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Sample records for strength transition rates

  1. Oscillator strengths and radiative rates for transitions in neutral sulfur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, N.C.; Hibbert, A.

    2008-01-01

    We present accurate oscillator strengths and radiative rates for 2173 E1 transitions among the 120 levels belonging to 3s 2 3p 4 , 3s3p 5 , and 3s 2 3p 3 ( 4 S o , 2 D o , 2 P o )nl configurations where nl=4s,5s,6s,4p,5p,6p,3d,4d,4f,5f. A configuration interaction approach is employed through the standard CIV3 program. The 114 LS states included in the present calculation generate 250 fine-structure levels belonging to the above configurations below 100,000 cm -1 . However, results of only 120 fine-structure levels are presented due to the absence of experimental energy values for the remaining levels. Tabulations of oscillator strengths and radiative rates, and their comparison with other calculations, are presented in the first two tables. In a separate table the oscillator strengths and transition probabilities, in length and velocity gauges, are presented for 2173 E1 transitions, and are arranged in ascending order of wavelength

  2. Electron impact collision strengths and transition rates for extreme ultraviolet emission from Xe10+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yunfeng; Gao Cheng; Zeng Jiaolong

    2009-01-01

    The energy levels, oscillator strengths, and electron impact collision strengths are calculated for the Xe 10+ ion using the configuration interaction scheme implemented by the Flexible Atomic Code. These data pertain to the 3917 levels belonging to the following configurations: 4s 2 4p 6 4d 8 , 4s 2 4p 6 4d 7 4f, 4s 2 4p 6 4d 7 5l (l = s, p, d, or f), 4s 2 4p 5 4d 9 , 4s 2 4p 5 4d 8 4f, 4s 2 4p 5 4d 8 5l, 4s 2 4p 6 4d 6 5s5p, 4s 2 4p 6 4d 6 5p5d. Configuration interactions among these configurations are included in the calculation. Collision strengths are obtained at 10 scattered electron energies (1-1000 eV) and are tabulated here at five representative energies of 10, 50, 100, 500, and 1000 eV. Effective collision strengths are obtained by assuming a Maxwellian electron velocity distribution at 10 temperatures ranging from 10 to 100 eV, and are tabulated at five representative temperatures of 10, 30, 50, 70 and 100 eV in this work. The whole data set should be useful for research involving extreme ultraviolet emission from Xe 10+

  3. Effect of cooling rate during solidification of Sn-9Zn lead-free solder alloy on its microstructure, tensile strength and ductile-brittle transition temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu, K.N., E-mail: prabhukn_2002@yahoo.co.in [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal, Mangalore 575 025 (India); Deshapande, Parashuram; Satyanarayan [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal, Mangalore 575 025 (India)

    2012-01-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of cooling rate on tensile and impact properties of Sn-9Zn alloy was assessed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both DBTT and UTS of the solder alloy increased with increase in cooling rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An optimum cooling rate during solidification would minimize DBTT and maximize UTS. - Abstract: Solidification rate is an important variable during processing of materials, including soldering, involving solidification. The rate of solidification controls the metallurgical microstructure at the solder joint and hence the mechanical properties. A high tensile strength and a lower ductile-brittle transition temperature are necessary for reliability of solder joints in electronic circuits. Hence in the present work, the effect of cooling rate during solidification on microstructure, impact and tensile properties of Sn-9Zn lead-free solder alloy was investigated. Four different cooling media (copper and stainless steel moulds, air and furnace cooling) were used for solidification to achieve different cooling rates. Solder alloy solidified in copper mould exhibited higher cooling rate as compared to other cooling media. The microstructure is refined as the cooling rate was increased from 0.03 to 25 Degree-Sign C/s. With increase in cooling rate it was observed that the size of Zn flakes became finer and distributed uniformly throughout the matrix. Ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the solder alloy increased with increase in cooling rate. Fractured surfaces of impact test specimens showed cleavage like appearance and river like pattern at very low temperatures and dimple like appearance at higher temperatures. The tensile strength of the solder alloy solidified in Cu and stainless moulds were higher as compared to air and furnace cooled samples. It is therefore suggested that the cooling rate during solidification of the solder alloy should be optimum to maximize the strength and minimize the

  4. Effect of cooling rate during solidification of Sn–9Zn lead-free solder alloy on its microstructure, tensile strength and ductile–brittle transition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, K.N.; Deshapande, Parashuram; Satyanarayan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effect of cooling rate on tensile and impact properties of Sn–9Zn alloy was assessed. ► Both DBTT and UTS of the solder alloy increased with increase in cooling rate. ► An optimum cooling rate during solidification would minimize DBTT and maximize UTS. - Abstract: Solidification rate is an important variable during processing of materials, including soldering, involving solidification. The rate of solidification controls the metallurgical microstructure at the solder joint and hence the mechanical properties. A high tensile strength and a lower ductile–brittle transition temperature are necessary for reliability of solder joints in electronic circuits. Hence in the present work, the effect of cooling rate during solidification on microstructure, impact and tensile properties of Sn–9Zn lead-free solder alloy was investigated. Four different cooling media (copper and stainless steel moulds, air and furnace cooling) were used for solidification to achieve different cooling rates. Solder alloy solidified in copper mould exhibited higher cooling rate as compared to other cooling media. The microstructure is refined as the cooling rate was increased from 0.03 to 25 °C/s. With increase in cooling rate it was observed that the size of Zn flakes became finer and distributed uniformly throughout the matrix. Ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the solder alloy increased with increase in cooling rate. Fractured surfaces of impact test specimens showed cleavage like appearance and river like pattern at very low temperatures and dimple like appearance at higher temperatures. The tensile strength of the solder alloy solidified in Cu and stainless moulds were higher as compared to air and furnace cooled samples. It is therefore suggested that the cooling rate during solidification of the solder alloy should be optimum to maximize the strength and minimize the DBTT.

  5. Strength and rupture-life transitions caused by secondary carbide precipitation in HT-9 during high-temperature low-rate mechanical testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiMelfi, R.J.; Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.; Hughes, T.H.

    1992-01-01

    The martensitic-ferritic alloy HT-9 is slated for long-term use as a fuel-cladding material in the Integral Fast Reactor. Analysis of published high-temperature mechanical property data suggests that secondary carbide precipitation would occur during service life causing substantial strengthening of the as-heat-treated material. Aspects of the kinetics of this precipitation process are extracted from calculations of the back stress necessary to produce the observed strengthening effect under various creep loading conditions. The resulting Arrhenius factor is shown to agree quantitatively with shifts to higher strength of crept material in reference to the intrinsic strength of HT-9. The results of very low constant strain-rate high-temperature tensile tests on as-heat-treated HT-9 that focus on the transition in strength with precipitation will be presented and related to rupture-life

  6. Polynomial expansions and transition strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draayer, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    The subject is statistical spectroscopy applied to determining strengths and strength sums of excitation processes in nuclei. The focus will be on a ds-shell isoscalar E2 study with detailed shell-model results providing the standard for comparison; similar results are available for isovector E2 and M1 and E4 transitions as well as for single-particle transfer and ν +- decay. The present study is intended to serve as a tutorial for applications where shell-model calculations are not feasible. The problem is posed and a schematic theory for strengths and sums is presented. The theory is extended to include the effect of correlations between H, the system Hamiltonian, and theta, the excitation operator. Associated with correlation measures is a geometry that can be used to anticipate the goodness of a symmetry. This is illustrated for pseudo SU(3) in the fp-shell. Some conclusions about fluctuations and collectivity that one can deduce from the statistical results for strengths are presented

  7. Electric Monopole Transition Strengths in 62Ni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evitts L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Excited states in 62Ni were populated with a (p, p’ reaction using the 14UD Pelletron accelerator at the Australian National University. Electric monopole transition strengths, ρ2(E0, were measured through simultaneous detection of the internal conversion electrons and γ rays emitted from the de-excitation of populated states, using the Super-e spectrometer coupled with a germanium detector. The strength of the 02+ to 01+ transition has been measured to be 77−34+23 × 10−3 and agrees with previously reported values. Upper limits have been placed on the 03+ to 01+ and 03+ to 02+ transitions. The measured ρ2(E0 value of the 22+ to 21+ transition in 62Ni has been measured for the first time and found to be one of the largest ρ2(E0 values measured to date in nuclei heavier than Ca. The low-lying states of 62Ni have previously been classified as one- and two-phonon vibrational states based on level energies. The measured electric quadrupole transition strengths are consistent with this interpretation. However as electric monopole transitions are forbidden between states which differ by one phonon number, the simple harmonic quadrupole vibrational picture is not suffcient to explain the large ρ2(E0 value for the 22+ to 21+ transition.

  8. Electric Monopole Transition Strengths in 62Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evitts, L. J.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Kibédi, T.; Moukaddam, M.; Alshahrani, B.; Eriksen, T. K.; Holt, J. D.; Hota, S. S.; Lane, G. J.; Lee, B. Q.; McCormick, B. P.; Palalani, N.; Reed, M. W.; Stroberg, S. R.; Stuchbery, A. E.

    2016-09-01

    Excited states in 62Ni were populated with a (p, p') reaction using the 14UD Pelletron accelerator at the Australian National University. Electric monopole transition strengths, ρ2(E0), were measured through simultaneous detection of the internal conversion electrons and γ rays emitted from the de-excitation of populated states, using the Super-e spectrometer coupled with a germanium detector. The strength of the 02+ to 01+ transition has been measured to be 77-34+23 × 10-3 and agrees with previously reported values. Upper limits have been placed on the 03+ to 01+ and 03+ to 02+ transitions. The measured ρ2(E0) value of the 22+ to 21+ transition in 62Ni has been measured for the first time and found to be one of the largest ρ2(E0) values measured to date in nuclei heavier than Ca. The low-lying states of 62Ni have previously been classified as one- and two-phonon vibrational states based on level energies. The measured electric quadrupole transition strengths are consistent with this interpretation. However as electric monopole transitions are forbidden between states which differ by one phonon number, the simple harmonic quadrupole vibrational picture is not suffcient to explain the large ρ2(E0) value for the 22+ to 21+ transition.

  9. Collision strengths for transitions in Ni XIX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    4l configurations of Ni XIX, for which flexible atomic code. (FAC) has been ... atomic data (namely energy levels, radiative rates, collision strengths, excitation rates, etc.) ... Zhang and Sampson, who adopted the Coulomb–Born-exchange.

  10. Electric Monopole Transition Strengths in the Stable Nickel Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evitts, Lee John

    A series of measurements of stable nickel isotopes were performed at the Australian National University in Canberra. Excited states in 58,60,62Ni were populated via inelastic scattering of proton beams delivered by the 14UD Pelletron accelerator. Multiple setups were used in order to determine the structure of low-lying states. The CAESAR array of Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors was used to measure the (E2/M1) mixing ratio of transitions from angular distributions of gamma rays. The Super-e spectrometer was used to measure conversion coefficients for a number of J to J transitions. The data obtained from both devices was combined with previously measured parent lifetimes and branching ratios to determine E0 transition strengths between J-pi transitions. The E0 transition strength for the second 0+ to first 0+ transitions in 60,62Ni have been measured for the first time through internal conversion electron detection. The experimental value of 132(+59,-70) for 62Ni agrees within 2 sigma of the previous result obtained from internal pair formation. However it is likely that the previous experimental results used an outdated theoretical model for internal pair formation emission. This work also represents the first measurements of E0 transition strengths between 2+ states in Ni isotopes. There is generally large E0 strength between the 2+ states, particularly in the second 2+ to first 2+ transition, however there is also a large uncertainty in the measurements owing to the difficulties involved in measuring conversion coefficients. In 62Ni, the E0 transition strength of 172(+62,-77) for the second 2+ to first 2+ transition gives further weight to the argument against the spherical vibrator model, as an E0 transition is forbidden if there is a change of only one phonon. The large measurement also indicates the presence of shape coexistence, complementing the recent experimental work carried out in the neutron-rich Ni isotopes.

  11. Random matrix theory for transition strengths: Applications and open questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, V. K. B.

    2017-12-01

    Embedded random matrix ensembles are generic models for describing statistical properties of finite isolated interacting quantum many-particle systems. A finite quantum system, induced by a transition operator, makes transitions from its states to the states of the same system or to those of another system. Examples are electromagnetic transitions (then the initial and final systems are same), nuclear beta and double beta decay (then the initial and final systems are different) and so on. Using embedded ensembles (EE), there are efforts to derive a good statistical theory for transition strengths. With m fermions (or bosons) in N mean-field single particle levels and interacting via two-body forces, we have with GOE embedding, the so called EGOE(1+2). Now, the transition strength density (transition strength multiplied by the density of states at the initial and final energies) is a convolution of the density generated by the mean-field one-body part with a bivariate spreading function due to the two-body interaction. Using the embedding U(N) algebra, it is established, for a variety of transition operators, that the spreading function, for sufficiently strong interactions, is close to a bivariate Gaussian. Also, as the interaction strength increases, the spreading function exhibits a transition from bivariate Breit-Wigner to bivariate Gaussian form. In appropriate limits, this EE theory reduces to the polynomial theory of Draayer, French and Wong on one hand and to the theory due to Flambaum and Izrailev for one-body transition operators on the other. Using spin-cutoff factors for projecting angular momentum, the theory is applied to nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double beta decay (NDBD). In this paper we will describe: (i) various developments in the EE theory for transition strengths; (ii) results for nuclear matrix elements for 130Te and 136Xe NDBD; (iii) important open questions in the current form of the EE theory.

  12. Effect of symmetry breaking on transition strength distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, G.E.; Shriner, J.F. Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The quantum numbers of over 100 states in 30 P have been determined from the ground state to 8 MeV. Previous measurements had provided complete spectroscopy in 26 Al. For these N=Z=odd nuclei, states of isospin T=0 and T=1 coexist at all energies. These spectra provide a unique opportunity to test the effect of symmetry breaking (of the approximate symmetry isospin) on the level statistics and on the transition strength distributions. The level statistics are strongly affected by the small symmetry breaking and the transition strength distributions differ from the Porter-Thomas distribution

  13. Transition-strength fluctuations and the onset of chaotic motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhassid, Y.; Levine, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The maximum-entropy formalism is used to characterize the fluctuations in transition strengths for a bound quantum-mechanical system. In the chaotic limit only one, ever present, sum rule is required as a constraint. The resulting distribution is that of Porter and Thomas, which can also be derived from random-matrix theory. For nonchaotic systems the distribution of transition strengths has a lower entropy. A possible additional constraint, operative during the onset of chaos, is proposed. The distribution of maximal entropy subject to both constraints accords with computed intensities in a system of two degrees of freedom

  14. Excitation rates for transitions in Kr XXXII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Keenan, F. P.; Lawson, K. D.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we report our results for collision strengths and effective collision strengths for transitions among the lowest 125 levels of the 2s22p, 2s2p2, 2p3, 2s23ell, 2s2p3ell, and 2p23ell configurations of Kr XXXII. For our calculations both the FAC and DARC codes have been employed.

  15. Oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for the intercombination transitions in Fe XXII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.

    1979-01-01

    Oscillator strengths and transition probabilities are evaluated for the intercombination transitions between the 2s 2 2p, 2s 2p 2 and 2p 3 states of Fe XXII using configuration interaction wavefunctions. The fine-structure splittings have also been calculated. Some significant differences with previous calculations are obtained

  16. Collision strengths for dipole-allowed transitions in S II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Y.K.; Henry, R.J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Calculations of collision strengths for electron-impact excitations of S II from the ground state 3p3 4S0 to excited states 3p4 4P, 3d 4F, 3d 4D, 4s 4P, and 3d 4P were carried out using the R-matrix code described by Berrington et al. (1978) and the NIEM code described by Henry et al. (1981). Results are presented for the thermally averaged collision strengths for the five-state and six-state calculations. Convergence behaviors were examined by comparison with the six-state calculations and the previously obtained two-state calculations. Uncertainties for these transitions were estimated to be within 20 percent, except for the 4S0 - 3p4 4P transition in which a 40 percent uncertainty was estimated. 22 refs

  17. Strength distribution of γ-transitions deexciting superdeformed rotational bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Martens, A.P.; Doesing, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Korichi, A.; Hannachi, F.; Calderin, I.J.; Lauritsen, T.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.; Fischer, S.M.; Hackman, G.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Nisius, D.; Reiter, P.; Amro, H.; Moore, E.F.

    1999-01-01

    The strength distribution of the γ rays in the decay-out from superdeformed (SD) states is investigated by applying the maximum likelihood method, with special emphasis on the influence of the lower threshold given by experimental conditions. Clear graphical solutions are found, and a careful estimation of the dispersion in the values of the number of degrees of freedom and of the average strength of the most likely χ 2 distribution is carried out. For the 194 Hg nucleus, 41 primary transitions from the decay-out of SD states are identified above 2600 keV. It is concluded that they represent the strongest 10% of the transitions selected stochastically from a Porter-Thomas distribution. This would support the scenario of a statistical decay of SD states via coupling to a compound state at normal deformation. However, the occurrence of several very strong direct one-step transitions as previously observed in 194 Hg has a very small probability of the order of 10 -4 . This may indicate special selection rules governing the decay. However, based on the absence of strong primary transitions from SD states in adjacent nuclei, the situation in 194 Hg is viewed as a very lucky incidence

  18. Transition and Electron Impact Excitation Collision Rates for O III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayal, S. S.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2017-12-01

    Transition probabilities, electron excitation collision strengths, and rate coefficients for a large number of O III lines over a broad wavelength range, from the infrared to ultraviolet, have been reported. The collision strengths have been calculated in the close-coupling approximation using the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix method. The multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method in combination with B-spline expansions is employed for an accurate representation of the target wave functions. The close-coupling expansion contains 202 O2+ fine-structure levels of the 2{s}22{p}2,2s2{p}3, 2{p}4,2{s}22p3s,3p,3d, 4s,4p,4d,4f,5s, and 2s2{p}33s,3p,3d configurations. The effective collision strengths are obtained by averaging electron excitation collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of velocities at electron temperatures ranging from 100 to 100,000 K. The calculated effective collision strengths have been reported for the 20,302 transitions between all 202 fine-structure levels. There is an overall good agreement with the recent R-matrix calculations by Storey et al. for the transitions between all levels of the ground 2{s}22{p}2 configuration, but significant discrepancies have been found with Palay et al. for transitions to the 2{s}22{p}2 1 S 0 level. Line intensity ratios between the optical lines arising from the 2{s}22{p}2{}3{P}{0,1,2} - 1 D 2 transitions have been compared with other calculations and observations from the photoionized gaseous nebulae, and good agreement is found. The present calculations provide the most complete and accurate data sets, which should allow a more detailed treatment of the available measured spectra from different ground and space observatories.

  19. Strength of wood versus rate of testing - A theoretical approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    2007-01-01

    Strength of wood is normally measured in ramp load experiments. Experience shows that strength increases with increasing rate of testing. This feature is considered theoretically in this paper. It is shown that the influence of testing rate is a phenomenon, which depends on the quality...... of the considered wood. Low quality wood shows lesser influence of testing rate. This observation agrees with the well-known statement made by Borg Madsen that weak wood subjected to a constant load, has a longer lifetime than strong wood. In general, the influence of testing rate on strength increases...

  20. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in Ti VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, K M; Keenan, F P; Msezane, A Z

    2013-01-01

    We report on calculations of energy levels, radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths for transitions among the lowest 253 levels of the (1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 ) 3s 2 3p 5 , 3s3p 6 , 3s 2 3p 4 3d, 3s3p 5 3d, 3s 2 3p 3 3d 2 , 3s 2 3p 4 4s, 3s 2 3p 4 4p and 3s 2 3p 4 4d configurations of Ti VI. The general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package and flexible atomic code are adopted for the calculations. Radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths are reported for all electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions among the 253 levels, although calculations have been performed for a much larger number of levels. Comparisons are made with existing available results and the accuracy of the data is assessed. Additionally, lifetimes for all 253 levels are listed, although comparisons with other theoretical results are limited to only 88 levels. Our energy levels are estimated to be accurate to better than 1% (within 0.03 Ryd), whereas results for other parameters are probably accurate to better than 20%. A reassessment of the energy level data on the National Institute of Standards and Technology website for Ti VI is suggested. (paper)

  1. Increased strength of concrete subject to high loading rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curbach, M.

    1987-01-01

    Within the scope of this work various problems are discussed which occur in connection with concrete under high tensile loading rates (e.g. when a plane crashes on a nuclear power plant very high loads occur which act only for a very short time). Particularly the causes for the already frequently noticed increases in strength with increasing loading rates are investigated and also the question whether this increased strength can be taken into account when dimensioning a construction. (MM) [de

  2. Rate-making in economies in transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    Eastern European economies in transition have unique needs which may be best served by considering how other economies around the world are making the transition to market-based economies. In particular, the recent Mexican experience may provide some lessons learned. Mexico has recently established for the first time a regulatory body with the power to regulate natural gas in certain ways. This paper outlines how the Mexican experience may be an appropriate jumping-off point for Eastern European economies in transition as they develop their own regulatory structure and rate-making. The paper concludes with an update on the recent experience in the U.S. to push the development of a market economy for natural gas further than it ever has before

  3. Flashing motor at high transition rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai Baoquan; Wang Liqiu; Liu Lianggang

    2007-01-01

    The movement of a Brownian particle in a fluctuating two-state periodic potential is investigated. At high transition rate, we use a perturbation method to obtain the analytical solution of the model. It is found that the net current is a peaked function of thermal noise, barrier height and the fluctuation ratio between the two states. The thermal noise may facilitate the directed motion at a finite intensity. The asymmetry parameter of the potential is sensitive to the direction of the net current

  4. Real Exchange Rates in Advanced Transition Economies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Grubacic

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent evidence from Eastern Europe suggests that one of the major obstacles towards the adoption of euro may lie in the impact that the recession of 2008 exerted on the trajectory of real exchange rates in new member countries (European Commission, 2015.  This paper aims to establish and explain the relationship between the external shocks derived from the global financial crisis and recession of 2008 and equilibrium real exchange rate in advanced transition economies of Eastern Europe. The interplay between the external and internal balances is explained by developing an inter-temporal optimizing model of the real exchange rate determination in a small open economy with structural distortions. The results of our model suggest that, in the aftermath of recession, if the Eastern European economies attempt to restore and maintain the balance between the consumption, saving, and investment, the equilibrium real exchange rate will tend to reverse its trajectory from appreciation to depreciation over time in order to encourage a greater production in the future. The equilibrium real exchange rate depreciation in the future may obtain either as a result of an increase in the direct subsidies on investment or as a result of reduced subsidies on the "net-of-investment" income.  The deprecation of countries’ real exchange rate, however, may continue to act as an effective constraint against the adoption of euro.

  5. Adaptive transition rates in excitable membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimon Marom

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation of activity in excitable membranes occurs over a wide range of timescales. Standard computational approaches handle this wide temporal range in terms of multiple states and related reaction rates emanating from the complexity of ionic channels. The study described here takes a different (perhaps complementary approach, by interpreting ion channel kinetics in terms of population dynamics. I show that adaptation in excitable membranes is reducible to a simple Logistic-like equation in which the essential non-linearity is replaced by a feedback loop between the history of activation and an adaptive transition rate that is sensitive to a single dimension of the space of inactive states. This physiologically measurable dimension contributes to the stability of the system and serves as a powerful modulator of input-output relations that depends on the patterns of prior activity; an intrinsic scale free mechanism for cellular adaptation that emerges from the microscopic biophysical properties of ion channels of excitable membranes.

  6. Strengths of gamma-ray transitions in A = 6–44 nuclei (III)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endt, P.M.

    The present tables list the strengths (in Weisskopf units) of over 2400 γ-ray transitions in A = 6–44 nuclei, classified according to character (electric or magnetic, multipolarity, isospin forbiddenness). Selected transitions from unbound states are included. The strengths for isovector E1 and M1

  7. Strength distributions of electromagnetic transitions in light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostin, V.Ya.; Koval', A.A.; Kopanets, E.G.; Tsytko, S.P.

    1980-01-01

    Distributions of probabilities of electromagnetic transitions from resonance levels of light nuclei with masses A=Z-40 for eight types of transition (epsilon1, epsilon2, M1, M8, isoscalar and isovector) are obtained. Recommended upper limits (RUL) of transition probabilities are determined for each type of transitions. A comparison with analogous characteristics for transitions between bound states is carried out. It has been causes found that RUL for resonance states substantially differ from RUL for transitions between bound states. Possible causes of such difference are discussed

  8. Experimental investigation of bond strength under high loading rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural behaviour of reinforced concrete is governed significantly by the transmission of forces between steel and concrete. The bond is of special importance for the overlapping joint and anchoring of the reinforcement, where rigid bond is required. It also plays an important role in the rotational capacity of plastic hinges, where a ductile bond behaviour is preferable. Similar to the mechanical properties of concrete and steel also the characteristics of their interaction changes with the velocity of the applied loading. For smooth steel bars with its main bond mechanisms of adhesion and friction, nearly no influence of loading rate is reported in literature. In contrast, a high rate dependence can be found for the nowadays mainly used deformed bars. For mechanical interlock, where ribs of the reinforcing steel are bracing concrete material surrounding the bar, one reason can be assumed to be in direct connection with the increase of concrete compressive strength. For splitting failure of bond, characterized by the concrete tensile strength, an even higher dynamic increase is observed. For the design of Structures exposed to blast or impact loading the knowledge of a rate dependent bond stress-slip relationship is required to consider safety and economical aspects at the same time. The bond behaviour of reinforced concrete has been investigated with different experimental methods at the University of the Bundeswehr Munich (UniBw and the Joint Research Centre (JRC in Ispra. Both static and dynamic tests have been carried out, where innovative experimental apparatuses have been used. The bond stress-slip relationship and maximum pull-out-forces for varying diameter of the bar, concrete compressive strength and loading rates have been obtained. It is expected that these experimental results will contribute to a better understanding of the rate dependent bond behaviour and will serve for calibration of numerical models.

  9. COLLISION STRENGTHS AND EFFECTIVE COLLISION STRENGTHS FOR TRANSITIONS WITHIN THE GROUND-STATE CONFIGURATION OF S III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, C. E.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P., E-mail: c.hudson@qub.ac.uk, E-mail: c.ramsbottom@qub.ac.uk, E-mail: p.scott@qub.ac.uk [Department of Applied Maths and Theoretical Physics, The Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-01

    We have carried out a 29-state R-matrix calculation in order to calculate collision strengths and effective collision strengths for the electron impact excitation of S III. The recently developed parallel RMATRX II suite of codes have been used, which perform the calculation in intermediate coupling. Collision strengths have been generated over an electron energy range of 0-12 Ryd, and effective collision strength data have been calculated from these at electron temperatures in the range 1000-100,000 K. Results are here presented for the fine-structure transitions between the ground-state configurations of 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 23} P{sub 0,1,2}, {sup 1}D{sub 2}, and {sup 1} S{sub 0}, and the values given resolve a discrepancy between two previous R-matrix calculations.

  10. Tantalum strength model incorporating temperature, strain rate and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hojun; Battaile, Corbett; Brown, Justin; Lane, Matt

    Tantalum is a body-centered-cubic (BCC) refractory metal that is widely used in many applications in high temperature, strain rate and pressure environments. In this work, we propose a physically-based strength model for tantalum that incorporates effects of temperature, strain rate and pressure. A constitutive model for single crystal tantalum is developed based on dislocation kink-pair theory, and calibrated to measurements on single crystal specimens. The model is then used to predict deformations of single- and polycrystalline tantalum. In addition, the proposed strength model is implemented into Sandia's ALEGRA solid dynamics code to predict plastic deformations of tantalum in engineering-scale applications at extreme conditions, e.g. Taylor impact tests and Z machine's high pressure ramp compression tests, and the results are compared with available experimental data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. gamma -transition rates in transitional odd gold nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Berg, V; Oms, J

    1981-01-01

    The results of two half-life measurements of excited states in /sup 185/Au are presented. One supports the proposed interpretation of the ground state configuration, the other one calls attention to the h 9/2 to h 11/2 M1 transitions in odd mass gold nuclei, which, in spite of considerable deformation changes of the h 9/2 state, all show the same retardation. (5 refs).

  12. The empirical connection between (p,n) cross sections and beta decay transition strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taddeucci, T.N.

    1988-01-01

    A proportionality is assumed to exist between 0/degree/ (p,n) cross sections and the corresponding beta decay transition strengths. The validity of this assumption is tested by comparison of measured (p,n) cross sections and analogous beta decay strengths. Distorted waves impulse approximation calculations also provide useful estimates of the accuracy of the proportionality relationship. 14 refs., 10 figs

  13. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in He-like Ga XXX, Ge XXXI, As XXXII, Se XXXIII and Br XXXIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M; Keenan, Francis P

    2013-01-01

    We report calculations of energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation cross sections and rates for transitions in He-like Ga XXX, Ge XXXI, As XXXII, Se XXXIII and Br XXXIV. The grasp (general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package) is adopted for calculating energy levels and radiative rates. For determining the collision strengths, and subsequently the excitation rates, the Dirac atomic R-matrix code (darc) is used. Oscillator strengths, radiative rates and line strengths are reported for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions among the lowest 49 levels of each ion. Additionally, theoretical lifetimes are provided for all 49 levels of the above five ions. Collision strengths are averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution and the effective collision strengths obtained listed over a wide temperature range up to 10 8 K. Comparisons are made with similar data obtained using the flexible atomic code (fac) to highlight the importance of resonances, included in calculations with darc, in the determination of effective collision strengths. Discrepancies between the collision strengths from darc and fac, particularly for some forbidden transitions, are also discussed. Finally, discrepancies between the present results for effective collision strengths with the darc code and earlier semi-relativistic R-matrix data are noted over a wide range of electron temperatures for many transitions in all ions. (paper)

  14. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in He-like Ga XXX, Ge XXXI, As XXXII, Se XXXIII and Br XXXIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, Francis P.

    2013-04-01

    We report calculations of energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation cross sections and rates for transitions in He-like Ga XXX, Ge XXXI, As XXXII, Se XXXIII and Br XXXIV. The grasp (general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package) is adopted for calculating energy levels and radiative rates. For determining the collision strengths, and subsequently the excitation rates, the Dirac atomic R-matrix code (darc) is used. Oscillator strengths, radiative rates and line strengths are reported for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions among the lowest 49 levels of each ion. Additionally, theoretical lifetimes are provided for all 49 levels of the above five ions. Collision strengths are averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution and the effective collision strengths obtained listed over a wide temperature range up to 108 K. Comparisons are made with similar data obtained using the flexible atomic code (fac) to highlight the importance of resonances, included in calculations with darc, in the determination of effective collision strengths. Discrepancies between the collision strengths from darc and fac, particularly for some forbidden transitions, are also discussed. Finally, discrepancies between the present results for effective collision strengths with the darc code and earlier semi-relativistic R-matrix data are noted over a wide range of electron temperatures for many transitions in all ions.

  15. Energy levels and radiative transition rates for Ge XXXI, As XXXII, and Se XXXIII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Sunny; Singh, J.; Jha, A. K. S.; Mohan, Man

    2014-07-01

    Fine-structure energies of the 67 levels belonging to the 1s2, 1s 2l, 1s3l, 1s4l, 1s5l, and 1s6l configurations of Ge XXXI, As XXXII, and Se XXXIII have been calculated using the General-Purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package. In addition, radiative rates, oscillator strengths, transition wavelengths, and line strengths have been calculated for all electric dipole, magnetic dipole, electric quadrupole, and magnetic quadrupole transitions among these levels. Lifetimes are also presented for all excited levels of these three ions. We have compared our results with the results available in the literature and the accuracy of the data is assessed. We predict new energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities where no other theoretical or experimental results are available, which will form the basis for future experimental work.

  16. Real exchange rates and transition economies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boero, G.; Mavromatis, K.; Taylor, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    In a number of empirical studies, transition economies have been shown to be subject to the Harrod-Balassa-Samuelson effect. This implies that the currencies of these countries have experienced a prolonged appreciation in real terms as their convergence proceeded. In this paper we find that a

  17. Transition rates in {sup 161}Dy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, V; Malmskog, S G

    1969-06-15

    The decay of {sup 161}Tb has been studied using a high resolution Ge(Li)-detector. Five new transitions were observed and fitted into the earlier proposed decay scheme. The half-life of the 131.8 keV level in {sup 161}Dy was determined in a delayed coincidence measurement to be 145 {+-} 15 psec. The low level scheme in {sup 161}Dy is discussed within a quasi-particle model allowing for Coriolis mixing. Special attention is given to the strongly retarded, K-allowed 131.8 keV E1 transition with a retardation factor F{sub W} > 1.5 x 10{sup 8}.

  18. Absolute Transition Rates in {sup 188}lr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmskog, S G; Berg, V

    1969-09-15

    Half-lives of several excited levels in {sup 188}lr have been measured using an electron-electron delayed coincidence spectrometer. Active {sup 188}Pt sources were prepared from spallation products using the ISOLDE on-line mass separator facility at CERN. The following half-lives were obtained: T{sub 1/2} (54.8 keV level) = (1.93 {+-} 0.10) nsec; T{sub 1/2} (96.7 keV level) = (0.59 {+-} 0.12) nsec; T{sub 1/2} (187.6 keV level) = (0.056 {+-} 0.013) nsec; T{sub 1/2} (195.1 keV level) = (0.051 {+-} 0.010) nsec; T{sub 1/2} (478. 3 keV level) {<=} 0.15 nsec The 54.8 keV transition was found to have an enhanced E2 transition probability indicating a collective character for this transition.

  19. Garnet Yield Strength at High Pressures and Implications for Upper Mantle and Transition Zone Rheology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavner, A.

    2008-01-01

    Garnet helps control the mechanical behavior of the Earth's crust, mantle, and transition zone. Here, measurements are presented suggesting that garnet, long considered to be a high-viscosity phase, is actually weaker than the other dominant components in the transition zone. The mechanical behavior of garnet at high pressures was examined using radial diffraction techniques in the diamond anvil cell. The yield strength of grossular garnet was inferred from synchrotron X-ray measurements of differential lattice strains. The differential stress was found to increase from 1.3 (±0.6) GPa at a hydrostatic pressure 5.8 (±1.1) GPa to 4.1 (±0.4) GPa at 15.7 (±1.0) GPa, where it was level to 19 GPa. The strength results are consistent with inferred strength values for majorite garnet from measurements in the diamond cell normal geometry, bolstering the idea that garnet-structured materials may all have similar strengths. In this low-temperature, high differential stress regime, garnet is shown to be significantly weaker than anhydrous ringwoodite and to have a strength similar to hydrous ringwoodite. This result suggests that the presence of water in the transition zone may not be required to explain a weak rheology, and therefore models of transition zone behavior built assuming that garnet is the high-strength phase may need to be revised.

  20. Dependence of dipole transition gamma ray strength on the type of nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cojocaru, V.; Stefanescu, Irina; Popescu, I.V.; Badica, T.; Olariu, A.

    2000-01-01

    The strength of gamma-ray transition is defined as the ratio between the experimental radiative width Γ γ and the theoretical radiative width calculated according to a model (for example Weisskopf single particle model, Γ W ). It is important to know on which parameters this strengths depend. In our previous work we put in evidence the dependence of the dipole transition gamma-ray strengths on the type of the nucleus. In this paper we look for a possible dependence of the quadrupole gamma-ray strengths on the type of nucleus (doubly-even, doubly-odd, with odd proton number and odd neutron number). All the input data are taken from the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven. In order to demonstrate this possible dependence one can use the average of the strongest 10% transitions of given character. As the A dependence is concerned we use the following A-regions: 6-20, 21-44, 45-90, 91-150, 151-200. An average value for these transitions is also plotted both for the E2 and M2 transitions. Generally, all the functions log 10 vs A (S=Γ γ /Γ W ) have the same pattern as 'total' put in evidence by Endt. Moreover, there is a clear difference in the most A regions of the average S 10 values for different types of nuclei. As the RUL (Recommended Upper Limits W.u.) are concerned they have to be established as the highest experimental values of the transition strengths. In this work we suggest new RUL but this time in connection with the type of the nucleus. A table with the RUL depending on the nuclear type, for E2 and M2 transitions, respectively, is given. The number of M2 transitions is quite small. In this case, one might set the recommended upper limits with some precaution. (authors)

  1. Acrylate oligomers in ultraviolet cured PSA's glass transition, molecular weight versus peel strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, H.C.

    1999-01-01

    Typically those not skilled in the art relate Glass Transition Temperature to Pressure Sensitive Adhesives. You need a low Tg material to prepare good pressure sensitive adhesives. This report deals with a wide range acrylate terminated oligomers in a standard formulation. Molecular weight, chemical structure variations are examined versus the Glass Transition of the oligomers and final peel strength. Each formulated adhesive will require unique oligomer properties to reach one hundred newtons per 100 millimeters (5.71 pounds per square inch) peel strength. Excellent peel strengths may be obtained with oligomer molecular weight ranging from six thousand to one thousand molecular weight and glass transition temperatures ranging from minus seventy four degrees centigrade up to thirteen degrees centigrade

  2. Non-Parametric Analysis of Rating Transition and Default Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fledelius, Peter; Lando, David; Perch Nielsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of non-parametric intensity estimation - including construction of pointwise confidence sets - for analyzing rating transition data. We find that transition intensities away from the class studied here for illustration strongly depend on the direction of the previous move b...

  3. Transition to high rate aerospace NDI processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderheiden, Bert; Thomson, Clint; Ivakhnenko, Igor; Garner, Chuck

    2018-04-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of carbon fiber composite materials in military and commercial aircraft, processes to manufacture and inspect the structural components must evolve to ensure economic viability. Inspection techniques which were developed to inspect products produced at a rate of one or two structures a month are not fast or flexible enough to inspect more than 8500 parts per month. This presentation describes the evolution of phased array ultrasonic inspection systems to provide the increased rate capacity, the flexibility to accommodate multiple unique designs, and the ability to rapidly adjust to product design changes. The paper will describe how system developments were made in response to new programs resulting in a much less expensive, higher degree of accuracy, increased flexibility, and lower cycle time inspections.

  4. Energy levels, oscillator strengths, line strengths, and transition probabilities in Si-like ions of La XLIII, Er LIV, Tm LV, and Yb LVI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhan-Bin, E-mail: chenzb008@qq.com [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China); Ma, Kun [School of Information Engineering, Huangshan University, Huangshan 245041 (China); Wang, Hong-Jian [Chongqing Key Laboratory for Design and Control of Manufacturing Equipment, Chongqing Technology and Business University, Chongqing 40067 (China); Wang, Kai, E-mail: wangkai@hbu.edu.cn [Hebei Key Lab of Optic-electronic Information and Materials, The College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Liu, Xiao-Bin [Department of Physics, Tianshui Normal University, Tianshui 741001 (China); Zeng, Jiao-Long [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Detailed calculations using the multi-configuration Dirac–Fock (MCDF) method are carried out for the lowest 64 fine-structure levels of the 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s3p{sup 2}3d, 3s{sup 2}3d{sup 2}, and 3p{sup 4} configurations in Si-like ions of La XLIII, Er LIV, Tm LV, and Yb LVI. Energies, oscillator strengths, wavelengths, line strengths, and radiative electric dipole transition rates are given for all ions. A parallel calculation using the many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) method is also carried out to assess the present energy levels accuracy. Comparisons are performed between these two sets of energy levels, as well as with other available results, showing that they are in good agreement with each other within 0.5%. These high accuracy results can be used to the modeling and the interpretation of astrophysical objects and fusion plasmas. - Highlights: • Energy levels and E1 transition rates of Si-like ions are presented. • Breit interaction and Quantum Electrodynamics effects are discussed. • Present results should be useful in the astrophysical application and plasma modeling.

  5. Beta transition rates in hot and dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, K.; El Eid, M.F.; Hillebrandt, W.

    1977-05-01

    Allowed and first-forbidden transition rates of β +- decays and e +- captures under stellar conditions of high temperatures and high densities are reformulated. The present paper mainly describes the formalism which is essentially based on the gross theory of nuclear β-decays, but also contains the numerical results of the transition rates of nuclei with the mass number 56. The discussion includes a short but critical review of several different approaches to the astrophysical β-transitions of nuclei as well as of the neutron and proton. Further results of the transition rates and the neutrino energy losses will soon be presented elsewhere as simple functions of temperature and density for many nuclei, together with an application to collapsing massive stars. (orig.) [de

  6. Fine-structure energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities in Ni XVI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, N.C.; Msezane, A.Z.

    2001-01-01

    Fine-structure energy levels relative to the ground state, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for transitions among the lowest 40 fine-structure levels belonging to the configurations 3s 2 3p, 3s3p 2 , 3s 2 3d, 3p 3 and 3s3p3d of Ni XVI are calculated using a large scale CI in program CIV3 of Hibbert. Relativistic effects are included through the Breit-Pauli approximation via spin-orbit, spin-other-orbit, spin-spin, Darwin and mass correction terms. The existing discrepancies between the calculated and measured values for many of the relative energy positions are resolved in the present calculation which yields excellent agreement with measurement. Also, many of our oscillator strengths for allowed and intercombination transitions are in very good agreement with the recommended data by the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST). (orig.)

  7. Prediction of the oscillator strengths for the electric dipole transitions in Th II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dembczynski, Jerzy [Institute of Control and Information Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Poznan University of Technology, Piotrowo 3A, 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Ruczkowski, Jaroslaw; Elantkowska, Magdalena [Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Metrology, Faculty of Technical Physics, Poznan University of Technology, Nieszawska 13B, 60-965 Poznan (Poland)

    2014-07-01

    In order to parametrize the oscillator strength, the matrix of angular coefficients of the possible transitions in multiconfiguration system were calculated. In the odd and even configuration systems, the fine structure eigenvectors for both parities were obtained, using our semiempirical method, which taken into account also the second order effects, resulting from the excitations from electronic closed shells to open shells and from open shells to empty shell. The correctness of the fine structure wave functions was verified by the comparison of calculated and experimental hyperfine structure constants for Th II available in the literature. The least square fit to experimental values for some transitions allow to obtain the values of radial parameters and predict the oscillator strengths values for all possible transitions from the levels under consideration. These calculations are necessary for the design of the nuclear frequency standard based on the thorium ion.

  8. Dependent interest and transition rates in life insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    For market consistent life insurance liabilities modelled with a multi-state Markov chain, it is of importance to consider the interest and transition rates as stochastic processes, for example in order to consider hedging possibilities of the risks, and for risk measurement. In the literature......, this is usually done with an assumption of independence between the interest and transition rates. In this paper, it is shown how to valuate life insurance liabilities using affine processes for modelling dependent interest and transition rates. This approach leads to the introduction of so-called dependent...... forward rates. We propose a specific model for surrender modelling, and within this model the dependent forward rates are calculated, and the market value and the Solvency II capital requirement are examined for a simple savings contract....

  9. Strength and strain rate sensitivity for hcp and fcc nanopolycrystal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. While there is overwhelming evidence that strengthening from grain size refinement persists into the nanocrystalline grain size regime consistent with extrapolation of classical Hall–Petch (H–P) behaviour, there are indications of a transition to an inverse H–P dependence, i.e. grain boundary weakening behaviour,.

  10. Flat punch adhesion: transition from fracture-based to strength-limited pull-off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yijie; Turner, Kevin T; Grierson, David S

    2014-01-01

    The adhesion of a cylindrical flat punch to a surface due to interatomic forces is a well-known problem that is important in many applications, including indentation experiments and the adhesion of fibrillar structures. Traditionally, the pull-off force has been related to the work of adhesion and punch geometry via the Kendall solution that uses a Griffith energy balance to assess crack propagation and pull-off. More recently, it has been shown that under certain conditions, notably at small punch diameters, the contact can behave in a ‘strength-limited’ fashion in which the interface separates uniformly rather than via crack propagation. Here, a Maugis-Dugdale-type analysis of power-law-shaped bodies in contact is used to examine the change in behaviour from the fracture-based Kendall solution to strength-limited pull-off for cylindrical flat punches. The transition from fracture-based to strength-limited behaviour is described in terms of a non-dimensional parameter that is similar to previous quantities used to describe the transition and is a function of the punch size, the elasticity of the contact, and the adhesion properties. The results of this relatively simple analysis compare favourably with results from more complex computational simulations. In addition, the results are used to develop a function that quantifies the transition between the Kendall solution and the strength-limited solution in order to facilitate interpretation of adhesion measurements in the transition regime between the two limits. Finally, the power-law analysis is used to assess the sensitivity of the transition to the exact shape of the punch. (paper)

  11. Oscillator strengths and transition probabilities from the Breit–Pauli R-matrix method: Ne IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahar, Sultana N., E-mail: nahar@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2014-09-15

    The atomic parameters–oscillator strengths, line strengths, radiative decay rates (A), and lifetimes–for fine structure transitions of electric dipole (E1) type for the astrophysically abundant ion Ne IV are presented. The results include 868 fine structure levels with n≤ 10, l≤ 9, and 1/2≤J≤ 19/2 of even and odd parities, and the corresponding 83,767 E1 transitions. The calculations were carried out using the relativistic Breit–Pauli R-matrix method in the close coupling approximation. The transitions have been identified spectroscopically using an algorithm based on quantum defect analysis and other criteria. The calculated energies agree with the 103 observed and identified energies to within 3% or better for most of the levels. Some larger differences are also noted. The A-values show good to fair agreement with the very limited number of available transitions in the table compiled by NIST, but show very good agreement with the latest published multi-configuration Hartree–Fock calculations. The present transitions should be useful for diagnostics as well as for precise and complete spectral modeling in the soft X-ray to infra-red regions of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. -- Highlights: •The first application of BPRM method for accurate E1 transitions in Ne IV is reported. •Amount of atomic data (n going up to 10) is complete for most practical applications. •The calculated energies are in very good agreement with most observed levels. •Very good agreement of A-values and lifetimes with other relativistic calculations. •The results should provide precise nebular abundances, chemical evolution etc.

  12. Influence of Binding Rates on Strength Properties of Moulding Sands with the GEOPOL Binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtzer M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of moulding sands with an inorganic binder called GEOPOL, developed by the SAND TEAM Company are presented in the paper. Hardeners of various hardening rates are used for moulding sands with this binder. The main aim of investigations was determination of the influence of the hardening rate of moulding sands with the GEOPOL binder on technological properties of these sands (bending strength, tensile strength, permeability and grindability. In addition, the final strength of moulding sands of the selected compositions was determined by two methods: by splitting strength and shear strength measurements. No essential influence of the hardening rate on such parameters as: permeability, grindability and final strength was found. However, the sand in which the slowest hardener (SA 72 were used, after 1 hour of holding, had the tensile and bending strength practically zero. Thus, the time needed for taking to pieces the mould made of such moulding sand will be 1.5 - 2 hours.

  13. Oscillator strengths for transitions among Fe III levels belonging to the three lowest configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, N C; Hibbert, A

    2008-01-01

    Accurate oscillator strengths and Einstein A-coefficients for some El and E2 transitions among 3d 6 , 3d 5 4s and 3d 5 4p levels of FeIII are presented and compared with other available results. The present results comprise by far the largest configuration interaction calculation for this astrophysically important ion, and include relativistic effects through the Breit-Pauli operator. The core-valence effects from a large number of 3d 6 and 3d 5 cores are carefully treated by optimising 4d, 4f, 5s, 5p, 5d, 5f and 6p orbitals either as a correction or as a correlation orbital while 1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p and 3d Hartree-Fock functions are used. The 4s and 4p functions are optimised as spectroscopic orbitals. Fine-tuning of the ab initio energies was done through adjusting by a small amount some diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrix. It is found that for many of the relatively strong dipole transitions, our calculated oscillator strengths agree with available calculations, while for the weaker transitions our results often disagree with the previously determined results. We also present gA values for five E2 transitions for the multiplets 3d 6 5 DJ → 3d 5 ( 6 S)4s 5 S 2. The present results for these transitions show a 30-40% increase over the results previously published.

  14. Large enhancement of radiative strength for soft transitions in the quasicontinuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinov, A; Algin, E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Belgya, T; Chankova, R; Guttormsen, M; Mitchell, G E; Rekstad, J; Schiller, A; Siem, S

    2004-10-01

    Radiative strength functions (RSFs) for the (56,57)Fe nuclei below the separation energy are obtained from the 57Fe(3He,alphagamma)56Fe and 57Fe(3He,3He'gamma)57Fe reactions, respectively. An enhancement of more than a factor of 10 over common theoretical models of the soft (E(gamma) less than or approximately equal 2 MeV) RSF for transitions in the quasicontinuum (several MeV above the yrast line) is observed. Two-step cascade intensities with soft primary transitions from the 56Fe(n,2gamma)57Fe reaction confirm the enhancement.

  15. E1-forbidden transition rates in ions of astrophysical interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Träbert, E

    2014-01-01

    Transition rates in atomic systems may appear to be of little importance in steady-state plasmas that are observed at great distances from Earth. However, some of the transition rates compete with collision rates, and in these cases certain line intensity ratios are affected and can serve as remote indicators of density. In the low-density environments of stellar coronae and planetary nebulae, the transition rates of interest are mostly spin-forbidden E1 decays, higher-multipole order transitions (M1, E2, M2, M3), and hyperfine-induced transitions. On Earth, measurements of the long upper level lifetimes of these atomic systems require the use of ion traps. A fair number of test cases with lifetimes in the range from nanoseconds to many seconds have been treated successfully, and the evolution of calculations along with the experimental progress is notable. A new generation of cold ion traps is expected to extend the atomic lifetime measurements on multiply charged ions into the range of many minutes. (paper)

  16. E2 and M1 transition strengths in heavy deformed nuclei revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draayer, J.P.; Popa, G.; Hirsch, J.G.; Vargas, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    An update on the status of pseudo-SU(3) shell-model calculations in strongly deformed nuclei in the rare earth region is presented. Representative results for energy levels as well as E2 (quadrupole) and M1 (scissors) transitions strengths in 162 Dy (even-even) and 163 Dy (odd-mass) are given. The calculations use realistic single-particle energies and quadrupole-quadrupole and pairing interaction strengths fixed from systematics. The strengths of rotor-like terms included in the Hamiltonian- all small relative to the other terms in the interaction were adjusted to give an overall best fit to the energy spectra. The results present a paradox: for even-even nuclei (integer angular momentum) non-zero pseudo-spin configurations seems to be unimportant while for the odd-mass systems (half-integer angular momentum) pseudo-spin mixing is essential as spin-flip couplings appear to dominate the M1 transition strengths. (Author)

  17. The Rate Sensitivity of High Strength Syntactic Foam

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Doleski, Robert; Plunkett, Stephen; Tucker, Wayne

    2003-01-01

    .... Quasi-static experiments were also conducted in compression, tension, and shear. A comparison of the quasi-static and dynamic properties showed that syntactic foam is mildly dependent on rate in compression...

  18. Configuration interaction calculations and excitation rates of X-ray and EUV transitions in sulfurlike manganese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Maaref, A.A., E-mail: ahmed.maaref@azhar.edu.eg; Saddeek, Y.B.; Abou halaka, M.M.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Fine-structure calculations of sulfurlike Mn have been performed using configuration interaction technique, CI. • The relativistic effects, Breit-Pauli Hameltonian, have been correlated to the CI calculations. • Excitation rates by electron impact of the Mn X ion have been evaluated up to ionization potential. - Abstract: Fine-structure calculations of energies and transition parameters have been performed using the configuration interaction technique (CI) as implemented in CIV3 code for sulfurlike manganese, Mn X. The calculations are executed in an intermediate coupling scheme using the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. As well as, energy levels and oscillator strengths are calculated using LANL code, where the calculations by LANL have been used to estimate the accuracy of the present CI calculations. The calculated energy levels, oscillator strengths, and lifetimes are in reasonable agreement with the published experimental and theoretical values. Electron impact excitation rates of the transitions emit soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths have been evaluated. The level population densities are calculated using the collisional radiative model (CRM), as well. The collisional excitation rates and collision strengths have been calculated in the electron temperature range ≤ the ionization potential, ∼1–250 eV.

  19. Cyclic strength of metals at impact strain rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleiche, A.M.; El-Kady, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    Rigorous understanding of the effects of impact loading on the mechanical response of materials and structures is essential for the optimum design and safe operation of many sophisticated engineering systems and components, such as industrial high-energy-rate fabrication processes and nuclear reactor containments. Extensive data are available at present on the dynamic behaviour of most metals in uniaxial tension, compression, torsion and pure shear, when they are subjected to diversified loading conditions, ranging from those characterised by monotonic constant rates, to those involving forward or reverse strain-rate jumps of several orders of magnitude. What appears to be missing in the current material data banks, however, is detailed information concerning the mechanical response under cyclic loading at impact strain rates. Such data are needed for engineering design purposes on one hand, and for the formulation of proper constitutive equations and the accurate modeling of deformation processes on the other. In the present paper, typical stress-strain characteristics at ambient temperature for copper, mild steel and titanium are first exhibited. The application of the unified Bodner-Partom constitutive theory to these data is then presented and discussed. (orig./GL)

  20. Strength training improves fatigue resistance and self-rated health in workers with chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Brandt, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    of a randomized controlled trial investigates the effect of strength training on muscular fatigue resistance and self-rated health among workers with chronic pain. Sixty-six slaughterhouse workers with chronic upper limb pain and work disability were randomly allocated to 10 weeks of strength training or usual...... (Spearman's rho = -0.40; P = 0.01). In conclusion, specific strength training improves muscular fatigue resistance and self-rated health and reduces pain of the hand/wrist in manual workers with chronic upper limb pain. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01671267.......-rated health and pain. Time to fatigue, muscle strength, hand/wrist pain, and self-rated health improved significantly more following strength training than usual care (all P

  1. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in B-like to F-like Kr ions (Kr XXXII XXVIII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Keenan, F. P.; Lawson, K. D.

    2008-05-01

    Energy levels, radiative rates, oscillator strengths, line strengths, and lifetimes have been calculated for transitions in B-like to F-like Kr ions, Kr XXXIII-XXVIII. For the calculations, the fully relativistic GRASP code has been adopted, and results are reported for all electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1), and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions among the lowest 125, 236, 272, 226, and 113 levels of Kr XXXII, Kr XXXI, Kr XXX, Kr XXIX, and Kr XXVIII, respectively, belonging to the n ⩽ 3 configurations. Comparisons are made with earlier available theoretical and experimental results, and some discrepancies have been noted and explained.

  2. Effect of transition metal impurities on the strength of grain boundaries in vanadium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xuebang; Kong, Xiang-Shan; You, Yu-Wei; Liu, Wei; Liu, C. S., E-mail: csliu@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-09-07

    Effects of 3d (Ti-Ni), 4d (Zr-Pd), and 5d (Hf-Pt) transition metal impurities on strength of two representative vanadium grain boundaries (GBs), symmetric Σ3(111) and asymmetric Σ5(210), were studied by first-principles calculations within the framework of the Rice-Wang thermodynamic model and within the computational tensile test. The desirable elements to increase the GB cohesion were predicted based on their segregation and strengthening behaviors across the different GB sites. It reveals that the elements Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb, and Ta are good choices for the GB cohesion enhancers. In addition, the GB strengthening by solutes is sensitive to the GB structures. The elements Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni decrease the GB strength of the Σ3(111) GB but they can increase the cohesion of the Σ5(210) GB. Furthermore, the origin of Ti-induced change of the GB strength was uncovered by analyzing the atomic bonds and electronic structures as well as the tensile strength. This work provides a theoretical guidance to screen promising alloying elements in V-based materials with improved resistance to GB decohesion and also helps us to understand the formation mechanism of Ti-rich precipitates in the V-Cr-Ti alloys under neutron or ion irradiation environments.

  3. Relativistic transition rates for sextet levels in Cr II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aashamar, K.; Luke, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    Configuration interaction calculations have been carried out to obtain rates for electric dipole transitions and lifetimes for the 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 3d 4 4d and 5s 6 D and 4d 6 F levels in Cr II. Up to 40 configurations have been included so correlation effects should be well accounted for. Relativistic interactions are included through the use of the Breit-Pauli hamiltonian to obtain the level wave functions and energies. Strong mixing of the 4d levels occurs and this leads to substantial departures from earlier nonrelativistic calculations that assume LS coupling for these states. Results include the actual compositions of both even and odd parity levels where significant mixing occurs and the rates for all transitions that are allowed to lower levels from these 4d and 5s levels. (orig.)

  4. Oscillator strengths and branching fractions of 4d75p-4d75s Rh II transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouazza, Safa

    2017-01-01

    This work reports semi-empirical determination of oscillator strengths, transition probabilities and branching fractions for Rh II 4d75p-4d75s transitions in a wide wavelength range. The angular coefficients of the transition matrix, beforehand obtained in pure SL coupling with help of Racah algebra are transformed into intermediate coupling using eigenvector amplitudes of these two configuration levels determined for this purpose; The transition integral was treated as free parameter in the least squares fit to experimental oscillator strength (gf) values found in literature. The extracted value: 5s|r1|4d75p> =2.7426 ± 0.0007 is slightly smaller than that computed by means of ab-initio method. Subsequently to oscillator strength evaluations, transition probabilities and branching fractions were deduced and compared to those obtained experimentally or through another approach like pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock model including core-polarization effects.

  5. Tensile strength of concrete under static and intermediate strain rates: Correlated results from different testing methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shengxing; Chen Xudong; Zhou Jikai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Tensile strength of concrete increases with increase in strain rate. ► Strain rate sensitivity of tensile strength of concrete depends on test method. ► High stressed volume method can correlate results from various test methods. - Abstract: This paper presents a comparative experiment and analysis of three different methods (direct tension, splitting tension and four-point loading flexural tests) for determination of the tensile strength of concrete under low and intermediate strain rates. In addition, the objective of this investigation is to analyze the suitability of the high stressed volume approach and Weibull effective volume method to the correlation of the results of different tensile tests of concrete. The test results show that the strain rate sensitivity of tensile strength depends on the type of test, splitting tensile strength of concrete is more sensitive to an increase in the strain rate than flexural and direct tensile strength. The high stressed volume method could be used to obtain a tensile strength value of concrete, free from the influence of the characteristics of tests and specimens. However, the Weibull effective volume method is an inadequate method for describing failure of concrete specimens determined by different testing methods.

  6. Distribution of spin dipole transition strength in the 15N(n,p)15C reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellar, A.; Alford, W.P.; Helmer, R.; Abegg, R.; Frekers, D.; Haeusser, O.; Henderson, R.S.; Jackson, K.P.; Vetterli, M.; Yen, S.; Jeppesen, R.; Larson, B.; Mildenberger, J.; Pointon, B.W.; Trudel, A.

