements models; Categorizacao de tensoes em modelos de elementos finitos de conexoes bocal-vaso de pressao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque, Levi Barcelos de

    1999-07-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III , is the most important code for nuclear pressure vessels design. Its design criteria were developed to preclude the various pressure vessel failure modes throughout the so-called 'Design by Analysis', some of them by imposing stress limits. Thus, failure modes such as plastic collapse, excessive plastic deformation and incremental plastic deformation under cyclic loading (ratchetting) may be avoided by limiting the so-called primary and secondary stresses. At the time 'Design by Analysis' was developed (early 60's) the main tool for pressure vessel design was the shell discontinuity analysis, in which the results were given in membrane and bending stress distributions along shell sections. From that time, the Finite Element Method (FEM) has had a growing use in pressure vessels design. In this case, the stress results are neither normally separated in membrane and bending stress nor classified in primary and secondary stresses. This process of stress separation and classification in Finite Element (FE) results is what is called stress categorization. In order to perform the stress categorization to check results from FE models against the ASME Code stress limits, mainly from 3D solid FE models, several research works have been conducted. This work is included in this effort. First, a description of the ASME Code design criteria is presented. After that, a brief description of how the FEM can be used in pressure vessel design is showed. Several studies found in the literature on stress categorization for pressure vessel FE models are reviewed and commented. Then, the analyses done in this work are presented in which some typical nozzle to pressure vessel connections subjected to internal pressure and concentrated loads were modeled with solid finite elements. The results from linear elastic and limit load analyses are compared to each other and also with the results obtained by formulae

  19. Effect of macro-design of immediately loaded implants on micromotion and stress distribution in surrounding bone using finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel, Akbar; Aalai, Shima; Rismanchian, Mansour

    2009-08-01

    Macro-design influences the initial stability of implant and reduces micromotions. The aim of this study was to determine and compare micromotions and stress distribution in the bone around immediately loaded Maestro and Xive implants using finite element analysis. In this experimental study, accurate, clear photos were prepared of Xive and Maestro implants 12 and 13 mm long and 4 and 3.8 mm in diameter, respectively, using a Nikon Digital Camera with a resolution 5.24-megapixels with 8x Optical Zoom and 4x Digital Zoom. After accurate measurements, 3-D models of the implants inside the lower mandible (D2) were processed in Solidworks Version 2003 environment and transferred into Ansys for finite element analysis. After loading of 500 N angled at 70 degrees from the horizontal plane, the micromotion of the implant and Von Misses stresses around the bone were measured. The measured micromotion in Maestro implant was 148 mum and that in Xive was 284 mum. Stress distribution in the bone surrounding Maestro implant was better than Xive, but maximum stress surrounding Xive implants (30 MPa) was lower than Maestro (33 MPa). Based on the results obtained in the present study, maximum micromotion in maestro was less than that in Xive implants. This finding can guarantee the application of maestro implants for immediate loading.

  20. Influence of Trabecular Bone on Peri-Implant Stress and Strain Based on Micro-CT Finite Element Modeling of Beagle Dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Sheng-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Hao; Xie, Jing; Sohodeb, Vikesh Kumar; Ding, Xi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to analyze the influence of trabecular microstructure modeling on the biomechanical distribution of the implant-bone interface. Two three-dimensional finite element mandible models, one with trabecular microstructure (a refined model) and one with macrostructure (a simplified model), were built. The values of equivalent stress at the implant-bone interface in the refined model increased compared with those of the simplified model and strain on the contrary. The distributions of stress and strain were more uniform in the refined model of trabecular microstructure, in which stress and strain were mainly concentrated in trabecular bone. It was concluded that simulation of trabecular bone microstructure had a significant effect on the distribution of stress and strain at the implant-bone interface. These results suggest that trabecular structures could disperse stress and strain and serve as load buffers.

  1. Finite element approach to study the behavior of fluid distribution in the dermal regions of human body due to thermal stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Khanday

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human body is a complex structure where the balance of mass and heat transport in all tissues is necessary for its normal functioning. The stabilities of intracellular and extracellular fluids are important physiological factors responsible for homoeostasis. To estimate the effects of thermal stress on the behavior of extracellular fluid concentration in human dermal regions, a mathematical model based on diffusion equation along with appropriate boundary conditions has been formulated. Atmospheric temperature, evaporation rate, moisture concentration and other factors affecting the fluid concentration were taken into account. The variational finite element approach has been employed to solve the model and the results were interpreted graphically.

  2. Stresses in reinforced nozzle-cylinder attachments under internal pressure loading analyzed by the finite-element method: a parameter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryson, J.W.; Johnson, W.G.; Bass, B.R.

    1977-01-01

    A parameter study was conducted on stresses in reinforced nozzle-to-cylinder attachments under internal pressure loading as analyzed by the finite-element method. Twenty-five models with branch-to-run diameter ratios 0.08 less than or equal to d/D less than or equal to 0.50 and run diameter-to-thickness ratios 10 less than or equal to D/T less than or equal to 100 were investigated. A three-dimensional finite-element program, CORTES-SA, which was developed at the University of California at Berkeley specifically for analyzing tee-joint configurations, was used in the study. It was concluded from the study that both of the reinforcement designs investigated significantly reduce maximum stresses relative to configurations having little or no reinforcement. For internal pressure loading, neither of the reinforcement designs offered a significant advantage over the other in that both types of reinforcement gave very nearly the same maximum stresses

  3. Simulation of thermal stresses in SiC-Al2O3 composite tritium penetration barrier by finite-element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hongbing; Tao, Jie; Gautreau, Yoann; Zhang, Pingze; Xu, Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Tritium penetration barrier (TPB) composed of Al 2 O 3 and SiC on 316L stainless steel was proposed to improve the tritium penetration resistance of the substrate in this work. At the same time, the concept of functionally graded materials (FGM) was applied to manage to decrease residual stresses between Al 2 O 3 and 316L stainless steel substrate due to the mismatch of their thermal expansion coefficients. The effects of system architecture on the residual stresses developed in the composite coatings were investigated numerically by means of finite-element analysis (FEA). Modeling results showed that the presence of the graded properties and the compositions within the coating did reduce the stress discontinuity at the interfaces between the coating and the substrate. Also, the magnitudes of the residual stresses on the coating surface and at the coating/substrate interface were dependent on the Al 2 O 3 and SiC coating thickness.

  4. The transmission of stress to grafted bone inside a titanium mesh cage used in anterior column reconstruction after total spondylectomy: a finite-element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamaru, Tomoyuki; Kawahara, Norio; Sakamoto, Jiro; Yoshida, Akira; Murakami, Hideki; Hato, Taizo; Awamori, Serina; Oda, Juhachi; Tomita, Katsuro

    2005-12-15

    A finite-element study of posterior alone or anterior/posterior combined instrumentation following total spondylectomy and replacement with a titanium mesh cage used as an anterior strut. To compare the effect of posterior instrumentation versus anterior/posterior instrumentation on transmission of the stress to grafted bone inside a titanium mesh cage following total spondylectomy. The most recent reconstruction techniques following total spondylectomy for malignant spinal tumor include a titanium mesh cage filled with autologous bone as an anterior strut. The need for additional anterior instrumentation with posterior pedicle screws and rods is controversial. Transmission of the mechanical stress to grafted bone inside a titanium mesh cage is important for fusion and remodeling. To our knowledge, there are no published reports comparing the load-sharing properties of the different reconstruction methods following total spondylectomy. A 3-dimensional finite-element model of the reconstructed spine (T10-L4) following total spondylectomy at T12 was constructed. A Harms titanium mesh cage (DePuy Spine, Raynham, MA) was positioned as an anterior replacement, and 3 types of the reconstruction methods were compared: (1) multilevel posterior instrumentation (MPI) (i.e., posterior pedicle screws and rods at T10-L2 without anterior instrumentation); (2) MPI with anterior instrumentation (MPAI) (i.e., MPAI [Kaneda SR; DePuy Spine] at T11-L1); and (3) short posterior and anterior instrumentation (SPAI) (i.e., posterior pedicle screws and rods with anterior instrumentation at T11-L1). The mechanical energy stress distribution exerted inside the titanium mesh cage was evaluated and compared by finite-element analysis for the 3 different reconstruction methods. Simulated forces were applied to give axial compression, flexion, extension, and lateral bending. In flexion mode, the energy stress distribution in MPI was higher than 3.0 x 10 MPa in 73.0% of the total volume inside

  5. Optical Finite Element Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, David; Taylor, Bradley K.

    1986-01-01

    A new high-accuracy optical linear algebra processor (OLAP) with many advantageous features is described. It achieves floating point accuracy, handles bipolar data by sign-magnitude representation, performs LU decomposition using only one channel, easily partitions and considers data flow. A new application (finite element (FE) structural analysis) for OLAPs is introduced and the results of a case study presented. Error sources in encoded OLAPs are addressed for the first time. Their modeling and simulation are discussed and quantitative data are presented. Dominant error sources and the effects of composite error sources are analyzed.

  6. Examining the validity of Stoney-equation for in-situ stress measurements in thin film electrodes using a large-deformation finite-element procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jici; Wei, Yujie; Cheng, Yang-Tse

    2018-05-01

    During the lithiation and delithiation of a thin film electrode, stress in the electrode is deduced from the curvature change of the film using the Stoney equation. The accuracy of such a measurement is conditioned on the assumptions that (a) the mechanical properties of the electrode remain unchanged during lithiation and (b) small deformation holds. Here, we demonstrate that the change in elastic properties can influence the measurement of the stress in thin film electrodes. We consider the coupling between diffusion and deformation during lithiation and delithiation of thin film electrodes and implement the constitutive behavior in a finite-deformation finite element procedure. We demonstrate that both the variation in elastic properties in thin film electrodes and finite-deformation during lithiation and delithiation would challenge the applicability of the Stoney-equation for in-situ stress measurements of thin film electrodes.

  7. [Stress analysis of femoral stems in cementless total hip arthroplasty by two-dimensional finite element method using boundary friction layer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomori, H; Imura, S; Gesso, H

    1992-04-01

    To develop stem design achieving primary fixation of stems and effective load transfer to the femur, we studied stress analysis of stems in cementless total hip arthroplasty by two-dimensional finite element method using boundary friction layer in stem-bone interface. The results of analyses of stem-bone interface stresses and von Mises stresses at the cortical bones indicated that ideal stem design features would be as follows: 1) Sufficient length, with the distal end extending beyond the isthmus region. 2) Maximum possible width, to contact the cortical bones in the isthmus region. 3) No collars but a lateral shoulder at the proximal portion. 4) A distal tip, to contact the cortical bones at the distal portion.

  8. [Stress analysis on the acetabular side of bipolar hemiarthroplasty by the two-dimensional finite element method incorporating the boundary friction layer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihashi, K; Imura, S; Oomori, H; Gesso, H

    1994-11-01

    We compared the biomechanical characteristics of bipolar and unipolar hemiarthroplasty on the proximal migration of the outer head by determining the von Mises stress distribution and acetabular (outer head) displacement with clinical assessment of hemiarthroplasty in 75 patients. This analysis used the two-dimensional finite element method, which incorporated boundary friction layers on both the inner and outer bearings of the prosthesis. Acetabular reaming increased stress within the pelvic bone and migration of the outer head. A combination of the acetabular reaming and bone transplantation increased the stress within the pelvic bone and grafted bone, and caused outer head migration. These findings were supported by clinical results. Although the bipolar endoprosthesis was biomechanically superior to the unipolar endoprosthesis, migration of the outer head still occurred. The bipolar endoprosthesis appeared to be indicated in cases of a femoral neck fracture or of avascular necrosis in the femoral head, but its use in cases of osteoarthritis in the hip required caution.

  9. Evaluation of the onset of failure under mechanical and thermal stresses on luting agent for metal-ceramic and metal crowns by finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Agnihotri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term clinical failures of cemented prosthesis depend, to a large extent, on the integrity of the luting agent. The causative factors that lead to microfracture and, hence, failure of the luting agents are the stresses acting inside the oral cavity. Therefore, the present study was designed to develop an understanding of the relationship between stresses in the tooth and the failure potential of the luting agent. Two-dimensional finite element stress analysis was performed on the mandibular second premolar. The behavior of zinc-phosphate and glass-ionomer were studied under different crowns (metal-ceramic and metal crown and loading conditions (mechanical force of 450 N acting vertically over the occlusal surface, thermal loads of 60° and 0°C. It was observed from the study that failure threshold of the luting agent was influenced both by the elastic modulus of the luting agent and by the type of the crown.

  10. A Large-scale Finite Element Model on Micromechanical Damage and Failure of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composites Including Thermal Residual Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P. F.; Li, X. K.

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study micromechanical progressive failure properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites with thermal residual stress by finite element analysis (FEA). Composite microstructures with hexagonal fiber distribution are used for the representative volume element (RVE), where an initial fiber breakage is assumed. Fiber breakage with random fiber strength is predicted using Monte Carlo simulation, progressive matrix damage is predicted by proposing a continuum damage mechanics model and interface failure is simulated using Xu and Needleman's cohesive model. Temperature dependent thermal expansion coefficients for epoxy matrix are used. FEA by developing numerical codes using ANSYS finite element software is divided into two steps: 1. Thermal residual stresses due to mismatch between fiber and matrix are calculated; 2. Longitudinal tensile load is further exerted on the RVE to perform progressive failure analysis of carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Numerical convergence is solved by introducing the viscous damping effect properly. The extended Mori-Tanaka method that considers interface debonding is used to get homogenized mechanical responses of composites. Three main results by FEA are obtained: 1. the real-time matrix cracking, fiber breakage and interface debonding with increasing tensile strain is simulated. 2. the stress concentration coefficients on neighbouring fibers near the initial broken fiber and the axial fiber stress distribution along the broken fiber are predicted, compared with the results using the global and local load-sharing models based on the shear-lag theory. 3. the tensile strength of composite by FEA is compared with those by the shear-lag theory and experiments. Finally, the tensile stress-strain curve of composites by FEA is applied to the progressive failure analysis of composite pressure vessel.

  11. Study of 3-D stress development in parent and twin pairs of a hexagonal close-packed polycrystal: Part II – crystal plasticity finite element modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdolvand, Hamidreza; Majkut, Marta; Oddershede, Jette; Wright, Jonathan P.; Daymond, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Stress heterogeneity within each individual grain of polycrystalline Zircaloy-2 is studied using a crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) model. For this purpose, the weighted Voronoi tessellation method is used to construct 3D geometries of more than 2600 grains based on their center-of-mass positions and volumes as measured by three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) microscopy. The constructed microstructure is meshed with different element densities and for different numbers of grains. Then a selected group of twin and parent pairs are studied. It is shown that the measured average stress for each grain from the 3DXRD experiment is within the stress variation zone of the grain modeled in the CPFE simulation. Also, the CPFE average stress calculation for each grain is in good agreement with the measured average stress values. It is shown that upon considering the stress variations within each grain, stresses in the parent and twin are quite different if they are plotted in the global coordinate system. However, if the stress tensor is rotated into the local coordinate system of the twin habit plane, all the stress components averaged over the presented population are close, except for the shear acting on the twin plane and the transverse stress. This result is significant as it provides information needed to model such parent-twin interactions in crystal plasticity codes

  12. Human exposure assessment in the near field of GSM base-station antennas using a hybrid finite element/method of moments technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Frans J C; Davidson, David B; Jakobus, Ulrich; Stuchly, Maria A

    2003-02-01

    A hybrid finite-element method (FEM)/method of moments (MoM) technique is employed for specific absorption rate (SAR) calculations in a human phantom in the near field of a typical group special mobile (GSM) base-station antenna. The MoM is used to model the metallic surfaces and wires of the base-station antenna, and the FEM is used to model the heterogeneous human phantom. The advantages of each of these frequency domain techniques are, thus, exploited, leading to a highly efficient and robust numerical method for addressing this type of bioelectromagnetic problem. The basic mathematical formulation of the hybrid technique is presented. This is followed by a discussion of important implementation details-in particular, the linear algebra routines for sparse, complex FEM matrices combined with dense MoM matrices. The implementation is validated by comparing results to MoM (surface equivalence principle implementation) and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) solutions of human exposure problems. A comparison of the computational efficiency of the different techniques is presented. The FEM/MoM implementation is then used for whole-body and critical-organ SAR calculations in a phantom at different positions in the near field of a base-station antenna. This problem cannot, in general, be solved using the MoM or FDTD due to computational limitations. This paper shows that the specific hybrid FEM/MoM implementation is an efficient numerical tool for accurate assessment of human exposure in the near field of base-station antennas.

  13. A Hybrid Lumped Parameters/Finite Element/Boundary Element Model to Predict the Vibroacoustic Characteristics of an Axial Piston Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaogan Ye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Low noise axial piston pumps become the rapid increasing demand in modern hydraulic fluid power systems. This paper proposes a systematic approach to simulate the vibroacoustic characteristics of an axial piston pump using a hybrid lumped parameters/finite element/boundary element (LP/FE/BE model, and large amount of experimental work was performed to validate the model. The LP model was developed to calculate the excitation forces and was validated by a comparison of outlet flow ripples. The FE model was developed to calculate the vibration of the pump, in which the modeling of main friction pairs using different spring elements was presented in detail, and the FE model was validated using experimental modal analysis and measured vibrations. The BE model was used to calculate the noise emitted from the pump, and a measurement of sound pressure level at representative field points in a hemianechoic chamber was conducted to validate the BE model. Comparisons between the simulated and measured results show that the developed LP/FE/BE model is effective in capturing the vibroacoustic characteristics of the pump. The presented approach can be extended to other types of fluid power components and contributes to the development of quieter fluid power systems.

  14. Finite element modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonks, M.R.; Williamson, R.; Masson, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Finite Element Method (FEM) is a numerical technique for finding approximate solutions to boundary value problems. While FEM is commonly used to solve solid mechanics equations, it can be applied to a large range of BVPs from many different fields. FEM has been used for reactor fuels modelling for many years. It is most often used for fuel performance modelling at the pellet and pin scale, however, it has also been used to investigate properties of the fuel material, such as thermal conductivity and fission gas release. Recently, the United Stated Department Nuclear Energy Advanced Modelling and Simulation Program has begun using FEM as the basis of the MOOSE-BISON-MARMOT Project that is developing a multi-dimensional, multi-physics fuel performance capability that is massively parallel and will use multi-scale material models to provide a truly predictive modelling capability. (authors)

  15. Evaluation of Stress Distribution of Mini Dental Implant-Supported Overdentures in Complete Cleft Palate Models: A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soğancı, Gökçe; Yazıcıoğlu, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Mini dental implants could be an alternative treatment method for prosthetic treatment of edentulous cleft palate. The aim of this study was to analyze stress distribution around the cortical bone and different plans using a varied number of mini dental implants in edentulous unilateral complete cleft palates. Three edentulous maxillary models were modified to create unilateral complete cleft palates. Mini dental implants (2.4 × 15 mm) were located as two mini implants at the premolar region, four mini implants at the premolar and molar region, and six mini implants at the first premolar, second premolar, and first molar regions in the models, respectively. Mucosa, o-ring/ball attachments, and overdentures were simulated. Vertical and horizontal loads of 100 N were applied on both the right and left molar teeth of the overdenture for each model. Maximum and minimum principal stress values and the distribution at cortical bone around the implants and cleft palates were evaluated by finite element analysis. Stress values under vertical loads were lower than values under horizontal loadings for all models. Stress values were found to be lower in the first model than in the second and third models. The highest stress values were found around implants in the second model. The unilateral feature of a complete cleft pattern affected the stress distribution. Stresses occured mostly around implants when the overdenture was supported by six implants; however, the stress distribution around implants was low with two implants because of tissue support.

  16. Linear Structural Stress Analysis of a Hull Girder Penetration and a Short Longitudinal Bulkhead Using Finite Element Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baumann, Gregg

    1997-01-01

    ... (Integrated Design Engineering Analysis Software) software. The term 'shadow zone' refers to areas of low stress concentrations that are caused by lines of stress bending around structural discontinuities...

  17. Utilization of a hybrid finite-element based registration method to quantify heterogeneous tumor response for adaptive treatment for lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Hoda; Zhang, Hong; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Lu, Wei; Ajlouni, Munther I.; Jin, Jian-Yue; (Spring Kong, Feng-Ming; Chetty, Indrin J.; Zhong, Hualiang

    2018-03-01

    Tumor response to radiation treatment (RT) can be evaluated from changes in metabolic activity between two positron emission tomography (PET) images. Activity changes at individual voxels in pre-treatment PET images (PET1), however, cannot be derived until their associated PET-CT (CT1) images are appropriately registered to during-treatment PET-CT (CT2) images. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of using deformable image registration (DIR) techniques to quantify radiation-induced metabolic changes on PET images. Five patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with adaptive radiotherapy were considered. PET-CTs were acquired two weeks before RT and 18 fractions after the start of RT. DIR was performed from CT1 to CT2 using B-Spline and diffeomorphic Demons algorithms. The resultant displacements in the tumor region were then corrected using a hybrid finite element method (FEM). Bitmap masks generated from gross tumor volumes (GTVs) in PET1 were deformed using the four different displacement vector fields (DVFs). The conservation of total lesion glycolysis (TLG) in GTVs was used as a criterion to evaluate the quality of these registrations. The deformed masks were united to form a large mask which was then partitioned into multiple layers from center to border. The averages of SUV changes over all the layers were 1.0  ±  1.3, 1.0  ±  1.2, 0.8  ±  1.3, 1.1  ±  1.5 for the B-Spline, B-Spline  +  FEM, Demons and Demons  +  FEM algorithms, respectively. TLG changes before and after mapping using B-Spline, Demons, hybrid-B-Spline, and hybrid-Demons registrations were 20.2%, 28.3%, 8.7%, and 2.2% on average, respectively. Compared to image intensity-based DIR algorithms, the hybrid FEM modeling technique is better in preserving TLG and could be useful for evaluation of tumor response for patients with regressing tumors.

  18. Stress and stability of plate-screw fixation and screw fixation in the treatment of Schatzker type IV medial tibial plateau fracture: a comparative finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaowei; Zhi, Zhongzheng; Yu, Baoqing; Chen, Fancheng

    2015-11-25

    The purpose of this study is to compare the stress and stability of plate-screw fixation and screw fixation in the treatment of Schatzker type IV medial tibial plateau fracture. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the medial tibial plateau fracture (Schatzker type IV fracture) was created. An axial force of 2500 N with a distribution of 60% to the medial compartment was applied to simulate the axial compressive load on an adult knee during single-limb stance. The equivalent von Mises stress, displacement of the model relative to the distal tibia, and displacement of the implants were used as the output measures. The mean stress value of the plate-screw fixation system was 18.78 MPa, which was significantly (P stress value of the triangular fragment in the plate-screw fixation system model was 42.04 MPa, which was higher than that in the screw fixation model (24.18 MPa). But the mean stress of the triangular fractured fragment in the screw fixation model was significantly higher in terms of equivalent von Mises stress (EVMS), x-axis, and z-axis (P < 0.001). This study demonstrated that the load transmission mechanism between plate-screw fixation system and screw fixation system was different and the stability provided by the plate-screw fixation system was superior to the screw fixation system.

  19. Utility of magnetic resonance imaging-based finite element analysis for the biomechanical stress analysis of hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic carotid plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadat, U.; Teng, Z.; Young, V.E.; Li, Z.Y.; Gillard, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Biomechanical stress analysis has been used for plaque vulnerability assessment. The presence of plaque hemorrhage (PH) is a feature of plaque vulnerability and is associated with thromboembolic ischemic events. The purpose of the present study was to use finite element analysis (FEA) to compare the stress profiles of hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic profiles. Forty-five consecutive patients who had suffered a cerebrovascular ischemic event with an underlying carotid artery disease underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of their symptomatic carotid artery in a 1.5-T MRI system. Axial images were manually segmented for various plaque components and used for FEA. Maximum critical stress (M-Cstress SL ) for each slice was determined. Within a plaque, the maximum M-Cstress SL for each slice of a plaque was selected to represent the maximum critical stress of that plaque (M-Cstress PL ) and used to compare hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic plaques. A total of 62% of plaques had hemorrhage. It was observed that plaques with hemorrhage had significantly higher stress (M-Cstress PL ) than plaques without PH (median [interquartile range]: 315kPa [247-434] vs. 200kPa [171-282], P=0.003). Hemorrhagic plaques have higher biomechanical stresses than non-hemorrhagic plaques. MRI-based FEA seems to have the potential to assess plaque vulnerability. (author)

  20. Establishment of a finite element model of a neonate's skull to evaluate the stress pattern distribution resulting during nasoalveolar molding therapy of cleft lip and palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Franz X; Heinrich, Veronika; Grill, Florian D; Wölfle, Felix; Hedderich, Dennis M; Rau, Andrea; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Ritschl, Lucas M; Loeffelbein, Denys J

    2018-04-01

    Nasoalveolar Molding (NAM) is associated with ambivalent acceptance regarding effectiveness and unknown long-term results. Our purpose was to analyze the stress distribution patterns within the viscero- and neurocranium of neonates during the first phase of NAM therapy. A finite element (FE) model of a healthy four-week-old neonate was generated, derived from a computed tomography scan allowing the implementation of a bone-density-dependent material model. The influence of dental germs with variable material properties, the cleft width and area of expected force application were analyzed in a worst-case scenario. The resulting stress distribution patterns for each situation were analyzed using the software Ansys APDL. The established FE model was verified with a convergence analysis. Overall, stress patterns at the age of four weeks showed von Mises stress values below 60.000 Pa in the viscero- and neurocranium. The influences of the allocation of material properties for the dental germs, the area of force application, and the cleft width were negligible. A workflow to simulate the stress distribution and deformation in neonates attributable to various areas of force application has been established. Further analyses of the skulls of younger and older neonates are needed to describe the stress distribution patterns during NAM therapy. Copyright © 2018 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A comparative study on the stress distribution around dental implants in three arch form models for replacing six implants using finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Maryam; Jahangirnezhad, Mahmoud; Yousefimanesh, Hojatollah; Robati, Maryam; Robati, Hossein

    2018-01-01

    Dental implant is a method to replacement of missing teeth. It is important for replacing the missed anterior teeth. In vitro method is a safe method for evaluation of stress distribution. Finite element analysis as an in vitro method evaluated stress distribution around replacement of six maxillary anterior teeth implants in three models of maxillary arch. In this in vitro study, using ABAQUS software (Simulia Corporation, Vélizy-Villacoublay, France), implant simulation was performed for reconstruction of six maxillary anterior teeth in three models. Two implants were placed on both sides of the canine tooth region (A model); two implants on both sides of the canine tooth region and another on one side of the central incisor region (B model); and two implants on both sides of the canine tooth region and two implants in the central incisor area (C model). All implants evaluated in three arch forms (tapered, ovoid, and square). Data were analyzed by finite analysis software. Von Mises stress by increasing of implant number was reduced. In a comparison of A model in each maxillary arch, the stress created in the cortical and cancellous bones in the square arch was less than ovoid and tapered arches. The stress created in implants and cortical and cancellous bones in C model was less than A and B models. The C model (four-implant) reduced the stress distribution in cortical and cancellous bones, but this pattern must be evaluated according to arch form and cost benefit of patients.

