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Sample records for stress distributions calculated

  1. Equivalence of Stress and Energy Calculations of Mean Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Bøcker; Brown, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    Calculations of the mean stress in a plastically deformed matrix containing randomly distributed elastic inclusions are considered. The mean stress for an elastically homogeneous material is calculated on the basis of an energy consideration which completely accounts for elastic interactions....... The result is shown to be identical to that obtained from a stress calculation. The possibility of including elastic interactions in the case of elastic inhomogeneity is discussed....

  2. Temperature and stress calculation for final disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarandi, T.

    1979-02-01

    Temperature and stress distribution in and around the final storage facility has been calculated for three different arrangements of the tunnels: - 2 planes with 60 m vertical distance between them - 2 planes with 100 m distance and - 1 plane. The highest temperatures and stresses occur for the 2 plane alternative with distance 60 m between planes. The maximum compressive stress is in this case 24.0 MPa 140 years after the time of deposition, compared with 12.6 MPa in the 1 plane case. The maximum tensile stress exists at the surface and is in the 2 plane case 6.0 MPa 800 - 1,500 years after deposition, compared with 4.2 MPa for the 1 plane variant. An estimation of maximum tensile stresses between the tunnel planes yields a value of 1.5 MPa. The above-mentioned stresses are due to temperature distribution induced by the radioactive waste. To obtain the total stresses, initial stresses in the undisturbed rock, which vary according to location, are to be added to these stresses. (author)

  3. Calculation Methods for Wallenius’ Noncentral Hypergeometric Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Agner

    2008-01-01

    Two different probability distributions are both known in the literature as "the" noncentral hypergeometric distribution. Wallenius' noncentral hypergeometric distribution can be described by an urn model without replacement with bias. Fisher's noncentral hypergeometric distribution...... is the conditional distribution of independent binomial variates given their sum. No reliable calculation method for Wallenius' noncentral hypergeometric distribution has hitherto been described in the literature. Several new methods for calculating probabilities from Wallenius' noncentral hypergeometric...... distribution are derived. Range of applicability, numerical problems, and efficiency are discussed for each method. Approximations to the mean and variance are also discussed. This distribution has important applications in models of biased sampling and in models of evolutionary systems....

  4. Benchmark calculations of power distribution within assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavarec, C.; Perron, J.F.; Verwaerde, D.; West, J.P.

    1994-09-01

    The main objective of this Benchmark is to compare different techniques for fine flux prediction based upon coarse mesh diffusion or transport calculations. We proposed 5 ''core'' configurations including different assembly types (17 x 17 pins, ''uranium'', ''absorber'' or ''MOX'' assemblies), with different boundary conditions. The specification required results in terms of reactivity, pin by pin fluxes and production rate distributions. The proposal for these Benchmark calculations was made by J.C. LEFEBVRE, J. MONDOT, J.P. WEST and the specification (with nuclear data, assembly types, core configurations for 2D geometry and results presentation) was distributed to correspondents of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. 11 countries and 19 companies answered the exercise proposed by this Benchmark. Heterogeneous calculations and homogeneous calculations were made. Various methods were used to produce the results: diffusion (finite differences, nodal...), transport (P ij , S n , Monte Carlo). This report presents an analysis and intercomparisons of all the results received

  5. Calculating Cumulative Binomial-Distribution Probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuer, Ernest M.; Bowerman, Paul N.

    1989-01-01

    Cumulative-binomial computer program, CUMBIN, one of set of three programs, calculates cumulative binomial probability distributions for arbitrary inputs. CUMBIN, NEWTONP (NPO-17556), and CROSSER (NPO-17557), used independently of one another. Reliabilities and availabilities of k-out-of-n systems analyzed. Used by statisticians and users of statistical procedures, test planners, designers, and numerical analysts. Used for calculations of reliability and availability. Program written in C.

  6. Temperature distribution and thermal stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Thermal effects of a double-end-pumped cubic Nd:YVO4 laser crystal are investigated in this paper. A detailed analysis of temperature distribution and thermal stress in cubic crystal with circular shape pumping is discussed. It has been shown that by considering the total input powers as constant, the ...

  7. Étude des distributions de contraintes autour d'un puits pétrolier. Application au calcul des pressions d'initiation de fracturation hydraulique Research on Stress Distribution Around an Oil Or Gas Well. Application to Calculating Pressures for Initiating Hydraulic Fracturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skoczylas F.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Des méthodes de résolution analytiques et numériques ont été proposées, pour déterminer les distributions de contraintes autour de forages pétroliers dans le cas de matériaux peu résistants. Le calcul de ces distributions aboutit à la détermination des pressions de fracturation. Le critère de plasticité de Mohr-Coulomb a été choisi pour la résolution analytique. Cette étude permet d'établir trois schémas types de distribution de contraintes, au moment de la fracturation, pour un régime permanent d'écoulement. La géométrie axisymétrique du modèle a permis d'utiliser une méthode numérique par schéma aux différences finies. La loi de comportement du matériau est déduite du critère de plasticité de Drucker. Cette résolution permet le chargement incrémental en pression dans le forage et de simuler une injection rapide par un couplage simplifié fluide-squelette. Le modèle élastoplastique à deux surfaces de charge de Lade-Shao a finalement été retenu pour décrire l'écrouissage du matériau. La comparaison des résultats des différentes méthodes de calcul s'effectue sur la base de l'influence respective du coefficient de poussée au repos Ko, du coefficient de Poisson et de la résistance à la compression, Co, du matériau. Analytical and numerical methods are proposed, in order to determine stresses distribution around borehole for axisymetric problems in the case of low strengh materials. Calculation of these distributions leads to the determination of hydraulic fracture-pressure. Analytical solutions were found in the case of Mohr-Coulomb criterion and steady flow. These solutions leads to three typical stresses distributions when hydraulic fracture takes place. Because problem's axisymetry, the finite difference method was used. The constitutive law was deduced using Drücker plasticity criterion with an associated flow rule for elastic perfectly plastic behaviour. Such a numerical method can take into

  8. Numerical calculation of impurity charge state distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crume, E.C.; Arnurius, D.E.

    1977-09-01

    The numerical calculation of impurity charge state distributions using the computer program IMPDYN is discussed. The time-dependent corona atomic physics model used in the calculations is reviewed, and general and specific treatments of electron impact ionization and recombination are referenced. The complete program and two examples relating to tokamak plasmas are given on a microfiche so that a user may verify that his version of the program is working properly. In the discussion of the examples, the corona steady-state approximation is shown to have significant defects when the plasma environment, particularly the electron temperature, is changing rapidly

  9. Calculation of thermal stresses in graphite fuel blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lejeail, Y.; Cabrillat, M.T.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a parametric study of temperature and thermal stress calculations inside a HTGR core graphite block, taking into account the effect of fluence on the thermal and mechanical properties, up to 4. 10 21 n/cm 2 . The Finite Element model, realized with Cast3M CEA code, includes the effects of irradiation creep, which tends to produce secondary stress relaxation. Then, the Weibull weakest link theory is recalled, evaluating the possible effects of volume, stress field distribution (loading factor), and multiaxiality for graphite-type materials, and giving the methodology to compare the stress to rupture for the structure to the one obtained from characterization, in the general case. The maximum of the Weibull stress in Finite Element calculations is compared to the value for tensile specimens. It is found that the maximum of the stress corresponds to the end of the irradiation cycle, after reactor shutdown, since both thermal conductivity and Young's modulus increase with time. However, this behaviour is partly counterbalanced by the increase of material strength with irradiation. (authors)

  10. A Lattice Calculation of Parton Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Cichy, Krzysztof; Poznan Univ.; Drach, Vincent; Univ. of Southern Denmark, Odense; Garcia-Ramos, Elena; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin; Hadjiyiannakou, Kyriakos; Jansen, Karl; Steffens, Fernanda; Wiese, Christian

    2015-04-01

    We report on our exploratory study for the direct evaluation of the parton distribution functions from lattice QCD, based on a recently proposed new approach. We present encouraging results using N f =2+1+1 twisted mass fermions with a pion mass of about 370 MeV. The focus of this work is a detailed description of the computation, including the lattice calculation, the matching to an infinite momentum and the nucleon mass correction. In addition, we test the effect of gauge link smearing in the operator to estimate the influence of the Wilson line renormalization, which is yet to be done.

  11. Calculation of dose distribution above contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Junya; Tenzou, Hideki; Manabe, Seiya; Iwakura, Yukiko

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between altitude and the distribution of the ambient dose rate in the air over soil decontamination area by using PHITS simulation code. The geometry configuration was 1000 m ×1000 m area and 1m in soil depth and 100m in altitude from the ground to simulate the area of residences or a school grounds. The contaminated region is supposed to be uniformly contaminated by Cs-137 γ radiation sources. The air dose distribution and space resolution was evaluated for flux of the gamma rays at each altitude, 1, 5, 10, and 20m. The effect of decontamination was calculated by defining sharpness S. S was the ratio of an average flux and a flux at the center of denomination area in each altitude. The suitable flight altitude of the drone is found to be less than 15m above a residence and 31m above a school grounds to confirm the decontamination effect. The calculation results can be a help to determine a flight planning of a drone to minimize the clash risk.

  12. Distributed Function Calculation over Noisy Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhidun Zeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering any connected network with unknown initial states for all nodes, the nearest-neighbor rule is utilized for each node to update its own state at every discrete-time step. Distributed function calculation problem is defined for one node to compute some function of the initial values of all the nodes based on its own observations. In this paper, taking into account uncertainties in the network and observations, an algorithm is proposed to compute and explicitly characterize the value of the function in question when the number of successive observations is large enough. While the number of successive observations is not large enough, we provide an approach to obtain the tightest possible bounds on such function by using linear programing optimization techniques. Simulations are provided to demonstrate the theoretical results.

  13. Stresses in reactor pressure vessel nozzles -- Calculations and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Polachova, H.

    1995-01-01

    Reactor pressure vessel nozzles are characterized by a high stress concentration which is critical in their low-cycle fatigue assessment. Program of experimental verification of stress/strain field distribution during elastic-plastic loading of a reactor pressure vessel WWER-1000 primary nozzle model in scale 1:3 is presented. While primary nozzle has an ID equal to 850 mm, the model nozzle has ID equal to 280 mm, and was made from 15Kh2NMFA type of steel. Calculation using analytical methods was performed. Comparison of results using different analytical methods -- Neuber's, Hardrath-Ohman's as well as equivalent energy ones, used in different reactor Codes -- is shown. Experimental verification was carried out on model nozzles loaded statically as well as by repeated loading, both in elastic-plastic region. Strain fields were measured using high-strain gauges, which were located in different distances from center of nozzle radius, thus different stress concentration values were reached. Comparison of calculated and experimental data are shown and compared

  14. Finite element calculation of stress induced heating of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akin, J.E.; Moazed, A.

    1976-01-01

    This research is concerned with the calculation of the amount of heat generated due to the development of mechanical stresses in superconducting composites. An emperical equation is used to define the amount of stress-induced heat generation per unit volume. The equation relates the maximum applied stress and the experimental measured hysteresis loop of the composite stress-strain diagram. It is utilized in a finite element program to calculate the total stress-induced heat generation for the superconductor. An example analysis of a solenoid indicates that the stress-induced heating can be of the same order of magnitude as eddy current effects

  15. Core stress distribution of phase shifting multimode polymer optical fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Rei; Matsuura, Motoharu; Nagata, Morio; Mishima, Kenji; Inoue, Azusa; Tagaya, Akihiro; Koike, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Poly-(methyl methacrylate-co-benzyl methacrylate) polarization-maintaining optical fibers are known for their high response to normal stress. In this report, responses to higher stress levels up to 0.45 MPa were investigated. The stress amplitude and direction in the fiber cross section were calculated and analyzed with a coincident mode-field obtained from the near-field pattern. The stress amplitude varies significantly in the horizontal direction and is considered to create multiple phases, explaining the measurement results. To investigate possible permanent deformation, the core yield point profile was analyzed. Although it largely exceeds the average applied stress, the calculated stress distribution indicates that the core could partially experience stress that exceeds the yield point

  16. Distribution of incremental static stress caused by earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Y. Kagan

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical calculations, simulations and measurements of rotation of earthquake focal mechanisms suggest that the stress in earthquake focal zones follows the Cauchy distribution which is one of the stable probability distributions (with the value of the exponent α equal to 1. We review the properties of the stable distributions and show that the Cauchy distribution is expected to approximate the stress caused by earthquakes occurring over geologically long intervals of a fault zone development. However, the stress caused by recent earthquakes recorded in instrumental catalogues, should follow symmetric stable distributions with the value of α significantly less than one. This is explained by a fractal distribution of earthquake hypocentres: the dimension of a hypocentre set, ��, is close to zero for short-term earthquake catalogues and asymptotically approaches 2¼ for long-time intervals. We use the Harvard catalogue of seismic moment tensor solutions to investigate the distribution of incremental static stress caused by earthquakes. The stress measured in the focal zone of each event is approximated by stable distributions. In agreement with theoretical considerations, the exponent value of the distribution approaches zero as the time span of an earthquake catalogue (ΔT decreases. For large stress values α increases. We surmise that it is caused by the δ increase for small inter-earthquake distances due to location errors.

  17. Calculation of the temperature distribution and thermal stresses in a gas turbine nozzle cooled by air film; Calculo de la distribucion de temperaturas y esfuerzos termicos en una tobera de turbina de gas enfriada por pelicula de aire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez R, Alejandro; Garcia I, Rafael; Mazur C, Zdislaw [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The analysis begins with the generation of a computational geometric model of the gas turbine nozzle using reverse engineering techniques. For the obtaining of the original geometry of the blade, a measurement machine by coordinates and computerized numerical control was used. Next, the computational model is converted into a three-dimensional mesh. In advance, a study of boundary conditions was made of the nozzle material as well as of the turbine operating conditions during non-operating cycles, start-ups and shut-downs. On the other hand, with the boundary conditions imposed to the model, the distributions of the temperature and pressures on the aerofoil profile of the nozzle blade were calculated. These results had to be manipulated to be exported to a finite element software (ANSYS); at this point, another nozzle model was elaborated to be able to import the temperature distribution. With the temperatures correctly imported, the simulations for the calculation of the thermal stresses were made in the nozzle. [Spanish] El analisis inicia con la generacion de un modelo geometrico computacional de la tobera de la turbina de gas utilizando tecnicas de ingenieria inversa. Para la obtencion de la geometria original del alabe, se utilizo una maquina de medicion por coordenadas y control numerico computarizado. A continuacion, el modelo computacional es convertido en una malla tridimensional. Con antelacion, se realizo un estudio de las condiciones de frontera, tanto del material de la tobera como de las condiciones de operacion de la turbina, durante ciclos de paro, arranque y disparo. Por otra parte, con las condiciones de frontera impuestas al modelo, se calcularon las distribuciones de las temperaturas y presiones sobre el perfil aerodinamico de la paleta de la tobera. Estos resultados tuvieron que ser manipulados para ser exportados a un software de elemento finito (ANSYS); en este punto, se elaboro otro modelo de la tobera para poder importar la distribucion de

  18. Calculation of thermal stress condition in long metal cylinder under heating by continuous laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uglov, A.A.; Uglov, S.A.; Kulik, A.N.

    1997-01-01

    The method of determination of temperature field and unduced thermal stresses in long metallic cylinder under its heating by cw-laser normally distributed heat flux is offered. The graphically presented results of calculation show the stress maximum is placed behind of center of laser heat sport along its movement line on the cylinder surface

  19. Analyzed method for calculating the distribution of electrostatic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, W.

    1981-01-01

    An analyzed method for calculating the distribution of electrostatic field under any given axial gradient in tandem accelerators is described. This method possesses satisfactory accuracy compared with the results of numerical calculation

  20. Calculation of thermoelastic stresses in the rewetting region of the fuel rod cladding during a loss of coolant accident (loca)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberty, N.C.; Carmo, E.G.D. do; Tanajura, C.A.S.

    1982-01-01

    A one-dimensional model for axial distribution calculation of temperature and thermal stresses in the fuel rod cladding for a Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) is developed. The effect of the coolant inlet temperaure, the Leidenfrost and the nucleate boiling in the stress distribution are evaluated. A perturbation in the cladding stress state is obtained. (E.G.) [pt

  1. Prediction of residual stress distributions due to surface machining and welding and crack growth simulation under residual stress distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Ryohei; Katsuyama, JInya; Onizawa, Kunio; Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Mikami, Yoshiki; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Residual stress distributions due to welding and machining are evaluated by XRD and FEM. → Residual stress due to machining shows higher tensile stress than welding near the surface. → Crack growth analysis is performed using calculated residual stress. → Crack growth result is affected machining rather than welding. → Machining is an important factor for crack growth. - Abstract: In nuclear power plants, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been observed near the weld zone of the core shroud and primary loop recirculation (PLR) pipes made of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel Type 316L. The joining process of pipes usually includes surface machining and welding. Both processes induce residual stresses, and residual stresses are thus important factors in the occurrence and propagation of SCC. In this study, the finite element method (FEM) was used to estimate residual stress distributions generated by butt welding and surface machining. The thermoelastic-plastic analysis was performed for the welding simulation, and the thermo-mechanical coupled analysis based on the Johnson-Cook material model was performed for the surface machining simulation. In addition, a crack growth analysis based on the stress intensity factor (SIF) calculation was performed using the calculated residual stress distributions that are generated by welding and surface machining. The surface machining analysis showed that tensile residual stress due to surface machining only exists approximately 0.2 mm from the machined surface, and the surface residual stress increases with cutting speed. The crack growth analysis showed that the crack depth is affected by both surface machining and welding, and the crack length is more affected by surface machining than by welding.

  2. Integrated Power Flow and Short Circuit Calculation Method for Distribution Network with Inverter Based Distributed Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Shan; Tong, Xiangqian

    2016-01-01

    Power flow calculation and short circuit calculation are the basis of theoretical research for distribution network with inverter based distributed generation. The similarity of equivalent model for inverter based distributed generation during normal and fault conditions of distribution network and the differences between power flow and short circuit calculation are analyzed in this paper. Then an integrated power flow and short circuit calculation method for distribution network with inverte...

  3. TensorCalculator: exploring the evolution of mechanical stress in the CCMV capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononova, Olga; Maksudov, Farkhad; Marx, Kenneth A.; Barsegov, Valeri

    2018-01-01

    A new computational methodology for the accurate numerical calculation of the Cauchy stress tensor, stress invariants, principal stress components, von Mises and Tresca tensors is developed. The methodology is based on the atomic stress approach which permits the calculation of stress tensors, widely used in continuum mechanics modeling of materials properties, using the output from the MD simulations of discrete atomic and C_α -based coarse-grained structural models of biological particles. The methodology mapped into the software package TensorCalculator was successfully applied to the empty cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) shell to explore the evolution of mechanical stress in this mechanically-tested specific example of a soft virus capsid. We found an inhomogeneous stress distribution in various portions of the CCMV structure and stress transfer from one portion of the virus structure to another, which also points to the importance of entropic effects, often ignored in finite element analysis and elastic network modeling. We formulate a criterion for elastic deformation using the first principal stress components. Furthermore, we show that von Mises and Tresca stress tensors can be used to predict the onset of a viral capsid’s mechanical failure, which leads to total structural collapse. TensorCalculator can be used to study stress evolution and dynamics of defects in viral capsids and other large-size protein assemblies.

  4. Simplified method of calculating residual stress in circumferential welding of piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umemoto, Tadahiro

    1984-01-01

    Many circumferential joints of piping are used in as-welded state, but in these welded joints, the residual stress as high as the yield stress of materials arises, and causes to accelerate stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. The experiment or the finite element method to clarify welding residual stress requires much time and labor, and is expensive, therefore, the author proposed the simplified method of calculation. The heating and cooling process of welding is very complex, and cannot be modeled as it is, therefore, it was assumed that in multiple layer welding, the welding condition of the last layer determines the residual stress, that material constants are invariable regardless of temperature, that the temperature distribution and residual stress are axisymmetric, and that there is repeated stress-strain relation in the vicinity of welded parts. The temperature distribution at the time of welding, thermal stress and welding residual stress are analyzed, and the material constants used for the calculation of residual stress are given. As the example of calculation, the effect of welding heat input and materials is shown. The extension of the method to a thick-walled pipe is discussed. (Kako, I.)

  5. Stress calculations for RTNS-iI 50-cm targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, B.J.; House, P.A.

    1981-04-01

    Structural calculations made during design of a 50-cm target for the Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-II) are detailed. The limited ability of the current 23-cm diameter target to dissipate the additional beam power required for a yield increase from 2 x 10 13 to 4 x 10 13 neutrons/second has resulted in the need for a larger target. The stresses of several design configurations for a 50-cm target were calculated. The stress contours that would occur in several different target designs with and without various types of structural reinforcement that reduce stress and deflection are presented

  6. Model and calculation of in situ stresses in anisotropic formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuezhi, W.; Zijun, L.; Lixin, H. [Jianghan Petroleum Institute, (China)

    1997-08-01

    In situ stresses in transversely isotropic material in relation to wellbore stability have been investigated. Equations for three horizontal in- situ stresses and a new formation fracture pressure model were described, and the methodology for determining the elastic parameters of anisotropic rocks in the laboratory was outlined. Results indicate significantly smaller differences between theoretically calculated pressures and actual formation pressures than results obtained by using the isotropic method. Implications for improvements in drilling efficiency were reviewed. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Stress distribution in two-dimensional silos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Rodríguez, Rodolfo; Pérez-Ángel, Gabriel

    2018-01-01

    Simulations of a polydispersed two-dimensional silo were performed using molecular dynamics, with different numbers of grains reaching up to 64 000, verifying numerically the model derived by Janssen and also the main assumption that the walls carry part of the weight due to the static friction between grains with themselves and those with the silo's walls. We vary the friction coefficient, the radii dispersity, the silo width, and the size of grains. We find that the Janssen's model becomes less relevant as the the silo width increases since the behavior of the stresses becomes more hydrostatic. Likewise, we get the normal and tangential stress distribution on the walls evidencing the existence of points of maximum stress. We also obtained the stress matrix with which we observe zones of concentration of load, located always at a height around two thirds of the granular columns. Finally, we observe that the size of the grains affects the distribution of stresses, increasing the weight on the bottom and reducing the normal stress on the walls, as the grains are made smaller (for the same total mass of the granulate), giving again a more hydrostatic and therefore less Janssen-type behavior for the weight of the column.

  8. Numerical methods for calculating thermal residual stresses and hydrogen diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblond, J.B.; Devaux, J.; Dubois, D.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal residual stresses and hydrogen concentrations are two major factors intervening in cracking phenomena. These parameters were numerically calculated by a computer programme (TITUS) using the FEM, during the deposition of a stainless clad on a low-alloy plate. The calculation was performed with a 2-dimensional option in four successive steps: thermal transient calculation, metallurgical transient calculation (determination of the metallurgical phase proportions), elastic-plastic transient (plain strain conditions), hydrogen diffusion transient. Temperature and phase dependence of hydrogen diffusion coefficient and solubility constant. The following results were obtained: thermal calculations are very consistent with experiments at higher temperatures (due to the introduction of fusion and solidification latent heats); the consistency is not as good (by 70 degrees) for lower temperatures (below 650 degrees C); this was attributed to the non-introduction of gamma-alpha transformation latent heat. The metallurgical phase calculation indicates that the heat affected zone is almost entirely transformed into bainite after cooling down (the martensite proportion does not exceed 5%). The elastic-plastic calculations indicate that the stresses in the heat affected zone are compressive or slightly tensile; on the other hand, higher tensile stresses develop on the boundary of the heat affected zone. The transformation plasticity has a definite influence on the final stress level. The return of hydrogen to the clad during the bainitic transformation is but an incomplete phenomenon and the hydrogen concentration in the heat affected zone after cooling down to room temperature is therefore sufficient to cause cold cracking (if no heat treatment is applied). Heat treatments are efficient in lowering the hydrogen concentration. These results enable us to draw preliminary conclusions on practical means to avoid cracking. (orig.)

  9. Macro design effects on stress distribution around implants: A photoelastic stress analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhat Emre Ozkir

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: As there were observable differences between the implant types, straight placed cylindrical implants showed better stress distribution characteristics, while inclined tapering implants had better stress distribution characteristics.

  10. Integrated Power Flow and Short Circuit Calculation Method for Distribution Network with Inverter Based Distributed Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Power flow calculation and short circuit calculation are the basis of theoretical research for distribution network with inverter based distributed generation. The similarity of equivalent model for inverter based distributed generation during normal and fault conditions of distribution network and the differences between power flow and short circuit calculation are analyzed in this paper. Then an integrated power flow and short circuit calculation method for distribution network with inverter based distributed generation is proposed. The proposed method let the inverter based distributed generation be equivalent to Iθ bus, which makes it suitable to calculate the power flow of distribution network with a current limited inverter based distributed generation. And the low voltage ride through capability of inverter based distributed generation can be considered as well in this paper. Finally, some tests of power flow and short circuit current calculation are performed on a 33-bus distribution network. The calculated results from the proposed method in this paper are contrasted with those by the traditional method and the simulation method, whose results have verified the effectiveness of the integrated method suggested in this paper.

  11. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ''end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified

  12. Stress distribution and topography of Tellus Regio, Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David R.; Greeley, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    The Tellus Regio area of Venus represents a subset of a narrow latitude band where Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) altimetry data, line-of-sight (LOS) gravity data, and Venera 15/16 radar images have all been obtained with good resolution. Tellus Regio also has a wide variety of surface morphologic features, elevations ranging up to 2.5 km, and a relatively low LOS gravity anomaly. This area was therefore chosen in order to examine the theoretical stress distributions resulting from various models of compensation of the observed topography. These surface stress distributions are then compared with the surface morphology revealed in the Venera 15/16 radar images. Conclusions drawn from these comparisons will enable constraints to be put on various tectonic parameters relevant to Tellus Regio. The stress distribution is calculated as a function of the topography, the equipotential anomaly, and the assumed model parameters. The topography data is obtained from the PVO altimetry. The equipotential anomaly is estimated from the PVO LOS gravity data. The PVO LOS gravity represents the spacecraft accelerations due to mass anomalies within the planet. These accelerations are measured at various altitudes and angles to the local vertical and therefore do not lend themselves to a straightforward conversion. A minimum variance estimator of the LOS gravity data is calculated, taking into account the various spacecraft altitudes and LOS angles and using the measured PVO topography as an a priori constraint. This results in an estimated equivalent surface mass distribution, from which the equipotential anomaly is determined.

  13. Stress distribution and topography of Tellus Regio, Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.R.; Greeley, R.

    1989-01-01

    The Tellus Regio area of Venus represents a subset of a narrow latitude band where Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) altimetry data, line-of-sight (LOS) gravity data, and Venera 15/16 radar images have all been obtained with good resolution. Tellus Regio also has a wide variety of surface morphologic features, elevations ranging up to 2.5 km, and a relatively low LOS gravity anomaly. This area was therefore chosen in order to examine the theoretical stress distributions resulting from various models of compensation of the observed topography. These surface stress distributions are then compared with the surface morphology revealed in the Venera 15/16 radar images. Conclusions drawn from these comparisons will enable constraints to be put on various tectonic parameters relevant to Tellus Regio. The stress distribution is calculated as a function of the topography, the equipotential anomaly, and the assumed model parameters. The topography data is obtained from the PVO altimetry. The equipotential anomaly is estimated from the PVO LOS gravity data. The PVO LOS gravity represents the spacecraft accelerations due to mass anomalies within the planet. These accelerations are measured at various altitudes and angles to the local vertical and therefore do not lend themselves to a straightforward conversion. A minimum variance estimator of the LOS gravity data is calculated, taking into account the various spacecraft altitudes and LOS angles and using the measured PVO topography as an a priori constraint. This results in an estimated equivalent surface mass distribution, from which the equipotential anomaly is determined

  14. Account of low temperature hardening in calculation of permissible stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, N.V.; Ul'yanenko, A.P.; Gorodyskij, N.I.

    1980-01-01

    Suggested is a calculation scheme of permissible stresses with the account of temperature hardening for steels and alloys, the dependences of strength, plasticity and rupture work of which on cooling temperature do not have threshold changes in a wide range of low temperatures (from 300 to 4.2 K). Application of the suggested scheme is considered on the example of 12Kh18N10T austenitic chromium-nickel steel

  15. Internal stress distribution for generating closure domains in laser-irradiated Fe–3%Si(110) steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Keiji; Imafuku, Muneyuki; Orihara, Hideto; Sakai, Yusuke; Ohya, Shin-Ichi; Suzuki, Tamaki; Shobu, Takahisa; Akita, Koichi; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2015-01-01

    Internal stress distribution for generating closure domains occurring in laser-irradiated Fe–3%Si(110) steels was investigated using high-energy X-ray analysis and domain theory based on the variational principle. The measured triaxial stresses inside the specimen were compressive and the stress in the rolling direction became more dominant than stresses in the other directions. The calculations based on the variational principle of magnetic energy for closure domains showed that the measured triaxial stresses made the closure domains more stable than the basic domain without closure domains. The experimental and calculation results reveal that the laser-introduced internal stresses result in the occurrence of the closure domains

  16. A Non-parametric Method for Calculating Conditional Stressed Value at Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Marumo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the Value at Risk (VaR of a portfolio under stressed conditions. In practice, the stressed VaR (sVaR is commonly calculated using the data set that includes the stressed period. It tells us how much the risk amount increases if we use the stressed data set. In this paper, we consider the VaR under stress scenarios. Technically, this can be done by deriving the distribution of profit or loss conditioned on the value of risk factors. We use two methods; the one that uses the linear model and the one that uses the Hermite expansion discussed by Marumo and Wolff (2013, 2016. Numerical examples shows that the method using the Hermite expansion is capable of capturing the non-linear effects such as correlation collapse and volatility clustering, which are often observed in the markets.

  17. Stress distributions of coils for toroidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajita, Tateo; Miyamoto, Kenro.

    1976-01-01

    The stress distributions of a D shaped coil and a circular coil are computed by the finite element method. The dependences of the stress distribution on the geometrical parameters of the stress distribution on the geometrical parameters of the coils and supporting methods are examined. The maximum amount of the stress in the D shaped coil is not much smaller than that of the circular one. However, the stress distribution of the D shaped coil becomes much more uniform. The supporting method has as much effect as the geometrical parameters of the coil on the stress distribution. (auth.)

  18. Finite element analysis of thermal stress distribution in different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice. Journal Home ... Von Mises and thermal stress distributions were evaluated. Results: In all ... distribution. Key words: Amalgam, finite element method, glass ionomer cement, resin composite, thermal stress ...

  19. Calculations of dose distributions using a neural network model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, R; Martin, E; Gschwind, R; Makovicka, L; Contassot-Vivier, S; Bahi, J

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of external beam radiotherapy is the treatment of tumours, while sparing, as much as possible, surrounding healthy tissues. In order to master and optimize the dose distribution within the patient, dosimetric planning has to be carried out. Thus, for determining the most accurate dose distribution during treatment planning, a compromise must be found between the precision and the speed of calculation. Current techniques, using analytic methods, models and databases, are rapid but lack precision. Enhanced precision can be achieved by using calculation codes based, for example, on Monte Carlo methods. However, in spite of all efforts to optimize speed (methods and computer improvements), Monte Carlo based methods remain painfully slow. A newer way to handle all of these problems is to use a new approach in dosimetric calculation by employing neural networks. Neural networks (Wu and Zhu 2000 Phys. Med. Biol. 45 913-22) provide the advantages of those various approaches while avoiding their main inconveniences, i.e., time-consumption calculations. This permits us to obtain quick and accurate results during clinical treatment planning. Currently, results obtained for a single depth-dose calculation using a Monte Carlo based code (such as BEAM (Rogers et al 2003 NRCC Report PIRS-0509(A) rev G)) require hours of computing. By contrast, the practical use of neural networks (Mathieu et al 2003 Proceedings Journees Scientifiques Francophones, SFRP) provides almost instant results and quite low errors (less than 2%) for a two-dimensional dosimetric map

  20. The Two Defaults Scenario for Stressing Credit Portfolio Loss Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Tasche

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The impact of a stress scenario of default events on the loss distribution of a credit portfolio can be assessed by determining the loss distribution conditional on these events. While it is conceptually easy to estimate loss distributions conditional on default events by means of Monte Carlo simulation, it becomes impractical for two or more simultaneous defaults as then the conditioning event is extremely rare. We provide an analytical approach to the calculation of the conditional loss distribution for the CreditRisk + portfolio model with independent random loss given default distributions. The analytical solution for this case can be used to check the accuracy of an approximation to the conditional loss distribution whereby the unconditional model is run with stressed input probabilities of default (PDs. It turns out that this approximation is unbiased. Numerical examples, however, suggest that the approximation may be seriously inaccurate but that the inaccuracy leads to overestimation of tail losses and, hence, the approach errs on the conservative side.

  1. Viscosity, granular-temperature, and stress calculations for shearing assemblies of inelastic, frictional disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, O.R.; Braun, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Employing nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics methods the effects of two energy loss mechanisms on viscosity, stress, and granular-temperature in assemblies of nearly rigid, inelastic frictional disks undergoing steady-state shearing are calculated. Energy introduced into the system through forced shearing is dissipated by inelastic normal forces or through frictional sliding during collisions resulting in a natural steady-state kinetic energy density (granular-temperature) that depends on the density and shear rate of the assembly and on the friction and inelasticity properties of the disks. The calculations show that both the mean deviatoric particle velocity and the effective viscosity of a system of particles with fixed friction and restitution coefficients increase almost linearly with strain rate. Particles with a velocity-dependent coefficient of restitution show a less rapid increase in both deviatoric velocity and viscosity as strain rate increases. Particles with highly dissipative interactions result in anisotropic pressure and velocity distributions in the assembly, particularly at low densities. At very high densities the pressure also becomes anisotropic due to high contact forces perpendicular to the shearing direction. The mean rotational velocity of the frictional disks is nearly equal to one-half the shear rate. The calculated ratio of shear stress to normal stress varies significantly with density while the ratio of shear stress to total pressure shows much less variation. The inclusion of surface friction (and thus particle rotation) decreases shear stress at low density but increases shear stress under steady shearing at higher densities

  2. Mass formula dependence of calculated spallation reaction product distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Takahiko; Nakahara, Yasuaki

    1990-01-01

    A new version of the spallation reaction simulation code NUCLEUS was developed by incorporating Uno and Yamada's mass formula. This version was used to calculate the distribution of products from the spallation of uranium nuclei by high-energy protons. The dependence of the distributions on the mass formula was examined by comparing the results with those from the original version, which is based on Cameron's mass formula and the mass table compiled by Wapstra et al. As regards the fission component of spallation products, the new version reproduces the reaction product data obtained from thin foil experiments much better, especially on the neutron excess side. (orig.) [de

  3. On the computation of momentum distributions within wavepacket propagation calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuerstein, Bernold; Thumm, Uwe

    2003-01-01

    We present a new method to extract momentum distributions from time-dependent wavepacket calculations. In contrast to established Fourier transformation of the spatial wavepacket at a fixed time, the proposed 'virtual detector' method examines the time dependence of the wavepacket at a fixed position. In first applications to the ionization of model atoms and the dissociation of H 2 + , we find a significant reduction of computing time and are able to extract reliable fragment momentum distributions by using a comparatively small spatial numerical grid for the time-dependent wavefunction

  4. Power operation, measurement and methods of calculation of power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindahl, S.O.; Bernander, O.; Olsson, S.

    1982-01-01

    During the initial fuel loading of a BWR core, extensive checks and measurements of the fuel are performed. The measurements are designed to verify that the reactor can always be safely operated in compliance with the regulatory constraints. The power distribution within the reactor core is evaluated by means of instrumentation and elaborate computer calculations. The power distribution forms the basis for the evaluation of thermal limits. The behaviour of the reactor during the ordinary modes of operation as well as during transients shall be well understood and such that the integrity of the fuel and the reactor systems is always well preserved. (author)

  5. Freight Calculation Model: A Case Study of Coal Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunianto, I. T.; Lazuardi, S. D.; Hadi, F.

    2018-03-01

    Coal has been known as one of energy alternatives that has been used as energy source for several power plants in Indonesia. During its transportation from coal sites to power plant locations is required the eligible shipping line services that are able to provide the best freight rate. Therefore, this study aims to obtain the standardized formulations for determining the ocean freight especially for coal distribution based on the theoretical concept. The freight calculation model considers three alternative transport modes commonly used in coal distribution: tug-barge, vessel and self-propelled barge. The result shows there are two cost components very dominant in determining the value of freight with the proportion reaching 90% or even more, namely: time charter hire and fuel cost. Moreover, there are three main factors that have significant impacts on the freight calculation, which are waiting time at ports, time charter rate and fuel oil price.

  6. Inventory calculations in sediment samples with heterogeneous plutonium activity distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, M.; Dahlgaard, H.

    2002-01-01

    A method to determine the total inventory of a heterogeneously distributed contamination of marine sediments is described. The study site is the Bylot Sound off the Thule Airbase, NW Greenland, where marine sediments became contaminated with plutonium in 1968 after a nuclear weapons accident. The calculation is based on a gamma spectrometric screening of the 241 Am concentration in 450 one-gram aliquots from 6 sediment cores. A Monte Carlo programme then simulates a probable distribution of the activity, and based on that, a total inventory is estimated by integrating a double exponential function. The present data indicate a total inventory around 3.5 kg, which is 7 times higher than earlier estimates (0.5 kg). The difference is partly explained by the inclusion of hot particles in the present calculation. A large uncertainty is connected to this estimate, and it should be regarded as preliminary. (au)

  7. Calculation of crack stress density of cement base materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-e Sui

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the fracture load of cement paste with different water cement ratio, different mineral admixtures, including fly ash, silica fume and slag, is obtained through experiments. the three-dimensional fracture surface is reconstructed and the three-dimensional effective area of the fracture surface is calculated. the effective fracture stress density of different cement paste is obtained. The results show that the polynomial function can accurately describe the relationship between the three-dimensional total area and the tensile strength

  8. Factors affecting stress distribution and displacements in crystals III-V grown by Czochralski method with liquid encapsulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schvezov, C.E.; Samarasekera, I.; Weinberg, F.

    1988-01-01

    A mathematical model based on the finite element method for calculating temperature and shear stress distributions in III-V crystals grown by LEC technique was developed. The calculated temperature are in good agreements with the experimental measurements. The shear stress distribution was calculated for several environmental conditions. The results showed that the magnitude and the distribution of shear stresses are highly sensitive to the crystal environment, including thickness and temperature distribution in boron oxides and the gas. The shear stress is also strongly influenced by interface curvature and cystals radius. (author) [pt

  9. Calculation of residual stresses by means of a 3D numerical weld simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicak, Tomas; Huemmer, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    The numerical weld simulation has developed very fast in recent years. The problem complexity has increased from simple 2D models to full 3D models, which can describe the entire welding process more realistically. As recent research projects indicate, a quantitative assessment of the residual stresses by means of a 3D analysis is possible. The structure integrity can be assessed based on the weld simulation results superimposed with the operating load. Moreover, to support the qualification of welded components parametric studies for optimization of the residual stress distribution in the weld region can be performed. In this paper a full 3D numerical weld simulation for a man-hole drainage nozzle in a steam generator will be presented. The residual stresses are calculated by means of an uncoupled transient thermal and mechanical FE analysis. The paper will present a robust procedure allowing reasonable predictions of the residual stresses for complex structures in industrial practice. (authors)

  10. Analytical model and application of stress distribution on mining coal floor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shu-yun; JIAN Zhen-quan; HOU Hong-liang; XIAO Wei-guo; YAO Pu

    2008-01-01

    Given the analysis of underground pressure, a stress calculation model of coal floor stress has been established based on a theory of elasticity. The model presents the law of stress distribution on the relatively fixed position of the mining coal floor: the extent of stress variation in a fixed floor position decreases gradually along with depth, the decreasing rate of the vertical stress is clearly larger than that of the horizontal stress at a specific depth. The direction of the maximum principal stress changes gradually from a vertical direction to a horizontal direction with the advance of the working face. The deformation and permeability of the rock mass of the coal floor are obtained by contrasting the difference of the principal stress established from theoretical calculations with curves of stress-strain and permeability-strain from tests, which is an important mechanical basis for preventing water inrush from confined aquifers.

  11. Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm on a distributed system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvie, Stephane; Dominoni, Matteo; Marini, Piergiorgio; Stasi, Michele; Pia, Maria Grazia; Scielzo, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The main goal of modern radiotherapy, such as 3D conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy is to deliver a high dose to the target volume sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. The accuracy of dose calculation in a treatment planning system is therefore a critical issue. Among many algorithms developed over the last years, those based on Monte Carlo proven to be very promising in terms of accuracy. The most severe obstacle in application to clinical practice is the high time necessary for calculations. We have studied a high performance network of Personal Computer as a realistic alternative to a high-costs dedicated parallel hardware to be used routinely as instruments of evaluation of treatment plans. We set-up a Beowulf Cluster, configured with 4 nodes connected with low-cost network and installed MC code Geant4 to describe our irradiation facility. The MC, once parallelised, was run on the Beowulf Cluster. The first run of the full simulation showed that the time required for calculation decreased linearly increasing the number of distributed processes. The good scalability trend allows both statistically significant accuracy and good time performances. The scalability of the Beowulf Cluster system offers a new instrument for dose calculation that could be applied in clinical practice. These would be a good support particularly in high challenging prescription that needs good calculation accuracy in zones of high dose gradient and great dishomogeneities

  12. Comparison of Measured Dark Current Distributions with Calculated Damage Energy Distributions in HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, C. J.; Marshall, P. W.; Howe, C. L.; Reed, R. A.; Weller, R. A.; Mendenhall, M.; Waczynski, A.; Ladbury, R.; Jordan, T. M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a combined Monte Carlo and analytic approach to the calculation of the pixel-to-pixel distribution of proton-induced damage in a HgCdTe sensor array and compares the results to measured dark current distributions after damage by 63 MeV protons. The moments of the Coulombic, nuclear elastic and nuclear inelastic damage distributions were extracted from Monte Carlo simulations and combined to form a damage distribution using the analytic techniques first described in [1]. The calculations show that the high energy recoils from the nuclear inelastic reactions (calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX [2]) produce a pronounced skewing of the damage energy distribution. While the nuclear elastic component (also calculated using the MCNPX) contributes only a small fraction of the total nonionizing damage energy, its inclusion in the shape of the damage across the array is significant. The Coulombic contribution was calculated using MRED [3-5], a Geant4 [4,6] application. The comparison with the dark current distribution strongly suggests that mechanisms which are not linearly correlated with nonionizing damage produced according to collision kinematics are responsible for the observed dark current increases. This has important implications for the process of predicting the on-orbit dark current response of the HgCdTe sensor array.

  13. Numerical calculation of velocity distribution near a vertical flat plate immersed in bubble flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Akihiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Horihata, Hideyuki; Hiraoka, Setsuro; Aragaki, Tsutomu; Yamada, Ikuho; Isoda, Shinji.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid and gas velocity distributions for bubble flow near a vertical flat plate were calculated numerically by using the SIMPLER method, where the flow was assumed to be laminar, two-dimensional, and at steady state. The two-fluid flow model was used in the numerical analysis. To calculate the drag force on a small bubble, Stokes' law for a rigid sphere is applicable. The dimensionless velocity distributions which were arranged with characteristic boundary layer thickness and maximum liquid velocity were adjusted with a single line and their forms were similar to that for single-phase wall-jet flow. The average wall shear stress derived from the velocity gradient at the plate wall was strongly affected by bubble diameter but not by inlet liquid velocity. The present dimensionless velocity distributions obtained numerically agreed well with previous experimental results, and the proposed numerical algorithm was validated. (author)

  14. Stress Distribution, Friction and Listeria Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prost, Jacques

    2003-03-01

    I will review our work on the physics of listeria propulsion based on an unavoidable elastic analysis of the stress distribution in the actin gel and dynamical boundary conditions (both normal and tangential). I will show in particular that it provides a natural explanation for the symmetry breaking transition occurring with beads (work with K. Sekimoto and F. Julicher), of the saltatory behavior of beads reported by A Bernheim et al (Nature 2002) and of the shape of soft beads (with O. Campas and J.F Joanny). This last analysis proves that, as announced in an earlier paper (F; Gerbal et al Biophys Journal 2000) the rear part of the gel contributes negatively to the motion.

  15. Stress distribution characteristics in the vicinity of coal seam floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zimo; Chanda, Emmanuel; Zhao, Jingli; Wang, Zhihe

    2018-01-01

    Although longwall top-coal caving (LTCC) has been a popular, more productive and cost-effective method in recent years, roadway floor heave and rock bursts frequently appear when exploiting such coal seams with large dip angle. This paper proposes addressing this problem by adopting three-dimensional roadway layout of stagger arrangement (3-D RLSA). In this study, the first step was to analyse the stress distribution characteristics in the vicinity of coal seam floor based on the stress slip line field theory. In the second step, numerical calculation using FLAC3D was conducted. Finally, an evaluation of the 3-D RLSA for solving this particular issue was given. Results indicate that for this particular mine the proposed 3-D RLSA results in 24% increase in the coal recovery ratio and a modest reduction in excavation and maintenance costs compared to the conventional LTCC method.

  16. Monte Carlo Calculation of Sensitivities to Secondaries' Angular Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perel, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm for Monte Carlo calculation of sensitivities of responses to secondaries' angular distributions (SAD) is developed, based on the differential operator approach. The algorithm was formulated for the sensitivity to Legendre coefficients of the SAD and is valid even in cases where the actual representation of SAD is not in the form of a Legendre series. The algorithm was implemented, for point- or ring-detectors, in a local version of the code MCNP. Numerical tests were performed to validate the algorithm and its implementation. In addition, an algorithm specific for the Kalbach-Mann representation of SAD is presented

  17. Strict calculation of electron energy distribution functions in inhomogeneous plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, R.

    1996-01-01

    It is objective of the paper to report on strict calculations of the velocity or energy distribution function function and related macroscopic properties of the electrons from appropriate electron kinetic equations under various plasma conditions and to contribute to a better understanding of the electron behaviour in inhomogeneous plasma regions. In particular, the spatial relaxation of plasma electrons acted upon by uniform electric fields, the response of plasma electrons on spatial disturbances of the electric field, the electron kinetics under the impact of space charge field confinement in the dc column plasma and the electron velocity distribution is stronger field as occurring in the electrode regions of a dc glow discharge is considered. (author)

  18. Beam brightness calculation for analytical and empirical distribution functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, T.J.; Boulais, K.A.; O, Y.S.; Rhee, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    The beam brightness, a figure of merit for a beam quality useful for high-current low-emittance beams, was introduced by van Steenbergen as B = I/V 4 , where I is the beam current and V 4 is the hypervolume in the four-dimensional trace space occupied by the beam particles. Customarily, the brightness is expressed in terms of the product of emittances ε x ε y as B = ηI/(π 2 ε x ε y ), where η is a form factor of order unity which depends on the precise definition of emittance and hypervolume. Recently, a refined definition of the beam brightness based on the arithmetic mean value defined in statistics is proposed. The beam brightness is defined as B triple-bond 4 > = I -1 ∫ ρ 4 2 dxdydx'dy', where I is the beam current given by I ∫ ρ 4 dxdydx'dy'. Note that in this definition, neither the hypervolume V 4 nor the emittance, are explicitly used; the brightness is determined solely by the distribution function. Brightnesses are unambiguously calculated and expressed analytically in terms of the respective beam current and effective emittance for a few commonly used distribution functions, including Maxwellian and water-bag distributions. Other distributions of arbitrary shape frequently encountered in actual experiments are treated numerically. The resulting brightnesses are expressed in the form B = ηI/(π 2 ε x ε y ), and η is found to be weakly dependent on the form of velocity distribution as well as spatial distribution

  19. Accurate calculation of field and carrier distributions in doped semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenji Yang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We use the numerical squeezing algorithm(NSA combined with the shooting method to accurately calculate the built-in fields and carrier distributions in doped silicon films (SFs in the micron and sub-micron thickness range and results are presented in graphical form for variety of doping profiles under different boundary conditions. As a complementary approach, we also present the methods and the results of the inverse problem (IVP - finding out the doping profile in the SFs for given field distribution. The solution of the IVP provides us the approach to arbitrarily design field distribution in SFs - which is very important for low dimensional (LD systems and device designing. Further more, the solution of the IVP is both direct and much easy for all the one-, two-, and three-dimensional semiconductor systems. With current efforts focused on the LD physics, knowing of the field and carrier distribution details in the LD systems will facilitate further researches on other aspects and hence the current work provides a platform for those researches.

  20. Calculation of the spallation product distribution in the evaporation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, T.; Kanno, I.; Nakahara, Y.; Takada, H.

    1989-01-01

    Some investigations are performed for the calculational model of nuclear spallation reaction in the evaporation process. A new version of a spallation reaction simulation code NUCLEUS has been developed by incorporating the newly revised Uno ampersand Yamada's mass formula and extending the counting region of produced nuclei. The differences between the new and original mass formulas are shown in the comparisons of mass excess values. The distributions of spallation products of a uranium target nucleus bombarded by energy (0.38 - 2.9 GeV) protons have been calculated with the new and original versions of NUCLEUS. In the fission component Uno ampersand Yamada's mass formula reproduces the measured data obtained from thin foil experiments significantly better, especially in the neutron excess side, than the combination of the Cameron's mass formula and the mass table compiled by Wapstra, et al., in the original version of NUCLEUS. Discussions are also made on how the mass-yield distribution of products varies dependent on the level density parameter a characterizing the particle evaporation. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  1. Calculation of the spallation product distribution in the evaporation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, T.; Kanno, I.; Nakahara, Y.; Takada, H.

    1989-01-01

    Some investigations are performed for the calculational model of nuclear spallation reaction in the evaporation process. A new version of a spallation reaction simulation code NUCLEUS has been developed by incorporating the newly revised Uno and Yamada's mass formula and extending the counting region of produced nuclei. The differences between the new and original mass formulas are shown in the comparisons of mass excess values. The distributions of spallation products of a uranium target nucleus bombarded by energy (0.38 - 2.9 GeV) protons have been calculated with the new and original versions of NUCLEUS. In the fission component Uno and Yamada's mass formula reproduces the measured data obtained from thin foil experiments significantly better, especially in the neutron excess side, than the combination of the Cameron's mass formula and the mass table compiled by Wapstra, et al., in the original version of NUCLEUS. Discussions are also made on how the mass-yield distribution of products varies dependent on the level density parameter α characterizing the particle evaporation. (author)

  2. stress distribution in continuo ribution in continuous thin ribution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    studied stresses in thin-walled box girder bridges but stress distribution walled box girder bridges .... the classical thin plate theory and trigonometric series. Lertsima et al. ..... remedied by applying spline finite strip method. Compared to other ...

  3. Transient temperature and stress distributions in the pressure vessel's wall of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, G.A. da

    1979-01-01

    In order to calculate the temperature distribution in a reactor vessel wall which is under the effect of gamma radiation originated in the reactor core, a numerical solution is proposed. This problem may arise from a reactor cooling pump failure .The thermal stresses are also calculated. (Author) [pt

  4. Calculating statistical distributions from operator relations: The statistical distributions of various intermediate statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Wu-Sheng; Xie, Mi

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we give a general discussion on the calculation of the statistical distribution from a given operator relation of creation, annihilation, and number operators. Our result shows that as long as the relation between the number operator and the creation and annihilation operators can be expressed as a † b=Λ(N) or N=Λ −1 (a † b), where N, a † , and b denote the number, creation, and annihilation operators, i.e., N is a function of quadratic product of the creation and annihilation operators, the corresponding statistical distribution is the Gentile distribution, a statistical distribution in which the maximum occupation number is an arbitrary integer. As examples, we discuss the statistical distributions corresponding to various operator relations. In particular, besides the Bose–Einstein and Fermi–Dirac cases, we discuss the statistical distributions for various schemes of intermediate statistics, especially various q-deformation schemes. Our result shows that the statistical distributions corresponding to various q-deformation schemes are various Gentile distributions with different maximum occupation numbers which are determined by the deformation parameter q. This result shows that the results given in much literature on the q-deformation distribution are inaccurate or incomplete. -- Highlights: ► A general discussion on calculating statistical distribution from relations of creation, annihilation, and number operators. ► A systemic study on the statistical distributions corresponding to various q-deformation schemes. ► Arguing that many results of q-deformation distributions in literature are inaccurate or incomplete

  5. LEGEND2007, Angular Distribution Table Calculations in ENDF Format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: LEGEND calculates linearly interpolable tabulated angular distributions starting from data in the ENDF/B format. IAEA1310/11: This version include the updates up to January 30, 2007. Changes in ENDF/B-VII Format and procedures, as well as the evaluations themselves, make it impossible for versions of the ENDF/B pre-processing codes earlier than PREPRO 2007 (2007 Version) to accurately process current ENDF/B-VII evaluations. The present code can handle all existing ENDF/B-VI evaluations through release 8, which will be the last release of ENDF/B-VI. Modifications from previous versions: Legend VERS. 2007-1 (JAN. 2007): checked against all ENDF/B=VII; increased max. points from 60,000 to 240,000

  6. Conceptual basis for calculations of absorbed-dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, W.K.; Rossi, H.H.; Alsmiller, R.G.; Berger, M.J.; Kellerer, A.M.; Roesch, W.C.; Spencer, L.V.; Zaider, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of radiation on matter are initiated by processes in which atoms and molecules of the medium are ionized or excited. Over a wide range of conditions, it is an excellent approximation to assume that the average number of ionizations and excitations is proportional to the amount of energy imparted to the medium by ionizing radiation in the volume of interest. The absorbed dose, that is, the average amount of energy imparted to the medium per unit mass, is therefore of central importance for the production of radiation effects, and the calculation of absorbed-dose distributions in irradiated media is the focus of interest of the present report. It should be pointed out, however, that even though absorbed dose is useful as an index relating absorbed energy to radiation effects, it is almost never sufficient; it may have to be supplemented by other information, such as the distributions of the amounts of energy imparted to small sites, the correlation of the amounts of energy imparted to adjacent sites, and so on. Such quantities are termed stochastic quantities. Unless otherwise stated, all quantities considered in this report are non-stochastic. 266 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  7. X-ray study of residual stress distribution of ground ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaida, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Keisuke; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Suzuki, Kenzi.

    1997-01-01

    The residual stress distribution of ground ceramics was determined from the eigen strain existing in the ground surface. The eigen strain of ground ceramics was tensile, and exponentially decreased with the distance from the surface. The residual stress distribution is given as a superposition of an exponential function of compression and a linear function. It is found that the actual residual stress distribution can be approximated by a compressive exponential function because the magnitude of tensile residual stress is negligibly small compared to the compressive residual stress. In the experiments, the diffraction angle was measured on ground silicon nitride for a wide range of sin 2 ψ using the glancing incidence X-ray diffraction technique. A strong nonlinearity was found in the 2θ-sin 2 ψ diagram at very high ψ-angles. From the analysis of nonlinearity, the residual stress distribution was determined. The residual stress distribution of silicon nitride coincided with the distribution calculated from the eigen strain distribution. Transmission electron microscopy was used to clarify the origin of generation of the residual stress. Both strain contrasts and microcracks were observed below the ground surface ; straight dislocations were also observed within silicon nitride grains near the ground surface. (author)

  8. Calculation of stress intensity factors for circumferential semi-elliptical cracks with high aspect ratio in pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zareei, A.; Nabavi, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, stress intensity factors are calculated at the deepest point of an internal circumferential semi-elliptical crack in a pipe subjected to any arbitrary load. Based on the three dimensional finite element analysis, a weight function is proposed for high aspect ratio semi-elliptical cracks in pipes. An effective expression is developed analytically to evaluate the stress intensity factor using the weight function method. For several crack face stress fields and welding residual stress distributions, the weight function is validated against finite element data and those in the literature. Based on the comparison results, it can be concluded that the solution proposed in this paper is effective in engineering applications. - Highlights: • Analysis of internal circumferential semi-elliptical cracks with high aspect ratio in pipes. • A weight function is proposed for the calculation of the stress intensity factors for the deepest point of the crack. • An effective closed form expression is proposed to evaluate the stress intensity factors. • Prediction of stress intensity factors for any applied stress gradients through the wall thickness without any limitations. • A three-dimensional finite element modeling employs to calculate the stress intensity factors for different geometries.

  9. Use of frozen stress in extracting stress intensity factor distributions in three dimensional cracked body problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. W.

    1992-01-01

    The adaptation of the frozen stress photoelastic method to the determination of the distribution of stress intensity factors in three dimensional problems is briefly reviewed. The method is then applied to several engineering problems of practical significance.

  10. Stress Distribution in Graded Cellular Materials Under Dynamic Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    Full Text Available Abstract Dynamic compression behaviors of density-homogeneous and density-graded irregular honeycombs are investigated using cell-based finite element models under a constant-velocity impact scenario. A method based on the cross-sectional engineering stress is developed to obtain the one-dimensional stress distribution along the loading direction in a cellular specimen. The cross-sectional engineering stress is contributed by two parts: the node-transitive stress and the contact-induced stress, which are caused by the nodal force and the contact of cell walls, respectively. It is found that the contact-induced stress is dominant for the significantly enhanced stress behind the shock front. The stress enhancement and the compaction wave propagation can be observed through the stress distributions in honeycombs under high-velocity compression. The single and double compaction wave modes are observed directly from the stress distributions. Theoretical analysis of the compaction wave propagation in the density-graded honeycombs based on the R-PH (rigid-plastic hardening idealization is carried out and verified by the numerical simulations. It is found that stress distribution in cellular materials and the compaction wave propagation characteristics under dynamic compression can be approximately predicted by the R-PH shock model.