    1990-08-01

    The reaction 15 N(n,p) 15 C was studied at a neutron energy of 288 MeV using the TRIUMF (n,p) charge exchange facility and a high pressure gas target. The angular distributions for spin dipole (ΔL=1) transitions to the states in 15 C at energies 0 MeV and 0.740 MeV, as well as for higher excitation energies, were measured and the results were compared with DWIA calculations. The measured distribution of the spin dipole strength agrees well with shell model predictions, indicating that a rather simple model provides a satisfactory description of the 15 N ground state, and of positive parity states in 15 C up to about 18 MeV excitation. The magnitude of the peak cross sections (at ≅ 7 degrees) is described well by the calculations when the theoretical cross section is renormalized by a factor 0.7. The calculated cross sections near zero degrees are generally smaller than experimental data. It this is a general feature of ΔL=1 transitions, it suggests that estimates of GT strength based on a multipole decomposition of measured cross sections may be too high. (Author) (41 refs., 3 tabs., 14 figs.)

  7. Strength functions of primary transitions following thermal neutron capture in strontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, C.; Lieb, K.P.

    1989-01-01

    The primary E1, M1 and E2 γ-radiation in 87,88,89 Sr observed after thermal neutron capture was compared with the predictions of single particle and giant resonance models. The nuclei feature a wide range of neutron binding energies between 6.3 and 11.1 MeV, which makes a 5.5 MeV spectrum of primary transition energies available for investigation. The (n, γ) reaction was used to estimate the parameters of the spin-flip M1 giant resonance in strontium. The total energy weighted M1 strength of this resonance exceeds the results of shell model and random phase approximation calculations for 90 Zr by a factor of 3-4. The E1 strengths were found to agree with the established giant dipole resonance model. The few data on primary E2 transitions do not allow to differentiate between the giant quadrupole resonance and the single particle models. (orig.)

  8. Radiative rates for E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions in Fe X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, K.M.; Keenan, F.P.

    2004-01-01

    Energies of the 54 levels belonging to the (1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 ) 3s 2 3p 5 , 3s3p 6 , 3s 2 3p 4 3d and 3s3p 5 3d configurations of Fe X have been calculated using the GRASP code of Dyall and colleagues (1989). Additionally, radiative rates, oscillator strengths, and line strengths are calculated for all electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2), and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions among these levels. Comparisons are made with results available in the literature, and the accuracy of the data is assessed. Our energy levels are estimated to be accurate to better than 3%, whereas results for other parameters are probably accurate to better than 20% . Additionally, the agreement between measured and calculated lifetimes is better than 10%. (authors)

  9. Atomic data from the IRON Project. XXXII. On the accuracy of the effective collision strength for the electron impact excitation of the quadrupole transition in AR III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galavís, M. E.; Mendoza, C.; Zeippen, C. J.

    1998-12-01

    Since te[Burgess et al. (1997)]{bur97} have recently questioned the accuracy of the effective collision strength calculated in the IRON Project for the electron impact excitation of the 3ssp23p sp4 \\ sp1 D -sp1 S quadrupole transition in Ar iii, an extended R-matrix calculation has been performed for this transition. The original 24-state target model was maintained, but the energy regime was increased to 100 Ryd. It is shown that in order to ensure convergence of the partial wave expansion at such energies, it is necessary to take into account partial collision strengths up to L=30 and to ``top-up'' with a geometric series procedure. By comparing effective collision strengths, it is found that the differences from the original calculation are not greater than 25% around the upper end of the common temperature range and that they are much smaller than 20% over most of it. This is consistent with the accuracy rating (20%) previously assigned to transitions in this low ionisation system. Also the present high-temperature limit agrees fairly well (15%) with the Coulomb-Born limit estimated by Burgess et al., thus confirming our previous accuracy rating. It appears that Burgess et al., in their data assessment, have overextended the low-energy behaviour of our reduced effective collision strength to obtain an extrapolated high-temperature limit that appeared to be in error by a factor of 2.

  10. L-shell radiative transition rates by selective synchrotron ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonetto, R D; Carreras, A C; Trincavelli, J; Castellano, G

    2004-01-01

    Relative L-shell radiative transition rates were obtained for a number of decays in Gd, Dy, Er, Yb, Hf, Ta and Re by means of a method for refining atomic and experimental parameters involved in the spectral analysis of x-ray irradiated samples. For this purpose, pure samples were bombarded with monochromatic synchrotron radiation tuning the incident x-ray energy in order to allow selective ionization of the different atomic shells. The results presented are compared to experimental and theoretical values published by other authors. A good general agreement was found and some particular discrepancies are discussed

  11. Strain Rate Dependent Ductile-to-Brittle Transition of Graphite Platelet Reinforced Vinyl Ester Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmananda Pramanik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous research, the fractal dimensions of fractured surfaces of vinyl ester based nanocomposites were estimated applying classical method on 3D digital microscopic images. The fracture energy and fracture toughness were obtained from fractal dimensions. A noteworthy observation, the strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of vinyl ester based nanocomposites, is reinvestigated in the current study. The candidate materials of xGnP (exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets reinforced and with additional CTBN (Carboxyl Terminated Butadiene Nitrile toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites that are subjected to both quasi-static and high strain rate indirect tensile load using the traditional Brazilian test method. High-strain rate indirect tensile testing is performed with a modified Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB. Pristine vinyl ester shows ductile deformation under quasi-static loading and brittle failure when subjected to high-strain rate loading. This observation reconfirms the previous research findings on strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of this material system. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Contribution of nanoreinforcement to the tensile properties is reported in this paper.

  12. Gamow-Teller strength distributions and electron capture rates for 55Co and 56Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Rahman, Muneeb-Ur

    2005-01-01

    The Gamow-Teller strength (GT) distributions and electron capture rates on 55 Co and 56 Ni have been calculated using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation theory. We calculate these weak interaction mediated rates over a wide temperature (0.01x10 9 -30x10 9 K) and density (10-10 11 gcm -3 ) domain. Electron capture process is one of the essential ingredients involved in the complex dynamics of supernova explosion. Our calculations of electron capture rates show differences with the reported shell model diagonalization approach calculations and are comparatively enhanced at presupernova temperatures. We note that the GT strength is fragmented over many final states

  13. A comparative study of different methods for calculating electronic transition rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananenka, Alexei A.; Sun, Xiang; Schubert, Alexander; Dunietz, Barry D.; Geva, Eitan

    2018-03-01

    We present a comprehensive comparison of the following mixed quantum-classical methods for calculating electronic transition rates: (1) nonequilibrium Fermi's golden rule, (2) mixed quantum-classical Liouville method, (3) mean-field (Ehrenfest) mixed quantum-classical method, and (4) fewest switches surface-hopping method (in diabatic and adiabatic representations). The comparison is performed on the Garg-Onuchic-Ambegaokar benchmark charge-transfer model, over a broad range of temperatures and electronic coupling strengths, with different nonequilibrium initial states, in the normal and inverted regimes. Under weak to moderate electronic coupling, the nonequilibrium Fermi's golden rule rates are found to be in good agreement with the rates obtained via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville method that coincides with the fully quantum-mechanically exact results for the model system under study. Our results suggest that the nonequilibrium Fermi's golden rule can serve as an inexpensive yet accurate alternative to Ehrenfest and the fewest switches surface-hopping methods.

  14. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Behavior for a High Specific Strength Steel: From Quasi-Static to Intermediate Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The strain rate effect on the tensile behaviors of a high specific strength steel (HSSS with dual-phase microstructure has been investigated. The yield strength, the ultimate strength and the tensile toughness were all observed to increase with increasing strain rates at the range of 0.0006 to 56/s, rendering this HSSS as an excellent candidate for an energy absorber in the automobile industry, since vehicle crushing often happens at intermediate strain rates. Back stress hardening has been found to play an important role for this HSSS due to load transfer and strain partitioning between two phases, and a higher strain rate could cause even higher strain partitioning in the softer austenite grains, delaying the deformation instability. Deformation twins are observed in the austenite grains at all strain rates to facilitate the uniform tensile deformation. The B2 phase (FeAl intermetallic compound is less deformable at higher strain rates, resulting in easier brittle fracture in B2 particles, smaller dimple size and a higher density of phase interfaces in final fracture surfaces. Thus, more energy need be consumed during the final fracture for the experiments conducted at higher strain rates, resulting in better tensile toughness.

  15. Random walk theory and exchange rate dynamics in transition economies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gradojević Nikola

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the validity of the random walk theory in the Euro-Serbian dinar exchange rate market. We apply Andrew Lo and Archie MacKinlay's (1988 conventional variance ratio test and Jonathan Wright's (2000 non-parametric ranks and signs based variance ratio tests to the daily Euro/Serbian dinar exchange rate returns using the data from January 2005 - December 2008. Both types of variance ratio tests overwhelmingly reject the random walk hypothesis over the data span. To assess the robustness of our findings, we examine the forecasting performance of a non-linear, nonparametric model in the spirit of Francis Diebold and James Nason (1990 and find that it is able to significantly improve upon the random walk model, thus confirming the existence of foreign exchange market imperfections in a small transition economy such as Serbia. In the last part of the paper, we conduct a comparative study on how our results relate to those of other transition economies in the region.

  16. Biotic turnover rates during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivrins, Normunds; Soininen, Janne; Amon, Leeli; Fontana, Sonia L.; Gryguc, Gražyna; Heikkilä, Maija; Heiri, Oliver; Kisielienė, Dalia; Reitalu, Triin; Stančikaitė, Miglė; Veski, Siim; Seppä, Heikki

    2016-11-01

    The Northern Hemisphere is currently warming at the rate which is unprecedented during the Holocene. Quantitative palaeoclimatic records show that the most recent time in the geological history with comparable warming rates was during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition (PHT) about 14,000 to 11,000 years ago. To better understand the biotic response to rapid temperature change, we explore the community turnover rates during the PHT by focusing on the Baltic region in the southeastern sector of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet, where an exceptionally dense network on microfossil and macrofossil data that reflect the biotic community history are available. We further use a composite chironomid-based summer temperature reconstruction compiled specifically for our study region to calculate the rate of temperature change during the PHT. The fastest biotic turnover in the terrestrial and aquatic communities occurred during the Younger Dryas-Holocene shift at 11,700 years ago. This general shift in species composition was accompanied by regional extinctions, including disappearance of mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) and many arctic-alpine plant taxa, such as Dryas octopetala, Salix polaris and Saxifraga aizoides, from the region. This rapid biotic turnover rate occurred when the rate of warming was 0.17 °C/decade, thus slightly lower than the current Northern Hemisphere warming of 0.2 °C/decade. We therefore conclude that the Younger Dryas-Holocene shift with its rapid turnover rates and associated regional extinctions represents an important palaeoanalogue to the current high latitude warming and gives insights about the probable future turnover rates and patterns of the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem change.

  17. Inter-band B(E2) transitions strengths in 160-170Dy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos E; Lerma, Sergio; Velázquez, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    The rare earth region of the nuclear landscape is characterized by a large collectivity observed. The microscopic studies are difficult to perform in the region due to the enormous size of the valence spaces. The use of symmetries based models avoids that problem, because the symmetry allows to choose the most relevant degrees of freedom for the system under consideration. We present theoretical results for electromagnetic properties in 160-168 Dy isotopes employing the pseudo-SU(3) model. In particular, we study the B(E2) inter-band transition strengths between the ground state, γ and, β-bands. The model succesfully describes in a systematic way rotational features in these nuclei and allows to extrapolate toward the midshell nucleus 170 Dy

  18. A PERFORMANCE COMPARISON BETWEEN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS AND MULTIVARIATE STATISTICAL METHODS IN FORECASTING FINANCIAL STRENGTH RATING IN TURKISH BANKING SECTOR

    OpenAIRE

    MELEK ACAR BOYACIOĞLU; YAKUP KARA

    2013-01-01

    Financial strength rating indicates the fundamental financial strength of a bank. The aim of financial strength rating is to measure a bank’s fundamental financial strength excluding the external factors. External factors can stem from the working environment or can be linked with the outside protective support mechanisms. With the evaluation, the rating of a bank free from outside supportive factors is being sought. Also the financial fundamental, franchise value, the variety of assets and w...

  19. Effect of electric field on the oscillator strength and cross-section for intersubband transition in a semiconductor quantum ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, S; Das, N R

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the oscillator strength and cross-section for intersubband optical transition in an n-type semiconductor quantum ring of cylindrical symmetry in the presence of an electric field perpendicular to the plane of the ring. The analysis is done considering Kane-type band non-parabolicity of the semiconductor and assuming that the polarization of the incident radiation is along the axis of the ring. The results show that the oscillator strength decreases and the transition energy increases with the electric field. The assumption of a parabolic band leads to an overestimation of the oscillator strength. The effects of the electric field, band non-parabolicity and relaxation time on absorption cross-section for intersubband transition in a semiconductor quantum ring are also shown. (paper)

  20. Strain rate dependent tensile behavior of advanced high strength steels: Experiment and constitutive modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Daeyong; Han, Heung Nam; Barlat, F.; Lee, Myoung-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    High strain rate tensile tests were conducted for three advanced high strength steels: DP780, DP980 and TRIP780. A high strain rate tensile test machine was used for applying the strain rate ranging from 0.1/s to 500/s. Details of the measured stress–strain responses were comparatively analyzed for the DP780 and TRIP780 steels which show similar microstructural feature and ultimate tensile strength, but different strengthening mechanisms. The experimental observations included: usual strain rate dependent plastic flow stress behavior in terms of the yield stress (YS), the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the uniform elongation (UE) and the total elongation (TE) which were observed for the three materials. But, higher strain hardening rate at early plastic strain under quasi-static condition than that of some increased strain rates was featured for TRIP780 steel, which might result from more active transformation during deformation with lower velocity. The uniform elongation that explains the onset of instability and the total elongation were larger in case of TRIP steel than the DP steel for the whole strain rate range, but interestingly the fracture strain measured by the reduction of area (RA) method showed that the TRIP steel has lower values than DP steel. The fractographs using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at the fractured surfaces were analyzed to relate measured fracture strain and the microstructural difference of the two materials during the process of fracture under various strain rates. Finally, constitutive modeling for the plastic flow stresses under various strain rates was provided in this study. The proposed constitutive law could represent both Hollomon-like and Voce-like hardening laws and the ratio between the two hardening types was efficiently controlled as a function of strain rate. The new strength model was validated successfully under various strain rates for several grades of steels such as mild steels, DP780, TRIP780, DP980 steels.

  1. Nanoparticle transport in water-unsaturated porous media: effects of solution ionic strength and flow rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prédélus, Dieuseul; Lassabatere, Laurent; Louis, Cédric; Gehan, Hélène; Brichart, Thomas; Winiarski, Thierry; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the influence of ionic strength and flow on nanoparticle (NP) retention rate in an unsaturated calcareous medium, originating from a heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposit of the region of Lyon (France). Laboratory columns 10 cm in diameter and 30 cm in length were used. Silica nanoparticles (Au-SiO 2 -FluoNPs), with hydrodynamic diameter ranging from 50 to 60 nm and labeled with fluorescein derivatives, were used to simulate particle transport, and bromide was used to characterize flow. Three flow rates and five different ionic strengths were tested. The transfer model based on fractionation of water into mobile and immobile fractions was coupled with the attachment/detachment model to fit NPs breakthrough curves. The results show that increasing flow velocity induces a decrease in nanoparticle retention, probably as the result of several physical but also geochemical factors. The results show that NPs retention increases with ionic strength. However, an inversion of retention occurs for ionic strength >5.10 −2  M, which has been scarcely observed in previous studies. The measure of zeta potential and DLVO calculations show that NPs may sorb on both solid-water and air-water interfaces. NPs size distribution shows the potential for nanoparticle agglomeration mostly at low pH, leading to entrapment in the soil pores. These mechanisms are highly sensitive to both hydrodynamic and geochemical conditions, which explains their high sensitivity to flow rates and ionic strength.

  2. Nanoparticle transport in water-unsaturated porous media: effects of solution ionic strength and flow rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prédélus, Dieuseul; Lassabatere, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.lassabatere@entpe.fr [Université de Lyon, Laboratoire d’Ecologie des Hydrosystèmes Naturels et Anthropisés, LEHNA (France); Louis, Cédric; Gehan, Hélène [Nano-H S.A.S., 2 place de l’Europe, Bâtiment A, Parc d’activité VALAD (France); Brichart, Thomas [Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306 CNRS (France); Winiarski, Thierry; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael [Université de Lyon, Laboratoire d’Ecologie des Hydrosystèmes Naturels et Anthropisés, LEHNA (France)

    2017-03-15

    This paper presents the influence of ionic strength and flow on nanoparticle (NP) retention rate in an unsaturated calcareous medium, originating from a heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposit of the region of Lyon (France). Laboratory columns 10 cm in diameter and 30 cm in length were used. Silica nanoparticles (Au-SiO{sub 2}-FluoNPs), with hydrodynamic diameter ranging from 50 to 60 nm and labeled with fluorescein derivatives, were used to simulate particle transport, and bromide was used to characterize flow. Three flow rates and five different ionic strengths were tested. The transfer model based on fractionation of water into mobile and immobile fractions was coupled with the attachment/detachment model to fit NPs breakthrough curves. The results show that increasing flow velocity induces a decrease in nanoparticle retention, probably as the result of several physical but also geochemical factors. The results show that NPs retention increases with ionic strength. However, an inversion of retention occurs for ionic strength >5.10{sup −2} M, which has been scarcely observed in previous studies. The measure of zeta potential and DLVO calculations show that NPs may sorb on both solid-water and air-water interfaces. NPs size distribution shows the potential for nanoparticle agglomeration mostly at low pH, leading to entrapment in the soil pores. These mechanisms are highly sensitive to both hydrodynamic and geochemical conditions, which explains their high sensitivity to flow rates and ionic strength.

  3. Increasing FSW join strength by optimizing feed rate, rotating speed and pin angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmadi, Djarot B.; Purnowidodo, Anindito; Siswanto, Eko

    2017-10-01

    Principally the join in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is formed due to mechanical bonding. At least there are two factors determines the quality of this join, first is the temperature in the area around the interface and secondly the intense of mixing forces in nugget zone to create the mechanical bonding. The adequate temperature creates good flowability of the nugget zone and an intensive mixing force produces homogeneous strong bonding. Based on those two factors in this research the effects of feed rate, rotating speed and pin angle of the FSW process to the tensile strength of resulted join are studied. The true experimental method was used. Feed rate was varied at 24, 42, 55 and 74 mm/minutes and from the experimental results, it can be concluded that the higher feed rate decreases the tensile strength of weld join and it is believed due to the lower heat embedded in the material. Inversely, the higher rotating speed increases the join’s tensile strength as a result of higher heat embedded in base metal and higher mixing force in the nugget zone. The rotating speed were 1842, 2257 and 2904 RPMs. The pin angle determines the direction of mixing force. With variation of pin angle: 0°, 4°, 8° and 12° the higher pin angle generally increases the tensile strength because of more intensive mixing force. For 12° pin angle the lower tensile strength is found since the force tends to push out the nugget area from the joint gap.

  4. Spontaneous transition rates for electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions for He-like calcium and sulfur ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingston, A.E.; Norrington, P.H.; Boone, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    The spontaneous decay rates for the electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions between all of the 1s 2 , 1s2 l and 1s3 l states have been obtained for helium-like calcium and sulfur ions. To assess the accuracy of the calculations, the transition probabilities were calculated using two sets of configuration interaction wavefunctions. One set of wavefunctions was generated using the fully relativistic GRASP code and the other was obtained using CIV3, in which relativistic effects are introduced using the Breit-Pauli approximation. The transition rates, A values, oscillator strengths and line strengths from our two calculations are found to be similar and to compare very well with other recent results for Δn=1 or 2 transitions. For Δn=0 transitions the agreement is much less good; this is mainly due to differences in the calculated excitation energies. (author)

  5. Isometric arm strength and subjective rating of upper limb fatigue in two-handed carrying tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai Way; Chiu, Wen-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Sustained carrying could result in muscular fatigue of the upper limb. Ten male and ten female subjects were recruited for measurements of isometric arm strength before and during carrying a load for a period of 4 minutes. Two levels of load of carrying were tested for each of the male and female subjects. Exponential function based predictive equations for the isometric arm strength were established. The mean absolute deviations of these models in predicting the isometric arm strength were in the range of 3.24 to 17.34 N. Regression analyses between the subjective ratings of upper limb fatigue and force change index (FCI) for the carrying were also performed. The results indicated that the subjective rating of muscular fatigue may be estimated by multiplying the FCI with a constant. The FCI may, therefore, be adopted as an index to assess muscular fatigue for two-handed carrying tasks.

  6. EXPERIMENTAL TESTS OF VANADIUM STRENGTH MODELS AT HIGH PRESSURES AND STRAIN RATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H; Barton, N R; Becker, R C; Bernier, J V; Cavallo, R M; Lorenz, K T; Pollaine, S M; Remington, B A; Rudd, R E

    2010-03-02

    Experimental results showing significant reductions from classical in the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth rate due to high pressure material strength or effective lattice viscosity in metal foils are presented. On the Omega Laser in the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, target samples of polycrystalline vanadium are compressed and accelerated quasi-isentropically at {approx}1 Mbar pressures, while maintaining the samples in the solid-state. Comparison of the results with constitutive models for solid state strength under these conditions show that the measured RT growth is substantially lower than predictions using existing models that work well at low pressures and long time scales. High pressure, high strain rate data can be explained by the enhanced strength due to a phonon drag mechanism, creating a high effective lattice viscosity.

  7. Probabilistic concept to describe the influence of rate of loading on strength of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihashi, H.; Wittmann, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    Any reliability assessment of concrete structures is dependent on realistic assumptions on strength distribution. By means of experimental test series the most appropriate distribution function cannot be determined. In this contribution a theoretical concept to describe variability of strength of concrete will be presented. This approach is based on the characteristic composite structure. The structure of concrete is composed of aggregates and a binding agent i.e. porous hardened cement paste. Under formal conditions there are already big pores and cracks in the matrix as well as in the interface before a specimen is loaded. All structural defects can be assumed to be statistically distributed all over the specimen. If a load is applied cracks start to grow form the most critical structural defects. For a realistic estimation of the reliability of a secondary containment under impact loading conditions the influence of rate of loading on mean value and variability of strength is of major interest. The presented theory predicts that the mean strength increases with a power law as the rate of loading increases, while the coefficient of variation remains constant. A number of test series have been carried out to verify the theoretical concept. Different types of mortar (model concrete) and concrete have been included in the test program. Within the range of accuracy experimental results agree well with theoretical predictions. It can be concluded that the variability of macroscopic properties of concrete can be linked with the distribution of structural defects. Strength of concrete is best represented by a Weibull-type distribution function. The influence of rate of loading on strength can be experessed by means of a general rate process. (orig.)

  8. Effect of Strength Training on Rate of Force Development in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjao, Andre Luiz Demantova; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken; Carneiro, Nelson Hilario; Goncalves, Raquel; Ferreira de Moura, Rodrigo; Cyrino, Edilson Serpeloni; Altimari, Leandro Ricardo; Gobbi, Sebastiao

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the effect of an 8-week strength training (ST) program on the rate of force development (RFD) and electromyographic activity (EMG) in older women. Seventeen women (M age = 63.4 years, SD = 4.9) without previous ST experience were randomly assigned to either a control (n = 7) or training (n = 10) group. A leg-press isometric test was…

  9. TRP 9904 - Constitutive Behavior of High Strength Multiphase Sheel Steel Under High Strain Rate Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Matlock; John Speer

    2005-03-31

    The focus of the research project was to systematically assess the strain rate dependence of strengthening mechanisms in new advanced high strength sheet steels. Data were obtained on specially designed and produced Duel Phase and TRIP steels and compared to the properties of automotive steels currently in use.

  10. Electron-impact excitation of Fe II: Effective collision strengths for optically allowed fine-structure transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsbottom, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of Fe II. We consider specifically the optically allowed lines for transitions from the 3d 6 4s and 3d 7 even parity configuration states to the 3d 6 4p odd parity configuration levels. The parallel suite of Breit-Pauli codes are utilized to compute the collision cross-sections where relativistic effects are included explicitly in both the target and the scattering approximation. A total of 100 LS or 262-jj levels formed from the basis configurations 3d 6 4s, 3d 7 and 3d 6 4p were included in the wavefunction representation of the target, including all doublet, quartet and sextet terms. The Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths are computed across a wide range of electron temperatures from 100 to 100,000 K, temperatures of importance in astrophysical and plasma applications. A detailed comparison is made with previous works and significant differences were found to occur for some of the transitions considered. We conclude that in order to obtain converged collision strengths and effective collision strengths for these allowed transitions it is necessary to include contributions from partial waves up to L = 50 explicitly in the calculation, and in addition, account for contributions from even higher partial waves through a 'top up' procedure.

  11. Effect of Strain Rate on Joint Strength and Failure Mode of Lead-Free Solder Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Lei, Yongping; Fu, Hanguang; Guo, Fu

    2018-03-01

    In surface mount technology, the Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder joint has a shorter impact lifetime than a traditional lead-tin solder joint. In order to improve the impact property of SnAgCu lead-free solder joints and identify the effect of silver content on tensile strength and impact property, impact experiments were conducted at various strain rates on three selected SnAgCu based solder joints. It was found that joint failure mainly occurred in the solder material with large plastic deformation under low strain rate, while joint failure occurred at the brittle intermetallic compound layer without any plastic deformation at a high strain rate. Joint strength increased with the silver content in SnAgCu alloys in static tensile tests, while the impact property of the solder joint decreased with increasing silver content. When the strain rate was low, plastic deformation occurred with failure and the tensile strength of the Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder joint was higher than that of Sn-0.3Ag-0.7Cu; when the strain rate was high, joint failure mainly occurred at the brittle interface layer and the Sn-0.3Ag-0.7Cu solder joint had a better impact resistance with a thinner intermetallic compound layer.

  12. Two- to one-phonon E3 transition strength in {sup 148}Gd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piiparinen, M [Niels Bohr Institute, Tandem Accelerator Laboratory, Roskilde (Denmark); [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Atac, A; Nyberg, J; Ramsoy, T; Sletten, G [Niels Bohr Institute, Tandem Acceleratory Laboratory, Roskile, (Denmark); Virtanen, A; Muller, D [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Kleinheinz, P [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Blomqvist, J [Manne Siegbahn Inst. of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1992-08-01

    In a plunger experiment the mean life of the ({nu} f{sub 6}{sup 2}x3{sup -}x3{sup -})12{sup +} state at 3.981 MeV in {sub 64}{sup 148}Gd{sub 84} was measured as {tau}=83(10)ps, giving 77(11)B{sub w} for the 1286 keV 12{sup +} {yields} 9{sup -} E3 transition rate, which confirms the double-octupole character of the 12{sup +} state. The observed deviations in energy and transition rate from harmonic vibration are shown to be caused by the exclusion principle acting between nucleons in the two phonons and are related to the dominant contributions to the {sup 148}Gd octupole phonon of the low-lying {Delta}l={Delta}j=3 proton- and neutron in-shell 3{sup -} excitations which are of vital significance for the octupole mode in open-shell nuclei. (author). 17 refs., 2 figs.

  13. MONETARY TRANSMISSION CHANNELS IN FLEXIBLE MONETARY AND EXCHANGE RATE REGIMES: THE CASE OF SELECTED TRANSITION ECONOMIES

    OpenAIRE

    JOSIFIDIS, Kosta; PUCAR, Emilija Beker; SUPIĆ, Novica

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores selected monetary transmission channels in the case of transition economies. Namely, an exchange rate channel, an interest rate channel, direct and indirect influence to an exchange rate, are focused. Specific (former) transition economies are differentiated according the combination of implemented monetary and exchange rate regimes: exchange rate as a nominal anchor and rigid exchange rate regimes, exchange rate as a nominal anchor and intermediate exchange rate regimes, a...

  14. CI+MBPT calculations of Ar I energies, g factors, and transition line strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savukov, I. M.

    2018-03-01

    Excited states of noble gas atoms present certain challenges to atomic theory for several reasons: first, relativistic effects are important and LS coupling is not optimal; second, energy intervals can be quite small, leading to strong mixing of states; third, many-body perturbation theory for hole states does not converge well. Previously, some attempts were made to solve this problem, using for example the all-order coupled-cluster approach and particle-hole configuration-interaction many-body perturbation theory (CI-MBPT) with modified denominators. However, while these approaches were promising, the accuracy was still limited. In this paper, we calculate Ar I energies, g factors, and transition amplitudes using ab initio CI-MBPT with eight valence electrons to avoid the problem of slow convergence of MBPT due to strong interaction between 3p and 3s states. We also included in CI many dominant states obtained by double excitations of the ground state configuration. Thus perturbation corrections were needed only for 1s, 2s, 2p core electrons non-included in valence-valence CI, which are quite small. We found that energy, g factors, and electric dipole matrix elements are in reasonable agreement with experiments. It is noteworthy that the theory agreed well with accurately measured g factors. Experimental oscillator strengths have large uncertainty, so in some cases we made a comparison with average values.

  15. Electron-impact excitation collision strengths and theoretical line intensities for transitions in S III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Hudson, C. E. [Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Keenan, F. P., E-mail: c.ramsbottom@qub.ac.uk [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-01

    We present Maxwellian-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of S III over a wide range of electron temperatures of astrophysical importance, log T{sub e} (K) = 3.0-6.0. The calculation incorporates 53 fine-structure levels arising from the six configurations—3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}, 3s3p {sup 3}, 3s {sup 2}3p3d, 3s {sup 2}3p4s, 3s {sup 2}3p4p, and 3s {sup 2}3p4d—giving rise to 1378 individual lines and is undertaken using the recently developed RMATRX II plus FINE95 suite of codes. A detailed comparison is made with a previous R-matrix calculation and significant differences are found for some transitions. The atomic data are subsequently incorporated into the modeling code CLOUDY to generate line intensities for a range of plasma parameters, with emphasis on allowed ultraviolet extreme-ultraviolet emission lines detected from the Io plasma torus. Electron density-sensitive line ratios are calculated with the present atomic data and compared with those from CHIANTI v7.1, as well as with Io plasma torus spectra obtained by Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The present line intensities are found to agree well with the observational results and provide a noticeable improvement on the values predicted by CHIANTI.

  16. The effect of changing the magnetic field strength on HiPIMS deposition rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, J W; Mishra, A; Kelly, P J

    2015-01-01

    The marked difference in behaviour between HiPIMS and conventional dc or pulsed-dc magnetron sputtering discharges with changing magnetic field strengths is demonstrated through measurements of deposition rate. To provide a comparison between techniques the same circular magnetron was operated in the three excitation modes at a fixed average power of 680 W and a pressure of 0.54 Pa in the non-reactive sputtering of titanium. The total magnetic field strength B at the cathode surface in the middle of the racetrack was varied from 195 to 380 G. DC and pulsed-dc discharges show the expected behaviour that deposition rates fall with decreasing B (here by ∼25–40%), however the opposite trend is observed in HiPIMS with deposition rates rising by a factor of 2 over the same decrease in B.These observations are understood from the stand point of the different composition and transport processes of the depositing metal flux between the techniques. In HiPIMS, this flux is largely ionic and slow post-ionized sputtered particles are subject to strong back attraction to the target by a retarding plasma potential structure ahead of them. The height of this potential barrier is known to increase with increasing B.From a simple phenomenological model of the sputtered particles fluxes, and using the measured deposition rates from the different techniques as inputs, the combined probabilities of ionization, α, and back attraction, β, of the metal species in HiPIMS has been calculated. There is a clear fall in αβ (from ∼0.9 to ∼0.7) with decreasing B-field strengths, we argue primarily due to a weakening of electrostatic ion back attraction, so leading to higher deposition rates. The results indicate that careful design of magnetron field strengths should be considered to optimise HiPIMS deposition rates. (paper)

  17. High Strain Rate Tensile Testing of Silver Nanowires: Rate-Dependent Brittle-to-Ductile Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandramoorthy, Rajaprakash; Gao, Wei; Bernal, Rodrigo; Espinosa, Horacio

    2016-01-13

    The characterization of nanomaterials under high strain rates is critical to understand their suitability for dynamic applications such as nanoresonators and nanoswitches. It is also of great theoretical importance to explore nanomechanics with dynamic and rate effects. Here, we report in situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) tensile testing of bicrystalline silver nanowires at strain rates up to 2/s, which is 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously reported in the literature. The experiments are enabled by a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) with fast response time. It was identified that the nanowire plastic deformation has a small activation volume (ductile failure mode transition was observed at a threshold strain rate of 0.2/s. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that along the nanowire, dislocation density and spatial distribution of plastic regions increase with increasing strain rate. Furthermore, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations show that deformation mechanisms such as grain boundary migration and dislocation interactions are responsible for such ductility. Finally, the MD and experimental results were interpreted using dislocation nucleation theory. The predicted yield stress values are in agreement with the experimental results for strain rates above 0.2/s when ductility is pronounced. At low strain rates, random imperfections on the nanowire surface trigger localized plasticity, leading to a brittle-like failure.

  18. Refractive index effects on the oscillator strength and radiative decay rate of 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Jyotirmayee; Nau, Werner M

    2004-01-01

    The photophysical properties of 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene (DBO) were determined in 15 solvents, two supramolecular hosts (cucurbit[7]uril and beta-cyclodextrin) as well as in the gas phase. The oscillator strength and radiative decay rate of DBO as a function of refractive index i.e. polarizability have been analyzed. The oscillator strength increases by a factor of 10 upon going from the gas phase to the most polarizable carbon disulfide, while the corresponding radiative decay rates increase by a factor of 40. There is a good empirical correlation between the oscillator strength of the weakly allowed n,pi* transition of DBO and the reciprocal bulk polarizability, which can be employed to assess the polarizability of unknown microheterogeneous environments. A satisfactory correlation between the radiative decay rate and the square of the refractive index is also found, as previously documented for chromophores with allowed transitions. However, the correlation improves significantly when the oscillator strength is included in the correlation, which demonstrates the importance of this factor in the Strickler-Berg equation for chromophores with forbidden or weakly allowed transitions, for which the oscillator strength may be strongly solvent dependent. The radiative decay rate of DBO in two supramolecular assemblies has been determined, confirming the very low polarizability inside the cucurbituril cavity, in between perfluorohexane and the gas phase. The fluorescence quantum yield of DBO in the gas phase has been remeasured (5.1 +/- 0.5%) and was found to fall one full order of magnitude below a previously reported value.

  19. Variable synaptic strengths controls the firing rate distribution in feedforward neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Cheng; Marsat, Gary

    2018-02-01

    Heterogeneity of firing rate statistics is known to have severe consequences on neural coding. Recent experimental recordings in weakly electric fish indicate that the distribution-width of superficial pyramidal cell firing rates (trial- and time-averaged) in the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL) depends on the stimulus, and also that network inputs can mediate changes in the firing rate distribution across the population. We previously developed theoretical methods to understand how two attributes (synaptic and intrinsic heterogeneity) interact and alter the firing rate distribution in a population of integrate-and-fire neurons with random recurrent coupling. Inspired by our experimental data, we extend these theoretical results to a delayed feedforward spiking network that qualitatively capture the changes of firing rate heterogeneity observed in in-vivo recordings. We demonstrate how heterogeneous neural attributes alter firing rate heterogeneity, accounting for the effect with various sensory stimuli. The model predicts how the strength of the effective network connectivity is related to intrinsic heterogeneity in such delayed feedforward networks: the strength of the feedforward input is positively correlated with excitability (threshold value for spiking) when firing rate heterogeneity is low and is negatively correlated with excitability with high firing rate heterogeneity. We also show how our theory can be used to predict effective neural architecture. We demonstrate that neural attributes do not interact in a simple manner but rather in a complex stimulus-dependent fashion to control neural heterogeneity and discuss how it can ultimately shape population codes.

  20. Yield strength of molybdenum, tantalum and tungsten at high strain rates and very high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Škoro, G.P.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Edgecock, T.R.; Booth, C.N.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New experimental data on the yield strength of molybdenum, tantalum and tungsten. ► High strain rate effects at record high temperatures (up to 2700 K). ► Test of the consistency of the Zerilli–Armstrong model at very high temperatures. - Abstract: Recently reported results of the high strain rate, high temperature measurements of the yield strength of tantalum and tungsten have been analyzed along with new experimental results on the yield strength of molybdenum. Thin wires are subjected to high stress by passing a short, fast, high current pulse through a thin wire; the amplitude of the current governs the stress and the repetition rate of the pulses determines the temperature of the wire. The highest temperatures reached in the experiments were 2100 °C (for molybdenum), 2250 °C (for tantalum) and 2450 °C (for tungsten). The strain-rates in the tests were in the range from 500 to 1500 s −1 . The parameters for the constitutive equation developed by Zerilli and Armstrong have been determined from the experimental data and the results have been compared with the data obtained at lower temperatures. An exceptionally good fit is obtained for the deformation of tungsten.

  1. Rating the strength of scientific evidence: relevance for quality improvement programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Kathleen N

    2004-02-01

    To summarize an extensive review of systems for grading the quality of research articles and rating the strength of bodies of evidence, and to highlight for health professionals and decision-makers concerned with quality measurement and improvement the available "best practices" tools by which these steps can be accomplished. Drawing on an extensive review of checklists, questionnaires, and other tools in the field of evidence-based practice, this paper discusses clinical, management, and policy rationales for rating strength of evidence in a quality improvement context, and documents best practices methods for these tasks. After review of 121 systems for grading the quality of articles, 19 systems, mostly specific, met a priori scientific standards for grading systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, observational studies, and diagnostic tests; eight systems (of 40 reviewed) met similar standards for rating the overall strength of evidence. All can be used as is or adapted for particular types of evidence reports or systematic reviews. Formally grading study quality and rating overall strength of evidence, using sound instruments and procedures, can produce reasonable levels of confidence about the science base for parts of quality improvement programs. With such information, health care professionals and administrators concerned with quality improvement can understand better the level of science (versus only clinical consensus or opinion) that supports practice guidelines, review criteria, and assessments that feed into quality assurance and improvement programs. New systems are appearing and research is needed to confirm the conceptual and practical underpinnings of these grading and rating systems, but the need for those developing systematic reviews, practice guidelines, and quality or audit criteria to understand and undertake these steps is becoming increasingly clear.

  2. Gamow-Teller strength and lepton captures rates on 66-71Ni in stellar matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Majid, Muhammad

    Charge-changing transitions play a significant role in stellar weak-decay processes. The fate of the massive stars is decided by these weak-decay rates including lepton (positron and electron) captures rates, which play a consequential role in the dynamics of core collapse. As per previous simulation results, weak interaction rates on nickel (Ni) isotopes have significant influence on the stellar core vis-à-vis controlling the lepton content of stellar matter throughout the silicon shell burning phases of high mass stars up to the presupernova stages. In this paper, we perform a microscopic calculation of Gamow-Teller (GT) charge-changing transitions, in the β-decay and electron capture (EC) directions, for neutron-rich Ni isotopes (66-71Ni). We further compute the associated weak-decay rates for these selected Ni isotopes in stellar environment. The computations are accomplished by employing the deformed proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) model. A recent study showed that the deformed pn-QRPA theory is well suited for the estimation of GT transitions. The astral weak-decay rates are determined over densities in the range of 10-1011g/cm3 and temperatures in the range of 0.01 × 109-30 × 109K. The calculated lepton capture rates are compared with the previous calculation of Pruet and Fuller (PF). The overall comparison demonstrates that, at low stellar densities and high temperatures, our EC rates are bigger by as much as two orders of magnitude. Our results show that, at higher temperatures, the lepton capture rates are the dominant mode for the stellar weak rates and the corresponding lepton emission rates may be neglected.

  3. Comparison of approximations to the transition rate in the DDHMS preequilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, L.; Carlson, B.V.

    2014-01-01

    The double differential hybrid Monte Carlo simulation model (DDHMS) originally used exciton model densities and transition densities with approximate angular distributions obtained using linear momentum conservation. Because the model uses only the simplest transition rates, calculations using more complex approximations to these are still viable. We compare calculations using the original approximation to one using a nonrelativistic Fermi gas transition densities with the approximate angular distributions and with exact nonrelativistic and relativistic transition transition densities. (author)

  4. Fissure formation in coke. 2: Effect of heating rate, shrinkage and coke strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.R. Jenkins; M.R. Mahoney [CSIRO, North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Mathematical and Information Sciences

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the effects of the heating rate, coke shrinkage and coke breakage strength upon the fissure pattern developed in a coke oven charge during carbonisation. This is done principally using a mechanistic model of the formation of fissures, which considers them to be an array of equally spaced fissures, whose depth follows a 'period doubling' pattern based upon the time history of the fissures. The model results are compared with pilot scale coke oven experiments. The results show that the effect of heating rate on the fissure pattern is different to the effect of coke shrinkage, while the effect of coke breakage strength on the pattern is less pronounced. The results can be seen in both the shape and size of resulting coke lumps after stabilisation. The approach gives the opportunity to consider means of controlling the carbonisation process in order to tune the size of the coke lumps produced. 7 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Daylight savings time transitions and the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bertel T; Sønderskov, Kim M; Hageman, Ida

    2017-01-01

    Background: Daylight savings time transitions affect approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide. Prior studies have documented associations between daylight savings time transitions and adverse health outcomes, but it remains unknown whether they also cause an increase in the incidence rate...... of depressive episodes. This seems likely because daylight savings time transitions affect circadian rhythms, which are implicated in the etiology of depressive disorder. Therefore, we investigated the effects of daylight savings time transitions on the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes. Methods...

  6. Low-energy enhancement of nuclear γ strength and its impact on astrophysical reaction rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsen A. C.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available An unexpected enhancement in the low-energy part of the γ-strength function for light and medium-mass nuclei has been discovered at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory. This enhancement could lead to an increase in the neutron-capture rates up to two orders of magnitude for very exotic, neutron-rich nuclei. However, it is still an open question whether this structure persists when approaching the neutron drip line.

  7. Effect of steam corrosion on core post strength loss: I. Low, chronic steam ingress rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichner, R.P.

    1976-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effect of chronic, low levels of steam ingress into the primary system of the HTGR on the corrosion, and consequent strength loss of the core support posts. The assessment proceeded through the following three steps: (1) The impurity composition in the primary system was estimated as a function of a range of steady ingress rates of from 0.001 to 1.0 g/sec, both by means of an analysis of the Dragon steam ingress experiment and a computer code, TIMOX, which treats the primary system as a well-mixed pot. (2) The core post burnoffs which result from 40-year exposures to these determined impurity atmospheres were then estimated using a corrosion rate expression derived from published ATJ-graphite corrosion rate data. Burnoffs were determined for both the core posts at the nominal and the maximum sustained temperature, estimated to be 90 0 C above nominal. (3) The final step involved assessment of the degree of strength loss resulting from the estimated burnoffs. An empirical equation was developed for this purpose which compares reasonably well with strength loss data for a number of different graphites and specimen geometries

  8. Microcrack Evolution and Associated Deformation and Strength Properties of Sandstone Samples Subjected to Various Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-Feng Chen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of micro-cracks in rocks under different strain rates is of great importance for a better understanding of the mechanical properties of rocks under complex stress states. In the present study, a series of tests were carried out under various strain rates, ranging from creep tests to intermediate strain rate tests, so as to observe the evolution of micro-cracks in rock and to investigate the influence of the strain rate on the deformation and strength properties of rocks. Thin sections from rock samples at pre- and post-failure were compared and analyzed at the microscale using an optical microscope. The results demonstrate that the main crack propagation in the rock is intergranular at a creep strain rate and transgranular at a higher strain rate. However, intergranular cracks appear mainly around the quartz and most of the punctured grains are quartz. Furthermore, the intergranular and transgranular cracks exhibit large differences in the different loading directions. In addition, uniaxial compressive tests were conducted on the unbroken rock samples in the creep tests. A comparison of the stress–strain curves of the creep tests and the intermediate strain rate tests indicate that Young’s modulus and the peak strength increase with the strain rate. In addition, more deformation energy is released by the generation of the transgranular cracks than the generation of the intergranular cracks. This study illustrates that the conspicuous crack evolution under different strain rates helps to understand the crack development on a microscale, and explains the relationship between the micro- and macro-behaviors of rock before the collapse under different strain rates.

  9. Study of the strength distribution of primary γ-transitions in the decay from superdeformed states in 194Hg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Martens, A.P.; Doessing, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Korichi, A.; Hannachi, F.; Calderin, I.J.; Lauritsen, T.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.; Fischer, S.M.; Hackman, G.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Nisius, D.; Reiter, P.; Amro, H.; Moore, E.F.

    1999-01-01

    The strength distribution of the primary γ rays in the decay from superdeformed (SD) states is investigated by applying the maximum likelihood method. For the 194 Hg nucleus, 41 primary transitions are identified above 2600 keV. It is concluded that they represent the strongest 10% of the transitions selected stochastically from a Porter-Thomas distribution. This would support the scenario of a statistical decay of SD states via coupling to a compound state at normal deformation. However, the occurrence of several very strong 'one-step linking' transitions is found to have a very small probability. Based on the absence of strong primary transitions from SD states in adjacent nuclei, the situation in 194 Hg is viewed as a very lucky incidence

  10. Reinterpretation of the recently measured absolute generalized oscillator strength for the Ar 3p-4p transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Msezane, A.Z.; Felfli, Z.; Chen, Z.; Amusia, M.Ya.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2002-01-01

    The recent experimental observation of the absolute generalized oscillator strength (GOS) for the Ar 3p-(4p,4p ' ) nondipole transition has been interpreted as a manifestation of quadrupole excitation [X. W. Fan and K. T. Leung, Phys. Rev. A 62, 062703 (2000)]. Contrary to the experimentalists' assignment, on the grounds of our random-phase-approximation with exchange (RPAE) calculation, we attribute the measured GOS to combined monopole, the dominant component, and quadrupole contributions. Our RPAE GOS's for the Ar dipole 3p-4s and 3p-3d,5s and the lowest nondipole transitions are compared with the measurements. The results could have significant implications for other similar transitions, previously interpreted as quadrupole excitation and for interpreting other discrete transitions

  11. Calculations for energies, transition rates, and lifetimes in Al-like Kr XXIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C. Y.; Si, R.; Liu, Y. W.; Yao, K.; Wang, K.; Guo, X. L.; Li, S.; Chen, C. Y.

    2018-05-01

    Using the second-order many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) method, a complete and accurate data set of excitation energies, lifetimes, wavelengths, and electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2), and magnetic quadrupole (M2) line strengths, transition rates, and oscillator strengths for the lowest 880 levels arising from the 3l3 (0 ≤ l ≤ 2), 3l2 4l‧ (0 ≤ l ≤ 2, 0 ≤l‧ ≤ 3), 3s2 5 l (0 ≤ l ≤ 4), 3p2 5 l (0 ≤ l ≤ 1), and 3s3p5 l (0 ≤ l ≤ 4) configurations in Al-like Kr XXIV is provided. Comparisons are made with available experimental and theoretical results. Our calculated energies are expected to be accurate enough to facilitate identifications of observed lines involving the n = 4 , 5 levels. The complete data set is also useful for modeling and diagnosing fusion plasma.

  12. Anomalous transition strength in the proton-unbound nucleus {sup 109}{sub 53}I{sub 56}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procter, M.G., E-mail: mark.procter@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cullen, D.M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Scholey, C.; Ruotsalainen, P. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Angus, L. [University of The West of Scotland, High Street, Paisley PA1 2BE (United Kingdom); Baeck, T.; Cederwall, B. [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Dewald, A.; Fransen, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937, Koeln (Germany); Grahn, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Greenlees, P.T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Hackstein, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937, Koeln (Germany); Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Liotta, R. [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Lumley, N.M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-13

    A lifetime measurement has been made for the first excited 11/2{sup +} state in the proton-unbound nucleus {sup 109}{sub 53}I{sub 56} using the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method in conjunction with recoil-proton tagging. The experimental reduced transition probability is considerably smaller than the prediction of theoretical shell-model calculations using the CD-Bonn nucleon-nucleon potential. The discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental reduced transition strengths in this work most likely arises from the inability of the current shell-model calculations to accurately account for the behavior of the unbound nuclear states.

  13. High-intensity intermittent exercise and its effects on heart rate variability and subsequent strength performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Leme Gonçalves Panissa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available PRUPOSE: To investigate the effects of a 5-km high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE on heart rate variability (HRV and subsequent strength performance. METHODS: nine trained males performed a control session composed of a half-squat strength exercise (4 x 80% of one repetition maximum – 1RM in isolation and 30-min, 1-, 4-, 8- and 24-h after an HIIE (1-min at the velocity peak:1-min passive recovery. All experimental sessions were performed on different days. The maximum number of repetitions and total weight lifted during the strength exercise were registered in all conditions; in addition, prior to each session, HRV were assessed [beat-to-beat intervals (RR and log-transformed of root means square of successive differences in the normal-to-normal intervals (lnRMSSD]. RESULTS: Performance in the strength exercise dropped at 30-min (31% and 1-h (19% post-HIIE concomitantly with lower values of RR (781±79 ms; 799±134 ms, respectively in the same recovery intervals compared to the control (1015±197 ms. Inferential analysis did not detect any effect of condition on lnRMSSD, however, values were lower after 30-min (3.5±0.4 ms and 1-h (3.3±0.5 ms with moderate and large effect sizes (0.9 and 1.2, respectively compared with the control condition (3.9±0.4 ms. CONCLUSION: Both RR and lnRMSSD seem to be associated with deleterious effects on strength performance, although further studies should be conducted to clarify this association.

  14. Heart rate variability reflects self-regulatory strength, effort, and fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C; Nes, Lise Solberg

    2007-03-01

    Experimental research reliably demonstrates that self-regulatory deficits are a consequence of prior self-regulatory effort. However, in naturalistic settings, although people know that they are sometimes vulnerable to saying, eating, or doing the wrong thing, they cannot accurately gauge their capacity to self-regulate at any given time. Because self-regulation and autonomic regulation colocalize in the brain, an autonomic measure, heart rate variability (HRV), could provide an index of self-regulatory strength and activity. During an experimental manipulation of self-regulation (eating carrots or cookies), HRV was elevated during high self-regulatory effort (eat carrots, resist cookies) compared with low self-regulatory effort (eat cookies, resist carrots). The experimental manipulation and higher HRV at baseline independently predicted persistence at a subsequent anagram task. HRV appears to index self-regulatory strength and effort, making it possible to study these phenomena in the field as well as the lab.

  15. Strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength of two silicon carbides: experimental evidence and micromechanical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinszner, Jean-Luc; Erzar, Benjamin; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-01-28

    Ceramic materials are commonly used to design multi-layer armour systems thanks to their favourable physical and mechanical properties. However, during an impact event, fragmentation of the ceramic plate inevitably occurs due to its inherent brittleness under tensile loading. Consequently, an accurate model of the fragmentation process is necessary in order to achieve an optimum design for a desired armour configuration. In this work, shockless spalling tests have been performed on two silicon carbide grades at strain rates ranging from 10 3 to 10 4  s -1 using a high-pulsed power generator. These spalling tests characterize the tensile strength strain rate sensitivity of each ceramic grade. The microstructural properties of the ceramics appear to play an important role on the strain rate sensitivity and on the dynamic tensile strength. Moreover, this experimental configuration allows for recovering damaged, but unbroken specimens, giving unique insight on the fragmentation process initiated in the ceramics. All the collected data have been compared with corresponding results of numerical simulations performed using the Denoual-Forquin-Hild anisotropic damage model. Good agreement is observed between numerical simulations and experimental data in terms of free surface velocity, size and location of the damaged zones along with crack density in these damaged zones.This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength of two silicon carbides: experimental evidence and micromechanical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinszner, Jean-Luc; Erzar, Benjamin; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic materials are commonly used to design multi-layer armour systems thanks to their favourable physical and mechanical properties. However, during an impact event, fragmentation of the ceramic plate inevitably occurs due to its inherent brittleness under tensile loading. Consequently, an accurate model of the fragmentation process is necessary in order to achieve an optimum design for a desired armour configuration. In this work, shockless spalling tests have been performed on two silicon carbide grades at strain rates ranging from 103 to 104 s-1 using a high-pulsed power generator. These spalling tests characterize the tensile strength strain rate sensitivity of each ceramic grade. The microstructural properties of the ceramics appear to play an important role on the strain rate sensitivity and on the dynamic tensile strength. Moreover, this experimental configuration allows for recovering damaged, but unbroken specimens, giving unique insight on the fragmentation process initiated in the ceramics. All the collected data have been compared with corresponding results of numerical simulations performed using the Denoual-Forquin-Hild anisotropic damage model. Good agreement is observed between numerical simulations and experimental data in terms of free surface velocity, size and location of the damaged zones along with crack density in these damaged zones. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  17. Energies, Wavelengths, and Transition Rates for Ga-Like Ions (Nd XXX-Tb XXXV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Fatma; Attia, S. M.

    2016-03-01

    Energies, wavelengths, transition probabilities, oscillator strengths, and line strengths have been calculated for 4s24p-4s4p2 and 4s24p-4s24d transitions in gallium-like ions from Z = 60 to 65, for Nd XXX, Pm XXXI, Sm XXXII, Eu XXXIII, Gd XXXIV, and Tb XXXV using the fully relativistic multiconfi guration Dirac-Fock method. The correlation with the n = 4 complex and the quantum electrodynamic effects have been considered in the calculations. The obtained results have been compared with the available experimental and other theoretical results.

  18. A system for rating the stability and strength of medical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reston James T

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methods for describing one's confidence in the available evidence are useful for end-users of evidence reviews. Analysts inevitably make judgments about the quality, quantity consistency, robustness, and magnitude of effects observed in the studies identified. The subjectivity of these judgments in several areas underscores the need for transparency in judgments. Discussion This paper introduces a new system for rating medical evidence. The system requires explicit judgments and provides explicit rules for balancing these judgments. Unlike other systems for rating the strength of evidence, our system draws a distinction between two types of conclusions: quantitative and qualitative. A quantitative conclusion addresses the question, "How well does it work?", whereas a qualitative conclusion addresses the question, "Does it work?" In our system, quantitative conclusions are tied to stability ratings, and qualitative conclusions are tied to strength ratings. Our system emphasizes extensive a priori criteria for judgments to reduce the potential for bias. Further, the system makes explicit the impact of heterogeneity testing, meta-analysis, and sensitivity analyses on evidence ratings. This article provides details of our system, including graphical depictions of how the numerous judgments that an analyst makes can be combined. We also describe two worked examples of how the system can be applied to both interventional and diagnostic technologies. Summary Although explicit judgments and formal combination rules are two important steps on the path to a comprehensive system for rating medical evidence, many additional steps must also be taken. Foremost among these are the distinction between quantitative and qualitative conclusions, an extensive set of a priori criteria for making judgments, and the direct impact of analytic results on evidence ratings. These attributes form the basis for a logically consistent system that can

  19. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in B-like to F-like Xe ions (Xe L-XLVI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, K.M.; Keenan, F.P.; Lawson, K.D.

    2010-01-01

    Energy levels, radiative rates, oscillator strengths, line strengths, and lifetimes have been calculated for transitions in B-like to F-like Xe ions, Xe L-XLVI. For the calculations, a fully relativistic GRASP code has been adopted, and results are reported for all electric dipole, electric quadrupole, magnetic dipole, and magnetic quadrupole transitions among the lowest 125, 236, 272, 226, and 113 levels of Xe L, Xe XLIX, Xe XLVIII, Xe XLVII, and Xe XLVI, respectively, belonging to the n ≤ 3 configurations.

  20. Transition metal rates in latosol twice treated with sewage sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tereza Jordão Pigozzo

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural recycling of sewage sludge has been a source of accumulation of heavy metals in the environment which may reach toxic levels and cause serious damage to the biota. Field experiments were undertaken for two agricultural years (2000 and 2002 and effects of two sewage sludge applications were evaluated through the extraction of (essential and non-essential transition metals by diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA extractor in a medium texture dystrophic Dark Red Latosol. Cd, Ni, Co, Pb and Cr were not detected. Application of sewage sludge initially caused a slight pH rise in the soil; later pH lowered and kept itself close to the starting level. It could be concluded that through consecutive sludge application, extractable rates of Fe and Mn in soil samples gradually increased during the two agricultural years in proportion to sewage sludge doses and sampling period. In fact, they were higher than rates of control. Due to low concentrations of soil samples, extractor had a restricted capacity for evaluation of its phytoavailability.A reciclagem agrícola do lodo de esgoto tem provocado o acúmulo de metais pesados no solo e na água, podendo atingir níveis tóxicos e causar danos às plantas cultivadas, aos animais e ao homem, por meio da cadeia trófica. Neste intuito foi desenvolvido o presente experimento, em condições de campo, entre 2000 e 2002, onde foram avaliados os efeitos da aplicação de lodo de esgoto por dois anos, sobre a extração de metais de transição (essenciais e não pelo extrator DTPA em um Latossolo Vermelho distrófico (LVd de textura média. As concentrações dos elementos metálicos: Mn, Fe, Cd, Ni, Co, Pb e Cr não foram detectados pelo método da absorção atômica na solução obtida com o extrator DTPA. A aplicação de lodo de esgoto causou inicialmente pequena elevação no pH do solo, posteriormente a diminuição do mesmo, e manteve-se próximo ao original. Foi possível concluir que, com

  1. Leak rate measurements on bimetallic transition samples for ILC cryomodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budagov, Yu.; Chernikov, A.; Sabirov, B.

    2008-01-01

    The results of leak test of bimetallic (titanium-stainless steel) transition elements produced by explosion welding are presented. Vacuum and high-pressure tests of the sample for leakage were carried out at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature. Similar tests were also carried out under thermal cycling conditions

  2. Strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength of two silicon carbides: experimental evidence and micromechanical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erzar, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic materials are commonly used to design multi-layer armour systems thanks to their favourable physical and mechanical properties. However, during an impact event, fragmentation of the ceramic plate inevitably occurs due to its inherent brittleness under tensile loading. Consequently, an accurate model of the fragmentation process is necessary in order to achieve an optimum design for a desired armour configuration. In this work, shockless spalling tests have been performed on two silicon carbide grades at strain rates ranging from 103 to 104 s−1 using a high-pulsed power generator. These spalling tests characterize the tensile strength strain rate sensitivity of each ceramic grade. The microstructural properties of the ceramics appear to play an important role on the strain rate sensitivity and on the dynamic tensile strength. Moreover, this experimental configuration allows for recovering damaged, but unbroken specimens, giving unique insight on the fragmentation process initiated in the ceramics. All the collected data have been compared with corresponding results of numerical simulations performed using the Denoual–Forquin–Hild anisotropic damage model. Good agreement is observed between numerical simulations and experimental data in terms of free surface velocity, size and location of the damaged zones along with crack density in these damaged zones. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates’. PMID:27956504

  3. An attempt to explain strength increase due to high loading rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibl, J.; Curbach, M.