  2. Stress Distribution Evaluation of the Periodontal Ligament in the Maxillary Canine for Retraction by Different Alveolar Corticotomy Techniques: A Three-dimensional Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Ariel Adriano Reyes; Saga, Armando Yukio; de Lima, Key Fonseca; Paese, Victor Nissen; Tanaka, Orlando M

    2016-01-01

    By using the finite element method (FEM), this study aimed to evaluate the effect of different corticotomy formats on the distribution and magnitude of stress on the periodontal ligament (PDL) during retraction of the maxillary canine. A geometric model of the left hemi-jaw was created from computed tomography scan images of a dry human skull and loads were administered during distalization movement of the canine. Three trials were performed: (1) without corticotomy, (2) box-shaped corticotomy and perforations in the cortical bone of the canine (CVC) and (3) CVC and circular-shaped corticotomy in the cortical bone of the edentulous space of the first premolar. There was no difference in stress distribution among the different corticotomy formats. Different corticotomy formats used to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement did not affect stress distribution in the PDL during canine retraction. From a mechanical perspective, the present study showed that the stress distribution on the PDL during canine retraction was similar in all the corticotomy formats. When using the Andrews T2 bracket, the PDL presented the highest levels of stress in the middle third of the PDL, suggesting that the force was near the center of resistance. Also, as bone weakening by corticotomies did not influence stress distribution, the surgical procedure could be simplified to a less aggressive one, focusing more on inflammatory cellular stimulation than on bone resistance. A simpler surgical act could also be performed by most orthodontists in their practices, enhancing postoperative response and reducing patient costs.

  3. Patient-specific stress analyses in the ascending thoracic aorta using a finite-element implementation of the constrained mixture theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, S Jamaleddin; Avril, Stéphane

    2017-10-01

    It is now a rather common approach to perform patient-specific stress analyses of arterial walls using finite-element models reconstructed from gated medical images. However, this requires to compute for every Gauss point the deformation gradient between the current configuration and a stress-free reference configuration. It is technically difficult to define such a reference configuration, and there is actually no guarantee that a stress-free configuration is physically attainable due to the presence of internal stresses in unloaded soft tissues. An alternative framework was proposed by Bellini et al. (Ann Biomed Eng 42(3):488-502, 2014). It consists of computing the deformation gradients between the current configuration and a prestressed reference configuration. We present here the first finite-element results based on this concept using the Abaqus software. The reference configuration is set arbitrarily to the in vivo average geometry of the artery, which is obtained from gated medical images and is assumed to be mechanobiologically homeostatic. For every Gauss point, the stress is split additively into the contributions of each individual load-bearing constituent of the tissue, namely elastin, collagen, smooth muscle cells. Each constituent is assigned an independent prestretch in the reference configuration, named the deposition stretch. The outstanding advantage of the present approach is that it simultaneously computes the in situ stresses existing in the reference configuration and predicts the residual stresses that occur after removing the different loadings applied onto the artery (pressure and axial load). As a proof of concept, we applied it on an ideal thick-wall cylinder and showed that the obtained results were consistent with corresponding experimental and analytical results of the well-known literature. In addition, we developed a patient-specific model of a human ascending thoracic aneurysmal aorta and demonstrated the utility in predicting the

  4. Effect of implant position, angulation, and attachment height on peri-implant bone stress associated with mandibular two-implant overdentures: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hae Ryong; Pae, Ahran; Kim, Yooseok; Paek, Janghyun; Kim, Hyeong-Seob; Kwon, Kung-Rock

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the level and distribution of peri-implant bone stresses associated with mandibular two-implant overdentures with different implant positions. Mathematical models of mandibles and overdentures were designed using finite element analysis software. Two intraosseous implants and ball attachment systems were placed in the interforaminal region. The overdenture, which was supported by the two implants, was designed to withstand bilateral and unilateral vertical masticatory loads (total 100 N). In all, eight types of models, which differed according to assigned implant positions, height of attachments, and angulation, were tested: MI (model with implants positioned in the lateral incisor sites), MC (implants in canine sites), MP (implants in premolar sites), MI-Hi (greater height of attachments), MC-M (canine implants placed with mesial inclination), MC-D (canine implants placed with distal inclination), MC-B (canine implants placed with buccal inclination), and MC-L (canine implants placed with lingual inclination). Peri-implant bone stress levels associated with overdentures retained by lateral incisor implants resulted in the lowest stress levels and the highest efficiency in distributing peri-implant stress. MI-Hi showed increased stress levels and decreased efficiency in stress distribution. As the implants were inclined, stress levels increased and the efficiency of stress distribution decreased. Among the inclined models, MC-B showed the lowest stress level and best efficiency in stress distribution. The lowest stress and the best stability of implants in mandibular two-implant overdentures were obtained when implants were inserted in lateral incisor areas with shorter attachments and were placed parallel to the long axes of the teeth.

  5. Finite Element Optimised Back Analysis of In Situ Stress Field and Stability Analysis of Shaft Wall in the Underground Gas Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel optimised back analysis method is proposed in this paper. The in situ stress field of an underground gas storage (UGS reservoir in a Turkey salt cavern is analysed by the basic theory of elastic mechanics. A finite element method is implemented to optimise and approximate the objective function by systematically adjusting boundary loads. Optimising calculation is performed based on a novel method to reduce the error between measurement and calculation as much as possible. Compared with common back analysis methods such as regression method, the method proposed can further improve the calculation precision. By constructing a large circular geometric model, the effect of stress concentration is eliminated and a minimum difference between computed and measured stress can be guaranteed in the rectangular objective region. The efficiency of the proposed method is investigated and confirmed by its capability on restoring in situ stress field, which agrees well with experimental results. The characteristics of stress distribution of chosen UGS wells are obtained based on the back analysis results and by applying the corresponding fracture criterion, the shaft walls are proven safe.

  6. Analysis of stress- strain distribution of dowel and glue line in L-type furniture joint by means of finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mossayeb dalvand

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study 3D stress-strain distribution of dowel and glue line on L-type joints made of plywood doweled was investigated. Members of joints made of 11-ply hardwood plywood (Hornbeam, Beech and Alder that were 19 mm in thickness. In this study effect of beech dowels in three levels diameters (6, 8 and 10 mm and penetration of depth (9, 13 and 17 mm on bending moment capacity of L-type joints under compression loading was investigated as experimental test, then stress-strain distribution of wood dowel and glue line in specimens were simulated by means of ANSYS 15 software with finite element method (FEM.Results have shown that bending moment resistance increased with increasing dowel diameter from 6 to 8 mm, but downward trend was observed with increasing 8 to 10 mm in dowel diameter. Bending moment resistance increased with increasing penetration depth. Also, result obtained of simulation by means of ANSYS software have shown that stress-strain in dowel and glue line increased with increasing diameter of dowel and Increasing stress in joints made of diameter dowel 10 mm due to fracture in joints and decrease in resistance once. According to results obtained of model analysis, the ultimate stress of dowel and glue line occurred in the area that joints were contacted.

  7. Effect of process variables on the Drucker-Prager cap model and residual stress distribution of tablets estimated by the finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Otoguro, Saori; Miura, Takahiro; Onuki, Yoshinori; Obata, Yasuko; Takayama, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    A multivariate statistical technique was applied to clarify the causal correlation between variables in the manufacturing process and the residual stress distribution of tablets. Theophylline tablets were prepared according to a Box-Behnken design using the wet granulation method. Water amounts (X1), kneading time (X2), lubricant-mixing time (X3), and compression force (X4) were selected as design variables. The Drucker-Prager cap (DPC) model was selected as the method for modeling the mechanical behavior of pharmaceutical powders. Simulation parameters, such as Young's modulus, Poisson rate, internal friction angle, plastic deformation parameters, and initial density of the powder, were measured. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the simulation parameters were significantly affected by process variables. The constructed DPC models were fed into the analysis using the finite element method (FEM), and the mechanical behavior of pharmaceutical powders during the tableting process was analyzed using the FEM. The results of this analysis revealed that the residual stress distribution of tablets increased with increasing X4. Moreover, an interaction between X2 and X3 also had an effect on shear and the x-axial residual stress of tablets. Bayesian network analysis revealed causal relationships between the process variables, simulation parameters, residual stress distribution, and pharmaceutical responses of tablets. These results demonstrated the potential of the FEM as a tool to help improve our understanding of the residual stress of tablets and to optimize process variables, which not only affect tablet characteristics, but also are risks of causing tableting problems.

  8. Effects of gape and tooth position on bite force and skull stress in the dingo (Canis lupus dingo using a 3-dimensional finite element approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Bourke

    Full Text Available Models of the mammalian jaw have predicted that bite force is intimately linked to jaw gape and to tooth position. Despite widespread use, few empirical studies have provided evidence to validate these models in non-human mammals and none have considered the influence of gape angle on the distribution of stress. Here using a multi-property finite element (FE model of Canis lupus dingo, we examined the influence of gape angle and bite point on both bite force and cranial stress. Bite force data in relation to jaw gape and along the tooth row, are in broad agreement with previously reported results. However stress data showed that the skull of C. l. dingo is mechanically suited to withstand stresses at wide gapes; a result that agreed well with previously held views regarding carnivoran evolution. Stress data, combined with bite force information, suggested that there is an optimal bite angle of between 25 degrees and 35 degrees in C. l. dingo. The function of these rather small bite angles remains unclear.

  9. Finite Element Analysis of Pipe T-Joint

    OpenAIRE

    P.M.Gedkar; Dr. D.V. Bhope

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports stress analysis of two pressurized cylindrical intersection using finite element method. The different combinations of dimensions of run pipe and the branch pipe are used to investigate thestresses in pipe at the intersection. In this study the stress analysis is accomplished by finite element package ANSYS.

  10. Finite-element analysis of dynamic fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberson, J. A.; Anderson, J. M.; King, W. W.

    1976-01-01

    Applications of the finite element method to the two dimensional elastodynamics of cracked structures are presented. Stress intensity factors are computed for two problems involving stationary cracks. The first serves as a vehicle for discussing lumped-mass and consistent-mass characterizations of inertia. In the second problem, the behavior of a photoelastic dynamic tear test specimen is determined for the time prior to crack propagation. Some results of a finite element simulation of rapid crack propagation in an infinite body are discussed.

  11. Crack Propagation by Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos H. Ricardo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Crack propagation simulation began with the development of the finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique. The aim of this paper is to verify the effect of different crack propagation rates in determination of crack opening and closing stress of an ASTM specimen under a standard suspension spectrum loading from FDandE SAE Keyhole Specimen Test Load Histories by finite element analysis. To understand the crack propagation processes under variable amplitude loading, retardation effects are observed

  12. X-Ray Diffraction Techniques and Finite Element Modeling to Control Residual Stress in High-Temperature Pressure Vessels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, S

    1999-01-01

    Manufacturing operations, such as swage autofrettage, shot peening, and overload processes, have been used to impart advantageous residual stresses to improve fatigue life in components used in high...

  13. States of stress and slip partitioning in a continental scale strike-slip duplex: Tectonic and magmatic implications by means of finite element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturrieta, Pablo Cristián; Hurtado, Daniel E.; Cembrano, José; Stanton-Yonge, Ashley

    2017-09-01

    Orogenic belts at oblique convergent subduction margins accommodate deformation in several trench-parallel domains, one of which is the magmatic arc, commonly regarded as taking up the margin-parallel, strike-slip component. However, the stress state and kinematics of volcanic arcs is more complex than usually recognized, involving first- and second-order faults with distinctive slip senses and mutual interaction. These are usually organized into regional scale strike-slip duplexes, associated with both long-term and short-term heterogeneous deformation and magmatic activity. This is the case of the 1100 km-long Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System in the Southern Andes, made up of two overlapping margin-parallel master faults joined by several NE-striking second-order faults. We present a finite element model addressing the nature and spatial distribution of stress across and along the volcanic arc in the Southern Andes to understand slip partitioning and the connection between tectonics and magmatism, particularly during the interseismic phase of the subduction earthquake cycle. We correlate the dynamics of the strike-slip duplex with geological, seismic and magma transport evidence documented by previous work, showing consistency between the model and the inferred fault system behavior. Our results show that maximum principal stress orientations are heterogeneously distributed within the continental margin, ranging from 15° to 25° counter-clockwise (with respect to the convergence vector) in the master faults and 10-19° clockwise in the forearc and backarc domains. We calculate the stress tensor ellipticity, indicating simple shearing in the eastern master fault and transpressional stress in the western master fault. Subsidiary faults undergo transtensional-to-extensional stress states. The eastern master fault displays slip rates of 5 to 10 mm/yr, whereas the western and subsidiary faults show slips rates of 1 to 5 mm/yr. Our results endorse that favorably oriented

  14. Stress and strain distribution in three different mini dental implant designs using in implant retained overdenture: a finite element analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aunmeungtong, W; Khongkhunthian, P; Rungsiyakull, P

    2016-01-01

    Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been used for prediction of stress and strain between dental implant components and bone in the implant design process. Purpose of this study was to characterize and analyze stress and strain distribution occurring in bone and implants and to compare stress and strain of three different implant designs. Three different mini dental implant designs were included in this study: 1. a mini dental implant with an internal implant-abutment connection (MDIi); 2. a mini dental implant with an external implant-abutment connection (MDIe); 3. a single piece mini dental implant (MDIs). All implant designs were scanned using micro-CT scans. The imaging details of the implants were used to simulate models for FEA. An artificial bone volume of 9×9 mm in size was constructed and each implant was placed separately at the center of each bone model. All bone-implant models were simulatively loaded under an axial compressive force of 100 N and a 45-degree force of 100 N loading at the top of the implants using computer software to evaluate stress and strain distribution. There was no difference in stress or strain between the three implant designs. The stress and strain occurring in all three mini dental implant designs were mainly localized at the cortical bone around the bone-implant interface. Oblique 45° loading caused increased deformation, magnitude and distribution of stress and strain in all implant models. Within the limits of this study, the average stress and strain in bone and implant models with MDIi were similar to those with MDIe and MDIs. The oblique 45° load played an important role in dramatically increased average stress and strain in all bone-implant models. Mini dental implants with external or internal connections have similar stress distribution to single piece mini dental implants. In clinical situations, the three types of mini dental implant should exhibit the same behavior to chewing force.

  15. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of the Stress Distribution at the Internal Implant-Abutment Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Yong; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Park, Chan-Jin; Cho, Lee-Ra

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated stress distribution in four different implant-abutment interface conditions in the internal tapered connection implant system. Four different implant diameters (3.5 mm, 4.0 mm, 4.5 mm, and 5.0 mm) and two abutment types (hexagonal and conical) were simulated. Four unique implant-abutment interface conditions were assumed based on wall thickness, mating surface length, distance to the vertical stop, and abutment shape. Axial and oblique loading was applied during abutment screw preload, and the Von Mises stresses were measured at the implant-abutment and abutment-screw interfaces. The implant-abutment interface stress decreased as the wall thickness increased. As the mating surface increased, the stress distribution trended downward, and when the distance to the implant vertical stop was 0 μm, the Von Mises stress was extremely high at the vertical stop. Despite their different shapes, the abutments showed similar stress distributions. However, the maximum Von Mises stress was higher in the conical connection than in the hexagonal connection, particularly at the contralateral side to loading. To decrease the stress distribution at the implant-abutment interface, the implant wall thickness, mating surface contact length, distance to the vertical stop, and abutment shape should be carefully considered.

  16. Finite element analysis of stress concentration in three popular brands of fiber posts systems used for maxillary central incisor teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Shalini; Garg, Vaibhav

    2011-07-01

    To study the stress concentrations in endodontically treated maxillary central incisor teeth restored with 3 different fiber post systems subjected to various oblique occlusal loads. FEM analysis was used to analyze stress concentrations generated in maxillary anterior teeth. Computer aided designing was used to create a 2-D model of an upper central incisor. Post systems analyzed were the DT Light Post (RDT, Bisco), Luscent Anchor (Dentatus) & RelyX (3M-ESPE). The entire design assembly was subjected to analysis by ANSYS for oblique loading forces of 25N, 80N & 125 N RESULTS: The resultant data showed that the RelyX generated the least amount of stress concentration. Minimal stress buildups contribute to the longevity of the restorations. Thus RelyX by virtue of judicious stress distribution is the better option for restoration of grossly decayed teeth.

  17. 3-D finite element stress analysis for fatigue design and evaluation: a parametric study of MOV(Motor Operated Valve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyeong Keun; Lee, Sang Min; Chang, Yoon Suk; Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Yun Jae

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a new procedure is proposed to accomplish the primary plus secondary stress(P+Q) at the 'structural element' instead of 'transition element'. For the P+Q evaluation, the calculated stresses by FEA are linearized along a stress classification line to extract the stress category, then the stress intensity is calculated to compare with the 3Sm limit. Also, in this paper, the 'design by analysis' criteria, adopted fundamental concepts and a new approach to calculate Ke factors are explained. The new procedure combined with 3-D FEA has been applied to motor operated valve in order to the over conservatism and the rack of margin. The evaluation results show a good applicability and can be utilized for fatigue life evaluation by using P+Q

  18. Finite element method - theory and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baset, S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the mathematical basis of the finite element method. Attention is drawn to the natural development of the method from an engineering analysis tool into a general numerical analysis tool. A particular application to the stress analysis of rubber materials is presented. Special advantages and issues associated with the method are mentioned. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  19. Influence of Implant Position on Stress Distribution in Implant-Assisted Distal Extension Removable Partial Dentures: A 3D Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memari, Yeganeh; Geramy, Allahyar; Fayaz, Amir; Rezvani Habib Abadi, Shirin; Mansouri, Yasaman

    2014-09-01

    Distal extension removable partial denture is a prosthesis with lack of distal dental support with a 13-fold difference in resiliency between the mucosa and the periodontal ligament, resulting in leverage during compression forces. It may be potentially destructive to the abutments and the surrounding tissues. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of implant location on stress distribution, in distal extension implant assisted removable partial dentures. Three-dimensional models of a bilateral distal extension partially edentulous mandible containing anterior teeth and first premolar in both sides of the arch, a partial removable denture and an implant (4×10mm) were designed. With the aid of the finite element program ANSYS 8.0, the models were meshed and strictly vertical forces of 10 N were applied to each cusp tip. Displacement and von Mises Maps were plotted for visualization of results. When an implant was placed in the second premolar region, the highest stress on implant, abutment tooth and cancellous bone was shown. The lowest stress was shown on implant and bone in the 1(st) molar area. Implants located in the first molar area showed the least distribution of stresses in the analyzed models.

  20. Influence of Implant Position on Stress Distribution in Implant-Assisted Distal Extension Removable Partial Dentures: A 3D Finite Element Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeganeh Memari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Distal extension removable partial denture is a prosthesis with lack of distal dental support with a 13-fold difference in resiliency between the mucosa and the periodontal ligament, resulting in leverage during compression forces. It may be potentially destructive to the abutments and the surrounding tissues. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of implant location on stress distribution, in distal extension implant assisted removable partial dentures.Three-dimensional models of a bilateral distal extension partially edentulous mandible containing anterior teeth and first premolar in both sides of the arch, a partial removable denture and an implant (4×10mm were designed. With the aid of the finite element program ANSYS 8.0, the models were meshed and strictly vertical forces of 10 N were applied to each cusp tip. Displacement and von Mises Maps were plotted for visualization of results.When an implant was placed in the second premolar region, the highest stress on implant, abutment tooth and cancellous bone was shown. The lowest stress was shown on implant and bone in the 1(st molar area.Implants located in the first molar area showed the least distribution of stresses in the analyzed models.

  1. Effects of the implant design on peri-implant bone stress and abutment micromovement: three-dimensional finite element analysis of original computer-aided design models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanishi, Yasufumi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Imazato, Satoshi; Nakano, Tamaki; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2014-09-01

    Occlusal overloading causes peri-implant bone resorption. Previous studies examined stress distribution in alveolar bone around commercial implants using three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis. However, the commercial implants contained some different designs. The purpose of this study is to reveal the effect of the target design on peri-implant bone stress and abutment micromovement. Six 3D implant models were created for different implant-abutment joints: 1) internal joint model (IM); 2) external joint model (EM); 3) straight abutment (SA) shape; 4) tapered abutment (TA) shapes; 5) platform switching (PS) in the IM; and 6) modified TA neck design (reverse conical neck [RN]). A static load of 100 N was applied to the basal ridge surface of the abutment at a 45-degree oblique angle to the long axis of the implant. Both stress distribution in peri-implant bone and abutment micromovement in the SA and TA models were analyzed. Compressive stress concentrated on labial cortical bone and tensile stress on the palatal side in the EM and on the labial side in the IM. There was no difference in maximum principal stress distribution for SA and TA models. Tensile stress concentration was not apparent on labial cortical bone in the PS model (versus IM). Maximum principal stress concentrated more on peri-implant bone in the RN than in the TA model. The TA model exhibited less abutment micromovement than the SA model. This study reveals the effects of the design of specific components on peri-implant bone stress and abutment displacement after implant-supported single restoration in the anterior maxilla.

  2. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Today\\'s large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Timo; Kronbichler, Martin; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Today's large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Evaluation of stress distribution of implant-retained mandibular overdenture with different vertical restorative spaces: A finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Ebadian

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The reduction of bar height and increase in the thickness of acrylic resin base in implant-supported overdentures are biomechanically favorable and may result in less stress in periimplant bone.

  5. Expanded Mixed Multiscale Finite Element Methods and Their Applications for Flows in Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, L.; Copeland, D.; Moulton, J. D.

    2012-01-01

    We develop a family of expanded mixed multiscale finite element methods (MsFEMs) and their hybridizations for second-order elliptic equations. This formulation expands the standard mixed multiscale finite element formulation in the sense that four

  6. A Patient Specific Biomechanical Analysis of Custom Root Analogue Implant Designs on Alveolar Bone Stress: A Finite Element Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Anssari Moin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of this study was to analyse by means of FEA the influence of 5 custom RAI designs on stress distribution of peri-implant bone and to evaluate the impact on microdisplacement for a specific patient case. Materials and Methods. A 3D surface model of a RAI for the upper right canine was constructed from the cone beam computed tomography data of one patient. Subsequently, five (targeted press-fit design modification FE models with five congruent bone models were designed: “Standard,” “Prism,” “Fins,” “Plug,” and “Bulbs,” respectively. Preprocessor software was applied to mesh the models. Two loads were applied: an oblique force (300 N and a vertical force (150 N. Analysis was performed to evaluate stress distributions and deformed contact separation at the peri-implant region. Results. The lowest von Mises stress levels were numerically observed for the Plug design. The lowest levels of contact separation were measured in the Fins model followed by the Bulbs design. Conclusions. Within the limitations of the applied methodology, adding targeted press-fit geometry to the RAI standard design will have a positive effect on stress distribution, lower concentration of bone stress, and will provide a better primary stability for this patient specific case.

  7. Stress and displacement pattern evaluation using two different palatal expanders in unilateral cleft lip and palate: a three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Anoop; Nagachandran, K S; Vijayalakshmi, Devaki

    2016-12-01

    In this finite element (FE) study, the stress distribution and displacement pattern was evaluated in the mid-palatal area and around circum-maxillary sutures exerted by bone-borne palatal expander (BBPE) in comparison with conventional HYRAX rapid palatal expander in unilateral cleft lip and palate. Computed tomography scan images of a patient with unilateral cleft palate was used to create a FE model of the maxillary bone along with circum-maxillary sutures. A three-dimensional model of the conventional HYRAX (Hygienic Rapid Expander) expander and custom-made BBPE was created by laser scanning and programmed into the FE model. With the BBPE, the maximum stress was observed at the implant insertion site, whereas with the conventional HYRAX expander, it was at the dentition level. Among the circum-maxillary sutures, the zygomaticomaxillary suture experienced maximum stress followed by the zygomaticotemporal and nasomaxillary sutures. Displacement in the X-axis (transverse) was highest on the cleft side, and in the Y-axis (antero-posterior), it was highest in the posterior region in the BBPE. The total displacement was observed maximum in the mid-palatal cleft area in the BBPE, and it produced true skeletal expansion at the alveolar level without any dental tipping when compared with the conventional HYRAX expander.

  8. Stress and displacement pattern evaluation using two different palatal expanders in unilateral cleft lip and palate: a three-dimensional finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Mathew

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this finite element (FE study, the stress distribution and displacement pattern was evaluated in the mid-palatal area and around circum-maxillary sutures exerted by bone-borne palatal expander (BBPE in comparison with conventional HYRAX rapid palatal expander in unilateral cleft lip and palate. Methods Computed tomography scan images of a patient with unilateral cleft palate was used to create a FE model of the maxillary bone along with circum-maxillary sutures. A three-dimensional model of the conventional HYRAX (Hygienic Rapid Expander expander and custom-made BBPE was created by laser scanning and programmed into the FE model. Results With the BBPE, the maximum stress was observed at the implant insertion site, whereas with the conventional HYRAX expander, it was at the dentition level. Among the circum-maxillary sutures, the zygomaticomaxillary suture experienced maximum stress followed by the zygomaticotemporal and nasomaxillary sutures. Displacement in the X-axis (transverse was highest on the cleft side, and in the Y-axis (antero-posterior, it was highest in the posterior region in the BBPE. Conclusions The total displacement was observed maximum in the mid-palatal cleft area in the BBPE, and it produced true skeletal expansion at the alveolar level without any dental tipping when compared with the conventional HYRAX expander.

  9. Finite Element Analysis of Bone Stress around Micro-Implants of Different Diameters and Lengths with Application of a Single or Composite Torque Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying-juan; Chang, Shao-hai; Ye, Jian-tao; Ye, Yu-shan; Yu, Yan-song

    2015-01-01

    Stress on the bone surrounding dental micro-implants affects implant success. To compare the stress on the bone surrounding a micro-implant after application of a single force (SF) of 200 g or a composite force (CF) of 200 g and 6 N.mm torque. Finite element models were developed for micro-implant diameters of 1.2, 1.6, and 2.0 mm, and lengths of 6, 8, 10, and 12 mm and either a SF or CF was applied. The maximum equivalent stress (Max EQS) of the bone surrounding the micro-implant was determined, and the relationships among type of force, diameter, and length were evaluated. The Max EQS of the CF exceeded that of the SF (Pimplant diameter, but not to implant length. The larger CF led to greater instability of the micro-implant and the effect was most pronounced at an implant diameter of 1.2 mm. The use of implant diameters of 1.6 mm and 2.0 mm produced no significant difference in implant stability when either a CF or SF was applied. When considering the use of an implant to perform three-dimensional control on the teeth, the implant diameter chosen should be > 1.2 mm.

  10. Influence of Implant Positions and Occlusal Forces on Peri-Implant Bone Stress in Mandibular Two-Implant Overdentures: A 3-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Arenal, Angel; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Ignacio; deLlanos-Lanchares, Hector; Brizuela-Velasco, Aritza; Dds, Elena Martin-Fernandez; Ellacuria-Echebarria, Joseba

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the bone stress around implants in mandibular 2-implant overdentures depending on the implant location and different loading conditions. Four 3-dimensional finite element models simulating a mandibular 2-implant overdenture and a Locator attachment system were designed. The implants were located at the lateral incisor, canine, second premolar, and crossed-implant levels. A 150 N unilateral and bilateral vertical load of different location was applied, as was 40 N when combined with midline load. Data for von Mises stress were produced numerically, color coded, and compared between the models for peri-implant bone and loading conditions. With unilateral loading, in all 4 models much higher peri-implant bone stress values were recorded on the load side compared with the no-load side, while with bilateral occlusal loading, the stress distribution was similar on both sides. In all models, the posterior unilateral load showed the highest stress, which decreased as the load was applied more mesially. In general, the best biomechanical environment in the peri-implant bone was found in the model with implants at premolar level. In the crossed-implant model, the load side greatly altered the biomechanical environment. Overall, the overdenture with implants at second premolar level should be the chosen design, regardless of where the load is applied. The occlusal loading application site influences the bone stress around the implant. Bilateral occlusal loading distributes the peri-implant bone stress symmetrically, while unilateral loading increases it greatly on the load side, no matter where the implants are located.