  11. Parton distributions and lattice QCD calculations: A community white paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huey-Wen; Nocera, Emanuele R.; Olness, Fred; Orginos, Kostas; Rojo, Juan; Accardi, Alberto; Alexandrou, Constantia; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Bozzi, Giuseppe; Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Collins, Sara; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Constantinou, Martha; Del Debbio, Luigi; Engelhardt, Michael; Green, Jeremy; Gupta, Rajan; Harland-Lang, Lucian A.; Ishikawa, Tomomi; Kusina, Aleksander; Liu, Keh-Fei; Liuti, Simonetta; Monahan, Christopher; Nadolsky, Pavel; Qiu, Jian-Wei; Schienbein, Ingo; Schierholz, Gerrit; Thorne, Robert S.; Vogelsang, Werner; Wittig, Hartmut; Yuan, C.-P.; Zanotti, James

    2018-05-01

    In the framework of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), parton distribution functions (PDFs) quantify how the momentum and spin of a hadron are divided among its quark and gluon constituents. Two main approaches exist to determine PDFs. The first approach, based on QCD factorization theorems, realizes a QCD analysis of a suitable set of hard-scattering measurements, often using a variety of hadronic observables. The second approach, based on first-principle operator definitions of PDFs, uses lattice QCD to compute directly some PDF-related quantities, such as their moments. Motivated by recent progress in both approaches, in this document we present an overview of lattice-QCD and global-analysis techniques used to determine unpolarized and polarized proton PDFs and their moments. We provide benchmark numbers to validate present and future lattice-QCD calculations and we illustrate how they could be used to reduce the PDF uncertainties in current unpolarized and polarized global analyses. This document represents a first step towards establishing a common language between the two communities, to foster dialogue and to further improve our knowledge of PDFs.

  12. Nonlocal approach to the analysis of the stress distribution in granular systems. I. Theoretical framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenkre, V. M.; Scott, J. E.; Pease, E. A.; Hurd, A. J.

    1998-05-01

    A theoretical framework for the analysis of the stress distribution in granular materials is presented. It makes use of a transformation of the vertical spatial coordinate into a formal time variable and the subsequent study of a generally non-Markoffian, i.e., memory-possessing (nonlocal) propagation equation. Previous treatments are obtained as particular cases corresponding to, respectively, wavelike and diffusive limits of the general evolution. Calculations are presented for stress propagation in bounded and unbounded media. They can be used to obtain desired features such as a prescribed stress distribution within the compact.

  13. X-ray fractography by using synchrotron radiation source. Residual stress distribution just beneath fatigue fracture surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akita, Koichi; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Toshihiko

    2000-01-01

    The residual stress distributions just beneath the fatigue fracture surface were measured using synchrotron radiation with three different wavelengths, i.e., three different penetration depths. The residual stress distributions were estimated from three kinds of diffraction data by the following process. First, a temporary residual stress distribution in the depth direction is assumed. Theoretical 2θ-sin 2 ψ diagrams for each wavelength, where each has a different penetration depth, are calculated by the cosψ method developed by one of the authors. The sum total of the differences between the theoretical and experimental values of the diffraction angle in 2θ-sin 2 ψ diagrams is calculated. This total value is minimized by changing the assumed stress distribution by the quasi-Newton optimization method. Finally, optimized 2θ-sin 2 ψ diagrams for each penetration depth and detailed stress distribution are determined. The true surface residual stress is obtained from this stress distribution. No effect of load ratio R (= P min /P max ) on the residual stresses of the fatigue fracture surfaces in low-carbon steels was observed when the sin 2 ψ method was used for stress measurement. However, the residual stresses became higher with increasing R when these were measured by the proposed method. On the basis of this, the stress intensity factor range, ΔK, can be estimated from the residual stress on the fatigue fracture surface. (author)

  14. Effect study of multi-bubbles on stress distribution of fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yi; Wang Xiaomin; Long Chongsheng

    2015-01-01

    The finite element model was proposed to simulate the process of the UO_2 dispersion fuel particle sustaining the internal pressure of multi-bubbles, and the stress distribution of fuel particle with intra-bubbles was calculated. The results show that when the bubbles line equidistantly along x axis, the max normal stress along y axis increases with the number of bubbles, meanwhile, the increment of the normal stress gradually decreases. There is a limit that the effect of bubble's number imposes on the max normal stress in the fuel particle. When multi-column of bubbles exist, the max normal stress along x axis in the fuel particle increases, and the max normal stress along y axis decreases with the increase of the number of bubble column. The stress concentration in the fuel particle decreases with the spacing radius ratio increasing. (authors)

  15. Thermographic Analysis of Stress Distribution in Welded Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domazet Ž.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue life prediction of welded joints based on S-N curves in conjunction with nominal stresses generally is not reliable. Stress distribution in welded area affected by geometrical inhomogeneity, irregular welded surface and weld toe radius is quite complex, so the local (structural stress concept is accepted in recent papers. The aim of this paper is to determine the stress distribution in plate type aluminum welded joints, to analyze the reliability of TSA (Thermal Stress Analysis in this kind of investigations, and to obtain numerical values for stress concentration factors for practical use. Stress distribution in aluminum butt and fillet welded joints is determined by using the three different methods: strain gauges measurement, thermal stress analysis and FEM. Obtained results show good agreement - the TSA mutually confirmed the FEM model and stresses measured by strain gauges. According to obtained results, it may be stated that TSA, as a relatively new measurement technique may in the future become a standard tool for the experimental investigation of stress concentration and fatigue in welded joints that can help to develop more accurate numerical tools for fatigue life prediction.

  16. Thermographic Analysis of Stress Distribution in Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piršić, T.; Krstulović Opara, L.; Domazet, Ž.

    2010-06-01

    The fatigue life prediction of welded joints based on S-N curves in conjunction with nominal stresses generally is not reliable. Stress distribution in welded area affected by geometrical inhomogeneity, irregular welded surface and weld toe radius is quite complex, so the local (structural) stress concept is accepted in recent papers. The aim of this paper is to determine the stress distribution in plate type aluminum welded joints, to analyze the reliability of TSA (Thermal Stress Analysis) in this kind of investigations, and to obtain numerical values for stress concentration factors for practical use. Stress distribution in aluminum butt and fillet welded joints is determined by using the three different methods: strain gauges measurement, thermal stress analysis and FEM. Obtained results show good agreement - the TSA mutually confirmed the FEM model and stresses measured by strain gauges. According to obtained results, it may be stated that TSA, as a relatively new measurement technique may in the future become a standard tool for the experimental investigation of stress concentration and fatigue in welded joints that can help to develop more accurate numerical tools for fatigue life prediction.

  17. On-line calculation of 3-D power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y. H.; In, W. K.; Park, J. R.; Lee, C. C.; Auh, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    The 3-D power distribution synthesis scheme was implemented in Totally Integrated Core Operation Monitoring System (TICOMS), which is under development as the next generation core monitoring system. The on-line 3-D core power distribution obtained from the measured fixed incore detector readings is used to construct the hot pin power as well as the core average axial power distribution. The core average axial power distribution and the hot pin power of TICOMS were compared with those of the current digital on-line core monitoring system, COLSS, which construct the core average axial power distribution and the pseudo hot pin power. The comparison shows that TICOMS results in the slightly more accurate core average axial power distribution and the less conservative hot pin power. Therefore, these results increased the core operating margins. In addition, the on-line 3-D power distribution is expected to be very useful for the core operation in the future

  18. Local stress calculation in simulations of multicomponent systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branicio, Paulo S.; Srolovitz, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The virial and Hardy methods provide accurate local stresses for single component materials such as monatomic metals. In contrast to the elemental material case, both methods provide poor estimates of the local stress for multicomponent materials. Using binary materials such as CaO, SiC and AlN and homogeneous strain, we demonstrate that there are several sources for the slow convergence of the virial and Hardy local stresses to the bulk values. Different approaches such as enforced stoichiometry, atomic localization functions and the atomic voronoi volume are used to improve the convergence and increase the spatial resolution of the local stress. The virial method with enforced stoichiometry and atomic voronoi volumes is the most accurate, giving exact stress values by the first atomic shell. In the general case, not assuming stoichiometry, the virial method with localization functions converge to 93% of the bulk value by the third atomic shell. This work may be particularly useful for the real-time description of stresses in simulations of shock waves and deformation dynamics.

  19. A computer program (COSTUM) to calculate confidence intervals for in situ stress measurements. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzik, E.J.; Walker, J.R.; Martin, C.D.

    1989-03-01

    The state of in situ stress is one of the parameters required both for the design and analysis of underground excavations and for the evaluation of numerical models used to simulate underground conditions. To account for the variability and uncertainty of in situ stress measurements, it is desirable to apply confidence limits to measured stresses. Several measurements of the state of stress along a borehole are often made to estimate the average state of stress at a point. Since stress is a tensor, calculating the mean stress and confidence limits using scalar techniques is inappropriate as well as incorrect. A computer program has been written to calculate and present the mean principle stresses and the confidence limits for the magnitudes and directions of the mean principle stresses. This report describes the computer program, COSTUM

  20. Biomechanical effects of two different collar implant structures on stress distribution under cantilever fixed partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merıç, Gökçe; Erkmen, Erkan; Kurt, Ahmet; Eser, Atilim; özden, Ahmet Utku

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the effects of two distinct collar geometries of implants on stress distribution in the bone around the implants supporting cantilever fixed partial dentures (CFPDs) as well as in the implant-abutment complex and superstructures. The three-dimensional finite element method was selected to evaluate the stress distribution. CFPDs which was supported by microthread collar structured (MCS) and non-microthread collar structured (NMCS) implants was modeled; 300 N vertical, 150 N oblique and 60 N horizontal forces were applied to the models separately. The stress values in the bone, implant-abutment complex and superstructures were calculated. In the MCS model, higher stresses were located in the cortical bone and implant-abutment complex in the case of vertical load while decreased stresses in cortical bone and implant-abutment complex were noted within horizontal and oblique loading. In the case of vertical load, decreased stresses have been noted in cancellous bone and framework. Upon horizontal and oblique loading, a MCS model had higher stress in cancellous bone and framework than the NMCS model. Higher von Mises stresses have been noted in veneering material for NMCS models. It has been concluded that stress distribution in implant-supported CFPDs correlated with the macro design of the implant collar and the direction of applied force.

  1. Development of guide thimble stress peaking factor calculation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seong Ki; Jeon, Sang Youn; Kim, Jae Ik; Jeon, Kyeong Lak; Kim, Kyu Tae

    2004-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Assembly for light water reactor which provides for 236 fuel rods consists of guide tubes, spacer grids, top/bottom nozzles. The guide tubes form the main structural components in conjunction with the grids, act as the main load carrying members of fuel assembly and serve as a support structure and a guide path for the control element, neutron sources and incore instruments after they are secured to upper and lower end areas. Top/bottom nozzles make the end parts of fuel assembly. And the spacer girds maintain the fuel rod array by providing positive lateral restraint to the fuel rod to the fuel rod but only frictional restraint to axial fuel rod motion. When the fuel assembly is in reactor, the tensional and compressional forces are applied to guide thimble through the top nozzle. The stresses vary with the location of guide thimble on the top nozzle plate since the different flow plate thickness between center and outer areas causes a different flexibility. The relative stress shall be considered during designing this kind of structure. And it is useful to know a coefficient to represent this relative stress difference and this value is called stress peaking factor

  2. Calculation of depletion with optimal distribution of initial control poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Lobo, P.D. de.

    1978-03-01

    The spatial depletion equations are linearized within the time intervals and their solution is obtained by modal analysis. At the beginning of life an optimal poison distribution that maximizes neutron economy and the corresponding flux is determined. At the start of the subsequent time steps the flux distributions are obtained by pertubation method in relation to the start of the previous time steps. The problem was studied with constant poison distribution in order to evaluate the influence of the poison at the beginning of life. The results obtained by the modal expansion techniques are satisfactory. However, the optimization of the initial distribution of the control poison does not indicate any significant effect on the core life [pt

  3. Vertical Distribution of Tidal Flow Reynolds Stress in Shallow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zhi-yao; NI Zhi-hui; LU Guo-nian

    2009-01-01

    Based on the results of the tidal flow Reynolds stresses of the field observations,indoor experiments,and numerical models,the parabolic distribution of the tidal flow Reynolds stress is proposed and its coefficients are determined theoretically in this paper.Having been well verified with the field data and experimental data,the proposed distribution of Reynolds stress is also compared with numerical model results,and a good agreement is obtained,showing that this distribution can well reflect the basic features of Reynolds stress deviating from the linear distribution that is downward when the tidal flow is of acceleration,upward when the tidal flow is of deceleration.Its dynamics cause is also discussed preliminarily and the influence of the water depth is pointed out from the definition of Reynolds stress,turbulent generation,transmission,and so on.The established expression for the vertical distribution of the tidal flow Reynolds stress is not only simple and explicit,but can also well reflect the features of the tidal flow acceleration and deceleration for further study on the velocity profile of tidal flow.

  4. Model calculations of stresses and deformations in rock salt in the near field of heated borehols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudewills, A.

    1984-08-01

    With the help of the finite element computer code ADINA thermally induced borehole closure and stress distribution in the salt were investigated by the example of the 'Temperature Test 3' performed in the Asse mine during which the temperature and the borehole closure were measured. The aim of the calculations has been the assessment of the capabilities of the ADINA code to solve complex thermomechanical problems and to verify the available thermomechanical material laws for rock salt. In these computations the modulus of elasticity and the creep law of salt were varied in order to assess the influence exerted by these material parameters. The computed borehole closures are in good agreement with the measured data. In second part the model computations of thermomechanical phenomena around a 300 m deep borehole are presented for a HLW repository with and without brine, respectively. The finite element investigations are carried out for a periodical and symmetrical disposal field configuration with an equivalent radius of 28 m of the cylindrical unit cell. The initial state of stress was assumed to be lithostatic. A hydrostatic fluid pressure of 12 MPa was chosen for the case of accidental flooding of the repository field shortly after emplacement of the waste canisters. The essential results of this thermomechanical analysis are the borehole closure and the stresses in rock salt in the near field of the repository borehole. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Calculation of stresses in a rock mass and lining in stagewise face drivage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryakov, VM; Zhamalova, BR

    2018-03-01

    Using the method of calculating mechanical state of a rock mass for the conditions of stagewise drivage of a production face in large cross-section excavations, the specific features of stress redistribution in lining of excavations are found. The zones of tensile stresses in the lining are detected. The authors discuss the influence of the initial stress state of rocks on the tension stress zones induced in the lining in course of the heading advance

  6. Influence of Transformation Plasticity on the Distribution of Internal Stress in Three Water-Quenched Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Qin, Shengwei; Zhang, Jiazhi; Wang, Ying; Rong, Yonghua; Zuo, Xunwei; Chen, Nailu

    2017-10-01

    Based on the hardenability of three medium carbon steels, cylinders with the same 60-mm diameter and 240-mm length were designed for quenching in water to obtain microstructures, including a pearlite matrix (Chinese steel mark: 45), a bainite matrix (42CrMo), and a martensite matrix (40CrNiMo). Through the combination of normalized functions describing transformation plasticity (TP), the thermo-elasto-plastic constitutive equation was deduced. The results indicate that the finite element simulation (FES) of the internal stress distribution in the three kinds of hardenable steel cylinders based on the proposed exponent-modified (Ex-Modified) normalized function is more consistent with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements than those based on the normalized functions proposed by Abrassart, Desalos, and Leblond, which is attributed to the fact that the Ex-Modified normalized function better describes the TP kinetics. In addition, there was no significant difference between the calculated and measured stress distributions, even though TP was taken into account for the 45 carbon steel; that is, TP can be ignored in FES. In contrast, in the 42CrMo and 40CrNiMo alloyed steels, the significant effect of TP on the residual stress distributions was demonstrated, meaning that TP must be included in the FES. The rationality of the preceding conclusions was analyzed. The complex quenching stress is a consequence of interactions between the thermal and phase transformation stresses. The separated calculations indicate that the three steels exhibit similar thermal stress distributions for the same water-quenching condition, but different phase transformation stresses between 45 carbon steel and alloyed steels, leading to different distributions of their axial and tangential stresses.

  7. Calculation of dynamic stresses in viscoelastic sandwich beams using oma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelayo, F.; Aenlle, M. L.; Ismael, G.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical response of sandwich elements with viscoelastic core is time and temperature dependent. Laminated glass is a sandwich element where the mechanical behavior of the glass layers is usually considered linear-elastic material whereas the core is made of an amorphous thermoplastic which...... data. In simple structures, analytical mode shapes can be used alternatively to the numerical ones. In this paper, the dynamic stresses on the glass layers of a laminated glass beam have estimated using the experimental acceleration responses measured at 7 points of the beam, and the experimental mode...

  8. From parallel to distributed computing for reactive scattering calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagana, A.; Gervasi, O.; Baraglia, R.

    1994-01-01

    Some reactive scattering codes have been ported on different innovative computer architectures ranging from massively parallel machines to clustered workstations. The porting has required a drastic restructuring of the codes to single out computationally decoupled cpu intensive subsections. The suitability of different theoretical approaches for parallel and distributed computing restructuring is discussed and the efficiency of related algorithms evaluated

  9. Stress and Friction Distribution around Slab Corner in Continuous Casting Mold with Different Corner Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sheng; Long, Mujun; Chen, Huabiao; Chen, Dengfu; Liu, Tao; Duan, Huamei; Cao, Junsheng

    2018-06-01

    The non-uniform friction and thermal stress in the mold are important as causes of the transverse cracks around strand corner. To analyze the stress distribution features around strand corner, a three-dimensional thermo-elastoplastic finite-element mold model with different corner structures (right-angle, big-chamfer, multi-chamfer, and fillet) was established. The temperature field in the mold was indirectly coupled through a three-dimensional fluid flow and heat transfer model. In addition, the non-uniform mold friction stress loaded on the strand surface was calculated through a friction model. The results show that the stress distribution on the shell is similar to the temperature distribution. The stress concentration appears in the strand corner and the lower part of wide face. The friction stress enhances the corner stress around the edge of the air-gap. For chamfered molds, the stress around the corner between the wide face and chamfer face is larger than that between the narrow face and chamfer face. Around the corner region, both the stress peak and the area of the large stress zone of the right-angle strand are the largest, while those of big-chamfered, multi-chamfered, and fillet strands decrease in that order. The stress peak position of the chamfered strands is closer to the mold exit than that of the right-angle strand. Compared with the use of the right-angle mold, the application of chamfered molds is able to reduce the stress concentration around the strand corner.

  10. Stress and Friction Distribution around Slab Corner in Continuous Casting Mold with Different Corner Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sheng; Long, Mujun; Chen, Huabiao; Chen, Dengfu; Liu, Tao; Duan, Huamei; Cao, Junsheng

    2018-02-01

    The non-uniform friction and thermal stress in the mold are important as causes of the transverse cracks around strand corner. To analyze the stress distribution features around strand corner, a three-dimensional thermo-elastoplastic finite-element mold model with different corner structures (right-angle, big-chamfer, multi-chamfer, and fillet) was established. The temperature field in the mold was indirectly coupled through a three-dimensional fluid flow and heat transfer model. In addition, the non-uniform mold friction stress loaded on the strand surface was calculated through a friction model. The results show that the stress distribution on the shell is similar to the temperature distribution. The stress concentration appears in the strand corner and the lower part of wide face. The friction stress enhances the corner stress around the edge of the air-gap. For chamfered molds, the stress around the corner between the wide face and chamfer face is larger than that between the narrow face and chamfer face. Around the corner region, both the stress peak and the area of the large stress zone of the right-angle strand are the largest, while those of big-chamfered, multi-chamfered, and fillet strands decrease in that order. The stress peak position of the chamfered strands is closer to the mold exit than that of the right-angle strand. Compared with the use of the right-angle mold, the application of chamfered molds is able to reduce the stress concentration around the strand corner.

  11. Visual Method for Spectral Energy Distribution Calculation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this work, we propose to use 'The Geometer's Sketchpad' to the fitting of a spectral energy distribution of blazar based on three effective spectral indices, αRO, αOX, and αRX and the flux density in the radio band. It can make us to see the fitting in detail with both the peak frequency and peak luminosity given ...

  12. Semianalytical and Seminumerical Calculations of Optimum Material Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Gunnar

    1963-06-15

    Perturbation theory applied to the multigroup diffusion equations gives a general condition for optimum distribution of reactor materials. A certain function of the material densities and the fluxes, here called the W (eight) function, must thus be constant where the variable material density is larger than zero if changes in this density affect only the group constants where the changes occur. The weight function is, however, generally a complicated function and complete solutions have therefore previously been presented only for the special case when constant weight function implies constant thermal flux. It is demonstrated that the condition of constant weight function can be used together with well known methods for numerical solution of the multigroup diffusion equations to obtain optimum material distributions also when the thermal flux varies over the core. Solution of the minimum fuel mass problem for two reflected reactors thus shows that an effective reflector such as D{sub 2}O gives a peak in the optimum fuel distribution at the core-reflector interface, while an ineffective reflector such as a breeder blanket or a steel tank wall 'pushes' the fuel away from the strongly absorbing zone. It is also interesting to compare the effective reflector case with analytically obtained solutions corresponding to flat power density, flat thermal flux and flat fuel density.

  13. Measurement of probability distributions for internal stresses in dislocated crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, Angus J.; Tarleton, Edmund; Vilalta-Clemente, Arantxa; Collins, David M. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Jiang, Jun; Britton, T. Benjamin [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Royal School of Mines, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-03

    Here, we analyse residual stress distributions obtained from various crystal systems using high resolution electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Histograms showing stress probability distributions exhibit tails extending to very high stress levels. We demonstrate that these extreme stress values are consistent with the functional form that should be expected for dislocated crystals. Analysis initially developed by Groma and co-workers for X-ray line profile analysis and based on the so-called “restricted second moment of the probability distribution” can be used to estimate the total dislocation density. The generality of the results are illustrated by application to three quite different systems, namely, face centred cubic Cu deformed in uniaxial tension, a body centred cubic steel deformed to larger strain by cold rolling, and hexagonal InAlN layers grown on misfitting sapphire and silicon carbide substrates.

  14. Importance of Force Decomposition for Local Stress Calculations in Biomembrane Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, Juan M; Torres-Sánchez, Alejandro; Arroyo, Marino

    2014-02-11

    Local stress fields are routinely computed from molecular dynamics trajectories to understand the structure and mechanical properties of lipid bilayers. These calculations can be systematically understood with the Irving-Kirkwood-Noll theory. In identifying the stress tensor, a crucial step is the decomposition of the forces on the particles into pairwise contributions. However, such a decomposition is not unique in general, leading to an ambiguity in the definition of the stress tensor, particularly for multibody potentials. Furthermore, a theoretical treatment of constraints in local stress calculations has been lacking. Here, we present a new implementation of local stress calculations that systematically treats constraints and considers a privileged decomposition, the central force decomposition, that leads to a symmetric stress tensor by construction. We focus on biomembranes, although the methodology presented here is widely applicable. Our results show that some unphysical behavior obtained with previous implementations (e.g. nonconstant normal stress profiles along an isotropic bilayer in equilibrium) is a consequence of an improper treatment of constraints. Furthermore, other valid force decompositions produce significantly different stress profiles, particularly in the presence of dihedral potentials. Our methodology reveals the striking effect of unsaturations on the bilayer mechanics, missed by previous stress calculation implementations.

  15. Distribution of Stress in Deformation Zone of Niobium Microalloyed Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandrlić, Ivan; Rešković, Stoja; Brlić, Tin

    2018-07-01

    Microalloyed steels today represent a significant part of total world production and processing of steel. Although widely used, there are scarce data on the stress distribution in the deformation zone of these steels. Research was carried out on two steel grades, both low-carbon structural steels with the same basic chemical composition, with one of them additionally microalloyed with niobium. Differences in the stress distribution in the deformation zone between two tested steels were continuously observed and measured using the methods of digital image correlation and thermography. It has been found out that niobium microalloyed steel has significantly more complex material flow and stress distribution in the deformation zone when compared to the plain low carbon steel.

  16. Distribution of Stress in Deformation Zone of Niobium Microalloyed Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandrlić, Ivan; Rešković, Stoja; Brlić, Tin

    2018-03-01

    Microalloyed steels today represent a significant part of total world production and processing of steel. Although widely used, there are scarce data on the stress distribution in the deformation zone of these steels. Research was carried out on two steel grades, both low-carbon structural steels with the same basic chemical composition, with one of them additionally microalloyed with niobium. Differences in the stress distribution in the deformation zone between two tested steels were continuously observed and measured using the methods of digital image correlation and thermography. It has been found out that niobium microalloyed steel has significantly more complex material flow and stress distribution in the deformation zone when compared to the plain low carbon steel.

  17. Residual-stress distributions near stainless steel butt weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elligson, W.A.; Shack, W.J.

    1978-01-01

    Concern for the integrity of stainless steel butt-weldments in boiling-water-reactor (BWR) piping systems has stimulated study of the conditions that cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the heat-affected zones (HAZ) of the weldments. It is generally agreed that a high stress exceeding the initial yield strength is one of the essential elements for crack initiation. Since design procedures usually ensure that load stresses are below initial yield, the source of the high stresses necessary to produce SCC is thought to be the residual stresses due to welding. To examine the level of residual stresses in the weldments of interest, bulk residual stresses were measured on 100 mm (4-in.) and 254 mm (10-in.) diameter Schedule 80 piping weldments using strain relief techniques. Both laboratory welded specimens and field welded specimens from reactors in service were studied. Axial bulk residual stress distributions were obtained at 45 0 intervals around the circumference. At each azimuthal position, the residual stresses were measured at seven axial positions: on the weld centerline and 13, 20, and 25 mm on either side of the weld centerline on both the inside and outside surfaces

  18. Interpretation of single grain De distributions and calculation of De

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Z.; Duller, G.A.T.; Wintle, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    Recent development of an instrument for measuring the optically stimulated luminescence signal from individual mineral grains has made it practicable to measure the equivalent dose (D e ) from many hundreds or thousands of single mineral grains from a sample. Such measurements can potentially be used to address issues such as sample integrity, and to make it possible to obtain ages from samples that consist of mixtures of grains, enlarging the range of materials to which luminescence dating can be applied. However, for reliable ages to be obtained, the characteristics of the equipment and the sample being analysed need to be understood. Using sensitised sedimentary quartz grains, the instrumental uncertainty in repeated optically stimulated luminescence measurements made using a single grain laser luminescence unit attached to a conventional luminescence reader was evaluated; a value of 1.2% was obtained. Grains from this sample were then used to investigate the uncertainty in a measured dose distribution obtained using the single aliquot measurement protocol on each grain that had previously received a known laboratory dose; after systematic rejection of grains that did not pass defined acceptance criteria, overdispersion of 7% was found. Additional spread in data was found when uniform aeolian sands were examined, resulting in overdispersion of ∼12%; this was attributed to a combination of factors relating to differences in field and laboratory conditions. A similar value was found for an archaeological horizon below this sand. For another sample from the same section, a significantly larger value was found, ∼29%; on this basis the finite mixture model was applied to obtain the likely dose components. The paper demonstrates the importance of correct assessment of error terms when analysing single grain D e distributions and a number of rejection criteria that are vital to avoid the inclusion of data that could lead to misinterpretation of the degree of

  19. Imaging shear stress distribution and evaluating the stress concentration factor of the human eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph Antony, S.

    2015-03-01

    Healthy eyes are vital for a better quality of human life. Historically, for man-made materials, scientists and engineers use stress concentration factors to characterise the effects of structural non-homogeneities on their mechanical strength. However, such information is scarce for the human eye. Here we present the shear stress distribution profiles of a healthy human cornea surface in vivo using photo-stress analysis tomography, which is a non-intrusive and non-X-ray based method. The corneal birefringent retardation measured here is comparable to that of previous studies. Using this, we derive eye stress concentration factors and the directional alignment of major principal stress on the surface of the cornea. Similar to thermometers being used for monitoring the general health in humans, this report provides a foundation to characterise the shear stress carrying capacity of the cornea, and a potential bench mark for validating theoretical modelling of stresses in the human eye in future.

  20. Determination of Hot-Carrier Distribution Functions in Uniaxially Stressed p-Type Germanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ove

    1973-01-01

    This paper gives a description of an experimental determination of distribution functions in k→ space of hot holes in uniaxially compressed germanium. The hot-carrier studies were made at 85°K at fields up to 1000 V/cm and uniaxial stresses up to 11 800 kg/cm2. The field and stress were always in...... probabilities with stress. A model based on the nonparabolicity of the upper p3 / 2 level is proposed for the negative differential conductivity in stressed p-type Ge....... function has been assumed. The parameters of the distribution function are then fitted to the experimental modulation. The calculation of absorption was performed numerically, using a four-band k→·p→ model. This model was checked for consistency by comparing with piezoabsorption measurements performed...... in thermal equilibrium. The average carrier energy calculated from the distribution function shows a fast increase with stress and almost saturates when the strain splitting of the two p3 / 2 levels reaches the optical-phonon energy. This saturation is interpreted in terms of the change in scattering...

  1. Internal Stress Distribution Measurement of TIG Welded SUS304 Samples Using Neutron Diffraction Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muslih, M. Refai; Sumirat, I.; Sairun; Purwanta

    2008-03-01

    The distribution of residual stress of SUS304 samples that were undergone TIG welding process with four different electric currents has been measured. The welding has been done in the middle part of the samples that was previously grooved by milling machine. Before they were welded the samples were annealed at 650 degree Celsius for one hour. The annealing process was done to eliminate residual stress generated by grooving process so that the residual stress within the samples was merely produced from welding process. The calculation of distribution of residual stress was carried out by measuring the strains within crystal planes of Fe(220) SUS304. Strain, Young modulus, and Poisson ratio of Fe(220) SUS304 were measured using DN1-M neutron diffractometer. Young modulus and Poisson ratio of Fe(220) SUS304 sample were measured in-situ. The result of calculations showed that distribution of residual stress of SUS304 in the vicinity of welded area is influenced both by treatments given at the samples-making process and by the electric current used during welding process.

  2. Development of the model for the stress calculation of fuel assembly under accident load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Il Kon

    1993-01-01

    The finite element model for the stress calculation in guide thimbles of a fuel assembly (FA) under seismic and loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) load is developed. For the stress calculation of FA under accident load, at first the program MAIN is developed to select the worst bending mode shaped FA from core model. And then the model for the stress calculation of FA is developed by means of the finite element code. The calculated results of program MAIN are used as the kinematic constraints of the finite element model of a FA. Compared the calculated results of the stiffness of the finite element model of FA with the test results they have good agreements. (Author)

  3. Calculated distribution of radionuclides in soils and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigdomenech, I.; Bergstroem, U.

    1994-12-01

    The description of the accumulation of radionuclides in some biospheric compartments is in general based on a sorption distribution coefficient K d . This value is very decisive for the concentration of long-lived radionuclides in reservoirs that are important from the dose point of view. Sorption is due to several processes such as ion-exchange and a variety of physical and chemical interactions which are difficult to interpret with the current K d -methodology. In addition, many of the K d values are obtained from laboratory or geospheric conditions not comparable to conditions prevailing in the biosphere. The main objective with this work is to deepen the knowledge about the theoretical background of K d -values. To achieve this purpose, available theoretical models for ion-exchange and surface complexation have been adapted for simulation under biospheric conditions. The elements treated are cesium, radium, neptunium, uranium and plutonium The results show that a triple layer surface complexation model may be used in estimating K d -values for actinides as a function of important chemical parameters such as pH and E H . It is concluded that by estimating some equilibrium constants and making some careful approximations, surface complexation models can be used for performance assessment of radioactive waste repositories. 72 refs, 7 figs

  4. Macro design effects on stress distribution around implants: a photoelastic stress analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkir, Serhat Emre; Terzioglu, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    Biomechanics is one of the main factors for achieving long-term success of implant supported prostheses. Long-term failures mostly depend on biomechanical complications. It is important to distinguish the effects of macro design of the implants. In this study, the photoelastic response of four different types of implants that were inserted with different angulations were comparatively analyzed. The implant types investigated were screw cylinder (ITI, Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland), stepped cylinder (Frialit2, Friadent GmbH, Manheim, Germany), root form (Camlog Rootline, Alatatec, Wilshelm, Germany), and cylindrical implant, with micro-threads on the implant neck (Astra, AstraTech, Mölndal, Sweden). In the test models, one of the implants was inserted straight, while the other one was aligned mesially with 15° angles. The superstructures were prepared as single crowns. A 150N loading was applied to the restorations throughout the test. A comparison of the implant designs showed that there were no significant differences between the straight implants; however, between the inclined implants, the most favorable stress distribution was seen with the stepped cylinder implants. The least favorable stress concentration was observed around the root formed implants. Microthreads around the implant neck appeared to be effective in a homogenous stress distribution. Observations showed that misaligned implants caused less stress than straight implants, but the stress concentrations were not homogenous. As there were observable differences between the implant types, straight placed cylindrical implants showed better stress distribution characteristics, while inclined tapering implants had better stress distribution characteristics.

  5. Modelling and analysis of the stress distribution in a multi-thin film system Pt/USG/Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, W. Z.; Roqueta, F.; Craveur, J. C.; Belhenini, S.; Gardes, P.; Tougui, A.

    2018-04-01

    Residual stress analysis is commonly achieved through curvature measurement with the help of Stoney’s formula. However, this conventional approach is inadequate for multi-layer thin film systems, which are widely used in today’s microelectronics. Also, for the thin film case, the residual stress is composed of thermal stress and intrinsic stress. Measuring the wafer curvature at room temperature provides a value for the average stresses in the layer, the two components cannot be distinguished by the existing methodologies of curvature measurement. To alleviate these problems, a modified curvature method combining finite element (FE) modelling is proposed to study the stress distribution in a Pt/USG/Si structure. A 2D FE model is firstly built in order to calculate the thermal stress in the multilayer structure, the obtained thermal stresses in respective films are verified by an analytical model. Then, we calculate the warpage of the multilayer structure by considering the intrinsic stress in the respective films. The residual stresses in the films are determined by minimizing the difference between the simulated warpage and that of experimental measurement. The proposed approach can be used to calculate not only the average residual stress but also thermal and intrinsic stress components in the USG and Platinum films. The obtained residual and intrinsic stresses from a numerical model are compared with the values of other studies. There is no limitation for the application of our methodologies regarding the number of the layers in the stack.

  6. Methodology of strength calculation under alternating stresses using the diagram of limiting amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovodov, V. V.; Valentov, A. V.; Kukhar, I. S.; Retyunskiy, O. Yu; Baraksanov, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The work proposes the algorithm to calculate strength under alternating stresses using the developed methodology of building the diagram of limiting stresses. The overall safety factor is defined by the suggested formula. Strength calculations of components working under alternating stresses in the great majority of cases are conducted as the checking ones. It is primarily explained by the fact that the overall fatigue strength reduction factor (Kσg or Kτg) can only be chosen approximately during the component design as the engineer at this stage of work has just the approximate idea on the component size and shape.

  7. Calculation of mixed mode stress intensity factors using an alternating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takayuki

    1999-01-01

    In this study, mixed mode stress intensity factors (K I and K II ) of a square plate with a notch were calculated using a finite element alternating method. The obtained results were compared with the ones by a finite element method, and it was shown that the finite element alternating method can accurately estimate mixed mode stress intensity factors. Then, using this finite element alternating method, mixed mode stress intensity factors were calculated as changing the size and position of the notch, and its simplified equations were proposed. (author)

  8. Non-iterative method to calculate the periodical distribution of temperature in reactors with thermal regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez de Alsina, O.L.; Scaricabarozzi, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    A matrix non-iterative method to calculate the periodical distribution in reactors with thermal regeneration is presented. In case of exothermic reaction, a source term will be included. A computer code was developed to calculate the final temperature distribution in solids and in the outlet temperatures of the gases. The results obtained from ethane oxidation calculation in air, using the Dietrich kinetic data are presented. This method is more advantageous than iterative methods. (E.G.) [pt

  9. 3-D flux distribution and criticality calculation of TRIGA Mark-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Can, B.

    1982-01-01

    In this work, the static calculation of the (I.T.U. TRIGA Mark-II) flux distribution has been made. The three dimensional, r-θ-z, representation of the core has been used. In this representation, for different configuration, the flux distribution has been calculated depending on two group theory. The thermal-hydraulics, the poisoning effects have been ignored. The calculations have been made by using the three dimensional and multigroup code CAN. (author)

  10. Volumetric Arterial Wall Shear Stress Calculation Based on Cine Phase Contrast MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potters, Wouter V.; van Ooij, Pim; Marquering, Henk; VanBavel, Ed; Nederveen, Aart J.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo assess the accuracy and precision of a volumetric wall shear stress (WSS) calculation method applied to cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) data. Materials and MethodsVolumetric WSS vectors were calculated in software phantoms. WSS algorithm parameters were optimized

  11. Calculations of the stress intensity factor on a specimen for a four-point bend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauerova, D.

    1995-02-01

    The stress intensity factor K I was calculated in dependence on the crack length in a sample for a (non-standard) four-point bend assuming elastic properties of the material. It is shown that the SYSTUS code gives the best results when calculating the K I value from the J-integral. 4 tabs., 12 figs., 4 refs

  12. Massive calculations of electrostatic potentials and structure maps of biopolymers in a distributed computing environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akishina, T.P.; Ivanov, V.V.; Stepanenko, V.A.

    2013-01-01

    Among the key factors determining the processes of transcription and translation are the distributions of the electrostatic potentials of DNA, RNA and proteins. Calculations of electrostatic distributions and structure maps of biopolymers on computers are time consuming and require large computational resources. We developed the procedures for organization of massive calculations of electrostatic potentials and structure maps for biopolymers in a distributed computing environment (several thousands of cores).

  13. Yield shear stress model of magnetorheological fluids based on exponential distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Chu-wen; Chen, Fei; Meng, Qing-rui; Dong, Zi-xin

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic chain model that considers the interaction between particles and the external magnetic field in a magnetorheological fluid has been widely accepted. Based on the chain model, a yield shear stress model of magnetorheological fluids was proposed by introducing the exponential distribution to describe the distribution of angles between the direction of magnetic field and the chain formed by magnetic particles. The main influencing factors were considered in the model, such as magnetic flux density, intensity of magnetic field, particle size, volume fraction of particles, the angle of magnetic chain, and so on. The effect of magnetic flux density on the yield shear stress was discussed. The yield stress of aqueous Fe 3 O 4 magnetreological fluids with volume fraction of 7.6% and 16.2% were measured by a device designed by ourselves. The results indicate that the proposed model can be used for calculation of yield shear stress with acceptable errors. - Highlights: • A yield shear stress model of magnetorheological fluids was proposed. • Use exponential distribution to describe the distribution of magnetic chain angles. • Experimental and predicted results were in good agreement for 2 types of MR

  14. Mechanical stress calculations for toroidal field coils by the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soell, M.; Jandl, O.; Gorenflo, H.

    1976-09-01

    After discussing fundamental relationships of the finite element method, this report describes the calculation steps worked out for mechanical stress calculations in the case of magnetic forces and forces produced by thermal expansion or compression of toroidal field coils using the SOLID SAP IV computer program. The displacement and stress analysis are based on the 20-node isoparametric solid element. The calculation of the nodal forces produced by magnetic body forces are discussed in detail. The computer programs, which can be used generally for mesh generation and determination of the nodal forces, are published elsewhere. (orig.) [de

  15. Simulation of Stress Distribution in a Thick- Walled Bushing Produced by Die-Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pisarek B.P.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metallographic investigations and a computer simulation of stresses in a gravity die-casting bushing were performed. Simulation of the casting process, solidification of the thick-walled bushing and calculations of the stress was performed using MAGMA5.3 software. The size variability of phases κII affecting the formation of phase stresses σf, depending on the location of the metallographic test area, was identified. The distribution of thermal σt and shrinkage stresses σs, depending on the location of the control point SC in the bushing's volume, was estimated. Probably the nature of these stresses will change slightly even after machining. This can cause variations in operating characteristics (friction coefficient, wear. Due to the strong inhomogeneity of the stress distribution in the bushing's casting, it is necessary to perform further tests of the possibility to conduct thermal treatment guaranteeing homogenization of the internal stresses in the casting, as well as to introduce changes in the bushing' s construction and the casting technology. The paper presents the continuation of the results of research aimed at identifying the causes of defects in the thick-walled bushing, die-casting made of CuAl10Fe5Ni5Cr aluminium bronze.

  16. Evaluation of dose equivalent rate distribution in JCO critical accident by radiation transport calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    In the prevention of nuclear disaster, there needs the information on the dose equivalent rate distribution inside and outside the site, and energy spectra. The three dimensional radiation transport calculation code is a useful tool for the site specific detailed analysis with the consideration of facility structures. It is important in the prediction of individual doses in the future countermeasure that the reliability of the evaluation methods of dose equivalent rate distribution and energy spectra by using of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation code, and the factors which influence the dose equivalent rate distribution outside the site are confirmed. The reliability of radiation transport calculation code and the influence factors of dose equivalent rate distribution were examined through the analyses of critical accident at JCO's uranium processing plant occurred on September 30, 1999. The radiation transport calculations including the burn-up calculations were done by using of the structural info...

  17. Distributed generation hosting capacity calculation of MV distribution feeders in Turkey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altin, Müfit; Oguz, Emre Utku; Bizkevelci, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Integration of distributed generation into distribution networks introduces new challenges to distribution system operators while the penetration level increases. One of the challenges is the voltage rise issue as a part of the steady-state analysis of DGs during planning and operational stages. ...

  18. Calculating Stress: From Entropy to a Thermodynamic Concept of Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nečesánek, Ivo; Konečný, David; Vasku, Anna

    2016-01-01

    To date, contemporary science has lacked a satisfactory tool for the objective expression of stress. This text thus introduces a new–thermodynamically derived–approach to stress measurement, based on entropy production in time and independent of the quality or modality of a given stressor or a combination thereof. Hereto, we propose a novel model of stress response based on thermodynamic modelling of entropy production, both in the tissues/organs and in regulatory feedbacks. Stress response is expressed in our model on the basis of stress entropic load (SEL), a variable we introduced previously; the mathematical expression of SEL, provided here for the first time, now allows us to describe the various states of a living system, including differentiating between states of health and disease. The resulting calculation of stress response regardless of the type of stressor(s) in question is thus poised to become an entirely new tool for predicting the development of a living system. PMID:26771542

  19. Simplified calculation of thermal stresses - on the reduction of effort in the stress analysis of reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karow, K.

    1984-01-01

    The fatigue behaviour of reactor components is predominantly determined from the in-service thermal stresses. The calculation of such stresses for a number of temperature transients in the adjacent fluid may be expensive, particularly with complicated structures. Under certain conditions this expense can be reduced considerably with the aid of a rule, which permits interpolation of thermal stresses from known reference values instead of calculation. This paper presents the derivation and method of application of this interpolation rule. The derivation procedure is based on well-known proportionalities between thermal stress range Δsigma in the structure and temperature change ΔT and rate of change T of the fluid in the extreme cases of an ideal thermal shock and quasi-steady-state conditions, respectively. For the real transients in between the relationship Δsigma proportional (ΔT)sup(x) Tsup(1-x)αsup(y) is proposed, where x is the shock-degree and lies between 0 and 1, and, additionally, y designates the influence of the heat transfer coefficient α. This formula yields the interpolation rule. The rule permits interpolation of stress ranges for additional thermal transients from at least 3 reference stresses via x and y. The procedure is applicable to any metallic structure, reduces fatigue analysis effort considerably and yields excellent results. The paper is split up into 2 parts. In the following the derivation of the rule is presented. The second part describes its application and will be published shortly. (orig.)

  20. Calculation of the flow distribution for the new core of the RA-6 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, J.C.; Delmastro, Dario F.

    2007-01-01

    In this work the pressure drop, the flow distribution, effective cooling flow rate and the velocity in the subchannels that cool fuel plates for the new core of RA-6 research reactor were calculated. These calculations were performed for a flow of 340 m 3 /hr and water temperatures of 12 C degrees, of 35 C degrees and 42 C degrees. The flow distribution was calculated without considering either safety factors or geometric changes. All the calculations were performed considering the flow as isothermal. (author) [es

  1. Monte-Carlo Method Python Library for dose distribution Calculation in Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randriantsizafy, R D; Ramanandraibe, M J [Madagascar Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, Antananarivo (Madagascar); Raboanary, R [Institut of astro and High-Energy Physics Madagascar, University of Antananarivo, Antananarivo (Madagascar)

    2007-07-01

    The Cs-137 Brachytherapy treatment is performed in Madagascar since 2005. Time treatment calculation for prescribed dose is made manually. Monte-Carlo Method Python library written at Madagascar INSTN is experimentally used to calculate the dose distribution on the tumour and around it. The first validation of the code was done by comparing the library curves with the Nucletron company curves. To reduce the duration of the calculation, a Grid of PC's is set up with listner patch run on each PC. The library will be used to modelize the dose distribution in the CT scan patient picture for individual and better accuracy time calculation for a prescribed dose.

  2. Monte-Carlo Method Python Library for dose distribution Calculation in Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randriantsizafy, R.D.; Ramanandraibe, M.J.; Raboanary, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cs-137 Brachytherapy treatment is performed in Madagascar since 2005. Time treatment calculation for prescribed dose is made manually. Monte-Carlo Method Python library written at Madagascar INSTN is experimentally used to calculate the dose distribution on the tumour and around it. The first validation of the code was done by comparing the library curves with the Nucletron company curves. To reduce the duration of the calculation, a Grid of PC's is set up with listner patch run on each PC. The library will be used to modelize the dose distribution in the CT scan patient picture for individual and better accuracy time calculation for a prescribed dose.

  3. Does Vertebroplasty Affect Radiation Dose Distribution?: Comparison of Spatial Dose Distributions in a Cement-Injected Vertebra as Calculated by Treatment Planning System and Actual Spatial Dose Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komemushi, A.; Tanigawa, N.; Kariya, Sh.; Yagi, R.; Nakatani, M.; Suzuki, S.; Sano, A.; Ikeda, K.; Utsunomiya, K.; Harima, Y.; Sawada, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To assess differences in dose distribution of a vertebral body injected with bone cement as calculated by radiation treatment planning system (RTPS) and actual dose distribution. Methods. We prepared two water-equivalent phantoms with cement, and the other two phantoms without cement. The bulk density of the bone cement was imported into RTPS to reduce error from high CT values. A dose distribution map for the phantoms with and without cement was calculated using RTPS with clinical setting and with the bulk density importing. Actual dose distribution was measured by the film density. Dose distribution as calculated by RTPS was compared to the dose distribution measured by the film dosimetry. Results. For the phantom with cement, dose distribution was distorted for the areas corresponding to inside the cement and on the ventral side of the cement. However, dose distribution based on film dosimetry was undistorted behind the cement and dose increases were seen inside cement and around the cement. With the equivalent phantom with bone cement, differences were seen between dose distribution calculated by RTPS and that measured by the film dosimetry. Conclusion. The dose distribution of an area containing bone cement calculated using RTPS differs from actual dose distribution

  4. Stress-strength reliability for general bivariate distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa H. Abdel-Hamid

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An expression for the stress-strength reliability R=P(X1distribution. Such distribution includes bivariate compound Weibull, bivariate compound Gompertz, bivariate compound Pareto, among others. In the parametric case, the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters and reliability function R are obtained. In the non-parametric case, point and interval estimates of R are developed using Govindarajulu's asymptotic distribution-free method when X1 and X2 are dependent. An example is given when the population distribution is bivariate compound Weibull. Simulation is performed, based on different sample sizes to study the performance of estimates.

  5. Numerical simulation of stress distribution in Al2 O3-TiC/Q235 diffusion bonded joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The distributions of the axial stress and shear stress in Al2O3-TiC/Q235 diffusion bonded joints were studied using finite element method (FEM). The effect of interlayer thickness on the axial stress and shear stress was also investigated. The results indicate that the gradients of the axial stress and shear stress are great near the joint edge. The maximal shear stress produces at the interface of the Al2O3-TiC and Ti interlayer. With the increase of Cu interlayer thickness, the magnitudes of the axial stress and shear stress first decrease and then increase. The distribution of the axial stress changes greatly with a little change in the shear stress. The shear fracture initiates at the interface of the Al2O3-TiC/ Ti interlayer with high shear stress and then propagates to the Al2O3-TiC side, which is consistent with the stress FEM calculating results.

  6. Influence of parafunctional loading and prosthetic connection on stress distribution: a 3D finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torcato, Leonardo Bueno; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Falcón-Antenucci, Rosse Mary; Santiago Júnior, Joel Ferreira; de Faria Almeida, Daniel Augusto

    2015-11-01

    Clinicians should consider parafunctional occlusal load when planning treatment. Prosthetic connections can reduce the stress distribution on an implant-supported prosthesis. The purpose of this 3-dimensional finite element study was to assess the influence of parafunctional loading and prosthetic connections on stress distribution. Computer-aided design software was used to construct 3 models. Each model was composed of a bone and an implant (external hexagon, internal hexagon, or Morse taper) with a crown. Finite element analysis software was used to generate the finite element mesh and establish the loading and boundary conditions. A normal force (200-N axial load and 100-N oblique load) and parafunctional force (1000-N axial and 500-N oblique load) were applied. Results were visualized as the maximum principal stress. Three-way analysis of variance and Tukey test were performed, and the percentage of contribution of each variable to the stress concentration was calculated from sum-of squares-analysis. Stress was concentrated around the implant at the cortical bone, and models with the external hexagonal implant showed the highest stresses (PProsthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prediction of residual stress distribution in multi-stacked thin film by curvature measurement and iterative FEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyeon Chang; Park, Jun Hyub

    2005-01-01

    In this study, residual stress distribution in multi-stacked film by MEMS (Micro-Electro Mechanical System) process is predicted using Finite Element Method (FEM). We develop a finite element program for REsidual Stress Analysis (RESA) in multi-stacked film. The RESA predicts the distribution of residual stress field in multi-stacked film. Curvatures of multi-stacked film and single layers which consist of the multi-stacked film are used as the input to the RESA. To measure those curvatures is easier than to measure a distribution of residual stress. To verify the RESA, mean stresses and stress gradients of single and multilayers are measured. The mean stresses are calculated from curvatures of deposited wafer by using Stoney's equation. The stress gradients are calculated from the vertical deflection at the end of cantilever beam. To measure the mean stress of each layer in multi-stacked film, we measure the curvature of wafer with the film after etching layer by layer in multi-stacked film

  8. Calculating computer-generated optical elements to produce arbitrary intensity distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, S.; Nugent, K.A.; Scholten, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: We describe preliminary investigation into using a computer to generate optical elements (CGOEs) with phase-only variation, that will produce an arbitrary intensity distribution in a given image plane. An iterative calculation cycles between the CGOE and the image plane and modifies each according to the appropriate constraints. We extend this to the calculation of defined intensity distributions in two separated planes by modifying both phase and intensity at the CGOE

  9. Calculations of higher twist distribution functions in the MIT bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signal, A.I.

    1997-01-01

    We calculate all twist-2, -3 and -4 parton distribution functions involving two quark correlations using the wave function of the MIT bag model. The distributions are evolved up to experimental scales and combined to give the various nucleon structure functions. Comparisons with recent experimental data on higher twist structure functions at moderate values of Q 2 give good agreement with the calculated structure functions. (orig.)

  10. On the stress calculation within phase-field approaches: a model for finite deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Daniel; Schwab, Felix; Schoof, Ephraim; Reiter, Andreas; Herrmann, Christoph; Selzer, Michael; Böhlke, Thomas; Nestler, Britta

    2017-08-01

    Numerical simulations based on phase-field methods are indispensable in order to investigate interesting and important phenomena in the evolution of microstructures. Microscopic phase transitions are highly affected by mechanical driving forces and therefore the accurate calculation of the stresses in the transition region is essential. We present a method for stress calculations within the phase-field framework, which satisfies the mechanical jump conditions corresponding to sharp interfaces, although the sharp interface is represented as a volumetric region using the phase-field approach. This model is formulated for finite deformations, is independent of constitutive laws, and allows using any type of phase inherent inelastic strains.

  11. Study on application of green's function method in thermal stress rapid calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guihe; Duan Yuangang; Xu Xiao; Chen Rong

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a quick and accuracy thermal stress calculation method, the Green's Function Method, which is a combination of finite element method and numerical algorithm method. Thermal stress calculation of Safe Injection Nozzle of Reactor Coolant Line of PWR plant is performed with Green's function method for heatup and cooldown thermal transients as a demonstration example, and the result is compared with finite element method to verify the rationality and accuracy of this method. The advantage and disadvantage of the Green's function method and the finite element method are also compared. (authors)

  12. Calculation method for residual stress analysis of filament-wound spherical pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, C.E. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Filament wound spherical pressure vessels may be produced with very high performance factors. These performance factors are a calculation of contained pressure times enclosed volume divided by structure weight. A number of parameters are important in determining the level of performance achieved. One of these is the residual stress state in the fabricated unit. A significant level of an unfavorable residual stress state could seriously impair the performance of the vessel. Residual stresses are of more concern for vessels with relatively thick walls and/or vessels constructed with the highly anisotropic graphite or aramid fibers. A method is established for measuring these stresses. A theoretical model of the composite structure is required. Data collection procedures and techniques are developed. The data are reduced by means of the model and result in the residual stress analysis. The analysis method can be used in process parameter studies to establish the best fabrication procedures

  13. Calculation of ruin probabilities for a dense class of heavy tailed distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladt, Mogens; Nielsen, Bo Friis; Samorodnitsky, Gennady

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a class of infinite-dimensional phase-type distributions with finitely many parameters as models for heavy tailed distributions. The class of finite-dimensional phase-type distributions is dense in the class of distributions on the positive reals and may hence approximate...... any such distribution. We prove that formulas from renewal theory, and with a particular attention to ruin probabilities, which are true for common phase-type distributions also hold true for the infinite-dimensional case. We provide algorithms for calculating functionals of interest...... such as the renewal density and the ruin probability. It might be of interest to approximate a given heavy tailed distribution of some other type by a distribution from the class of infinite-dimensional phase-type distributions and to this end we provide a calibration procedure which works for the approximation...

  14. Comparison of stress and total energy methods for calculation of elastic properties of semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, M A; Schulz, S; O'Reilly, E P

    2013-01-16

    We explore the calculation of the elastic properties of zinc-blende and wurtzite semiconductors using two different approaches: one based on stress and the other on total energy as a function of strain. The calculations are carried out within the framework of density functional theory in the local density approximation, with the plane wave-based package VASP. We use AlN as a test system, with some results also shown for selected other materials (C, Si, GaAs and GaN). Differences are found in convergence rate between the two methods, especially in low symmetry cases, where there is a much slower convergence for total energy calculations with respect to the number of plane waves and k points used. The stress method is observed to be more robust than the total energy method with respect to the residual error in the elastic constants calculated for different strain branches in the systems studied.

  15. The calculation of electron depth-dose distributions in multilayer medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chuanshan; Xu Mengjie; Li Zhiliang; Feng Yongxiang; Li Panlin

    1989-01-01

    Energy deposition in multilayer medium and the depth dose distribution in the layers are studied. Based on semi-empirical calculation of electron energy absorption in matter with EDMULT program of Tabata and Ito, further work has been carried out to extend the computation to multilayer composite material. New program developed in this paper makes IBM-PC compatible with complicated electron dose calculations

  16. Numerical Calculation of Distribution of Induced Carge Density on Planar Confined Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolotov, V.; Druzhchenko, R.; Karazin, V.; Lominadze, J.; Kharadze, F.

    2007-01-01

    The calculation method of distribution of induced charge density on planar surfaces, including fractal structures of Sierpinski carpet type, is propesed. The calculation scheme is based on the fact that simply connected conducting surface of arbitrary geometry is an equipotential surface. (author)

  17. A calculation strategy for the determination of the temperature distribution in radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahne, K.; Biurrun, E.

    1989-01-01

    In the past many calculation tools have been developed for the determination of instationary temperature distributions in radioactive waste repositories (single source model/large scale model/unit cell model using analytical or numerical methods; overall model using analytical or numerical methods). This paper discusses how, in practice, all these calculation tools have to be associated sensibly in a special calculation strategy making use of their actual advantages

  18. Ab initio calculation of positron distribution, ACAR and lifetime in TTF-TCNQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Shoji; Kohyama, Masanori

    2000-01-01

    We have performed ab initio calculations of positron distribution, ACAR and lifetime in the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor TTF-TCNQ. The electronic structure is obtained within the LDA, while the positron state is calculated either with the LDA or with the GGA. Except the positron lifetime, differences between the LDA and GGA results are rather small. The obtained results are compared with our previous experiments and calculations.

  19. Calculation of life distributions, in particular Weibull distributions, from operational observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauhut, J.

    1982-01-01

    Established methods are presented by which life distributions of machine elements can be determined on the basis of laboratory experiments and operational observations. Practical observations are given special attention as the results estimated on the basis of conventional have not been accurate enough. As an introduction, the stochastic life concept, the general method of determining life distributions, various sampling methods, and the Weibull distribution are explained. Further, possible life testing schedules and maximum-likelihood estimates are discussed for the complete sample case and for censered sampling without replacement in laboratory experiments. Finally, censered sampling with replacement in laboratory experiments is discussed; it is shown how suitable parameter estimates can be obtained for given life distributions by means of the maximum-likelihood method. (orig./RW) [de

  20. Stress wave calculations in composite plates using the fast Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, F. C.

    1973-01-01

    The protection of composite turbine fan blades against impact forces has prompted the study of dynamic stresses in composites due to transient loads. The mathematical model treats the laminated plate as an equivalent anisotropic material. The use of Mindlin's approximate theory of crystal plates results in five two-dimensional stress waves. Three of the waves are flexural and two involve in-plane extensional strains. The initial value problem due to a transient distributed transverse force on the plate is solved using Laplace and Fourier transforms. A fast computer program for inverting the two-dimensional Fourier transform is used. Stress contours for various stresses and times after application of load are obtained for a graphite fiber-epoxy matrix composite plate. Results indicate that the points of maximum stress travel along the fiber directions.