    1989-01-01

    Most materials such as steel, concrete, ceramics, polymers, etc. show an increase of strength due to high loading rates. A number of mathematical equations are available to describe this behaviour. Nevertheless the physical reasons for these observations are still unknown. The common behaviour of a number of materials leads to the assumption that at least some explanations are material independent. Due to this reason the results of the research done at the Institute for Concrete Structures in Karlsruhe are presented in this paper to furnish new ideas for the material research due to dynamic loading. (orig.)

  4. Supporting the Energy Transition: the Role of Low Interest Rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnin, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Low interest rates tend to favor 'green technologies' competitiveness while also increasing their cost volatility. Our analysis of the impact of interest rates on green energy technologies costs points to three key conclusions: - A low interest rate environment makes green energy technologies more competitive. Hydroelectric power is less expensive than any other technology across the entire spectrum of interest rate levels that we analyzed in this paper. Wind on-shore is competitive with all other technologies up until interest rates of about 8%. - Green energy technologies' LCOEs react more significantly to a change in interest rates than the LCOEs of brown energy technologies, implying a greater volatility for green energy technologies' costs in response to interest rate volatility. A higher volatility is damaging because it brings more uncertainty in investment decisions. As a result, stable interest rates are more beneficial for green energy investments than for brown energy investments. - In order to increase the ratio of green to brown energy investments, we can consider a discount on the interest rates for the former or a premium on interest rates for the latter. Our estimations indicate that, because interest rate changes have a greater impact on the costs of green energy technologies, a discount on green investments' interest rates would be more efficient than a premium on brown investments' interest rates. (author)

  5. Cooperative effect of random and time-periodic coupling strength on synchronization transitions in one-way coupled neural system: mean field approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiancheng, Shi; Min, Luo; Chusheng, Huang

    2017-08-01

    The cooperative effect of random coupling strength and time-periodic coupling strengh on synchronization transitions in one-way coupled neural system has been investigated by mean field approach. Results show that cooperative coupling strength (CCS) plays an active role for the enhancement of synchronization transitions. There exist an optimal frequency of CCS which makes the system display the best CCS-induced synchronization transitions, a critical frequency of CCS which can not further affect the CCS-induced synchronization transitions, and a critical amplitude of CCS which can not occur the CCS-induced synchronization transitions. Meanwhile, noise intensity plays a negative role for the CCS-induced synchronization transitions. Furthermore, it is found that the novel CCS amplitude-induced synchronization transitions and CCS frequency-induced synchronization transitions are found.

  6. Effects of temperature and sliding rate on frictional strength of granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockner, D.A.; Summers, R.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Layers of artificial granite gouge have been deformed on saw-cut granite surfaces inclined 30?? to the sample axes. Samples were deformed at a constant confining pressure of 250 MPa and temperatures of 22 to 845??C. The velocity dependence of the steady-state coefficient of friction (??ss) was determined by comparing sliding strengths at different sliding rates. The results of these measurements are consistent with those reported by Solberg and Byerlee (1984) at room temperature and Stesky (1975) between 300 and 400??C. Stesky found that the slip-rate dependence of (??ss) increased above 400??C. In the present study, however, the velocity dependence of (??ss) was nearly independent of temperature. ?? 1986 Birkha??user Verlag.

  7. Study on the Depth, Rate, Shape, and Strength of Pulse with Cardiovascular Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Yeon Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulse diagnosis is important in oriental medicine. The purpose of this study is explaining the mechanisms of pulse with a cardiovascular simulator. The simulator is comprised of the pulse generating part, the vessel part, and the measurement part. The pulse generating part was composed of motor, slider-crank mechanism, and piston pump. The vessel part, which was composed with the aorta and a radial artery, was fabricated with silicon to implement pulse wave propagation. The pulse parameters, such as the depth, rate, shape, and strength, were simulated. With changing the mean pressure, the floating pulse and the sunken pulse were generated. The change of heart rate generated the slow pulse and the rapid pulse. The control of the superposition time of the reflected wave generated the string-like pulse and the slippery pulse. With changing the pulse pressure, the vacuous pulse and the replete pulse were generated. The generated pulses showed good agreements with the typical pulses.

  8. Dependency of Shear Strength on Test Rate in SiC/BSAS Ceramic Matrix Composite at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Both interlaminar and in-plane shear strengths of a unidirectional Hi-Nicalon(TM) fiber-reinforced barium strontium aluminosilicate (SiC/BSAS) composite were determined at 1100 C in air as a function of test rate using double notch shear test specimens. The composite exhibited a significant effect of test rate on shear strength, regardless of orientation which was either in interlaminar or in in-plane direction, resulting in an appreciable shear-strength degradation of about 50 percent as test rate decreased from 3.3 10(exp -1) mm/s to 3.3 10(exp -5) mm/s. The rate dependency of composite's shear strength was very similar to that of ultimate tensile strength at 1100 C observed in a similar composite (2-D SiC/BSAS) in which tensile strength decreased by about 60 percent when test rate varied from the highest (5 MPa/s) to the lowest (0.005 MPa/s). A phenomenological, power-law slow crack growth formulation was proposed and formulated to account for the rate dependency of shear strength of the composite.

  9. Levels and Transition Rates in {sup 199}Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmskog, S G; Baecklin, A; Fogelberg, B

    1967-10-15

    The decay of {sup 199}Pt to {sup 199}Au (T{sub 1/2} = 30.8 min) has been investigated using a Ge(Li) detector and a double focusing beta spectrometer. 34 transitions were found and multipolarities were assigned for 11 of these, including a 55.15 keV M2 + (0.9 {+-} 0.5) % E3 isomeric transition. Using these data together with the results of {gamma}-{gamma} and {beta}-{gamma} coincidence measurements, a decay scheme containing 9 excited levels and 25 transitions was constructed and spin and parity assignments were made. Using the delayed coincidence technique half-lives were determined for 3 levels and upper limits were obtained for 5 additional levels. The following levels were found: 77.21 {+-} 0.03 keV (1/2{sup +}, 1.1 {+-} 0.1 ns ); 316.98 {+-} 0.10 (5/2{sup +}, < 55 ps); 323.57 {+-}0.09 keV ((1/2), 3/2{sup +}, 35 {+-}20 ps); 493.59 {+-}0.10 keV (7/2{sup +}, < 35 ps ) ; 542.82 {+-} 0.07 keV (5/2{sup +}, < 30 ps ) ; 548.65 {+-} 0.09 keV (11/2{sup -}); 734.44 {+-}0.11 keV (7/2{sup -}, 0.36 {+-} 0.04 ns); 791.47 {+-} 0.15 keV (3/2{sup +}, 5/2{sup +}, < 50 ps); and 967.98 {+-} 0.20 keV (3/2{sup (+)}, 5/2{sup (+)}, < 100 ps ). The decay properties of the lowest excited positive parity levels are discussed in terms of de-Shalit's core excitation model.

  10. Evaluation of the effects of strain rate on material properties of the high strength concrete used in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Shohei; Shirai, Koji; Takayanagi, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Concrete physical properties (compressive strength, tensile strength, initial elastic modulus and maximum strain) affected by strain rate weren't fully utilize for material model in dynamic response analysis for seismic and impact load because of few reports and various difficulties of impact tests. Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) methods are the most popular high-speed material testing and were also applied for composite material. We applied SHPB for concrete specimen and reported the strain rate effect to the concrete physical property. We used hydraulic testing device for 10 -5 /s to 10 0 /s strain rate and SHPB methods for over 10 1 /s. Four cases of concrete tests (high (50MPa at 28days)/low (35MPa at 28days) compressive strength (based on the test of exiting nuclear power facilities) and dry/wet condition) were done. And we formulated strain rate effect about compressive strength and initial elastic modulus from comparing with previous studies. (author)

  11. Determination of the production rate of low intensity isomeric transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakosi, L.; Veres, A.; Tam, N.C.; Pavlicsek, I.

    1992-01-01

    Flat 2π and cylindrical 4π multiwire proportional counters were built for counting for low energy internal conversion electrons from the nuclear isomers 83m Kr, 103m Rh and 189m Os, induced by irradiation with high intensity 60 Co and 4 MeV bremsstrahlung sources. The β-decay of 176m Lu was recorded by a plastic scintillator. In this way higher sensitivities were attained than by detecting γ-rays or characteristic X-rays associated with the isomeric transitions, and the excitation of 189m Os by low energy 137 Cs and 300 kV X-ray sources also became detectable. Comparatively large isomeric activities produced by linac irradiation were standardizing by a Ge spectrometer for calibrating proportional and scintillation counting. (orig.)

  12. A novel multi-responsive polyampholyte composite hydrogel with excellent mechanical strength and rapid shrinking rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Tan, Ying; Chen, Qiang; An, Huiyong; Li, Wenbo; Dong, Lisong; Wang, Pixin

    2010-05-15

    Series of hydrophilic core-shell microgels with cross-linked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) as core and poly(vinyl amine) (PVAm) as shell are synthesized via surfactant-free emulsion polymerization. Then, the microgels are treated with a small amount of potassium persulfate (KPS) to generate free radicals on the amine nitrogens of PVAm, which subsequently initiate the graft copolymerization of acrylic acid (AA), acryloyloxyethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (DAC), and acrylamide (AAm) onto microgels to prepare multi-responsive composite hydrogels. The composite hydrogels consist of cross-linked ungrafted polyampholyte chains as the first network and microgels with grafted polyampholyte chains as graft point and second network and show surprising mechanical strength and rapid response rate. The investigation shows the compress strength of composite hydrogels is up to 17-30 MPa, which is 60-100 times higher than that of the hydrogel matrix. The composite hydrogel shows reversible switch of transmittance when traveling the lowest critical temperature (LCST) of microgels. When the composite hydrogel swollen in pH 2.86 solution at ambient condition is immersed into the pH 7.00 solution at 45 °C, a rapid dynamic shrinking can be observed. And the character time (τ) of shrinking dynamic of composite hydrogel is 251.9 min, which is less than that of hydrogel matrix (τ=2273.7 min). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of the oscillator strength of 'hypersensitive' transitions to the investigation of complex equilibria of lanthanide ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukietynska, K.; Mondry, A.; Osmeda, E.

    1981-01-01

    Stability constants and thermodynamic parameters of Nd 3+ , Ho 3+ and Er 3+ complexes with acetates, propionates, glycolates, lactates and α-hydroxyisobutyrates were determined by a spectroscopic method based upon the measurements of the variation of oscillator strengths of 'hypersensitive' 4f-4f-transitions. The sets of βsub (n) values at 21 0 C are in a good agreement with those found potentiometrically. The stability constants of the complexes evaluated at 5 different temperatures were used for the calculation of ΔG, ΔH, ΔS values. The evaluated thermodynamic parameters are in a satisfactory agreement with those found calorimetrically. The thermodynamic parameters calculated from two independent 'hypersensitive' transitions of the Er 3+ ion are also consistent. (author)

  14. Identifying transition rates of ionic channels via observations at a single state

    CERN Document Server

    Deng Ying Chun; Qian Min Ping; Feng Jian Feng

    2003-01-01

    We consider how to determine all transition rates of an ion channel when it can be described by a birth-death chain or a Markov chain on a star-graph with continuous time. It is found that all transition rates are uniquely determined by the distribution of its lifetime and death-time histograms at a single state. An algorithm to calculate the transition rates exactly, based on the statistics of the lifetime and death-time of the Markov chain at the state, is provided. Examples to illustrate how an ion channel activity is fully determined by the observation of a single state of the ion channel are included.

  15. Identifying transition rates of ionic channels via observations at a single state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Yingchun; Peng Shenglun; Qian Minping; Feng Jianfeng

    2003-01-01

    We consider how to determine all transition rates of an ion channel when it can be described by a birth-death chain or a Markov chain on a star-graph with continuous time. It is found that all transition rates are uniquely determined by the distribution of its lifetime and death-time histograms at a single state. An algorithm to calculate the transition rates exactly, based on the statistics of the lifetime and death-time of the Markov chain at the state, is provided. Examples to illustrate how an ion channel activity is fully determined by the observation of a single state of the ion channel are included

  16. Identifying transition rates of ionic channels via observations at a single state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Yingchun [School of Mathematics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Peng Shenglun [School of Mathematics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Qian Minping [School of Mathematics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Feng Jianfeng [COGS, Sussex University, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-07

    We consider how to determine all transition rates of an ion channel when it can be described by a birth-death chain or a Markov chain on a star-graph with continuous time. It is found that all transition rates are uniquely determined by the distribution of its lifetime and death-time histograms at a single state. An algorithm to calculate the transition rates exactly, based on the statistics of the lifetime and death-time of the Markov chain at the state, is provided. Examples to illustrate how an ion channel activity is fully determined by the observation of a single state of the ion channel are included.

  17. THE TRANSITION MASS-LOSS RATE: CALIBRATING THE ROLE OF LINE-DRIVEN WINDS IN MASSIVE STAR EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vink, Jorick S.; Graefener, Goetz, E-mail: jsv@arm.ac.uk [Armagh Observatory, College Hill, BT61 9DG Armagh (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-01

    A debate has arisen regarding the importance of stationary versus eruptive mass loss for massive star evolution. The reason is that stellar winds have been found to be clumped, which results in the reduction of unclumped empirical mass-loss rates. Most stellar evolution models employ theoretical mass-loss rates which are already reduced by a moderate factor of {approx_equal}2-3 compared to non-corrected empirical rates. A key question is whether these reduced rates are of the correct order of magnitude, or if they should be reduced even further, which would mean that the alternative of eruptive mass loss becomes necessary. Here we introduce the transition mass-loss rate M-dot{sub trans} between O and Wolf-Rayet stars. Its novelty is that it is model independent. All that is required is postulating the spectroscopic transition point in a given data set, and determining the stellar luminosity, which is far less model dependent than the mass-loss rate. The transition mass-loss rate is subsequently used to calibrate stellar wind strength by its application to the Of/WNh stars in the Arches cluster. Good agreement is found with two alternative modeling/theoretical results, suggesting that the rates provided by current theoretical models are of the right order of magnitude in the {approx}50 M{sub Sun} mass range. Our results do not confirm the specific need for eruptive mass loss as luminous blue variables, and current stellar evolution modeling for Galactic massive stars seems sound. Mass loss through alternative mechanisms might still become necessary at lower masses, and/or metallicities, and the quantification of alternative mass loss is desirable.

  18. THE TRANSITION MASS-LOSS RATE: CALIBRATING THE ROLE OF LINE-DRIVEN WINDS IN MASSIVE STAR EVOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vink, Jorick S.; Gräfener, Götz

    2012-01-01

    A debate has arisen regarding the importance of stationary versus eruptive mass loss for massive star evolution. The reason is that stellar winds have been found to be clumped, which results in the reduction of unclumped empirical mass-loss rates. Most stellar evolution models employ theoretical mass-loss rates which are already reduced by a moderate factor of ≅2-3 compared to non-corrected empirical rates. A key question is whether these reduced rates are of the correct order of magnitude, or if they should be reduced even further, which would mean that the alternative of eruptive mass loss becomes necessary. Here we introduce the transition mass-loss rate M-dot trans between O and Wolf-Rayet stars. Its novelty is that it is model independent. All that is required is postulating the spectroscopic transition point in a given data set, and determining the stellar luminosity, which is far less model dependent than the mass-loss rate. The transition mass-loss rate is subsequently used to calibrate stellar wind strength by its application to the Of/WNh stars in the Arches cluster. Good agreement is found with two alternative modeling/theoretical results, suggesting that the rates provided by current theoretical models are of the right order of magnitude in the ∼50 M ☉ mass range. Our results do not confirm the specific need for eruptive mass loss as luminous blue variables, and current stellar evolution modeling for Galactic massive stars seems sound. Mass loss through alternative mechanisms might still become necessary at lower masses, and/or metallicities, and the quantification of alternative mass loss is desirable.

  19. Absolute E0 and E2 transition rates and collective states in 116Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantele, J.; Julin, R.; Luontama, M.; Passoja, A.; Poikolainen, T.; Baecklin, A.; Jonsson, N.-G.

    1978-08-01

    Absolute E0 and E2 transition rates in 116 Sn have been measured using several newly developed techniques. Many E2 transitions are observed to have a collective character with B(E2) values of up to 60 W.u. The presence of deformed excited states in 116 Sn is discussed in view of the results obtained. (author)

  20. Relativistic model-potential oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for 4fsup(n)6s-4fsup(n)6p transitions in Eu(II), Tb(II), and Ho(II) in J1j coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdalek, J.

    1984-01-01

    The lowest 4fsup(n)6s-4fsup(n)6p transitions are studied for the Eu(II) (n=7), Tb(II) (n=9), and Ho(II) (n=11) spectra, where the J 1 J coupling is an acceptable approximation. The relativistic radial integrals, required to evaluate the oscillator strengths and transition probabilities, are calculated with the model-potential method, which includes also core-polarization effects. The similarities observed in oscillator strengths for transitions with given ΔJ but different J values are discussed and explained. The computed oscillator strengths are compared with those obtained with the Coulomb approximation and it is found that the latter are only 11-12% lower. The core polarization influence on oscillator strengths is also investigated and the 19-21% decrease in oscillator strengths due to this effect is predicted. This result may, however, be overestimated because of some deficiencies in our procedure. (author)

  1. A PERFORMANCE COMPARISON BETWEEN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS AND MULTIVARIATE STATISTICAL METHODS IN FORECASTING FINANCIAL STRENGTH RATING IN TURKISH BANKING SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MELEK ACAR BOYACIOĞLU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Financial strength rating indicates the fundamental financial strength of a bank. The aim of financial strength rating is to measure a bank’s fundamental financial strength excluding the external factors. External factors can stem from the working environment or can be linked with the outside protective support mechanisms. With the evaluation, the rating of a bank free from outside supportive factors is being sought. Also the financial fundamental, franchise value, the variety of assets and working environment of a bank are being evaluated in this context. In this study, a model has been developed in order to predict the financial strength rating of Turkish banks. The methodology of this study is as follows: Selecting variables to be used in the model, creating a data set, choosing the techniques to be used and the evaluation of classification success of the techniques. It is concluded that the artificial neural network system shows a better performance in terms of classification of financial strength rating in comparison to multivariate statistical methods in the raining set. On the other hand, there is no meaningful difference could be found in the validation set in which the prediction performances of the employed techniques are tested.

  2. Muscle strength and physical activity are associated with self-rated health in an adult Danish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Andreas W; Beyer, Nina; Flensborg-Madsen, Trine; Grønbæk, Morten; Helge, Jørn W

    2013-12-01

    To describe associations of muscle strength, physical activity and self-rated health. Isometric muscle strength by maximal handgrip strength (HGS) or muscle strength by 30s repeated chair stand test (30s-CS) was combined with leisure time physical activity. Using logistic regression odds ratio was calculated for good self-rated health according to the combined associations among 16,539 participants (59.7% women), mean age 51.9 (SD: 13.8) years, from a cross-sectional study in Denmark 2007-2008. Good self-rated health was positively associated with higher levels of physical activity and greater muscle strength. Regarding HGS the highest OR for good self-rated health was in the moderate/vigorous physically active participants with high HGS (OR=6.84, 95% CI: 4.85-9.65 and OR=7.34, 95% CI: 5.42-9.96 for men and women, respectively). Similarly the highest OR for good self-rated health was in the moderate/vigorous physically active participants with high scores in the 30s-CS test (6.06, 95% CI: 4.32-8.50 and 13.38, 95% CI: 9.59-18.67 for men and women, respectively). The reference groups were sedentary participants with low strength (HGS or 30s-CS). The combined score for physical activity level with either HGS or 30s-CS was strongly positively associated with self-related health. © 2013.

  3. Strength, ductility, and ductile-brittle transition temperature for MFR [magnetic fusion reactor] candidate vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, B.A.; Lee, R.H.; Smith, D.L.; Peterson, J.R.

    1987-09-01

    The dependence of the yield strength, tensile strength, elongation, and reduction in area on temperature for the V-15Ti-7.5Cr, V-20Ti, V-15Cr-5Ti, V-12Cr-5Ti, V-10Cr-5Ti, and V-3Ti-1Si alloys was determined from tensile tests at temperatures ranging from 25 to 700 0 C. The strength of the alloys increased with an increase of the combined Cr and Ti concentration. The total elongation for the alloys ranged between 20% and 38%. The reduction in area ranged from 30% to 90%. The DBTT, which was determined from the temperature dependence of the reduction in area, was less than 25 0 C for the V-15Ti-7.5Cr, V-20Ti, and V-3Ti-1Si alloys. The DBTT for the V-10Cr-5Ti, V-12Cr-5Ti, and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys was also less than 25 0 C if these alloys were annealed to reduce the hydrogen concentration prior to the tensile test. If these latter alloys were not annealed prior to the tensile test, the DBTT ranged from 40 0 C to 90 0 C and the DBTT increased with an increase of the Cr concentration. A Cr/Ti concentration ratio of 0 to 0.5 in these alloys was found to cause the alloys to be less susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. 14 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Strength, ductility, and ductile-brittle transition temperature for MFR candidate vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, B.A.; Lee, R.H.; Smith, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The dependence of the yield strength, tensile strength, elongation, and reduction in area on temperature for the V-15Ti-7.5Cr, V-20Ti, V-15Cr-5Ti, V-12Cr-5Ti, V-10Cr-5Ti, and V-3Ti-1Si alloys was determined from tensile tests at temperatures ranging from 25 to 700 0 C. The strength of the alloys increased with an increase of the combined Cr and Ti concentration. The total elongation for the alloys ranged between 20 and 38%. The reduction in area ranged from 30 to 90%. The DBTT, which was determined from the temperature dependence of the reduction in area, was less than 25 0 C for the V-15Ti-7.5Cr, V-20Ti, and V-3Ti-1Si alloys. The DBTT for the V-10Cr-5Ti, V-12Cr-5Ti, and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys was also less than 25 0 C if these alloys were annealed to reduce the hydrogen concentration prior to the tensile test. If these latter alloys were not annealed prior to the tensile test, the DBTT ranged from 40 to 90 0 C and the DBTT increased with an increase of the Cr concentration. A Cr/Ti concentration ratio of 0-0.5 in these alloys was found to cause the alloys to be less susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. (orig.)

  5. Radon concentration; source strength and ventilation rate: how well do we know the connections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    The simple steady state model which is frequently used to relate radon concentration (C), source strength (S) and ventilation rate (l/'tau') is expressed in the equation C=S'tau'. The assumptions of this model are given and their validity explored in this paper. In particular the assumption of steady state conditions fot the ventilation rate is studied experimentally in a simple one chamber building, the Solar Classroom at Hamilton College. Even in this simple case variations are found of a factor of three or more in 'tau' which can be attributed to wind and stack effects. Studies of other houses are cited which show that variations of 'tau' between houses can be as large as factor of sixty or more. The implications of these results for developing ventilation standards or for mitigating the indoor radon problem are suggested. Individual houses can be understood and mitigating strategies implemented in them on a case by case basis but a statistical treatment of houses in general does not seem to be a fruitful approach. (Author)

  6. Nuclear structure properties and stellar weak rates for 76Se: Unblocking of the Gamow Teller strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Ishfaq, Mavra; Böyükata, Mahmut; Riaz, Muhammad

    2017-10-01

    At finite temperatures (≥ 107K), 76Se is abundant in the core of massive stars and electron capture on 76Se has a consequential role to play in the dynamics of core-collapse. The present work may be classified into two main categories. In the first phase we study the nuclear structure properties of 76Se using the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1). The IBM-1 investigations include the energy levels, B (E 2) values and the prediction of the geometry. We performed the extended consistent-Q formalism (ECQF) calculation and later the triaxial formalism calculation (constructed by adding the cubic term to the ECQF). The geometry of 76Se can be envisioned within the formalism of the potential energy surface based on the classical limit of IBM-1 model. In the second phase, we reconfirm the unblocking of the Gamow-Teller (GT) strength in 76Se (a test case for nuclei having N > 40 and Z fashion. Results are compared with experimental data and previous calculations. The calculated GT distribution fulfills the Ikeda sum rule. Rates for β-delayed neutrons and emission probabilities are also calculated. Our study suggests that at high stellar temperatures and low densities, the β+-decay on 76Se should not be neglected and needs to be taken into consideration along with electron capture rates for simulation of presupernova evolution of massive stars.

  7. Ultimate Tensile Strength as a Function of Test Rate for Various Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Ultimate tensile strength of five different continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/BSAS (2D 2 types), SiC/MAS-5 (2D), SiC/SiC (2D enhanced), and C/SiC(2D) was determined as a function of test rate at I 100 to 1200 'C in air. All five composite materials exhibited a significant dependency of ultimate strength on test rate such that the ultimate strength decreased with decreasing test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress rate) to another (constant stress loading) for SiC/BSAS suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law type of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics.

  8. Daylight Savings Time Transitions and the Incidence Rate of Unipolar Depressive Episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Bertel T; Sønderskov, Kim M; Hageman, Ida; Dinesen, Peter T; Østergaard, Søren D

    2017-05-01

    Daylight savings time transitions affect approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide. Prior studies have documented associations between daylight savings time transitions and adverse health outcomes, but it remains unknown whether they also cause an increase in the incidence rate of depressive episodes. This seems likely because daylight savings time transitions affect circadian rhythms, which are implicated in the etiology of depressive disorder. Therefore, we investigated the effects of daylight savings time transitions on the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes. Using time series intervention analysis of nationwide data from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register from 1995 to 2012, we compared the observed trend in the incidence rate of hospital contacts for unipolar depressive episodes after the transitions to and from summer time to the predicted trend in the incidence rate. The analyses were based on 185,419 hospital contacts for unipolar depression and showed that the transition from summer time to standard time were associated with an 11% increase (95% CI = 7%, 15%) in the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes that dissipated over approximately 10 weeks. The transition from standard time to summer time was not associated with a parallel change in the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes. This study shows that the transition from summer time to standard time was associated with an increase in the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes. Distress associated with the sudden advancement of sunset, marking the coming of a long period of short days, may explain this finding. See video abstract at, http://links.lww.com/EDE/B179.

  9. Transitional rates, risk and the Ontario wholesale power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, M.

    2001-01-01

    Navigant Consulting is a large investor-owned management consulting firm specializing in energy-based and other networked and regulated industries across Canada. The company works with clients to create delivery and protect shareholder value in the face of uncertainty and change. This presentation discussed the issue of price volatility in competitive electricity markets. The points to keep in mind for pricing in competitive power markets is that: (1) electricity should be generated simultaneously with use, (2) rates in administered markets are average over some time period, (3) competitive pool markets do not average costs, (4) in competitive pool markets, prices are set in very short (hourly or less) intervals, (5) prices in competitive markets are more volatile than in administered markets for both economic and market structure reasons, and (6) the degree of volatility and price levels can change quickly. The Ontario power market was also discussed with reference to price volatility in Ontario and what this means for electricity customers. tabs., figs

  10. MONETARY TRANSMISSION CHANNELS IN FLEXIBLE MONETARY AND EXCHANGE RATE REGIMES: THE CASE OF SELECTED TRANSITION ECONOMIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosta JOSIFIDIS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores selected monetary transmission channels in the case of transition economies. Namely, an exchange rate channel, an interest rate channel, direct and indirect influence to an exchange rate, are focused. Specific (former transition economies are differentiated according the combination of implemented monetary and exchange rate regimes: exchange rate as a nominal anchor and rigid exchange rate regimes, exchange rate as a nominal anchor and intermediate exchange rate regimes, and implicit/explicit inflation targeting monetary regime and floating (managed/free exchange rate regime. The monetary transmission is tracked during different phases in a transition process towards the EU and compared between different nominal anchors and exchange rate regimes. In order to track the influence of a monetary policy instruments (impulses to different goals of a monetary policy (responses during the period from 6-24 months, we use VAR and VEC models. Monthly frequency of following time series are used in the models: nominal exchange rates, consumer price indexes, foreign exchange reserves, and reference interest rates. The aim of the paper is to point to the distinction between de jure and de facto exchange rate regimes, and to the adequacy of used combination of monetary and exchange rate regimes having in mind revealed features of investigated monetary transmission channels.

  11. Interpreting impedance spectra of organic photovoltaic cells—Extracting charge transit and recombination rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullenbach, Tyler K.; Zou, Yunlong; Holmes, Russell J., E-mail: rholmes@umn.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Holst, James [New Products R and D, Sigma-Aldrich Corporation, 6000 N. Teutonia Avenue, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53209 (United States)

    2014-09-28

    Impedance spectroscopy has been widely used to extract the electron-hole recombination rate constant in organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs). This technique is typically performed on OPVs held at open-circuit. Under these conditions, the analysis is simplified with recombination as the only pathway for the decay of excess charge carriers; transit provides no net change in the charge density. In this work, we generalize the application and interpretation of impedance spectroscopy for bulk heterojunction OPVs at any operating voltage. This, in conjunction with reverse bias external quantum efficiency measurements, permits the extraction of both recombination and transit rate constants. Using this approach, the transit and recombination rate constants are determined for OPVs with a variety of electron donor-acceptor pairings and compositions. It is found that neither rate constant individually is sufficient to characterize the efficiency of charge collection in an OPV. It is demonstrated that a large recombination rate constant can be accompanied by a large transit rate constant, thus fast recombination is not necessarily detrimental to OPV performance. Extracting the transit and recombination rate constants permits a detailed understanding of how OPV architecture and processing conditions impact the transient behavior of charge carriers, elucidating the origin of optimum device configurations.

  12. Evolution of E 2 transition strength in deformed hafnium isotopes from new measurements on 172Hf,174Hf, and 176Hf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudigier, M.; Nomura, K.; Dannhoff, M.; Gerst, R.-B.; Jolie, J.; Saed-Samii, N.; Stegemann, S.; Régis, J.-M.; Robledo, L. M.; Rodríguez-Guzmán, R.; Blazhev, A.; Fransen, Ch.; Warr, N.; Zell, K. O.

    2015-04-01

    Background: The available data for E 2 transition strengths in the region between neutron-deficient hafnium and platinum isotopes are far from complete. More and precise data are needed to enhance the picture of structure evolution in this region and to test state-of-the-art nuclear models. In a simple model, the maximum collectivity is expected at the middle of the major shell. However, for actual nuclei, particularly in heavy-mass regions, which should be highly complex, this picture may no longer be the case, and one should use a more realistic nuclear-structure model. We address this point by studying the spectroscopy of Hf as a representative case. Purpose: We remeasure the 21+ half-lives of 172,174,176Hf, for which there is some disagreement in the literature. The main goal is to measure, for the first time, the half-lives of higher-lying states of the rotational band. The new results are compared to a theoretical calculation for absolute transition strengths. Method: The half-lives were measured using γ -γ and conversion-electron-γ delayed coincidences with the fast timing method. For the determination of half-lives in the picosecond region, the generalized centroid difference method was applied. For the theoretical calculation of the spectroscopic properties, the interacting boson model is employed, whose Hamiltonian is determined based on microscopic energy-density functional calculations. Results: The measured 21+ half-lives disagree with results from earlier γ -γ fast timing measurements, but are in agreement with data from Coulomb excitation experiments and other methods. Half-lives of the 41+ and 61+ states were measured, as well as a lower limit for the 81+ states. Conclusions: This work shows the importance of a mass-dependent effective boson charge in the interacting boson model for the description of E 2 transition rates in chains of nuclei. It encourages further studies of the microscopic origin of this mass dependence. New experimental

  13. Atmospheric cycles of nitrogen oxides and ammonia. [source strengths and destruction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottger, A.; Ehhalt, D. H.; Gravenhorst, G.

    1981-01-01

    The atmospheric cycles of nitrogenous trace compounds for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres are discussed. Source strengths and destruction rates for the nitrogen oxides: NO, NO2 and HNO3 -(NOX) and ammonia (NH3) are given as a function of latitude over continents and oceans. The global amounts of NOX-N and NH3-N produced annually in the period 1950 to 1975 (34 + 5 x one trillion g NOx-N/yr and 29 + or - 6 x one trillion g NH3-N/yr) are much less than previously assumed. Globally, natural and anthropogenic emissions are of similar magnitude. The NOx emission from anthropogenic sources is 1.5 times that from natural processes in the Northern Hemisphere, whereas in the Southern Hemisphere, it is a factor of 3 or 4 less. More than 80% of atmospheric ammonia seems to be derived from excrements of domestic animals, mostly by bulk deposition: 24 + or - 9 x one trillion g NO3 -N/yr and 21 + or - 9 x one trillion g NH4+-N/yr. Another fraction may be removed by absorption on vegetation and soils.

  14. Evolution of the fracture process zone in high-strength concrete under different loading rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cámara M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available For cementitious materials, the inelastic zone around a crack tip is termed as fracture process zone (FPZ and dominated by complicated mechanism, such as microcracking, crack deflection, bridging, crack face friction, crack tip blunting by voids, crack branching, and so on. Due to the length of the FPZ is related with the characteristic length of the cementitious materials, the size, extent and location of the FPZ has been the object of countless research efforts for several decades. For instance, Cedolin et al. [1] have used an optical method based on the moiré interferometry to determine FPZ in concrete. Castro-Montero et al. [2] have applied the method of holographic interferometry to mortar to study the extension of the FPZ. The advantage of the interferometry method is that the complete FPZ can be directly observed on the surface of the sample. Swartz et al. [3] has adopted the dye penetration technique to illustrate the changing patterns observed as the crack progress from the tensile side to the compression side of the beam. Moreover, acoustic emission (AE is also an experimental technique well suited for monitoring fracture process. Haidar et al. [4] and Maji et al. [5] have studied the relation between acoustic emission characteristics and the properties of the FPZ. Compared with the extensive research on properties of the FPZ under quasi-static loading conditions, much less information is available on its dynamic characterization, especially for high-strength concrete (HSC. This paper presents the very recent results of an experimental program aimed at disclosing the loading rate effect on the size and velocity of the (FPZ in HSC. Eighteen three-point bending specimens were conducted under a wide range of loading rates from from 10-4 mm/s to 103 mm/s using either a servo-hydraulic machine or a self-designed drop-weight impact device. The beam dimensions were 100 mm 100 mm in cross section, and 420 mm in length. The initial notch

  15. The Impact of the Applied Exchange Rate Regimes on the Internal Balance of Transition Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujanić Vlado

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the key goals of the economic policy makers of every country is to achieve internal and external balance. An unavoidable segment of the analysis concerning the achievement of internal and external balance is certainly the influence of the exchange rate regime applied in a country. European transition countries, despite their similar initial problems and final objectives, applied different exchange rate regimes adapted to the economic circumstances and needs of the country. The paper aims to examine and demonstrate the impact of the applied exchange rate regime on the internal balance of the transition countries. The research encompasses 10 representative transition countries, in the period from 2000-2014. The results of the research, from the aspect of internal balance, confirmed the justification of the application of the floating exchange rate regime in more developed, but not in less-developed, European transition countries. The application of floating exchange rate regimes in less-developed transition countries is associated with a considerably higher average inflation rate, which may be explained by the higher import dependence of lessdeveloped countries and by the consequent transfer of depreciation to price growth.

  16. 0(gs)+ -->2(1)+ transition strengths in 106Sn and 108Sn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, A; Cederkäll, J; Fahlander, C; Hjorth-Jensen, M; Ames, F; Butler, P A; Davinson, T; Eberth, J; Fincke, F; Görgen, A; Górska, M; Habs, D; Hurst, A M; Huyse, M; Ivanov, O; Iwanicki, J; Kester, O; Köster, U; Marsh, B A; Mierzejewski, J; Reiter, P; Scheit, H; Schwalm, D; Siem, S; Sletten, G; Stefanescu, I; Tveten, G M; Van de Walle, J; Van Duppen, P; Voulot, D; Warr, N; Weisshaar, D; Wenander, F; Zielińska, M

    2008-07-04

    The reduced transition probabilities, B(E2; 0(gs)+ -->2(1)+), have been measured in the radioactive isotopes (108,106)Sn using subbarrier Coulomb excitation at the REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN. Deexcitation gamma rays were detected by the highly segmented MINIBALL Ge-detector array. The results, B(E2;0(gs)+ -->2(1)+)=0.222(19)e2b2 for 108Sn and B(E2; 0(gs)+-->2(1)+)=0.195(39)e2b2 for 106Sn were determined relative to a stable 58Ni target. The resulting B(E2) values are approximately 30% larger than shell-model predictions and deviate from the generalized seniority model. This experimental result may point towards a weakening of the N=Z=50 shell closure.

  17. Atomistic simulation of ideal shear strength, point defects, and screw dislocations in bcc transition metals: Mo as a prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, W.; Moriarty, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Using multi-ion interatomic potentials derived from first-principles generalized pseudopotential theory, we have studied ideal shear strength, point defects, and screw dislocations in the prototype bcc transition metal molybdenum (Mo). Many-body angular forces, which are important to the structural and mechanical properties of such central transition metals with partially filled d bands, are accounted for in the present theory through explicit three- and four-ion potentials. For the ideal shear strength of Mo, our computed results agree well with those predicted by full electronic-structure calculations. For point defects in Mo, our calculated vacancy-formation and activation energies are in excellent agreement with experimental results. The energetics of six self-interstitial configurations have also been investigated. The left-angle 110 right-angle split dumbbell interstitial is found to have the lowest formation energy, in agreement with the configuration found by x-ray diffuse scattering measurements. In ascending order, the sequence of energetically stable interstitials is predicted to be left-angle 110 right-angle split dumbbell, crowdion, left-angle 111 right-angle split dumbbell, tetrahedral site, left-angle 001 right-angle split dumbbell, and octahedral site. In addition, the migration paths for the left-angle 110 right-angle dumbbell self-interstitial have been studied. The migration energies are found to be 3 endash 15 times higher than previous theoretical estimates obtained using simple radial-force Finnis-Sinclair potentials. Finally, the atomic structure and energetics of left-angle 111 right-angle screw dislocations in Mo have been investigated. We have found that the so-called open-quote open-quote easy close-quote close-quote core configuration has a lower formation energy than the open-quote open-quote hard close-quote close-quote one, consistent with previous theoretical studies. (Abstract Truncated)

  18. Determination of hyperfine-induced transition rates from observations of a planetary nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brage, Tomas; Judge, Philip G; Proffitt, Charles R

    2002-12-31

    Observations of the planetary nebula NGC3918 made with the STIS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope reveal the first unambiguous detection of a hyperfine-induced transition 2s2p 3P(o)(0)-->2s2 1S0 in the berylliumlike emission line spectrum of N IV at 1487.89 A. A nebular model allows us to confirm a transition rate of 4x10(-4) sec(-1)+/-33% for this line. The measurement represents the first independent confirmation of the transition rate of hyperfine-induced lines in low ionization stages, and it provides support for the techniques used to compute these transitions for the determination of very low densities and isotope ratios.

  19. Ultrasonic inspection of the strength member weld of transit and pioneer heat sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudley, W.A.

    1975-01-01

    A nondestructive technique was developed which allows ultrasonic inspection of the closure weld for the strength member component in plutonium-238 radioisotopic heat sources. The advantage of the ultrasonic approach, over that of the more commonly used radiographic one, is the recognized superiority of ultrasonic testing for identifying lack-of-weld penetration (LOP) when accompanied by incomplete diffusion bonding. The ultrasonic technique, a transverse mode scan of the weld for detection of LOP, is primarily accomplished by use of a holding fixture which permits the vented heat source to be immersed into an inspection tank. The mechanical portion of the scanning system is a lathe modified with an inspection tank and a manipulator. This scanning system has been used in the past to inspect SNAP-27 heat sources. The analyzer-transducer combination used in the inspection is capable of detecting a channel type flaw with a side wall depth of 0.076 mm (0.003 in.) in a weld standard. (U.S.)

  20. The adverse effect of real effective exchange rate change on trade balance in European transition countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selena Begović

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Most European transition countries have fixed or highly managed flexible exchange rate regimes. This exchange rate rigidity is sometimes argued to worsen the trade balance by keeping the currency overvalued. However, there is no unambiguous evidence that currency depreciation/devaluation positively affects trade balance and leads towards the adjustment, even in the short-run. Therefore, we examine the effect of real effective exchange rate (hereafter REER on trade balance in European transition economies over the period 2000-2015. By using fixed effect model for static and generalised method of moments for dynamic estimation, we find that there is an adverse effect of the REER on trade balance in European transition countries over the period 2000-2015. Namely, depreciation of REER deteriorates trade balance in European transition countries, which could be explained by high import dependence and low export capacity. This implies that policymakers in European transition countries should not use exchange rate policy to improve trade balance. This is important in the light of their accession towards European economic and monetary integration, implying that these countries should focus more on using fiscal, rather than monetary (and exchange rate, policy to adjust trade balance, which is one of the required real convergence towards the EU standards.

  1. The numerical evaluation on non-radiative multiphonon transition rate from different electronic bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Bangfen.

    1985-10-01

    A numerical calculation on the non-radiative multiphonon transition probability based on the adiabatic approximation (AA) and the static approximation (SA) has been accomplished in a model of two electronic levels coupled to one phonon mode. The numerical results indicate that the spectra based on different approximations are generally different apart from those vibrational levels which are far below the classical crossing point. For large electron-phonon coupling constant, the calculated transition rates based on AA are more reliable; on the other hand, for small transition coupling the transition rates near or beyond the cross region are quite different for two approximations. In addition to the diagonal non-adiabatic potential, the mixing and splitting of the original static potential sheets are responsible for the deviation of the transition rates based on different approximations. The relationship between the transition matrix element and the vibrational level shift, the Huang-Rhys factor, the separation of the electronic levels and the electron-phonon coupling is analysed and discussed. (author)

  2. Biasing transition rate method based on direct MC simulation for probabilistic safety assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Lei Pan; Jia-Qun Wang; Run Yuan; Fang Wang; Han-Qing Lin; Li-Qin Hu; Jin Wang

    2017-01-01

    Direct Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is a powerful probabilistic safety assessment method for accounting dynamics of the system.But it is not efficient at simulating rare events.A biasing transition rate method based on direct MC simulation is proposed to solve the problem in this paper.This method biases transition rates of the components by adding virtual components to them in series to increase the occurrence probability of the rare event,hence the decrease in the variance of MC estimator.Several cases are used to benchmark this method.The results show that the method is effective at modeling system failure and is more efficient at collecting evidence of rare events than the direct MC simulation.The performance is greatly improved by the biasing transition rate method.

  3. Energy landscape, structure and rate effects on strength properties of alpha-helical proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertaud, Jeremie; Hester, Joshua; Jimenez, Daniel D; Buehler, Markus J

    2010-01-01

    The strength of protein domains is crucial to identify the mechanical role of protein domains in biological processes such as mechanotransduction, tissue mechanics and tissue remodeling. Whereas the concept of strength has been widely investigated for engineered materials, the strength of fundamental protein material building blocks and how it depends on structural parameters such as the chemical bonding, the protein filament length and the timescale of observation or deformation velocity remains poorly understood. Here we report a systematic analysis of the influence of key parameters that define the energy landscape of the strength properties of alpha-helical protein domains, including energy barriers, unfolding and refolding distances, the locations of folded and unfolded states, as well as variations of the length and pulling velocity of alpha-helical protein filaments. The analysis is facilitated by the development of a double-well mesoscale potential formulation, utilized here to carry out a systematic numerical analysis of the behavior of alpha-helices. We compare the results against widely used protein strength models based on the Bell model, one of the simplest models used to characterize the strength of protein filaments. We find that, whereas Bell-type models are a reasonable approximation to describe the rupture of alpha-helical protein domains for a certain range of pulling speeds and values of energy barriers, the model ceases to hold for very large energy barriers and for very small pulling speeds, in agreement with earlier findings. We conclude with an application of our mesoscale model to investigate the effect of the length of alpha-helices on their mechanical strength. We find a weakening effect as the length of alpha-helical proteins increases, followed by an asymptotic regime in which the strength remains constant. We compare strand lengths found in biological proteins with the scaling law of strength versus alpha-helix filament length. The

  4. Effect of test temperature and strain rate on the tensile properties of high-strength, high-conductivity copper alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The unirradiated tensile properties of wrought GlidCop AL25 (ITER grade zero, IGO) solutionized and aged CuCrZr, and cold-worked and aged and solutionized and aged Hycon 3HP{trademark} CuNiBe have been measured over the temperature range of 20-500{degrees}C at strain rates between 4 x 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1} and 0.06 s{sup {minus}1}. The measured room temperature electrical conductivity ranged from 64 to 90% IACS for the different alloys. All of the alloys were relatively insensitive to strain rate at room temperature, but the strain rate sensitivity of GlidCop Al25 increased significantly with increasing temperature. The CuNiBe alloys exhibited the best combination of high strength and high conductivity at room temperature. The strength of CuNiBe decreased slowly with increasing temperature. However, the ductility of CuNiBe decreased rapidly with increasing temperature due to localized deformation near grain boundaries, making these alloy heats unsuitable for typical structural applications above 300{degrees}C. The strength and uniform elongation of GlidCop Al25 decreased significantly with increasing temperature at a strain rate of 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1}, whereas the total elongation was independent of test temperature. The strength and ductility of CuCrZr decreased slowly with increasing temperature.

  5. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Songjie; Zhang Zuogui; Akiyama, Eiji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki; Zhang Boping

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  6. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Songjie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China); Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Zuogui [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Akiyama, Eiji [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: AKIYAMA.Eiji@nims.go.jp; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Boping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  7. Loading rate effects on strength and fracture toughness of pipe steels used in Task 1 of the IPIRG program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschall, C.W.; Landow, M.P.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1993-10-01

    Material characterization tests were conducted on laboratory specimens machined from pipes to determine the effect of dynamic loading (i.e., rates comparable to those for high amplitude seismic events) on tensile properties and fracture resistance at 288 C (550 F). Specimens were fabricated from seven different pipes, including carbon steels and stainless steels (both base metal and weld metal), which were to be subjected to full-scale pipe tests in IPIRG Task 1.0. For the stainless steels tested at 288 C (550 F), tensile strength was unchanged, while yield strength and fracture resistance were increased. The increase in fracture resistance was modest for the wrought base metals and substantial for the weld metal and the cast base metal. The carbon steels tested were sensitive to dynamic strain aging, and hence the strength and toughness was affected by both temperature and strain rate effects. The carbon steel base metal and welds exhibited ultimate tensile strength values at 288 C (550 F) that were greater than at room temperature. Furthermore, the ultimate tensile strength at 288 C (550 F) was lowered significantly by increased strain rate and, in the carbon steel base metals, increased strain rate also lowered the fracture resistance, substantially in the base metal of one pipe. In comparing these results to the IPIRG pipe test results to date, it was found that the trends of these tests agree well with the Subtask 1.2 quasi-static and dynamic pipe fracture experiments. Loads measured in the Subtask 1.1 pipe experiments were, however, somewhat higher than would have been expected by the trends observed in the laboratory tests

  8. Efficient Computation of Transition State Resonances and Reaction Rates from a Quantum Normal Form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, Roman; Waalkens, Holger; Wiggins, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    A quantum version of a recent formulation of transition state theory in phase space is presented. The theory developed provides an algorithm to compute quantum reaction rates and the associated Gamov-Siegert resonances with very high accuracy. The algorithm is especially efficient for

  9. Distorted wave approach to calculate Auger transition rates of ions in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutscher, Stefan A. E-mail: sad@utk.edu; Diez Muino, R.; Arnau, A.; Salin, A.; Zaremba, E

    2001-08-01

    We evaluate the role of target distortion in the determination of Auger transition rates for multicharged ions in metals. The required two electron matrix elements are calculated using numerical solutions of the Kohn-Sham equations for both the bound and continuum states. Comparisons with calculations performed using plane waves and hydrogenic orbitals are presented.

  10. The Multi-state Latent Factor Intensity Model for Credit Rating Transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, S.J.; Lucas, A.; Monteiro, A.

    2008-01-01

    A new empirical reduced-form model for credit rating transitions is introduced. It is a parametric intensity-based duration model with multiple states and driven by exogenous covariates and latent dynamic factors. The model has a generalized semi-Markov structure designed to accommodate many of the

  11. Beware of breaks in exchange rates: evidence from European transition countries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kočenda, Evžen

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 3 (2005), s. 307-324 ISSN 0939-3625 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : exchange rate regime * emerging and transition countries * central banks Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecosys.2005.02.006

  12. ScienceToGo.org: The Strengths and Weaknesses of Communicating Climate Change through Mass Transit Advertising Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Chen, R. F.; Wilson, R.; Rabkin, D.; Thompson, S. R.

    2016-02-01

    Engaging urban populations with climate change science is a difficult challenge since cities can seem so removed from the `natural environment.' However, mass transit provides an inherent means of communicating environmental messages with a cross section of the urban population. The Out of Home Media (OHM) spaces found on platforms and inside train cars provide a potentially effective means of bringing informal science learning opportunities directly to an underserved STEM audience. Our team felt that any messaging curriculum for a coastal urban subway system must complement the scary reality of the impacts of a changing climate (i.e. rising sea levels) with current examples of how the city is preparing for a more sustainable future. Urban areas such as Boston must develop adaptation and mitigation strategies that will help them not only survive, but thrive in a changing environment. In 2013-14, ScienceToGo.org ran a series of 12 engaging posters and placards staring `Ozzie the Ostrich' on the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority's Red and Orange subway lines targeting an audience of more than 400,000 riders per day. The 12 month curriculum was divided into three phases: reality, relevance, and hope. During the presentation, we will present the results of our quasi-experimental research which identifies, quantifies, and explains the observed impacts of the campaign on adult riders. The strengths and weaknesses of the communication strategy will be discussed. Finally, we will conclude with some recommendations for how this work could improve and inform other urban informal science learning initiatives.

  13. Dynamic strength of rock with single planar joint under various loading rates at various angles of loads applied

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yun Shu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Intact rock-like specimens and specimens that include a single, smooth planar joint at various angles are prepared for split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB testing. A buffer pad between the striker bar and the incident bar of an SHPB apparatus is used to absorb some of the shock energy. This can generate loading rates of 20.2–4627.3 GPa/s, enabling dynamic peak stresses/strengths and associated failure patterns of the specimens to be investigated. The effects of the loading rate and angle of load applied on the dynamic peak stresses/strengths of the specimens are examined. Relevant experimental results demonstrate that the failure pattern of each specimen can be classified as four types: Type A, integrated with or without tiny flake-off; Type B, slide failure; Type C, fracture failure; and Type D, crushing failure. The dynamic peak stresses/strengths of the specimens that have similar failure patterns increase linearly with the loading rate, yielding high correlations that are evident on semi-logarithmic plots. The slope of the failure envelope is the smallest for slide failure, followed by crushing failure, and that of fracture failure is the largest. The magnitude of the plot slope of the dynamic peak stress against the loading rate for the specimens that are still integrated after testing is between that of slide failure and crushing failure. The angle of application has a limited effect on the dynamic peak stresses/strengths of the specimens regardless of the failure pattern, but it affects the bounds of the loading rates that yield each failure pattern, and thus influences the dynamic responses of the single jointed specimen. Slide failure occurs at the lowest loading rate of any failure, but can only occur in single jointed specimen that allows sliding. Crushing failure is typically associated with the largest loading rate, and fracture failure may occur when the loading rate is between the boundaries for slide failure and crushing

  14. Effect of traditional resistance and power training using rated perceived exertion for enhancement of muscle strength, power, and functional performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiggemann, Carlos Leandro; Dias, Caroline Pieta; Radaelli, Regis; Massa, Jéssica Cassales; Bortoluzzi, Rafael; Schoenell, Maira Cristina Wolf; Noll, Matias; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2016-04-01

    The present study compared the effects of 12 weeks of traditional resistance training and power training using rated perceived exertion (RPE) to determine training intensity on improvements in strength, muscle power, and ability to perform functional task in older women. Thirty healthy elderly women (60-75 years) were randomly assigned to traditional resistance training group (TRT; n = 15) or power training group (PT; n = 15). Participants trained twice a week for 12 weeks using six exercises. The training protocol was designed to ascertain that participants exercised at an RPE of 13-18 (on a 6-20 scale). Maximal dynamic strength, muscle power, and functional performance of lower limb muscles were assessed. Maximal dynamic strength muscle strength leg press (≈58 %) and knee extension (≈20 %) increased significantly (p training. Muscle power also increased with training (≈27 %; p functional performance after training period (≈13 %; p effective in improving maximal strength, muscle power, and functional performance of lower limbs in elderly women.

  15. Time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy of Ag in the (1300-3600)-cm(-1) region: Transitions involving f and g states and oscillator strengths

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Matulková, Irena; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Kubelík, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2010), 022502 ISSN 1050-2947 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400705; GA AV ČR KAN100500652 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : spectroscopy * transitions * oscillator strengths Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; The oretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.861, year: 2010

  16. Strength and Absorption Rate of Compressed Stabilized Earth Bricks (CSEBs Due to Different Mixture Ratios and Degree of Compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Abd Halid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressed Stabilized Earth Brick (CSEB is produced by compressing a mixture of water with three main materials such as Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC, soil, and sand. It becomes popularfor its good strength, better insulation properties, and a sustainable product due to its easy production with low carbon emission and less skilled labour required. Different types of local soils usedwill produce CSEB of different physical properties in terms of its strength, durability, and water absorption rate. This study focuses on laterite soil taken from the surrounding local area in Parit Raja, Johor, and CSEB samples are produced based on prototype brick size 100×50×30 mm. The investigations are based on four different degree of compactions (i.e. 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 Psi and three different mix proportion ratios of cement:sand:laterite soil (i.e. 1:1:9, 1:2:8, 1:3:7. A total of 144 CSEB samples have been tested at 7 and 28 days curing periods to determine the compressive strength (BS 3921:1985 and water absorption rate (MS 76:1972. It was found that maximum compressive strength of CSEB was 14.68 N/mm2 for mixture ratio of 1:3:7 at 2500 Psi compaction. Whereas, the minimum strengthis 6.87 N/mm2 for 1:1:9mixture ratio at 1500 Psi. Meanwhile, the lowest water absorption was 12.35% for mixture ratio of 1:2:8 at 3000 Psi; while the 1:1:9 mixture ratio at 1500 Psi gave the highest rate of 16.81%. This study affirms that the sand content in the mixture and the degree of compaction would affect the value of compressive strength and water absorption of CSEB.

  17. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubitidze, Fridon; Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2-5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20-40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110-120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99-164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue.

  18. The Coupled Effect of Loading Rate and Grain Size on Tensile Strength of Sandstones under Dynamic Disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is of significance to comprehend the effects of rock microstructure on the tensile strength under different loading rates caused by mining disturbance. So, in this paper, three kinds of sandstones drilled from surrounding rocks in Xiao Jihan Coal to simulate the in situ stress state, whose average grain size is 30 μm (fine grain, FG, 105 μm (medium grain, MG, and 231 μm (Coarse grain, CG, are selected with the calculation of optical microscopic technique and moreover processed to Brazilian disc (BD to study the mechanical response of samples. The dynamic Brazilian tests of samples with three kinds of grain sizes are conducted with the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB driven by pendulum hammer, which can produce four different velocities (V=2.0 m/s, 2.5 m/s, 3.3 m/s, and 4.2 m/s when the incident bar is impacted by pendulum hammer. The incident wave produced by pendulum hammer is a slowly rising stress wave, which allows gradual stress accumulation in the specimen and maintains the load at both ends of the specimen in an equilibrium state. The results show that the dynamic strength of three kinds of BD samples represented loading rates dependence, and FG sandstones are more sensitive for loading rates than MG and CG samples. Moreover, the peak strength is observed to increase linearly with an increasing stress rates, and the relationship between the dynamic BD strength and stress rates can be built through a linear equation. Finally, the failure modes of different grain sizes are discussed and explained by microfailure mechanism.

  19. Lifetime measurements and dipole transition rates for superdeformed states in {sup 190}Hg.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amro, H.

    1999-03-24

    The Doppler-shift attenuation method was used to measure life-times of superdeformed (SD) states for both the yrast and the first excited superdeformed band of {sup 190}Hg. Intrinsic quadruple moments Q{sub 0} were extracted. For the first time, the dipole transition rates have been extracted for the inter-band transitions which connect the excited SD band to the yrast states in the second minimum. The results support the interpretation of the excited SD band as a rotational band built on an octupole vibration.

  20. Lifetime measurements and dipole transition rates for superdeformed states in 190Hg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amro, H.

    1999-01-01

    The Doppler-shift attenuation method was used to measure life-times of superdeformed (SD) states for both the yrast and the first excited superdeformed band of 190 Hg. Intrinsic quadruple moments Q 0 were extracted. For the first time, the dipole transition rates have been extracted for the inter-band transitions which connect the excited SD band to the yrast states in the second minimum. The results support the interpretation of the excited SD band as a rotational band built on an octupole vibration

  1. Configuration splitting and gamma-decay transition rates in the two-group shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isakov, V. I.

    2015-01-01

    Expressions for reduced gamma-decay transition rates were obtained on the basis of the twogroup configuration model for the case of transitions between particles belonging to identical groups of nucleons. In practical applications, the present treatment is the most appropriate for describing decays for odd–odd nuclei in the vicinity of magic nuclei or for nuclei where the corresponding subshells stand out in energy. Also, a simple approximation is applicable to describing configuration splitting in those cases. The present calculations were performed for nuclei whose mass numbers are close to A ∼ 90, including N = 51 odd—odd isotones

  2. Electron transfer by excited benzoquinone anions: slow rates for two-electron transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamadar, Matibur; Cook, Andrew R; Lewandowska-Andralojc, Anna; Holroyd, Richard; Jiang, Yan; Bikalis, Jin; Miller, John R

    2013-09-05

    Electron transfer (ET) rate constants from the lowest excited state of the radical anion of benzoquinone, BQ(-•)*, were measured in THF solution. Rate constants for bimolecular electron transfer reactions typically reach the diffusion-controlled limit when the free-energy change, ΔG°, reaches -0.3 eV. The rate constants for ET from BQ(-•)* are one-to-two decades smaller at this energy and do not reach the diffusion-controlled limit until -ΔG° is 1.5-2.0 eV. The rates are so slow probably because a second electron must also undergo a transition to make use of the energy of the excited state. Similarly, ET, from solvated electrons to neutral BQ to form the lowest excited state, is slow, while fast ET is observed at a higher excited state, which can be populated in a transition involving only one electron. A simple picture based on perturbation theory can roughly account for the control of electron transfer by the need for transition of a second electron. The picture also explains how extra driving force (-ΔG°) can restore fast rates of electron transfer.

  3. Relativistic many-body calculation of energies, transition rates, lifetimes, and multipole polarizabilities in Cs-like La iii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, M. S.