  11. Finite Element Simulation of Mechanical and Moisture-Related Stresses in Laterally Loaded Multi-Dowel Timber Connections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormarsson, Sigurdur; Dahlblom, O.; Nygaard, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Numerical simulations of stress distribution within a moment stiff timber frame corner have been performed. The frame corner is a multi-dowel connection with two slotted-in steel plates. The interaction between the fasteners and the wood material is modelled as a full contact interaction based...

  12. Influence of prosthesis type and material on the stress distribution in bone around implants: A 3-dimensional finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökçe Meriç

    2011-03-01

    Conclusions: Prosthesis design and materials affect the load-transmission mechanism. Although additional experimental and clinical studies are needed, FRC FPDs can be considered a suitable alternative treatment choice for implant-supported prostheses. Within the limitations of the study, the 3-unit FPD supported by 2 implants with a cantilevered extension revealed acceptable stress distributions.

  13. Finite-element formulations for the thermal stress analysis of two- and three-dimensional thin reactor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Kennedy, J.M.; Belytschko, T.B.; Schoeberle, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    In several postulated LMFBR subassembly-to-subassembly failure propagation events, it is hypothesized that the duct wall of an accident subassembly fails and deposits molten fuel on the outer wall of an adjacent subassembly. It is therefore necessary to determine if the deposited fuel will fail the adjacent wall and thus propagate the event. This entails a thermal stress analysis, and since at times the adjacent subassembly is internally pressurized, thermomechanical analysis are also of value. Solutions are presented for several elastic plastic thermal problems. Some of these examples are compared to available analytic solutions. In addition, the hypothetical accident of molten fuel deposition on the adjacent hexcan is addressed. Combinations of pressure and thermal loading are considered. It is shown that the principal feature of the response is a large in-plane compressive stress which would undoubtedly cause buckling

  14. Finite element analysis of thermal stresses of the reactor vessel in a severe light water reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovkov, A.I.; Semenov, A.S.; Granovsky, V.S.; Kovtunova, S.V.

    1995-01-01

    The thermal stress and damage analysis of the light water reactor (LWR) vessel is considered in a severe accident conditions. The high temperature corium accumulates on the vessel bottom and necessary condition of its holding is intensive cooling of vessel. External flooding with outside cooling of the LWR vessel is one of the accident management strategies being proposed to ensure the integrity of the vessel after a severe accident. (author). 8 refs., 5 figs

  15. Finite element analysis of thermal stresses of the reactor vessel in a severe light water reactor accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovkov, A.I.; Semenov, A.S. [St. Petersburg State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation); Granovsky, V.S.; Kovtunova, S.V. [Research Inst. of Technology, Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The thermal stress and damage analysis of the light water reactor (LWR) vessel is considered in a severe accident conditions. The high temperature corium accumulates on the vessel bottom and necessary condition of its holding is intensive cooling of vessel. External flooding with outside cooling of the LWR vessel is one of the accident management strategies being proposed to ensure the integrity of the vessel after a severe accident. (author). 8 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Influence of Number of Implants and Attachment Type on Stress Distribution in Mandibular Implant-Retained Overdentures: Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed I. El-Anwar

    2017-03-01

    CONCLUSION: Caps deformation and stresses are negligible in cases of using locator attachment in comparison to ball attachments. This may indicate longer lifetime and less repair/maintenance operations in implant overdentures retained by locator attachments. Although the study revealed that bone was insensitive to a number of implants or attachment type, it may be recommended to use two implants in the canine region than using four, where the locator attachments were found to be better.

  17. Finite Element Analysis of Stress Distribution in Three Commonly Used Implant Systems in D2 and D4 Bone Densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Radha

    2016-01-01

    Materials and Methods : Pro-engineer 3-0 software was used to create the geometric models of the three implant systems (Nobel biocare, Biohorizon, Adin and two bone densities D2 and D4. Six 3D models were created to simulate each one of the three implant systems supporting a metal ceramic crown placed in two different densities of bone D2 and D4. The Poisson′s ratio(΅ and Youngs modulus(E of elasticity were assigned to different materials used for the models. Vertical and oblique loads of 450N each were applied on all six models. Von Mises stress analysis was done with ANSYS software. Results : Von Mises stresses were more within D4 type bone than D2 type, for all the three systems of implants and less stresses were seen in Biohorizon implant followed by Nobel Biocare and Adin implant particularly in D4 bone. Conclusion: The study concluded that the selection of a particular implant system should be based on the scientific research rather than on popularity.

  18. Evaluation of polymerization shrinkage, polymerization shrinkage stress, wear resistance, and compressive strength of a silorane-based composite: A finite element analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Mitthra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding the mechanical properties is important in predicting the clinical behavior of composites. Finite element analysis (FEA evaluates properties of materials replicating clinical scenario. Aim: This study evaluated polymerization shrinkage and stress, wear resistance (WR, and compressive strength (CS of silorane in comparison with two methacrylate resins. Settings and Design: This study design was a numerical study using FEA. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional (3D models of maxillary premolar with Class I cavities (2 mm depth, 4 mm length, and 2.5 mm width created and restored with silorane, nanohybrid, and microhybrid; Groups I, II, and III, respectively. Loads of 200–600 N were applied. Polymerization shrinkage was first determined by displacement produced in the X, Y, and Z planes. Maximum stress distribution due to shrinkage was calculated using AN SYS software. 3D cube models of composite resins were simulated with varying filler particle size. Similar loads were applied. WR and compressive stress were calculated: K W L/H and load/cross-sectional area, respectively. Statistical analysis done using one-way ANOVA, Kruskal–Wallis, and Tukey's honestly significant difference test (P < 0.05. Results: Polymerization shrinkage (0.99% and shrinkage stress (233.21 Mpa of silorane were less compared to microhybrid (2.14% and 472.43 Mpa and nanohybrid (2.32% and 464.88 Mpa. Silorane (7.92×/1011 μm/mm3 and nanohybrid (7.79×/1011 showed superior WR than microhybrid (1.113×/1017. There was no significant difference in compressive stress among the groups. Conclusion: Silorane exhibited less polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress compared to methacrylates. Silorane and nanohybrid showed greater WR compared to microhybrid. CS of all groups was similar.

  19. Finite element method (FEM) model of the mechanical stress on phospholipid membranes from shock waves produced in nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ronald; Roth, Caleb C.; Shadaram, Mehdi; Beier, Hope; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2015-03-01

    The underlying mechanism(s) responsible for nanoporation of phospholipid membranes by nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsEP) remains unknown. The passage of a high electric field through a conductive medium creates two primary contributing factors that may induce poration: the electric field interaction at the membrane and the shockwave produced from electrostriction of a polar submersion medium exposed to an electric field. Previous work has focused on the electric field interaction at the cell membrane, through such models as the transport lattice method. Our objective is to model the shock wave cell membrane interaction induced from the density perturbation formed at the rising edge of a high voltage pulse in a polar liquid resulting in a shock wave propagating away from the electrode toward the cell membrane. Utilizing previous data from cell membrane mechanical parameters, and nsEP generated shockwave parameters, an acoustic shock wave model based on the Helmholtz equation for sound pressure was developed and coupled to a cell membrane model with finite-element modeling in COMSOL. The acoustic structure interaction model was developed to illustrate the harmonic membrane displacements and stresses resulting from shockwave and membrane interaction based on Hooke's law. Poration is predicted by utilizing membrane mechanical breakdown parameters including cortical stress limits and hydrostatic pressure gradients.

  20. Experimental investigation and finite element simulation of laser beam welding induced residual stresses and distortions in thin sheets of AA 6056-T4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zain-ul-abdein, Muhammad; Nelias, Daniel; Jullien, Jean-Francois; Deloison, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Laser beam welding has recently found its application in the fabrication of aircraft structures where fuselage panels, made of thin sheets of AA 6056-T4 (an aluminium alloy), are welded with stiffeners of the same material in a T-joint configuration. The present work simulates laser beam welding induced residual stresses and distortions using industrially employed thermal and mechanical boundary conditions. Various measurements performed on small-scale welded test specimens provide a database of experimental results that serves as a benchmark for qualification of the simulation results. The welding simulation is performed with the commercial finite element software Abaqus and a Fortran programme encoding a conical heat source with Gaussian volumetric distribution of flux. A sequentially coupled temperature-displacement analysis is undertaken to simulate the weld pool geometry, transient temperature and displacement fields. The material is assumed to follow an elasto-plastic law with isotropic hardening behaviour (von Mises plasticity model). A comparison between the experimental and simulation results shows a good agreement. Finally, the residual stress and strain states in a T-joint are predicted.

  1. An introduction to the UNCLE finite element scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enderby, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    UNCLE is a completely general finite element scheme which provides common input, output, equation-solving and other facilities for a family of finite element codes for linear and non-linear stress analysis, heat transfer etc. This report describes the concepts on which UNCLE is based and gives a general account of the facilities provided. (author)

  2. Analysis of Tube Drawing Process – A Finite Element Approach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper the effect of die semi angle on drawing load in cold tube drawing has been investigated numerically using the finite element method. The equation governing the stress distribution was derived and solved using Galerkin finite element method. An isoparametric formulation for the governing equation was utilized ...

  3. An introduction to the UNCLE finite element scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enderby, J A [UK Atomic Energy Authority, Northern Division, Risley Nuclear Power Development Establishment, Risley, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    1983-05-01

    UNCLE is a completely general finite element scheme which provides common input, output, equation-solving and other facilities for a family of finite element codes for linear and non-linear stress analysis, heat transfer etc. This report describes the concepts on which UNCLE is based and gives a general account of the facilities provided. (author)

  4. Influence of different abutment diameter of implants on the peri-implant stress in the crestal bone: A three-dimensional finite element analysis--In vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradya, Anupama; Kumar, U Krishna; Chowdhary, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    The study was designed to evaluate and compare stress distribution in transcortical section of bone with normal abutment and platform switched abutment under vertical and oblique forces in posterior mandible region. A three-dimensional finite element model was designed using ANSYS 13.0 software. The type of bone selection for the model was made of type II mandibular bone, having cortical bone thickness ranging from 0.595 mm to 1.515 mm with the crestal region measuring 1.5 mm surrounding dense trabecular bone. The implant will be modulated at 5 mm restorative platform and tapering down to 4.5 mm wide at the threads, 13 mm long with an abutment 3 mm in height. The models will be designed for two situations: (1) An implant with a 5 mm diameter abutment representing a standard platform in the posterior mandible region. (2) An implant with a 4.5 mm diameter abutment representing platform switching in the posterior mandible region. Force application was performed in both oblique and vertical conditions using 100 N as a representative masticatory force. For oblique loading, a force of 100 N was applied at 15° from the vertical axis. von Mises stress analysis was evaluated. The results of the study showed cortical stress in the conventional and platform switching model under oblique forces were 59.329 MPa and 39.952 MPa, respectively. Cortical stress in the conventional and platform switching model under vertical forces was 13.914 MPa and 12.793 MPa, respectively. Results from this study showed the platform switched abutment led to relative decrease in von Mises stress in transcortical section of bone compared to normal abutment under vertical and oblique forces in posterior mandible region.

  5. A comparison of stress distribution and flexion among various designs of bar attachments for implant overdentures: A three dimensional finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Vijay

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Bar overdentures are popular choices among clinicians worldwide but configurations that provide an optimal biomechanical distribution of stress are still debatable. Aims: To compare the stresses and elastic flexion between implant supported bar overdentures in various configurations using finite element analysis. Settings and Design: A CAT scan of a human mandible was used to generate an anatomically accurate mechanical model. Materials and Methods: Three models with bars and clips in three different configurations were constructed. Model 1 had a single bar connecting two implants, Model 2 had three bars connecting all the four implants, and Model 3 had two bars connecting the medial and distal implants on the sides only. The models were loaded under static conditions with 100N load distributed at the approximate position of the clip. The mandibular boundary conditions were modeled considering the real geometry of its muscle supporting system. Maximum von Mises stress at the level of the bar and at the bone implant interface were compared in all three models. The flexion of mandible and the bar was also compared qualitatively. Statistical Analysis Used: The analyses were accomplished using the ANSYS software program and were processed by a personal computer. Stress on these models was analyzed after loading conditions. Results: Qualitative comparisons showed that stress at the level of the bar and at the bone implant interface were in the following order: Model 1> Model 3> Model 2. The flexion of the mandible and the bar were in the following order: Model 2 > Model 1 > Model 3. Conclusions: Four implant bar systems connected by bars on the sides only is a better choice than two implant bar systems and four implant bar systems with bars connecting all four implants.

  6. Analysis of residual stresses due to roll-expansion process: Finite element computation and validation by experimental tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aufaure, M.; Boudot, R.; Zacharie, G.; Proix, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The steam generator heat exchangers of pressurized water reactors are made of U-shaped tubes, both ends of them being fixed to a plate by roll-expansion. This process consists in increasing the tube section by means of a rotating tool in order to apply its outer side to the surface of the hole through the plate. As reported by de Keroulas (1986), in service cracks appeared on these tubes in the transition from expanded to nonexpanded portions. So we developed a program to compute residual stresses at the surface of the tubes, which caused their cracking, and to endeavour to lower their level by acting on some parameters. This program was validated by experimental tests. (orig.)

  7. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book analyzes finite element theory as applied to computational fluid mechanics. It includes a chapter on using the heat conduction equation to expose the essence of finite element theory, including higher-order accuracy and convergence in a common knowledge framework. Another chapter generalizes the algorithm to extend application to the nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. Other chapters are concerned with the analysis of a specific fluids mechanics problem class, including theory and applications. Some of the topics covered include finite element theory for linear mechanics; potential flow; weighted residuals/galerkin finite element theory; inviscid and convection dominated flows; boundary layers; parabolic three-dimensional flows; and viscous and rotational flows

  8. Biomechanical Influence of Implant Neck Designs on Stress Distribution over Adjacent Bone: A Three-Dimensional Non-Linear Finite Element Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikman Ishak, Muhammad; Shafi, Aisyah Ahmad; Mohamad, Su Natasha; Jizat, Noorlindawaty Md

    2018-03-01

    The design of dental implant body has a major influence on the stress dissipation over adjacent bone as numbers of implant failure cases reported in past clinical studies. Besides, the inappropriate implant features may cause excessive high or low stresses which could possibly contribute to pathologic bone resorption or atrophy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of different configurations of implant neck on stress dispersion within the adjacent bone via three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA). A set of computed tomography (CT) images of craniofacial was used to reconstruct a 3-D model of mandible using an image-processing software. The selected region of interest was the left side covering the second premolar, first molar and second molar regions. The bone model consisted of both compact (cortical) and porous (cancellous) structures. Three dental implant sets (crown, implant body, and abutment) with different designs of implant neck – straight, tapered with 15°, and tapered with 30° were modelled using a computer-aided design (CAD) software and all models were then analysed via 3-D FEA software. Top surface of first molar crown was subjected to occlusal forces of 114.6 N, 17.2 N, and 23.4 N in the axial, lingual, and mesio-distal directions, respectively. All planes of the mandible model were rigidly constrained in all directions. The result has demonstrated that the straight implant body neck is superior in attributing to high stress generation over adjacent bone as compared to others. This may associate with lower frictional resistance produced than those of tapered designs to withstand the applied loads.

  9. Stress concentration during pellet cladding interaction: Comparison of closed-form solutions with 2D(r,θ) finite element simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sercombe, Jérôme; Masson, Renaud; Helfer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper presents closed-formed solutions concerning pellet cladding interaction. • First, the opening of a radial crack in a pellet fragment is estimated. • Second, the stresses in the cladding in front of the pellet crack are calculated. • The closed-formed solutions are found in good agreement with 2D FE simulations. • They are then used in the fuel code ALCYONE to model PCI during power ramps. -- Abstract: This paper presents two closed-form solutions that can be used to enrich the mechanical description of fuel pellets and cladding behavior in standard one-dimensional based fuel performance codes. The first one is concerned with the estimation of the opening of a radial crack in a pellet fragment induced by the radial thermal gradient in the pellet and limited by the pellet-clad contact pressure. The second one describes the stress distribution in a cladding bore in front of an opening pellet crack. A linear angular variation of the pellet-clad contact pressure and a constant prescribed radial displacement are considered. The closed-form solutions are checked by comparison to independent finite element models of the pellet fragment and of the cladding. Their ability to describe non-axisymmetric displacement and stress fields during loading histories representative of base irradiation and power ramps is then demonstrated by cross-comparison with the 2D pellet fragment-cladding model of the multi-dimensional fuel performance code ALCYONE. The calculated radial crack opening profiles at different times and the hoop stress concentration in the cladding at the top of the ramp are found in good agreement with ALCYONE

  10. Stress and strain distribution in three different mini dental implant designs using in implant retained overdenture: a finite element analysis study

    Science.gov (United States)

    AUNMEUNGTONG, W.; KHONGKHUNTHIAN, P.; RUNGSIYAKULL, P.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been used for prediction of stress and strain between dental implant components and bone in the implant design process. Purpose Purpose of this study was to characterize and analyze stress and strain distribution occurring in bone and implants and to compare stress and strain of three different implant designs. Materials and methods Three different mini dental implant designs were included in this study: 1. a mini dental implant with an internal implant-abutment connection (MDIi); 2. a mini dental implant with an external implant-abutment connection (MDIe); 3. a single piece mini dental implant (MDIs). All implant designs were scanned using micro-CT scans. The imaging details of the implants were used to simulate models for FEA. An artificial bone volume of 9×9 mm in size was constructed and each implant was placed separately at the center of each bone model. All bone-implant models were simulatively loaded under an axial compressive force of 100 N and a 45-degree force of 100 N loading at the top of the implants using computer software to evaluate stress and strain distribution. Results There was no difference in stress or strain between the three implant designs. The stress and strain occurring in all three mini dental implant designs were mainly localized at the cortical bone around the bone-implant interface. Oblique 45° loading caused increased deformation, magnitude and distribution of stress and strain in all implant models. Conclusions Within the limits of this study, the average stress and strain in bone and implant models with MDIi were similar to those with MDIe and MDIs. The oblique 45° load played an important role in dramatically increased average stress and strain in all bone-implant models. Clinical implications Mini dental implants with external or internal connections have similar stress distribution to single piece mini dental implants. In clinical situations, the three types of mini dental implant

  11. Stress Analysis of Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    8217, Finite Elements in Nonlinear Mechanics, 1., 109-130, Tapir Publishers, Norway (1978). 9. A.J. Barnard and P.W. Sharman, ’Elastic-Plastic Analysis Using...Hybrid Stress Finite Elements,’ Finite Elements in Nonlinear Mechanics, 1, 131-148, Tapir Publishers Norway, (1978). ’.........Pian, ’Variational

  12. Finite Element Simulation of Fracture Toughness Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Seok Jae; Liu, Cong Hao

    2013-01-01

    Finite element simulations of tensile tests were performed to determine the equivalent stress - equivalent plastic strain curves, critical equivalent stresses, and critical equivalent plastic strains. Then, the curves were used as inputs to finite element simulations of fracture toughness tests to determine the plane strain fracture toughness. The critical COD was taken as the COD when the equivalent plastic strain at the crack tip reached a critical value, and it was used as a crack growth criterion. The relationship between the critical COD and the critical equivalent plastic strain or the reduction of area was found. The relationship between the plane strain fracture toughness and the product of the critical equivalent stress and the critical equivalent plastic strain was also found

  13. Finite element analysis of ARPS structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhkamp, J.D.; McDougal, J.R.; Kramer, D.P.

    1998-01-01

    Algor finite element software was used to determine the stresses and deflections in the metallic walls of Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (ARPS) designs. The preliminary design review of these systems often neglects the structural integrity of the design which can effect fabrication and the end use of the design. Before finite element analysis (FEA) was run on the canister walls of the thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generator, hand calculations were used to approximate the stresses and deflections in a flat plate. These results compared favorably to the FEA results of a similar size flat plate. The AMTEC (Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Conversion) cells were analyzed by FEA and the results compared to two cells that were mechanically tested. The mechanically tested cells buckled in the thin sections, one at the top and one in the lower section. The FEA predicted similar stress and shape results but the critical buckling load was found to be very shape dependent

  14. Determining the Critical Slip Surface of Three-Dimensional Soil Slopes from the Stress Fields Solved Using the Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-chuan Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The slope stability problem is an important issue for the safety of human beings and structures. The stability analysis of the three-dimensional (3D slope is essential to prevent landslides, but the most important and difficult problem is how to determine the 3D critical slip surface with the minimum factor of safety in earth slopes. Basing on the slope stress field with the finite element method, a stability analysis method is proposed to determine the critical slip surface and the corresponding safety factor of 3D soil slopes. Spherical and ellipsoidal slip surfaces are considered through the analysis. The moment equilibrium is used to compute the safety factor combined with the Mohr-Coulomb criteria and the limit equilibrium principle. Some assumptions are introduced to reduce the search range of center points and the radius of spheres or ellipsoids. The proposed method is validated by a classical 3D benchmark soil slope. Simulated results indicate that the safety factor of the benchmark slope is 2.14 using the spherical slip surface and 2.19 using the ellipsoidal slip surface, which is close to the results of previous methods. The simulated results indicate that the proposed method can be used for the stability analysis of a 3D soil slope.

  15. Stope Stability Assessment and Effect of Horizontal to Vertical Stress Ratio on the Yielding and Relaxation Zones Around Underground Open Stopes Using Empirical and Finite Element Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehri, Mohammadali; Apel, Derek; Liu, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Predicting the stability of open stopes can be a challenging task for underground mine engineers. For decades, the stability graph method has been used as the first step of open stope design around the world. However, there are some shortcomings with this method. For instance, the stability graph method does not account for the relaxation zones around the stopes. Another limitation of the stability graph is that this method cannot to be used to evaluate the stability of the stopes with high walls made of backfill materials. However, there are several analytical and numerical methods that can be used to overcome these limitations. In this study, both empirical and numerical methods have been used to assess the stability of an open stope located between mine levels N9225 and N9250 at Diavik diamond underground mine. It was shown that the numerical methods can be used as complementary methods along with other analytical and empirical methods to assess the stability of open stopes. A three dimensional elastoplastic finite element model was constructed using Abaqus software. In this paper a sensitivity analysis was performed to investigate the impact of the stress ratio "k" on the extent of the yielding and relaxation zones around the hangingwall and footwall of the understudy stope.

  16. The variation of the unitary stresses occurring in the working part in relation to the type of soil, using the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiorescu, E.; Chiorescu, D.

    2017-08-01

    Agriculture brings a major contribution to the sustainable development of the economy, providing food to people. Because of the continuous growth of the population, there is an ever increasing need of food worldwide. For this reason, it is necessary to study the contact between the soil and the active tool of the cultivators, in relation to the type of soil and its parameters. The physical-mechanical characteristics of the soils are influenced by the moving velocity of the working part, as well as by the humidity of the soil. The humidity triggers the change of the friction coefficient at the soil-steel contact, being of significant importance for the decrease of the working resistance of the working tools and responsible for increasing exploitation costs. The model used for the soil has a non-linear plastic behavior of the Drucker Prager type, being different from the Mises model. The programming software Ansys was used for the simulation with the finite element method, allowing the study of the behavior of the active working part, the normal stress being analyzed in real conditions, at various depths and velocities for a soil with a clay-sandy texture.

  17. Real-time patient-specific finite element analysis of internal stresses in the soft tissues of a residual limb: a new tool for prosthetic fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoy, S; Yarnitzky, G; Yizhar, Z; Kristal, A; Oppenheim, U; Siev-Ner, I; Gefen, A

    2007-01-01

    Fitting of a prosthetic socket is a critical stage in the process of rehabilitation of a trans-tibial amputation (TTA) patient, since a misfit may cause pressure ulcers or a deep tissue injury (DTI: necrosis of the muscle flap under intact skin) in the residual limb. To date, prosthetic fitting typically depends on the subjective skills of the prosthetist, and is not supported by biomedical instrumentation that allows evaluation of the quality of fitting. Specifically, no technology is presently available to provide real-time continuous information on the internal distribution of mechanical stresses in the residual limb during fitting of the prosthesis, or while using it and this severely limits patient evaluations. In this study, a simplified yet clinically oriented patient-specific finite element (FE) model of the residual limb was developed for real-time stress analysis. For this purpose we employed a custom-made FE code that continuously calculates internal stresses in the residual limb, based on boundary conditions acquired in real-time from force sensors, located at the limb-prosthesis interface. Validation of the modeling system was accomplished by means of a synthetic phantom of the residual limb, which allowed simultaneous measurements of interface pressures and internal stresses. Human studies were conducted subsequently in five TTA patients. The dimensions of bones and soft tissues were obtained from X-rays of the residual limb of each patient. An indentation test was performed in order to obtain the effective elastic modulus of the soft tissues of the residual limb. Seven force sensors were placed between the residual limb and the prosthetic liner, and subjects walked on a treadmill during analysis. Generally, stresses under the shinbones were approximately threefold higher than stresses at the soft tissues behind the bones. Usage of a thigh corset decreased the stresses in the residual limb during gait by approximately 80%. Also, the stresses

  18. Verification of Orthogrid Finite Element Modeling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeve, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    The stress analysis of orthogrid structures, specifically with I-beam sections, is regularly performed using finite elements. Various modeling techniques are often used to simplify the modeling process but still adequately capture the actual hardware behavior. The accuracy of such 'Oshort cutso' is sometimes in question. This report compares three modeling techniques to actual test results from a loaded orthogrid panel. The finite element models include a beam, shell, and mixed beam and shell element model. Results show that the shell element model performs the best, but that the simpler beam and beam and shell element models provide reasonable to conservative results for a stress analysis. When deflection and stiffness is critical, it is important to capture the effect of the orthogrid nodes in the model.

  19. On the reliability of finite element solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, K.S.R.K.

    1975-01-01

    The extent of reliability of the finite element method for analysis of nuclear reactor structures, and that of reactor vessels in particular and the need for the engineer to guard against the pitfalls that may arise out of both physical and mathematical models have been high-lighted. A systematic way of checking the model to obtain reasonably accurate solutions is presented. Quite often sophisticated elements are suggested for specific design and stress concentration problems. The desirability or otherwise of these elements, their scope and utility vis-a-vis the use of large stack of conventional elements are discussed from the view point of stress analysts. The methods of obtaining a check on the reliability of the finite element solutions either through modelling changes or an extrapolation technique are discussed. (author)

  20. Finite element analysis of nonlinear creeping flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loula, A.F.D.; Guerreiro, J.N.C.

    1988-12-01

    Steady-state creep problems with monotone constitutive laws are studied. Finite element approximations are constructed based on mixed Petrov-Galerkin formulations for constrained problems. Stability, convergence and a priori error estimates are proved for equal-order discontinuous stress and continuous velocity interpolations. Numerical results are presented confirming the rates of convergence predicted in the analysis and the good performance of this formulation. (author) [pt

  1. Crack Propagation by Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    H. Ricardo, Luiz Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Crack propagation simulation began with the development of the finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique. The aim of this paper is to verify the effect of different crack propagation rates in determination of crack opening and closing stress of an ASTM specimen under a standard suspension spectrum loading from FD&E SAE Keyh...