  1. Influence of Hardening Model on Weld Residual Stress Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, Jonathan; Gunnars, Jens (Inspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-06-15

    This study is the third stage of a project sponsored by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) to improve the weld residual stress modelling procedures currently used in Sweden. The aim of this study was to determine which material hardening model gave the best agreement with experimentally measured weld residual stress distributions. Two girth weld geometries were considered: 19mm and 65mm thick girth welds with Rin/t ratios of 10.5 and 2.8, respectively. The FE solver ABAQUS Standard v6.5 was used for analysis. As a preliminary step some improvements were made to the welding simulation procedure used in part one of the project. First, monotonic stress strain curves and a mixed isotropic/kinematic hardening model were sourced from the literature for 316 stainless steel. Second, more detailed information was obtained regarding the geometry and welding sequence for the Case 1 weld (compared with phase 1 of this project). Following the preliminary step, welding simulations were conducted using isotropic, kinematic and mixed hardening models. The isotropic hardening model gave the best overall agreement with experimental measurements; it is therefore recommended for future use in welding simulations. The mixed hardening model gave good agreement for predictions of the hoop stress but tended to under estimate the magnitude of the axial stress. It must be noted that two different sources of data were used for the isotropic and mixed models in this study and this may have contributed to the discrepancy in predictions. When defining a mixed hardening model it is difficult to delineate the relative contributions of isotropic and kinematic hardening and for the model used it may be that a greater isotropic hardening component should have been specified. The kinematic hardening model consistently underestimated the magnitude of both the axial and hoop stress and is not recommended for use. Two sensitivity studies were also conducted. In the first the effect of using a

  2. Influence of Hardening Model on Weld Residual Stress Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, Jonathan; Gunnars, Jens

    2009-06-01

    This study is the third stage of a project sponsored by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) to improve the weld residual stress modelling procedures currently used in Sweden. The aim of this study was to determine which material hardening model gave the best agreement with experimentally measured weld residual stress distributions. Two girth weld geometries were considered: 19mm and 65mm thick girth welds with Rin/t ratios of 10.5 and 2.8, respectively. The FE solver ABAQUS Standard v6.5 was used for analysis. As a preliminary step some improvements were made to the welding simulation procedure used in part one of the project. First, monotonic stress strain curves and a mixed isotropic/kinematic hardening model were sourced from the literature for 316 stainless steel. Second, more detailed information was obtained regarding the geometry and welding sequence for the Case 1 weld (compared with phase 1 of this project). Following the preliminary step, welding simulations were conducted using isotropic, kinematic and mixed hardening models. The isotropic hardening model gave the best overall agreement with experimental measurements; it is therefore recommended for future use in welding simulations. The mixed hardening model gave good agreement for predictions of the hoop stress but tended to under estimate the magnitude of the axial stress. It must be noted that two different sources of data were used for the isotropic and mixed models in this study and this may have contributed to the discrepancy in predictions. When defining a mixed hardening model it is difficult to delineate the relative contributions of isotropic and kinematic hardening and for the model used it may be that a greater isotropic hardening component should have been specified. The kinematic hardening model consistently underestimated the magnitude of both the axial and hoop stress and is not recommended for use. Two sensitivity studies were also conducted. In the first the effect of using a

  3. Monte Carlo Calculation of Sensitivities to Secondary Angular Distributions. Theory and Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perell, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    The basic methods for solution of the transport equation that are in practical use today are the discrete ordinates (SN) method, and the Monte Carlo (Monte Carlo) method. While the SN method is typically less computation time consuming, the Monte Carlo method is often preferred for detailed and general description of three-dimensional geometries, and for calculations using cross sections that are point-wise energy dependent. For analysis of experimental and calculated results, sensitivities are needed. Sensitivities to material parameters in general, and to the angular distribution of the secondary (scattered) neutrons in particular, can be calculated by well known SN methods, using the fluxes obtained from solution of the direct and the adjoint transport equations. Algorithms to calculate sensitivities to cross-sections with Monte Carlo methods have been known for quite a time. However, only just recently we have developed a general Monte Carlo algorithm for the calculation of sensitivities to the angular distribution of the secondary neutrons

  4. Non--Local Approach to the Analysis of the Stress Distribution in Granular Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. E.; Kenkre, V. M.; Hurd, A. J.

    1998-03-01

    A continuum mechanical theory of the stress distribution in granular materials is presented, where the transformation of the vertical spatial coordinate into a formal time variable converts the study of the static stress distribution into a generally non--Markoffian, i.e., memory-possessing (non-local) propagation analysis. Previous treatments (J. -P). Bouchaud, M. E. Cates, and P. Claudin, J. Phys. I France 5, 639 (1995). (C. -h). Liu, S. R. Nagel, D. A. Schecter, S. N. Coppersmith, S. Majumdar, O. Narayan, and T. A. Witten, Science 269, 513 (1995). are shown to be particular cases of our theory corresponding to, respectively, wave-like and dif fusive limits of the general evolution. Calculations are presented for the example of ceramic or metal powder compaction in dies, with emphasis on the understanding of previously unexplained features as seen in experimental data found in the literature o ver the past 50 years. Specific proposals for new experimental investigations are presented.

  5. A proposal of a benchmark for calculation of the power distribution next to the absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temesvari, E.; Hordosy, G.; Maraczy, Cs.; Hegyi, Gy.; Kereszturi, A.

    1999-01-01

    A proposal of a new benchmark problem was formulated to consider the characteristics of the VVER-440 fuel assembly with enrichment zoning, i. e. to study the space dependence of the power distribution near to a control assembly. A quite detailed geometry and the material composition of the fuel and the control assemblies were modeled by the help of MCNP calculations in AEKI. The results of the MCNP calculations were built in the KARATE code system as the new albedo matrices. The comparison of the KARATE calculation results and the MCNP calculations for this benchmark is presented. (Authors)

  6. Stress reduction of Cu-doped diamond-like carbon films from ab initio calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Structure and properties of Cu-doped diamond-like carbon films (DLC were investigated using ab initio calculations. The effect of Cu concentrations (1.56∼7.81 at.% on atomic bond structure was mainly analyzed to clarify the residual stress reduction mechanism. Results showed that with introducing Cu into DLC films, the residual compressive stress decreased firstly and then increased for each case with the obvious deterioration of mechanical properties, which was in agreement with the experimental results. Structural analysis revealed that the weak Cu-C bond and the relaxation of both the distorted bond angles and bond lengths accounted for the significant reduction of residual compressive stress, while at the higher Cu concentration the increase of residual stress attributed to the existence of distorted Cu-C structures and the increased fraction of distorted C-C bond lengths.

  7. Measurements and Monte Carlo calculations of photon energy distributions in MAYAK PA workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetanin, M.; Vasilenko, E.; Semenov, M.; Xanthos, S.; Takoudis, G.; Clouvas, A.; Silva, J.; Potiriadis, C.

    2008-01-01

    Photon energy distributions were measured in different workplaces of the Mayak Production Association (MPA), which was the first plutonium production plant in the former Soviet Union. In situ gamma spectrometry measurements were performed with a portable germanium detector. The spectral stripping method is used for the conversion of the in situ gamma-ray spectra to photon fluence rate energy distribution. This method requires the simulation of the portable germanium detector, which has been performed based on the MCNP code of Los Alamos. Measured photon fluence rate energy distributions were compared with calculated photon energy distributions (with the MCNP code) in two different workplaces: in the first workplace the geometry exposure was known. On the contrary, in the second workplace, as in most workplaces of MPA, the exposure geometry was unknown. The results obtained from the comparison between the experimental and calculated photon fluence rate energy distributions are presented and discussed. (authors)

  8. MORSEC-SP, Step Function Angular Distribution for Cross-Sections Calculation by Program MORSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: MORSEC-SP allows one to utilize a step distribution to describe the angular dependence of the multi- group function in the MORSEC cross section module of the MORSE Monte Carlo code. The step distribution is always non-negative and may be used in the random walk and for making point detector estimators. 2 - Method of solution: MORSEC-SP utilizes a table look up procedure to provide the probability of scattering when making point detector estimates for a given incident energy group and scattering angle. In the random walk, the step distributions are converted to cumulative distributions and an angle of scatter is selected from the cumulative distributions. Step distributions are obtained from calculation using the converted moments from the given Legendre coefficients of the scattering distributions. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Additional coding to the MORSEC module is variable dimensional and fully incorporated into blank common

  9. Calculation of Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns from highly stressed polycrystalline materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, M. J., E-mail: macdonm@umich.edu [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Vorberger, J. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Gamboa, E. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Fletcher, L. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Drake, R. P. [Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, Applied Physics, and Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Calculations of Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns from polycrystalline materials have typically been done in the limit of small deviatoric stresses. Although these methods are well suited for experiments conducted near hydrostatic conditions, more robust models are required to diagnose the large strain anisotropies present in dynamic compression experiments. A method to predict Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns for arbitrary strains has been presented in the Voigt (iso-strain) limit [Higginbotham, J. Appl. Phys. 115, 174906 (2014)]. Here, we present a method to calculate Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns from highly stressed polycrystalline samples in the Reuss (iso-stress) limit. This analysis uses elastic constants to calculate lattice strains for all initial crystallite orientations, enabling elastic anisotropy and sample texture effects to be modeled directly. The effects of probing geometry, deviatoric stresses, and sample texture are demonstrated and compared to Voigt limit predictions. An example of shock-compressed polycrystalline diamond is presented to illustrate how this model can be applied and demonstrates the importance of including material strength when interpreting diffraction in dynamic compression experiments.

  10. Time dependent and asymptotic neutron number probability distribution calculation using discrete Fourier transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, Ph.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we consider the probability distribution of neutrons in a multiplying assembly. The problem is studied using a space independent one group neutron point reactor model without delayed neutrons. We recall the generating function methodology and analytical results obtained by G.I. Bell when the c 2 approximation is used and we present numerical solutions in the general case, without this approximation. The neutron source induced distribution is calculated using the single initial neutron distribution which satisfies a master (Kolmogorov backward) equation. This equation is solved using the generating function method. The generating function satisfies a differential equation and the probability distribution is derived by inversion of the generating function. Numerical results are obtained using the same methodology where the generating function is the Fourier transform of the probability distribution. Discrete Fourier transforms are used to calculate the discrete time dependent distributions and continuous Fourier transforms are used to calculate the asymptotic continuous probability distributions. Numerical applications are presented to illustrate the method. (author)

  11. H TO Zn IONIZATION EQUILIBRIUM FOR THE NON-MAXWELLIAN ELECTRON κ-DISTRIBUTIONS: UPDATED CALCULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzifčáková, E.; Dudík, J.

    2013-01-01

    New data for the calculation of ionization and recombination rates have been published in the past few years, most of which are included in the CHIANTI database. We used these data to calculate collisional ionization and recombination rates for the non-Maxwellian κ-distributions with an enhanced number of particles in the high-energy tail, which have been detected in the solar transition region and the solar wind. Ionization equilibria for elements H to Zn are derived. The κ-distributions significantly influence both the ionization and recombination rates and widen the ion abundance peaks. In comparison with the Maxwellian distribution, the ion abundance peaks can also be shifted to lower or higher temperatures. The updated ionization equilibrium calculations result in large changes for several ions, notably Fe VIII-Fe XIV. The results are supplied in electronic form compatible with the CHIANTI database.

  12. Calculation of flux density distribution on irradiation field of electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ryuichi

    1977-03-01

    The simple equation of flux density distribution in the irradiation field of an ordinary electron accelerator is a function of the physical parameters concerning electron irradiation. Calculation is based on the mean square scattering angle derived from a simple multiple scattering theory, with the correction factors of air scattering, beam scanning and number transmission coefficient. The flux density distribution was measured by charge absorption in a graphite target set in the air. For the calculated mean square scattering angles of 0.089-0.29, the values of calculation agree with those by experiment within about 10% except at large scattering angles. The method is applicable to dose evaluation of ordinary electron accelerators and design of various irradiators for radiation chemical reaction. Applicability of the simple multiple scattering theory in calculation of the scattered flux density and periodical variation of the flux density of scanning beam are also described. (auth.)

  13. Calculation of a steam generating tube stressed state under temperature oscillations in burnout zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, V.A.; Loshchinin, V.M.; Remizov, O.V.

    1982-01-01

    The technique for evaluating the steam generating tube stressed state under the wall temperature oscillations in the burnout zone is described. The technique is based on analytical solutions for transfer functions connecting the amplitude of surface temperature oscillation with the amplitude and frequency of heat transfer coefficient oscillation and amplitude of thermoelastic stress oscillation with that of temperature oscillation. The results of calculations according to considered technique are compared with that of the problem numerical solution. The conclusion is made that the technique under consideration may be applied for evaluation of steam generator evaporating tube lifetime [ru

  14. Numerical modeling of regional stress distributions for geothermal exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Theophile; Peter-Borie, Mariane; Gentier, Sylvie; Blaisonneau, Arnold

    2017-04-01

    Any high-enthalpy unconventional geothermal projectcan be jeopardized by the uncertainty on the presence of the geothermal resource at depth. Indeed, for the majority of such projects the geothermal resource is deeply seated and, with the drilling costs increasing accordingly, must be located as precisely as possible to increase the chance of their economic viability. In order to reduce the "geological risk", i.e., the chance to poorly locate the geothermal resource, a maximum amount of information must be gathered prior to any drilling of exploration and/or operational well. Cross-interpretation from multiple disciplines (e.g., geophysics, hydrology, geomechanics …) should improve locating the geothermal resource and so the position of exploration wells ; this is the objective of the European project IMAGE (grant agreement No. 608553), under which the work presented here was carried out. As far as geomechanics is concerned, in situ stresses can have a great impact on the presence of a geothermal resource since they condition both the regime within the rock mass, and the state of the major fault zones (and hence, the possible flow paths). In this work, we propose a geomechanical model to assess the stress distribution at the regional scale (characteristic length of 100 kilometers). Since they have a substantial impact on the stress distributions and on the possible creation of regional flow paths, the major fault zones are explicitly taken into account. The Distinct Element Method is used, where the medium is modeled as fully deformable blocks representing the rock mass interacting through mechanically active joints depicting the fault zones. The first step of the study is to build the model geometry based on geological and geophysical evidences. Geophysical and structural geology results help positioning the major fault zones in the first place. Then, outcrop observations, structural models and site-specific geological knowledge give information on the fault

  15. Calculation of the self-consistent current distribution and coupling of an RF antenna array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballico, M.; Puri, S.

    1993-10-01

    A self-consistent calculation of the antenna current distribution and fields in an axisymmetric cylindrical geometry for the ICRH antenna-plasma coupling problem is presented. Several features distinguish this calculation from other codes presently available. 1. Variational form: The formulation of the self consistent antenna current problem in a variational form allows good convergence and stability of the algorithm. 2. Multiple straps: Allows modelling of (a) the current distribution across the width of the strap (by dividing it up into sub straps) (b) side limiters and septum (c) antenna cross-coupling. 3. Analytic calculation of the antenna field and calculation of the antenna self-consistent current distribution, (given the surface impedance matrix) gives rapid calculation. 4. Framed for parallel computation on several different parallel architectures (as well as serial) gives a large speed improvement to the user. Results are presented for both Alfven wave heating and current drive antenna arrays, showing the optimal coupling to be achieved for toroidal mode numbers 8< n<10 for typical ASDEX upgrade plasmas. Simulations of the ASDEX upgrade antenna show the importance of the current distribution across the antenna and of image currents flowing in the side limiters, and an analysis of a proposed asymmetric ITER antenna is presented. (orig.)

  16. Continuous energy Monte Carlo calculations for randomly distributed spherical fuels based on statistical geometry model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Isao [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan); Mori, Takamasa; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Itakura, Hirofumi

    1996-03-01

    The method to calculate neutronics parameters of a core composed of randomly distributed spherical fuels has been developed based on a statistical geometry model with a continuous energy Monte Carlo method. This method was implemented in a general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP, and a new code MCNP-CFP had been developed. This paper describes the model and method how to use it and the validation results. In the Monte Carlo calculation, the location of a spherical fuel is sampled probabilistically along the particle flight path from the spatial probability distribution of spherical fuels, called nearest neighbor distribution (NND). This sampling method was validated through the following two comparisons: (1) Calculations of inventory of coated fuel particles (CFPs) in a fuel compact by both track length estimator and direct evaluation method, and (2) Criticality calculations for ordered packed geometries. This method was also confined by applying to an analysis of the critical assembly experiment at VHTRC. The method established in the present study is quite unique so as to a probabilistic model of the geometry with a great number of spherical fuels distributed randomly. Realizing the speed-up by vector or parallel computations in future, it is expected to be widely used in calculation of a nuclear reactor core, especially HTGR cores. (author).

  17. Axial power distribution calculation using a neural network in the nuclear reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. H.; Cha, K. H.; Lee, S. H. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This paper is concerned with an algorithm based on neural networks to calculate the axial power distribution using excore detector signals in the nuclear reactor core. The fundamental basis of the algorithm is that the detector response can be fairly accurately estimated using computational codes. In other words, the training set, which represents relationship between detector signals and axial power distributions, for the neural network can be obtained through calculations instead of measurements. Application of the new method to the Yonggwang nuclear power plant unit 3 (YGN-3) shows that it is superior to the current algorithm in place. 7 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  18. Distribution and Parameter's Calculations of Television Cameras Inside a Nuclear Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-kafas, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, a distribution of television cameras and parameter's calculation inside and outside a nuclear facility is presented. Each of exterior and interior camera systems will be described and explained. The work shows the overall closed circuit television system. Fixed and moving cameras with various lens format and different angles of view are used. The calculations of width of images sensitive area and Lens focal length for the cameras will be introduced. The work shows the camera locations and distributions inside and outside the nuclear facility. The technical specifications and parameters for cameras selection are tabulated

  19. Axial power distribution calculation using a neural network in the nuclear reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y H; Cha, K H; Lee, S H [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    This paper is concerned with an algorithm based on neural networks to calculate the axial power distribution using excore detector signals in the nuclear reactor core. The fundamental basis of the algorithm is that the detector response can be fairly accurately estimated using computational codes. In other words, the training set, which represents relationship between detector signals and axial power distributions, for the neural network can be obtained through calculations instead of measurements. Application of the new method to the Yonggwang nuclear power plant unit 3 (YGN-3) shows that it is superior to the current algorithm in place. 7 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  20. Analysis of calculating methods for failure distribution function based on maximal entropy principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Chunying; Lin Yuangen; Jiang Meng; Wu Changli

    2009-01-01

    The computation of invalidation distribution functions of electronic devices when exposed in gamma rays is discussed here. First, the possible devices failure distribution models are determined through the tests of statistical hypotheses using the test data. The results show that: the devices' failure distribution can obey multi-distributions when the test data is few. In order to decide the optimum failure distribution model, the maximal entropy principle is used and the elementary failure models are determined. Then, the Bootstrap estimation method is used to simulate the intervals estimation of the mean and the standard deviation. On the basis of this, the maximal entropy principle is used again and the simulated annealing method is applied to find the optimum values of the mean and the standard deviation. Accordingly, the electronic devices' optimum failure distributions are finally determined and the survival probabilities are calculated. (authors)

  1. Representation of stress distributions inprismatic and cylindrical linear elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Giménez-Palomares

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The  loads  applied  on  a  linear  structural  element  generate  internal  forces  in  the  cross  sections  which,  in turn, result in stresses along the element. The nature, extent and shape of stress distributions are required  parameters  to  compute  the  strength  of  structural  elements  or  machinery  components  in  order  to  its analysis or design. In this work, it is presented a virtual laboratory which allows to obtain different stress distributions  in  an  isostatic  beam,  prismatic  or  cylindrical,  subjected  to  axial  forces,  shear  forces  and bending moments. The virtual laboratory permits a great interactivity, allowing the simulation of various real  situations  in  which  the  user  can  modify  the  magnitude  and  direction  of  acting  loads,  and  also  the boundary conditions of the beam. The ultimate goal of this paper is to present a tool aimed to support the learning and teaching of subjects related to Elasticy and Strength of Materials that are found in bachelor university degrees.

  2. A Sample Calculation of Tritium Production and Distribution at VHTR by using TRITGO Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ik Kyu; Kim, D. H.; Lee, W. J.

    2007-03-01

    TRITGO code was developed for estimating the tritium production and distribution of high temperature gas cooled reactor(HTGR), especially GTMHR350 by General Atomics. In this study, the tritium production and distribution of NHDD was analyzed by using TRITGO Code. The TRITGO code was improved by a simple method to calculate the tritium amount in IS Loop. The improved TRITGO input for the sample calculation was prepared based on GTMHR600 because the NHDD has been designed referring GTMHR600. The GTMHR350 input with related to the tritium distribution was directly used. The calculated tritium activity among the hydrogen produced in IS-Loop is 0.56 Bq/g- H2. This is a very satisfying result considering that the limited tritium activity of Japanese Regulation Guide is 5.6 Bq/g-H2. The basic system to analyze the tritium production and the distribution by using TRITGO was successfully constructed. However, there exists some uncertainties in tritium distribution models, the suggested method for IS-Loop, and the current input was not for NHDD but for GTMHR600. The qualitative analysis for the distribution model and the IS-Loop model and the quantitative analysis for the input should be done in the future

  3. A Sample Calculation of Tritium Production and Distribution at VHTR by using TRITGO Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ik Kyu; Kim, D. H.; Lee, W. J

    2007-03-15

    TRITGO code was developed for estimating the tritium production and distribution of high temperature gas cooled reactor(HTGR), especially GTMHR350 by General Atomics. In this study, the tritium production and distribution of NHDD was analyzed by using TRITGO Code. The TRITGO code was improved by a simple method to calculate the tritium amount in IS Loop. The improved TRITGO input for the sample calculation was prepared based on GTMHR600 because the NHDD has been designed referring GTMHR600. The GTMHR350 input with related to the tritium distribution was directly used. The calculated tritium activity among the hydrogen produced in IS-Loop is 0.56 Bq/g- H2. This is a very satisfying result considering that the limited tritium activity of Japanese Regulation Guide is 5.6 Bq/g-H2. The basic system to analyze the tritium production and the distribution by using TRITGO was successfully constructed. However, there exists some uncertainties in tritium distribution models, the suggested method for IS-Loop, and the current input was not for NHDD but for GTMHR600. The qualitative analysis for the distribution model and the IS-Loop model and the quantitative analysis for the input should be done in the future.

  4. Calculation of the radial dose distribution around the trajectory of an ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretzsch, G.

    1979-01-01

    The dose caused in polyester by incoming protons, alpha beams, 127 I ions, and 16 O ions has been calculated as a function of the distance perpendicularly to their trajectory. Based on simplified assumptions regarding the binding state of target electrons, emission of secondary electrons and their propagation in matter, it has been found that the dose depends on the distance to the ion trajectory (R) in the form Rsup(-l), l being about 2. The calculated radial dose distributions agree well with values calculated or measured by other authors

  5. FEAST: a two-dimensional non-linear finite element code for calculating stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayal, M.

    1986-06-01

    The computer code FEAST calculates stresses, strains, and displacements. The code is two-dimensional. That is, either plane or axisymmetric calculations can be done. The code models elastic, plastic, creep, and thermal strains and stresses. Cracking can also be simulated. The finite element method is used to solve equations describing the following fundamental laws of mechanics: equilibrium; compatibility; constitutive relations; yield criterion; and flow rule. FEAST combines several unique features that permit large time-steps in even severely non-linear situations. The features include a special formulation for permitting many finite elements to simultaneously cross the boundary from elastic to plastic behaviour; accomodation of large drops in yield-strength due to changes in local temperature and a three-step predictor-corrector method for plastic analyses. These features reduce computing costs. Comparisons against twenty analytical solutions and against experimental measurements show that predictions of FEAST are generally accurate to ± 5%

  6. The calculation of the viscosity from the autocorrelation function using molecular and atomic stress tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, S. T.

    The stress-stress correlation function and the viscosity of a united-atom model of liquid decane are studied by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation using two different formalisms for the stress tensor: the atomic and the molecular formalisms. The atomic and molecular correlation functions show dramatic difference in short-time behaviour. The integrals of the two correlation functions, however, become identical after a short transient period whichis significantly shorter than the rotational relaxation time of the molecule. Both reach the same plateau value in a time period corresponding to this relaxation time. These results provide a convenient guide for the choice of the upper integral time limit in calculating the viscosity by the Green-Kubo formula.

  7. Calculation of the thermal stress and thermal resistance of anisotropic materials. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivko, A I; Epishin, A I; Svetlov, I L; Samoilov, A I; Sukhanov, N N

    1989-04-01

    The stressed state in a wedge and in a family of plates cut from single-crystal ingots of 40 axial orientations is analyzed. It is shown that, in contrast to the case of the wedge, the value of the thermal stress tensor components in the plates depends substantially not only on the axial crystallographic orientation but also on the azimuthal orientation. Requirements on the crystallographic orientation of simple single-crystal parts of plate or wedge type are formulated with the aim of decreasing the detrimental effects of thermal stresses. The correctness of the calculations is confirmed by results of thermal fatigue tests of hollow prismatic specimens, i.e., blade simulators with 001, 011, and 111 axial orientations.

  8. Civil engineering: calculations of pre-stressed concrete structures using CodeAster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, B.; Ulm, F.

    1997-11-01

    This document presents an analysis of the different calculation methods for pre-stressed concrete structure which can be performed by using finite element methods. Two methods of calculating the pre-stressing of concrete structures with finite elements have been determined. The equivalent method which consists of replacing the action of pre-stressing the concrete by equivalent forces. These method is well suited to dimensioning and studying the overall stability of a structure. It is not an easy matter to take into account the coupled or time-varying phenomena. This approach ignores the evolution of the interaction between the pre-stressing and the concrete. The explicit method which consists of including the mechanical resolution of the pre-stressed cables in that of a concrete structure. Not only does this allow a local study of the pre-stressed to be made, it also allows the coupling which developed over time to be determined, e.g. slip, deferred deformation and coupling between the steel and concrete behaviours. This method enables non-linear phenomena with varying degrees of complexity, such as fracture or yielding of the steels, drying out of the concrete, creep, etc to be described. The two methods are complementary. This document presents the mathematical and computer developments relating to each of this method. In the case of the explicit method, certain of the Code-Aster functions already make it possible to meet several EDF application requirements. Several couplings can be taken into account, such as thermomechanical, shrinkage in drying, creep, relaxation and injection of the cables. Three immediate developments of Code-Aster are proposed for the following applications: - a procedure for calculating the pre-stress losses along the pre-stressing cables; - a command to allocate these forces in the form of an initial force field in the bar elements associated with the cables; - a procedure for linking elements whose nodes do not coincide with each other

  9. A virtual crack-closure technique for calculating stress intensity factors for cracked three dimensional bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Tan, P. W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional virtual crack-closure technique is presented which calculates the strain energy release rates and the stress intensity factors using only nodal forces and displacements from a standard finite element analysis. The technique is an extension of the Rybicki-Kanninen (1977) method, and it assumes that any continuous function can be approximated by a finite number of straight line segments. Results obtained by the method for surface cracked plates with and without notches agree favorably with previous results.

  10. Code-B-1 for stress/strain calculation for TRISO fuel particle (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aihara, Jun; Ueta, Shohei; Shibata, Taiju; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2011-12-01

    We have developed Code-B-1 for the prediction of the failure probabilities of the coated fuel particles for the high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) under operation by modification of an existing code. A finite element method (FEM) is employed for the stress calculation part and Code-B-1 can treat the plastic deformation of the coating layer of the coated fuel particles which the existing code cannot treat. (author)

  11. The calculation of dissipated work, elastoplastic cyclic stress and cyclic strain in a structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xucheng; Xie Yihuan.

    1986-01-01

    With the development of the reactor technique, there is being an increasing interest in the calculation of elastoplastic response of a structure to its complex loading. This paper introduces a constitutive relation of a material for discribing unloading property, and uses it in an analysis of a real structure under a cyclic loading. The results, which include cyclic stress, cyclic strain and dissipated work, are meaningful in the researches of the structure behavior under complex loading and of the structural safety

  12. Comparison of experimental and calculated neutron emission spectra and angular distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruppelaar, H.; Akkermans, J.M.

    1980-06-01

    Experimental and calculated neutron emission spectra and angular distributions have been intercompared for 14.6-MeV neutron-induced reactions. The experimental data, measured by Hermsdorf et al., cover 34 elements in a large mass range. To calculate the differential neutron scattering cross sections a unified model of preequilibrium neutron emission was used, in which the generalized master equation of Mantzouranis et al. was solved with a fast exact matrix method, recently introduced by Akkermans. For the scattering kernel a three-term Legendre polynomial representation was adopted, which was either derived from the differential free nucleon-nucleon scattering cross section or fitted to obtain optimal agreement with the set of experimental data of Hermsdorf et al. The results of the last-mentioned calculation are quite acceptable in view of the fact that only two global parameters have been to describe the angular distributions of all experimental data. The report contains tables and graphs of the calculated Legendre coefficients and graphs of energy-averaged angular distributions for all 34 elements. It is further shown that improvements in the energy and angular distributions could be obtained by means of adjustment of the level-density parameters of the individual residual nuclei. Finally a short discussion is devoted to the problems of fitting angular distributions at backward angles by varying the model parameters or the specification of the initial condition. It is indicated that the so-called preequilibrium phase of the nuclear reaction actually consists of two different stages, the first one generating the forward-peaked angular distributions and the second one showing angular distributions symmetric about 90 0

  13. HammerCloud: A Stress Testing System for Distributed Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ster, Daniel C van der; García, Mario Úbeda; Paladin, Massimo; Elmsheuser, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Distributed analysis of LHC data is an I/O-intensive activity which places large demands on the internal network, storage, and local disks at remote computing facilities. Commissioning and maintaining a site to provide an efficient distributed analysis service is therefore a challenge which can be aided by tools to help evaluate a variety of infrastructure designs and configurations. HammerCloud is one such tool; it is a stress testing service which is used by central operations teams, regional coordinators, and local site admins to (a) submit arbitrary number of analysis jobs to a number of sites, (b) maintain at a steady-state a predefined number of jobs running at the sites under test, (c) produce web-based reports summarizing the efficiency and performance of the sites under test, and (d) present a web-interface for historical test results to both evaluate progress and compare sites. HammerCloud was built around the distributed analysis framework Ganga, exploiting its API for grid job management. HammerCloud has been employed by the ATLAS experiment for continuous testing of many sites worldwide, and also during large scale computing challenges such as STEP'09 and UAT'09, where the scale of the tests exceeded 10,000 concurrently running and 1,000,000 total jobs over multi-day periods. In addition, HammerCloud is being adopted by the CMS experiment; the plugin structure of HammerCloud allows the execution of CMS jobs using their official tool (CRAB).

  14. HammerCloud: A Stress Testing System for Distributed Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    van der Ster, Daniel C; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Paladin, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Distributed analysis of LHC data is an I/O-intensive activity which places large demands on the internal network, storage, and local disks at remote computing facilities. Commissioning and maintaining a site to provide an efficient distributed analysis service is therefore a challenge which can be aided by tools to help evaluate a variety of infrastructure designs and configurations. HammerCloud (HC) is one such tool; it is a stress testing service which is used by central operations teams, regional coordinators, and local site admins to (a) submit arbitrary number of analysis jobs to a number of sites, (b) maintain at a steady-state a predefined number of jobs running at the sites under test, (c) produce web-based reports summarizing the efficiency and performance of the sites under test, and (d) present a web-interface for historical test results to both evaluate progress and compare sites. HC was built around the distributed analysis framework Ganga, exploiting its API for grid job management. HC has been ...

  15. Calculation of the effective D-d neutron energy distribution incident on a cylindrical shell sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Hiroshi

    1977-07-01

    A method is proposed to calculate the effective energy distribution of neutrons incident on a cylindrical shell sample placed perpendicularly to the direction of the deuteron beam bombarding a deuterium metal target. The Monte Carlo method is used and the Fortran program is contained. (auth.)

  16. Dirac-Fock atomic electronic structure calculations using different nuclear charge distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, L; Dyall, KG

    1997-01-01

    Numerical Hartree-Fock calculations based on the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian for the first 109 elements of the periodic table are presented. The results give the total electronic energy, as a function of the nuclear model that is used, for four different models of the nuclear charge distribution. The

  17. A transmission probability method for calculation of neutron flux distributions in hexagonal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasastjerna, F.; Lux, I.

    1980-03-01

    A transmission probability method implemented in the program TPHEX is described. This program was developed for the calculation of neutron flux distributions in hexagonal light water reactor fuel assemblies. The accuracy appears to be superior to diffusion theory, and the computation time is shorter than that of the collision probability method. (author)

  18. On the representation of electron multiple elastic-scattering distributions for Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawrakow, I.; Bielajew, A.F.

    1998-01-01

    A new representation of elastic electron-nucleus (Coulomb) multiple-scattering distributions is developed. Using the screened Rutherford cross section with the Moliere screening parameter as an example, a simple analytic angular transformation of the Goudsmit-Saunderson multiple-scattering distribution accounts for most of the structure of the angular distribution leaving a residual 3-parameter (path-length, transformed angle and screening parameter) function that is reasonably slowly varying and suitable for rapid, accurate interpolation in a computer-intensive algorithm. The residual function is calculated numerically for a wide range of Moliere screening parameters and path-lengths suitable for use in a general-purpose condensed-history Monte Carlo code. Additionally, techniques are developed that allow the distributions to be scaled to account for energy loss. This new representation allows ''''on-the-fly'''' sampling of Goudsmit-Saunderson angular distributions in a screened Rutherford approximation suitable for class II condensed-history Monte Carlo codes. (orig.)

  19. The Influence of Distributed Leadership on Job Stress in Technical and Vocational Education

    OpenAIRE

    Siva Rabindarang; Khuan Wai Bing; Khoo Yin Yin

    2014-01-01

    Distributed leadership proposed in the field of leadership studies for the improvement of organizational effectiveness. Job stress is the work situation that can affect the organizational performance. Thus, these studies carried out to measure the influence of distributed leadership on job stress. Studies on distributed leadership and job stress are scarce especially in technical and vocational education. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine the influence of distributed leader...

  20. Effect of dosimeter type for commissioning small photon beams on calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Garduño, O. A., E-mail: oagarciag@innn.edu.mx, E-mail: amanda.garcia.g@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Mexico City 14269, México and Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Legaria 694, México City 11500, México (Mexico); Rodríguez-Ponce, M. [Departamento de Biofísica, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Mexico City 14080, México (Mexico); Gamboa-deBuen, I. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico City 04510 (Mexico); Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico City 04510 (Mexico); Galván de la Cruz, O. O. [Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Mexico City 14269, México (Mexico); and others

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of the detector used to commission small photon beams on the calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: In this study, six types of detectors were used to characterize small photon beams: three diodes [a silicon stereotactic field diode SFD, a silicon diode SRS, and a silicon diode E], an ionization chamber CC01, and two types of radiochromic film models EBT and EBT2. These detectors were used to characterize circular collimated beams that were generated by a Novalis linear accelerator. This study was conducted in two parts. First, the following dosimetric data, which are of particular interest in SRS, were compared for the different detectors: the total scatter factor (TSF), the tissue phantom ratios (TPRs), and the off-axis ratios (OARs). Second, the commissioned data sets were incorporated into the treatment planning system (TPS) to compare the calculated dose distributions and the dose volume histograms (DVHs) that were obtained using the different detectors. Results: The TSFs data measured by all of the detectors were in good agreement with each other within the respective statistical uncertainties: two exceptions, where the data were systematically below those obtained for the other detectors, were the CC01 results for all of the circular collimators and the EBT2 film results for circular collimators with diameters below 10.0 mm. The OAR results obtained for all of the detectors were in excellent agreement for all of the circular collimators. This observation was supported by the gamma-index test. The largest difference in the TPR data was found for the 4.0 mm circular collimator, followed by the 10.0 and 20.0 mm circular collimators. The results for the calculated dose distributions showed that all of the detectors passed the gamma-index test at 100% for the 3 mm/3% criteria. The aforementioned observation was true regardless of the size of the calculation grid for all of the circular collimators

  1. Model calculations of the influence of population distribution on the siting of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, F.; Walmod-Larsen, O.

    1984-02-01

    This report was prepared for a working group established in April 1981 by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency with the task of investigating siting problems of nuclear power stations in Denmark. The purpose of the working group was to study the influence of the population density around a site on nuclear power safety. The importance of emergency planning should be studied as well. In this model study two specific accident sequences were simulated on a 1000 MWe nuclear power plant. The plant was assumed to be placed in the center of two different model population distributions. The concequences for the two population distributions from the two accidents were calculated for the most frequent weather conditions. Doses to individuals were calculated for the bone marrow, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, thyroidea and for the whole body. The collective whole body doses were also calculated for the two populations considered. (author)

  2. a New Method for Calculating Fractal Dimensions of Porous Media Based on Pore Size Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yuxuan; Cai, Jianchao; Wei, Wei; Hu, Xiangyun; Wang, Xin; Ge, Xinmin

    Fractal theory has been widely used in petrophysical properties of porous rocks over several decades and determination of fractal dimensions is always the focus of researches and applications by means of fractal-based methods. In this work, a new method for calculating pore space fractal dimension and tortuosity fractal dimension of porous media is derived based on fractal capillary model assumption. The presented work establishes relationship between fractal dimensions and pore size distribution, which can be directly used to calculate the fractal dimensions. The published pore size distribution data for eight sandstone samples are used to calculate the fractal dimensions and simultaneously compared with prediction results from analytical expression. In addition, the proposed fractal dimension method is also tested through Micro-CT images of three sandstone cores, and are compared with fractal dimensions by box-counting algorithm. The test results also prove a self-similar fractal range in sandstone when excluding smaller pores.

  3. An analytical method for calculating stresses and strains of ATF cladding based on thick walled theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Hak Sung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo Chan; Yang, Yong Sik; In, Wang kee [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, an analytical method based on thick walled theory has been studied to calculate stress and strain of ATF cladding. In order to prescribe boundary conditions of the analytical method, two algorithms were employed which are called subroutine 'Cladf' and 'Couple' of FRACAS, respectively. To evaluate the developed method, equivalent model using finite element method was established and stress components of the method were compared with those of equivalent FE model. One of promising ATF concepts is the coated cladding, which take advantages such as high melting point, a high neutron economy, and low tritium permeation rate. To evaluate the mechanical behavior and performance of the coated cladding, we need to develop the specified model to simulate the ATF behaviors in the reactor. In particular, the model for simulation of stress and strain for the coated cladding should be developed because the previous model, which is 'FRACAS', is for one body model. The FRACAS module employs the analytical method based on thin walled theory. According to thin-walled theory, radial stress is defined as zero but this assumption is not suitable for ATF cladding because value of the radial stress is not negligible in the case of ATF cladding. Recently, a structural model for multi-layered ceramic cylinders based on thick-walled theory was developed. Also, FE-based numerical simulation such as BISON has been developed to evaluate fuel performance. An analytical method that calculates stress components of ATF cladding was developed in this study. Thick-walled theory was used to derive equations for calculating stress and strain. To solve for these equations, boundary and loading conditions were obtained by subroutine 'Cladf' and 'Couple' and applied to the analytical method. To evaluate the developed method, equivalent FE model was established and its results were compared to those of analytical model. Based on the

  4. Effect of Taper on Stress Distribution of All Ceramic Fixed Partial Dentures: a 3D-FEA Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gerami-Panah

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Mechanical failure of ceramic materials is controlled by brittle fracture, mostly occurred in tension. In 3-unit all-ceramic FPDs the connector area is considered to be at fracture risk because of tensile stress concentrations.Purpose: The aim of this FE analysis was to evaluate the effect of taper on stress distribution in all-ceramic FPDs.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study two 3-D finite element models of thee-unit IPS-Empress 2 FPDs replacing mandible second premolar were created by means of finite element software. The digital images were obtained from CT scan of human skull. Abutment was reduced with 12 and 22 degrees of taper. The cement layer,PDL, cancellous bone and cortical bone were also modeled. Frameworks of core material were fabricated. A static load of 100 N was applied at mid pontic area.Resolved stresses were calculated according to the Von Mises criterion and principal stresses.Results: In both models stresses were concentrated at the connectors. The maximum stresses were lower in the model with larger taper. The maximum Von Mises stress was recorded at the connector region of the premolar and the pontic. In model with larger taper the patterns of stresses were also more distributed and less concentrated.Conclusion: The highest Von Mises and principal stress were recorded at the connectors. Tensile stresses developed at the gingival connector of premolar and pontic was higher than molar. The stress level in model with 22-degree taper was lower compare to 12-degree and the stress pattern was more distributed, lowered the risk ofconcentrations.

  5. A procedure for temperature-stress fields calculation of WWER-1000 primary circuit in PTS event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petkov, G [Technical Univ., Dept. Thermal and Nuclear Power Engineering, Sofia (Bulgaria); Groudev, P; Argirov, J [Bulgarian Academy of Science, Inst. for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1997-09-01

    The paper presents the procedure of an investigation of WWER-1000 primary circuit temperature-stress field by the use of thermohydraulic computation data for a pressurized thermal shock event ``Core overcooling``. The procedure is based on a model of the plane stress state with ideal contact between wall and medium for the calculation. The computation data are calculated on the base of WWER-1000 thermohydraulic model by the RELAP5/MOD3 codes. This model was developed jointly by the Bulgarian and BNL/USA staff to provide an analytical tool for performing safety analysis. As a result of calculations by codes the computation data for temperature field law (linear laws of a few distinguished parts) and pressure of coolant at points on inner surface of WWER-1000 primary circuit equipment are received. Such calculations can be used as a base for determination of all-important load-carrying sections of the primary circuit pipes and vessels, which need further consideration. (author). 7 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs.

  6. Polycrystalline models for the calculation of residual stresses in zirconium alloys tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signorelli, J.W.; Turner, P.A.; Lebensohn, R.A.; Pochettino, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Tubes made of different Zirconium alloys are used in various types of reactors. The final texture of tubes as well as the distribution of residual stresses depend on the mechanical treatments done during their manufacturing process. The knowledge and prediction of both the final texture and the distribution of residual stresses in a tube for nuclear applications are of outstanding importance in relation with in-reactor performance of the tube, especially in what concerns to its irradiation creep and growth behaviour. The viscoplastic and the elastoplastic self consistent polycrystal models are used to investigate the influence of different mechanical treatments, performed during rolling processes on the final distribution of intergranular residual stresses of zirconium alloys tubes. The residual strains predictions with both formulations show a non linear dependence with the orientation, but they are qualitatively different. This discrepancy could be explain in terms of the relative plastic activity between the -type and -type deformation modes predicted with the viscoplastic and elastoplastic models. (author). 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  7. Primitive Path Analysis and Stress Distribution in Highly Strained Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Kremer, Kurt

    2018-01-16

    Polymer material properties are strongly affected by entanglement effects. For long polymer chains and composite materials, they are expected to be at the origin of many technically important phenomena, such as shear thinning or the Mullins effect, which microscopically can be related to topological constraints between chains. Starting from fully equilibrated highly entangled polymer melts, we investigate the effect of isochoric elongation on the entanglement structure and force distribution of such systems. Theoretically, the related viscoelastic response usually is discussed in terms of the tube model. We relate stress relaxation in the linear and nonlinear viscoelastic regimes to a primitive path analysis (PPA) and show that tension forces both along the original paths and along primitive paths, that is, the backbone of the tube, in the stretching direction correspond to each other. Unlike homogeneous relaxation along the chain contour, the PPA reveals a so far not observed long-lived clustering of topological constraints along the chains in the deformed state.

  8. The stress distribution in shell bodies and wings as an equilibrium problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, H

    1937-01-01

    This report treats the stress distribution in shell-shaped airplane components (fuselage, wings) as an equilibrium problem; it includes both cylindrical and non-cylindrical shells. In particular, it treats the stress distribution at the point of stress application and at cut-out points.

  9. Stress Calculation of a TRISO Coated Particle Fuel by Using a Poisson's Ratio in Creep Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Moon-Sung; Kim, Y. M.; Lee, Y. W.; Jeong, K. C.; Kim, Y. K.; Oh, S. C.; Kim, W. K.

    2007-01-01

    KAERI, which has been carrying out the Korean VHTR (Very High Temperature modular gas cooled Reactor) project since 2004, has been developing a performance analysis code for the TRISO coated particle fuel named COPA (COated Particle fuel Analysis). COPA predicts temperatures, stresses, a fission gas release and failure probabilities of a coated particle fuel in normal operating conditions. KAERI, on the other hand, is developing an ABAQUS based finite element(FE) model to cover the non-linear behaviors of a coated particle fuel such as cracking or debonding of the TRISO coating layers. Using the ABAQUS based FE model, verification calculations were carried out for the IAEA CRP-6 benchmark problems involving creep, swelling, and pressure. However, in this model the Poisson's ratio for elastic solution was used for creep strain calculation. In this study, an improvement is made for the ABAQUS based finite element model by using the Poisson's ratio in creep condition for the calculation of the creep strain rate. As a direct input of the coefficient in a creep condition is impossible, a user subroutine for the ABAQUS solution is prepared in FORTRAN for use in the calculations of the creep strain of the coating layers in the radial and hoop directions of the spherical fuel. This paper shows the calculation results of a TRISO coated particle fuel subject to an irradiation condition assumed as in the Miller's publication in comparison with the results obtained from the old FE model used in the CRP-6 benchmark calculations

  10. A calculation of dose distribution around 32P spherical sources and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Ken; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Nishizawa, Kunihide; Maekoshi, Hisashi

    1977-01-01

    In order to avoid the radiation hazard in radiation therapy of craniopharyngioma by using 32 P, it is helpful to prepare a detailed dose distribution in the vicinity of the source in the tissue. Valley's method is used for calculations. A problem of the method is pointed out and the method itself is refined numerically: it extends a region of xi where an approximate polynomial is available, and it determines an optimum degree of the polynomial as 9. Usefulness of the polynomial is examined by comparing with Berger's scaled absorbed dose distribution F(xi) and the Valley's result. The dose and dose rate distributions around uniformly distributed spherical sources are computed from the termwise integration of our polynomial of degree 9 over the range of xi from 0 to 1.7. The dose distributions calculated from the spherical surface to a point at 0.5 cm outside the source, are given, when the radii of sources are 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 1.0, and 1.5 cm respectively. The therapeutic dose for a craniopharyngioma which has a spherically shaped cyst, and the absorbed dose to the normal tissue, (oculomotor nerve), are obtained from these dose rate distributions. (auth.)

  11. Calculation of multi-dimensional dose distribution in medium due to proton beam incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawachi, Kiyomitsu; Inada, Tetsuo

    1978-01-01

    The method of analyzing the multi-dimensional dose distribution in a medium due to proton beam incidence is presented to obtain the reliable and simplified method from clinical viewpoint, especially for the medical treatment of cancer. The heavy ion beam being taken out of an accelerator has to be adjusted to fit cancer location and size, utilizing a modified range modulator, a ridge filter, a bolus and a special scanning apparatus. The precise calculation of multi-dimensional dose distribution of proton beam is needed to fit treatment to a limit part. The analytical formulas consist of those for the fluence distribution in a medium, the divergence of flying range, the energy distribution itself, the dose distribution in side direction and the two-dimensional dose distribution. The fluence distribution in polystyrene in case of the protons with incident energy of 40 and 60 MeV, the energy distribution of protons at the position of a Bragg peak for various values of incident energy, the depth dose distribution in polystyrene in case of the protons with incident energy of 40 and 60 MeV and average energy of 100 MeV, the proton fluence and dose distribution as functions of depth for the incident average energy of 250 MeV, the statistically estimated percentage errors in the proton fluence and dose distribution, the estimated minimum detectable tumor thickness as a function of the number of incident protons for the different incident spectra with average energy of 250 MeV, the isodose distribution in a plane containing the central axis in case of the incident proton beam of 3 mm diameter and 40 MeV and so on are presented as the analytical results, and they are evaluated. (Nakai, Y.)

  12. Confluence of calculational and experimental information for determination of power distribution and burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serov, I.V.; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    A technique for the statistical confluence of any number of possibly correlated informational sources employed in reactor analysis can be used to improve the estimates of physical quantities given by the sources taken separately. The formulas of the presented technique being based on multivariate Bayesian conditioning are general and can be employed in different applications. Insight into the nature of the informational source allows different types of data associated with the source to be improved. Estimation of biases, variances and correlation coefficients for the systematic and statistical errors associated with the informational sources is reliable confluence, but pays off by providing optimal estimates. The technique of the calculational and experimental information confluence is applied to the determination of the power distribution and burnup for the research reactor HOR of the Delft University of Technology. The code system CONHOR carries out all the stages of the calculation for the HOR reactor, using an existing code for static core calculations and burnup calculations. (author)

  13. Confluence of calculational and experimental information for determination of power distribution and burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serov, I.V.; Hoogenboom, J.E. [Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)

    1996-05-01

    A technique for the statistical confluence of any number of possibly correlated informational sources employed in reactor analysis can be used to improve the estimates of physical quantities given by the sources taken separately. The formulas of the presented technique being based on multivariate Bayesian conditioning are general and can be employed in different applications. Insight into the nature of the informational source allows different types of data associated with the source to be improved. Estimation of biases, variances and correlation coefficients for the systematic and statistical errors associated with the informational sources is reliable confluence, but pays off by providing optimal estimates. The technique of the calculational and experimental information confluence is applied to the determination of the power distribution and burnup for the research reactor HOR of the Delft University of Technology. The code system CONHOR carries out all the stages of the calculation for the HOR reactor, using an existing code for static core calculations and burnup calculations. (author).

  14. GENGTC-JB: a computer program to calculate temperature distribution for cylindrical geometry capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Someya, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Toshiki; Niimi, Motoji; Hoshiya, Taiji; Harayama, Yasuo

    1987-09-01

    In design of JMTR irradiation capsules contained specimens, a program (named GENGTC) has been generally used to evaluate temperature distributions in the capsules. The program was originally compiled by ORNL(U.S.A.) and consisted of very simple calculation methods. From the incorporated calculation methods, the program is easy to use, and has many applications to the capsule design. However, it was considered to replace original computing methods with advanced ones, when the program was checked from a standpoint of the recent computer abilities, and also to be complicated in data input. Therefore, the program was versioned up as aim to make better calculations and improve input method. The present report describes revised calculation methods and input/output guide of the version-up program. (author)

  15. Distributed Sensor Network for meteorological observations and numerical weather Prediction Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Á. Vas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The prediction of weather generally means the solution of differential equations on the base of the measured initial conditions where the data of close and distant neighboring points are used for the calculations. It requires the maintenance of expensive weather stations and supercomputers. However, if weather stations are not only capable of measuring but can also communicate with each other, then these smart sensors can also be applied to run forecasting calculations. This applies the highest possible level of parallelization without the collection of measured data into one place. Furthermore, if more nodes are involved, the result becomes more accurate, but the computing power required from one node does not increase. Our Distributed Sensor Network for meteorological sensing and numerical weather Prediction Calculations (DSN-PC can be applied in several different areas where sensing and numerical calculations, even the solution of differential equations, are needed.

  16. A Pearson VII distribution function for fast calculation of dechanneling and angular dispersion of beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Lin; Peng Luohan

    2009-01-01

    Although multiple scattering theories have been well developed, numerical calculation is complicated and only tabulated values have been available, which has caused inconvenience in practical use. We have found that a Pearson VII distribution function can be used to fit Lugujjo and Mayer's probability curves in describing the dechanneling phenomenon in backscattering analysis, over a wide range of disorder levels. Differentiation of the obtained function gives another function to calculate angular dispersion of the beam in the frameworks by Sigmund and Winterbon. The present work provides an easy calculation of both dechanneling probability and angular dispersion for any arbitrary combination of beam and target having a reduced thickness ≥0.6, which can be implemented in modeling of channeling spectra. Furthermore, we used a Monte Carlo simulation program to calculate the deflection probability and compared them with previously tabulated data. A good agreement was reached.

  17. Stress Distribution during Rapid Canine Retraction with a Distraction Device: A Finite Element Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nareen Chakravarthy Challagulla

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The periodontium in the maxillary first molar region showed the maximum stress and the canine showed unequal stress distribution with more stress at the crest of the alveolar bone and lesser stress at the apical region which lessens root resorption.

  18. Distribution of the minimum path on percolation clusters: A renormalization group calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hipsh, Lior.

    1993-06-01

    This thesis uses the renormalization group for the research of the chemical distance or the minimal path on percolation clusters on a 2 dimensional square lattice. Our aims are to calculate analytically (iterative calculation) the fractal dimension of the minimal path. d min. , and the distributions of the minimum paths, l min for different lattice sizes and for different starting densities (including the threshold value p c ). For the distributions. We seek for an analytic form which describes them. The probability to get a minimum path for each linear size L is calculated by iterating the distribution of l min for the basic cell of size 2*2 to the next scale sizes, using the H cell renormalization group. For the threshold value of p and for values near to p c . We confirm a scaling in the form: P(l,L) =f1/l(l/(L d min ). L - the linear size, l - the minimum path. The distribution can be also represented in the Fourier space, so we will try to solve the renormalization group equations in this space. A numerical fitting is produced and compared to existing numerical results. In order to improve the agreement between the renormalization group and the numerical simulations, we also present attempts to generalize the renormalization group by adding more parameters, e.g. correlations between bonds in different directions or finite densities for occupation of bonds and sites. (author) 17 refs

  19. DIST: a computer code system for calculation of distribution ratios of solutes in the purex system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachimori, Shoichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-05-01

    Purex is a solvent extraction process for reprocessing the spent nuclear fuel using tri n-butylphosphate (TBP). A computer code system DIST has been developed to calculate distribution ratios for the major solutes in the Purex process. The DIST system is composed of database storing experimental distribution data of U(IV), U(VI), Pu(III), Pu(IV), Pu(VI), Np(IV), Np(VI), HNO{sub 3} and HNO{sub 2}: DISTEX and of Zr(IV), Tc(VII): DISTEXFP and calculation programs to calculate distribution ratios of U(IV), U(VI), Pu(III), Pu(IV), Pu(VI), Np(IV), Np(VI), HNO{sub 3} and HNO{sub 2}(DIST1), and Zr(IV), Tc(VII)(DITS2). The DIST1 and DIST2 determine, by the best-fit procedures, the most appropriate values of many parameters put on empirical equations by using the DISTEX data which fulfill the assigned conditions and are applied to calculate distribution ratios of the respective solutes. Approximately 5,000 data were stored in the DISTEX and DISTEXFP. In the present report, the following items are described, 1) specific features of DIST1 and DIST2 codes and the examples of calculation 2) explanation of databases, DISTEX, DISTEXFP and a program DISTIN, which manages the data in the DISTEX and DISTEXFP by functions as input, search, correction and delete. and at the annex, 3) programs of DIST1, DIST2, and figure-drawing programs DIST1G and DIST2G 4) user manual for DISTIN. 5) source programs of DIST1 and DIST2. 6) the experimental data stored in the DISTEX and DISTEXFP. (author). 122 refs.

  20. Three-phase Power Flow Calculation of Low Voltage Distribution Network Considering Characteristics of Residents Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaping; Lin, Shunjiang; Yang, Zhibin

    2017-05-01

    In the traditional three-phase power flow calculation of the low voltage distribution network, the load model is described as constant power. Since this model cannot reflect the characteristics of actual loads, the result of the traditional calculation is always different from the actual situation. In this paper, the load model in which dynamic load represented by air conditioners parallel with static load represented by lighting loads is used to describe characteristics of residents load, and the three-phase power flow calculation model is proposed. The power flow calculation model includes the power balance equations of three-phase (A,B,C), the current balance equations of phase 0, and the torque balancing equations of induction motors in air conditioners. And then an alternating iterative algorithm of induction motor torque balance equations with each node balance equations is proposed to solve the three-phase power flow model. This method is applied to an actual low voltage distribution network of residents load, and by the calculation of three different operating states of air conditioners, the result demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed model and the algorithm.

  1. Multiplicity distributions of gluon and quark jets and a test of QCD analytic calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, J. William

    1999-01-01

    Gluon jets are identified in e + e - hadronic annihilation events by tagging two quark jets in the same hemisphere of an event. The gluon jet is defined inclusively as all the particles in the opposite hemisphere. Gluon jets defined in this manner have a close correspondence to gluon jets as they are defined for analytic calculations, and are almost independent of a jet finding algorithm. The mean and first few higher moments of the gluon jet charged particle multiplicity distribution are compared to the analogous results found for light quark (uds) jets, also defined inclusively. Large differences are observed between the mean, skew and curtosis values of the gluon and quark jets, but not between their dispersions. The cumulant factorial moments of the distributions are also measured, and are used to test the predictions of QCD analytic calculations. A calculation which includes next-to-next-to-leading order corrections and energy conservation is observed to provide a much improved description of the separated gluon and quark jet cumulant moments compared to a next-to-leading order calculation without energy conservation. There is good quantitative agreement between the data and calculations for the ratios of the cumulant moments between gluon and quark jets. The data sample used is the LEP-1 sample of the OPAL experiment at LEP

  2. Multiplicity distributions of gluon and quark jets and a test of QCD analytic calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary, J. William

    1999-03-01

    Gluon jets are identified in e{sup +}e{sup -} hadronic annihilation events by tagging two quark jets in the same hemisphere of an event. The gluon jet is defined inclusively as all the particles in the opposite hemisphere. Gluon jets defined in this manner have a close correspondence to gluon jets as they are defined for analytic calculations, and are almost independent of a jet finding algorithm. The mean and first few higher moments of the gluon jet charged particle multiplicity distribution are compared to the analogous results found for light quark (uds) jets, also defined inclusively. Large differences are observed between the mean, skew and curtosis values of the gluon and quark jets, but not between their dispersions. The cumulant factorial moments of the distributions are also measured, and are used to test the predictions of QCD analytic calculations. A calculation which includes next-to-next-to-leading order corrections and energy conservation is observed to provide a much improved description of the separated gluon and quark jet cumulant moments compared to a next-to-leading order calculation without energy conservation. There is good quantitative agreement between the data and calculations for the ratios of the cumulant moments between gluon and quark jets. The data sample used is the LEP-1 sample of the OPAL experiment at LEP.