    2014-05-01

    Excitation energies of the [Xe]nd (n =5-9), [Xe]ns (n =6-10), [Xe]np (n =6-9), [Xe]nf (n =4-8), and [Xe]ng (n =5-8) states in La iii, where [Xe] = 1s22s22p63s23p63d104s24p64d105s25p6, are evaluated. Electric dipole matrix elements for the allowed transitions between the low-lying [Xe]nd, [Xe]ns, [Xe]np, [Xe]nf, and [Xe]ng states in the La iii ion are calculated using the high-precision relativistic all-order method where all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders of perturbation theory. Recommended values are provided for a large number of electric dipole matrix elements, oscillator strengths, transition rates, and lifetimes. Scalar and tensor polarizabilities of the states listed above are evaluated. The uncertainties of the recommended values are estimated. Electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole matrix elements are calculated to determine lifetimes of the 5d5/2 and 6s metastable levels. The ground-state E1, E2, and E3 static polarizabilities are calculated. This work provides recommended values critically evaluated for their accuracy for a number of La iii atomic properties for use in planning and analysis of various experiments as well as theoretical modeling.

  4. Hydration rate and strength development of low-heat type portland cement mortar mixed with pozzolanic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Jun

    1998-01-01

    Recently, low-heat type Portland cement was specified in Japan Industrial Standards (JIS). Its hydration proceeds slowly. The results of the research so far obtained indicate that slow hydration of cement and mixing of pozzolanic materials with cement make micro-structure of harded cement paste dense and durable. In this study, a blended cement using low-heat type Portland cement and some of pozzolanic materials has been newly developed and its strength property and hydration ratio were checked. The followings are conclusion. (1) Hydration rate of cement paste varies with the replacement ratio of pozzolanic materials. (2) A good liner relationship between strength and total hydration rate of cement paste was observed. (3) A proper replacement ratio of both base-cement and pozzolanic material for manufacturing a blended cement is 50%. (author)

  5. Gravity waves as a probe of the Hubble expansion rate during an electroweak scale phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Zhou Peng

    2010-01-01

    Just as big bang nucleosynthesis allows us to probe the expansion rate when the temperature of the Universe was around 1 MeV, the measurement of gravity waves from electroweak scale first order phase transitions may allow us to probe the expansion rate when the temperature of the Universe was at the electroweak scale. We compute the simple transformation rule for the gravity wave spectrum under the scaling transformation of the Hubble expansion rate. We then apply this directly to the scenario of quintessence kination domination and show how gravity wave spectra would shift relative to Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and Big Bang Observer projected sensitivities.

  6. Assessment of isometric muscle strength and rate of torque development with hand-held dynamometry: Test-retest reliability and relationship with gait velocity after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentiplay, Benjamin F; Tan, Dawn; Williams, Gavin; Adair, Brooke; Pua, Yong-Hao; Bower, Kelly J; Clark, Ross A

    2018-04-27

    Isometric rate of torque development examines how quickly force can be exerted and may resemble everyday task demands more closely than isometric strength. Rate of torque development may provide further insight into the relationship between muscle function and gait following stroke. Aims of this study were to examine the test-retest reliability of hand-held dynamometry to measure isometric rate of torque development following stroke, to examine associations between strength and rate of torque development, and to compare the relationships of strength and rate of torque development to gait velocity. Sixty-three post-stroke adults participated (60 years, 34 male). Gait velocity was assessed using the fast-paced 10 m walk test. Isometric strength and rate of torque development of seven lower-limb muscle groups were assessed with hand-held dynamometry. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated for reliability and Spearman's rho correlations were calculated for associations. Regression analyses using partial F-tests were used to compare strength and rate of torque development in their relationship with gait velocity. Good to excellent reliability was shown for strength and rate of torque development (0.82-0.97). Strong associations were found between strength and rate of torque development (0.71-0.94). Despite high correlations between strength and rate of torque development, rate of torque development failed to provide significant value to regression models that already contained strength. Assessment of isometric rate of torque development with hand-held dynamometry is reliable following stroke, however isometric strength demonstrated greater relationships with gait velocity. Further research should examine the relationship between dynamic measures of muscle strength/torque and gait after stroke. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Investigation of char strength and expansion properties of an intumescent coating exposed to rapid heating rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Kristian Petersen; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Català, Pere

    2013-01-01

    , char properties, measured at room temperature, were dependent on the preceding storage conditions (in air or in a desiccator). The char was found to have the highest mechanical strength against compression in the outer crust facing the heat source. For thin (147μm) free coating films, a tendency...... with respect to the mechanical resistance against compression, degree of expansion, and residual mass fraction. Experimental results show that when using this type of shock heating, the mechanical resistance of the char against compression cannot meaningfully be correlated to the expansion factor. In addition...

  8. Estimation of the transit dose component in high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Romero, A.; Millan Cebrian, E.; Lozano Flores, F.J.; Lope Lope, R.; Canellas Anoz, M.

    2001-01-01

    Current high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) treatment planning systems usually calculate dose only from source stopping positions (stationary component), but fails to account for the administered dose when the source is moving (dynamic component or transit dose). Numerical values of this transit dose depends upon the source velocity, implant geometry, source activity and prescribed dose. In some HDR treatments using particular geometry the transit dose cannot be ignored because it increases the dose at the prescriptions points and also could increase potential late tissue complications as predicted by the linear quadratic model. International protocols recommend to verify this parameter. The aim of this paper has been to establish a procedure for the transit dose calculation for the Gammamed 12i equipment at the RT Department in the Clinical University Hospital (Zaragoza-Spain). A numeric algorithm was implemented based on a dynamic point approximation for the moving HDR source and the calculated results for the entrance-exit transit dose was compared with TLD measurements made in some discrete points. (author) [es

  9. Deducing the kinetics of protein synthesis in vivo from the transition rates measured in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Rudorf

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The molecular machinery of life relies on complex multistep processes that involve numerous individual transitions, such as molecular association and dissociation steps, chemical reactions, and mechanical movements. The corresponding transition rates can be typically measured in vitro but not in vivo. Here, we develop a general method to deduce the in-vivo rates from their in-vitro values. The method has two basic components. First, we introduce the kinetic distance, a new concept by which we can quantitatively compare the kinetics of a multistep process in different environments. The kinetic distance depends logarithmically on the transition rates and can be interpreted in terms of the underlying free energy barriers. Second, we minimize the kinetic distance between the in-vitro and the in-vivo process, imposing the constraint that the deduced rates reproduce a known global property such as the overall in-vivo speed. In order to demonstrate the predictive power of our method, we apply it to protein synthesis by ribosomes, a key process of gene expression. We describe the latter process by a codon-specific Markov model with three reaction pathways, corresponding to the initial binding of cognate, near-cognate, and non-cognate tRNA, for which we determine all individual transition rates in vitro. We then predict the in-vivo rates by the constrained minimization procedure and validate these rates by three independent sets of in-vivo data, obtained for codon-dependent translation speeds, codon-specific translation dynamics, and missense error frequencies. In all cases, we find good agreement between theory and experiment without adjusting any fit parameter. The deduced in-vivo rates lead to smaller error frequencies than the known in-vitro rates, primarily by an improved initial selection of tRNA. The method introduced here is relatively simple from a computational point of view and can be applied to any biomolecular process, for which we have

  10. Decline in measured glomerular filtration rate is associated with a decrease in endurance, strength, balance and fine motor skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellberg, Matthias; Höglund, Peter; Svensson, Philippa; Abdulahi, Huda; Clyne, Naomi

    2017-07-01

    Physical performance in chronic kidney disease affects morbidity and mortality. The aim was to find out which measures of physical performance are important in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and if there are associations with declining measured glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Endurance was assessed by 6 min walk test (6-MWT) and stair climbing, muscular endurance by 30 s sit to stand, heel rises and toe lifts, strength by quadriceps- and handgrip-strength, balance by functional reach and Berg's balance scale, and fine motor skills by Moberg's picking-up test. GFR was measured by Iohexol clearance. The study comprised 101 patients with CKD 3b-5 not started dialysis, 40 women and 61 men, with a mean age of 67 ± 13 (range: 22 - 87) years. All measures of physical performance were impaired. A decrease in GFR of 10 mL/min per 1.73 m 2 corresponded to a 35 metre shorter walking distance in the 6-MWT. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed significant relationships between decline in GFR and the 6-MWT (P = 0.04), isometric quadriceps strength left (P = 0.04), balance measured as functional reach (P = 0.02) and fine motor skills in the left hand as measured by Moberg's picking-up test (P = 0.01), respectively, after sex, age, comorbidity and the interaction between sex and age had been taken into account. Endurance, muscular endurance, strength, balance and fine motor skills were impaired in patients with CKD 3b-5. Walking capacity, isometric quadriceps strength, balance, and fine motor skills were associated with declining GFR. The left extremities were more susceptible to GFR, ageing and comorbidities and seem thus to be more sensitive. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  11. Evaluation of bond strength and load deflection rate of multi-stranded fixed retainer wires: An In-Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Sarah Samson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fixed orthodontic retainers must be well retained on the tooth surfaces, allow physiologic movement of teeth and exert minimal forces on the teeth to be retained. Previous studies analyzed the bond strength and amount of deflection caused due to the debonding force but not the magnitude of force needed for unit deformation. Aims: This study aims to evaluate and compare the bond strength and load deflection rate (LDR of three different fixed retainer wires. Materials and Methods: The wires were divided into three Groups: A – three-stranded twisted ligature wire, B – Bond-A-Braid (Reliance Orthodontics, and C – three-stranded twisted lingual retainer wire (3M Unitek. Twenty models were prepared for each group with a passive 15 mm long lingual retainer wire bonded to two lower incisors. An occlusogingival force was applied to the wire until it debonded. For LDR, three-point bending test was done at 0.5 mm deflection. These forces were measured using a Universal Instron Testing Machine. Statistical Analysis: Mean bond strength/LDR and pairwise comparisons were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey's honest significant difference post hoc test, respectively. Results: Group C exhibited the highest mean bond strength and LDR of 101.17N and 1.84N, respectively. The intergroup comparisons were all statistically significant. Conclusion: Compared to the other two wire types, Group C might be better retained on the teeth due to its higher bond strength. With its relatively higher LDR value, it may resist deformation from occlusal forces, thereby reducing inadvertent tooth movement and yet remain flexible enough to allow physiologic tooth movements.

  12. Cost-related model for transit rates in electric power distribution networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collstrand, F.

    1994-02-01

    The planned deregulation of the swedish electrical power market will require a new structure of the electrical energy rates. In this report different models of transit rates are studied. The report includes studies of literature and a proposal to a rate structure and is made specifically for Malmoe Energi AB. The differences between various methods of calculating the transfer cost are illustrated. Further, the build-up of the tariff structure and its base elements are discussed. The costs are divided on different categories of costumers and shows the cost for each customer. The new regulations should apply simultaneously to all networks, independent of the voltage level. The transit cost should be based on a number of basic elements: capital cost, operation and maintenance, losses, measuring and administration. Capital cost and operation and maintenance should be charged as power fees, the loss cost as an energy fee and the measuring and administration cost as a fixed fee. The customer bill should be split into two parts, one for the transit cost and one for the energy usage. 15 refs., 37 tabs., 6 figs

  13. The calculation of oscillator strengths for the 5s21S0→5s5p1,3P1 transitions in Cd-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guangyuan

    1998-01-01

    The screened hydrogenic model is employed to calculate the oscillator strength of the 5s 2 1 S 0 -5s5p 1 P 1 resonance transition in Cd-like ions (Z = 48 -74). The expression for the oscillator strength of the 5s 2 1 S 0 -5s5p 3 P1 is given, with the introduction of the correctional coefficient K and the mixing angle in jj-coupling. The results are compared with that of other authors, and some discussions are also given

  14. MgH Rydberg series: Transition energies from electron propagator theory and oscillator strengths from the molecular quantum defect orbital method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corzo, H. H.; Velasco, A. M.; Lavín, C.; Ortiz, J. V.

    2018-02-01

    Vertical excitation energies belonging to several Rydberg series of MgH have been inferred from 3+ electron-propagator calculations of the electron affinities of MgH+ and are in close agreement with experiment. Many electronically excited states with n > 3 are reported for the first time and new insight is given on the assignment of several Rydberg series. Valence and Rydberg excited states of MgH are distinguished respectively by high and low pole strengths corresponding to Dyson orbitals of electron attachment to the cation. By applying the Molecular Quantum Defect Orbital method, oscillator strengths for electronic transitions involving Rydberg states also have been determined.

  15. A study on the strength of an armour-grade aluminum under high strain-rate loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Hazell, P. J.

    2010-06-01

    The aluminum alloy 5083 in tempers such as H32 and H131 is an established light-weight armour material. While its dynamic response under high strain-rates has been investigated elsewhere, little account of the effect of material orientation has been made. In addition, little information on its strength under such loadings is available in the literature. Here, both the longitudinal and lateral components of stress have been measured using embedded manganin stress gauges during plate-impact experiments on samples with the rolling direction aligned both orthogonal and parallel to the impact axis. The Hugoniot elastic limit, spall, and shear strengths were investigated for incident pressures in the range 1-8 GPa, providing an insight into the response of this alloy under shock loading. Further, the time dependence of lateral stress behind the shock front was investigated to give an indication of material response.

  16. Method to increase the transition temperature and for the critical magnetic field strength of the known intermetallic compounds of vanadium or niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, H.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a method to raise the transition temperature and critical magnetic field strength of superconducting, intermetallic compounds of vanadium and niobium. For example, a niobium alloy with 4 wt.% Al in melted in vacuum electric arc and formed into a sheet of about 1 mm thick. Strips of this sheet are electrically heated up to 1,900 0 C for one hour in a high-vacuum oven. The strips are then annealed in evacuated quartz ampoules for 120 hours at 800 0 C. These strips have a transition temperature of 24 K and a critical magnetic field strength of 600 kg; the critical current density was 5 x 10 4 A/cm 2 . (HPOE) [de

  17. Influence of cooling rate on the precipitation microstructure in a medium strength Al-Zn-Mg alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschamps, A. [SIMAP, INPGrenoble-CNRS-UJF BP 75, 38402 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France)], E-mail: alexis.deschamps@simap.grenoble-inp.fr; Texier, G.; Ringeval, S. [CEA-DAM centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-Sur-Tille (France); SIMAP, INPGrenoble-CNRS-UJF BP 75, 38402 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Delfaut-Durut, L. [CEA-DAM centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-Sur-Tille (France)

    2009-02-15

    Medium strength Al-Zn-Mg age hardening alloys are widely used when a low quench sensitivity is required, such as in welding applications. In this work we present a detailed characterization of the precipitate microstructures resulting from different quench rates from the solution treatment, and from the subsequent artificial ageing to the T6 state, in an Al-4.5Zn-1Mg (wt%) alloy. This work is carried out using differential scanning calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy and in situ small-angle X-ray scattering. It is shown that for quench rate between 5 and 200 deg. C/min substantial heterogeneous precipitation is observed, nucleated on dispersoids and on grain boundaries, the former being of much larger size than the latter. During subsequent ageing, it is shown that the precipitation kinetics in the material unaffected by the quench-induced precipitates is independent on the quench rate used.

  18. Energy levels, radiative rates, and lifetimes for transitions in W XL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, Francis P.

    2014-01-01

    Energy levels and radiative rates are reported for transitions in Br-like tungsten, W XL, calculated with the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package (GRASP). Configuration interaction (CI) has been included among 46 configurations (generating 4215 levels) over a wide energy range up to 213 Ryd. However, for conciseness results are only listed for the lowest 360 levels (with energies up to ∼43 Ryd), which mainly belong to the 4s 2 4p 5 ,4s 2 4p 4 4d,4s 2 4p 4 4f,4s4p 6 ,4p 6 4d,4s4p 5 4d,4s 2 4p 3 4d 2 , and 4s 2 4p 3 4d4f configurations, and provided for four types of transitions, E1, E2, M1, and M2. Comparisons are made with existing (but limited) results. However, to fully assess the accuracy of our data, analogous calculations have been performed with the flexible atomic code, including an even larger CI than in GRASP. Our energy levels are estimated to be accurate to better than 0.02 Ryd, whereas results for radiative rates (and lifetimes) should be accurate to better than 20% for a majority of the strong transitions

  19. Ultra-high-rate pseudocapacitive energy storage in two-dimensional transition metal carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Kota, Sankalp; Lin, Zifeng; Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Shpigel, Netanel; Levi, Mikhael D.; Halim, Joseph; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Barsoum, Michel W.; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2017-08-01

    The use of fast surface redox storage (pseudocapacitive) mechanisms can enable devices that store much more energy than electrical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) and, unlike batteries, can do so quite rapidly. Yet, few pseudocapacitive transition metal oxides can provide a high power capability due to their low intrinsic electronic and ionic conductivity. Here we demonstrate that two-dimensional transition metal carbides (MXenes) can operate at rates exceeding those of conventional EDLCs, but still provide higher volumetric and areal capacitance than carbon, electrically conducting polymers or transition metal oxides. We applied two distinct designs for MXene electrode architectures with improved ion accessibility to redox-active sites. A macroporous Ti3C2Tx MXene film delivered up to 210 F g-1 at scan rates of 10 V s-1, surpassing the best carbon supercapacitors known. In contrast, we show that MXene hydrogels are able to deliver volumetric capacitance of ˜1,500 F cm-3 reaching the previously unmatched volumetric performance of RuO2.

  20. Ultra-high-rate pseudocapacitive energy storage in two-dimensional transition metal carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukatskaya, Maria R. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Stanford, CA (United States); Kota, Sankalp [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lin, Zifeng [Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Reseau sur le Stockage Electrochimique de l' Energie (RS2E) (France); Zhao, Meng -Qiang [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shpigel, Netanel [Bar-Ilan Univ., Ramat-Gan (Israel); Levi, Mikhael D. [Bar-Ilan Univ., Ramat-Gan (Israel); Halim, Joseph [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Taberna, Pierre -Louis [Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Reseau sur le Stockage Electrochimique de l' Energie (RS2E) (France); Barsoum, Michel W. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Simon, Patrice [Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Reseau sur le Stockage Electrochimique de l' Energie (RS2E) (France); Gogotsi, Yury G. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-07-10

    In this study, the use of fast surface redox storage (pseudocapacitive) mechanisms can enable devices that store much more energy than electrical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) and, unlike batteries, can do so quite rapidly. Yet, few pseudocapacitive transition metal oxides can provide a high power capability due to their low intrinsic electronic and ionic conductivity. Here we demonstrate that two-dimensional transition metal carbides (MXenes) can operate at rates exceeding those of conventional EDLCs, but still provide higher volumetric and areal capacitance than carbon, electrically conducting polymers or transition metal oxides. We applied two distinct designs for MXene electrode architectures with improved ion accessibility to redox-active sites. A macroporous Ti3C2Tx MXene film delivered up to 210 F g–1 at scan rates of 10 V s–1, surpassing the best carbon supercapacitors known. In contrast, we show that MXene hydrogels are able to deliver volumetric capacitance of ~1,500 F cm–3 reaching the previously unmatched volumetric performance of RuO2.

  1. Transitions in genetic toggle switches driven by dynamic disorder in rate coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hang; Thill, Peter; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-01-01

    In biochemical systems, intrinsic noise may drive the system switch from one stable state to another. We investigate how kinetic switching between stable states in a bistable network is influenced by dynamic disorder, i.e., fluctuations in the rate coefficients. Using the geometric minimum action method, we first investigate the optimal transition paths and the corresponding minimum actions based on a genetic toggle switch model in which reaction coefficients draw from a discrete probability distribution. For the continuous probability distribution of the rate coefficient, we then consider two models of dynamic disorder in which reaction coefficients undergo different stochastic processes with the same stationary distribution. In one, the kinetic parameters follow a discrete Markov process and in the other they follow continuous Langevin dynamics. We find that regulation of the parameters modulating the dynamic disorder, as has been demonstrated to occur through allosteric control in bistable networks in the immune system, can be crucial in shaping the statistics of optimal transition paths, transition probabilities, and the stationary probability distribution of the network.

  2. Transitions in genetic toggle switches driven by dynamic disorder in rate coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hang, E-mail: hangchen@mit.edu; Thill, Peter; Cao, Jianshu [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-05-07

    In biochemical systems, intrinsic noise may drive the system switch from one stable state to another. We investigate how kinetic switching between stable states in a bistable network is influenced by dynamic disorder, i.e., fluctuations in the rate coefficients. Using the geometric minimum action method, we first investigate the optimal transition paths and the corresponding minimum actions based on a genetic toggle switch model in which reaction coefficients draw from a discrete probability distribution. For the continuous probability distribution of the rate coefficient, we then consider two models of dynamic disorder in which reaction coefficients undergo different stochastic processes with the same stationary distribution. In one, the kinetic parameters follow a discrete Markov process and in the other they follow continuous Langevin dynamics. We find that regulation of the parameters modulating the dynamic disorder, as has been demonstrated to occur through allosteric control in bistable networks in the immune system, can be crucial in shaping the statistics of optimal transition paths, transition probabilities, and the stationary probability distribution of the network.

  3. The unusual strength of the 5.14→1.27MeV, 2-→2+ transition in 22Ne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merdinger, J.C.; Bozek, E.; Gehringer, C.; Stachura, Z.

    1975-01-01

    The lifetime of the 5.14MeV excited state of 22 Ne was investigated by use of the electronic timing, recoil distance and Doppler shift attenuation techniques. A mean life tau=1.2+-0.3ps was obtained, corresponding to a transition strength of 9.8x10 -6 W.u. for the E1 decay of this state [fr

  4. Evaluation of Relationships between Drilling Rate Index and Physical and Strength Properties of Selected Rock Units of Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafique, U.; Abu Bakar, M. Z.

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen selected rock types collected from different formations of Pakistan were subjected to Drilling Rate Index (DRI) tests and various physical and strength properties tests including, porosity (n), density, primary wave velocity (V/sub p/), uniaxial compressive strength (sigma/sub c/), Brazilian tensile strength (sigma/sub t/) and Schmidt hammer rebound number (R/sub n/),. Prior knowledge of the drill ability of rocks and their physico-mechanical properties plays a decisive role in planning and design of rock drilling and excavation processes. DRI tests developed by NTNU/SINTEF are in use by the industry since 1960s and have proved very successful in estimation of the boreability of rocks, but no such work has been reported for Pakistani rocks to date. Reasonable correlations were found between the DRI and the properties of the tested rocks. The trends shown in this paper are of interest for the machine manufacturers and operators working on various projects involving the use of drilling machines and other mechanical excavators. (author)

  5. Weighted f-values, A-values, and line strengths for the E1 transitions among 3d6, 3d54s, and 3d54p levels of Fe III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, Narayan C.; Hibbert, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Weighted oscillator strengths, weighted radiative rates, and line strengths for all the E1 transitions between 285 fine-structure levels belonging to the 3d 6 , 3d 5 4s, and 3d 5 4p configurations of Fe III are presented, in ascending order of wavelength. Calculations have been undertaken using the general configuration interaction (CI) code CIV3. The large configuration set is constructed by allowing single and double replacements from any of 3d 6 , 3d 5 4s, 3d 5 4p, and 3d 5 4d configurations to nl orbitals with n≤5,l≤3 as well as 6p. Additional selective promotions from 3s and 3p subshells are also included in the CI expansions to incorporate the important correlation effects in the n=3 shell. Results of some strong transitions between levels of 3d 6 , 3d 5 4s, and 3d 5 4p configurations are also presented and compared with other available calculations. It is found that large disagreements occur in many transitions among the existing calculations

  6. High strength semi-active energy absorbers using shear- and mixedmode operation at high shear rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becnel, Andrew C.

    This body of research expands the design space of semi-active energy absorbers for shock isolation and crash safety by investigating and characterizing magnetorheological fluids (MRFs) at high shear rates ( > 25,000 1/s) under shear and mixed-mode operation. Magnetorheological energy absorbers (MREAs) work well as adaptive isolators due to their ability to quickly and controllably adjust to changes in system mass or impact speed while providing fail-safe operation. However, typical linear stroking MREAs using pressure-driven flows have been shown to exhibit reduced controllability as impact speed (shear rate) increases. The objective of this work is to develop MREAs that improve controllability at high shear rates by using pure shear and mixed shear-squeeze modes of operation, and to present the fundamental theory and models of MR fluids under these conditions. A proof of concept instrument verified that the MR effect persists in shear mode devices at shear rates corresponding to low speed impacts. This instrument, a concentric cylinder Searle cell magnetorheometer, was then used to characterize three commercially available MRFs across a wide range of shear rates, applied magnetic fields, and temperatures. Characterization results are presented both as flow curves according to established practice, and as an alternate nondimensionalized analysis based on Mason number. The Mason number plots show that, with appropriate correction coefficients for operating temperature, the varied flow curve data can be collapsed to a single master curve. This work represents the first shear mode characterization of MRFs at shear rates over 10 times greater than available with commercial rheometers, as well as the first validation of Mason number analysis to high shear rate flows in MRFs. Using the results from the magnetorheometer, a full scale rotary vane MREA was developed as part of the Lightweight Magnetorheological Energy Absorber System (LMEAS) for an SH-60 Seahawk helicopter

  7. Flow-rate measurement using radioactive tracers and transit time method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turtiainen, Heikki

    1986-08-01

    The transit time method is a flow measurement method based on tracer techniques. Measurement is done by injecting to the flow a pulse of tracer and measuring its transit time between two detection positions. From the transit time the mean flow velosity and - using the pipe cross section area - the volume flow rate can be calculated. When a radioisotope tracer is used the measurement can be done from outside the pipe and without disturbing the process (excluding the tracer injection). The use of the transit time method has been limited because of difficulties associated with handling and availability of radioactive tracers and lack of equipment suitable for routine use in industrial environments. The purpose of this study was to find out if these difficulties may be overcome by using a portable isotope generator as a tracer source and automating the measurement. In the study a test rig and measuring equipment based on the use of a ''1''3''7Cs/''1''3''7''''mBa isotope generator were constructed. They were used to study the accuracy and error sources of the method and to compare different algorithms to calculate the transit time. The usability of the method and the equipment in industrial environments were studied by carrying out over 20 flow measurements in paper and pulp mills. On the basis of the results of the study, a project for constructing a compact radiatracer flowmeter for industrial use has been started. The application range of this kind of meter is very large. The most obvious applications are in situ calibration of flowmeters, material and energy balance studies, process equipment analyses (e.g. pump efficiency analyses). At the moment tracer techniques are the only methods applicable to these measurements on-line and with sufficient accuracy

  8. Mechanical strength model for plastic bonded granular materials at high strain rates and large strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browning, R.V.; Scammon, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Modeling impact events on systems containing plastic bonded explosive materials requires accurate models for stress evolution at high strain rates out to large strains. For example, in the Steven test geometry reactions occur after strains of 0.5 or more are reached for PBX-9501. The morphology of this class of materials and properties of the constituents are briefly described. We then review the viscoelastic behavior observed at small strains for this class of material, and evaluate large strain models used for granular materials such as cap models. Dilatation under shearing deformations of the PBX is experimentally observed and is one of the key features modeled in cap style plasticity theories, together with bulk plastic flow at high pressures. We propose a model that combines viscoelastic behavior at small strains but adds intergranular stresses at larger strains. A procedure using numerical simulations and comparisons with results from flyer plate tests and low rate uniaxial stress tests is used to develop a rough set of constants for PBX-9501. Comparisons with the high rate flyer plate tests demonstrate that the observed characteristic behavior is captured by this viscoelastic based model. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  9. Known for My Strengths: Positive Traits of Transition-Age Youth With Intellectual Disability and/or Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Erik W.; Boehm, Thomas L.; Biggs, Elizabeth E.; Annandale, Naomi H.; Taylor, Courtney E.; Loock, Aimee K.; Liu, Rosemary Y.

    2015-01-01

    Can young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities be known for their strengths? This mixed-method study explored the strengths of 427 youth and young adults with intellectual disability and/or autism (ages 13-21) from the vantage point of their parents. Using the Assessment Scale for Positive Character Traits-Developmental…

  10. Effect of Ambulatory Transitional Care Management on 30-Day Readmission Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Jonathan; Rankin, Wade; Roper, Karen L; Weatherford, Sarah; Cardarelli, Roberto

    2018-05-01

    A process improvement initiative for transitional care management (TCM) was evaluated for effectiveness in reducing 30-day readmission rates in a retrospective cohort study. Regression models analyzed the association between level of TCM component implementation and readmission rates among patients discharged from a university medical center hospital. Of the 1884 patients meeting inclusion criteria, only 3.7% (70) experienced a 30-day readmission. Patients receiving the full complement of TCM had 86.6% decreased odds of readmission compared with patients who did not receive TCM ( P < .001). However, the complete package of TCM services under Medicare guidelines may not be essential. A postdischarge telephone call did not reduce readmission odds, provided a TCM office visit occurred. Important for risk assessment models targeting patients for TCM, the number of previous hospital admissions, not age, predicted 30-day readmission risk. This study provides evidence that primary care-based TCM can reduce 30-day readmissions even when overall rates are low.

  11. Influence of curing rate of resin composite on the bond strength to dentin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Asmussen, E; Peutzfeldt, A

    2007-01-01

    @ 1000 mW/cm2) for all groups. A split Teflon mold was clamped to the treated dentin surface and filled with resin composite. The rate of cure was varied, using one of four LED-curing units of different power densities. The rate of cure was also varied using the continuous or pulse-delay mode....... In continuous curing mode, in order to give an energy density totaling 16 J/cm2, the power densities (1000, 720, 550, 200 mW/cm2) emitted by the various curing units were compensated for by the light curing period (16, 22, 29 or 80 seconds). In the pulse-delay curing mode, two seconds of light curing at one...... of the four power densities was followed by a one-minute interval, after which light cure was completed (14, 29, 27 or 78 seconds), likewise, giving a total energy density of 16 J/cm2. The specimens produced for each of the eight curing protocols and two resin composites (Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent...

  12. Shear-rate-dependent strength control on the dynamics of rainfall-triggered landslides, Tokushima Prefecture, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G.; Suemine, A.; Schulz, W.H.

    2010-01-01

    A typhoon (Typhoon No. 10) attacked Shikoku Island and the Tyugoku area of Japan in 2004. This typhoon produced a new daily precipitation record of 1317 mm on Shikoku Island and triggered hundreds of landslides in Tokushima Prefecture. One catastrophic landslide was triggered in the Shiraishi area of Kisawa village, and destroyed more than 10 houses while also leaving an unstable block high on the slope. The unstable block kept moving after the event, showing accelerating and decelerating movement during and after rainfall and reaching a displacement of several meters before countermeasures were put into place. To examine the mechanism for this landsliding characteristic, samples (weathered serpentinite) were taken from the field, and their shear behaviours examined using ring shear tests. The test results revealed that the residual shear strength of the samples is positively dependent on the shear rate, which may provide an explanation for the continuous acceleratingdecelerating process of the landsliding. The roughness of the shear surface and the microstructure of the shear zone were measured and observed by laser microscope and SEM techniques in an attempt to clarify the mechanism of shear rate effect on the residual shear strength. Copyright ?? 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Variational transition state theory for multidimensional activated rate processes in the presence of anisotropic friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Frishman, Anatoli M.; Pollak, Eli

    1994-09-01

    Variational transition state theory (VTST) is applied to the study of the activated escape of a particle trapped in a multidimensional potential well and coupled to a heat bath. Special attention is given to the dependence of the rate constant on the friction coefficients in the case of anisotropic friction. It is demonstrated explicitly that both the traditional as well as the nontraditional scenarios for the particle escape are recovered uniformly within the framework of VTST. Effects such as saddle point avoidance and friction dependence of the activation energy are derived from VTST using optimized planar dividing surfaces.

  14. Variations in strength and slip rate along the san andreas fault system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C H; Wesnousky, S G

    1992-04-03

    Convergence across the San Andreas fault (SAF) system is partitioned between strike-slip motion on the vertical SAF and oblique-slip motion on parallel dip-slip faults, as illustrated by the recent magnitude M(s) = 6.0 Palm Springs, M(s) = 6.7 Coalinga, and M(s) = 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquakes. If the partitioning of slip minimizes the work done against friction, the direction of slip during these recent earthquakes depends primarily on fault dip and indicates that the normal stress coefficient and frictional coefficient (micro) vary among the faults. Additionally, accounting for the active dip-slip faults reduces estimates of fault slip rates along the vertical trace of the SAF by about 50 percent in the Loma Prieta and 100 percent in the North Palm Springs segments.

  15. The effect of addition of primary positive salts, complex salt, on the ionic strength and rate constant at various temperatures by reaction kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurade, S. S.; Ramteke, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we have investigated the rate of reaction by using ionic strength at different temperatures. The main goal of this experiment is to determine the relation between ionic strength with reaction rate, reaction time and rate constant with temperature. It is observed that the addition of positive salt indicate the increasing ionic strength with increase in run time at various temperatures. Thus the temperature affects the speed of reaction and mechanism by which chemical reaction occurs and time variable plays vital role in the progress of reaction at different temperatures.

  16. Strength and Deformation Rate of Plate Boundaries: The Rheological Effects of Grain Size Reduction, Structure, and Serpentinization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesi, L.; Gueydan, F.

    2016-12-01

    Global strain rate maps reveal 1000-fold contrasts between plate interiors, oceanic or continental diffuse plate boundaries and narrow plate boundaries. Here, we show that rheological models based on the concepts of shear zone localization and the evolution of rock structure upon strain can explain these strain rate contrasts. Ductile shear zones constitute a mechanical paradox in the lithosphere. As every plastic deformation mechanism is strain-rate-hardening, ductile rocks are expected to deform at low strain rate and low stress (broad zone of deformation). Localized ductile shear zones require either a localized forcing (locally high stress) or a thermal or structural anomaly in the shear zone; either can be inherited or develop progressively as rocks deform. We previously identified the most effective process at each depth level of the lithosphere. In the upper crust and middle crust, rocks fabric controls localization. Grain size reduction is the most efficient mechanism in the uppermost mantle. This analysis can be generalized to consider a complete lithospheric section. We assume strain rate does not vary with depth and that the depth-integrated strength of the lithospheric does not change over time, as the total force is controlled by external process such as mantle convection and plate and slab buoyancy. Reducing grain size from a coarse value typical of undeformed peridotite to a value in agreement with the stress level (piezometer) while letting that stress vary from depth to depth (the integrated stress remains the same) increases the lithospheric strain rate by about a factor of 1000. This can explain the development of diffuse plate boundaries. The slightly higher strain rate of continental plate boundary may reflect development of a layered rock fabric in the middle crust. Narrow plate boundaries require additional weakening process. The high heat flux near mid-ocean ridge implies a thin lithosphere, which enhances stress (for constant integrated

  17. Rates of E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions in Ni II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Hibbert, A.; Ramsbottom, C. A.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We present rates for all E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions among the 295 fine-structure levels of the configurations 3d9, 3d84s, 3d74s2, 3d84p, and 3d74s4p, determined through an extensive configuration interaction calculation. Methods: The CIV3 code developed by Hibbert and coworkers is used to determine for these levels configuration interaction wave functions with relativistic effects introduced through the Breit-Pauli approximation. Results: Two different sets of calculations have been undertaken with different 3d and 4d functions to ascertain the effect of such variation. The main body of the text includes a representative selection of data, chosen so that key points can be discussed. Some analysis to assess the accuracy of the present data has been undertaken, including comparison with earlier calculations and the more limited range of experimental determinations. The full set of transition data is given in the supplementary material as it is very extensive. Conclusions: We believe that the present transition data are the best currently available. Full Table 4 and Tables 5-8 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A107

  18. Quantum-Classical Phase Transition of the Escape Rate of Two-Sublattice Antiferromagnetic Large Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owerre, Solomon Akaraka; Paranjape, M. B.

    2014-11-01

    The Hamiltonian of a two-sublattice antiferromagnetic spins, with single (hard-axis) and double ion anisotropies described by H = J {\\hat S}1...\\hatS 2-2Jz \\hat {S}1z\\hat {S}2z+K(\\hat {S}1z2 +\\hat {S}2z2) is investigated using the method of effective potential. The problem is mapped to a single particle quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian in terms of the relative coordinate and reduced mass. We study the quantum-classical phase transition of the escape rate of this model. We show that the first-order phase transition for this model sets in at the critical value Jc = (Kc+Jz, c)/2 while for the anisotropic Heisenberg coupling H = J(S1xS2x +S1yS2y) + JzS1zS2z + K(S1z2+ S2z2) we obtain Jc = (2Kc-Jz, c)/3. The phase diagrams of the transition are also studied.

  19. Superplastic Creep of Metal Nanowires From Rate-Dependent Plasticity Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Weiwei; Cao, Penghui; Park, Harold S

    2018-04-30

    Understanding the time-dependent mechanical behavior of nanomaterials such as nanowires is essential to predict their reliability in nanomechanical devices. This understanding is typically obtained using creep tests, which are the most fundamental loading mechanism by which the time-dependent deformation of materials is characterized. However, due to existing challenges facing both experimentalists and theorists, the time-dependent mechanical response of nanowires is not well-understood. Here, we use atomistic simulations that can access experimental time scales to examine the creep of single crystal FCC metal (Cu, Ag, Pt) nanowires. We report that both Cu and Ag nanowires show significantly increased ductility and superplasticity under low creep stresses, where the superplasticity is driven by a rate-dependent transition in defect nucleation from twinning to trailing partial dislocations at the micro or millisecond timescale. The transition in deformation mechanism also governs a corresponding transition in the stress-dependent creep time at the microsecond (Ag) and millisecond (Cu) timescales. Overall, this work demonstrates the necessity of accessing timescales that far exceed those seen in conventional atomistic modeling for accurate insights into the time-dependent mechanical behavior and properties of nanomaterials.

  20. Behaviour of venous flow rates in intermittent sequential pneumatic compression of the legs using different compression strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassmann-Glaser, I.

    1984-01-01

    A study with 25 patients was performed in order to find out whether intermittent, sequential, pneumatic leg compression is of value in the preventive management of thrombosis due to its effect on the venous flow rates. For this purpose, xenon 133 was injected into one of the foot veins and the flow rate in each case determined for the distance between instep and inguen using different compression strengths, with pressure being exerted on the ankle, calf and thigh. Increased flow rates were already measured at an average pressure value of 34.5 mmHg, while the maximum effect was achieved by exerting a pressure of 92.5 mmHg, which increased the flow rate by 366% as compared to the baseline value. The results point to a significant improvement of the venous flow rates due to intermittent, sequential, pneumatic leg compression and thus provide evidence to prove the value of this method in the prevention of hemostasis and thrombosis. (TRV) [de

  1. Calculation of levels, transition rates, and lifetimes for the arsenic isoelectronic sequence Sn XVIII-Ba XXIV, W XLII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Chen, Z. B.; Chen, C. Y.; Yan, J.; Dang, W.; Zhao, X. H.; Yang, X.

    2017-09-01

    Multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculations of energy levels, wavelengths, oscillator strengths, lifetimes, and electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic quadrupole (M2) transition rates are reported for the arsenic isoelectronic sequence Sn XVIII-Ba XXIV, W XLII. Results are presented among the 86 levels of the 4s2 4p3, 4 s 4p4, 4p5, 4s2 4p2 4 d, and 4 s 4p3 4 d configurations in each ion. The relativistic atomic structure package GRASP2K is adopted for the calculations, in which the contributions from the correlations within the n ≤ 7 complexes, Breit interaction (BI) and quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects are taking into account. The many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) method is also employed as an independent calculation for comparison purposes, taking W XLII as an example. Calculated results are compared with data from other calculations and the observed values from the Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Good agreements are obtained. i.e, the accuracy of our energy levels is assessed to be better than 0.6%. These accurate theoretical data should be useful for diagnostics of hot plasmas in fusion devices.

  2. Excitation strengths and transition radii differences of one-phonon quadrupole excitations from electron scattering on {sup 92,94}Zr and {sup 94}Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheikh Obeid, Abdulrahman

    2014-11-01

    In the framework of this thesis electron scattering experiments on low-energy excitations of {sup 92}Zr and {sup 94}Zr were performed at the S-DALINAC in a momentum transfer range q=0.3-0.6 fm{sup -1}. The nature of one-phonon symmetric and mixed-symmetric 2{sup +} and 3{sup -} states of {sup 92}Zr was investigated by comparison with predictions of the quasi-particle phonon model (QPM). Theoretical (e,e') cross sections have been calculated within the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) to account for Coulomb distortion effects. The reduced strengths of the one-quadrupole phonon states and the one-octupole phonon state have been extracted. The similarity of the momentum-transfer dependence of the form factors between the 2{sup +} states supports the one-phonon nature of the 2{sup +}{sub 2} state of {sup 92}Zr. A new method based on the Plane Wave Born Approximation (PWBA) for a model-independent determination of the ratio of the E2 transition strengths of fully symmetric (FSS) and mixed-symmetry (MSS) one-phonon excitations of heavy vibrational nuclei is introduced. Due to the sensitivity of electron scattering to charge distributions, the charge transition-radii difference can be determined. The basic assumptions (independence from the ratio of Coulomb corrections and from absolute values of transition radii) are tested within the Tassie model, which makes no specific assumptions about the structure of the states other than collectivity. It is shown that a PWBA analysis of the form factors, which usually fails for heavy nuclei, can nevertheless be applied in a relative analysis. This is a new promising approach to determine the ground state transition strength of the 2{sup +} MSS of vibrational nuclei with a precision limited only by the experimental information about the B(E2;2{sup +}{sub 1}→0{sup +}{sub 1}) strength. The PWBA approach furthermore provides information about differences of the proton transition radii of the respective states

  3. TRANSIT

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. TRANSIT. SYSTEM: DETERMINE 2D-POSITION GLOBALLY BUT INTERMITTENT (POST-FACTO). IMPROVED ACCURACY. PRINCIPLE: POLAR SATELLITES WITH INNOVATIONS OF: GRAVITY-GRADIENT ATTITUDE CONTROL; DRAG COMPENSATION. WORKS ...

  4. High count-rate study of two TES x-ray microcalorimeters with different transition temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Jun; Adams, Joseph S.; Bandler, Simon R.; Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele L.; Chervenak, James A.; Eckart, Megan E.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Sadleir, John E.; Smith, Stephen J.; Wassell, Edward J.

    2017-10-01

    We have developed transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter arrays with high count-rate capability and high energy resolution to carry out x-ray imaging spectroscopy observations of various astronomical sources and the Sun. We have studied the dependence of the energy resolution and throughput (fraction of processed pulses) on the count rate for such microcalorimeters with two different transition temperatures (T c). Devices with both transition temperatures were fabricated within a single microcalorimeter array directly on top of a solid substrate where the thermal conductance of the microcalorimeter is dependent upon the thermal boundary resistance between the TES sensor and the dielectric substrate beneath. Because the thermal boundary resistance is highly temperature dependent, the two types of device with different T cs had very different thermal decay times, approximately one order of magnitude different. In our earlier report, we achieved energy resolutions of 1.6 and 2.3 eV at 6 keV from lower and higher T c devices, respectively, using a standard analysis method based on optimal filtering in the low flux limit. We have now measured the same devices at elevated x-ray fluxes ranging from 50 Hz to 1000 Hz per pixel. In the high flux limit, however, the standard optimal filtering scheme nearly breaks down because of x-ray pile-up. To achieve the highest possible energy resolution for a fixed throughput, we have developed an analysis scheme based on the so-called event grade method. Using the new analysis scheme, we achieved 5.0 eV FWHM with 96% throughput for 6 keV x-rays of 1025 Hz per pixel with the higher T c (faster) device, and 5.8 eV FWHM with 97% throughput with the lower T c (slower) device at 722 Hz.

  5. Work and family transitions and the self-rated health of young women in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Rachel; Waterhouse, Philippa

    2018-04-01

    Understanding the transition to adulthood has important implications for supporting young adults and understanding the roots of diversity in wellbeing later in life. In South Africa, the end of Apartheid means today's youth are experiencing their transition to adulthood in a changed social and political context which offers opportunities compared to the past but also threats. This paper presents the first national level analysis of the patterning of key transitions (completion of education, entry into the labour force, motherhood and marriage or cohabitation), and the association between the different pathways and health amongst young women. With the use of longitudinal data from the South African National Income Dynamics Study (2008-2015), this paper employs sequence analysis to identify common pathways to adulthood amongst women aged 15-17 years at baseline (n = 429) and logistic regression modelling to examine the association between these pathways and self-rated health. The sequence analysis identified five pathways: 1. 'Non-activity commonly followed by motherhood', 2. 'Pathway from school, motherhood then work', 3. 'Motherhood combined with schooling', 4. 'Motherhood after schooling', and 5. 'Schooling to non-activity'. After controlling for baseline socio-economic and demographic characteristics and health, the regression results show young women who followed pathways characterised by early motherhood and economic inactivity (1, 3 and 4) had poorer self-rated health compared to women whose pathways were characterised by combining motherhood and economic activity (2) and young women who were yet to become economically active or mothers (5). Therefore, policies should seek to prevent adolescent childbearing, support young mothers to continue their educational careers and enable mothers in work and seeking work to balance their work and care responsibilities. Further, the findings highlight the value of taking a holistic approach to health and provide

  6. Calculation of Rates of 4p–4d Transitions in Ar II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Hibbert

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental work by Belmonte et al. (2014 has given rates for some 4p–4d transitions that are significantly at variance with the previous experimental work of Rudko and Tang (1967 recommended in the NIST tabulations. To date, there are no theoretical rates with which to compare. In this work, we provide such theoretical data. We have undertaken a substantial and systematic configuration interaction calculation, with an extrapolation process applied to ab initio mixing coefficients, which gives energy differences in agreement with experiment. The length and velocity forms give values that are within 10%–15% of each other. Our results are in sufficiently close agreement with those of Belmonte et al. that we can confidently recommend that their results are much more accurate than the early results of Rudko and Tang, and should be adopted in place of the latter.

  7. Integrated High-Rate Transition Radiation Detector and Tracking Chamber for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD-6 \\\\ \\\\Over the past five years, RD-6 has developed a transition radiation detector and charged particle tracker for high rate operation at LHC. The detector elements are based on C-fibre reinforced kapton straw tubes of 4~mm diameter filled with a Xenon gas mixture. Detailed measurements with and without magnetic field have been performed in test beams, and in particular have demonstrated the possibility of operating straw tubes at very high rate (up to 20~MHz) with accurate drift-time measurement accuracy. A full-scale engineering prototype containing 10~000 straws is presently under assembly and will be accurately measured with a powerful X-ray tube. Integrated front-end electronics with fast readout have been designed and successfully operated in test beam. \\\\ \\\\Finally extensive simulations performed for ATLAS have shown that such a detector will provide powerful pattern recognition, accurate momentum measurements, efficient level-2 triggering and excellent electron identification, even at the highe...

  8. Rate-induced solubility and suppression of the first-order phase transition in olivine LiFePO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; van Hulzen, Martijn; Singh, Deepak P; Brownrigg, Alex; Wright, Jonathan P; van Dijk, Niels H; Wagemaker, Marnix

    2014-05-14

    The impact of ultrahigh (dis)charge rates on the phase transition mechanism in LiFePO4 Li-ion electrodes is revealed by in situ synchrotron diffraction. At high rates the solubility limits in both phases increase dramatically, causing a fraction of the electrode to bypass the first-order phase transition. The small transforming fraction demonstrates that nucleation rates are consequently not limiting the transformation rate. In combination with the small fraction of the electrode that transforms at high rates, this indicates that higher performances may be achieved by further optimizing the ionic/electronic transport in LiFePO4 electrodes.

  9. Effect of Cooling Rate on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties in SA508 Gr4N High Strength Low Alloy Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minchul; Park, Sanggyu; Choi, Kwonjae; Lee, Bongsang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The microstructure of Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel is a mixture of tempered martensite and tempered lower bainite and that of Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel is predominantly tempered upper bainite. Higher strength and toughness steels are very attractive as an eligible RPV steel, so several researchers have studied to use the Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel for the NPP application. Because of the thickness of reactor vessel, there are large differences in austenitizing cooling rates between the surface and the center locations of thickness in RPV. Because the cooling rates after austenitization determine the microstructure, it would affect the mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel, and it may lead to inhomogeneous characteristics when the commercial scale of RPV is fabricated. In order to apply the Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel to RPV, it is necessary to evaluate the changes of microstructure and mechanical properties with varying phase fractions in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel. In this study, the effects of martensite and bainite fractions on mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel were examined by controlling the cooling rate after austenitization. First of all, continuous cooling transformation(CCT) diagram was established from the dilatometric analyses. Then, the phase fractions at each cooling rate were quantitatively evaluated. Finally, the mechanical properties were correlated with the phase fraction, especially fraction of martensite in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel.

  10. Radiative Decay Rates for Electric Dipole, Magnetic Dipole and Electric Quadrupole Transitions in Triply Ionized Thulium (Tm IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saturnin Enzonga Yoca

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A new set of radiative decay parameters (oscillator strengths, transition probabilities for spectral lines in triply ionized thulium (Tm IV has been obtained within the framework of the pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock (HFR approach. The effects of configuration interaction and core-polarization have been investigated in detail and the quality of the results has been assessed through a comparison between different HFR physical models. The spectroscopic data listed in the present paper cover electric dipole as well as magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole transitions in a wide range of wavelengths from extreme ultraviolet to near infrared.

  11. Kinetic parameters, collision rates, energy exchanges and transport coefficients of non-thermal electrons in premixed flames at sub-breakdown electric field strengths

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; El Morsli, Mbark

    2014-01-01

    The effects of an electric field on the collision rates, energy exchanges and transport properties of electrons in premixed flames are investigated via solutions to the Boltzmann kinetic equation. The case of high electric field strength, which

  12. Effects of stair-climbing on balance, gait, strength, resting heart rate, and submaximal endurance in healthy seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donath, L; Faude, O; Roth, R; Zahner, L

    2014-04-01

    Stair-climbing serves as a feasible opportunity to remain physically active within everyday-life. Data on neuromuscular and cardiorespiratory performance after regular stair-climbing in seniors are scarce. Forty-eight seniors were stratified to a one- (taking every step, INT1) or two-step strategy (every second step, INT2) or a control group (CON). Thirty-nine seniors [females: n = 22, males: n = 17; age: 70.5 (SD 5.1) years; BMI: 25.8 (3.1) kg/m(2)] completed the 8-week intervention (three weekly sessions). Before and after the intervention, balance, gait, strength, and submaximal endurance (at different intensities) were assessed. Maximal strength and explosive power did not improve significantly (0.10 walking significantly decreased (-11/min; P beam balancing (4.5 cm width) increased in INT2 (P = 0.007) compared with CON. With more pronounced effects in INT2, stair-climbing significantly improved resting and exercise heart rates, perceived exertion, and dynamic balance performance in healthy seniors and may contribute to better overall fitness, reduced fall risk, and less perceived strain during daily life activities. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Effects of Strength Training Sessions Performed with Different Exercise Orders and Intervals on Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Sandro; Figueiredo, Tiago; Marques, Silvio; Leite, Thalita; Cardozo, Diogo; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Simão, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    This study compared the effect of a strength training session performed at different exercise orders and rest intervals on blood pressure and heart rate variability (HRV). Fifteen trained men performed different upper body exercise sequences [large to small muscle mass (SEQA) and small to large muscle mass (SEQB)] in randomized order with rest intervals between sets and exercises of 40 or 90 seconds. Fifteen repetition maximum loads were tested to control the training intensity and the total volume load. The results showed, significant reductions for systolic blood pressure (SBP) for all sequences compared to baseline and, post-exercise: SEQA90 at 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 minutes; SEQA40 and SEQB40 at 20 minutes and SEQB90 at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 minutes. For diastolic blood pressure (DBP), significant reductions were found for three sequences compared to baseline and, post-exercise: SEQA90 and SEQA40 at 50 and 60 minutes; SEQB40 at 10, 30 and 60 minutes. For HRV, there were significant differences in frequency domain for all sequences compared to baseline. In conclusion, when performing upper body strength training sessions, it is suggested that 90 second rest intervals between sets and exercises promotes a post-exercise hypotensive response in SBP. The 40 second rest interval between sets and exercises was associated with greater cardiac stress, and might be contraindicated when working with individuals that exhibit symptoms of cardiovascular disease.

  14. Dependence of the brittle ductile transition on strain-rate-dependent critical homologous temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Paul M.

    2017-05-01

    Earthquakes mainly occur in crust or mantle that is below a critical temperature for the tectonic strain-rate, \\dot{e}_t, such that stress builds up to the breaking point before it can relax due to creep. Then long-range stress correlation gives rise to power law seismicity including large events. The limiting temperature depends on pressure, which is taken into account by finding a critical homologous temperature THc = T/TM above which earthquakes are rarely observed (where T, TM are temperature and average melting temperature of constituent minerals). We find that THc for ocean plates is ∼0.55. For California earthquakes, it is also close to 0.55. The uppermost mantle layer of oceanic plates of thickness ∼50 km is composed of harzburgite and depleted peridotite from which basalt has been removed to form ocean crust. Thus it has a higher melting temperature than the peridotite of the surrounding mantle, or the lower halves of plates. Thicknesses of seismicity in deep subduction zones, determined from 2-D polynomial fits to a relocated catalogue, are ∼50 km, which suggests that the earthquake channel is confined to this layer. We construct models to find homologous temperatures in slabs, and find that seismicity thicknesses are also, on average, confined to TH ≤ 0.55 ± 0.05. The associated rheology is compared with that obtained from flexure models of ocean lithosphere. The brittle-ductile transition occurs where viscosity drops from high values in the cold cores of slabs to values of 1022-1023 Pa s, that is, where creep strain-rates become comparable to tectonic rates. The cut-off for deep earthquakes is not sharp. However they appear unlikely to occur if homologous temperature is high TH > 0.55. Exceptions to the rule are anomalously deep earthquakes such as those beneath the Iceland and the Hawaiian hotspots, and the Newport Inglewood Fault. These are smaller events with short-range stress correlation, and can be explained if strain-rates are two to

  15. Sex Differences in the Level and Rate of Change of Physical Function and Grip Strength in the Danish 1905-Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oksuzyan, Anna; Maier, Heiner; McGue, Matt

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The study was conducted to examine sex differences in the initial level and rate of change in physical function and grip strength. METHOD: The baseline survey included 2,262 Danes born in 1905 and alive in 1998 and followed-up in 2000, 2003, and 2005. Hence, the authors fully used...... the power of having a cohort with multiple assessments in late life and virtually complete follow-up of lifespan (through December 2008). Latent growth curve modeling was used. RESULTS: Men had higher initial levels and rates of decline in strength score and grip strength. Lifespan was positively correlated...

  16. Optical potentials and isoscalar transition rates from 104 MeV alpha-particle scattering by the N=28 isotopes 48Ca, 50Ti and 52Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, E.; Pesl, R.; Gils, H.J.; Rebel, H.; Buschmann, J.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Zagromski, S.

    1983-02-01

    Precisely measured differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering from 104 MeV alpha-particles by 48 Ca, 50 Ti and 52 Cr are reported. The analyses aim primarily at the determination of strength, radial shapes and deformation of the scattering potentials, looking for isotonic differences of N = 28 isotones. The mean square radii of the (real) potentials are discussed in terms of mean square radius differences of the matter distributions. The isoscalar transition rates derived by coupled channel analyses of the measured cross sections are compared with electromagnetic rates. In addition to the analyses on the basis of a slightly generalized extended optical model a semi-microscopic deformed folding model has been applied, using a density-dependent effective alpha-bound nucleon interaction. Though an excellent description of the data over the full angular range is obtained the resulting values of the deformation parameters appear to be not consistent with results from various different methods. (orig.) [de

  17. Self-optimized construction of transition rate matrices from accelerated atomistic simulations with Bayesian uncertainty quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinburne, Thomas D.; Perez, Danny

    2018-05-01

    A massively parallel method to build large transition rate matrices from temperature-accelerated molecular dynamics trajectories is presented. Bayesian Markov model analysis is used to estimate the expected residence time in the known state space, providing crucial uncertainty quantification for higher-scale simulation schemes such as kinetic Monte Carlo or cluster dynamics. The estimators are additionally used to optimize where exploration is performed and the degree of temperature acceleration on the fly, giving an autonomous, optimal procedure to explore the state space of complex systems. The method is tested against exactly solvable models and used to explore the dynamics of C15 interstitial defects in iron. Our uncertainty quantification scheme allows for accurate modeling of the evolution of these defects over timescales of several seconds.

  18. A Peer-Led High School Transition Program Increases Graduation Rates Among Latino Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Valerie L; Simon, Patricia; Mun, Eun-Young

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the impact of a manualized high school transition program, the Peer Group Connection (PGC) program, on the graduation rate at a low-income, Mid-Atlantic high school. The program utilized twelfth grade student peer leaders to create a supportive environment for incoming ninth grade students. Results of a randomized control trial demonstrated that male students who participated in the program during ninth grade were significantly more likely to graduate from high school within four years than male students in the control group (81% versus 63%). Findings suggest that peers can be effective in delivering a school-based, social emotional learning intervention and that it is possible to intervene in the ninth grade to influence the probability of high school graduation.

  19. The TIGRESS Integrated Plunger ancillary systems for electromagnetic transition rate studies at TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, P.; Henderson, R.; Andreoiu, C.; Ashley, R.; Austin, R.A.E.; Ball, G.C.; Bender, P.C.; Bey, A.; Cheeseman, A.; Chester, A.; Cross, D.S.; Drake, T.E.; Garnsworthy, A.B.; Hackman, G.; Holland, R.; Ketelhut, S.; Kowalski, P.; Krücken, R.; Laffoley, A.T.; Leach, K.G.

    2014-01-01

    The TIGRESS Integrated Plunger device is a new experimental tool for nuclear structure investigations via gamma-ray spectroscopy with post-accelerated beams from the ISAC-II facility at TRIUMF. Several ancillary detection systems integral to the device's capabilities for charged-particle tagging and light-ion identification following a variety of nuclear reaction mechanisms have been constructed and characterized. In particular, a silicon PIN diode wall, an annular silicon segmented detector, and a CsI(Tl) scintillator wall have together enabled particle-gamma correlations for reaction channel selectivity and precision kinematic reconstruction in recent measurements. We highlight the construction, characteristics, and implementation of the device's ancillary detectors as they enable a rich set of electromagnetic transition rate measurements via Doppler-shift lifetime techniques and low-energy Coulomb excitation

  20. n l -> n' l' transition rates in electron and proton - Rydberg atom collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrinceanu, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Electrons and protons drive the recombination dynamics of highly excited Rydberg atoms in cold rarefied plasmas found in astrophysical conditions such as primordial recombination or star formation in H-II clouds. It has been recognized that collisions induce both energy and angular momentum transitions in Rydberg atoms, although in different proportions, depending on the initial state, temperature and the given species considered in the collision (electron or proton). Most studies focused on one collision type at a time, under the assumption that collision types are independent or their effects are not competing. The classical Monte-Carlo trajectory simulations presented in this work calculate the rates for both energy and angular momentum transfers and show their interdependence. For example, energy transfer with small angular momentum change are more efficient for target states with initial large angular momentum. The author acknowledges support received from the National Science Foundation through a Grant for the Center for Research on Complex Networks (HRD-1137732).