  2. A study on the nonlinear finite element analysis of reinforced concrete structures: shell finite element formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Seo, Jeong Moon

    2000-08-01

    The main goal of this research is to establish a methodology of finite element analysis of containment building predicting not only global behaviour but also local failure mode. In this report, we summerize some existing numerical analysis techniques to be improved for containment building. In other words, a complete description of the standard degenerated shell finite element formulation is provided for nonlinear stress analysis of nuclear containment structure. A shell finite element is derived using the degenerated solid concept which does not rely on a specific shell theory. Reissner-Mindlin assumptions are adopted to consider the transverse shear deformation effect. In order to minimize the sensitivity of the constitutive equation to structural types, microscopic material model is adopted. The four solution algorithms based on the standard Newton-Raphson method are discussed. Finally, two numerical examples are carried out to test the performance of the adopted shell medel.

  3. A study on the nonlinear finite element analysis of reinforced concrete structures: shell finite element formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Seo, Jeong Moon

    2000-08-01

    The main goal of this research is to establish a methodology of finite element analysis of containment building predicting not only global behaviour but also local failure mode. In this report, we summerize some existing numerical analysis techniques to be improved for containment building. In other words, a complete description of the standard degenerated shell finite element formulation is provided for nonlinear stress analysis of nuclear containment structure. A shell finite element is derived using the degenerated solid concept which does not rely on a specific shell theory. Reissner-Mindlin assumptions are adopted to consider the transverse shear deformation effect. In order to minimize the sensitivity of the constitutive equation to structural types, microscopic material model is adopted. The four solution algorithms based on the standard Newton-Raphson method are discussed. Finally, two numerical examples are carried out to test the performance of the adopted shell medel

  4. Finite element analysis of metallurgical phase transformations in AA 6056-T4 and their effects upon the residual stress and distortion states of a laser welded T-joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zain-ul-abdein, Muhammad; Nelias, Daniel; Jullien, Jean-Francois; Boitout, Frederic; Dischert, Luc; Noe, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft industry makes extensive use of aluminium alloy AA 6056-T4 in the fabrication of fuselage panels using laser beam welding technique. Since high temperatures are involved in the manufacturing process, the precipitation/dissolution occurrences are expected as solid state phase transformations. These transformations are likely to affect the residual distortion and stress states of the component. The present work investigates the effect of metallurgical phase transformations upon the residual stresses and distortions induced by laser beam welding in a T-joint configuration using the finite element method. Two separate models were studied using different finite element codes, where the first one describes a thermo-mechanical analysis using Abaqus; while the second one discusses a thermo-metallo-mechanical analysis using Sysweld. A comparative analysis of experimentally validated finite element models has been performed and the residual stress states with and without the metallurgical phase transformations are predicted. The results show that the inclusion of phase transformations has a negligible effect on predicted distortions, which are in agreement with the experimental data, but an effect on predicted residual stresses, although the experimentally measured residual stresses are not available to support the analyses.

  5. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PECINGINA OLIMPIA-MIOARA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The application of finite element method is analytical when solutions can not be applied for deeper study analyzes static, dynamic or other types of requirements in different points of the structures .In practice it is necessary to know the behavior of the structure or certain parts components of the machine under the influence of certain factors static and dynamic . The application of finite element in the optimization of components leads to economic growth , to increase reliability and durability organs studied, thus the machine itself.

  6. Finite elements of nonlinear continua

    CERN Document Server

    Oden, John Tinsley

    1972-01-01

    Geared toward undergraduate and graduate students, this text extends applications of the finite element method from linear problems in elastic structures to a broad class of practical, nonlinear problems in continuum mechanics. It treats both theory and applications from a general and unifying point of view.The text reviews the thermomechanical principles of continuous media and the properties of the finite element method, and then brings them together to produce discrete physical models of nonlinear continua. The mathematical properties of these models are analyzed, along with the numerical s

  7. Finite element modeling of the filament winding process using ABAQUS

    OpenAIRE

    Miltenberger, Louis C.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive stress model of the filament winding fabrication process, previously implemented in the finite element program, WACSAFE, was implemented using the ABAQUS finite element software package. This new implementation, referred to as the ABWACSAFE procedure, consists of the ABAQUS software and a pre/postprocessing routine that was developed to prepare necessary ABAQUS input files and process ABAQUS displacement results for stress and strain computation. The ABWACSAF...

  8. On symmetric pyramidal finite elements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liu, L.; Davies, K. B.; Yuan, K.; Křížek, Michal

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 11, 1-2 (2004), s. 213-227 ISSN 1492-8760 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1019201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : mesh generation * finite element method * composite elements Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.108, year: 2004

  9. Structure and mechanical properties of Cresco-Ti laser-welded joints and stress analyses using finite element models of fixed distal extension and fixed partial prosthetic designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Hakan; Kurtoglu, Cem; Gurbuz, Riza; Tutuncu, Naki

    2005-03-01

    The Cresco-Ti System uses a laser-welded process that provides an efficient technique to achieve passive fit frameworks. However, mechanical behavior of the laser-welded joint under biomechanical stress factors has not been demonstrated. This study describes the effect of Cresco-Ti laser-welding conditions on the material properties of the welded specimen and analyzes stresses on the weld joint through 3-dimensional finite element models (3-D FEM) of implant-supported fixed dentures with cantilever extensions and fixed partial denture designs. Twenty Grade III (ASTM B348) commercially pure titanium specimens were machine-milled to the dimensions described in the EN10002-1 tensile test standard and divided into test (n = 10) and control (n = 10) groups. The test specimens were sectioned and laser-welded. All specimens were subjected to tensile testing to determine yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and percent elongation (PE). The Knoop micro-indentation test was performed to determine the hardness of all specimens. On welded specimens, the hardness test was performed at the welded surface. Data were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U test and Student's t test (alpha=.05). Fracture surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy to characterize the mode of fracture and identify defects due to welding. Three-dimensional FEMs were created that simulated a fixed denture with cantilever extensions supported by 5 implants (M1) and a fixed partial denture supported by 2 implants (M2), 1 of which was angled 30 degrees mesio-axially. An oblique load of 400 N with 15 degrees lingual-axial inclinations was applied to both models at various locations. Test specimens fractured between the weld and the parent material. No porosities were observed on the fractured surfaces. Mean values for YS, UTS, PE, and Knoop hardness were 428 +/- 88 MPa, 574 +/- 113 MPa, 11.2 +/- 0.4%, 270 +/- 17 KHN, respectively, for the control group and 642 +/- 2 MPa, 772 +/- 72

  10. Automation of finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Korelc, Jože

    2016-01-01

    New finite elements are needed as well in research as in industry environments for the development of virtual prediction techniques. The design and implementation of novel finite elements for specific purposes is a tedious and time consuming task, especially for nonlinear formulations. The automation of this process can help to speed up this process considerably since the generation of the final computer code can be accelerated by order of several magnitudes. This book provides the reader with the required knowledge needed to employ modern automatic tools like AceGen within solid mechanics in a successful way. It covers the range from the theoretical background, algorithmic treatments to many different applications. The book is written for advanced students in the engineering field and for researchers in educational and industrial environments.

  11. Finite elements methods in mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Eslami, M Reza

    2014-01-01

    This book covers all basic areas of mechanical engineering, such as fluid mechanics, heat conduction, beams, and elasticity with detailed derivations for the mass, stiffness, and force matrices. It is especially designed to give physical feeling to the reader for finite element approximation by the introduction of finite elements to the elevation of elastic membrane. A detailed treatment of computer methods with numerical examples are provided. In the fluid mechanics chapter, the conventional and vorticity transport formulations for viscous incompressible fluid flow with discussion on the method of solution are presented. The variational and Galerkin formulations of the heat conduction, beams, and elasticity problems are also discussed in detail. Three computer codes are provided to solve the elastic membrane problem. One of them solves the Poisson’s equation. The second computer program handles the two dimensional elasticity problems, and the third one presents the three dimensional transient heat conducti...

  12. Modelling bucket excavation by finite element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecingina, O. M.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in geological components of the layers from lignite pits have an impact on the sustainability of the cup path elements and under the action of excavation force appear efforts leading to deformation of the entire assembly. Application of finite element method in the optimization of components leads to economic growth, to increase the reliability and durability of the studied machine parts thus the machine. It is obvious usefulness of knowledge the state of mechanical tensions that the designed piece or the assembly not to break under the action of tensions that must cope during operation. In the course of excavation work on all bucket cutting force components, the first coming into contact with the material being excavated cutting edge. Therefore in the study with finite element analysis is retained only cutting edge. To study the field of stress and strain on the cutting edge will be created geometric patterns for each type of cup this will be subject to static analysis. The geometric design retains the cutting edge shape and on this on the tooth cassette location will apply an areal force on the abutment tooth. The cutting edge real pattern is subjected to finite element study for the worst case of rock cutting by symmetrical and asymmetrical cups whose profile is different. The purpose of this paper is to determine the displacement and tensions field for both profiles considering the maximum force applied on the cutting edge and the depth of the cutting is equal with the width of the cutting edge of the tooth. It will consider the worst case when on the structure will act both the tangential force and radial force on the bucket profile. For determination of stress and strain field on the form design of cutting edge profile will apply maximum force assuming uniform distribution and on the edge surface force will apply a radial force. After geometric patterns discretization on the cutting knives and determining stress field, can be seen that at the

  13. Structural modeling techniques by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yeong Jin; Kim, Geung Hwan; Ju, Gwan Jeong

    1991-01-01

    This book includes introduction table of contents chapter 1 finite element idealization introduction summary of the finite element method equilibrium and compatibility in the finite element solution degrees of freedom symmetry and anti symmetry modeling guidelines local analysis example references chapter 2 static analysis structural geometry finite element models analysis procedure modeling guidelines references chapter 3 dynamic analysis models for dynamic analysis dynamic analysis procedures modeling guidelines and modeling guidelines.

  14. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bond, Stephen D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Littlewood, David John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, Stan Gerald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  15. Linear and Nonlinear Finite Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    Metzler. Con/ ugte rapdent solution of a finite element elastic problem with high Poson rato without scaling and once with the global stiffness matrix K...nonzero c, that makes u(0) = 1. According to the linear, small deflection theory of the membrane the central displacement given to the membrane is not... theory is possible based on the approximations (l-y 2 )t = +y’ 2 +y𔃾 , (1-y𔃼)’ 1-y’ 2 - y" (6) that change eq. (5) to V𔃺) = , [yŖ(1 + y") - Qy𔃼

  16. Complex finite element sensitivity method for creep analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Farias, Armando; Montoya, Arturo; Millwater, Harry

    2015-01-01

    The complex finite element method (ZFEM) has been extended to perform sensitivity analysis for mechanical and structural systems undergoing creep deformation. ZFEM uses a complex finite element formulation to provide shape, material, and loading derivatives of the system response, providing an insight into the essential factors which control the behavior of the system as a function of time. A complex variable-based quadrilateral user element (UEL) subroutine implementing the power law creep constitutive formulation was incorporated within the Abaqus commercial finite element software. The results of the complex finite element computations were verified by comparing them to the reference solution for the steady-state creep problem of a thick-walled cylinder in the power law creep range. A practical application of the ZFEM implementation to creep deformation analysis is the calculation of the skeletal point of a notched bar test from a single ZFEM run. In contrast, the standard finite element procedure requires multiple runs. The value of the skeletal point is that it identifies the location where the stress state is accurate, regardless of the certainty of the creep material properties. - Highlights: • A novel finite element sensitivity method (ZFEM) for creep was introduced. • ZFEM has the capability to calculate accurate partial derivatives. • ZFEM can be used for identification of the skeletal point of creep structures. • ZFEM can be easily implemented in a commercial software, e.g. Abaqus. • ZFEM results were shown to be in excellent agreement with analytical solutions

  17. Finite element simulation of asphalt fatigue testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullidtz, Per; Kieler, Thomas Lau; Kargo, Anders

    1997-01-01

    The traditional interpretation of fatigue tests on asphalt mixes has been in terms of a logarithmic linear relationship between the constant stress or strain amplitude and the number of load repetitions to cause failure, often defined as a decrease in modulus to half the initial value...... damage mechanics.The paper describes how continuum damage mechanics may be used with a finite element program to explain the progressive deterioration of asphalt mixes under laboratory fatigue testing. Both constant stress and constant strain testing are simulated, and compared to the actual results from...... three point and four point fatigue test on different mixes. It is shown that the same damage law, based on energy density, may be used to explain the gradual deterioration under constant stress as well as under constant strain testing.Some of the advantages of using this method for interpreting fatigue...

  18. Engineering computation of structures the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, Maria Augusta; Roseiro, Luis; Cirne, José; Leal, Rogério

    2015-01-01

    This book presents theories and the main useful techniques of the Finite Element Method (FEM), with an introduction to FEM and many case studies of its use in engineering practice. It supports engineers and students to solve primarily linear problems in mechanical engineering, with a main focus on static and dynamic structural problems. Readers of this text are encouraged to discover the proper relationship between theory and practice, within the finite element method: Practice without theory is blind, but theory without practice is sterile. Beginning with elasticity basic concepts and the classical theories of stressed materials, the work goes on to apply the relationship between forces, displacements, stresses and strains on the process of modeling, simulating and designing engineered technical systems. Chapters discuss the finite element equations for static, eigenvalue analysis, as well as transient analyses. Students and practitioners using commercial FEM software will find this book very helpful. It us...

  19. Estimation of the Thickness and the Material Combination of the Thermal Stress Control Layer (TSCL) for the Stellite21 Hardfaced STD61 Hot Working Tool Steel Using Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Na-Ra; Ahn, Dong-Gyu; Oh, Jin-Woo

    2014-01-01

    The research on a thermal stress control layer (TSCL) begins to undertake to reduce residual stress and strain in the vicinity of the joined region between the hardfacing layer and the base part. The goal of this paper is to estimate the material combination and the thickness of TSCL for the Stellite21 hardfaced STD61 hot working tool steel via three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). TSCL is created by the combination of Stellite21 and STD61. The thickness of TSCL ranges from 0.5 mm to 1.5 mm. The influence of the material combination and the thickness of TSCL on temperature, thermal stress and thermal strain distributions of the hardfaced part have been investigated. The results of the investigation have been revealed that a proper material combination of TSCL is Stellite21 of 50 % and STD61 of 50 %, and its appropriate thickness is 1.0 mm

  20. Finite element application to global reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, F.A.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Finite Element Method is described as a Coarse Mesh Method with general basis and trial functions. Various consequences concerning programming and application of Finite Element Methods in reactor physics are drawn. One of the conclusions is that the Finite Element Method is a valuable tool in solving global reactor analysis problems. However, problems which can be described by rectangular boxes still can be solved with special coarse mesh programs more efficiently. (orig.) [de

  1. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  2. A first course in finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Fish, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Developed from the authors, combined total of 50 years undergraduate and graduate teaching experience, this book presents the finite element method formulated as a general-purpose numerical procedure for solving engineering problems governed by partial differential equations.  Focusing on the formulation and application of the finite element method through the integration of finite element theory, code development, and software application, the book is both introductory and self-contained, as well as being a hands-on experience for any student. This authoritative text on Finite Elements:Adopts

  3. Finite Element Analysis of Circular Plate using SolidWorks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yeo Jin; Jhung, Myung Jo

    2011-01-01

    Circular plates are used extensively in mechanical engineering for nuclear reactor internal components. The examples in the reactor vessel internals are upper guide structure support plate, fuel alignment plate, lower support plate etc. To verify the structural integrity of these plates, the finite element analyses are performed, which require the development of the finite element model. Sometimes it is very costly and time consuming to make the model especially for the beginners who start their engineering job for the structural analysis, necessitating a simple method to develop the finite element model for the pursuing structural analysis. Therefore in this study, the input decks are generated for the finite element analysis of a circular plate as shown in Fig. 1, which can be used for the structural analysis such as modal analysis, response spectrum analysis, stress analysis, etc using the commercial program Solid Works. The example problems are solved and the results are included for analysts to perform easily the finite element analysis of the mechanical plate components due to various loadings. The various results presented in this study would be helpful not only for the benchmark calculations and results comparisons but also as a part of the knowledge management for the future generation of young designers, scientists and computer analysts

  4. Finite element coiled cochlea model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isailovic, Velibor; Nikolic, Milica; Milosevic, Zarko; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Radovic, Milos; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Cochlea is important part of the hearing system, and thanks to special structure converts external sound waves into neural impulses which go to the brain. Shape of the cochlea is like snail, so geometry of the cochlea model is complex. The simplified cochlea coiled model was developed using finite element method inside SIFEM FP7 project. Software application is created on the way that user can prescribe set of the parameters for spiral cochlea, as well as material properties and boundary conditions to the model. Several mathematical models were tested. The acoustic wave equation for describing fluid in the cochlea chambers - scala vestibuli and scala timpani, and Newtonian dynamics for describing vibrations of the basilar membrane are used. The mechanical behavior of the coiled cochlea was analyzed and the third chamber, scala media, was not modeled because it does not have a significant impact on the mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Future work is needed for more realistic geometry model. Coiled model of the cochlea was created and results are compared with initial simplified coiled model of the cochlea.

  5. Finite element simulation of ironing process under warm conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swadesh Kumar Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal forming is one of the most important steps in manufacturing of a large variety of products. Ironing in deep drawing is done by adjusting the clearance between the punch and the die and allow the material flow over the punch. In the present investigation effect of extent of ironing behavior on the characteristics of the product like thickness distribution with respect to temperature was studied. With the help of finite element simulation using explicit finite element code LS-DYNA the stress in the drawn cup were predicted in the drawn cup. To increase the accuracy in the simulation process, numbers of integration points were increased in the thickness direction and it was found that there is very close prediction of finite element results to that of experimental ones.

  6. Finite element analysis of tubular joints in offshore structures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... representing a 2-D model of the joint between the brace and the chord walls. This was subsequently followed but finite element analysis of six tubular joints. A global analysis was initially undertaken, then the submodel analysis carried in the areas of stress concentration. Journal of Civil Engineering, JKUAT (2001) Vol 6, ...

  7. A cohesive finite element formulation for modelling fracture and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cohesive elements experience material softening and lose their stress carrying capacity. A few simple ..... In the present work, a Lagrangian finite element procedure is employed. In this formu clation ...... o, is related to 'c o by,. 't o='c o ¼ 1 ہ. 1.

  8. Appendix F : finite element analysis of end region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    FE (finite element) modeling was conducted to 1) provide a better understanding of the : elastic behavior of the end region prior to cracking and 2) to evaluate the effects of bearing pad : stiffness and width on end region elastic stresses. The FEA ...

  9. Non-linear finite element modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    The note is written for courses in "Non-linear finite element method". The note has been used by the author teaching non-linear finite element modeling at Civil Engineering at Aalborg University, Computational Mechanics at Aalborg University Esbjerg, Structural Engineering at the University...

  10. Nonlinear finite element modeling of corrugated board

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. C. Gilchrist; J. C. Suhling; T. J. Urbanik

    1999-01-01

    In this research, an investigation on the mechanical behavior of corrugated board has been performed using finite element analysis. Numerical finite element models for corrugated board geometries have been created and executed. Both geometric (large deformation) and material nonlinearities were included in the models. The analyses were performed using the commercial...

  11. Why do probabilistic finite element analysis ?

    CERN Document Server

    Thacker, Ben H

    2008-01-01

    The intention of this book is to provide an introduction to performing probabilistic finite element analysis. As a short guideline, the objective is to inform the reader of the use, benefits and issues associated with performing probabilistic finite element analysis without excessive theory or mathematical detail.

  12. Finite-Element Software for Conceptual Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemann, J.; Sandberg, G.; Damkilde, Lars

    2010-01-01

    and research. Forcepad is an effort to provide a conceptual design and teaching tool in a finite-element software package. Forcepad is a two-dimensional finite-element application based on the same conceptual model as image editing applications such as Adobe Photoshop or Microsoft Paint. Instead of using...

  13. Contact stress by the method of finite elements of the steel AISI 1045 hardened by roller; Tensiones de contacto por el metodo de elementos finitos del acero AISI 1045 endurecido por rodillo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-columbie, T.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, I.; Alcantara-Borges, D.; Fernandez-Guilarte, E.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the tense-deformational behavior is analyzed by means of simulation using the finite element method for AISI 1045 cold rolled deformed steel. ANYSYS V.10 software was used in this study. Revolution number, compressive strength and tool feed rate were the variables considered in the deformation process. They allowed determining the contact stress of the deformed material. The material used was 30 mm diameter and 100 mm length. Samples of 30 mm diameter and 3 mm thickness were prepared for the optical microscopic observation, which were compared to the results obtained from the simulation. The tensile status of the deformed samples was evaluated as from the reduction of the average size of the grains as per the strength applied. This study intends to show that the cold hardening method is a surface hardening option. (Author)

  14. Finite element simulations of two rock mechanics tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlke, H.J.; Lott, S.A.

    1986-04-01

    Rock mechanics tests are performed to determine in situ stress conditions and material properties of an underground rock mass. To design stable underground facilities for the permanent storage of high-level nuclear waste, determination of these properties and conditions is a necessary first step. However, before a test and its associated equipment can be designed, the engineer needs to know the range of expected values to be measured by the instruments. Sensitivity studies by means of finite element simulations are employed in this preliminary design phase to evaluate the pertinent parameters and their effects on the proposed measurements. The simulations, of two typical rock mechanics tests, the plate bearing test and the flat-jack test, by means of the finite element analysis, are described. The plate bearing test is used to determine the rock mass deformation modulus. The flat-jack test is used to determine the in situ stress conditions of the host rock. For the plate bearing test, two finite element models are used to simulate the classic problem of a load on an elastic half space and the actual problem of a plate bearing test in an underground tunnel of circular cross section. For the flat-jack simulation, a single finite element model is used to simulate both horizontal and vertical slots. Results will be compared to closed-form solutions available in the literature

  15. The effect of implant number and position on the stress behavior of mandibular implant retained overdentures: A three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topkaya, Tolga; Solmaz, Murat Yavuz

    2015-07-16

    The present study evaluated the effects of ball anchor abutment attached to implants with a 4.30 mm diameter and 11 mm insert length on stress distribution in a patient without any remaining teeth in the lower jaw. In the study, the stress analysis was performed for five different configurations (2 with 4 implant-supported and 3 with 2 implant-supported) and three different loading types using ANSYS Workbench software. The stresses measured in the 4 implant-supported models were lower compared to the stresses measured in the 2 implant-supported models. The stresses on the implants intensified on the cervical region of the implants. When the effects of the loading sites on the stress were examined, the loading on the first molar tooth produced the highest stresses on the implants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Books and monographs on finite element technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper proviees a listing of all of the English books and some of the foreign books on finite element technology, taking into account also a list of the conference proceedings devoted solely to finite elements. The references are divided into categories. Attention is given to fundamentals, mathematical foundations, structural and solid mechanics applications, fluid mechanics applications, other applied science and engineering applications, computer implementation and software systems, computational and modeling aspects, special topics, boundary element methods, proceedings of symmposia and conferences on finite element technology, bibliographies, handbooks, and historical accounts.

  17. Electrical machine analysis using finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Nicola

    2005-01-01

    OUTLINE OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDSVector AnalysisElectromagnetic FieldsFundamental Equations SummaryReferencesBASIC PRINCIPLES OF FINITE ELEMENT METHODSIntroductionField Problems with Boundary ConditionsClassical Method for the Field Problem SolutionThe Classical Residual Method (Galerkin's Method)The Classical Variational Method (Rayleigh-Ritz's Method)The Finite Element MethodReferencesAPPLICATIONS OF THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD TO TWO-DIMENSIONAL FIELDSIntroductionLinear Interpolation of the Function fApplication of the Variational MethodSimple Descriptions of Electromagnetic FieldsAppendix: I

  18. Finite element analysis of piezoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowrie, F.; Stewart, M.; Cain, M.; Gee, M.

    1999-01-01

    This guide is intended to help people wanting to do finite element analysis of piezoelectric materials by answering some of the questions that are peculiar to piezoelectric materials. The document is not intended as a complete beginners guide for finite element analysis in general as this is better dealt with by the individual software producers. The guide is based around the commercial package ANSYS as this is a popular package amongst piezoelectric material users, however much of the information will still be useful to users of other finite element codes. (author)

  19. Stochastic Finite Element Analysis of Non-Linear Structures Modelled by Plasticity Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frier, Christian; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2003-01-01

    A Finite Element Reliability Method (FERM) is introduced to perform reliability analyses on two-dimensional structures in plane stress, modeled by non-linear plasticity theory. FERM is a coupling between the First Order Reliability Method (FORM) and the Finite Element Method (FEM). FERM can be us...

  20. Investigation of faulted tunnel models by combined photoelasticity and finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladkany, S.G.; Huang, Yuping

    1994-01-01

    Models of square and circular tunnels with short faults cutting through their surfaces are investigated by photoelasticity. These models, when duplicated by finite element analysis can predict the stress states of square or circular faulted tunnels adequately. Finite element analysis, using gap elements, may be used to investigate full size faulted tunnel system

  1. Stress analysis at bone-implant interface of single- and two-implant-retained mandibular overdenture using three-dimensional finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnakumar Lahoti

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, it had been seen that stresses produced were the highest on HB and SB in single implant-retained mandibular overdenture while stresses produced across the denture as well as implant were the highest in two-implant-retained mandibular overdenture.

  2. Finite element methods a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Whiteley, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    This book presents practical applications of the finite element method to general differential equations. The underlying strategy of deriving the finite element solution is introduced using linear ordinary differential equations, thus allowing the basic concepts of the finite element solution to be introduced without being obscured by the additional mathematical detail required when applying this technique to partial differential equations. The author generalizes the presented approach to partial differential equations which include nonlinearities. The book also includes variations of the finite element method such as different classes of meshes and basic functions. Practical application of the theory is emphasised, with development of all concepts leading ultimately to a description of their computational implementation illustrated using Matlab functions. The target audience primarily comprises applied researchers and practitioners in engineering, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  3. Advanced finite element method in structural engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Yu-Qiu; Long, Zhi-Fei

    2009-01-01

    This book systematically introduces the research work on the Finite Element Method completed over the past 25 years. Original theoretical achievements and their applications in the fields of structural engineering and computational mechanics are discussed.

  4. ANSYS mechanical APDL for finite element analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    ANSYS Mechanical APDL for Finite Element Analysis provides a hands-on introduction to engineering analysis using one of the most powerful commercial general purposes finite element programs on the market. Students will find a practical and integrated approach that combines finite element theory with best practices for developing, verifying, validating and interpreting the results of finite element models, while engineering professionals will appreciate the deep insight presented on the program's structure and behavior. Additional topics covered include an introduction to commands, input files, batch processing, and other advanced features in ANSYS. The book is written in a lecture/lab style, and each topic is supported by examples, exercises and suggestions for additional readings in the program documentation. Exercises gradually increase in difficulty and complexity, helping readers quickly gain confidence to independently use the program. This provides a solid foundation on which to build, preparing readers...

  5. Review on Finite Element Method * ERHUNMWUN, ID ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: In this work, we have discussed what Finite Element Method (FEM) is, its historical development, advantages and ... residual procedures, are examples of the direct approach ... The paper centred on the "stiffness and deflection of ...

  6. Finite element bending behaviour of discretely delaminated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    due to their light weight, high specific strength and stiffness properties. ... cylindrical shell roofs respectively using finite element method with centrally located .... where { }ε and { }γ are the direct and shear strains in midplane and { }κ denotes ...