  3. Multiplicity distributions of gluon and quark jets and a test of QCD analytic calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary, J.W. [California Univ., Riverside, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1999-03-01

    Gluon jets are identified in e{sup +}e{sup -} hadronic annihilation events by tagging two quark jets in the same hemisphere of an event. The gluon jet is defined inclusively as all the particles in the opposite hemisphere. Gluon jets defined in this manner have a close correspondence to gluon jets as they are defined for analytic calculations, and are almost independent of a jet finding algorithm. The mean and first few higher moments of the gluon jet charged particle multiplicity distribution are compared to the analogous results found for light quark (uds) jets, also defined inclusively. Large differences are observed between the mean, skew and curtosis values of the gluon and quark jets, but not between their dispersions. The cumulant factorial moments of the distributions are also measured, and are used to test the predictions of QCD analytic calculations. A calculation which includes next-to-next-to-leading order corrections and energy conservation is observed to provide a much improved description of the separated gluon and quark jet cumulant moments compared to a next-to-leading order calculation without energy conservation. There is good quantitative agreement between the data and calculations for the ratios of the cumulant moments between gluon and quark jets. The data sample used is the LEP-1 sample of the OPAL experiment at LEP. (orig.) 6 refs.

  4. Multiplicity distributions of gluon and quark jets and a test of QCD analytic calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Gluon jets are identified in e + e - hadronic annihilation events by tagging two quark jets in the same hemisphere of an event. The gluon jet is defined inclusively as all the particles in the opposite hemisphere. Gluon jets defined in this manner have a close correspondence to gluon jets as they are defined for analytic calculations, and are almost independent of a jet finding algorithm. The mean and first few higher moments of the gluon jet charged particle multiplicity distribution are compared to the analogous results found for light quark (uds) jets, also defined inclusively. Large differences are observed between the mean, skew and curtosis values of the gluon and quark jets, but not between their dispersions. The cumulant factorial moments of the distributions are also measured, and are used to test the predictions of QCD analytic calculations. A calculation which includes next-to-next-to-leading order corrections and energy conservation is observed to provide a much improved description of the separated gluon and quark jet cumulant moments compared to a next-to-leading order calculation without energy conservation. There is good quantitative agreement between the data and calculations for the ratios of the cumulant moments between gluon and quark jets. The data sample used is the LEP-1 sample of the OPAL experiment at LEP. (orig.)

  5. Multiplicity distributions of gluon and quark jets and a test of QCD analytic calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, J. William

    1999-03-01

    Gluon jets are identified in e +e - hadronic annihilation events by tagging two quark jets in the same hemisphere of an event. The gluon jet is defined inclusively as all the particles in the opposite hemisphere. Gluon hets defined in this manner have a close correspondence to gluon jets as they are defined for analytic calculations, and are almost independent of a jet finding algorithm. The mean and first few higher moments of the gluon jet charged particle multiplicity distribution are compared to the analogous results found for light quark (uds) jets, also defined inclusively. Large differences are observed between the mean, skew and curtosis values of the gluon and quark jets, but not between their dispersions. The cumulant factorial moments of the distributions are also measured, and are used to test the predictions of QCD analytic calculations. A calculation which includes next-to-next-to-leading order corrections and energy conservation is observed to provide a much improved description of the separated gluon and quark jet cumulant moments compared to a next-to-leading order calculation without energy conservation. There is good quantitative agreement between the data and calculations for the ratios of the cumulant moments between gluon and quark jets. The data sample used is the LEP-1 sample of the OPAL experiment at LEP.

  6. Tibiofemoral contact stress and stress distribution evaluation of total knee arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szivek, J A; Cutignola, L; Volz, R G

    1995-08-01

    The Fuji film (Itochu, Los Angeles, CA) area analysis technique demonstrates that a more accurate assessment of tibiofemoral contact stresses is possible when the film is used at 37 degrees C and at the upper end of its sensitivity range (in this case, a 2,000-N load). An AMK with a regular and Hylamer-M insert (DePuy, Warsaw, IN), an MG II (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN), an Omnifit (Osteonics, Allendale, NJ), an Ortholoc III (Dow Corning Wright, Midland, MI), a PCA II (Howmedica, Rutherford, NJ), and a PFC (Johnson & Johnson Orthopaedics, Raynham, MA) had average contact stresses that varied only 12% at 60 degrees flexion. At 0 degrees, 15 degrees and 60 degrees flexion, stresses ranged from 13 to 25 MPa. Contact area distribution ratios, which were smaller at 37 degrees C than at 24 degrees C, provide a quantitative means of grouping implants according to the shape of the tibiofemoral contact area. The Omnifit, MG II, PCA II, and PFC had small ratios (symmetric areas). The AMK and Ortholoc III had large ratios (asymmetric contact areas). If the impression is reflective of wear, it would be expected to be focal in knees with small ratios and contact areas, and uniform in knees with large ratios and contact areas, whereas large ratios and small areas would imply a linear wear pattern. Calibrated electrical resistance contact stress measurements indicated that the Fuji film measurements underestimated the magnitude of contact stresses. They also provided a means of quantifying the rate of area increase during initial loading of the knees, with the highest area increase noted for the knee with the roughest insert (Ortholoc III) and the lowest area increase for the knee with the smoothest insert (PCA II).

  7. Investigation of stress distribution in normal and oblique partial penetration. Welded nozzles by 3-D photoelastic stress freezing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, H.; Kubo, M.; Katori, T.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental investigation by 3-D photoelasticity has been carried out to measure the stress distribution of partial penetration welded nozzles attached to the bottom head of a pressure vessel. A 3-D photoelastic stress freezing method was chosen as the most effective means of observation of the stress distribution in the vicinity of the nozzle/wall weld. The experimental model was a 1:20 scale spherical bottom head. Both an axisymmetric nozzle and an asymmetric nozzle were investigated. Epoxy resin, which is a thermosetting plastic, was used as the model material. The oblique effect was examined by comparing the stress distribution of the asymmetric nozzle with that of the axisymmetric nozzle. Furthermore, the experimental results were compared with the analytical results using 3-D finite element method (FEM). The stress distributions obtained from the frozen fringe pattern of the 3-D photoelastic model were in good agreement with those by 3-D FEM. (orig.)

  8. A deep learning approach to estimate stress distribution: a fast and accurate surrogate of finite-element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Liu, Minliang; Martin, Caitlin; Sun, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Structural finite-element analysis (FEA) has been widely used to study the biomechanics of human tissues and organs, as well as tissue-medical device interactions, and treatment strategies. However, patient-specific FEA models usually require complex procedures to set up and long computing times to obtain final simulation results, preventing prompt feedback to clinicians in time-sensitive clinical applications. In this study, by using machine learning techniques, we developed a deep learning (DL) model to directly estimate the stress distributions of the aorta. The DL model was designed and trained to take the input of FEA and directly output the aortic wall stress distributions, bypassing the FEA calculation process. The trained DL model is capable of predicting the stress distributions with average errors of 0.492% and 0.891% in the Von Mises stress distribution and peak Von Mises stress, respectively. This study marks, to our knowledge, the first study that demonstrates the feasibility and great potential of using the DL technique as a fast and accurate surrogate of FEA for stress analysis. © 2018 The Author(s).

  9. Analysis of temperature and stress distribution of superheater tubes after attemperation or sootblower activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madejski, Paweł; Taler, Dawid

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The CFD simulation was used to calculate 3D steam and tube wall temperature distributions in the platen superheater. • The CFD results can be used in design of superheaters made of tubes with complex cross-section. • The CFD analysis enables the proper selection of the steel grade. • The transient temperature and stress distributions were calculated using Finite Volume Method. • The detailed analysis prevents superheater tubes from excessive stresses during sootblower or attemperator activation. - Abstract: Superheaters are characterized by high metal temperatures due to higher steam temperature and low heat transfer coefficients on the tube inner surfaces. Superheaters have especially difficult operating conditions, particularly during attemperator and sootblower activations, when temperature and steam flow rate as well as tube wall temperature change with time. A detailed thermo-mechanical analysis of the superheater tubes makes it possible to identify the cause of premature high-temperature failures and aids greatly in the changes in tubing arrangement and improving start-up technology. This paper presents a thermal and strength analysis of a tube “double omega”, used in the steam superheaters in CFB boilers

  10. Calculated and measured dose distribution in electron and X-ray irradiated water phantom

    CERN Document Server

    Ziaie, F; Bulka, S; Afarideh, H; Hadji-Saeid, S M

    2002-01-01

    The Bremsstrahlung yields produced by incident electrons on a tantalum converter have been calculated by using a Monte-Carlo computer code. The tantalum thickness as an X-ray converter was optimized for 2, 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 MeV electron beams. The dose distribution in scanning and conveyor direction for both 2 MeV electron and X-ray converted from 2 MeV electron beam have been calculated and compared with experimental results. The economical aspects of low energy electron conversion were discussed as well.

  11. Isodose distributions and dose uniformity in the Portuguese gamma irradiation facility calculated using the MCNP code

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, C

    2001-01-01

    A systematic study of isodose distributions and dose uniformity in sample carriers of the Portuguese Gamma Irradiation Facility was carried out using the MCNP code. The absorbed dose rate, gamma flux per energy interval and average gamma energy were calculated. For comparison purposes, boxes filled with air and 'dummy' boxes loaded with layers of folded and crumpled newspapers to achieve a given value of density were used. The magnitude of various contributions to the total photon spectra, including source-dependent factors, irradiator structures, sample material and other origins were also calculated.

  12. Estimation of stress distribution in ferromagnetic tensile specimens using low cost eddy current stress measurement system and BP neural network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Li

    Full Text Available Estimation of the stress distribution in ferromagnetic components is very important for evaluating the working status of mechanical equipment and implementing preventive maintenance. Eddy current testing technology is a promising method in this field because of its advantages of safety, no need of coupling agent, etc. In order to reduce the cost of eddy current stress measurement system, and obtain the stress distribution in ferromagnetic materials without scanning, a low cost eddy current stress measurement system based on Archimedes spiral planar coil was established, and a method based on BP neural network to obtain the stress distribution using the stress of several discrete test points was proposed. To verify the performance of the developed test system and the validity of the proposed method, experiment was implemented using structural steel (Q235 specimens. Standard curves of sensors at each test point were achieved, the calibrated data were used to establish the BP neural network model for approximating the stress variation on the specimen surface, and the stress distribution curve of the specimen was obtained by interpolating with the established model. The results show that there is a good linear relationship between the change of signal modulus and the stress in most elastic range of the specimen, and the established system can detect the change in stress with a theoretical average sensitivity of -0.4228 mV/MPa. The obtained stress distribution curve is well consonant with the theoretical analysis result. At last, possible causes and improving methods of problems appeared in the results were discussed. This research has important significance for reducing the cost of eddy current stress measurement system, and advancing the engineering application of eddy current stress testing.

  13. Estimation of stress distribution in ferromagnetic tensile specimens using low cost eddy current stress measurement system and BP neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianwei; Zhang, Weimin; Zeng, Weiqin; Chen, Guolong; Qiu, Zhongchao; Cao, Xinyuan; Gao, Xuanyi

    2017-01-01

    Estimation of the stress distribution in ferromagnetic components is very important for evaluating the working status of mechanical equipment and implementing preventive maintenance. Eddy current testing technology is a promising method in this field because of its advantages of safety, no need of coupling agent, etc. In order to reduce the cost of eddy current stress measurement system, and obtain the stress distribution in ferromagnetic materials without scanning, a low cost eddy current stress measurement system based on Archimedes spiral planar coil was established, and a method based on BP neural network to obtain the stress distribution using the stress of several discrete test points was proposed. To verify the performance of the developed test system and the validity of the proposed method, experiment was implemented using structural steel (Q235) specimens. Standard curves of sensors at each test point were achieved, the calibrated data were used to establish the BP neural network model for approximating the stress variation on the specimen surface, and the stress distribution curve of the specimen was obtained by interpolating with the established model. The results show that there is a good linear relationship between the change of signal modulus and the stress in most elastic range of the specimen, and the established system can detect the change in stress with a theoretical average sensitivity of -0.4228 mV/MPa. The obtained stress distribution curve is well consonant with the theoretical analysis result. At last, possible causes and improving methods of problems appeared in the results were discussed. This research has important significance for reducing the cost of eddy current stress measurement system, and advancing the engineering application of eddy current stress testing.

  14. Calculation of Local Stress and Fatigue Resistance due to Thermal Stratification on Pressurized Surge Line Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandriyana, B.; Utaja

    2010-06-01

    Thermal stratification introduces thermal shock effect which results in local stress and fatique problems that must be considered in the design of nuclear power plant components. Local stress and fatique calculation were performed on the Pressurize Surge Line piping system of the Pressurize Water Reactor of the Nuclear Power Plant. Analysis was done on the operating temperature between 177 to 343° C and the operating pressure of 16 MPa (160 Bar). The stagnant and transient condition with two kinds of stratification model has been evaluated by the two dimensional finite elements method using the ANSYS program. Evaluation of fatigue resistance is developed based on the maximum local stress using the ASME standard Code formula. Maximum stress of 427 MPa occurred at the upper side of the top half of hot fluid pipe stratification model in the transient case condition. The evaluation of the fatigue resistance is performed on 500 operating cycles in the life time of 40 years and giving the usage value of 0,64 which met to the design requirement for class 1 of nuclear component. The out surge transient were the most significant case in the localized effects due to thermal stratification.

  15. Calculating emittance for Gaussian and Non-Gaussian distributions by the method of correlations for slits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    One common way for measuring the emittance of an electron beam is with the slits method. The usual approach for analyzing the data is to calculate an emittance that is a subset of the parent emittance. This paper shows an alternative way by using the method of correlations which ties the parameters derived from the beamlets to the actual parameters of the parent emittance. For parent distributions that are Gaussian, this method yields exact results. For non-Gaussian beam distributions, this method yields an effective emittance that can serve as a yardstick for emittance comparisons

  16. A calculation method for transient flow distribution of SCWR(CSR1000)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Juan; Zhou, Tao; Chen, Jie; Liu, Liang; Muhammad, Ali Shahzad; Muhammad, Zeeshan Ali; Xia, Bangyang

    2017-01-01

    The supercritical water reactor CSR1000 is selected for the study. A parallel channel flow transient flow distribution module is developed, which is used for solving unsteady nonlinear equations. The incorporated programs of SCAC-CSR1000 are executed on normal and abnormal operating conditions. The analysis shows that: 1. Transient flow distribution can incorporate parallel channel flow calculation, with an error less than 0.1%; 2. After a total loss of coolant flow, the flow of each channel shows a downward trend; 3. In the event of introducing a traffic accident, the first coolant flow shows an increasing trend.

  17. An improved method for calculating force distributions in moment-stiff timber connections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormarsson, Sigurdur; Blond, Mette

    2012-01-01

    An improved method for calculating force distributions in moment-stiff metal dowel-type timber connections is presented, a method based on use of three-dimensional finite element simulations of timber connections subjected to moment action. The study that was carried out aimed at determining how...... the slip modulus varies with the angle between the direction of the dowel forces and the fibres in question, as well as how the orthotropic stiffness behaviour of the wood material affects the direction and the size of the forces. It was assumed that the force distribution generated by the moment action...

  18. Dose Distribution Calculation Using MCNPX Code in the Gamma-ray Irradiation Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Ho

    1991-02-01

    60 Co-gamma irradiators have long been used for foods sterilization, plant mutation and development of radio-protective agents, radio-sensitizers and other purposes. The Applied Radiological Science Research Institute of Cheju National University has a multipurpose gamma irradiation facility loaded with a MDS Nordin standard 60 Co source (C188), of which the initial activity was 400 TBq (10,800 Ci) on February 19, 2004. This panoramic gamma irradiator is designed to irradiate in all directions various samples such as plants, cultured cells and mice to administer given radiation doses. In order to give accurate doses to irradiation samples, appropriate methods of evaluating, both by calculation and measurement, the radiation doses delivered to the samples should be set up. Computational models have been developed to evaluate the radiation dose distributions inside the irradiation chamber and the radiation doses delivered to typical biolological samples which are frequently irradiated in the facility. The computational models are based on using the MCNPX code. The horizontal and vertical dose distributions has been calculated inside the irradiation chamber and compared the calculated results with measured data obtained with radiation dosimeters to verify the computational models. The radiation dosimeters employed are a Famer's type ion chamber and MOSFET dosimeters. Radiation doses were calculated by computational models, which were delivered to cultured cell samples contained in test tubes and to a mouse fixed in a irradiation cage, and compared the calculated results with the measured data. The computation models are also tested to see if they can accurately simulate the case where a thick lead shield is placed between the source and detector. Three tally options of the MCNPX code, F4, F5 and F6, are alternately used to see which option produces optimum results. The computation models are also used to calculate gamma ray energy spectra of a BGO scintillator at

  19. Analysis of Simple Creep Stress Calculation Methods for Creep Life Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jun Min; Lee, Han Sang; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Creep analysis takes much more time than elastic or elastic-plastic analysis. In this study, we conducted elastic and elastic-plastic analysis and compared the results with creep analysis results. In the elastic analysis, we used primary stress, which can be classified by the Mα-tangent method and stress intensities recommended in the ASME code. In the elastic-plastic analysis, we calculated the parameters recommended in the R5 code. For the FE models, a bending load, uniaxial load, and biaxial load were applied to the cross shaped welded plate, and a bending load and internal pressure were applied to the elbow pipe. To investigate the element size sensitivity, we conducted FE analysis for various element sizes for the cases where bending load was applied to the cross shaped welded plate. There was no significant difference between the creep.

  20. Calculation of pressure distribution in vacuum systems using a commercial finite element program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.; Wehrle, B.; Jostlein, H.

    1991-01-01

    The finite element method has proven to be a very useful tool for calculating pressure distributions in complex vacuum systems. A number of finite element programs have been developed for this specific task. For those who do not have access to one of these specialized programs and do not wish to develop their own program, another option is available. Any commercial finite element program with heat transfer analysis capabilities can be used to calculate pressure distributions. The approach uses an analogy between thermal conduction and gas conduction with the quantity temperature substituted for pressure. The thermal analogies for pumps, gas loads and tube conductances are described in detail. The method is illustrated for an example vacuum system. A listing of the ANSYS data input file for this example is included. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. Calculation of magnetization curves and probability distribution for monoclinic and uniaxial systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobh, Hala A.; Aly, Samy H.; Yehia, Sherif

    2013-01-01

    We present the application of a simple classical statistical mechanics-based model to selected monoclinic and hexagonal model systems. In this model, we treat the magnetization as a classical vector whose angular orientation is dictated by the laws of equilibrium classical statistical mechanics. We calculate for these anisotropic systems, the magnetization curves, energy landscapes and probability distribution for different sets of relevant parameters and magnetic fields of different strengths and directions. Our results demonstrate a correlation between the most probable orientation of the magnetization vector, the system's parameters, and the external magnetic field. -- Highlights: ► We calculate magnetization curves and probability angular distribution of the magnetization. ► The magnetization curves are consistent with probability results for the studied systems. ► Monoclinic and hexagonal systems behave differently due to their different anisotropies

  2. Calculation of age-dependent dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides uniformly distributed in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Tran Van; Satoh, Daiki; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Tsuda, Shuichi; Endo, Akira; Saito, Kimiaki; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    2005-02-01

    Age-dependent dose conversion coefficients for external exposure to photons emitted by radionuclides uniformly distributed in air were calculated. The size of the source region in the calculation was assumed to be effectively semi-infinite in extent. Firstly, organ doses were calculated with a series of age-specific MIRD-5 type phantoms using MCNP code, a Monte Carlo transport code. The calculations were performed for mono-energetic photon sources of twelve energies from 10 keV to 5 MeV and for phantoms of newborn, 1, 5, 10 and 15 years, and adult. Then, the effective doses to the different age-phantoms from the mono-energetic photon sources were estimated based on the obtained organ doses. The calculated effective doses were used to interpolate the conversion coefficients of the effective doses for 160 radionuclides, which are important for dose assessment of nuclear facilities. In the calculation, energies and intensities of emitted photons from radionuclides were taken from DECDC, a recent compilation of decay data for radiation dosimetry developed at JAERI. The results are tabulated in the form of effective dose per unit concentration and time (Sv per Bq s m -3 ). (author)

  3. Calculation and measurement of the intensity distribution of 60Co radiation behind block filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerlach, R.; Kranepuhl, H.; Salewski, D.

    1987-01-01

    A method for determining the absorption length in block filters with non-focussing edges is described. It accounts for geometric parameters as source diameter, source-surface-distance and the position of the absorber relative to the central ray. The model was checked by intensity measurements. Behind the absorber as well as in the penumbra regions good agreement between calculation and measurement of the intensity distribution was observed. (author)

  4. Status of the fuel stress and failure rate calculations at KFA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongartz, K.

    1980-11-01

    In this report a new model for calculating stresses in the SiC layer of TRISO coated particles is presented. The gain in computer time with respect to the Walther model used up to now is a factor of 100. The restrictions of this model are - application is only possible to TRISO particles and not BISO which can be handled with the Walther model as well, the SiC layer is regarded as rigid: in fact, its Young's modulus is higher by a factor of 10 as compared to that of the Pyrocarbon layers. (orig.) [de

  5. Application of H-matrices method to the calculation of the stress field in a viscoelastic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, M.; Hirahara, K.

    2017-12-01

    In SW Japan, the Philippine Sea plate subducts from the south and the large earthquakes around M (Magnitude) 8 repeatedly occur at the plate boundary along the Nankai Trough, called as Nankai/Tonankai earthquakes. Near the rupture area of these earthquakes, the active volcanoes lines in the Kyushu region SW Japan, such as Sakurajima volcano. There are also distributed in the Tokai-Kanto region SE Japan, such as Mt. Fuji. The eruption of Mt. Fuji in 1707, called as Hoei eruption, have occurred 49 days after the one of the series of Nankai/Tonankai earthquakes, 1707 Hoei earthquake (M8.4). It suggests that the stress field due to the earthquake sometimes helps the volcanoes to erupt. When we consider the stress change due to the earthquake, the effect of viscoelastic deformation of the crust will be important. FEM is always used for modeling such inelastic effect. However, it requires the high computational cost of O(N3), where N is the number of discretized cells of the inelastic medium. Recently, a new method based on BIEM is proposed by Barbot and Fialko (2010). In their method, calculation of the stress field due to the inelastic strain is replaced to solve the inhomogeneous Navier's equation with equivalent body forces of the inelastic strain. Then, using the stress-strain greenfunction in an elastic medium, we can take into account the inelastic effect. In this study, we employ their method to evaluate the stress change at the active volcanoes around the Nankai/Tonankai earthquakes. Their method requires the computational cost and memory storage of O(N2). We try to reduce the computational amount and the memory by applying the fast computation method of H-matrices method. With H-matrices method, a dense matrix is divided into hierarchical structure of submatrices, and each submatrix is approximated to be low rank. When we divide the viscoelastic medium into N = 8,640 or 69,120 uniform cuboid cells and apply the H-matrices method, the required storage memory for

  6. A diffusion-theoretical method to calculate the neutron flux distribution in multisphere configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuerrer, F.

    1980-01-01

    For characterizing heterogene configurations of pebble-bed reactors the fine structure of the flux distribution as well as the determination of the macroscopic neutronphysical quantities are of interest. When calculating system parameters of Wigner-Seitz-cells the usual codes for neutron spectra calculation always neglect the modulation of the neutron flux by the influence of neighbouring spheres. To judge the error arising from that procedure it is necessary to determinate the flux distribution in the surrounding of a spherical fuel element. In the present paper an approximation method to calculate the flux distribution in the two-sphere model is developed. This method is based on the exactly solvable problem of the flux determination of a point source of neutrons in an infinite medium, which contains a spherical perturbation zone eccentric to the point source. An iteration method allows by superposing secondary fields and alternately satisfying the conditions of continuity on the surface of each of the two fuel elements to advance to continually improving approximations. (orig.) 891 RW/orig. 892 CKA [de

  7. A calculation model for primary intensity distributions from cylindrically symmetric x-ray lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hristov, Dimitre; Maltz, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    A calculation model for the quantitative prediction of primary intensity fluence distributions obtained by the Bragg diffraction focusing of kilovoltage radiation by cylindrical x-ray lenses is presented. The mathematical formalism describes primary intensity distributions from cylindrically-symmetric x-ray lenses, with a planar isotropic radiation source located in a plane perpendicular to the lens axis. The presence of attenuating medium inserted between the lens and the lens focus is accounted for by energy-dependent attenuation. The influence of radiation scattered within the media is ignored. Intensity patterns are modeled under the assumption that photons that are not interacting with the lens are blocked out at any point of interest. The main characteristics of the proposed calculation procedure are that (i) the application of vector formalism allows universal treatment of all cylindrical lenses without the need of explicit geometric constructs; (ii) intensity distributions resulting from x-ray diffraction are described by a 3D generalization of the mosaic spread concept; (iii) the calculation model can be immediately coupled to x-ray diffraction simulation packages such as XOP and Shadow. Numerical simulations based on this model are to facilitate the design of focused orthovoltage treatment (FOT) systems employing cylindrical x-ray lenses, by providing insight about the influence of the x-ray source and lens parameters on quantities of dosimetric interest to radiation therapy

  8. Oblique incidence of electron beams - comparisons between calculated and measured dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karcher, J.; Paulsen, F.; Christ, G.

    2005-01-01

    Clinical applications of high-energy electron beams, for example for the irradiation of internal mammary lymph nodes, can lead to oblique incidence of the beams. It is well known that oblique incidence of electron beams can alter the depth dose distribution as well as the specific dose per monitor unit. The dose per monitor unit is the absorbed dose in a point of interest of a beam, which is reached with a specific dose monitor value (DIN 6814-8[5]). Dose distribution and dose per monitor unit at oblique incidence were measured with a small-volume thimble chamber in a water phantom, and compared to both normal incidence and calculations of the Helax TMS 6.1 treatment planning system. At 4 MeV and 60 degrees, the maximum measured dose per monitor unit at oblique incidence was decreased up to 11%, whereas at 18MeV and 60 degrees this was increased up to 15% compared to normal incidence. Comparisons of measured and calculated dose distributions showed that the predicted dose at shallow depths is usually higher than the measured one, whereas it is smaller at depths beyond the depth of maximum dose. On the basis of the results of these comparisons, normalization depths and correction factors for the dose monitor value were suggested to correct the calculations of the dose per monitor unit. (orig.)

  9. Calculating the mass distribution of heavy nucleus fission product by neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudkov, A.N.; Koldobskij, A.B.; Kolobashkin, V.M.; Semenova, E.V.

    1981-01-01

    The technique of calculating the fission product mass yields by neutrons which are necessary for performing nucleus physical calculations in designing nuclear reactor cores is considered. The technique is based on the approximation of fission product mass distribution over the whole mass range by five Gauss functions. New analytical expressions for determining energy weights of used gaussians are proposed. The results of comparison of experimental data with calculated values for fission product mass obtained for reference processes in the capacity of which the fission reactions are chosen: 233 U, 235 U fission by thermal neutrons, 232 Th, 233 U, 235 U, 238 U by fission spectrum neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons and for 232 Th fission reactions by 11 MeV neutrons and 238 U by 7.7 MeV neutrons. On the basis of the analysis of results obtained the conclusion is drawn on a good agreement of fission product mass yield calculation values obtained using recommended values of mass distribution parameters with experimental data [ru

  10. Analysis of stress distribution of timing belts by FEM; Yugen yosoho ni yoru timing belt oryoku kaiseki (belt code oryoku bunpu kaiseki hokoku)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Y; Tomono, K; Takahashi, H; Uchida, T [Honda R and D Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    A model of the belt analyzed by-ABAQUS (: a general nonlinear finite element program) successfully confirmed the mechanism that generates the belt cord stress. A quite good agreement between experimental and computed results for the stress distribution of the belt cord. It is found that maximum stress of the cords occurs near the root of the tooth by calculation, where the belt cords break off. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  11. Calculation of pellet radial power distributions with a Monte Carlo burnup code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motomu; Yamamoto, Toru; Nakata, Tetsuo

    2010-01-01

    The Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) has been working on an irradiation test program of high-burnup MOX fuel at Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR). MOX and UO 2 fuel rods had been irradiated up to about 64 GWd/t (rod avg.) as a Japanese utilities research program (1st phase), and using those fuel rods, in-situ measurement of fuel pellet centerline temperature was done during the 2nd phase of irradiation as the JNES test program. As part of analysis of the temperature data, power distributions in a pellet radial direction were analyzed by using a Monte Carlo burnup code MVP-BURN. In addition, the calculated results of deterministic burnup codes SRAC and PLUTON for the same problem were compared with those of MVP-BURN to evaluate their accuracy. Burnup calculations with an assembly model were performed by using MVP-BURN and those with a pin cell model by using SRAC and PLUTON. The cell pitch and, therefore, fuel to moderator ratio in the pin cell calculation was determined from the comparison of neutron energy spectra with those of MVP-BURN. The fuel pellet radial distributions of burnup and fission reaction rates at the end of the 1st phase irradiation were compared between the three codes. The MVP-BURN calculation results show a large peaking in the burnup and fission rates in the pellet outer region for the UO 2 and MOX pellets. The SRAC calculations give very close results to those of the MVP-BURN. On the other hand, the PLUTON calculations show larger burnup for the UO 2 and lower burnup for the MOX pellets in the pellet outer region than those of MVP-BURN, which lead to larger fission rates for the UO 2 and lower fission rates for the MOX pellets, respectively. (author)

  12. CDFMC: a program that calculates the fixed neutron source distribution for a BWR using Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez T, A.M.; Xolocostli M, J.V.; Palacios H, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The three-dimensional neutron flux calculation using the synthesis method, it requires of the determination of the neutron flux in two two-dimensional configurations as well as in an unidimensional one. Most of the standard guides for the neutron flux calculation or fluences in the vessel of a nuclear reactor, make special emphasis in the appropriate calculation of the fixed neutron source that should be provided to the used transport code, with the purpose of finding sufficiently approximated flux values. The reactor core assemblies configuration is based on X Y geometry, however the considered problem is solved in R θ geometry for what is necessary to make an appropriate mapping to find the source term associated to the R θ intervals starting from a source distribution in rectangular coordinates. To develop the CDFMC computer program (Source Distribution calculation using Monte Carlo), it was necessary to develop a theory of independent mapping to those that have been in the literature. The method of meshes overlapping here used, is based on a technique of random points generation, commonly well-known as Monte Carlo technique. Although the 'randomness' of this technique it implies considering errors in the calculations, it is well known that when increasing the number of points randomly generated to measure an area or some other quantity of interest, the precision of the method increases. In the particular case of the CDFMC computer program, the developed technique reaches a good general behavior when it is used a considerably high number of points (bigger or equal to a hundred thousand), with what makes sure errors in the calculations of the order of 1%. (Author)

  13. The calculation of the quark distribution amplitudes of decuplet baryons by means of QCD sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonekamp, J.

    1994-11-01

    Using the QCD sum rule technique, we derive the quark distribution amplitudes of the decuplet memebers Δ(1232), Σ * (1385), Ξ * (1530) and Ω(1672). Generalizing the treatment of the Bethe-Salpeter amplitude, we can distinguish spin- and orbital- angular momentum parts of the quark distributions and establish separate sum rules for the contributions. Projecting out the angular momentum 1/2 contributions, we obtain sum rules which are saturated by the lowest resonance in the given iso spin channel, thus resolving deficiencies of the standard approach. We find that for helicity 1/2 the spin part of the quark distributions is asymmetric. Also the orbital angular momentum contributions are extremely asymmetric and tend to decrease the asymmetry of the spin part. As a result of SU(3) symmetry breaking, configuration mixing occurs and the decuplet baryons Σ * and Ξ * receive octet contributions. The antisymmetric part of these octet contributions is calculated. (orig.)

  14. Laser quench hardening of steel: Effects of superimposed elastic pre-stress on the hardness and residual stress distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meserve, Justin

    Cold drawn AISI 4140 beams were LASER surface hardened with a 2 kW CO2 LASER. Specimens were treated in the free state and while restrained in a bending fixture inducing surface tensile stresses of 94 and 230 MPa. Knoop hardness indentation was used to evaluate the through thickness hardness distribution, and a layer removal methodology was used to evaluate the residual stress distribution. Results showed the maximum surface hardness attained was not affected by pre-stress during hardening, and ranged from 513 to 676 kg/mm2. The depth of effective hardening varied at different magnitudes of pre-stress, but did not vary proportionately to the pre-stress. The surface residual stress, coinciding with the maximum compressive residual stress, increased as pre-stress was increased, from 1040 MPa for the nominally treated specimens to 1270 MPa for specimens pre-stressed to 230 MPa. The maximum tensile residual stress observed in the specimens decreased from 1060 MPa in the nominally treated specimens to 760 MPa for specimens pre-stressed to 230 MPa. Similarly, thickness of the compressive residual stress region increased and the depth at which maximum tensile residual stress occurred increased as the pre-stress during treatment was increased Overall, application of tensile elastic pre-stress during LASER hardening is beneficial to the development of compressive residual stress in AISI 4140, with minimal impact to the hardness attained from the treatment. The newly developed approach for LASER hardening may support efforts to increase both the wear and fatigue resistance of parts made from hardenable steels.

  15. A New Displacement-based Approach to Calculate Stress Intensity Factors With the Boundary Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Abstract The analysis of cracked brittle mechanical components considering linear elastic fracture mechanics is usually reduced to the evaluation of stress intensity factors (SIFs. The SIF calculation can be carried out experimentally, theoretically or numerically. Each methodology has its own advantages but the use of numerical methods has become very popular. Several schemes for numerical SIF calculations have been developed, the J-integral method being one of the most widely used because of its energy-like formulation. Additionally, some variations of the J-integral method, such as displacement-based methods, are also becoming popular due to their simplicity. In this work, a simple displacement-based scheme is proposed to calculate SIFs, and its performance is compared with contour integrals. These schemes are all implemented with the Boundary Element Method (BEM in order to exploit its advantages in crack growth modelling. Some simple examples are solved with the BEM and the calculated SIF values are compared against available solutions, showing good agreement between the different schemes.

  16. The denoising of Monte Carlo dose distributions using convolution superposition calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naqa, I; Cui, J; Lindsay, P; Olivera, G; Deasy, J O

    2007-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations can be accurate but are also computationally intensive. In contrast, convolution superposition (CS) offers faster and smoother results but by making approximations. We investigated MC denoising techniques, which use available convolution superposition results and new noise filtering methods to guide and accelerate MC calculations. Two main approaches were developed to combine CS information with MC denoising. In the first approach, the denoising result is iteratively updated by adding the denoised residual difference between the result and the MC image. Multi-scale methods were used (wavelets or contourlets) for denoising the residual. The iterations are initialized by the CS data. In the second approach, we used a frequency splitting technique by quadrature filtering to combine low frequency components derived from MC simulations with high frequency components derived from CS components. The rationale is to take the scattering tails as well as dose levels in the high-dose region from the MC calculations, which presumably more accurately incorporates scatter; high-frequency details are taken from CS calculations. 3D Butterworth filters were used to design the quadrature filters. The methods were demonstrated using anonymized clinical lung and head and neck cases. The MC dose distributions were calculated by the open-source dose planning method MC code with varying noise levels. Our results indicate that the frequency-splitting technique for incorporating CS-guided MC denoising is promising in terms of computational efficiency and noise reduction. (note)

  17. NOTE: The denoising of Monte Carlo dose distributions using convolution superposition calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Naqa, I.; Cui, J.; Lindsay, P.; Olivera, G.; Deasy, J. O.

    2007-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations can be accurate but are also computationally intensive. In contrast, convolution superposition (CS) offers faster and smoother results but by making approximations. We investigated MC denoising techniques, which use available convolution superposition results and new noise filtering methods to guide and accelerate MC calculations. Two main approaches were developed to combine CS information with MC denoising. In the first approach, the denoising result is iteratively updated by adding the denoised residual difference between the result and the MC image. Multi-scale methods were used (wavelets or contourlets) for denoising the residual. The iterations are initialized by the CS data. In the second approach, we used a frequency splitting technique by quadrature filtering to combine low frequency components derived from MC simulations with high frequency components derived from CS components. The rationale is to take the scattering tails as well as dose levels in the high-dose region from the MC calculations, which presumably more accurately incorporates scatter; high-frequency details are taken from CS calculations. 3D Butterworth filters were used to design the quadrature filters. The methods were demonstrated using anonymized clinical lung and head and neck cases. The MC dose distributions were calculated by the open-source dose planning method MC code with varying noise levels. Our results indicate that the frequency-splitting technique for incorporating CS-guided MC denoising is promising in terms of computational efficiency and noise reduction.

  18. A simplified treatment of radial enrichment distributions of LWR fuel assemblies in criticality calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennebach, M.; Schnorrenberg, N.

    2008-01-01

    Criticality safety assessments are usually performed for fuel assembly models that are as generic as possible to encompass small modifications in geometry that have no impact on criticality. Dealing with different radial enrichment distributions for a fuel assembly type, which is especially important for BWR fuel, poses more of a challenge, since this characteristic is rather obviously influencing the neutronic behaviour of the system. Nevertheless, the large variability of enrichment distributions makes it very desirable and even necessary to treat them in a generalized way, both to keep the criticality safety assessment from becoming too unwieldy and to avoid having to extend it every time a new variation comes up. To be viable, such a generic treatment has to be demonstrably covering, i.e. lead to a higher effective neutron multiplication factor k eff than any of the radial enrichment distributions it represents. Averaging the enrichment evenly over the fuel rods of the assembly is a general and simple approach, and under reactor conditions, it is also a covering assumption: the graded distribution is introduced to achieve a linear power distribution, therefore reducing the enrichment of the better moderated rods at the edge of the assembly. With an even distribution of the average enrichment over all rods, these wellmoderated rods will cause increased fission rates at the assembly edges and a rise in k eff . Since the moderator conditions in a spent nuclear fuel cask differ strongly from a reactor even when considering optimal moderation, the proof that a uniform enrichment distribution is a covering assumption compared with detailed enrichment distributions has to be cask-specific. In this report, a method for making that proof is presented along with results for fuel assemblies from BWR reactors. All results are from three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations with the SCALE 5.1 code package [1], using a 44-group neutron crosssection library based on ENDF

  19. A novel stress distribution analytical model of O-ring seals under different properties of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Di; Wang, Shao Ping; Wang, Xing Jian

    2017-01-01

    The elastomeric O-ring seals have been widely used as sealing elements in hydraulic systems. The sealing performance of O-ring seals is related to stress distribution. The stresses distribution depends on the squeeze rate and internal pressure, and would vary with properties of O-ring seals materials. Thus, in order to study the sealing performance of O-ring seals, it is necessary to describe the analytic relationship between stress distribution and properties of O-ring seals materials. For this purpose, a novel Stress distribution analytical model (SDAM) is proposed in this paper. The analytical model utilizes two stress complex functions to describe the stress distribution of O-ring seals. The proposed SDAM can express not only the analytical relationship between stress distribution and Young’s modulus, but also the one between stress distribution and Poisson’s ratio. Finally, compared results between finite element analysis and the SDAM validate that the proposed model can effectively reveal the stress distribution under different properties for O-ring materials

  20. A novel stress distribution analytical model of O-ring seals under different properties of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Di; Wang, Shao Ping; Wang, Xing Jian [School of Automation Science and Electrical Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing (China)

    2017-01-15

    The elastomeric O-ring seals have been widely used as sealing elements in hydraulic systems. The sealing performance of O-ring seals is related to stress distribution. The stresses distribution depends on the squeeze rate and internal pressure, and would vary with properties of O-ring seals materials. Thus, in order to study the sealing performance of O-ring seals, it is necessary to describe the analytic relationship between stress distribution and properties of O-ring seals materials. For this purpose, a novel Stress distribution analytical model (SDAM) is proposed in this paper. The analytical model utilizes two stress complex functions to describe the stress distribution of O-ring seals. The proposed SDAM can express not only the analytical relationship between stress distribution and Young’s modulus, but also the one between stress distribution and Poisson’s ratio. Finally, compared results between finite element analysis and the SDAM validate that the proposed model can effectively reveal the stress distribution under different properties for O-ring materials.

  1. A direct solution procedure for calculating time-varying stresses in structural systems by the principles of variational calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanou, G.D.

    1975-01-01

    The calculation of time-dependent stresses in structural systems operating at elevated temperatures with temperature gradients is discussed. The proposed method described in this report is of a direct formulation technique and

  2. Dose distribution calculation for in-vivo X-ray fluorescence scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, R. G.; Lozano, E.; Valente, M.

    2013-01-01

    In-vivo X-ray fluorescence constitutes a useful and accurate technique, worldwide established for constituent elementary distribution assessment. Actually, concentration distributions of arbitrary user-selected elements can be achieved along sample surface with the aim of identifying and simultaneously quantifying every constituent element. The method is based on the use of a collimated X-ray beam reaching the sample. However, one common drawback for considering the application of this technique for routine clinical examinations was the lack of information about associated dose delivery. This work presents a complete study of the dose distribution resulting from an in-vivo X-ray fluorescence scanning for quantifying biohazard materials on human hands. Absorbed dose has been estimated by means of dosimetric models specifically developed to this aim. In addition, complete dose distributions have been obtained by means of full radiation transport calculations in based on stochastic Monte Carlo techniques. A dedicated subroutine has been developed using the Penelope 2008 main code also integrated with dedicated programs -Mat Lab supported- for 3 dimensional dose distribution visualization. The obtained results show very good agreement between approximate analytical models and full descriptions by means of Monte Carlo simulations. (Author)

  3. Packing simulation code to calculate distribution function of hard spheres by Monte Carlo method : MCRDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Isao; Mori, Takamasa; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Shirai, Hiroshi.

    1996-03-01

    High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) employ spherical fuels named coated fuel particles (CFPs) consisting of a microsphere of low enriched UO 2 with coating layers in order to prevent FP release. There exist many spherical fuels distributed randomly in the cores. Therefore, the nuclear design of HTGRs is generally performed on the basis of the multigroup approximation using a diffusion code, S N transport code or group-wise Monte Carlo code. This report summarizes a Monte Carlo hard sphere packing simulation code to simulate the packing of equal hard spheres and evaluate the necessary probability distribution of them, which is used for the application of the new Monte Carlo calculation method developed to treat randomly distributed spherical fuels with the continuous energy Monte Carlo method. By using this code, obtained are the various statistical values, namely Radial Distribution Function (RDF), Nearest Neighbor Distribution (NND), 2-dimensional RDF and so on, for random packing as well as ordered close packing of FCC and BCC. (author)

  4. Calculation of absolute protein-ligand binding free energy using distributed replica sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodinger, Tomas; Howell, P Lynne; Pomès, Régis

    2008-10-21

    Distributed replica sampling [T. Rodinger et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2, 725 (2006)] is a simple and general scheme for Boltzmann sampling of conformational space by computer simulation in which multiple replicas of the system undergo a random walk in reaction coordinate or temperature space. Individual replicas are linked through a generalized Hamiltonian containing an extra potential energy term or bias which depends on the distribution of all replicas, thus enforcing the desired sampling distribution along the coordinate or parameter of interest regardless of free energy barriers. In contrast to replica exchange methods, efficient implementation of the algorithm does not require synchronicity of the individual simulations. The algorithm is inherently suited for large-scale simulations using shared or heterogeneous computing platforms such as a distributed network. In this work, we build on our original algorithm by introducing Boltzmann-weighted jumping, which allows moves of a larger magnitude and thus enhances sampling efficiency along the reaction coordinate. The approach is demonstrated using a realistic and biologically relevant application; we calculate the standard binding free energy of benzene to the L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme. Distributed replica sampling is used in conjunction with thermodynamic integration to compute the potential of mean force for extracting the ligand from protein and solvent along a nonphysical spatial coordinate. Dynamic treatment of the reaction coordinate leads to faster statistical convergence of the potential of mean force than a conventional static coordinate, which suffers from slow transitions on a rugged potential energy surface.

  5. Verification of ANISN-F by calculating the neutron distribution from a Ra-Be source in water as well as by simple criticality calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etemad, M.A.

    1981-04-01

    The one dimensional discrete ordinates code ANISN-F was used to calculate the thermal neutron flux distribution in water from a Ra-Be neutron source. The calculations were performed in order to investigate the different possibilities of the code as well as to verify the results of the calculations in terms of comparisons to corresponding experimental data. Two different group cross section libraries were used in the calculations and conclusions were drawn on the adequacy of these libraries for a fixed source type calculation. Furthermore, critically calculations were performed for an infinite homogeneous slab of multiplying material using different angular and spatial approximations. The results of these calculations were then compared to the corresponding results previously obtained at this department by a different method and a different code. (author)

  6. On Calculation Methods and Results for Straight Cylindrical Roller Bearing Deflection, Stiffness, and Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Timothy L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess some calculation methods for quantifying the relationships of bearing geometry, material properties, load, deflection, stiffness, and stress. The scope of the work was limited to two-dimensional modeling of straight cylindrical roller bearings. Preparations for studies of dynamic response of bearings with damaged surfaces motivated this work. Studies were selected to exercise and build confidence in the numerical tools. Three calculation methods were used in this work. Two of the methods were numerical solutions of the Hertz contact approach. The third method used was a combined finite element surface integral method. Example calculations were done for a single roller loaded between an inner and outer raceway for code verification. Next, a bearing with 13 rollers and all-steel construction was used as an example to do additional code verification, including an assessment of the leading order of accuracy of the finite element and surface integral method. Results from that study show that the method is at least first-order accurate. Those results also show that the contact grid refinement has a more significant influence on precision as compared to the finite element grid refinement. To explore the influence of material properties, the 13-roller bearing was modeled as made from Nitinol 60, a material with very different properties from steel and showing some potential for bearing applications. The codes were exercised to compare contact areas and stress levels for steel and Nitinol 60 bearings operating at equivalent power density. As a step toward modeling the dynamic response of bearings having surface damage, static analyses were completed to simulate a bearing with a spall or similar damage.

  7. Pressure distribution of implant-supported removable partial dentures with stress-breaking attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Kentaro; Kurihara, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yasunori; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2014-04-01

    This in vitro study investigated the pressure distribution of the implant-supported removable partial dentures (RPDs) with the stress-breaking attachments under the occlusal force. The experimental model of bilateral missing premolars and molars was modified from a commercial simulation model. Five pressure sensors were embedded near the bilateral first molars, first premolars, and medio-lingual alveolar crest. Two implants were placed near the second molars, and they were connected to the denture base using the following conditions: complete separation between the denture base and implant with cover screws (CRPD), flexible connection with a stress-breaking ball (SBB) attachment, and rigid connection without stress breaking with healing caps (HC). The pressure at five different areas of the soft tissue and the displacement of the RPDs were simultaneously measured, loading up to 50 N. The coefficient of variation (CV) for each connection was calculated from all data of the pressure at five areas to evaluate the pressure distribution. The pressure on medio-lingual alveolar crest and molars of the HC was less than SBB and CRPD. In contrast, the pressure on premolars of SBB was greater than for the HC and CRPD. The CV of SBB was less than that of HC and CRPD. Denture displacement of HC and SBB was less than for CRPD. Within the in vitro limitations, precise denture settlements and pressure distribution under the denture base could be controlled using an SBB attachment. An SBB attachment might be able to protect the implant from harmful force. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Calculation of Pressure Distribution at Rotary Body Surface with the Vortex Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Dergachev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vortex element method allows to simulate unsteady hydrodynamic processes in incompressible environment, taking into account the evolution of the vortex sheet, including taking into account the deformation or moving of the body or part of construction.For the calculation of the hydrodynamic characteristics of the method based on vortex element software package was developed MVE3D. Vortex element (VE in program is symmetrical Vorton-cut. For satisfying the boundary conditions at the surface used closed frame of vortons.With this software system modeled incompressible flow around a cylindrical body protection elongation L / D = 13 with a front spherical blunt with the angle of attack of 10 °. We analyzed the distribution of the pressure coefficient on the body surface of the top and bottom forming.The calculate results were compared with known Results of experiment.Considered design schemes with different number of Vorton framework. Also varied radius of VE. Calculation make possible to establish the degree of sampling surface needed to produce close to experiment results. It has been shown that an adequate reproducing the pressure distribution in the transition region spherical cylindrical surface, on the windward side requires a high degree of sampling.Based on these results Can be possible need to improve on the design scheme of body's surface, allowing more accurate to describe the flow vorticity in areas with abrupt changes of geometry streamlined body.

  9. Prediction of fission mass-yield distributions based on cross section calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hambsch, F.-J.; G.Vladuca; Tudora, Anabella; Oberstedt, S.; Ruskov, I.

    2005-01-01

    For the first time, fission mass-yield distributions have been predicted based on an extended statistical model for fission cross section calculations. In this model, the concept of the multi-modality of the fission process has been incorporated. The three most dominant fission modes, the two asymmetric standard I (S1) and standard II (S2) modes and the symmetric superlong (SL) mode are taken into account. De-convoluted fission cross sections for S1, S2 and SL modes for 235,238 U(n, f) and 237 Np(n, f), based on experimental branching ratios, were calculated for the first time in the incident neutron energy range from 0.01 to 5.5 MeV providing good agreement with the experimental fission cross section data. The branching ratios obtained from the modal fission cross section calculations have been used to deduce the corresponding fission yield distributions, including mean values also for incident neutron energies hitherto not accessible to experiment

  10. Independent calculation of dose distributions for helical tomotherapy using a conventional treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klüter, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.klueter@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Schubert, Kai; Lissner, Steffen; Sterzing, Florian; Oetzel, Dieter; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, and Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, and German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schlegel, Wolfgang [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Oelfke, Uwe [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Nill, Simeon [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric verification of treatment plans in helical tomotherapy usually is carried out via verification measurements. In this study, a method for independent dose calculation of tomotherapy treatment plans is presented, that uses a conventional treatment planning system with a pencil kernel dose calculation algorithm for generation of verification dose distributions based on patient CT data. Methods: A pencil beam algorithm that directly uses measured beam data was configured for dose calculation for a tomotherapy machine. Tomotherapy treatment plans were converted into a format readable by an in-house treatment planning system by assigning each projection to one static treatment field and shifting the calculation isocenter for each field in order to account for the couch movement. The modulation of the fluence for each projection is read out of the delivery sinogram, and with the kernel-based dose calculation, this information can directly be used for dose calculation without the need for decomposition of the sinogram. The sinogram values are only corrected for leaf output and leaf latency. Using the converted treatment plans, dose was recalculated with the independent treatment planning system. Multiple treatment plans ranging from simple static fields to real patient treatment plans were calculated using the new approach and either compared to actual measurements or the 3D dose distribution calculated by the tomotherapy treatment planning system. In addition, dose–volume histograms were calculated for the patient plans. Results: Except for minor deviations at the maximum field size, the pencil beam dose calculation for static beams agreed with measurements in a water tank within 2%/2 mm. A mean deviation to point dose measurements in the cheese phantom of 0.89% ± 0.81% was found for unmodulated helical plans. A mean voxel-based deviation of −0.67% ± 1.11% for all voxels in the respective high dose region (dose values >80%), and a mean local

  11. Independent calculation of dose distributions for helical tomotherapy using a conventional treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klüter, Sebastian; Schubert, Kai; Lissner, Steffen; Sterzing, Florian; Oetzel, Dieter; Debus, Jürgen; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The dosimetric verification of treatment plans in helical tomotherapy usually is carried out via verification measurements. In this study, a method for independent dose calculation of tomotherapy treatment plans is presented, that uses a conventional treatment planning system with a pencil kernel dose calculation algorithm for generation of verification dose distributions based on patient CT data. Methods: A pencil beam algorithm that directly uses measured beam data was configured for dose calculation for a tomotherapy machine. Tomotherapy treatment plans were converted into a format readable by an in-house treatment planning system by assigning each projection to one static treatment field and shifting the calculation isocenter for each field in order to account for the couch movement. The modulation of the fluence for each projection is read out of the delivery sinogram, and with the kernel-based dose calculation, this information can directly be used for dose calculation without the need for decomposition of the sinogram. The sinogram values are only corrected for leaf output and leaf latency. Using the converted treatment plans, dose was recalculated with the independent treatment planning system. Multiple treatment plans ranging from simple static fields to real patient treatment plans were calculated using the new approach and either compared to actual measurements or the 3D dose distribution calculated by the tomotherapy treatment planning system. In addition, dose–volume histograms were calculated for the patient plans. Results: Except for minor deviations at the maximum field size, the pencil beam dose calculation for static beams agreed with measurements in a water tank within 2%/2 mm. A mean deviation to point dose measurements in the cheese phantom of 0.89% ± 0.81% was found for unmodulated helical plans. A mean voxel-based deviation of −0.67% ± 1.11% for all voxels in the respective high dose region (dose values >80%), and a mean local

  12. Visualizing Stress and Temperature Distribution During Elevated Temperature Deformation of IN-617 Using Nanomechanical Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Wang, Hao; Tomar, Vikas

    2018-04-01

    This work presents direct measurements of stress and temperature distribution during the mesoscale microstructural deformation of Inconel-617 (IN-617) during 3-point bending tests as a function of temperature. A novel nanomechanical Raman spectroscopy (NMRS)-based measurement platform was designed for simultaneous in situ temperature and stress mapping as a function of microstructure during deformation. The temperature distribution was found to be directly correlated to stress distribution for the analyzed microstructures. Stress concentration locations are shown to be directly related to higher heat conduction and result in microstructural hot spots with significant local temperature variation.

  13. Residual Stress Distribution In Heat Affected Zone Of Welded Steel By Means Of Neutron Diffraction Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajar, Andika; Prasuad; Gunawan; Muslich, M. Rifai

    1996-01-01

    Three dimensional residual stress distribution in the heat affected zone of 10 mm thick welded steel by means of neutron diffraction technique has been measured. The results showed that the residual stress was distributed near the welded metal, namely within about 46,25 mm. The major tensile stresses occurred in the X-direction, and they attained a level greater than 2000 MPa through the position far away fram the weld. The tensile stresses in the Y and Z- directions lied between 500 and 1500 MPa, The results also suggest that the stress in the surface was greater than that in the middle of the sample

  14. Bed shear stress distribution in straight channels with arbitrary cross section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bo; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    The bed shear stress distribution in straight open channels is affected by mechanisms as bed curvature of the cross section profile, shear diffusion, and secondary currents. This paper compares some analytical and numerical methods to estimate the bed shear stress distribution. The methods...

  15. Power distribution and fuel depletion calculation for a PWR, using LEOPARD and CITATION codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    By modifying LEOPARD a new program, LEOCIT, has been developed in which additional subroutines prepare cross-section libraries in 1, 2 or 4 energy groups and subsequently record these on disc or tape in a format appropriate for direct input to the CITATION code. Use of LEOCIT in conjunction with CITATION is demonstrated by simulating the first depletion cycle of Angra Unit 1. In these calculations two energy groups are used in 1/4, X - Y geometry to give the soluble boron curve, the fuel depletion and the point to point power distribution in Angra 1. Finally relevant results obtained here are compared with those published by Westinghouse, CNEN and Furnas and recommendations are made to improve the system of neutronic calculation developed in this work. (Author) [pt

  16. Practical considerations in the calculation of orientation distribution functions from electron back-scattered diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, A.W.

    1994-01-01

    Using model data sets for the Brass orientation, the importance of scatter width, angular accuracy and grain size and volume fraction on the sensitivity of the calculated Orientation Distribution Functions have been determined in order to highlight some of the practical considerations needed in the processing of experimental data from individual grain orientation measurements determined by the Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction technique. It is suggested that the most appropriate scatter width can be calculated from the maximum function height versus scatter width curve in order to accommodate variations in texture sharpness. The sensitivity of the ODF to careful sample preparation, mounting and pattern analysis, in order to keep errors in angular accuracy to 1 or less is demonstrated, as is the imperative need to correct for the size of grains, and their volume fractions. (orig.)

  17. Calculations of Neutron Flux Distributions by Means of Integral Transport Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlvik, I

    1967-05-15

    Flux distributions have been calculated mainly in one energy group, for a number of systems representing geometries interesting for reactor calculations. Integral transport methods of two kinds were utilised, collision probabilities (CP) and the discrete method (DIT). The geometries considered comprise the three one-dimensional geometries, planes, sphericals and annular, and further a square cell with a circular fuel rod and a rod cluster cell with a circular outer boundary. For the annular cells both methods (CP and DIT) were used and the results were compared. The purpose of the work is twofold, firstly to demonstrate the versatility and efficacy of integral transport methods and secondly to serve as a guide for anybody who wants to use the methods.

  18. Application of a distributed optical fiber sensing technique in monitoring the stress of precast piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Y; Shi, B; Wei, G Q; Zhang, D; Chen, S E

    2012-01-01

    Due to its ability in providing long distance, distributed sensing, the optical fiber sensing technique based on a Brillouin optical time domain reflectometer (BOTDR) has a unique advantage in monitoring the stability and safety of linear structures. This paper describes the application of a BOTDR-based technique to measure the stress within precast piles. The principle behind the BOTDR and the embedding technique for the sensing optical fiber in precast piles is first introduced, and then the analysis method and deformation and stress calculation based on distributed strain data are given. Finally, a methodology for using a BOTDR-based monitoring workflow for in situ monitoring of precast piles, combined with a practical example, is introduced. The methodology requires implantation of optical fibers prior to pile placement. Field experimental results show that the optical fiber implantation method with slotting, embedding, pasting and jointing is feasible, and have accurately measured the axial force, side friction, end-bearing resistance and bearing feature of the precast pile according to the strain measuring data. (paper)

  19. An analytical transport theory method for calculating flux distribution in slab cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Krim, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    A transport theory method for calculating flux distributions in slab fuel cell is described. Two coupled integral equations for flux in fuel and moderator are obtained; assuming partial reflection at moderator external boundaries. Galerkin technique is used to solve these equations. Numerical results for average fluxes in fuel and moderator and the disadvantage factor are given. Comparison with exact numerical methods, that is for total reflection moderator outer boundaries, show that the Galerkin technique gives accurate results for the disadvantage factor and average fluxes. (orig.)

  20. User interface tool based on the MCCM for the calculation of dpa distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinnera, I.; Cruz, C.; Abreu, Y.; Leyva, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Monte Carlo assisted Classical Method (MCCM) was introduced by the authors to calculate the displacements per atom (dpa) distributions in solid materials, making use of the standard outputs of simulation code system MCNP and the classical theories of electron elastic scattering. Based on this method a new DLL with several user interface functions was implemented. Then, an application running on Windows systems was development in order to allow the easy handle of different useful functionalities included on it. In the present work this application is presented and some examples of it successful use in different interesting materials are exposed. (Author)

  1. Calculating method for confinement time and charge distribution of ions in electron cyclotron resonance sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougar-Jabon, V.D.; Umnov, A.M.; Kutner, V.B.