  1. State estimation for Markov-type genetic regulatory networks with delays and uncertain mode transition rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jinling; Lam, James; Wang Zidong

    2009-01-01

    This Letter is concerned with the robust state estimation problem for uncertain time-delay Markovian jumping genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) with SUM logic, where the uncertainties enter into both the network parameters and the mode transition rate. The nonlinear functions describing the feedback regulation are assumed to satisfy the sector-like conditions. The main purpose of the problem addressed is to design a linear estimator to approximate the true concentrations of the mRNA and protein through available measurement outputs. By resorting to the Lyapunov functional method and some stochastic analysis tools, it is shown that if a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) is feasible, the desired state estimator, that can ensure the estimation error dynamics to be globally robustly asymptotically stable in the mean square, exists. The obtained LMI conditions are dependent on both the lower and the upper bounds of the delays. An illustrative example is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed estimation schemes.

  2. Extended calculations of energies, transition rates, and lifetimes for F-like Kr XXVIII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C. Y.; Si, R.; Yao, K.; Gu, M. F.; Wang, K.; Chen, C. Y.

    2018-02-01

    The excitation energies, lifetimes, wavelengths and E1, E2, M1 and M2 transition rates for the lowest 389 levels of the 2l7, 2l63l‧, 2l64l‧, and 2l65l‧ configurations from second-order many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) calculations, and the results for the lowest 200 states of the 2l7, 2l63l‧, and 2l64l‧ configurations from multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) calculations in F-like Kr XXVIII are presented in this work. The relative differences between our two sets of level energies are mostly within 0.005% for the lowest 200 levels. Comparisons are made with experimental and other available theoretical results to assess the reliability and accuracy of the present calculations. We believe them to be the most complete and accurate results for Kr XXVIII at present.

  3. Surface hopping, transition state theory, and decoherence. II. Thermal rate constants and detailed balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Amber; Subotnik, Joseph E., E-mail: subotnik@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, 231 South 34th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-10-07

    We investigate a simple approach to compute a non-adiabatic thermal rate constant using the fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) dynamics. We study the effects of both decoherence (using our augmented-FSSH (A-FSSH) algorithm) and forbidden hops over a large range of parameters, including high and low friction regimes, and weak and strong electronic coupling regimes. Furthermore, when possible, we benchmark our results against exact hierarchy equations of motion results, where we usually find a maximum error of roughly a factor of two (at reasonably large temperatures). In agreement with Hammes-Schiffer and Tully, we find that a merger of transition state theory and surface hopping can be both accurate and efficient when performed correctly. We further show that detailed balance is followed approximately by A-FSSH dynamics.

  4. High rate gamma spectroscopy system for activation analysis of short-lived isomeric transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westphall, G P [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Hochschulen, Vienna

    1976-07-15

    A high rate spectroscopy system specially suited for measurement of short-lived isomeric transitions is described, which, as part of a fast activation analysis facility at the TRIGA Mark II reactor, provides for automatic recording and immediate evaluation of gamma spectra taken from nuclides activated at stationary or pulsed reactor power. The system consists of a commercial de-coupled Ge(Li)-detector of 70 cm/sup 3/ modified for recycling operation for input rates in excess of 500000 c/s /sup 60/Co, a time variant trapezoidal shaping section and a fast constant dead-time ADC coupled to a programmed multichannel analyzer. Novel circuits for efficient pile-up rejection and time variant base line restoration extend the concept of gated integration up to count rates of more than 200000 c/s /sup 60/Co. Time-sequenced recording of spectra is performed by a minicomputer operated as a front-end processor of a larger laboratory computer, where final data processing takes place. New concepts for very simple and cost-effective implementation of multichannel analyzers by means of general purpose small computers are described.

  5. A high rate gamma spectroscopy system for activation analysis of short lived isomeric transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westphal, G P [Atominstitut, Vienna (Austria)

    1976-07-01

    A high rate spectroscopy system specially suited for measurement of short-lived isomeric transitions is described, which, as part of a fast activation analysis facility at the TRIGA Mark II reactor, provides for automatic recording and immediate evaluation of gamma spectra taken from nuclides activated at stationary or pulsed reactor power. The system consists of a commercial DC-coupled Ge(Li)-detector of 70 cm{sup 3} modified for recycling operation for input rates in excess of 500,000 c/s Co-60, a time variant trapezoidal shaping section and a fast constant dead-time ADC coupled to a programmed multi-channel analyzer. Novel circuits for efficient pile-up rejection and time variant base line restoration extend the concept of gated integration up to count rates of more than 300,000 c/s Co-60. Time-sequenced recording of spectra is performed by a mini computer operated as a front-end processor of a larger laboratory computer, where final data processing takes place. New concepts for very simple and cost-effective implementation of multi-channel analyzers by means of general purpose small computers are described. (author)

  6. Effect of strain rate and notch geometry on tensile properties and fracture mechanism of creep strength enhanced ferritic P91 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Chandan; Mahapatra, M. M.; Kumar, Pradeep; Saini, N.

    2018-01-01

    Creep strength enhanced ferritic (CSEF) P91 steel were subjected to room temperature tensile test for quasi-static (less than 10-1/s) strain rate by using the Instron Vertical Tensile Testing Machine. Effect of different type of notch geometry, notch depth and angle on mechanical properties were also considered for different strain rate. In quasi-static rates, the P91 steel showed a positive strain rate sensitivity. On the basis of tensile data, fracture toughness of P91 steel was also calculated numerically. For 1 mm notch depth (constant strain rate), notch strength and fracture toughness were found to be increased with increase in notch angle from 45° to 60° while the maximum value attained in U-type notch. Notch angle and notch depth has found a minute effect on P91 steel strength and fracture toughness. The fracture surface morphology was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM).

  7. Quadrupole and monopole generalized oscillator strength for 2p-3p, 2p-4p transition of neon atomic in the velocity formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomis, L; Diedhiou, I; Tall, M S; Diallo, S; Diatta, C S; Niassy, B

    2007-01-01

    The quadrupole and monopole generalized oscillator strengths (GOS) as a function of momentum transfer are calculated for the 2p-3p and 2p-4p transitions of the neon atom using the analytical Hartree-Fock (HF) wavefunctions for the ground-state and the wavefunctions for the excited states which are obtained numerically from the modified HF Slater equation. Calculations are carried out by using the HF method and random phase approximation with exchange in the velocity formulation. The positions and the number of the extrema in the GOS have received particular attention in the evaluation. Our calculated monopole GOS of 2p-3p transition in velocity form reveals one maximum located between the experimental and theoretical results of other authors. The disagreement between our first maximum of the quadrupole GOS 2p-3p transition with the experimental and other theoretical ones is unimportant. The extrema of the monopole and quadrupole GOS of 2p-4p transition are given in this paper. The results of velocity form study also show that the electron correlation effects are important around the maxima and are found to influence the positions of the extrema insignificantly

  8. The strength of the M2 transition from the 7-/2 hole state in 43K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletti, A.R.; Southon, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The mean life of the 738 keV level of 43 K has been measured by direct electronic timing as tausub(m) = 265 +- 15 ns. The reaction 40 Ar(α,pγ) 43 K at 10.4 MeV was used to excite the level. A comparison is made with another recent measurement while the deduced M2 strength is compared with those in other potassium isotopes. (author)

  9. Shell model calculations for levels and transition rates in 204Pb and 206Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.; McEllistrem, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    Level energies and decay rates of both negative and positive parity levels of 206,204 Pb have been calculated through mixed-configuration shell model calculations using the modified surface delta interaction (MSDI), the Schiffer-True central interaction, and another two-body interaction. These calculations were all carried out with a full six-orbit neutron hole space. The predicted low-lying levels with the MSDI are in excellent agreement with experiments, accounting for the energies, spins, and parities of essentially all levels below 3 MeV excitation energy except known particle-hole collective excitations in both nuclei. Almost all calculated E2 and M1 transition rates are consistent with measured branching ratios for γ-ray decay of excited levels. The comparison of the observed and calculated levels demonstrates the important role played by the neutron-hole i 13/2 configuration in the levels of 204 Pb and 206 Pb, and interprets an apparent discrepancy over the character and energy spacings of 0 + levels in 204 Pb

  10. Rate constants of chemical reactions from semiclassical transition state theory in full and one dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Samuel M., E-mail: samuel.greene@chem.ox.ac.uk; Shan, Xiao, E-mail: xiao.shan@chem.ox.ac.uk; Clary, David C., E-mail: david.clary@chem.ox.ac.u [Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-28

    Semiclassical Transition State Theory (SCTST), a method for calculating rate constants of chemical reactions, offers gains in computational efficiency relative to more accurate quantum scattering methods. In full-dimensional (FD) SCTST, reaction probabilities are calculated from third and fourth potential derivatives along all vibrational degrees of freedom. However, the computational cost of FD SCTST scales unfavorably with system size, which prohibits its application to larger systems. In this study, the accuracy and efficiency of 1-D SCTST, in which only third and fourth derivatives along the reaction mode are used, are investigated in comparison to those of FD SCTST. Potential derivatives are obtained from numerical ab initio Hessian matrix calculations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory, and Richardson extrapolation is applied to improve the accuracy of these derivatives. Reaction barriers are calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level. Results from FD SCTST agree with results from previous theoretical and experimental studies when Richardson extrapolation is applied. Results from our implementation of 1-D SCTST, which uses only 4 single-point MP2/cc-pVTZ energy calculations in addition to those for conventional TST, agree with FD results to within a factor of 5 at 250 K. This degree of agreement and the efficiency of the 1-D method suggest its potential as a means of approximating rate constants for systems too large for existing quantum scattering methods.

  11. Radiative Rates for Forbidden Transitions in Doubly-Ionized Fe-Peak Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fivet, Vanessa; Quinet, P.; Bautista, M.

    2012-05-01

    Accurate and reliable atomic data for lowly-ionized Fe-peak species (Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu) are of paramount importance for the analysis of the high resolution astrophysical spectra currently available. The third spectra of several iron group elements have been observed in different galactic sources like Herbig-Haro objects in the Orion Nebula [1] and stars like Eta Carinae [2]. However, forbidden transitions between low-lying metastable levels of doubly-ionized iron-peak ions have been very little investigated so far and radiative rates for those lines remain sparse or inexistent. We are carrying out a systematic study of the electronic structure of doubly-ionized iron-peak elements. The magnetic dipole (M1) and electric quadrupole (E2) transition probabilities are computed using the pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock (HFR) code of Cowan [3] and the central Thomas-Fermi-Dirac potential approximation implemented in AUTOSTRUCTURE [4]. This multi-platform approach allows for consistency checks and intercomparison and has proven very successful in the study of the complex Fe-peak species where many different effects contribute [5]. References [1] A. Mesa-Delgado et al., MNRAS 395 (2009) 855 [2] S. Johansson et al., A&A 361 (2000) 977 [3] R.D. Cowan, The Theory of Atomic Structure and Spectra, Berkeley: Univ. California Press (1981) [4] N.R. Badnell, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 30 (1997) 1 [5] M. Bautista et al., ApJ 718 (2010) L189

  12. Energy Levels and B(E2) transition rates in the Hartree-Fock approximation with the Skyrme force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, D.R. de; Mizrahi, S.S.

    1976-11-01

    The Hartree-Fock approximation with the Skyrme force is applied to the A = 4n type of nuclei in the s-d shell. Energy levels and electric quadrupole transition probabilities within the ground states band are calculated from the projected states of good angular momentum. Strong approximations are made but the results concerning the spectra are better than those obtained with more sophisticated density independent two-body interactions. The transition rates are less sensitive to the interaction, as previously verified

  13. Scan-rate dependence in protein calorimetry: the reversible transitions of Bacillus circulans xylanase and a disulfide-bridge mutant.

    OpenAIRE

    Davoodi, J.; Wakarchuk, W. W.; Surewicz, W. K.; Carey, P. R.

    1998-01-01

    The stabilities of Bacillus circulans xylanase and a disulfide-bridge-containing mutant (S100C/N148C) were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal inactivation kinetics. The thermal denaturation of both proteins was found to be irreversible, and the apparent transition temperatures showed a considerable dependence upon scanning rate. In the presence of low (nondenaturing) concentrations of urea, calorimetric transitions were observed for both proteins in the second...

  14. Entrainment to periodic initiation and transition rates in a computational model for gene translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Margaliot

    Full Text Available Periodic oscillations play an important role in many biomedical systems. Proper functioning of biological systems that respond to periodic signals requires the ability to synchronize with the periodic excitation. For example, the sleep/wake cycle is a manifestation of an internal timing system that synchronizes to the solar day. In the terminology of systems theory, the biological system must entrain or phase-lock to the periodic excitation. Entrainment is also important in synthetic biology. For example, connecting several artificial biological systems that entrain to a common clock may lead to a well-functioning modular system. The cell-cycle is a periodic program that regulates DNA synthesis and cell division. Recent biological studies suggest that cell-cycle related genes entrain to this periodic program at the gene translation level, leading to periodically-varying protein levels of these genes. The ribosome flow model (RFM is a deterministic model obtained via a mean-field approximation of a stochastic model from statistical physics that has been used to model numerous processes including ribosome flow along the mRNA. Here we analyze the RFM under the assumption that the initiation and/or transition rates vary periodically with a common period T. We show that the ribosome distribution profile in the RFM entrains to this periodic excitation. In particular, the protein synthesis pattern converges to a unique periodic solution with period T. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first proof of entrainment in a mathematical model for translation that encapsulates aspects such as initiation and termination rates, ribosomal movement and interactions, and non-homogeneous elongation speeds along the mRNA. Our results support the conjecture that periodic oscillations in tRNA levels and other factors related to the translation process can induce periodic oscillations in protein levels, and may suggest a new approach for re-engineering genetic

  15. Strength problems and ordering of nonstoichiometric monocarbides and mononitrides of subgroup 4a i 5a transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manukhin, A.V.; Lopatin, P.B.

    1995-01-01

    Consideration is given to graphical concentration dependences of flexural strength limit of TiC x and VC x monocarbides, ZrN x mononitride and to the relationship between these dependences and phenomena of nonmetallic vacancy ordering in mentioned compounds. The assumption about existence of the second ordered structure in TiC x titanium monocarbide and ordered structure in ZrN x zirconium mononitride (0.78...0.8 < x < 0.9...0.95) was supported. 15 refs.; 4 figs

  16. The magnitude and rate of reduction in strength, dexterity and sensation in the human hand vary with ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Jocelyn L; McNulty, Penelope A

    2013-08-01

    Cutaneous sensation and motor performance of the hand decline with age. It is not known if motor performance declines are influenced by reductions in cutaneous sensation, or if motor performance deteriorates at a consistent rate across motor tasks. Handgrip strength, finger-tapping frequency and grooved-pegboard performance were assessed for both hands of 70 subjects (20-88 years), 10 per decade. Motor declines were compared to reductions in perceptual cutaneous sensation tested at 10 hand sites using calibrated von Frey filaments. Motor performance decreased with age for all motor tasks (psensation also decreased with age, measured as increased von Frey thresholds of 0.04 g [0.02-0.07] to 0.16 g [0.04-0.4] (psensation varied with sex, side-tested and site. Reductions in grip-based tasks were associated with sensory declines in the palm, but elsewhere there was little correlation among motor tasks and cutaneous sensation in the hand. Grooved-pegboard performance was the best predictor of age-related declines in motor performance regardless of sex or side-tested. Our results suggest age-related declines in motor function cannot be inferred from, or provide information about, changes in cutaneous sensation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Uniaxial Compressive Strength and Fracture Mode of Lake Ice at Moderate Strain Rates Based on a Digital Speckle Correlation Method for Deformation Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijian Lian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Better understanding of the complex mechanical properties of ice is the foundation to predict the ice fail process and avoid potential ice threats. In the present study, uniaxial compressive strength and fracture mode of natural lake ice are investigated over moderate strain-rate range of 0.4–10 s−1 at −5 °C and −10 °C. The digital speckle correlation method (DSCM is used for deformation measurement through constructing artificial speckle on ice sample surface in advance, and two dynamic load cells are employed to measure the dynamic load for monitoring the equilibrium of two ends’ forces under high-speed loading. The relationships between uniaxial compressive strength and strain-rate, temperature, loading direction, and air porosity are investigated, and the fracture mode of ice at moderate rates is also discussed. The experimental results show that there exists a significant difference between true strain-rate and nominal strain-rate derived from actuator displacement under dynamic loading conditions. Over the employed strain-rate range, the dynamic uniaxial compressive strength of lake ice shows positive strain-rate sensitivity and decreases with increasing temperature. Ice obtains greater strength values when it is with lower air porosity and loaded vertically. The fracture mode of ice seems to be a combination of splitting failure and crushing failure.

  18. Effect of resistance training on muscle strength and rate of force development in healthy older adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guizelini, Pedrode Camargo; de Aguiar, Rafael Alves; Denadai, Benedito Sérgio; Caputo, Fabrizio; Greco, Camila Coelho

    2018-02-01

    Rapid force capacity, identified by rate of rise in contractile force at the onset of contraction, i.e., the rate of force development (RFD), has been considered an important neuromuscular parameter of physical fitness in elderly individuals. Randomized control studies conducted in adults have found that resistance training may elicit different outcomes in terms of RFD and muscle strength. Thus, the main purpose of this study was to review systematically the literature for studies regarding the influence of resistance training on muscle strength and RFD in elderly persons. A literature search was performed in major electronic databases from inception to March 2017. Studies including health individuals with a mean age≥60years, describing the effect of resistance training on RFD and muscle strength were found eligible. The outcomes were calculated as the difference in percentage change between control and experimental groups (% change) and data were presented as mean±95% confidence limits. Meta-analyses were performed using a random-effects model and, in addition, simple and multiple meta-regression analyses were used to identify effects of age, training type, sessions per week and training duration on % change in RFD and muscle strength. Thirteen training effects were collected from 10 studies included in the meta-analysis. The resistance training program had a moderate beneficial effect on both muscle strength (% change=18.40%, 95% CL 13.69-23.30, pchange=26.68, 95% CL 14.41-35.52, pchanges in muscle strength and RFD. It can be concluded that explosive training and heavy strength training are effective resistance training methods aiming to improve both muscle strength and RFD after short-to-medium training period. However, muscle strength and RFD seem to adapt differently to resistance training programs, suggesting caution for their interchangeable use in clinical assessments of the elderly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Benchmarking transition energies and emission strengths for X-ray astrophysics with measurements at the Livermore EBITs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hell, Natalie [Friedrich Alexander Univ., Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    K-shell transitions in astrophysically abundant metals and L-shell transitions in Fe group elements show characteristic signatures in the soft X-ray spectrum in the energy range 0.1–10 keV. These signatures have great diagnostic value for plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, and can thus help understand the physics controlling the energetic processes in astrophysical sources. This diagnostic power increases with advances in spectral resolution and effective area of the employed X-ray observatories. However, to make optimal use of the diagnostic potential – whether through global spectral modeling or through diagnostics from local modeling of individual lines – the underlying atomic physics has to be complete and well known. With the next generation of soft X-ray observatories featuring micro-calorimeters such as the SXS on Astro- H/Hitomi and the X-IFU on Athena, broadband high-resolution spectroscopy with large effective area will become more commonly available in the next decade. With these spectrometers, the accuracy of the plasma parameters derived from spectral modeling will be limited by the uncertainty of the reference atomic data rather than by instrumental factors, as is sometimes already the case for the high-resolution grating observations with Chandra-HETG and XMM-Newton-RGS. To take full advantage of the measured spectra, assessment of the accuracy of and improvements to the available atomic reference data are therefore important. Dedicated measurements in the laboratory are essential to benchmark the theoretical calculations providing the bulk of the reference data used in astrophysics. Experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion traps (EBIT-I and SuperEBIT) have a long history of providing this service. In this work, I present new measurements of transition energies and absolute electron impact excitation cross sections geared towards currently open atomic physics data needs.

  20. Influence of number of sets on blood pressure and heart rate variability after a strength training session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Tiago; Rhea, Matthew R; Peterson, Mark; Miranda, Humberto; Bentes, Claudio M; dos Reis, Victor Machado de Ribeiro; Simão, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of 1, 3, and 5 sets of strength training (ST), on heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure. Eleven male volunteers (age: 26.1 ± 3.6 years; body mass: 74.1 ± 8.1 kg; height: 172 ± 4 cm) with at least 6 months previous experience in ST participated in the study. After determining the 1 repetition maximum (1RM) load for the bench press (BP), lat pull down (LPD), shoulder press (SP), biceps curl (BC), triceps extension (TE), leg press (LP), leg extension (LE), and leg curl (LC), the participants performed 3 different exercise sequences in a random order and 72 hours apart. During the first sequence, subjects performed a single set of 8-10 repetitions, at 70% 1RM, and with 2-minute rest interval between exercises. Exercises were performed in the following order: BP, LPD, SP, BC, TE, LP, LE, and LC. During the second sequence, subjects performed the same exercise sequence, with the same intensity, 2-minute rest interval between sets and exercises, but with 3 consecutive sets of each exercise. During the third sequence, the same protocol was followed but with 5 sets of each exercise. Before and after the training sessions, blood pressure and HRV were measured. The statistical analysis demonstrated a greater duration of postexercise hypotension after the 5-set program vs. the 1 set or 3 sets (p ≤ 0.05). However, the 5-set program promoted a substantial cardiac stress, as demonstrated by HRV (p ≤ 0.05). These results indicate that 5 sets of 8-10 repetitions at 70% 1RM load may provide the ideal stimulus for a postexercise hypotensive response. Therefore, ST composed of upper- and lower-body exercises and performed with high volumes are capable of producing significant and extended postexercise hypotensive response. In conclusion, strength and conditioning professionals can prescribe 5 sets per exercises if the goal is to reduce blood pressure after training. In addition, these findings may have

  1. Yield and strength properties of the Ti-6-22-22S alloy over a wide strain rate and temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, L.; Kanel, G.I.; Razorenov, S.V.; Bezrouchko, G.S.; Meyer, L.

    2002-01-01

    A mechanical behavior of the Ti-6-22-22S alloy was studied under uniaxial strain conditions at shock-wave loading and under uniaxial compressive stress conditions over a strain rate range of 10-4 s-1 to 103 s-1. The test temperature was varied from -175 deg. C to 620 deg. C. The strain-rate and the temperature dependencies of the yield stress obtained from the uniaxial stress tests and from the shock-wave experiments are in a good agreement and demonstrate a significant decrease in the yield strength as the temperature increases. This indicates the thermal activation mechanism of plastic deformation of the alloy is maintained at strain rates up to 106 s-1. Variation of sample thickness from 2.24 to 10 mm results in relatively small variations in the dynamic yield strength and the spall strength over the whole temperature range

  2. A combined neural network and mechanistic approach for the prediction of corrosion rate and yield strength of magnesium-rare earth alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birbilis, N., E-mail: nick.birbilis@monash.ed [ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Monash University (Australia); CAST Co-operative Research Centre, Monash University (Australia); Cavanaugh, M.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University (United States); Sudholz, A.D. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Monash University (Australia); Zhu, S.M.; Easton, M.A. [CAST Co-operative Research Centre, Monash University (Australia); Gibson, M.A. [CSIRO Division of Process Science and Engineering (Australia)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: This study presents a body of corrosion data for a set of custom alloys and displays this in multivariable space. These alloys represent the next generation of Mg alloys for auto applications. The data is processed using an ANN model, which makes it possible to yield a single expression for prediction of corrosion rate (and strength) as a function of any input composition (of Ce, La or Nd between 0 and 6 wt.%). The relative influence of the various RE elements on corrosion is assessed, with the outcome that Nd additions can offer comparable strength with minimal rise in corrosion rate. The morphology and solute present in the eutectic region itself (as opposed to just the intermetallic presence) was shown - for the first time - to also be a key contributor to corrosion. The above approach sets the foundation for rational alloy design of alloys with corrosion performance in mind. - Abstract: Additions of Ce, La and Nd to Mg were made in binary, ternary and quaternary combinations up to {approx}6 wt.%. This provided a dataset that was used in developing a neural network model for predicting corrosion rate and yield strength. Whilst yield strength increased with RE additions, corrosion rates also systematically increased, however, this depended on the type of RE element added and the combination of elements added (along with differences in intermetallic morphology). This work is permits an understanding of Mg-RE alloy performance, and can be exploited in Mg alloy design for predictable combinations of strength and corrosion resistance.

  3. Transition rate diagrams and excitation of titanium in a glow discharge in argon and neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Zdeněk; Steers, Edward B. M.; Pickering, Juliet C.

    2018-06-01

    Emission spectra of titanium in a Grimm-type glow discharge in argon and neon were studied using the formalism of transition rate diagrams. Ti I spectra in argon and neon discharges are similar, without signs of selective excitation, and populations of Ti I levels exhibit a decreasing trend as function of energy, except for some scatter. A major excitation process of Ti II in argon discharge is charge transfer from argon ions to neutral titanium. In neon discharge, a strong selective excitation was observed of Ti II levels at ≈13.3-13.4 eV relative to the Ti I ground state. It was attributed to charge transfer from doubly charged titanium ions to neutral titanium, while the Ti++ ions are produced by charge transfer and ionization of neutral titanium by neon ions. Cascade excitation is important for Ti II levels up to an energy of ≈13 eV relative to the Ti I ground state, both in argon and neon discharges.

  4. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) desensitization increases sea urchin spermatozoa fertilization rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrezan-Nitao, Elis; Boni, Raianna; Marques-Santos, Luis Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) is a protein complex whose opening promotes an abrupt increase in mitochondrial inner membrane permeability. Calcium signaling pathways are described in gametes and are involved in the fertilization process. Although mitochondria may act as Ca(2+) store and have a fast calcium-releasing mechanism through MPTP, its contribution to fertilization remains unclear. The work aimed to investigate the MPTP phenomenon in sea urchin spermatozoa and its role on the fertilization. Several pharmacological tools were used to evaluate the MPTP's physiology. Our results demonstrated that MPTP occurs in male gametes in a Ca(2+) - and voltage-dependent manner and it is sensitive to cyclosporine A. Additionally, our data show that MPTP opening does not alter ROS generation in sperm cells. Inhibition of MPTP in spermatozoa strongly improved the fertilization rate, which may involve mechanisms that increase the spermatozoa lifespan. The present work is the first report of the presence of a voltage- and Ca(2+) -dependent MPTP in gametes of invertebrates and indicates MPTP opening as another evolutionary feature shared by sea urchins and mammals. Studies about MPTP in sea urchin male gametes may contribute to the elucidation of several mechanisms involved in sperm infertility. © 2016 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  5. Introducing ab initio based neural networks for transition-rate prediction in kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Luca; Castin, Nicolas; Domain, Christophe; Olsson, Pär

    2017-02-01

    The quality of kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of microstructure evolution in alloys relies on the parametrization of point-defect migration rates, which are complex functions of the local chemical composition and can be calculated accurately with ab initio methods. However, constructing reliable models that ensure the best possible transfer of physical information from ab initio to KMC is a challenging task. This work presents an innovative approach, where the transition rates are predicted by artificial neural networks trained on a database of 2000 migration barriers, obtained with density functional theory (DFT) in place of interatomic potentials. The method is tested on copper precipitation in thermally aged iron alloys, by means of a hybrid atomistic-object KMC model. For the object part of the model, the stability and mobility properties of copper-vacancy clusters are analyzed by means of independent atomistic KMC simulations, driven by the same neural networks. The cluster diffusion coefficients and mean free paths are found to increase with size, confirming the dominant role of coarsening of medium- and large-sized clusters in the precipitation kinetics. The evolution under thermal aging is in better agreement with experiments with respect to a previous interatomic-potential model, especially concerning the experiment time scales. However, the model underestimates the solubility of copper in iron due to the excessively high solution energy predicted by the chosen DFT method. Nevertheless, this work proves the capability of neural networks to transfer complex ab initio physical properties to higher-scale models, and facilitates the extension to systems with increasing chemical complexity, setting the ground for reliable microstructure evolution simulations in a wide range of alloys and applications.

  6. Effects of cooling rate, austenitizing temperature and austenite deformation on the transformation behavior of high-strength boron steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, Dong Jun; Shin, Eun Joo; Choi, Young Won; Lee, Jae Sang; Koo, Yang Mo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Non-equilibrium segregation of B in steel depends strongly on the cooling rate. ► A higher austenitization temperature reduced the B hardenability effect. ► An increase in B concentration at γ grain boundaries accelerates the B precipitation. ► The loss of B hardenability effect is due to intragranular borocarbide precipitation. ► The controlled cooling after hot deformation increased the B hardenability effect. - Abstract: The phase transformation behavior of high-strength boron steel was studied considering the segregation and precipitation behavior of boron (B). The effects of cooling rate, austenitizing temperature and austenite deformation on the transformation behavior of B-bearing steel as compared with B-free steel were investigated by using dilatometry, microstructural observations and analysis of B distribution. The effects of these variables on hardenability were discussed in terms of non-equilibrium segregation mechanism and precipitation behavior of B. The retardation of austenite-to-ferrite transformation by B addition depends strongly on cooling rate (CR); this is mainly due to the phenomenon of non-equilibrium grain boundary segregation of B. The hardenability effect of B-bearing steel decreased at higher austenitizing temperature due to the precipitation of borocarbide along austenite grain boundaries. Analysis of B distribution by second ion mass spectroscopy confirmed that the grain boundary segregation of B occurred at low austenitizing temperature of 900 °C, whereas B precipitates were observed along austenite grain boundaries at high austenitizing temperature of 1200 °C. The significant increase in B concentration at austenite grain boundaries due to grain coarsening and a non-equilibrium segregation mechanism may lead to the B precipitation. In contrast, solute B segregated to austenite grain boundaries during cooling after heavy deformation became more stable because the increase in boundary area by grain

  7. Q2 Dependence of Quadrupole Strength in the gamma*p-->Delta+(1232) --> p pi0 Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volker Burkert; Kyungseon Joo; Lee Smith; Ralph Minehart

    2002-01-01

    Models of baryon structure predict a small quadrupole deformation of the nucleon due to residual tensor forces between quarks or distortions from the pion cloud. Sensitivity to quark versus pion degrees of freedom occurs through the Q 2 dependence of the magnetic (M 1+ ), electric (E 1+ ), and scalar (S 1+ ) multipoles in the γ*p → Δ + (1232) → pπ 0 transition. New precision measurements of the ratios E 1+ /M 1+ and S 1+ /M 1+ are reported here over the range Q 2 = 0.4-1.8 GeV 2 . Results are best described by recent unitary models in which the pion cloud plays a dominant role

  8. Optical absorption of carbon nanotube diodes: Strength of the electronic transitions and sensitivity to the electric field polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencarelli, Davide; Pierantoni, Luca; Rozzi, Tullio

    2008-03-01

    Aim of this work is to model electrostatically doped carbon nanotubes (CNT), which have recently proved to perform as ideal PN diodes, also showing photovoltaic properties. The new model is able to predict the optical absorption of semiconducting CNT as function of size and chirality. We justify theoretically, for the first time, the experimentally observed capability of CNTs to detect and select not only a well defined set of frequencies, as resulting from their discrete band structure, but also the polarization of the incident radiation. The analysis develops from an approach proposed in a recent contribution. The periodic structure of CNTs is formally modeled as a photonic crystal, that is characterized by means of numerical simulators. Longitudinal and transverse components of the electric field are shown to excite distinct interband transitions between well defined energy levels. Equivalently, for a given energy of the incident radiation, absorption may show polarization ratios strongly exceeding unity.

  9. Strength and Conditioning Coaches’ Application of the Session Rating of Perceived Exertion Method of Monitoring Within Professional Rugby Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comyns Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Session rating of perceived exertion (session-RPE is a method of monitoring and managing training loads. The purpose of this study was to research how and for what purpose strength and conditioning (S&C coaches implement this monitoring method within professional rugby union. The study also aimed to assess if S&C coaches found this monitoring method to be valid and effective. An online survey containing 24 fixed response questions was used to assess how S&C coaches applied the session-RPE method. The survey was piloted with expert researchers and practitioners in the area of session-RPE prior to distribution and alterations were made to the survey based on the experts’ feedback. Twenty S&C coaches working with professional rugby union clubs in Ireland, England, Scotland and Wales completed the survey. The coaches’ responses indicated that the majority found the session-RPE to be a valid and effective monitoring method. While some good implementation practices were identified, not all of the coaches adhered to these guidelines which may impact on the accuracy of the collected data. For example, 30% of coaches do not collect the RPE for every session that a player does per week limiting the use of the session-RPE variables cumulative training load, training monotony, training strain and acute:chronic load ratio. S&C coaches within rugby should consider using session-RPE as a method of monitoring and implement the method in a manner reflective of research findings to enhance the potential applications of this system in maximising adaptations and minimising the risk of injury.

  10. Generalized oscillator strength for the argon 3p6-3p5 4s transition: Correlation and exchange effects on the characteristic minimum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhifan; Msezane, Alfred Z.; Amusia, M. Ya.

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the generalized oscillator strength (GOS) for a transition of the type np→(n+1)s, where n is the principal quantum number of the outermost filled shell of the atomic ground state, using the random-phase approximation with exchange. We find that the influence of correlation and exchange effects on the position of the characteristic minimum in the GOS of Ar(n=3) is insignificant. Also, our first Born approximation predicts the position of the minimum accurately provided that accurate target wave functions are employed. Our results agree excellently with measurements and are expected to be applicable equally to the corresponding subshells of Ne(n=2), Kr(n=4), and Xe(n=5). (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  11. Generalized oscillator strength for the argon 3p{sup 6}-3p{sup 5} 4s transition: Correlation and exchange effects on the characteristic minimum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhifan [Center for Theoretical Studies of Physical Systems, and Department of Physics, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia 30314 (United States); Msezane, Alfred Z. [Center for Theoretical Studies of Physical Systems, and Department of Physics, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia 30314 (United States); Amusia, M. Ya. [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904, (Israel)

    1999-12-01

    We have investigated the generalized oscillator strength (GOS) for a transition of the type np{yields}(n+1)s, where n is the principal quantum number of the outermost filled shell of the atomic ground state, using the random-phase approximation with exchange. We find that the influence of correlation and exchange effects on the position of the characteristic minimum in the GOS of Ar(n=3) is insignificant. Also, our first Born approximation predicts the position of the minimum accurately provided that accurate target wave functions are employed. Our results agree excellently with measurements and are expected to be applicable equally to the corresponding subshells of Ne(n=2), Kr(n=4), and Xe(n=5). (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  12. Compressive strength and interfacial transition zone of sugar cane bagasse ash concrete: A comparison to the established pozzolans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Asma Abd Elhameed; Shafiq, Nasir; Nuruddin, Muhd Fadhil

    2015-05-01

    Agricultural and industrial by-products are commonly used in concrete production as cement replacement materials (CRMs) or as admixtures to enhance both fresh and hardened properties of concrete as well as to save the environment from the negative effects caused by their disposal. Sugar Cane Bagasse Ash (SCBA) is one of the promising CRMs, it is used as a partial replacement of cement for producing concrete; properties of such concrete depend on the chemical composition, fineness, and burning temperature of SCBA. Approximately 1500 Million tons of sugarcane are annually produced over all the world which leave about 40-45% bagasse after juice crushing for sugar industry giving an average annual production of about 600 Million tons of bagasse as a waste material. This paper presents some findings on the effect of SCBA on workability, compressive strength and microstructure of interfacial zone of concrete and its performance is compared to some of the established CRMs namely Densified Silica Fume, Fly Ash and Microwave Incinerated Rice Husk Ash.

  13. Condition-based maintenance for a system subject to a non-homogeneous wear process with a wear rate transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouladirad, Mitra, E-mail: mitra.fouladirad@utt.f [Universite de Technologie de Troyes, Institut Charles Delaunay, FRE CNRS 2848, 12 rue Marie Curie, 10010 Troyes (France); Grall, Antoine [Universite de Technologie de Troyes, Institut Charles Delaunay, FRE CNRS 2848, 12 rue Marie Curie, 10010 Troyes (France)

    2011-06-15

    The aim of this paper is to propose an adaptive maintenance model for a gradually deteriorating system. The system considered initially deteriorates with a nominal deterioration rate and at an unknown time the system's deterioration rate changes and the new deterioration rate is a time-dependent function. To deal with the transition of mode of deterioration in the framework of the maintenance decision rule an adequate online change detection algorithm is used. The maintenance decision rule is chosen in order to minimise the total maintenance cost including the cost of unavailability. The main result of this paper is to point out the interest of using a detection algorithm and hence the appreciation of a decision rule which takes into account transitions in the deterioration rate.

  14. Condition-based maintenance for a system subject to a non-homogeneous wear process with a wear rate transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouladirad, Mitra; Grall, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose an adaptive maintenance model for a gradually deteriorating system. The system considered initially deteriorates with a nominal deterioration rate and at an unknown time the system's deterioration rate changes and the new deterioration rate is a time-dependent function. To deal with the transition of mode of deterioration in the framework of the maintenance decision rule an adequate online change detection algorithm is used. The maintenance decision rule is chosen in order to minimise the total maintenance cost including the cost of unavailability. The main result of this paper is to point out the interest of using a detection algorithm and hence the appreciation of a decision rule which takes into account transitions in the deterioration rate.

  15. The rate-limiting mechanism of transition metal gettering in multicrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugo, S.A.; Thompson, A.C.; Imaizumi, M.

    1997-01-01

    Multicrystalline silicon is a very interesting material for terrestrial solar cells. Its low cost and respectable energy conversion efficiency (12-15%) makes it arguably the most cost competitive material for large-volume solar power generation. However, the solar cell efficiency of this material is severely degraded by regions of high minority carrier recombination which have been shown to possess both dislocations and microdefects. These structural defects are known to increase in recombination activity with transition metal decoration. Therefore, gettering of metal impurities from the material would be expected to greatly enhance solar cell performance. Contrary to this rationale, experiments using frontside phosphorus and/or backside aluminum treatments have been found to improve regions with low recombination activity while having little or no effect on the high recombination regions and in turn only slightly improving the overall cell performance. The goal of this research is to determine the mechanism by which gettering is ineffectual on these high recombination regions. The authors have performed studies on integrated circuit (IC) quality single crystal and multicrystalline solar cell silicon (mc-silicon) in the as-grown state and after a variety of processing/gettering steps. With Surface Photovoltage measurements of the minority carrier diffusion length which is inversely proportional to carrier recombination, they have seen that aluminum gettering is effective for improving IC quality material but ineffective for improving the regions of initially low diffusion lengths (high recombination rates) in mc-silicon. Of particular interest is the great increase in diffusion length for IC material as compared to the mc-silicon. Clearly the IC material has benefited to a greater extent from the gettering procedure than the mc-silicon

  16. Financial Distress Prediction Using Discrete-time Hazard Model and Rating Transition Matrix Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Bi-Huei; Chang, Chih-Huei

    2009-08-01

    Previous studies used constant cut-off indicator to distinguish distressed firms from non-distressed ones in the one-stage prediction models. However, distressed cut-off indicator must shift according to economic prosperity, rather than remains fixed all the time. This study focuses on Taiwanese listed firms and develops financial distress prediction models based upon the two-stage method. First, this study employs the firm-specific financial ratio and market factors to measure the probability of financial distress based on the discrete-time hazard models. Second, this paper further focuses on macroeconomic factors and applies rating transition matrix approach to determine the distressed cut-off indicator. The prediction models are developed by using the training sample from 1987 to 2004, and their levels of accuracy are compared with the test sample from 2005 to 2007. As for the one-stage prediction model, the model in incorporation with macroeconomic factors does not perform better than that without macroeconomic factors. This suggests that the accuracy is not improved for one-stage models which pool the firm-specific and macroeconomic factors together. In regards to the two stage models, the negative credit cycle index implies the worse economic status during the test period, so the distressed cut-off point is adjusted to increase based on such negative credit cycle index. After the two-stage models employ such adjusted cut-off point to discriminate the distressed firms from non-distressed ones, their error of misclassification becomes lower than that of one-stage ones. The two-stage models presented in this paper have incremental usefulness in predicting financial distress.

  17. Agreement between pre-post measures of change and transition ratings as well as then-tests

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Thorsten; Richter, Susanne; Raspe, Heiner

    2013-01-01

    Background Different approaches have been developed for measuring change. Direct measurement of change (transition ratings) requires asking a patient directly about his judgment about the change he has experienced (reported change). With indirect measures of change, the patients? status is assessed at different time points and differences between them are calculated (measured change). When using the quasi-indirect approach (?then-test?), patients are asked after an intervention to rate their ...

  18. Effect of the space charge layer on pre-transition corrosion rate of Zr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanikawa, S.; Etoh, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The pre- and post-transition oxide films formed in steam at 673 K were investigated by an AC impedance method. The results showed that the space charge layer was present in the pre-transition oxide film and it was absent in the post-transition oxide film. The oxidation kinetics was simulated by oxygen diffusion in the space charge layer. Cubic or one-fourth power law was explained by the effect of the space charge layer. Supposing that the space charge layer formed the potential difference through the oxide film by 0.7 V, calculated oxidation kinetics agreed with the experimental one before transition. This potential difference corresponded to the measured value by AC impedance method within the experimental error. Shadow effect could be explained by this simulation supposing the disappearance of the space charge layer due to the formation of a negative electric field by β-rays. (author)

  19. Calculations with spectroscopic accuracy for energies, transition rates, hyperfine interaction constants, and Landé gJ-factors in nitrogen-like Kr XXX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Li, S.; Jönsson, P.; Fu, N.; Dang, W.; Guo, X. L.; Chen, C. Y.; Yan, J.; Chen, Z. B.; Si, R.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive self-consistent multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculations and second-order many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) calculations are performed for the lowest 272 states belonging to the 2s22p3, 2s2p4, 2p5, 2s22p23l, and 2s2p33l (l=s, p, d) configurations of N-like Kr XXX. Complete and consistent data sets of level energies, wavelengths, line strengths, oscillator strengths, lifetimes, AJ, BJ hyperfine interaction constants, Landé gJ-factors, and electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic quadrupole (M2) transition rates among all these levels are given. The present MCDF and MBPT results are compared with each other and with other available experimental and theoretical results. The mean relative difference between our two sets of level energies is only about 0.003% for these 272 levels. The accuracy of the present calculations are high enough to facilitate identification of many observed spectral lines. These accurate data can be served as benchmark for other calculations and can be useful for fusion plasma research and astrophysical applications.

  20. The effect of the long-wavelength approximation on the one-photon transition rates for heavy quarkonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, J. Jr.; Adamova, D.

    1985-05-01

    A simple model of the one-photon transitions in heavy quarkonia is presented based on a quark-antiquark Hamiltonian with spin-dependent potential terms. qq-bar bound state wavefunctions are obtained treating the whole Hamiltonian nonperturbatively, including the tensor term. The one-photon transition rates are calculated using these wave functions and a non-relativistic electromagnetic current density operator. All the relevant terms in the multipole decomposition are taken into account and the results are compared with those obtained after performing the long-wavelength limit as well as with results given by other authors. (author)

  1. Anaerobic methane oxidation rates at the sulfate-methane transition in marine sediments from Kattegat and Skagerrak (Denmark)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iversen, N.; Jorgensen, B.B.

    1985-01-01

    Concomitant radiotracer measurements were made of in situ rates of sulfate reduction and anaerobic methane oxidation in 2-3-m-long sediment cores. Methane accumulated to high concentrations (> 1 mM CH 4 ) only below the sulfate zone, at 1 m or deeper in the sediment. Sulfate reduction showed a broad maximum below the sediment surface and a smaller, narrow maximum at the sulfate-methane transition. Methane oxidation was low (0.002-0.1 nmol CH 4 cm -3 d -1 ) throughout the sulfate zone and showed a sharp maximum at the sulfate-methane transition, coinciding with the sulfate reduction maximum. Total anaerobic methane oxidation at two stations was 0.83 and 1.16 mmol CH 4 m -2 d -1 , of which 96% was confined to the sulfate-methane transition. All the methane that was calculated to diffuse up into the sulfate-methane transition was oxidized in this zone. The methane oxidation was equivalent to 10% of the electron donor requirement for the total measured sulfate reduction. A third station showed high sulfate concentrations at all depths sampled and the total methane oxidation was only 0.013 mmol m -2 d -1 . From direct measurements of rates, concentration gradients, and diffusion coefficients, simple calculations were made of sulfate and methane fluxes and of methane production rates

  2. Effect of hydriding temperature and strain rate on the ductile-brittle transition in β treated Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of hydriding temperature and strain rate on the ductile-brittle transition in β treated Zircaloy-4 has been investigated. The hydriding temperature used is 700degC, strain rates being 4x10 -4 s -1 and 4x10 -3 s -1 . The results show that at same conditions the ductility of hydrides decreases as the hydriding temperature decreases. There exists a critical temperature (transition temperature) of 250degC for hydriding at 700degC, below which the hydrided specimens (and so for the hydrides) are brittle, while above it they are ductile. This transition temperature is lower than the one mentioned by various authors obtained for hydriding at 400degC. For the same hydriding temperature of 700degC, the specimens tested at 4x10 -3 s -1 are less ductile than those tested at 4x10 -4 s -1 . Furthermore, unlike at a strain rate of 4x10 -4 s -1 , there is no more a clear ductile-brittle transition behaviour. (author)

  3. New technique for a simultaneous estimation of the level density and radiative strength functions of dipole transitions at E sub e sub x<=B sub n -0.5 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khitrov, V A

    2001-01-01

    The new, model-independent method to estimate simultaneously the level densities excited in the (n,gamma) reaction and the radiative strength functions of dipole transitions is developed. The method can be applied for any nucleus and reaction followed by cascade gamma-emission. It is just necessary to measure the intensities of two-step gamma-cascades depopulating one or several high-excited states and determine the quanta ordering in the main portion of the observed cascades. The method provides a sufficiently narrow interval of most probable densities of levels with given J suppi and radiative strength functions of dipole transitions populating them.

  4. Atomistic Simulation of the Rate-Dependent Ductile-to-Brittle Failure Transition in Bicrystalline Metal Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Weiwei; Cao, Penghui; Park, Harold S

    2018-02-14

    The mechanical properties and plastic deformation mechanisms of metal nanowires have been studied intensely for many years. One of the important yet unresolved challenges in this field is to bridge the gap in properties and deformation mechanisms reported for slow strain rate experiments (∼10 -2 s -1 ), and high strain rate molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (∼10 8 s -1 ) such that a complete understanding of strain rate effects on mechanical deformation and plasticity can be obtained. In this work, we use long time scale atomistic modeling based on potential energy surface exploration to elucidate the atomistic mechanisms governing a strain-rate-dependent incipient plasticity and yielding transition for face centered cubic (FCC) copper and silver nanowires. The transition occurs for both metals with both pristine and rough surfaces for all computationally accessible diameters (ductile-to-brittle transition in failure mode similar to previous experimental studies on bicrystalline silver nanowires is observed, which is driven by differences in dislocation activity and grain boundary mobility as compared to the high strain rate case.

  5. A combined neural network and mechanistic approach for the prediction of corrosion rate and yield strength of magnesium-rare earth alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birbilis, N.; Cavanaugh, M.K.; Sudholz, A.D.; Zhu, S.M.; Easton, M.A.; Gibson, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → This study presents a body of corrosion data for a set of custom alloys and displays this in multivariable space. These alloys represent the next generation of Mg alloys for auto applications. → The data is processed using an ANN model, which makes it possible to yield a single expression for prediction of corrosion rate (and strength) as a function of any input composition (of Ce, La or Nd between 0 and 6 wt.%). → The relative influence of the various RE elements on corrosion is assessed, with the outcome that Nd additions can offer comparable strength with minimal rise in corrosion rate. → The morphology and solute present in the eutectic region itself (as opposed to just the intermetallic presence) was shown - for the first time - to also be a key contributor to corrosion. → The above approach sets the foundation for rational alloy design of alloys with corrosion performance in mind. - Abstract: Additions of Ce, La and Nd to Mg were made in binary, ternary and quaternary combinations up to ∼6 wt.%. This provided a dataset that was used in developing a neural network model for predicting corrosion rate and yield strength. Whilst yield strength increased with RE additions, corrosion rates also systematically increased, however, this depended on the type of RE element added and the combination of elements added (along with differences in intermetallic morphology). This work is permits an understanding of Mg-RE alloy performance, and can be exploited in Mg alloy design for predictable combinations of strength and corrosion resistance.

  6. Absolute El, {delta}K= O Transition Rates in Odd-Mass Pm and Eu-Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmskog, S G

    1967-06-15

    The half life of the 5/2{sup -} (532) intrinsic state in {sup 151}Pm, {sup 153}Eu and {sup 155}Eu has been determined by the delayed coincidence method. The absolute E1, {delta}K = 0 transition probabilities between the 5/2{sup -} (532) -> 5/2{sup +} (413) intrinsic states have been deduced and compared with theoretical predictions, using the Nilsson model as a starting point. The effect on the predicted transition probabilities obtained by adding pairing correlations and Coriolis coupling have also been studied. It has been found that the experimental transition rates, which are still strongly enhanced, cannot be explained by these contributions alone. It is therefore suggested that collective dipole contributions like those arising through the octupole excitations are of importance.

  7. Are rate of perceived exertion and feelings of pleasure/displeasure modified in elderly women undergoing 8 week of strength training of prescribe intensity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benites, Mariana L; Alves, Ragami C; Ferreira, Sandro S; Follador, Lucio; da Silva, Sergio G

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to verify the rate of perceived exertion and feelings of pleasure/displeasure in elderly women, who did normally perform physical exercises, following eight weeks of strength training in a constant routine. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven sedentary women were subjected to anthropometric assessment. The maximum load (100%) for each used in this study was determined by performing a test to determined the 1RM for each of them according to the protocol of Fatouros et al. and the Feeling Scale and RPE scale were explained to the women. After these initial procedures, the subjects followed a routine for strength training, performing three sets of repetitions at 70% of the one-repetition maximum for each exercise (bench press, leg extension, pulldown, leg curl) without modifying the exercises and their execution order. The frequency of training was three days per week. ANOVA was used to analyze the behavior of the dependent variable, and the post hoc tests were used to identify significant differences. [Results] Strength increased only in the fifth week. The rate of perceived exertion showed a reduction only in the fifth week in the leg extension, pulldown, leg curl. [Conclusion] The percentage of 70% the one-repetition maximum recommended to increase the strength gains and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle does not provide feelings of displeasure when performing proposed exercise. However, it may be possible to modulate this percentage to obtain more pleasant feelings over two months.

  8. Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of a novel FeCrNiBSi advanced high-strength steel: Slow, accelerated and fast casting cooling rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askari-Paykani, Mohsen; Shahverdi, Hamid Reza, E-mail: shahverdi@modares.ac.ir; Miresmaeili, Reza

    2016-06-21

    In the current work, three different solidification routes and a two-step heat treatment process were applied to a novel FeCrNiBSi alloy system to introduce a new candidate for advanced high-strength steels. The evolution of the microstructure after solidification, heat treatment, and tensile deformation was characterized using optical and electron microscopy techniques, as well as hardness and room temperature uniaxial tensile tests. The effects of the different solidification routes and heat treatment parameters on the deformation and fracture mechanisms of this steel are discussed. Grain refinement, precipitation hardening, and solid solution as a result of the fast casting cooling rate led to an increase in strength at improved ductility. This result can be explained partly by the less severe stress/strain partitioning at the matrix grain/M{sub 2}B interfaces and better interface cohesion. Moreover, the stress/strain partitioning characteristics between the matrix grains and M{sub 2}B led to a higher initial strain hardening rate. The fast casting cooling rate further promoted ductile fracture mechanisms, which is a result of increased cleavage fracture stress. The higher casting cooling rate and two-step heat treatment resulted in a strong increase in formability index, from 8 GPa% to 24 GPa%, at which the mechanical properties occupy the TRIP envelope. Heat treatment of the fast-cooling specimens led to a small reduction in yield and tensile strength and 22% total elongation percentage improvement (from 10% to 32%).

  9. The Effects of Industrial Protective Gloves and Hand Skin Temperatures on Hand Grip Strength and Discomfort Rating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Z. Ramadan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Daily working activities and functions require a high contribution of hand and forearm muscles in executing grip force. To study the effects of wearing different gloves on grip strength, under a variety of hand skin temperatures, an assessment of the maximum grip strength was performed with 32 healthy male workers with a mean age (standard deviation of 30.44 (5.35 years wearing five industrial gloves at three hand skin temperatures. Their ages and anthropometric characteristics including body mass index (BMI, hand length, hand width, hand depth, hand palm, and wrist circumference were measured. The hand was exposed to different bath temperatures (5 °C, 25 °C, and 45 °C and hand grip strength was measured using a Jamar hydraulic hand dynamometer with and without wearing the gloves (chemical protection glove, rubber insulating glove, anti-vibration impact glove, cotton yarn knitted glove, and RY-WG002 working glove. The data were analyzed using the Shapiro–Wilk test, Pearson correlation coefficient, Tukey test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA of the within-subject design analysis. The results showed that wearing gloves significantly affected the maximum grip strength. Wearing the RY-WG002 working glove produced a greater reduction on the maximum grip when compared with the bare hand, while low temperatures (5 °C had a significant influence on grip when compared to medium (25 °C and high (45 °C hand skin temperatures. In addition, participants felt more discomfort in both environmental extreme conditions. Furthermore, they reported more discomfort while wearing neoprene, rubber, and RY-WG002 working gloves.

  10. The Effects of Industrial Protective Gloves and Hand Skin Temperatures on Hand Grip Strength and Discomfort Rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Mohamed Z

    2017-12-04

    Daily working activities and functions require a high contribution of hand and forearm muscles in executing grip force. To study the effects of wearing different gloves on grip strength, under a variety of hand skin temperatures, an assessment of the maximum grip strength was performed with 32 healthy male workers with a mean age (standard deviation) of 30.44 (5.35) years wearing five industrial gloves at three hand skin temperatures. Their ages and anthropometric characteristics including body mass index (BMI), hand length, hand width, hand depth, hand palm, and wrist circumference were measured. The hand was exposed to different bath temperatures (5 °C, 25 °C, and 45 °C) and hand grip strength was measured using a Jamar hydraulic hand dynamometer with and without wearing the gloves (chemical protection glove, rubber insulating glove, anti-vibration impact glove, cotton yarn knitted glove, and RY-WG002 working glove). The data were analyzed using the Shapiro-Wilk test, Pearson correlation coefficient, Tukey test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the within-subject design analysis. The results showed that wearing gloves significantly affected the maximum grip strength. Wearing the RY-WG002 working glove produced a greater reduction on the maximum grip when compared with the bare hand, while low temperatures (5 °C) had a significant influence on grip when compared to medium (25 °C) and high (45 °C) hand skin temperatures. In addition, participants felt more discomfort in both environmental extreme conditions. Furthermore, they reported more discomfort while wearing neoprene, rubber, and RY-WG002 working gloves.

  11. Effects of organic loading rates on reactor performance and microbial community changes during thermophilic aerobic digestion process of high-strength food wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Lee, Jae Won; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the applicability of single-stage thermophilic aerobic digestion (TAD) process treating high-strength food wastewater (FWW), TAD process was operated at four organic loading rates (OLRs) from 9.2 to 37.2 kg COD/m(3)d. The effects of OLRs on microbial community changes were also examined. The highest volumetric removal rate (13.3 kg COD/m(3)d) and the highest thermo-stable protease activity (0.95 unit/mL) were detected at OLR=18.6 kg COD/m(3)d. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles and quantitative PCR (qPCR) results showed significant microbial community shifts in response to changes in OLR. In particular, DGGE and phylogenetic analysis demonstrate that the presence of Bacillus sp. (phylum of Firmicutes) was strongly correlated with efficient removal of organic particulates from high-strength food wastewater. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Energy spectra and E2 transition rates of 124—130Ba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, H.; Seidi, M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we have studied the energy spectra and B(E2) values of 124—130Ba isotopes in the shape phase transition region between the spherical and gamma unstable deformed shapes. We have used a transitional interacting Boson model (IBM), Hamiltonian which is based on affine SU(1,1) Lie algebra in the both IBM-1 and 2 versions and also the Catastrophe theory in combination with a coherent state formalism to generate energy surfaces and determine the exact values of control parameters. Our results for control parameters suggest a combination of U(5) and SO(6) dynamical symmetries in this isotopic chain. Also, the theoretical predictions can be rather well reproduce the experimental counterparts, when the control parameter is approached to the SO(6) limit.

  13. Are rate of perceived exertion and feelings of pleasure/displeasure modified in elderly women undergoing 8 week of strength training of prescribe intensity?

    OpenAIRE

    Benites, Mariana L.; Alves, Ragami C.; Ferreira, Sandro S.; Follador, Lucio; da Silva, Sergio G.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to verify the rate of perceived exertion and feelings of pleasure/displeasure in elderly women, who did normally perform physical exercises, following eight weeks of strength training in a constant routine. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven sedentary women were subjected to anthropometric assessment. The maximum load (100%) for each used in this study was determined by performing a test to determined the 1RM for each of them according to the protocol of ...

  14. Transition rates from schizotypal disorder to psychotic disorder for first-contact patients included in the OPUS trial. A randomized clinical trial of integrated treatment and standard treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone

    2006-01-01

    Only a few randomized clinical trials have tested the effect on transition rates of intervention programs for patients with sub-threshold psychosis-like symptoms.......Only a few randomized clinical trials have tested the effect on transition rates of intervention programs for patients with sub-threshold psychosis-like symptoms....

  15. Transitioning to the New High School Graduation Rate. Policy on Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenard, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    For nearly a decade, states have had flexibility in collecting and reporting graduation rate data for state and federal accountability purposes. But in 2008, the U.S. Department of Education issued new guidelines that require all states to report a new rate--the four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate--beginning in the 2011-2012 school year.…

  16. Effect of Cooling Rate on Phase Transformations in a High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel Studied from the Liquid Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorin, Thomas; Stanford, Nicole; Taylor, Adam; Hodgson, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The phase transformation and precipitation in a high-strength low-alloy steel have been studied over a large range of cooling rates, and a continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram has been produced. These experiments are unique because the measurements were made from samples cooled directly from the melt, rather than in homogenized and re-heated billets. The purpose of this experimental design was to examine conditions pertinent to direct strip casting. At the highest cooling rates which simulate strip casting, the microstructure was fully bainitic with small regions of pearlite. At lower cooling rates, the fraction of polygonal ferrite increased and the pearlite regions became larger. The CCT diagram and the microstructural analysis showed that the precipitation of NbC is suppressed at high cooling rates, and is likely to be incomplete at intermediate cooling rates.