  7. Bibliography for finite elements. [2200 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteman, J R [comp.

    1975-01-01

    This bibliography cites almost all of the significant papers on advances in the mathematical theory of finite elements. Reported are applications in aeronautical, civil, mechanical, nautical and nuclear engineering. Such topics as classical analysis, functional analysis, approximation theory, fluids, and diffusion are covered. Over 2200 references to publications up to the end of 1974 are included. Publications are listed alphabetically by author and also by keywords. In addition, finite element packages are listed.

  8. The finite element method in electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Jianming

    2014-01-01

    A new edition of the leading textbook on the finite element method, incorporating major advancements and further applications in the field of electromagnetics The finite element method (FEM) is a powerful simulation technique used to solve boundary-value problems in a variety of engineering circumstances. It has been widely used for analysis of electromagnetic fields in antennas, radar scattering, RF and microwave engineering, high-speed/high-frequency circuits, wireless communication, electromagnetic compatibility, photonics, remote sensing, biomedical engineering, and space exploration. The

  9. Surgery simulation using fast finite elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes our recent work on real-time surgery simulation using fast finite element models of linear elasticity. In addition, we discuss various improvements in terms of speed and realism......This paper describes our recent work on real-time surgery simulation using fast finite element models of linear elasticity. In addition, we discuss various improvements in terms of speed and realism...

  10. Autologous nerve graft repair of different degrees of sciatic nerve defect:stress and displacement at the anastomosis in a three-dimensional finite element simulation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-dong Piao; Kun Yang; Peng Li; Min Luo

    2015-01-01

    In the repair of peripheral nerve injury using autologous or synthetic nerve grafting, the mag-nitude of tensile forces at the anastomosis affects its response to physiological stress and the ultimate success of the treatment. One-dimensional stretching is commonly used to measure changes in tensile stress and strain; however, the accuracy of this simple method is limited. There-fore, in the present study, we established three-dimensional ifnite element models of sciatic nerve defects repaired by autologous nerve grafts. Using PRO E 5.0 ifnite element simulation software, we calculated the maximum stress and displacement of an anastomosis under a 5 N load in 10-, 20-, 30-, 40-mm long autologous nerve grafts. We found that maximum displacement increased with graft length, consistent with specimen force. These ifndings indicate that three-dimensional ifnite element simulation is a feasible method for analyzing stress and displacement at the anas-tomosis after autologous nerve grafting.

  11. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of the stress distribution in the endodontically treated maxillary central incisor by glass fiber post and dentin post

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarfaraz Memon

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The FEA results showed that the stress in the cervical area of the dentin was more for fiber post when compared to dentin post, and maximum displacement values were less for dentin post in comparison to fiber post.

  12. Steam generator tube rupture simulation using extended finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Extended finite element method used for modeling the steam generator tube rupture. • Crack propagation is modeled in an arbitrary solution dependent path. • The FE model is used for estimating the rupture pressure of steam generator tubes. • Crack coalescence modeling is also demonstrated. • The method can be used for crack modeling of tubes under severe accident condition. - Abstract: A steam generator (SG) is an important component of any pressurized water reactor. Steam generator tubes represent a primary pressure boundary whose integrity is vital to the safe operation of the reactor. SG tubes may rupture due to propagation of a crack created by mechanisms such as stress corrosion cracking, fatigue, etc. It is thus important to estimate the rupture pressures of cracked tubes for structural integrity evaluation of SGs. The objective of the present paper is to demonstrate the use of extended finite element method capability of commercially available ABAQUS software, to model SG tubes with preexisting flaws and to estimate their rupture pressures. For the purpose, elastic–plastic finite element models were developed for different SG tubes made from Alloy 600 material. The simulation results were compared with experimental results available from the steam generator tube integrity program (SGTIP) sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). A reasonable correlation was found between extended finite element model results and experimental results.

  13. Steam generator tube rupture simulation using extended finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Extended finite element method used for modeling the steam generator tube rupture. • Crack propagation is modeled in an arbitrary solution dependent path. • The FE model is used for estimating the rupture pressure of steam generator tubes. • Crack coalescence modeling is also demonstrated. • The method can be used for crack modeling of tubes under severe accident condition. - Abstract: A steam generator (SG) is an important component of any pressurized water reactor. Steam generator tubes represent a primary pressure boundary whose integrity is vital to the safe operation of the reactor. SG tubes may rupture due to propagation of a crack created by mechanisms such as stress corrosion cracking, fatigue, etc. It is thus important to estimate the rupture pressures of cracked tubes for structural integrity evaluation of SGs. The objective of the present paper is to demonstrate the use of extended finite element method capability of commercially available ABAQUS software, to model SG tubes with preexisting flaws and to estimate their rupture pressures. For the purpose, elastic–plastic finite element models were developed for different SG tubes made from Alloy 600 material. The simulation results were compared with experimental results available from the steam generator tube integrity program (SGTIP) sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). A reasonable correlation was found between extended finite element model results and experimental results.

  14. Coupling of smooth particle hydrodynamics with the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaway, S.W.; Heinstein, M.W.; Swegle, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    A gridless technique called smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) has been coupled with the transient dynamics finite element code ppercase[pronto]. In this paper, a new weighted residual derivation for the SPH method will be presented, and the methods used to embed SPH within ppercase[pronto] will be outlined. Example SPH ppercase[pronto] calculations will also be presented. One major difficulty associated with the Lagrangian finite element method is modeling materials with no shear strength; for example, gases, fluids and explosive biproducts. Typically, these materials can be modeled for only a short time with a Lagrangian finite element code. Large distortions cause tangling of the mesh, which will eventually lead to numerical difficulties, such as negative element area or ''bow tie'' elements. Remeshing will allow the problem to continue for a short while, but the large distortions can prevent a complete analysis. SPH is a gridless Lagrangian technique. Requiring no mesh, SPH has the potential to model material fracture, large shear flows and penetration. SPH computes the strain rate and the stress divergence based on the nearest neighbors of a particle, which are determined using an efficient particle-sorting technique. Embedding the SPH method within ppercase[pronto] allows part of the problem to be modeled with quadrilateral finite elements, while other parts are modeled with the gridless SPH method. SPH elements are coupled to the quadrilateral elements through a contact-like algorithm. ((orig.))

  15. A finite element model of ferroelectric/ferroelastic polycrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HWANG,STEPHEN C.; MCMEEKING,ROBERT M.

    2000-02-17

    A finite element model of polarization switching in a polycrystalline ferroelectric/ferroelastic ceramic is developed. It is assumed that a crystallite switches if the reduction in potential energy of the polycrystal exceeds a critical energy barrier per unit volume of switching material. Each crystallite is represented by a finite element with the possible dipole directions assigned randomly subject to crystallographic constraints. The model accounts for both electric field induced (i.e. ferroelectric) switching and stress induced (i.e. ferroelastic) switching with piezoelectric interactions. Experimentally measured elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric constants are used consistently, but different effective critical energy barriers are selected phenomenologically. Electric displacement versus electric field, strain versus electric field, stress versus strain, and stress versus electric displacement loops of a ceramic lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) are modeled well below the Curie temperature.

  16. Peak stresses shift from femoral tunnel aperture to tibial tunnel aperture in lateral tibial tunnel ACL reconstructions: a 3D graft-bending angle measurement and finite-element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Bracht, Hans; Tampere, Thomas; Beekman, Pieter; Schepens, Alexander; Devriendt, Wouter; Verdonk, Peter; Victor, Jan

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the effect of tibial tunnel orientation on graft-bending angle and stress distribution in the ACL graft. Eight cadaveric knees were scanned in extension, 45°, 90°, and full flexion. 3D reconstructions with anatomically placed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) grafts were constructed with Mimics 14.12 ® . 3D graft-bending angles were measured for classic medial tibial tunnels (MTT) and lateral tibial tunnels (LTT) with different drill-guide angles (DGA) (45°, 55°, 65°, and 75°). A pivot shift was performed on 1 knee in a finite-element analysis. The peak stresses in the graft were calculated for eight different tibial tunnel orientations. In a classic anatomical ACL repair, the largest graft-bending angle and peak stresses are seen at the femoral tunnel aperture. The use of a different DGA at the tibial side does not change the graft-bending angle at the femoral side or magnitude of peak stresses significantly. When using LTT, the largest graft-bending angles and peak stresses are seen at the tibial tunnel aperture. In a classic anatomical ACL repair, peak stresses in the ACL graft are found at the femoral tunnel aperture. When an LTT is used, peak stresses are similar compared to classic ACL repairs, but the location of the peak stress will shift from the femoral tunnel aperture towards the tibial tunnel aperture. the risk of graft rupture is similar for both MTTs and LTTs, but the location of graft rupture changes from the femoral tunnel aperture towards the tibial tunnel aperture, respectively. I.

  17. Investigation of Shear Stud Performance in Flat Plate Using Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Viswanathan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Three types of shear stud arrangement, respectively featuring an orthogonal, a radial and a critical perimeter pattern, were evaluated numerically. A numerical investigation was conducted using the finite element software ABAQUS to evaluate their ability to resist punching shear in a flat plate. The finite element analysis here is an application of the nonlinear analysis of reinforced concrete structures using three-dimensional solid finite elements. The nonlinear characteristics of concrete were achieved by employing the concrete damaged plasticity model in the finite element program. Transverse shear stress was evaluated using finite element analysis in terms of shear stress distribution for flat plate with and without shear stud reinforcement. The model predicted that shear studs placed along the critical perimeter are more effective compared to orthogonal and radial patterns.

  18. Integral finite element analysis of turntable bearing with flexible rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Biao; Liu, Yunfei; Guo, Yuan; Tang, Shengjin; Su, Wenbin; Lei, Zhufeng; Wang, Pengcheng

    2018-03-01

    This paper suggests a method to calculate the internal load distribution and contact stress of the thrust angular contact ball turntable bearing by FEA. The influence of the stiffness of the bearing structure and the plastic deformation of contact area on the internal load distribution and contact stress of the bearing is considered. In this method, the load-deformation relationship of the rolling elements is determined by the finite element contact analysis of a single rolling element and the raceway. Based on this, the nonlinear contact between the rolling elements and the inner and outer ring raceways is same as a nonlinear compression spring and bearing integral finite element analysis model including support structure was established. The effects of structural deformation and plastic deformation on the built-in stress distribution of slewing bearing are investigated on basis of comparing the consequences of load distribution, inner and outer ring stress, contact stress and other finite element analysis results with the traditional bearing theory, which has guiding function for improving the design of slewing bearing.

  19. [The Waste Package Project. Final report, July 1, 1995--February 27, 1996]: Volume 3, Stress study in faulted tunnel models by combined photoelastic measurements and finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladkany, S.G.; Huang, Yuping.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this part of the Nuclear Waste Package Project research at UNLV is to investigate the stresses in a model of a faulted mountain and the effect of the fault on the stability of drifts in a proposed High Level Nuclear Waste Repository. An investigation was performed to develop a proper technique for analyzing the stresses in and around three adjacent scaled tunnel models, along with the stress concentration factors resulting from the existence of a fault that penetrates two of the three tunnels, at an inclined angel of 44 degrees to the horizontal plane. The results and experience gained from this investigation will be used in a future project in which a full-size repository drift and a penetrating fault will be modeled and analyzed

  20. Nonlinear finite element analysis of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottosen, N.S.

    1980-05-01

    This report deals with nonlinear finite element analysis of concrete structures loaded in the short-term up until failure. A profound discussion of constitutive modelling on concrete is performed; a model, applicable for general stress states, is described and its predictions are compared with experimental data. This model is implemented in the AXIPLANE-program applicable for axisymmetrick and plane structures. The theoretical basis for this program is given. Using the AXIPLANE-program various concrete structures are analysed up until failure and compared with experimental evidence. These analyses include panels pressure vessel, beams failing in shear and finally a specific pull-out test, the Lok-Test, is considered. In these analyses, the influence of different failure criteria, aggregate interlock, dowel action, secondary cracking, magnitude of compressive strenght, magnitude of tensile strenght and of different post-failure behaviours of the concrete are evaluated. Moreover, it is shown that a suitable analysis of the theoretical data results in a clear insight into the physical behaviour of the considered structures. Finally, it is demonstrated that the AXISPLANE-program for widely different structures exhibiting very delicate structural aspects gives predictions that are in close agreement with experimental evidence. (author)

  1. Finite element simulation for creep crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Sasaki, Toru; Nakagaki, Michihiko; Brust, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element method was applied to a generation phase simulation of creep crack growth. Experimental data on creep crack growth in a 1Cr-1Mo-1/4V steel compact tension specimen were numerically simulated using a node-release technique and the variations of various fracture mechanics parameters such as CTOA, J, C * and T * during creep crack growth were calculated. The path-dependencies of the integral parameters J, C * and T * were also obtained to examine whether or not they could characterize the stress field near the tip of a crack propagating under creep condition. The following conclusions were obtained from the present analysis. (1) The J integral shows strong path-dependency during creep crack growth, so that it is does not characterize creep crack growth. (2) The C * integral shows path-dependency to some extent during creep crack growth even in the case of Norton type steady state creep law. Strictly speaking, we cannot use it as a fracture mechanics parameter characterizing creep crack growth. It is, however, useful from the practical viewpoint because it correlates well the rate of creep crack growth. (3) The T * integral shows good path-independency during creep crack growth. Therefore, it is a candidate for a fracture mechanics parameter characterizing creep crack growth. (author)

  2. Numerical Analysis of Residual Stress and Distortion Use Finite Element Method on Inner Bottom Construction of Geomarin IV Survey Ship with Welding Sequence Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syahroni, N.; Hartono, A. B. W.; Murtedjo, M.

    2018-03-01

    In the ship fabrication industry, welding is the most critical stage. If the quality of welding on ship fabrication is not good, then it will affect the strength and overall appearance of the structure. One of the factors that affect the quality of welding is residual stress and distortion. In this research welding simulation is performed on the inner bottom construction of Geomarin IV Ship Survey using shell element and has variation to welding sequence. In this study, welding simulations produced peak temperatures at 2490 K at variation 4. While the lowest peak temperature was produced by variation 2 with a temperature of 2339 K. After welding simulation, it continued simulating residual stresses and distortion. The smallest maximum tensile residual stress found in the inner bottom construction is 375.23 MPa, and the maximum tensile pressure is -20.18 MPa. The residual stress is obtained from variation 3. The distortion occurring in the inner bottom construction for X=720 mm is 4.2 mm and for X=-720 mm, the distortion is 4.92 mm. The distortion is obtained from the variation 3. Near the welding area, distortion value reaches its minimum point. This is because the stiffeners in the form of frames serves as anchoring.

  3. Finite element analysis of degraded concrete structures - Workshop proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    This workshop is related to the finite element analysis of degraded concrete structures. It is composed of three sessions. The first session (which title is: the use of finite element analysis in safety assessments) comprises six papers which titles are: Historical Development of Concrete Finite Element Modeling for Safety Evaluation of Accident-Challenged and Aging Concrete Structures; Experience with Finite Element Methods for Safety Assessments in Switzerland; Stress State Analysis of the Ignalina NPP Confinement System; Prestressed Containment: Behaviour when Concrete Cracking is Modelled; Application of FEA for Design and Support of NPP Containment in Russia; Verification Problems of Nuclear Installations Safety Software of Strength Analysis (NISS SA). The second session (title: concrete containment structures under accident loads) comprises seven papers which titles are: Two Application Examples of Concrete Containment Structures under Accident Load Conditions Using Finite Element Analysis; What Kind of Prediction for Leak rates for Nuclear Power Plant Containments in Accidental Conditions; Influence of Different Hypotheses Used in Numerical Models for Concrete At Elevated Temperatures on the Predicted Behaviour of NPP Core Catchers Under Severe Accident Conditions; Observations on the Constitutive Modeling of Concrete Under Multi-Axial States at Elevated Temperatures; Analyses of a Reinforced Concrete Containment with Liner Corrosion Damage; Program of Containment Concrete Control During Operation for the Temelin Nuclear Power Plant; Static Limit Load of a Deteriorated Hyperbolic Cooling Tower. The third session (concrete structures under extreme environmental load) comprised five papers which titles are: Shear Transfer Mechanism of RC Plates After Cracking; Seismic Back Calculation of an Auxiliary Building of the Nuclear Power Plant Muehleberg, Switzerland; Seismic Behaviour of Slightly Reinforced Shear Wall Structures; FE Analysis of Degraded Concrete

  4. Boundary conditions on the Jointed Block Test: A two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite element analysis of stresses and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, M.P.; Mitchell, S.J.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents the results from a numerical modeling study which was performed in support of the analysis of data from the Near-Surface Test Facility Block Test. The objective of the work was to investigate the potential for features of the test geometry and construction to influence the uniformity of the stress distribution across the test block and generate anomalous deformational response characteristics during loading. The analysis results indicated that the components of the test set-up can modify the imposed boundary conditions and affect the stress distribution in the block. However, the influence of these conditions was not sufficient to generate the anomalous conditions observed in actual field data. 5 refs

  5. Finite element modeling of micromachined MEMS photon devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Boyd M., III; Schonberger, D. W.; Datskos, Panos G.

    1999-09-01

    The technology of microelectronics that has evolved over the past half century is one of great power and sophistication and can now be extended to many applications (MEMS and MOEMS) other than electronics. An interesting application of MEMS quantum devices is the detection of electromagnetic radiation. The operation principle of MEMS quantum devices is based on the photoinduced stress in semiconductors, and the photon detection results from the measurement of the photoinduced bending. These devices can be described as micromechanical photon detectors. In this work, we have developed a technique for simulating electronic stresses using finite element analysis. We have used our technique to model the response of micromechanical photon devices to external stimuli and compared these results with experimental data. Material properties, geometry, and bimaterial design play an important role in the performance of micromechanical photon detectors. We have modeled these effects using finite element analysis and included the effects of bimaterial thickness coating, effective length of the device, width, and thickness.

  6. Finite Element Modeling of Micromachined MEMS Photon Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datskos, P.G.; Evans, B.M.; Schonberger, D.

    1999-01-01

    The technology of microelectronics that has evolved over the past half century is one of great power and sophistication and can now be extended to many applications (MEMS and MOEMS) other than electronics. An interesting application of MEMS quantum devices is the detection of electromagnetic radiation. The operation principle of MEMS quantum devices is based on the photoinduced stress in semiconductors, and the photon detection results from the measurement of the photoinduced bending. These devices can be described as micromechanical photon detectors. In this work, we have developed a technique for simulating electronic stresses using finite element analysis. We have used our technique to model the response of micromechanical photon devices to external stimuli and compared these results with experimental data. Material properties, geometry, and bimaterial design play an important role in the performance of micromechanical photon detectors. We have modeled these effects using finite element analysis and included the effects of bimaterial thickness coating, effective length of the device, width, and thickness

  7. Determination of the most appropriate stress distribution by Finite Element Analysis in fixation with resorbable screws after Bilateral Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkarat F.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Due to the complications associated with fixation by Titanium screws and plates in Bilateral Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy (BSSRO surgery, the use of resorbable polymers has been increasingly recommended. Since there are not enough studies on this issue, this study aimed to assess the most appropriate stress distribution in fixation with resorbable screws after BSSRO surgery by Fnite Element Analysis (FEA."nMaterials and Methods: This experimental study was performed on simulated human mandible using Ansys and Catia softwares. The osteotomy line was applied to the simulated model and experimental loads of 75, 135 and 600 N were respectively exerted according to the natural direction of occlusal force. The distribution pattern of stress was assessed and compared for fixation with one resorbable screw, two resorbable screws in vertical pattern, two resorbable screws in horizontal pattern, three resorbable screws in L pattern and three resorbable screws in inverted backward L pattern using Ansys software."nResults: Among the four simulated fixations, L pattern showed the highest primary stability. Two screws in vertical pattern were also associated with sufficient primary stability and less trauma and cost for patients. One screw did not provide enough stability under 600 N."nConclusion: Polymer-based resorbable screws (polyglycolic acid and D, L polylactide acid provided satisfactory primary stability in BSSRO surgery.

  8. [Application of Finite Element Method in Thoracolumbar Spine Traumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Qiu, Yong-gui; Shao, Yu; Gu, Xiao-feng; Zeng, Ming-wei

    2015-04-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is a mathematical technique using modern computer technology for stress analysis, and has been gradually used in simulating human body structures in the biomechanical field, especially more widely used in the research of thoracolumbar spine traumatology. This paper reviews the establishment of the thoracolumbar spine FEM, the verification of the FEM, and the thoracolumbar spine FEM research status in different fields, and discusses its prospects and values in forensic thoracolumbar traumatology.

  9. Finite elements for the thermomechanical calculation of massive structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argyris, J.H.; Szimmat, J.; Willam, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper examines the fine element analysis of thermal stress and deformation problems in massive structures. To this end compatible idealizations are utilized for heat conduction and static analysis in order to minimize the data transfer. For transient behaviour due to unsteady heat flow and/or inelastics material processes the two computational parts are interwoven in form of an integrated software package for finite element analysis of thermomechanical problems in space and time. (orig.) [de

  10. Finite Element Simulation of Diametral Strength Test of Hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozturk, Fahrettin; Toros, Serkan; Evis, Zafer

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the diametral strength test of sintered hydroxyapatite was simulated by the finite element software, ABAQUS/Standard. Stress distributions on diametral test sample were determined. The effect of sintering temperature on stress distribution of hydroxyapatite was studied. It was concluded that high sintering temperatures did not reduce the stress on hydroxyapatite. It had a negative effect on stress distribution of hydroxyapatite after 1300 deg. C. In addition to the porosity, other factors (sintering temperature, presence of phases and the degree of crystallinity) affect the diametral strength of the hydroxyapatite.

  11. A mixed finite element domain decomposition method for nearly elastic wave equations in the frequency domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xiaobing [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A non-overlapping domain decomposition iterative method is proposed and analyzed for mixed finite element methods for a sequence of noncoercive elliptic systems with radiation boundary conditions. These differential systems describe the motion of a nearly elastic solid in the frequency domain. The convergence of the iterative procedure is demonstrated and the rate of convergence is derived for the case when the domain is decomposed into subdomains in which each subdomain consists of an individual element associated with the mixed finite elements. The hybridization of mixed finite element methods plays a important role in the construction of the discrete procedure.

  12. Finite element modeling of TFTR poloidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, J.A.; O'Toole, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Poloidal Field (PF) coils were originally analyzed to TFTR design conditions. The coils have been reanalyzed by PPPL and Grumman to determine operating limits under as-built conditions. Critical stress levels, based upon data obtained from the reanalysis of each PF coil, are needed for input to the TFTR simulation code algorithms. The primary objective regarding structural integrity has been to ascertain the magnitude and location of critical internal stresses in each PF coil due to various combinations of electromagnetic and thermally induced loads. For each PF coil, a global finite element model (FEM) of a coil sector is being analyzed to obtain the basic coil internal loads and displacements. Subsequent fine mesh local models of the coil lead stem and lead spur regions produce the magnitudes and locations of peak stresses. Each copper turn and its surrounding insulation are modeled using solid finite elements. The corresponding electromagnetic and thermal analyses are similarly modeled. A series of test beams were developed to determine the best combination of MSC/NASTRAN-type finite elements for use in PF coil analysis. The results of this analysis compare favorably with those obtained by the earlier analysis which was limited in scope

  13. Finite Element Methods and Their Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhangxin

    2005-01-01

    This book serves as a text for one- or two-semester courses for upper-level undergraduates and beginning graduate students and as a professional reference for people who want to solve partial differential equations (PDEs) using finite element methods. The author has attempted to introduce every concept in the simplest possible setting and maintain a level of treatment that is as rigorous as possible without being unnecessarily abstract. Quite a lot of attention is given to discontinuous finite elements, characteristic finite elements, and to the applications in fluid and solid mechanics including applications to porous media flow, and applications to semiconductor modeling. An extensive set of exercises and references in each chapter are provided.

  14. The finite element response matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, H.; Martin, W.R.

    1983-02-01

    A new technique is developed with an alternative formulation of the response matrix method implemented with the finite element scheme. Two types of response matrices are generated from the Galerkin solution to the weak form of the diffusion equation subject to an arbitrary current and source. The piecewise polynomials are defined in two levels, the first for the local (assembly) calculations and the second for the global (core) response matrix calculations. This finite element response matrix technique was tested in two 2-dimensional test problems, 2D-IAEA benchmark problem and Biblis benchmark problem, with satisfatory results. The computational time, whereas the current code is not extensively optimized, is of the same order of the well estabilished coarse mesh codes. Furthermore, the application of the finite element technique in an alternative formulation of response matrix method permits the method to easily incorporate additional capabilities such as treatment of spatially dependent cross-sections, arbitrary geometrical configurations, and high heterogeneous assemblies. (Author) [pt

  15. Global-Local Finite Element Analysis of Bonded Single-Lap Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Bahattin; Madenci, Erdogan; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesively bonded lap joints involve dissimilar material junctions and sharp changes in geometry, possibly leading to premature failure. Although the finite element method is well suited to model the bonded lap joints, traditional finite elements are incapable of correctly resolving the stress state at junctions of dissimilar materials because of the unbounded nature of the stresses. In order to facilitate the use of bonded lap joints in future structures, this study presents a finite element technique utilizing a global (special) element coupled with traditional elements. The global element includes the singular behavior at the junction of dissimilar materials with or without traction-free surfaces.

  16. Three dimensional mathematical model of tooth for finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puškar Tatjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The mathematical model of the abutment tooth is the starting point of the finite element analysis of stress and deformation of dental structures. The simplest and easiest way is to form a model according to the literature data of dimensions and morphological characteristics of teeth. Our method is based on forming 3D models using standard geometrical forms (objects in programmes for solid modeling. Objective. Forming the mathematical model of abutment of the second upper premolar for finite element analysis of stress and deformation of dental structures. Methods. The abutment tooth has a form of a complex geometric object. It is suitable for modeling in programs for solid modeling SolidWorks. After analyzing the literature data about the morphological characteristics of teeth, we started the modeling dividing the tooth (complex geometric body into simple geometric bodies (cylinder, cone, pyramid,.... Connecting simple geometric bodies together or substricting bodies from the basic body, we formed complex geometric body, tooth. The model is then transferred into Abaqus, a computational programme for finite element analysis. Transferring the data was done by standard file format for transferring 3D models ACIS SAT. Results. Using the programme for solid modeling SolidWorks, we developed three models of abutment of the second maxillary premolar: the model of the intact abutment, the model of the endodontically treated tooth with two remaining cavity walls and the model of the endodontically treated tooth with two remaining walls and inserted post. Conclusion Mathematical models of the abutment made according to the literature data are very similar with the real abutment and the simplifications are minimal. These models enable calculations of stress and deformation of the dental structures. The finite element analysis provides useful information in understanding biomechanical problems and gives guidance for clinical research.

  17. A weak Galerkin least-squares finite element method for div-curl systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jichun; Ye, Xiu; Zhang, Shangyou

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a weak Galerkin least-squares method for solving div-curl problem. This finite element method leads to a symmetric positive definite system and has the flexibility to work with general meshes such as hybrid mesh, polytopal mesh and mesh with hanging nodes. Error estimates of the finite element solution are derived. The numerical examples demonstrate the robustness and flexibility of the proposed method.