    1996-01-01

    It is common knowledge that the electrostatic pit in a core plasma of electron cyclotron resonance sources exerts strict control over generation of ions in high charge states. This work is aimed at finding a dependence of the lifetime of ions on their charge states in the core region and to elaborate a numerical model of ion charge dispersion not only for the core plasmas but for extracted beams as well. The calculated data are in good agreement with the experimental results on charge distributions and magnitudes for currents of beams extracted from the 14 GHz DECRIS source. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  2. Analytic and numerical calculations of quantum synchrotron spectra from relativistic electron distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brainerd, J.J.; Petrosian, V.

    1987-01-01

    Calculations are performed numerically and analytically of synchrotron spectra for thermal and power-law electron distributions using the single-particle synchrotron power spectrum derived from quantum electrodynamics. It is found that the photon energy at which quantum effects appear is proportional to temperature and independent of field strength for thermal spectra; quantum effects introduce an exponential roll-off away from the classical spectra. For power law spectra, the photon energy at which quantum effects appear is inversely proportional to the magnetic field strength; quantum effects produce a steeper power law than is found classically. The results are compared with spectra derived from the classical power spectrum with an energy cutoff ensuring conservation of energy. It is found that an energy cutoff is generally an inadequate approximation of quantum effects for low photon energies and for thermal spectra, but gives reasonable results for high-energy emission from power-law electron distributions. 17 references

  3. Measurement of stress distributions in truck tyre contact patch in real rolling conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghelache, Gabriel; Moisescu, Raluca

    2012-12-01

    Stress distributions on three orthogonal directions have been measured across the contact patch of truck tyres using the complex measuring system that contains a transducer assembly with 30 sensing elements placed in the road surface. The measurements have been performed in straight line, in real rolling conditions. Software applications for calibration, data acquisition, and data processing were developed. The influence of changes in inflation pressure and rolling speed on the shapes and sizes of truck tyre contact patch has been shown. The shapes and magnitudes of normal, longitudinal, and lateral stress distributions, measured at low speed, have been presented and commented. The effect of wheel toe-in and camber on the stress distribution results was observed. The paper highlights the impact of the longitudinal tread ribs on the shear stress distributions. The ratios of stress distributions in the truck tyre contact patch have been computed and discussed.

  4. SPANDE, Stress Analysis of General Space-frame and Pipework. SPATAM, Tilt Angle Calculation of Framework for Program SPANDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, D.C.; Enderby, J.A.; Knowles, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: The programme is intended to analyse almost any type of space-frame. Members of the frame may be either straight or of constant curvature between nodes provided that, in the case of curved members, one of the principal axes of the cross-section of the member lies in the same plane as the member. Loading may comprise concentrated loads, distributed loads, thermal loads or may take the form of specified displacements. The programme calculates the forces and moments in all the members of the framework, the reactions at all external restraints and the displacements of all the nodes. For pipework problems, the maximum stress difference in the pipe, calculated in accordance with the code of practice, is also quoted. 2 - Method of solution: The framework is solved by displacement methods involving stiffness matrices, making it possible to analyse space-frames with virtually any number of redundancies. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: For ICL 4/70, the framework is limited to 1000 nodes, 2000 members, 100 different member types or 200 specified nodal displacements

  5. Probabilistic Harmonic Calculation in Distribution Networks with Electric Vehicle Charging Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxue Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrating EV charging station into power grid will bring impacts on power system, among which the most significant one is the harmonic pollution on distribution networks. Due to the uncertainty of the EV charging process, the harmonic currents brought by EV charging stations have a random nature. This paper proposed a mathematical simulation method for studying the working status of charging stations, which considers influencing factors including random leaving factor, electricity price, and waiting time. Based on the proposed simulation method, the probability distribution of the harmonic currents of EV charging stations is obtained and used in the calculation of the probability harmonic power flow. Then the impacts of EVs and EV charging stations on distribution networks can be analyzed. In the case study, the proposed simulation and analysis method is implemented on the IEEE-34 distribution network. The influences of EV arrival rates, the penetration rate, and the accessing location of EV charging station are also investigated. Results show that this research has good potential in guiding the planning and construction of charging station.

  6. Seismic analysis, support design and stress calculation of HTR-PM transport and conversion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zheyu; Yuan Chaolong; Zhang Haiquan; Nie Junfeng

    2012-01-01

    Background: The transport and conversion devices are important guarantees for normal operation of HTR-PM fuel handling system in normal and fault conditions. Purpose: A conflict of devices' support design needs to be solved. The flexibility of supports is required because of pipe thermal expansion displacement, while the stiffness is also required because of large devices quality and eccentric distance. Methods: In this paper, the numerical simulation was employed to analyze the seismic characteristics and optimize the support program, Under the chosen support program, the stress calculation of platen support bracket was designed by solidworks software. Results: The supports solved the conflict between the flexibility and stiffness requirements. Conclusions: Therefore, it can ensure the safety of transport and conversion devices and the supports in seismic conditions. (authors)

  7. An Exploration of Wind Stress Calculation Techniques in Hurricane Storm Surge Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyra M. Bryant

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available As hurricanes continue to threaten coastal communities, accurate storm surge forecasting remains a global priority. Achieving a reliable storm surge prediction necessitates accurate hurricane intensity and wind field information. The wind field must be converted to wind stress, which represents the air-sea momentum flux component required in storm surge and other oceanic models. This conversion requires a multiplicative drag coefficient for the air density and wind speed to represent the air-sea momentum exchange at a given location. Air density is a known parameter and wind speed is a forecasted variable, whereas the drag coefficient is calculated using an empirical correlation. The correlation’s accuracy has brewed a controversy of its own for more than half a century. This review paper examines the lineage of drag coefficient correlations and their acceptance among scientists.

  8. Calculation of elastic-plastic strain ranges for fatigue analysis based on linear elastic stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, G.

    1998-01-01

    Fatigue analysis requires that the maximum strain ranges be known. These strain ranges are generally computed from linear elastic analysis. The elastic strain ranges are enhanced by a factor K e to obtain the total elastic-plastic strain range. The reliability of the fatigue analysis depends on the quality of this factor. Formulae for calculating the K e factor are proposed. A beam is introduced as a computational model for determining the elastic-plastic strains. The beam is loaded by the elastic stresses of the real structure. The elastic-plastic strains of the beam are compared with the beam's elastic strains. This comparison furnishes explicit expressions for the K e factor. The K e factor is tested by means of seven examples. (orig.)

  9. A numerical study on stress distribution across the ankle joint: Effects of material distribution of bone, muscle force and ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Subrata; Ghosh, Rajesh

    2017-09-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a realistic three dimensional FE model of intact ankle joint. Three dimensional FE model of the intact ankle joint was developed using computed tomography data sets. The effect of muscle force, ligaments and proper material property distribution of bone on stress distribution across the intact ankle joint was studied separately. Present study indicates bone material property, ligaments and muscle force have influence on stress distribution across the ankle joint. Proper bone material, ligaments and muscle must be considered in the computational model for pre-clinical analysis of ankle prosthesis.

  10. Stress distribution in quasi-crystalline granular piles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trigger, S.A.; Heijst, van G.J.F.; Krasnopolskaya, T.S.; Schram, P.P.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is a rigorous consideration of the stress problem in some simple models of granular piles. Discrete models are considered and the transition to the continuous description is accomplished in order to find the coarse-grained average stress. Some phenomenological rules are

  11. A study of stress distribution in elbows mounted on stanchions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basavanhally, N.R.; Tonet, N.

    1983-01-01

    It is a common practice, both in the nuclear and power piping industry, to have integral attachments on piping to either form a restraint or an anchor. For small attachments, such as lugs, one can use the readily available methods (eg., ASME Code Case N-318) to evaluate the local stresses at these attachments. For elbows or curved pipes mounted on stanchions, the evaluation of local stresses is more complex. In the present analysis, a 3D finite element model was implemented to determine the stress intensification factor that can be applied to piping stress under internal pressure and in-plane bending type of loads. The analysis indicates that, for an internal pressure load, in-plane bending is generated. For such supports, a stress intensification factor should be used to account for the increased loads. The results also indicate that there is an optimum elbow to stanchion post radius ratio which should be used in designing such supports. (orig.)

  12. Postseismic viscoelastic surface deformation and stress. Part 1: Theoretical considerations, displacement and strain calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    A model of viscoelastic deformations associated with earthquakes is presented. A strike-slip fault is represented by a rectangular dislocation in a viscoelastic layer (lithosphere) lying over a viscoelastic half-space (asthenosphere). Deformations occur on three time scales. The initial response is governed by the instantaneous elastic properties of the earth. A slower response is associated with viscoelastic relaxation of the lithosphere and a yet slower response is due to viscoelastic relaxation of the asthenosphere. The major conceptual contribution is the inclusion of lithospheric viscoelastic properties into a dislocation model of earthquake related deformations and stresses. Numerical calculations using typical fault parameters reveal that the postseismic displacements and strains are small compared to the coseismic ones near the fault, but become significant further away. Moreover, the directional sense of the deformations attributable to the elastic response, the lithospheric viscoelastic softening, and the asthenospheric viscoelastic flow may differ and depend on location and model details. The results and theoretical arguments suggest that the stress changes accompanying lithospheric relaxation may also be in a different sense than and be larger than the strain changes.

  13. Manipulating the magnetic anisotropy and magnetization dynamics by stress: Numerical calculation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, M. A.; Bohn, F.

    2018-05-01

    We perform a theoretical and experimental investigation of the magnetic properties and magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic magnetostrictive multilayer grown onto a flexible substrate and submitted to external stress. We calculate the magnetic behavior and magnetoimpedance effect for a trilayered system from an approach that considers a magnetic permeability model for planar geometry and a magnetic free energy density which takes into account induced uniaxial and magnetoelastic anisotropy contributions. We verify remarkable modifications of the magnetic anisotropy with external stress, as well as we show that the dynamic magnetic response is strongly affected by these changes. We discuss the magnetic features that lead to modifications of the frequency limits where distinct mechanisms are responsible by the magnetoimpedance variations, enabling us to manipulate the resonance fields. To test the robustness of the approach, we directly compare theoretical results with experimental data. Thus, we provide experimental evidence to confirm the validity of the theoretical approach, as well as to manipulate the resonance fields to tune the MI response according to real applications in devices.

  14. Calculated depth-dose distributions for H+ and He+ beams in liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Abril, Isabel; Denton, Cristian D.; Heredia-Avalos, Santiago; Kyriakou, Ioanna; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris

    2009-01-01

    We have calculated the dose distribution delivered by proton and helium beams in liquid water as a function of the target-depth, for incident energies in the range 0.5-10 MeV/u. The motion of the projectiles through the stopping medium is simulated by a code that combines Monte Carlo and a finite differences algorithm to consider the electronic stopping power, evaluated in the dielectric framework, and the multiple nuclear scattering with the target nuclei. Changes in projectile charge-state are taken into account dynamically as it moves through the target. We use the MELF-GOS model to describe the energy loss function of liquid water, obtaining a value of 79.4 eV for its mean excitation energy. Our calculated stopping powers and depth-dose distributions are compared with those obtained using other methods to describe the energy loss function of liquid water, such as the extended Drude and the Penn models, as well as with the prediction of the SRIM code and the tables of ICRU.

  15. Experimental and calculating study on the stressed state of superconducting coils of toroidal field in the T-15 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaulina, I.G.; Gusev, S.V.; Sivkova, G.N.

    1987-01-01

    Results of calculational and experimental atudy of stress-deformed state of superconducting coils of the T-15 tokamak toroidal field are presented. The calculations are made using the method of finite elements and refined theory of cores. Experimental studies were carried out using elastic tensometric model of polymer materials. Test results are compared with the calculational results. Divergence between calculational and experimental values of displacement of characteristic points in the unit does not exceed 20 %. Results of model studies confirm the expediency of the calculational model used for designing SOTP unit for the T-15 tokamak

  16. Finite-temperature stress calculations in atomic models using moments of position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Misra, Anil; Ouyang, Lizhi

    2018-07-01

    Continuum modeling of finite temperature mechanical behavior of atomic systems requires refined description of atomic motions. In this paper, we identify additional kinematical quantities that are relevant for a more accurate continuum description as the system is subjected to step-wise loading. The presented formalism avoids the necessity for atomic trajectory mapping with deformation, provides the definitions of the kinematic variables and their conjugates in real space, and simplifies local work conjugacy. The total work done on an atom under deformation is decomposed into the work corresponding to changing its equilibrium position and work corresponding to changing its second moment about equilibrium position. Correspondingly, we define two kinematic variables: a deformation gradient tensor and a vibration tensor, and derive their stress conjugates, termed here as static and vibration stresses, respectively. The proposed approach is validated using MD simulation in NVT ensembles for fcc aluminum subjected to uniaxial extension. The observed evolution of second moments in the MD simulation with macroscopic deformation is not directly related to the transformation of atomic trajectories through the deformation gradient using generator functions. However, it is noteworthy that deformation leads to a change in the second moment of the trajectories. Correspondingly, the vibration part of the Piola stress becomes particularly significant at high temperature and high tensile strain as the crystal approaches the softening limit. In contrast to the eigenvectors of the deformation gradient, the eigenvectors of the vibration tensor show strong spatial heterogeneity in the vicinity of softening. More importantly, the elliptic distribution of local atomic density transitions to a dumbbell shape, before significant non-affinity in equilibrium positions has occurred.

  17. Computer calculation of dose distributions in radiotherapy. Report of a panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    As in most areas of scientific endeavour, the advent of electronic computers has made a significant impact on the investigation of the physical aspects of radiotherapy. Since the first paper on the subject was published in 1955 the literature has rapidly expanded to include the application of computer techniques to problems of external beam, and intracavitary and interstitial dosimetry. By removing the tedium of lengthy repetitive calculations, the availability of automatic computers has encouraged physicists and radiotherapists to take a fresh look at many fundamental physical problems of radiotherapy. The most important result of the automation of dosage calculations is not simply an increase in the quantity of data but an improvement in the quality of data available as a treatment guide for the therapist. In October 1965 the International Atomic Energy Agency convened a panel in Vienna on the 'Use of Computers for Calculation of Dose Distributions in Radiotherapy' to assess the current status of work, provide guidelines for future research, explore the possibility of international cooperation and make recommendations to the Agency. The panel meeting was attended by 15 participants from seven countries, one observer, and two representatives of the World Health Organization. Participants contributed 20 working papers which served as the bases of discussion. By the nature of the work, computer techniques have been developed by a few advanced centres with access to large computer installations. However, several computer methods are now becoming 'routine' and can be used by institutions without facilities for research. It is hoped that the report of the Panel will provide a comprehensive view of the automatic computation of radiotherapeutic dose distributions and serve as a means of communication between present and potential users of computers

  18. Comparison of measured and calculated reaction rate distributions in an scwr-like test lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raetz, Dominik, E-mail: dominik.raetz@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Jordan, Kelly A., E-mail: kelly.jordan@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Murphy, Michael F., E-mail: mike.murphy@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Perret, Gregory, E-mail: gregory.perret@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Chawla, Rakesh, E-mail: rakesh.chawla@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne, EPFL (Switzerland)

    2011-04-15

    High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements were performed on 61 rods of an SCWR-like fuel lattice, after irradiation in the central test zone of the PROTEUS zero-power research reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. The derived reaction rates are the capture rate in {sup 238}U (C{sub 8}) and the total fission rate (F{sub tot}), and also the reaction rate ratio C{sub 8}/F{sub tot}. Each of these has been mapped rod-wise on the lattice and compared to calculated results from whole-reactor Monte Carlo simulations with MCNPX. Ratios of calculated to experimental values (C/E's) have been assessed for the C{sub 8}, F{sub tot} and C{sub 8}/F{sub tot} distributions across the lattice. These C/E's show excellent agreement between the calculations and the measurements. For the {sup 238}U capture rate distribution, the 1{sigma} level in the comparisons corresponds to an uncertainty of {+-}0.8%, while for the total fission rate the corresponding value is {+-}0.4%. The uncertainty for C{sub 8}/F{sub tot}, assessed as a reaction rate ratio characterizing each individual rod position in the test lattice, is significantly higher at {+-}2.2%. To determine the reproducibility of these results, the measurements were performed twice, once in 2006 and again in 2009. The agreement between these two measurement sets is within the respective statistical uncertainties.

  19. A simplified calculation procedure for mass isotopomer distribution analysis (MIDA) based on multiple linear regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Fernández, Mario; Rodríguez-González, Pablo; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a novel, rapid and easy calculation procedure for Mass Isotopomer Distribution Analysis based on multiple linear regression which allows the simultaneous calculation of the precursor pool enrichment and the fraction of newly synthesized labelled proteins (fractional synthesis) using linear algebra. To test this approach, we used the peptide RGGGLK as a model tryptic peptide containing three subunits of glycine. We selected glycine labelled in two 13 C atoms ( 13 C 2 -glycine) as labelled amino acid to demonstrate that spectral overlap is not a problem in the proposed methodology. The developed methodology was tested first in vitro by changing the precursor pool enrichment from 10 to 40% of 13 C 2 -glycine. Secondly, a simulated in vivo synthesis of proteins was designed by combining the natural abundance RGGGLK peptide and 10 or 20% 13 C 2 -glycine at 1 : 1, 1 : 3 and 3 : 1 ratios. Precursor pool enrichments and fractional synthesis values were calculated with satisfactory precision and accuracy using a simple spreadsheet. This novel approach can provide a relatively rapid and easy means to measure protein turnover based on stable isotope tracers. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. LENMODEL: A forward model for calculating length distributions and fission-track ages in apatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Kevin D.

    1993-05-01

    The program LENMODEL is a forward model for annealing of fission tracks in apatite. It provides estimates of the track-length distribution, fission-track age, and areal track density for any user-supplied thermal history. The program approximates the thermal history, in which temperature is represented as a continuous function of time, by a series of isothermal steps of various durations. Equations describing the production of tracks as a function of time and annealing of tracks as a function of time and temperature are solved for each step. The step calculations are summed to obtain estimates for the entire thermal history. Computational efficiency is maximized by performing the step calculations backwards in model time. The program incorporates an intuitive and easy-to-use graphical interface. Thermal history is input to the program using a mouse. Model options are specified by selecting context-sensitive commands from a bar menu. The program allows for considerable selection of equations and parameters used in the calculations. The program was written for PC-compatible computers running DOS TM 3.0 and above (and Windows TM 3.0 or above) with VGA or SVGA graphics and a Microsoft TM-compatible mouse. Single copies of a runtime version of the program are available from the author by written request as explained in the last section of this paper.

  1. Calculation of momentum distribution function of a non-thermal fermionic dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Anirban; Gupta, Aritra, E-mail: anirbanbiswas@hri.res.in, E-mail: aritra@hri.res.in [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India)

    2017-03-01

    The most widely studied scenario in dark matter phenomenology is the thermal WIMP scenario. Inspite of numerous efforts to detect WIMP, till now we have no direct evidence for it. A possible explanation for this non-observation of dark matter could be because of its very feeble interaction strength and hence, failing to thermalise with the rest of the cosmic soup. In other words, the dark matter might be of non-thermal origin where the relic density is obtained by the so-called freeze-in mechanism. Furthermore, if this non-thermal dark matter is itself produced substantially from the decay of another non-thermal mother particle, then their distribution functions may differ in both size and shape from the usual equilibrium distribution function. In this work, we have studied such a non-thermal (fermionic) dark matter scenario in the light of a new type of U(1){sub B−L} model. The U(1){sub B−L} model is interesting, since, besides being anomaly free, it can give rise to neutrino mass by Type II see-saw mechanism. Moreover, as we will show, it can accommodate a non-thermal fermionic dark matter as well. Starting from the collision terms, we have calculated the momentum distribution function for the dark matter by solving a coupled system of Boltzmann equations. We then used it to calculate the final relic abundance, as well as other relevant physical quantities. We have also compared our result with that obtained from solving the usual Boltzmann (or rate) equations directly in terms of comoving number density, Y . Our findings suggest that the latter approximation is valid only in cases where the system under study is close to equilibrium, and hence should be used with caution.

  2. Calculations of and evidence for chain packing stress in inverse lyotropic bicontinuous cubic phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearman, Gemma C; Khoo, Bee J; Motherwell, Mary-Lynn; Brakke, Kenneth A; Ces, Oscar; Conn, Charlotte E; Seddon, John M; Templer, Richard H

    2007-06-19

    Inverse bicontinuous cubic lyotropic phases are a complex solution to the dilemma faced by all self-assembled water-amphiphile systems: how to satisfy the incompatible requirements for uniform interfacial curvature and uniform molecular packing. The solution reached in this case is for the water-amphiphile interfaces to deform hyperbolically onto triply periodic minimal surfaces. We have previously suggested that although the molecular packing in these structures is rather uniform the relative phase behavior of the gyroid, double diamond, and primitive inverse bicontinuous cubic phases can be understood in terms of subtle differences in packing frustration. In this work, we have calculated the packing frustration for these cubics under the constraint that their interfaces have constant mean curvature. We find that the relative packing stress does indeed differ between phases. The gyroid cubic has the least packing stress, and at low water volume fraction, the primitive cubic has the greatest packing stress. However, at very high water volume fraction, the double diamond cubic becomes the structure with the greatest packing stress. We have tested the model in two ways. For a system with a double diamond cubic phase in excess water, the addition of a hydrophobe may release packing frustration and preferentially stabilize the primitive cubic, since this has previously been shown to have lower curvature elastic energy. We have confirmed this prediction by adding the long chain alkane tricosane to 1-monoolein in excess water. The model also predicts that if one were able to hydrate the double diamond cubic to high water volume fractions, one should destabilize the phase with respect to the primitive cubic. We have found that such highly swollen metastable bicontinuous cubic phases can be formed within onion vesicles. Data from monoelaidin in excess water display a well-defined transition, with the primitive cubic appearing above a water volume fraction of 0.75. Both of

  3. A nodal method of calculating power distributions for LWR-type reactors with square fuel lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeglund, Randolph.

    1980-06-01

    A nodal model is developed for calculating the power distribution in the core of a light water reactor with a square fuel lattice. The reactor core is divided into a number of more or less cubic nodes and a nodal coupling equation, which gives the thermal power density in one node as a function of the power densities in the neighbour nodes, is derived from the neutron diffusion equations for two energy groups. The three-dimensional power distribution can be computed iteratively using this coupling equation, for example following the point Jacobi, the Gauss-Seidel or the point successive overrelaxation scheme. The method has been included as the neutronic model in a reactor core simulation computer code BOREAS, where it is combined with a thermal-hydraulic model in order to make a simultaneous computation of the interdependent power and void distributions in a boiling water reactor possible. Also described in this report are a method for temporary one-dimensional iteration developed in order to accelerate the iterative solution of the problem and the Haling principle which is widely used in the planning of reloading operations for BWR reactors. (author)

  4. Theory and calculation of water distribution in bentonite in a thermal field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1988-09-01

    Highly compacted bentonite is under consideration for use as a buffer material in geological repositories for high-level radioactive wastes. To assess the suitability of bentonite for this use, it is necessary to be able to predict the rate and spatial extent of water uptake and water distribution in highly compacted bentonite in the presence of thermal gradients. The ''Buffer Mass Test'' (BMT) was conducted by workers in Sweden as part of the Stripa Project. The BMT measured uptake and spatial distributions of water infiltrating annuli of compacted MX-80 sodium bentonite heated from within and surrounded by granite rock; the measurements provided a body of data very valuable for comparison to results of theoretical calculations. Results of experiments on adsorption of water by highly compacted MX-80 bentonite have been reported by workers in Switzerland. The experiments included measurements of heats of immersion and adsorption-desorption isotherms. These measurements provide the basis for prediction of water vapor pressures in equilibrium with bentonite having specified adsorbed water contents at various temperatures. The present work offers a phenomenological description of the processes influencing movement of water in compacted bentonite in the presence of a variable thermal field. The theory is applied to the bentonite buffer-water system in an assumed steady state of heat and mass transport, using critical data derived from the experimental work done in Switzerland. Results of the theory are compared to distributions of absorbed water in buffers observed in the Swedish BMT experiments. 9 refs., 2 figs

  5. Photon path length distributions for cloudy skies – oxygen A-Band measurements and model calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Funk

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the statistics underlying cloudy sky radiative transfer (RT by inspection of the distribution of the path lengths of solar photons. Recent studies indicate that this approach is promising, since it might reveal characteristics about the diffusion process underlying atmospheric radiative transfer (Pfeilsticker, 1999. Moreover, it uses an observable that is directly related to the atmospheric absorption and, therefore, of climatic relevance. However, these studies are based largely on the accuracy of the measurement of the photon path length distribution (PPD. This paper presents a refined analysis method based on high resolution spectroscopy of the oxygen A-band. The method is validated by Monte Carlo simulation atmospheric spectra. Additionally, a new method to measure the effective optical thickness of cloud layers, based on fitting the measured differential transmissions with a 1-dimensional (discrete ordinate RT model, is presented. These methods are applied to measurements conducted during the cloud radar inter-comparison campaign CLARE’98, which supplied detailed cloud structure information, required for the further analysis. For some exemplary cases, measured path length distributions and optical thicknesses are presented and backed by detailed RT model calculations. For all cases, reasonable PPDs can be retrieved and the effects of the vertical cloud structure are found. The inferred cloud optical thicknesses are in agreement with liquid water path measurements. Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (radiative processes; instruments and techniques

  6. Photon path length distributions for cloudy skies – oxygen A-Band measurements and model calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Funk

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the statistics underlying cloudy sky radiative transfer (RT by inspection of the distribution of the path lengths of solar photons. Recent studies indicate that this approach is promising, since it might reveal characteristics about the diffusion process underlying atmospheric radiative transfer (Pfeilsticker, 1999. Moreover, it uses an observable that is directly related to the atmospheric absorption and, therefore, of climatic relevance. However, these studies are based largely on the accuracy of the measurement of the photon path length distribution (PPD. This paper presents a refined analysis method based on high resolution spectroscopy of the oxygen A-band. The method is validated by Monte Carlo simulation atmospheric spectra. Additionally, a new method to measure the effective optical thickness of cloud layers, based on fitting the measured differential transmissions with a 1-dimensional (discrete ordinate RT model, is presented. These methods are applied to measurements conducted during the cloud radar inter-comparison campaign CLARE’98, which supplied detailed cloud structure information, required for the further analysis. For some exemplary cases, measured path length distributions and optical thicknesses are presented and backed by detailed RT model calculations. For all cases, reasonable PPDs can be retrieved and the effects of the vertical cloud structure are found. The inferred cloud optical thicknesses are in agreement with liquid water path measurements.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (radiative processes; instruments and techniques

  7. Finite element analysis of thermal stress distribution in different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • Jan-Feb 2016 • Vol 19 • Issue 1. Abstract ... Key words: Amalgam, finite element method, glass ionomer cement, resin composite, thermal stress ... applications for force analysis and assessment of different.

  8. Influence of mild hyperglycemia on cerebral FDG distribution patterns calculated by statistical parametric mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Keiichi; Ishii, Kenji; Saito, Yoko; Oda, Keiichi; Kimura, Yuichi; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2008-01-01

    In clinical cerebral 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) studies, we sometimes encounter hyperglycemic patients with diabetes mellitus or patients who have not adhered to the fasting requirement. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of mild hyperglycemia (plasma glucose range 110-160 mg/dl) on the cerebral FDG distribution patterns calculated by statistical parametric mapping (SPM). We studied 19 healthy subjects (mean age 66.2 years). First, all the subjects underwent FDG-PET scans in the fasting condition. Then, 9 of the 19 subjects (mean age 64.3 years) underwent the second FDG-PET scans in the mild hyperglycemic condition. The alterations in the FDG-PET scans were investigated using SPM- and region of interest (ROI)-based analyses. We used three reference regions: SPM global brain (SPMgb) used for SPM global mean calculation, the gray and white matter region computed from magnetic resonance image (MRIgw), and the cerebellar cortex (Cbll). The FDG uptake calculated as the standardized uptake value (average) in SPMgb, MRIgw, and Cbll regions in the mild hyperglycemic condition was 42.7%, 41.3%, and 40.0%, respectively, of that observed in the fasting condition. In SPM analysis, the mild hyperglycemia was found to affect the cerebral distribution patterns of FDG. The FDG uptake was relatively decreased in the gray matter, mainly in the frontal, temporal, and parietal association cortices, posterior cingulate, and precuneus in both SPMgb- and MRIgw-reference-based analyses. When Cbll was adopted as the reference region, those decrease patterns disappeared. The FDG uptake was relatively increased in the white matter, mainly in the centrum semiovale in all the reference-based analyses. It is noteworthy that the FDG distribution patterns were altered under mild hyperglycemia in SPM analysis. The decreased uptake patterns in SPMgb- (SPM default) and MRIgw-reference-based analyses resembled those observed in

  9. Calculation of energy and angular distributions of the bremsstrahlung of 10 MeV electrons bombarding a thick tungsten target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsovbun, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    Computer calculations have been performed to extend the data available on energy and angular distribution of the 10 MeV electron bremsrahlung into a higher angle region. The ETRAN-16D program developed by R.G.Berger for calculation of electron-photon cascades passing through matter using computers IBM-360 and UNIVAC-1108 was modified to operate with the CDC-6500 computer. A brief summary of the program is provided. An angular distribution of the bremsstrahlung dose absorbed in the air has been also calculated. The results extended into the 90-180 deg region can be used to calculate the biological shield of electron accelerators

  10. Free energy calculations, enhanced by a Gaussian ansatz, for the "chemical work" distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulougouris, Georgios C

    2014-05-15

    The evaluation of the free energy is essential in molecular simulation because it is intimately related with the existence of multiphase equilibrium. Recently, it was demonstrated that it is possible to evaluate the Helmholtz free energy using a single statistical ensemble along an entire isotherm by accounting for the "chemical work" of transforming each molecule, from an interacting one, to an ideal gas. In this work, we show that it is possible to perform such a free energy perturbation over a liquid vapor phase transition. Furthermore, we investigate the link between a general free energy perturbation scheme and the novel nonequilibrium theories of Crook's and Jarzinsky. We find that for finite systems away from the thermodynamic limit the second law of thermodynamics will always be an inequality for isothermal free energy perturbations, resulting always to a dissipated work that may tend to zero only in the thermodynamic limit. The work, the heat, and the entropy produced during a thermodynamic free energy perturbation can be viewed in the context of the Crooks and Jarzinsky formalism, revealing that for a given value of the ensemble average of the "irreversible" work, the minimum entropy production corresponded to a Gaussian distribution for the histogram of the work. We propose the evaluation of the free energy difference in any free energy perturbation based scheme on the average irreversible "chemical work" minus the dissipated work that can be calculated from the variance of the distribution of the logarithm of the work histogram, within the Gaussian approximation. As a consequence, using the Gaussian ansatz for the distribution of the "chemical work," accurate estimates for the chemical potential and the free energy of the system can be performed using much shorter simulations and avoiding the necessity of sampling the computational costly tails of the "chemical work." For a more general free energy perturbation scheme that the Gaussian ansatz may not be

  11. A general technique for confluence of calculational and experimental information with application to power distribution determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serov, I.V.; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Physical quantities can be obtained by utilizing different informational sources. The available information is usually associated with systematic and statistical errors. If the informational sources are utilized simultaneously, then it is possible to obtain posterior estimates of the quantities with better statistical properties than exhibited by any prior estimates. The general technique for confluence of any number possibly dependent informational sources can be developed. Insight into the nature of the informational source allows different types of data associated with the source to be improved. The formulas of the technique are presented and applied to the power distribution determination for research reactor HOR of the Delft University of Technology, employing calculational and experimental data. (authors). 5 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  12. Foundational Report Series: Advanced Distribution Management Systems for Grid Modernization, Business Case Calculations for DMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaonan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Singh, Ravindra [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wang, Jianhui [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Reilly, James T. [Reilly Associates, Pittson, PA (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Distribution Management System (DMS) applications require a substantial commitment of technical and financial resources. In order to proceed beyond limited-scale demonstration projects, utilities must have a clear understanding of the business case for committing these resources that recognizes the total cost of ownership. Many of the benefits provided by investments in DMSs do not translate easily into monetary terms, making cost-benefit calculations difficult. For example, Fault Location Isolation and Service Restoration (FLISR) can significantly reduce customer outage duration and improve reliability. However, there is no well-established and universally-accepted procedure for converting these benefits into monetary terms that can be compared directly to investment costs. This report presents a methodology to analyze the benefits and costs of DMS applications as fundamental to the business case.

  13. Quantum-mechanical calculation of carrier distribution in MOS accumulation and strong inversion layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Wei Lee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We derive a statistical physics model of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG and propose an accurate approximation method for calculating the quantum-mechanical effects of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS structure in accumulation and strong inversion regions. We use an exponential surface potential approximation in solving the quantization energy levels and derive the function of density of states in 2D to 3D transition region by applying uncertainty principle and Schrödinger equation in k-space. The simulation results show that our approximation method and theory of density of states solve the two major problems of previous researches: the non-negligible error caused by the linear potential approximation and the inconsistency of density of states and carrier distribution in 2D to 3D transition region.

  14. Calculation of Investments for the Distribution of GPON Technology in the village of Bishtazhin through database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Jusuf Qarkaxhija

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available According to daily reports, the income from internet services is getting lower each year. Landline phone services are running at a loss,  whereas mobile phone services are getting too mainstream and the only bright spot holding together cable operators (ISP  in positive balance is the income from broadband services (Fast internet, IPTV. Broadband technology is a term that defines multiple methods of information distribution through internet at great speed. Some of the broadband technologies are: optic fiber, coaxial cable, DSL, Wireless, mobile broadband, and satellite connection.  The ultimate goal of any broadband service provider is being able to provide voice, data and the video through a single network, called triple play service. The Internet distribution remains an important issue in Kosovo and particularly in rural zones. Considering the immense development of the technologies and different alternatives that we can face, the goal of this paper is to emphasize the necessity of a forecasting of such investment and to give an experience in this aspect. Because of the fact that in this investment are involved many factors related to population, geographical factors, several technologies and the fact that these factors are in continuously change, the best way is, to store all the data in a database and to use this database for different results. This database helps us to substitute the previous manual calculations with an automatic procedure of calculations. This way of work will improve the work style, having now all the tools to take the right decision about an Internet investment considering all the aspects of this investment.

  15. Thermal infrared imaging of the variability of canopy-air temperature difference distribution for heavy metal stress levels discrimination in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biyao; Liu, Xiangnan; Liu, Meiling; Wang, Dongmin

    2017-04-01

    This paper addresses the assessment and interpretation of the canopy-air temperature difference (Tc-Ta) distribution as an indicator for discriminating between heavy metal stress levels. Tc-Ta distribution is simulated by coupling the energy balance equation with modified leaf angle distribution. Statistical indices including average value (AVG), standard deviation (SD), median, and span of Tc-Ta in the field of view of a digital thermal imager are calculated to describe Tc-Ta distribution quantitatively and, consequently, became the stress indicators. In the application, two grains of rice growing sites under "mild" and "severe" stress level were selected as study areas. A total of 96 thermal images obtained from the field measurements in the three growth stages were used for a separate application of a theoretical variation of Tc-Ta distribution. The results demonstrated that the statistical indices calculated from both simulated and measured data exhibited an upward trend as the stress level becomes serious because heavy metal stress would only raise a portion of the leaves in the canopy. Meteorological factors could barely affect the sensitivity of the statistical indices with the exception of the wind speed. Among the statistical indices, AVG and SD were demonstrated to be better indicators for stress levels discrimination.

  16. A prediction method of temperature distribution and thermal stress for the throttle turbine rotor and its application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a prediction method of the temperature distribution for the thermal stress for the throttle-regulated steam turbine rotor is proposed. The rotor thermal stress curve can be calculated according to the preset power requirement, the operation mode and the predicted critical parameters. The results of the 660 MW throttle turbine rotor show that the operators are able to predict the operation results and to adjust the operation parameters in advance with the help of the inertial element method. Meanwhile, it can also raise the operation level, thus providing the technical guarantee for the thermal stress optimization control and the safety of the steam turbine rotor under the variable load operation.

  17. Residual stress distribution in carbon steel pipe welded joint measured by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto; Ishiwata, Masayuki; Morii, Yukio; Minakawa, Nobuaki

    2000-01-01

    In order to estimate crack growth behavior of fatigue and stress corrosion cracking in pipes, the residual stress distribution near the pipe weld region has to be measured through the wall thickness. Since the penetration depth of neutron is deep enough to pass through the thick pipe wall, the neutron diffraction technique for the residual stress measurement is effective for this purpose. At the first step the residual stress distribution near the weld region in a butt-welded carbon steel pipe was measured by the neutron diffraction. Significant stresses extended only to a distance of 30 mm from the center of the weld. The major tensile stresses occurred in the hoop direction in the fusion and heat affected zones of the weldment, and they attained a level greater than 200 MPa through the thickness. While the axial residual stress at the inside surface was 50 MPa, the stress at the outside surface was -100 MPa. The comparison of residual stress distributions measured by the neutron diffraction, the X-ray diffraction and the strain gauge method reveals that the neutron diffraction is the most effective for measuring the residual stress inside the structural components. (author)

  18. The role of prosthetic abutment material on the stress distribution in a maxillary single implant-supported fixed prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, Hugo Eduardo; Bordin, Dimorvan; Del Bel Cury, Altair A.; Silva, Wander José da; Faot, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the influence of abutment's material and geometry on stress distribution in a single implant-supported prosthesis. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional models were made based on tomographic slices of the upper middle incisor area, in which a morse taper implant was positioned and a titanium (Ti) or zirconia (ZrN) universal abutments was installed. The commercially available geometry of titanium (T) and zirconia (Z) abutments were used to draw two models, TM1 and ZM1 respectively, which served as control groups. These models were compared with 2 experimental groups were the mechanical properties of Z were applied to the titanium abutment (TM2) and vice versa for the zirconia abutment (ZM2). Subsequently, loading was simulated in two steps, starting with a preload phase, calculated with the respective friction coefficients of each materials, followed by a combined preload and chewing force. The maximum von Mises stress was described. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA that considered material composition, geometry and loading (p 0.05). Conclusion: The screw was the piece most intensely affected, mainly through the preload force, independent of the abutment's material. - Highlights: • The abutment's screw was the most impaired piece of the dental implant system. • The highest stress was located at first thread of the abutment's screw. • The preload is the main factor in the abutment's screw stress. • Abutment configuration and material can have a positive contribution for the stress distribution

  19. Composite resin reinforced with pre-tensioned fibers: a three-dimensional finite element study on stress distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Lin; Shinya, Akikazu; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2013-01-01

    Pre-tensioned construction material is utilized in engineering applications of high strength demands. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the pre-tensioning fibers of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) using three-dimensional finite element (FE) analysis. The 3D FE models of particulate composite resin (CR), FRC and composite resin reinforced with pre-tensioned fibers (PRE-T-FRC) were constructed. The uniaxial three-point bending test was simulated using FE analysis to calculate the principal stress distribution. In the FRC and PRE-T-FRC, stresses were higher than CR, and they were located in the fiber. However, the maximum principal stress value at the composite of PRE-T-FRC was lower than the FRC and CR. Composite resin reinforced with pre-tensioned fibers was advantageous for stress distribution and lowering the stress at the composite itself. Experimental studies on physical properties of pre-tensioned FRC are encouraged to be conducted.

  20. Experimental and calculated LET distributions in the Cosmos-2044 biosatellite orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudkin, V.E.; Karpov, O.N.; Potapov, Yu.V.; Benton, E.V.; Frank, A.L.; Watts, J.W. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    During the flight of the Cosmos-2044 biosatellite, joint U.S.S.R.-U.S.A. investigations of different characteristics of cosmic radiation (CR) in the near-Earth environment were carried out. The U.S. dielectric track detectors CR-39 and Soviet BYa- and BR-type nuclear photo-emulsions were used as detectors. The present work shows some results of experimental measurements of linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of CR particles obtained with the use of these detectors, which were placed both inside and outside the satellite. The LET spectra measurement with plastic detectors is composed of two parts: the measurement of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) particles, and of short-range particles. The contributions of these components to the total LET distribution at various thicknesses of the shielding were analyzed and the results of these studies are presented. Calculated LET spectra in the Cosmos-2044 orbit were compared with experimental data. On the basis of experimental and calculated values of the LET spectra, absorbed and equivalent CR doses were calculated. In the shielding range of 1-1.5 g cm -2 , outside the spacecraft, the photo-emulsions yielded 10.3 mrad d -1 and 27.5 mrem d -1 (LET ≥ 2 MeV cm -1 ) while the CR-39 yielded averages of 1.43 mrad d -1 and 13.4 mrem d -1 (LET ≥ 40 MeV cm -1 ). Inside the spacecraft (≥10 g cm -2 ) the photo-emulsions yielded 8.9 mrad d -1 and 14.5 mrem d -1 . (author)

  1. Calculation of contraction stresses in dental composites by analysis of crack propagation in the matrix surrounding a cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Ferracane, Jack L; Sakaguchi, Ronald L; Swain, Michael V

    2009-04-01

    Polymerization contraction of dental composite produces a stress field in the bonded surrounding substrate that may be capable of propagating cracks from pre-existing flaws. The objectives of this study were to assess the extent of crack propagation from flaws in the surrounding ceramic substrate caused by composite contraction stresses, and to propose a method to calculate the contraction stress in the ceramic using indentation fracture. Initial cracks were introduced with a Vickers indenter near a cylindrical hole drilled into a glass-ceramic simulating enamel. Lengths of the radial indentation cracks were measured. Three composites having different contraction stresses were cured within the hole using one- or two-step light-activation methods and the crack lengths were measured. The contraction stress in the ceramic was calculated from the crack length and the fracture toughness of the glass-ceramic. Interfacial gaps between the composite and the ceramic were expressed as the ratio of the gap length to the hole perimeter, as well as the maximum gap width. All groups revealed crack propagation and the formation of contraction gaps. The calculated contraction stresses ranged from 4.2 MPa to 7.0 MPa. There was no correlation between the stress values and the contraction gaps. This method for calculating the stresses produced by composites is a relatively simple technique requiring a conventional hardness tester. The method can investigate two clinical phenomena that may occur during the placement of composite restorations, i.e. simulated enamel cracking near the margins and the formation of contraction gaps.

  2. Calculation of the angular radiance distribution for a coupled atmosphere and canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shunlin; Strahler, Alan H.

    1993-01-01

    The radiative transfer equations for a coupled atmosphere and canopy are solved numerically by an improved Gauss-Seidel iteration algorithm. The radiation field is decomposed into three components: unscattered sunlight, single scattering, and multiple scattering radiance for which the corresponding equations and boundary conditions are set up and their analytical or iterational solutions are explicitly derived. The classic Gauss-Seidel algorithm has been widely applied in atmospheric research. This is its first application for calculating the multiple scattering radiance of a coupled atmosphere and canopy. This algorithm enables us to obtain the internal radiation field as well as radiances at boundaries. Any form of bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) as a boundary condition can be easily incorporated into the iteration procedure. The hotspot effect of the canopy is accommodated by means of the modification of the extinction coefficients of upward single scattering radiation and unscattered sunlight using the formulation of Nilson and Kuusk. To reduce the computation for the case of large optical thickness, an improved iteration formula is derived to speed convergence. The upwelling radiances have been evaluated for different atmospheric conditions, leaf area index (LAI), leaf angle distribution (LAD), leaf size and so on. The formulation presented in this paper is also well suited to analyze the relative magnitude of multiple scattering radiance and single scattering radiance in both the visible and near infrared regions.

  3. Calculation uncertainty of distribution-like parameters in NPP of PAKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szecsenyi, Zsolt; Korpas, Layos

    2000-01-01

    In the reactor-physical point of view there were two important events in the Nuclear Power Plant of PAKS in this year. The Russian type profiled assemblies were loaded into the PAKS Unit 3, and new limitation system was introduced on the same Unit. It was required to solve a lot of problems because of these both events. One of these problems was the determination of uncertainty of quantities of the new limitation considering the fabrication uncertainties for the profiled assembly. The importance of determination of uncertainty is to guarantee on 99.9% level the avoidance of fuel failure. In this paper the principles of determination of calculation accuracy, applied methods and obtained results are presented in case of distribution-like parameters. A few elements of the method have been presented on earlier symposiums, so in this paper the whole method is just outlined. For example the GPT method was presented in the following paper: Uncertainty analysis of pin wise power distribution of WWER-440 assembly considering fabrication uncertainties. Finally in the summary of this paper additional intrinsic opportunities in the method are presented. (Authors)

  4. Measuring and Modeling Root Distribution and Root Reinforcement in Forested Slopes for Slope Stability Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D.; Giadrossich, F.; Schwarz, M.; Vergani, C.

    2016-12-01

    Roots provide mechanical anchorage and reinforcement of soils on slopes. Roots also modify soil hydrological properties (soil moisture content, pore-water pressure, preferential flow paths) via subsurface flow path associated with root architecture, root density, and root-size distribution. Interactions of root-soil mechanical and hydrological processes are an important control of shallow landslide initiation during rainfall events and slope stability. Knowledge of root-distribution and root strength are key components to estimate slope stability in vegetated slopes and for the management of protection forest in steep mountainous area. We present data that show the importance of measuring root strength directly in the field and present methods for these measurements. These data indicate that the tensile force mobilized in roots depends on root elongation (a function of soil displacement), root size, and on whether roots break in tension of slip out of the soil. Measurements indicate that large lateral roots that cross tension cracks at the scarp are important for slope stability calculations owing to their large tensional resistance. These roots are often overlooked and when included, their strength is overestimated because extrapolated from measurements on small roots. We present planned field experiments that will measure directly the force held by roots of different sizes during the triggering of a shallow landslide by rainfall. These field data are then used in a model of root reinforcement based on fiber-bundle concepts that span different spacial scales, from a single root to the stand scale, and different time scales, from timber harvest to root decay. This model computes the strength of root bundles in tension and in compression and their effect on soil strength. Up-scaled to the stand the model yields the distribution of root reinforcement as a function of tree density, distance from tree, tree species and age with the objective of providing quantitative

  5. Estimation of residual stress distribution for pressurizer nozzle of Kori nuclear power plant considering safe end

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    In nuclear power plants, ferritic low alloy steel nozzle was connected with austenitic stainless steel piping system through alloy 82/182 butt weld. Accurate estimation of residual stress for weldment is important in the sense that alloy 82/182 is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. There are many results which predict residual stress distribution for alloy 82/182 weld between nozzle and pipe. However, nozzle and piping system usually connected through safe end which has short length. In this paper, residual stress distribution for pressurizer nozzle of Kori nuclear power plant was predicted using FE analysis, which considered safe end. As a result, existing residual stress profile was redistributed and residual stress of inner surface was decreased specially. It means that safe end should be considered to reduce conservatism when estimating the piping system.

  6. Variation behavior of residual stress distribution by manufacturing processes in welded pipes of austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Ryohei; Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2012-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been observed near heat affected zone (HAZ) of primary loop recirculation pipes made of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel type 316L in the nuclear power plants. For the non-sensitization material, residual stress is the important factor of SCC, and it is generated by machining and welding. In the actual plants, welding is conducted after machining as manufacturing processes of welded pipes. It could be considered that residual stress generated by machining is varied by welding as a posterior process. This paper presents residual stress variation due to manufacturing processes of pipes using X-ray diffraction method. Residual stress distribution due to welding after machining had a local maximum stress in HAZ. Moreover, this value was higher than residual stress generated by welding or machining. Vickers hardness also had a local maximum hardness in HAZ. In order to clarify hardness variation, crystal orientation analysis with EBSD method was performed. Recovery and recrystallization were occurred by welding heat near the weld metal. These lead hardness decrease. The local maximum region showed no microstructure evolution. In this region, machined layer was remained. Therefore, the local maximum hardness was generated at machined layer. The local maximum stress was caused by the superposition effect of residual stress distributions due to machining and welding. Moreover, these local maximum residual stress and hardness are exceeded critical value of SCC initiation. In order to clarify the effect of residual stress on SCC initiation, evaluation including manufacturing processes is important. (author)

  7. A computer program for calculation of reliable pair distribution functions of non-crystalline materials from limited diffraction data. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, F.Y.

    1978-01-01

    This program calculates the final pair distribution functions of non-crystalline materials on the basis of the experimental structure factor as calculated in part I and the parameters of the small distance part of the pair distribution function as calculated in part II. In this way, truncation error may be eliminated from the final pair distribution function. The calculations with this program depend on the results of calculations with the programs described in parts I and II. The final pair distribution function is calculated by a Fourier transform of a combination of an experimental structure factor and a model structure factor. The storage requirement depends on the number of data points in the structure factor, the number of data points in the final pair distribution function and the number of peaks necessary to resolve the small distance part of the pair distribution function. In the present set-up a storage requirement is set to 8860 words which is estimated to be satisfactory for a large number of cases. (Auth.)

  8. Yield stress distribution in injection-moulded glassy polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeeten, W.M.H.; Kanters, M.J.W.; Engels, T.A.P.; Govaert, L.E.

    2015-01-01

    A methodology for structural analysis simulations is presented that incorporates the distribution of mechanical propertiesalong the geometrical dimensions of injection-moulded amorphous polymer products. It is based on a previously developedmodelling approach, where the thermomechanical history

  9. Development of a time-dependent energy model to calculate the mining-induced stress over gates and pillars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezaei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Generally, longwall mining-induced stress results from the stress relaxation due to destressed zone that occurs above the mined panel. Knowledge of induced stress is very important for accurate design of adjacent gateroads and intervening pillars which helps to raise the safety and productivity of longwall mining operations. This study presents a novel time-dependent analytical model for determination of the longwall mining-induced stress and investigates the coefficient of stress concentration over adjacent gates and pillars. The model is developed based on the strain energy balance in longwall mining incorporated to a rheological constitutive model of caved materials with time-varying parameters. The study site is the Tabas coal mine of Iran. In the proposed model, height of destressed zone above the mined panel, total longwall mining-induced stress, abutment angle, induced vertical stress, and coefficient of stress concentration over neighboring gates and intervening pillars are calculated. To evaluate the effect of proposed model parameters on the coefficient of stress concentration due to longwall mining, sensitivity analysis is performed based on the field data and experimental constants. Also, the results of the proposed model are compared with those of existing models. The comparative results confirm a good agreement between the proposed model and the in situ measurements. According to the obtained results, it is concluded that the proposed model can be successfully used to calculate the longwall mining-induced stress. Therefore, the optimum design of gate supports and pillar dimensions would be attainable which helps to increase the mining efficiency.

  10. Research on stress distribution regularity of cement sheaths of radial well based on ABAQUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jihui; Cheng, Yuanfang; Li, Xiaolong; Xiao, Wen; Li, Menglai

    2017-12-01

    To ensure desirable outcome of hydraulic fracturing based on ultra-short radius radial systems, it is required to investigate the stress distribution regularity and stability of the cement sheath. On the basis of the theoretical model of the cement sheath stress distribution, a reservoir mechanical model was built using the finite element software, ABAQUS, according to the physical property of a certain oil reservoir of the Shengli oilfield. The stress distribution of the casing-cement-sheath-formation system under the practical condition was simulated, based on which analyses were conducted from multiple points of view. Results show that the stress on the internal interface of the cement sheath exceeds that on the external interface, and fluctuates with higher amplitudes, which means that the internal interface is the most failure-prone. The unevenness of the cement sheath stress distribution grows with the increasing horizontal principal stress ratio, and so does the variation magnitude. This indicates that higher horizontal principal stress ratios are unfavourable for the structural stability of the cement sheath. Both the wellbore quantity of the URRS and the physical property of the material can affect the cement sheath distribution. It is suggested to optimize the quantity of the radial wellbore and use cement with a lower elastic modulus and higher Poisson’s ratio. At last, the impact level of the above factor was analysed, with the help of the grey correlation analysis.

  11. Determination of space-energy distribution of resonance neutrons in reactor lattice cell and calculation of resonance integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmijarevic, I.

    1980-01-01

    Space-energy distribution of resonance neutrons in reactor lattice cell was determined by solving the Boltzmann equation by spherical harmonics method applying P-3 approximation. Computer code SPLET used for these calculations is described. Resonance absorption and calculation of resonance integrals are described as well. Effective resonance integral values for U-238 resonance at 6.7 Ev are calculated for heavy water reactor cell with metal, oxide and carbide fuel elements

  12. Calculation of breaking radiation dose fields in heterogenous media by a method of the transformation of axial distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mil'shtejn, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of dose fields in a heterogeneous tissue equivalent medium has shown that dose distributions have radial symmetry and can be described by a curve of axial distribution with renormalization of maximum ionization depth. A method of the calculation of a dose field in a heterogeneous medium using the principle of radial symmetry is presented

  13. The use of fractal dimension calculation algorithm to determine the nature of autobiographical memories distribution across the life span

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitina, Olga V.; Nourkova, Veronica V.

    In the given research we offer the technique for the calculation of the density of events which people retrieve from autobiographical memory. We wanted to prove a non-uniformity nature of memories distribution in the course of time and were interested with the law of distribution of these events during life course.

  14. Influence of intrinsic and extrinsic forces on 3D stress distribution using CUDA programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räss, Ludovic; Omlin, Samuel; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2013-04-01

    In order to have a better understanding of the influence of buoyancy (intrinsic) and boundary (extrinsic) forces in a nonlinear rheology due to a power law fluid, some basics needs to be explored through 3D numerical calculation. As first approach, the already studied Stokes setup of a rising sphere will be used to calibrate the 3D model. Far field horizontal tectonic stress is applied to the sphere, which generates a vertical acceleration, buoyancy driven. This simple and known setup allows some benchmarking performed through systematic runs. The relative importance of intrinsic and extrinsic forces producing the wide variety of rates and styles of deformation, including absence of deformation and generating 3D stress patterns, will be determined. Relation between vertical motion and power law exponent will also be explored. The goal of these investigations will be to run models having topography and density structure from geophysical imaging as input, and 3D stress field as output. The stress distribution in Swiss Alps and Plateau and its implication for risk analysis is one of the perspective for this research. In fact, proximity of the stress to the failure is fundamental for risk assessment. Sensitivity of this to the accurate topography representation can then be evaluated. The developed 3D numerical codes, tuned for mid-sized cluster, need to be optimized, especially while running good resolution in full 3D. Therefor, two largely used computing platforms, MATLAB and FORTRAN 90 are explored. Starting with an easy adaptable and as short as possible MATLAB code, which is then upgraded in order to reach higher performance in simulation times and resolution. A significant speedup using the rising NVIDIA CUDA technology and resources is also possible. Programming in C-CUDA, creating some synchronization feature, and comparing the results with previous runs, helps us to investigate the new speedup possibilities allowed through GPU parallel computing. These codes

  15. Residual stress measurement of large scaled welded pipe using neutron diffraction method. Effect of SCC crack propagation and repair weld on residual stress distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Katsuyama, Jinya; Tobita, Tohru; Morii, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The RESA-1 neutron engineering diffractometer in the JRR-3 (Japan Research Reactor No.3) at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, which is used for stress measurements, was upgraded to realize residual stress measurements of large scaled mechanical components. A series of residual stress measurements was made to obtain through-thickness residual stress distributions in a Type 304 stainless steel butt-welded pipe of 500A-sch.80 using the upgraded RESA-1 diffractometer. We evaluated effects of crack propagation such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and a part-circumference repair weld on the residual stress distributions induced by girth welding. Measured residual stress distributions near original girth weld revealed good agreement with typical results shown in some previous works using finite element method, deep hole drilling as well as neutron diffraction. After introducing a mock crack with 10 mm depth in the heat affected zone on the inside wall of the pipe by electro discharge machining, the axial residual stresses were found to be released in the part of the mock crack. However, changes in the through-wall bending stress component and the self-equilibrated stress component were negligible and hence the axial residual stress distribution in the ligament was remained in the original residual stresses near girth weld without the mock crack. Furthermore, changes in hoop and radial residual stress were also small. The residual stress distributions after a part repair welding on the outer circumference of the girth weld were significantly different from residual stress distributions near the original girth weld. The through-thickness average axial residual stress was increased due to increase of the tensile membrane stress and mitigation of the bending stress after repair welding. Throughout above studies, we evidenced that the neutron diffraction technique is useful and powerful tool for measuring residual stress distributions in large as well as thick mechanical

  16. Effects of Prosthesis Stem Tapers on Stress Distribution of Cemented Hip Arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, Abdul Halim; Nor, Mohd Asri Mohd; Saman, Alias Mohd; Tamin, Mohd Nasir; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul

    2010-01-01

    Aseptic loosening effects are critical issues in encouraging long term stability of cemented hip arthroplasty. Stress shielding is believed to be an important factor that contributes to the aseptic loosening problems. The numerous changes in the prosthesis stem design are intended to minimize the stress shielding and aseptic loosening problems and to improve the long term performance of the implants. In this study, the stress distribution in cemented hip arthroplasty is established using finite element method. The taper of the prosthesis is designed to be 3 deg. at anterior/posterior, 3 deg. at medial/lateral and 10 deg. from wide lateral to narrow medial. Major muscle loads and contact forces are simulated for walking (toe-off phase) and stair climbing load cases. Effects of prosthesis stem tapers on the resulting stress distribution are investigated. Results show that compressive stress dominates in the medial plane while tensile stress in the lateral plane of the femur. The corresponding stress levels of intact femur for walking and stair-climbing load cases are 22 and 29 MPa, respectively. The magnitude of Tresca stress for the THA femur in stair-climbing load case remains higher in the region of 85 MPa while the walking load case induces around 40 MPa. The stress range in the straight and single taper stem prosthesis is lower than 260 MPa, while localized Tresca stress is in the order of the yield strength of Ti-6Al-4V alloy for double and triple taper stem design.