  17. Reversible conformational transition gives rise to 'zig-zag' temperature dependence of the rate constant of irreversible thermoinactivation of enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitsky VYu; Melik-Nubarov, N S; Siksnis, V A; Grinberg VYa; Burova, T V; Levashov, A V; Mozhaev, V V

    1994-01-15

    We have obtained unusual 'zig-zag' temperature dependencies of the rate constant of irreversible thermoinactivation (k(in)) of enzymes (alpha-chymotrypsin, covalently modified alpha-chymotrypsin, and ribonuclease) in a plot of log k(in) versus reciprocal temperature (Arrhenius plot). These dependencies are characterized by the presence of both ascending and descending linear portions which have positive and negative values of the effective activation energy (Ea), respectively. A kinetic scheme has been suggested that fits best for a description of these zig-zag dependencies. A key element of this scheme is the temperature-dependent reversible conformational transition of enzyme from the 'low-temperature' native state to a 'high-temperature' denatured form; the latter form is significantly more stable against irreversible thermoinactivation than the native enzyme. A possible explanation for a difference in thermal stabilities is that low-temperature and high-temperature forms are inactivated according to different mechanisms. Existence of the suggested conformational transition was proved by the methods of fluorescence spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The values of delta H and delta S for this transition, determined from calorimetric experiments, are highly positive; this fact underlies a conclusion that this heat-induced transition is caused by an unfolding of the protein molecule. Surprisingly, in the unfolded high-temperature conformation, alpha-chymotrypsin has a pronounced proteolytic activity, although this activity is much smaller than that of the native enzyme.

  18. Rock mass classification system : transition from RMR to GSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications is expected to replace the rock mass rating : (RMR) system with the Geological Strength Index (GSI) system for classifying and estimating : engineering properties of rock masses. This transition is motivat...

  19. Thermal expansion and cooling rate dependence of transition temperature in ZrTiO4 single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal expansion in ZrTiO 4 single crystal was investigated in the temperature range covering the normal, incommensurate, and commensurate phases. Remarkable change was found at the normal-incommensurate phase transition (T I ) in all thermal expansion coefficients a, b, and c. The spontaneous strains χ as and χ bs along the a and b axes show linear temperature dependence, while the spontaneous strain χ cs along the c axis shows a nonlinear temperature dependence. Small discontinuity along the c direction was observed at the incommensurate-commensurate transition temperature, T c = 845 C. dT I /dP and dT c /dP depend on the cooling rate

  20. The development, retention and decay rates of strength and power in elite rugby union, rugby league and American football: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, Daniel Travis; Gill, Nicholas; Cronin, John; McGuigan, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Strength and power are crucial components to excelling in all contact sports; and understanding how a player's strength and power levels fluctuate in response to various resistance training loads is of great interest, as it will inevitably dictate the loading parameters throughout a competitive season. This is a systematic review of training, maintenance and detraining studies, focusing on the development, retention and decay rates of strength and power measures in elite rugby union, rugby league and American football players. A literature search using MEDLINE, EBSCO Host, Google Scholar, IngentaConnect, Ovid LWW, ProQuest Central, ScienceDirect Journals, SPORTDiscus and Wiley InterScience was conducted. References were also identified from other review articles and relevant textbooks. From 300 articles, 27 met the inclusion criteria and were retained for further analysis. STUDY QUALITY: Study quality was assessed via a modified 20-point scale created to evaluate research conducted in athletic-based training environments. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) quality rating of the included studies was 16.2 ± 1.9; the rating system revealed that the quality of future studies can be improved by randomly allocating subjects to training groups, providing greater description and detail of the interventions, and including control groups where possible. Percent change, effect size (ES = [Post-Xmean - Pre-Xmean)/Pre-SD) calculations and SDs were used to assess the magnitude and spread of strength and power changes in the included studies. The studies were grouped according to (1) mean intensity relative volume (IRV = sets × repetitions × intensity; (2) weekly training frequency per muscle group; and (3) detraining duration. IRV is the product of the number of sets, repetitions and intensity performed during a training set and session. The effects of weekly training frequencies were assessed by normalizing the percent change values to represent the weekly changes in

  1. Fatigue properties for the fracture strength of columnar accessory minerals embedded within metamorphic tectonites: implications for stress magnitude in continental crust at the depth of the brittle-plastic transition zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, N.; Iwashita, N.; Masuda, T.

    2009-04-01

    1. Introduction Previous studies have compiled yield-strength profiles of continental lithosphere based on the results of laboratory measurements and numerical calculations; however, yield-strength values remain poorly constrained, especially at depths below the brittle-plastic transition zone. Recent studies by the authors have refined the microboudin technique for estimating palaeostress magnitude in the deep crust (> 10 km depth). This technique has the potential to provide important information on stress levels in the deep continental crust, an environment to which available in situ stress measurements and palaeopiezometric methods cannot be applied. In applying the microboudinage technique, obtaining an estimate of the palaeostress magnitude requires knowledge of the fracture strength of columnar accessory minerals (e.g., tourmaline, amphibole, and epidote) that are subjected to brittle fracturing during plastic deformation of the surrounding matrix minerals. The absolute magnitude of fracture strength is known to show a marked reduction in the case of fatigue fracture. Fatigue fracture falls into two categories: static fatigue and cyclic fatigue. In the field of experimental rock deformation, stress corrosion by water molecules (static fatigue) is commonly invoked as the mechanism of fatigue fracture; however, evidence of both static and cyclic fatigue has been reported from studies of natural geological samples. The present study focused on the fatigue properties of columnar accessory minerals at high temperatures, with the aim of improving the accuracy of estimates of natural palaeostress magnitude at depth in the crust. 2. Constant stress-rate test A constant stress-rate test was performed to determine the influence of static fatigue on the strength of columnar accessory minerals. The test was conducted under three-point bending with a span distance of 10 mm. Temperature conditions and the crosshead speed were set in the ranges of ambient to 600°C, and 0

  2. Kinetic parameters, collision rates, energy exchanges and transport coefficients of non-thermal electrons in premixed flames at sub-breakdown electric field strengths

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-02

    The effects of an electric field on the collision rates, energy exchanges and transport properties of electrons in premixed flames are investigated via solutions to the Boltzmann kinetic equation. The case of high electric field strength, which results in high-energy, non-thermal electrons, is analysed in detail at sub-breakdown conditions. The rates of inelastic collisions and the energy exchange between electrons and neutrals in the reaction zone of the flame are characterised quantitatively. The analysis includes attachment, ionisation, impact dissociation, and vibrational and electronic excitation processes. Our results suggest that Townsend breakdown occurs for E/N = 140 Td. Vibrational excitation is the dominant process up to breakdown, despite important rates of electronic excitation of CO, CO2 and N2 as well as impact dissociation of O2 being apparent from 50 Td onwards. Ohmic heating in the reaction zone is found to be negligible (less than 2% of peak heat release rate) up to breakdown field strengths for realistic electron densities equal to 1010 cm-3. The observed trends are largely independent of equivalence ratio. In the non-thermal regime, electron transport coefficients are insensitive to mixture composition and approximately constant across the flame, but are highly dependent on the electric field strength. In the thermal limit, kinetic parameters and transport coefficients vary substantially across the flame due to the spatially inhomogeneous concentration of water vapour. A practical approach for identifying the plasma regime (thermal versus non-thermal) in studies of electric field effects on flames is proposed. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  3. Identifying Major Transitions in the Evolution of Lithic Cutting Edge Production Rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Muller

    Full Text Available The notion that the evolution of core reduction strategies involved increasing efficiency in cutting edge production is prevalent in narratives of hominin technological evolution. Yet a number of studies comparing two different knapping technologies have found no significant differences in edge production. Using digital analysis methods we present an investigation of raw material efficiency in eight core technologies broadly representative of the long-term evolution of lithic technology. These are bipolar, multiplatform, discoidal, biface, Levallois, prismatic blade, punch blade and pressure blade production. Raw material efficiency is assessed by the ratio of cutting edge length to original core mass. We also examine which flake attributes contribute to maximising raw material efficiency, as well as compare the difference between expert and intermediate knappers in terms of cutting edge produced per gram of core. We identify a gradual increase in raw material efficiency over the broad sweep of lithic technological evolution. The results indicate that the most significant transition in efficiency likely took place with the introduction of small foliate biface, Levallois and prismatic blade knapping, all introduced in the Middle Stone Age / Middle Palaeolithic among early Homo sapiens and Neanderthals. This suggests that no difference in raw material efficiency existed between these species. With prismatic blade technology securely dated to the Middle Palaeolithic, by including the more recent punch and pressure blade technology our results dispel the notion that the transition to the Upper Palaeolithic was accompanied by an increase in efficiency. However, further increases in cutting edge efficiency are evident, with pressure blades possessing the highest efficiency in this study, indicating that late/epi-Palaeolithic and Neolithic blade technologies further increased efficiency.

  4. Relationship between the shear viscosity and heating rate in metallic glasses below the glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khonik, Vitaly A.; Kobelev, N. P.

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown that first-order irreversible structural relaxation with distributed activation energies must lead to a linear decrease of the logarithm of Newtonian shear viscosity with the logarithm of heating rate upon linear heating of glass. Such a behavior is indeed observed in the experiments on metallic glasses. Structural relaxation-induced viscous flow leads to infra-low-frequency Maxwell viscoelastic internal friction, which is predicted to increase with the heating rate

  5. Large-scale evaluation of β -decay rates of r -process nuclei with the inclusion of first-forbidden transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marketin, T.; Huther, L.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.

    2016-02-01

    Background: r -process nucleosynthesis models rely, by necessity, on nuclear structure models for input. Particularly important are β -decay half-lives of neutron-rich nuclei. At present only a single systematic calculation exists that provides values for all relevant nuclei making it difficult to test the sensitivity of nucleosynthesis models to this input. Additionally, even though there are indications that their contribution may be significant, the impact of first-forbidden transitions on decay rates has not been systematically studied within a consistent model. Purpose: Our goal is to provide a table of β -decay half-lives and β -delayed neutron emission probabilities, including first-forbidden transitions, calculated within a fully self-consistent microscopic theoretical framework. The results are used in an r -process nucleosynthesis calculation to asses the sensitivity of heavy element nucleosynthesis to weak interaction reaction rates. Method: We use a fully self-consistent covariant density functional theory (CDFT) framework. The ground state of all nuclei is calculated with the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model, and excited states are obtained within the proton-neutron relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation (p n -RQRPA). Results: The β -decay half-lives, β -delayed neutron emission probabilities, and the average number of emitted neutrons have been calculated for 5409 nuclei in the neutron-rich region of the nuclear chart. We observe a significant contribution of the first-forbidden transitions to the total decay rate in nuclei far from the valley of stability. The experimental half-lives are in general well reproduced for even-even, odd-A , and odd-odd nuclei, in particular for short-lived nuclei. The resulting data table is included with the article as Supplemental Material. Conclusions: In certain regions of the nuclear chart, first-forbidden transitions constitute a large fraction of the total decay rate and must be

  6. Analysis of the development and prediction of the rate of unemployment in selected countries with market and transitive economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich Maca

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is aimed at the presentation of findings achieved in the study of the dynamics and trends of the rate of unemployment in selected countries with market and transitive economy in the reference period 1995–2001. In addition to the description of developmental trends of analysed time series by means of trend functions of linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, power and inverse types their informative ability was verified as a starting base for the realization of point prediction of investigated events for 2005. With given 95% probability, minimum and maximum values are determined of the evaluated macroeconomic indicator for a defined time horizon.

  7. Measurement of K-line transition rates for Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe and Co using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreras, A.; Stutz, G.; Castellano, G.

    2003-01-01

    Transition rates were obtained from spectra for pure metallic samples of atomic number ranging from 22 to 27, measured with monochromatic incident X-ray beams from a synchrotron source. The experimental setup for this consisted of an energy dispersive spectrometer in a conventional 45-45 deg. geometry, mounted in an evacuated chamber. Absorption, detector efficiency and multiple scattering were taken into account. The results obtained are compared with recent theoretical and experimental data as well as with the well-known theoretical predictions from Scofield

  8. Measurement of K-line transition rates for Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe and Co using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreras, A. E-mail: alejo@quechua.fis.uncor.edu; Stutz, G.; Castellano, G

    2003-08-01

    Transition rates were obtained from spectra for pure metallic samples of atomic number ranging from 22 to 27, measured with monochromatic incident X-ray beams from a synchrotron source. The experimental setup for this consisted of an energy dispersive spectrometer in a conventional 45-45 deg. geometry, mounted in an evacuated chamber. Absorption, detector efficiency and multiple scattering were taken into account. The results obtained are compared with recent theoretical and experimental data as well as with the well-known theoretical predictions from Scofield.

  9. Plants Growth Rate in Evapotranspiration continuous system reactors as the 2nd Treatment at Anaerobic-evapotranspiration system with High Strength Ammonium in Leachate Influent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badrus Zaman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium is one of parameter which responsible to leachate toxicity. Preliminary research was shown that the Fimbristylis globulosa (water plant, Alocasia macrorrhiza (terrestrial plant and Eleusine indica (terrestrial grass were potential plants for used as object in evaporation reactor system with high strength ammonium  concentration in leachate treatment. This research was integrated of anaerobic system with evapotranspiration system with continuous influent using ammonium concentration in leachate was 2000 mg/l NH4-N. Plants growth rate was analyzed for 25 days operated. The result shown that average of thallus growth rate of Fimbristylis globulosa was 17,5 cm d-1. The average of leaf and thallus growth rate of Alocasia macrorrhiza was 18,1 cm d-1 and 3,2 cm d-1 respectively. The average of blade and thallus of Eleusine indica were same that was 4,7 cm d-1.This research conclude that integration system of anaerobic and evpotranspiration was be potential used for high strength ammonium in leachate treatment.

  10. Giant Suppression of the Activation Rate in Dynamical Systems Exhibiting Chaotic Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gac, J. M.; Xafebrowski, J. J.

    2008-05-01

    The phenomenon of giant suppression of activation, when two or more correlated noise signals act on the system, was found a few years ago in dynamical bistable or metastable systems. When the correlation between these noise signals is strong enough and the amplitudes of the noise are chosen correctly --- the life time of the metastable state may be longer than in the case of the application of only a single noise even by many orders of magnitude. In this paper, we investigate similar phenomena in systems exhibiting several chaotic transitions: Pomeau--Manneville intermittency, boundary crisis and interior crisis induced intermittency. Our goal is to show that, in these systems the application of two noise components with the proper choice of the parameters in the case of intermittency can also lengthen the mean laminar phase length or, in the case of boundary crisis, lengthen the time the trajectory spends on the pre-crisis attractor. In systems with crisis induced intermittency, we introduce a new phenomenon we called quasi-deterministic giant suppression of activation in which the lengthening of the laminar phase lengths is caused not by the action of two correlated noise signals but by a single noise term which is correlated with one of the chaotic variables of the system.

  11. Calculation of photonuclear process in the region of several tens MeV. Formulation of exact transition rate for high energy γ-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Hiroaki; Harada, Hideo

    1999-01-01

    The electromagnetic field approximated by using long wave-length limit is not valid for heavy nuclear mass or high energy γ-ray transition. To examine the contribution of the electric multipole field that is neglected in long wave-length limit, we formulize the El transition rate for the strict electric multipole field and compare quantitatively this result with Weisskopf estimate. (author)

  12. Impact of a Ninth-Grade Transition Program on Cumulative GPAs and Credits, Ninth-Grade Dropout Rates, and Student Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrman, B. R.

    2010-01-01

    Concerned educators have been implementing ninth-grade transition programs to help freshmen adjust to the demands in high school and to reduce ninth-grade failure rates. The purpose of this quasi-experimental quantitative study was to investigate the impact of a ninth-grade transition program. The research questions addressed impact on cumulative…

  13. Influence of oxygen flow rate on metal-insulator transition of vanadium oxide thin films grown by RF magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xu; Liu, Xinkun; Li, Haizhu; Huang, Mingju [Henan University, Key Lab of Informational Opto-Electronical Materials and Apparatus, School of Physics and Electronics, Kaifeng (China); Zhang, Angran [South China Normal University, Institute of Electronic Paper Displays, South China Academy of Advanced Optoelectronics, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-03-15

    High-quality vanadium oxide (VO{sub 2}) films have been fabricated on Si (111) substrates by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering deposition method. The sheet resistance of VO{sub 2} has a significant change (close to 5 orders of magnitude) in the process of the metal-insulator phase transition (MIT). The field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) results show the grain size of VO{sub 2} thin films is larger with the increase of oxygen flow. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate the thin films fabricated at different oxygen flow rates grow along the (011) crystalline orientation. As the oxygen flow rate increases from 3 sccm to 6 sccm, the phase transition temperature of the films reduces from 341 to 320 K, the width of the thermal hysteresis loop decreases from 32 to 9 K. The thin films fabricated in the condition of 5 sccm have a high temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) -3.455%/K with a small resistivity of 2.795 ρ/Ω cm. (orig.)

  14. Generalized oscillator strength for the transition Aapprox. /sup 1/B/sup 2u/Xapprox. A/sub 1g/ in benzene at initial kinetic energies 400 eV and 500 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klump, K N; Lassettre, E N

    1977-10-01

    Generalized oscillator strengths, f, for the transition A/sup 1/B/sub 2u/ reverse arrow X/sup 1/A/sub 1g/ in benzene, determined by electron impact methods, are reported as a function of the momentum change. At scattering angles down to 2.5/sup 0/ helium was used as the comparison gas. Determinations are also reported at theta = 0/sup 0/ using mercury as the comparison gas. The oscillator strength curve has both a minimum and a maximum due to the superposition of electric dipole and octupole transitions. The band envelope is studied and is shown to remain unchanged in shape but is shifted by h nu/sub 6/ approximately 0.065 eV with increasing angle due to the shift from electric dipole to octupole scattering.

  15. Dose and dose rate effects on coherent-to-incoherent transition of precipitates upon irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhengchao

    2006-01-01

    A typical precipitation hardened alloy, Cu-Co dilute alloy was selected to study the precipitation behavior and irradiation effect on precipitates. It is found that the principal effect of ion irradiation on the coherent precipitates is loss of coherency, and TEM cross-section observations show that the fraction of the incoherent precipitates is dependent on dose but not on dose rate during heavy ion irradiation.

  16. Population growth, interest rate, and housing tax in the transitional China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ling-Yun; Wen, Xing-Chun

    2017-03-01

    This paper combines and develops the models in Lastrapes (2002) and Mankiw and Weil (1989), which enables us to analyze the effects of interest rate and population growth shocks on housing price in one integrated framework. Based on this model, we carry out policy simulations to examine whether the housing (stock or flow) tax reduces the housing price fluctuations caused by interest rate or population growth shocks. Simulation results imply that the choice of housing tax tools depends on the kind of shock that housing market faces. In the situation where the housing price volatility is caused by the population growth shock, the flow tax can reduce the volatility of housing price while the stock tax makes no difference to it. If the shock is resulting from the interest rate, the policy maker should not impose any kind of the housing taxes. Furthermore, the effect of one kind of the housing tax can be strengthened by that of the other type of housing tax.

  17. Crossover behavior of the thermal conductance and Kramers’ transition rate theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velizhanin, Kirill A.; Sahu, Subin; Chien, Chih-Chun; Dubi, Yonatan; Zwolak, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Kramers’ theory frames chemical reaction rates in solution as reactants overcoming a barrier in the presence of friction and noise. For weak coupling to the solution, the reaction rate is limited by the rate at which the solution can restore equilibrium after a subset of reactants have surmounted the barrier to become products. For strong coupling, there are always sufficiently energetic reactants. However, the solution returns many of the intermediate states back to the reactants before the product fully forms. Here, we demonstrate that the thermal conductance displays an analogous physical response to the friction and noise that drive the heat current through a material or structure. A crossover behavior emerges where the thermal reservoirs dominate the conductance at the extremes and only in the intermediate region are the intrinsic properties of the lattice manifest. Not only does this shed new light on Kramers’ classic turnover problem, this result is significant for the design of devices for thermal management and other applications, as well as the proper simulation of transport at the nanoscale.

  18. A Longitudinal Study into Indicators of Mental Health, Strengths and Difficulties Reported by Boarding Students as They Transition from Primary School to Secondary Boarding Schools in Perth, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, David J.; Lester, Leanne

    2017-01-01

    This study examined indicators of mental health, as well as strengths and difficulties, as reported by same-age boarding and non-boarding students spanning four time points over a 2-year period as they transitioned from primary to boarding school in Western Australia (i.e., at the end of Grade 7, beginning of Grade 8, end of Grade 8, and end of…

  19. Men with Sickle Cell Anemia and Priapism Exhibit Increased Hemolytic Rate, Decreased Red Blood Cell Deformability and Increased Red Blood Cell Aggregate Strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kizzy-Clara Cita

    Full Text Available To investigate the association between priapism in men with sickle cell anemia (SCA and hemorheological and hemolytical parameters.Fifty-eight men with SCA (median age: 38 years were included; 28 who had experienced priapism at least once during their life (priapism group and 30 who never experienced this complication (control group. Twenty-two patients were treated with hydroxycarbamide, 11 in each group. All patients were at steady state at the time of inclusion. Hematological and biochemical parameters were obtained through routine procedures. The Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer was used to measure red blood cell (RBC deformability at 30 Pa (ektacytometry and RBC aggregation properties (laser backscatter versus time. Blood viscosity was measured at a shear rate of 225 s-1 using a cone/plate viscometer. A principal component analysis was performed on 4 hemolytic markers (i.e., lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT, total bilirubin (BIL levels and reticulocyte (RET percentage to calculate a hemolytic index.Compared to the control group, patients with priapism exhibited higher ASAT (p = 0.01, LDH (p = 0.03, RET (p = 0.03 levels and hemolytic indices (p = 0.02. Higher RBC aggregates strength (p = 0.01 and lower RBC deformability (p = 0.005 were observed in patients with priapism compared to controls. After removing the hydroxycarbamide-treated patients, RBC deformability (p = 0.01 and RBC aggregate strength (p = 0.03 were still different between the two groups, and patients with priapism exhibited significantly higher hemolytic indices (p = 0.01 than controls.Our results confirm that priapism in SCA is associated with higher hemolytic rates and show for the first time that this complication is also associated with higher RBC aggregate strength and lower RBC deformability.

  20. Examination of factors associated with use rates after transition from a universal to partial motorcycle helmet use law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Brendan J; Barrette, Timothy P; Morden, Jeffery; Savolainen, Peter T; Gates, Timothy J

    2017-01-02

    Motorcycle riders account for a disproportionately high number of traffic injuries and fatalities compared to occupants of other vehicle types. Though research has demonstrated the benefits of helmet use in preventing serious and fatal injuries in the event of a crash, helmet use has remained relatively stable in the United States, where the most recent national estimates show a 64% use rate. Use rates have been markedly lower among those states that do not have a universal helmet law for all riders. In 2012, the state of Michigan repealed its longstanding mandatory helmet use law. In order to gain insights as to the effects of this legislative change, a study was conducted to examine short-term changes in helmet use and identify factors associated with use rates. A statewide direct observation survey was conducted 1 year after the transition from a universal helmet law to a partial helmet law. A random parameters logistic regression model was estimated to identify motorcyclist, roadway, and environmental characteristics associated with helmet use. This modeling framework accounts for both intravehicle correlation (between riders and passengers on the same motorcycle) as well as unobserved heterogeneity across riders due to important unobserved factors. Helmet use was shown to vary across demographic segments of the motorcyclist population. Use rates were higher among Caucasian riders, as well as among those age 60 and above. No significant difference was observed between male and female riders. Use was also found to vary geographically, temporally, and with respect to various environmental characteristics. Geographically, helmet use rates tended to be correlated with historical restraint use trends, which may be reflective of riding environment and general differences in the riding population. To this end, rates were also highly variable based upon the type of motorcycle and whether the motorcyclist was wearing high-visibility gear. The study results demonstrate

  1. Optimization of high-rate TN removal in a novel constructed wetland integrated with microelectrolysis system treating high-strength digestate supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Luchen; He, Keli; Wu, Shubiao; Sun, Hao; Wang, Yanfei; Huang, Xu; Dong, Renjie

    2016-08-01

    The potential of high-rate TN removal in three aerated horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetlands to treat high-strength anaerobic digestate supernatant was evaluated. Different strategies of intermittent aeration and effluent recirculation were applied to compare their effect on nitrogen depuration performance. Additional glucose supply and iron-activated carbon based post-treatment systems were established and examined, respectively, to further remove nitrate that accumulated in the effluents from aerated wetlands. The results showed that intermittent aeration (1 h on:1 h off) significantly improved nitrification with ammonium removal efficiency of 90% (18.1 g/(m(2)·d)), but limited TN removal efficiency (53%). Even though effluent recirculation (a ratio of 1:1) increased TN removal from 53% to 71%, the effluent nitrate concentration was still high. Additional glucose was used as a post-treatment option and further increased the TN removal to 82%; however, this implementation caused additional organic pollution. Furthermore, the iron-activated carbon system stimulated with a microelectrolysis process achieved greater than 85% effluent nitrate removal and resulted in 86% TN removal. Considering the high TN removal rate, aerated constructed wetlands integrated with a microelectrolysis-driven system show great potential for treating high-strength digestate supernatant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hip rate of force development and strength are impaired in females with patellofemoral pain without signs of altered gluteus medius and maximus morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Guilherme S; Barton, Christian John; Serrão, Fábio Viadanna

    2018-02-01

    To compare rate of force development (RFD) and isometric muscle strength of the hip abductors and extensors; and the thickness and the amount of non-contractile tissue of the gluteus medius and maximus between females with and without patellofemoral pain (PFP). Cross-sectional study. Fifty-four physically active females (27 with PFP and 27 healthy individuals) were studied. Hip muscle isometric strength and RFD was evaluated using isokinetic dynamometry. RFD was measured until 30%, 60%, and 90% of the maximal isometric torque (MIT). Hip muscle morphology was evaluated using ultrasonography. The PFP group possessed slower RFD compared to the control group by 33% for hip abductors until 90%MIT (-0.23%/ms, 95%CI -0.44 to -0.02, ES=0.59); by 51% for hip extensors until 30%MIT (-0.42%/ms, 95%CI -0.66 to -0.18, ES=0.97); and by 55% for hip extensors until 60%MIT (-0.36%/ms, 95%CI -0.60 to -0.12, ES=0.81). The PFP group possessed reduced isometric torque compared to the control group by 10% for hip abduction (-16.0Nm/kg×100, 95% CI -30.2 to -1.9, ES=0.61) and by 15% for hip extension (-30.1Nm/kg×100, 95%CI -51.4 to -8.9, ES=0.76). No significant between group differences for the thickness and the amount of non-contractile tissue of the gluteus medius and maximus were identified. Females with PFP have deficits in isometric strength and RFD in hip abduction and extension. RFD deficits are greater than strength deficits which may highlight their potential importance. Hip muscle strength and RFD deficits do not appear to be explained by muscle thickness or proportion of non-contractile tissue of the gluteal musculature as measured by ultrasound. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The astrophysical r-process and its dependence on properties of nuclei far from stability beta strength functions and neutron capture rates

    CERN Document Server

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H V; Metzinger, J; Oda, T; Thielemann, F K

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that the astrophysical r-process and the question of its site are very sensitive to 'standard' nuclear physics parameters like the beta decay properties and neutron capture rates. Since for these quantities in almost all r-process calculations up to now, and also in all estimates of the production rates of chronometric pairs, only very rough assumptions have been made, it is attempted to present procedures which put the calculation of these quantities for nuclei far from stability on a reliable physical basis. This is done by a microscopic description of the beta strength function and by using a statistical model based on a 'next to first principles' optical potential including effects of deformation for the neutron capture rates. The beta -decay rates for approximately 6000 nuclei between the beta -stability line and the neutron drip line are calculated. The heavy element synthesis by explosive He burning then is calculated using these beta -rates and using realistic star models treating the supe...

  4. High-precision QED calculations of the hyperfine structure in hydrogen and transition rates in multicharged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volotka, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    Studies of the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen are strongly motivated by the level of accuracy achieved in recent atomic physics experiments, which yield finally model-independent informations about nuclear structure parameters with utmost precision. Considering the current status of the determination of corrections to the hyperfine splitting of the ground state in hydrogen, this thesis provides further improved calculations by taking into account the most recent value for the proton charge radius. Comparing theoretical and experimental data of the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen the proton-size contribution is extracted and a relativistic formula for this contribution is derived in terms of moments of the nuclear charge and magnetization distributions. An iterative scheme for the determination of the Zemach and magnetic radii of the proton is proposed. As a result, the Zemach and magnetic radii are determined and the values are compared with the corresponding ones deduced from data obtained in electron-proton scattering experiments. The extraction of the Zemach radius from a rescaled difference between the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen and in muonium is considered as well. Investigations of forbidden radiative transitions in few-electron ions within ab initio QED provide a most sensitive tool for probing the influence of relativistic electron-correlation and QED corrections to the transition rates. Accordingly, a major part of this thesis is devoted to detailed studies of radiative and interelectronic-interaction effects to the transition probabilities. The renormalized expressions for the corresponding corrections in one- and twoelectron ions as well as for ions with one electron over closed shells are derived employing the two-time Green's function method. Numerical results for the correlation corrections to magnetic transition rates in He-like ions are presented. For the first time also the frequency-dependent contribution is calculated, which has to be

  5. High-precision QED calculations of the hyperfine structure in hydrogen and transition rates in multicharged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volotka, A.V.

    2006-07-01

    Studies of the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen are strongly motivated by the level of accuracy achieved in recent atomic physics experiments, which yield finally model-independent informations about nuclear structure parameters with utmost precision. Considering the current status of the determination of corrections to the hyperfine splitting of the ground state in hydrogen, this thesis provides further improved calculations by taking into account the most recent value for the proton charge radius. Comparing theoretical and experimental data of the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen the proton-size contribution is extracted and a relativistic formula for this contribution is derived in terms of moments of the nuclear charge and magnetization distributions. An iterative scheme for the determination of the Zemach and magnetic radii of the proton is proposed. As a result, the Zemach and magnetic radii are determined and the values are compared with the corresponding ones deduced from data obtained in electron-proton scattering experiments. The extraction of the Zemach radius from a rescaled difference between the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen and in muonium is considered as well. Investigations of forbidden radiative transitions in few-electron ions within ab initio QED provide a most sensitive tool for probing the influence of relativistic electron-correlation and QED corrections to the transition rates. Accordingly, a major part of this thesis is devoted to detailed studies of radiative and interelectronic-interaction effects to the transition probabilities. The renormalized expressions for the corresponding corrections in one- and twoelectron ions as well as for ions with one electron over closed shells are derived employing the two-time Green's function method. Numerical results for the correlation corrections to magnetic transition rates in He-like ions are presented. For the first time also the frequency-dependent contribution is calculated, which has to be

  6. The Reliability and Validity of the English and Spanish Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD and Normal Behavior Rating Scales in a Preschool Sample: Continuum Measures of Hyperactivity and Inattention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakes, Kimberley D.; Swanson, James M.; Riggs, Matt

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the reliability and validity of the English and Spanish versions of the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD-symptom and Normal-behavior (SWAN) rating scale. Method: Parents of preschoolers completed both a SWAN and the well-established Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) on two separate occasions over a span of 3…

  7. Optical transition rates of a meso-substituted thiacarbocyanine in methanol-in-oil reverse micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezcelik, Serdar; Zeynep Atay, N.

    2005-01-01

    We report the photophysical properties of 3,3'-diethyl-5,5'-dichloro-9-phenylthiacarbocyanine (DDPT) in methanol-in-oil (m/o) reverse micellar systems which form methanol droplets stabilized with anionic surfactant aerosol-OT (AOT) in n-heptane. The fluorescence quantum yield of DDPT is enhanced by a factor of 17 in the methanol droplet in comparison with bulk methanol. The fluorescence lifetimes of DDPT in m/o reverse micelles are prolonged up to 2.2 ns with increasing molar ratio of methanol to surfactant (w 0 =[MeOH]/[AOT]), whereas the fluorescence lifetime of DDPT in bulk methanol is 75 ps. The non-radiative rate constants of DDPT in the droplets are decreased by a factor of 40, resulting in a remarkable enhancement in quantum yields, indicating that internal motions of DDPT in the droplets are significantly reduced due to strong electrostatic interactions between the positively charged DDPT and the negatively charged sulfonate head-groups of AOT and the spatial confinement induced by the reverse micellar structure

  8. Integration of balance and strength training into daily life activity to reduce rate of falls in older people (the LiFE study): randomised parallel trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemson, Lindy; Fiatarone Singh, Maria A; Bundy, Anita; Cumming, Robert G; Manollaras, Kate; O'Loughlin, Patricia; Black, Deborah

    2012-08-07

    To determine whether a lifestyle integrated approach to balance and strength training is effective in reducing the rate of falls in older, high risk people living at home. Three arm, randomised parallel trial; assessments at baseline and after six and 12 months. Randomisation done by computer generated random blocks, stratified by sex and fall history and concealed by an independent secure website. Residents in metropolitan Sydney, Australia. Participants aged 70 years or older who had two or more falls or one injurious fall in past 12 months, recruited from Veteran's Affairs databases and general practice databases. Exclusion criteria were moderate to severe cognitive problems, inability to ambulate independently, neurological conditions that severely influenced gait and mobility, resident in a nursing home or hostel, or any unstable or terminal illness that would affect ability to do exercises. Three home based interventions: Lifestyle integrated Functional Exercise (LiFE) approach (n=107; taught principles of balance and strength training and integrated selected activities into everyday routines), structured programme (n=105; exercises for balance and lower limb strength, done three times a week), sham control programme (n=105; gentle exercise). LiFE and structured groups received five sessions with two booster visits and two phone calls; controls received three home visits and six phone calls. Assessments made at baseline and after six and 12 months. Primary measure: rate of falls over 12 months, collected by self report. Secondary measures: static and dynamic balance; ankle, knee and hip strength; balance self efficacy; daily living activities; participation; habitual physical activity; quality of life; energy expenditure; body mass index; and fat free mass. After 12 months' follow-up, we recorded 172, 193, and 224 falls in the LiFE, structured exercise, and control groups, respectively. The overall incidence of falls in the LiFE programme was 1.66 per person

  9. A systematic and detailed investigation of radiative rates for forbidden transitions of astrophysical interest in doubly ionized iron peak elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinet, Pascal; Fivet, Vanessa; Bautista, Manuel

    2015-08-01

    The knowledge of accurate and reliable atomic data for lowly ionized iron peak elements, from scandium to copper, is of paramount importance for the analysis of the high resolution spectra currently available. The third spectra of several iron group elements have been observed in different galactic sources like Herbig-Haro objects in the Orion Nebula [1] and stars like Eta Carinae [2]. However, forbidden transitions between low-lying metastable levels of doubly ionized species have been little investigated so far and radiative rates for those lines remain sparse or inexistent.In the present contribution, we report on the recent study we have performed concerning the determination of magnetic dipole (M1) and electric quadrupole (E2) transition probabilities in those ions. For the calculations, we have extensively used the pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock (HFR) code of Cowan [3] and the central Thomas-Fermi-Dirac potential approximation implemented in AUTOSTRUCTURE [4]. This multi-platform approach allowed us to check the consistency and to assess the accuracy of the results obtained.[1] Mesa-Delgado A. et al., MNRAS 395, 855 (2009)[2] Johansson S. et al., A&A 361, 977 (2000)[3] Cowan R.D., The Theory of Atomic Structure and Spectra, Univ. California Press, Berkeley (1981)[4] Badnell N.R., J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 30, 1 (1997)

  10. Transition to Pulse-Like Rupture, With and Without Inclusion of Evolving Temperature and Pore Pressure, When Accounting for Extreme Weakening at High Slip Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, H.; Dunham, E. M.; Rice, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    We have conducted rupture propagation simulations incorporating the combined effects of thermal pressurization of pore fluid by distributed heating within a finite width shear zone, and flash heating of microscopic contacts. These are probably the primary weakening mechanisms at high coseismic slip rates. For flash heating, we use a rate- and state-dependent friction law in the slip law formulation, accounting for extreme velocity weakening above a weakening slip rate Vw ~ 0.1 m/s that depends on the background temperature, and a very short state evolution distance, L, of ~ 10 μm, which is comparable to the asperity length. We have also conducted a series of calculations with neglecting evolving change in macroscopic temperature, T, and pore pressure, p, and compared the results. Slip rate, V, at a point on a fault increases when a rupture front approaches, and decreases behind it. In the pulse-like solutions, V decreases below Vw, and the point is eventually locked. On the other hand, in the crack-like solutions, V increases again only if we allow evolving change in T and p. In the cases when we neglect changes in T and p, V continues to decrease behind the rupture front as long as we simulate. Here, a question emerges; is the solution crack-like because of the short calculation time? Zheng and Rice [1998] proposed an intuitive criterion between crack-like and pulse-like solutions as follows: If and only if the background shear stress, τb, is larger than a critical value, τpulse, there are roots of τss(V) = τb - μ V/2 cs, where τss is steady-state strength, μ is shear modulus and cs is shear speed. If TZR = - (μ/2cs)/(dτss/dV) at the largest root is near unity, the solution is pulse-like. Our calculations without T and p changes show that the pulse-like solution regime extends above τpulse, at least up to the point where TZR = 0.176, if a rupture is initiated by a perturbation in shear stress in a certain manner. The transition time to pulse

  11. Grouping subjects based on conditioning criteria reveals differences in acquisition rates and in strength of conditioning-specific reflex modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Bell, Carrie A; Schreurs, Bernard G

    2017-11-01

    Averaging behavioral data such as the nictitating membrane response (NMR) across subjects can conceal important individual and group differences. Analyses were conducted of NMR data from rabbits that were grouped based on the point during NMR conditioning when subjects produced 8 conditioned responses (CR) in a set of 10 trials. This resulted in five groups (Early Day 1, Late Day 1, Early Day 2, Late Day 2, Early Day 3) in which group differences in CR acquisition rates were found. Percent (%) CRs were not found to increase monotonically and between-session differences in % CR were found. Conditioning-specific reflex modification (CRM) of the NMR is a type of enhanced reflexive responding of the NMR that is detected when the unconditioned stimulus (US) is presented in the absence of the conditioned stimulus (CS) following paired classical conditioning. CRM occurred in some subjects in all five groups. Subjects from both the group that was fastest and the group that was slowest to reach the learning criterion had unconditioned response (UR) topographies following NMR conditioning that strongly resembled the CR-UR response sequence elicited during NMR conditioning. This finding was most pronounced when the US duration used to assess CRM was equivalent to that used during NMR conditioning, further evidence to support the hypothesis that CRM is a CR that has generalized from the CS to the US. While grouping data based on conditioning criteria did not facilitate identifying individuals more predisposed to exhibiting CRM, strong CRM only occurred in the groups that reached the conditioning criterion the fastest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A poly(glycerol sebacate)-coated mesoporous bioactive glass scaffold with adjustable mechanical strength, degradation rate, controlled-release and cell behavior for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dan; Yang, Kai; Tang, Wei; Liu, Yutong; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng

    2015-07-01

    Various requirements in the field of tissue engineering have motivated the development of three-dimensional scaffold with adjustable physicochemical properties and biological functions. A series of multiparameter-adjustable mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) scaffolds with uncrosslinked poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) coating was prepared in this article. MBG scaffold was prepared by a modified F127/PU co-templating process and then PGS was coated by a simple adsorption and lyophilization process. Through controlling macropore parameters and PGS coating amount, the mechanical strength, degradation rate, controlled-release and cell behavior of the composite scaffold could be modulated in a wide range. PGS coating successfully endowed MBG scaffold with improved toughness and adjustable mechanical strength covering the bearing range of trabecular bone (2-12MPa). Multilevel degradation rate of the scaffold and controlled-release rate of protein from mesopore could be achieved, with little impact on the protein activity owing to an "ultralow-solvent" coating and "nano-cavity entrapment" immobilization method. In vitro studies indicated that PGS coating promoted cell attachment and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, without affecting the osteogenic induction capacity of MBG substrate. These results first provide strong evidence that uncrosslinked PGS might also yield extraordinary achievements in traditional MBG scaffold. With the multiparameter adjustability, the composite MBG/PGS scaffolds would have a hopeful prospect in bone tissue engineering. The design considerations and coating method of this study can also be extended to other ceramic-based artificial scaffolds and are expected to provide new thoughts on development of future tissue engineering materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Time-gated single-photon detection module with 110 ps transition time and up to 80 MHz repetition rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttafava, Mauro, E-mail: mauro.buttafava@polimi.it; Boso, Gianluca; Ruggeri, Alessandro; Tosi, Alberto [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Dalla Mora, Alberto [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    We present the design and characterization of a complete single-photon counting module capable of time-gating a silicon single-photon avalanche diode with ON and OFF transition times down to 110 ps, at repetition rates up to 80 MHz. Thanks to this sharp temporal filtering of incoming photons, it is possible to reject undesired strong light pulses preceding (or following) the signal of interest, allowing to increase the dynamic range of optical acquisitions up to 7 decades. A complete experimental characterization of the module highlights its very flat temporal response, with a time resolution of the order of 30 ps. The instrument is fully user-configurable via a PC interface and can be easily integrated in any optical setup, thanks to its small and compact form factor.

  14. Thermal rate coefficients in collinear versus bent transition state reactions: the N+N{sub 2} case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagana, Antonio; Faginas Lago, Noelia; Rampino, Sergio [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Huarte-Larranaga, FermIn [Computer Simulation and Modeling Lab (CoSMoLab), Parc CientIfic de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); GarcIa, Ernesto [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad del PaIs Vasco, 01006 Vitoria (Spain)], E-mail: lagana05@gmail.com, E-mail: fhuarte@pcb.ub.es, E-mail: e.garcia@ehu.es

    2008-10-15

    Zero total angular momentum exact quantum calculations of the probabilities of the N+N{sub 2} reaction have been performed on the L3 potential energy surface having a bent transition state. This has allowed us to work out J-shifting estimates of the thermal rate coefficient based on the calculation of either detailed (state-to-state) or cumulative (multiconfiguration) probabilities. The results obtained are used to compare the numerical outcomes and the concurrent computational machineries of both quantum and semiclassical approaches as well as to exploit the potentialities of the J-shifting model. The implications of moving the barrier to reaction from the previously proposed collinear geometry of the LEPS to the bent one of L3 are also investigated by comparing the related detailed reactive probabilities.

  15. Time-gated single-photon detection module with 110 ps transition time and up to 80 MHz repetition rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttafava, Mauro; Boso, Gianluca; Ruggeri, Alessandro; Tosi, Alberto; Dalla Mora, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We present the design and characterization of a complete single-photon counting module capable of time-gating a silicon single-photon avalanche diode with ON and OFF transition times down to 110 ps, at repetition rates up to 80 MHz. Thanks to this sharp temporal filtering of incoming photons, it is possible to reject undesired strong light pulses preceding (or following) the signal of interest, allowing to increase the dynamic range of optical acquisitions up to 7 decades. A complete experimental characterization of the module highlights its very flat temporal response, with a time resolution of the order of 30 ps. The instrument is fully user-configurable via a PC interface and can be easily integrated in any optical setup, thanks to its small and compact form factor

  16. Detailing magnetic field strength dependence and segmental artifact distribution of myocardial effective transverse relaxation rate at 1.5, 3.0, and 7.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Antonella; Hezel, Fabian; Positano, Vincenzo; Keilberg, Petra; Pepe, Alessia; Lombardi, Massimo; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-06-01

    Realizing the challenges and opportunities of effective transverse relaxation rate (R2 *) mapping at high and ultrahigh fields, this work examines magnetic field strength (B0 ) dependence and segmental artifact distribution of myocardial R2 * at 1.5, 3.0, and 7.0 T. Healthy subjects were considered. Three short-axis views of the left ventricle were examined. R2 * was calculated for 16 standard myocardial segments. Global and mid-septum R2 * were determined. For each segment, an artifactual factor was estimated as the deviation of segmental from global R2 * value. The global artifactual factor was significantly enlarged at 7.0 T versus 1.5 T (P = 0.010) but not versus 3.0 T. At 7.0 T, the most severe susceptibility artifacts were detected in the inferior lateral wall. The mid-septum showed minor artifactual factors at 7.0 T, similar to those at 1.5 and 3.0 T. Mean R2 * increased linearly with the field strength, with larger changes for global heart R2 * values. At 7.0 T, segmental heart R2 * analysis is challenging due to macroscopic susceptibility artifacts induced by the heart-lung interface and the posterior vein. Myocardial R2 * depends linearly on the magnetic field strength. The increased R2 * sensitivity at 7.0 T might offer means for susceptibility-weighted and oxygenation level-dependent MR imaging of the myocardium. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Variational transition-state theory study of the rate constant of the DMS·OH scavenging reaction by O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Anguita, Juan M; González-Lafont, Àngels; Lluch, José M

    2011-07-30

    The chemical tropospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS, CH3SCH3) degradation involves several steps highly dependent on the environmental conditions. So, intensive efforts have been devoted during the last years to enhance the understanding of the DMS oxidation mechanism under different conditions. The reaction of DMS with OH is considered to be the most relevant process that initiates the whole oxidation process. The experimental observations have been explained by a two-channel mechanism consisting of a H-abstraction process leading to CH3S(O)CH3 and HO2 and an addition reaction leading to the DMS·OH adduct. In the presence of O2, the DMS·OH adduct is competitively scavenged increasing the contribution of the addition channel to the overall DMS oxidation. Recent experimental measurements have determined from a global fit that the rate constant of this scavenging process is independent of pressure and temperature but this rate constant cannot be directly measured. In this article, a variational transition-state theory calculation of the low- and high-pressure rate constants for the reaction between DMS·OH and O2 has been carried out as a function of temperature. Our proposal is that the slight temperature dependence of the scavenging rate constant can only be explained if the H-abstraction bottleneck is preceded by a dynamical bottleneck corresponding to the association process between the DMS·OH adduct and the O2 molecule. The agreement between the low-pressure and high-pressure rate constants confirms the experimental observations. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The astrophysical r-process and its dependence on properties of nuclei far from stability: Beta strength functions and neutron capture rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor, H.V.; Metzinger, J.; Oda, T.; Thielemann, F.K.; Hillebrandt, W.

    1981-01-01

    The question of the astrophysical site of the rapid neutron capture (r-) process which is believed to be responsible for the production of the heavy elements in the universe has been a problem in astrophysics for more than two decades. The solution of this problem is not only dependent on the development of realistic astrophysical supernova models, i.e. correct treatment of the hydrodynamics of gravitational collapse and supernova explosion and the equation of state of hot and dense matter, but is shown in this paper to be very sensitive also to 'standard' nuclear physics properties of nuclei far from stability such as beta decay properties and neutron capture rates. For both of the latter, strongly oversimplifying assumptions, not applying the development in nuclear physics during the last decade, have been made in almost all r-process calculations performed up to now. A critical discussion of the state of the art of such calculations seems therefore to be indicated. In this paper procedures are described which allow one to obtain: 1) β-decay properties (decay rates, β-delayed neutron emissions and fission rates); 2) neutron capture rates for neutron-rich nuclei considerably improved over what has been used up to now. The beta strength functions are calculated for approx. equal to6000 nuclei between beta stability line and neutron drip line. By hydrodynamical supernova explosion calculations using realistic stellar models it is shown that as a consequence of the improved β-rates explosive He burning is a convincing alternative site to the 'classical' r-process whose existence still is questionable. The new β-rates will be important also for the investigation of further astrophysical sites producing heavy elements such as the r(n)-processes in explosive C or Ne burning. (orig.)

  19. Effects of oxygen content and heating rate on phase transition behavior in Bi2(V0.95Ti0.05)O5.475-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taninouchi, Yu-ki; Uda, Tetsuya; Ichitsubo, Tetsu; Awakura, Yasuhiro; Matsubara, Eiichiro

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Phase transition behavior of oxide-ion conductor Bi 2 (V 0.95 Ti 0.05 )O 5.475-x , which has various thermal histories and physical forms. → At the same heating rate of 10 K min -1 , Bi 2 (V 0.95 Ti 0.05 )O 5.475-x with less oxygen content exhibits transition from α f to β f at a higher temperature and the transition from β f to γ f at a lower temperature. → α f directly transformed to β f at fast heating rates. At a slower heating rate of 2 K min -1 , β f precipitated from α f due to the sufficient diffusion of Ti and oxygen vacancies. - Abstract: The phase transition behavior of oxide-ion conductor Bi 2 (V 0.95 Ti 0.05 )O 5.475-x , which has various thermal histories and sample forms, has been studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed that the oxygen content per compositional formula varied with the applied thermal treatment, although no significant structural difference was observed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The phase transition behavior from α f to β f and from β f to γ f , observed at a heating rate of 10 K min -1 , are markedly affected by the sample preparation. For example, the endothermic peak of the transition from α f to β f appeared at around 400 deg. C for quenched powder and at around 320 deg. C for powder cooled at 0.5 K min -1 . The trend of the transition temperatures can be qualitatively explained in terms of oxygen content, i.e., Bi 2 (V 0.95 Ti 0.05 )O 5.475-x with less oxygen content exhibits the transition from α f to β f at a higher temperature and the transition from β f to γ f at a lower temperature. We confirmed the two types of transition behavior from α f to β f depending on heating rate of DSC and high-temperature X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD) analysis. At rapid heating rates of 10 and 40 K min -1 , α f transformed to β f directly. Meanwhile, at a slow heating rate of 2 K min -1 , the β f precipitated from α f because slow heating

  20. Mechanistic dissimilarities between environmentally-influenced fatigue-crack propagation at near-threshold and higher growth rates in lower-strength steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suresh, S.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1981-11-01

    The role of hydrogen gas in influencing fatigue crack propagation is examined for several classes of lower strength pressure vessel and piping steels. Based on measurements over a wide range of growth rates from 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -2/ mm/cycle, crack propagation rates are found to be significantly higher in dehumidified gaseous hydrogen compared to moist air in two distinct regimes of crack growth, namely (i) at the intermediate range of growth typically above approx. 10/sup -5/ mm/cycle, and (ii) at the near-threshold region below approx. 10/sup -6/ mm/cycle approaching lattice dimensions per cycle. Both effects are seen at maximum stress intensities (K/sub max/) far below the sustained-load threshold stress intensity for hydrogen-assisted cracking (K/sub Iscc/). Characteristics of environmentally influenced fatigue crack growth in each regime are shown to be markedly different with regard to fractography and the effect of such variables as load ratio and frequency. It is concluded that the primary mechanisms responsible for the influence of the environment in each regime are distinctly different. Whereas corrosion fatigue behavior at intermediate growth rates can be attributed to hydrogen embrittlement processes, the primary role of moist environments at near-threshold levels is shown to involve a contribution from enhanced crack closure due to the formation of crack surface corrosion deposits at low load ratios.

  1. Effect of cooling rate on the transition temperature in Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yugui; Wang Jinsong; Wang Nanlin; Jiao Xinping; Han Guchang; Chen Zhaojia; Wang Keqin; Wu Xiaoguang

    1989-12-01

    The resistance and a.c. susceptibility measurement show that cooling rate of the cast-annealing samples in heat treatment process has some effect on the 110K superconducting phase in Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system. Rapid quenching of the sample in air from 845 deg C causes oxygen deficiency in lattice and brings about a trifling change of unit cell size along c-axis direction. The d.c. magnetization and specific heat anomaly Δc measurements demostrate that fast cooling rate can reduce the transition temperature of high-T c phase and the lower critical field, and weaken the pinning forces for vertex lines. The peak value of specific heat anomaly of the sample with nominal composition of Bi 1.7 Pb 0.3 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 4.5 O v is still small in comparison with YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 . From the magnetization curve the authors estimate that the superconducting volume fraction is about 20%

  2. Pulse Rate and Transit Time Analysis to Predict Hypotension Events After Spinal Anesthesia During Programmed Cesarean Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolea, Juan; Lázaro, Jesús; Gil, Eduardo; Rovira, Eva; Remartínez, José M; Laguna, Pablo; Pueyo, Esther; Navarro, Augusto; Bailón, Raquel

    2017-09-01

    Prophylactic treatment has been proved to reduce hypotension incidence after spinal anesthesia during cesarean labor. However, the use of pharmacological prophylaxis could carry out undesirable side-effects on mother and fetus. Thus, the prediction of hypotension becomes an important challenge. Hypotension events are hypothesized to be related to a malfunctioning of autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation of blood pressure. In this work, ANS responses to positional changes of 51 pregnant women programmed for a cesarean labor were explored for hypotension prediction. Lateral and supine decubitus, and sitting position were considered while electrocardiographic and pulse photoplethysmographic signals were recorded. Features based on heart rate variability, pulse rate variability (PRV) and pulse transit time (PTT) analysis were used in a logistic regression classifier. The results showed that PRV irregularity changes, assessed by approximate entropy, from supine to lateral decubitus, and standard deviation of PTT in supine decubitus were found as the combination of features that achieved the best classification results sensitivity of 76%, specificity of 70% and accuracy of 72%, being normotensive the positive class. Peripheral regulation and blood pressure changes, measured by PRV and PTT analysis, could help to predict hypotension events reducing prophylactic side-effects in the low-risk population.

  3. Impact toughness and microstructure relationship in niobium- and vanadium-microalloyed steels processed with varied cooling rates to similar yield strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, S. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, LA 70504-4130 (United States); Misra, R.D.K. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, LA 70504-4130 (United States)]. E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu; Mannering, T. [Nucor-Yamato Steel, P.O. Box 1228, 5929 East State Highway 18, Blytheville, AR 72316 (United States); Panda, D. [Nucor-Yamato Steel, P.O. Box 1228, 5929 East State Highway 18, Blytheville, AR 72316 (United States); Jansto, S.G. [Reference Metals, 1000 Old Pond Road, Bridgeville, PA 15017 (United States)

    2006-11-15

    We describe here the relationship between microstructure and impact toughness behavior as a function of cooling rate for industrially processed Nb- and V-microalloyed steels of almost similar yield strength ({approx}60 ksi). Both Nb- and V-microalloyed steels exhibited increase in toughness with increase in cooling rates during processing. However, Nb-microalloyed steels were characterized by relatively higher toughness than the V-microalloyed steels under identical processing conditions. The microstructure of Nb- and V-microalloyed steels processed at conventional cooling rate, primarily consisted of polygonal ferrite-pearlite microconstituents, while Nb-microalloyed steels besides polygonal ferrite and pearlite contained significant fraction of degenerated pearlite. The microstructure of Nb- and V-microalloyed steels processed at relatively higher cooling rate contained degenerated pearlite and lath-type (acicular) ferrite in addition to the primary ferrite-pearlite constituents. The fraction of degenerated pearlite was higher in Nb-microalloyed steels than in the V-microalloyed steels. In both Nb- and V-microalloyed steels the precipitation characteristics were similar with precipitation occurring at grain boundaries, dislocations, and in the ferrite matrix. Fine-scale ({approx}5-10 nm) precipitation was observed in the ferrite matrix of both the steels. The selected area diffraction (SAD) pattern analysis revealed that these fine precipitates were MC type of niobium and vanadium carbides in the respective steels and followed Baker-Nutting orientation relationship with the ferrite matrix. The microstructural studies suggest that the increase in toughness of Nb-microalloyed steels is attributed to higher fraction of degenerated pearlite in the steel.

  4. Impact toughness and microstructure relationship in niobium- and vanadium-microalloyed steels processed with varied cooling rates to similar yield strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugam, S.; Misra, R.D.K.; Mannering, T.; Panda, D.; Jansto, S.G.

    2006-01-01

    We describe here the relationship between microstructure and impact toughness behavior as a function of cooling rate for industrially processed Nb- and V-microalloyed steels of almost similar yield strength (∼60 ksi). Both Nb- and V-microalloyed steels exhibited increase in toughness with increase in cooling rates during processing. However, Nb-microalloyed steels were characterized by relatively higher toughness than the V-microalloyed steels under identical processing conditions. The microstructure of Nb- and V-microalloyed steels processed at conventional cooling rate, primarily consisted of polygonal ferrite-pearlite microconstituents, while Nb-microalloyed steels besides polygonal ferrite and pearlite contained significant fraction of degenerated pearlite. The microstructure of Nb- and V-microalloyed steels processed at relatively higher cooling rate contained degenerated pearlite and lath-type (acicular) ferrite in addition to the primary ferrite-pearlite constituents. The fraction of degenerated pearlite was higher in Nb-microalloyed steels than in the V-microalloyed steels. In both Nb- and V-microalloyed steels the precipitation characteristics were similar with precipitation occurring at grain boundaries, dislocations, and in the ferrite matrix. Fine-scale (∼5-10 nm) precipitation was observed in the ferrite matrix of both the steels. The selected area diffraction (SAD) pattern analysis revealed that these fine precipitates were MC type of niobium and vanadium carbides in the respective steels and followed Baker-Nutting orientation relationship with the ferrite matrix. The microstructural studies suggest that the increase in toughness of Nb-microalloyed steels is attributed to higher fraction of degenerated pearlite in the steel

  5. Compressive strength and initial water absorption rate for cement brick containing high-density polyethylene (HDPE) as a substitutional material for sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Noorwirdawati; Din, Norhasmiza; Sheikh Khalid, Faisal; Shahidan, Shahiron; Radziah Abdullah, Siti; Samad, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Mohamad, Noridah

    2017-11-01

    The rapid growth of today’s construction sector requires high amount of building materials. Bricks, known to have solid properties and easy to handle, which leads to the variety of materials added or replaced in its mixture. In this study, high density polyethylene (HDPE) was selected as the substitute materials in the making of bricks. The reason behind the use of HDPE is because of its recyclable properties and the recycling process that do not emit hazardous gases to the atmosphere. Other than that, the use of HDPE will help reducing the source of pollution by avoiding the millions of accumulated plastic waste in the disposal sites. Furthermore, the material has high endurance level and is weatherproof. This study was carried out on experimenting the substitute materials in the mixture of cement bricks, a component of building materials which is normally manufactured using the mixture of cement, sand and water, following a certain ratios, and left dried to produce blocks of bricks. A series of three different percentages of HDPE were used, which were 2.5%, 3.0% and 3.5%. Tests were done on the bricks, to study its compressive strength and the initial water absorption rate. Both tests were conducted on the seventh and 28th day. Based on the results acquired, for compressive strength tests on the 28th day, the use of 2.5% of HDPE shown values of 12.6 N/mm2 while the use of 3.0% of HDPE shown values of 12.5 N/mm2. Onto the next percentage, 3.5% of HDPE shown values of 12.5 N/mm2.