  18. Finite elements for analysis and design

    CERN Document Server

    Akin, J E; Davenport, J H

    1994-01-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is an analysis tool for problem-solving used throughout applied mathematics, engineering, and scientific computing. Finite Elements for Analysis and Design provides a thoroughlyrevised and up-to-date account of this important tool and its numerous applications, with added emphasis on basic theory. Numerous worked examples are included to illustrate the material.Key Features* Akin clearly explains the FEM, a numerical analysis tool for problem-solving throughout applied mathematics, engineering and scientific computing* Basic theory has bee

  19. Implementation of a Unified Constitutive Model into the ABAQUS Finite Element Package

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wescott, R

    1999-01-01

    Unified constitutive models have previously been developed at AMRL and implemented into the PAFEC and ABAQUS Finite Element packages to predict the stress-strain response of structures that undergo...

  20. Finite element study of a HDR-RPV-section including a nozzle under thermal shock transient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany); Katzenmeier, G [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Wanner, R; Mercier, O [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1988-12-31

    This document presents a finite element study of a reactor pressure vessel section under thermal stresses. The strength properties of the vessel walls are studied as well as cracks due to the thermo-shock transient. (TEC). 6 refs.

  1. Finite element design procedure for correcting the coining die profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrino, Paulo; Leitão, Paulo J.; Alves, Luis M.; Martins, Paulo A. F.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a new finite element based design procedure for correcting the coining die profiles in order to optimize the distribution of pressure and the alignment of the resultant vertical force at the end of the die stroke. The procedure avoids time consuming and costly try-outs, does not interfere with the creative process of the sculptors and extends the service life of the coining dies by significantly decreasing the applied pressure and bending moments. The numerical simulations were carried out in a computer program based on the finite element flow formulation that is currently being developed by the authors in collaboration with the Portuguese Mint. A new experimental procedure based on the stack compression test is also proposed for determining the stress-strain curve of the materials directly from the coin blanks.

  2. Finite-element analysis of flawed and unflawed pipe tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.J.; Nickell, R.E.; Sullaway, M.F.

    1989-12-01

    Contemporary versions of the general purpose, nonlinear finite element program ABAQUS have been used in structural response verification exercises on flawed and unflawed austenitic stainless steel and ferritic steel piping. Among the topics examined, through comparison between ABAQUS calculations and test results, were: (1) the effect of using variations in the stress-strain relationship from the test article material on the calculated response; (2) the convergence properties of various finite element representations of the pipe geometry, using shell, beam and continuum models; (3) the effect of test system compliance; and (4) the validity of ABAQUS J-integral routines for flawed pipe evaluations. The study was culminated by the development and demonstration of a ''macroelement'' representation for the flawed pipe section. The macroelement can be inserted into an existing piping system model, in order to accurately treat the crack-opening and crack-closing static and dynamic response. 11 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab

  3. Finite-element pre-analysis for pressurized thermoshock tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keinaenen, H.; Talja, H.; Lehtonen, M.; Rintamaa, R.; Bljumin, A.; Timofeev, B.

    1992-05-01

    The behaviour of a model pressure vessel is studied in a pressurized thermal shock loading. The tests were performed at the Prometey Institute in St. Petersburg. The calculations were performed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland. The report describes the preliminary finite-element analyses for the fourth, fifth and sixth thermoshock tests with the first model pressure vessel. Seven pressurized thermoshock tests were made with the same model using five different flaw geometries. In the first three tests the flaw was actually a blunt notch. In the two following tests (tests 4 and 5) a sharp pre-crack was produced before the test. In the last two test (tests 6 and 7) the old crack was used. According to the measurements and post-test ultrasonic examination of the crack front, the sixth test led to significant crack extension. Both temperatures and stresses were calculated using the finite-element method. The calculations were made using the idealized initial flaw geometry and preliminary material data. Both two-and three-dimensional models were used in the calculations. J-integral values were calculated from the elastic-plastic finite-element results. The stress intensity factor values were evaluated on the basis of the calculated J-integrals and compared with the preliminary material fracture toughness data obtained from the Prometey Institute

  4. A short summary on finite element modelling of fatigue crack closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Konjengbam Darunkumar [Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati (India); Parry, Matthew Roger [Airbus Operations Ltd, Bristol(United Kingdom); Sinclair, Ian [University of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    This paper presents a short summary pertaining to the finite element modelling of fatigue crack closure. Several key issues related to finite element modelling of fatigue crack closure are highlighted: element type, mesh refinement, stabilization of crack closure, crack-tip node release scheme, constitutive model, specimen geometry, stress-states (i.e., plane stress, plane strain), crack closure monitoring. Reviews are presented for both straight and deflected cracks.

  5. Finite element analysis of inelastic structural behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argyris, J.H.; Szimmat, J.; Willam, K.J.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes recent achievements in the finite element analysis of inelastic material behavior. The main purpose is to examine the interaction of three disciplines; (i) the finite element formulation of large deformation problems in the light of a systematic linearization, (ii) the constitutive modelling of inelastic processes in the rate-dependent and rate-independent response regime and (iii) the numerical solution of nonlinear rate problems via incremental iteration techniques. In the first part, alternative finite element models are developed for the idealization of large deformation problems. A systematic approach is presented to linearize the field equations locally by an incremental procedure. The finite element formulation is then examined for the description of inelastic material processes. In the second part, nonlinear and inelastic material phenomena are classified and illustrated with representative examples of concrete and metal components. In particular, rate-dependent and rate-independent material behavior is examined and representative constitutive models are assessed for their mathematical characterization. Hypoelastic, elastoplastic and endochronic models are compared for the description rate-independent material phenomena. In the third part, the numerial solution of inelastic structural behavior is discussed. In this context, several incremental techniques are developed and compared for tracing the evolution of the inelastic process. The numerical procedures are examined with regard to stability and accuracy to assess the overall efficiency. The 'optimal' incremental technique is then contrasted with the computer storage requirements to retain the data for the 'memory-characteristics' of the constitutive model

  6. Finite element modelling of solidification phenomena

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The process of solidification process is complex in nature and the simulation of such process is required in industry before it is actually undertaken. Finite element method is used to simulate the heat transfer process accompanying the solidification process. The metal and the mould along with the air gap formation ...

  7. Image segmentation with a finite element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourdin, Blaise

    1999-01-01

    regularization results, make possible to imagine a finite element resolution method.In a first time, the Mumford-Shah functional is introduced and some existing results are quoted. Then, a discrete formulation for the Mumford-Shah problem is proposed and its $\\Gamma$-convergence is proved. Finally, some...

  8. Finite element analysis of tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Christian Nai En; Mikkelsen, Mikkel Peter W; Hansen, Leif Berner

    2010-01-01

    Project. The data consisted of 21,219 3D elements with a cortical shell and a trabecular core. Three types of load of torsion, a direct lateral load and axial compression were applied. RESULTS: The finite element linear static analysis resulted in relevant fracture localizations and indicated relevant...

  9. Quadrature representation of finite element variational forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølgaard, Kristian Breum; Wells, Garth N.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter addresses the conventional run-time quadrature approach for the numerical integration of local element tensors associated with finite element variational forms, and in particular automated optimizations that can be performed to reduce the number of floating point operations...

  10. A finite element for plates and shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, A.; Feijoo, R.A.; Bevilacqua, L.

    1981-08-01

    A simple triangular finite element for plates and shells, is presented. Since the rotation fields are assumed independent of the displacement fields, the element allows one to solve thick shells problems. In the limit for thin shell, the Kirchoff-Love hypothesis is automatically satisfied, thus enlarging its range of application. (Author) [pt

  11. On higher order pyramidal finite elements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liu, L.; Davies, K.B.; Křížek, Michal; Guan, L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 2 (2011), s. 131-140 ISSN 2070-0733 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100190803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : pyramidal polynomial basis functions * finite element method * composite elements * three-dimensional mortar elements Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.750, year: 2011

  12. Orthodontic treatment: Introducing finite element analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, W.D. van; Leeuwen, E.J. van

    1998-01-01

    The aim of orthodontic treatment is the displacement of teeth by means ofspecial appliances, like braces and brackets. Through these appliances the orthodontist can apply a set of forces to the teeth which wilt result in its displacement through the jawbone. Finite Element analysis of this process

  13. Isogeometric finite element analysis of poroelasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irzal, F.; Remmers, J.J.C.; Verhoosel, C.V.; Borst, de R.

    2013-01-01

    We present an alternative numerical approach for predicting the behaviour of a deformable fluid-saturated porous medium. The conventional finite element technology is replaced by isogeometric analysis that uses non-uniform rational B-splines. The ability of these functions to provide higher-order

  14. Modelling drawbeads with finite elements and verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carleer, B.D.; Carleer, B.D.; Vreede, P.T.; Vreede, P.T.; Louwes, M.F.M.; Louwes, M.F.M.; Huetink, Han

    1994-01-01

    Drawbeads are commonly used in deep drawing processes to control the flow of the blank during the forming operation. In finite element simulations of deep drawing the drawbead geometries are seldom included because of the small radii; because of these small radii a very large number of elements is

  15. Fast finite elements for surgery simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses volumetric deformable models for modeling human body parts and organs in surgery simulation systems. These models are built using finite element models for linear elastic materials. To achieve real-time response condensation has been applied to the system stiffness matrix...

  16. Simplicial Finite Elements in Higher Dimensions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brandts, J.; Korotov, S.; Křížek, Michal

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2007), s. 251-265 ISSN 0862-7940 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/04/1503 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : n-simplex * finite element method * superconvergence Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  17. Discrete/Finite Element Modelling of Rock Cutting with a TBM Disc Cutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labra, Carlos; Rojek, Jerzy; Oñate, Eugenio

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents advanced computer simulation of rock cutting process typical for excavation works in civil engineering. Theoretical formulation of the hybrid discrete/finite element model has been presented. The discrete and finite element methods have been used in different subdomains of a rock sample according to expected material behaviour, the part which is fractured and damaged during cutting is discretized with the discrete elements while the other part is treated as a continuous body and it is modelled using the finite element method. In this way, an optimum model is created, enabling a proper representation of the physical phenomena during cutting and efficient numerical computation. The model has been applied to simulation of the laboratory test of rock cutting with a single TBM (tunnel boring machine) disc cutter. The micromechanical parameters have been determined using the dimensionless relationships between micro- and macroscopic parameters. A number of numerical simulations of the LCM test in the unrelieved and relieved cutting modes have been performed. Numerical results have been compared with available data from in-situ measurements in a real TBM as well as with the theoretical predictions showing quite a good agreement. The numerical model has provided a new insight into the cutting mechanism enabling us to investigate the stress and pressure distribution at the tool-rock interaction. Sensitivity analysis of rock cutting performed for different parameters including disc geometry, cutting velocity, disc penetration and spacing has shown that the presented numerical model is a suitable tool for the design and optimization of rock cutting process.

  18. Finite element analysis of the cyclic indentation of bilayer enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Yunfei; Xuan, Fu-zhen; Chen, Xiaoping; Yang, Fuqian

    2014-01-01

    Tooth enamel is often subjected to repeated contact and often experiences contact deformation in daily life. The mechanical strength of the enamel determines the biofunctionality of the tooth. Considering the variation of the rod arrangement in outer and inner enamel, we approximate enamel as a bilayer structure and perform finite element analysis of the cyclic indentation of the bilayer structure, to mimic the repeated contact of enamel during mastication. The dynamic deformation behaviour of both the inner enamel and the bilayer enamel is examined. The material parameters of the inner and outer enamel used in the analysis are obtained by fitting the finite element results with the experimental nanoindentation results. The penetration depth per cycle at the quasi-steady state is used to describe the depth propagation speed, which exhibits a two-stage power-law dependence on the maximum indentation load and the amplitude of the cyclic load, respectively. The continuous penetration of the indenter reflects the propagation of the plastic zone during cyclic indentation, which is related to the energy dissipation. The outer enamel serves as a protective layer due to its great resistance to contact deformation in comparison to the inner enamel. The larger equivalent plastic strain and lower stresses in the inner enamel during cyclic indentation, as calculated from the finite element analysis, indicate better crack/fracture resistance of the inner enamel. (paper)

  19. Finite element analysis of the cyclic indentation of bilayer enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yunfei; Xuan, Fu-zhen; Chen, Xiaoping; Yang, Fuqian

    2014-04-01

    Tooth enamel is often subjected to repeated contact and often experiences contact deformation in daily life. The mechanical strength of the enamel determines the biofunctionality of the tooth. Considering the variation of the rod arrangement in outer and inner enamel, we approximate enamel as a bilayer structure and perform finite element analysis of the cyclic indentation of the bilayer structure, to mimic the repeated contact of enamel during mastication. The dynamic deformation behaviour of both the inner enamel and the bilayer enamel is examined. The material parameters of the inner and outer enamel used in the analysis are obtained by fitting the finite element results with the experimental nanoindentation results. The penetration depth per cycle at the quasi-steady state is used to describe the depth propagation speed, which exhibits a two-stage power-law dependence on the maximum indentation load and the amplitude of the cyclic load, respectively. The continuous penetration of the indenter reflects the propagation of the plastic zone during cyclic indentation, which is related to the energy dissipation. The outer enamel serves as a protective layer due to its great resistance to contact deformation in comparison to the inner enamel. The larger equivalent plastic strain and lower stresses in the inner enamel during cyclic indentation, as calculated from the finite element analysis, indicate better crack/fracture resistance of the inner enamel.

  20. Recent uses of the finite element method in design/analysis of CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayal, M.; Lim, D.

    1985-06-01

    Finite element codes FEAST and ELESTRES have been used to show: that initial pellet density can have a significant effect on the probability of fuel defect near end cap welds; that sheath stresses/strains are highly multiaxial near circumferential ridges; and that the multiaxiality affects sheath integrity significantly. The finite element thermal code FEAT was used to redesign bearing pads to obtain lower temperture; this eliminated crevice corrosion. FEAT was also used to assess the influences of braze voids and of end flux peaking. These analyses involved complex geometries. By using finite elements, we could obtain accurate assessments economically and rapidly. Finite element codes are also being developed for bowing, diffusion, flow patterns, and stress corrosion cracking

  1. Finite element model for expansive stress due to corrosion of reinforced concrete structures; Analisis con elemento finito de los esfuerzos expansivos por corrosion en las estructuras de concreto reforzado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castorena Gonzalez, J.H.; Calderon Guillen, J.A. [Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Los Mochis, Sinaloa (Mexico)]. E-mail: kstor28@yahoo.com.mx; cajoel_99@yahoo.com; Almeraya Calderon, F.; Gaona Tiburcio, C. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico)]. E-mail: facundo.almeraya@cimav.edu.mx; citlalli.gaona@cimav.edu.mx; Almaral Sanchez, J.L. [Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Los Mochis, Sinaloa (Mexico)]. E-mail: jalmaral@gmail.com; Martinez Villafane, A. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico)]. E-mail: martinez.villafane@cimav.edu.mx

    2011-01-15

    The corrosion in the reinforcement steel is a problem that diminishes the useful life of reinforced concrete structures, reside committing its structural security. In the available models to estimate the mechanical effect of the corrosion, it is assumed that the corroded steel, through the oxides that grow to its surroundings, exercises a pressure on the surrounding concrete supposing a problem of plane stress or plane strain. In this work, the problem is modeled with three-dimensional finite element starting from an experiment on a subjected cylinder to accelerated corrosion, with strain gage to measure the pressure indirectly in the interface steel-concrete. From the results obtained it can be concluded that the effect of the length of corroded steel, anodic length, has a significant effect on the magnitude of the pressure in the interface steel-concrete, fact that can be used to improve the existing models. [Spanish] La corrosion en el acero de refuerzo es un problema que disminuye la vida util en las estructuras de concreto reforzado, ademas de comprometer su seguridad estructural. En los modelos disponibles para estimar el efecto mecanico de la corrosion, se supone que el acero corroido, a traves de los oxidos que crecen a su alrededor, ejercen una presion sobre el concreto circundante suponiendo un problema de esfuerzos o deformaciones planas, En el presente trabajo, se modela el problema con elemento finito tridimensional a partir de un experimento sobre un cilindro de concreto reforzado sometido a corrosion acelerada, instrumentado para medir indirectamente la presion en la interfase acero-concreto. De los resultados obtenidos se concluye que el efecto de la longitud de acero corroido, longitud anodica, tiene un efecto significativo sobre la magnitud de la presion en la interfase acero-concreto, hecho que puede ser utilizado para mejorar los modelos existentes.

  2. A finite element method for neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackroyd, R.T.

    1983-01-01

    A completely boundary-free maximum principle for the first-order Boltzmann equation is derived from the completely boundary-free maximum principle for the mixed-parity Boltzmann equation. When continuity is imposed on the trial function for directions crossing interfaces the completely boundary-free principle for the first-order Boltzmann equation reduces to a maximum principle previously established directly from first principles and indirectly by the Euler-Lagrange method. Present finite element methods for the first-order Boltzmann equation are based on a weighted-residual method which permits the use of discontinuous trial functions. The new principle for the first-order equation can be used as a basis for finite-element methods with the same freedom from boundary conditions as those based on the weighted-residual method. The extremum principle as the parent of the variationally-derived weighted-residual equations ensures their good behaviour. (author)

  3. Finite element reliability analysis of fatigue life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, H.H.; Belytschko, T.; Liu, W.K.

    1992-01-01

    Fatigue reliability is addressed by the first-order reliability method combined with a finite element method. Two-dimensional finite element models of components with cracks in mode I are considered with crack growth treated by the Paris law. Probability density functions of the variables affecting fatigue are proposed to reflect a setting where nondestructive evaluation is used, and the Rosenblatt transformation is employed to treat non-Gaussian random variables. Comparisons of the first-order reliability results and Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the accuracy of the first-order reliability method is quite good in this setting. Results show that the upper portion of the initial crack length probability density function is crucial to reliability, which suggests that if nondestructive evaluation is used, the probability of detection curve plays a key role in reliability. (orig.)

  4. Introduction to nonlinear finite element analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Nam-Ho

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces the key concepts of nonlinear finite element analysis procedures. The book explains the fundamental theories of the field and provides instructions on how to apply the concepts to solving practical engineering problems. Instead of covering many nonlinear problems, the book focuses on three representative problems: nonlinear elasticity, elastoplasticity, and contact problems. The book is written independent of any particular software, but tutorials and examples using four commercial programs are included as appendices: ANSYS, NASTRAN, ABAQUS, and MATLAB. In particular, the MATLAB program includes all source codes so that students can develop their own material models, or different algorithms. This book also: ·         Presents clear explanations of nonlinear finite element analysis for elasticity, elastoplasticity, and contact problems ·         Includes many informative examples of nonlinear analyses so that students can clearly understand the nonlinear theory ·    ...

  5. Finite element analysis of human joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossart, P.L.; Hollerbach, K.

    1996-09-01

    Our work focuses on the development of finite element models (FEMs) that describe the biomechanics of human joints. Finite element modeling is becoming a standard tool in industrial applications. In highly complex problems such as those found in biomechanics research, however, the full potential of FEMs is just beginning to be explored, due to the absence of precise, high resolution medical data and the difficulties encountered in converting these enormous datasets into a form that is usable in FEMs. With increasing computing speed and memory available, it is now feasible to address these challenges. We address the first by acquiring data with a high resolution C-ray CT scanner and the latter by developing semi-automated method for generating the volumetric meshes used in the FEM. Issues related to tomographic reconstruction, volume segmentation, the use of extracted surfaces to generate volumetric hexahedral meshes, and applications of the FEM are described.

  6. ZONE: a finite element mesh generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, M.J.

    1976-05-01

    The ZONE computer program is a finite-element mesh generator which produces the nodes and element description of any two-dimensional geometry. The geometry is subdivided into a mesh of quadrilateral and triangular zones arranged sequentially in an ordered march through the geometry. The order of march can be chosen so that the minimum bandwidth is obtained. The node points are defined in terms of the x and y coordinates in a global rectangular coordinate system. The zones generated are quadrilaterals or triangles defined by four node points in a counterclockwise sequence. Node points defining the outside boundary are generated to describe pressure boundary conditions. The mesh that is generated can be used as input to any two-dimensional as well as any axisymmetrical structure program. The output from ZONE is essentially the input file to NAOS, HONDO, and other axisymmetric finite element programs. 14 figures

  7. Finite element analysis of human joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, P.L.; Hollerbach, K.

    1996-09-01

    Our work focuses on the development of finite element models (FEMs) that describe the biomechanics of human joints. Finite element modeling is becoming a standard tool in industrial applications. In highly complex problems such as those found in biomechanics research, however, the full potential of FEMs is just beginning to be explored, due to the absence of precise, high resolution medical data and the difficulties encountered in converting these enormous datasets into a form that is usable in FEMs. With increasing computing speed and memory available, it is now feasible to address these challenges. We address the first by acquiring data with a high resolution C-ray CT scanner and the latter by developing semi-automated method for generating the volumetric meshes used in the FEM. Issues related to tomographic reconstruction, volume segmentation, the use of extracted surfaces to generate volumetric hexahedral meshes, and applications of the FEM are described

  8. Finite element simulations with ANSYS workbench 16

    CERN Document Server

    Lee , Huei-Huang

    2015-01-01

    Finite Element Simulations with ANSYS Workbench 16 is a comprehensive and easy to understand workbook. It utilizes step-by-step instructions to help guide readers to learn finite element simulations. Twenty seven real world case studies are used throughout the book. Many of these cases are industrial or research projects the reader builds from scratch. All the files readers may need if they have trouble are available for download on the publishers website. Companion videos that demonstrate exactly how to preform each tutorial are available to readers by redeeming the access code that comes in the book. Relevant background knowledge is reviewed whenever necessary. To be efficient, the review is conceptual rather than mathematical. Key concepts are inserted whenever appropriate and summarized at the end of each chapter. Additional exercises or extension research problems are provided as homework at the end of each chapter. A learning approach emphasizing hands-on experiences spreads through this entire book. A...

  9. Tube Bulge Process : Theoretical Analysis and Finite Element Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasco, Raphael; Boudeau, Nathalie

    2007-01-01

    This paper is focused on the determination of mechanics characteristics for tubular materials, using tube bulge process. A comparative study is made between two different models: theoretical model and finite element analysis. The theoretical model is completely developed, based first on a geometrical analysis of the tube profile during bulging, which is assumed to strain in arc of circles. Strain and stress analysis complete the theoretical model, which allows to evaluate tube thickness and state of stress, at any point of the free bulge region. Free bulging of a 304L stainless steel is simulated using Ls-Dyna 970. To validate FE simulations approach, a comparison between theoretical and finite elements models is led on several parameters such as: thickness variation at the free bulge region pole with bulge height, tube thickness variation with z axial coordinate, and von Mises stress variation with plastic strain. Finally, the influence of geometrical parameters deviations on flow stress curve is observed using analytical model: deviations of the tube outer diameter, its initial thickness and the bulge height measurement are taken into account to obtain a resulting error on plastic strain and von Mises stress

  10. Finite element based electric motor design optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this effort was to develop a finite element code for the analysis and design of permanent magnet electric motors. These motors would drive electromechanical actuators in advanced rocket engines. The actuators would control fuel valves and thrust vector control systems. Refurbishing the hydraulic systems of the Space Shuttle after each flight is costly and time consuming. Electromechanical actuators could replace hydraulics, improve system reliability, and reduce down time.

  11. Finite element methods for incompressible flow problems

    CERN Document Server

    John, Volker

    2016-01-01

    This book explores finite element methods for incompressible flow problems: Stokes equations, stationary Navier-Stokes equations, and time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations. It focuses on numerical analysis, but also discusses the practical use of these methods and includes numerical illustrations. It also provides a comprehensive overview of analytical results for turbulence models. The proofs are presented step by step, allowing readers to more easily understand the analytical techniques.

  12. Upstand Finite Element Analysis of Slab Bridges

    OpenAIRE

    O'Brien, Eugene J.; Keogh, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    For slab bridge decks with wide transverse edge cantilevers, the plane grillage analogy is shown to be an inaccurate method of linear elastic analysis due to variations in the vertical position of the neutral axis. The upstand grillage analogy is also shown to give inaccurate results, this time due to inappropriate modelling of in-plane distortions. An alternative method, known as upstand finite element analysis, is proposed which is sufficiently simple to be used on an everyday basis in the ...

  13. Finite element simulation of heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bergheau, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    This book introduces the finite element method applied to the resolution of industrial heat transfer problems. Starting from steady conduction, the method is gradually extended to transient regimes, to traditional non-linearities, and to convective phenomena. Coupled problems involving heat transfer are then presented. Three types of couplings are discussed: coupling through boundary conditions (such as radiative heat transfer in cavities), addition of state variables (such as metallurgical phase change), and coupling through partial differential equations (such as electrical phenomena).? A re

  14. Variational approach to probabilistic finite elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belytschko, T.; Liu, W. K.; Mani, A.; Besterfield, G.

    1991-08-01

    Probabilistic finite element methods (PFEM), synthesizing the power of finite element methods with second-moment techniques, are formulated for various classes of problems in structural and solid mechanics. Time-invariant random materials, geometric properties and loads are incorporated in terms of their fundamental statistics viz. second-moments. Analogous to the discretization of the displacement field in finite element methods, the random fields are also discretized. Preserving the conceptual simplicity, the response moments are calculated with minimal computations. By incorporating certain computational techniques, these methods are shown to be capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. By construction, these methods are applicable when the scale of randomness is not very large and when the probabilistic density functions have decaying tails. The accuracy and efficiency of these methods, along with their limitations, are demonstrated by various applications. Results obtained are compared with those of Monte Carlo simulation and it is shown that good accuracy can be obtained for both linear and nonlinear problems. The methods are amenable to implementation in deterministic FEM based computer codes.

  15. Finite Element Method in Machining Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Markopoulos, Angelos P

    2013-01-01

    Finite Element Method in Machining Processes provides a concise study on the way the Finite Element Method (FEM) is used in the case of manufacturing processes, primarily in machining. The basics of this kind of modeling are detailed to create a reference that will provide guidelines for those who start to study this method now, but also for scientists already involved in FEM and want to expand their research. A discussion on FEM, formulations and techniques currently in use is followed up by machining case studies. Orthogonal cutting, oblique cutting, 3D simulations for turning and milling, grinding, and state-of-the-art topics such as high speed machining and micromachining are explained with relevant examples. This is all supported by a literature review and a reference list for further study. As FEM is a key method for researchers in the manufacturing and especially in the machining sector, Finite Element Method in Machining Processes is a key reference for students studying manufacturing processes but al...