  17. Finite Element Analysis of the Effect of Superstructure Materials and Loading Angle on Stress Distribution around the Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari K

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: A general process in implant design is to determine the reason of possible problems and to find the relevant solutions. The success of the implant depends on the control technique of implant biomechanical conditions. Objectives: The goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of both abutment and framework materials on the stress of the bone around the implant by using threedimensional finite element analysis. Materials and Methods: A three-dimensional model of a patient’s premaxillary bone was fabricated using Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT. Then, three types of abutment from gold, nickel-chromium and zirconia and also three types of crown frame from silver-palladium, nickel-chromium and zirconia were designed. Finally, a 178 N force at angles of zero, 30 and 45 degrees was exerted on the implant axis and the maximum stress and strain in the trabecular, cortical bones and cement was calculated. Results: With changes of the materials and mechanical properties of abutment and frame, little difference was observed in the level and distribution pattern of stress. The stress level was increased with the rise in the angle of pressure exertion. The highest stress concentration was related to the force at the angle of 45 degrees. The results of the cement analysis proved an inverse relationship between the rate of elastic modulus of the frame material and that of the maximum stress in the cement. Conclusions: The impact of the angle at which the force was applied was more significant in stress distribution than that of abutment and framework core materials.

  18. Effects on Subtalar Joint Stress Distribution After Cannulated Screw Insertion at Different Positions and Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cheng-song; Chen, Wan; Chen, Chen; Yang, Guang-hua; Hu, Chao; Tang, Kang-lai

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects on subtalar joint stress distribution after cannulated screw insertion at different positions and directions. After establishing a 3-dimensional geometric model of a normal subtalar joint, we analyzed the most ideal cannulated screw insertion position and approach for subtalar joint stress distribution and compared the differences in loading stress, antirotary strength, and anti-inversion/eversion strength among lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion, traditional screw insertion, and ideal cannulated screw insertion. The screw insertion approach allowing the most uniform subtalar joint loading stress distribution was lateral screw insertion near the border of the talar neck plus medial screw insertion close to the ankle joint. For stress distribution uniformity, antirotary strength, and anti-inversion/eversion strength, lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion was superior to traditional double-screw insertion. Compared with ideal cannulated screw insertion, slightly poorer stress distribution uniformity and better antirotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength were observed for lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion. Traditional single-screw insertion was better than double-screw insertion for stress distribution uniformity but worse for anti-rotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength. Lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion was slightly worse for stress distribution uniformity than was ideal cannulated screw insertion but superior to traditional screw insertion. It was better than both ideal cannulated screw insertion and traditional screw insertion for anti-rotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength. Lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion is an approach with simple localization, convenient operation, and good safety. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluating stress distribution in two different designs of class I partial removable dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Geramipanah

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available In Present study a digital model of hemimaxillectomy was reconstructed by computer and stress distribution of removable partial dentures in tissues, periodontal ligament and bone were thoroughly evaluated. The maximum stress of two different removable partial denture designs which contained buccal and lingual c-shaped clasps respectively were analyzed and compared. It was assumed that a 90 gram force which is equal to an average obturator’s weight is applied outwardly. The results showed that the maximum stress distribution in these two designs is not significantly different.

  20. Calculation of the residual stress field created by quenching and grinding in a cast duplex stainless steel pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupas, P.; Le Delliou, P.

    1997-01-01

    We calculate with a finite element program the residual stresses generated by quenching and grinding a cast duplex stainless steel pipe. These calculations are performed with Code Aster (developed by EDF/R and D D). They are preliminary to a 3D study concerning an elbow made of the same material. Quenching is simulated by an axisymmetric thermomechanical calculation. Grinding are simulated either by lowering mechanical properties in ground parts of the pipe, either by the releasing the nodes. Stresses due to quenching are in high compression in the skin and tensile in the middle. After grinding (the first concerning both internal and external skins, the second concerning only the internal skin), stresses become tensile on the skin. These results are compared to those obtained in a similar study by CEA and also to the measurement. Some important differences appear in the thermal results between the two FE programs, due to a too coarse time step in the CASTEM 2000 calculation. However, the effect on the residual stress field is not very important. Two complementary studies have shown a negligible influence of mesh size, as well as an equivalence of the two numerical methods used for simulating grinding (lowering the Young modulus and releasing the nodes), according the values given at the notes of the skin by the first method are corrected. (authors)

  1. A novel method for calculating the energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchitchekova, Deyana S.; Morthomas, Julien; Ribeiro, Fabienne; Ducher, Roland; Perez, Michel

    2014-07-01

    A novel method for accurate and efficient evaluation of the change in energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress is introduced. This method, called Linear Combination of Stress States, is based on the knowledge of the effects of simple stresses (uniaxial or shear) on these diffusion barriers. Then, it is assumed that the change in energy barriers under a complex stress can be expressed as a linear combination of these already known simple stress effects. The modifications of energy barriers by either uniaxial traction/compression and shear stress are determined by means of atomistic simulations with the Climbing Image-Nudge Elastic Band method and are stored as a set of functions. The results of this method are compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. It is shown that, linear anisotropic elasticity fails to predict the correct energy barrier variation with stress (especially with shear stress) whereas the proposed method provides correct energy barrier variation for stresses up to ˜3 GPa. This study provides a basis for the development of multiscale models of diffusion under non-uniform stress.

  2. A novel method for calculating the energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchitchekova, Deyana S.; Morthomas, Julien; Perez, Michel; Ribeiro, Fabienne; Ducher, Roland

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for accurate and efficient evaluation of the change in energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress is introduced. This method, called Linear Combination of Stress States, is based on the knowledge of the effects of simple stresses (uniaxial or shear) on these diffusion barriers. Then, it is assumed that the change in energy barriers under a complex stress can be expressed as a linear combination of these already known simple stress effects. The modifications of energy barriers by either uniaxial traction/compression and shear stress are determined by means of atomistic simulations with the Climbing Image-Nudge Elastic Band method and are stored as a set of functions. The results of this method are compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. It is shown that, linear anisotropic elasticity fails to predict the correct energy barrier variation with stress (especially with shear stress) whereas the proposed method provides correct energy barrier variation for stresses up to ∼3 GPa. This study provides a basis for the development of multiscale models of diffusion under non-uniform stress

  3. A novel method for calculating the energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tchitchekova, Deyana S. [IRSN, PSN, SEMIA, LPTM, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Univ. Lyon, INSA Lyon, MATEIS, UMR CNRS 5510, Villeurbanne (France); Morthomas, Julien; Perez, Michel [Univ. Lyon, INSA Lyon, MATEIS, UMR CNRS 5510, Villeurbanne (France); Ribeiro, Fabienne [IRSN, PSN, SEMIA, LPTM, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Ducher, Roland [IRSN, PSN, SAG, LETR, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2014-07-21

    A novel method for accurate and efficient evaluation of the change in energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress is introduced. This method, called Linear Combination of Stress States, is based on the knowledge of the effects of simple stresses (uniaxial or shear) on these diffusion barriers. Then, it is assumed that the change in energy barriers under a complex stress can be expressed as a linear combination of these already known simple stress effects. The modifications of energy barriers by either uniaxial traction/compression and shear stress are determined by means of atomistic simulations with the Climbing Image-Nudge Elastic Band method and are stored as a set of functions. The results of this method are compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. It is shown that, linear anisotropic elasticity fails to predict the correct energy barrier variation with stress (especially with shear stress) whereas the proposed method provides correct energy barrier variation for stresses up to ∼3 GPa. This study provides a basis for the development of multiscale models of diffusion under non-uniform stress.

  4. theoretical investigation of stresses distributions in hollow sandcrete

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The test thin plate distributes the load on the block and the hollow block is regarded as a two ... Some research works had been done on the relationship between cavity ... The results would help reduce the cost, labour and time necessary to.

  5. Selection of distribution coefficients for contaminant fate and transport calculations: Strontium as a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, D.I.; Krupka, K.M.; Serne, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    As part of an ongoing project funded by a cooperative effort involving the Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (ORIA) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Nuclear Regulatory Agency (NRC), distribution coefficient (K d ) values are being compiled from the literature to develop provisional tables for cadmium, cesium, chromium, lead, plutonium, strontium, thorium, and uranium. The tables are organized according to important aqueous- and solid-phase parameters affecting the sorption of these contaminants. These parameters, which vary with contaminant, include pH and redox conditions; cation exchange capacity (CEC); presence of iron-oxide, aluminum-oxide, clay, and mica minerals; organic matter content; and solution concentrations of contaminants, competing ions, and complexing ligands. Sorption information compiled for strontium is used to illustrate our approach. The strontium data show how selected geochemical parameters (i.e., CEC, pH, and clay content) affect Strontium K d values and the selection of open-quote default close-quote K d values needed for modeling contaminant transport and risks at sites for which site specific data are lacking. Results of our evaluation may be used by site management and technical staff to assess contaminant fate, migration, and risk calculations in support of site remediation and waste management decisions

  6. Distribution of Side Abutment Stress in Roadway Subjected to Dynamic Pressure and Its Engineering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Qiangling

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The borehole stress-meter was employed in this study to investigate the distribution of the side abutment stress in roadway subjected to dynamic pressure. The results demonstrate that the side abutment stress of the mining roadway reaches a peak value when the distance to the gob is 8 m and the distribution curve of the side abutment stress can be divided into three zones: stress rising zone, stress stabilizing zone, and stress decreasing zone. Further numerical investigation was carried out to study the effect of the coal mass strength, coal seam depth, immediate roof strength, and thickness on the distribution of the side abutment stress. Based on the research results, we determined the reasonable position of the mining roadway and the optimal width of the barrier pillar. The engineering application demonstrates that the retention of the barrier pillar with a width of 5 m along the gob as the haulage roadway for the next panel is feasible, which delivers favorable technological and economic benefits.

  7. The Effect of Resection Angle on Stress Distribution after Root-End Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Jaiane Bandoli; Dal Piva, Amanda Maria de Oliveira; Tribst, João Paulo Mendes; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Tango, Rubens Nisie

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to investigate the influence of the resection angle on the stress distribution of retrograde endodontic treated maxillary incisors under oblique-load application. Methods and Materials: A maxillary central incisor which was endodontically treated and restored with a fiber glass post was obtained in a 3-dimensional numerical model and distributed into three groups according to type of resection: control; restored with fiber post without retrograde obturation, R45 and R90 with 45º and 90º resection from tooth axial axis, respectively and restored with Fuji II LC (GC America). The numerical models received a 45º occlusal load of 200 N/cm2 on the middle of lingual surface. All materials and structures were considered linear elastic, homogeneous and isotropic. Numerical models were plotted and meshed with isoparametric elements, and the results were analyzed using maximum principal stress (MPS). Results: MPS showed greater stress values in the bone tissue for control group than the other groups. Groups with apicectomy showed acceptable stress distribution on the fiber post, cement layer and root dentin, presenting more improved values than control group. Conclusion: Apicectomy at 90º promotes more homogeneity on stress distribution on the fiber post, cement layer and root dentin, which suggests less probability of failure. However, due to its facility and stress distribution also being better than control group, apicectomy at 45° could be a good choice for clinicians. PMID:29707013

  8. Thermodynamic method for generating random stress distributions on an earthquake fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barall, Michael; Harris, Ruth A.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a new method for generating random stress distributions on an earthquake fault, suitable for use as initial conditions in a dynamic rupture simulation. The method employs concepts from thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. A pattern of fault slip is considered to be analogous to a micro-state of a thermodynamic system. The energy of the micro-state is taken to be the elastic energy stored in the surrounding medium. Then, the Boltzmann distribution gives the probability of a given pattern of fault slip and stress. We show how to decompose the system into independent degrees of freedom, which makes it computationally feasible to select a random state. However, due to the equipartition theorem, straightforward application of the Boltzmann distribution leads to a divergence which predicts infinite stress. To avoid equipartition, we show that the finite strength of the fault acts to restrict the possible states of the system. By analyzing a set of earthquake scaling relations, we derive a new formula for the expected power spectral density of the stress distribution, which allows us to construct a computer algorithm free of infinities. We then present a new technique for controlling the extent of the rupture by generating a random stress distribution thousands of times larger than the fault surface, and selecting a portion which, by chance, has a positive stress perturbation of the desired size. Finally, we present a new two-stage nucleation method that combines a small zone of forced rupture with a larger zone of reduced fracture energy.

  9. Interface topography and residual stress distributions in W coatings for fusion armour applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: g.thomas@cranfield.ac.uk; Vincent, R. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Matthews, G. [UKAEA Fusion, K2 Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Dance, B. [TWI Ltd, Granta Park, Great Abingdon, Cambridge CB1 6AL (United Kingdom); Grant, P.S. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2008-03-25

    Vacuum plasma sprayed (VPS) tungsten (W) coatings are potential plasma facing components in future fusion power plants. However, the large coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between W and underlying structural steels and other metallic materials poses a significant problem for manufacturing and service life because of the evolution of large thermally induced stresses leading to failure. In this paper, the effects of the substrate/coating interface 3D geometry on stress distributions are investigated using finite element analysis and VPS experiments to manufacture up to 2 mm thick W coatings. The key factors that affect internal stress distributions during thermal exposure have been identified including graded composition inter-layers, stress concentration effects, mechanical adhesion, and the possible role of segmentation in relieving coating stresses on surface sculptured substrates.

  10. Interface topography and residual stress distributions in W coatings for fusion armour applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.; Vincent, R.; Matthews, G.; Dance, B.; Grant, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    Vacuum plasma sprayed (VPS) tungsten (W) coatings are potential plasma facing components in future fusion power plants. However, the large coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between W and underlying structural steels and other metallic materials poses a significant problem for manufacturing and service life because of the evolution of large thermally induced stresses leading to failure. In this paper, the effects of the substrate/coating interface 3D geometry on stress distributions are investigated using finite element analysis and VPS experiments to manufacture up to 2 mm thick W coatings. The key factors that affect internal stress distributions during thermal exposure have been identified including graded composition inter-layers, stress concentration effects, mechanical adhesion, and the possible role of segmentation in relieving coating stresses on surface sculptured substrates

  11. Stress Distribution around Laser-Welded Cutting Wheels Using a Spherical Indentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Hee; Lee, Wan Kyu; Jeong, In Hyeon; Nahm, Seung Hoon [KRISS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    A spherical indentation has been proposed as a nondestructive method of measuring local residual stress field in laser-voided joints. The apparent yield strengths interpreted from the spherical indentation data of as-welded cutting wheel were compared with the intrinsic yield strengths measured at nearly equivalent locations in annealed wheel. Their difference along the distance from the welding line is welding stress distribution because the intrinsic yield strength is invariant regardless of the elastic residual stress. The spherical indentations show that the laser-welded diamond cutting wheel displays a 10 min-wide distribution of the welding residual stress and has peak compressive and tensile stresses in the shank and tip regions, respectively.

  12. Impact of peak electricity demand in distribution grids: a stress test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogsteen, Gerwin; Molderink, Albert; Hurink, Johann L.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria; Schuring, Friso; Kootstra, Ben

    2015-01-01

    The number of (hybrid) electric vehicles is growing, leading to a higher demand for electricity in distribution grids. To investigate the effects of the expected peak demand on distribution grids, a stress test with 15 electric vehicles in a single street is conducted and described in this paper.

  13. A Different Approach to Assess Oxidative Stress in Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Patients Through The Calculation of Oxidative Stress Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edi Hartoyo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to determine the involvement of Oxidative Stress (OS in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF through the analysis of oxidative stress Index (OSI. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT activity, and OSI were measured in 61 child dengue patients and (aged 6 months–18 years with three different stages of DHF, i.e stage I, II, and III. The results show that the levels of MDA, SOD and CAT activity, and OSI significantly different between the group. The all parameters that investigated in this present study seems higher MDA level and OSI in the higher grade of DHF, except for SOD and CAT activity. From this result, it can be concluded that oxidative stress pathways might be involved in the pathomechanism of DHF and OSI might be used as a biomarker for OS and the severity in DHF patients.

  14. Study of temperature distribution of pipes heated by moving rectangular gauss distribution heat source. Development of pipe outer surface irradiated laser stress improvement process (L-SIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Takahiro; Kamo, Kazuhiko; Asada, Seiji; Terasaki, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    The new process called L-SIP (outer surface irradiated Laser Stress Improvement Process) is developed to improve the tensile residual stress of the inner surface near the butt welded joints of pipes in the compression stress. The temperature gradient occurs in the thickness of pipes in heating the outer surface rapidly by laser beam. By the thermal expansion difference between the inner surface and the outer surface, the compression stress occurs near the inner surface of pipes. In this paper, the theoretical equation for the temperature distributions of pipes heated by moving rectangular Gauss distribution heat source on the outer surface is derived. The temperature histories of pipes calculated by theoretical equation agree well with FEM analysis results. According to the theoretical equation, the controlling parameters of temperature distributions and histories are q/2a y , vh, a x /h and a y /h, where q is total heat input, a y is heat source length in the axial direction, a x is Gaussian radius of heat source in the hoop direction, ν is moving velocity, and h is thickness of the pipe. The essential variables for L-SIP, which are defined on the basis of the measured temperature histories on the outer surface of the pipe, are Tmax, F 0 =kτ 0 /h 2 , vh, W Q and L Q , where Tmax is maximum temperature on the monitor point of the outer surface, k is thermal diffusivity coefficient, τ 0 is the temperature rise time from 100degC to maximum temperature on the monitor point of the outer surface, W Q is τ 0 x ν, and L Q is the uniform temperature length in the axial direction. It is verified that the essential variables for L-SIP match the controlling parameters by the theoretical equation. (author)

  15. Adjusts of control rod cross sections and its utilization in power distribution calculations for Angra-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, C.M. de

    1981-01-01

    One of the most important part in neutronics calculations is the study of core behavior with inserted control rods. The first stage of this calculations consists in generating equivalent microscopic cross sections for the basic cells containing fuel or absorbed material. The cross sections will be then adjusted. The choice of parameters that help in those adjustments, were obtained by the comparisons of data coming from the control rod supercell calculations with the Hammer and Citation computer codes. The effect of those adjustments in core integral parameters was evaluated; in this work only the core power two-dimensional distribution calculations with the D bank completely inserted, is studied. (E.G.) [pt

  16. Choice of initial conditions in dynamical calculations of distributions of nuclear fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosenko, G.I.

    1993-01-01

    The distribution function in the coordinates and momenta for a fissioning system traversing a barrier is determined in terms of Langevin fluctuation-dissipation dynamics. It is shown that this distribution is best described by the Kramers distribution. The equilibrium distribution can be used as the initial condition, provided that the system is in the overdamping regime. 28 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Effect of Integration Patterns Around Implant Neck on Stress Distribution in Peri-Implant Bone: A Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jingyun; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Chao

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the biomechanical performance of different osseointegration patterns between cortical bone and implants using finite element analysis. Fifteen finite element models were constructed of the mandibular fixed prosthesis supported by implants. Masticatory loads (200 N axial, 100 N oblique, 40 N horizontal) were applied. The cortical bone/implant interface was divided equally into four layers: upper, upper-middle, lower-middle, and lower. The bone stress and implant displacement were calculated for 5 degrees of uniform integration (0, 20%, 40%, 60%, and 100%) and 10 integration patterns. The stress was concentrated in the bone margin and gradually decreased as osseointegration progressed, when the integrated and nonintegrated areas were alternated on the bone-implant surface. Compared with full integration, the integration of only the lower-middle layer or lower half layers significantly decreased von Mises, tensile, and compressive stresses in cortical bone under oblique and horizontal loads, and these patterns did not induce higher stress in the cancellous bone. For the integration of only the upper or upper-middle layer, stress in the cortical and cancellous bones significantly increased and was considerably higher than in the case of nonintegration. In addition, the maximum stress in the cortical bone was sensitive to the quantity of integrated nodes at the bone margin; lower quantity was associated with higher stress. There was no significant difference in the displacement of implants among 15 models. Integration patterns of cortical bone significantly affect stress distribution in peri-implant bone. The integration of only the lower-middle or lower half layers helps to increase the load-bearing capacity of peri-implant bone and decrease the risk of overloading, while upper integration may further increase the risk of bone resorption. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. The importance of geospatial data to calculate the optimal distribution of renewable energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Paula; Masó, Joan

    2013-04-01

    Specially during last three years, the renewable energies are revolutionizing the international trade while they are geographically diversifying markets. Renewables are experiencing a rapid growth in power generation. According to REN21 (2012), during last six years, the total renewables capacity installed grew at record rates. In 2011, the EU raised its share of global new renewables capacity till 44%. The BRICS nations (Brazil, Russia, India and China) accounted for about 26% of the total global. Moreover, almost twenty countries in the Middle East, North Africa, and sub-Saharan Africa have currently active markets in renewables. The energy return ratios are commonly used to calculate the efficiency of the traditional energy sources. The Energy Return On Investment (EROI) compares the energy returned for a certain source and the energy used to get it (explore, find, develop, produce, extract, transform, harvest, grow, process, etc.). These energy return ratios have demonstrated a general decrease of efficiency of the fossil fuels and gas. When considering the limitations of the quantity of energy produced by some sources, the energy invested to obtain them and the difficulties of finding optimal locations for the establishment of renewables farms (e.g. due to an ever increasing scarce of appropriate land) the EROI becomes relevant in renewables. A spatialized EROI, which uses variables with spatial distribution, enables the optimal position in terms of both energy production and associated costs. It is important to note that the spatialized EROI can be mathematically formalized and calculated the same way for different locations in a reproducible way. This means that having established a concrete EROI methodology it is possible to generate a continuous map that will highlight the best productive zones for renewable energies in terms of maximum energy return at minimum cost. Relevant variables to calculate the real energy invested are the grid connections between

  19. OPT-TWO: Calculation code for two-dimensional MOX fuel models in the optimum concentration distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shohei; Okuno, Hiroshi; Sakai, Tomohiro

    2007-08-01

    OPT-TWO is a calculation code which calculates the optimum concentration distribution, i.e., the most conservative concentration distribution in the aspect of nuclear criticality safety, of MOX (mixed uranium and plutonium oxide) fuels in the two-dimensional system. To achieve the optimum concentration distribution, we apply the principle of flattened fuel importance distribution with which the fuel system has the highest reactivity. Based on this principle, OPT-TWO takes the following 3 calculation steps iteratively to achieve the optimum concentration distribution with flattened fuel importance: (1) the forward and adjoint neutron fluxes, and the neutron multiplication factor, with TWOTRAN code which is a two-dimensional neutron transport code based on the SN method, (2) the fuel importance, and (3) the quantity of the transferring fuel. In OPT-TWO, the components of MOX fuel are MOX powder, uranium dioxide powder and additive. This report describes the content of the calculation, the computational method, and the installation method of the OPT-TWO, and also describes the application method of the criticality calculation of OPT-TWO. (author)

  20. Residual stresses in as-sprayed and heat treated TBCs : measurements and FEM calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolloos, M.F.J.; Houben, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The first part of this paper concerns measurement of through-thickness residual stresses in TBCs by the hole-drilling method. The influences of top coat thickness and different thermal histories (furnace and burner rig) were determined. Low tensile stresses prevailed in the as-sprayed state, and low

  1. Dose distribution and dosimetry parameters calculation of MED3633 Palladium-103 source in water phantom using MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mowlavi, A. A.; Binesh, A.; Moslehitabar, H.

    2006-01-01

    Palladium-103 ( 103 Pd) is a brachytherapy source for cancer treatment. The Monte Carlo codes are usually applied for dose distribution and effect of shieldings. Monte Carlo calculation of dose distribution in water phantom due to a MED3633 103 Pd source is presented in this work. Materials and Methods: The dose distribution around the 10 3Pd Model MED3633 located in the center of 30*30*30 m 3 water phantom cube was calculated using MCNP code by the Monte Carlo method. The percentage depth dose variation along the different axis parallel and perpendicular to the source was also calculated. Then, the isodose curves for 100%, 75%, 50% and 25% percentage depth dose and dosimetry parameters of TG-43 protocol were determined. Results: The results show that the Monte Carlo Method could calculate dose deposition in high gradient region, near the source, accurately. The isodose curves and dosimetric characteristics obtained for MED3633 103 Pd source are in good agreement with published results. Conclusion: The isodose curves of the MED3633 103 Pd source have been derived form dose calculation by MCNP code. The calculated dosimetry parameters for the source agree quite well with their Monte Carlo calculated and experimental measurement values

  2. Simulation of lung cancer treatment with equivalent dose calculation and analysis of the dose distribution profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalhofer, J. L.; Marques L, J.; Da Silva, A. X.; Dos Reis J, J. P.; Da Silva J, W. F. R.; Arruda C, S. C.; Monteiro de S, E.; Santos B, D. V.

    2017-10-01

    Actually, lung cancer is one of the most lethal types, due to the disease in the majority of the cases asymptomatic in the early stages, being the detection of the pathology in advanced stage, with tumor considerable volume. Dosimetry analysis of healthy organs under real conditions is not feasible. Therefore, computational simulations are used to auxiliary in dose verification in organs of patients submitted to radiotherapy. The goal of this study is to calculate the equivalent dose, due to photons, in surrounding in healthy organs of a patient submitted to radiotherapy for lung cancer, through computational modeling. The simulation was performed using the MCNPX code (Version, 2006], Rex and Regina phantom [ICRP 110, 2008], radiotherapy room, Siemens Oncor Expression accelerator operating at 6 MV and treatment protocol adopted at the Inca (National Cancer Institute, Brazil). The results obtained, considering the dose due to photons for both phantom indicate that organs located inside the thoracic cavity received higher dose, being the bronchi, heart and esophagus more affected, due to the anatomical positioning. Clinical data describe the development of bronchiolitis, esophagitis, and cardiomyopathies with decreased cardiopulmonary function as one of the major effects of lung cancer treatment. In the Regina phantom, the second largest dose was in the region of the breasts with 615,73 mSv / Gy, while in the Rex 514,06 mSv / Gy, event related to the difference of anatomical structure of the organ. Through the t mesh command, a qualitative analysis was performed between the dose deposition profile of the planning system and the simulated treatment, with a similar profile of the dose distribution being verified along the patients body. (Author)

  3. STRESS DISTRIBUTION IN THE STRATIFIED MASS CONTAINING VERTICAL ALVEOLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobileva Tatiana Nikolaevna

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Almost all subsurface rocks used as foundations for various types of structures are stratified. Such heterogeneity may cause specific behaviour of the materials under strain. Differential equations describing the behaviour of such materials contain rapidly fluctuating coefficients, in view of this, solution of such equations is more time-consuming when using today’s computers. The method of asymptotic averaging leads to getting homogeneous medium under study to averaged equations with fixed factors. The present article is concerned with stratified soil mass consisting of pair-wise alternative isotropic elastic layers. In the results of elastic modules averaging, the present soil mass with horizontal rock stratification is simulated by homogeneous transversal-isotropic half-space with isotropy plane perpendicular to the standing axis. Half-space is loosened by a vertical alveole of circular cross-section, and virgin ground is under its own weight. For horizontal parting planes of layers, the following two types of surface conditions are set: ideal contact and backlash without cleavage. For homogeneous transversal-isotropic half-space received with a vertical alveole, the analytical solution of S.G. Lekhnitsky, well known in scientific papers, is used. The author gives expressions for stress components and displacements in soil mass for different marginal conditions on the alveole surface. Such research problems arise when constructing and maintaining buildings and when composite materials are used.

  4. Residual stress distribution analysis of heat treated APS TBC using image based modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Zhang, Xun; Chen, Ying; Carr, James; Jacques, Simon; Behnsen, Julia; di Michiel, Marco; Xiao, Ping; Cernik, Robert

    2017-08-01

    We carried out a residual stress distribution analysis in a APS TBC throughout the depth of the coatings. The samples were heat treated at 1150 °C for 190 h and the data analysis used image based modelling based on the real 3D images measured by Computed Tomography (CT). The stress distribution in several 2D slices from the 3D model is included in this paper as well as the stress distribution along several paths shown on the slices. Our analysis can explain the occurrence of the "jump" features near the interface between the top coat and the bond coat. These features in the residual stress distribution trend were measured (as a function of depth) by high-energy synchrotron XRD (as shown in our related research article entitled 'Understanding the Residual Stress Distribution through the Thickness of Atmosphere Plasma Sprayed (APS) Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) by high energy Synchrotron XRD; Digital Image Correlation (DIC) and Image Based Modelling') (Li et al., 2017) [1].

  5. Acceleration of calculation of nuclear heating distributions in ITER toroidal field coils using hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Polunovskiy, Eduard; Loughlin, Michael J.; Grove, Robert E.; Sawan, Mohamed E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Assess the detailed distribution of the nuclear heating among the components of the ITER toroidal field coils. • Utilize the FW-CADIS method to dramatically accelerate the calculation of detailed nuclear analysis. • Compare the efficiency and reliability of the FW-CADIS method and the MCNP weight window generator. - Abstract: Because the superconductivity of the ITER toroidal field coils (TFC) must be protected against local overheating, detailed spatial distribution of the TFC nuclear heating is needed to assess the acceptability of the designs of the blanket, vacuum vessel (VV), and VV thermal shield. Accurate Monte Carlo calculations of the distributions of the TFC nuclear heating are challenged by the small volumes of the tally segmentations and by the thick layers of shielding provided by the blanket and VV. To speed up the MCNP calculation of the nuclear heating distribution in different segments of the coil casing, ground insulation, and winding packs of the ITER TFC, the ITER Organization (IO) used the MCNP weight window generator (WWG). The maximum relative uncertainty of the tallies in this calculation was 82.7%. In this work, this MCNP calculation was repeated using variance reduction parameters generated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) code and both MCNP calculations were compared in terms of computational efficiency and reliability. Even though the ADVANTG MCNP calculation used less than one-sixth of the computational resources of the IO calculation, the relative uncertainties of all the tallies in the ADVANTG MCNP calculation were less than 6.1%. The nuclear heating results of the two calculations were significantly different by factors between 1.5 and 2.3 in some of the segments of the furthest winding pack turn from the plasma neutron source. Even though the nuclear heating in this turn may not affect the ITER design because it is much smaller than the nuclear heating in the

  6. Acceleration of calculation of nuclear heating distributions in ITER toroidal field coils using hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M., E-mail: ibrahimam@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Polunovskiy, Eduard; Loughlin, Michael J. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon Sur Verdon, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Grove, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Sawan, Mohamed E. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Assess the detailed distribution of the nuclear heating among the components of the ITER toroidal field coils. • Utilize the FW-CADIS method to dramatically accelerate the calculation of detailed nuclear analysis. • Compare the efficiency and reliability of the FW-CADIS method and the MCNP weight window generator. - Abstract: Because the superconductivity of the ITER toroidal field coils (TFC) must be protected against local overheating, detailed spatial distribution of the TFC nuclear heating is needed to assess the acceptability of the designs of the blanket, vacuum vessel (VV), and VV thermal shield. Accurate Monte Carlo calculations of the distributions of the TFC nuclear heating are challenged by the small volumes of the tally segmentations and by the thick layers of shielding provided by the blanket and VV. To speed up the MCNP calculation of the nuclear heating distribution in different segments of the coil casing, ground insulation, and winding packs of the ITER TFC, the ITER Organization (IO) used the MCNP weight window generator (WWG). The maximum relative uncertainty of the tallies in this calculation was 82.7%. In this work, this MCNP calculation was repeated using variance reduction parameters generated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) code and both MCNP calculations were compared in terms of computational efficiency and reliability. Even though the ADVANTG MCNP calculation used less than one-sixth of the computational resources of the IO calculation, the relative uncertainties of all the tallies in the ADVANTG MCNP calculation were less than 6.1%. The nuclear heating results of the two calculations were significantly different by factors between 1.5 and 2.3 in some of the segments of the furthest winding pack turn from the plasma neutron source. Even though the nuclear heating in this turn may not affect the ITER design because it is much smaller than the nuclear heating in the

  7. Application of evaporation model to the calculation of energy spectrum and angular distribution of recoil nuclei from neutron induced reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Y; Sugimoto, M; Sugiyama, K [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1978-12-01

    Calculated angular distributions and energy spectra from 14.8 MeV neutron induced (n,2n) reactions based on a simple evaporation model were obtained by means of the Monte Carlo method. It was ascertained that the effects on the spectra of the method of determining the nuclear temperature and the value of the level density parameter are much smaller than those of the reaction Q-value and the nuclear mass. As a check on the calculational procedure, results of similar calculations were compared with the experimental recoil escape efficiency for /sup 27/Al(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 24/Na reaction. Distortions of the energy spectra in thick target materials were also obtained. These results suggest that this model is fully applicable to the calculation of primary knock-on atoms distributions from various nuclear reactions.

  8. Analysis and measurement of residual stress distribution of vanadium/ceramics joints for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Y.; Ueda, K.

    1998-01-01

    Vanadium alloys are considered as candidate structural materials for fusion reactor system. When vanadium alloys are used in fusion reactor system, joining with ceramics for insulating is one of material issues to be solved to make component of fusion reactor. In the application of ceramics/metal jointing and coating, residual stress caused by difference of thermal expansion rate between ceramics and metals is an important factor in obtaining good bonding strength and soundness of coating. In this work, residual stress distribution in direct diffusion bonded vanadium/alumina joint (jointing temperature: 1400 C) was measured by small area X-ray diffraction method. And the comparison of finite element method (FEM) analysis and actual stress distribution was carried out. Tensile stress concentration at the edge of the boundary of the joint in alumina was observed. The residual stress concentration may cause cracks in alumina, or failure of bonding. Actually, cracks in alumina caused by thermal stress after bonding at 1500 C was observed. The stress concentration of the joint must be reduced to obtain good bonded joint. Lower bonding temperature or to devise the shape of the outer surface of the joint will reduce the stress concentration. (orig.)

  9. Calculation of stresses and deformations in a cylindrical shell with imperfect initial shape and at the circumference nonuniform temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonchuk, M.P.; Pyl'chenkov, Eh.Kh.; Dvortsova, L.I.

    1976-01-01

    A method is proposed for calculating the stress-strain state of a thin cylindrical shell with initial shape imperfections under conditions of peripheral nonuniformity of temperatures and a prolonged effect of external loads. The method is based on the plane deformation hypothesis, it takes into account geometrical nonlinearity and also the steady and nonsteady stages of creep. Different schemes are considered of the problem realization on the computer. The possibility of using the method for analyzing stresses, strains and lifetime of the fuel elements and other reactor elements is demonstrated

  10. Stress State of Elastic Thick-Walled Ring With Self-Balanced Pressures Distributed on Its Internal and External Borders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravchuk Aleksandr Stepanovich

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available For the first time with the help of the theory of analytic functions and Kolosov-Muskhelishvili formulas the problem of the two-dimensional theory of elasticity for a thickwalled ring with the uneven pressures, acting on its borders, was solved. The pressure on the inner and outer boundaries is represented by Fourier series. The authors represent the two complex functions which solve boundary problem in the form of Laurent series. The logarithmic terms in these series are absent because the boundary problem has the self-balancing loads on each boundary of ring. The coefficients in the Laurent series are calculated by the boundary conditions. Firstly, the equations were obtained in the general form. But the hypothesis about even distributions of pressures at borders of ring was used for constructing an example. It leads to the fact that all coefficients of analytic functions represented in Laurent series have to be only real. As a solving example, the representation of pressures in equivalent hypotrochoids was used. The application of the computer algebra system Mathematica greatly simplifies the calculation of the distribution of stresses and displacements in ring. It does not require manual formal separation of real and imaginary parts in terms of Kolosov-Muskhelishvili to display the distribution of the physical parameters. It separates them only for calculated numbers with the help of built-in functions.

  11. Measurement of the residual stress distribution in a thick pre-stretched aluminum plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, S. X.; Li, X. Q.; M, S.; Zhang, Y. C.; Gong, Y. D.

    2008-12-01

    Thick pre-stretched aluminum alloy plates are widely used in aircraft, while machining distortion caused by initial residual stress release in thick plates is a common and serious problem. To reduce the distortion, the residual stress distribution in thick plate must be measured. According to the characteristics of the thick pre-stretched aluminum alloy plate, based the elastic mechanical theory, this article deduces the modified layer-removal strain method adapting two different strain situations, which are caused by tensile and compressive stress. To validate this method, the residual stresses distribution along the thick direction of plate 2D70T351 is measured by this method, it is shown that the new method deduced in this paper is simple and accurate, and is very useful in engineering.

  12. Bayesian Approach for Constant-Stress Accelerated Life Testing for Kumaraswamy Weibull Distribution with Censoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Abd-Alla EL-Helbawy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The accelerated life tests provide quick information on the life time distributions by testing materials or products at higher than basic conditional levels of stress such as pressure, high temperature, vibration, voltage or load to induce failures. In this paper, the acceleration model assumed is log linear model. Constant stress tests are discussed based on Type I and Type II censoring. The Kumaraswmay Weibull distribution is used. The estimators of the parameters, reliability, hazard rate functions and p-th percentile at normal condition, low stress, and high stress are obtained. In addition, credible intervals for parameters of the models are constructed. Optimum test plan are designed. Some numerical studies are used to solve the complicated integrals such as Laplace and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods.

  13. Bayesian Approach for Constant-Stress Accelerated Life Testing for Kumaraswamy Weibull Distribution with Censoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Abd-Alla EL-Helbawy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The accelerated life tests provide quick information on the life time distributions by testing materials or products at higher than basic conditional levels of stress such as pressure, high temperature, vibration, voltage or load to induce failures. In this paper, the acceleration model assumed is log linear model. Constant stress tests are discussed based on Type I and Type II censoring. The Kumaraswmay Weibull distribution is used. The estimators of the parameters, reliability, hazard rate functions and p-th percentile at normal condition, low stress, and high stress are obtained. In addition, credible intervals for parameters of the models are constructed. Optimum test plan are designed. Some numerical studies are used to solve the complicated integrals such as Laplace and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods.

  14. Calculated energy distributions for light 0.25--18-keV ions scattered from solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.E.; Harms, A.A.; Karapetsas, S.K.

    1975-01-01

    Scattered energy distributions are calculated for light ions incident on Nb and Mo surfaces of interest for controlled nulcear fusion reactors. The scattered energy is found to vary as a function of the reflection coefficient between a multiple-collision limit at low energies and a single-collision Rutherford scattering limit at high energies. High-energy peaking of the scattered particle distributions is also found for low incident energies

  15. EGSnrc calculated and MRI-polymer gel dosimeter measured dose distribution of gamma knife in presence of inhomogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allahverdi Pourfallah, T.; Allahverdi, M.; Riahi Alam, N.; Ay, M.; Zahmatkesh, M.; Ibbott, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Stereotactic gamma-knife radiosurgery plays an important role in managing small intracranial brain lesions. Currently, polymer gel dosimetry is still the only dosimetry method for directly measuring three-dimensional dose distributions. polymer gel dosimeters are tissue equivalent and can act as a phantom material. In this study effects of inhomogeneities on those distributions have been investigated using both EGSnrc calculation and PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter. (author)

  16. The role of prosthetic abutment material on the stress distribution in a maxillary single implant-supported fixed prosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, Hugo Eduardo, E-mail: hugo.e.peixoto@hotmail.com [Implantology Team, Latin American Institute of Research and Education in Dentistry, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Bordin, Dimorvan, E-mail: dimorvan_bordin@hotmail.com [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Limeira avenue, 901-Vila Rezende, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903 (Brazil); Del Bel Cury, Altair A., E-mail: altcury@fop.unicamp.br [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Limeira avenue, 901-Vila Rezende, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903 (Brazil); Silva, Wander José da, E-mail: wanderjose@fop.unicamp.br [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Limeira avenue, 901-Vila Rezende, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903 (Brazil); Faot, Fernanda, E-mail: fernanda.faot@gmail.com [Department of Restorative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Gonçalves Chaves, 457, 2nd floor, Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul 96015-560 (Brazil)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the influence of abutment's material and geometry on stress distribution in a single implant-supported prosthesis. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional models were made based on tomographic slices of the upper middle incisor area, in which a morse taper implant was positioned and a titanium (Ti) or zirconia (ZrN) universal abutments was installed. The commercially available geometry of titanium (T) and zirconia (Z) abutments were used to draw two models, TM1 and ZM1 respectively, which served as control groups. These models were compared with 2 experimental groups were the mechanical properties of Z were applied to the titanium abutment (TM2) and vice versa for the zirconia abutment (ZM2). Subsequently, loading was simulated in two steps, starting with a preload phase, calculated with the respective friction coefficients of each materials, followed by a combined preload and chewing force. The maximum von Mises stress was described. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA that considered material composition, geometry and loading (p < 0.05). Results: Titanium and zirconia abutments showed similar von Mises stresses in the mechanical part of the four models. The area with the highest concentration of stress was the screw thread, following by the screw body. The highest stress levels occurred in screw thread was observed during the preloading phase in the ZM1 model (931 MPa); and during the combined loading in the TM1 model (965 MPa). Statistically significant differences were observed for loading, the material × loading interaction, and the loading × geometry interaction (p < 0.05). Preloading contributed for 77.89% of the stress (p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences to the other factors (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The screw was the piece most intensely affected, mainly through the preload force, independent of the abutment's material. - Highlights: • The abutment's screw was the most impaired piece of the

  17. Calculation of three-dimensional mass flow and temperature distributions of nuclear reactors using the hardy cross iterative global solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Neto, A.J. da; Alvim, A.C.M.

    1989-01-01

    This work describes the thermalhydraulics code CROSS, designed for micro-computer calculation of heat and mass flow distributions in LWR nuclear reactor cores using the Hardy Cross method. Equations to calculate the pressure variations in the coolant channels are presented, along with derivation of a linear system of equations to calculate the energy balance. This system is solved through the Benachievicz method. A case study is presented, showing that the methodology developed in this work can be used in place of the forward marching multi-channel codes. (author) [pt

  18. Development of the balance equations model for calculation of ion charge-state distribution in ECR ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, A.V.; Shirkov, G.D.; Consoli, F.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Barbarino, S.

    2008-01-01

    The investigation of the widespread model for the calculation of ion charge-state distributions (CSD) in electron cyclotron-resonance ion source based on the set of balance equations is given. The modification of this model that allows one to describe the confinement and accumulation processes of highly charged ions in ECR plasma for gas mixing case more precisely is discussed. The new approach for the time confinement calculation (ions and electrons) based on the theory of Pastukhov is offered, viz. - calculation of confinement times during two step minimization of special type functionals. The results obtained by this approach have been compared with available experimental data

  19. Distribution and natural history of stress fractures in U.S. Marine recruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greaney, R.B.; Gerber, F.H.; Laughlin, R.L.; Kmet, J.P.; Metz, C.D.; Kilcheski, T.S.; Rao, B.R.; Silverman, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    In a prospective study of stress injuries of the lower extremities of U.S. Marine recruits, researchers derived a frequency distribution of stress fractures. The most frequently fractured bone was the tibia (73%), while the single most common site was the posterior calcaneal tuberosity (21%). The natural history of stress fractures by scintigraphy and radiography has been outlined, showing the evolutionary changes on either study as a universal progression independent of injury site or type of stress. An identical spectrum of changes should be present within any group undergoing intense new exercise. The frequency distribution of stress fractures should be a function of differing forms and intensities of exercise, therefore, our figures should not be applied to other groups. Researchers used the presence of a scintigraphic abnormality at a symptomatic site as the criterion for diagnosis of stress fracture. Since the distribution of skeletal radiotracer uptake is directly dependent on local metabolic activity, it is expected that a focal alteration in bone metabolism will result in a scintigram approaching 100% sensitivity for the abnormality (9). In the proper clinical setting, the specificity should approximate this figure; however, a focal, nonstress-related bone abnormality which has not manifested any radiographic change, such as early osteomyelitis, could result in a false-positive examination. Specificity cannot, therefore, be accurately determined without an actual determination of the pathologic changes within the bone, necessarily involving biopsy

  20. Measurements of three dimensional residual stress distribution on laser irradiated spot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hirotomo; Akita, Koichi; Ohya, Shin-ichi; Sano, Yuji; Naito, Hideki

    2004-01-01

    Three dimensional residual stress distributions on laser irradiated spots were measured using synchrotron radiation to study the basic mechanism of laser peening. A water-immersed sample of high tensile strength steel was irradiated with Q-switched and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The residual stress depth profile of the sample was obtained by alternately repeating the measurement and surface layer removal by electrolytic polishing. Tensile residual stresses were observed on the surface of all irradiated spots, whereas residual stress changed to compressive just beneath the surface. The depth of compressive residual stress imparted by laser irradiation and plastic deformation zone increased with increasing the number of laser pulses irradiated on the same spot. (author)

  1. The influence of muscle forces on the stress distribution in the lumbar spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, C; Rasmussen, J; Simonsen, Erik B.

    2011-01-01

    muscles. Results: In general the von Mises stress was larger by 30 %, and even higher when looking at the von Mises stress distribution in the superio-anterior and central part of the vertebral body and in the pedicles. Conclusion: The application of spine muscles to a finite element model showed markedly...... larger von Mises stress responses in the central and anterior part of the vertebral body, which can be tolerated in the young and healthy spine, but it would increase the risk of compression fractures in the elderly, osteoporotic spine.......Introduction: Previous studies of bone stresses in the human lumbar spine have relied on simplified models when modeling the spinal musculature, even though muscle forces are likely major contributors to the stresses in the vertebral bones. Detailed musculoskeletal spine models have recently become...

  2. Calculating disadvantage factor for fuel taking into account the neutron energy distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.

    1964-01-01

    Errors in calculating the disadvantage factor are caused by applying the diffusion approximation and one-group method. This paper describes the method for calculating the fuel disadvantage factor by applying a non-diffusion method taking into account neutron thermalization

  3. Determination of stress distribution in III-V single crystal layers for heterogeneous integration applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, M.; Hayashi, S. [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Goorsky, M.S.; Sandhu, R.; Chang-Chien, P.; Gutierrez-Aitken, A.; Tsai, R. [Northrop Grumman Space Technology, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Noori, A.; Poust, B. [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Northrop Grumman Space Technology, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    Double crystal X-ray diffraction imaging and a variable temperature stage are employed to determine the stress distribution in heterogeneous wafer bonded layers though the superposition of images produced at different rocking curve angles. The stress distribution in InP layers transferred to a silicon substrate at room temperature exhibits an anticlastic deformation, with different regions of the wafer experiencing different signs of curvature. Measurements at elevated temperatures ({<=}125 C) reveals that differences in thermal expansion coefficients dominate the stress and that interfacial particulates introduce very high local stress gradients that increase with increased temperature. For thinned GaAs substrates (100 {mu}m) bonded using patterned metal interlayers to a separate GaAs substrate at {approx}200 C, residual stresses are produced at room temperature due to local stress points from metallization contacts and vias and the complex stress patterns can be observed using the diffraction imaging technique. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Calculation of neutron radiation energy deposition distribution in subcellular parts of tissue using recombination chamber microdosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golnik, N.; Zielczynski, M.

    1999-01-01

    Recombination chamber microdosimetry was used as an instrument for determination of local neutron radiation energy deposition distribution. The method allows to simulate of subcellular regions of tissue of the order of 70 nm in size. The results obtained qualitatively correspond to relationship between biological efficiency and neutron energy, and show regular differences of distributions achieved by the recombination method and distributions measured using tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC), which simulates greater tissue regions of 1 μm in size

  5. Global heating distributions for January 1979 calculated from GLA assimilated and simulated model-based datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaack, Todd K.; Lenzen, Allen J.; Johnson, Donald R.

    1991-01-01

    This study surveys the large-scale distribution of heating for January 1979 obtained from five sources of information. Through intercomparison of these distributions, with emphasis on satellite-derived information, an investigation is conducted into the global distribution of atmospheric heating and the impact of observations on the diagnostic estimates of heating derived from assimilated datasets. The results indicate a substantial impact of satellite information on diagnostic estimates of heating in regions where there is a scarcity of conventional observations. The addition of satellite data provides information on the atmosphere's temperature and wind structure that is important for estimation of the global distribution of heating and energy exchange.

  6. ZOCO V - a computer code for the calculation of time-dependent spatial pressure distribution in reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfeld, G.; Schally, P.

    1978-06-01

    ZOCO V is a computer code which can calculate the time- and space- dependent pressure distribution in containments of water-cooled nuclear power reactors (both full pressure containments and pressure suppression systems) following a loss-of-coolant accident, caused by the rupture of a main coolant or steam pipe

  7. Dose distributions of a proton beam for eye tumor therapy: Hybrid pencil-beam ray-tracing calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rethfeldt, Ch.; Fuchs, H.; Gardey, K.-U.

    2006-01-01

    For the case of eye tumor therapy with protons, improvements are introduced compared to the standard dose calculation which implies straight-line optics and the constant-density assumption for the eye and its surrounding. The progress consists of (i) taking account of the lateral scattering of the protons in tissue by folding the entrance fluence distribution with the pencil beam distribution widening with growing depth in the tissue, (ii) rescaling the spread-out Bragg peak dose distribution in water with the radiological path length calculated voxel by voxel on ray traces through a realistic density matrix for the treatment geometry, yielding a trajectory dependence of the geometrical range. Distributions calculated for some specific situations are compared to measurements and/or standard calculations, and differences to the latter are discussed with respect to the requirements of therapy planning. The most pronounced changes appear for wedges placed in front of the eye, causing additional widening of the lateral falloff. The more accurate prediction of the dose dependence at the field borders is of interest with respect to side effects in the risk organs of the eye

  8. Calculation of the magnetic flux density distribution in type-II superconductors with finite thickness and well-defined geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forkl, A.; Kronmueller, H.

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of the critical current density j c (r) in hard type-II superconductors depends strongly on their sample geometry. Rules are given for the construction of j c (r). Samples with homogeneous thickness are divided into cakelike regions with a unique current direction. The spatial magnetic flux density distribution and the magnetic polarization of such a cakelike unit cell with homogeneous current density are calculated analytically. The magnetic polarization and magnetic flux density distribution of a superconductor in the mixed state is then given by an adequate superposition of the unit cell solutions. The theoretical results show good agreement with magneto-optically determined magnetic flux density distributions of a quadratic thin superconducting YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x film. The current density distribution is discussed for several sample geometries

  9. Quantum key distribution with finite resources: calculating the min-entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratzik, Sylvia; Mertz, Markus; Kampermann, Hermann; Abruzzo, Silvestre; Bruss, Dagmar [Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The min-entropy is an important quantity in quantum key distribution. Recently, a connection between the min- entropy and the minimal-error discrimination problem was found. We use this connection to evaluate the min-entropy for different quantum key distribution setups.

  10. Calculation of oxygen distribution in uranium-plutonium oxide fuels during irradiation (programme CODIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, A.; Sari, C.

    1978-01-01

    Radial gradients of oxygen to metal ratio, O/M, in uranium-plutonium oxide fuel pins, during irradiation and at the end of life, have been calculated on the basis of solid-state thermal diffusion using measured values of the heat of transport. A detailed computer model which includes the calculation of temperature profiles and the variation of the average O/M ratio as a function of burn-up is given. Calculations show that oxygen profiles are affected by the isotopic composition of the fuel, by the temperature profiles and by fuel-cladding interactions

  11. On the symmetric α-stable distribution with application to symbol error rate calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Soury, Hamza

    2016-12-24

    The probability density function (PDF) of the symmetric α-stable distribution is investigated using the inverse Fourier transform of its characteristic function. For general values of the stable parameter α, it is shown that the PDF and the cumulative distribution function of the symmetric stable distribution can be expressed in terms of the Fox H function as closed-form. As an application, the probability of error of single input single output communication systems using different modulation schemes with an α-stable perturbation is studied. In more details, a generic formula is derived for generalized fading distribution, such as the extended generalized-k distribution. Later, simpler expressions of these error rates are deduced for some selected special cases and compact approximations are derived using asymptotic expansions.

  12. Calculation of stress intensity factors using the UNCLE finite element system and their application in fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, J.H.B.

    1978-02-01

    The behaviour of crack-like defects in loaded structures is in many cases characterised by the stress intensity factor, K, which describes the spatial distribution around the crack tip. Analytical evaluation of K for generalised loading and geometry would be extremely complex. A finite element approach is described which utilises the existing UNCLE system of the UKAEA. The interpretation of the results for a fracture mechanics analysis is briefly reviewed. (author)

  13. A Study of Stress Distribution in Layered and Gradient Tribological Coatings (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    FG) Ti/TiC coating design. On the top of the 440C stainless steel substrate, α-Ti is added as a bond layer with 50nm thickness to improve the... stainless steel substrate and the rigid spherical indenter was performed. Figure 5 (a) shows the normalized Hertzian point contact pressure distribution...AFRL-ML-WP-TP-2007-402 A STUDY OF STRESS DISTRIBUTION IN LAYERED AND GRADIENT TRIBOLOGICAL COATINGS (PREPRINT) Young Sup Kang, Shashi K

  14. Forward-weighted CADIS method for variance reduction of Monte Carlo calculations of distributions and multiple localized quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J. C.; Blakeman, E. D.; Peplow, D. E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid (Monte Carlo/deterministic) method for increasing the efficiency of Monte Carlo calculations of distributions, such as flux or dose rate distributions (e.g., mesh tallies), as well as responses at multiple localized detectors and spectra. This method, referred to as Forward-Weighted CADIS (FW-CADIS), is a variation on the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method, which has been used for some time to very effectively improve the efficiency of Monte Carlo calculations of localized quantities, e.g., flux, dose, or reaction rate at a specific location. The basis of this method is the development of an importance function that represents the importance of particles to the objective of uniform Monte Carlo particle density in the desired tally regions. Implementation of this method utilizes the results from a forward deterministic calculation to develop a forward-weighted source for a deterministic adjoint calculation. The resulting adjoint function is then used to generate consistent space- and energy-dependent source biasing parameters and weight windows that are used in a forward Monte Carlo calculation to obtain approximately uniform statistical uncertainties in the desired tally regions. The FW-CADIS method has been implemented in the ADVANTG/MCNP framework and has been fully automated within the MAVRIC sequence of SCALE 6. Results of the application of the method to enabling the calculation of dose rates throughout an entire full-scale pressurized-water reactor facility are presented and discussed. (authors)

  15. Effect of processing conditions on residual stress distributions by bead-on-plate welding after surface machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Ryohei; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2014-01-01

    Residual stress is important factor for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) that has been observed near the welded zone in nuclear power plants. Especially, surface residual stress is significant for SCC initiation. In the joining processes of pipes, butt welding is conducted after surface machining. Residual stress is generated by both processes, and residual stress distribution due to surface machining is varied by the subsequent butt welding. In previous paper, authors reported that residual stress distribution generated by bead on plate welding after surface machining has a local maximum residual stress near the weld metal. The local maximum residual stress shows approximately 900 MPa that exceeds the stress threshold for SCC initiation. Therefore, for the safety improvement of nuclear power plants, a study on the local maximum residual stress is important. In this study, the effect of surface machining and welding conditions on residual stress distribution generated by welding after surface machining was investigated. Surface machining using lathe machine and bead on plate welding with tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc under various conditions were conducted for plate specimens made of SUS316L. Then, residual stress distributions were measured by X-ray diffraction method (XRD). As a result, residual stress distributions have the local maximum residual stress near the weld metal in all specimens. The values of the local maximum residual stresses are almost the same. The location of the local maximum residual stress is varied by welding condition. It could be consider that the local maximum residual stress is generated by same generation mechanism as welding residual stress in surface machined layer that has high yield stress. (author)

  16. Measurements and calculations of neutron spectra and neutron dose distribution in human phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palfalvi, J.

    1984-11-01

    The measurement and calculation of the radiation field around and in a phantom, with regard to the neutron component and the contaminating gamma radiation, are essential for radiation protection and radiotherapy purposes. The final report includes the development of the simple detector system, automized detector measuring facilities and a computerized evaluating system. The results of the depth dose and neutron spectra experiments and calculations in a human phantom are given

  17. Thermal stresses calculations in near-surface layers of sphere bodies, falling to the Sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demchenko, B.I.; Shestakova, L.I.

    2005-01-01

    Profiles of temperature and temperature stresses in surface layers of silicate and icy spheric bodies, falling to the Sun along parabolic orbits were obtained on the base of the analytical solution of the linear heat diffusion equation. Results may be useful for thermal evolution analysis of meteor and comet bodies in the Sun system. (author)

  18. Calculation of hydrogen diffusion toward a crack in a stressed solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-10-01

    A set of eigensolutions is derived for use in expanding the steady-state concentration of hydrogen diffusing through a region bounded by two cylinders centred on an infinite crack in a stressed solid. Comparison is made with some experimental values of the hydrogen-induced crack-propagation velocity within the framework of the theory of Dutton and Puls. (author)

  19. Numerical weld modeling - a method for calculating weld-induced residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, S.; Keim, E.; Schmidt, J.

    2001-01-01

    In the past, weld-induced residual stresses caused damage to numerous (power) plant parts, components and systems (Erve, M., Wesseling, U., Kilian, R., Hardt, R., Bruemmer, G., Maier, V., Ilg, U., 1994. Cracking in Stabilized Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping of German Boiling Water Reactors - Characteristic Features and Root Causes. 20. MPA-Seminar 1994, vol. 2, paper 29, pp.29.1-29.21). In the case of BWR nuclear power plants, this damage can be caused by the mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in austenitic piping or the core shroud in the reactor pressure vessel and is triggered chiefly by weld-induced residual stresses. One solution of this problem that has been used in the past involves experimental measurements of residual stresses in conjunction with weld optimization testing. However, the experimental analysis of all relevant parameters is an extremely tedious process. Numerical simulation using the finite element method (FEM) not only supplements this method but, in view of modern computer capacities, is also an equally valid alternative in its own right. This paper will demonstrate that the technique developed for numerical simulation of the welding process has not only been properly verified and validated on austenitic pipe welds, but that it also permits making selective statements on improvements to the welding process. For instance, numerical simulation can provide information on the starting point of welding for every weld bead, the effect of interpass cooling as far as a possible sensitization of the heat affected zone (HAZ) is concerned, the effect of gap width on the resultant weld residual stresses, or the effect of the 'last pass heat sink welding' (welding of the final passes while simultaneously cooling the inner surface with water) producing compressive stresses in the root area of a circumferential weld in an austenitic pipe. The computer program FERESA (finite element residual stress analysis) was based on a commercially

  20. Stress Prediction for Distributed Structural Health Monitoring Using Existing Measurements and Pattern Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Teng, Jun; Zhou, Qiushi; Peng, Qiexin

    2018-02-01

    The stress in structural steel members is the most useful and directly measurable physical quantity to evaluate the structural safety in structural health monitoring, which is also an important index to evaluate the stress distribution and force condition of structures during structural construction and service phases. Thus, it is common to set stress as a measure in steel structural monitoring. Considering the economy and the importance of the structural members, there are only a limited number of sensors that can be placed, which means that it is impossible to obtain the stresses of all members directly using sensors. This study aims to develop a stress response prediction method for locations where there are insufficent sensors, using measurements from a limited number of sensors and pattern recognition. The detailed improved aspects are: (1) a distributed computing process is proposed, where the same pattern is recognized by several subsets of measurements; and (2) the pattern recognition using the subset of measurements is carried out by considering the optimal number of sensors and number of fusion patterns. The validity and feasibility of the proposed method are verified using two examples: the finite-element simulation of a single-layer shell-like steel structure, and the structural health monitoring of the space steel roof of Shenzhen Bay Stadium; for the latter, the anti-noise performance of this method is verified by the stress measurements from a real-world project.