  6. On the strength of the U{sub A}(1) anomaly at the chiral phase transition in N{sub f}=2 QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, Bastian B. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Goethe-Universität,D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Institut für theoretische Physik, Universität Regensburg,D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Francis, Anthony [Department of Physics & Astronomy, York University,4700 Keele St, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3 (Canada); Meyer, Harvey B. [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Institut für Kernphysik and Helmholtz Institut Mainz,Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Philipsen, Owe [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Goethe-Universität,D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Robaina, Daniel; Wittig, Hartmut [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Institut für Kernphysik and Helmholtz Institut Mainz,Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2016-12-30

    We study the thermal transition of QCD with two degenerate light flavours by lattice simulations using O(a)-improved Wilson quarks. Temperature scans are performed at a fixed value of N{sub t}=(aT){sup −1}=16, where a is the lattice spacing and T the temperature, at three fixed zero-temperature pion masses between 200 MeV and 540 MeV. In this range we find that the transition is consistent with a broad crossover. As a probe of the restoration of chiral symmetry, we study the static screening spectrum. We observe a degeneracy between the transverse isovector vector and axial-vector channels starting from the transition temperature. Particularly striking is the strong reduction of the splitting between isovector scalar and pseudoscalar screening masses around the chiral phase transition by at least a factor of three compared to its value at zero temperature. In fact, the splitting is consistent with zero within our uncertainties. This disfavours a chiral phase transition in the O(4) universality class.

  7. Training-induced changes in muscle CSA,muscle strength, EMG and rate of force development in elderly subjects after long-term unilateral disuse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetta, Charlotte; Aagaard, Per; Rosted, Anne

    2004-01-01

    , maximal isometric strength, RFD, and muscle activation in elderly men and women recovering from long-term muscle disuse and subsequent hip surgery. The improvement in both muscle mass and neural function is likely to have important functional implications for elderly individuals........ Thirty subjects completed the trial. In the strength-training group, significant increases were observed in maximal isometric muscle strength (24%, P impulse (27-32%, P

  8. Effective inclusion of polarization effects in calculations of the oscillator strengths and transition energies in atoms and molecules using the equation-of-motion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushkov, A.V.; Kol'tsova, N.Yu.

    1994-01-01

    Equations of motion were solved by a modified method in a quasi-particle representation of the density functional taking into account the most important polarization effects, including the so-called 2p-2h two-particle-two-hole interactions. Based on these calculations, spectroscopic data on energies and oscillator strengths of the helium atom (the test computation), carbon monoxide, nitrogen molecule, and ethylene are presented that refine some previously reported experimental and theoretical results. It is shown that in some cases the inclusion of polarization corrections introduced by 2p-2h effects is of basic importance because it provides up to ∼30% contribution to the energies and oscillator strengths. 23 refs., 5 tabs

  9. Gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome determined with 99mTc-labeled pellets and scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, O.H.; Gjorup, T.; Christensen, F.N.

    1986-12-01

    A new method employing 99mTc-labeled pellets for determination of the gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time is described. The participants were six normal subjects and 16 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (eight with diarrhea and eight with obstipation as the primary complaint). The gastric emptying rate was the same in the three groups. The patients in the obstipation group had a significantly longer small bowel transit time than the normals (P less than 0.02) and the patients in the diarrhea group (P less than 0.01). There was no demonstrable difference between the small bowel transit time in the normals and in the patients in the diarrhea group.

  10. Gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome determined with 99mTc-labeled pellets and scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, O.H.; Gjorup, T.; Christensen, F.N.

    1986-01-01

    A new method employing 99mTc-labeled pellets for determination of the gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time is described. The participants were six normal subjects and 16 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (eight with diarrhea and eight with obstipation as the primary complaint). The gastric emptying rate was the same in the three groups. The patients in the obstipation group had a significantly longer small bowel transit time than the normals (P less than 0.02) and the patients in the diarrhea group (P less than 0.01). There was no demonstrable difference between the small bowel transit time in the normals and in the patients in the diarrhea group

  11. Substrate removal kinetics in high-rate upflow anaerobic filters packed with low-density polyethylene media treating high-strength agro-food wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Rajinikanth; Torrijos, Michel; Kumar, Pradeep; Mehrotra, Indu

    2013-02-15

    The process kinetics for two upflow anaerobic filters (UAFs) treating high strength fruit canning and cheese-dairy wastewaters as feed were investigated. The experimental unit consisted of a 10-L (effective volume) reactor filled with low-density polyethylene media. COD removal efficiencies of about 80% were recorded at the maximum OLRs of 19 and 17 g COD L(-1) d(-1) for the fruit canning and cheese-dairy wastewaters, respectively. Modified Stover-Kincannon and second-order kinetic models were applied to data obtained from the experimental studies in order to determine the substrate removal kinetics. According to Stover-Kincannon model, U(max) and K(B) values were estimated as 109.9 and 109.7 g L(-1) d(-1) for fruit canning, and 53.5 and 49.7 g L(-1) d(-1) for cheese dairy wastewaters, respectively. The second order substrate removal rate k(2(s)) was found to be 5.0 and 1.93 d(-1) respectively for fruit canning and cheese dairy wastewaters. As both these models gave high correlation coefficients (R(2) = 98-99%), they could be used in predicting the behaviour or design of the UAF. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling and sensitivity analysis on the transport of aluminum oxide nanoparticles in saturated sand: effects of ionic strength, flow rate, and nanoparticle concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Tanzina; Millwater, Harry; Shipley, Heather J

    2014-11-15

    Aluminum oxide nanoparticles have been widely used in various consumer products and there are growing concerns regarding their exposure in the environment. This study deals with the modeling, sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification of one-dimensional transport of nano-sized (~82 nm) aluminum oxide particles in saturated sand. The transport of aluminum oxide nanoparticles was modeled using a two-kinetic-site model with a blocking function. The modeling was done at different ionic strengths, flow rates, and nanoparticle concentrations. The two sites representing fast and slow attachments along with a blocking term yielded good agreement with the experimental results from the column studies of aluminum oxide nanoparticles. The same model was used to simulate breakthrough curves under different conditions using experimental data and calculated 95% confidence bounds of the generated breakthroughs. The sensitivity analysis results showed that slow attachment was the most sensitive parameter for high influent concentrations (e.g. 150 mg/L Al2O3) and the maximum solid phase retention capacity (related to blocking function) was the most sensitive parameter for low concentrations (e.g. 50 mg/L Al2O3). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Teacher Ratings of Children's Behavior Problems and Functional Impairment Across Gender and Ethnicity : Construct Equivalence of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwirs, Barbara; Burger, Huibert; Schulpen, Tom; Vermulst, A. A.; HiraSing, R. A.; Buitelaar, Jan

    The present study examined construct equivalence of the teacher Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and compared mean scores in an ethnically diverse sample of children living in the Netherlands. Elementary schoolteachers completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire for 2,185 children

  14. Teacher ratings of children's behavior problems and functional impairment across gender and ethnicity: construct equivalence of the strengths and difficulties questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwirs, B.; Burger, H.; Schulpen, T.; Vermulst, A.A.; Hira Sing, R.A.; Buitelaar, J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined construct equivalence of the teacher Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and compared mean scores in an ethnically diverse sample of children living in the Netherlands. Elementary schoolteachers completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire for 2,185 children

  15. Determinants of cognitive development of low SES children in Chile: a post-transitional country with rising childhood obesity rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Marcos; Uauy, Ricardo; Corvalán, Camila; López-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Kain, Juliana

    2013-09-01

    Studies conducted in developing countries have noted associations between concurrent stunting, social-emotional problems and poor cognitive ability in young children. However, the relative contribution of these variables in Latin America is likely changing as undernutrition rates decline and prevalence of childhood obesity rises. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 106 normal-weight and 109 obese preschool children to compare the relative contribution of early nutrition, sociodemographic factors and psychosocial variables on cognitive development in normal-weight and obese preschool children in Chile. The study variables were categorized as: (1) socio-demographic (age, sex, birth order and socioeconomic) (2) early nutrition (maternal height, birth weight, birth length and height at 5 years) (3) psychosocial factors (maternal depression, social-emotional wellbeing and home space sufficiency). In order to assess determinants of cognitive development at 4-5 years we measured intelligence quotient (IQ); variability in normal children was mostly explained by socio-demographic characteristics (r(2) = 0.26), while in obese children early nutritional factors had a significant effect (r(2) = 0.12) beyond socio-demographic factors (r(2) = 0.19). Normal-weight children, who were first born, of slightly better SES and height Z score >1, had an IQ ≥ 6 points greater than their counterparts (p birth weight >4,000 g and low risk of socio-emotional problems had on average ≥5 IQ points greater than their peers (p < 0.05). We conclude that in Chile, a post-transitional country, IQ variability of normal children was mostly explained by socio-demographic characteristics; while in obese children, early nutrition also played a significant role.

  16. Level spectra, electromagnetic moments and transition rates and spectroscopic factors for odd rhodium isotopes in the Coriolis coupling model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredbacka, A.; Brenner, M.; Malik, F.B.; Aabo Akademi, Turku

    1989-01-01

    Properties of low-lying positive- and negative-parity states of 97,99,101,103,105,107,109 Rh at low excitation energies have been analyzed in terms of a Coriolis coupling model. The model can account for the general trend of the level schemes for states of both parties. In particular, the 9/2, 7/2, and 5/2 triplet near the ground state, the occurrence of multiple 13/2 and at least one 15/2 and 19/2 state of positive parity are reasonably reproduced by the model. Similarly, 1/2 ground-state spin followed by a (3/2, 5/2) doublet, and one or more 13/2 and 17/2 states of negative parity are adequately understood in terms of the model. The calculated electromagnetic dipole and quadrupole moments and magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole transition rates are in broad agreement with the observed ones. This is achieved without the use of any effective charge. The general trend of observed spectroscopic factors for pick-up reactions is in agreement with the calculated ones. The results are presented as a function of deformation. Because of the sparsity of data on many of these isotopes, no attempt has been made to find the best fit for each isotope individually. Since the model can reasonably reproduce the general trend of level schemes, electromagnetic properties and spectroscopic factors, one may conclude that the Coriolis coupling model provides a good description of the nuclear properties of these isotopes. (orig.)

  17. Study of continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse transit time, heart rate and photoplethysmography-derived hemodynamic covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jingjie; Huang, Zhongyi; Zhou, Congcong; Ye, Xuesong

    2018-06-01

    It is widely recognized that pulse transit time (PTT) can track blood pressure (BP) over short periods of time, and hemodynamic covariates such as heart rate, stiffness index may also contribute to BP monitoring. In this paper, we derived a proportional relationship between BP and PPT -2 and proposed an improved method adopting hemodynamic covariates in addition to PTT for continuous BP estimation. We divided 28 subjects from the Multi-parameter Intelligent Monitoring for Intensive Care database into two groups (with/without cardiovascular diseases) and utilized a machine learning strategy based on regularized linear regression (RLR) to construct BP models with different covariates for corresponding groups. RLR was performed for individuals as the initial calibration, while recursive least square algorithm was employed for the re-calibration. The results showed that errors of BP estimation by our method stayed within the Association of Advancement of Medical Instrumentation limits (- 0.98 ± 6.00 mmHg @ SBP, 0.02 ± 4.98 mmHg @ DBP) when the calibration interval extended to 1200-beat cardiac cycles. In comparison with other two representative studies, Chen's method kept accurate (0.32 ± 6.74 mmHg @ SBP, 0.94 ± 5.37 mmHg @ DBP) using a 400-beat calibration interval, while Poon's failed (- 1.97 ± 10.59 mmHg @ SBP, 0.70 ± 4.10 mmHg @ DBP) when using a 200-beat calibration interval. With additional hemodynamic covariates utilized, our method improved the accuracy of PTT-based BP estimation, decreased the calibration frequency and had the potential for better continuous BP estimation.

  18. Oscillator strengths for neutral technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garstang, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Oscillator strengths have been calculated for most of the spectral lines of TcI which are of interest in the study of stars of spectral type S. Oscillator strengths have been computed for the corresponding transitions in MnI as a partial check of the technetium calculations

  19. Prediction of flow rates through an orifice at pressures corresponding to the transition between molecular and isentropic flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMuth, S.F.; Watson, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    A model of compressible flow through an orifice, in the region of transition from free molecular to isentropic expansion flow, has been developed and tested for accuracy. The transitional or slip regime is defined as the conditions where molecular interactions are too many for free molecular flow modeling, yet not great enough for isentropic expansion flow modeling. Due to a lack of literature establishing a well-accepted model for predicting transitional flow, it was felt such work would be beneficial. The model is nonlinear and cannot be satisfactorily linearized for a linear regression analysis. Consequently, a computer routine was developed which minimized the sum of the squares of the residual flow for the nonlinear model. The results indicate an average accuracy within 15% of the measured flow throughout the range of test conditions. Furthermore, the results of the regression analysis indicate that the transitional regime lies between Knudsen numbers of approximately 2 and 45. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  20. Width and strength of the hot giant dipole resonance. The role of the life time of the compound nucleus and the transition from order to chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, P.

    1996-01-01

    A bump in the γ decay spectrum is observed at high energies which is due to the excitation of the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) in the compound nucleus. The fact is discussed that the total width of the γ-ray spectrum of the GDR transitions must contain twice the width of the compound nucleus levels. This implies that one must except a rapid increase of the width of the GDR. This increase contributes to the observed saturation of the photon multiplicity. A new suppression factor due to the lost of collectivity induced by the fast particle emission is proposed. (K.A.)

  1. Fragile-to-fragile liquid transition at Tg and stable-glass phase nucleation rate maximum at the Kauzmann temperature TK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournier, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    An undercooled liquid is unstable. The driving force of the glass transition at T g is a change of the undercooled-liquid Gibbs free energy. The classical Gibbs free energy change for a crystal formation is completed including an enthalpy saving. The crystal growth critical nucleus is used as a probe to observe the Laplace pressure change Δp accompanying the enthalpy change −V m ×Δp at T g where V m is the molar volume. A stable glass–liquid transition model predicts the specific heat jump of fragile liquids at T≤T g , the Kauzmann temperature T K where the liquid entropy excess with regard to crystal goes to zero, the equilibrium enthalpy between T K and T g , the maximum nucleation rate at T K of superclusters containing magic atom numbers, and the equilibrium latent heats at T g and T K . Strong-to-fragile and strong-to-strong liquid transitions at T g are also described and all their thermodynamic parameters are determined from their specific heat jumps. The existence of fragile liquids quenched in the amorphous state, which do not undergo liquid–liquid transition during heating preceding their crystallization, is predicted. Long ageing times leading to the formation at T K of a stable glass composed of superclusters containing up to 147 atom, touching and interpenetrating, are evaluated from nucleation rates. A fragile-to-fragile liquid transition occurs at T g without stable-glass formation while a strong glass is stable after transition

  2. Influence of transit water flow rate on its dispensation and on inflow through nozzles in pressure pipeline under action of external pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniuk, V. V.; Riabenko, O. A.; Ivaniv, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    The influence of transit flow rate of water upon operative of the equipped with nozzles pressure pipeline is experimentally investigated. External pressure, which varies in the range of 1465-2295 mm, acted upon the pipeline. The angle β between vectors of velocities of the stream in the pipeline and jets which branch off through nozzles were given the value: 0° ; 45° ; 90° ; 135° ; 180°. The diameter of the pipeline was of D=20.18 mm, the diameter of nozzles d=6.01 mm. The distances between the nozzles were 180 mm, and the number of them 11. The value of the transit flow rate at input into the pipeline varied from 4.05 to 130.20 cm3 / s. The increase in flow rate of the transit flux Qtr caused increase in non-uniformity of distribution of operating heads and increase in flow rate of water along the pipeline over the segment of its dispensation. On the segment of collecting of water, inverse tendency was observed. The number of nozzles through which water became to be dispensed increased with the increase in Qtr.

  3. Selected properties of nuclei at the magic shell closures from the studies of E1, M1 and E2 transition rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mach, H.; Baluyut, A.-M.; Smith, D.; Ruchowska, E.; Koester, U.; Fraile, L. M.; Penttilae, H.; Aeystoe, J.; Elomaa, V.-V.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Kessler, T.; Moore, I. D.; Rahaman, S.; Rissanen, J.; Ronkainen, J.; Ronkanen, P.; Saastamoinen, A.

    2009-01-01

    Using the Advanced Time-Delayed method we have studied transition rates in several neutron-rich nuclei at the magic shell closures. These include the heavy Co and Fe nuclei just below the Z = 28 shell closure at the point of transition from spherical to collective structures. Of particular interest is 63 Fe located exactly at the point of transition at N = 37. A substantial increase in the information on this nucleus was obtained from a brief fast timing study conducted at ISOLDE. The new results indicate that 63 Fe seems to depart from a simple shell model structure observed for heavier N = 37 isotones of 65 Ni and 67 Zn.Another region of interest are the heavy Cd and Sn nuclei at N = 72, 74 and the properties of negative parity quasi-particle excitations. These experiments, performed at the IGISOL separator at Jyvaeskylae, revealed interesting properties of the E2 rates in the sequence of E2 transitions connecting the 10 + , 8 + , 6 + , 4 + , 2 + and 0 + members of the multiplet of levels in 122 Sn due to neutrons in the h 11/2 orbit.

  4. H2 Control for the Continuous-Time Markovian Jump Linear Uncertain Systems with Partly Known Transition Rates and Input Quantization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Gang Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For a class of continuous-time Markovian jump linear uncertain systems with partly known transition rates and input quantization, the H2 state-feedback control design is considered. The elements in the transition rates matrix include completely known, boundary known, and completely unknown ones. First, an H2 cost index for Markovian jump linear uncertain systems is introduced; then by introducing a new matrix inequality condition, sufficient conditions are formulated in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs for the H2 control of the Markovian jump linear uncertain systems. Less conservativeness is achieved than the result obtained with the existing technique. Finally, a numerical example is given to verify the validity of the theoretical results.

  5. THM determination of the 65 keV resonance strength intervening in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S. [Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Burjan, S. V.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Coc, A. [CSNSM, UMR 8609, CNRS/IN2P3 and Universitè Paris Sud 11, Bâtiment 104, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Gulino, M.; Tumino, A. [Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Italy and Universitá Kore di Enna, Enna (Italy); Hammache, F. [IPN, IN2P3-CNRS et Université de Paris-Sud 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Irgaziev, B. [GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology Topi District Swabi NWFP (Pakistan); Kiss, G. G.; Somorjai, E. [ATOMKI, Debrecen (Hungary); Lamia, L. [Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. [Cyclotron Institute,Texas A and M University College Station (United States); and others

    2015-02-24

    The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction is of paramount importance for the nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants (RG), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars and classical novae. We report on the indirect study of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach recently developed for extracting the resonance strength of the narrow resonance at E{sub c.m.}{sup R} = 65 keV (E{sub X} =5.673 MeV). The strength of the 65 keV resonance in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the {sup 17}O+p radiative capture channel.

  6. Shape and structure of N=Z 64Ge; Electromagnetic transition rates from the application of the Recoil Distance Method to knock-out reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Starosta, K.; Dewald, A.; Dunomes, A.; Adrich, P.; Amthor, A. M.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Bowen, M.; Brown, B. A.; Chester, A.; Gade, A.; Galaviz, D.; Glasmacher, T.; Ginter, T.; Hausmann, M.

    2007-01-01

    Transition rate measurements are reported for the first and the second 2+ states in N=Z 64Ge. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with large-scale Shell Model calculations applying the recently developed GXPF1A interactions. Theoretical analysis suggests that 64Ge is a collective gamma-soft anharmonic vibrator. The measurement was done using the Recoil Distance Method (RDM) and a unique combination of state-of-the-art instruments at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Labor...

  7. Transition rate diagrams — A new approach to the study of selective excitation processes: The spectrum of manganese in a Grimm-type glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Zdeněk; Steers, Edward B.M.; Pickering, Juliet C.; Mushtaq, Sohail

    2014-01-01

    The emission spectra of manganese observed using a Grimm-type glow discharge in pure argon, argon with 0.3% v/v hydrogen and pure neon were studied in order to identify major excitation and ionization processes of manganese in the plasma. A new procedure is proposed, in which each observed emission line is associated with the corresponding transition between different states of the Mn atom or Mn ion, and, by considering all the observed transitions from and into a specific state, a measure of the total rate is determined at which this state is radiatively populated and depopulated. These resulting population/depopulation rates are then plotted as function of level energy. Such plots, called here “transition rate diagrams”, show the role of individual states in the formation of the observed spectrum and can be used to identify possible selective excitation processes. Also, cascade excitation by radiative decay of higher excited states can be conveniently evaluated in this way. A detailed description of the observed Mn I and Mn II spectra is given for Ar, Ar–H 2 and Ne plasmas and relevant excitation/ionization mechanisms are discussed. Matrix effects in analysis of manganese by glow discharge spectroscopy are discussed. A list of important Mn I and Mn II lines excited in the glow discharge plasma is given. - Highlights: • We measured GD-OES spectra of Mn in Ar, Ar(H) and Ne discharges. • We determined transition rate diagrams of Mn I and Mn II in these discharges. • Using those diagrams, we identified major excitation processes involved

  8. Transition rate diagrams - A new approach to the study of selective excitation processes: The spectrum of manganese in a Grimm-type glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Zdeněk; Steers, Edward B. M.; Pickering, Juliet C.; Mushtaq, Sohail

    2014-02-01

    The emission spectra of manganese observed using a Grimm-type glow discharge in pure argon, argon with 0.3% v/v hydrogen and pure neon were studied in order to identify major excitation and ionization processes of manganese in the plasma. A new procedure is proposed, in which each observed emission line is associated with the corresponding transition between different states of the Mn atom or Mn ion, and, by considering all the observed transitions from and into a specific state, a measure of the total rate is determined at which this state is radiatively populated and depopulated. These resulting population/depopulation rates are then plotted as function of level energy. Such plots, called here “transition rate diagrams”, show the role of individual states in the formation of the observed spectrum and can be used to identify possible selective excitation processes. Also, cascade excitation by radiative decay of higher excited states can be conveniently evaluated in this way. A detailed description of the observed Mn I and Mn II spectra is given for Ar, Ar-H2 and Ne plasmas and relevant excitation/ionization mechanisms are discussed. Matrix effects in analysis of manganese by glow discharge spectroscopy are discussed. A list of important Mn I and Mn II lines excited in the glow discharge plasma is given.

  9. Transition of some type of integrated circuits into latch-up mode under effect of ionizing radiation of large dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdichevskij, B.E.; Madzharova, T.B.

    1986-01-01

    Some types of integrated circuits (IC) are almost short-circuit, i.e. they transit to the latch-up regime under the effect of ionizing radiation pulses of large dose rate. The results of investigation into IC under their transition into the latch-up regime at supply voltage of 10 V are presented. It is shown that IC stably transit to the latch-up regime if the dinistor current becomes at least equal to the photocurrent. At bias reduction from 15 to 6 V the dose rate at which the latch-up arises grows from 2.5x10 9 to 3.5x10 9 rad (Si)/s. Burn-out of supply busbar is the usual type of IC failure at latch-up arising. Measures for IC protection from latch-up are shown. In some IC the latch-up is formed beginning from a certain critical value of dose rate, the so-called ''windows'' of latch-up

  10. Ab initio calculation of transition state normal mode properties and rate constants for the H(T)+CH4(CD4) abstraction and exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatz, G.C.; Walch, S.P.; Wagner, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    We present ab initio (GVB--POL--CI) calculations for enough of the region about the abstraction and exchange saddle points for H(T)+CH 4 (CD 4 ) to perform a full normal mode analysis of the transition states. The resulting normal mode frequencies are compared to four other published surfaces: an ab initio UHF--SCF calculation by Carsky and Zahradnik, a semiempirical surface by Raff, and two semiempirical surfaces by Kurylo, Hollinden, and Timmons. Significant quantitative and qualitative differences exist between the POL--CI results and those of the other surfaces. Transition state theory rate constants and vibrationally adiabatic reaction threshold energies were computed for all surfaces and compared to available experimental values. For abstraction, the POL--CI rates are in good agreement with experimental rates and in better agreement than are the rates of any of the other surfaces. For exchange, uncertainties in the experimental values and in the importance of vibrationally nonadiabatic effects cloud the comparison of theory to experiment. Tentative conclusions are that the POL--CI barrier is too low by several kcal. Unless vibrationaly nonadiabatic effects are severe, the POL--CI surface is still in better agreement with experiment than are the other surfaces. The rates for a simple 3-atom transition state theory model (where CH 3 is treated as an atom) are compared to the rates for the full 6-atom model. The kinetic energy coupling of reaction coordinate modes to methyl group modes is identified as being of primary importance in determining the accuracy of the 3-atom model for this system. Substantial coupling in abstraction, but not exchange, causes the model to fail for abstraction but succeed for exchange

  11. Interaction effects of region-level GDP per capita and age on labour market transition rates in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Zanin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this paper is to measure the effect of the interaction between age for the population of males and females aged 18 to 74 and region-level GDP per capita on labour market transition probabilities in Italy. We compare different occupational states in a sample of males and females who remained in their region of residence at two points in time (12 months apart. We estimate the transition probabilities using a flexible hierarchical logit model with interaction effects between worker age and region-level GDP per capita. We apply this model using longitudinal data from the Italian Labour Force Survey that cover the 2004–2013 period. We find empirical support for the assumption that people in the same age cohort have different labour market opportunities based on the level of GDP per capita in their region of residence. These differences are particularly relevant among younger workers.

  12. Ringwoodite growth rates from olivine with ~75 ppmw H2O: Metastable olivine must be nearly anhydrous to exist in the mantle transition zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Frane, Wyatt L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). School of Earth and Space Exploration; Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Atmospheric, Earth and Energy Division; Sharp, Thomas G. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). School of Earth and Space Exploration; Mosenfelder, Jed L. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences; Leinenweber, Kurt [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). School of Earth and Space Exploration

    2013-04-15

    It has been previously demonstrated that as little as 300 ppmw H2O increases wadsleyite and ringwoodite growth rates to magnitudes that are inconsistent with the metastable olivine hypothesis. To further test this hypothesis, we present new ringwoodite growth rate measurements from olivine with ~75 ppmw H2O at 18 GPa and 700, 900, and 1100 °C. These growth rates are nearly identical to those from olivine with ~300 ppmw H2O, and significantly higher than those from nominally anhydrous olivine. We infer that transformation of olivine with 75-300 ppmw H2O is primarily enhanced by hydrolytic weakening of reaction rims, which reduces the elastic strain-energy barrier to growth. We present a new method for fitting nonlinear nominally anhydrous data, to demonstrate that reduction of growth rates by elastic strain energy is an additional requirement for metastable olivine. In conclusion, based on previous thermokinetic modeling, these enhanced growth rates are inconsistent with the persistence of metastable olivine wedges into the mantle transition zone. Metastable persistence of olivine into the mantle transition-zone would therefore require < 75 ppmw H2O.

  13. Influence of extreme pedal rates on pulmonary O(2) uptake kinetics during transitions to high-intensity exercise from an elevated baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimenna, Fred J; Wilkerson, Daryl P; Burnley, Mark; Bailey, Stephen J; Jones, Andrew M

    2009-10-31

    We used extreme pedal rates to investigate the influence of muscle fibre recruitment on pulmonary V(O)(2) kinetics during unloaded-to-moderate-intensity (U-->M), unloaded-to-high-intensity (U-->H), and moderate-intensity to high-intensity (M-->H) cycling transitions. Seven healthy men completed transitions to 60% of the difference between gas-exchange threshold and peak V(O)(2) from both an unloaded and a moderate-intensity (95% GET) baseline at cadences of 35 and 115rpm. Pulmonary gas exchange was measured breath-by-breath and iEMG of the m. vastus lateralis and m. gluteus maximus was measured during all tests. At 35rpm, the phase II time constant (tau(p)) values for U-->M, U-->H, and M-->H were 26+/-7, 31+/-7 and 36+/-8s with the value for M-->H being longer than for U-->M (PM, U-->H, and M-->H were 29+/-8, 48+/-16 and 53+/-20s with the value for U-->M being shorter than for the other two conditions (Pinfluenced by an interaction of exercise intensity and pedal rate and are consistent with the notion that changes in muscle fibre recruitment are responsible for slower phase II V(O)(2) kinetics during high-intensity and work-to-work exercise transitions.

  14. Shifts in mass-scaling of respiration, feeding, and growth rates across life-form transitions in marine pelagic organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Hirst, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic rate of organisms may be viewed as a basic property from which other vital rates and many ecological patterns emerge and that follows a universal allometric mass scaling law, or it may be considered a property of the organism that emerges as a result of the adaptation to the environ...... and be the result of the optimization of trade-offs that allow sufficient feeding and growth rates to balance mortality...

  15. Standardisation of tracer and type of meal in the evaluation of gastric emptying and colon transit rates in normal Beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormehl, I.C.; Jordaan, J.H.; Jacobs, D.J.; Plessis, M. du; Pilloy, W.

    1984-01-01

    The transit of 111 In-labelled polymer beads of different particle sizes in the stomach and colon of five healthy Beagle dogs was monitored after intake of different kinds of meal by a gamma camera and data processor system. The various meals studied were a solid balanced type of dog food mixed with molk, pure milk, and finally a metal of raw meat. The polymer beads carried triethylenetetramine type functions which efficiently chelated 111 In +3 from an aqueous solution of InCl 3 . These labelled beads were well mixed into the food before being offered to the dogs. Gastric emptying curves from which half-times of emptying (Tsub(1/2)) could be obtained are presented and statistically compared. Good quality images with quantification of the colon transit rate also became possible. It appeared that standardisation of the tracer and of the metal is compulsory for relevant and reproducible results. (orig.)

  16. Standardisation of tracer and type of meal in the evaluation of gastric emptying and colon transit rates in normal Beagle dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormehl, I.C.; Jordaan, J.H.; Jacobs, D.J.; Plessis, M. du; Pilloy, W.

    1984-01-01

    The transit of /sup 111/In-labelled polymer beads of different particle sizes in the stomach and colon of five healthy Beagle dogs was monitored after intake of different kinds of meal by a gamma camera and data processor system. The various meals studied were a solid balanced type of dog food mixed with molk, pure milk, and finally a meal of raw meat. The polymer beads carried triethylenetetramine type functions which efficiently chelated /sup 111/In/sup +3/ from an aqueous solution of InCl/sub 3/. These labelled beads were well mixed into the food before being offered to the dogs. Gastric emptying curves from which half-times of emptying (Tsub(1/2)) could be obtained are presented and statistically compared. Good quality images with quantification of the colon transit rate also became possible. It appeared that standardisation of the tracer and of the metal is compulsory for relevant and reproducible results.

  17. Development of specimen size and test rate effects on the J-integral upper transition behavior of A533B steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyce, James A.

    1988-01-01

    During the past three years a test method has been developed for dynamic testing of fracture mechanics specimens which is specifically designed for application to the upper transition temperature range. The method uses drop tower loading rates of 2.5 m/sec and obtains a J IC or a J-R curve using an analytical key curve approach verified by initial and final crack length measurements obtained from the fracture surface. A J-R curve is obtained from each specimen and contains crack growth corrections so that it is directly comparable with static results obtained in accordance with the ASTM E1152 J-R curve test method. The test procedure has been applied to A106 steel, A533B steel and US Navy HY80 and HY100 steels at temperatures from -200F to 150F. Standard 1T three point bend specimens were used for the A533B and the HY100 steel. Static test results have shown that the J at cleavage initiation (which is presently an unstandardized quantity) is specimen a/W independent throughout the ductile to brittle transition but of course demonstrates considerable statistical scatter in the vicinity of the ductile upper shelf. Dynamic J-R tests have shown an increase in J IC with test rate for most, but not for all, materials. Separation of J into elastic and plastic components shows that the elastic J component increases with test rate in a fashion consistent with the materials tensile sensitivity to test rate but the plastic J component decreases with test rate - an apparent visco-plastic phenomena. For A106 steel the plastic J decrease exceeds the elastic J increase and the upper shelf toughness falls - while the other materials have demonstrated a relatively larger increase in the elastic J component and a smaller decrease in the plastic J component giving an overall increase in upper shelf toughness. Separation of the J integral into elastic and plastic components has demonstrated that J EL is specimen scale and geometry dependent while J PL is relatively scale and geometry

  18. Transition in the decay rates of stationary distributions of Lévy motion in an energy landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleta, Kamil; Lőrinczi, József

    2016-02-01

    The time evolution of random variables with Lévy statistics has the ability to develop jumps, displaying very different behaviors from continuously fluctuating cases. Such patterns appear in an ever broadening range of examples including random lasers, non-Gaussian kinetics, or foraging strategies. The penalizing or reinforcing effect of the environment, however, has been little explored so far. We report a new phenomenon which manifests as a qualitative transition in the spatial decay behavior of the stationary measure of a jump process under an external potential, occurring on a combined change in the characteristics of the process and the lowest eigenvalue resulting from the effect of the potential. This also provides insight into the fundamental question of what is the mechanism of the spatial decay of a ground state.

  19. Transition in the decay rates of stationary distributions of Lévy motion in an energy landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleta, Kamil; Lőrinczi, József

    2016-02-01

    The time evolution of random variables with Lévy statistics has the ability to develop jumps, displaying very different behaviors from continuously fluctuating cases. Such patterns appear in an ever broadening range of examples including random lasers, non-Gaussian kinetics, or foraging strategies. The penalizing or reinforcing effect of the environment, however, has been little explored so far. We report a new phenomenon which manifests as a qualitative transition in the spatial decay behavior of the stationary measure of a jump process under an external potential, occurring on a combined change in the characteristics of the process and the lowest eigenvalue resulting from the effect of the potential. This also provides insight into the fundamental question of what is the mechanism of the spatial decay of a ground state.

  20. Ab initio calculation of the transition-state properties and addition rate constants for H + C2H2 and selected isotopic analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, L.B.; Wagner, A.F.; Bowman, J.M.; Schatz, G.C.; Christoffel, K.

    1982-01-01

    GVB-POL-CI ab initio calculations of the geometries, energetics, and normal mode frequencies of C 2 H 2 , C 2 H 3 , and the transition state for the addition reaction of H + C 2 H 2 are presented. In addition, normal mode frequencies for the isotopic variants D + C 2 D 2 , D + C 2 H 2 , and H + C 2 D 2 are preented. These results are compared to experimental values for C 2 H 2 and to ab initio values of Hagase and Kern, and semiempirical values of Keil, Lynch, Cowfer, and Michael. The results are also used to calculate the apparent bimolecular addition rate constant using conventional RRKM theory for chemical activation. The calculated rate constants and their isotopic variants are compared as a function of temperature and pressure to available experimental information. The agreement is little different from that obtained by Keil et al. with a similar calculation using semiempirical values for acetylene, transition-state, and vinyl radical properties. In particular, the calculated high-pressure limit of the rate constant appears to be at least 1 order of magnitude higher than the experimental limit. Several possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed

  1. Shape and Structure of N=Z Ge64: Electromagnetic Transition Rates from the Application of the Recoil Distance Method to a Knockout Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starosta, K.; Dewald, A.; Dunomes, A.; Adrich, P.; Amthor, A. M.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Bowen, M.; Brown, B. A.; Chester, A.; Gade, A.; Galaviz, D.; Glasmacher, T.; Ginter, T.; Hausmann, M.; Horoi, M.; Jolie, J.; Melon, B.; Miller, D.; Moeller, V.; Norris, R. P.; Pissulla, T.; Portillo, M.; Rother, W.; Shimbara, Y.; Stolz, A.; Vaman, C.; Voss, P.; Weisshaar, D.; Zelevinsky, V.

    2007-07-01

    Transition rate measurements are reported for the 21+ and 22+ states in N=Z Ge64. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with large-scale shell-model calculations applying the recently developed GXPF1A interactions. The measurement was done using the recoil distance method (RDM) and a unique combination of state-of-the-art instruments at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). States of interest were populated via an intermediate-energy single-neutron knockout reaction. RDM studies of knockout and fragmentation reaction products hold the promise of reaching far from stability and providing lifetime information for excited states in a wide range of nuclei.

  2. NAIRU estimates in a transitional economy with an extremely high unemployment rate: The case of the Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trpeski Predrag

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the paper is to estimate the NAIRU for the Macedonian economy and to discuss the applicability of this indicator. The paper provides time-varying estimates for the period 1998-2012, which are obtained using the Ball and Mankiw (2002 approach, supplemented with the iterative procedure proposed by Ball (2009. The results reveal that the Macedonian NAIRU has ahumpshaped path. The estimation is based on both the LFS unemployment rate and the LFS unemployment rate corrected for employment in the grey economy. The dynamics of the estimated NAIRU stress the ability of the NAIRU to present the cyclical misbalances in a national economy.

  3. Phase transitions in tumor growth: IV relationship between metabolic rate and fractal dimension of human tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt-Mar, J. A.; Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Cocho, G.; Mansilla, R.; Martin, R. R.; Montero, S.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2017-05-01

    By the use of thermodynamics formalism of irreversible processes, complex systems theory and systems biology, it is derived a relationship between the production of entropy per unit time, the fractal dimension and the tumor growth rate for human tumors cells. The thermodynamics framework developed demonstrates that, the dissipation function is a Landau potential and also the Lyapunov function of the dynamical behavior of tumor growth, which indicate the directional character, stability and robustness of the phenomenon. The entropy production rate may be used as a quantitative index of the metastatic potential of tumors. The current theoretical framework will hopefully provide a better understanding of cancer and contribute to improvements in cancer treatment.

  4. Abrupt transition to heightened poliomyelitis epidemicity in England and Wales, 1947-1957, associated with a pronounced increase in the geographical rate of disease propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallman-Raynor, M R; Cliff, A D

    2014-03-01

    The abrupt transition to heightened poliomyelitis epidemicity in England and Wales, 1947-1957, was associated with a profound change in the spatial dynamics of the disease. Drawing on the complete record of poliomyelitis notifications in England and Wales, we use a robust method of spatial epidemiological analysis (swash-backwash model) to evaluate the geographical rate of disease propagation in successive poliomyelitis seasons, 1940-1964. Comparisons with earlier and later time periods show that the period of heightened poliomyelitis epidemicity corresponded with a sudden and pronounced increase in the spatial rate of disease propagation. This change was observed for both urban and rural areas and points to an abrupt enhancement in the propensity for the geographical spread of polioviruses. Competing theories of the epidemic emergence of poliomyelitis in England and Wales should be assessed in the light of this evidence.

  5. The CEE housing markets before, during and after the transition: an overview of property prices and home ownership rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena IONASCU

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to investigate relevant economic aspects, which characterized housing markets from Central and Eastern European (CEE countries, to identify the factors which determine the house prices and to find the economic implications of property investments, under an international micro and macroeconomic environment. Methodological, the article uses the deduction and comparative analysis of collected statistical data, and strategic reforms in post-communist countries are qualitatively explored through content analysis. In the case of CEE region, fundamentals determinants, such as real income, real interest rate, demographic factors, play an extremely important role in explaining house price distortions. The principles of communist ideology added a special note in the evolution of prices, so the home ownership rate, the housing quality, the financial housing system, European integration represent a number of traditional factors with significant impact.

  6. Unemployment transitions and self-rated health in Europe: A longitudinal analysis of EU-SILC from 2008 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tøge, Anne Grete; Blekesaune, Morten

    2015-10-01

    The Great Recession of 2008 has led to elevated unemployment in Europe and thereby revitalised the question of causal health effects of unemployment. This article applies fixed effects regression models to longitudinal panel data drawn from the European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions for 28 European countries from 2008 to 2011, in order to investigate changes in self-rated health around the event of becoming unemployed. The results show that the correlation between unemployment and health is partly due to a decrease in self-rated health as people enter unemployment. Such health changes vary by country of domicile, and by individual age; older workers have a steeper decline than younger workers. Health changes after the unemployment spell reveal no indication of adverse health effects of unemployment duration. Overall, this study indicates some adverse health effects of unemployment in Europe--predominantly among older workers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Visualization of heart rate variability of long-term heart transplant patient by transition networks: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna eWdowczyk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a heart transplant patient at his 17th year of uncomplicated follow-up. Within a frame of routine check out several tests were performed. With such a long and uneventful follow-up some degree of graft reinnervation could be anticipated. However, the patient's electrocardiogram and exercise parameters seemed largely inconclusive in this regard. The exercise heart rate dynamics were suggestive of only mild, if any parasympathetic reinnervation of the graft with persisting sympathetic activation. On the other hand, traditional heart rate variability (HRV indices were inadequately high, due to erratic rhythm resulting from interference of the persisting recipient sinus node or nonconducted atrial parasystole. New tools, originated from network representation of time series, by visualization short-term dynamical patterns, provided a method to discern HRV increase due to reinnervation from other reasons.

  8. Metal-to-Insulator Transition in Anatase TiO2 Thin Films Induced by Growth Rate Modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate control of the carrier density of single phase anatase TiO 2 thin films by nearly two orders of magnitude by modulating the growth kinetics during pulsed laser deposition, under fixed thermodynamic conditions. The resistivity and the intensity of the photoluminescence spectra of these TiO 2 samples, both of which correlate with the number of oxygen vacancies, are shown to depend strongly on the growth rate. A quantitative model is used to explain the carrier density changes.

  9. Attitude Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Lauren C; Krosnick, Jon A

    2017-01-03

    Attitude strength has been the focus of a huge volume of research in psychology and related sciences for decades. The insights offered by this literature have tremendous value for understanding attitude functioning and structure and for the effective application of the attitude concept in applied settings. This is the first Annual Review of Psychology article on the topic, and it offers a review of theory and evidence regarding one of the most researched strength-related attitude features: attitude importance. Personal importance is attached to an attitude when the attitude is perceived to be relevant to self-interest, social identification with reference groups or reference individuals, and values. Attaching personal importance to an attitude causes crystallizing of attitudes (via enhanced resistance to change), effortful gathering and processing of relevant information, accumulation of a large store of well-organized relevant information in long-term memory, enhanced attitude extremity and accessibility, enhanced attitude impact on the regulation of interpersonal attraction, energizing of emotional reactions, and enhanced impact of attitudes on behavioral intentions and action. Thus, important attitudes are real and consequential psychological forces, and their study offers opportunities for addressing behavioral change.

  10. Metal-to-Insulator Transition in Anatase TiO2 Thin Films Induced by Growth Rate Modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachikawa, T; Minohara, M.; Nakanishi, Y.; Hikita, Y.; Yoshita, M.; Akiyama, H.; Bell, C.; Hwang, H.Y.

    2012-06-21

    We demonstrate control of the carrier density of single phase anatase TiO{sub 2} thin films by nearly two orders of magnitude by modulating the growth kinetics during pulsed laser deposition, under fixed thermodynamic conditions. The resistivity and the intensity of the photoluminescence spectra of these TiO{sub 2} samples, both of which correlate with the number of oxygen vacancies, are shown to depend strongly on the growth rate. A quantitative model is used to explain the carrier density changes.

  11. Atomic Transition Probabilities Scandium through Manganese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.A.; Fuhr, J.R.; Wiese, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    Atomic transition probabilities for about 8,800 spectral lines of five iron-group elements, Sc(Z = 21) to Mn(Z = 25), are critically compiled, based on all available literature sources. The data are presented in separate tables for each element and stage of ionization and are further subdivided into allowed (i.e., electric dipole-E1) and forbidden (magnetic dipole-M1, electric quadrupole-E2, and magnetic quadrupole-M2) transitions. Within each data table the spectral lines are grouped into multiplets, which are in turn arranged according to parent configurations, transition arrays, and ascending quantum numbers. For each line the transition probability for spontaneous emission and the line strength are given, along with the spectroscopic designation, the wavelength, the statistical weights, and the energy levels of the upper and lower states. For allowed lines the absorption oscillator strength is listed, while for forbidden transitions the type of transition is identified (M1, E2, etc.). In addition, the estimated accuracy and the source are indicated. In short introductions, which precede the tables for each ion, the main justifications for the choice of the adopted data and for the accuracy rating are discussed. A general introduction contains a discussion of our method of evaluation and the principal criteria for our judgements

  12. Nonmonotonic Temperature Dependence of the Pressure-Dependent Reaction Rate Constant and Kinetic Isotope Effect of Hydrogen Radical Reaction with Benzene Calculated by Variational Transition-State Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xin; Truhlar, Donald G; Xu, Xuefei

    2017-11-30

    The reaction between H and benzene is a prototype for reactions of radicals with aromatic hydrocarbons. Here we report calculations of the reaction rate constants and the branching ratios of the two channels of the reaction (H addition and H abstraction) over a wide temperature and pressure range. Our calculations, obtained with an accurate potential energy surface, are based on variational transition-state theory for the high-pressure limit of the addition reaction and for the abstraction reaction and on system-specific quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel theory calibrated by variational transition-state theory for pressure effects on the addition reaction. The latter is a very convenient way to include variational effects, corner-cutting tunneling, and anharmonicity in falloff calculations. Our results are in very good agreement with the limited experimental data and show the importance of including pressure effects in the temperature interval where the mechanism changes from addition to abstraction. We found a negative temperature effect of the total reaction rate constants at 1 atm pressure in the temperature region where experimental data are missing and accurate theoretical data were previously missing as well. We also calculated the H + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 and D + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 kinetic isotope effects, and we compared our H + C 6 H 6 results to previous theoretical data for H + toluene. We report a very novel nonmonotonic dependence of the kinetic isotope effect on temperature. A particularly striking effect is the prediction of a negative temperature dependence of the total rate constant over 300-500 K wide temperature ranges, depending on the pressure but generally in the range from 600 to 1700 K, which includes the temperature range of ignition in gasoline engines, which is important because aromatics are important components of common fuels.

  13. Gender differences in predictors of self-rated health in Armenia: a population-based study of an economy in transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirchyan, Anahit; Petrosyan, Varduhi; Thompson, Michael E

    2012-11-14

    Self-rated health is a widely used health outcome measure that strongly correlates with physical and mental health status and predicts mortality. This study identified the set of predictors of fair/poor self-rated health in adult female and male populations of Armenia during a period of long-lasting socio-economic transition to a market economy. Differences in self-rated health were analyzed along three dimensions: socioeconomic, behavioral/attitudinal, and psychosocial. The study utilized data from a 2006 nationwide household health survey that used a multi-stage probability proportional to size cluster sampling with a combination of interviewer-administered and self-administered surveys. Both female and male representatives of a household aged 18 and over completed the self-administered survey. Multivariate odds ratios (OR) for fair/poor self-rated health were calculated for different sets of variables and logistic regression models fitted separately for women and men to identify the determinants of fair/poor self-rated health. Overall, 2310 women and 462 men participated in the survey. The rate of fair/poor self-rated health was 61.8% among women and 59.7% among men. For women, the set of independent predictors of fair/poor self-rated health included age, unemployment, poverty, low affordability of healthcare, depression, and weak social support. For men, the set included age, lower education, depression, weak social support, and drinking alcohol less than once a week. For both genders, depression and weak social support demonstrated the strongest independent association with fair/poor self-rated health. The prevalence of fair/poor self-rated health was similar among men and women in this study, but the sets of independent predictors of perceived health differed somewhat, possibly, reflecting lifestyle differences between men and women in Armenia. Nevertheless, psychosocial variables were the strongest predictors of fair/poor self-rated health for both genders

  14. Gender differences in predictors of self-rated health in Armenia: a population-based study of an economy in transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demirchyan Anahit

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Self-rated health is a widely used health outcome measure that strongly correlates with physical and mental health status and predicts mortality. This study identified the set of predictors of fair/poor self-rated health in adult female and male populations of Armenia during a period of long-lasting socio-economic transition to a market economy. Methods Differences in self-rated health were analyzed along three dimensions: socioeconomic, behavioral/attitudinal, and psychosocial. The study utilized data from a 2006 nationwide household health survey that used a multi-stage probability proportional to size cluster sampling with a combination of interviewer-administered and self-administered surveys. Both female and male representatives of a household aged 18 and over completed the self-administered survey. Multivariate odds ratios (OR for fair/poor self-rated health were calculated for different sets of variables and logistic regression models fitted separately for women and men to identify the determinants of fair/poor self-rated health. Results Overall, 2310 women and 462 men participated in the survey. The rate of fair/poor self-rated health was 61.8% among women and 59.7% among men. For women, the set of independent predictors of fair/poor self-rated health included age, unemployment, poverty, low affordability of healthcare, depression, and weak social support. For men, the set included age, lower education, depression, weak social support, and drinking alcohol less than once a week. For both genders, depression and weak social support demonstrated the strongest independent association with fair/poor self-rated health. Conclusions The prevalence of fair/poor self-rated health was similar among men and women in this study, but the sets of independent predictors of perceived health differed somewhat, possibly, reflecting lifestyle differences between men and women in Armenia. Nevertheless, psychosocial variables were the

  15. Cell Growth Rate Dictates the Onset of Glass to Fluidlike Transition and Long Time Superdiffusion in an Evolving Cell Colony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmi-Kakkada, Abdul N.; Li, Xin; Samanta, Himadri S.; Sinha, Sumit; Thirumalai, D.

    2018-04-01

    Collective migration dominates many phenomena, from cell movement in living systems to abiotic self-propelling particles. Focusing on the early stages of tumor evolution, we enunciate the principles involved in cell dynamics and highlight their implications in understanding similar behavior in seemingly unrelated soft glassy materials and possibly chemokine-induced migration of CD 8+T cells. We performed simulations of tumor invasion using a minimal three-dimensional model, accounting for cell elasticity and adhesive cell-cell interactions, as well as cell birth and death, to establish that cell-growth-rate-dependent tumor expansion results in the emergence of distinct topological niches. Cells at the periphery move with higher velocity perpendicular to the tumor boundary, while the motion of interior cells is slower and isotropic. The mean-square displacement Δ (t ) of cells exhibits glassy behavior at times comparable to the cell cycle time, while exhibiting superdiffusive behavior, Δ (t )≈tα (α >1 ), at longer times. We derive the value of α ≈1.33 using a field theoretic approach based on stochastic quantization. In the process, we establish the universality of superdiffusion in a class of seemingly unrelated nonequilibrium systems. Superdiffusion at long times arises only if there is an imbalance between cell birth and death rates. Our findings for the collective migration, which also suggest that tumor evolution occurs in a polarized manner, are in quantitative agreement with in vitro experiments. Although set in the context of tumor invasion, the findings should also hold in describing the collective motion in growing cells and in active systems, where creation and annihilation of particles play a role.

  16. A twin study of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Dimensions rated by the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD-symptoms and Normal-behavior (SWAN) Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hay, D.A.; Bennett, K.S.; Levy, J.; Sergeant, J.A.; Swanson, J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: When symptom rating scales are used in the general population, there is severe skewness, with many individuals having no symptoms. While this has major implications for genetic designs that require extremely discordant and concordant (EDAC) siblings, little is known of the genetics of

  17. First-principles method for calculating the rate constants of internal-conversion and intersystem-crossing transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiev, R R; Cherepanov, V N; Baryshnikov, G V; Sundholm, D

    2018-02-28

    A method for calculating the rate constants for internal-conversion (k IC ) and intersystem-crossing (k ISC ) processes within the adiabatic and Franck-Condon (FC) approximations is proposed. The applicability of the method is demonstrated by calculation of k IC and k ISC for a set of organic and organometallic compounds with experimentally known spectroscopic properties. The studied molecules were pyrromethene-567 dye, psoralene, hetero[8]circulenes, free-base porphyrin, naphthalene, and larger polyacenes. We also studied fac-Alq 3 and fac-Ir(ppy) 3 , which are important molecules in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). The excitation energies were calculated at the multi-configuration quasi-degenerate second-order perturbation theory (XMC-QDPT2) level, which is found to yield excitation energies in good agreement with experimental data. Spin-orbit coupling matrix elements, non-adiabatic coupling matrix elements, Huang-Rhys factors, and vibrational energies were calculated at the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) levels. The computed fluorescence quantum yields for the pyrromethene-567 dye, psoralene, hetero[8]circulenes, fac-Alq 3 and fac-Ir(ppy) 3 agree well with experimental data, whereas for the free-base porphyrin, naphthalene, and the polyacenes, the obtained quantum yields significantly differ from the experimental values, because the FC and adiabatic approximations are not accurate for these molecules.

  18. A comparison of four scoring methods based on the parent-rated Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire as used in the Dutch preventive child health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treffers Philip DA

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Validated questionnaires can support the identification of psychosocial problems by the Preventive Child Health Care (PCH system. This study assesses the validity and added value of four scoring methods used with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ for the identification of psychosocial problems among children aged 7–12 by the PCH. Methods We included 711 (of 814 children (response: 87% aged 7–12 undergoing routine health assessments in nine PCH services across the Netherlands. Child health professionals interviewed and examined children and parents. Prior to the interview, parents completed the SDQ and the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL, which were not shown to the professionals. The CBCL and data about the child's current treatment status were used as criteria for the validity of the SDQ. We used four SDQ scoring approaches: an elevated SDQ Total Difficulties Score (TDS, parent-defined difficulties, an elevated score for emotional symptoms, conduct problems or hyperactivity in combination with a high impairment score, and a combined score: an elevated score for any of these three methods. Results The Cohen's Kappa ranged from 0.33 to 0.64 for the four scoring methods with the CBCL scores and treatment status, generally indicating a moderate to good agreement. All four methods added significantly to the identification of problems by the PCH. Classification based on the TDS yielded results similar to more complicated methods. Conclusion The SDQ is a valid tool for the identification of psychosocial problems by PCH. As a first step, the use of a simple classification based on the SDQ TDS is recommended.

  19. Effect of slow release-Fampridine on muscle strength, rate of force development, functional capacity and cognitive function in an enriched population of MS patients. A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H B; Nielsen, J L; Ravnborg, M.

    2016-01-01

    contraction (MVC) and rate of force development (RFD) of the lower extremities and 2) to replicate previously published data on the effect of slow release-Fampridine (SR-Fampridine) on the functional capacity of the lower limbs, the upper limb and cognitive function, in persons with multiple sclerosis (pw....... Furthermore, a significant effect of SR-Fampridine on T25FW, SSST and 5-STS was demonstrated. CONCLUSION: Gold standard dynamometry assessment of muscle strength showed improved MVC and RFD in persons with MS treated with SR-Fampridine compared to placebo. Furthermore, previous findings on the effects of SR...

  20. Healthy Zero Energy Buildings (HZEB) Program - Cross-Sectional Study of Contaminant Levels, Source, Strengths, and Ventilation Rates in Retail Stores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Sidheswaran, Meera; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William

    2014-02-01

    This field study measured ventilation rates and indoor air quality parameters in 21 visits to retail stores in California. The data was collected to guide the development of new, science-based commercial building ventilation rate standards that balance the dual objectives of increasing energy efficiency and maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. Data collection occurred between September 2011 and March 2013. Three types of stores participated in this study: grocery stores, furniture/hardware stores, and apparel stores. Ventilation rates and indoor air contaminant concentrations were measured on a weekday, typically between 9 am and 6 pm. Ventilation rates measured using a tracer gas decay method exceeded the minimum requirement of California’s Title 24 Standard in all but one store. Even though there was adequate ventilation according to Title 24, concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein exceeded the most stringent chronic health guidelines. Other indoor air contaminants measured included carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O{sub 3}), and particulate matter (PM). Concentrations of CO{sub 2} were kept low by adequate ventilation, and were assumed low also because the sampling occurred on a weekday when retail stores were less busy. CO concentrations were also low. The indoor-outdoor ratios of O{sub 3} showed that the first-order loss rate may vary by store trade types and also by ventilation mode (mechanical versus natural). Analysis of fine and ultrafine PM measurements showed that a substantial portion of the particle mass in grocery stores with cooking-related emissions was in particles less than 0.3 μm. Stores without cooking as an indoor source had PM size distributions that were more similar indoors and outdoors. The whole-building emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and PM were estimated from the measured ventilation rates and indoor and outdoor contaminant concentrations. Mass balance models were

  1. Effect of the heating rate on residual thermo-hydro-mechanical properties of a high-strength concrete in the context of nuclear waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galle, C.; Pin, M.; Ranc, G.; Rodrigues, S.

    2003-01-01

    Concrete is likely to be used in massive structures for nuclear waste long-term storage facilities in France. In the framework of vitrified waste and spent fuel management, these structures could be submitted to high temperatures. In standard conditions, ambient temperature should not exceed 60 degC but in case of failure of a cooling system, concretes could be temporarily exposed to temperatures up to 250 degC. Depending on the temperature rise kinetics, concretes could be damaged to a greater or lesser extent. In this context, an experimental study on the effect of heating rate on concrete thermo-hydro-mechanical properties exposed to high temperatures (110 - 250 degC) was carried out at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). Data analysis and interpretation provided enough arguments to conclude that, at local scale, the impact of heating rate on residual properties was real though relatively limited. (author)

  2. Dose rate, mitotic cycle duration, and sensitivity of cell transitions from G1 → S and G2 → M to protracted gamma radiation in root meristems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, L.S.; Hof, J.V.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments were designed to determine the relative radiosensitivity of the cell transition points of G1 → S and G2 → M in root meristems of several plant species. Label and mitotic indices and microspectrophotometry were used to measure the proportions of cells in each mitotic cycle stage in root meristems after protracted gamma radiation. The criterion of radiosensitivity was the dose rate needed to produce a tissue with less than 1 percent cells in S and none in M after 3 days of continuous exposure. The results show that DNA is the primary radiation target in proliferative root meristems and that the cycle duration stipulates the time interval of vulnerability. In each species, nonrandom reproducible cell proportions were established with 2C:4C:8C amounts of nuclear DNA after 3 days of exposure. Roots of Helianthus annuus, Crepis capillaris, and Tradescantia clone 02 had 80 percent cells with a 2C amount of DNA and 20 percent had a 4C amount of DNA. In these species the transition point of G1 → S was more radiosensitive than G2 → M. Roots of Pisum sativum and Triticum aestivum had cell proportions at 2C:4C:8C amounts of DNA in frequencies of 0.10 to 0.20:0.40 to 0.60:0.30 to 0.40. In these two species 0.30 to 0.40 cells underwent radiation-induced endoreduplication that resulted from a rapid inhibition of cell transit from G2 → M and a slower impairment of G1 → S. Cells increased from 2C to 4C and from 4C to 8C amounts of DNA during irradiation. The proportions of nuclei with 2C:4C:8C amounts of DNA were dependent in part upon the relative radiosensitivity of the G1 → S and G2 → M control points. The data show the relative radiosensitivity of the transition points from G1 → S and from G2 → M was species specific and unrelated to the cycle duration and mean nuclear DNA content of the plant species

  3. Shape and structure of N=Z ^64Ge; Electromagnetic transition rates from the application of the Recoil Distance Method to knock-out reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starosta, K.; Dewald, A.