  16. Semianalytic Design Sensitivity Analysis of Nonlinear Structures With a Commercial Finite Element Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Hee; Yoo, Jung Hun; Choi, Hyeong Cheol

    2002-01-01

    A finite element package is often used as a daily design tool for engineering designers in order to analyze and improve the design. The finite element analysis can provide the responses of a system for given design variables. Although finite element analysis can quite well provide the structural behaviors for given design variables, it cannot provide enough information to improve the design such as design sensitivity coefficients. Design sensitivity analysis is an essential step to predict the change in responses due to a change in design variables and to optimize a system with the aid of the gradient-based optimization techniques. To develop a numerical method of design sensitivity analysis, analytical derivatives that are based on analytical differentiation of the continuous or discrete finite element equations are effective but analytical derivatives are difficult because of the lack of internal information of the commercial finite element package such as shape functions. Therefore, design sensitivity analysis outside of the finite element package is necessary for practical application in an industrial setting. In this paper, the semi-analytic method for design sensitivity analysis is used for the development of the design sensitivity module outside of a commercial finite element package of ANSYS. The direct differentiation method is employed to compute the design derivatives of the response and the pseudo-load for design sensitivity analysis is effectively evaluated by using the design variation of the related internal nodal forces. Especially, we suggest an effective method for stress and nonlinear design sensitivity analyses that is independent of the commercial finite element package is also discussed. Numerical examples are illustrated to show the accuracy and efficiency of the developed method and to provide insights for implementation of the suggested method into other commercial finite element packages

  17. Finite element analysis of FRP-strengthened RC beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teeraphot Supaviriyakit

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a non-linear finite element analysis of reinforced concrete beam strengthened with externally bonded FRP plates. The finite element modeling of FRP-strengthened beams is demonstrated. Concrete and reinforcing bars are modeled together as 8-node isoparametric 2D RC element. The FRP plate is modeled as 8-node isoparametric 2D elastic element. The glue is modeled as perfect compatibility by directly connecting the nodes of FRP with those of concrete since there is no failure at the glue layer. The key to the analysis is the correct material models of concrete, steel and FRP. Cracks and steel bars are modeled as smeared over the entire element. Stress-strain properties of cracked concrete consist of tensile stress model normal to crack, compressive stress model parallel to crack and shear stress model tangential to crack. Stressstrain property of reinforcement is assumed to be elastic-hardening to account for the bond between concrete and steel bars. FRP is modeled as elastic-brittle material. From the analysis, it is found that FEM can predict the load-displacement relation, ultimate load and failure mode of the beam correctly. It can also capture the cracking process for both shear-flexural peeling and end peeling modes similar to the experiment.

  18. Thermal analysis of cracked bodies using finite element techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellen, T.K.; Price, R.H.; Harrison, R.P.

    1975-01-01

    The paper develops the potential energy equation in terms of finite element theory including thermal loads. Following this, the energy release rate and consequently the stress intensity factors are derived. Considerations of the classical near crack tip equations are made and deficiencies with the popular substitution methods are highlighted. A method of removing these deficiencies is described. Various energy methods are reconsidered in terms of the role of the thermal energy contribution to the potential energy. These methods include work of crack closure, energy compliance and virtual crack extensions with no other change in nodal geometry, and therefore only requires the recalculation of the stiffness matrices of the crack tip elements. An example of a quadratic temperature gradient parallel to the crack plane in an edge cracked plate is described. Comparisons of the various finite element methods are made and generally show good agreement. A second application compares the virtual crack extension method with an approximate analytical solution in determining stress intensity factors for a thick hollow cylinder with an axial crack for various depths through the wall thickness and for different times. Initially the cylinder is at a uniform high temperature and is then subjected to a sustained cooling shock. Analytical solutions are available for temperature and stress distributions in the uncracked pipe. The stress intensity for a shallow crack in the early stages of the transient has been determined using a superposition procedure. Comparison of the analytical and computed results shows good agreement between the methods

  19. Two-Dimensional Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of CMC Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    A research program has been developed to quantify the effects of the microstructure of a woven ceramic matrix composite and its variability on the effective properties and response of the material. In order to characterize and quantify the variations in the microstructure of a five harness satin weave, chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC/SiC composite material, specimens were serially sectioned and polished to capture images that detailed the fiber tows, matrix, and porosity. Open source quantitative image analysis tools were then used to isolate the constituents, from which two dimensional finite element models were generated which approximated the actual specimen section geometry. A simplified elastic-plastic model, wherein all stress above yield is redistributed to lower stress regions, is used to approximate the progressive damage behavior for each of the composite constituents. Finite element analyses under in-plane tensile loading were performed to examine how the variability in the local microstructure affected the macroscopic stress-strain response of the material as well as the local initiation and progression of damage. The macroscopic stress-strain response appeared to be minimally affected by the variation in local microstructure, but the locations where damage initiated and propagated appeared to be linked to specific aspects of the local microstructure.

  20. Finite element elastic-plastic analysis of LMFBR components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, A.; Pifko, A.; Armen, H. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The present effort involves the development of computationally efficient finite element methods for accurately predicting the isothermal elastic-plastic three-dimensional response of thick and thin shell structures subjected to mechanical and thermal loads. This work will be used as the basis for further development of analytical tools to be used to verify the structural integrity of liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) components. The methods presented here have been implemented into the three-dimensional solid element module (HEX) of the Grumman PLANS finite element program. These methods include the use of optimal stress points as well as a variable number of stress points within an element. This allows monitoring the stress history at many points within an element and hence provides an accurate representation of the elastic-plastic boundary using a minimum number of degrees of freedom. Also included is an improved thermal stress analysis capability in which the temperature variation and corresponding thermal strain variation are represented by the same functional form as the displacement variation. Various problems are used to demonstrate these improved capabilities. (Auth.)

  1. Finite elements for non-linear analysis of pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamim, A.C.; Ebecken, N.F.F.

    1982-01-01

    The application of a three-dimensional lagrangian formulation for the great dislocations analysis and great rotation of pipelines systems is studied. This formulation is derived from the soil mechanics and take into account the shear stress effects. Two finite element models are implemented. The first, of right axis, uses as interpolation functions the conventional gantry functions, defined in relation to mobile coordinates. The second, of curve axis and variable cross sections, is obtained from the degeneration of the three-dimensional isoparametric element, and uses as interpolation functions third degree polynomials. (E.G.) [pt

  2. A General Finite Element Scheme for Limit State Analysis and Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars

    1999-01-01

    Limit State analysis which is based on a perfect material behaviour is used in many different applications primarily within Structural Engineering and Geotechnics. The calculation methods have not reached the same level of automation such as Finite Element Analysis for elastic structures....... The computer based systems are more ad hoc based and are typically not well-integrated with pre- and postprocessors well-known from commercial Finite Element codes.A finite element based formulation of limit state analysis is presented which allows an easy integration with standard Finite Element codes...... for elastic analysis. In this way the user is able to perform a limit state analysis on the same model used for elastic analysis only adding data for the yield surface.The method is based on the lower-bound theorem and uses stress-based elements with a linearized yield surface. The mathematical problem...

  3. Finite Element Based Design and Optimization for Piezoelectric Accelerometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Bin; Kriegbaum, B.; Yao, Q.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic Finite Element design and optimisation procedure is implemented for the development of piezoelectric accelerometers. Most of the specifications of accelerometers can be obtained using the Finite Element simulations. The deviations between the simulated and calibrated sensitivities...

  4. Application of finite-element-methods in food processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    Presentation of the possible use of finite-element-methods in food processing. Examples from diffusion studies are given.......Presentation of the possible use of finite-element-methods in food processing. Examples from diffusion studies are given....

  5. Finite element analysis of plastic recycling machine designed for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... design was evaluated using finite element analysis (FEA) tool in Solid Works Computer ... Also, a minimum factor of safety value of 5.3 was obtained for shredder shaft ... Machine; Design; Recycling; Sustainability; Finite Element; Simulation ...

  6. Coupling of modal and finite elements methods for the diffraction of guided elastics waves: application to non destructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baronian, V.

    2009-11-01

    A typical nondestructive examination based on guided elastic waves can be simulated by considering an elastic 2D (a plate) or 3D (a rod) guide that contains a defect (a crack, a local heterogeneity due to a weld etc.). Our aim is to solve numerically the problem of the scattering by a defect of a mode propagating in a guide. This has been achieved by developing a method that couples i) finite elements in the smallest possible region of the guide that contains the defect, with ii) the modal decomposition of waves outside this region. The main challenge consists in finding the right linking condition of both representations. A decisive tool is the obtaining of an orthogonality relation which makes it possible to project the finite element solution onto guided modes. For this, the problem is formulated in terms of hybrid vectors (displacement/stress) for which a bi-orthogonality relation exists, namely, the Fraser's relation. It is then possible to derive an exact (transparent) condition on the artificial boundaries of the finite element domain; the modal series taken into account being necessarily truncated, transparency is achieved only approximately. Eventually, this boundary condition is integrated in a variational approach (in terms of displacement) in order to develop a finite element method. The transparent boundary condition being expressed in terms of the hybrid vectors, the stress normal to the artificial boundary is introduced as a supplementary unknown, together with a mixed formulation. Both 2D and 3D isotropic guides with free boundary conditions have been considered numerically. Guided modes are computed thanks to an original modeling approach also based on the hybrid (displacement/stress) vectors; interestingly, bi-orthogonality relation expressed in a discrete form is preserved. The code implementing these methods leads to fast computations of the scattering matrix of a defect; once this matrix has been computed at various frequencies, the defect

  7. A finite element study on the effects of midsymphyseal distraction osteogenesis on the mandible and articular disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Nam; Cha, Bong-Kuen; Choi, Dong-Soon; Jang, Insan; Yi, Yang-Jin; Jost-Brinkmann, Paul-Georg

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the biomechanical effect of midsymphyseal distraction osteogenesis with three types of distractors on the mandible and articular disc using a three-dimensional finite element model analysis. A virtual model of the mandible was produced from computed tomography scan images of a healthy 27-year-old man. On the finite element model of the mandible, expansion of the bone-borne, tooth-borne, and hybrid type distractors were simulated with the jaw-closing muscles. The displacement and stress distribution of the mandible and articular disc were analyzed. With the bone-borne appliance the alveolar process area was displaced more than the basal bone area. The tooth-borne appliance displaced the mandibular body in a parallel manner and showed high level of the von Mises stress in the alveolar process and the ramal region as well as in the condylar neck area. The hybrid type showed medium amount of displacement and stress distribution compared with the bone-borne and tooth-borne type. At the articular disc the compressive stress was concentrated in the anteromedial and posterolateral area, and it was highest in the tooth-borne distractor, followed by hybrid appliance and bone-borne appliance. The tooth-borne distractor produced more parallel bony widening in the midsymphyseal area and larger expansion in the molar region; however, it induced higher stress concentration on the articular disc than the hybrid appliance and bone-borne appliance. Whether any long-term side effects on the temporomandibular joint are anticipated, especially in tooth-borne distractor, remains to be investigated.

  8. Scientific use of the finite element method in Orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knop, Luegya; Gandini, Luiz Gonzaga; Shintcovsk, Ricardo Lima; Gandini, Marcia Regina Elisa Aparecida Schiavon

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The finite element method (FEM) is an engineering resource applied to calculate the stress and deformation of complex structures, and has been widely used in orthodontic research. With the advantage of being a non-invasive and accurate method that provides quantitative and detailed data on the physiological reactions possible to occur in tissues, applying the FEM can anticipate the visualization of these tissue responses through the observation of areas of stress created from applied orthodontic mechanics. OBJECTIVE: This article aims at reviewing and discussing the stages of the finite element method application and its applicability in Orthodontics. RESULTS: FEM is able to evaluate the stress distribution at the interface between periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, and the shifting trend in various types of tooth movement when using different types of orthodontic devices. Therefore, it is necessary to know specific software for this purpose. CONCLUSIONS: FEM is an important experimental method to answer questions about tooth movement, overcoming the disadvantages of other experimental methods. PMID:25992996

  9. Error-controlled adaptive finite elements in solid mechanics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stein, Erwin; Ramm, E

    2003-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Error-controlled Adaptive Finite-element-methods . . . . . . . . . . . . Missing Features and Properties of Today's General Purpose FE Programs for Structural...

  10. The finite element method in engineering, 2nd edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    This work provides a systematic introduction to the various aspects of the finite element method as applied to engineering problems. Contents include: introduction to finite element method; solution of finite element equations; solid and structural mechanics; static analysis; dynamic analysis; heat transfer; fluid mechanics and additional applications

  11. A finite element method for neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackroyd, R.T.

    1978-01-01

    A variational treatment of the finite element method for neutron transport is given based on a version of the even-parity Boltzmann equation which does not assume that the differential scattering cross-section has a spherical harmonic expansion. The theory of minimum and maximum principles is based on the Cauchy-Schwartz equality and the properties of a leakage operator G and a removal operator C. For systems with extraneous sources, two maximum and one minimum principles are given in boundary free form, to ease finite element computations. The global error of an approximate variational solution is given, the relationship of one the maximum principles to the method of least squares is shown, and the way in which approximate solutions converge locally to the exact solution is established. A method for constructing local error bounds is given, based on the connection between the variational method and the method of the hypercircle. The source iteration technique and a maximum principle for a system with extraneous sources suggests a functional for a variational principle for a self-sustaining system. The principle gives, as a consequence of the properties of G and C, an upper bound to the lowest eigenvalue. A related functional can be used to determine both upper and lower bounds for the lowest eigenvalue from an inspection of any approximate solution for the lowest eigenfunction. The basis for the finite element is presented in a general form so that two modes of exploitation can be undertaken readily. The model can be in phase space, with positional and directional co-ordinates defining points of the model, or it can be restricted to the positional co-ordinates and an expansion in orthogonal functions used for the directional co-ordinates. Suitable sets of functions are spherical harmonics and Walsh functions. The latter set is appropriate if a discrete direction representation of the angular flux is required. (author)

  12. Finite element simulation of piezoelectric transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, T; Kagawa, Y; Wakatsuki, N; Okamura, H

    2001-07-01

    Piezoelectric transformers are nothing but ultrasonic resonators with two pairs of electrodes provided on the surface of a piezoelectric substrate in which electrical energy is carried in the mechanical form. The input and output electrodes are arranged to provide the impedance transformation, which results in the voltage transformation. As they are operated at a resonance, the electrical equivalent circuit approach has traditionally been developed in a rather empirical way and has been used for analysis and design. The present paper deals with the analysis of the piezoelectric transformers based on the three-dimensional finite element modelling. The PIEZO3D code that we have developed is modified to include the external loading conditions. The finite element approach is now available for a wide variety of the electrical boundary conditions. The equivalent circuit of lumped parameters can also be derived from the finite element method (FEM) solution if required. The simulation of the present transformers is made for the low intensity operation and compared with the experimental results. Demonstration is made for basic Rosen-type transformers in which the longitudinal mode of a plate plays an important role; in which the equivalent circuit of lumped constants has been used. However, there are many modes of vibration associated with the plate, the effect of which cannot always be ignored. In the experiment, the double resonances are sometimes observed in the vicinity of the operating frequency. The simulation demonstrates that this is due to the coupling of the longitudinal mode with the flexural mode. Thus, the simulation provides an invaluable guideline to the transformer design.

  13. FINELM: a multigroup finite element diffusion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgs, C.E.; Davierwalla, D.M.

    1981-06-01

    FINELM is a FORTRAN IV program to solve the Neutron Diffusion Equation in X-Y, R-Z, R-theta, X-Y-Z and R-theta-Z geometries using the method of Finite Elements. Lagrangian elements of linear or higher degree to approximate the spacial flux distribution have been provided. The method of dissections, coarse mesh rebalancing and Chebyshev acceleration techniques are available. Simple user defined input is achieved through extensive input subroutines. The input preparation is described followed by a program structure description. Sample test cases are provided. (Auth.)

  14. On constitutive modelling in finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathe, K.J.; Snyder, M.D.; Cleary, M.P.

    1979-01-01

    This compact contains a brief introduction to the problems involved in constitutive modeling as well as an outline of the final paper to be submitted. Attention is focussed on three important areas: (1) the need for using theoretically sound material models and the importance of recognizing the limitations of the models, (2) the problem of developing stable and effective numerical representations of the models, and (3) the necessity for selection of an appropriate finite element mesh that can capture the actual physical response of the complete structure. In the final paper, we will be presenting our recent research results pertaining to each of these problem areas. (orig.)

  15. Generalized multiscale finite element methods: Oversampling strategies

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.; Galvis, Juan; Li, Guanglian; Presho, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose oversampling strategies in the generalized multiscale finite element method (GMsFEM) framework. The GMsFEM, which has been recently introduced in Efendiev et al. (2013b) [Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods, J. Comput. Phys., vol. 251, pp. 116-135, 2013], allows solving multiscale parameter-dependent problems at a reduced computational cost by constructing a reduced-order representation of the solution on a coarse grid. The main idea of the method consists of (1) the construction of snapshot space, (2) the construction of the offline space, and (3) construction of the online space (the latter for parameter-dependent problems). In Efendiev et al. (2013b) [Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods, J. Comput. Phys., vol. 251, pp. 116-135, 2013], it was shown that the GMsFEM provides a flexible tool to solve multiscale problems with a complex input space by generating appropriate snapshot, offline, and online spaces. In this paper, we develop oversampling techniques to be used in this context (see Hou and Wu (1997) where oversampling is introduced for multiscale finite element methods). It is known (see Hou and Wu (1997)) that the oversampling can improve the accuracy of multiscale methods. In particular, the oversampling technique uses larger regions (larger than the target coarse block) in constructing local basis functions. Our motivation stems from the analysis presented in this paper, which shows that when using oversampling techniques in the construction of the snapshot space and offline space, GMsFEM will converge independent of small scales and high contrast under certain assumptions. We consider the use of a multiple eigenvalue problems to improve the convergence and discuss their relation to single spectral problems that use oversampled regions. The oversampling procedures proposed in this paper differ from those in Hou and Wu (1997). In particular, the oversampling domains are partially used in constructing local

  16. TITUS: a general finite element system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bougrelle, P.

    1983-01-01

    TITUS is a general finite element structural analysis system which performs linear/non-linear, static/dynamic analyses of heat-transfer/thermo-mechanical problems. One of the major features of TITUS is that it was designed by engineers, to address engineers in an industrial environment. This has resulted in an easy to use system, with a high-level free-formatted problem oriented language, a large selection of pre- and post processors and sophisticated graphic capabilities. TITUS has many references in civil, mechanical and nuclear engineering applications. The TITUS system is available on various types of machines, from large mainframes to mini computers

  17. Finite element analysis of permanent magnet motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boglietti, A.; Chiampi, M.; Tartaglia, M.; Chiarabaglio, D.

    1989-01-01

    The analysis of permanent magnet D.C. brushless motors, supplied by current control inverters, is developed employing a finite element package tailored for such devices. The study is devoted to predicting the performance of a set of four poles machines, under different operating conditions (no-load, rated load). The over-load conditions are also considered including the saturation effect. Moreover the influence of such design parameters, as the tooth shape and the number of magnet segments, is investigated. Computed results are found in satisfactory agreement with experimental ones

  18. Assessing women's lacrosse head impacts using finite element modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J Michio; Hoshizaki, T Blaine; Gilchrist, Michael D

    2018-04-01

    Recently studies have assessed the ability of helmets to reduce peak linear and rotational acceleration for women's lacrosse head impacts. However, such measures have had low correlation with injury. Maximum principal strain interprets loading curves which provide better injury prediction than peak linear and rotational acceleration, especially in compliant situations which create low magnitude accelerations but long impact durations. The purpose of this study was to assess head and helmet impacts in women's lacrosse using finite element modelling. Linear and rotational acceleration loading curves from women's lacrosse impacts to a helmeted and an unhelmeted Hybrid III headform were input into the University College Dublin Brain Trauma Model. The finite element model was used to calculate maximum principal strain in the cerebrum. The results demonstrated for unhelmeted impacts, falls and ball impacts produce higher maximum principal strain values than stick and shoulder collisions. The strain values for falls and ball impacts were found to be within the range of concussion and traumatic brain injury. The results also showed that men's lacrosse helmets reduced maximum principal strain for follow-through slashing, falls and ball impacts. These findings are novel and demonstrate that for high risk events, maximum principal strain can be reduced by implementing the use of helmets if the rules of the sport do not effectively manage such situations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nonlinear finite element analyses: advances and challenges in dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, N; Ona, M; Suzuki, T; Igarashi, Y

    2008-07-01

    To discuss the development and current status of application of nonlinear finite element method (FEM) in dentistry. The literature was searched for original research articles with keywords such as nonlinear, finite element analysis, and tooth/dental/implant. References were selected manually or searched from the PUBMED and MEDLINE databases through November 2007. The nonlinear problems analyzed in FEM studies were reviewed and categorized into: (A) nonlinear simulations of the periodontal ligament (PDL), (B) plastic and viscoelastic behaviors of dental materials, (C) contact phenomena in tooth-to-tooth contact, (D) contact phenomena within prosthodontic structures, and (E) interfacial mechanics between the tooth and the restoration. The FEM in dentistry recently focused on simulation of realistic intra-oral conditions such as the nonlinear stress-strain relationship in the periodontal tissues and the contact phenomena in teeth, which could hardly be solved by the linear static model. The definition of contact area critically affects the reliability of the contact analyses, especially for implant-abutment complexes. To predict the failure risk of a bonded tooth-restoration interface, it is essential to assess the normal and shear stresses relative to the interface. The inclusion of viscoelasticity and plastic deformation to the program to account for the time-dependent, thermal sensitive, and largely deformable nature of dental materials would enhance its application. Further improvement of the nonlinear FEM solutions should be encouraged to widen the range of applications in dental and oral health science.

  20. Three dimensional finite element linear analysis of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inbasakaran, M.; Pandarinathan, V.G.; Krishnamoorthy, C.S.

    1979-01-01

    A twenty noded isoparametric reinforced concrete solid element for the three dimensional linear elastic stress analysis of reinforced concrete structures is presented. The reinforcement is directly included as an integral part of the element thus facilitating discretization of the structure independent of the orientation of reinforcement. Concrete stiffness is evaluated by taking 3 x 3 x 3 Gauss integration rule and steel stiffness is evaluated numerically by considering three Gaussian points along the length of reinforcement. The numerical integration for steel stiffness necessiates the conversion of global coordiantes of the Gaussian points to nondimensional local coordinates and this is done by Newton Raphson iterative method. Subroutines for the above formulation have been developed and added to SAP and STAP routines for solving the examples. The validity of the reinforced concrete element is verified by comparison of results from finite element analysis and analytical results. It is concluded that this finite element model provides a valuable analytical tool for the three dimensional elastic stress analysis of concrete structures like beams curved in plan and nuclear containment vessels. (orig.)

  1. On the finite element modeling of the asymmetric cracked rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Shudeifat, Mohammad A.

    2013-05-01

    The advanced phase of the breathing crack in the heavy duty horizontal rotor system is expected to be dominated by the open crack state rather than the breathing state after a short period of operation. The reason for this scenario is the expected plastic deformation in crack location due to a large compression stress field appears during the continuous shaft rotation. Based on that, the finite element modeling of a cracked rotor system with a transverse open crack is addressed here. The cracked rotor with the open crack model behaves as an asymmetric shaft due to the presence of the transverse edge crack. Hence, the time-varying area moments of inertia of the cracked section are employed in formulating the periodic finite element stiffness matrix which yields a linear time-periodic system. The harmonic balance method (HB) is used for solving the finite element (FE) equations of motion for studying the dynamic behavior of the system. The behavior of the whirl orbits during the passage through the subcritical rotational speeds of the open crack model is compared to that for the breathing crack model. The presence of the open crack with the unbalance force was found only to excite the 1/2 and 1/3 of the backward critical whirling speed. The whirl orbits in the neighborhood of these subcritical speeds were found to have nearly similar behavior for both open and breathing crack models. While unlike the breathing crack model, the subcritical forward whirling speeds have not been observed for the open crack model in the response to the unbalance force. As a result, the behavior of the whirl orbits during the passage through the forward subcritical rotational speeds is found to be enough to distinguish the breathing crack from the open crack model. These whirl orbits with inner loops that appear in the neighborhood of the forward subcritical speeds are then a unique property for the breathing crack model.

  2. Generalization of mixed multiscale finite element methods with applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C S [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Many science and engineering problems exhibit scale disparity and high contrast. The small scale features cannot be omitted in the physical models because they can affect the macroscopic behavior of the problems. However, resolving all the scales in these problems can be prohibitively expensive. As a consequence, some types of model reduction techniques are required to design efficient solution algorithms. For practical purpose, we are interested in mixed finite element problems as they produce solutions with certain conservative properties. Existing multiscale methods for such problems include the mixed multiscale finite element methods. We show that for complicated problems, the mixed multiscale finite element methods may not be able to produce reliable approximations. This motivates the need of enrichment for coarse spaces. Two enrichment approaches are proposed, one is based on generalized multiscale finte element metthods (GMsFEM), while the other is based on spectral element-based algebraic multigrid (rAMGe). The former one, which is called mixed GMsFEM, is developed for both Darcy’s flow and linear elasticity. Application of the algorithm in two-phase flow simulations are demonstrated. For linear elasticity, the algorithm is subtly modified due to the symmetry requirement of the stress tensor. The latter enrichment approach is based on rAMGe. The algorithm differs from GMsFEM in that both of the velocity and pressure spaces are coarsened. Due the multigrid nature of the algorithm, recursive application is available, which results in an efficient multilevel construction of the coarse spaces. Stability, convergence analysis, and exhaustive numerical experiments are carried out to validate the proposed enrichment approaches. iii

  3. Modelling optimization involving different types of elements in finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wai, C M; Rivai, Ahmad; Bapokutty, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Finite elements are used to express the mechanical behaviour of a structure in finite element analysis. Therefore, the selection of the elements determines the quality of the analysis. The aim of this paper is to compare and contrast 1D element, 2D element, and 3D element used in finite element analysis. A simple case study was carried out on a standard W460x74 I-beam. The I-beam was modelled and analyzed statically with 1D elements, 2D elements and 3D elements. The results for the three separate finite element models were compared in terms of stresses, deformation and displacement of the I-beam. All three finite element models yield satisfactory results with acceptable errors. The advantages and limitations of these elements are discussed. 1D elements offer simplicity although lacking in their ability to model complicated geometry. 2D elements and 3D elements provide more detail yet sophisticated results which require more time and computer memory in the modelling process. It is also found that the choice of element in finite element analysis is influence by a few factors such as the geometry of the structure, desired analysis results, and the capability of the computer

  4. The finite element response Matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, H.; Martin, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    A new method for global reactor core calculations is described. This method is based on a unique formulation of the response matrix method, implemented with a higher order finite element method. The unique aspects of this approach are twofold. First, there are two levels to the overall calculational scheme: the local or assembly level and the global or core level. Second, the response matrix scheme, which is formulated at both levels, consists of two separate response matrices rather than one response matrix as is generally the case. These separate response matrices are seen to be quite beneficial for the criticality eigenvalue calculation, because they are independent of k /SUB eff/. The response matrices are generated from a Galerkin finite element solution to the weak form of the diffusion equation, subject to an arbitrary incoming current and an arbitrary distributed source. Calculational results are reported for two test problems, the two-dimensional International Atomic Energy Agency benchmark problem and a two-dimensional pressurized water reactor test problem (Biblis reactor), and they compare well with standard coarse mesh methods with respect to accuracy and efficiency. Moreover, the accuracy (and capability) is comparable to fine mesh for a fraction of the computational cost. Extension of the method to treat heterogeneous assemblies and spatial depletion effects is discussed

  5. Finite element analysis of multilayer coextrusion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Schunk, Peter Randall; Baer, Thomas A. (Proctor & Gamble Company, West Chester, OH); Mrozek, Randy A. (Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD); Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow (Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD); Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Collins, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2011-09-01

    Multilayer coextrusion has become a popular commercial process for producing complex polymeric products from soda bottles to reflective coatings. A numerical model of a multilayer coextrusion process is developed based on a finite element discretization and two different free-surface methods, an arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) moving mesh implementation and an Eulerian level set method, to understand the moving boundary problem associated with the polymer-polymer interface. The goal of this work is to have a numerical capability suitable for optimizing and troubleshooting the coextrusion process, circumventing flow instabilities such as ribbing and barring, and reducing variability in layer thickness. Though these instabilities can be both viscous and elastic in nature, for this work a generalized Newtonian description of the fluid is used. Models of varying degrees of complexity are investigated including stability analysis and direct three-dimensional finite element free surface approaches. The results of this work show how critical modeling can be to reduce build test cycles, improve material choices, and guide mold design.