  1. Statistics on Near Wall Structures and Shear Stress Distribution from 3D Holographic Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, J.; Malkiel, E.; Katz, J.

    2007-11-01

    Digital Holographic Microscopy performs 3D velocity measurement in the near-wall region of a turbulent boundary layer in a square channel over a smooth wall at Reτ=1,400. Resolution of ˜1μm over a sample volume of 1.5x2x1.5mm (x^+=50, y^+=60, z^+=50) is sufficient for resolving buffer layer and lower log layer structures, and for measuring instantaneous wall shear stress distributions from velocity gradients in the viscous sublayer. Results, based on 700 instantaneous realizations, provide detailed statistics on the spatial distribution of both wall stress components along with characteristic flow structures. Conditional sampling based on maxima and minima of wall shear stresses, as well as examination of instantaneous flow structures, lead to development of a conceptual model for a characteristic flow phenomenon that seems to generating extreme stress events. This structure develops as an initially spanwise vortex element rises away from the surface, due to local disturbance, causing a local stress minimum. Due to increasing velocity with elevation, this element bends downstream, forming a pair of inclined streamwise vortices, aligned at 45^0 to freestream, with ejection-like flow between them. Entrainment of high streamwise momentum on the outer sides of this vortex pair generates streamwise shear stress maxima, 70 δν downstream, which are displaced laterally by 35 δν from the local minimum.

  2. Evaluation of stress distribution characteristics on various bar designs of three-implant-supported mandibular overdentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Tokar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Implant-supported-overdentures, instead of conventional complete dentures, are frequently recommended to rehabilitate patients having edentulous mandible. The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution characteristics of mandibular implant-supported overdentures with four different bar attachment designs. Materials and Method: A photoelastic mandibular model with three implants (3.75 mm - 13 mm placed at the interforaminal region was generated from a cast of an edentulous mandible. Four mandibular bar overdenture designs were fabricated: bar-clip, bar-galvano, bar-locator, and bar-ceka. Axial vertical loads (135 N were applied to the central fossa of the right first molar area for each overdenture design. Stress concentrations were recorded photographically and analyzed visually. Results: The tested bar attachment designs revealed low and moderate stress levels. The lowest stress was observed with the bar-clip design, followed by bar-locator, bar-ceka, and bar-galvano designs. Conclusion: The loads were distributed to all of the implants. Studied designs experienced moderate stress levels around the loaded side implant. Bars with distally placed stud attachments and surface treatment with electroforming seems to increase stress levels around the implants.

  3. Calculated thermally induced displacements and stresses for heater experiments at Stripa, Sweden. Linear thermoelastic models using constant material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, T.; Cook, N.G.W.

    1979-12-01

    Thermally induced displacements and stresses have been calculated by finite element analysis to guide the design, operation, and data interpretation of the in situ heating experiments in a granite formation at Stripa, Sweden. There are two full-scale tests with electrical heater canisters comparable in size and power to those envisaged for reprocessed high level waste canisters and a time-scaled test. To provide a simple theoretical basis for data analysis, linear thermoelasticity was assumed. Constant (temperature-independent) thermal and mechanical rock properties were used in the calculations. These properties were determined by conventional laboratory testing on small intact core specimens recovered from the Stripa test site. Two-dimensional axisymmetric models were used for the full-scale experiments, and three-dimensional models for the time-scaled experiment. Highest compressive axial and tangential stresses are expected at the wall of the heater borehole. For the 3.6 kW full-scale heated experiment, maximum compressive tangential stress was predicted to be below the unconfined compressive strength of Stripa granite, while for the 5 kW experiment, the maximum was approximately equal to the compressive strength before the concentric ring of eight 1 kW peripheral heaters was activated, but would exceed that soon afterwards. Three zones of tensile thermomechanical stresses will occur in each full-scale experiment. Maximum vertical displacements range from a fraction of a millimeter over most of the instrumented area of the time-scaled experiment to a few millimeters in the higher-power full-scale experiment. Radial displacements are typically half or less than vertical displacements. The predicted thermomechanical displacements and stresses have been stored in an on-site computer to facilitate instant graphic comparison with field data as the latter are collected

  4. Efficient computer program EPAS-J1 for calculating stress intensity factors of three-dimensional surface cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Takayuki; Yagawa, Genki.

    1982-03-01

    A finite element computer program EPAS-J1 was developed to calculate the stress intensity factors of three-dimensional cracks. In the program, the stress intensity factor is determined by the virtual crack extension method together with the distorted elements allocated along the crack front. This program also includes the connection elements based on the Lagrange multiplier concept to connect such different kinds of elements as the solid and shell elements, or the shell and beam elements. For the structure including three-dimensional surface cracks, the solid elements are employed only at the neighborhood of a surface crack, while the remainder of the structure is modeled by the shell or beam elements due to the reason that the crack singularity is very local. Computer storage and computational time can be highly reduced with the application of the above modeling technique for the calculation of the stress intensity factors of the three-dimensional surface cracks, because the three-dimensional solid elements are required only around the crack front. Several numerical analyses were performed by the EPAS-J1 program. At first, the accuracies of the connection element and the virtual crack extension method were confirmed using the simple structures. Compared with other techniques of connecting different kinds of elements such as the tying method or the method using anisotropic plate element, the present connection element is found to provide better results than the others. It is also found that the virtual crack extension method provides the accurate stress intensity factor. Furthermore, the results are also presented for the stress intensity factor analyses of cylinders with longitudinal or circumferential surface cracks using the combination of the various kinds of elements together with the connection elements. (author)

  5. On the symmetric α-stable distribution with application to symbol error rate calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Soury, Hamza; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    The probability density function (PDF) of the symmetric α-stable distribution is investigated using the inverse Fourier transform of its characteristic function. For general values of the stable parameter α, it is shown that the PDF

  6. Calculation of dose distribution for 252Cf fission neutron source in tissue equivalent phantoms using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Gang; Guo Yong; Luo Yisheng; Zhang Wenzhong

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To provide useful parameters for neutron radiotherapy, the author presents results of a Monte Carlo simulation study investigating the dosimetric characteristics of linear 252 Cf fission neutron sources. Methods: A 252 Cf fission source and tissue equivalent phantom were modeled. The dose of neutron and gamma radiations were calculated using Monte Carlo Code. Results: The dose of neutron and gamma at several positions for 252 Cf in the phantom made of equivalent materials to water, blood, muscle, skin, bone and lung were calculated. Conclusion: The results by Monte Carlo methods were compared with the data by measurement and references. According to the calculation, the method using water phantom to simulate local tissues such as muscle, blood and skin is reasonable for the calculation and measurements of dose distribution for 252 Cf

  7. Influence of Sewer Sediments on Flow Friction and Shear Stress Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrusquia, G.; Petersen, O.; Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    Most sewers contain more or less deposited sediments. The paper discusses the distribution of the boundary shear stresses and the hydraulic resistance in part-full sewer pipes with such deposited sediments. The discussion is based on a series of numerical experiments using a validated numerical...

  8. Is the wide distribution of aspen a result of its stress tolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    V. J. Lieffers; S. M. Landhausser; E. H. Hogg

    2001-01-01

    Populus tremuloides is distributed from drought-prone fringes of the Great Plains to extremely cold sites at arctic treeline. To occupy these conditions aspen appears to be more tolerant of stress than the other North American species of the genus Populus. Cold winters, cold soil conditions during the growing season, periodic drought, insect defoliation, and...

  9. The influence of initial defects on mechanical stress and deformation distribution in oxidized silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulinich O. A.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The near-surface silicon layers in silicon – dioxide silicon systems with modern methods of research are investigated. It is shown that these layers have compound structure and their parameters depend on oxidation and initial silicon parameters. It is shown the influence of initial defects on mechanical stress and deformation distribution in oxidized silicon.

  10. Thermal stress comparison in modular power converter topologies for smart transformers in the electrical distribution system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Markus; Ma, Ke; Liserre, Marco

    2015-01-01

    A Smart Transformer (ST) can cover an important managing role in the future electrical distribution grid. For the moment, the reliability and cost are not competitive with traditional transformers and create a barrier for its application. This work conduct detail designs and analysis...... for a promising modular ST solution, which is composed of Modular Multi-level converter, Quad Active Bridge DC-DC converters, and two-level voltage source converters. The focus is put on the loading conditions and thermal stress of power semiconductor devices in order to discover critical parts of the whole...... system when performing various mission profiles in the realistic distribution grid. It is concluded that the thermal stress for all stages is low during normal operation and especially the isolation stage is stressed least....

  11. Parameter Estimations and Optimal Design of Simple Step-Stress Model for Gamma Dual Weibull Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy Mohamed Salem

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers life-testing experiments and how it is effected by stress factors: namely temperature, electricity loads, cycling rate and pressure. A major type of accelerated life tests is a step-stress model that allows the experimenter to increase stress levels more than normal use during the experiment to see the failure items. The test items are assumed to follow Gamma Dual Weibull distribution. Different methods for estimating the parameters are discussed. These include Maximum Likelihood Estimations and Confidence Interval Estimations which is based on asymptotic normality generate narrow intervals to the unknown distribution parameters with high probability. MathCAD (2001 program is used to illustrate the optimal time procedure through numerical examples.

  12. A fully coupled finite element model for stress distribution in buried gas pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahya Sukirman; Zainal Zakaria; Woong Soon Yue

    2001-01-01

    The study of stress-strain relationship is very important in many designs of buried structures over the years. The behavior and mechanism between the interaction of soil and buried structures such as a natural pipeline will mostly contributes to the integrity of the pipeline. This paper presents a fully coupled finite element of consolidation analysis model to study the stress-strain distribution along a buried pipeline before it excess its maximum deformation limit. The behavior of the soil-pipeline system can be modelled by a non-linear elasto-plastic based on Mohr-Coulomb and critical state yield surfaces. The deformation and deflection of the pipeline due to drained and external loading condition will be considered here. Finally the stress-strain distribution of the buried pipeline will be utilised to obtain the maximum deformation limit and the deflection of the buried pipeline. (Author)

  13. Evaluation of the stress distribution on the pressure vessel head with multi-openings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.S.; Kim, T.W.; Jeong, K.H.; Lee, G.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-06-01

    This report discusses and analyzes the stress distribution on the pressure vessel head with multi-openings(3 PSV nozzles, 2 SDS nozzles and 1 Man Way) according to patterns of the opening distance. The pressurizer of Korea Standardized Nuclear Power Plant(Ulchin 3 and 4), which meets requirements of the cyclic operation and opening design defined by ASME code, was used as the basic model for that. Stress changes according to the distance between openings were investigated and the factors which should be considered for the opening design were analyzed. Also, the nozzle loads at Level A, B conditions and internal pressure were applied in order to evaluate changes of head stress distributions due to nozzle loads. (author). 6 refs., 29 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Calculation of the dose distribution in water from {sup 71}Ge K-shell x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang H.; Reece, Warren D.; Poston, John W. Sr. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States)

    1997-06-01

    The dose distribution in water from {sup 71}Ge K-shell x-rays (E{sub ave}=9.44 eV) was calculated for various source configurations using both analytic and GS4 Monte Carlo calculations. The point source kernel and the buildup factor are presented. The buildup factor for a point source in water has been found to increase up to about 1.1 as radial distance approaches 1 cm. Comparison between {sup 71}Ge and {sup 90}Sr/Y shows a similarity between their relative dose distribution in water. The dose distribution from a disc source was calculated using the EGS4 code and compared with the results from analytic calculation. Excellent agreement was observed, confirming the validity of analytic calculations. The dose rate at 0.01 cm from a {sup 71}Ge disc source was calculated to be about 1.3x10{sup -5} Gy MBq{sup -1}s{sup -1}. Based on the results from his study, {sup 71}Ge activity of the order of 3.7x10{sup 10} Bq({approx}1 Ci) might be necessary to obtain dose rates typical of {sup 90}Sr/Y ophthalmic applicators. The possibility of using {sup 71}Ge as a source of radioactive stents was also investigated. A {sup 71}Ge stent was modelled as a cylindrical shell source and the dose rates were determined by Monte Carlo calculations. Some calculated results are compared with published values for a {sup 32}P-coated stent. The dose rate at 0.01 cm from a {sup 71}Ge stent has been calculated to be about .5x10{sup -3} Gy MBq{sup -1}h{sup -1}, which is much lower than the reported dose rate at the same distance from a {sup 32}P-coated stent. However, an initial source activity of the order of 3.7x10{sup 7} Bq ({approx}1 mCi) would easily result in a typical target dose ({approx}24 Gy) needed for intravascular stent applications. In conclusion, {sup 71}Ge sources could be used as alternatives to beta sources and, unlike high-energy ({approx}MeV) beta sources, may provide easily predictable dose distributions in heterogeneous media and low dose rates, which might be beneficial for

  15. Adaptation of BAp crystal orientation to stress distribution in rat mandible during bone growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, T; Fujitani, W; Ishimoto, T [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Umakoshi, Y [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1, Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaragi, 305-0471 (Japan)], E-mail: nakano@mat.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2009-05-01

    Biological apatite (BAp) c-axis orientation strongly depends on stress distribution in vivo and tends to align along the principal stress direction in bones. Dentulous mandible is subjected to a complicated stress condition in vivo during chewing but few studies have been carried out on the BAp c-axis orientation; so the adaptation of BAp crystal orientation to stress distribution was examined in rat dentulous mandible during bone growth and mastication. Female SD rats 4 to 14 weeks old were prepared, and the bone mineral density (BMD) and BAp crystal orientation were analyzed in a cross-section of mandible across the first molar focusing on two positions: separated from and just under the tooth root on the same cross-section perpendicular to the mesiodistal axis. The degree of BAp orientation was analyzed by a microbeam X-ray diffractometer using Cu-K{alpha} radiation equipped with a detector of curved one-dimensional PSPC and two-dimensional PSPC in the reflection and transmission optics, respectively. BMD quickly increased during bone growth up to 14 weeks, although it was independent of the position from the tooth root. In contrast, BAp crystal orientation strongly depended on the age and the position from the tooth root, even in the same cross-section and direction, especially along the mesiodistal and the biting axes. With increased biting stress during bone growth, the degree of BAp orientation increased along the mesiodistal axis in a position separated from the tooth root more than that near the tooth root. In contrast, BAp preferential alignment clearly appeared along the biting axis near the tooth root. We conclude that BAp orientation rather than BMD sensitively adapts to local stress distribution, especially from the chewing stress in vivo in the mandible.

  16. Calculation of spatial distribution of optical escape factor and its application to He I collisional-radiative model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Yohei; Kado, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    An integral analytical formula for a spatial distribution of the optical escape factor (OEF) in an infinite cylindrical plasma is derived as a function of an arbitrary upper state spatial density profile, the temperature ratio of the upper state to the lower state, and the optical depth of the corresponding transition. Test calculations are carried out for three different upper state profiles, i.e., uniform (rectangular), parabolic, and Gaussian upper state profiles. The OEF takes on negative values at the periphery of the parabolic and Gaussian upper state profiles. These characteristics cannot be expressed by the conventional OEF formulas derived for the center of the plasma, even though the optical depth is increased. In addition to the analytical derivation of the formula, two practical formulas are proposed: an empirical formula of the spatial distribution of the OEF for the Gaussian upper state density profile and a linear formula of the OEF distribution for upper state profiles that are expressed as linear combinations. These formulas enable us to calculate the spatial distribution of the OEF for the multiple-Gaussian upper state profile without the need for time-consuming integral calculations.

  17. Calculated efficiencies of three-material low stress coatings for diffractive x-ray transmission optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubec, Adam; Braun, Stefan; Gawlitza, Peter; Menzel, Maik; Leson, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray optical elements made by thin film coating techniques such as multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) and multilayer zone plates (MZP) are promising approaches to achieve resolutions in hard X-ray microscopy applications of less than 10 nm. The challenge is to make a lens with a large numerical aperture on the one hand and a decent working distance on the other hand. One of the limiting factors with the coated structures is the internal stress in the films, which can lead to significant bending of the substrate and various types of unwanted diffraction effects. Several approaches have been discussed to overcome this challenge. One of these is a three-material combination such as Mo/MoSi_2/Si, where four single layers per period are deposited. Mo and Si represent the absorber and spacer in this case while MoSi_2 forms a diffusion barrier; in addition the thicknesses of absorber and spacer are chosen to minimize residual stress of the overall coating. Here the diffraction efficiency as well as the profile of the beam in the focal plane are discussed in order to find a tradeoff between lowest residual stress and best diffraction properties.

  18. Tissue distribution of 3H-corticosterone in response to stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolta, M.G.; Soliman, K.F.A.

    1981-01-01

    The level and distribution of 3 H-corticosterone ( 3 H-B) was investigated in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats in response to diethyl ether stress, epinephrine (EP) and/or dexamethasone administration. Diethyl ether stress caused a significant increase in the 3 H-B counts by some of the body tissues and brain regions studied. Plasma 3 H-B counts in the stressed rats were found to be twice as much as in the control animals. When EP (1.0 mg/kg) was injected, the tissue-plasma ratios of 3 H-B were significantly lower (P 3 H-B count in the plasma in response to diethyl ether stress or EP may indicate a decline in rate of corticosterone metabolism. (author)

  19. Calculations of tritium breeding ratio and inventory distributions of FEB blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Baiquan

    2001-01-01

    Based on the design features of FEB reactor blanket, the tritium breeding ratio and tritium concentrations in liquid lithium of each breeding zone have been calculated after 10 days full power operation for outboard blanket and one day operation for inboard blanket. The comparisons with the results calculated by Monte-Carlo code MORSE-CGT are made. Meanwhile the inventory in beryllium multiplier after one-year full power operation has also been estimated. An important conclusion has been drew the thermal hydraulic design should be careful to guarantee the blanket temperature should not rise as high as 680 degree C

  20. A methodology for on-line calculation of temperature and thermal stress under non-linear boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botto, D.; Zucca, S.; Gola, M.M.

    2003-01-01

    In the literature many works have been written dealing with the task of on-line calculation of temperature and thermal stress for machine components and structures, in order to evaluate fatigue damage accumulation and estimate residual life. One of the most widespread methodologies is the Green's function technique (GFT), by which machine parameters such as fluid temperatures, pressures and flow rates are converted into metal temperature transients and thermal stresses. However, since the GFT is based upon the linear superposition principle, it cannot be directly used in the case of varying heat transfer coefficients. In the present work, a different methodology is proposed, based upon CMS for temperature transient calculation and upon the GFT for the related thermal stress evaluation. This new approach allows variable heat transfer coefficients to be accounted for. The methodology is applied for two different case studies, taken from the literature: a thick pipe and a nozzle connected to a spherical head, both subjected to multiple convective boundary conditions

  1. Calculation of Distribution Dynamics of Inhomogeneous Temperature Field in Range of Fuel Elements by Using FreeFem++

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amosova, E. V.; Shishkin, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    This article introduces the result of studying the heat exchange in the fuel element of the nuclear reactor fuel magazine. Fuel assemblies are completed as a bundle of cylindrical fuel elements located at the tops of a regular triangle. Uneven distribution of fuel rods in a nuclear reactor’s core forms the inhomogeneity of temperature fields. This article describes the developed method for heat exchange calculation with the account for impact of an inhomogeneous temperature field on the thermal-physical properties of materials and unsteady effects. The acquired calculation results are used for evaluating the tolerable temperature levels in protective case materials.

  2. Calculated model of radioactive fission and corrosion product accumulation and distribution in a fast reactor sodium coolant circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizin, V.D.; Konyashov, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    A simple calculation procedure of radioactive products accumulation and distribution in a primary circuit has been developed on the basis of experimental investigations at the BOR-60 reactor. Common knowledge on the impurity products transfer at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas phase boundary is taken. Use is made of the typical in reactor physics relationships for the description of the products transition to the equipment surfaces, of fission products release, metal corrosion and others. Satisfactory agreement of the calculation data with the experimental ones has been obtained. (orig.)

  3. A one-dimensional, one-group absorption-production nodal method for neutron flux and power distributions calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    It is presented the absorption-production nodal method for steady and dynamical calculations in one-dimension and one group energy. It was elaborated the NOD1D computer code (in FORTRAN-IV language). Calculations of neutron flux and power distributions, burnup, effective multiplication factors and critical boron concentration were made with the NOD1D code and compared with results obtained through the CITATION code, which uses the finite difference method. The nuclear constants were produced by the LEOPARD code. (M.C.K.) [pt

  4. Application of the single-channel continuous synthesis method to criticity and power distribution calculations in thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medrano Asensio, Gregorio.

    1976-06-01

    A detailed power distribution calculation in a large power reactor requires the solution of the multigroup 3D diffusion equations. Using the finite difference method, this computation is too expensive to be performed for design purposes. This work is devoted to the single channel continous synthesis method: the choice of the trial functions and the determination of the mixing functions are discussed in details; 2D and 3D results are presented. The method is applied to the calculation of the IAEA ''Benchmark'' reactor and the results obtained are compared with a finite element resolution and with published results [fr

  5. Molecular orbital calculations of the unpaired electron distribution and electric field gradients in divalent paramagnetic Ir complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, S.R.; Vugman, N.V.; Guenzburger, D.

    1988-01-01

    Semi-empirical Molecular Orbital calculations were performed for the paramagnetic complex ions [Ir(CN) 5 ] 3- , [Ir(CN) 5 Cl] 4- and [Ir(CN) 4 Cl 2 ] 4- . Energy levels schemes and Mulliken-type populations were obtained. The distribution of the unpaired spin over the atoms in the complexes was derived, and compared to data obtained from Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectra with the aid of a Ligand Field model. The electric field gradients at the Ir nucleus were calculated and compared to experiment. The results are discussed in terms of the chemical bonds formed by Ir and the ligands. (author) [pt

  6. Calculation of the radiance distribution at the boundary of an isotropically scattering slab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doosje, M; Hoenders, B.J; Rinzema, K.

    The radiance arising from an anisotropically scattering illuminated stack of n slabs is calulated using the equation of radiative transfer. It appears to be unnecessary to calculate the radiance inside the material; including only the radiance at the boundary surfaces is sufficient to obtain the

  7. Transport calculation of neutron flux distribution in reflector of PW reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remec, I.

    1982-01-01

    Two-dimensional transport calculation of the neutron flux and spectrum in the equatorial plain of PW reactor, using computer program DOT 3, is presented. Results show significant differences between neutron fields in which test samples and reactor vessel are exposed. (author)

  8. When the mean is not enough: Calculating fixation time distributions in birth-death processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, Peter; Traulsen, Arne; Galla, Tobias

    2015-10-01

    Studies of fixation dynamics in Markov processes predominantly focus on the mean time to absorption. This may be inadequate if the distribution is broad and skewed. We compute the distribution of fixation times in one-step birth-death processes with two absorbing states. These are expressed in terms of the spectrum of the process, and we provide different representations as forward-only processes in eigenspace. These allow efficient sampling of fixation time distributions. As an application we study evolutionary game dynamics, where invading mutants can reach fixation or go extinct. We also highlight the median fixation time as a possible analog of mixing times in systems with small mutation rates and no absorbing states, whereas the mean fixation time has no such interpretation.

  9. Finite element analysis of the equivalent stress distribution in Schanz screws during the use of a femoral fracture distractor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Giordano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT To evaluate the mechanical stress and elastic deformation exercised in the thread/shaft transition of Schanz screws in assemblies with different screw anchorage distances in the entrance to the bone cortex, through the distribution and location of tension in the samples. An analysis of 3D finite elements was performed to evaluate the distribution of the equivalent stress (triple stress state in a Schanz screw fixed bicortically and orthogonally to a tubular bone, using two mounting patterns: (1 thread/shaft transition located 20 mm from the anchorage of the Schanz screws in the entrance to the bone cortex and (2 thread/shaft transition located 3 mm from the anchorage of the Schanz screws in entrance to the bone cortex. The simulations were performed maintaining the same direction of loading and the same distance from the force vector in relation to the center of the hypothetical bone. The load applied, its direction, and the distance to the center of the bone were constant during the simulations in order to maintain the moment of flexion equally constant. The present calculations demonstrated linear behavior during the experiment. It was found that the model with a distance of 20 mm between the Schanz screws anchorage in the entrance to the bone cortex and the thread/shaft transition reduces the risk of breakage or fatigue of the material during the application of constant static loads; in this model, the maximum forces observed were higher (350 MPa. The distance between the Schanz screws anchorage at the entrance to the bone cortex and the smooth thread/shaft transition of the screws used in a femoral distractor during acute distraction of a fracture must be farther from the entrance to the bone cortex, allowing greater degree of elastic deformation of the material, lower mechanical stress in the thread/shaft transition, and minimized breakage or fatigue. The suggested distance is 20 mm.

  10. Effect of local automatic control rods on three-dimensional calculations of the power distribution in an RBMK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogosbekyan, L.R.; Lysov, D.A.; Bronitskii, L.L.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical simulators and information systems that support nuclear reactor operators must have fast models to estimate how fuel reloads and control rod displacement affect neutron and power distributions in the core. The consequences of reloads and control rod displacement cannot be evaluated correctly without considering local automatic control-rod operations in maintaining the radial power distribution. Fast three-dimensional models to estimate the effects of reloads and displacement of the control and safety rods have already been examined. I.V. Zonov et al. used the following assumptions in their calculational model: (1) the full-scale problem could be reduced a three-dimensional fragment of a locally perturbed core, and (2) the boundary conditions of the fragment and its total power were constant. The last assumption considers approximately how local automatic control rods stabilize the radial power distribution, but three dimensional calculations with these rods are not considered. These assumptions were introduced to obtain high computational speed. I.L. Bronitskii et al. considered in more detail how moving the local automatic control rods affect the power dimensional in the three-dimensional fragment, because, with on-line monitoring of the reload process, information on control rod positions is periodically renewed, and the calculations are done in real time. This model to predict the three-dimensional power distribution to (1) do a preliminary reload analysis, and (2) prepare the core for reloading did not consider the effect of perturbations from the local automatic control rods. Here we examine a model of a stationary neutron distribution. On one hand it gives results in an acceptable computation time; on the other it is a full-scale three-dimensional model and considers how local automatic control rods affect both the radial and axial power distribution

  11. Estimation of dose distribution and neutron spectra in JCO critical accident by shielding calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Yukio

    2001-01-01

    The information about neutrons at the surrounding of JCO site in the critical accident is limited to survey results by neutron Rem counter in the period of accident and activation data very near the test facility measured after the shut down of accident. This caused the big uncertainty in the dose estimation by detailed shielding calculation codes. On the other hand, environmental activity data measured by radiochemical researchers included the information about fast neutrons inside of JCO site and thermal neutrons up to 1 km from test facility. It is important to grasp the actual circumstance and examine the executed evaluation of the critical accident as scientifically as possible. Therefore, it is meaningful for different field researchers to corporate and exchange the information. In the Technical Divisions of Radiation Science and Technology in Atomic Energy Society of Japan, the information about neutron spectra are released from their home page and three groups of JAERI/CRC, Sumitomo Atomic Energy Industry and Nuclear Power Engineering Corp. (NUPEC)/Mitsubishi Research Institute Inc. (MRI), tried the shielding calculation by Monte Carlo Code MCNP-4B. The procedures and main results of shielding calculations were reviewed in this report. The main difference of shielding calculation by three groups was density and water content of autoclaved light-weight concrete (ALC) as the wall and ceiling. From the result by NUPEC/MRI, it was estimated that the water content in ALC was from 0.05 g/cm 3 to 0.10 g/cm 3 . The behavior of dose equivalent attenuation obtained by shielding calculation was very similar with the measured data from 250 m to 1,700 m obtained by survey meter, TLD and monitoring post. For more exact dose estimation, more detail examination of density and water content of ALC will be needed. (author)

  12. To the calculation technique and interpretation of atom radial distribution curves in ternary alloy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutchak, Ya.I.; Frenchko, V.S.; Voznyak, O.M.

    1975-01-01

    Certain models of the structure of three-component melts are considered: the ''quasi-eutectic'' one, the model of statistical distribution of atoms and the ''polystructural'' model. The analytical expressions are given for the area under the first maximum of the curve describing the radial distribution of atoms for certain versions of the ''polystructural'' model. On the example of In-Ga-Ga and Bi-Cd-Sn eutectic melts the possibility of estimating the nature of atomic ordering in three-component melts through checking the models under consideration has been demonstrated

  13. Effective oscillator strength distributions of spherically symmetric atoms for calculating polarizabilities and long-range atom–atom interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jun, E-mail: phyjiang@yeah.net [Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics and Functional Materials of Gansu Province, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, 0909 (Australia); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, 0909 (Australia); Cheng, Yongjun, E-mail: cyj83mail@gmail.com [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, 0909 (Australia); Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Science, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Bromley, M.W.J., E-mail: brom@physics.uq.edu.au [School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4075 (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Effective oscillator strength distributions are systematically generated and tabulated for the alkali atoms, the alkaline-earth atoms, the alkaline-earth ions, the rare gases and some miscellaneous atoms. These effective distributions are used to compute the dipole, quadrupole and octupole static polarizabilities, and are then applied to the calculation of the dynamic polarizabilities at imaginary frequencies. These polarizabilities can be used to determine the long-range C{sub 6}, C{sub 8} and C{sub 10} atom–atom interactions for the dimers formed from any of these atoms and ions, and we present tables covering all of these combinations.

  14. Effective oscillator strength distributions of spherically symmetric atoms for calculating polarizabilities and long-range atom–atom interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Jun; Mitroy, J.; Cheng, Yongjun; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    Effective oscillator strength distributions are systematically generated and tabulated for the alkali atoms, the alkaline-earth atoms, the alkaline-earth ions, the rare gases and some miscellaneous atoms. These effective distributions are used to compute the dipole, quadrupole and octupole static polarizabilities, and are then applied to the calculation of the dynamic polarizabilities at imaginary frequencies. These polarizabilities can be used to determine the long-range C 6 , C 8 and C 10 atom–atom interactions for the dimers formed from any of these atoms and ions, and we present tables covering all of these combinations

  15. SOILD: A computer model for calculating the effective dose equivalent from external exposure to distributed gamma sources in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; LePoire, D.; Yu, C.; Schafetz, S.; Mehta, P.

    1991-01-01

    The SOLID computer model was developed for calculating the effective dose equivalent from external exposure to distributed gamma sources in soil. It is designed to assess external doses under various exposure scenarios that may be encountered in environmental restoration programs. The models four major functional features address (1) dose versus source depth in soil, (2) shielding of clean cover soil, (3) area of contamination, and (4) nonuniform distribution of sources. The model is also capable of adjusting doses when there are variations in soil densities for both source and cover soils. The model is supported by a data base of approximately 500 radionuclides. 4 refs

  16. POLYANA-A tool for the calculation of molecular radial distribution functions based on Molecular Dynamics trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroulis, Christos; Raptis, Theophanes; Raptis, Vasilios

    2015-12-01

    We present an application for the calculation of radial distribution functions for molecular centres of mass, based on trajectories generated by molecular simulation methods (Molecular Dynamics, Monte Carlo). When designing this application, the emphasis was placed on ease of use as well as ease of further development. In its current version, the program can read trajectories generated by the well-known DL_POLY package, but it can be easily extended to handle other formats. It is also very easy to 'hack' the program so it can compute intermolecular radial distribution functions for groups of interaction sites rather than whole molecules.

  17. THE CALCULATION OF STRESS-STRAIN STATE OF THREE-LAYER BEAM TAKING INTO ACCOUNT EDGE EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh. M. Muselemov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is dedicated to the calculation of the stress-strain state (SSS of the three-layer beam (TLB subject to boundary effects.In this paper, a system of differential equations of equilibrium of the threelayer beam. To solve these equations, it is necessary to know the 12 boundary conditions, co-which depend on support conditions and loading of sandwich beams under study. This system of equations is solved by the application package of mathematical modeling "Maple 5.4." The solution of this system we obtain expressions for determining de-formations and stress all components (bearing layers and filler, a three-layer beam anywhere under specified conditions of fastening the ends of the beam and its loading. 

  18. VLab: A Science Gateway for Distributed First Principles Calculations in Heterogeneous High Performance Computing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira, Pedro Rodrigo Castro

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and deployment of a cyberinfrastructure for distributed high-throughput computations of materials properties at high pressures and/or temperatures--the Virtual Laboratory for Earth and Planetary Materials--VLab. VLab was developed to leverage the aggregated computational power of grid systems to solve…

  19. Preliminary Calculations of Bypass Flow Distribution in a Multi-Block Air Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Hwan; Tak, Nam Il

    2011-01-01

    The development of a methodology for the bypass flow assessment in a prismatic VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) core has been conducted at KAERI. A preliminary estimation of variation of local bypass flow gap size between graphite blocks in the NHDD core were carried out. With the predicted gap sizes, their influence on the bypass flow distribution and the core hot spot was assessed. Due to the complexity of gap distributions, a system thermo-fluid analysis code is suggested as a tool for the core thermo-fluid analysis, the model and correlations of which should be validated. In order to generate data for validating the bypass flow analysis model, an experimental facility for a multi-block air test was constructed at Seoul National University (SNU). This study is focused on the preliminary evaluation of flow distribution in the test section to understand how the flow is distributed and to help the selection of experimental case. A commercial CFD code, ANSYS CFX is used for the analyses

  20. A method to calculate flux distribution in reactor systems containing materials with grain structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanek, J.

    1980-01-01

    A method is proposed to compute the neutron flux spatial distribution in slab, spherical or cylindrical systems containing zones with close grain structure of material. Several different types of equally distributed particles embedded in the matrix material are allowed in one or more zones. The multi-energy group structure of the flux is considered. The collision probability method is used to compute the fluxes in the grains and in an ''effective'' part of the matrix material. Then the overall structure of the flux distribution in the zones with homogenized materials is determined using the DPN ''surface flux'' method. Both computations are connected using the balance equation during the outer iterations. The proposed method is written in the code SURCU-DH. Two testcases are computed and discussed. One testcase is the computation of the eigenvalue in simplified slab geometry of an LWR container of one zone with boral grains equally distributed in an aluminium matrix. The second is the computation of the eigenvalue in spherical geometry of the HTR pebble-bed cell with spherical particles embedded in a graphite matrix. The results are compared to those obtained by repeated use of the WIMS Code. (author)

  1. On the calculation of x-ray scattering signals from pairwise radial distribution functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Asmus Ougaard; Biasin, Elisa; Haldrup, Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    We derive a formulation for evaluating (time-resolved) x-ray scattering signals of solvated chemical systems, based on pairwise radial distribution functions, with the aim of this formulation to accompany molecular dynamics simulations. The derivation is described in detail to eliminate any possi...

  2. A Microstructural Study of Load Distribution in Cartilage: A Comparison of Stress Relaxation versus Creep Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashvin Thambyah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The compressive response of articular cartilage has been extensively investigated and most studies have focussed largely on the directly loaded matrix. However, especially in relation to the tissue microstructure, less is known about load distribution mechanisms operating outside the directly loaded region. We have addressed this issue by using channel indentation and DIC microscopy techniques that provide visualisation of the matrix microstructural response across the regions of both direct and nondirect loading. We hypothesise that, by comparing the microstructural response following stress relaxation and creep compression, new insights can be revealed concerning the complex mechanisms of load bearing. Our results indicate that, with stress relaxation, the initial mode of stress decay appears to primarily involve relaxation of the surface layer. In the creep loading protocol, the main mode of stress release is a lateral distribution of load via the mid matrix. While these two modes of stress redistribution have a complex relationship with the zonally differentiated tissue microstructure and the depth of strain, four mechanostructural mechanisms are proposed to describe succinctly the load responses observed.

  3. Calculation of distribution profile components of atoms doped into a monocrystals by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gverdtsiteli, I.G.; Guldamashvili, A.I.; Sadagashvili, M.I.

    1989-01-01

    Single analytic relations are derived for calculating relative contributions of different profile components (unchanneled, partly channeled and well channeld ions) produced by multiple scattering of incident ions in an amorphous surface layer of a target. Calculated values of profile components are in good agreement with available experimental data at different values of ion energies, angles and incident planes of ions, crystallographic orientation, depth of the amorphous surface layer of target, orientation exactness and ion beam divergence. Those analytical relations permit to give account of features and nature of profile shape behaviour as a function of experimental conditions and to make an optimal choice parameters of ion alloying to obtain a profile of required shape

  4. 3D dose distribution calculation in a voxelized human phantom by means of Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abella, V.; Miro, R.; Juste, B.; Verdu, G.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide the reconstruction of a real human voxelized phantom by means of a MatLab program and the simulation of the irradiation of such phantom with the photon beam generated in a Theratron 780 (MDS Nordion) 60 Co radiotherapy unit, by using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle), version 5. The project results in 3D dose mapping calculations inside the voxelized antropomorphic head phantom. The program provides the voxelization by first processing the CT slices; the process follows a two-dimensional pixel and material identification algorithm on each slice and three-dimensional interpolation in order to describe the phantom geometry via small cubic cells, resulting in an MCNP input deck format output. Dose rates are calculated by using the MCNP5 tool FMESH, superimposed mesh tally, which gives the track length estimation of the particle flux in units of particles/cm 2 . Furthermore, the particle flux is converted into dose by using the conversion coefficients extracted from the NIST Physical Reference Data. The voxelization using a three-dimensional interpolation technique in combination with the use of the FMESH tool of the MCNP Monte Carlo code offers an optimal simulation which results in 3D dose mapping calculations inside anthropomorphic phantoms. This tool is very useful in radiation treatment assessments, in which voxelized phantoms are widely utilized.

  5. SPLET - A program for calculating the space-lethargy distribution of epithermal neutrons in a reactor lattice cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M.V.; Zmijatevic, I.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure to solve the space-single-lethargy dependent transport equation for epithermal neutrons in a cylindricised multi-region reactor lattice cell has been developed and proposed in the earlier papers. Here, the computational algorithm is comprised and the computing program SPLET, which calculates the space-lethargy distribution of the spherical harmonics neutron flux moments, as well as the related integral quantities as reaction rates and resonance integrals, is described. (author)

  6. Optimization of an algorithm for 3D calculation of radiation dose distribution in heterogeneous media for use in radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perles, L.A.; Chinellato, C.D.; Rocha, J.R.O.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper has been presented a modification of a algorithm for three-dimensional (3D) radiation dose distribution in heterogeneous media by convolutions. This modification has maintained good accordance between calculated and simulated data in EGS4 code. The results of algorithm have been compared with commercial program PLATO, where have been noticed inconsistency for equivalent density regions in a muscle-lung-muscle interface system

  7. Calculation of beam paths in optical systems containing inhomogeneous isotropic media with cylindrical distribution of the refractive index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grammatin, A.P.; Degen, A.B.; Katranova, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    A system of differential equations convenient for numerical computer integrating is proposed to calculate beam paths, elementary astigmatic beams, and the optical path in isotropic media with cylindrical distribution of the refractive index. A method for selecting the step of this integration is proposed. This technique is implemented in the program package for computers of the VAX series meant for the computer-aided design of optical systems. 4 refs

  8. Numerical investigation on residual stress distribution and evolution during multipass narrow gap welding of thick-walled stainless steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.; Zhang, J.X.; Xue, C.B.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We performed pass-by-pass simulation of stresses for welding of thick-walled pipes. → The distributions and evolution of the residual stresses are demonstrated. → After the groove is filled to a height, the through-wall stress is almost unchanged. - Abstracts: The detailed pass-by-pass finite element (FE) simulation is presented to investigate the residual stresses in narrow gap multipass welding of pipes with a wall thickness of 70 mm and 73 weld passes. The simulated residual stress on the outer surface is validated with the experimental one. The distribution and evolution of the through-wall residual stresses are demonstrated. The investigated results show that the residual stresses on the outer and inner surfaces are tensile in the weld zone and its vicinity. The through-wall axial residual stresses at the weld center line and the HAZ line demonstrate a distribution of bending type. The through-wall hoop residual stress within the weld is mostly tensile. After the groove is filled to a certain height, the peak tensile stresses and the stress distribution patterns for both axial and hoop stresses remain almost unchanged.

  9. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis on Stress Distribution of Internal Implant-Abutment Engagement Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Yong; Huh, Yun-Hyuk; Park, Chan-Jin; Cho, Lee-Ra

    To investigate the stress distribution in an implant-abutment complex with a preloaded abutment screw by comparing implant-abutment engagement features using three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). For FEA modeling, two implants-one with a single (S) engagement system and the other with a double (D) engagement system-were placed in the human mandibular molar region. Two types of abutments (hexagonal, conical) were connected to the implants. Different implant models (a single implant, two parallel implants, and mesial and tilted distal implants with 1-mm bone loss) were assumed. A static axial force and a 45-degree oblique force of 200 N were applied as the sum of vectors to the top of the prosthetic occlusal surface with a preload of 30 Ncm in the abutment screw. The von Mises stresses at the implant-abutment and abutment-screw interfaces were measured. In the single implant model, the S-conical abutment type exhibited broader stress distribution than the S-hexagonal abutment. In the double engagement system, the stress concentration was high in the lower contact area of the implant-abutment engagement. In the tilted implant model, the stress concentration point was different from that in the parallel implant model because of the difference in the bone level. The double engagement system demonstrated a high stress concentration at the lower contact area of the implant-abutment interface. To decrease the stress concentration, the type of engagement features of the implant-abutment connection should be carefully considered.

  10. Inter-comparison of Dose Distributions Calculated by FLUKA, GEANT4, MCNP, and PHITS for Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi-Yi; Tsai, Pi-En; Lee, Shao-Chun; Liu, Yen-Chiang; Chen, Chin-Cheng; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2017-09-01

    The dose distributions from proton pencil beam scanning were calculated by FLUKA, GEANT4, MCNP, and PHITS, in order to investigate their applicability in proton radiotherapy. The first studied case was the integrated depth dose curves (IDDCs), respectively from a 100 and a 226-MeV proton pencil beam impinging a water phantom. The calculated IDDCs agree with each other as long as each code employs 75 eV for the ionization potential of water. The second case considered a similar condition of the first case but with proton energies in a Gaussian distribution. The comparison to the measurement indicates the inter-code differences might not only due to different stopping power but also the nuclear physics models. How the physics parameter setting affect the computation time was also discussed. In the third case, the applicability of each code for pencil beam scanning was confirmed by delivering a uniform volumetric dose distribution based on the treatment plan, and the results showed general agreement between each codes, the treatment plan, and the measurement, except that some deviations were found in the penumbra region. This study has demonstrated that the selected codes are all capable of performing dose calculations for therapeutic scanning proton beams with proper physics settings.

  11. Effect of preemptive weld overlay sequence on residual stress distribution for dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant pressurizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hong Yeol; Song, Tae Kwang; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation method which arrest crack. An overlay weld sued in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). PWOL was good for distribution of residual stress of Dissimilar Metal Weld(DMW) by previous research. Because range of overlay welding is wide relatively, residual stress distribution on PWR is affected by welding sequence. In order to examine the effect of welding sequence, PWOL was applied to a specific DMW of KORI nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, the welding direction that from nozzle to pipe is better good for residual stress distribution on PWR.

  12. Effect of preemptive weld overlay sequence on residual stress distribution for dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Hong Yeol; Song, Tae Kwang; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong

    2008-01-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation method which arrest crack. An overlay weld sued in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). PWOL was good for distribution of residual stress of Dissimilar Metal Weld(DMW) by previous research. Because range of overlay welding is wide relatively, residual stress distribution on PWR is affected by welding sequence. In order to examine the effect of welding sequence, PWOL was applied to a specific DMW of KORI nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, the welding direction that from nozzle to pipe is better good for residual stress distribution on PWR

  13. Calculation of mass flow and steam quality distribution on fuel elements of light-water cooled boiling water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermanns, H.J.

    1977-04-01

    By the example of light-water cooled nuclear reactors, the state of the calculation methods at disposal for calculating mass flow and steam quality distribution (sub-channel analysis) is indicated. Particular regard was paid to the transport phenomena occurring in reactor fuel elements in the range of two phase flow. Experimentally determined values were compared with recalculations of these experiments with the sub-channel code COBRA; from the results of these comparing calculations, conclusions could be drawn on the suitability of this code for defined applications. Limits of reliability could be determined to some extent. Based on the experience gained and the study of individual physical model concepts, recognized as being important, a sub-channel model was drawn up and the corresponding numerical computer code (SIEWAS) worked out. Experiments made at GE could be reproduced with the code SIEWAS with sufficient accuracy. (orig.) [de

  14. A method for the calculation of the cumulative failure probability distribution of complex repairable systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldarola, L.

    1976-01-01

    A method is proposed for the analytical evaluation of the cumulative failure probability distribution of complex repairable systems. The method is based on a set of integral equations each one referring to a specific minimal cut set of the system. Each integral equation links the unavailability of a minimal cut set to its failure probability density distribution and to the probability that the minimal cut set is down at the time t under the condition that it was down at time t'(t'<=t). The limitations for the applicability of the method are also discussed. It has been concluded that the method is applicable if the process describing the failure of a minimal cut set is a 'delayed semi-regenerative process'. (Auth.)

  15. Analysis of the temperature and stress distributions in ceramic window materials subjected to microwave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferber, M.K.; Kimrey, H.D.; Becher, P.F.

    1983-07-01

    The temperature and stress and distributions generated in ceramic materials currently employed in microwave gyrotron tube windows were determined for a variety of operating conditions. Both edge- and face-cooled windows of either polycrystalline BeO or polycrystalline Al 2 O 3 were considered. The actual analysis involved three steps. First, a computer program was used to determine the electric field distribution within the window at a given power level and frequency (TE 02 wave propagation assumed). This program was capable of describing both the radial and axial dependence of the electric field. The effects of multiple internal reflections at the various dielectric interfaces were also accounted for. Secondly, the field distribution was used to derive an expression for the heat generated per unit volume per unit time within the window due to dieletric losses. A generalized heat conduction computer code was then used to compute the temperature distribution based on the heat generation function. Third, the stresses were determined from the temperature profiles using analytical expression or a finite-element computer program. Steady-state temperature and stress profiles were computed for the face-cooled and edge-cooled windows

  16. Calculation of the equilibrium distribution for a deleterious gene by the finite Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, K

    1982-03-01

    In a population of constant size every deleterious gene eventually attains a stochastic equilibrium between mutation and selection. The individual probabilities of this equilibrium distribution can be computed by an application of the finite Fourier transform to an appropriate branching process formula. Specific numerical examples are discussed for the autosomal dominants, Huntington's chorea and chondrodystrophy, and for the X-linked recessive, Becker's muscular dystrophy.

  17. Distribution of degrees of polymerization in statistically branched polymers with tetrafunctional branch points: model calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Netopilík, Miloš; Kratochvíl, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 2 (2006), s. 196-203 ISSN 0959-8103 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100500501; GA AV ČR IAA4050403; GA AV ČR IAA4050409; GA ČR GA203/03/0617 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : statistical branching * tetrafunctional branch points * molecular-weight distribution Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.475, year: 2006

  18. Alternating current loss calculation in a high-TC superconducting transmission cable considering the magnetic field distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noji, H; Haji, K; Hamada, T

    2003-01-01

    We have calculated the alternating current (ac) losses of a 114 MVA high-T C superconducting (HTS) transmission cable using an electric-circuit (EC) model. The HTS cable is fabricated by Tokyo Electric Power Company and Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. The EC model is comprised of a resistive part and an inductive part. The resistive part is obtained by the approximated Norris equation for a HTS tape. The Norris equation indicates hysteresis losses due to self-fields. The inductive part has two components, i.e. inductances related to axial fields and those related to circumferential fields. The layer currents and applied fields of each layer were calculated by the EC model. By using both values, the ac losses of the one-phase HTS cable were obtained by calculation considering the self-field, the axial field and the circumferential field of the HTS tape. The measured ac loss transporting 1 kA rms is 0.7 W m -1 ph -1 , which is equal to the calculation. The distribution of each layer loss resembles in shape the distribution of the circumferential field in each layer, which indicates that the circumferential fields strongly influence the ac losses of the HTS cable

  19. Binomial Distribution Sample Confidence Intervals Estimation 1. Sampling and Medical Key Parameters Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor DRUGAN

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to present the usefulness of the binomial distribution in studying of the contingency tables and the problems of approximation to normality of binomial distribution (the limits, advantages, and disadvantages. The classification of the medical keys parameters reported in medical literature and expressing them using the contingency table units based on their mathematical expressions restrict the discussion of the confidence intervals from 34 parameters to 9 mathematical expressions. The problem of obtaining different information starting with the computed confidence interval for a specified method, information like confidence intervals boundaries, percentages of the experimental errors, the standard deviation of the experimental errors and the deviation relative to significance level was solves through implementation in PHP programming language of original algorithms. The cases of expression, which contain two binomial variables, were separately treated. An original method of computing the confidence interval for the case of two-variable expression was proposed and implemented. The graphical representation of the expression of two binomial variables for which the variation domain of one of the variable depend on the other variable was a real problem because the most of the software used interpolation in graphical representation and the surface maps were quadratic instead of triangular. Based on an original algorithm, a module was implements in PHP in order to represent graphically the triangular surface plots. All the implementation described above was uses in computing the confidence intervals and estimating their performance for binomial distributions sample sizes and variable.

  20. Calculating the Prior Probability Distribution for a Causal Network Using Maximum Entropy: Alternative Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Markham

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Some problems occurring in Expert Systems can be resolved by employing a causal (Bayesian network and methodologies exist for this purpose. These require data in a specific form and make assumptions about the independence relationships involved. Methodologies using Maximum Entropy (ME are free from these conditions and have the potential to be used in a wider context including systems consisting of given sets of linear and independence constraints, subject to consistency and convergence. ME can also be used to validate results from the causal network methodologies. Three ME methods for determining the prior probability distribution of causal network systems are considered. The first method is Sequential Maximum Entropy in which the computation of a progression of local distributions leads to the over-all distribution. This is followed by development of the Method of Tribus. The development takes the form of an algorithm that includes the handling of explicit independence constraints. These fall into two groups those relating parents of vertices, and those deduced from triangulation of the remaining graph. The third method involves a variation in the part of that algorithm which handles independence constraints. Evidence is presented that this adaptation only requires the linear constraints and the parental independence constraints to emulate the second method in a substantial class of examples.

  1. Effect of thermoplastic appliance thickness on initial stress distribution in periodontal ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Shin Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation into the initial stress distribution induced within the periodontal ligament by thermoplastic appliances with different thicknesses is performed. Based on the plaster model of a 25-year-old male patient, a finite element model of the maxillary lateral incisors and their supporting structures is constructed. In addition, four finite element models of thermoplastic appliances with different thicknesses in the range of 0.5–1.25 mm are also constructed based on the same plaster model. Finite element analysis simulations are performed to examine the effects of the force delivered by the thermoplastic appliances on the stress response of the periodontal ligament during the elastic recovery process. The results show that the stress induced in the periodontal ligament increases with an increasing appliance thickness. For example, the stress triples from 0.0012 to 0.0038 MPa as the appliance thickness is increased from 0.75 to 1.25 mm. The results presented in this study provide a useful insight into as a result of the compressive and tensile stresses induced by thermoplastic appliances of different thicknesses. Moreover, the results enable the periodontal ligament stress levels produced by thermoplastic appliances of different thicknesses to be reliably estimated.

  2. Effect of cryogenic treatment on distribution of residual stress in case carburized En 353 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensely, A.; Venkatesh, S.; Mohan Lal, D.; Nagarajan, G.; Rajadurai, A.; Junik, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    The effect of cryogenic treatment on the distribution of residual stress in the case carburized steel (En 353) was studied using X-ray diffraction technique. Two types of cryogenic treatment: shallow cryogenic treatment (193 K) and deep cryogenic treatment (77 K) were adopted, as a supplement to conventional heat treatment. The amount of retained austenite in conventionally heat-treated, shallow cryogenically treated and deep cryogenically treated samples was found to be 28%, 22% and 14%, respectively. The conventionally heat-treated, shallow cryogenically treated and deep cryogenically treated samples in untempered condition had a surface residual stress of -125 MPa, -115 MPa and -235 MPa, respectively. After tempering the conventionally heat-treated, shallow cryogenically treated and deep cryogenically treated samples had a surface residual stress of -150 MPa, -80 MPa and -80 MPa, respectively. A comparative study of the three treatments revealed that there was an increase in the compressive residual stress in steel that was subjected to cryogenic treatment prior to tempering. The experimental investigation revealed that deep cryogenically treated steel when subjected to tempering has undergone a reduction in compressive residual stress. Such stress relieving behaviour was mainly due to the increased precipitation of fine carbides in specimens subjected to DCT with tempering

  3. Calculation of charged fusion product distributions in space, energy, and time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schivell, J.; Monticello, D.A.; Zweben, S.J.

    1992-02-01

    The equation for the radial diffusion and slowing down of fast ions in a plasma is solved by a finite-difference technique. The terms included are ion source, radial diffusion, electron and ion drag. From the ion density at the radial boundary, the loss flux is calculated and used to model the signals in a lost-ion diagnostic. The code is also used to model the density of α-particles in future DT experiments. This information is used to predict the features to be seen by alpha diagnostics

  4. A comparison of alternative methods of calculating complementary cumulative distribution functions of health effects following an atmospheric radioactive release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponting, A.C.; Nair, S.

    1984-04-01

    A concept extensively used in studying the consequences of accidental atmospheric radioactive releases is that of the Complementary Cumulative Distribution Function, CCDF. Various methods of calculating CCDFs have been developed with particular applications in putting degraded core accidents in perspective and in identifying release sequences leading to high risks. This note compares three methods with specific reference to their accuracy and computational efficiency. For two of the methods (that used in the US Reactor Safety Study code CRAC2 and extended version of that method), the effects of varying the sector width and considering site-specific population distributions have been determined. For the third method it is only necessary to consider the effects of site-specific population distributions. (author)

  5. Calculating Kolmogorov Complexity from the Output Frequency Distributions of Small Turing Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahaye, Jean-Paul; Gauvrit, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on various notions from theoretical computer science, we present a novel numerical approach, motivated by the notion of algorithmic probability, to the problem of approximating the Kolmogorov-Chaitin complexity of short strings. The method is an alternative to the traditional lossless compression algorithms, which it may complement, the two being serviceable for different string lengths. We provide a thorough analysis for all binary strings of length and for most strings of length by running all Turing machines with 5 states and 2 symbols ( with reduction techniques) using the most standard formalism of Turing machines, used in for example the Busy Beaver problem. We address the question of stability and error estimation, the sensitivity of the continued application of the method for wider coverage and better accuracy, and provide statistical evidence suggesting robustness. As with compression algorithms, this work promises to deliver a range of applications, and to provide insight into the question of complexity calculation of finite (and short) strings. Additional material can be found at the Algorithmic Nature Group website at http://www.algorithmicnature.org. An Online Algorithmic Complexity Calculator implementing this technique and making the data available to the research community is accessible at http://www.complexitycalculator.com. PMID:24809449

  6. Calculating Kolmogorov complexity from the output frequency distributions of small Turing machines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Soler-Toscano

    Full Text Available Drawing on various notions from theoretical computer science, we present a novel numerical approach, motivated by the notion of algorithmic probability, to the problem of approximating the Kolmogorov-Chaitin complexity of short strings. The method is an alternative to the traditional lossless compression algorithms, which it may complement, the two being serviceable for different string lengths. We provide a thorough analysis for all Σ(n=1(11 2(n binary strings of length n<12 and for most strings of length 12≤n≤16 by running all ~2.5 x 10(13 Turing machines with 5 states and 2 symbols (8 x 22(9 with reduction techniques using the most standard formalism of Turing machines, used in for example the Busy Beaver problem. We address the question of stability and error estimation, the sensitivity of the continued application of the method for wider coverage and better accuracy, and provide statistical evidence suggesting robustness. As with compression algorithms, this work promises to deliver a range of applications, and to provide insight into the question of complexity calculation of finite (and short strings. Additional material can be found at the Algorithmic Nature Group website at http://www.algorithmicnature.org. An Online Algorithmic Complexity Calculator implementing this technique and making the data available to the research community is accessible at http://www.complexitycalculator.com.

  7. Calculations of lightning-induced voltages in medium voltage distribution lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munhoz Rojas, Patricio E. [Instituto de Tecnologia para o Desenvolvimento (LACTEC/UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], E-mail: patricio@lactec.org.br; Pinto, Cleverson Luiz da Silva [Companhia Paranaense de Energia (COPEL), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], E-mail: cleverson@copel.com

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to show the results of a new computer program, written in Mat Lab environment, that is intended to calculate the lightning induced voltages in multi-conductor non-homogeneous lines, in order to be able to evaluate the impact of the usual protective measures implemented against lightning-induced disturbances. The main new features of this program are: a coupling model in terms of the scalar potentials referred to a remote ground was adopted; the coupling to the vertical conductors was considered in a manner similar to rest of the line; the describing equations were converted into a system of coupled ordinary differential equations, by a discretization only in space, which was subsequently solved using the powerful ODE solvers existing in Mat Lab. The validation of the new program has been performed by comparing its predicted results with other theoretical and computational results available in the literature and also with other experimental results published in the literature. It is shown that the agreement with other well established theoretical results is very good and, also, that the agreement between the newly calculated results and some published experimental results is better than previously obtained results. (author)

  8. Calculation of fluence rate distributions in a pre design clinical facility for BNCT at the LFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeters, T.T.J.M.; Freudenreich, W.E.