    2007-04-01

    Transition rate measurements are reported for the 2^+1 and 2^+2 states in the N=Z nucleus ^64Ge. The measurement was done utilizing the Recoil Distance Method (RDM) and a unique combination of state of the art instruments at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). States of interest were populated via an intermediate energy single neutron knock-out reaction. RDM studies of knock-out and fragmentation reaction products hold the promise of reaching far from stability and providing lifetime information for intermediate-spin excited states in a wide range of exotic nuclei. The large-scale Shell Model calculations applying the recently developed GXPF1A interaction are in excellent agreement with the above results. Theoretical analysis suggests that ^64Ge is a collective γ-soft anharmonic vibrator.

  4. Shape and structure of N=Z 64Ge: electromagnetic transition rates from the application of the recoil distance method to a knockout reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starosta, K; Dewald, A; Dunomes, A; Adrich, P; Amthor, A M; Baumann, T; Bazin, D; Bowen, M; Brown, B A; Chester, A; Gade, A; Galaviz, D; Glasmacher, T; Ginter, T; Hausmann, M; Horoi, M; Jolie, J; Melon, B; Miller, D; Moeller, V; Norris, R P; Pissulla, T; Portillo, M; Rother, W; Shimbara, Y; Stolz, A; Vaman, C; Voss, P; Weisshaar, D; Zelevinsky, V

    2007-07-27

    Transition rate measurements are reported for the 2(1)+ and 2(2)+ states in N=Z 64Ge. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with large-scale shell-model calculations applying the recently developed GXPF1A interactions. The measurement was done using the recoil distance method (RDM) and a unique combination of state-of-the-art instruments at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). States of interest were populated via an intermediate-energy single-neutron knockout reaction. RDM studies of knockout and fragmentation reaction products hold the promise of reaching far from stability and providing lifetime information for excited states in a wide range of nuclei.

  5. Analytical description of spin-Rabi oscillation controlled electronic transitions rates between weakly coupled pairs of paramagnetic states with S=(1)/(2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, R.; Baker, W. J.; Boehme, C.; Raikh, M. E.

    2013-04-01

    We report on the theoretical and experimental study of spin-dependent electronic transition rates which are controlled by a radiation-induced spin-Rabi oscillation of weakly spin-exchange and spin-dipolar coupled paramagnetic states (S=(1)/(2)). The oscillation components [the Fourier content, F(s)] of the net transition rates within spin-pair ensembles are derived for randomly distributed spin resonances, with an account of a possible correlation between the two distributions corresponding to individual pair partners. Our study shows that when electrically detected Rabi spectroscopy is conducted under an increasing driving field B1, the Rabi spectrum, F(s), evolves from a single peak at s=ΩR, where ΩR=γB1 is the Rabi frequency (γ is the gyromagnetic ratio), to three peaks at s=ΩR, s=2ΩR, and low s≪ΩR. The crossover between the two regimes takes place when ΩR exceeds the expectation value δ0 of the difference in the Zeeman energies within the pairs, which corresponds to the broadening of the magnetic resonance by disorder caused by a hyperfine field or distributions of Landé g factors. We capture this crossover by analytically calculating the shapes of all three peaks at an arbitrary relation between ΩR and δ0. When the peaks are well developed their widths are Δs˜δ02/ΩR. We find a good quantitative agreement between the theory and experiment.

  6. Rates and timing of vertical-axis block rotations across the central Sierra Nevada-Walker Lane transition in the Bodie Hills, California/Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Dylan H.; Burbank, Douglas W.; Herman, Scott W.; Bogue, Scott

    2011-10-01

    We use paleomagnetic data from Tertiary volcanic rocks to address the rates and timing of vertical-axis block rotations across the central Sierra Nevada-Walker Lane transition in the Bodie Hills, California/Nevada. Samples from the Upper Miocene (˜9 Ma) Eureka Valley Tuff suggest clockwise vertical-axis block rotations between NE-striking left-lateral faults in the Bridgeport and Mono Basins. Results in the Bodie Hills suggest clockwise rotations (R ± ΔR, 95% confidence limits) of 74 ± 8° since Early to Middle Miocene (˜12-20 Ma), 42 ± 11° since Late Miocene (˜8-9 Ma), and 14 ± 10° since Pliocene (˜3 Ma) time with no detectable northward translation. The data are compatible with a relatively steady rotation rate of 5 ± 2° Ma-1 (2σ) since the Middle Miocene over the three examined timescales. The average rotation rates have probably not varied by more than a factor of two over time spans equal to half of the total time interval. Our paleomagnetic data suggest that block rotations in the region of the Mina Deflection began prior to Late Miocene time (˜9 Ma), and perhaps since the Middle Miocene if rotation rates were relatively constant. Block rotation in the Bodie Hills is similar in age and long-term average rate to rotations in the Transverse Ranges of southern California associated with early transtensional dextral shear deformation. We speculate that the age of rotations in the Bodie Hills indicates dextral shear and strain accommodation within the central Walker Lane Belt resulting from coupling of the Pacific and North America plates.

  7. Consequences of acid strength for isomerization and elimination catalysis on solid acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macht, Josef; Carr, Robert T; Iglesia, Enrique

    2009-05-13

    We address here the manner in which acid catalysis senses the strength of solid acids. Acid strengths for Keggin polyoxometalate (POM) clusters and zeolites, chosen because of their accurately known structures, are described rigorously by their deprotonation energies (DPE). Mechanistic interpretations of the measured dynamics of alkane isomerization and alkanol dehydration are used to obtain rate and equilibrium constants and energies for intermediates and transition states and to relate them to acid strength. n-Hexane isomerization rates were limited by isomerization of alkoxide intermediates on bifunctional metal-acid mixtures designed to maintain alkane-alkene equilibrium. Isomerization rate constants were normalized by the number of accessible protons, measured by titration with 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine during catalysis. Equilibrium constants for alkoxides formed by protonation of n-hexene increased slightly with deprotonation energies (DPE), while isomerization rate constants decreased and activation barriers increased with increasing DPE, as also shown for alkanol dehydration reactions. These trends are consistent with thermochemical analyses of the transition states involved in isomerization and elimination steps. For all reactions, barriers increased by less than the concomitant increase in DPE upon changes in composition, because electrostatic stabilization of ion-pairs at the relevant transition states becomes more effective for weaker acids, as a result of their higher charge density at the anionic conjugate base. Alkoxide isomerization barriers were more sensitive to DPE than for elimination from H-bonded alkanols, the step that limits 2-butanol and 1-butanol dehydration rates; the latter two reactions showed similar DPE sensitivities, despite significant differences in their rates and activation barriers, indicating that slower reactions are not necessarily more sensitive to acid strength, but instead reflect the involvement of more unstable organic

  8. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using pp collision data at [Formula: see text] and 8 TeV in the ATLAS experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Affolder, A A; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Alimonti, G; Alio, L; Alison, J; Alkire, S P; Allbrooke, B M M; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Álvarez Piqueras, D; Alviggi, M G; Amadio, B T; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anders, J K; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Arabidze, G; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arduh, F A; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Axen, B; Ayoub, M K; Azuelos, G; Baak, M A; Baas, A E; Bacci, C; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Balek, P; Balestri, T; Balli, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnes, S L; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Basalaev, A; Bassalat, A; Basye, A; Bates, R L; Batista, S J; Batley, J R; Battaglia, M; Bauce, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beacham, J B; Beattie, M D; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, M; Becker, S; Beckingham, M; Becot, C; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Beermann, T A; Begel, M; Behr, J K; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bender, M; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez Garcia, J A; Benjamin, D P; Bensinger, J R; Bentvelsen, S; Beresford, L; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Beringer, J; Bernard, C; Bernard, N R; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Berta, P; Bertella, C; Bertoli, G; Bertolucci, F; Bertsche, C; Bertsche, D; Besana, M I; Besjes, G J; Bessidskaia Bylund, O; Bessner, M; Besson, N; Betancourt, C; Bethke, S; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianchini, L; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieniek, S P; Biglietti, M; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Black, C W; Black, J E; Black, K M; Blackburn, D; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blanco, J E; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Bock, C; Boehler, M; Bogaerts, J A; Bogdanchikov, A G; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A S; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borroni, S; Bortfeldt, J; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boudreau, J; Bouffard, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brazzale, S F; Brendlinger, K; Brennan, A J; Brenner, L; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Bristow, K; Bristow, T M; Britton, D; Britzger, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Bronner, J; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, T; Brooks, W K; Brosamer, J; Brost, E; Brown, J; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Bryngemark, L; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Buda, S I; Budagov, I A; Buehrer, F; Bugge, L; Bugge, M K; Bulekov, O; Bullock, D; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burghgrave, B; Burke, S; Burmeister, I; Busato, E; Büscher, D; Büscher, V; Bussey, P; Butler, J M; Butt, A I; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Butti, P; Buttinger, W; Buzatu, A; Buzykaev, A R; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cairo, V M; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calandri, A; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Caloba, L P; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Camacho Toro, R; Camarda, S; Camarri, P; Cameron, D; Caminada, L M; Caminal Armadans, R; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Campoverde, A; Canale, V; Canepa, A; Cano Bret, M; Cantero, J; Cantrill, R; Cao, T; Capeans Garrido, M D M; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Capua, M; Caputo, R; Cardarelli, R; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carminati, L; Caron, S; Carquin, E; Carrillo-Montoya, G D; Carter, J R; Carvalho, J; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Casolino, M; Castaneda-Miranda, E; Castelli, A; Castillo Gimenez, V; Castro, N F; Catastini, P; Catinaccio, A; Catmore, J R; Cattai, A; Caudron, J; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Ceradini, F; Cerio, B C; Cerny, K; Cerqueira, A S; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Cerutti, F; Cerv, M; Cervelli, A; Cetin, S A; Chafaq, A; Chakraborty, D; Chalupkova, I; Chang, P; Chapleau, B; Chapman, J D; Charlton, D G; Chau, C C; Chavez Barajas, C A; Cheatham, S; Chegwidden, A; Chekanov, S; Chekulaev, S V; Chelkov, G A; Chelstowska, M A; Chen, C; Chen, H; Chen, K; Chen, L; Chen, S; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Cheng, H C; Cheng, Y; Cheplakov, A; Cheremushkina, E; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R; Chernyatin, V; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Chiarella, V; Childers, J T; Chiodini, G; Chisholm, A S; Chislett, R T; Chitan, A; Chizhov, M V; Choi, K; Chouridou, S; Chow, B K B; Christodoulou, V; Chromek-Burckhart, D; Chu, M L; Chudoba, J; 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    Combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. The combinations include the results of the analyses of the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] decay modes, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton-proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 [Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text] TeV and 20.3 [Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text] TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is [Formula: see text]. The observed Higgs boson production and decay rates are interpreted in a leading-order coupling framework, exploring a wide range of benchmark coupling models both with and without assumptions on the Higgs boson width and on the Standard Model particle content in loop processes. The data are found to be compatible with the Standard Model expectations for a Higgs boson at a mass of 125.36 GeV for all models considered.

  9. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using pp collision data at √s=7 and 8 TeV in the ATLAS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aad, G. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Université and CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Abbott, B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Abdallah, J. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Abdinov, O. [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Aben, R. [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics and University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2016-01-05

    Combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. The combinations include the results of the analyses of the H→γγ, ZZ{sup ∗}, WW{sup ∗}, Zγ, bb{sup -bar}, ττ and μμ decay modes, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton-proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 fb{sup -1} at √s=7 TeV and 20.3 fb{sup -1} at √s=8 TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is 1.18{sub -0.14}{sup +0.15}. The observed Higgs boson production and decay rates are interpreted in a leading-order coupling framework, exploring a wide range of benchmark coupling models both with and without assumptions on the Higgs boson width and on the Standard Model particle content in loop processes. The data are found to be compatible with the Standard Model expectations for a Higgs boson at a mass of 125.36 GeV for all models considered.

  10. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using pp collision data at √(s) = 7 and 8 TeV in the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.

    2016-01-01

    Combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. The combinations include the results of the analyses of the H → γγ, ZZ*, WW*, Zγ, b anti b, ττ and μμ decay modes, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton-proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 fb -1 at √(s) = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb -1 at √(s) = 8 TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is 1.18 -0.14 +0.15 . The observed Higgs boson production and decay rates are interpreted in a leading-order coupling framework, exploring a wide range of benchmark coupling models both with and without assumptions on the Higgs boson width and on the Standard Model particle content in loop processes. The data are found to be compatible with the Standard Model expectations for a Higgs boson at a mass of 125.36 GeV for all models considered. (orig.)

  11. Topological strength of magnetic skyrmions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D.; Ramos, J.G.G.S.; Rodrigues, E.I.B.

    2017-02-01

    This work deals with magnetic structures that attain integer and half-integer skyrmion numbers. We model and solve the problem analytically, and show how the solutions appear in materials that engender distinct, very specific physical properties, and use them to describe their topological features. In particular, we found a way to model skyrmion with a large transition region correlated with the presence of a two-peak skyrmion number density. Moreover, we run into the issue concerning the topological strength of a vortex-like structure and suggest an experimental realization, important to decide how to modify and measure the topological strength of the magnetic structure.

  12. Bond strength of masonry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluijm, van der R.; Vermeltfoort, A.Th.

    1992-01-01

    Bond strength is not a well defined property of masonry. Normally three types of bond strength can be distinguished: - tensile bond strength, - shear (and torsional) bond strength, - flexural bond strength. In this contribution the behaviour and strength of masonry in deformation controlled uniaxial

  13. HOW TO DETERMINE THE AMOTIZED COST OF BANK CREDITS ACCORDING TO THE EFFECTIVE INTEREST RATE METHOD IN THE CONTEXT OF TRANSITION TO IFRS (INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL REPORTING STANDARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana SEVCIUC

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is known that licensed banks in the Republic of Moldova are in the period of fulfilling the action plan with a view to implementing the project on transition from the National Accounting Standards to the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS. Fair and timely decisions are only possible based on objective and successive information, which explains the need for IFRS. At the same time, a major role in popularization of IFRS is played by the specialized publications. Therefore, this article aims at highlighting genuine financial information, transparency, comparability of accounting data and will increase reliability of financial statements of licensed banks. In conclusion we report that when calculating the effective interest rate, the bank estimates cash flows considering all contractual terms of the credit, but does not take into account future credit losses. The calculation includes all commissions and points paid or received by contractual parties that are an integral part of the effective interest rate, transaction costs and all other premiums and discounts.

  14. Soft radiative strength in warm nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Garrett, P E; Nelson, R O; Schiller, A; Voinov, A; Agvaanluvsan, U; Algin, E; Belgya, T; Chankova, R; Guttormsen, M; Mitchell, G E; Rekstad, J; Siem, S

    2004-01-01

    Unresolved transitions in the nuclear γ-ray cascade produced in the decay of excited nuclei are best described by statistical concepts: a continuous radiative strength function (RSF) and level density yield mean values of transition matrix elements. Data on the soft (E γ < 3-4 MeV) RSF for transitions between warm states (i.e. states several MeV above the yrast line) have, however, remained elusive

  15. Gamow-teller transitions: progress and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, G.

    1994-01-01

    The determination of the Gamow-Teller (GT) matrix elements from beta-decay and charge exchange reactions has led to a series of discoveries concerning the structure of the nucleus and the properties of spin-isospin transitions in nuclei. The study of GT distribution and strength, either by charge exchange or weak decay, provides excellent tests for nuclear models as these parameters are extremely sensitive to the details of nuclear structure. Recent improvements of these models have reduced, for the most part, differences between experiment and theory, allowing in turn a more reliable estimate of weak decay rates in stellar matter. A better understanding of the 'missing strength' and of the failure of many experiments to detect the strength that is present have also been obtained. Recently, it appears also that weak decay studies in selected region (proton or neutron rich) of the N-Z plane give access to the GT giant resonance. (J.S.). 65 refs., 10 figs

  16. The effects of growth rate on leg morphology and tibia breaking strength, mineral density, mineral content, and bone ash in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, M Y; Karnuah, A B; Mitchell, A D; Anthony, N B; Pesti, G M; Aggrey, S E

    2012-08-01

    Fast-growing broilers are especially susceptible to bone abnormalities, causing major problems for broiler producers. The cortical bones of fast-growing broilers are highly porous, which may lead to leg deformities. Leg problems were investigated in 6-wk-old Arkansas randombred broilers. Body weight was measured at hatch and at 6 wk. There were 8 different settings of approximately 450 eggs each. Two subpopulations, slow-growing (SG; bottom quarter, n=511) and fast-growing (FG; top quarter, n=545), were created from a randombred population based on their growth rate from hatch until 6 wk of age. At 6 wk of age, the broilers were processed and chilled at 4°C overnight before deboning. Shank (78.27±8.06 g), drum stick (190.92±16.91 g), and thigh weights (233.88±22.66 g) of FG broilers were higher than those of SG broilers (54.39±6.86, 135.39±15.45, and 168.50±21.13 g, respectivly; Ppercentage of ash content (39.76±2.81) of FG broilers was lower than that of SG broilers (39.99±2.67; P=0.173). Fast-growing broiler bones were longer, wider, heavier, stronger, more dense, and contained more ash than SG ones. After all parameters were calculated per unit of final BW at 6 wk, tibia density and bone ash percentage of FG broilers were lower than those of SG broilers.

  17. Rates and equilibrium constants of the ligand-induced conformational transition of an HCN ion channel protein domain determined by DEER spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collauto, Alberto; DeBerg, Hannah A; Kaufmann, Royi; Zagotta, William N; Stoll, Stefan; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2017-06-14

    Ligand binding can induce significant conformational changes in proteins. The mechanism of this process couples equilibria associated with the ligand binding event and the conformational change. Here we show that by combining the application of W-band double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy with microfluidic rapid freeze quench (μRFQ) it is possible to resolve these processes and obtain both equilibrium constants and reaction rates. We studied the conformational transition of the nitroxide labeled, isolated carboxy-terminal cyclic-nucleotide binding domain (CNBD) of the HCN2 ion channel upon binding of the ligand 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Using model-based global analysis, the time-resolved data of the μRFQ DEER experiments directly provide fractional populations of the open and closed conformations as a function of time. We modeled the ligand-induced conformational change in the protein using a four-state model: apo/open (AO), apo/closed (AC), bound/open (BO), bound/closed (BC). These species interconvert according to AC + L ⇌ AO + L ⇌ BO ⇌ BC. By analyzing the concentration dependence of the relative contributions of the closed and open conformations at equilibrium, we estimated the equilibrium constants for the two conformational equilibria and the open-state ligand dissociation constant. Analysis of the time-resolved μRFQ DEER data gave estimates for the intrinsic rates of ligand binding and unbinding as well as the rates of the conformational change. This demonstrates that DEER can quantitatively resolve both the thermodynamics and the kinetics of ligand binding and the associated conformational change.

  18. Electric quadrupole strength in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirson, M.W.

    1979-01-01

    Isoscalar electric quadrupole strength distributions in nuclei are surveyed, and it is concluded that the strength is shared, in most cases, roughly equally between low-lying transitions and the giant quadrupole state. The same is not true of the isovector case. A simple extension of the schematic model gives a remarkably successul description of the data, and emphasizes the vital importance of the coupling between high-lying and low-lying quadrupole modes. The standadrd simple representation of the giant quadrupole resonance as produced by operating on the nuclear ground state with the quadrupole transition operator is not applicable to the isoscalar case. It is suggested that giant resonances fall into broad classes of similar states, with considerable qualitative differences between the distinct classes. (author)

  19. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using pp collision data at √s = 7 and 8 TeV in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as of its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. Included in the combinations are the results of the decay modes H → γγ, ZZ∗, WW∗, Zγ, bb ̄, ττ and μμ, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton-proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 fb−1 at √s = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb−1 at √s = 8 TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is 1.18 ± 0.10 ± 0.07±0.08, where the first error reflects the statistical uncertainty and 0.07 the second and third errors reflect respectively the experimental and theoretical systematic uncertainties. Strong evidence is found for the vector boson fusion process with a signifi...

  20. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using $pp$ collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ and $8$ TeV in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Childers, John Taylor; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; 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Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2016-01-05

    Combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. The combinations include the results of the analyses of the $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma,\\, ZZ^*,\\, WW^*,\\, Z\\gamma,\\, b\\bar{b},\\, \\tau\\tau$ and $\\mu\\mu$ decay modes, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton--proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is $1.18^{+0.15}_{-0.14}$. The data provide unequivocal confirmation of the gluon fusion production of the Higgs boson, strong evidence of vector-boson fusion production and support Standard Model assumptions of production in association...

  1. Quantum phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, S.

    1999-01-01

    Phase transitions are normally associated with changes of temperature but a new type of transition - caused by quantum fluctuations near absolute zero - is possible, and can tell us more about the properties of a wide range of systems in condensed-matter physics. Nature abounds with phase transitions. The boiling and freezing of water are everyday examples of phase transitions, as are more exotic processes such as superconductivity and superfluidity. The universe itself is thought to have passed through several phase transitions as the high-temperature plasma formed by the big bang cooled to form the world as we know it today. Phase transitions are traditionally classified as first or second order. In first-order transitions the two phases co-exist at the transition temperature - e.g. ice and water at 0 deg., or water and steam at 100 deg. In second-order transitions the two phases do not co-exist. In the last decade, attention has focused on phase transitions that are qualitatively different from the examples noted above: these are quantum phase transitions and they occur only at the absolute zero of temperature. The transition takes place at the ''quantum critical'' value of some other parameter such as pressure, composition or magnetic field strength. A quantum phase transition takes place when co-operative ordering of the system disappears, but this loss of order is driven solely by the quantum fluctuations demanded by Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. The physical properties of these quantum fluctuations are quite distinct from those of the thermal fluctuations responsible for traditional, finite-temperature phase transitions. In particular, the quantum system is described by a complex-valued wavefunction, and the dynamics of its phase near the quantum critical point requires novel theories that have no analogue in the traditional framework of phase transitions. In this article the author describes the history of quantum phase transitions. (UK)

  2. Nuclear Weak Rates and Detailed Balance in Stellar Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misch, G. Wendell, E-mail: wendell@sjtu.edu, E-mail: wendell.misch@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dong Chuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2017-07-20

    Detailed balance is often invoked in discussions of nuclear weak transitions in astrophysical environments. Satisfaction of detailed balance is rightly touted as a virtue of some methods of computing nuclear transition strengths, but I argue that it need not necessarily be strictly obeyed in astrophysical environments, especially when the environment is far from weak equilibrium. I present the results of shell model calculations of nuclear weak strengths in both charged-current and neutral-current channels at astrophysical temperatures, finding some violation of detailed balance. I show that a slight modification of the technique to strictly obey detailed balance has little effect on the reaction rates associated with these strengths under most conditions, though at high temperature the modified technique in fact misses some important strength. I comment on the relationship between detailed balance and weak equilibrium in astrophysical conditions.

  3. Role of the momentum transfer in the quenching of the Gamow-Teller strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marketin, Tomislav [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb (Croatia); Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Paar, Nils; Vretenar, Dario [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-07-01

    A fully consistent calculation of the Gamow-Teller strength is presented, based on a microscopic theoretical framework. Nuclear ground state is determined using the relativistic Hartree-Bogolyubov (RHB) model with density dependent meson-nucleon coupling constants, and transition rates are calculated via proton-neutron relativistic quasiparticle RPA using the same interaction as in the RHB equations. The (p,n) probe has a similar spin-isospin operator structure to the Gamow-Teller (GT) operator. However, they become comparable only if the GT cross section is measured at a very small momentum transfer q. At higher momentum transfer the isovector spin monopole (IVSM) mode occurs, with the r{sup 2}{sigma}{tau} transition operator. Unlike the Gamow-Teller operator which excites only the 0{Dirac_h}{omega} transitions, the isovector spin monopole operator can also excite 2{Dirac_h}{omega} transitions and can change the strength distribution at high excitation energies. We explore the strength beyond the resonance, examine the effect of momentum transfer on the total strength and compare the results with recent measurements.

  4. Rates and timing of vertical-axis block rotations across the Sierra Nevada-Walker Lane transition in the Bodie Hills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, D. H.; Herman, S.; Burbank, D.; Bogue, S.

    2008-12-01

    We use paleomagnetic data from Tertiary volcanic rocks to address the rates and timing of vertical-axis block rotation across the Sierra Nevada-Walker Lane transition in the Bodie Hills, California/Nevada. In zones of continental deformation, block rotations are an important mechanism for permanent stain accommodation, and thus may be crucial to testing geodetic block models and resolving geologic-geodetic slip discrepancies. In our study, data included in the paleomagetic site means are high quality AF demagnetization results (least squared fits that generally include 5-7 points with MAD values less than 1). Thermal demagnetization results match the AF directions, and both thermal demag and rockmag results indicate strong ChRM, mostly carried by single domain magnetite. The site means used to calculate the VGPs all have a95 values less than 10 (mostly 2-5) and include 6-11 sites each. Each site (and thus site mean) has a reasonably well-known structural correction. The VGP scatter values range from 12 to 16 degrees, indicating that they include appropriate secular variation. The mean declinations and 95 percent confidence limits for each VGP timeslice are statistically distinct from one another (71 ± 9, 39 ± 13, and 11 ± 11 degrees). The slope of a linear regression fit to the age versus declination data gives a rate of vertical axis block rotation of approximately 3-4 degrees/Myr. Fitting two separate lines to the age vs. declination data would indicate an increase in the rates of rotation since ~10 Ma. Two possible interpretations of the data are: (1) the rotations began during or before the Middle Miocene, or (2) rates of rotation were high initially (e.g. ~10 Ma) and decelerated until the Pliocene. These data have implications for the (1) timing and spatial extent of distributed strain accumulation related to the initiation of the San Andreas Fault-Eastern California Shear Zone-Walker Lane transform plate boundary, (2) transfer of transform plate boundary

  5. Energies and E1, M1, E2, and M2 transition rates for states of the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 3}, 2s2p{sup 4}, and 2p{sup 5} configurations in nitrogen-like ions between F III and Kr XXX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rynkun, P., E-mail: pavel.rynkun@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Information Technologies, Lithuanian University of Educational Science, Studentu 39, LT-08106 Vilnius (Lithuania); Jönsson, P. [Group for Materials Science and Applied Mathematics, Malmö University, 20506 Malmö (Sweden); Gaigalas, G. [Department of Physics and Information Technologies, Lithuanian University of Educational Science, Studentu 39, LT-08106 Vilnius (Lithuania); Vilnius University, Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, A. Goštauto 12, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania); Froese Fischer, C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8420 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Based on relativistic wavefunctions from multiconfiguration Dirac–Hartree–Fock and configuration interaction calculations, E1, M1, E2, and M2 transition rates, weighted oscillator strengths, and lifetimes are evaluated for the states of the (1s{sup 2})2s{sup 2}2p{sup 3},2s2p{sup 4}, and 2p{sup 5} configurations in all nitrogen-like ions between F III and Kr XXX. The wavefunction expansions include valence, core–valence, and core–core correlation effects through single–double multireference expansions to increasing sets of active orbitals. The computed energies agree very well with experimental values, with differences of only 300–600 cm{sup −1} for the majority of the levels and ions in the sequence. Computed transitions rates are in close agreement with available data from MCHF-BP calculations by Tachiev and Froese Fischer [G.I. Tachiev, C. Froese Fischer, A and A 385 (2002) 716].

  6. Corium crust strength measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomperski, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439-4840 (United States)], E-mail: lomperski@anl.gov; Farmer, M.T. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439-4840 (United States)], E-mail: farmer@anl.gov

    2009-11-15

    Corium strength is of interest in the context of a severe reactor accident in which molten core material melts through the reactor vessel and collects on the containment basemat. Some accident management strategies involve pouring water over the melt to solidify it and halt corium/concrete interactions. The effectiveness of this method could be influenced by the strength of the corium crust at the interface between the melt and coolant. A strong, coherent crust anchored to the containment walls could allow the yet-molten corium to fall away from the crust as it erodes the basemat, thereby thermally decoupling the melt from the coolant and sharply reducing the cooling rate. This paper presents a diverse collection of measurements of the mechanical strength of corium. The data is based on load tests of corium samples in three different contexts: (1) small blocks cut from the debris of the large-scale MACE experiments, (2) 30 cm-diameter, 75 kg ingots produced by SSWICS quench tests, and (3) high temperature crusts loaded during large-scale corium/concrete interaction (CCI) tests. In every case the corium consisted of varying proportions of UO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and the constituents of concrete to represent a LWR melt at different stages of a molten core/concrete interaction. The collection of data was used to assess the strength and stability of an anchored, plant-scale crust. The results indicate that such a crust is likely to be too weak to support itself above the melt. It is therefore improbable that an anchored crust configuration could persist and the melt become thermally decoupled from the water layer to restrict cooling and prolong an attack of the reactor cavity concrete.

  7. The Strength Compass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledertoug, Mette Marie

    In the Ph.D-project ͚Strengths-based Learning - Children͛s character strengths as a means to their learning potential͛ 750 Danish children have assessed ͚The Strength Compass͛ in order to identify their strengths and to create awareness of strengths. This was followed by a strengths......-based intervention program in order to explore the strengths. Finally different methods to apply the strength in everyday life at school were applied. The paper presentation will show the results for strengths display for children aged 6-16 in different categories: Different age groups: Are the same strengths...... present in both small children and youths? Gender: Do the results show differences between the two genders? Danish as a mother- tongue language: Do the results show any differences in the strengths display when considering different language and cultural backgrounds? Children with Special Needs: Do...

  8. Transition properties of the Be-like X-ray from Mg IX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Feng Hu

    2017-11-23

    Nov 23, 2017 ... Transition properties of the Be-like Kα X-ray from Mg IX. FENG HU1,3,∗ ... 1. Introduction. Magnesium is one of the most abundant elements in the. Universe, and its .... sion coefficients for the configuration state functions are optimized to ..... The absorption oscillator strengths ( fij) and radiative rate Aji for a ...

  9. Families in Transition .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, Michael L., Ed.; Gumaer, James, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on disrupted families and the role of the school counselor in helping children adjust. Describes characteristics of healthy families, and discusses the transition to the blended family, effects of divorce groups on children's classroom behavior, counseling children in stepfamilies, single-parent families, and parenting strengths of single…

  10. Allowed and forbidden transition parameters for Fe XV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive set of fine structure energy levels, oscillator strengths (f), line strengths (S), and radiative decay rates (A) for bound-bound transitions in Fe XV is presented. The allowed electric dipole (E1) transitions were obtained from the relativistic Breit-Pauli R-matrix method which is based on the close coupling approximation. A total of 507 fine structure energy levels with n ≤ 10, l ≤ 9, and 0 ≤ J ≤ 10 are found. They agree within 1% with the available observed energies. These energy levels yield a total of 27,812 E1, same-spin multiplets and intercombination transitions. The A values are in good agreement with those compiled by NIST and other existing values for most transitions. Forbidden transitions are obtained from a set of 20 configurations with orbitals ranging from 1s to 5f using the relativistic code SUPERSTRUCTURE (SS) in the Breit-Pauli approximation. From a set of 123 fine structure levels, a total of 6962 S and A values are presented for forbidden electric quadrupole (E2), electric octupole (E3), magnetic dipole (M1), and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions. The energies from SS calculations agree with observed energies to within 1-3%. A values for E2, M1 transitions agree very well with the available values for most transitions while those for M2 transitions show variable agreement. The large set of transition parameters presented should be applicable for both diagnostics and spectral modeling in the X-ray, ultraviolet, and optical regions of astrophysical plasmas.

  11. Anomalies in the coil-stretch transition of flexible polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Aishani; Cherayil, Binny J.

    2018-03-01

    The flow-induced coil-stretch transition of high molecular weight polymers has generally been held to be of first order. But evidence of significant slowing down in the rate at which the polymers relax to equilibrium in the vicinity of the transition suggests that the thermodynamic character of the transition may be less clear-cut. The above slowing down effect is actually characteristic of a second-order transition, and it points to the existence of a broad spectrum of conformational states in the transition region, analogous to the existence of fluctuations of all length scales at a critical point. In this paper, using a path integral approach based on a free-draining finitely extensible chain model, we calculate various polymer properties as a function of elongational flow as a way of exploring different statistical mechanical details of the coil-stretch transition. These properties include the molecular weight dependence of the flow-extension curve of the polymer, the distribution of its steady-state end-to-end distances, and the characteristic relaxation time τR of these distances. Among other findings, our calculations indicate that the coil-stretch transition is discontinuous in the N → ∞ limit, that the effective free energy of the chain is unimodal at all values of the flow, becoming broad and flat in the immediate vicinity of the transition, and that the ratio of τR to the Rouse relaxation time increases abruptly at the transition before eventually reaching a plateau value at large flow strengths. These aspects of the coil-stretch transition place it among a larger class of unconventional nominally first-order single chain transitions that include the adsorption transition of surface-tethered polymers and the escape transition of compressed polymers.

  12. A Pilot Health Information Technology-Based Effort to Increase the Quality of Transitions From Skilled Nursing Facility to Home: Compelling Evidence of High Rate of Adverse Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Jennifer L; Kanaan, Abir O; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Tjia, Jennifer; Cutrona, Sarah L; Garber, Lawrence; Preusse, Peggy; Field, Terry S

    2016-04-01

    Older adults are often transferred from hospitals to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) for post-acute care. Patients may be at risk for adverse outcomes after SNF discharges, but little research has focused on this period. Assessment of the feasibility of a transitional care intervention based on a combination of manual information transmission and health information technology to provide automated alert messages to primary care physicians and staff; pre-post analysis to assess potential impact. A multispecialty group practice. Adults aged 65 and older, discharged from SNFs to home; comparison group drawn from SNF discharges during the previous 1.5 years, matched on facility, patient age, and sex. For the pre-post analysis, we tracked rehospitalization within 30 days after discharge and adverse drug events within 45 days. The intervention was developed and implemented with manual transmission of information between 8 SNFs and the group practice followed by entry into the electronic health record. The process required a 5-day delay during which a large portion of the adverse events occurred. Over a 1-year period, automated alert messages were delivered to physicians and staff for the 313 eligible patients discharged from the 8 SNFs to home. We compared outcomes to those of individually matched discharges from the previous 1.5 years and found similar percentages with 30-day rehospitalizations (31% vs 30%, adjusted HR 1.06, 95% CI 0.80-1.4). Within the adverse drug event (ADE) study, 30% of the discharges during the intervention period and 30% of matched discharges had ADEs within 45 days. Older adults discharged from SNFs are at high risk of adverse outcomes immediately following discharge. Simply providing alerts to outpatient physicians, especially if delivered multiple days after discharge, is unlikely to have any impact on reducing these rates. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  13. Fine Structure Intervals ‎ ‎-‎ ‎ , ‎ ‎-‎ ‎ and ‎Electric Dipole Transition Rate ‎ ‎-‎ ‎ in ‎Phosphorus Isoelectronic Sequence ‎ ‎ ‎And Phosphorus Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Yousif Hussein

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A systematic study for the calculation of the fine structure intervals -  and -   for the ground configuration 3s23p3 and the excited configuration 3s23p24s respectively, and electric dipole transition rate -  as well as transition energy form the excited configuration 3s23p24s to the ground configuration 3s23p3 in Phosphorus isoelectronic sequence by applying multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF method. The effect of Breit interaction, QED and correlation on the fine structure interval and the gauge invariance effect on the transition probability are studied. Also the fine structure intervals for the phosphorus ions from Piii to Pxv are calculated and are compared with the available experimental data and gives good consistent

  14. The strength compass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledertoug, Mette Marie

    of agreement/disagreement. Also the child/teacher is asked whether the actual strength is important and if he or she has the possibilities to apply the strength in the school. In a PhDproject ‘Strengths-based Learning - Children’s Character Strengths as Means to their Learning Potential’ 750 Danish children......Individual paper presentation: The ‘Strength Compass’. The results of a PhDresearch project among schoolchildren (age 6-16) identifying VIAstrengths concerning age, gender, mother-tongue-langue and possible child psychiatric diagnosis. Strengths-based interventions in schools have a theoretical...... Psychological Publishing Company. ‘The Strength Compass’ is a computer/Ipad based qualitative tool to identify the strengths of a child by a self-survey or a teacher’s survey. It is designed as a visual analogue scale with a statement of the strength in which the child/teacher may declare the degree...

  15. Crack Arrest Toughness of Two High Strength Steels (AISI 4140 and AISI 4340)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripling, E. J.; Mulherin, J. H.; Crosley, P. B.

    1982-04-01

    The crack initiation toughness ( K c ) and crack arrest toughness ( K a ) of AISI 4140 and AISI 4340 steel were measured over a range of yield strengths from 965 to 1240 MPa, and a range of test temperatures from -53 to +74°C. Emphasis was placed on K a testing since these values are thought to represent the minimum toughness of the steel as a function of loading rate. At the same yield strengths and test temperatures, K a for the AISI 4340 was about twice as high as it was for the AISI 4140. In addition, the K a values showed a more pronounced transition temperature than the K c values, when the data were plotted as a function of test temperature. The transition appeared to be associated with a change in fracture mechanism from cleavage to dimpled rupture as the test temperature was increased. The occurrence of a “pop-in” behavior at supertransition temperatures has not been found in lower strength steels, and its evaluation in these high strength steels was possible only because they are not especially tough at their supertransition temperatures. There is an upper toughness limit at which pop-in will not occur, and this was found for the AISI 4340 steel when it was tempered to its lowest yield strength (965 MPa). All the crack arrest data were identified as plane strain values, while only about one-half of the initiation values could be classified this way.

  16. Rates of volcanic deposition, facies changes and movements in a dynamic basin: the Nuussuaq Basin, West Greenland, around the C27n-C26r transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A. K.; Larsen, L. M.; Riisager, P.

    2002-01-01

    the C27n-C26r transition (estimated duration less than 10 ka and here assumed to be 5 ka) as a c. 170 m thick zone within a succession of thin picritic lava flows. Multimodel photogrammetry combined with chemical and lithological analysis of the volcanic rocks has allowed detailed 3D analysis...

  17. Electric dipole transitions for four-times ionized cerium (Ce V)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usta, Betül Karaçoban, E-mail: bkaracoban@sakarya.edu.tr; Akgün, Elif, E-mail: elif.akgun@ogr.sakarya.edu.tr; Alparslan, Büşra, E-mail: busra.alparslan1@ogr.sakarya.edu.tr [Physics Department, Sakarya University, 54187, Sakarya (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    We have calculated the transition parameters, such as wavelengths, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities (or rates), for the electric dipole (E1) transitions in four-times ionized cerium (Ce V, Z = 58) by using the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method within the framework of Breit-Pauli (MCHF+BP) relativistic corrections and the relativistic Hartree-Fock (HFR) method. The obtained results have been compared with other works available in literature. A discussion of these calculations for Ce V in this study has also been in view of the MCHF+BP and HFR methods.

  18. Causal strength induction from time series data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Kevin W; Rottman, Benjamin M

    2018-04-01

    One challenge when inferring the strength of cause-effect relations from time series data is that the cause and/or effect can exhibit temporal trends. If temporal trends are not accounted for, a learner could infer that a causal relation exists when it does not, or even infer that there is a positive causal relation when the relation is negative, or vice versa. We propose that learners use a simple heuristic to control for temporal trends-that they focus not on the states of the cause and effect at a given instant, but on how the cause and effect change from one observation to the next, which we call transitions. Six experiments were conducted to understand how people infer causal strength from time series data. We found that participants indeed use transitions in addition to states, which helps them to reach more accurate causal judgments (Experiments 1A and 1B). Participants use transitions more when the stimuli are presented in a naturalistic visual format than a numerical format (Experiment 2), and the effect of transitions is not driven by primacy or recency effects (Experiment 3). Finally, we found that participants primarily use the direction in which variables change rather than the magnitude of the change for estimating causal strength (Experiments 4 and 5). Collectively, these studies provide evidence that people often use a simple yet effective heuristic for inferring causal strength from time series data. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Strength and life under creeping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospishil, B.

    1982-01-01

    Certain examples of the application of the Lepin modified creep model, which are of interest from technical viewpoint, are presented. Mathematical solution of the dependence of strength limit at elevated temperatures on creep characteristics is obtained. Tensile test at elevated temperatures is a particular case of creep or relaxation and both strength limit and conventional yield strength at elevated temperatures are completely determined by parameters of state equations during creep. The equation of fracture summing during creep is confirmed not only by the experiment data when stresses change sporadically, but also by good reflection of durability curve using the system of equations. The system presented on the basis of parameters of the equations obtained on any part of durability curve, permits to forecast the following parameters of creep: strain, strain rate, life time, strain in the process of fracture. Tensile test at elevated temperature is advisable as an addition when determining creep curves (time-strain curves) [ru

  20. Electron Excitation Rate Coefficients for Transitions from the IS21S Ground State to the 1S2S1,3S and 1S2P1,3P0 Excited States of Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Kingston, A. E.; McDowell, M. R. C.

    1984-03-01

    The available experimental and theoretical electron impact excitation cross section data for the transitions from the 1s2 1S ground state to the 1s2s 1,3S and 1s2p 1,3P0 excited states of helium are assessed. Based on this assessed data, excitation rate coefficients are calculated over a wide electron temperature range below 3.0×106K. A comparison with other published results suggests that the rates used should be lower by a factor of 2 or more.

  1. Influência da força da musculatura periférica no sucesso da decanulação Influence of peripheral muscle strength on the decannulation success rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibelle Andrade Lima

    2011-03-01

    leucócitos no dia da decanulação influenciaram no sucesso de remoção do traqueóstomo.INTRODUCTION: Tracheostomy is probably the most common surgical procedure in critically ill patients and is generally performed to facilitate mechanical ventilation weaning. Evidence-based guidelines have confirmed the benefits of tracheostomy weaning protocols and of the physiotherapists engagement in this process; however, no consensus decannulation criteria are currently available. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the influence of peripheral muscle strength and other indicators on decannulation success. METHODS: This was an observational retrospective study that analyzed the medical records of patients admitted to the medical and surgical intensive care unit of Hospital Agamenon Magalhães between March 2007 and August 2009. Respiratory and peripheral muscle strengths were evaluated in decannulated patients. RESULTS: Overall, 1,541 patients were evaluated, 143 of which had been tracheostomized, and only 57 of which had been decannulated. Forty-six patients had a satisfactory decannulation outcome, while 11 had decannulation failure, requiring the return to an artificial airway within 2 weeks. The calculated Medical Research Council peripheral muscle strength score was significantly lower for the failure group than for the successful decannulation group (28.33 ± 15.31 vs. 41.11 ± 11.52; P = 0.04. Scores above or equal 26 had 94.4% sensitivity and 50.0% specificity for the decannulation outcome, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.7593. In addition, white blood cell counts were higher in decannulation failure group patients (14,070 ± 3,073 vs. 10,520 ± 3,402 cells/μL; P = 0.00. CONCLUSION: This study has shown that peripheral muscle strength and blood leucocyte counts evaluated on the day of decannulation may influence the tracheostomy decannulation success rate.

  2. Transitional Justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gissel, Line Engbo

    This presentation builds on an earlier published article, 'Contemporary Transitional Justice: Normalising a Politics of Exception'. It argues that the field of transitional justice has undergone a shift in conceptualisation and hence practice. Transitional justice is presently understood to be th...... to be the provision of ordinary criminal justice in contexts of exceptional political transition.......This presentation builds on an earlier published article, 'Contemporary Transitional Justice: Normalising a Politics of Exception'. It argues that the field of transitional justice has undergone a shift in conceptualisation and hence practice. Transitional justice is presently understood...

  3. Strengths-based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledertoug, Mette Marie

    -being. The Ph.D.-project in Strength-based learning took place in a Danish school with 750 pupils age 6-16 and a similar school was functioning as a control group. The presentation will focus on both the aware-explore-apply processes and the practical implications for the schools involved, and on measurable......Strength-based learning - Children͛s Character Strengths as Means to their Learning Potential͛ is a Ph.D.-project aiming to create a strength-based mindset in school settings and at the same time introducing strength-based interventions as specific tools to improve both learning and well...

  4. Flow Strength of Shocked Aluminum in the Solid-Liquid Mixed Phase Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, William

    2011-06-01

    Shock waves have been used to determine material properties under high shock stresses and very-high loading rates. The determination of mechanical properties such as compressive strength under shock compression has proven to be difficult and estimates of strength have been limited to approximately 100 GPa or less in aluminum. The term ``strength'' has been used in different ways. For a Von-Mises solid, the yield strength is equal to twice the shear strength of the material and represents the maximum shear stress that can be supported before yield. Many of these concepts have been applied to materials that undergo high strain-rate dynamic deformation, as in uni-axial strain shock experiments. In shock experiments, it has been observed that the shear stress in the shocked state is not equal to the shear strength, as evidenced by elastic recompressions in reshock experiments. This has led to an assumption that there is a yield surface with maximum (loading)and minimum (unloading), shear strength yet the actual shear stress lies somewhere between these values. This work provides the first simultaneous measurements of unloading velocity and flow strength for transition of solid aluminum to the liquid phase. The investigation describes the flow strength observed in 1100 (pure), 6061-T6, and 2024 aluminum in the solid-liquid mixed phase region. Reloading and unloading techniques were utilized to provide independent data on the two unknowns (τc and τo) , so that the actual critical shear strength and the shear stress at the shock state could be estimated. Three different observations indicate a change in material response for stresses of 100 to 160 GPa; 1) release wave speed (reloading where applicable) measurements, 2) yield strength measurements, and 3) estimates of Poisson's ratio, all of which provide information on the melt process including internal consistency and/or non-equilibrium and rate-dependent melt behavior. The study investigates the strength properties

  5. Bubble nucleation and growth in very strong cosmological phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mégevand, Ariel, E-mail: megevand@mdp.edu.ar; Ramírez, Santiago

    2017-06-15

    Strongly first-order phase transitions, i.e., those with a large order parameter, are characterized by a considerable supercooling and high velocities of phase transition fronts. A very strong phase transition may have important cosmological consequences due to the departures from equilibrium caused in the plasma. In general, there is a limit to the strength, since the metastability of the old phase may prevent the transition to complete. Near this limit, the bubble nucleation rate achieves a maximum and thus departs from the widely assumed behavior in which it grows exponentially with time. We study the dynamics of this kind of phase transitions. We show that in some cases a gaussian approximation for the nucleation rate is more suitable, and in such a case we solve analytically the evolution of the phase transition. We compare the gaussian and exponential approximations with realistic cases and we determine their ranges of validity. We also discuss the implications for cosmic remnants such as gravitational waves.

  6. The Importance of Muscular Strength: Training Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchomel, Timothy J; Nimphius, Sophia; Bellon, Christopher R; Stone, Michael H

    2018-04-01

    This review covers underlying physiological characteristics and training considerations that may affect muscular strength including improving maximal force expression and time-limited force expression. Strength is underpinned by a combination of morphological and neural factors including muscle cross-sectional area and architecture, musculotendinous stiffness, motor unit recruitment, rate coding, motor unit synchronization, and neuromuscular inhibition. Although single- and multi-targeted block periodization models may produce the greatest strength-power benefits, concepts within each model must be considered within the limitations of the sport, athletes, and schedules. Bilateral training, eccentric training and accentuated eccentric loading, and variable resistance training may produce the greatest comprehensive strength adaptations. Bodyweight exercise, isolation exercises, plyometric exercise, unilateral exercise, and kettlebell training may be limited in their potential to improve maximal strength but are still relevant to strength development by challenging time-limited force expression and differentially challenging motor demands. Training to failure may not be necessary to improve maximum muscular strength and is likely not necessary for maximum gains in strength. Indeed, programming that combines heavy and light loads may improve strength and underpin other strength-power characteristics. Multiple sets appear to produce superior training benefits compared to single sets; however, an athlete's training status and the dose-response relationship must be considered. While 2- to 5-min interset rest intervals may produce the greatest strength-power benefits, rest interval length may vary based an athlete's training age, fiber type, and genetics. Weaker athletes should focus on developing strength before emphasizing power-type training. Stronger athletes may begin to emphasize power-type training while maintaining/improving their strength. Future research should

  7. Accelerated Strength Testing of Thermoplastic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, J. R.; Allen, D. H.; Bradley, W. L.

    1998-01-01

    Constant ramp strength tests on unidirectional thermoplastic composite specimens oriented in the 90 deg. direction were conducted at constant temperatures ranging from 149 C to 232 C. Ramp rates spanning 5 orders of magnitude were tested so that failures occurred in the range from 0.5 sec. to 24 hrs. (0.5 to 100,000 MPa/sec). Below 204 C, time-temperature superposition held allowing strength at longer times to be estimated from strength tests at shorter times but higher temperatures. The data indicated that a 50% drop in strength might be expected for this material when the test time is increased by 9 orders of magnitude. The shift factors derived from compliance data applied well to the strength results. To explain the link between compliance and strength, a viscoelastic fracture model was investigated. The model, which used compliance as input, was found to fit the strength data only if the critical fracture energy was allowed to vary with temperature reduced stress rate. This variation in the critical parameter severely limits its use in developing a robust time-dependent strength model. The significance of this research is therefore seen as providing both the indication that a more versatile acceleration method for strength can be developed and the evidence that such a method is needed.

  8. Give Me Strength.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    维拉

    1996-01-01

    Mort had an absolutely terrible day at the office.Everythingthat could go wrong did go wrong.As he walked home he could beheard muttering strange words to himself:“Oh,give me strength,give me strength.”Mort isn’t asking for the kind of strength thatbuilds strong muscles:he’s asking for the courage or ability to

  9. Argon line broadening by neutral atoms and application to the measurement of oscillator strengths of AI resonance lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallee, O.; Ranson, P.; Chapelle, J.

    1977-01-01

    AI line broadening was studied from collisions between neutral argon atoms (3p 5 4p-3p 5 4s transitions) in a weakly ionised plasma jet (neutral atoms temperature T 0 approximately 4000K, electrons temperature Tsub(e) approximately 6000K, electronic density Nsub(e) 15 cm -3 , ionisation rate α -4 , and pressure range from 1 to 3 kg/cm 2 ). A satisfactory description of Van der Waals broadened lines is obtained by means of a Lennard-Jones potential. Measurement of line widths whose corresponding transitions occur on resonant levels, gives with relatively good accuracy the oscillator strength of the argon resonance lines [fr

  10. Unraveling the role of entropy in tuning unimolecular vs . bimolecular reaction rates: The case of olefin polymerization catalyzed by transition metals

    KAUST Repository

    Falivene, Laura

    2018-04-24

    Olefin polymerization catalyzed by Group 4 transition metals is studied here as test case to reveal the entropy effects when bimolecular and unimolecular reactions are computed for processes occurring in solution. Catalytic systems characterized by different ligand frameworks, metal, and growing polymeric chain for which experimental data are available have been selected in order to validate the main approaches to entropy calculation. Applying the “standard” protocol results in a strong disagreement with the experimental results and the methods introducing a direct correction of the translational entropy term based on a single experimental parameter emerge as the most reliable. The general and powerful computational tool achieved in this study can represent a further step towards the “catalyst design” to control and predict the molecular mass of the resulting polymers.

  11. Elastic-plastic transition: A universal law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the initial stress-strain behavior in a tensile test is often characterized as linear elastic up to a yield stress and nonlinear plastic thereafter, the pre-yield transition region is known to exhibit significant curvature and hysteresis. Hundreds of high-precision loading-unloading-loading tensile tests were performed using 26 commercial sheet alloys exhibiting a wide range of strength, ductility and crystal structure. Analysis of the results reveals the following: 1.There is no significant linear elastic region; the proportional limit is ~0 MPa when measured with sufficient sensitivity. 2.Each of the hundreds of measured transitional stress-strain curves can be characterized by a single parameter, here called the “modulus reduction rate.”The corresponding equation captures ~80% of the observed variation, a factor of 3 to 6 better than a one-parameter linear approximation. 3.Most interestingly, the transitional behavior for all alloys follows a “Universal Law” requiring no fit parameters. The law depends only upon the strength of the material and its Young’s modulus, both of which are can be measured by independent tests or adopted from handbooks. The Universal Law captures ~90% of the variation represented by the one-parameter representation and eliminates the need for mechanical testing to implement and apply. The practical and theoretical implications of these results are discussed. The results provide a simple path to significantly improving applied constitutive models in the transitional regime. The consistency of the effect for such a wide range of metals and suggests that the origin of the behavior lies in the pile-up and relaxation of dislocation arrays.

  12. Supporting Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Asima; Petrucco, James

    2018-01-01

    Meadowbrook Primary School has explored the use of The Teacher Assessment in Primary Science (TAPS) to support transition, initially for transfer to secondary school and now for transition from Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) into Key Stage 1 (ages 5-7). This article will consider an example of a secondary transition project and discuss the…

  13. Rates and Controls of N2 Fixation in Sphagnum spp. along the Hydrological Gradient - Beaver Pond to Bog Transition at Mer Bleue, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivkovic, T.; Moore, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    Many northern bogs with low atmospheric N inputs acquire N only via N2-fixation. Little is known about rates and controls on N2-fixation in bogs. The aim of this study was to: 1) test the important ecological drivers for N2-fixation, 2) investigate seasonal and temporal patterns of N2 fixation, and 3) to estimate current N2-fixation rates at Mer Bleue bog. We used acetylene reduction assay (ARA) to measure N2-fixation from June-October 2013 and 2014 (currently ongoing field season) along a hydrological gradient (beaver pond, hollows and hummocks). The highest ARA rates in 2013 growing season occurred in the pond in floating Sphagnum cuspidatum mats (50.3 ± 12.9 μmol m-2 d-1 Mean ± Std Err) which were up to 2.5 times latger than the rates found in the hummock with the lowest water table depth throughout the season. Two rain events during the summer 2013 increased ARA rates in all plots by 1 to 4 times, suggesting that moisture availability may play a crucial role on N2 fixation potential in the field. We are currently investigating the role of moisture, temperature, PAR and nutrient content (N, phosphorous and metals) on ARA along the gradient. In addition, we are using 15N2 enrichment method to estimate N2 fixation rates and compare them to ARA method at Mer Bleue bog.

  14. Mapping strengths into virtues: The relation of the 24 VIA-strengths to six ubiquitous virtues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willibald eRuch

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Values-in-Action (VIA-classification distinguishes six core virtues and 24 strengths. As the assignment of the strengths to the virtues was done on theoretical grounds it still needs empirical verification. As an alternative to factor analytic investigations the present study utilizes expert judgments. In a pilot study the conceptual overlap among five sources of knowledge (strength’s name including synonyms, short definitions, brief descriptions, longer theoretical elaborations, and item content about a particular strength was examined. The results show that the five sources converged quite well, with the short definitions and the items being slightly different from the other. All strengths exceeded a cut-off value but the convergence was much better for some strengths (e.g., zest than for others (e.g., perspective. In the main study 70 experts (from psychology, philosophy, theology, etc. and 41 laypersons rated how prototypical the strengths are for each of the six virtues. The results showed that 10 were very good markers for their virtues, 9 were good markers, four were acceptable markers, and only one strength failed to reach the cut-off score for its assigned virtue. However, strengths were often markers for two or even three virtues, and occasionally they marked the other virtue more strongly than the one they were assigned to. The virtue prototypicality ratings were slightly positively correlated with higher coefficients being found for justice and humanity. A factor analysis of the 24 strengths across the ratings yielded the six factors with an only slightly different composition of strengths and double loadings. It is proposed to adjust either the classification (by reassigning strengths and by allowing strengths to be subsumed under more than one virtue or to change the definition of certain strengths so that they only exemplify one virtue. The results are discussed in the context of factor analytic attempts to verify the

  15. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...

  16. High strength ferritic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic steel is specified in which the major alloying elements are chromium and molybdenum, with smaller quantities of niobium, vanadium, silicon, manganese and carbon. The maximum swelling is specified for various irradiation conditions. Rupture strength is also specified. (U.K.)

  17. Photon strength functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, I.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for extracting photon strength functions are briefly discussed. We follow the Brink-Axel approach to relate the strength functions to the giant resonances observed in photonuclear work and summarize the available data on the E1, E2 and M1 resonances. Some experimental and theoretical problems are outlined. (author)

  18. Interviewing to Understand Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Michael R.

    2018-01-01

    Interviewing clients about their strengths is an important part of developing a complete understanding of their lives and has several advantages over simply focusing on problems and pathology. Prerequisites for skillfully interviewing for strengths include the communication skills that emerge from a stance of not knowing, developing a vocabulary…

  19. 34 CFR 300.43 - Transition services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported...; (2) Is based on the individual child's needs, taking into account the child's strengths, preferences..., acquisition of daily living skills and provision of a functional vocational evaluation. (b) Transition...

  20. Model of fracture of metal melts and the strength of melts under dynamic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, P. N.; Mayer, A. E.

    2015-01-01

    The development of a continuum model of deformation and fracture of melts is needed for the description of the behavior of metals in extreme states, in particular, under high-current electron and ultrashort laser irradiation. The model proposed includes the equations of mechanics of a two-phase continuum and the equations of the kinetics of phase transitions. The change (exchange) of the volumes of dispersed and carrier phases and of the number of dispersed particles is described, and the energy and mass exchange between the phases due to phase transitions is taken into account. Molecular dynamic (MD) calculations are carried out with the use of the LAMMPS program. The continuum model is verified by MD, computational, and experimental data. The strength of aluminum, copper, and nickel is determined at various temperatures and strain rates. It is shown that an increase in the strain rate leads to an increase in the strength of a liquid metal, while an increase in temperature leads to a decrease in its strength

  1. Model of fracture of metal melts and the strength of melts under dynamic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, P. N., E-mail: polina.nik@mail.ru; Mayer, A. E., E-mail: mayer@csu.ru [Chelyabinsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    The development of a continuum model of deformation and fracture of melts is needed for the description of the behavior of metals in extreme states, in particular, under high-current electron and ultrashort laser irradiation. The model proposed includes the equations of mechanics of a two-phase continuum and the equations of the kinetics of phase transitions. The change (exchange) of the volumes of dispersed and carrier phases and of the number of dispersed particles is described, and the energy and mass exchange between the phases due to phase transitions is taken into account. Molecular dynamic (MD) calculations are carried out with the use of the LAMMPS program. The continuum model is verified by MD, computational, and experimental data. The strength of aluminum, copper, and nickel is determined at various temperatures and strain rates. It is shown that an increase in the strain rate leads to an increase in the strength of a liquid metal, while an increase in temperature leads to a decrease in its strength.

  2. Multi-infor