  6. New mixed finite-element methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, L.P.

    1987-01-01

    New finite-element methods are proposed for mixed variational formulations. The methods are constructed by adding to the classical Galerkin method various least-squares like terms. The additional terms involve integrals over element interiors, and include mesh-parameter dependent coefficients. The methods are designed to enhance stability. Consistency is achieved in the sense that exact solutions identically satisfy the variational equations.Applied to several problems, simple finite-element interpolations are rendered convergent, including convenient equal-order interpolations generally unstable within the Galerkin approach. The methods are subdivided into two classes according to the manner in which stability is attained: (1) circumventing Babuska-Brezzi condition methods; (2) satisfying Babuska-Brezzi condition methods. Convergence is established for each class of methods. Applications of the first class of methods to Stokes flow and compressible linear elasticity are presented. The second class of methods is applied to the Poisson, Timoshenko beam and incompressible elasticity problems. Numerical results demonstrate the good stability and accuracy of the methods, and confirm the error estimates

  7. ABOUT SOLUTION OF MULTIPOINT BOUNDARY PROBLEMS OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS WITH THE USE OF COMBINED APPLICATION OF FINITE ELEMENT METHOD AND DISCRETE-CONTINUAL FINITE ELEMENT METHOD PART 2: SPECIAL ASPECTS OF FINITE ELEMENT APPROXIMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel A. Akimov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As is well known, the formulation of a multipoint boundary problem involves three main components: a description of the domain occupied by the structure and the corresponding subdomains; description of the conditions inside the domain and inside the corresponding subdomains, the description of the conditions on the boundary of the domain, conditions on the boundaries between subdomains. This paper is a continuation of another work published earlier, in which the formulation and general principles of the approximation of the multipoint boundary problem of a static analysis of deep beam on the basis of the joint application of the finite element method and the discrete-continual finite element method were considered. It should be noted that the approximation within the fragments of a domain that have regular physical-geometric parameters along one of the directions is expedient to be carried out on the basis of the discrete-continual finite element method (DCFEM, and for the approximation of all other fragments it is necessary to use the standard finite element method (FEM. In the present publication, the formulas for the computing of displacements partial derivatives of displacements, strains and stresses within the finite element model (both within the finite element and the corresponding nodal values (with the use of averaging are presented. Boundary conditions between subdomains (respectively, discrete models and discrete-continual models and typical conditions such as “hinged support”, “free edge”, “perfect contact” (twelve basic (basic variants are available are under consideration as well. Governing formulas for computing of elements of the corresponding matrices of coefficients and vectors of the right-hand sides are given for each variant. All formulas are fully adapted for algorithmic implementation.

  8. Finite Element Analysis of a Four-Cylinder Four Stroke Gasoline Engine Crankshaft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parman Setyamartana

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Stress analysis of a crankshaft using traditional method is complicated and needs modification by considering its stress concentration factors. To solve this problem, the crankshaft strength of a four-cylinder four stroke gasoline engine is modeled and analyzed using finite element method (FEM in this paper. For this purpose, the crankshaft is modeled using CATIA software in detail. Then, the model is imported in ANSYS. In the recent software, the model is meshed into a number of finite elements. After defining the boundary and loading conditions, the stresses occur in the crankshaft are analyzed in order to identify critical locations on it.

  9. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF HASTELLOY C-22HS IN END MILLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kadirgama

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a finite element analysis of the stress distribution in the end milling operation of nickel-based superalloy HASTELLOY C-2000. Commercially available finite element software was used to develop the model and analyze the distribution of stress components in the machined surface of HASTELLOY C-22HS following end milling with coated carbide tools. The friction interaction along the tool-chip interface was modeled using the Coulomb friction law. It was found that the stress had lower values under the cut surface and that it increased gradually near the cutting edge.

  10. Finite element analysis of cylindrical pressure vessels having a misalignment in a circumferential joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aseer Brabin, T.; Christopher, T.; Nageswara Rao, B.

    2010-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) has been carried out to obtain the elastic stress distribution at cylinder-to-cylinder junction in pressurized shell structures that have applications in space - vehicle design. To validate the finite element modeling and analysis results, three joint configurations, (viz., unfilleted butt joint with equal thickness, unfilleted butt joint with unequal thickness and filleted butt joint with equal thickness) having test results in open literature were considered. The peak stress values for these configurations obtained from FEA are close to that of test results. The peak stress value is found to reduce due to filleted butt joint as expected and also confirmed through test results.

  11. Artificial intelligence and finite element modelling for monitoring flood defence structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pyayt, A.L.; Mokhov, I.I.; Kozionov, A.; Kusherbaeva, V.; Melnikova, N.B.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.; Meijer, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a hybrid approach to monitoring the stability of flood defence structures equipped with sensors. This approach combines the finite element modelling with the artificial intelligence for real-time signal processing and anomaly detection. This combined method has been developed for the

  12. Finite element and analytical models for twisted and coiled actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xintian; Liu, Yingxiang; Li, Kai; Chen, Weishan; Zhao, Jianguo

    2018-01-01

    Twisted and coiled actuator (TCA) is a class of recently discovered artificial muscle, which is usually made by twisting and coiling polymer fibers into spring-like structures. It has been widely studied since discovery due to its impressive output characteristics and bright prospects. However, its mathematical models describing the actuation in response to the temperature are still not fully developed. It is known that the large tensile stroke is resulted from the untwisting of the twisted fiber when heated. Thus, the recovered torque during untwisting is a key parameter in the mathematical model. This paper presents a simplified model for the recovered torque of TCA. Finite element method is used for evaluating the thermal stress of the twisted fiber. Based on the results of the finite element analyses, the constitutive equations of twisted fibers are simplified to develop an analytic model of the recovered torque. Finally, the model of the recovered torque is used to predict the deformation of TCA under varying temperatures and validated against experimental results. This work will enhance our understanding of the deformation mechanism of TCAs, which will pave the way for the closed-loop position control.

  13. Friction welding; Magnesium; Finite element; Shear test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Contri Campanelli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction spot welding (FSpW is one of the most recently developed solid state joining technologies. In this work, based on former publications, a computer aided draft and engineering resource is used to model a FSpW joint on AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets and subsequently submit the assembly to a typical shear test loading, using a linear elastic model, in order to conceive mechanical tests results. Finite element analysis shows that the plastic flow is concentrated on the welded zone periphery where yield strength is reached. It is supposed that “through the weld” and “circumferential pull-out” variants should be the main failure behaviors, although mechanical testing may provide other types of fracture due to metallurgical features.

  14. Adaptive finite element method for shape optimization

    KAUST Repository

    Morin, Pedro; Nochetto, Ricardo H.; Pauletti, Miguel S.; Verani, Marco

    2012-01-01

    We examine shape optimization problems in the context of inexact sequential quadratic programming. Inexactness is a consequence of using adaptive finite element methods (AFEM) to approximate the state and adjoint equations (via the dual weighted residual method), update the boundary, and compute the geometric functional. We present a novel algorithm that equidistributes the errors due to shape optimization and discretization, thereby leading to coarse resolution in the early stages and fine resolution upon convergence, and thus optimizing the computational effort. We discuss the ability of the algorithm to detect whether or not geometric singularities such as corners are genuine to the problem or simply due to lack of resolution - a new paradigm in adaptivity. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2012.

  15. Finite element computation of plasma equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivier, M.

    1977-01-01

    The applicability of the finite element method is investigated for the numerical solution of the nonlinear Grad-Shafranov equation with free boundary for the flux function of a plasma at equilibrium. This method is based on the case of variational principles and finite dimensional subspaces whose elements are piecewise polynomial functions obtained by a Lagrange type interpolation procedure over a triangulation of the domain. Two cases of plasma pressure (exponential and quadratic including a vacuum region) were examined. In both cases the nonuniqueness of the solutions was shown in exhibiting a deeper solution in the case of exponential pressure function, and a non-constant solution for a quadratic pressure function. In order to get this ''other'' solution, two linearization methods were tested with two different constraints. Different cross sections are investigated

  16. Adaptive finite element method for shape optimization

    KAUST Repository

    Morin, Pedro

    2012-01-16

    We examine shape optimization problems in the context of inexact sequential quadratic programming. Inexactness is a consequence of using adaptive finite element methods (AFEM) to approximate the state and adjoint equations (via the dual weighted residual method), update the boundary, and compute the geometric functional. We present a novel algorithm that equidistributes the errors due to shape optimization and discretization, thereby leading to coarse resolution in the early stages and fine resolution upon convergence, and thus optimizing the computational effort. We discuss the ability of the algorithm to detect whether or not geometric singularities such as corners are genuine to the problem or simply due to lack of resolution - a new paradigm in adaptivity. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2012.

  17. Finite element program Lamcal. (User's manual)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamain, L.G.; Blanckenburg, J.F.G.

    1982-01-01

    The present user's manual gives the input formats, job control and an input example for the finite element part of the Lamcal program. The input data have been organized in a more or less self explaining way, using keywords and standard input formats and is printed at the beginning of every run. To simplify the use of the whole program and to avoid unecessary data handling, all three parts of the Lamcal program, meshgeneration, plotting and, FE, are combined into one load module. This setup allows to do all calculations in one single run. However, preprocessing, postprocessing and restarts can be made in separate runs as well. The same reserved space for the dynamic core storage is used in all three parts, if the available space is not sufficient the FE program will stop

  18. Adaptive finite element methods for differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    These Lecture Notes discuss concepts of `self-adaptivity' in the numerical solution of differential equations, with emphasis on Galerkin finite element methods. The key issues are a posteriori error estimation and it automatic mesh adaptation. Besides the traditional approach of energy-norm error control, a new duality-based technique, the Dual Weighted Residual method for goal-oriented error estimation, is discussed in detail. This method aims at economical computation of arbitrary quantities of physical interest by properly adapting the computational mesh. This is typically required in the design cycles of technical applications. For example, the drag coefficient of a body immersed in a viscous flow is computed, then it is minimized by varying certain control parameters, and finally the stability of the resulting flow is investigated by solving an eigenvalue problem. `Goal-oriented' adaptivity is designed to achieve these tasks with minimal cost. At the end of each chapter some exercises are posed in order ...

  19. An Exact Implementation Of The Hoek–Brown Criterion For Elasto-Plastic Finite Element Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Johan; Damkilde, Lars

    2007-01-01

    A simple stress update algorithm for generalised Hoek-Brown plasticity is presented. It is intended for use in elasto-plastic finite element computations and utilises the return mapping concept for computing the stress increment belonging to a given increment in strain at a material point. In the...

  20. Finite element approximations of the stokes flow problem based upon various variational principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, L.P.; Hughers, T.J.R.; Stenberg, R.

    1989-05-01

    Finite element methods are constructed by adding to the usual Galerkin method terms that are mesh-dependent least-squares forms of the Euler-Lagrange equations. The methods are consistent and possess additional stability compared to the Galerkin method. Finite element interpolations, which are unstable in the Galerkin approach, are now convergent. The methodology is applied to the velocity-pressure formulation, a.k.a., Herrmann's formulation, to the stress-velocity formulation, a.k.a., Hellinger-Reissner's formulation and to a new formulation based on augmented stress, pressure and velocity [pt

  1. INVESTIGATION OF HYDROELASTIC BEHAVIOR OF A PONTOON-TYPE VLFS DURING UNSTEADY EXTERNAL LOADS IN WAVE CONDITION USING A HYBRID FINITE ELEMENT-BOUNDARY ELEMENT (FE-ME METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydroelastic behaviour of a pontoon-type VLFS subjected to unsteady external loads in wave condition is investigated in the context of the time-domain modal expansion theory, in which the boundary element method (BEM based on time domain Kelvin sources is used for hydrodynamic forces and the finite element method (FEM is adopted for solving the deflections of the VLFS. In this analysis, the interpolation-tabulation scheme is applied to assess rapidly and accurately the free-surface Green function in finite water depth, and the boundary integral equation of a quarter VLFS model is further established taking advantage of symmetry of flow field and structure. The VLFS is modelled as an equivalent solid plate based on the Mindlin plate theory. The coupled plate-water model is performed to determine the wave-induced responses and transient behaviour under external loads such as a huge mass impact onto the structure and moving loads of an airplane, respectively. These results are verified with existing numerical results and experimental test. Then, the developed numerical tools are used in the study of the combined action taking into account of the mass drop/airplane landing as well as forward or reverse incident wave action. The deflections of the runway, the time history of vertical positions and the trajectory of the airplane are also presented through a systematic time-domain simulation, which illustrates the usefulness of the presently developed numerical solutions.

  2. Efficient improvement of virtual crack extension method by a derivative of the finite element stiffness matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, H.; Nakano, S.; Yuuki, R.; Chung, N.Y.

    1991-01-01

    In the virtual crack extension method, the stress intensity factor, K, is obtained from the converged value of the energy release rate by the difference of the finite element stiffness matrix when some crack extension are taken. Instead of the numerical difference of the finite element stiffness, a new method to use a direct dirivative of the finite element stiffness matrix with respect to crack length is proposed. By the present method, the results of some example problems, such as uniform tension problems of a square plate with a center crack and a rectangular plate with an internal slant crack, are obtained with high accuracy and good efficiency. Comparing with analytical results, the present values of the stress intensity factors of the problems are obtained with the error that is less than 0.6%. This shows the numerical assurance of the usefulness of the present method. A personal computer program for the analysis is developed

  3. Consistency between analytical and finite element predictions for safety of cylindrical pressure vessels at higher temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iancu, Otto Theodor

    2014-01-01

    The prediction of the plastic collapse load of cylindrical pressure vessels is very often made by using expensive Finite Element computations. The calculation of the collapse load requires an elastic-plastic material model and the consideration of non-linear geometry effects. The plastic collapse load causes overall structural instability and cannot be determined directly from a Finite Element analysis. In the present paper the plastic collapse load for a cylindrical pressure vessel is determined by an analytical method based on a linear elastic perfectly plastic material model. When plasticity occurs the material is considered to be incompressible and the tensor of plastic strains to be parallel to the stress deviator tensor. In this case the finite stress-strain relationships of Henkel can be used for calculating the pressure for which plastic flow occurs. The analytical results are completely confirmed by Finite Element predictions. (orig.)

  4. Finite element analysis theory and application with ANSYS

    CERN Document Server

    Moaveni, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    For courses in Finite Element Analysis, offered in departments of Mechanical or Civil and Environmental Engineering. While many good textbooks cover the theory of finite element modeling, Finite Element Analysis: Theory and Application with ANSYS is the only text available that incorporates ANSYS as an integral part of its content. Moaveni presents the theory of finite element analysis, explores its application as a design/modeling tool, and explains in detail how to use ANSYS intelligently and effectively. Teaching and Learning Experience This program will provide a better teaching and learning experience-for you and your students. It will help: *Present the Theory of Finite Element Analysis: The presentation of theoretical aspects of finite element analysis is carefully designed not to overwhelm students. *Explain How to Use ANSYS Effectively: ANSYS is incorporated as an integral part of the content throughout the book. *Explore How to Use FEA as a Design/Modeling Tool: Open-ended design problems help stude...

  5. Impact of new computing systems on finite element computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor, A.K.; Fulton, R.E.; Storaasi, O.O.

    1983-01-01

    Recent advances in computer technology that are likely to impact finite element computations are reviewed. The characteristics of supersystems, highly parallel systems, and small systems (mini and microcomputers) are summarized. The interrelations of numerical algorithms and software with parallel architectures are discussed. A scenario is presented for future hardware/software environment and finite element systems. A number of research areas which have high potential for improving the effectiveness of finite element analysis in the new environment are identified

  6. The finite element method its basis and fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Zienkiewicz, Olek C; Zhu, JZ

    2013-01-01

    The Finite Element Method: Its Basis and Fundamentals offers a complete introduction to the basis of the finite element method, covering fundamental theory and worked examples in the detail required for readers to apply the knowledge to their own engineering problems and understand more advanced applications. This edition sees a significant rearrangement of the book's content to enable clearer development of the finite element method, with major new chapters and sections added to cover: Weak forms Variational forms Multi-dimensional field prob

  7. A hybrid finite-element and cellular-automaton framework for modeling 3D microstructure of Ti–6Al–4V alloy during solid–solid phase transformation in additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaohua; Xu, Yaopengxiao; Jiao, Yang

    2018-06-01

    Additive manufacturing such as selective laser sintering and electron beam melting has become a popular technique which enables one to build near-net-shape product from packed powders. The performance and properties of the manufactured product strongly depends on its material microstructure, which is in turn determined by the processing conditions including beam power density, spot size, scanning speed and path etc. In this paper, we develop a computational framework that integrates the finite element method (FEM) and cellular automaton (CA) simulation to model the 3D microstructure of additively manufactured Ti–6Al–4V alloy, focusing on the β → α + β transition pathway in a consolidated alloy region as the power source moves away from this region. Specifically, the transient temperature field resulted from a scanning laser/electron beam following a zig-zag path is first obtained by solving nonlinear heat transfer equations using the FEM. Next, a CA model for the β → α + β phase transformation in the consolidated alloy is developed which explicitly takes into account the temperature dependent heterogeneous nucleation and anisotropic growth of α grains from the parent β phase field. We verify our model by reproducing the overall transition kinetics predicted by the Johnson–Mehl–Avrami–Kolmogorov theory under a typical processing condition and by quantitatively comparing our simulation results with available experimental data. The utility of the model is further demonstrated by generating large-field realistic 3D alloy microstructures for subsequent structure-sensitive micro-mechanical analysis. In addition, we employ our model to generate a wide spectrum of alloy microstructures corresponding to different processing conditions for establishing quantitative process-structure relations for the system.

  8. Introduction to finite element analysis using MATLAB and Abaqus

    CERN Document Server

    Khennane, Amar

    2013-01-01

    There are some books that target the theory of the finite element, while others focus on the programming side of things. Introduction to Finite Element Analysis Using MATLAB(R) and Abaqus accomplishes both. This book teaches the first principles of the finite element method. It presents the theory of the finite element method while maintaining a balance between its mathematical formulation, programming implementation, and application using commercial software. The computer implementation is carried out using MATLAB, while the practical applications are carried out in both MATLAB and Abaqus. MA

  9. Adaptive Smoothed Finite Elements (ASFEM) for history dependent material models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quak, W.; Boogaard, A. H. van den

    2011-01-01

    A successful simulation of a bulk forming process with finite elements can be difficult due to distortion of the finite elements. Nodal smoothed Finite Elements (NSFEM) are an interesting option for such a process since they show good distortion insensitivity and moreover have locking-free behavior and good computational efficiency. In this paper a method is proposed which takes advantage of the nodally smoothed field. This method, named adaptive smoothed finite elements (ASFEM), revises the mesh for every step of a simulation without mapping the history dependent material parameters. In this paper an updated-Lagrangian implementation is presented. Several examples are given to illustrate the method and to show its properties.

  10. Obtaining local reciprocal lattice vectors from finite-element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, John P; Connolley, Thomas; Hill, Tim P; Huang, Houcheng; Sharp, Doug W; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Finite-element analysis is frequently used by engineers at synchrotron beamlines to calculate the elastic deformation of a single crystal undergoing mechanical bending or thermal load. ANSYS Workbench software is widely used for such simulations. However, although ANSYS Workbench software provides useful information on the displacements, strains and stresses within the crystal, it does not yield the local reciprocal lattice vectors that would be required for X-ray diffraction calculations. To bridge this gap, a method based on the shape functions and interpolation procedures of the software itself has been developed. An application to the double-crystal bent Laue monochromator being designed for the I12 (JEEP) wiggler beamline at the Diamond Light Source is presented.

  11. Finite element analysis of mechanical stability of coarsened nanoporous gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hoon-Hwe; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Dunand, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical stability of nanoporous gold (np-Au) at various stages of thermal coarsening is studied via finite element analysis under volumetric compression using np-Au architectures imaged via X-ray nano-tomography. As the np-Au is coarsened thermally over ligament sizes ranging from 185 to 465 nm, the pore volume fraction is determinant for the mechanical stability of the coarsened np-Au, unlike the curvature and surface orientation of the ligaments. The computed Young's modulus and yield strength of the structures are compared with the Gibson–Ashby model. The geometry of the structures determines the locations where stress concentrations occur at the onset of yielding.

  12. Studying apple bruise using a finite element method analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoal-Faria, P.; Alves, N.

    2017-07-01

    Apple bruise damage from harvesting, handling, transporting and sorting is considered to be the major source of reduced fruit quality, resulting in a loss of profits for the entire fruit industry. Bruising is defined as damage and discoloration of fruit flesh, usually with no breach of the skin. The three factors which can physically cause fruit bruising are vibration, compression load and impact. The last one is the main source of bruise damage. Therefore, prediction of the level of damage, stress distribution and deformation of the fruits under external force has become a very important task. To address these problems a finite element analysis has been developed for studying Portuguese Royal Gala apple bruise. The results obtained will be suitable to apple distributors and sellers and will allow a reduction of the impact caused by bruise damage in apple annual production.

  13. Finite element analysis of elasto-plastic tee joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, G.H.

    1974-09-01

    The theory and computational procedures used in the computer program B169TJ/EP for the analysis of elasto-plastic tee joints are described, and detailed user's guide is presented. The program is particularly applicable to joints conforming to the ANSI B16.9 Manufacturing Standard, but can also be applied to other joint geometries. The joint may be loaded by internal pressure and by arbitrary combinations of applied forces and moments at the ends of the branch and run pipes, and the loading sequence may be arbitrary. The joint material is assumed to yield according to the von Mises criterion, and to exhibit either linear kinematic hardening or nonlinear isotropic hardening after yield. The program makes use of the finite element and mesh generation procedures previously applied in the elastic stress analysis program B16.9TJ/ SA, with minor modifications. (U.S.)

  14. OXYGEN PRESSURE REGULATOR DESIGN AND ANALYSIS THROUGH FINITE ELEMENT MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asterios KOSMARAS

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen production centers produce oxygen in high pressure that needs to be defused. A regulator is designed and analyzed in the current paper for medical use in oxygen production centers. This study aims to design a new oxygen pressure regulator and perform an analysis using Finite Element Modeling in order to evaluate its working principle. In the design procedure,the main elements and the operating principles of a pressure regulator are taking into account. The regulator is designed and simulations take place in order to assessthe proposed design. Stress analysis results are presented for the main body of the regulator, as well as, flow analysis to determine some important flow characteristics in the inlet and outlet of the regulator.

  15. Probabilistic finite elements for fracture and fatigue analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. K.; Belytschko, T.; Lawrence, M.; Besterfield, G. H.

    1989-01-01

    The fusion of the probabilistic finite element method (PFEM) and reliability analysis for probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) is presented. A comprehensive method for determining the probability of fatigue failure for curved crack growth was developed. The criterion for failure or performance function is stated as: the fatigue life of a component must exceed the service life of the component; otherwise failure will occur. An enriched element that has the near-crack-tip singular strain field embedded in the element is used to formulate the equilibrium equation and solve for the stress intensity factors at the crack-tip. Performance and accuracy of the method is demonstrated on a classical mode 1 fatigue problem.

  16. Heterogeneous modelling and finite element analysis of the femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Binkai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the largest and longest bone in the human body, the femur has important research value and application prospects. This paper introduces a fast reconstruction method with Mimics and ANSYS software to realize the heterogeneous modelling of the femur according to Hu distribution of the CT series, and simulates it in various situations by finite element analysis to study the mechanical characteristics of the femur. The femoral heterogeneous model shows the distribution of bone mineral density and material properties, which can be used to assess the diagnosis and treatment of bone diseases. The stress concentration position of the femur under different conditions can be calculated by the simulation, which can provide reference for the design and material selection of prosthesis.

  17. FEHM, Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyvoloski, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: FEHM is a numerical simulation code for subsurface transport processes. It models 3-D, time-dependent, multiphase, multicomponent, non-isothermal, reactive flow through porous and fractured media. It can accurately represent complex 3-D geologic media and structures and their effects on subsurface flow and transport. Its capabilities include flow of gas, water, and heat; flow of air, water, and heat; multiple chemically reactive and sorbing tracers; finite element/finite volume formulation; coupled stress module; saturated and unsaturated media; and double porosity and double porosity/double permeability capabilities. 2 - Methods: FEHM uses a preconditioned conjugate gradient solution of coupled linear equations and a fully implicit, fully coupled Newton Raphson solution of nonlinear equations. It has the capability of simulating transport using either a advection/diffusion solution or a particle tracking method. 3 - Restriction on the complexity of the problem: Disk space and machine memory are the only limitations

  18. Elasto-viscoplastic finite element model for prestressed concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prates Junior, N.P.; Silva, C.S.B.; Campos Filho, A.; Gastal, F.P.S.L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a computational model, based on the finite element method, for the study of reinforced and prestressed concrete structures under plane stress states. It comprehends short and long-term loading situations, where creep and shrinkage in concrete and steel relaxation are considered. Elasto-viscoplastic constitutive models are used to describe the behavior of the materials. The model includes prestressing and no prestressing reinforcement, on situation with pre- and post-tension with and without bond. A set of prestressed concrete slab elements were tested under instantaneous and long-term loading. The experimental data for deflections, deformations and ultimate strength are used to compare and validate the results obtained through the proposed model. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs

  19. Finite-element simulation of blood perfusion in muscle tissue during compression and sustained contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vankan, W J; Huyghe, J M; Slaaf, D W; van Donkelaar, C C; Drost, M R; Janssen, J D; Huson, A

    1997-09-01

    Mechanical interaction between tissue stress and blood perfusion in skeletal muscles plays an important role in blood flow impediment during sustained contraction. The exact mechanism of this interaction is not clear, and experimental investigation of this mechanism is difficult. We developed a finite-element model of the mechanical behavior of blood-perfused muscle tissue, which accounts for mechanical blood-tissue interaction in maximally vasodilated vasculature. Verification of the model was performed by comparing finite-element results of blood pressure and flow with experimental measurements in a muscle that is subject to well-controlled mechanical loading conditions. In addition, we performed simulations of blood perfusion during tetanic, isometric contraction and maximal vasodilation in a simplified, two-dimensional finite-element model of a rat calf muscle. A vascular waterfall in the venous compartment was identified as the main cause for blood flow impediment both in the experiment and in the finite-element simulations. The validated finite-element model offers possibilities for detailed analysis of blood perfusion in three-dimensional muscle models under complicated loading conditions.

  20. Stability Analysis of Anchored Soil Slope Based on Finite Element Limit Equilibrium Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the condition of the plane strain, finite element limit equilibrium method is used to study some key problems of stability analysis for anchored slope. The definition of safe factor in slices method is generalized into FEM. The “true” stress field in the whole structure can be obtained by elastic-plastic finite element analysis. Then, the optimal search for the most dangerous sliding surface with Hooke-Jeeves optimized searching method is introduced. Three cases of stability analysis of natural slope, anchored slope with seepage, and excavation anchored slope are conducted. The differences in safety factor quantity, shape and location of slip surface, anchoring effect among slices method, finite element strength reduction method (SRM, and finite element limit equilibrium method are comparatively analyzed. The results show that the safety factor given by the FEM is greater and the unfavorable slip surface is deeper than that by the slice method. The finite element limit equilibrium method has high calculation accuracy, and to some extent the slice method underestimates the effect of anchor, and the effect of anchor is overrated in the SRM.