    1995-12-01

    In a previous study [1], it was demonstrated that the creation of a thermal neutron facility for clinical BNCT in the LFR is feasible. Monte Carlo calculations had shown that the neutron fluence rates and gamma dose rates at the detector position of a model representing a first outline of a clinical facility met all requirements that are necessary for clinical BNCT. In order to gain more information about the neutron fluence rates at several positions, a second step is required. Calculations have been performed for the free beam and for a tumour bearing phantom at 5 cm and 10 cm distance from the irradiation window. Due to thermalization and back scattering, the thermal fluence rates in the tumour at 5 and 10 cm distance from the bismuth shield appeared to be approximately twice as high as the thermal fluence rates in the free beam at the corresponding positions of 5 to 6 cm and 10 to 11 cm from the irradiation window. (orig.)

  9. The probability distribution of intergranular stress corrosion cracking life for sensitized 304 stainless steels in high temperature, high purity water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Masatsune; Kenjyo, Takao; Matsukura, Shinji; Kawamoto, Teruaki

    1984-01-01

    In order to discuss the probability distribution of intergranular stress corrsion carcking life for sensitized 304 stainless steels, a series of the creviced bent beem (CBB) and the uni-axial constant load tests were carried out in oxygenated high temperature, high purity water. The following concludions were resulted; (1) The initiation process of intergranular stress corrosion cracking has been assumed to be approximated by the Poisson stochastic process, based on the CBB test results. (2) The probability distribution of intergranular stress corrosion cracking life may consequently be approximated by the exponential probability distribution. (3) The experimental data could be fitted to the exponential probability distribution. (author)

  10. Calculations of spetial and energy distribution of neutrons in reactor core and shielding. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rataj, J.

    1985-01-01

    The most important methods are briefly described of solving the Boltzmann equation describing neutron transport, such as are used at UJV Rez. These are the methods of P N -approximation, the S N method, further the Monte Carlo method and the moments method in which the solution of the Boltzmann equation describing the spatial and energy distribution of neutron flux density proceeds from the system of equations given by the P N -approximation. It is emphasized that the results are loaded with a big error or are totally erroneous when inaccurate cross sections or unsuitable libraries of cross sections are used. (J.P.)

  11. Calculation of the nonlinear relativistic Thomson scattering fields and Its application to electron distribution function diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasp, J.; Pastor, I.; Álvarez-Estrada, R. F.; Castejón, F.

    2015-02-01

    Analytical results obtained recently of the ab-initio classical incoherent Thomson Scattering (TS) spectrum from a single-electron (Alvarez-Estrada et al 2012 Phys. Plasmas 19 062302) have been numerically implemented in a paralelized code to efficiently compute the TS emission from a given electron distribution function, irrespective of its characteristics and/or the intensity of the incoming radiation. These analytical results display certain differences, when compared with other authors, in the general case of incoming linearly and circularly polarized radiation and electrons with arbitrary initial directions. We regard such discrepancies and the ubiquitous interest in TS as motivations for this work. Here, we implement some analytical advances (like generalized Bessel functions for incoming linearly polarized radiation) in TS. The bulk of this work reports on the efficient computation of TS spectra (based upon our analytical approach), for an electron population having an essentially arbitrary distribution function and for both incoming linearly and circularly polarized radiation. A detailed comparison between the present approach and a previous Monte Carlo one (Pastor et al 2011 Nuclear Fusion 51 043011), dealing with the ab-initio computation of TS spectra, is reported. Both approaches are shown to fully agree with each other. As key computational improvements, the analytical technique yields a × 30 to × 100 gain in computation time and is a very flexible tool to compute the scattered spectrum and eventually the scattered electromagnetic fields in the time domain. The latter are computed explicitly here for the first time, as far as we know. Scaling laws for the power integrated over frequency versus initial kinetic energy are studied for the case of isotropic and monoenergetic electron distribution functions and their potential application as diagnostic tools for high-energy populations is briefly discussed. Finally, we discuss the application of these

  12. Calculation of X-ray emission produced by a quasi-monoenergetic electron distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanaei, M.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. By using an intense ultrafast laser interaction with plasma, generation of accelerated relativistic electrons with quasi monoenergetic spectrum has been possible. Analytic expressions for spectra and emission efficiencies of x-rays bremsstrahlung and characteristic line emission produced by a quasi-monoenergetic electron distribution from several targets are investigated. In this work, a Gaussian profile is assumed for the quasi-monoenergetic electron spectrum. The produced x-ray radiations are compared with the previous achieved results for a Maxwellian electron profile. These results and achievements are discussed in detail. Also, the outcomes can be evaluated with the experimental and simulated results.

  13. Calculation of the optimum fuel distribution which maximizes the power output of a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, W.N. dos.

    1979-01-01

    Using optimal control techniques, the optimum fuel distribution - which maximizes the power output of a thermal reactor - is obtained. The nuclear reactor is described by a diffusion theory model with four energy groups and by assuming plane geometry. Since the analytical solution is impracticable, by using a perturbation method, a FORTRAN program was written, in order to obtain the numerical solution. Numerical results, for a thermal reactor light water moderated, non reflected, are shown. The fissile fuel material considered is Uranium-235. (Author) [pt

  14. Calculation of the secondary gamma radiation by the Monte Carlo method at displaced sampling from distributed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, Eh.E.; Fadeev, I.A.

    1979-01-01

    A possibility to use displaced sampling from a bulk gamma source in calculating the secondary gamma fields by the Monte Carlo method is discussed. The algorithm proposed is based on the concept of conjugate functions alongside the dispersion minimization technique. For the sake of simplicity a plane source is considered. The algorithm has been put into practice on the M-220 computer. The differential gamma current and flux spectra in 21cm-thick lead have been calculated. The source of secondary gamma-quanta was assumed to be a distributed, constant and isotropic one emitting 4 MeV gamma quanta with the rate of 10 9 quanta/cm 3 xs. The calculations have demonstrated that the last 7 cm of lead are responsible for the whole gamma spectral pattern. The spectra practically coincide with the ones calculated by the ROZ computer code. Thus the algorithm proposed can be offectively used in the calculations of secondary gamma radiation transport and reduces the computation time by 2-4 times

  15. Theoretical Analysis of Stress Distribution in Bonded Single Strap and Stiffened Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Ghoddous

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, distribution of peeling stress in two types of adhesively-bonded joints is investigated. The joints are a single strap and a stiffened joint. Theses joints are under uniform tensile load and materials are assumed orthotropic. Layers can be identical or different in mechanical or geometrical properties. A two-dimensional elasticity theory that includes the complete stress-strain and the complete strain-displacement relations for adhesive and adherends is used in this analysis. The displacement is assumed to be linear in the adhesive layer. A set of differential equations was derived and solved by using appropriate boundary conditions. Results revealed that the peak peeling stress developed within the adhesive layer is a function of geometrical and mechanical properties. FEM solution is used as the second method to verify the analytical results. A good agreement is observed between analytical and FEM solutions.

  16. Comparing of Normal Stress Distribution in Static and Dynamic Soil-Structure Interaction Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kholdebarin, Alireza; Massumi, Ali; Davoodi, Mohammad; Tabatabaiefar, Hamid Reza

    2008-01-01

    It is important to consider the vertical component of earthquake loading and inertia force in soil-structure interaction analyses. In most circumstances, design engineers are primarily concerned about the analysis of behavior of foundations subjected to earthquake-induced forces transmitted from the bedrock. In this research, a single rigid foundation with designated geometrical parameters located on sandy-clay soil has been modeled in FLAC software with Finite Different Method and subjected to three different vertical components of earthquake records. In these cases, it is important to evaluate effect of footing on underlying soil and to consider normal stress in soil with and without footing. The distribution of normal stress under the footing in static and dynamic states has been studied and compared. This Comparison indicated that, increasing in normal stress under the footing caused by vertical component of ground excitations, has decreased dynamic vertical settlement in comparison with static state

  17. Calculation of the dielectric tensor for a generalized Lorentzian (kappa) distribution function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, D.; Xue, S.; Thorne, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    Expressions are derived for the elements of the dielectric tensor for linear waves propagating at an arbitrary angle to a uniform magnetic field in a fully hot plasma whose constituent particle species σ are modeled by generalized Lorentzian distribution functions. The expressions involve readily computable single integrals whose integrands involve only elementary functions, Bessel functions, and modified plasma dispersion functions, the latter being available in the form of finite algebraic series. Analytical forms for the integrals are derived in the limits λ→0 and λ→∞, where λ=(k perpendicular ρ Lσ ) 2 /2, with k perpendicular the component of wave vector perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, and ρ Lσ the Larmor radius for the particle species σ. Consideration is given to the important limits of wave propagation parallel and perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, and also to the cold plasma limit. Since most space plasmas are well modeled by generalized Lorentzian particle distribution functions, the results obtained in this paper provide a powerful tool for analyzing kinetic (micro-) instabilities in space plasmas in a very general context, limited only by the assumptions of linear plasma theory

  18. Calculation approaches for grid usage fees to influence the load curve in the distribution grid level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illing, Bjoern

    2014-01-01

    Dominated by the energy policy the decentralized German energy market is changing. One mature target of the government is to increase the contribution of renewable generation to the gross electricity consumption. In order to achieve this target disadvantages like an increased need for capacity management occurs. Load reduction and variable grid fees offer the grid operator solutions to realize capacity management by influencing the load profile. The evolution of the current grid fees towards more causality is required to adapt these approaches. Two calculation approaches are developed in this assignment. On the one hand multivariable grid fees keeping the current components demand and energy charge. Additional to the grid costs grid load dependent parameters like the amount of decentralized feed-ins, time and local circumstances as well as grid capacities are considered. On the other hand the grid fee flat-rate which represents a demand based model on a monthly level. Both approaches are designed to meet the criteria for future grid fees. By means of a case study the effects of the grid fees on the load profile at the low voltage grid is simulated. Thereby the consumption is represented by different behaviour models and the results are scaled at the benchmark grid area. The resulting load curve is analyzed concerning the effects of peak load reduction as well as the integration of renewable energy sources. Additionally the combined effect of grid fees and electricity tariffs is evaluated. Finally the work discusses the launching of grid fees in the tense atmosphere of politics, legislation and grid operation. Results of this work are two calculation approaches designed for grid operators to define the grid fees. Multivariable grid fees are based on the current calculation scheme. Hereby demand and energy charges are weighted by time, locational and load related dependencies. The grid fee flat-rate defines a limitation in demand extraction. Different demand levels

  19. Development and application of a model to calculate the distribution of radon in houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haider, B.; Papamokos, E.; Ferron, G.; Peter, J.; Unverfaerth, L.

    1990-01-01

    In order to produce a radon profile of the examined houses, an electronic measuring process was used to determine the concentration of radon decomposition products. The measurements were made inside flats with the doors closed, in vertical air exchange between the cellars and the storeys of houses and in the cellar itself. The measured decomposition product and measured gas concentrations show that, apart from the cellar floor, part of the building material makes a considerable contribution to emanation of radon and thoron. It was found that a model for calculating the loading of the inhabitants of a house with radon is not yet available due to the complicated flat geometry and the activities of the inhabitants. (DG) [de

  20. Systematic assembly homogenization and local flux reconstruction for nodal method calculations of fast reactor power distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorning, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    A simultaneous pin lattice cell and fuel bundle homogenization theory has been developed for use with nodal diffusion calculations of practical reactors. The theoretical development of the homogenization theory, which is based on multiple-scales asymptotic expansion methods carried out through fourth order in a small parameter, starts from the transport equation and systematically yields: a cell-homogenized bundled diffusion equation with self-consistent expressions for the cell-homogenized cross sections and diffusion tensor elements; and a bundle-homogenized global reactor diffusion equation with self-consistent expressions for the bundle-homogenized cross sections and diffusion tensor elements. The continuity of the angular flux at cell and bundle interfaces also systematically yields jump conditions for the scaler flux or so-called flux discontinuity factors on the cell and bundle interfaces in terms of the two adjacent cell or bundle eigenfunctions. The expressions required for the reconstruction of the angular flux or the 'de-homogenization' theory were obtained as an integral part of the development; hence the leading order transport theory angular flux is easily reconstructed throughout the reactor including the regions in the interior of the fuel bundles or computational nodes and in the interiors of the pin lattice cells. The theoretical development shows that the exact transport theory angular flux is obtained to first order from the whole-reactor nodal diffusion calculations, done using the homogenized nuclear data and discontinuity factors, is a product of three computed quantities: a ''cell shape function''; a ''bundle shape function''; and a ''global shape function''. 10 refs

  1. Comparison of measured and Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions from circular collimators for radiosurgical beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esnaashari, K. N.; Allahverdi, M.; Gharaati, H.; Shahriari, M.

    2007-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is an important clinical tool for the treatment of small lesions in the brain, including benign conditions, malignant and localized metastatic tumors. A dosimetry study was performed for Elekta 'Synergy S' as a dedicated Stereotactic radiosurgery unit, capable of generating circular radiation fields with diameters of 1-5 cm at iso centre using the BEAM/EGS4 Monte Carlo code. Materials and Methods: The linear accelerator Elekta Synergy S equipped with a set of 5 circular collimators from 10 mm to 50 mm in diameter at iso centre distance was used. The cones were inserted in a base plate mounted on the collimator linac head. A PinPoint chamber and Wellhofer water tank chamber were selected for clinical dosimetry of 6 MV photon beams. The results of simulations using the Monte Carlo system BEAM/EGS4 to model the beam geometry were compared with dose measurements. Results: An excellent agreement was found between Monte Carlo calculated and measured percentage depth dose and lateral dose profiles which were performed in water phantom for circular cones with 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 cm in diameter. The comparison between calculation and measurements showed up to 0.5 % or 1 m m difference for all field sizes. The penumbra (80-20%) results at 5 cm depth in water phantom and SSD=95 ranged from 1.5 to 2.1 mm for circular collimators with diameter 1 to 5 cm. Conclusion: This study showed that BEAMnrc code has been accurate in modeling Synergy S linear accelerator equipped with circular collimators

  2. On the calculation of internal forces in mechanically stressed polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdoshenko, Stanislav M.; Konda, Sai Sriharsha M.; Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss how to define and to compute internal forces in a molecule subjected to mechanical stress. Because of the inherently many-body character of intramolecular interactions, internal forces cannot be uniquely defined without specifying a set of internal coordinates used to describe the molecular structure. When such a set is comprised of 3N − 6 interactomic distances (N being the number of atoms) and includes the bond lengths of interest, we show that the associated forces, while satisfying the equation F = ∂V/∂R (where R is the bond length, F is the internal force in this bond, and V is the potential energy of the molecule), can be determined from the molecular geometry alone. We illustrate these ideas using several toy models ranging from small molecules to a graphene sheet and show that the magnitude of the internal force in a bond is not necessarily a good predictor of its strength in response to mechanical loading. At the same time, analysis of internal forces reveals interesting phenomena such as the force multiplication effect, where weak external forces may, e.g., be used to break strong bonds, and offers insight into the catch-bond phenomenon where chemical reactivity is suppressed through application of a force

  3. Study of the stress distribution around an orthotropic bi-material notch tip

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klusák, Jan; Profant, T.; Kotoul, M.

    417-418, - (2010), s. 385-388 ISSN 1013-9826. [International Conference on Fracture and Damage Mechanics /8./. Malta, 08.09.2009-10.09.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/08/0994; GA AV ČR 1QS200410502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Generalized fracture mechanics * Singular stress distribution * Orthotropic bimaterial notch Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics www.scientific.net

  4. Tungsten heavy metal alloys relations between the crystallographic texture and the internal stress distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolas, G.; Voltz, M.

    2001-01-01

    Quite often the W-Ni-Fe-Co heavy alloys are subjected to a thermomechanical processing of swaging and aging in order to obtain the highest possible level of resistance. Within the framework of this plastic deformation on cylindrical parts, the swaging leads to the distribution of morphological and crystallographic texture as well as specific internal stresses. The resulting mechanical characteristics are correlated to structural and sub-structural variations. (author)

  5. Distinctive hippocampal zinc distribution patterns following stress exposure in an animal model of PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, Hagit; Cohen, Hagit; Karpas, Zeev; Zeiri, Yehuda

    2017-03-22

    Emerging evidence suggests that zinc (Zn) deficiency is associated with depression and anxiety in both human and animal studies. The present study sought to assess whether there is an association between the magnitude of behavioral responses to stress and patterns of Zn distribution. The work has focused on one case study, the association between an animal model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the Zn distribution in the rat hippocampus. Behaviors were assessed with the elevated plus-maze and acoustic startle response tests 7 days later. Preset cut-off criteria classified exposed animals according to their individual behavioral responses. To further characterize the distribution of Zn that occurs in the hippocampus 8 days after the exposure, laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) imaging was used. It has been found that Zn distribution in the dentate gyrus (DG) sub-region in the hippocampus is clearly more widely spread for rats that belong to the extreme behavioral response (EBR) group as compared to the control group. Comparison of the Zn concentration changes in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) and the DG sub-regions of the hippocampus shows that the concentration changes are statistically significantly higher in the EBR rats compared to the rats in the control and minimal behavioral response (MBR) groups. In order to understand the mechanism of stress-induced hippocampal Zn dyshomeostasis, relative quantitative analyses of metallothionein (MT), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and caspase 3 immunoreactivity were performed. Significant differences in the number of caspase-ir and Bcl-2 cells were found in the hippocampal DG sub-region between the EBR group and the control and MBR groups. The results of this study demonstrate a statistically significant association between the degree of behavioral disruption resulting from stress exposure and the patterns of Zn distribution and concentration changes in the various hippocampal regions

  6. Calculation of the fast ion tail distribution for a spherically symmetric hot spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, C. J.; Tang, X.-Z.; Guo, Z.; Berk, H. L.

    2014-10-01

    The fast ion tail for a spherically symmetric hot spot is computed via the solution of a simplified Fokker-Planck collision operator. Emphasis is placed on describing the energy scaling of the fast ion distribution function in the hot spot as well as the surrounding cold plasma throughout a broad range of collisionalities and temperatures. It is found that while the fast ion tail inside the hot spot is significantly depleted, leading to a reduction of the fusion yield in this region, a surplus of fast ions is observed in the neighboring cold plasma region. The presence of this surplus of fast ions in the neighboring cold region is shown to result in a partial recovery of the fusion yield lost in the hot spot.

  7. Calculation of the fast ion tail distribution for a spherically symmetric hot spot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDevitt, C. J.; Tang, X.-Z.; Guo, Z. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Berk, H. L. [Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    The fast ion tail for a spherically symmetric hot spot is computed via the solution of a simplified Fokker-Planck collision operator. Emphasis is placed on describing the energy scaling of the fast ion distribution function in the hot spot as well as the surrounding cold plasma throughout a broad range of collisionalities and temperatures. It is found that while the fast ion tail inside the hot spot is significantly depleted, leading to a reduction of the fusion yield in this region, a surplus of fast ions is observed in the neighboring cold plasma region. The presence of this surplus of fast ions in the neighboring cold region is shown to result in a partial recovery of the fusion yield lost in the hot spot.

  8. Calculation of lobe mixer flow with reynolds stress model. Oryoku hoteishiki model ni yoru lobe mixer ryu no suchi keisan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Makoto; Arakawa, Chuichi; Tagori, Tetsuo [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan) Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering Univ. of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1990-02-25

    It is considered that exhaust gas energy of turbofan engine is partly collected to realize the improvement of propulsion efficiency together with the reduction of noise appeared by the change in velocity distribution of exhaust gas flow. Then Lobe mixer was studied and its effectiveness was widely recognized, however the development of more realistic prediction method of exhaust nozzle system including Lobe mixer, is not completed yet. The stress equation model with low Reynolds Number which is easily used by the expansion of Launder Reece Rodi model in three dimension coordinate system was newly constructed. Applicability of the stress equation in more complicated flow field was greatly improved. While the above model was applied to Lobe mixer system, then the qualitative reproduction of mixing process accompanied with flow around Lobe and longitudinal eddy of core or bi-pass flow, was realized. There is room for improvement of pressure strain correlation term and behavior of Reynolds stress very close by wall surface in this model. 16 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Calculation of neutron flux distribution of thermal neutrons from microtron converter in a graphite moderator with water reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrejsek, K.

    1977-01-01

    The calculation is made of the thermal neutron flux in the moderator and reflector by solving the neutron diffusion equation using the four-group theory. The correction for neutron absorption in the moderator was carried out using the perturbation theory. The calculation was carried out for four groups with the following energy ranges: the first group 2 MeV to 3 keV, the second group 3 keV to 5 eV, the third group 5 eV to 0.025 eV and the fourth group 0.025 eV. The values of the macroscopic cross section of capture and scattering, of the diffusion coefficient, the macroscopic cross section of the moderator, of the neutron age and the extrapolation length for the water-graphite moderator used in the calculations are given. The spatial distribution of the thermal neutron flux is graphically represented for graphite of a 30, 40, and 50 cm radius and for graphite of a 30 and 40 cm radius with a 10 cm water reflector; a graphic comparison is made of the distribution of the thermal neutron flux in water and in graphite, both 40 cm in radius. The system of graphite with reflector proved to be the best and most efficient system for raising the flux density of thermal neutrons. (J.P.)

  10. Calculational model based on influence function method for power distribution and control rod worth in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshio, S.; Kazuo, A.

    1983-01-01

    A model for calculating the power distribution and the control rod worth in fast reactors has been developed. This model is based on the influence function method. The characteristics of the model are as follows: 1. Influence functions for any changes in the control rod insertion ratio are expressed by using an influence function for an appropriate control rod insertion in order to reduce the computer memory size required for the method. 2. A control rod worth is calculated on the basis of a one-group approximation in which cross sections are generated by bilinear (flux-adjoint) weighting, not the usual flux weighting, in order to reduce the collapse error. 3. An effective neutron multiplication factor is calculated by adjoint weighting in order to reduce the effect of the error in the one-group flux distribution. The results obtained in numerical examinations of a prototype fast reactor indicate that this method is suitable for on-line core performance evaluation because of a short computing time and a small memory size

  11. Calculational model based on influence function method for power distribution and control rod worth in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanda, T.; Azekura, K.

    1983-01-01

    A model for calculating the power distribution and the control rod worth in fast reactors has been developed. This model is based on the influence function method. The characteristics of the model are as follows: Influence functions for any changes in the control rod insertion ratio are expressed by using an influence function for an appropriate control rod insertion in order to reduce the computer memory size required for the method. A control rod worth is calculated on the basis of a one-group approximation in which cross sections are generated by bilinear (flux-adjoint) weighting, not the usual flux weighting, in order to reduce the collapse error. An effective neutron multiplication factor is calculated by adjoint weighting in order to reduce the effect of the error in the one-group flux distribution. The results obtained in numerical examinations of a prototype fast reactor indicate that this method is suitable for on-line core performance evaluation because of a short computing time and a small memory size

  12. Calculation of Ion Charge State Distributions After Inner-Shell Ionization in Xe Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammedein, A.M.; Ghoneim, A.A.; Kandil, M.K.; Kadad, I.M.

    2009-01-01

    The vacancy cascades following initial inner-shell vacancies in single and multi-ionized atoms often lead to highly charged residual ions. The inner-shell vacancy produced by ionization processes may decay by either a radiative or non-radiative transition. In addition to the vacancy filling processes, there is an electron shake off process due to the change of core potential of the atom. In the calculation of vacancy cascades, the radiative (x-ray) and non-radiative (Auger and Coster-Kronig) branching ratios give valuable information on the de-excitation dynamics of an atom with inner-shell vacancy. The production of multi-charged ions yield by the Auger cascades following inner shell ionization of an atom has been studied both experimentally and theoretically. Multi-charged Xe ions following de-excitation of K, L 1 , L 2,3 , M 1 , M 2,3 and M 4,5 subshell vacancies are calculated using Monte-Carlo algorithm to simulate the vacancy cascade development. Fluorescence yield (radiative) and Auger, Coster- Kronig yield (non- radiative) are evaluated. The decay of K hole state through radiative transitions is found to be more probable than non-radiative transitions in the first step of de-excitation. On the other hand, the decay of L, M vacancies through non-radiative transitions are more probable. The K shell ionization in Xe atom mainly yields Xe 7+ , Xe 8+ , Xe 9+ and Xe 1 0 + ions, and the charged X 8+ ions are the highest. The main product from the L 1 shell ionization is found to be Xe 8+ , Xe 9+ ions, while the charged Xe 8+ ions predominate at L 2,3 hole states. The charged Xe 6+ , Xe 7+ and Xe 8+ ions mainly yield from 3s 1/2 and 3p 1/2 , 3/2 ionization, while Xe in 3d 3/2 , 5/2 hole states mainly turns into Xe 4+ and Xe 5+ ions. The present results are found to agree well with the experimental data. (author)

  13. Effect of phytohormones on absorption and distribution of ions in salt-stressed bean plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Starck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bean plant seedlings grown in water culture were treated for 5 days either with NaCl or with 7-times concentrated nutrient solution (diminished water potential by 3-103 hPa in both cases. Control and stressed plants were treated for 24 hrs with zeatin and GA,. NaCl-stress reduced distinctly ion absorption rate (K, Ca and P. Zeatin and GA3 promoted potassium uptake, but only in NaCI-treated plants. These hormones diminished Na accumulation in metabolically active organs but increased P- and Ca-content. In plants grown under both kind of stresses zeatin and GA3 partially reestablished the ratio of the main mono- to divalent cations, which increased in the leaves and apical part of the stressed plants. ABA introduced into the nutrient solution caused inhibition of the ion uptake (K, Ca, Mg and P. similar to that caused by NaCl-stress. The above reported results seem to confirm the supposition, that hormones act as an important factor contributing to regulation of both uptake and distribution of ions. In this way growth substances may also participate in the regulation of transport of various substances (among others - assimilates in the whole plant.

  14. Macroscopic electrical field distribution and field-induced surface stresses of needle-shaped field emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moy, Charles K.S., E-mail: charles.moy@sydney.edu.au [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ranzi, Gianluca [ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Petersen, Timothy C. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ringer, Simon P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2011-05-15

    One major concern since the development of the field ion microscope is the mechanical strength of the specimens. The macroscopic shape of the imaging tip greatly influences field-induced stresses and there is merit in further study of this phenomenon from a classical perspective. Understanding the geometrical, as opposed to localized electronic, factors that affect the stress might improve the quality and success rate of atom probe experiments. This study uses macroscopic electrostatic principles and finite element modelling to investigate field-induced stresses in relation to the shape of the tip. Three two-dimensional idealized models are considered, namely hyperbolic, parabolic and sphere-on-orthogonal-cone; the shapes of which are compared to experimental tips prepared by electro-polishing. Three dimensional morphologies of both a nano-porous and single-crystal aluminium tip are measured using electron tomography to quantitatively test the assumption of cylindrical symmetry for electro-polished tips. The porous tip was prepared and studied to demonstrate a fragile specimen for which such finite element studies could determine potential mechanical failure, prior to any exhaustive atom probe investigation. -- Research highlights: {yields} We use electrostatic principles and finite element to model field-induced stresses. {yields} We study two-dimensional idealized needle-shaped field emitters. {yields} Stress distribution of hyperbolic, parabolic and sphere-on-orthogonal-cone tips mapped. {yields} Electron tomography to obtain the morphology of three-dimensional aluminium tips. {yields} Studies of the morphology of the porous tip demonstrate a fragile specimen.

  15. The effect of unerupted permanent tooth crowns on the distribution of masticatory stress in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley S Hammond

    Full Text Available Human mothers wean their children from breast milk at an earlier developmental stage than do ape mothers, resulting in human children chewing solid and semi-solid foods using the deciduous dentition. Mechanical forces generated by chewing solid foods during the post-weaning period travel through not only the deciduous teeth, but also the enamel caps of the developing permanent teeth within the maxilla and mandible, which are not present in the adult face. The effects of mechanical stress propagating through these very stiff structures have yet to be examined. Based on a heuristic model, we predicted that the enamel of the embedded developing teeth would act to reduce stresses in the surrounding bony elements of the juvenile face. We tested this hypothesis by simulating occlusal loading in a finite element (FE model of a child's cranium with a complete set of deciduous teeth and the first permanent molars embedded in the bony crypt in the maxilla. We modeled bone and enamel with appropriate material properties and assessed the effect of embedding high-stiffness enamel structures on stress distribution in the juvenile face. Against expectation, the presence of unerupted enamel caps does not affect the magnitude or location of stresses in the juvenile face. Our results do not support the hypothesis that the unerupted secondary teeth act to moderate stresses in the juvenile face.

  16. MCNPX calculations of dose rate distribution inside samples treated in the research gamma irradiating facility at CTEx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusin, Tiago; Rebello, Wilson F.; Vellozo, Sergio O.; Gomes, Renato G., E-mail: tiagorusin@ime.eb.b, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.b, E-mail: vellozo@cbpf.b, E-mail: renatoguedes@ime.eb.b [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Vital, Helio C., E-mail: vital@ctex.eb.b [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (CTEx), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    A cavity-type cesium-137 research irradiating facility at CTEx has been modeled by using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. The irradiator has been daily used in experiments to optimize the use of ionizing radiation for conservation of many kinds of food and to improve materials properties. In order to correlate the effects of the treatment, average doses have been calculated for each irradiated sample, accounting for the measured dose rate distribution in the irradiating chambers. However that approach is only approximate, being subject to significant systematic errors due to the heterogeneous internal structure of most samples that can lead to large anisotropy in attenuation and Compton scattering properties across the media. Thus this work is aimed at further investigating such uncertainties by calculating the dose rate distribution inside the items treated such that a more accurate and representative estimate of the total absorbed dose can be determined for later use in the effects-versus-dose correlation curves. Samples of different simplified geometries and densities (spheres, cylinders, and parallelepipeds), have been modeled to evaluate internal dose rate distributions within the volume of the samples and the overall effect on the average dose. (author)

  17. MCNPX calculations of dose rate distribution inside samples treated in the research gamma irradiating facility at CTEx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusin, Tiago; Rebello, Wilson F.; Vellozo, Sergio O.; Gomes, Renato G.; Silva, Ademir X.

    2011-01-01

    A cavity-type cesium-137 research irradiating facility at CTEx has been modeled by using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. The irradiator has been daily used in experiments to optimize the use of ionizing radiation for conservation of many kinds of food and to improve materials properties. In order to correlate the effects of the treatment, average doses have been calculated for each irradiated sample, accounting for the measured dose rate distribution in the irradiating chambers. However that approach is only approximate, being subject to significant systematic errors due to the heterogeneous internal structure of most samples that can lead to large anisotropy in attenuation and Compton scattering properties across the media. Thus this work is aimed at further investigating such uncertainties by calculating the dose rate distribution inside the items treated such that a more accurate and representative estimate of the total absorbed dose can be determined for later use in the effects-versus-dose correlation curves. Samples of different simplified geometries and densities (spheres, cylinders, and parallelepipeds), have been modeled to evaluate internal dose rate distributions within the volume of the samples and the overall effect on the average dose. (author)

  18. Application of the Monte Carlo integration method in calculations of dose distributions in HDR-Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltas, D; Geramani, K N; Ioannidis, G T; Kolotas, C; Zamboglou, N [Strahlenklinik, Stadtische Kliniken Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Giannouli, S [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    1999-12-31

    Source anisotropy is a very important factor in brachytherapy quality assurance of high dose rate HDR Ir 192 afterloading stepping sources. If anisotropy is not taken into account then doses received by a brachytherapy patient in certain directions can be in error by a clinically significant amount. Experimental measurements of anisotropy are very labour intensive. We have shown that within acceptable limits of accuracy, Monte Carlo integration (MCI) of a modified Sievert integral (3D generalisation) can provide the necessary data within a much shorter time scale than can experiments. Hence MCI can be used for routine quality assurance schedules whenever a new design of HDR or PDR Ir 192 is used for brachytherapy afterloading. Our MCI calculation results are comparable with published experimental data and Monte Carlo simulation data for microSelectron and VariSource Ir 192 sources. We have shown not only that MCI offers advantages over alternative numerical integration methods, but also that treating filtration coefficients as radial distance-dependent functions improves Sievert integral accuracy at low energies. This paper also provides anisotropy data for three new Ir 192 sources, one for microSelectron-HDR and two for the microSelectron-PDR, for which data currently is not available. The information we have obtained in this study can be incorporated into clinical practice.

  19. Distribution of stress on TMJ disc induced by use of chincup therapy: assessment by the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calçada, Flávio Siqueira; Guimarães, Antônio Sérgio; Teixeira, Marcelo Lucchesi; Takamatsu, Flávio Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To assess the distribution of stress produced on TMJ disc by chincup therapy, by means of the finite element method. Methods: a simplified three-dimensional TMJ disc model was developed by using Rhinoceros 3D software, and exported to ANSYS software. A 4.9N load was applied on the inferior surface of the model at inclinations of 30, 40, and 50 degrees to the mandibular plane (GoMe). ANSYS was used to analyze stress distribution on the TMJ disc for the different angulations, by means of finite element method. Results: The results showed that the tensile and compressive stresses concentrations were higher on the inferior surface of the model. More presence of tensile stress was found in the middle-anterior region of the model and its location was not altered in the three directions of load application. There was more presence of compressive stress in the middle and mid-posterior regions, but when a 50o inclined load was applied, concentration in the middle region was prevalent. Tensile and compressive stresses intensities progressively diminished as the load was more vertically applied. Conclusions: stress induced by the chincup therapy is mainly located on the inferior surface of the model. Loads at greater angles to the mandibular plane produced distribution of stresses with lower intensity and a concentration of compressive stresses in the middle region. The simplified three-dimensional model proved useful for assessing the distribution of stresses on the TMJ disc induced by the chincup therapy. PMID:29160348

  20. Summary of calculations of dynamic response characteristics and design stress of the 1/5 scale PSE torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, D.

    1977-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is currently involved in a 1/5 scale testing program on the Mark I BWR pressure suppression system. A key element of the test setup is a pressure vessel that is a 90 0 sector of a torus. Proper performance of the 90 0 torus depends on its structural integrity and structural dynamic characteristics. It must sustain the internal pressurization of the planned tests, and its dynamic response to the transient test loads should be minimal. If the structural vibrations are too great, interpretation of important load cell and pressure transducer data will be difficult. The purpose of the report is to bring together under one cover calculations pertaining to the structural dynamic characteristics and structural integrity of 90 0 torus. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) system description in which the torus and associated hardware are briefly described; (2) structural dynamics in which calculations of natural frequency and dynamic response are presented; and (3) structural integrity in which stress calculations for design purposes are presented; and an appendix which contains an LLL internal report comparing the expected load cell response for a three and four-point supported torus

  1. Autoregressive moving average fitting for real standard deviation in Monte Carlo power distribution calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueki, Taro

    2010-01-01

    The noise propagation of tallies in the Monte Carlo power method can be represented by the autoregressive moving average process of orders p and p-1 (ARMA(p,p-1)], where p is an integer larger than or equal to two. The formula of the autocorrelation of ARMA(p,q), p≥q+1, indicates that ARMA(3,2) fitting is equivalent to lumping the eigenmodes of fluctuation propagation in three modes such as the slow, intermediate and fast attenuation modes. Therefore, ARMA(3,2) fitting was applied to the real standard deviation estimation of fuel assemblies at particular heights. The numerical results show that straightforward ARMA(3,2) fitting is promising but a stability issue must be resolved toward the incorporation in the distributed version of production Monte Carlo codes. The same numerical results reveal that the average performance of ARMA(3,2) fitting is equivalent to that of the batch method in MCNP with a batch size larger than one hundred and smaller than two hundred cycles for a 1100 MWe pressurized water reactor. The bias correction of low lag autocovariances in MVP/GMVP is demonstrated to have the potential of improving the average performance of ARMA(3,2) fitting. (author)

  2. Permafrost distribution in the European Alps: calculation and evaluation of an index map and summary statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Boeckli

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is the production of an Alpine Permafrost Index Map (APIM covering the entire European Alps. A unified statistical model that is based on Alpine-wide permafrost observations is used for debris and bedrock surfaces across the entire Alps. The explanatory variables of the model are mean annual air temperatures, potential incoming solar radiation and precipitation. Offset terms were applied to make model predictions for topographic and geomorphic conditions that differ from the terrain features used for model fitting. These offsets are based on literature review and involve some degree of subjective choice during model building. The assessment of the APIM is challenging because limited independent test data are available for comparison and these observations represent point information in a spatially highly variable topography. The APIM provides an index that describes the spatial distribution of permafrost and comes together with an interpretation key that helps to assess map uncertainties and to relate map contents to their actual expression in the terrain. The map can be used as a first resource to estimate permafrost conditions at any given location in the European Alps in a variety of contexts such as research and spatial planning.

    Results show that Switzerland likely is the country with the largest permafrost area in the Alps, followed by Italy, Austria, France and Germany. Slovenia and Liechtenstein may have marginal permafrost areas. In all countries the permafrost area is expected to be larger than the glacier-covered area.

  3. X-ray evaluation of residual stress distributions within surface machined layer generated by surface machining and sequential welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Yuu; Okano, Shigetaka; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    The excessive tensile residual stress generated by welding after surface machining may be an important factor to cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nuclear power plants. Therefore we need to understand and control the residual stress distribution appropriately. In this study, residual stress distributions within surface machined layer generated by surface machining and sequential welding were evaluated by X-ray diffraction method. Depth directional distributions were also investigated by electrolytic polishing. In addition, to consider the effect of work hardened layer on the residual stress distributions, we also measured full width at half maximum (FWHM) obtained from X-ray diffraction. Testing material was a low-carbon austenitic stainless steel type SUS316L. Test specimens were prepared by surface machining with different cutting conditions. Then, bead-on-plate welding under the same welding condition was carried out on the test specimens with different surface machined layer. As a result, the tensile residual stress generated by surface machining increased with increasing cutting speed and showed nearly uniform distributions on the surface. Furthermore, the tensile residual stress drastically decreased with increasing measurement depth within surface machined layer. Then, the residual stress approached 0 MPa after the compressive value showed. FWHM also decreased drastically with increasing measurement depth and almost constant value from a certain depth, which was almost equal regardless of the machining condition, within surface machined layer in all specimens. After welding, the transverse distribution of the longitudinal residual stress varied in the area apart from the weld center according to machining conditions and had a maximum value in heat affected zone. The magnitude of the maximum residual stress was almost equal regardless of the machining condition and decreased with increasing measurement depth within surface machined layer. Finally, the

  4. The Importance of Considering the Temporal Distribution of Climate Variables for Ecological-Economic Modeling to Calculate the Consequences of Climate Change for Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plegnière, Sabrina; Casper, Markus; Hecker, Benjamin; Müller-Fürstenberger, Georg

    2014-05-01

    The basis of many models to calculate and assess climate change and its consequences are annual means of temperature and precipitation. This method leads to many uncertainties especially at the regional or local level: the results are not realistic or too coarse. Particularly in agriculture, single events and the distribution of precipitation and temperature during the growing season have enormous influences on plant growth. Therefore, the temporal distribution of climate variables should not be ignored. To reach this goal, a high-resolution ecological-economic model was developed which combines a complex plant growth model (STICS) and an economic model. In this context, input data of the plant growth model are daily climate values for a specific climate station calculated by the statistical climate model (WETTREG). The economic model is deduced from the results of the plant growth model STICS. The chosen plant is corn because corn is often cultivated and used in many different ways. First of all, a sensitivity analysis showed that the plant growth model STICS is suitable to calculate the influences of different cultivation methods and climate on plant growth or yield as well as on soil fertility, e.g. by nitrate leaching, in a realistic way. Additional simulations helped to assess a production function that is the key element of the economic model. Thereby the problems when using mean values of temperature and precipitation in order to compute a production function by linear regression are pointed out. Several examples show why a linear regression to assess a production function based on mean climate values or smoothed natural distribution leads to imperfect results and why it is not possible to deduce a unique climate factor in the production function. One solution for this problem is the additional consideration of stress indices that show the impairment of plants by water or nitrate shortage. Thus, the resulting model takes into account not only the ecological

  5. Effect of geometric construction on residual stress distribution in designing a nuclear rotor joined by multipass narrow gap welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Long; Zhang, Linjie; Zhang, Jianxun; Zhuang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The internal stress of the pipe is measured using local material removal method. • Bottom protrusion at weld seam can release the stress and mitigate stress evolution. The through-wall axial stress is bending type under the effect of the rotor discs. • The impact of geometric construction on the stress evolution begins after pass 15. - Abstract: The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of geometric construction on the distribution of residual stresses before and after heat treatment in designing a nuclear welded rotor. The local material removal method was used to measure internal residual stress of the experimental pipe after post weld heat treatment. Three finite element models were employed as follows: a model of experimental pipe, a model with a bottom protrusion existed at the weld region, and a model of two rotor discs butt-welded with a bottom protrusion at the weld region. Investigated results showed that the bottom protrusion existed at the weld region can decrease the residual stress and mitigate the stress evolution significantly on the inner surface. Under the binding effect of the rotor discs, the axial stress of inner surface region is compressive stress; the through-wall axial stress at the weld center line can be deemed to a bending type; both the hoop stress and axial stress at the weld center line on the inner surface are compressive. The impact of geometric construction on the stress evolution at the root bead begins after pass 15 deposited

  6. Benchmark calculation for the steady-state temperature distribution of the HTR-10 under full-power operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fubing; Dong Yujie; Zheng Yanhua; Shi Lei; Zhang Zuoyi

    2009-01-01

    Within the framework of a Coordinated Research Project on Evaluation of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Performance (CRP-5) initiated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the calculation of steady-state temperature distribution of the 10 MW High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor-Test Module (HTR-10) under its initial full power experimental operation has been defined as one of the benchmark problems. This paper gives the investigation results obtained by different countries who participate in solving this benchmark problem. The validation works of the THERMIX code used by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) are also presented. For the benchmark items defined in this CRP, various calculation results correspond well with each other and basically agree the experimental results. Discrepancies existing among various code results are preliminarily attributed to different methods, models, material properties, and so on used in the computations. Temperatures calculated by THERMIX for the measuring points in the reactor internals agree well with the experimental values. The maximum fuel center temperatures calculated by the participants are much lower than the limited value of 1,230degC. According to the comparison results of code-to-code as well as code-to-experiment, THERMIX is considered to reproduce relatively satisfactory results for the CRP-5 benchmark problem. (author)

  7. Calculation of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity considering non-uniform radial temperature distribution in the fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazirandeh, Ali [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Science and Research Branch; Hooshyar Mobaraki, Almas

    2017-07-15

    The safe operation of a reactor is based on feedback models. In this paper we attempted to discuss the influence of a non-uniform radial temperature distribution on the fuel rod temperature coefficient of reactivity. The paper demonstrates that the neutron properties of a reactor core is based on effective temperature of the fuel to obtain the correct fuel temperature feedback. The value of volume-averaged temperature being used in the calculations of neutron physics with feedbacks would result in underestimating the probable event. In the calculation it is necessary to use the effective temperature of the fuel in order to provide correct accounting of the fuel temperature feedback. Fuel temperature changes in different zones of the core and consequently reactivity coefficient change are an important parameter for analysis of transient conditions. The restricting factor that compensates the inserted reactivity is the temperature reactivity coefficient and effective delayed neutron fraction.

  8. RAGRAF: a computer code for calculating temperature distributions in multi-pin fuel assemblies in a stagnant gas atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, A.

    1979-02-01

    A method of calculating the temperature distribution in a cross-section of a multi-pin nuclear reactor fuel assembly has been computerised. It utilises the thermal radiation interchange between individual fuel pins in either a square or triangular pitched lattice. A stagnant gas atmosphere within the fuel assembly is assumed which inhibits natural convection but permits thermal conduction between adjacent fuel pins. no restriction is placed upon the shape of wrapper used, but its temperature must always be uniform. RAGRAF has great flexibility because of the many options it provides. Although, essentially, it is a transient code, steady state solutions may be readily identified from successive temperature prints. An enclosure for the assembly wrapper is available, to be included or discarded at will during transient calculations. outside the limit of the assembly wrapper, any type or combination of heat transfer mode may be included. Transient variations in boundary temperature may be included if required. (author)

  9. New approach for absolute fluence distribution calculations in Monte Carlo simulations of light propagation in turbid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Böcklin, Christoph; Baumann, Dirk; Fröhlich, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    A novel way to attain three dimensional fluence rate maps from Monte-Carlo simulations of photon propagation is presented in this work. The propagation of light in a turbid medium is described by the radiative transfer equation and formulated in terms of radiance. For many applications, particularly in biomedical optics, the fluence rate is a more useful quantity and directly derived from the radiance by integrating over all directions. Contrary to the usual way which calculates the fluence rate from absorbed photon power, the fluence rate in this work is directly calculated from the photon packet trajectory. The voxel based algorithm works in arbitrary geometries and material distributions. It is shown that the new algorithm is more efficient and also works in materials with a low or even zero absorption coefficient. The capabilities of the new algorithm are demonstrated on a curved layered structure, where a non-scattering, non-absorbing layer is sandwiched between two highly scattering layers

  10. Combination of physical exercise and adenosine improves accuracy of automatic calculation of stress LVEF in gated SPECT using QGS software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranipour, N.; AL-Nahhas, A.; Towey, D.

    2005-01-01

    Combining exercise and adenosine during the stress phase of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is known to reduce adverse effects and improve image quality. The aim of this study was to assess whether it can also improve the automatic calculation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by QGS software package, during the stress phase of Gated SPECT. One hundred patients who had stress Gated SPECT were retrospectively included in this study. Gated data of those who had adenosine only (50 patients = group A) was compared with those obtained in another group of 50 patients who had added bicycle exercise (Group B). All had identical image acquisition protocol using 99mT c-tetrofosmine. Clinical adverse effects, changes in blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and ECG were monitored. Visual assessment of subdiaphragmatic uptake and accuracy of automatic regions of interest (ROI's) drawn by the software were noted. Regions of interest that involved sub-diaphragmatic uptake and resulting in low LVEF were manually adjusted to include the left ventricle only, and the frequency of manual adjustment was noted. No significant difference was noted in age, sex, baseline BP and HR between groups A and B. Adverse effects occurred less often in group B compared to group A (12% vs. 24%, p = 0.118). Maximum HR and BP achieved during stress were significantly higher in group B compared to group A (p 0.025, p = 0.001 respectively). The number of patients who had faulty ROI's and low LVEF, who needed manual adjustment of ROI.s, were higher in group A compared to group B (16% vs. 6%, p = 0.025). The values of LVEF showed significant improvement following manual adjustment of ROI's, increasing from a mean of 19.63 ± 15.96 to 62.13 ± 7.55 (p = 0.0001) and from 17.33 ± 9.5 to 49.67 ± 7.7 (p = 0.0014) in groups A and B respectively. The addition of exercise to adenosine significantly improves the automatic calculation of LVEF by QGS software during Gated SPECT and reduces the need

  11. Direct calculation of unambiguous electron-density distributions of Langmuir-Blodgett films normal to the membrane plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frieling, M. von; Bradaczek, H.

    1990-01-01

    In regard to X-ray diffraction, Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films consisting of lipid bilayers represent a 'one-dimensional crystal' with a very small number of unit cells in the direction of stacking. Such bounded systems yield X-ray diffraction diagrams which, in certain respects, contain more information than those of the conventional effectively infinite single crystals. This additional information consists of the profiles of the broadened reflections and their dislocation from the reciprocal-lattice points. These profiles are specific for each different structure and hence enable the direct calculation of unambiguous electron-density distributions from a single set of intensity data. At first, the Q function (the generalized Patterson function), i.e. the distance statistics of the structure sought after is calculated from the intensity data. Thereafter, the unambiguous convolution square root of the Q function must be determined, which is identical to the unknown electron-density distribution. For this purpose two mathematically completely different methods were established and compared. They were applied to diffraction patterns of Langmuir-Blodgett films of simple synthetic lipids with characteristic molecular subunits and showed identical results within the experimental resolution. This verifies the structures and the methods to calculate them. Furthermore, all features of the simple structures were compatible with the expectations. All one-dimensional electron-density distributions showed the common features of lipid bilayers. The characteristic molecular subunits can be recognized and reveal some interesting details. In general, they yield information about orientation, conformation and localization of molecular subunits and membrane components. (orig.)

  12. Calculations of the three-dimensional power distribution in the Fort St. Vrain reactor using UK methods and data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D W

    1973-04-15

    Assessments of the ability of UK methods and data developed primarily for the low enriched uranium cycle to simulate thorium cycle HTRs haye been extended to cover reactivity and power distributions in commercial size reactors. The Fort St. Vrain 330 MW(E) HTR being built in the United States by Gulf General Atomic has been chosen as a convenient object for such a study since detailed design information together with the results of GGA's own calculations have been published. The results obtained are in good agreement with those obtained by GGA and indicate that both thorium and low enriched cycle HTRs can be adequately modelled with UK data and methods.

  13. Analytical Calculation of the Magnetic Field distribution in a Flux-Modulated Permanent-Magnet Brushless Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a rapid approach to compute the magnetic field distribution in a flux-modulated permanent-magnet brushless motor. Partial differential equations are used to describe the magnet field behavior in terms of magnetic vector potentials. The whole computational domain is divided...... into several regions, i.e., magnet, air-gaps, slot-openings, and slots. The numerical solution could be obtained by applying the boundary constraints on the interfaces between these regions. The accuracy of the proposed analytical model is verified by comparing the no-load magnetic field and armature reaction...... magnetic field with those calculated by finite element method....

  14. Radiation dose distributions close to the shower axis calculated for high energy electron initiated electromagnetic showers in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, S.; Gsponer, A.

    1983-01-01

    Absorbed radiation doses produced by 500, 1,000 and 10,000 MeV electron initiated electromagnetic showers in air have been calculated using a Monte Carlo program. The radial distributions of the absorbed dose near to the shower axis are found to be significantly narrower than predicted by simple analytical shower theory. For a 500 MeV, 10 kA, 100 ns electron beam pulse, the region in which the total dose is in excess of 1 krad and the dose rate in excess of 10 10 rad/s is a cigar-shaped envelope of radius 1 m and length 200 m. (orig.) [de

  15. A new Monte Carlo program for calculations of dose distributions within tissue equivalent phantoms irradiated from π--meson beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybilla, G.

    1980-11-01

    The present paper reports on the structure and first results from a new Monte Carlo programme for calculations of energy distributions within tissue equivalent phantoms irradiated from π - -beams. Each pion or generated secondary particle is transported until to the complete loss of its kinetic energy taking into account pion processes like multiple Coulomb scattering, pion reactions in flight and absorption of stopped pions. The code uses mainly data from experiments, and physical models have been added only in cases of lacking data. Depth dose curves for a pensil beam of 170 MeV/c within a water phantom are discussed as a function of various parameters. Isodose contours are plotted resulting from a convolution of an extended beam profile and the dose distribution of a pencil beams. (orig.) [de

  16. On deriving the Maxwell stress tensor method for calculating the optical force and torque on an object in harmonic electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qian; Lin, Haoze

    2017-07-01

    Though extensively used in calculating optical force and torque acting on a material object illuminated by laser, the Maxwell stress tensor (MST) method follows the electromagnetic linear and angular momentum balance that is usually derived in most textbooks for a continuous volume charge distribution in free space, if not resorting to the application of Noether’s theorem in electrodynamics. To cast the conservation laws into a physically appealing form involving the current densities of linear and angular momentum, on which the MST method is based, the divergence theorem is employed to transform a volume integral into a surface integral. When a material object of finite volume is put into the field, it brings about a discontinuity of field across its surface, due to the presence of induced surface charge and surface current. Ambiguity arises among students in whether the divergence theorem can still be directly used without any justification. By taking into account the effect of the induced surface charge and current, we present a simple pedagogical derivation for the MST method for calculating the optical force and torque on an object immersed in monochromatic optical field, without resorting to Noether’s theorem. Although the results turn out to be identical to those given in the standard textbooks, our derivation avoids the direct use of the divergence theorem on a discontinuous function.

  17. On deriving the Maxwell stress tensor method for calculating the optical force and torque on an object in harmonic electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Qian; Lin, Haoze

    2017-01-01

    Though extensively used in calculating optical force and torque acting on a material object illuminated by laser, the Maxwell stress tensor (MST) method follows the electromagnetic linear and angular momentum balance that is usually derived in most textbooks for a continuous volume charge distribution in free space , if not resorting to the application of Noether’s theorem in electrodynamics. To cast the conservation laws into a physically appealing form involving the current densities of linear and angular momentum, on which the MST method is based, the divergence theorem is employed to transform a volume integral into a surface integral. When a material object of finite volume is put into the field, it brings about a discontinuity of field across its surface, due to the presence of induced surface charge and surface current. Ambiguity arises among students in whether the divergence theorem can still be directly used without any justification. By taking into account the effect of the induced surface charge and current, we present a simple pedagogical derivation for the MST method for calculating the optical force and torque on an object immersed in monochromatic optical field, without resorting to Noether’s theorem. Although the results turn out to be identical to those given in the standard textbooks, our derivation avoids the direct use of the divergence theorem on a discontinuous function. (paper)

  18. Stress distribution in the 16MND5 bainitic steel. Experimental analysis and polycrystalline modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesci, R.; Inal, K.; Berveiller, M.; Masson, R.

    2003-01-01

    The 16MND5 bainitic steel being a two-phase material (ferrite/cementite), the X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) is the most efficient tool to determine the stress states into the ferritic phase (sin 2 ψ method). The latter, coupled to the observations realized during tensile tests (specimen surface and facies), have permitted to establish criteria to describe the behavior and the damaging processes of the material on a crystallographic scale, in the lower part of the ductile-to-brittle transition region and at lower temperatures [-196 deg. C;-60 deg. C]. During the loading, the damage is observed with a Scanning Electron Microscope, while the internal stresses are determined by XRD: the stress states are less important in ferrite than in bainite (macroscopic stress), the difference not exceeding 150 MPa. A multi-scale polycrystalline model is developed concurrently with the experimental measurements: a Mori-Tanaka formulation is used to describe the elastoplastic behavior of a ferritic single crystal reinforced by cementite precipitates, while the transition to the polycrystal is achieved by a self-consistent approach. The developed modeling takes into account the temperature effects on the stress states in each phase and includes a cleavage criterion (critical value of the stress normal to [100] planes), which expresses the damage of the material: thus, it enables to predict the actual experimental behavior of the 16MND5 steel in relation to temperature, and to take into account the failure process which is fragile from -120 deg. C. Besides, it is also possible to calculate the strains of the diffracting planes, which can be compared to those measured by XRD: this enables to evaluate the heterogeneity of the strains for each crystallographic orientation. (authors)

  19. Evaluation of heterogeneity dose distributions for Stereotactic Radiotherapy (SRT: comparison of commercially available Monte Carlo dose calculation with other algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Wataru

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to compare dose distributions from three different algorithms with the x-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC calculations, in actual computed tomography (CT scans for use in stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT of small lung cancers. Methods Slow CT scan of 20 patients was performed and the internal target volume (ITV was delineated on Pinnacle3. All plans were first calculated with a scatter homogeneous mode (SHM which is compatible with Clarkson algorithm using Pinnacle3 treatment planning system (TPS. The planned dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. In a second step, the CT images, structures and beam data were exported to other treatment planning systems (TPSs. Collapsed cone convolution (CCC from Pinnacle3, superposition (SP from XiO, and XVMC from Monaco were used for recalculating. The dose distributions and the Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs were compared with each other. Results The phantom test revealed that all algorithms could reproduce the measured data within 1% except for the SHM with inhomogeneous phantom. For the patient study, the SHM greatly overestimated the isocenter (IC doses and the minimal dose received by 95% of the PTV (PTV95 compared to XVMC. The differences in mean doses were 2.96 Gy (6.17% for IC and 5.02 Gy (11.18% for PTV95. The DVH's and dose distributions with CCC and SP were in agreement with those obtained by XVMC. The average differences in IC doses between CCC and XVMC, and SP and XVMC were -1.14% (p = 0.17, and -2.67% (p = 0.0036, respectively. Conclusions Our work clearly confirms that the actual practice of relying solely on a Clarkson algorithm may be inappropriate for SRT planning. Meanwhile, CCC and SP were close to XVMC simulations and actual dose distributions obtained in lung SRT.

  20. Calculation of dose distribution in compressible breast tissues using finite element modeling, Monte Carlo simulation and thermoluminescence dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadyari, Parvin; Faghihi, Reza; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Lotfi, Mehrzad; Rahim Hematiyan, Mohammad; Koontz, Craig; Meigooni, Ali S.

    2015-12-01

    Compression is a technique to immobilize the target or improve the dose distribution within the treatment volume during different irradiation techniques such as AccuBoost® brachytherapy. However, there is no systematic method for determination of dose distribution for uncompressed tissue after irradiation under compression. In this study, the mechanical behavior of breast tissue between compressed and uncompressed states was investigated. With that, a novel method was developed to determine the dose distribution in uncompressed tissue after irradiation of compressed breast tissue. Dosimetry was performed using two different methods, namely, Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP5 code and measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The displacement of the breast elements was simulated using a finite element model and calculated using ABAQUS software. From these results, the 3D dose distribution in uncompressed tissue was determined. The geometry of the model was constructed from magnetic resonance images of six different women volunteers. The mechanical properties were modeled by using the Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic material model. Experimental dosimetry was performed by placing the TLD chips into the polyvinyl alcohol breast equivalent phantom. The results determined that the nodal displacements, due to the gravitational force and the 60 Newton compression forces (with 43% contraction in the loading direction and 37% expansion in the orthogonal direction) were determined. Finally, a comparison of the experimental data and the simulated data showed agreement within 11.5%  ±  5.9%.